Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th April 1809.
Reference Number: 18090412
Reference Number: f18090412-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 12th of APRIL, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL-DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; sir Alexander Thompson , knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; sir Soulden Lawrence , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; sir Simon Le Blanc knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; sir William Curtis , bart. sir John Eamer , knt. sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Josiah Boydell , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Hopwood

Robert Huxley

James Waylett

William Cogger

George Dean

Henry Trollop

William Moodey

Stephen Curtis

John Hughes

John Plimpton

Thomas Dismore

John Warren .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Wapshot

John Sich

Frederick Francis

John Howell

Edward Harland

William Wright

Michael Foster

John Crick

Thomas Smith

James Wilson

Isaac Moffat

Samuel Jeffrey .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Grimsdale

Robert Whitlock

Philip Green

William Keene

Richard Williams

William Drury

Thomas Collier

James Smith

Joseph Dunstan

Henry Thompson

Thomas Seir

Thomas Newman .

Reference Number: t18090412-1

309. PATRICK ST. LEDGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , five pound weight of red paint, value 2 s. from out of the ordnance stores in the tower of London , the property of our Sovereign Lord the King ; - and

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ROBEAT COOMME. Q. You are a soldier in the seventh veteran battalion - A. Yes. On the 28th of February I was a centinel at the magazine at the end of the white tower; I was stationed at the Tower; the prisoner was a labourer belonging to the Tower, he was employed by the board of ordnance. On this day, about twenty minutes before six in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner go behind some old ropes, I saw him take some paint up in a bladder and put it in his pocket; I took it out, I told him he should not have it; I kept the paint till the corporal came to relieve me; I let the prisoner go; I did not see the prisoner again till I saw him at the office.

JOHN SMITH. I was corporal of the guard. I received the paint of the last witness; I delivered it to the officer of the guard; he delivered it to Gotty the officer.

JOHN GOTTY . I am an officer belonging to the Thames police. The paint I got from the clerk of the storehouse; I have had it ever since. I apprehended the prisoner in Brush alley, East Smithfield, on the 3d of March; I told him I must take him in custody for stealing the paint, and a pistol that he had taken from the Tower; he said he knew nothing about the pistol, he had not got it.

JOHN COOPER. I am clerk in the storekeeper's office in the Tower; the prisoner was employed as an extra man in the different store offices.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been serving my king and my country both at home and abroad. On this evening I went down to get a bit of wood to light a fire; this paper I saw there; I took it up, the centinel ordered me to put it down again; I put it down again, and then he said nothing to me, he was not thirty yards from me at the time.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-2

310. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Sides , about the hour of three at night on the 19th of November , and stealing therein thirty ounces of gold, value 75 l. fifty gold seals, value 70 l. eighty pair of earrings, value 50 l. sixteen gold chains, value 30 l. twenty gold lockets and broaches, value 60 l. six pair of bracelets, value 20 l. and a time piece, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Sides .

THOMAS SIDES. I live in Red Lion yard, Red Lion street, in the parish of St. John Clerkenwell , I am a housekeeper .

Q. In the month of November last were you disturbed at any time of the night - A. Yes, about four o'clock on the morning of the 20th I was awoke by a light in the adjoining room to my sleeping room.

Q. Was there any light in your sleeping room - A. No; it is a small room which I sleep in; I keep the door open to let air in from the adjoining room; the adjoining room is a large room which I keep as a warehouse; the light from the adjoining room appeared by flashes. I saw two men.

Q. It was not one steady uniform light - A. No. I saw the two men in a stooping position in the adjoining room, at the table in which the door of my bed room was open; the table was on the same side of the room as the door of the adjoining room I sleep in, and the men stood between the table and the wainscot, and in their hands was a jeweller's case open; the jeweller's case had been in a bureau; I had locked it up the over night myself about eight o'clock; the bureau was in the same room.

Q. What do you mean by a jeweller's case - A. It is a case that is carried about town to the jewellers' shops, it is covered with leather, but the substance is wood; the prisoner was the further man from me; the other man intercepted the sight of his face from me, I had a better view of the other man; instantly as I perceived the two men in the room I rose up, I searched for my sword, but from the alarm of the men I went without it: the instant I arose their light disappeared.

Q. What became of them - A. I saw them again on the stairs, but their light was so diminished I could only distinguish two forms of men on the stairs; I threw up the landing place window and called to the watchman; they went down stairs and out of the door; I saw them go up the court from the window; they went out of the court and escaped. I went to Roberts's lodgings as soon as I could dress myself.

Q. Where was his lodgings - A. In a court in Holborn; he was not there himself, there was a woman in the room. I found none of my property in his room.

Q. Did you examine your jeweller's box, or was that gone - A. The jeweller's box was not gone, part of the goods were gone; I examined the jeweller's box when I returned from Robert's lodgings; I went to Roberts' lodgings about five o'clock in the morning; I returned home in about two hours, then I examined the premises; I found then that they had been in my workshop at the top of the house, and they had taken away some gold in an unfinished state. I sleep in the first floor; the workshop is over where I sleep. I missed from the workshop seals, broaches, and various articles in an unfinished state.

Q. Did you examine your bureau in the room adjoining - A. Yes. I found it broken open; I had locked it about eight o'clock, before I went to bed; out of the bureau there had been taken twenty ounces of unwrought gold, besides several seals and gold net chains. I had seen them the over night.

Q. Did you examine the house below stairs to see how these people came in - A. I went into the kitchen;

I found the window open, the sash was thrown up, and the shutters were removed from the window, and in their usual place in the kitchen, and the street door was open.

Q. You have described the room which the two men were in being the room in which your bedroom door opened - A. Yes.

Q. And the table by which they were standing, how far was it from your bed room door - A. About a yard, and very close to the wainscot; the side of my bed was towards the door; it is a small room; the bed was close as could be to the door, only room enough just to undress myself; when the flash of light came I could see the men while I was in bed; the flash of light continued only an instant.

Q. The only view you had of seeing the prisoner was only an instant during this flash of light - A. Yes; I only just saw him imperfectly, because the other man was between me and him. I do not know who the other man was; I had a better sight of him than the prisoner, but I never saw him afterwards.

Q. Can you take upon you to say the prisoner was one of the men - A. I could not swear to his face, I only speak as to his general appearance.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. He had worked for me a little while before; he had worked in the shop, and then I gave him work out.

Q. Did you find any of your goods out at any time - A. I found them out, but I could not trace them to the prisoner.

Q. I want to know whether you can now swear that the prisoner was one of the men that were in your room - A. To the best of my knowledge, I believe it; I cannot swear to him by his face; the other man intercepted the sight of his face from me; I only saw part of his whisker of one side; I will not take upon me to swear; by the appearance of the man altogether I believe him to be the man; but his face I could not at all swear to, I might be mistaken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-3

311. THOMAS HUMPHRIES was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 9th of October , five bushels of grains, value 1 s. the property of John Smith - whereof David Bainsley was convicted of feloniously stealing .

MR. NEWSOM, a witness, being called and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-4

312. BENJAMIN POULTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of February , a saddle, value 10 s. two stirrups, value 5 s. and two girts, value 3 d. the property of Hutches Trowers .

AMOS CARR . I am groom to Mr. Hutches Trowers in the Tower.

Q. Where was his stable on the 23rd of February - A. At Clapton ; about a fortnight before the 23rd of February, I put the property in a place over the stable.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am constable of Hackney. I know nothing more than having the prisoner brought to me on the 23rd of February by Robert Harvey ; he had the saddle on his shoulder; I have kept the saddle ever since.

ROBERT HARVEY. I am one of the patrols of Hackney. On the 23rd of February, about half past one in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with the saddle, stirrups and girts; I asked him how he came by it; he said it was his own property, he brought it from Edmonton, and that he was going to take it to town to sell it; I took him to the watchhouse, and delivered it over to Griffiths.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in Jail , and confined Six Months in the House of Correction ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-5

313. MARY MOYES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a silver watch, value 1 l. and two seven shilling pieces , the property of John Sully .

JOHN SULLY. I live at No. 17, Great Saffron hill ; I keep a sale shop . On the 13th of February my wife and I were sitting at dinner; the prisoner at the bar came into the shop; my wife said there is Mary, shall I ask her in; she then said to the prisoner, Mary, will you go and order a pint of beer; the girl readily went for the beer and brought it in; my wife asked her if she would take a piece of beef, she said thank you, ma'am, no; at the time she came into the room a customer came into the shop. I went into the shop and left my wife in the room; when I was in the room my wife laid two seven shilling pieces on the table and a crooked shilling; at the time I was serving the customer another customer came in; then my wife got up and came into the shop, leaving the girl there; my wife had not been long behind the counter before she saw the girl coming out, she asked her some questions, but what I do not know; the prisoner then went out of the side door very quick; my wife went down stairs, she returned immediately and went into the room, and said the girl had robbed us. I then went and missed the money and my silver watch. I immediately went in pursuit of her, but could not find her; I had an accident - sprained my knee and hurt my thumb.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. No, I never did.

MRS. SULLY. The prisoner was a servant with me about two years back, and upon my hearing that she had a cruel mother I always, when she came to me made her welcome. On the 13th of February the prisoner came to me, I put my hand in my pocket, took out two seven shilling pieces and a crooked shilling; a customer came into the shop, my husband went into the shop to serve the customer; Mr. Sharp, who was with us, followed him immediately into the shop; I said, Mary, will you have a piece of beef, and when the second customer came in I went into the shop and left the girl in the room; I am sure there was nobody in the room but the girl. When I was in the shop I heard the side door creak; I was rather surprised to hear the door; I said, Mary (she said yes, ma'am), I am going down stairs; I saw her countenance change, I thought she might not be well; I turned into the room and found the two seven shilling pieces which had been on the table, gone; immediately from there I went into the kitchen, I said Mary is gone, good God,

she has robbed me; my husband said, robbed indeed! my watch is gone; I said go after her; the watch was a family watch. Mr. Sharp went after her one way and my husband the other; Mr. Sully slipped down; they could not find her; she was found on the Wednesday week following; she was brought by an officer from Mile End in a coach to our house.

Q. Did you ever find the watch - A. Never; I told her she had acted very cruel to me. I said Mary, if you will return the watch I will let you go; she told me not to talk to her, she should go before my betters, it was too late to talk about the watch, it was not in my power to liberate her.

Q. You have known this young woman some time - A. Yes; she lived with me about five months. I never found any thing amiss while she lived with me.

Mr. Arabin. There was one lodger in the house - was there not - A. I believe there was.

MR. SHARP. On the 13th of February, about half past one, I was in Mr. Sully's back room; the prisoner came in, Mrs. Sully asked her to get a pint of beer, she brought it; there were two seven shilling pieces on the table and a shilling, and two watches were in the room; we were in the back room altogether. After the prisoner had fetched the beer a customer came in the shop; Mr. Sully went to the shop, I followed him immediately, I stood outside of the counter; another customer came in; Mrs. Sully came out, leaving the prisoner in the room alone. In the course of a minute or two I saw this young woman get up from the chair and sit down again; about a minute after that she came out of the shop; Mrs. Sully and she talked together; Mrs. Sully went down stairs, came up and went into the room, she exclaimed, good God! she has robbed us. I went one way and Mr. Sully the other after her; we did not find her.

WILLIAM REID. I am an officer. On the 25th of February I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Sully's house: I searched her, and found nothing about her; I searched her lodgings, I found nothing there.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-6

314. JOHN MANGAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon Joseph Hawes , on the 8th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 1 l. a steel chain, value 3 d. a silver seal, value 1 s. and a metal key, value 1 d. the property Joseph Hawes.

JOSEPH HAWES . Q. On the 8th of March were you robbed any where in the highway - A. On Wednesday the 8th of March I was returning to town from Hendon. About ten minutes before six in the evening I was stopped by three footpads on the Hampstead road, near Chalk farm ; all three of them presented pistols, two of them at my left ear and one at my right; I told them I was only a working person, I had nothing to lose. Afterwards they asked me for my pocket book.

Q. Which of them asked you for your pocket book - A. I believe it was the prisoner at the bar, he was upon my left; I told him I never carried one. Afterwards the same person said there was no time to lose, the same person felt about me and felt my watch; he dragged the watch out of my watch pocket.

Q. What sort of a watch was it - A. A silver watch, a steel chain, and a small silver seal. After they had robbed me they told me to return back from whence I came - to Hampstead - this was in the Hampstead road.

Q. When they presented the pistols what did they say to you - A. They said nothing further than stop.

Q. When the man had taken the watch from you, he told you to return back to Hampstead - A. Yes. When I went back towards Hampstead on the Hampstead road, one of the parties called after me and said, if any body stopped me, to say my business was done by a party on the road; I returned back some Distance, I met some gentlemen coming to town, I returned with them, and when I came with them to the Half way house we met some Bow street officers. I told them.

Q. Had you known the persons that stopped you before - A. No.

Q. What sort of a light was there - A. It was light sir, not very light indeed, there was no moon.

Q. Then it was a cloudy night - how was the person dressed that took the watch from you - A. He wore a velveteen jacket and breeches; they were all in velveteen or a dark brown thick set.

Q. How was he dressed in other respects - A. I took no other notice of his dress than he had on a velveteen jacket and breeches. I had never seen him before.

Q. What size man was he - A. Tall and rather stout; I saw him about a fortnight afterwards at Worship street office before the magistrate.

Q. Can you speak to the person who robbed you, so as to speak with certainty - A. I cannot say any further than with regard to his dress; I think he is the person that took the watch from me, I cannot speak to his features; on the contrary, I was too much frightened.

Mr. Arabin. You say one of these men had a jacket on, it was a cloudy night, and you were under very great alarm - A. Yes.

OBADIAH COOPER. I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Cordy, 163 Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. Have you any watch pawned by the prisoner - A. Yes; on the 9th of February a watch, chain, and small silver seal.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Are you certain the prisoner was the man - A. Yes, he pledged it in the name of John Morris , he said it was his own property, he lived in Ratcliff Highway.

Mr. Arabin. You do a great deal of business at your shop - A. Yes.

Q. Of course there are a great many people come to your shop - A. Yes.

Q. You say that whoever it was that pawned the watch at your shop, you had never seen him before - A. No.

COURT, to prosecutor. Look at that watch - A. This is the watch that was taken from me on the 8th of February, and this is the chain and seal, it is my

property; I am certain it is my watch, chain, and seal.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You are a police officer - A. I am, and conductor of part of the patrol of Bow street.

Q. Did you at any time search the lodgings of the prisoner - A. I did, at Priest's court, Tower hill, on Sunday the 19th of February; he told me it was his lodgings. In a small box, in a chest, I found that duplicate of a watch, with several others.

Q. Now let Mr. Cooper see whether that is the duplicate he gave to the prisoner - A. It is.

Mr. Arabin to Vickrey. I believe at first he communicated to you his name and where he lived - A. Not at first; he came very quietly with me.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-7

315. JOHN DOVE was indicted for that he on the 31st of March , in and upon Richard Pearson , a subject of our Lord the King, unlawfully, wilfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and that he with a certain poker did then and there cut the said Richard Pearson in and upon his head, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him . And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only with different intentions.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-8

316. MARY WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a gold ring set with diamonds, value 40 s. the property of John Whitmore , in his dwelling house .

BARNARD GLEED. I am a patrol belonging to Bow street office, attached to Worship street office. On Saturday the 25th of February, I was at Mr. Perkins's, pawnbroker, Bishopsgate street, the corner of Widegate alley. Esther Newnham, a little girl, came in with a ring in her hand; she asked the pawnbroker what it was worth; I heard the conversation, and I saw her leave it; I came out of the shop and stood at the corner of Widegate alley, I saw the little girl come out of the shop, she went down Widegate alley into Petticoat lane; I followed her; she went from there into Artillery street, she went into Bishopsgate street, she went towards Shoreditch church; she then went up to Mary Wood , who was in the street looking in at a shop window: I went up to them while they were in conversation, I asked Wood if she sent that little girl to pledge the ring; she said she did; I asked her if she knew what ring it was; she said it was a diamond ring, she found it in Hackney road, a little after Christmas, in the snow; she said when she found it she shewed the ring to a gentleman coming past, he told her the ring was worth eighty guineas. I took them both into custody, and took them to Mr. Mason's house, an officer of Worship street office.

Q. You did not see the ring while the prisoner was talking to the little girl - A. No; I saw it on the counter at the pawnbrokers; they had refused to take it in of the little girl.

PETER MASON . I am an officer of Worship street office. The last witness brought the prisoner and the little girl to my house; I left the prisoner with Gleed for him to take her to the office; I went to the pawnbroker's; this ring was delivered up to me. The prisoner told me two or three stories, the last I believe to be the truth, that she found it in her master's garden in the City road; first she said she found it in Hackney road, then she said she found it in the City road, and then she said she found it in her master's garden; I asked her if she had shewed it to her master and mistress; she said she had not.

Q. Did the prisoner say that ring - A. Yes; this conversation was at my house; she afterwards saw the ring at the office.

RICHARD PHILLIP HYAM . I live with Richard Perkins .

Q. Do you remember a little girl bringing a ring to your shop - A. Perfectly; it was on Saturday the 25th of February, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon; I refused to lend her any money on it; I marked the ring on the inside; that is the same ring.

ESTHER NEWNHAM . Q. Do you recollect any time carrying a ring to a pawnbroker's shop - A. Yes, on the 25th of February I carried it to Mr. Perkins's shop, the prisoner sent me to pledge it; she came with me to the pawnbroker's; she told me to take it in the pawnbrokers, and to ask six shillings on the ring, and to ask them the value of it; I expected her to follow me. They kept the ring.

Q. Where did you next see the prisoner - A. I found her by the turnpike in Shoreditch; I told her she must come back to the pawnbroker's to tell where she got the ring from; Mr. Gleed the officer came and asked her whether she had sent me with the ring; she said yes, she had; he asked her where she got it from; she said she found it in Hackney road.

Q. Did you ever see the ring before she offered it to you to carry to the pawnbroker's - A. Yes; I saw it on the 24th at our lodgings.

JOHN WHITMORE . I live at No. 9, Bunhill row.

Q. Do you know that ring - A. Yes; I know it to be mine, I lost it from my dwelling house; at the time it was lost I lived in York place, St. Mary, Islington; the prisoner lived servant in the house at the time, she was cook. In the latter end of December Mrs. Whitmore took it off her finger and dropped it in the dining room accidentally as she was going to bed; Mrs. Whitmore looked for it but did not find it; Mrs. Whitmore spoke to all the servants when she went up to bed about it.

Q. Did the prisoner live servant in the house at the time - A. Yes, she had lived with me between two or three months.

Q. How long did she stay after this - A. About ten days after this.

Q. Was she about to leave your service at the time - A. Yes.

Q. You never heard of it being found, did you - A. No. It was a gold ring, set with diamonds.

Prisoner. My mistress never spoke any thing at all about the rings to me; she dropped four rings that night.

ELEANOR ALICE GIBBS. I lived servant with Mr. Whitmore; I had only been there a week when the ring was lost.

Q. When did you first know that a ring had been lost - A. The next morning.

Q. You did not know of it the over night - A. No; the next morning I came into the dining room, the prisoner shewed me two rings in the dining room of my mistress's house; she said she thought my mistress had left these two rings upon the piano forte; she gave them to my mistress; my mistress said there was another ring dropped, to both of us; we both searched for it; I went and shook the green baize in the front area, I shook the ring out; I gave the ring to the prisoner, she was the first that came into the kitchen; she gave it to my mistress; that was the third ring.

Q. Did you tell her where you found it - A. Yes, against the area door; my mistress said there was another, she said there was four dropped, she described the ring to both of us; she said it was a gold ring set with diamonds: we both searched for it; I never knew of it being found.

Q. to prosecutor. You were speaking of your wife having pulled off a ring and having dropped it on the floor - A. Yes, she dropped four rings.

Q. You saw that did you - A. Yes; they were dropped after she took them off her fingers.

Q. Where had she put them - A. To the best of my recollection she had put them on the marble slab over the fire place.

Q. Were the whole of them dropped - A. Yes; I believe two of them were found that night; I heard of one being found, I was not at home at the time. That ring has got children's hair in it, set with diamonds.

Hyam. In the present state the ring is worth three pounds; it cost five pounds or guineas.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-9

317. MARY MOUNTAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , two bank notes, value 2 l. each, the property of John Griffiths , in his dwelling house .

JOHN VALENTINE GRIFFITHS . I keep the Brown's tavern , Aliffe street, Goodman's fields, St. Mary, Whitechapel . On the 29th of March, the waiter came to me in my parlour, and requested me to go to the bar, that my housekeeper wanted me.

Q. What is her name - A. Mary Havendon ; I went to her, the prisoner was in the bar with her; my housekeeper told me that she had taken out a five pound note and two two-pound notes, and twelve shillings and sixpence, which was nine pounds twelve shillings and sixpence, and seven shillings and sixpence she took for the wine, in change of a ten pound note for three pints of wine; at that minute a man that frequented the house with eggs came, my housekeeper went to him and bought two shillingsworth of eggs, and when she returned she missed two two-pound notes from off the bar; she said there was no one present in the bar but herself and the prisoner; she requested that I would send for an officer. I put the question to the prisoner, she denied taking them; I sent for an officer, the officer came; the housekeeper and the prisoner were in the bar, I shewed him into the bar; he came out and told me he had found the two two-pounds upon her. I know nothing of the notes, I leave that to my housekeeper.

Mr. Alley. This woman did not live with you at the time - A. No.

Q. The poor girl did live with you - A. Yes; she was obliged to go away, being pregnant.

Q. You said something about Brown's tavern - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not a house that was indicted - A. By the informers it was, and I took my trial by the informers.

Q. You have denominated it a tavern - A. It was so called a long while before I knew it.

Q. This poor girl has lived with you - A. That I have informed you.

Q. I believe some application has been made to her to come back, has there not - A. That I do not know, I leave that to my housekeeper, I never heard of any solicitation.

Q. You reside in the house, do you - A. I do.

MARY HAVENDON . Q. Are you housekeeper to Mr. Griffiths at Brown's tavern - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect at any time the prisoner at the bar coming into your house - A. Yes, she came the 29th of March.

Q. Was any body else in the bar besides you and the girl - A. Not a soul. I received a ten pound note previous to her coming in, to take for three pints of wine out of it; I took from the till a five pound note, two two-pound notes, and the rest in small change to make up the ten pounds.

Q. Were they bank notes - A. Yes; I put them on the desk over the till; I received the ten pound note of a captain of a ship.

Q. No person was in the bar waiting for the change was there - A. No. After I had taken the bank notes out of the desk, the prisoner came into the bar, she came from towards the kitchen; I did not know that she was in the house. Nearly at the same time that she came into the bar, a man that I am in the habit of purchasing eggs and butter came in and asked me if I wanted any thing, he came to a table that stood under the bar window; I stepped out of the bar one step, I bought two shillingsworth of eggs, I returned into the bar and took up the money, which I had placed before on the desk; I counted over the notes, I missed two two-pound notes; one of the two pound notes had writing with red ink, and the word Soho in black ink; the other was an old dirty note and torn. I said I had missed some money; I opened the till, I could not find any such money; I turned round to the prisoner and said I had lost two two-pound notes from off the desk; she seemed rather agitated when I mentioned it, she said there has no person been in the bar but you and I, and either you or I must have the money, rather impertinently, so I convinced her that I had got no such money. I rang the bar bell, and told the waiter to call his master; Mr. Griffiths came, he sent for an officer; I gave the officer, when he came, the description of the money that I had lost; the officer said to her, if you have the money say so; she positively denied it; before the officer came I saw her shuffling her hands in her bosom. The officer has the notes.

Mr. Alley. I understood you to say you had left the notes on the desk - A. Yes; they were both taken

together.

Q. What is your waiter's name - A. William Richards ; he does not live there now.

Q. Has not the house sometimes passed in the name of the waiter who has lived in it - A. Not to my knowledge; the name of Brown is kept on the door. It always passed in the name of Brown.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 27th of March, I was sent for to go to Brown's tavern; I went there. I found the prisoner along with the housekeeper in the bar; the last witness informed me that she had lost two two-pound notes; she said there was nobody in the bar but their two selves; she said she certainly must have it; the prisoner denied having the notes; Mr. Griffiths came and insisted upon her being searched; the housekeeper said the notes are wrote in red ink, and in black ink was wrote Soho upon the same note; she said she thought she had them in her bosom, by her putting her hand up to her bosom; I told her I must search her, and desired her to unpin her clothes, which she did immediately; she unpinned her clothes by her breast, I saw the ends of the notes under her clothes; I took the notes out of her bosom; I shewed them to the housekeeper; on my examining the notes I found they were just as she described them; these are the notes I took from her bosom.

Mrs. Havendon. These are the two two-pound notes, one has red ink upon it, and the word Soho; I can swear to the two-pound notes, because I had no other two-pound notes.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witnesses to her character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-10

318. MARY BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , three waistcoats, value 13 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two aprons, value 1 s. a coat, value 2 l. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. two shirts, value 8 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Robert Aves , in the dwelling house of Samuel French .

ANN FRENCH . My husband's name is Samuel French , we live at No. 3, Little Hallifax street, Whitechapel .

Q. Have you a house there - A. Yes; Robert Aves lodged in the one pair of stairs room. On the 23d of February, about half after one o'clock, I saw the prisoner go out of the house, and when I came to the top of the kitchen stairs, I saw her with Robert Aves ' box in her arms before her; I followed her into Cricksand street; she put the box down on a step of a door, with her knee against it to prevent it from falling; I told her it was not her property, she had taken it out of my house; she said she was sent by the wife of the owner of the box from Mile End Town, the woman gave her a shilling for fetching the box; that the man owed me money for his lodging, she was afraid I would stop the box for the money; I took the box from her and brought it back again, and she followed me back to my own house; Aves was then in sight of the house; I called to him.

Q. Is he married - A. No. Mr. Griffiths was sent for, he took the woman in his care; the same box that I took from the woman was delivered to Griffiths the officer.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am a constable belonging to Whitechapel office. On the 23d of February I was sent for to the house of the last witness; when I came there I found the prisoner, she stood just within the door, and this box was in the passage; Mrs. French told me the woman had stole the box; Aves was by. I took her in custody, and the young man took the box to the office; he swore to his property, and she was committed. I have had them ever since.

ROBERT AVES . Q. Did you on the 23d of February lodge at Mr. French's - A. Yes; I went out between eight and nine o'clock; I lodge in the one pair of stairs room, I had left my box in my room when I went out; it contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Look at that box, and tell me whether that is the box - A. It is; I saw Mrs. French bringing the box up the street in her arms when I returned home.

Q. Are you a single man or a married man - A. A single man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Whitechapel, it was a very windy day, I had my little girl in my arms; my little girl's bonnet bew off her head, a woman behind me came and picked it up, she said it was very cold; I said it was; we came into discourse, she asked me whether I would go into a public house and have share of a pint of beer with her, she told me that her husband's tools were in danger of being taken by the landlord for rent, she said if I would go with her and carry the box, she would give me a shilling; I left my little girl at an acquaintances of mine. I went with her to the house I was to carry the box to, King alley, Red Lion street; she went right into the house, I believe she must have been acquainted with the house, or else she could not have gone so perfectly in the house; she brought the box down, I went no further in the house than the door; she gave me the box, I was taking it along, I put it down on a step, a gentlewoman came up to me whom I did not know, nor should I know her again; she said where are you going to take that box; I said a gentlewoman gave it me, she is in the house now; she took the box from me; I went back with her, but I saw no person.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-11

319. JANE WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , five yards and three quarters of British lace, value 5 s. 9 d. the property of Robert Kenyon , privately in his shop .

ROBERT KENYON . I live in Newport market, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster , I keep a haberdasher's shop .

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the shop - A. I am not certain of it, I was in the shop. On the 1st of April, between six and seven in the evening, I came to the door; we have got a large window inside of the shop, it has got a quantity of lace hanging upon it; on my coming there the prisoner saw me; she ran away;

there was a number of women standing there. On her running away. I looked at the lace, I saw there was a deficiency of one piece of lace; I pursued the prisoner and caught her at the corner of the market; I found the lace in her apron; she said some person had given it her, or she had picked it up in the street, I do not know which; I am sure I had not sold the lace. I had seen it hanging on the window an hour before; there were others serving in the shop, but none near the lace; I was serving the lace.

Q. Can any body standing in the street, take this lace off the windows - A. Yes, they could if they were to put their hand forward.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, if it was the last minute I had to speak or breathe, I never entered the shop to buy, sell, or thieve; I happened to be going along the street on the other side of the way, I saw great number of people standing at his door, I suppose forty; I went over to see what it was; he had a great quantity of laces hanging out to attract poor distressed people, as he always has; you may know by the colour of the lace that it was never taken out of the shop, it was on the ground; a woman took it up, she said it was hers by her picking it up; she was going to lay it down; one of the women said do not lay it down again; she gave it me. I was very much distressed indeed; I thought he would never be the worse for it; I was out of work and very much afflicted with sickness - and as I stand here he has sworn false as God is true, what he has spoke against me.

GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-12

320. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of December , a silver tea pot, value 6 l. the property of Robert Metham .

ROBERT METHAM . I am a manufacturing silversmith , I live at No. 57, Bartholomew close . I lost this tea pot on the 14th of last December in the forenoon; the prisoner came to my house requesting me to let him have two silver teapots for the purpose of shewing them to some ladies who resided in Brunswick square.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes; I have known him this four or five years; I let him have one to shew; he was to call the next day to let me know whether the customer had taken the pot or not.

Q. Therefore he had liberty to sell it if he could - A. He had liberty to sell it.

Q. You did not expect to see it again - A. I expected to see the pot or the money. I did not see him the next day. The day following he called, he told me he had not been to shew the pot, he was then going out with it in his bag to shew it to the customer, and was to call the next day; from that time I saw no more of him or the pot till I took him into custody.

Mr. Gurney. Because he did not pay you for the pot so you took him up for a felony - A. I took him up before I saw the pot in pledge; he had pledged the pot the day he had it of me, and he sold the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-13

321. THOMAS GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , a hat, value 7 s. the property of George Payne .

JOHN PAYNE . I am brother to Mr. George Payne in Newgate street , hatter .

Q. Has he any partner - A. No; I was behind the counter. On the 1st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw a hand take a hat from withinside of the door way; I got over the counter, and when I came to the door, a boy, who said his name was John Broughton , said there he goes; the prisoner was then crossing the street towards Ivey Lane. Upon my calling stop thief he dropped the hat; I overtook him in Paternoster row; he turned round and asked me what I wanted. I brought him back to my brother's house; I never lost sight of him till I caught him.

JOHN BROUGHTON . I was passing down Newgate street, I looked in at the window; the back of the man was towards me; I saw his hand take the hat from off the peg within the door; he crossed the road, I halloaed out there he goes; I did not see his face. Mr. Payne followed him. The same man who took the hat, I kept sight of him till he came to Ivey lane; in Ivey lane I lost sight of him. I saw Mr. Paine bring a man back.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I am a constable. I was coming along Newgate street; at the cry of stop thief I stopped; the hat fell at my feet.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence - called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-14

322. DOROTHY ASH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , seven yards of sarcenet, value 1 l. 13 s. the property of John Harvey and James Lamming , privately in their shop .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . Q. Are you a shopman in the service of Messieurs John Harvey and James Lamming - A. I am; there; is no other partner. On the 27th of February last, about three o'clock, the prisoner, in company with a young woman, came into the shop, she was in the shop about an hour, dealing with Thomas Taylor or Benjamin Bryan ; I was measuring some sarcenets for the country; I had cut off two seven yards and marked them, and put them on the counter open; I then went from the shop into the warehouse for some more; I was not gone three minutes, and when I came back one of them was gone; I made some enquiries; in consequence of what was told me, she was followed, and brought back into our shop; she laid her bundle on the counter, and a paper parcel she had in her hand she laid down; that contained the seven yards of sarcenet.

THOMAS THOMAS . I am shopman to Messrs. Harvey and Lamming.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop on the day the last witness has spoken of - A. Yes; she purchased some ginghams and handkerchiefs of me; she was about an hour in the shop.

Q. Did she purchase any sarcenets - A. She did not. She quitted the shop at the time Roberts was coming

out of the shop; on his coming back and missing the sarcenet, I went after the prisoner, I overtook her, asked her to comeback, and told her I thought she had something that she ought not to have; she gave no answer, but came readily back with me, and laid both of the bundles down on the counter, this piece of paper under the bundle, and in this paper I found seven yards of sarcenet; a constable was sent for, and she was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-15

323. THOMAS COOPER and JOHN CARTER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Kidgell , about the hour of five in the afternoon on the 8th of April , John Kidgell and others of his family being therein, and feloniously stealing therein, twelve gold seals, value 20 l. his property.

JOHN KIDGELL . I am a seal engraver , I live in Gracechurch street, in the parish of St. Allhallows, Lombard street .

Q. Is the whole house yours - A. Yes, I inhabit it. On Saturday last, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at home in the shop; at the same time I believe the whole family was at home - my wife and three daughters. Two or three persons came in, and wished me to go out and see whether I had lost any thing; on my going out I perceived a corner of a square had been cut, and some seals had been taken out, with some instrument; the watchman ran after the persons, and brought them back; one of them took the seals out of his pocket, and threw them on the counter.

- SATCHELL. I am a labourer in the East India warehouse and watchman of Bridge ward. It is customary for us to receive our money on Saturday night at the watchouse by London bridge. On my returning back I observed the prisoners at Mr. Kidgell's shop window; their appearance occasioned me to look at them; I perceived the pane of glass before which they stood was broken across in a corner direction; I judged from that they were robbing the shop; I went to the stand of coaches opposite Mr. Kidgell's shop, and communicated my suspicion to the waterman who was standing by the horses, either watering or feeding them, I do not know which; we both stood together, looking at them for the space of five or six minutes, not more, rather less; finding they left the window, I went into Mr. Kidgell's shop; I asked him if he had lost any thing out of the broken pane of glass in the window; he expressed his surprize that it was broke, immediately looked, and told me that he had. I immediately ran out of his shop and called the waterman to my assistance, followed the prisoners up Nag's head court, secured the prisoner Carter, and directed the waterman to secure the other. I brought them back into Mr. Kidgell's shop; the prisoner Carter immediately turned out the seals from his pocket and put them on the counter; he said that he was the person but that he knew nothing of the other young fellow. As I brought them into Mr. Kidgell's door I saw Salmon, who is a constable; I called him in, I told him I thought I should want his assistance. We immediately conveyed him to the Compter.

Q. When you first observed these men at the window were they together - A. They were very close together.

Q. Did they appear to you to be connected - A. I judged that they must be connected because that I observed one of them taking something out, or forcing it out; I could not understand the other to be a bystander; if he was, he must have seen it, he was so close to it.

Q. Why you saw it, and you was at some distance - A. At first I passed close behind them, then I went into the middle of the street; they went away together and turned into Nag's head court.

Carter. When I went up to the window the window was broken.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a waterman in Grace church street.

Q. Mr. Satchell came to you as you were watering the horses - A. Yes. I turned my head, I saw the two prisoners close together; the prisoner Carter was active with his fingers; I saw them together till they parted from the spot; then they went up Nag's head court. The moment Mr. Satchell came out I followed him up the court.

Q. Are these the same men that you followed - A. They are. Satchell took Carter and I took Cooper. We brought them back to the shop; Carter produced twelve seals there.

JOHN SALMON . I am an officer; I have got the seals and a knife; I took that from the prisoner Carter; that was every thing he had about him. I searched the prisoner Cooper. I found upon him several rounds of wire; I am not certain whether I returned it to the prisoner or left it on the counter; it was an iron wire, about the size of a knitting needle; when it was pulled out it was about a yard long.

Q. to Kidgell. Now with respect to this window, was it whole before - A. Yes, I saw it whole in the morning.

Q. One of them produced the seals to you, look at them - A. This piece of glass is half the glass that was taken out; the hole was as big again as that.

Q. How were they taken out - A. I do not know, unless by that wire. These are all my seals; they are worth above twenty pounds - at least twenty pounds; they are gold seals.

JURY to prosecutor. You did not hear the window break, did you - A. I did not; I was in the shop at the time.

Q. to Salmon. Was there any hook at the end of this wire - A. I cannot say I perceived it.

Q. Was the window cut or broken - A. Broken.

COURT, to Satchell. Do you know whether these two prisoners were talking together - A. I did not hear them; they appeared to be so close together that one could not do any thing without the other seeing.

Q. to Rogers. Do you know from the position they were in, whether they seemed to have any conversation - A. That I could not tell.

Q. You do not think that Cooper was an indifferent spectator, do you - A. No. They were standing nearly face to face, and when they were taken they were both together then.

Cooper's Defence. I am innocent.

Carter said nothing in his defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

COOPER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

CARTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[The prisoners were recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of their youth.]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-16

324. MARY CARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , three pair of pantaloons, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of Robert Matther .

ROBERT MATTHER I am a hosier in Sun street, Bishopsgate street . On the 2nd of March, about half past twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner came into the shop; the woman that was with her asked for a pair of black stockings; I shewed her some at two shillings a pair; while the woman was looking at the stockings, I perceived the prisoner stoop down and pick up something and was putting it under her clothes; the woman that was looking at the stockings offered me twenty-pence; I told her I could not take it. The prisoner laid hold of the child that was with her, and said come my dear, and went out, and the woman that was looking at the stockings immediately followed her out; one turned down the street and the other up the street; I followed the prisoner and asked her what she had got under her cloak; she said only this; I found it was three pair of pantaloons. I sent for a constable and gave charge of her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On this day I was going along; a woman met me she said do not you get your living by charing; I said yes; she said will you go along with me and do half a day's work; I said yes. Turning up Sun street she said come in here with me, I want to buy a pair of stockings; I went in with her; that gentleman shewed her a pair of stockings, my little child was running about the shop; I took the child and said come, and went out of the shop; the woman came out with me, she gave me these things; the gentleman came up and said what have you got; I said these, the woman gave them me. I am entirely innocent of this theft.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-17

325. SARAH STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , a gown, value 3 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Sarah Ward ; a pair of shoes, value 6 d. and a pair of stockings, value 3 d. the property of Jane Ward .

SARAH WARD . I am a servant ; the prisoner worked for my mother, she takes in scouring and washing ; my mother lives in Angel alley, Little Moor fields .

Q. What day were you robbed of these things - A. On Thursday morning, about half past seven, I lost them from my mother's.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner with taking them - A. Because we missed them as soon as she was gone out of the place; my mother went out on Thursday night and saw her with the apron on; my mother gave charge of her, and the duplicate of the gown was found on her by the constable.

Q. Then all you know is that you lost these things on the Thursday - A. Yes; I went after her and saw her find the apron on her.

JOHN PUGH . On the night of the 6th of April, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. This young woman gave charge of her for stealing a gown, apron, shoes and stockings; I searched her, I found the apron, shoes and stockings upon her, and two duplicates; a duplicate of a shirt, and the other for a gown. I produce the shoes, stockings and apron.

REEVES and COTTERILL, two pawnbrokers, were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

Sarah Ward . The apron, shoes and stockings are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with them four or five years, I am an unfortunate girl; when I had money they partook of it; they lent me the things to pledge, and being in liquor I put the things on.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-18

326. JAMES BLOWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , four muskets, value 7 l. 8 s. the property of James Thompson , and John Thompson .

JAMES THOMPSON : I am a gun maker ; my son John Thompson is my partner ; our manufactory is in Swan street, Whitechapel. The guns were sent from my warehouse to the Tower to be viewed, as is the custom of our trade; they were sent prior to the 15th of March; John Cross called at my warehouse, told me he believed the prisoner had taken some of my guns from the Tower . The prisoner is a gun maker .

Q. Then it is the custom of all the gun makers to send their guns to be viewed there - A. Yes, every contractor.

Mr. Gurney, If any objection is made to them they are brought back to be altered - A. Yes.

JOHN PRICE . I am a gun maker; I work for Mr. Thompson; there were thirty guns of my finishing; I sent them to Mr. Thompson's warehouse; which guns were afterwards sent to the Tower; I know they are the guns that I finished.

RICHARD BLAKE . I am a labourer to Mr. Thompson; I took thirty guns to the Tower on the 10th of of March last, to be viewed; they were guns made by Price.

JOHN CROSS . I am a gun maker, I live in Split's terrace, St. George's in the East. On the 15th of March I was in the Tower view room; it is the general place for all the guns to go of the Tower description; I had suspicion that Blowen had taken away some guns, I looked round the room and saw some of the guns of Blowen's marked with chalk standing close to Price's gun's; I counted them guns and found twenty nine standing there, including this gun that was chalked of Blowen's; in twenty minutes afterwards, or thereabouts, Blowen had finished all the business he had got to do, he went home; in about twenty minutes afterwards I had finished all I had to do, I counted these guns again, and counted but twenty six; I immediately went to John Price and asked him what guns he had

sent; he said thirty; I communicated my suspicion to one of the viewers; we went to Lambeth street office, had a search warrant, and found four guns locked up in his bed room behind the bed.

FRANCIS SPRING . I am an officer. On the 15th of March I went with Mr. Thompson to the prisoner's house, I told the prisoner that I had got a search warrant to search for four muskets belonging to Mr. Thompson; he said he had no such thing in his house; when I came to the bed room he made some difficulty of finding the key; I found the four muskets put behind the head of the bed; I took the prisoner in custody.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your oath did not he say he did not know how they came there - A. Yes.

Q. He had not the whole house - A. No; he had the second floor; there was a great number of other muskets in the room.

The property produced and identified.

RICHARD STAPP . Q. You are an apprentice to the prisoner Blowen - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day your master was taken up - A. Yes.

Q. Had your master been in the habit of furnishing guns to the Tower - A. Yes.

Q. We understand they are subject to be viewed, if they want to be altered they are returned - A. Yes.

Q. On the 14th or 15th of March were any guns, which your master had sent to the tower to be viewed, ordered to be brought back - A. Yes; eight.

Q. On the morning of the 15th did your younger brother bring any - A. He brought two.

Q. How many were brought altogether on that day or the day before - A. There were eight or nine turned back.

Q. On the morning that your master was taken up did you find any that was not your master's property - A. There were four guns; my master was not at home. When I found these four I put them behind the bed that my brother might not have a beating for them, because the boy had brought four guns in before, and my master beat him severely for it; I meaned to send them back to the tower at the watering time, then my master would not have known it.

Q. After you had done this did your master come in - A. Yes; I did not acquaint my master with it; I went out to get a side of brass, and while I was gone my master was taken up to the office for the four guns; upon that I went to the officer to deliver my evidence. I found my master locked up and his hearing was done with.

Q. Upon your solemn oath had your master any knowledge of these guns being behind the bed - A. I do not believe he knew of it; the number to be returned was ten, and we had only nine.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-19

327. DANIEL CANE , junior , and ROBERT ROSE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , two penknives, value 2 s. eight razors, value 8 s. a pair of snuffers, value 3 s. seven silver boxes, value 20 s. seven silver thimbles, value 7 s. and two silver fruit knives, value 6 s. the property of Richard Kember , in his dwelling house ; and

DANIEL CANE , senior , for receiving the same, he knowing them to be stolen .

RICHARD KEMBER . I live at Uxbridge, in the parish of Hillingdon , I have a house there.

Q. Have you any partner in your business - A. None. I am a watchmaker ; I sell other articles besides watches.

Q. When was it you missed any part of your property from your house - A On the 13th of March; I missed them out of a glass case; I went out about seven o'clock in the evening, I left my wife and servant in the shop; I returned about nine o'clock and missed them from out of the glass case; I saw a part of the property two days after in the possession of Mr. Murray the officer.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am a constable of Uxbridge.

Q. Did you yourself find any thing, and where - A. Yes; in the dwelling house of Cane, the elder.

Q. Then one of the prisoner's is Cane's son, is not he - A. Yes; he lived with his father; I found in this house two penknives; they laid upon a shelf in the house; that was on Saturday the 16th of March. A silver box the old man gave me himself, where he was at work, at Mrs. Johnson's; I had heard he had a box, I asked him for it.

Q. What was his employment - A. Something in the sack way, either spinning or weaving.

Q. This was before you went to his house - A. Yes, in the same morning; after I had been to the house I went after the boys; I did not find them till Saturday, they were brought from Brentford. On Thursday the old man had a bag with him; on the Friday I went with him from our cage to the justice; when he came back I examined the bag, I found a razor, and I picked up another razor that had dropped out of the bag.

Q. Did you see it drop - A. No, I picked it up.

SARAH MARCHANT . I am a married woman, my husband is a sacking weaver. Young Daniel Cane gave me two silver thimbles: on the 13th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I met him by chance, I had known him some time, I told him his shirt was ready, if he came for it before I went to bed he should have it; he came up into my room for his things in about a quarter of an hour after I met him, I gave him his shirt; he shewed me two silver thimbles, he said he would make me a present of them; I asked him how he came by them; he said he found them against the White Horse at Uxbridge; he shewed me three small silver boxes and some razors; he said he found them altogether.

Q. When was it that you mentioned any thing about the thimbles - A. On the Wednesday I gave one of the thimbles away to a young woman, a servant at Uxbridge; the other thimble I kept till I delivered it to Mr. Murray.

Q. to Murray. Were you present when the examination was taken of these prisoners - A. Yes; it was taken in writing.

Q. Did you see any body sign it - A. Yes; I think it was Mr. Arabin and Dr. Parry, and the two boys signed it; they made a mark. The prisoners were told by Mr. Arabin that they need not say any thing to convict themselves if they did not like, I had not

asked them any thing. The clerk of the magistrates wrote the examination.

Q. Look, and see whether that is the paper you mentioned - A. Yes; I saw the two boys make the marks. (The examination read.)

" Daniel Cane the younger being apprehendeded and now present, confesses that he did the above robbery on Monday evening last in company with another boy of the name of Robert Rose - that Robert Rose went into the shop and brought out the different goods, while he ( Daniel Cane ) waited at the door of the shop - that part of the goods were carried to the lodgings of Daniel Cane the elder, and that two thimbles were given to Sarah Marchant of Uxbridge, and two razors were given to the husband of Sarah Marchant . - Daniel Carter saith, that he delivered the other articles to his father. - The said Robert Rose confesses that the above evidence of Daniel Cane , junior, so far as relates to him, is true."

MRS. MARCHANT. The old man called me into his room; I live in the same yard; he bid me put a chair outside of the door, and look under the tiles of the house, I should find somewhat; I got up in the chair, I found a paper containing two razors, a silver box, and a silver knife; the old man told me to deliver them up directly.

The property produced and identified.

Daniel Cane , senior's, Defence. (read) My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - the prisoner, Daniel Cane , is a flax dresser, a widower, with one only son - Daniel Cane , junior; he has always got his bread by industry, he has worked one year and four months at Mrs. Johnson's; unfortunately he has been and now is afflicted with blindness and deafness, which prevented him from instructing his son; his son and companions had access to his apartment at all times, and could with the greatest ease play with his infirmities - they could plant any thing in his house without his knowledge; he declares he had neither act or part in the boy's proceedings, much less to receive them - and hopes you will weigh his case with consideration.

Cane, junior, and Rose said nothing in their defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

CANE, JUNIOR, GUILTY, aged 13.

ROSE, GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

CANE, SENIOR, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-20

328. HENRY WESTON and THOMAS MORRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , a coat, value 40 s. the property of Henry Searle , in his dwelling house .

HENRY SEARLE . I am a tailor , I live in King street, Covent garden, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent garden ; I am a housekeeper. On the 9th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Weston came into the shop, he asked me the price of a coat in the window, which he took to be a blue one; I told him it was a green coat; he asked me the price of that; I told him four pounds; he them went out and called Morris by the name of Jem; they both came in, he told Morris what I said respecting the coat; Morris made answer it was too much money to give, he could not afford it; they then both went out - Weston, with a view of looking at other coats that were in the window. He came in again, he asked me if I had a blue one; I told him I had, but I could not sell it to him; I shewed it to him. He asked me what I would make a blue one for; I told him four guineas; he then called Morris again by the name of Jem, he told him I would make him a blue coat for four guineas; Morris made answer again, called him Bill, it was too much money, he could not afford it. Weston then said he would have one, and he would give me two pounds as a deposit; he desired me to take his measure; he had a great coat on; I told him he must take his great coat off, or else I could not measure him; he said, oh yes, I will pull both my coats off; he did. I told him I could not measure him in that manner, he must put one on again; Weston said, oh yes, you can measure me, and threw out his arm. Morris said, oh Bill, you must put one on, the gentleman cannot measure you in that way. At that instant I heard a noise at the door, it was as though the buttons of a coat were hitting against the door; I was looking at Weston, with my back to Morris; I turned round to see what the noise was, I found that Morris and the blue coat were gone. I then told Weston I should detain him; he seemed very willing at first to be detained. I had nobody with me but a little girl in the back parlour, I sent her for a constable. After the girl was gone, Weston said he would not be detained; a scuffle ensued between him and me, he got out of the door, I got hold of the skirts of his coat and cried out a thief; two country stage coachmen were coming by at the same time and secured him. I did not know how to act at that time, the constable was not come; he got away, and ran twenty or thirty yards; he was secured then by the persons that were gathered round, and delivered to a watchman and taken to Bow street. Before he was taken, he said if I liked to go with him, he would go and get the coat back again.

Q. Are you sure that Morris is the man that was with him - A. Yes.

Q. When did you next see Morris - A. I saw him on Friday afternoon (the next day) on Ludgate hill, in company with two more; I then did not say any thing. On the Monday following I saw him at Bow street.

Q. How came you, when you saw him on the Friday, not to stop him - A. I had passed him before I saw him; I was very fatigued, I had been walking near the whole day.

CHARLES SMITH . I am a pawnbroker in Long Acre. Thomas Morris pawned a coat with me on the 9th of March, I believe about eight o'clock in the evening, in the name of Turner. I lent him a guinea and a half on the coat. He came on the Monday following, he wished to sell the coat; I detained him, and sent for an officer.

The property produced and identified.

Weston's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge; I went into that gentleman's shop to be measured for a coat as I wished to have it for Easter; in the mean time a man came in and took the coat; the gentleman asked me who came with me; I replied no

one particularly, I had come from a club; he kept me ten minutes; I asked him what he wanted with me; he said he had lost a coat; I thought it hard to be detained from my next day's work; I went out of doors, he laid hold of my coat.

Morris's Defence. I never saw the gentleman before with my eyes, and as to the coat it is my own property. That young man is innocent of the crime laid to his charge.

WESTON, GUILTY , aged 22.

MORRIS, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-21

329 SAMUEL GARDENER and ANN GARDENER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Straffing , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 26th of March , and feloniously stealing therein a silver watch, value 4 l. two tea spoons, value 4 s. three gowns, value 10 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a shawl, value 5 s. a shift, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. a pair of stays, value 3 s. two counterpanes, value 15 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a table cloth, value 9 d. a yard of muslin, value 1 s. three sheets, value 9 s. and a piece of bed furniture, value 6 d. the property of Richard Straffing ; - three waistcoats; value 15 s. a gown, value 2 s. a cloak, value 1 s. a piece of cotton, value 2 s. and a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Matthew Aldrich .

MARGARET STRAFFING . My husband's name is Richard Straffing ; I live at No. 111, Pennington street, St. Georges' in the East ; my husband is a sailor , he is at sea.

Q. Whose house is it you live in, or do you rent the whole house - A. Yes; I have lived in the house above two years. Matthew Aldrich rents a part of the house with me.

Q. When was this - A. On Palm Sunday. I cannot recollect the day of the month.

Q. What time did you go out on that day - A. At three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going to Hoxton fields; I put a screw in the parlour back window, and secured the sash; the back door was bolted within before I went out; I went out at the front door, and shut it, it caught the lock, I tried it and I found it had caught. Matthew Aldrich had the key of the door with him; I left no one at home when I went out.

Q. How were you to get in if you returned before him - A. He was to meet me at the same place at seven o'clock, which he did at the place I was gong to; about half past nine o'clock I returned home with Matthew Aldrich , I was met at the door by Mary Ann Rawlinson , she lived next door to me; I went into the house, I found the spring lock was shut; Matthew Aldrich opened the door; when a light was got I found the screw of the back window was out and laying on the tea board in the buffet.

Q. Had that window been broken for a person to unscrew it - A. No, it was a hole through; it could be easily pushed out with a nail from the outside; it was a bad screw, the sash was down; that window looks into my yard.

Q. Where does the prisoner live - A. Next door; his kitchen window looks into my yard.

Q. Now in what state did you find your house inside - A. I found the screw out, and one of the drawers open; in the parlour there is a window before and a window behind; the first thing that I missed was a cotton shirt belonging to my husband, and other things belonging to me; such things as I have described in the indictment.

Q. When did you put them there - A. I had aired them on the Sunday and put them in the drawers; I missed a silver hunting watch off the mantle piece, and two silver tea spoons from off the tea board in the buffet.

Q. Did you ever after see your things again - A. Yes, at the police office the next day.

Mr. Walford. Mrs. Straffing, what is your maiden name - A. Margaret Goodyear .

Q. Have you known the prisoner long - A. About five years; he lived with me about five years; there was one William Potter lodged a little time with me.

Q. The greater part of the five years you and he lived alone together in the house - A. Not the greater part of the time, a very little time.

Q. Did you ever pass for his sister - A. I have done, by reason that we moved to different houses, and my husband being at sea; to hinder suspicions that I might be censured for.

Q. Censured for what - what was you afraid of - A. They might have said there was something more than particular between us; my husband knew of it.

Q. He was living with you or you with him - A. He lodged with me; my husband was at home at the time we moved to two houses.

Q. Do you know the female prisoner, Mrs. Gardener - A. I do know her; I have seen her, living next door.

Q. She is his wife is not she - A For what I know.

Q. Do you not know that she is his wife - A. I cannot say; I know he has another one, Mary Ann Steward ; I have seen her at my house. The woman prisoner passes for his wife in the neighbourhood. I have not seen the certificate.

Q. As you have lived with this man five years you were rather angry when he left you - A. Not at all; I moved upon the account I did not want him to lodge in the house, and he took the house of me.

Q. You never had any animosity with the woman had you - A. No.

Q. Did you ever promise not to prosecute them - A I said if he delivered the goods to me, I did not wish to go any further.

Q. Did you ever propose to receive a sum of money to make it up - A. I never saw any money.

Q. You never mentioned fifty pound - did you - A. I never mentioned any sum of money whatever.

Q. Did you ever say you would have the money down - A. I did not; nor never any expressions of the kind.

MATTHEW ALDRICH . Q. We understand that you lodge in this house of Mrs. Straffing's - A. Yes; I lodge in the first floor; I have lodged there near two years.

Q. Do you remember on Palm Sunday you were going out - A. Yes; I went out a quarter before three o'clock, before Mrs. Straffing; I took the key with me; we returned together about half past nine; I missed three waistcoats, a while muslin cloak belonging to my wife, and the cotton; they were taken out of my

drawer. I saw them at the office on the Monday.

MARY ANN RAWLINSON . Q. Do you live next door to Mrs. Straffing - A. Yes.

Q. We understand that you gave her some information when she came home - A. Yes. I was not at home at the time the robbery was done, but when the young woman came with the beer about eight o'clock, I found Mrs. Straffing's door open, I shut it; I did not go into the house.

Q. Then how long it had been open you cannot tell - A. No.

MOSES COHEN . I live at No. 2, John's Hill, St. George's in the East, nearly opposite of Mrs. Straffing's. On this Sunday, about eleven o'clock at night, I heard a noise, I opened my door and saw Mrs. Straffing, she said she was robbed, I went into her house and strait into the yard to see if any of the mould was disturbed; I observed two tracks of feet from the back door to the right of the yard.

Q. How long these steps had been there you could not tell - A. No.

Q. Is there a window from the prisoner's house that looks into this yard of Mrs. Straffing's - A. There is a window about two foot wide. I found a bit of an old handkerchief in the yard in a tub of water, about two foot from Mrs. Straffing's window, and I found a bit of an old rag somewhat near the water tub. On the next morning, about six o'clock, I was awoke out of my bed by a knocking.

Q. Did you go with Mrs. Straffing any where - A. No; I went over to her; Mrs. Gardener was with me; I found her in Gardener's house.

Q. You have said that you accompanied her there in your examination - A. Then there is a great error in the deposition; I found her at Gardener's along with the Thames police man.

Q. Was the man and his wife there then - A. Yes, they were both present; Mrs. Straffing was crying bitterly for her things, with that I interceded as a neighbour, I said give the poor creature her things, and have done with it; the man said speak to my wife; the prosecutrix promised to forgive them over and over again, she did upon my oath, provided she got the things again; afterwards I took the wife up stairs with the officer and myself into an empty room and spoke to her; I said your sister has promised to forgive all, for God's sake let her have the things again; I prevailed upon her to tell me where the things were, and to let her have them again.

Q. Did you go any where - A. I went with the woman; I was brought from one street into another; afterwards I was told it was No. 100, Chapman street, she knocked at the door, no answer was given; she said her mother and father was not up; we waited, and the door was opened; an elderly woman came out, she asked us what induced us to come there so soon; the woman prisoner said we had been out to get some milk; the woman prisoner gave the woman some gin; while the woman was gone she took me into the yard and there I found the watch; it laid by the side of some wood.

Q. Was it covered over - A. No; it was within the wood, but very visible; and the two spoons were there.

Q. Were not they concealed under the wood - A. They were very plain to be seen, I put them into my coat pocket that I have on now; from there, by her desire, I went to a house in Back Church lane.

Q. Did the woman prisoner go with you - A. Yes; she took me to a house; we went into a two pair of stairs room; a woman was there; she said to the woman give me these bundles, I have got to make up some money for my husband.

Q. What was that woman's name - A. God knows what the woman's name was, I never saw her before; the bundles were brought out; I took the two bundles upon my shoulders and went with them and the woman prisoner to my house; according as I understood the nature of the business between the brother and sister.

Q. What did you do with these bundles - A. They were taken by Mrs. Straffing and the officer.

Q. Had the officer the same bundles that you brought from the woman's house - A. I took the bundles away, and the officer took them; I cannot swear to the bundles. The very identical bundle that was brought from the woman into my parlour the officer had.

Mr. Walford. Were you ever present when any sum of money was proposed by the prosecutrix - A. I can swear upon my oath she said if she had a considerable sum of money she would not prosecute.

Q. How long have you known the prisoners - A. Between four and five years. Gardener is a worthy honest man as ever the country produced; were I possessed of five hundred pounds I would give it him; I look upon this to be done out of design.

- MORANT. Q. You are an officer of the Thames police, are you not - A. I am.

Q. On Monday morning, in consequence of any application made to you by the prosecutrix, did you go with her and where - A. I went to her house. I examined the back yard, I saw no place where I could find any thing of the robbery having been done, except from the window of the prisoners. I went to Gardener's house, I knocked at the door, he opened it, I told him my business, that the next door neighbour had been robbed, and suspicion fell upon him; the wife was in bed. I asked him if he had any objection to my searching the house; he said none at all; by the time the wife was up I proceeded to search; I found nothing in the house. Cohen came in as a neighbour; he asked me if I would trust the woman with him up stairs, I told him I would; they went up, and they afterwards called for the man; some time elapsed. I was called, I went up stairs, Cohen informed me that they had confessed that they had done the robbery, he asked me if I would trust the woman with him to fetch the property.

Q. You entrusted the woman with him - A. I did. I kept the man in custody, I wanted to see if I could find where the property was. I followed the woman and Cohen at a distance a little way, the woman prisoner saw me, she told me if I followed them the property should not come forth; I wanted to dog them, to see where the property was. I found I could not get the property any other way. I let the woman prisoner and Cohen go; I was upon the watch, I saw the woman and Cohen come back, Cohen had a bundle on his back; I followed Cohen into his house; the female prisoner was present; I saw a silver watch, two silver spoons, and the things that were contained in the two bundles. I took them directly to Mrs. Straffing to

see if she could speak to them.

The property produced and identified.

Ann Gardener 'r Defence. I know nothing about it, I was out at the time.

Samuel Gardener was not put on his defence.

Ann Gardener called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-22

230. JOHN CHISHOLME and ANN CURTIS were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Williams on the 18th of March , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 50 s. and a coat, value 21 s. his property.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . Q. Did you at any time in last month meet either of the prisoners any where - A. I did, on the 17th of March. I had dined in the neighbourhood of the Strand, I quitted my party about twelve at night, I went to see a gentleman home that had lodged with me to Northumberland street. I live at Kennington.

Q. What countryman are you - A. An Italian . I turned from Northumberland street into the Strand, I was in liquor, I missed my way, I thought to go over Westminster bridge; I turned, I believe, the other way. I met the woman Ann Curtis , I believe in the Strand, I asked her if she would tell me the shortest way to Kennington, or to Westminster bridge, to put me in the right road; I told her I was a married man, I could have nothing to do with her; there was no carriage in the road, or else I would have taken it. Instead of putting me right, she led me up Catherine street; I thought she was leading me right. I got shoved into a court, I afterwards found, I did not know it at the instant; I was shoved into a house.

Q. Who shoved you into the house - A. I cannot tell; the woman had hold of my arm; I got into the parlour in a minute, I said where is this, I said get me some one that will shew me the way; there was a candle in the parlour, the candle was put out, and I either got a shove or a push; I got a blow upon the nose, I bled desparately.

Q. Was she in she room - A. I believe she was, it was all done in a moment; my coat was taken off, and this watch taken from my pocket; when I felt the blood it brought me to my recollection. I made to the door, I called the watch, the watch came immediately, and afterwards three or four Bow street officers came; a light was had; they searched, and nothing was found.

Q. When a light was got was any person in the room - A. No, the prisoner was gone; there was nobody but the officers and me in the room.

Q. Had you seen the man at that time - A. No, I did not.

Q. Are you sure whether any body pushed you, or whether the woman pulled you in - A. I cannot tell, the woman had hold of my arm; I cannot say whether any body assisted in getting me in the room.

Q. Were you in a situation to take notice of her, so as to say that she is the woman - A. No, I will not swear that she is the woman.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin in the Fields. I and two men of the name of Limbrick were out on duty at half past twelve o'clock at night; we went about the streets; about a quarter past one o'clock, as we were coming down Catherine street, I heard the cry of Watch; upon which the watchman came over from Exeter street; he went up the court, and we followed him.

Q. Where was the cry of Watch from - A. From Bedford court; it leads into Little Catherine street, going into Drury lane; it is on the left hand. We followed the watchman up to No. 2 in this court, where the gentleman was standing at the door without his coat.

Q. Who was the gentleman - A. Mr. Williams, the last witness. We then went in to see if the coat was about the place, or the persons in the parlour; we found nobody there. We searched the house all over, and when I came to the two pair of stairs I found the witness, who is here. I got information; I went down to a night house in Burleigh street, the Horseshoe and Magpie; when we got in I looked in the bar; I saw the woman prisoner in the bar.

Q. That is the prisoner Ann Curtis - A. Yes. I opened the door of the bar and went in, and close to where she stood I saw a watch lying, I said to the landlord is this your watch; he said no; the prisoner dropped it; the prisoner was sitting close to him; I took the watch and kept it till I went before the magistrate, then by the order of the magistrate I gave it to the gentleman, and marked it first. This is the watch that I took up close to the woman, and the watch that I gave to Mr. Williams; I marked it with the letter D, and here the letter D is.

THOMAS LIMERICK . I am one of patrols belonging to Bow street.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Donaldson to No. 2, Bedford court - A. Yes; at the time that Donaldson was there, I was there; I saw the prosecutor there without his coat.

Q. Did you go with him into the Horse Shoe and Magpie, Burleigh street - A. Yes; when we went into the door I saw Ann Curtis throw the watch down on the seat of the bench she was sitting on, out of her right hand.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner any where - A. Yes, I saw Chrisholme at the corner of Exeter street; before we went into the court I heard a noise up the court; I went to the court to see. I saw somebody come out of there. I saw Chisholme go up the court three different times in ten minutes; when he went up the court he returned back again.

Q. When he went up the court what did he do - can you tell - A. No.

Q. Did you see whether he went into any house there - A. I did not; he went backwards and forwards three different times; I know no further than apprehending him after he had been up the third time, I laid hold of him. This was after I had seen the prosecutor in his shirt sleeves.

JOHN JORDAN . I know no further than seeing the man in the house in the week time before.

Q. What house - A. The same house, No. 2, Bedford court; I saw him in the house that evening; I lodge in the house, in the two pair.

Q. What evening do you speak of - you say that evening - A. Yes; I saw him there the same evening when this gentleman was robbed; I lodged

in the house then; I do not now. There are two rooms on the ground floor.

Q. In which room did you see Chisholme - A. He was in no room, he was in the passage. It was between twelve and one before the officer came.

Q. Was the woman there at the time - A. I heard a noise below, I did not see the woman there then, she might be in the apartment, I did not see her. I heard a gentleman call out Watch; that was after I saw Chisholme; I was up stairs.

Q. How long after you saw Chisholme was it that you heard the gentleman call out Watch - A. It might be half an hour. The woman lodges in the house in the parlour. Chisholme did not lodge in the house as I know of.

Q. Did you leave Chisholme in the passage when you passed him - A. I left him there; I went up to bed.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. I saw him before, in the same week; I saw him in one of the rooms that the prisoner lodged in; I only saw him in the passage that night, and in the course of the week I had seen him in her room, and no other time.

Chisholme was not put on his defence.

Curtis's Defence. I never saw the gentleman before I saw him at Bow street. I went out the same afternoon, and coming home between one and two o'clock, I put my foot against the watch; other young women lodged in the same rooms, and were in the habit of receiving company there; there were different men and women drinking at the public house. When I went in I asked the publican to keep the watch till the next day; he said stop till I draw a pint of beer. These gentlemen then came in, and took the watch and me to the watchhouse; I did not know who the watch belonged to, nor did I know what to do with it, I meaned to give it to the publican to keep till the next day, to see if there was any owner to it.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . When Donaldson and me went into the house together, Donaldson opened the bar door, he said there is the woman that we want; in a moment I saw her hand go, I suspected she was doing something. I heard the watch fall on the bench. I said, Donaldson, there is the watch.

CHISHOLME, NOT GUILTY .

CURTIS - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-23

331. EVAN MORGAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Chandler , about the hour of eight on the 22nd of March , and burglariously stealing therein two silver gravy spoons, value 30 s. the property of Robert Chandler .

ROBERT CHANDLER , junior. Q. Where is this shop situated - A. In Leicester square, No. 8 , it is part of my father's dwelling house; I have no share in the business.

Q. How is this shop part of the dwelling house, do you enter at the shop door - A. Not exactly so; the shop is a separate tenement, but we have a communication by a passage.

Q. Is it part of the house - A. It has been a separate tenement for many years; it is not under the same roof.

Q. Then what communication is there - A. Through the wall of the house there is a door that opens from the shop to the house; my father has bought the house and the shop at the same time; I slept in the house at the time the offence was committed; the house was undergoing some alterations; the whole of the family intended to come there.

Q. How long had the communication been made between the shop and this house - A. About a fortnight.

Q. What night was it that this happened - A. The 22nd of March, between eight and nine o'clock; we had lit candles about an hour and a half, I suppose.

Q. Were you in the shop at the time - A. I was, and my father was there; I was standing inside of the shop; there were lamps outside of the shop window. I heard a window break; I immediately ran out of the door.

Q. Was this the window of the shop, or was it a shew glass - A. The window of the shop. I perceived the prisoner drawing his hand from the broken pane, and in his hand was two silver gravy spoons; I saw them, they had been hanging in the window against the pane which was broken; I seized him by the breast, and with the assistance of a neighbour we took him into the shop: The neighbour who assisted me took the spoons out of his hand. I went for a constable; the spoons were delivered to the constable.

Mr. Curwood. When you heard the pane of glass break from the noise, was it like a person cutting a pane, or a person dashing his hand against it - A. Not like cutting it.

Q. I do not know whether you have heard about the man, whether he has been deranged - A. I have heard so; but from what fell from his own mouth I should not suppose so.

MR. HAMMOND. Q. Do you live near Mr. Chandler - A. I do, next door; I was standing in my shop on the evening mentioned; I heard a noise of glass breaking; I immediately ran out and perceived the prisoner standing by the side of Mr. Chandler's window, with the spoons in his hand; I took the spoons from his hand and dragged him into the shop; I kept the spoons and him till a constable came, and then I gave them to the constable.

Q. How long had your candles been lighted - A. About an hour and a half. When I went out it was very dark.

- CRESWELL. I took the prisoner in custody, I took him to the watchhouse. The next morning, as I was taking him to Marlborough street - the prisoner was handcuffed to another - crossing Wardour street, he knocked me down and stunned me for a moment; he could not get away on account of the other man he was handcuffed to.

The property produced and identified.

ROBERT KEATE , ESQ. - Mr. Curwood. I believe, sir, you are deputy surgeon general of the land forces - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was assistant surgeon to the 35th regiment; he left that regiment in August last; from the official report he left that regiment on account of his being deranged in mind, and being incapable of attending the sick in that regiment.

COURT. Where was that regiment - A. In Sicily. I had no acquaintance with him till he returned. I conceived he was labouring under that malady when he

arrived from Sicily in August last. I saw Mr. Morgan within this last three weeks or a month; I observed he looked extremely aukward, and remarked it to himself. He lately has been appointed to the York rangers; I objected when he applied to be on full pay.

Q. How long is that ago - A. About two months; Mr. Morgan has frequently called at the office; I did not consider him to be perfectly sound of mind; I understood that he went into the country afterwards; about three weeks ago is the last time I saw Mr. Morgan; he appeared extremely heated and hurried. I mentioned to the surgeon general my regret that he had been recommended upon full pay.

Q. Then somebody thought he was a fit person - A. There was a letter came from a relation and a medical man there, that he had been quiet during his stay there, six weeks.

Mr. Curwood. Did he appear to be a man that was not answerable for his actions - A. In such a state as that I was only sorry that he was placed in such a situation to have the charge of sick men; I did not think him fit for any thing in that line.

COURT to Chandler. At the time that the prisoner was apprehended did you, from your own observations, see any thing that imported the least insanity - A. Not the least in the world. When he was brought into the shop my father asked him where he supposed he would go for this offence; he made answer, take me where you will, I have no place to put my head into. I perceived no symptoms in the least of mental derangement.

Q. to Hammond. Did any thing occur to your observation with respect to the prisoner's mind - A. I should not imagine him to be insane; his conversation and language was quite different; there was nothing that led me to suppose so.

Q. to Creswell. When you came and took him in custody how was his behaviour - A. He appeared sullen all the way; he knocked me down the next morning; he wanted to run away; he wanted the other prisoner to run away; the other prisoner told me so afterward.

ROBERT BENNET . Q. You are a waiter to the Bell Savage inn - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming there any time - A. It was in July or August last; he staid there eight or ten days; from his conduct during the time he was there he was insane, certainly.

MR. NEWMAN. Q. This man is in your custody - how has his behaviour been - A. His behaviour has been very extraordinary indeed; he has been in my custody from the 27th of March; he appeared sometimes quite stupid, and very indecent in his behaviour, so much so that he has been a disgust to all the prisoners; I have been obliged to lock him up by himself.

Q. From the best of your belief do you think it proceeded from perverseness of temper, or from derangement of mind - A. I should rather think from derangement of mind.

MARY EARLE. Q. You are chamber maid to the Bell Savage - A. Yes. I remember the prisoner coming there in August, he staid there ten nights, he very seldom went out of the bed room the whole of the time, and never dressed. What I saw of his conduct I believe him to be insane.

Verdict of the jury - That he was INSANE at the time .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-24

332. PETER COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 15 s. a pair of braces, value 2 s. 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. 6 d. and a neck pad, value 6 d. the property of Simon Wellington .

SIMON WELLINGTON . I keep two lodgings; I live at No. 16, New street square. My wife was put to bed lately, I took lodgings at No. 8, Robin Hood court, Shoe lane. On Saturday the 1st of April, in the morning, I left a bundle there, and on Saturday evening my landlord came to me and asked me if I had not left a bundle in the room; I told him yes; he informed me that a man had been in the house and took the bundle out; he took me to the White Swan in Shoe lane; when I came there the landlord asked me the contents of the bundle; I told him. We took the man to the Poultry compter.

Q. Who is that man - A. The prisoner.

PETER JONES . I am a cordwainer, I live at No. 15, Flower de Luce court, Fleet street. On the 1st of April, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Robin Hood court, I saw the prisoner come out of Wellington's house with a bag in his hand; instantaneously a woman ran out of the house and called stop thief; I run after the man, in company with two more, for about twenty yards, and there we took the man; he threw the bag away the moment he was laid hold of; I laid hold of the bag and my friend secured the prisoner.

JOSEPH LINGARD . On Saturday the 1st of April I heard my wife cry out stop thief, as I was at tea; I immediately ran out of doors, I saw the prisoner with the bag, I ran after him and laid hold of him, we both fell down together. The two constables came by at the same time; one got hold of the bag and the other got hold of the prisoner.

SARAH LINGARD . I am the wife of the last witness, my husband is a coppersmith; I live at No. 18, Robin Hood court. Wellington lodged there. On Saturday the 1st of April, between six and seven o'clock, I heard the prisoner go through the passage; he made towards the door, I ran after him and called out stop thief; my husband followed him; I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. He had no business in your house, had he - A. No; none at all.

Q. What room were the things belonging to Mr. Wellington in - A. In the garret.

JAMES POSJOY. I am an officer. I produce the bag. On Saturday evening the 1st of April, I was passing the door of Wellington's lodgings, in company with Peter Jones ; I saw the prisoner come out of the door with this bag in his hand, he shut the door after him; in one moment the door was opened and the lady called out stop thief; I joined in the pursuit and catched hold of him; it is the same bag, he had it under his arm, and the contents are the same. It is the prisoner's bag.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the things; I was

going along Shoe lane, I went up to see what was the matter, I saw a mob of people; this man came behind me and gave me a violent blow on my head, knocked me down and broke my knee pan; they dragged me into the public house and said I must be the man that dropped the things.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-25

333. ELIZABETH PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Sarah Wells ; - and a waistcoat, value 6 d. the property of John Woodruff .

SARAH WELLS . I live with Mrs. Roberts, the Brown Bear, corner of Seacoal lane .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know; she did not live in the house with me.

Q. When had you last seen your things safe - A. It is five weeks next Monday; on that night at half past twelve o'clock I was going to bed, I pushed my door open and found my box broken open and a man's waistcoat in my box; I took this waistcoat into the garret to ask Mr. Woodruff if this waistcoat belonged to him, and when I came up to the bed the prisoner was under the bed; she creeped from under the bed; she had neither cap, handkerchief or shoes on.

Q. What became of her - A Mr. Woodruff demanded her to go out of the house; when she was coming down stairs I went to her and pulled a shift of mine from under her arm.

Q. Did you know nothing of this woman at all - A. I never saw her before. Her cap and apron I found in my box, her bonnet and shoes were at the head of Mr. Woodruff's bed; my room is the two pair of stairs room, Mr. Woodruff's is the garret.

JOHN WOODRUFF . I am a journeyman brass founder, I lodge at the Brown Bear . On the evening of the 27th of March, about half past twelve o'clock, I went up to bed, I began to undress myself, I heard somebody under the bed; the girl came up, she said Mr. Woodruff is that your waistcoat; I said who is there; I had an old sword, I drew it. I told them whoever it was to come out; the prisoner creeped from under the bed, she said a young man was to meet her there, he said he lived in the room. Nobody sleep in that room but myself.

Q. Was she sober - A. I cannot say, she said she was tipsy. We found the staple of the girl's box as if sawed through.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have two small children; my husband is out of employ and a cripple; I went out that night to get a shilling by prostitution; I went up Seacoal lane, a young man told me to go up into the garret of that house and when the house was quiet he would come up; after I had been there a little while that young man came up, he asked me what I wanted; he swore he would cut me in two if I did not speak; he dragged me down stairs; my clothes came off with his dragging me down stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-26

334. WILLIAM WAKEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of April , a watch, value 10 l. a chain value 1 s. and a key, value 3 d. the property of John Robertson , from his person .

JOHN ROBERTSON . I lost this watch about ten o'clock on Monday evening, the 3rd of April, near the Mansion house ; I cannot speak to seeing the prisoner that night at all.

Q. There was a crowd of people about the Mansion house - A. Yes; I felt it taken away, I felt a jerk.

WILLIAM PHENE . I am a confectioner. On the 3rd of April, about ten o'clock, as I was observing the company going to the Mansion house, I felt a great crowd behind; on turning round I observed the prisoner snatch a watch from a gentleman; upon which I attempted to seize him, I could not; I observed there was only one way of his making his way off; on that way I observed him, keeping my eye upon him frequently; I was again going to take him in the crowd, at that moment he came off the pavement; I then attempted to seize him, but could not; he then run, I followed at the distance of half a yard. I suppose he ran between the carriages he had the start of me on the pavement: as I came on the pavement he passed me with the cry of stop thief.

Q. Had you called stop thief before - A. I never called out at all; I instantly seized him, I never left my hold till he was put in the Poultry compter.

Q. What became of the watch - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Alley. Your curiosity was excited, like a great many more honest men, to see the company go into the Mansion house - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know the person of the gentleman at the time - A. No.

Q. Nor did you know when you saw him at the Mansion house that he was the person against whom the attempt was made - A. No.

Q. All you know you saw an attempt made by somebody on a gentleman - A. By the prisoner, I am sure of it.

Q. You supposed that the prisoner was the person that made the snatch - A. I am sure of it.

Q. The prisoner was standing near the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. The same impression might be in his mind; he might fancy he saw somebody snatch the watch from the prosecutor, and he might be calling out stop thief to have them taken - when he was searched you found upon him his own watch, and eight or ten pounds in money - A. When he was searched in the Poultry compter the watch was not found upon him.

Q. Do you recollect observing at the Poultry compter, that you was quite sure that he must have the watch about him, and you directed a strict search to be made - A. No, I was sure that he was not in possession of it.

Q. The next day you attended at the Mansion house and saw the prosecutor - A. No, on the second examination I saw the prosecutor.

Q. And then, and not till then, you were not able to ascertain that the watch was lost by the prosecutor - A. No.

Q. Did you never say before the watch was produced that it was a handsome watch - A. No.

Q. Then you were not able afterwards to know whether the watch that was produced was the watch that was taken at the time, supposing the prisoner stole it - A. No.

COURT. The moment you saw the watch snatched

from the gentleman's pocket, you never lost sight of him - A. No. When we secured him there was a mob about him; he was taken down Walbrook; some said duck him, and some pump upon him; two gentlemen came up, and said take him to the Poultry compter.

SAMUEL PORTER . Q. You are a marshalman - A. I am. On Easter Monday I was on duty at the Mansion house. About ten o'clock a gentleman came up to me, saying he had found a watch, he believed it to be a gold watch, he would wish to leave it in such hands as the right owner might have it. I asked the gentleman his name, and I gave the gentleman my name; the gentleman's name is Sharp.

Mr. Gleed. Are you certain it is the same watch - A. Yes.

Q. It was out of your custody - how long - A. Almost four days; then it was locked up in Mr. Hoblers's box at the Mansion house; it was delivered to me at the Mansion house; I have had it ever since.

SAMUEL SHARPE . I am at the Commercial docks. I was crossing Charlotte row, from that side next to the Mansion house, near ten o'clock on the day mentioned; just before I got to the pavement, I heard something fall down, and break like glass; there were several people passing at the time, they did not look at it; I put my hand down, I found it was a watch case. I looked a little further, I saw the watch.

Q. What part of Charlotte row was this - A. Between the side door of the Mansion house and the one in front.

Q. What did the crowd appear to be about - A. They appeared to me to be passing and repassing. I delivered the watch to Mr. Porter at the Mansion house.

Mr. Alley. Then the impression on your mind was, that there was no robbery then - A. I did not see any thing at all; it certainly fell on the pavement; how it came there I could not tell, I heard it drop, and was rather surprised that they that passed took no notice of it; it appeared to drop from some of the people that were passing at the time; no person stopped to pick it up, which rather surprised me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been down to Greenwich to get my prize wages; I found the office locked up; I came back by the stage. Coming by the Mansion house I came across the street, he came and laid hold of me by the shoulders, he said stay; I said I shall not stop. I was lugged by my legs and arms, and when they got me to the Poultry compter, then the constable came and searched me, and found nothing; then they would not let me go, this young fellow would not let me go, he said he was sure I had the watch, it was a pretty watch.

JURY to Phene. When you saw the prisoner make an attempt at the watch, did you see the watch whether it was a white one, or what - A. I saw it all in his hand together, and part hanging out.

Q. You did not take any notice of the gentleman that lost the watch - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-27

335. THOMAS COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , three pounds weight of tea, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of the united merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, laying it to be the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS GLASS . I am an assistant elder in the East India company's warehouse; the prisoner was a drummer and a labourer in the East India company's service .

Q. What part of the warehouse was the prisoner employed in in the East India company's warehouse - A. On the top floor, in Crutched Friars, in the city of London .

Q. Have you a great number of men employed in that warehouse on that floor - A. About twenty; that floor contained tea.

Q. What time did he leave his employment - A. At two o'clock; I was present at the time he locked up the internal warehouse of that floor; at that hour on that day I received the key at the stair head myself; he left the bunch of keys in that door which I locked after him.

Q. What kind of tea was on that floor - A. Congou and campre.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a custom house officer. On the 10th of March I was at the East India warehouse, Crutched Friars; about ten minutes after two I observed the prisoner, he was coming out of the iron gates that separate the premises from the outer yard; he came to me to be rubbed down as usual; on searching of him I found some loose tea in each of his coat pockets; he was in a very great hurry, he made a start to run up the steps with the delivery book; I immediately followed him up the steps and told him I had not done with him; he then begged I would let him go, he hoped I would forgive him; I told him it was more than my situation was worth. I took him into Mr. Saunders's office, and took out six ounces of tea from both his coat pockets; I asked him to unbutton his waistcoat, which he declined; I did it myself; I then found one bag of tea on his right side, under his arm; I searched on the other side, I found another in a similar direction on the left side, and another smaller one just at the pit of his stomach. I was then ordered by Mr. Saunders to see him to the compter; he said he was sorry for what he had done, and begged Mr. Saunders to forgive him. I have got the tea here; it has been weighed, the weight is three pounds. I looked in that warehouse on Saturday or Monday, I cannot say which day, I saw a chest in the upper floor that apparently had been plundered, which corresponded with this part that was in his pockets.

Mr. Glass. That paper of tea is of the same colour and quality, one part of it, as is in the warehouse; the other part is blacker than any tea I saw in the warehouse.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and during that time to be whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-28

336. SARAH MONKHOUSE was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 12th of March , five pounds three quarters weight of pork, value 5 s. 9 d. the property of Mary Curtis , widow .

MARY CURTIS . I live at 129, Chancery lane ; I keep a pork shop . Sarah Monkhouse was a lodger of mine, she lived in a little house through my yard; some time previous to the robbery I lost the key of my shop.

THOMAS CURTIS . I am a guard to a coach, to Mr. Bolton. On Sunday morning, the 12th of April, about ten minutes before three o'clock, I was awoke by something falling in the shop; I sleep in a room adjoining; about three o'clock I heard the watchman call the hour; about a quarter of an hour afterwards I saw a light go through the passage, as though somebody was going into our shop; I got up in my bed, I heard the drawer open and shut and halfpence rattle; I went into the passage to see if the foredoor was shut, it was shut; I looked towards the back door, it was open. I went and knocked at my mother's room door, up stairs, to get a light; I heard somebody try the fore-door. I came down, and who should I meet but the prisoner in the passage. I knocked her down. I felt something wet in her right hand; I halloaed out who is here, which alarmed my mother, a light was had, and this wet proved to be two pieces of pickled pork, it was left on the ground and the key of my mother's shop. The prisoner ran into her own room; I went to the watchhouse and got the constable, he took her in custody. The pickle pork weighed five pounds three quarters.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-29

337. ALEXANDER RANKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , five pounds weight of rags, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Aylwin and William Liddard .

JOHN AYLWIN . I am a wharfinger , at Ralph's and Young's key, Lower Thames street ; my partner's name is William Liddard ; the prisoner has been in our employ about eight months. On the 22nd of March, from information of one of my men, I went to the warehouse; the instant I got there the prisoner came towards the door as though he was going out; he went back into the warehouse upon seeing of me; he came forwards, I asked him if he had found any of the loose things that had been lost; he said he had found the chain only; he then walked back again into the warehouse; he came forward again. I told him that I was very much afraid that there was a thief about the warehouse, we had lost a many trifling things, I could not tell what become of them; he said he felt himself equally surprized as I did to know what had become of them. I stood against the door post looking at him; he went to the back of the warehouse and came back again; I then asked him if he was waiting for any thing; he said no, and immediately walked out, passed me and went down the step; he got a little distance; seeing him look a little bulky I called to him and asked him if he had got any thing in his pockets; he made an evasive kind of answer as though he did not know what I meaned; I called to him again, he did not stop. I called to him again rather sharp, he then turned round and stopped; I told him I hoped my fears were not true, had he or had he not any thing in his pockets that he should not have; he answered I do not know what you mean, sir, by asking me such questions; I put my hand to his coat pocket and asked him what he had got there so bulky; he said only an old clout or two; I took his hat off his head, his hat was as full of rags as it well could be; I then desired him to walk into the accompting house; he said he was very sorry. I sent for a constable; he came and searched him in my presence, and found five pounds of rags in his hat, pockets, round his waist and in his breeches.

- WOODMAN. I am a constable; I searched the prisoner; in the crown of his hat I found these rags, out of his pockets I took a great many rags, and about his loins and in the back part of his breeches. I then took him into custody.

Prosecutor. I had such rags about my wharf.

Prisoner's Defence. I had too much liquor; I do not find fault with any thing that Mr. Aylwin has said; if I had told Mr. Aylwin how I had come by them I should not have come in so much trouble; Mr. Aylwin has given us the liberty to take the sweepings of the salted goods to sell, and I thought if there were any of any other sort I might take that too; we had delivered some bags and I swept it up. The reason I concealed it was because the other men did not know of it; it was not worth while sharing of them.

GUILTY, aged 42.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-30

338. MARGARET PAYNE and ANN JORDAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , twenty one yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of William James , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM JAMES . I live at 29, Middle row, Holborn ; I am a linen draper .

THOMAS BINGHAM . I live at my father's, opposite Mr. James, he is an ironmonger; while I was in our shop I saw a young woman come out of Mr. James's shop, she went to the shop window to these two prisoner, and something that she had under her clothes she gave to one of them; I went into the shop and informed them of it; the young man went after them and brought them back.

Q. Which of the young women did she give it to - A. I cannot say, they were both together.

JAMES FEAN . I am shopman to Mr. James. On Thursday the 21st of March, between four and five o'clock, Mr. Bingham gave me information. I saw the prisoners going down Middle row; when I got near Jordan I saw a bulk under her apron, I caught her by the arm, and said, now, ma'am, walk back; she immediately replied, I did not take it, a woman in a beaver hat gave it me; I brought Jordan back. She took from under her apron a piece of blue printed cotton; I took it from her. I saw the person with a beaver hat on standing near the prisoner Jordan; I put my hand on Margaret Payne , I said is this the woman; she replied yes. They were both taken in custody.

Q. You had not seen either of the prisoners in the

shop, had you - A. No, not that afternoon.

MRS. PARSLEY: I was coming from the city; I saw the two prisoners walking towards Mr. James's shop.

Q. Did you know them before - A. No. On a sudden there was a third, which stood by Mr. James's shop door; they then appeared as though they were going to quarrel. I saw Ann Jordan stoop and take a piece of printed cotton in her left hand, and put it under her apron; it was instantly done, when they came to the third; and Jordan, when she took it, went off. The third immediately asked the price of a piece of cotton at the door, but when she saw the prisoner detected she ran off.

Q. Had she a beaver hat on - A. No, Margaret Payne had.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-31

339. THOMAS BOLTON and ANDREW TIFFEN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Salmon , about the hour of nine at night on the 1st of March, with intent the goods and chattels therein feloniously and burglariously to steal .

WILLIAM SALMON . I live at 54, Goswell street, in the parish of St. Luke ; I keep the whole house; the shop is the lower part. I keep a butter, cheese, and bacon shop .

Q. Were you in your shop when somebody came into it - A. I was in the parlour, my parlour has a glass door to it.

Q. What day was this - A. On the 1st of March, a few minutes after nine in the evening; I am sure of it, the watch was set.

Q. Had you any candles alight in your shop - A. Yes, for two hours or more; it was quite dark.

Q. Your parlour is behind your shop, and separated from your shop by a glass door, is it - A. Yes.

Q. And none of your people were in your shop - were they - A. No.

Q. Had you been in the shop any time before - A. Yes, about three or four or five minutes, I cannot exactly say; no longer. I was in the shop, I let a customer out and fastened the door after them; I am sure that I shut the door myself and fastened it with the latch.

Q. Is your shop door one door, not a hatch at the bottom - A. No, it is all one door, a glass door.

Q. When you were in this parlour did you hear any thing - A. When I was in the parlour I heard somebody spring the latch.

Q. You heard the latch of the shop door - A. I heard the latch of the shop door; I turned my head, I did not rise out of the chair; I looked through the glass door, I did not see any one come in, I saw the door go, I could see over the bottom of the door.

Q. Did you see whether the shop door was open - A. It was perfectly open when I turned my head; I did not get off my chair till a gentleman came past; he sung out to me there is a thief in your shop; he was at the door; I believe he stepped in the shop; I got up and went into the shop when I heard the gentleman speak; the gentleman catched this man upon his hands and knees.

Q. Did you see him - A. No.

Q. Then tell me what yoo saw - A. I saw the gentleman had got the man by the collar; I saw a gentleman in my shop, he had hold of the prisoner Bolton.

Q. How far had the gentleman come in the shop - had he got within the door of your shop, or was it at the door that he had got hold of him - A. He was about a yard within the door way; the gentleman had hold of Bolton by the collar, Bolton had been down upon his hands and knees; he gave the alarm to me, I catched hold of Bolton by the collar, half outside of the door; the gentleman said there was another; I did not see another in the shop, or looking in at the window. Immediately after that I left Bolton in the shop with my wife.

Q. Did you shut the door, or any thing - A. No.

Q. And he staid quietly in the soop, did he - A. No, he ran away.

Q. Where did you go to when you left him in the shop with your wife - A. I went to the gentleman that Tiffen insulted outside of the shop.

Q. How far off did you catch hold of Tiffen - A. He run about a hundred yards, I saw him running; the gentleman said he was the man; he and another tried to strike the gentleman three or four times. I got him by the collar myself, and resigned him to the watchman.

Q. Did you then come back to your shop - A. No. I did not; he got away from the watchman, he stripped himself of his clothes, I saw him pull of his clothes; he crossed Goswell street and went up Gee street. I followed him.

Q. Did you see him taken - A. Yes; Lewis, a black man, took him; I am sure he was the same man; he was brought back and taken to the watchhouse, from there, after he was put in the watchhouse, he was taken to Clerkenwell prison; I accompanied him there; he struggled, we were obliged to tie his hands. While I was at the watchhouse Bolton got away.

Q. That you know nothing about - A. No.

Q. You did not find Bolton in your shop - A. No; Bolton came up to the watchhouse door while I was there present - I said this is the man that I had by the collar in the shop; then he went towards Whitecross street, he on the right hand pavement and I down on the horseway; I got before him and caught him by the collar, and brought him back to the watchhouse. I am sure he is the same man. I told him he was my prisoner, that he was the man which the gentleman caught on his hands and knees in my shop. Then I brought him to the watchhouse.

Q. In your shop you have cheese, butter, and bacon - A. Yes.

Q. You go through the shop into the house to go up stairs - A. Yes. I have been robbed twice before.

Tiffen. The gentleman says I was apprehended by a black man. Lewis can testily that he never apprehended me.

Prosecutor. Lewis is not here.

COURT. Are you sure he is the same man that was apprehended - A. Yes.

Q. What is the name of the person that came into the shop - A. Mr. Dennet.

Tiffen. I would wish to ask the prosecutor if he ever saw me at his shop - A. I never saw him to my knowledge before.

Tiffen. Nor you never saw me in company with this man - A. I never saw either of the prisoners before to my knowledge.

JOHN DENNET. Q. Do you know the shop of Mr. Salmon in Goswell street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect going by one evening, and seeing somebody in the shop - A. Yes; on the 1st of March, a little after nine in the evening.

Q. What, were you walking along the street - A. Yes. On the 1st of March, a little after nine in the evening, just as I came to Mr. Salmon's shop, I saw something going up the three steps of the shop, it looked something black, like a great dog; I stopped to look, I thought it was a very large dog, I stood a moment, I perceived it was a man upon his hands and knees going into the shop; the shop door at that time was open, and it struck me that it was a man going to rob the shop. I stepped back just round the door post, there was a passage close to it.

Q. You stepped back to watch - A. Yes, to watch. I cast my eye along the front of the window, I saw another man looking into the shop window; the other man then came from she shop window - Tiffen did.

Q. Was Tiffen the other man - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know him before, did you - A. Yes, I have seen him before.

Q. You did not know his name to be Tiffen, did you - A. No; I never heard his name before; I was in the dark, I could see him plainly by the light of the window, I knew him by sight. The moment he came from the shop window by the door, he either said George or Thomas, I believe, I cannot say which. The prisoner Bolton, I believe, did not hear him; he passed the door a few yards, he returned again; when he came by the door, he said d - n you George or Thomas, or whatever name it was - you are done.

Q. At the time he said that, where was the other person that you had seen - A. About two yards in the shop, going forward in the shop upon his hands and knees; I believe Bolton then heard him speak, and then Bolton was withdrawing out of the shop; I stepped into the shop, and caught hold of him by the back part of his coat; I asked him if he was going to rob the man's shop - he said no.

Q. Did you see any one else in the shop - A. No. I asked him what business he had there; in the mean time Mr. Salmon came out.

Q. Did you call him out - A. No further than my speaking loud; Mr. Salmon came out of the parlour, at least the back room; I then delivered him into Mr. Salmon's care; he was then off his hands and knees; when Mr. Salmon came to me, and I delivered him up to Mr. Salmon, I said to Mr. Salmon take him into custody, there is another concerned in it, I shall see him in a minute; in the mean time there came round ten or fifteen people. I turned round and saw Tiffen, I said you are the rascal that was concerned with him.

Q. Are you sure that the man you saw in the crowd was the same man that you had seen outside of the window, and who had spoke to him - A. I was sure he was the same person. As soon as I told him he was the rascal that was concerned with him he drawed himself in an attitude to strike me; I had a stick in my hand, and a bundle under my other arm; I struck him across the arm.

Q. You say he did make a blow at you - A. Yes; with his fist; he then attempted the second time to strike me; I struck him with my stick; he would have struck me if he could, but he could not get at me; he ran across the street directly, I pursued him across the street; I struck him once or twice going across; he ran down Sutton street, just at the corner of Sutton street I struck him across the shoulder, he reeled and fell down. One of the watchmen came up to me and was going to collar me; I said go and take hold of the thief; then he was taken hold of by the watchman in my presence; the first watchman that came up could not hold him; the second watchman came up; he stripped himself out of his coat and he did make an attempt to run, after he was stripped out of his coat; he was stopped by a third watchman. I left him in the care of the watchmen; I never saw him any more till I saw him at Worship street. I went home after that.

Q. Are you sure that Tiffen was the man that you have been speaking about - A. I am sure that Tiffen is the man that spoke to him, and the man that was at the window; he went as far as Gee street after he spoke to him, and there he stopped by the post; I saw Bolton go into the shop; I took him in the shop.

WILLIAM SPICER. I am an officer of the parish. I was sent for; I found both the prisoners in the watchhouse; I took them to prison.

Bolton's Defence. I was going to Mr. Wood's in Aldersgate street with some work for my father; my shoe came untied coming home, I put my foot upon the step to tie my shoe; the witness said here is a thief in the shop; I had no occasion for stealing of any thing. I declare to Almighty God I know nothing of the young man.

Tiffen's Defence. I was walking on the other side of Goswell street; I was very much in liquor; I saw a mob on the other side of the way, consequently I pushed myself into the mob; this gentleman was accusing one and another; he said, you were with him; I argued with him on the subject; he drew a large stick and hit me on the arm; I ran away and he pursued me and struck me. I never had any discourse with the other young man before this transaction.

BOLTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

TIFFEN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090412-32

340. JAMES CROWDER , alias BROWN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Meycock , about the hour of eight, on the night of the 6th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two silk handkerchiefs, value 15 s. his property.

JAMES MEYCOCK. I live at 64, Broad street, in St. Giles's parish ; I am a haberdasher .

Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. Yes. On the 6th of this month, about half past seven in the evening, I heard a window break, that was the first thing that attracted my attention; it was rather a private window that gave light to a desk; it looked into Drury lane; the other window was shut up, this was not.

Q. What sort of a light was there at that time - A. There was no light but what was in the shop; there was no day light nor no moon as I know of; it was half past seven o'clock. I heard the glass fall; in

about half a minute or a minute I went to the place from whence the sound proceeded, of the broken glass. I saw a man's hand had got hold of my handkerchiefs, that was fastened to a line; he was pulling them out of the window, through the glass that was broken. They were silk handkerchiefs, he was drawing them out of the broken pane of glass.

Q. Was that the pane of the small window that you spoke of - A. Yes.

Q. Describe how these handkerchiefs were hanging before you heard the glass fall - A. They were hanging on a line of red tape, nailed on each side of the window for that purpose.

Q. Were they within the shop - A. Yes; within the shop; they were fastened with three large pins.

Q. Was any part of them drawn out of the house - A. Yes, as much as half a yard at least; he could not get them off; he gave them a sharp pull at the time I got to the window; I saw the handle did not get them off; he tore the corner of the handkerchief. When he saw I saw his face at the window, by the glimmer of light that was in my shop, and likewise his hand, he ran off.

Q. What light had you in your shop - A. There were several candles in the shop, there were two lamps in the Broad street side, but in this window there was nothing but a candle alight standing on the desk.

Q. There was light enough to distinguish him so as to know him - A. Yes; I saw his face and I knew it was the same man; when I saw him afterwards I suppose the prisoner saw me; I laid hold of the handkerchief, he ran off or walked off; he was gone very quick; I sent my boy after him, I did not pursue him myself; my boy assisted in taking of him; Samuel Parsons took him. The prisoner is the man I saw attempting to take the handkerchiefs out of my shop; he was brought back in about two or three minutes after he was gone.

Prisoner. When Mr. Meycock was at the office he charged me with breaking the window; he then said he did not know whether there were four or five handkerchiefs; now he has indicted me for two.

Prosecutor. There were two handkerchiefs at the office; there were neither four or five handkerchiefs mentioned; I did say two or three; I did not know which till I counted them.

SAMUEL PARSONS . Q Were you near the house of Mr. Meycock on the 6th of this month - A. Yes; I was standing on the opposite side of the way in Drury lane, about half past seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it dark then - A. Yes.

Q. Is Mr. Meycock's the corner of Drury lane - A. Yes; on the left hand as you go from here. I saw the prisoner come up Drury lane.

Q. Did he come up alone - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Meycock's window; it is a small window that looks into Drury lane; he stopped there about a minute; I heard the glass break.

Q. Where was he standing when you heard the glass break - A. He was standing close by the window; I saw him with his hand put on the glass at the bottom of the window.

Q. Was his hand touching the glass of the window - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the glass breaking what did he do - A. He walked off about two yards to the corner of Drury lane and looked up Broad street; he found nobody come out; just at that moment he turned back again to the window that was broke, he put his hand in through the broken pane, and gave the handkerchiefs a pull.

Q. Did you see any handkerchiefs at that time - A. Yes, they were hanging outside of the window, about half a yard.

Q. Where were the handkerchiefs hanging - A. Inside.

Q. What was the consequence of this pull - A He drawed them out about half a yard; he then walked five yards away, he left the handkerchiefs there, about half a yard hanging out; he walked off five yards from the window; I crossed over the way, with intent to take him; he turned his head round a little, and seeing me behind him - I was about half a yard behind him - he ran away; I pursued him to the Coal yard, there I took him.

Q. How far was that - A. About fifty yards.

Q. Was that the same side of the way - A. No, the other side of the way; he crossed over the way. I took him and brought him back to the shop again.

Q. Mr. Meycock's shop you mean - A. Yes; he was there delivered to the watchman.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-33

341. ELIZABETH TOMLIN was indicted for that she on the 19th of March , being big with a certain child, which she by the providence of God did bring forth alive, alone, and in secret, and which said male child so being born alive by the laws of these realms was a bastard - and the indictment further stated that the prisoner not having the fear of God before her eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, did afterwards, to wit on the 19th of March, in and upon the said male bastard child, feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, make an assault, and that she the said male child with both her hands did take alive and put into, squeeze and force down alive, into the pipe of a certain water closet, by means whereof the said child was instantly smothered and died .

SECOND COUNT by fixing and fastening both her hands about the neck of the said child, did kill the said child by choaking and strangling it - and so the jurors say that she the said male child did feloniously kill and murder.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

SARAH COLLINS . Q. You I believe were a servant to Mrs. Standey and Mrs. Standey lived with Mrs. Mitchell in Coram street - A. Yes, on the 19th of March.

Q. There was another servant lived there - A. Yes, who was sister to the prisoner, her name was Mary Tomlin .

Q. Had the prisoner at the bar slept with you at any time at that house - A. She slept with me and her sister on Saturday night the 18th of March; she made no complaint that night that I heard of.

Q. On the next day Sunday did she go to church - A. Yes, with her sister and me; we returned about one o'clock. About two o'clock her sister, with me

and the prisoner sat down to dinner; she did not appear to eat any dinner.

Q. At what time was dinner over - A. Between two and three o'clock; she went and sat in a chair near the fire, she sat a little while and seemed in pain; she went out of the kitchen between three and four o'clock.

Q. Do you know where she went to - A. No.

Q. Whereabouts is the water closet situated with respect to the kitchen - A. About three or four yards from the kitchen; the kitchen is under ground and the water closet is level with it; it is for Mrs. Mitchell's family, but not for Mrs. Standey's.

Q. How long was she absent before she returned to the kitchen - A. I believe about twenty minutes; when she returned into the kitchen, she went to the dresser; there was a great discharge of blood run from her; we made no observations to her, nor did she say any thing on the subject; she sat down by the fire; a little while afterwards she got up, she went away to go to bed in the upper room; between seven and eight o'clock in the evening I went up stairs into her room; she was in bed.

COURT. That is the room where you and her sister and herself had slept the night before - A. Yes; I did not say any thing to her then; she slept there that night; when her sister and I went to bed, her sister asked her how she did; she said better. I got into bed and her sister; I did not hear any thing more.

Mr. Alley. What time did you get up in the morning - A. Her sister and I got up about seven o'clock on the Monday morning; she got up shortly after, she took breakfast with the sister and me.

Q. Was any thing said upon what had past - A. No. She left my master's house between eleven and twelve o'clock, she went out with her sister.

Q. Now recollect yourself and tell me whether or not any thing else passed between you and the prisoner after the prisoner returned, when she got up to leave the kitchen to go up to bed - A. I laughed, and she said if I was in such pain as her I should not laugh.

MARTHA STANDEY . Q. You and your husband reside in the house in which the prisoner's sister was your servant - A Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had been in the habit of sleeping there for any length of time with the sister - A. I understood on the Saturday night and the Sunday night.

Q. Had you given any directions about her sleeping there - A. A month before I had.

Q. Had you made any observation upon the prisoner's person, while she was coming backwards and forwards to your house - A. I thought she looked larger than she was accustomed to.

Q. When was that - A. On the latter end of February.

MARY TOMLIN. Q. That unfortunate woman I believe is your sister - you lived servant with the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Is your sister married - A. No.

Q. Was your sister in the habit of frequently sleeping with you - A. Only twice, on Saturday and Sunday night in March.

Q. We understand that you and your sister, and Collins went to church on the Sunday, and you returned about one o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. After dinner did your sister leave the kitchen - A. She did.

Q. How long did she seem absent - A. It did not seem long; she went to the water closet.

COURT. Did you see her go there - A. No, I did not; I did not know that she was there.

Mr. Alley. When she returned into the kitchen what did you observe - A. I observed a few spots of blood, it was but a little; Collins cleaned it away; I saw her take the roll towel in her hand, I did not notice what use she made of it.

Q. How long did she remain in the kitchen before she went up stairs - A. A few minutes.

Q. We understand that she afterwards went up to her bed, and you, Collins, and her, slept together that night - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been to the water closet that day - A. I did not go till Sunday evening, after my sister had gone up stairs; I saw one spot of blood on the seat. I did not look on the floor.

Q. The next morning we understand you and your sister went out - A. Yes, a little before twelve o'clock, to her lodgings in Fulwood-rents.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Mr. Roberts - A. Yes, in the evening, he is a surgeon in Chancery lane; we went to consult Mr. Roberts, as my sister was indisposed.

Q. You told me a little while ago that you had not known that your sister was in the water closet - did you, or did you not, warm any gin while she was absent from the kitchen - A. Yes, and I took it to her in the water closet, because she was poorly: I found her there very weak and ill; she said she had a dreadful discharge in the water closet. On the Thursday I examined my sister trunk at her lodging, I found some baby linen.

MARY WEBBER. Q. I believe you live with Mrs. Mitchell - A. Yes.

Q. Her husband keeps the house where Mrs. Standey and the prisoner's sister lives - A. Yes.

Q. Was it you that cleaned out the water closet regularly - A. Yes. I cleaned it the week before Sunday the 19th of March.

Q. Had you been in it on the Sunday morning - A. Yes, between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. At that time did you observe any blood either upon the seat or the boards of the water closet - A. No.

Q. When did you next go into it - A. Monday morning, about eleven o'clock; I then found the pan half full of water; I threw more water in, because I thought it would wash it away. In about a week after, when the plumber had been to rectify the place, when I washed the floor, there was a place covered with mud, I took a knife and scraped the mud off; I observed a very large place of blood; then I told my mistress.

CATHERINE MITCHELL . Q. Your husband keeps a house in Coram street - A. He does; the prisoner's sister is a servant in the house.

Q. Do you recollect the last witness communicating any thing to you respecting the water closet - A. Yes, near a fortnight after the 19th; my observation was, that the child had been born on the floor, because there were stains of blood on the boards; the marks were almost apparently of the child's head and legs.

Mr. Gurney. There was blood in a round shape and

in a long shape - A. Yes.

Q. This was a good while after the prisoner was taken up, and after you believed there had been a child born is that place - A. Yes.

Q. And then having that impression on your mind, you thought it was so - you do not mean to swear that it was so, do you - A. Oh dear, no.

Q. How much of the blood might be scraped away to leave that impression, you do not know - A. No. I did not clean the place, my servant did.

ROBERT MITCHELL. Q. You keep the house in Coram street of which we have been speaking - A. Yes.

Q. Had you occasion to have the water closet cleaned - A. On Thursday morning the 23d of March, about three o'clock, I found this place full of water.

Q. You found the lead bason wanted cleaning - A. Yes. I took a large poker, which we use for the oven, and put it down, and found something large in the place; I could scarcely get the poker down. After using it about ten minutes, the water began to clear off; then I perceived the foot of a child; I called my man who worked for me to see it; I sent for a constable at breakfast time.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE . Q. I am a constable. I was sent for by Mr. Mitchell on the 23d of March; I got a candle, went to the water closet and looked into the bason; I saw the child's legs; I attempted to get it out, I could not; the plumber opened the water closet. I took the child out; the head had gone through the hole, it was in the pipe. I took the child to the public house and left it there.

GEORGE HORTON . I am a plumber. On the 23d of last month I went to Mr. Mitchell's house, I cut the pipe of the water closet open, and turned the lead back; I turned the child out; the head and shoulders went through the stink trap; the pipe was only four inches and a half diameter. I saw no impression on the child but on the arm, which I imagine was done by the poker. I found a hole in the stink trap when I took it up; the poker had gone through it.

COURT. The head of the child could not have passed through this aperture without force, whether with the poker you cannot say - A. No.

Q. Would not the head of the child lying there stop the water without any force having been used - A. Certainly.

JOHN FAYTHORN . Q. You are in the medical profession - A. Yes. I am a surgeon and apothecary.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the child, of which we have been speaking today - A. On the 23d of March I saw it at the public house in Wilmot street.

Q. Describe, from the appearance of the child, whether it appeared to have come at its full time - A. Yes, I am certain of it, from the nails and all other appearances; I examined it minutely. I observed under the left arm pit a great laceration, which appeared to have been done with some blunt instrument; the upper part of the body had changed considerably from putrefaction. I cannot take upon me to say that the child was born alive. I called in two medical friends of the neighbourhood; I went with these gentlemen and examined the child again; I can only say the child went its full time. The laceration, if the child was ever alive, was after life terminated; the placenta was connected with the child, no ligature had been made upon the navel string, the umbilical cord was not tied or disengaged at all; the placenta of the child and the umbilical cord had not been separated.

COURT. What conclusion do you draw from that fact - A. Supposing the child to have been born alive, no ligature having been made on the umbilical cord, had the child been born alive, must have soon expired from the loss of blood.

Mr. Gurney. You found the body of the child and the placenta connected by the navel string - A. Yes.

Q. Is not that just what you would expect to find if a woman had been delivered sitting on a water closet, and all would have fell down the water closet together - A. Certainly.

Q. You say the laceration under the left arm certainly had been caused by violence, it had the appearance to you the same that a poker would have made by working it down the water closet - A. Certainly.

MR. COOPER. Q. You are a surgeon - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the child at the public house - A. I did, in company with Mr. Faythorn. The child was in a putrid state at the time I saw it; the child came at its full time by all appearance. I cannot take upon me to say whether it was born alive or no; the after birth was attached to the child, it had no marks of violence, excepting the laceration of the arm pit, which I take to proceed from the poker that was used; we made no experiments upon the lungs, that is quite exploded; I examined round the neck, I saw no particular appearance round the neck.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY OF THE MURDER -

But that she was delivered of a child, and the issue of her body, which if born alive would have been a bastard - that she did, by putting it into the water closet, endeavour to conceal the birth thereof .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-34

342. GEORGE SCALES was indicted for that he on the 2nd of April , in and upon John Brown , feloniously, wilfully, and with malice a forethought, did make an assault, and that he with both his hands, in and upon the head of the said John Brown, feloniously did strike and beat, and that he, the said John Brown, to and against the ground, feloniously and violently did cast and throw, thereby giving him divers mortal blows, bruises, and wounds, in and upon his head, of which he died, so the jurors say that he the said John Brown did kill and murder .

Also stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition for feloniously killing and slaying John Brown.

THOMAS BUDGE . I live at Stanmore; I am a butcher.

Q. Did you know the deceased, John Brown - A. Yes; he was a gardener's labourer .

Q. Upon the beginning of this month were you disturbed while you were in bed by any noise - A. Yes; on Sunday the 2nd of April, between ten and eleven o'clock; I was in bed, but not laying down; upon hearing the noise I got out of bed and looked out of my window, I saw as many as six men; my window is as near as possible to the road; two of the men seemed to be in the act of stripping to fight; one, I believe, was stripped. It was a very moon light night

indeed.

Q. Was there light enough to distinguish who the persons were - A. I did not know who they were. When I looked through the window the prisoner seemed to be in the act of taking part of one of the men who were going to fight; I knew the prisoner before, I have seen him about the town; when they were about to fight the prisoner made an observation that the man of the name of Baldwyn had got the upper part of the hill; in consequence of which Baldwyn came down the hill, opposite of his antagonist, a man of the name of Eversly.

Q. Was Eversly a man known to you by his person - A. Not till after they had been fighting. When Baldwyn came down they set to fight, Baldwyn knocked Eversly down, Brown, the deceased, was very near to Baldwyn at the time; the prisoner assisted Eversly to get up and set him to with Baldwyn; I will not be certain whether it was the second or third time they set them to; Scales made some observations, but what I could not hear. Eversley was down I believe every time he set to, he was very much in liquor; they were both down at times; Scales made some observation to Brown, in consequence of which Brown said I am no second, I wish to see fair play; Scales stood in the attitude of defending himself against Brown; the two men that were fighting set to again; while these men were fighting Scales struck Brown and knocked him down.

Q. What had Brown the deceased done to the prisoner to induce the prisoner to strike him - A. I did not see Brown do any thing. The two men that were fighting continued fighting; Brown got up and followed Scales two or three yards and hit at him, whether he struck him I cannot say; I did not hear Brown say a word, only that he was not a second; that was before he was knocked down. Scales followed the men that were fighting; Brown stood opposite of my door, he did not go near them any more; the two men that were fighting had two or three more rounds after that; I considered them all in liquor; Scales was in liquor, he kept with the party that were fighting; they might be five or six yards down the road; Scales came from them and came up to Brown, leaving them fighting; he struck him somewhere about the upper part of the body, but where I cannot undertake to say.

Q. What had Brown done - A. Nothing more than what I have said.

Q. Upon Scales returning back to Brown the second time had Brown done or said any thing to induce him to strike him that time - A. I never heard him move or say any thing. In consequence of this blow by Scales Brown fell down in the channel opposite of my window; he laid there some minutes; Scales returned to the men that were fighting; he never offered to return to Brown again, nor to take any further notice of him. The men continued fighting, they were not aware of the mischief that was done; nor do I think Scales was. Brown lay in the channel some time.

Q. How did he get out - A. He was moved by one of the witnesses present; I did not see Brown get up again; I thought he was dead.

Q. Before Scales struck Brown the first time had Brown done any thing to him - A. Not any thing.

Prisoner. Brown pushed me before I touched him

Witness. I cannot undertake to say that he did no do it.

COURT. Can you take upon you to say that the second time he struck him whether he did any thing to him - A. No further than following him to strike him.

Q. You said after two or three rounds he came back - what I want to know is this - whether Brown had struck at Scales when he came back so as to provoke him - A. No; he never lifted his hand.

Q. You say he was opposite of your door - A. Yes.

Q. If he had lifted his hand should you not have seen it - A. Certainly.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the deceased Brown - A. About twenty five minutes; I helped to carry him into the public house.

Q. Was the place where he was standing near the channel - A. Yes, about twelve inches from the channel; there was a strong oak plank against the foot path, he was standing on the road; he fell from the road into the channel, and possibly might fall against this oak plank. At the time I helped to carry him into the public house he was quite dead; I suppose so; Dr. Andrews was sent for immediately.

Q. Did it appear to you whether or no the deceased was in liquor - A. I should suppose he was; he had a very deep scar in his chin; three of his front teeth were knocked in, and I saw some blood coming from his ear, which we concluded came from his mouth or his nose; he fell with his face in the channel.

Q. You did not examine to see whether the blood came from the ear - A. No.

JAMES TILLMAN . I live at Stanmore.

Q. Did you go to the Abercorn Arms on this Sunday - A. Yes; between six and seven o'clock in the evening; there were several people in the tap room, among others were John Eversly and William Baldwyn , and Brown the deceased.

Q. Was the prisoner there - A. No, he was not there all the evening. They continued drinking there till half past ten o'clock.

Q. Had there been any dispute between any of these people during that evening - A. Yes; between Eversly and Baldwyn; it was made up, and they drank afterwards; when they went out Eversly and Baldwyn fell a fighting in the road.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there afterwards - A. Yes; he came from the Windmill on the common; upon his coming down the hill he came to them that were fighting; Brown was standing by at the time; he gave Scales a push by the elbow, because Scales was coming to take the part of Eversly; Scales asked Brown if he was Baldwyn's second; Brown said he was no second, but he liked to see fair play; with that Scales struck Brown and knocked him down into the channel; I did not hear Brown speak after.

Q. How near was this to the Abercorn Arms - A. It was between the Abercorn Arms and Mr. Budge's house; I never saw him knocked down but once, and I was as sober as I am now.

Q. How far were you from Brown at the time that Scales struck him - A. I might be two or three yards on the other side of the road; James Perry was between me and them.

ELIZABETH WALKER . Q. How old are you - A. Between thirteen and fourteen, I think so, I am not sure; I live at Stanmore, I draw beer at the Abercorn

tap, and sleep at my mother's; between ten and eleven o'clock at night on Easter Sunday, when I came out of the tap, Eversly and Baldwyn were stripping, and when they stripped they began fighting; after fighting a little while, Mr. Brown said, let us see fair play.

Q. Who did he say that to - A. To George Scales , the prisoner; he was taking Eversly's part, and Brown was taking Baldwyn's part. Scales said, b - your eyes, go along away, you have no business with it; George Scales pushed Mr. Brown down in the channel; I did not mind whereabouts he hit him; I think he pushed him, I am not quite sure whether he hit him or pushed him; he fell from the road with his face in the channel.

Q. How far was that from the Abercorn Arms - A. It was between Mr. Budge's and the tap.

Q. What was the consequence of his being pushed down in the channel - A. He fetched two groans, that is all I heard of him; I never saw him move; he laid about ten minutes with his face in the channel, then John Tillman, Mr. Budge, and others, took him into the tap; I did not see him knocked or pushed but once. Scales had not been at our tap that night; he was along with the other men before I came out.

RICHARD ANDREWS . Q. I understand you are a surgeon at Stanmore - A. I am.

Q. Did you know the deceased Brown - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Were you on Easter Sunday sent for to attend him at any time in the night - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock I found him on the road on his back, near the Abercorn tap; he was carried immediately into the tap by my desire. I attempted to bleed him and recover him, but without effect, he was perfectly dead. I found a deep wound on the chin to the bone, from whence a quantity of blood might have flowed; several of his foreteeth were knocked in and loosened; the head was opened. On examining the head, a blood vessel had given way about the pericranium, and a large quantity of blood was found in the cavity of the skull, which I have no doubt was the cause of his death.

Q. Was the ruptured blood vessel that you have described the consequence of his falling - A. Yes, I think it was.

Q. You have described that his chin was cut to the bone, and some of his teeth were knocked in, and consequently it must be done with great violence - A. Yes, he was a very heavy and powerful man also.

Q. Am I to understand you that your opinion is, the rupture of this vessel was occasioned by the fall - A. Certainly, and that rupture was the cause of his death.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Windmill, Bushy common, drinking part of the afternoon, me and a young man came from the Windmill a little after ten o'clock; coming from the place, I saw Eversly fighting with another man, I said what are you fighting about; he said he had been used ill by this other man, he had nobody to assist him; I said I will assist you; he was knocked down by the two men that he was fighting with; I was picking him up; the deceased pushed me away; I turned round and pushed him in return; whether I pushed him or hit him, I am not confident which; he fell.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-35

343. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a chest, value 2 s. and twelve pounds weight of tea, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Crofts , privately in his shop .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be in his dwelling house.

THOMAS CROFTS . I am a grocer , I live at No. 2, Marylebone street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . The entrance to my house is through the shop only, I rent the house and shop myself, it is one and the same occupation. On Monday the 6th of March, about six o'clock, some men came to the door.

Q. You saw them did you - A. I did not see them; I heard them talking at the door, in the mean time my young man came from the kitchen with two lamps; a man came in and asked for an ounce of coffee, and while the young man was weighing the coffee I heard a chest rattle; I was in the middle of the shop, a board had given way, I was putting a board there.

Q. Where was the chest - A. There were four chests placed by the door, one on the top of the other; this chest was on the top of the pile; they stood on the floor; when I heard the chests rattle I did not know whether it was at the stairs or the door; there were chests also placed at the stairs; I called out to the servant to know whether she had gone up stairs; I turned round and missed the chest standing within the shop, by the door; I run out of the door and crossed the street and went into Francis-street; when I had got two or three doors up I heard something which I thought to be a chest pitching; I had gone beyond him; I turned round and saw the prisoner standing with the chest before him in Francis-street.

Q. Was he holding the chest - A. I am not certain; the chest was on the ground. I laid hold of the prisoner by the collar, I said you rascal you have got my chest; I throwed him against the wall and kept him till Mr. Goding chanced to come by the corner, I called him to assist me; we took the prisoner back to the shop; a man coming by, we desired him to bring the chest of tea back. I am sure it was my chest of tea; it contained about twelve or thirteen pounds of tea; the cost price was about six shillings and eight pence a pound. The prisoner was secured.

Q. How far did the chest stand from the door - A. Close to the door; inside.

Q. Is your young man here - A. No.

FRANCIS GODING . I live in Titchbourne-street, Golden-square. I was crossing Marylebone-street at Francis-street, Mr. Crofts was calling out for assistance, he had got the prisoner; I saw the chest there; I took the prisoner back to Mr. Crofts' house; I asked the prisoner how he could do such a thing; he said he had found it.

Q. to prosecutor. When did you weigh the tea - A. On the Saturday before I went to Marlborough-street the second time. I kept the chest of tea in the shop ever since; the chest is the same now as when taken from the prisoner; there is the same quantity of tea in the chest now as when I took it from the man.

Q. When you took it from the man you did not weigh it - A. No; I weighed it on the 10th of March, it weighed about thirty nine pounds, chest and all; I took twenty five-pounds off for the fare.

Q. But you took no pains to secure the chest, so that no more could be put in it - A. I put it up just as it was, the top was broke as it is now.

Mr. Walford. The offence was committed on Monday, and you did not weigh the tea till Saturday - A. No.

Q. What any body else might do you do not know - A. I never suffer any body to meddle with the chests. I had not taken any notice of the chest for some time; I am sure there was tea in it when it was taken away.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn, I was coming by when I saw a man chuck this chest off his shoulder; I thought he had chucked it away. I am a person that drives a chaise at Turnham green; I keep rabbits, I thought it would make a good rabbit hutch; I did not know where his shop was till he took me back. Had the chest been full I should not have been able to carry it.

GUILTY, aged 27.

On the Second Count of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-36

344. WILLIAM HARDING and WILLIAM SEXTON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , two rugs, value 30 s. the property of John Miles .

THOMAS AIGE . I live at No. 25, Poland street, On the 8th of March, between three and four o'clock, I was in Broad street, Carnaby market , I saw the two prisoners just by Mr. Miles's, an upholsterer ; I was standing with William Nichols and William Fletcher ; they pushed William Fletcher into the kennel; we took notice of them through their pushing him into the kennel. Harding went into Mr. Miles's shop.

Q. What did the other do - A. I did not see whether he went in, or no; he was by the door. Harding came out with two rugs under his arm almost directly, they both went together to Marshall street.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . Q. Were you with the last witness, Aige, in the beginning of March, in Broad street - A. Yes. On the 8th of March, between two and three o'clock, we were playing in Broad street, these two prisoners came by; Harding shoved Sexton up against me; he went further on and went into Mr Miles's shop; presently he came out with two rugs under his arm. Sexton stood at the door while Harding went into Mr. Miles's shop; they walked to the top of Broad street. We went to tell Mr. Miles, they ran down Marshall street together, as fast as they could.

WILLIAM FLETCHER . Q. Do you remember being with Nicholls and Aige in Broad-street - A. Yes, on the 8th of March, about half after two o'clock.

Q. Look at the prisoners and tell me whether you saw them, or either of them - A. Yes; we were playing, they came up Broad street; one of the prisoners pushed the other against me and pushed me down; they went up to Mr. Miles's shop, Harding went in; I cannot say whether the other did or no. Harding came out with the rugs, they went up Broad street together; at the corner of Marshall-street they turned round to see if any body was coming after them; we went and told Mr. Miles instantly; the prisoners upon seeing us go into Mr. Miles's ran down Marshall-street.

JOHN MILES . Q. We understand you are an upholsterer in Broad-street - A. Yes. On the 8th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I believe all the three boys came together; from their information I ran down Marshall-street into Silver-street; I went into the Bunch of Grapes in Pulteney-street; the corner of Green's-court.

Q. Did you find the prisoners in the house - A. Not the first time; I saw the prisoner Harding coming up Green's court, he had two rugs under his arm, I followed him into the door of the Grapes, and told him they were my property; shortly after Petherick came in and took him in custody.

WILLIAM PETHERICK. On Wednesday the 8th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I took them rugs off the tap room table at the Bunch of Grapes; Harding was standing close by, I took him to Marlborough street office. A person came in and gave me information, I went to the public house by the office; one of the lads pointed out Sexton. I brought him to the office.

The property produced and identified.

Harding's Defence. I was not at work on the 8th of March, I went to the Green Man and Still to meet a friend coming up from the country; on my return I met a man, he said he would give me two or three shillings to take them rugs to Green's-court; I went into the public house. Mr. Petherick came and took me.

Sexton's Defence. On the 8th of March I was sent by my mistress to pay the tax gatherer in Swallow-street, as my master was out of town; on my return I went into the public house where the officer was to get me a pint of beer. Mr. Petherick came and took me into the office.

Harding called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Sexton called no witnesses to character.

HARDING, GUILTY , aged 20.

SEXTON, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-37

345. ANN HORSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , two table cloths, value 16 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. and two towels, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Mascall .

THOMAS MASCALL . I live in Adam street, Adelphi ; the prisoner was my chambermaid ; I did not miss these things before they were found; my housekeeper brought me the duplicates of my own property on the 9th of March; where she brought them from I cannot tell. On the evening of the same day I went to the shop of Mr. Pennington, pawnbroker, Compton street, Soho, there I saw my property; they are all marked.

JAMES PENNINGTON . I live in Compton street, Soho, I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of March Mr. Mascal came to my shop with some duplicates; they led to the discovery of these things. On the 16th of

February the prisoner pledged a table cloth for ten shillings; she told me she lived in Compton street, her name was Ann Horsley . On the 24th of February she brought a sheet and two towels; I lent her seven shillings on them; on the 4th of March she pledged a table-cloth for eight shillings. The duplicates produced by Mr. Mascall are the same I gave the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with Mr. Mascall as servant; he has got some other of my duplicates; I know nothing of them things, he did not take the duplicates from me.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-38

346. ELEANOR DUFFY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , twenty eight yards of printed calico, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of James Gray , privately in his shop .

JAMES GRAY . I am a linen draper , 25 Bishopsgate Without . On the 13th of March, about four in the afternoon, I was serving two young women at the further end of the shop; I saw my young man waiting upon the prisoner; between us there was a pile of Irish linens on the counter; I looked over the counter; looking towards the door, I saw the prisoner, who had a little girl with her, move her great coat, I saw her strike her hand against the coat, I had no reason to suspect that she had taken any thing till I saw her going out of the door, then I perceived she had something bulky under her coat; I immediately ran after her; she had passed the next shop. I laid hold of her arm, told her she had got something that did not belong to her; she said she had not; I brought into the middle of the shop a piece of printed cotton, dropped from under her coat on the floor. Shephard came by the door, and took her in custody.

THOMAS BERRYMORE . On the 13th of March the prisoner came to Mr. Gray's shop; I shewed her several different patterns, but none of them she seemed inclined to purchase; I shewed her a pattern, which she took two yards of, she flung down a guinea; I went to the upper end of the shop to get change; there was a pile of Irish stood between me and her; at that time I suppose the woman must have took the print; she took the two yards of print at three shillings; I gave her eighteen shillings change; she went out of the shop. Mr. Gray went out of the shop and fetched the woman back, and after she got in the middle of the shop, I saw a print drop from under her clothes.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner paid for what she brought - A. She did; my master saw her putting her clothes down, he suspected all was not right.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-39

347. CHARLES BASNET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , three brushes, value 6 s. three combs, value 2 s. 7 d. a mallet, value 1 s. two plate leathers, value 4 s. 6 d. a hair broom, value 3 s. and three waiters, value 2 s. the property of Robert Kelly .

ROBERT KELLY . I am a turner , I live at 15, Portugal street, Lincoln's inn ; the prisoner was my porter . On searching his lodgings in Fell-street, Monkwell street, I found a number of my goods there, on the 6th of March; he left my service on the 4th of February.

Q. What did you find at his lodgings - A. Two clothes brushes, three combs, two nail brushes, three mahogany waiters, two plate leather, an hair broom, two kettle holders, and several other articles that are here; they were all in his lodgings.

Mr. Alley. Did not the prisoner tell you that he had a prize ticket, and that he would pay you when it became due - A. I never heard him say so.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am an officer. Mr. Kelly applied to me respecting his porter, and with some difficulty I apprehended him; he was denied in the forepart of the day. I went to his lodgings again at half after ten at night; a friend watched him in; when I knocked at the door they denied him; I said I was sure he had returned. I went up stairs, I found him concealed in the garret; Mr. Kelly gave charge of him. I found nothing on his person but a small comb, the brushes were all found in a box; the long broom was behind the door, or else in the passage. I marked them.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-40

348. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of March , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a linen draper , I live in Gracechurch-street . I have no partner.

DAVID WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Roberts. On the 25th of March I was standing in the shop, a short distance from the door, folding a piece of print; I thought I heard the door open, I looked towards the door, I perceived a piece of print move from its proper place towards the door.

Q. How far inside of the shop was it - A. Very near the door; it hung up with several more. I instantly ran towards the door, I drawed one part of the print that remained within the door; I then perceived the prisoner drop the print. I ran and caught hold of him, and by the assistance of another witness brought him into the shop, and when we got him in the shop he got his back against the counter, and by pushing him against the counter we perceived a bag behind his back, tied under his coat; we took him into the accounting house; we found in this bag two pieces of gingham and shawls.

Q. When you laid hold of this piece of print, was it entirely removed from its place - A. Entirely, about a yard from its proper place; as he was dragging it through the door I ran and trod upon it; he let the other end drop; I picked it up. When I first got hold of him he told me he was not the man, he said that he saw the man trying to take the print, and he run away, pointing down the street; there was no other man there at the time; there was a short woman. I did not see her till I had got hold of him.

JOHN GEORGE . Q. You are the other young man that was with Mr. Williams - A. Yes. On the 25th of March I was standing in Mr. Roberts's shop, I observed the print was moved close to the door; I immediately ran and observed the witness laying hold of a man, upon which I laid hold of the prisoner; the print was between the shop door then, half in and half out; the prisoner said there was a man looking at it, and had ran across the way; I collared him and forced him in the shop; I asked him what he meaned by pretending to steal the print; he said he never touched it, it was a man that had run across the way; he was standing with his back to the counter. I supposed he was going to take something up to strike me, I shoved him down, and by his falling there was a bag rose up behind him; I took him into the accompting house; I asked him what was in that bag; I took out two pieces of gingham and a shawl; he first said he bought them from a shop in the Borough; afterwards he confessed that he took them from a shop in the Borough, and he confessed that he took the print from our shop; after that I told him I would sooner prosecute him for a lie than the truth.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not touch the print; the reason that I owned to it, they told me if I would own to it they would forgive me; I told them I saw a man take it and run across the way, and after that I told them I took it, to gain my liberty; at the same time I knew I had not touched it, I thought I might as well say that as not, to gain my liberty.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-41

349. JAMES FAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a pair of pistols, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Rea , and John Rea , junior .

THOMAS REA . I am a gun maker , I live in the Minories ; my partner's name is John Rea . I missed two pair of pistols and two odd one's about the latter end of February; on the 25th of February I went to the St. Andrew's tavern, there I got information, I went with the officer to Mr. Lawson's on the 26th of February, there we found a pair of pistols, which was my property. The prisoner was one of my workmen; he came to work for me about the middle of October.

Mr. Pooley. On the 25th of February was the prisoner working for you - A. He worked then I believe at his own residence, Glasshouse-yard.

Q. How long before you found these pistols was he working in your shop - A. About a fortnight.

Q. Where had you seen the pistols - A. I did not see the pistols till I went to Mr. Lawson.

Q. How lately before that had you seen these pistols - A. Within three weeks, in my shop in the Minories.

MR. LAWSON. I live at No. 97, East Smithfield. I bought a pair of pistols of the prisoner on or about the 22nd or 23d of February; I bought them at St. Andrew's tavern, Lower East Smithfield, I gave twenty shillings for them. The pistols that I bought of the prisoner I shewed to Mr. Rea, and I delivered them to the officer.

WILLIAM GOOD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Rea. I know that I cleaned these pistols when first they came into the house.

ELISHA CRAHN. I am a city officer; I took the prisoner in custody at Mr. Rea's house; I received the pistols of Mr. Lawson, I have had them ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Them pistols I had from Birmingham, my mother sent them me up, William Lander , a boatman, brought them me from my mother; I have not been in Mr. Rea's shop since January last; I have worked at home since that period. I heard the officers were after me, I went to Mr. Rea's shop; Mr. Rea owes me fourteen pounds; he has even offered to go to my friends to tell them there was no bill found against me, that my friends need not come; Mr. Rea gives my wife and family employ now, and he said he never intended to hurt me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-42

350. JOSEPH SILVESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , a bag, value 1 s. and twenty pounds weight of flour, value 5 s. the property of Charles Pratt , esq.

The case was stated by Mr. Pollock.

CHARLES CURTOYS . Q. What is the prisoner - A. Carman ; he drived Mr. Charles Pratt 's waggon. On Tuesday the 14th of March I had occasion to go to the stables at Tottenham about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of the mill as I returned from the stable.

Q. Had he any occasion as carman to go into the mill - A. He had not; he was ordered the week before not to go into the mill.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. He had a bag in his hand; I said what have you got there; I supposed it was flour; I said where did you get this, who gave you this; he said nobody; I took the bag from him, and took him and the bag into the house; I looked in the bag, I found it to be fine flour; I told him the short time that he had been in the mill I thought somebody might have given it him out of the mill; he said nobody; he persisted in it that he took it himself; he said he had taken it, having only received six pence for unloading a score sacks of flour; and it was a very hard thing they were not better paid for their work. We pay him eighteen shillings a week, and the bakers give him six pence for unloading the flour.

COURT. Was this part of the flour he had delivered - A. No; it was of a different quality to that he had delivered; that was the third and this was the finest. I sealed the bag and brought it here; I have every reason to believe this is Mr. Pratt's flour we never have any body else's flour there; the value of the flour is five shillings.

Q. Where was this flour kept - A. Up a flight of stairs in the mill.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Curtoys was going to the house, he happened to turn his head round and saw me. I picked this flour up on the premises, he asked me what I had got there; I said I did not know, I

picked it up; I being intoxicated in liquor I did not give him a proper answer, he did not understand me.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Publicly whipped One Hundred Yards at Tottenam High Cross and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-43

351. CATHERINE HAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , seven yards of kerseymere cloth, value 4 l. the property of Samuel Prosser , in his dwelling house .

MR. DUNN. I am shopman to Mr. Prosser, Bedfordbury, he is a woollen draper and man's mercer . On the 10th of April I was in the accounting house, talking to a lady; I turned my head and saw the prisoner go out, I followed her about a dozen doors from the house, I saw a piece of kerseymere in her apron; I brought her back; the ticket was fastened to the kerseymere with my hand writing; I know it to be Mr. Prosser's. When I brought the prisoner back to the shop, she laid the kerseymere on the counter, where she took it from; this is the kerseymere, it is my master's property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fine One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-44

352. LOUISA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , seven shifts, value 35 s. a petticoat, value 10 s. a dressing gown, value 8 s. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two aprons, value 1 s. and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of lady Elizabeth Bingham , spinster , in the dwelling house of Richard earl of Lucan .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a servant to lord Lucan, his house is in Hamlet place, Piccadilly, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On Friday the 17th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I was sitting in the hall along with the porter, the prisoner Louisa Smith rung at the bell, the porter opened the hall door; the prisoner came in and asked for the housekeeper.

Q. Had you ever seen her before - A. No. I know nothing of her. She asked if the housekeeper was at home, the porter said yes; he went to shew her from the hall to the stairs that go down into the housekeeper's room; she said porter do not trouble yourself, I know her very well; the porter came back; I saw no more of her till she came out, that was about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I then did not see her where she came from; it was darkish; there were no lamps in the hall lighted; the porter lighted her down the steps.

Q. When did you see her afterwards - A. About a week afterwards I saw her at Marlborough street, I knew her.

ROBERT ARCHBUD . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Nichols, Westminster bridge road. On Saturday the 18th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought five shifts and a petticoat, I lent her sixteen shillings on them; she pledged them in the name of Richardson, at Lambeth. I have seen her before at our shop.

The property produced and identified.

ANNE KELLER . I am a servant to lord Lucan.

Q. Do you know any thing of that woman coming to the house - A. No. These things were missed on the 17th of February, the same evening, on my going into lady Elizabeth Bingham 's bed room, I saw a pocket handkerchief lay on the floor, between eight and nine o'clock; I took it up and put it in the drawer, then I missed the things.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-five shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-45

353. EZEKIEL LOCKLEADER , alias LOCKTHURSTON , and ROBERT LOCKLEADER , alias LOCKTHURSTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a mare, value 14 l. the property of John Ashby .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

STEPHEN NORTON . Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Ashby's - A. Yes, his name is John Ashby , he resides at Cuddome in Kent , it is about eighteen miles from town, and eight miles from Bromley.

Q. Your master is a quaker - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 5th of March had your master a mare - A. Yes; I attended her, I put her in the stable on the night of the 5th of March, about half past nine o'clock.

Q. Was that stable adjoining the premises of Mr. Richards, the millwright - A. Yes. On the next morning, between five and six o'clock, on the 6th of March, I went to the stable, I found the door open and the mare was gone; the lock was turned almost off the door; two collars, the harness and whip, were gone.

Q. Was there any straw gone - A. Not from our place.

COURT. What sort of a mare was she - A. A brown mare; she was ringed on both shoulders, the right shoulder rather more than the left; I know the mare very well. The mare is now in the yard.

Mr. Curwood. What trade is your master - A. A miller , he has no partner.

Q. There is no particular striking marks about this mare, no blaze in the forehead, is there - A. There is a small mark in the forehead.

COURT. Are there any marks on her legs - A. The off hind leg is white near the hock down towards the hoof, and the near fore leg is white a little way up.

Q. What height is she - A. I cannot tell the particular height, she is not quite fifteen hands, high I believe, somewhere thereabouts.

THOMAS EVANS . Q. You keep the turnpike gate in the parish of Caston, at Leave's green - A. Yes.

Q. How far is that from Cuddome - A. From Cuddome street it is about three miles.

Q. Do you remember on Sunday night the 5th of March any cart and mare coming to your gate - A. Yes, I had but one; it came about one o'clock or a little after.

COURT. That was Monday morning rather - A. Yes. It was a very moon shiney, star light morning.

Mr. Alley. How many persons were in that cart - A. I saw but one, and that was the person which drove it.

Q. Did you get any toll of him - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with him at the time the toll was paid - A. I had; he staid a little while three or four minutes.

Q. Do you recollect the person - have you ever seen him since - A. I have; I saw him at the magistrate's office, Hatton-garden.

Q. Now look round and tell me whether you see him here - A. This hither young man, Robert Lockleader .

Q. Are you sure that he was the man that you conversed with, and that paid you the toll - A. That was the man that paid me toll.

Q. Did you see whether there was any straw in the cart - A. A great deal of straw stuck up at the sides of the cart.

Q. Was any enquiry made to you about the road to London - A. They never asked for the road to London. We conversed a little while, when I asked them for the toll, he said he would pay me when he came back; I asked him who the cart belonged to; he told me the cart belonged to Mr. Dodd; then I said you shall not go through without paying me the toll; he said I must give him change - what is your change - a shilling; I told him to hand me over the money, I would give him the change; he gave me the shilling; I put my hand in my pocket and gave him sixpence, then I released him and away he went. His toll was sixpence.

Q. From your observations of him, do you know that he was the person that drove the cart - A. Yes; he told me the cart belonged to Mr. Dodd. It was harnessed up in an odd kind of manner; I can say that I can swear to the horse and cart; I have seen the horse and cart through my gate three times a week; that is the horse that was in the cart that is in the yard, I have seen it; it was harnessed in an odd way, with rope under and over the back. I stood by the harness while I was discoursing with him, and put my hand upon it.

Mr. Curwood. You have said you could not swear to the horse and cart - A. I can swear to the horse and cart; that was the horse and cart that went through my gate; I did not chuse to swear to it then.

COURT. Can you swear to the horse - are you certain that horse in the yard is the horse that went through your gate - A. I am sure that is the horse that went through the gate; I did not mind the marks; I know that it is the horse that went through my gate, seeing it so many times.

Mr. Curwood. You have but few horses come through your gate - A. Some nights none; I had just let a team through before, but not a horse and cart; only that horse and cart; I saw it next at Hatton-garden.

Q. How happened it that you did not know him again - A. I did know him.

Q. How happened it that you could not swear to it the first time - A. I did not choose to swear to it that time.

COURT. Why did you not choose to take your oath the first time - A. I did not like it.

Q. What reason had you for not liking it - A. I was loth to swear to him; I was sure he was the man.

Q. Why were you loth to swear to him when you saw him at the office - A. I never did take an oath before.

Q. No doubt of that - if you knew he was the man why were you loth to swear to him, when you were sworn to tell the truth - if you had no doubt of his being the man why did not you not swear that he was the man - A. I did not choose.

Q. Tell us your reason for not choosing - A. I did not like to take an oath to him.

Q. Why did not you like to swear to him if you knew him - if you had a doubt you did right, but if you had not a doubt, why did not you swear to him - A. I did not choose.

Q. What reason had you for not choosing - why do not you answer me - A. Why to be sure I was rather afraid, being in the night.

Q. It being in the night when you saw him, you doubted whether he was the man - A. I have sworn to him.

COURT. Then you said I believe him to be the man, I do not swear to him.

JANE WERRY . Q. Where do you live - A. I live in Cuddome parish, close by the woodside, about half a mile from the prosecutor's house.

Q. Does your brother in Cuddome keep a cart - A. Yes, about two miles from me; he lives about half a mile from Mr. Ashby.

Q. Do you know your brother's cart very well - A. Yes, I know it by the rattle; I had the curiosity to get out of bed on the night of the 5th of March.

Q. Did any thing induce you to get out of bed - A. Yes; I was awoke between twelve and one on the night of the 5th of March; I heard the cart; I got out of bed; I knew the noise perfectly well, that induced me to get up.

COURT. What made you know the noise of the cart - A. I have been in the habit of using the cart.

Q. What sort of a noise has your brother's cart - has your brother's cart a different noise from other people's carts - A. It went lumping along, it made a great noise.

Q. Do not other carts make so much noise as your brother's - do you mean to swear that no other cart made so much noise as your brother's cart - A. I cannot swear that, but it made a lumping noise; I used it three or four times a week. I got up, I saw the cart, I had a great suspicion by the noise that it was my brother's cart; I saw two slimmish young men in the cart. It was moon-light, a; bright as day; I thought I knew it by the noise.

Q. Did you know it by looking at it - A. I thought I knew it by the noise; there were two slight young men in it, one of them seemed to lay back in the straw; they seemed to be as near the size of the prisoners, as nigh as I can tell.

Q. Is your house nearer Cuddome than the turnpike - A. Yes.

Q. Then before they get to Leave's green they pass your house - A. Yes.

Mr. Curwood. This is a comical cart, you thought you knew it by the noise - A. Yes; I thought I knew the cart.

Q. But you were not quite certain when you saw it. - A. No, I was certain of the noise.

JOHN HINCKLEY . I am a bone-boiler; I live at the bottom of Maiden-lane, St. Pancras.

Q. On Monday morning, the 6th of March, about six o'clock, or a little after, were you out - A. Yes; I was going to my horse up Maiden lane; I observed about half a mile up the lane, a cart drawed into the ditch and the horse of the other side, tied to a bush, grazing in Mr. Dennett's field.

Q. Was it a horse or a mare - A. I did not take notice. It was a dark brown horse, almost a black. The horse in the yard is the same horse. I saw the two prisoners about an hundred yards from the cart, they were looking into Mr. Dennett's field; they were standing by the bank side; the horse was tied to a bush in the field.

Q. Did you speak to them - A. I went on; I went up to my horse and fed and watered him; about half an hour afterwards I came down and looked in the cart and found a boy, I pulled the straw of one side, he appeared to me to be asleep.

COURT. How big a boy - A. A small boy, about ten or twelve years of age.

Mr. Alley. Was that the boy that saw at Hatton Garden office before the magistrate - A. No, I never saw him there, he was released before I came.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners when you saw the boy - A. No; I did not; the horse's harness was in the cart with the boy.

Q. I think you said it was full of straw - A. Yes, it was full of straw. Near two o'clock in the day, I cannot tell exactly what time it was, it was very late in the day; I came down Maiden-lane to get some victuals; I saw that small boy bring the horse out of Mr. Dennett's field; he tied him to the wheel of the cart.

Q. Were either of the prisoners about the cart then - A. No; I never saw them any more till I saw them at Hatton Garden.

WILLIAM CARR . On the 6th of March Thomas Frost , my master (he lives in Maiden-lane, St. Pancras) sent me after his horses, between nine and ten in the morning; I went up the lane to bring the horses to go to work; I saw a boy and I saw a cart in a ditch in the lane, by the side of a bank, and the horse was in Mr. Dennett's field.

Q. Have you seen the horse today - A. Yes; it was the same horse that is in the yard; and I have seen the cart to day over the way. Between five and six in the evening my master ordered me to bring the horses again to work, after having turned them out; as I was coming down the lane I saw the little boy again and the two prisoners, they were all three together, they were going up the lane towards the cart and horse, the horse was then in the field; I asked them whether they would take the horse out of the field, or else they would get it pounded; they said (all three) we are going off at five o'clock.

COURT. Did all three speak - A. I did not take notice which of them said it; one of them said we are going off at five o'clock; I do not know which it was.

Mr. Alley. Are you sure the answer was we are going off at five o'clock - A. Yes.

Mr. Curwood. You say you did not take notice who gave you the answer - A. No.

Q. You say you saw the little boy - you are not quite certain who made the answer, it might be him - A. It might be.

JAMES PETERS. I live in Maiden-lane, about a mile up. On the 6th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw a cart and a dark brown coloured horse, almost a black. I saw the cart to day, and the horse I saw yesterday in the yard. The cart was standing on the road side, with one wheel drawed in the ditch against the bank; the horse stood of the opposite side of the lane, grazing in the lane, almost opposite of the cart; I took notice of the cart; my little boy was with me; I saw these two prisoners and a small boy in the lane, they were apparently to me playing at marbles about an hundred yards from the cart. I went towards the bottom of the lane, I met two men, I assisted in taking the prisoners.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of March, a little before seven in the evening, in Maiden-lane; I was in company with Davies, from whom I received the information; I came to the cart, one wheel of which stood in the ditch on the left hand side of the lane, it was pretty well full of loose straw; I felt in the cart and I felt these two prisoners legs, and a boy there was.

Q. You felt the legs of three persons - A. I did, and it turned out to be the two prisoners, they were covered with straw; I first felt them and called out to know who was there; I said who have you got there; they jumped up and shewed their heads; I whistled for Davies; and the boy belonging to these prisoners attempted to get out of the cart; I made them get out of the cart, and I secured them; the horse was then in the field on one side of the cart, just a little over the bank, which the horse might get up, as there were very few bushes; I secured them; being dark I put some knives that I took from them in my pocket; I found a dollar and a few shillings on Ezekiel. After their examination they wished to have their knives; Robert owns one knife, and Ezekiel the other. They have asked me several times for the knives; yesterday I was down below in the yard where the prisoners were, I shewed them both the knives; Robert said the old knife was his, and Ezekiel owned the new one.

Q. When you apprehended them did you ask them who they were and where they lived - A. I did; they told me that they lived at Mrs. Norris's, Porter's-buildings, Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row; and that they laid down in the cart for half an hour; I enquired according to that direction, I was not able to discover that they lived there; I went to the house that they directed me to; the people of the house told me that they did not know them. I searched the house there were only two rooms.

Mr. Curwood. It was a very cold night - A. It was coolish and very dark.

GEORGE WERRY . I live at Cuddome, I am a labourer, and keep a cart and two horses; I go to work with them.

Q. Have you seen a cart near this court - A. Yes, that cart belongs to me.

Q. When did you lose that cart - A. I missed it on Monday morning the 6th of March; it was the last thing I saw on Sunday night when I went to bed.

Hancock. I shewed him the cart, and he owned it.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a millwright. I live at Cuddome.

Q. Now look at that knife, that is the old knife described by Hancock to be claimed by Robert - A. That is my knife.

Q. When did you lose it - A. I am not able to say in what week it was.

Q. How soon after the 5th of March did you miss that knife - A. A week after; I used that knife on Sunday the 5th of March.

Q. Had you ever given it or lent it to any body - A. I have never given it to any body or lent it to any body. I am quite sure it is mine.

Mr. Curwood. Do you know when you lost that knife - A. I know I had that knife on that day; I never saw it after; I make no doubt the knife was taken when my tools were taken; the cart was gone from my house that night as I used the knife in the day; I lost the tools in the night, and the knife at the same time, I make no doubt; I am not able to say whether the knife was left in the same place as the tools or not; I believe it was; I used it on the 5th in picking the dirt from under the heels of my boots; I used it in my own house part, and part where my tools are.

COURT. Where did you first begin to use the knife to pick the dirt out of your boots - A. In my house.

Q. to Hancock. When you apprehended the prisoners what did you do with the horse and cart - A. We took the horse and cart the same night.

Q. Is the same horse now in the yard - A. Yes.

Q. They call it a horse, I see in the indictment they call it a mare - A. It is a mare.

Q. Was the horse in the yard yesterday - A. It was, I caused it to be brought in the yard from the stable over the way.

Q. Do you know whether Peters saw it yesterday - A. I have no doubt but he did. The cart had chalked upon it

" Thomas Simmonds , 794;" the board, it appears had been taken off.

Q. to Peters. Go out and look at the horse now - A. That is the same mare, I have seen the mare now.

Esckiel Lockleader's Defence. We were walking up the lane in the morning to meet my sister, she was gone up to Highgate, and we walked by the cart; I said to my brother we may as well sit down on the cart till my sister comes up; we sat down in the cart; it was very cold, we laid down in the cart, and throwed the straw over us, thinking we should hear her come by. My brother's knife was a round pointed knife; when Mr. Hancock shewed it us, I told him it was too far off, I could not tell.

Robert Lockleader 's Defence. When Mr. Hancock was coming down the lane, he told three children he would give them ten guineas if they would swear what he wanted them and when he shewed the knives to us, I told him it was too far off, I could not tell.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

E. LOCKLEADER - GUILTY, DEATH , aged 17.

R. LOCKLEADER - GUILTY, DEATH , aged 15.

The prisoners were recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury on account of their youth .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-46

354. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February ten yards of Irish linen, value 30 s. a shirt, value 10 s. eight squares of muslin, value 28 s. three squares of lawn, value 12 s. a yard of diaper, value 2 s. seven pair of stockings, value 24 s. and a square of cambric, value 14 s. the property of Samel Hoskins, in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL HOSKINS . I am linen draper , I live in Shadwell High-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell , I keep a house there, my shop is part of that house, the prisoner was my shopman. On the 17th of February I was in a little room adjoining my shop; the prisoner slept in the shop, his bed was under the counter, and his box was kept under the counter; as I came out of the room adjoining the shop I saw him at his box, when he looked up his countenance altered; I suspected him, I sent him out of an errand; he went and I searched the box; the box was left open, and the key in it. The first thing I saw was a paper parcel containing a piece of Irish; the prisoner came in in about ten minutes; I looked no further in the box then. I put the piece of Irish in the box as I found it. When he returned I told him if he wanted to go out he had better go soon - he had asked me on the preceding evening to go out as the next evening to the Minories - I went into my little room, in order to give him the opportunity of taking this piece of Irish cloth out if he chose it; I saw him go behind the counter, and I heard the noise of the box lid; he went out; I went to the box again, I found the piece of cloth was gone; I directly went after him, but could not find him; I returned back to my shop, and then I examined the box farther; my lad Thomas Stevens and Mr. Butler were in the shop. Upon examining it I found some squares of muslin, some squares of lawn, and a square of French cambric, then I told the boy to go and fetch an officer; I did not search the box thoroughly. The prisoner returned about half past nine o'clock; I asked the prisoner where he had been to, he said to the Minories; I told him I thought it was very odd I could not find him. I had gone in a direction to that way; he then paused and begged pardon, and said he turned up Union-street; I asked him what he had done with the piece of cloth he had taken out that evening, he said he had taken it to a woman to be made up, he said he had bought it before he came to me; I told him I must beg his pardon, I thought it was cut from a cloth that we had on the shelf, that I had compared that piece of cloth with the piece of cloth on the shelf, and the quantity of cloth and the fold corresponded with it; I had so done when the prisoner was out; he said it never was my property; then I called him into the shop to look at the other things, I had taken them out of his box and laid them on the counter; he told me he had cut these things off and put the money in the till; I told him that it was a thing very unusual in the trade, and what any honest young man would never have thought of.

Q. When did you find any stockings - A. The next morning; I had not searched the box thoroughly that evening; he was taken in custody that evening; the next morning I found about five or six pair of stockings; I asked him where he got these stockings from; he said he bought them in the country; I told him I did not think that possible; because they had my marks on them; but he had altered my marks; he said nothing to that.

Q. Did you ever get again any piece of Irish cloth that you had seen - A. Yes; I went the next morning to Mrs. Harris's with the officer, in Red-gate-court, in the Minories; Mrs. Harris delivered it to me; we found two other shirts at this woman's house that we had no idea of; the cloth he had taken out of our house to this woman's house, to make the shirts. The piece of Irish, she gave me, that he had taken the over night.

We went to another person's house; Mrs. Harris sent her son after us with a shirt that was made up, that shirt had my private mark on it; the lad said I was desired to call at his mother's; on our return to Mrs. Harris she produced another shirt partly made up.

Q. Was the piece of cloth that you got back in the same state as when you saw it in the prisoner's box - A. Yes, in the same state.

Q. Then these shirts must have been from some other cloth - A. Yes.

Q. The diaper, you have said nothing about that - A. That I put on the counter; I put all these things in the box again.

Mr. Knapp. You say this young man has been with you about three months; he came to you with a good character - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BUTLER . Q. We understand you are a neighbour of Mr. Hoskins's - A. Yes.

Q. He sent for you this evening - A. Yes; I saw a number of articles spread on the counter; when the prisoner came in Mr. Hoskins put a question to him respecting the Irish linen; he said he had taken it to some person to make up, and that it was his own property prior to his coming to Mr. Hoskins, and with respect to the other articles, he said he had cut them off and put the money in the till; the stockings were not there at that moment, but when we came before the magistrate the next day they were produced. Mr. Hoskins identified them by his mark; he observed it was in some measure altered, but he was confident they were his property.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a police constable; I was sent for to Mr. Hoskins's, the prisoner was given into my charge on the night of the 17th of February, about ten o'clock; I went the next morning with Mr. Hoskins to Mrs. Harris's; she lives in Wild-court, it comes into Red-gate-street; she produced a piece of Irish cloth and a piece of cambric, to make a frill; I went to another house, a little boy came after me with a shirt. I told him to take it back to his mother, Mrs. Harris, that was done; I went back to the mother, she gave me the shirt; she told me that she had another shirt partly made; I got that from Mrs. Harris, and I took a pair of stockings from the prisoner's feet at the office. Mr. Hoskins looked at them and thought they were his.

SUSANNAH HARRIS. I live at No. 15, Wild-court, it comes into Redgate-street. I knew the prisoner by living with Mr. Smith, a linen-draper in the Minories, about two months ago. The prisoner asked me if I knew any body that would make him some shirts; I told him I did; he brought me cloth to make two shirts. On the 17th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, he brought a piece of Irish cloth, and a bit of cambric for a frill, to make another shirt; I never opened it; I delivered it to Mr. Brown in the same state as it was when the prisoner delivered it to me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to Mr. Hoskins's first I bought some stockings of him, whether it was one, two, or three pair, I cannot recollect now; at that time I gave him a profit upon these things; he mentioned at the time that what things I wanted in his shop I might have without any profit; and as for the Irish cloth, when I came from Mr. Smith he sold off his stock in trade, and when he was selling off his Irish by auction I bought a piece of twenty six yards; and the cloth which Mr. Hoskins claims is a part of that. Mr. Hoskings had a good character with me, that he cannot deny.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-47

355. JOHN CARR was indicted for that he on the 19th of February , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder, and leaden bullet, which he then and there held in his hand, feloniously, wickedly, and unlawfully did shoot at Edward Rice , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him ; - and

THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

EDWARD RICE . I am a Bow-street patrol , attached to the office in Worship-street. On Sunday the 19th of February, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I was in company with Vickery and Gleed in Stepney fields; we met two men; Vickery was first, I was next, and Gleed was behind me; Vickery laid hold of the last man of the two, and said let us see who these men are. The prisoner passed me and Gleed; Gleed followed the prisoner and I followed Gleed; the prisoner walked five or six paces, turned to the left and ran away towards the Half Way House in the Commercial-road; I ran after him and passed Gleed.

Q. What did you run after him for - A. To take him in custody, to see who and what he was; I ran fifteen or twenty paces after him; then he turned his face a little to the left; I had the sight of his face, I was within two or three yards of him, he put his right hand over his left shoulder and fired a pistol at me; then he ran five or six yards further and I after him; he turned half way round to the left and threw the pistol at me; it went over my head, struck the ground behind me, and went into a ditch of water just by; with his stopping to throw the pistol at me, I got near enough to reach him with this cane in my hand. I gave him two or three blows on his head and neck, he ran fifty or sixty yards further, towards the Commercial-road; I ran after him, crying stop thief; he jumped over a ditch and made his escape. I went to the Half-way house to Vickery, where he had the other man in custody; Vickery gave him in custody of another man; he and Gleed went to look for the pistol.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-48

356. ALICE BUNTING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Gibbs , no person being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 1st of March , and stealing therein a bonnet, value 7 s, a cloak, value 2 s. a gown, value 4 s. four caps, value 2 s. six habit shirts, value 1 s. and a plated caddie spoon, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Gibbs .

THOMAS GIBBS . I live at No. 23, Woodbridge-street, Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell , I am a painter ; I live in a lodging house belonging to Mr. Harrison, he lives in Aylesbury-street; the prisoner lodged in the next room to me.

Q. Who lodged in the room with you - A. Nobody but me and my wife; the prisoner's room adjoined mine; the rooms were separated by a partition and a door which was nailed up; the nails were of the prisoner's side.

Q. How long had she been in possession of this room - A. Four days. On Wednesday the 1st of March I went out about half after two o'clock, my wife was out, I locked the door and took the key with me; I came home alone, about half past four; I found my room door locked; I unlocked it; on my going into the room I found my wife's box on the bed, I left it by the side of the door under another box, it had been wrenched open; it was left locked; there were two pictures, a child's cap, and a shirt left in it; I found a bonnet and a red gown gone from the great box, that box was not locked.

Q. Before you examined the box what observations did you make about the room - A. When I entered the room I found the box on the bed; I examined the other box, and then I turned round and found the door between her room and mine open.

Q. Was there any lock upon that door - A. It was only nailed up with six or seven nails; the nails had been wrenched, and a bit of the wood cut off; I went through the door into the prisoner's room, she was not there.

Q. When did you see the prisoner afterwards - A. In about ten days after I met her in Beech-street.

Q. Had you been acquainted with her at all - A. I had been laid up with the rheumatism seventeen months - one night I laid myself down on the chair by the wainscot; I heard a moan, I said to my wife who is that, she said the young woman in the next room; I said go and see what is the matter with her; she went, she was laying on the boards without any thing over her; she brought her in; I gave her victuals, and kept her till eleven o'clock at night, thinking she was in distress. I met the prisoner in Beech-street, I said are not you a pretty creature; she said she would not run away. I brought her home to my wife, my wife asked her if she could tell her any thing about the things, she said she knew nothing at all about them; after keeping her from six o'clock to eleven, I went to Mr. Stanton the officer, he searched her, I saw two caps found upon her, a caddie spoon, two housewives, and one piece of gown.

Q. Did you ever find any of the other things - A. No.

MARY NEEDIS . Q. You and your husband live in the same house with Gibbs - A. Yes. On Wednesday the 1st of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner come down stairs with a parcel before her; she went out of the house and went towards Clerkenwell-green.

Q. Was that the same day that you heard of this room of Gibbs's being broken open - A. Yes.

MARY GIBBS . Q. You are the wife of Thomas Gibbs - A. Yes. I left my lodgings at seven o'clock in the morning; when I went out I left all my things in my box, and when I returned I missed all the articles that are mentioned in the indictment; this was on the 1st of March, and on the 10th she was found; she denied knowing any thing of these things; I told her that the cap she had on her head was mine; she immediately pulled off her bonnet, took the cap off, and chucked it in the window. After my husband was gone for the officer, I asked her what she had done with the things; she said after she got out in the street she did not know what she had done with them.

ROBERT STANTON . Q. You are the officer that was sent for - A. Yes. On the 10th of March I went to Mr. Gibbs' room; I found the prisoner there, I begged her to draw her hand out of her pocket hole; and in drawing it out she dropped a cap; she seemed unwilling for me to search her pocket; I told her I must. I took from her pocket a caddie spoon, two housewives, and a piece of old gown.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-49

357. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a coat, value 50 s. the property of James Kirk , in the dwelling house of John Neale .

JAMES KIRK . I lodge at the Coach and Horses, Hatton-garden , in the house of John Neale . On Saturday the 25th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. I came home and went into my room; I found my box open, it seemed as if it had been picked open; I did not miss my coat then, I missed it the next day when I went to clean myself.

Q. When you found your box open why did not you examine it - A. I had no suspicion then. On Monday I saw the coat at Hatton-garden office.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same room - A. Yes.

JOHN NEALE . Q. You keep the Coach and Horses, Hatton-garden - A. Yes. On Saturday evening the 25th of February, between six and seven o'clock, Davis came down stairs with a bundle in his hand. On Sunday morning Kirk went up stairs to clean himself; he returned upon the stairs again and said he missed the coat; he told my mistress; I got an officer.

JAMES RAMSEY . I live with Mr. Page, pawnbroker, Liquorpond-street. This coat was pledged on Saturday the 25th of February for eighteen shillings, in the name of John Davis , by a man with the same kind of clothes on as the prisoner has on now. I cannot say the prisoner is the man.

JAMES HANCOCK. On Sunday the 26th of February I took the prisoner in custody; I found four of five duplicates on him - one of them for the coat pledged in the name of John Davis .

Ramsey. This is the duplicate I gave to the person that pawned the coat.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up early on Sunday morning; going out of the back room door I saw this ticket, it laid on the stair case; I looked at it, and said this ticket is not mine. I came in and had my breakfast, I intended to make it known to Mr. Neale, but the taproom being full I did not; I went to Bethnal-green for my clean linen, and when I came back a young man and I had two pots of beer; I had not an opportunity of telling the landlord; the young man did not go away so soon as I expected. Mr. Neale went out for the

constable; I did not like to deliver the ticket up, as the tap-room was so full of people; I was ashamed to take it out to give it him.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-50

358. JOB HATT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of February , a silver watch, value 40 s. and a jacket, value 5 s. the property of John Green , in the dwelling house of John Atkins .

JOHN GREEN . I am a warehouseman to a printer ; I live at No. 12, Eagle-street, Red-Lion-square , in John Atkins 's house; I lodge with my mother, she has the two garrets.

Q. Your mother took the lodgings and you pay her - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he came to me on the 24th of February, he is a bookbinder; I have known him three years, he lodged in the back garret with me two nights; I took him out of charity, to keep him out of the streets; he told me he was going to a place on the Monday; he slept in my room on the 24th and 25th, not in the same bed with me, we put some boxes up, and two pillows for him to sleep on. I put the watch under my head; in the morning, about five o'clock, he awakened me and asked me the way to the privy; I told him; he went down stairs and did not return; I went to sleep after that, I awoke about seven o'clock, I missed my watch and my velveteen jacket that was laying on my bed. On Monday the 6th of March I saw the prisoner in St. Martin's watchhouse, I asked him where my property was; he told me that he had lent the watch to Mr. Jones, a publican in Tower street for twenty eight shillings; the jacket he had sold in Rosemary lane for four shillings and six pence; but he could not exactly tell me the place. I saw the watch on the 6th of March, but the jacket I have never seen again.

DANIEL JONES . I keep the Hussar's Head in Tower street. The prisoner came to my house for a lodging; I cannot exactly tell the time, it was four or five days before the 6th of March; he had a lodging for two or three nights; before he went away he said he had a watch in pawn, and as he owed me two or three nights lodging, and for a little porter besides, he said if I would go along with him and take the watch out of pawn, he would sell it to a jew for two pounds. I went with him to the pawnbroker by Well close-square; I redeemed it; I gave twenty eight shillings and some odd pence; I went with him to a jew in Rosemary-lane to sell the watch; the jew said he would give no more than a guinea and a half for the watch; the twenty eight shillings that I paid for the watch, and the odd halfpence, and two or three shillings he owed me for the lodging and beer, I thought I might as well keep the watch as let the jew have it. I kept the watch with his consent. Nettleton, the officer, has the watch.

- NETTLETON. On Monday morning I went with the prosecutor to St. Martin's watchhouse; I asked the prisoner what he had done with his watch; he told me he left it at Mr. Jones's for twenty eight shillings, which he owed Mr. Jones; the jacket he said he had sold in Rosemary-lane for four shillings and six pence. Green and I went to Mr. Jones; he produced the watch directly; I have had the watch ever since.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18090412-51

359. JOB HATT was indicted was feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , a silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Richard Comerford , in the dwelling house of Edward Stanley .

RICHARD COMERFORD . On the 20th of February last I lodged at Edward Stanley 's house, New Exchange court, in the Strand .

Q. Were you at that time moving to any other lodging - A. Yes; I was finishing my moving on that day; the prisoner came to me about a fortnight before this happened; I told him it was not in my power to do much for him; I would do what I could. About a week before I moved I gave him victuals and drink, and three nights I gave him a shilling to pay for his lodging. I consented to his assisting me in moving my goods.

Q. At the time he assisted you in moving your goods where was your watch hanging - A. On a nail by the window, in the four pair of stairs room; the prisoner took several parcels, and then he came to take a table, I said I will take this, you take something else down in your hand; I took the table and left the prisoner in the room; when I got to the street door he came, and I delivered him the table, and told him to make haste to my other apartment. I went up to my employ again, and as soon as I got up stairs I missed my watch; I ran after the prisoner; when I got to my other apartment the prisoner was not there, but the table was.

WILLIAM RODWELL . I live in Broad street, Ratcliffe, I am a pawnbroker. On the 20th of February, in the evening, this watch was pawned at my shop in the name of Joseph Smith ; I do not know the person that pawned it; it was a man.

MR. JORDAN. Q. Did the prisoner ever offer to sell you a pawnbroker's duplicate - A. Yes; on the 22nd of February; I gave him two shillings for it.

Mr. Rodwell. This is the duplicate that I gave the man who pawned the watch with me; I lent eighteen shillings on the watch.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of one guinea only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18090412-52

360. JOHN FORREST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , fourteen pounds weight of solder, value 10 s. the property of William Piper .

WILLIAM PIPER . I am a plumber , I live in Little Eastcheap. On Thursday last the prisoner came to work as usual as a labourer ; he had worked for me seventeen months; after dismissing the rest of the men to their respective jobs, I desired him to collect his tools,

to go out with his partner; I observed the prisoner not to come forward; I went to see what he was about, I observed him shuffling about his breeches; I took no notice but desired him to come forward, and collect his tools to go out with his partner; he took up his tools, together with a piece of pipe about eight foot long; in doing which he appeared to stagger; I watched him out, he appeared to walk with difficulty, and when he had got about fifteen yards off I called to him by name; he immediately turned down Pudding-lane, as if to put down his load; I went to the corner of the lane and desired that he would return to the shop; upon which he said, upon my honour Mr. Piper. I have nothing of yours about me; I asserted that I was suspicious that he had, and desired him to go back; upon which he unbuttoned his breeches and pulled out the cake of solder in question; he gave it me; I went back to the shop with him, sent for a constable and gave charge of him.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-53

361. WILLIAM SPENDER was indicted for that he on the 23rd of September , was servant to Charles Mawhood , Thomas Greasely and William Hughes , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession for his said masters, the sum of 8 l. 16 s. and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN BOOTH . Q. You live at Louth in Lincolnshire - A. Yes; I am a draper.

Q. In the month of August, or September last, did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, the 8th of September last; he came to receive money for Mr. Mawhood and co.

Q. Had you before given them an order for these goods for which he came to receive this payment - A. I had.

Q. Did you pay him for the goods - A. I paid him eight pounds sixteen shillings; the discount was taken off; the whole amount of the bill was nine pounds five shillings and a penny; I paid to him on account of his masters eight pounds sixteen shillings.

CHARLES MAWHOOD . Q. What are you by business - A. A woollen draper in West Smithfield; my partners' names are Thomas Greasley and William Hughs .

Q. In September last was the prisoner in your employ - A. Yes.

Q. Had you in the month of March last, a debt of nine pounds five shillings and a penny due from Mr. Booth at Louth, for goods that you had furnished him with in March - A. Yes; it stands in our books now.

COURT. What discount do you give - A. Five per cent for six months, I believe.

Q. That would reduce the debt to eight pounds sixteen shillings, supposing the money to have been paid to your rider - eight pounds sixteen shillings would have been your demand - A. That was what would he expected.

Mr. Gurney. On what day in September did the prisoner come to town - A. I believe the prisoner arrived in September, our cash book will tell.

Q. First look at your own ledger - A The article in the ledger is only to goods nine pounds five shillings and a penny; that remains undischarged in our ledger now.

Q. At the time your rider goes out upon a journey does he take with him a pocket journal - A. He does.

Q. Do you now hold in you hand any pocket journal that the prisoner took out with him on that journey - A. I do; it is made from the general ledger that we have in our accompting house; it is extracted from the general ledger, to take out the general cases in the journey he is going to; this pocket lodger is all his hand writing.

COURT. It gives him instructions what to do - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Turn to Mr. Booth at Louth, in that ledger - A. John Booth , Louth March the 31st to goods; nine pounds five shillings and a penny; this is the prisoner's hand writing.

Q. After the prisoner had received that money from Mr. Booth, was it his course to make any entry in that pocket ledger - A. It would have been this course to have made an entry in that ledger after he had received the money, and he has a pocket journal to enter it in.

Q. In other instances, in that ledger has he acknowledged of receiving the money - A. In some he has, and some he has not; there is a column there to write down debit and credit.

Q. When he returned from his journey was it his course to make the entry of that cash book into the ledger - A. He generally made that from the pocket journal of his own. That pocket journal of his last journey we have not.

Q. Now give me the cash book - has he in that cash book accounted to you for this eight pounds sixteen shillings - A. He has not.

Q. Has he accounted for any money received of Mr. Booth - A. None whatever; on the 22nd of September 1808, he returned home and commenced accounting with me on the same day.

Q. When did you first learn that this money had been paid by Mr. Booth, how lately - A. I believe somewhere about the latter end of March, this year.

Q. To this moment you have never received that eight pounds sixteen shillings - A. No.

Q. I take it for granted the only way for accounting was by putting an entry in the cash book - A. Of course.

Prisoner. Did you write to Mr. Booth to ascertain the fact which you have stated in this court, or did you not know it from my information first - A. We discovered it by writing to other gentlemen in that journey; they stating that they had paid Mr. Spender on such a day.

Q. Had not I previously stated that I had received this money from Mr. Booth, before you knew it from any other source - A. I have some delicacy in answering that question; Mr. Spender after being taxed with Mr. Bullman's money, admitted that he had taken up other money, among which was Mr. Booth's; it is imperious

necessity, calling upon me as prosecutor, to divulge that.

Q. Have not I offered to account for the balance - A. You have written several letters to me since you have been in custody, wishing me to take it as a debt.

COURT. That cannot be allowed.

Mr. Gurney. Was it not the prisoner's duty, as your servant, to collect money and receive orders for you, if so, was it not his duty to render an account of the money he so took - A. Most assuredly.

Q. Was it ever allowed to him to conceal money from you which he had received of your customers, and without your knowledge to apply the money to his own use - A. Never.

Q. Then you say in consequence of finding some of your customers in arrears you wrote to them, and finding they had paid, you charged the prisoner - A. We did.

Q. Was it upon that account he first confessed - A. It was; one of the letters was laying upon the desk, when he came into the accompting-house from the last journey.

Q. Did he upon that occasion give you this list of of money he had received - A. He did.

Q. Mr. Bullman 12 l. 10 s. - Mr. Booth 9 l. 5 s. 1 d. he gave that to you as a sum he had received - A. He did, that was lately.

Prisoner. Mr. Mawhood had no knowledge of my receiving the money from Mr. Booth till I informed him of it.

COURT. Then he had the best information, that of your own confession.

Prisoner's Defence. Consciously knowing that I had no intention feloniously to appropriate any private money of my prosecutors to my own use, I rely upon the jury's verdict - whether it shall be for or against me I shall be perfectly submissive. I have other vouchers - are we not to go forward? -

Prisoner to Hughes. When you came to me at Liverpool, did I not press you to call upon all the customers - A. You certainly did.

COURT. When - A. In the latter end of last March.

Prisoner. When we left the Swan and Two Necks. Lad-lane, did you at that moment suspect my honesty - A. Not in the least.

Q. Did I not inform you that I had received the sum in question before you knew of it - A. Yes; that was after receiving Mr. Bullman's letter you delivered me this paper; there is Mr. Booth's name, and several other names, stated on the paper.

Q. Have you not, Mr. Hughes, come and asked me to give security for this sum as a debt - A. I certainly have asked you to give security for the debt.

COURT. When was that - A. A week ago.

Mr. Gurney. Upon that you received advice that that would be improper for you to do - A. Yes.

Q. You would be compounding of felony - A. Yes.

Prisoner to Greasley. Did not you, in company with Mr. Hughes, say; it was no more than a debt, and asked security - A. I did.

Q. Did I not then say, I could not negociate security while charged as a felon - A. You did.

Q. But if you considered it a debt, and I was placed so, I was ready to negociate - A. You did so.

COURT. When was all this conversation - A. Last Monday, after he was finally committed.

Mr. Gurney. After you had done all this, you found it was very improper - A. I did.

Q. And you did it without Mr. Mawhood's authority - A. I did.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-54

362. WILLIAM SPENDER was indicted for that he on the 23d of September was servant to Charles Mawhood , Thomas Greasley , and William Hughes , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for them, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sem of 11 l. 17 s. for and on their account, that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM BULLMAN . Q. Where do you live - A. In Sunderland; I am a linen and woollen draper.

Q. On the 25th of August last did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you at that time make any payment to him on account of Messrs. Mawhood and co. - A. I paid him an account of 12 l. 10 s. the discount reduced it to 11 l. 17 s. I have a memorandum of it written by the prisoner at the same time.

Q. Did you at that time make any payment to him of the sum of 21 l. 4 s. - A. I did not. I paid him in March preceding August.

CHARLES MAWHOOD . Q. What are the names of your partners - A. Thomas Greasley and William Hughes .

Q. In the month of August last, and some time before, was the prisoner in your employ - A. Yes, he had been in our employ between three and four years as clerk and rider.

Q. Did he return from a journey on the 22nd of September - A. I believe he might; I could tell by a reference to the books; I suppose that was about the time.

Q. In August in that summer was he in Sunderland - A. Yes, we had letters from him.

Q. At that time did Mr. Bullman appear upon your ledger as debtor - A. He did.

Q. At that time how much was he indebted to you - A. 12 l. 10 s. 1 d. - he is credited for 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. as receive August 25, 1808.

Q. Then when he went out that journey, Mr. Bullman appeared indebted to you 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. and 12 l. 10 s. - A. I must refer to the cash-book, I would wish to be correct - 1808, August 25, 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. before that; he was indebted that since by credit by the prisoner in the journey of August and September, in the cash-book; here is his hand-writing; this is the prisoner's pocket ledger, which he kept at that time, it is his writing.

Mr. Gurney. It appears there was an article of 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. for goods supplied the 31st of August 1807 - he writes in the last column, bill 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. discharged - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive that letter from him in the course of that journey - A. Yes, we did.

Q. This letter is dated 28th of August 1808, Bedal in Yorkshire - receipts since my last, Sunderland, S. Watson 3 l. 3 s. - W. Bullman 21 l. 4 s. 5 d.

COURT. Is that his hand-writing - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Then three days after the money was

paid, as he represented it, he writes received this 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. - A. Yes, he entered down in my cash-book as received on the 26th of August 1808.

Q. Then that 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. had not been accounted for as part of the March journey - A. Oh no.

Q. Did he ever account to you for the 11 l. 17 s. - A. Never.

Q. In consequence of your writing to Mr. Bullman for this 11 l. 17 s. did you receive that answer from him - A. We did; that is a letter from Mr. Bullman, dated March 1809; it was laying upon his desk when he returned, it was read by him (the letter read). Upon seeing that he went in tears, he felt himself much hurt, he mentioned many others; he said he would give an account of all the money he had taken up; he pleaded very hard for mercy; this was on the 25th of March; he was taken to the Counter on that day.

Q. Did he on that day, or on the next day, send you that letter that is dated the 25th, I believe - A. He did, that is his hand-writing. (The letter read.)

Prisoner to Mawhood. You have stated that I never accounted for Mr. Bullman's money, and at the same time you have produced an account where I have stated it.

COURT. He has stated that you accounted for the 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. but you did not account for the 11 l. 17 s. that you ought to have accounted.

[A paper read, wherein the prisoner, after being charged by the prosecutors, accounted for different sums that he had received to the amount of 128 l.]

Prisoner. Mr. Mawhood admits that when I stood charged with having received 11 l. 17 s. that I returned 21 l. - do you conceive that I acted with a felonious intention - Mr. Mawhood. When you entered the 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. you should have entered the 11 l. 17 s. and the 21 l. 4 s. 5 d. should have been entered six months before.

Prisoner. Will you swear that you do not stand indebted to me for salary - A. Here are the books that will prove it - he is overpaid.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not an opportunity of searching the books, hurried as I was before the magistrate; - even Mr. Humphries, the solicitor, has been to me to flatter me, so that I am left defenceless.

Mr. Gurney, to Mawhood. Were the books produced before the magistrate - A. They were.

Q. Did he at that time complain that he had not sufficient time to look into them - A. No.

Q. Have you induced any body to flatter the prisoner - A. No.

Q. to Humphreys. The prisoner says that you have been to the prison, that you have flattered him, and he is left defenceless - is that true - A. I saw him once, when I once went to a young man; I asked him who was his counsel; I told him I had prepared the bill, most likely he would be tried that evening; he told me that he should defend himself, he did not doubt but that he should get through it; that is all, I believe, that passed.

Mr. Humphreys. I think I did say that the prosecutors would not be rigid, they would be as lenient as they could.

Prisoner. I have to state what I said before - that I had never any felonious intent to conceal the property. I was hurried off to a jail; I have been frequently promised that I should have assistance to retain counsel; not having that assistance, after being bereft of all my money, and in a prison, where I was filthy, I was ragged, I troubled no friend, still relying on the prosecutor for assistance. I lay to the mercy of the jury to find my verdict. The prosecutor has been and flattered me in jail; the other prosecutors have been and led me on that it was a debt, and I might discharge my attorney and my friends, that I needed no money of them, nor need I put myself to any expence; I have no wish now to deny any thing but my felonious intent. If I had been a desperate character, and intended to conceal any thing from my prosecutors, I could have done it from one to ten thousand pounds; that there is an error in my accounts I admit. I have been asked to give security in this unfortunate place; I said I will not negociate in this unfortunate place; I have a respectable family. Having said this, I believe I have nothing more to impress upon the jury; - if they acquit me of the felony, they perhaps will not acquit me of the debt, nor do I wish to be acquitted of the debt, if a debt arises upon the two accounts.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-55

363. JOHN STEINBECK was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, on the 29th of March , in and upon Elizabeth Sage , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth Sage did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner being a foreigner , was tried by a jury half English and half foreigners.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-56

364. THOMAS WARD was indicted for that he on the 16th of March , feloniously, wickedly, maliciously, and unlawfully did set fire to a certain house of John Hobbs , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent thereby to injure the said John Hobbs .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be the dwelling house of William Mackdine .

JOSEPH HOBBS . Q. What are you - A. I am out of business; I live with my mother at Stanmore.

Q. What is Ward, the prisoner - A. I am entirely a stranger to his profession, I did not know him till this unfortunate affair happened.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 16th of March, I happened to be in town at the time; I know nothing of it, except seeing the combustibles at the time; the house belongs to my brother John Hobbs; he had the possession of the house; it is his own property; it is in John's court, Golden square ; he lives at Stanmore.

Q. Was the house set fire to - A. I know nothing more than seeing the combustibles under the stairs.

Q. Who is the tenant - A. Mr. Mackdine.

Q. Your brother John Hobbs is not here - A. No.

Mr. Alley. You do not know that it is his house, do you - A. I do, I received the rent for him.

COURT. When did you receive the rent for him - A. I have not received the rent for this half year; I used to receive it; Thomas Scott receives the rent now for him; I believe his name is Thomas.

JURY. What combustibles were there - A. Small

pieces of wood, pitch and paper, and over the fire place were three or four ounces of gunpowder, on the mantle piece.

Q. Were you the first person that saw the combustibles - A. No.

WILLIAM MACKDINE . I am a wine cooper, I live at No 3, John's-court, Golden-square.

Q. Have you a house there - A. Yes, that is the house that was on fire.

Q. When was it - A. On the 16th of March.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. He lodged in the same house.

Q. He hired of you the kitchen and parlour - A. Of my wife; the kitchen and parlour did not belong to me, it belonged to my brother in law; I took the house of Mr. Hobbs myself; but he and I agreed to pay one half of the rent, he one half and I the other; we have paid the rent in that way.

Q. Did you take the house in both your names - A. I do not know whether we did or not; we understood it so.

Q. You took the house of Joseph Hobbs - who is your landlord - A. Mr. John Hobbs .

Q. What was the circumstance of this business - A. Mr. Harrison was the first person that found the house was on fire.

BENJAMIN HARRISON . I am a cordwainer, I live at No. 4, John's court; I was at work on the 16th of March, I heard the alarm of fire about twelve o'clock in the day, I went down stairs immediately, I found a great smoke in the passage of No. 3, I found the door fast, I endeavoured to open the door, I could not; then I tried the windows, I found them all fast; so I forced the door open; on my entrance there was smoke all round so that I could not see; my wife brought the first pail of water, and the other women assisted to bring water; we got the flame under. After the flame was extinguished I looked at the fire place, the grate had some coals, paper, and other things in it, that had not been lighted that day; it excited suspicion in me that it could not come by accident; I requested a candle, because in the part where the fire originated it was dark, it was where a bed had stood, but the bed being away the combustibles were all together; when I got a candle, I saw there were some lighted wood, a large book and some paper that had taken fire, and part of a birch broom, and two or three pound of pitch were all lighted by the flame. It had taken to that part of the partition that is over the stair-case, and the partition of the first floor it had burned; that part of the partition where these things lay we knocked out with our feet, it was on flame; had it been burned through it would not have been in my power to have got it out. There was a small cask that had held white lead or white paint, there was an hamper that had a large oil flask, a large oil glass bottle, it was contained in an hamper; there was some gunpowder and shot at the fire place; there was some shot, I believe, I did not inspect much into it, being away from where the fire was. After we had extinguished the fire a driver belonging to a fire engine came in and looked at it, and others came in; I thought it must be done on purpose; and this person in court, came in; I desired them not to touch it. One of the firemen, in court, had the inspection of it.

Q. What fire office took this man up - A. The Eagle fire office; Mr. Beetham is the solicitor of the Eagle fire office.

Mr. Alley. At this place where the fire was, was there not a hole so that a man might put his hand or a candle there - A. No, there was no hole there till we kicked it out.

Q. Were there not two fires in this house, before this happened - A. I do not know that there were two fires in this house; there was a child that set her clothes on fire.

Q. You say you did not see any such a place in which a man might have put his hand - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you mean to say that a person without could not remove the boards and so have put his hand in and set a light there - A. I do not conceive that any man or child could.

Q. How long have you lived in this court - A. Six years.

Q. How long had this poor man lived there - A. I do not know that ever I saw him above three times.

Q. Was there not some property of that poor man's found in the room - A. There was some little property found in the room; a bird cage, a grate, and a flap of a table.

Q. Then certainly if the house had been burned down the property must have been gone - how long after the fire had been discovered was it that the poor man came home - A. At dark night.

Q. His brother was sent to, was not he - A. A woman went to his brother's to enquire after him.

Q. Do not you know that as soon as the woman went to his brother's, the man came - A. I cannot say what past from twelve o'clock till night. The man came in the court that night, I took upon myself that night to lay hold of him; he came about eight hours after the fire.

Q. Did not he come and remain, did he ever abscond - A. No, he could not abscond; as soon as he came I laid hold of him.

Q. Some property was found in this room after the man came home - A. Yes.

COURT. What was the property - A. There was a bird cage, an old mop, this cask of colour, a jar, the grate and the flap of the table; there was only one parlour below stairs.

- EDWARDS. I live in John's-court, No. 6, I was up in my room in the morning till near twelve o'clock; I heard the alarm with the women and children; I immediately went down stairs; just round the corner I saw the women and children at the door; I entered the door, Mr. Harrison was endeavouring to break open the parlour door; I came before the parlour door was broken open.

Q. How did he break it open - A. With our strength, I had nothing in my hands; after we broke the door I saw on my going in the room, at the right hand, that it was on fire. Then by the assistance of the women and the water I endeavoured to put it out.

Q. Was there much flame - A. Not much at that time, but it would have been in a few minutes; it was on fire, but not much blaze; I went to that part which I perceived most in danger, which was over the stairs leading to the kitchen, and broke in the pannel; I returned into the room again, and exerted my power in throwing the water to all parts that were in danger.

We put it out with water.

Q. Now in what state did you find the room when it was out - A. I then looked to see how the fire could happen; I perceived there had been no fire in the stove apparently that day; I looked round the room, I perceived a small piece of candle and a flask, which contained some oil; these were placed by the combustibles, which were some pieces of paper, bits of wood, and pitch; on the top of that there were some bits of birch broom; I said to Mr. Harrison and another gentleman, that this candle had been placed there to keep the flames in; and there stood a keg there, which I think was placed there to throw the heat among the combustibles.

Q. What was in the keg - A. It appeared to be white paint, or white-wash; I cannot say what it was, it was one or the other; I did not take particular notice. I never saw the prisoner to my knowledge till I saw him at Marlborough-street office.

JOHN PHILIP M'KENNELL. I am clerk to a banker; I was called in by the parties that had put out the fire to look at it, and there I saw the remains of a large writing book, which had been partly burnt, and on the top of that there was about two pounds of pitch, or better, I cannot exactly say, with some few ends of short sticks, an oil bladder, and part of a birch broom; there was nothing in the oil bladder at the time I saw it.

Q. Could this have been put into that room on the outside - A. No, not without forcing part of it in; on the mantle-piece over the fire place was a packet of gunpowder and some shot, and the fire place was laid ready to kindle, but never had been kindled for that day; the stove was drawn out of the situation of the place it had stood in; I do not think there had been any fire in it from the time it had been drawn out.

Q. What goods were there in the room - A. kind of a table, a bird cage, an old chair, and this stove; no other furniture.

Mr. Alley. You have told us there was some powder that was on the mantle piece - A. Yes.

Q. That was a considerable distance from it - A. Not a considerable distance from it, the sparks might have jumped to it.

Q. It was mixed with shot - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Do you remember being asked whether he knew of the gunpowder being there - A. He never accounted for any one thing.

Q. What sort of a lock was on this man's door - A. I did not see it.

COURT. Did he give any account how these combustibles came there - A. No, he did not.

Mr. Alley. You say there was an oil bladder there - Yes.

Q. You did not examine the lock - A. No.

Q. What distance was the bladder from where the fire happened - A. Close by the place where the fire had kindled; the pitch and every other article had been extinguished when I came there.

WILLIAM HICKS . I am a fireman of the Royal Exchange fire office; when I came there the fire was out, at this No. 3, John's-court.

Q. What time of the day was it when you came there - A. I believe a quarter after twelve o'clock; I saw the wainscot burned of the stair-case, I saw some pitch and some tar close to where the wainscot had been on fire; I went to see that the people were safe in the one pair of stairs room; when I found they were all perfectly safe I went away. About four or five foot square of the wainscot was burned each way, the wainscoting that parts the parlour from the kitchen stair-case.

SARAH WALLIS . I am a housekeeper in the court, No. 1; I was washing at my own window, I saw Mr. Ward, he passed my house going down the court about half an hour before the alarm of fire was given. I know nothing more than bringing the water to assist in putting it out.

Q. Are you sure that he passed about half an hour before - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of his person - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure what day it was - A. It was on the 16th of March, the day that the fire happened.

Q. What time of the day was the fire - A. Near Twelve o'clock.

MARTHA PRATT . I live at No. 2, John's-court. On the 16th of March I saw Mr. Ward go down the court, about a quarter after eleven, with a small bottle in his hand.

Q. What is he - A. They call him a painter, I do not know any thing of the man, I know no more than seeing the room on fire, and bringing several pails of water to extinguish the fire; I saw the wainscot burning and the room all of a smoke; I live in the second floor, next door to the house that was burning. On the evening of the same day he came to the end of the court, he asked me whether I had heard any thing of a fire, I told him I had, I supposed that he had, it happened in his apartment; I said he knew something of it; he said he knew nothing about it. I told him there was a person that wanted to speak to him; then he stopped. I saw Mr. Harrison coming down the court, I called to him; Mr. Harrison was not above two yards from him; he came and took him immediately.

Mr. Alley. You said you supposed that he knew something about it, you meaned to insinuate that he did the thing - you thought so then and do now, do not you - A. I do.

Q. He said he knew nothing of it, meaning that he did not do it, when you said to him that he knew something about it - all I wish you to tell me is this, whether you did not mean by that expression that he had done the deed - A. I did.

Q. His answer was, that he knew nothing about it - A. Yes.

COURT. What time of the day was it when you saw him - A. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Mr. Alley. The court is a poor wretched place - A. No, not wretched, the houses are inhabited by poor hard working people, and no other person insured but the ground landlord, Mr. Hobbs.

COURT, to Macdine. You and your wife live at No. 3, you live in the house - A. Yes.

Q. Who else lives in the house besides you - A. There is a lodger in the house, he is a broker; I cannot tell you the name; I occupy the first floor, the broker lives over me.

Q. Who occupies the ground floor - A. Thomas Ward took the kitchen and parlour of my wife, he occupied the kitchen and parlour; there is only one room of a floor.

Q. What business did he carry on there - A. He

had a board in the window; Thomas Ward , painter and glazier.

Q. Was he there on the 16th - A. Yes. On the 1st of this month he had been a quarter of a year there; he moved part of his furniture to Marlborough row a fortnight before this happened; he left what the gentlemen have stated to you in this place.

Q. After the fire you went into the room; you heard what they had found there - A. Yes.

Q. Was that all the goods that he had left there - A. Yes; what they have stated to you; a grate, a bird cage, this oil bottle, with basket work wrought round it. My room was over the place where the fire began.

Mr. Alley. His brother is a painter, is not he - A. Yes.

COURT. You pay your rent to Mr. Hobbs - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. What rent did this poor man pay - A. Two guineas and a half a quarter.

Q. What do you pay for the house - A. Fourteen guineas a year; he paid at the rate of ten guineas a year.

Q. You said he had removed some of his furniture the fortnight before; have you been to his apartment in Marlborough-row - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see what furniture he brought into your house - A. I never did.

THOMAS BARNES . I am the officer; I produce the articles that were set alight; two oil bladders, some broom, some paper, partly burned, some gunpowder and shot, pitch, and some tar, and some pieces of wood.

Mackdine. I found these things on the the premises after I had secured him in our watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day this gentleman has mentioned, I was taken in custody, I had been out; I returned to my brother; my brother told me the house had been set on fire; I said to him, go down with me; he said he had been down; I said if he would not go with me I would go myself. When I got to the court eight or ten people caught hold of me, one of them said put him in the parlour and set a light to it; I catched cold there, that is the reason I slept away from the place, because it was damp. As I went up the court I did not see any of the house burned. Respecting the gunpowder, I had it about three weeks or a month in paper on the mantle piece; I took it from my brother; and respecting the house being set on fire, I know nothing of it; and with respect to the combustibles, the greater part was straw, it was all swept up together.

WILLIAM WARD . - Mr. Alley. What are you - A. I am a painter and glazier.

Q. That unfortunate man I believe is your brother - did he work for you - A. When he applied for work I gave it him.

Q. We have heard about furniture being removed from this wretched lodging that he had - A. Yes; about the worth of two pounds was all the furniture that he had in the world; and what was left in the lodging was worth about twenty-five or twenty-six shillings.

Q. What situation of life has he been in before - A. He was a tallow-chandler.

Q. He was a man of property lately - he has been under the necessity of living by labour - A. I have given him work.

Q. What were the value of the articles left in the apartment - A. There was a fire stove worth a guinea, a carboil worth six or seven shillings, and there was an old chair and white lead barrel.

Q. We have heard about some gunpowder - A. About Christmas he was shooting with me and one of my men, being bad weather we could not work; he took the gun and powder home; the shot and powder were altogether, which I saw on the mantle shelf in paper; it had not been taken away then; I am sure it is the same that he had; there was about two or three ounces.

Q. You are a housekeeper - A. I have been a housekeeper seven years back; a master painter and glazier; sometimes I have seven men, sometimes ten, and sometimes fifteen.

MATTHEW DOYLE . Q. Do you know this house in which the man at the bar lodged - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the stair case where the fire was - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the time of the fire - A. I do.

Q. Had you known any other fire there before the prisoner came there - A. Yes; I was once there myself when a fire broke out, and the house was in danger of being burned; then there was another fire there; the first fire was eight years ago; the other I cannot say how long that was.

Q. You are a carpenter - do you know what situation the wainscot of the stair case was in, and of the room, where this poor man had the furniture - A. I do. There was a window on the stair case without a sash or shutter, only some rough boards across it; between these rough boards there was a vacancy that a man's finger, or a child's hand might go in.

Q. That communicated to where this fire happened - A. It was right over it.

Q. Had you at any time repaired it - A. Yes; the last repair I did was last Christmas: I mended the floor and ceiling where it was broken.

Q. Then you had an opportunity of seeing, that any body might put a candle or a match in there - A. Yes.

COURT. If so the prisoner might have done it.

Mr. Alley. There is no doubt about that.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-57

365. SAYHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a watch, value 5 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. a gold chain, value 30 s. a silver compass, value 5 s. ten yards of woollen cloth, value 12 l. a coat, value 1 l. two Turkey small clothes, value 2 l. a shawl, value 10 s. a silk Turkish vest, value 15 s. and a cloak, value 30 s. the property of Sidy Hadge Abedelinzed Bonhalel , in the dwelling house of William Ebdin .

- MILLER. I am an officer of Lambeth-street office; I received information that the prisoner was on board a ship at Gravesend; when I got there I saw him coming on shore in a boat; I saw him searched; I saw this watch found upon his person; he was searched in the mayor's house at Gravesend, by one of the mayor's officers; I believe the watch was taken from the inside of his sash; these articles were behind him in a window seat, this ten yards of blue woollen cloth.

Q. Do you know whether he was in possession of it or not - A. I do not. It was a pinchbeck watch, the chain

is gold.

Q. You found no duplicates - A. No; all that I speak of is the watch, and the cloth; these trowsers were taken from his person, and one pair of small clothes from his person, and one pair in the bundle.

[The prosecutor being a foreigner was examined through the medium of an interpreter; the prisoner also had an interpreter.]

SIDY HADGE ABEDELINZED BONHALEL. Q. to interpreter. Ask him what he is and where he lived - A. He is a Mahometan . On the 28th of March, he lived in the Little Minories , he lodged there; his landlord's name is Ebdin. On the 28th of March, he lost a watch, chain, and seal; he saw them the night before; he missed them on the 28th of March in the morning when he came into his apartment, and he found the prisoner was gone.

Q. Ask him whether the prisoner used to visit him in that house, or how the prisoner could get at them - A. He took him out of the street, to give him provision out of charity.

Q. How long had he been with him - A. Five or six weeks; he slept in another room with his servant.

Q. Ask him whether he slept in his apartment on the 27th of March - A. He slept there the night before the morning of the robbery, he saw him; the things were not locked up, they were on a chair, and me watch hung up in the room; he never saw the prisoner after these things were missing till he was brought before the magistrate.

Q. Ask him if the prisoner had given him any notice of leaving him - A. No; he gave information to the public office, and published hand-bills.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was an unfortunate thing that came into my head; nobody was concerned in it but myself.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-58

366. BRYON CAVANAGH and THOMAS DENEEFE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of February , five yards of plush, value 20 s. the property of Henry Bloomfield ; - and

THREE OTHER COUNTS the same as the former, only stating the goods to belong to different people.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am a custom-house officer; I was stationed on board the Ann in the London docks , captain William Reynolds ; on the 23rd of February last.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes; they were lumpers on board that ship; I was walking to and fro the ship; looking towards the main hatch I saw Cavanagh with the plush round his body, he was standing there; the other prisoner was putting his jacket over it, endeavouring to conceal it; afterwards Cavanagh came on deck, the mate seized him by the collar and asked him what he had got round him; he said it was his own property; he offered to run; a piece was hanging down his person, the mate took hold of the end of the piece; we took the plush from him. Clark, the constable, was sent for, the mate gave charge of him; the plush has remained in my hands ever since. Deneefe was given in custody at the same time, he said he was innocent; we took them to the police office and returned to the ship; we found the piece in the hold where it had been cut off, and the next morning we found the case where it had been, broken open.

WILLIAM CLARK . On the 23rd of February I took charge of Cavanagh and Deneefe; we took them to the police office; we returned to the ship and found part of the piece in the hold; they correspond.

- . I am clerk to Mr. William Bloomfield ; he is an American merchant.

Q. Did you put on board the Ann any plush - A. Yes, on the 17th of February; it is worth five shillings a yard.

The property produced and identified.

Cavanagh's Defence. I was very much intoxicated with liquor; I found it in the hold; I took it up to give it the mate; I put it round my waist not to dirty it in getting it out of the ship's hold; there were two gangs of men working in the hold.

Deneefe's Defence. May it please your lordship, I have been all my life-time bred to industry and hard labour; Cavanagh acted as foreman ; in no respect had I act or part in the transaction than obeying his orders; I was obliged to do what he ordered me; we only worked as lumpers, from Thursday to Saturday.

CAVANAGH, GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

DENEEFE, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-59

367. SARAH PEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , a bible, value 40 s. the property of Mary Gotham , widow , in the dwelling house of Robert Barker .

MARY GOTHAM . I am a widow, I live in Sutton street ; I am a book sewer-and folder . The prisoner has worked for me; I lost Southwell's family bible from out of my room on the 19th of January; I found the prisoner in the workhouse; she had the duplicate on her; she had lodged with me in the same house.

EDWARD AYSCOUGH . I am beadle and constable of St. Dunstan's; the prisoner had been in our house six weeks; she delivered a pocket-book into my possession; I found in it a duplicate of a bible.

JAMES HANCOCK . The robbery having been done in the county the prisoner was delivered up to me, and the pocket-book containing the duplicate of the bible.

WILLIAM BURROWS . I am a pawnbroker in Barbican; I took that bible in pawn of the prisoner on the 19th of January, I lent her ten shillings on it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid the rent, and my prosecutor found coals and candles. I hope you will shew me as much favour as the laws of my country will permit.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-60

368. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , a bed, value 8 s. a blanket, value 7 s. a pillow, value 6 d. and a carpet, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Fouseca .

ANN KEMP . I am the niece of Mrs. Fouseca, my uncle lives in Newmarket-street, Wapping . On Sunday the 2nd of April in the evening, my uncle and aunt were out, I heard a noise as if something had been thrown down from the top of the house; upon that Peter Christian and I ran out; we found the prisoner going along the street with the carpet and bed upon his shoulders; Christian laid hold of the bed, and said to the prisoner this belongs to another man; the prisoner threw it down and ran away.

Q. You have told me that John Christian was in the house - what became of him - A. While we were gone out, he came down and went away; just before he are his supper and went up stairs to bed; he asked me for a light, he slept in the room where that bed was; the carpet was in the cupboard; the prisoner escaped; this was past ten o'clock at night, it was very moon light; I had seen the prisoner three or four times before; I had seen him that afternoon talking to John Christian and two or three more. I am quite sure he is the man.

Q. Did John Christian ever come back again - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I know of no robbery; the prosecutor has brought this action through spite and malice. Some time past he kept a crimping-house for sailors; he suspected I took some sailors from his house.

THOMAS FOUSECA . Q. Did you know any thing of this man before he was taken up - A. No, I never saw him before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-61

369. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for that she at the general sessions of the peace of our Lord the King, holden for the county of Middlesex on the 2nd of December in the 46th year of his Majesty's reign, was convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeited and false money, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged by the court that she should be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more, and that she on the same day again was indiced for like offence and received the like judgment; and the indictment further stated, that she on the 27th of March in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign , one piece of false and counterfeited money made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a shilling, as and for a good shilling unlawfully and feloniously did utter to Sarah the wife of Thomas Horner , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. I believe you are one of the clerks of the solicitor of the mint - A. I am. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Elizabeth Smith ; I got it from the office of the clerk of the peace for the county of Middlesex, I have examined it with the original, it is a correct copy. (Copy of the record read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . Q. You are clerk to the keeper of New Prison, Clerkenwell - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I was at Clerkenwell in December sessions 1805, when the prisoner was convicted as a common utterer of counterfeit money; she was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year; I am positive to her person; she remained in that prison one year, and found sureties for her good behaviour for two years afterwards.

MARY BAKER . Q. You are the wife of William Baker - A. Yes; I reside in Goswell-street-road, my husband is a stationer. On Monday the 27th of March, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my house; I had seen her once before; she asked for two sheets of writing paper, I served her, she gave me a shilling, the paper came to two pence, I gave her ten pence in halfpence change; she went away; directly she was gone I went to the door to look at the shilling, I saw it was a very bad one; I was going after her, I saw my husband, I gave it to my husband and told him; he went after her; I followed him; the prisoner went into Mrs. Horner's, a greengrocer's shop; my husband went after her, I did not.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am the husband of the last witness, I live in Goswell-street-road, I am a stationer.

Q. Do you remember receiving on the 27th of March a shilling from your wife - A. I do.

Q. In consequence of your receiving that shilling, and the communication that she made to you, did you fellow the prisoner - A. I did; I ran down to Ashby-street, and looking down the street I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Horner's shop; I stood at the side of the door for a short time; when I saw her in the act of paying for what she had ordered, I went in and stood by the side of her, I then saw her lay down a counterfeit shilling; I then said to Mrs. Horner take care of that shilling, it is a bad one, I could see it was a bad one when she laid it down; I said that she had been to my shop and passed the one which I had in my hand, which was a counterfeit; I went and got a constable; I delivered my shilling and Mrs. Horner delivered her shilling to the constable; the prisoner was searched, and five good sixpences were found upon her in a bit of paper; I cannot say how much copper money there was found upon her in halfpence, penny-pieces and farthings; there were three shillings altogether, I believe; she had a basket with her, that is the reason I knew her; when I was going after her the basket was searched; there were two sheets of paper in it, a few apples, some potatoes, a white bason, a brown bason, a bit of tripe, and salt fish, a bottle or pipkin, and a mug. The prisoner told the constable that she had kept a public house in Aldersgate street for twenty-one years, and then she denied it, and said that she lived in Golden-lane.

SARAH HORNER . My husband's name is Thomas Horner , we live in Upper Ashby-street, Goswell-street road; my husband is a gardener, we keep a green-grocer's and chandler's-shop. On the 27th of March last, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came in my shop and asked for half an ounce of tobacco, which came to two-pence-halfpenny; I served her; she put down a shilling; Mr. Baker came in and said it was a bad one; he looked at it; he said here is another which my wife has taken; he desired I would take care of the shilling and the woman; and he would fetch a constable.

Q. Did you take care of it - A. I did; and he fetched a constable; when he returned with the constable, the constable had the shilling the prisoner tendered me, and Mr. Baker gave the constable his shilling.

She had a basket with a top to it.

JOHN GILPIN . I am a constable.

Q. You were fetched to Mr. Baker's house on the 27th of March - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive of Mrs. Baker a shilling - A. Yes; that is the one I received from Mrs. Horner, and this is the one I received from Mrs. Baker; I searched the prisoner; she had a basket; there was a small piece of tripe and salt fish, a quantity of potatoes and three or four apples, a white jug, a child's jug, a white and a brown bason, and two sheets of writing paper; I searched her person, I found about three shillings and seven pence in copper, halfpence, penny-pieces and farthings, and five good sixpences wrapped up in a bit of paper.

RICHARD FRANKLIN . Q. Are you one of the moniers of the mint - A. I am.

Q. Have the goodness to look at these two shillings - A. I have; they are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all right but the bason; I had no bason in the basket.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 59.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-62

370. WILLIAM BOWLER and ELIZABETH BOWLER were indicted for that they on the 1st of April , twenty pieces of false and counterfeited pieces of money, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of good legal current money of this realm, called a shilling, the said counterfeited pieces of money not being cut in pieces, did put off to Mary Johnson , at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import, and was counterfeited, for, that is to say, for ten shillings .

To this indictment William Bowler pleaded

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence against Elizabeth Bowler , she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-63

371. GEORGE SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , four bound books, value 10 s. the property of William Laycock , privately in his shop .

GEORGE STAINES . I live with Mr. Laycock, High-street, St. Giles's; he is a bookseller .

Q. When did you lose these books - A. In the morning of Saturday the 8th of April the prisoner came into the shop and asked if my master or mistress were at home; my mistress's little boy was in the shop, I sent him up to call his mother; he said my mistress would be down presently; I stood at the door; he said, oh, I cannot wait any longer; he went off; I saw no more of him. On the Thursday morning following I saw him walking backwards and forwards at the door, looking at me; I and my master's girl ran after him, and called stop thief; I told him my mistress wanted to speak to him; he said he was going up Oxford-street.

Q. On Saturday, when you sent the little boy up for your mistress, what did he do - A. He staid in the shop; there was nobody else in the shop but him, I was outside of the door putting out the books; he said I cannot stay any longer; we missed the books the minute he was gone from the shop.

Q. Do you know how many - A. About half a shelf full. I am positive he is the same man.

JOHN PETER WRIGHT . I am a bookseller in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On Saturday morning, the 8th instant, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought these books to sell, he asked fourteen shillings for them; I bid him half a guinea, as they were odd volumes; I told him they were not worth fourteen shillings. He would not take half a guinea at first; he went away and returned; he said I should have them for the half guinea; I took the books and gave him the money; about half an hour afterwards, the books were standing on my counter, Mr. Laycock came in and claimed them; I described the person that I bought them of, which turned out to be the same young man that the lad had described being in the shop. This is the man that I bought the books of; on Thursday morning, in the forepart of the day, the lad ran over to my shop, saying, we have catched the thief; I went over and saw him. These are the books; two volumes of Shakespeare, and two volumes of Biblical Researches.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a boot closer and shoe-maker, I live at No. 10, Stonecutter street; I received these books last Saturday week of a man that I made shoes, and calashed a pair of boots for.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings and sixpence .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-64

372. SARAH LIDDLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July , three sheets, value 9 s. the property of the churchwardens and overseers of the parish of St. George .

ANN BARRY . Q. You are the mistress of St. George's workhouse - A. I am; the prisoner was a nurse in the house.

Q. In July did you give her any number of sheets for that part of the workhouse in which she was employed - A. I gave her eighteen sheets, that was the number allowed for the ward in which she was in.

Q. In February did you examine to see if she had any sheets missing - A. I found six missing; she first said she knew nothing of them; she afterwards said she had given them to a person, which proved to be her sister; she denied having the duplicates.

WILLIAM LEDGER . I am one of overseers of the parish of St. George. When I charged the prisoner respecting the sheets she produced four duplicates; three of them are for the sheets. She acknowledged that she had taken them, and that she was sorry for it. These are the duplicates.

WILLIAM GREGSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Ashbrige, Ratcliffe Highway, pawnbroker; I have two sheets pawned, one on the 18th of July and the other on the 22nd; I do not remember the person that pawned them.

WILLIAM SMELLIE . I am a pawnbroker, Shadwell. On the 30th of July a sheet was pledged with me in the name of Sarah Pearson .

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge myself in a fault. I leave it to God and the judge.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-65

373. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , two sheets. value 14 s. four table cloths, value 1 l. 18 s. a shirt, value 14 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of William Taylor .

JANE TAYLOR . I am the wife of William Taylor ; I take in washing; I live in Dog-row, Bethnal-green .

Q. Did you lose any linen you had to wash any time - A. Yes, in the latter end of October last; I lost part from the house and part from the customer; it was not come home to me; the prisoner was a weekly servant .

Q. When did you find it out - A. I found it out three months afterwards, on the day after the prisoner left me; she left me in the latter end of January. I went round to my customers, there was part of the articles missing that I was obliged to pay for; four table cloths; two of them belonged to Mr. Breeder and two of my own, and a shirt and handkerchief; I found them at the pawnbrokers; the prisoner left me on her knowing that I should go round to my customers; on the 1st of March, my husband saw the prisoner and brought her home, and I sent for a constable.

JANE DOCKREY Mrs. Taylor washed for me; I live in Norton Faldgate.

Q. Was there any of the linen that you sent to her deficient - A. Yes, a pair of sheets; at the latter end of October the prisoner brought home the clean linen and took home the dirty; that pair of sheets was in the bundle. Mrs. Taylor paid eighteen shillings for them.

ELIZABETH BREEDER . I live in Elder-street, at the sign of the Elder Tree; I employed Mrs. Taylor to wash for me; the prisoner took the dirty linen away, and when the linen was returned there were two table cloths missing. Mrs. Taylor paid me fifteen shillings for them.

SEPTIMUS SADLER. I am a pawnbroker, 134, Bishopgate street. On the 25th of October, I received two sheets and two table cloths; I took them myself of a person calling herself Elizabeth Deacon .

JOHN STEVENSON . I live with Mr. Clarkson, pawnbroker, Bishopgate-street. On the 15th of October, I took in a shirt, 21st a table cloth, and 26th another table cloth; I have every reason to believe the prisoner pledged them.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I left Mrs. Taylor, I went to the Infirmary sick, I was there six weeks; when I came out I was not able to go to work again; I did not pawn the things.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-66

374. JOSEPH LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , two ox tongues, value 9 s. the property of Lewis Aarons ; - and

EMANUEL HARRIS for receiving them, knowing them to be stolen .

LEWIS AARONS . I am a butcher in Duke-street, Aldgate ; the prisoner Levy was my servant . In consequence of information on Friday the 3rd of March, between the joists of the floor of the shop, and the ceiling of the cellar; I there saw an ox tongue; I took it out, made an incission and put a card in it with my own name on it; after I had marked it I put it back to the place, after which I went to dinner; after I sat down to dinner, I heard the door of the cellar either open or shut; I left my dinner and found that Levy and my other servant were both gone out of the house.

Q. Did they leave the house together - A. That I cannot say. I went into the street, and took the direction that went to Harris's house; I got sight of the man, which I suppose was Levy; I did not see his face, it appeared to be Levy from the size of him; I followed the same person into Harris's house; after he had been in the house perhaps a minute, I put my ear to the keyhole, I heard some voice, I cannot say it was either Harris or Levy, nor could I tell what they said; I went to get an officer, he was not at home; on the second consideration I thought I would leave it alone till the morning. On Saturday morning I went to Harris's house, he is a butcher in Petticoat-lane; I asked him if he had any tongues to sell, he said he had four or five; I requested him to let me look at them; he said he had sold them to another butcher. I took two tongues out of the tub.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-67

375. ELIZABETH PICKING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of John Souvelane , in the dwelling house of George Bicknell .

SECOND COUNT stating it to be the property of George Bicknell .

MRS. BICKNELL. Q. Are you the wife of George Bicknell - A. Yes, he is a sailor ; I live at No. 1, Ship-street, St. George's in the East ; I rent the whole house. The prisoner lived about an hundred yards from me.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She sews sail-work for ships ; she asked me to come and see her child, as it lay dead; she asked me to lend her a black skirt; I said yes; she went up to my grandmother for the skirt; my grandmother lives with me; I was out at work when she went for the skirt; I put the watch in the drawer on the Friday evening; she went on the Saturday morning.

Q. What is your grandmother's name - A. Mary George .

MARY GEORGE . On the 25th of February the prisoner came; I opened the drawer for a skirt, the watch was by the side of it; she rather hurried me; I stooped down to take the skirt, and I missed the watch. I never saw it since.

OBADIAH COOPER . I live with Mr. Cordy, Ratcliffe Highway; this watch was pawned by the prisoner on the 25th of February. I am positive this is the woman.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch in the days of my breath before.

The prisoner called one witness to character.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-68

376. PHILIP TRAGGER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Boyd Germaine , about the hour of eight at night, on the 3rd of April, with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, a gold ring, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of John Field .

JOHN FIELD . I am an artist ; this ring was placed in the shop window of Mr. Germaine in the Strand.

Q. All you know the ring is your property - A. Yes.

GEORGE DISMORE . I live with John Boyd Germaine; he is a jeweller , No. 25, in the Strand, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields ; he rents the house.

Q. When did this happen - A. I cannot say; I discovered it about eight o'clock on Tuesday morning.

Q. When did you see this ring - A. It was there on Monday afternoon inside of the shop; I cannot say when I saw it last; the window was not broken till after the candles were lit; on Tuesday morning I found the glass broke and pushed in, and this ring was taken out.

Q. Who did it you did not know - A. No; I did not see the ring taken out.

JONATHAN TROTT . On Tuesday the 4th of April, I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody upon another charge; I saw him very uneasy with one knee against the ham of the other leg; there was a great mob of people, I begged them to be kept back; seeing him uneasy, I said what have you got there; I took hold of his leg and found this ring and this penknife.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-69

377. BRIDGET M'LAUGHLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , forty yards of lace, value 4 l. the property of James Taylor Brown .

JAMES TAYLOR BROWN. I live at No. 77, Chiswell-street ; I am a haberdasher .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am a servant to Mr. Brown. On the 10th of March, about five o'clock, I was in the back room, I saw the prisoner and another by the shop window; the other came into the shop; I saw her have the lace in her hand; the prisoner was standing at the window all the time with her arms folded under her apron; the door was open; the other other one run out of the shop with the lace in her hand; they both ran up Golden-lane together; I am sure this is the woman that stood at the door.

JOHANNA WEBB . I attend the shop, I was not in the shop at the time; all I know there was some lace missing.

CHRISTOPHER WRIGHT . I was in the kitchen; I was called up, I ran after the prisoner and called out stop thief; both the woman ran up Golden-lane into Collier's-court, No. 7; the woman in a pink gown ran up stairs; a person came down and said what is the matter; I said you know what is the matter, I want the woman in the pink gown; she then run up stairs, and when the prisoner came down she was taken by the officer; she said let me alone, I have got nothing.

MARY BURTON . I live at No. 7, Collier's-court, Golden-lane; as I was sitting by the fire with a baby in my arms, I heard somebody run up stairs in a great hurry; I opened the door, I saw nobody, I heard the people talking; the first I saw was a little boy, Christopher Wright, I said what is the matter; he said you know what is the matter, I want the young woman in the pink gown; I said there is no young, woman here; I went up stairs to see, she came out of my room; she said give me the way, she went by and slipped down all the way. A man that was there, that I thought to be an officer, came up stairs, I desired him to go into my room to see if she had lodged the lace there; the lace was not there; I said it must be on the garret stairs; he went up and found it on the stairs; he said it is all right now, do not frighten yourself.

ANN DAWSON . I live in Chiswell-street, opposite of Mr. Brown; I was sitting at the three pair of stairs window, I observed two young women, one was standing at Mr. Brown's shop window and the other at the door looking through the glass; the prisoner had get her arms folded up; she went and spoke to the other woman and then they both went into the shop; the prisoner had a red shawl, and a check apron on, and as soon as she went into the shop I observed her take something and put it into he pocket, it was white; the moment she took it she walked off; the prisoner folded her arms and came out.

Q. Did you see the other take any thing - A. I saw the other take something and put it into her apron; the prisoner walked away, and the other one ran; they did not join together as I saw; they went towards Golden-lane.

Q. At the distance you was could you see into the shop, it is a wide street - A. I could perfectly see into the shop from where I was.

- BROOKE. I am an officer; I heard the alarm of stop thief in Beech-street; I ran and saw the prisoner go up Golden-lane; when she turned up Collier's-court I lost sight of her; I went up Collier's-court, I said where is she; they said in there; just as I was going into the house a man came out; he said leave her; I told him I should not, and just as I got on the door step she met me, I took her out of the house. She said I have got nothing, I shall not go, I won't go; I told her she was my prisoner; she resisted and hit me three times over my head.

Q. Was the lace ever found - A. No.

Q. to Burton. What was that man that took the lace - A. I do not know, I never saw him before; I thought he was an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the shop in my life, nor do not know where it is.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-70

378. ANN TOVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , a leather purse, value 1 d. and seven shillings, the property of William Hughes , from the person of Elizabeth his wife .

ELIZABETH HUGHES . My husband's name is William Hughes ; he is a soldier .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She is a bad person. On Monday the 13th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, me and my husband were coming

home with another soldier, we met this prisoner in Rope-maker-street; she asked me to have something to drink.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes; we went to the Jack of Newbury the corner of Bunhill-row, to drink with her; we had half a pint of gin between four of us; I told her if she would go along with me I would give her a drop in return. We went to the White-horse in Old-street; we had half a pint of rum there; then there were three of us; just as I called for it I fell down in a fit, I am subject to fits; when I came out of the fit I was very cold, and while I was putting my hand in my pocket to pay for the rum, I went into another fit; the purse fell out of my hand; when I came to I called for my purse; the landlord gave it me; when I went home, this good body went home with me; she held my left side, where I put my purse in. I went into my own house, this body was with me, and when I arose in the morning my purse was gone; I did not feel for it on the over night.

Q. Why do you accuse her with it - A. Because there was nobody in my company when I left the public house; my purse contained seven shillings in silver and a meat ticket.

Q. Have you ever found your purse again - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Are you really married to this man you call your husband - A. Yes; at Shoreditch church.

Q. What time was this you were coming home - A. Between ten and eleven at night; we had been to East Smithfield, where we had two pots of beer before.

Q. I should like to know how much you drank that day - can you tell me how a decent woman should go with your husband, invited by a bad girl to drink - A. She asked me to drink.

Q. Then whatever a person is, if they ask you, you drink with them, good or bad - A. Yes.

Q. And you are subject to fits - you put your hand in your pocket, and took out your pocket-book to pay for the rum, and down you fell dead drunk, and when you had recovered from your fit you was obliged to be led home by this good body - this woman was living in the neighbourhood - A. Yes.

Q. And you were in fits the whole night - what do you take generally for your fits - A. I never go to the doctor.

Q. Now if you were so bad in the fit, how could you tell that you put the purse into your left-hand pocket - I know I did.

Q. You could not walk steady, was not that the reason of your being led home - A. No, it was the fit.

JAMES GEARY . I am an headborough of St. Luke's. On Wednesday last I apprehended her; I searched her, and found the purse upon her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came out of the White Horse I kicked the purse before me, but there was nothing in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-71

379. ANN NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , a purse, value 1 d. a seven shilling, a shilling, and a penny piece, the property of William Driver , from his person .

WILLIAM DRIVER . On the 19th of February, a quarter after eleven at night, I was going home to my lodgings, down High-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner accosted me, she asked me if I would give her something to drink; I told her I would not; she put her hand into my pocket and drew my purse, with a seven shilling piece in it; I felt her hand come out of my pocket; I catched her hand, and felt the purse in it. I and the watchman took her to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse; I took the purse from her pocket, it contained a seven shilling piece, a shilling, and a few halfpence; the prosecutor claimed the purse.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This man asked me in Whitechapel to take a walk with me in an indecent manner, and behaved very indecent; he said take the purse if you will go up any turning; I did not choose; he gave me the purse and a seven shilling piece, and because I would not be indecent in the street, he asked me for it again; when I came to the watchhouse it was found in my pocket - then I said if you are wicked enough to have me locked up after giving it me, you shall be locked up too - I gave charge of him.

Partridge. The prosecutor had no charge given of him; he living at Poplar, staid with me to go before the magistrate the next morning to substantiate the charge.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-72

380. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 6 s. and five yards of cambric, value 12 s. the property of John Savage and Robert Evans .

ROBERT EVANS . I am a linen draper in Oxford-street , my partner's name is John Savage ; the prisoner is our porter . On the 25th of February, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock, as William Webb was sweeping out the shop, I noticed a handkerchief hanging out of his pocket, I suspected it to be our property; I requested to look at it, it was quite new and not in the least tumbled; I asked him where he got it from, he said he had it from the baker's man that served me with bread the day before to match it for another; I went over to the baker's man, and requested to see the handkerchief that he had bought; the handkerchief he produced me was all over flour, it had been worn some time. After breakfast I questioned the prisoner again; he still persisted that he had it of this man; I told him I had seen the baker's man, and the handkerchief he had bought was then in his possession. He then confessed he had taken it. I sent for a constable, he searched him and his box.

HENRY BEVAN . I assist in serving in the shop. I saw a handkerchief in the prisoner's pocket, which I knew to be one of our patterns. Mr. Evans came into the shop, I observed it to him, I asked him what he had in his pocket, then he put it further in.

CATHERINE FLINDALL . I am cook to Mr. Evans; I produce a piece of print I found in the prisoner's bed in the shop, under the counter; I went to take the dirty sheets off his bed, I found it between the prisoner's sheets. The print was found after he was in custody.

RICHARD GEORGE . I am a parish constable. I

apprehended the prisoner in the prosecutors' shop, about nine o'clock on the 25th of February. I found the silk handkerchief in his hat; he first told me he had it of the baker's man; at the watchhouse he said he found it behind the counter as he was sweeping up the shop.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Henry Bevan owed me a spite ever since Christmas; he would not share the Christmas box with me; I told master, he made him.

Bevan. We have quarrelled; I never owed him any spite.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-73

381. MARY KEELING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , a shirt, value 2 s. the property of James Leonard .

BRIDGET LEONARD . I am the wife of James Leonard. I take in washing; I live in Meeting-house-court, Worship-street . I hung the shirt on a line in the court about two o'clock on the 5th of April; about seven o'clock in the evening my neighbour saw her take it off the line; she took it from her and gave it me. I know the shirt.

FRANCES SEIR . I live in Meeting-house-court; last Wednesday week, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take the shirt off the line in the court and put it in her lap; I went after her and took it from her; she run towards the office; they took her in, and I was sent for.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The shirt flew off the line I suppose; I took it up; the woman said it belonged to her, I gave it to her.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Imprisoned One Week in Newgate .

Second Middlesex before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-74

382. SARAH BALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , two pounds weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of Isaac Jordan .

ISAAC JORDAN . I live at Edmonton ; I keep a cheesemonger's shop there. On the 8th of April the prisoner came to me with some black-lead to sell; I bought the black lead of her; the bacon was on the counter, I observed her take the bacon and put it into her handkerchief; she had a quartern loaf, a candle, and a pipe of tobacco; she bundled the things up and went out of the shop; I followed her, and charged her with having stolen my bacon; when I brought her back she declared she did not know any thing at all of it; it was two pounds of bacon; I sell it for a shilling a pound.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this gentleman's shop, I asked him to buy seven pounds of black lead, I told him it was eight pence a pound; he agreed to give me eight pence a pound; after he had weighed it he emptied it into his drawer and put me down three shillings and sixpence, he said that was plenty, he thought, perhaps I might have stolen it. I never saw the bacon till he came after me; he said you have a bit of bacon of mine; I said I did not know any thing about it; he stooped down and picked up the bacon and called me a thieving whore.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-75

383. JAMES LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing on 11th of March , three seven-shilling pieces , the property of James John Kimber .

JAMES JOHN KIMBER . I am a pawnbroker at Knightsbridge . On the 9th of March the prisoner came, he said he wanted a watch key; he came again the next day, he said he wanted a watch key; I said you had one yesterday; he said he sold that, he got a pint of beer by that; I had missed some money, I suspected him; I marked twelve seven shilling pieces and four half guineas. On the 11th he came again, I went to a neighbour's, my lad came to me; I went to my shop and took the prisoner by the collar, and said that he had got some of my money; he denied it; I desired him to turn the money out of his pocket; he put his hand in his pocket and took out fourteen or fifteen shillings, he said is there any thing you can swear to; I said yes, there is two seven shilling pieces that I have marked, knowing that you would come; I said there was another; he said if there was, he had a wife and family, he hoped I would not hurt him; there was seven shillings for that. These are the two seven shilling pieces, I have kept them by themselves; I know they are my own seven shillings pieces by the mark.

- GOODYEAR. I am a servant to the prosecutor. On the 11th of March the prisoner came for a watch key; I gave him the key; he said let me have a seven shilling piece, like that I had before to put at the bottom of a punch ladle; I shewed him the seven shilling pieces; after a bit I missed three of them; I then went and told my master, and he was apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of the affair as a child unborn.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-76

384. CATHERINE FANNIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , two half crowns , the property of James Tidball .

JAMES TIDBALL . I am a line and twine manufacturer in the Old Artillery-ground ; the prisoner was my servant , I entrusted her to serve in my shop. On the 20th of February, about eleven o'clock; I went out, I sent a person with marked money to buy goods, I gave William Taylor two half crowns and seven shillings; I told the prisoner not to put the money in the till, but on the press behind the counter. I gave him twelve shillings and eight pence, marked money; he brought me the twine that I ordered; I returned about two hours afterwards, I asked her what she had sold, she gave me the money she had taken, to the amount of eleven shillings and ten pence; I looked over the money, and found six shillings missing of the marked money.

Q. She was not bound to give you the same money, was she - A. No; I apprehended she had taken more

money than she delivered me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-77

385. CHARLES ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , two pound weight of hemp, value 2 s. the property of William Sims , sen. William Sims , jun. and Jacob Sims .

JONATHAN DODD. I am servant to Messrs. Sims; the prisoner was employed by them. On the 17th of February in the evening, I catched hold of the prisoner's pocket, and took out these three pieces of hemp, they were made up hard; he absconded.

- HOLBROOK. I am an officer of Shadwell. I apprehended the prisoner about three weeks after the robbery.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. We were chucking hemp about. Some went over a neighbour's yard; one of the men went and picked it up, for fear master should know of it, they began chucking it about again; I said you shall not chuck it about, I will put it in my pocket, and when I was coming out I put my coat on.

The prisoner called one witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-78

386. ALEXANDER M'QUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , five fowls, value 20 s. the property of James Wyatt .

JAMES WYATT . I live at No. 13, Pleasant-row, Globe-fields, Bethnal-green . On the 12th of March, about half after four in the morning, I was alarmed by a noise, I got out of bed as quick as I could; I found my washhouse door broken open and all my fowls taken away, four hens and a cock. Joseph Evans took the prisoner about three gardens from my place.

JOSEPH EVANS . I am a weaver; my boy keeps some rabbits; the rabbits made a noise, the boy got out of bed and saw the outer door open, he called to me and said there was a man gone away with his rabbits; I immediately jumped out of bed and went after the man; about three gardens off I took the prisoner with one fowl under his arm, and a great stick in his hand; I kept him till assistance came; the man that assisted me picked the other four fowls up coming along; they were in a bag.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will shew me mercy.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-79

387. GEORGE NEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , twenty-four pound weight of brass, value 10 s. three screws, value 1 s. and two patent lamps, value 16 s. the property of James Smethurst .

JAMES SMETHURST . I live in Upper-Berkley-street, Portman-square. On the 13th of March Mr. Butters called at my house to know if I had missed any property; I went to his house, and there I saw the property; the whole of the brass is mine; there is but three pieces I can swear to. I desired him to come to my house in Bond-street; he did; he saw George New , my porter ; he said New was the person that brought the brass to sell, in the presence of the prisoner.

MR. BUTTERS. I live at No. 36, Wigmore-street. On the 9th of March, the prisoner brought this brass to me and offered it to sell; I suspected it was not honestly come by, I stopped the brass; I told him if he brought any respectable person to convince me he came honestly by it I would buy it; he called himself Thomas Wilkes , he said he worked for Mr. Panton. From information I went to Mr. Smethurst's shop, I saw the prisoner, I asked him why he did not call for the money for the brass he had left at my house a few evenings ago; he said he had not been that way since. I am sure he is the man that presented the brass for sale.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am a constable. On the 13th of March, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; as soon as I got to Mr. Smethurst's house, he asked if he was to suffer alone, he should not have done it if his fellow porter had not put it into the basket and asked him to carry it out to sell; I said you did carry it out and offer it for sale; he said he did.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-80

388. ELIZABETH KINHOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , seven pounds and a half weight of beef, value 5 s. and two pounds and a half weight of mutton, value 20 d. the property of William Watkins .

WILLIAM WATKINS . I am a butcher ; the prisoner is a teacher of languages , she lives in Titchfield street. On the 6th of April, about two o'clock, she came in the shop and purchased some beaf steaks of my young man; I was at dinner, I saw her take the beef and mutton from the shop board; I followed her and took the beef from her, it was under her right arm under her cloak. I will swear to my beef.

Mr. Knapp. You have made an enquiry of this woman, and you find that she is a respectable character - A. Yes; I do not think that she is right in her mind.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-81

389. THOMAS POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , four yards of coating, value 30 s. the property of John Hobbs .

JOHN HOBBS . I am a mercer and woollen draper , 401, Oxford-street . On the 28th of March, the prisoner and two others were in my shop; they enquired for a person of the name of Gray, a woollen-draper; my lad was only in the shop at the time; Powell called my young man forward to give an answer to them; he went forward and they asked for the same person they had before; he not knowing of any such person came into the back parlour to me; I heard him ask a second time; I went forward immediately, I told him I did not know any such person; I then saw the man take up the coating and go out with it with the prisoner; I saw the man that took it give it to the prisoner in the street; he was going on with it, I overtook him, brought him back and the piece of coating to my own house. This is the coating, it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. I leave it to the mercy of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-82

390. SARAH SPRINGETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , a shirt, value 7 s. and two silver tea spoons, value 4 s. the property of Edward Harwood .

SARAH HARWOOD . I am the wife of Edward Harwood , I live at No. 19, Rose-street, at the back of St. Luke's church . On the 21st of February I missed two silver tea-spoons and a shirt; on the 22nd of February the prisoner came into my kitchen, and said I should find the shirt between that and Saturday, in my own house; in consequence of that, when my husband came home, I called her in and told her that she must be the thief; she said if I would say nothing about it I should have my shirt; she at last confessed that she had pawned it and destroyed the duplicate; we went to the pawnbroker's, where she confessed she had pawned it, and there we found it.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer of St. Luke's. On Thursday February the 23d I apprehended the prisoner; I found the duplicate of a shirt on her for six shillings, pledged on the 18th of February, in the name of Elizabeth Springett, and a duplicate of a tea-spoon pledged for eighteen-pence; I have another duplicate of a spoon delivered to me by the prosecutor; he told me he found it in her room.

JAMES KING . I am a pawnbroker, I live at Mr. Parsons', 61 Holywell-street, Shoreditch. On the 18th of February a shirt was pawned in the prisoner's name for six shillings, and a tea-spoon for one shilling and nine-pence.

ROBERT RAY . I am a pawnbroker, 97 Old-street, On the 17th of February the prisoner pledged a teaspoon with me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was left a widower with four small children; I was out of work, my children were crying for bread; I took the spoons, and then I took the shirt. I told her I would restore her property by Saturday night. On the Thursday the officer took me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-83

391. WILLIAM WHITEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , 1 l. 19 s. 2 d. in monies numbered , the property of William Woodcock .

WILLIAM WOODCOCK . I live at the Dover Castle, Grosvenor-mews, Grosvenor-place. On Thursday the 2nd of March I had an order to send two pots of ale to sir John Callan 's butler, Mansfield-street; the prisoner was my servant ; he paid him the money immediately he took it; he came back to me, put down a shilling, and said take one pot out of the shilling, and send change for a two-pound note, and take the other pot; the pot of ale came to ten-pence; I gave him a guinea, a half guinea, and seven shillings and eight-pence; he took the change. I never saw him afterwards till he was taken. Sir John's butler never gave him orders for any change.

Q. Is the butler here - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-84

392. WILLIAM WHITBREAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , three saws, value 12 s. the property of William Birch .

JOHN SCOTT . I am a watchman. On the 23d of February, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner, he had the saws and some boards; I asked him whose they were, he said his brother had given him them: I had a suspicion, I took him to the watchhouse; they proved to be William Birch 's saws.

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-85

393. MARGARET CONNON , alias SMALLWOOD , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , a silver gravy spoon, value 18 s. the property of James Fosberry .

JAMES FOSBERRY . I keep Thomas's hotel , Berkley-square ; the prisoner was a pot-girl , I know nothing of the transaction.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER. I live at Mr. Essex, pawnbroker, 224 in the Strand. On Thursday the 9th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought me a gravy spoon to pledge, asking thirty shillings upon it, she said it was her mistress's; I told her that I suspected she had taken it from her master or mistress. I sent for an officer and had her taken in custody.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I came very honestly by the spoon, the pot-man gave it me.

Prosecutor. The prisoner said that her fellow servant gave it her at the Hole in the Wall; and when he heard that she was taken in custody, he took his box and ran away. The boy and she used to frequent my house to see the servant.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-86

394. FRANCES COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of April , two shirts, value 8 s. and two shirts, value 10 s. the property of James Collin .

JANE COLLIN . I am the wife of James Collin , I take in washing, I live in Shepherd's-court, No. 19 , Curzon-street, May-fair; I employed the prisoner to wash for me. On the 15th of April I detected a shift between the prisoner's petticoats, I was stooping down by her side, I saw something white by her petticoats, I laid hold of it; she said it was her's; she snatched it out of my hand, she said she wanted to wash it; I did not mind it any more till the Sunday; I missed a shirt; then I sent for an officer.

ALEXANDER BALL . I went to the house where the prisoner lodged; the prosecutor, pointed out the prisoner; I had a hard struggle to get the prisoner's pockets from her. I took out of one pocket a silver table spoon; the next thing an handkerchief; the prosecutor said that was hers. I felt further in the pocket; I found the duplicate of a shift.

PHILIP EASTON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shirt and a shift, pawned on the 1st of April and the 7th of April, by the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When the constable took hold of my pockets, I said I had a spoon belonging to lord Fitzgerald, that I meaned to take home the next morning.

I know nothing of the other shirt.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-87

395. TIMOTHY COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a sack, value 5 s. the property of William Parkins and John Thompson .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a coal merchant , I keep the Adelphi wharf .

ROBERT COLLINS . I am a carman to Mr. Thompson. On Tuesday evening last, about half past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner go away from the waggon with an empty sack; I followed him into the Strand, I stopped him and brought him and the sack to my masters' accompting house; this is the sack, I am sure it is my masters'. The waggon was standing under the Adelphi wharf.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the sack within three yards of the Strand; I took it across the Strand to lay it upon a post, and just before I got to the post this man came and said it was his masters' sack; I said take it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-88

396. CHRISTOPHER HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , two halfcrown pieces, twenty-five shillings, and eighteen sixpences , the property of Samuel Barnard .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Barnard. On the 26th of February I met a man -

Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. He is very much like the man. I met a man at the door of Mr. Barrett's shop, he told me to bring half a pint of rum, and change for a two pound-note; I took one pound nineteen shillings, and I met the man by the door of Mr. Barrett's shop; he said you have been a long while, give me the change; here is the note; I do not want the rum. He gave me this bit of paper.

Q. Look at the prisoner - is he the man - A. He is very much like the man; I am not quite certain; I never saw him before.

Q. After you had given the man his change, how soon after was the prisoner taken up - A. In half an hour.

Q. Were you quite sure then that was the man that you gave the change to - A. Yes; he was very much like him in the face.

Q. Were you sure then that he was the man - A. Not quite sure.

SAMUEL MILLER . I took him in custody on Sunday, February the 26th; I found on him two shillings and sixpence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-89

397. CHRISTOPHER HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , a half guinea, and two shillings , the property of William Brewer .

WILLIAM WARTON . I am servant to William Brewer , a cheesemonger , No. 280, Whitechapel-road. He sent a little boy to our shop; he said please to send two pound of Cambridge butter to Nottingham-place, No 2; he met me at the corner of Nottingham-place; he told me to go back and get a pound of best Cheshire cheese, and a shillings-worth of eggs, and change for a one pound note; I took him the change, twelve shillings and ten pence; I gave it him; he took me to No. 9, and bid me go to the next door but one; there was nobody lived there. He gave me this paper.

Q. You gave him the change and he gave you this paper - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You do not know the prisoner - A. No; I never saw him before the time he met me; I took great notice of him; he certainly is the person, I have no doubt about him.

Q. Have you never had a doubt, and said you believed he was the man - A. I never said I believed he was the man, I was sure he was the man.

Q. It was very dark, was it not - A. But there was light at the corner shop; I am quite sure that is the man, I swear positively that he is the man.

Mr. Knapp to Thomas Williams . You have heard the witness swear to the person of the prisoner - what did you hear him say - A. I said to him this afternoon are you sure that is the man; he said I believe that is the man.

COURT to Warton. Did you say this afternoon that you believed it - A. No, I did not; I said I was sure he was the man.

COURT to Williams. How old are you - A. I am thirteen next May.

Q. You told me you had never seen the prisoner before - A. Yes

Q. Is that true - A. Yes.

COURT. How came you to tell the justice that you had seen him at your master's bar; you said then I am certain the prisoner is the man - A. I had seen him at the bar several times, at the bar of my master's house; and I know his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-90

398. CHRISTOPHER HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , two seven shilling pieces, and five shillings , the property of Francis Saunders .

JOHN STEVENS . I am a labourer; at the time of this transaction I was servant to Francis Saunders , he keeps a coal-shed in William-street, Commercial-road . At the latter end of January, about twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came to me and ordered half a bushel of coals, and change of a one pound note; I took the coals, I met him just at the end of our street; he asked me if I had got the change; I told him yes; I gave him two seven shilling pieces and five shillings; he asked me whether I had brought any wood; I told him I had not, there was none ordered as I knew of; he gave me a piece of paper rolled up as for the note; he told me he would go for the wood; I went up to the place where he directed and knocked at the door, a woman came out; I said ma'am here is coals for you; she said they were not for her; she would not take them in.

Q. Now look at that man - A. To the best of my knowledge, I am certain sure that is the man; I saw him two or three times, and I saw him by the light of our lamps; I pointed him out at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I always bore the character which I bear before you.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-91

399. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a leather backband, value 3 s. an iron chain trace, value 3 s. a ball-cock, value 5 s. four small bolts and nuts, value 2 s. two axle-tree boxes, value 1 s. and three pieces of iron, value 1 s. the property of Richard Winstanley and John Strange Winstanley .

JOHN BRINE. I live in the New-road, Somers-town. The property was taken from Woburn-mews ; there had been a sale there; the prisoner was Mr. Winstanley, the auctioneer's, porter ; I was put in possession of the yard to see the things lotted out.

JOHN HUTT . I am a police officer of Hatton-garden. On the 16th of March, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner was coming down Cow-cross with another man, with a bag on his back; he went into an old iron shop, kept by one Newman, he acted very cautious before he went in, and turned round to see if any one was looking after him; I do not think he could see me, I was standing in the door-way of the public house opposite; the prisoner went right in the iron shop; I followed him. The other man went away then; when I got into the shop I laid hold of the prisoner, I said my friend what have you got here; he said he had only got some bits of iron; I said I must see what it is; he said it was his own property, he brought them from home; I saw it contained copper and brass, I told him he must go along with me.

JOHN STRANGE WINSTANLEY . Q. Are you in partnership with your father - A. Yes, his name is Richard Winstanley ; we are auctioneers .

Q. Do you know any thing of these things - A. Nothing whatever; the prisoner was one of our porters. We had a sale at Woburn-mews.

Q. Do you know whether you had any such things for sale - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. There is nothing of them in the catalogue - A. No.

COURT. Very likely, there is many things in a sale left out in a catalogue - whose property were these things - A. The late Mr. Scrimshaw's, a stone mason and builder; they were to be sold by order of the executors.

Q. You had a disposing power over these things - A. Yes; on the 16th of March, the sale was to finish in the afternoon.

Q. to Brine. You say you was in the possession of this yard, were Mr. Scrimshaw's things there for the purpose of sale - A. Yes; I saw this backband; when I was there I observed that this backband was not in the catalogue, to the other porter; these bolts I recollect, and all the things were like what was there; I told the other porter I should purchase them myself.

Prisoner's Defence. The things in question laid about; there were none of them in the catalogue.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-92

400. JOHN CANNON and WILLIAM BARNES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , twenty sugar bags, value 20 s. the property of Benjamin Severn and Frederick Benjamin King .

WILLIAM WINNING . I am a servant to Benjamin Severn and Frederick Benjamin King ; they are sugar grinders , Mile-end Old-town in the Commercial-road.

Q. Do you know these men Cannon and Barnes - A. Barnes was carman to them, and Cannon is a man that deals in bags , he lives in Clerkenwell; he had been a servant to Messrs. Severn and King .

Q. Do you know whether Messrs. Severn and King lost any sugar bags - A. On Friday last I heard that these men were in custody; I saw them and the bags; I examined the bags, I know them by the East India warrants.

THOMAS BISHOP . I am the principal superintendant of Messrs. Severn and King's sugar manufactory. On Thursday the 13th of April, I stood at my door, I saw the waggon stop in White-horse-lane, Stepney; Barnes was driving the waggon, Cannon was with him; it was about a quarter past seven in the evening; Barnes had to bring the bags from Mr. Severn's and King's house in Queen-street, Cheapside, to be washed to get the sugar out; on my seeing the waggon stop I went to the waggon, the two men were by the waggon; I remonstrated with the carman for being so late, he ought to have been there at half past four; he was completely drunk; I requested him to take the horses and waggon into the yard; I asked Cannon whose bags they were on the pavement; he gave me answer that he brought them from over the water, he said they were his; I said I was afraid they were the property of Messrs. Severn and King; he said how could I think of such a thing, knowing him so long; I requested him to take the bags into the yard, which he did; I sent for an officer, I gave charge of him; he said he was innocent. The bags were on the pavement by the waggon when I came up. As far as the proof of these papers, these bags correspond with these papers; we found twenty bags with the marks on them, they correspond with the warrants.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-93

401. EDWARD GILBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , a shirt, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. and a coat, value 5 s. the property of George Reeves .

TIMOTHY DAVIS . I live at Pits-end, South-mims . On the 9th of April, the prisoned lodger in my house; he got up in the morning and left other lodgers in the room, in bed; on the next day, about three o'clock, the prisoner was going by my house with a recruiting serjeant, he had enlisted; I asked the serjeant where he was going to take the prisoner to, I said I have reason to detain him, he has robbed my house; he had got Reeves' shirt and waistcoat; the coat he said he had sold for five shillings; these things were all in the

room where he slept.

GEORGE REEVES . Q. Where did you lose your things - A. Out of Mr. Davis's house; my coat off the bed, my shirt, waistcoat, and stockings out of my box, in the same room.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-94

402. WILLIAN BERRESFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March , two quires of paper, value 1 s. 2 d. and two quires and seven sheets of other paper, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Harris .

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am a tallow chandler ; I live in Broad-wall, Christ-church-parish, Surry . The prisoner was an officer of excise , and surveyed my candles; I had been under his survey about five or six months. On the 15th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, I marked two quires of paper, I left them in the work shop on a box; we are in the wholesale way there.

Q. Was that place where you left them where the prisoner and the other excise officers would have access - A. Yes; I saw the paper on the 16th, it was all right then, about eleven o'clock in the evening.

Q. When did you miss it - A. On the 17th my young man got up about five o'clock, he missed it; I missed it on the 17th at seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. At the time when you saw it last, what person was on the premises - A. None but my own men.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had been there between eleven o'clock at night and five in the morning - A. Yes, he was there about half past twelve at night, he signed a specimen that night. On the morning of the 17th, about eleven or twelve o'clock, I obtained a search warrant, and with the officers, I went to the prisoner's house in a court in Gray's-inn-lane; we found him at home, and made a search; we found the whole of the two quires of paper; I had marked them. The officer asked him where he got this paper, and I think his answer was, that he got it from my manufactory; I will not be certain of it.

Mr. Gleed. You have not a very great partiality for excise officers, have you - A. If they conduct themselves with propriety we do not dislike them.

Q. During the time you were under this man's survey, had you any dispute with him - A. About three months before he had made a false survey; I had no words with him.

Prisoner. That is very wrong, Mr. Harris; see what is before you there - [pointing to the inscription over the bench.]

COURT. You was displeased with what you call a false survey - A. Yes; he alarmed my family, and I thought he came for what I found him; he had no occasion to come that night, we did not expect him; my wife was very much alarmed indeed.

GEORGE TANNER . I am clerk to Mr. Harris. On the morning of the 17th I let the prisoner in at the gate, I suppose it to be about half past twelve o'clock; on the beginning of the 17th at night I let him in, gave him the key of the workshop, and went to bed.

Q. When he went there he had access to the place where the paper was - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen any paper in the warehouse before you went to bed that night - A. Yes, I had seen the paper there between ten and eleven o'clock that night. I left no one in the shop when I went to bed.

Q. How early did you rise in the morning - A. About five o'clock in the morning; I went in with an excise officer named Pyrke; there was no person had been except the prisoner at that time; none of the workmen had come to work before I went in, I am certain of that; I went in at five o'clock with that excise officer, and missed the paper.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer.

Q. Did you on the morning of the 17th of March go with the prosecutor with any search warrant to the prisoner's house - A. I did, about eleven o'clock in the middle of the day; the prisoner's house I think is in Bull-head-court, Gray's-inn-lane; the prisoner was sitting in the house; he acknowledged he was the person. I searched the bottom part of the house, where he was; I did not find any thing there. I told the prisoner my business, I had come to search for some paper that he had stole from Mr. Harris; I went up stairs; seeing the one pair of stairs door open, I said to Mr. Harris we will go in here; I had searched below, and left the prisoner in my brother officer's custody; the prisoner's mother and Mr. Harris went up with me; I found it in a one pair of stairs bed-room, laying on a chair, just as it is now; I took it down stairs and shewed it the prisoner. Mr. Harris told the prisoner it was his paper, there was his hand writing on it, and the day of the month, and he must have stolen it.

Q. Did you see Mr. Harris's hand writing upon it - A. Yes; the prisoner said nothing, he seemed in a melancholy way; after he sat a little bit I asked him who had put the paper in the room above, he said he did himself; I said there is Mr. Harris' hand writing on it; he said it is his paper; he was silent then for some time. I said if you put the paper there you must know who you brought it from; he then said, I suppose I must tell; no said I; you are not bound to tell unless you please; he then said he took the paper from Mr. Harris, and begged Mr. Harris not to be severe with him; the paper is marked J. Harris, March 15th, on six of the sheets, in small characters, on the back, inside the sheets.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner to Harris. You know, sir, you are upon oath - what quantity of paper do you swear to - A. To the quantity found.

Q. You swear to four quires of paper -

COURT. No, to two.

Prisoner. I am by trade a bookbinder; he knows we use various kinds of paper of all quality and sizes, and paper of that quality and size I bought of Mr. Burslam - where did Mr. Harris buy that paper - A. Harris. I bought that paper of Mr. Burslam.

Prisoner. Can you swear to that hand writing - A. Yes; on the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock. George Tanner saw me write it.

Q. You have brought a witness to swear to your hand writing - can he swear to it - A. He saw me write it.

Mr. Gurney, to Tanner. Did you see Mr. Harris write his name on that paper - A. Yes; I can swear to his hand writing: I can swear that I saw Mr. Harris write this; his name, and March 15th; I know my

master's hand writing.

COURT. Can you swear that you saw him write 15th of March on this paper before the search warrant was taken out - A. Yes. I have lived with Mr. Harris three years; all the time this man was under the survey.

Q. During the time this man has surveyed do you remember any quarrel - A. No quarrel between them at all. Mr. Harris wrote in the specimen a wrong survey.

Q. To your knowledge has any complaint been prefered to the board of excise, or to a justice of peace by this man - A. I never heard of any complaint being made by this man.

Q. You never heard of any complaint being made by this man, so as to excite your master's resentment - A. I never heard any thing of the sort.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 1st of day of October I came to the division where Mr. Harris now resides; I commenced surveying him on that day. It was about five months ago, or better, that he attempted to get a brother officer, William Williams , discharged, for making a false survey; that was reported to the surveyor, it proved an unfortunate case for the young man, but for the character that Mr. Harris bore with the excise - Mr. Harris has been before that time fined for running the duties of the excise twice, but ever since he has had an antipathy to excise officers, for their preventing him robbing government of the duties. It was about four months ago I was surveying candles at Mr. Harris's; when we were weighing them there was sixty-eight pounds draft in the scales, I called out sixty-eight, he cried out sixty-three pounds; Mr. Harris turned his heel and went away; Mr. Harris paid full duty for that. It is my turn every third week to survey the house of the prosecutor day and night. It was in the month of February, about three weeks ago, I waited near an hour at the door, it rained very hard, it was between two and three o'clock, I was wet through; I rung the bell very hard, then in about ten minutes I got admittance. When we make a survey at the house it is common for us to sign a specimen, a book hanging up in the house; I made a survey then; I wrote upon the specimen, between two and three o'clock in the morning; Mr. Harris came into the factory in a very great passion, he wrote upon the specimen that I had made a false survey, that it was about half past twelve when I went there, which was more than he ought to have done; George Tanner , his man, supported the case against me to my surveyor, and it very nearly turned out a serious affair in getting me discharged, but the surveyor knowing the character of him, I was not discharged; I denied the charge to Mr. Harris's face, and to the face of George Tanner . From that time I could see that Mr. Harris had some spite against me, he could never look me in my face as a man; whenever I met him he always looked down as though all was not right. Nothing particular transpired from that time till the 16th of March, I had occasion to go to Mr. Harris's again; my brother officer told me to take care how I dealt with the person here present, I made my usual survey on the 17th, about two o'clock in the morning, before day light. The man, George Tanner let me in, I made my usual survey, I was five minutes in the premises altogether; after that I went and made my survey at Mr. Benjamin Hall's and Mr. Scrimshaw's, I believe they are in coalition together, one of whom the honourable gentleman standing up is a relation to; I leave it to these people, if they are here, to know whether I had any paper about me at the time; after I left these premises I had no paper with me; I did not go back to Mr. Harris's premises again.

COURT. There is nothing in the size of that paper that you might not carry it without observation.

Prisoner. After six o'clock I went home and cleaned my regimentals, I was going to attend parade in the excise corps. Between twelve and one two officers came in with a search warrant; they asked me if Mr. Berresford lived there; I said yes; they asked if he was at home; I said I was the person in question; they said they had a search warrant; no search warrant was shewn to me, nor did they tell me what they were come for; they made their search in the room below where I was in; there they could find nothing; they went down stairs, searched the cellar, they could find nothing there; and as I am informed they searched the top of the house next, up in the garret, they could find nothing there that they wanted; they went into the apartment on the first floor, which was a ready furnished lodging. They came down stairs afterwards with the paper in their hands; I wanted to go up myself, I was refused, my wife was refused, and my children was refused.

COURT. Do you mean that no one of the family was permitted to go - A. Yes, at first; afterwards my mother went into the room to them, but that was after they had got the paper in their hand; when she went up stairs they were searching a chest of drawers, and the officer wanted to take out two half crowns out of the drawer belonging to one of my children; she refused it, and said they had no right to do any such thing; when they found that they called her a d - d fornicating b - h, and used such language which frightened the poor creature, that she hardly knew what she was doing of. The officer came down with the paper and asked me if I knew any thing about the paper belonging to Mr. Harris; I told them no; there was some threatening language used to me (I never was in a court before); I did not know what I said not any more than what I said the first time, that I did know any thing about it. Then the officer handcuffed me; as I was being handcuffed I turned my head and asked to kiss one of my children before I went; the answer made was if I was not quiet they would knock out my brains. I declare to God in Heaven I do not know by what means it came in my house no more than a child unborn; I really believe that there were some illegal tricks practiced against me; yet I have every reason to believe I shall meet with that justice in this court that every Englishman expects.

Mr. Gurney, to Harris. The prisoner has said that you are a fraudulent trader - I believe you were once fined, what was that transaction - A. I had a young man that was unaccustomed to making candles; it is six years ago; he moved six pound of candles from one box to another; my men told him it was wrong; I was absent, I paid fifty pounds for it; it was totally without my knowledge.

Q. He says that you have taken some dislike to him because upon weighing some candles you called sixty-three,

when they ought to be sixty-eight - A. No such a thing; I never weighed them; my man weighs them; I never spoke one word when he was weighing of candles.

Q. Have you any reason to believe the excise entertain any suspicion of you - A. I know they have no reason, and I do know that they do not; I never went to make any complaint to the surveyor, nor caused George Tanner to go about the false survey; I wrote on the specimen only, a false survey; there is no occasion of sending any person to the surveyor, he must sign it as well as we. The surveyor must see it.

COURT. Did you know where this man lodged before the occurrence happened - A. I swear not. I sent to the chamberlain to get his address, after the circumstance happened, on the 17th of March, the same morning, and not till then. When we got to his house the officer went in first; I never went in the house before I went in with Trott.

Q. Did any person with your knowledge, direction, or consent, go that house where he lived before the search warrant went there - A. No one.

Q. When you went there did he desire to go up stairs - A. He did not say any thing till after we went up stairs; then I understood by the other officer he wanted to come up stairs.

Q. Did the officer in your presence tell him what he came to search for - A. Yes; he told him he came to search for paper that was lost.

Prisoner. That I deny Mr. Harris.

COURT. Did you search the cellar - A. We did, and the lower room, where he was, I found some candles, which I knew to be my own; we asked him what other part of the house belonged to him; he or his wife said the garret; we were going up and the old woman, his mother, or his wife's mother, said two pair of stairs gentlemen, in a loud voice, she said so twice. The prisoner made no request to go with us as I heard; when we got to the first floor the officer perceived the door to be open, he said we will walk in here; the old woman was on the stairs close behind; as soon as we got into the room I saw the paper laying in the chair; I said it was my paper.

Q. Did you search any chest of drawers - A. It was searched by the officer; the officer asked her whose property it was; she said it was Mr. Berresford's; the officer opened a little box, found two half crowns; the old woman said that is the children's; the officer replied we have nothing to do with that, he put it in the box again; there was no ill language passed whatever; the officer said he had done a bad thing, it was a chance but he would be transported; there was no reproachful language made use of whatever.

Mr. Gurney to Tanner. Do you recollect the time that this survey was made, which your master thought was irregular - A. Yes, about three months ago.

Q. Upon that occasion did your master make any complaint to the office - A. No other than writing a false survey; I do not know but what the surveyor, John Lewis , asked him what time he was there.

Q. Of your own knowledge did your master ever attempt to remove this man from his place as an excise officer - A. Not to my knowledge, no otherwise than writing in the specimen.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, from the 5th of March when you saw your master put these marks on the paper, down to the time that you went to the house of the prisoner with the officers, did you know where the prisoner lived - A. Not untill the 17th, about eight or nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did you either of your own accord or by the desire of your master go to that house, or send any person till you went with the officer to execute the search warrant - A. No; nor do I know of any person going there by the consent of my master before the search warrant was executed; I was present when the search warrant was executed; he never expressed a desire to follow us, as I know of. The old woman went up with the officer; she was before me, but not before the officer.

Q. to Trott. Did you acquaint the prisoner with every thing that you came to search for, when you came into the house, that you came to search for paper - A. I did, I am sure of that; and when his mother attemped to get out of the room, if it his mother, I desired my brother officer not to let her go; I learned from the prosecutor where the prisoner lived, a little time before the warrant was obtained; we went instantly we had the warrant.

Q. Had you the opportunity of going to the prisoners house before you went with the warrant - A. No; I had something particular to do, I was glad to go and come back again; I will swear that I never went to the prisoner's house before I went with the warrant; and I did not know it then till the number of the door was pointed out to me.

Q. While you were below with the prisoner did he express any desire to accompany you up stairs, when you made the search warrant - A. He did not, that I swear positively, if he had I should have permitted him; but the mother went; if he had gone I should have left my brother officer below with the rest of the family. The mother denied that being his room before the prisoner.

Q. Did you search the chest of drawers - A. Yes, and she pretended she had not got the keys; I said I should break the drawers open if I had not the key. I saw two half crowns, I said whose money is this; she said it belonged to one of the son's children; I said how came that money to be here when you told me the room is let out to another person; she had said that in the presence of the prisoner; I believe, I told her she was an old liar for telling me it was let out to another person; she then confessed to be that they were his things in the room; I wrapped the money up and put it in the same place; I went to lock the drawer, she said never mind locking it.

THOMAS EKELSOE . Q. You were left in custody of this man while they went up to search - A. Yes.

Q. Before you went up stairs was there any desire expressed by this man to go up stairs - A. No; if he had asked me, he would have been permitted. When Trott went in, he told him he was come to search for Mr. Harris's property; the wife said what property; Trott told him he was come to search for paper.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-95

403. MARY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 2nd of January , two pair of stockings, value 4 s. three yards of muslin, value 6 s. three yards of printed cotton, value 6 s. a yard of satin, value 2 s. and four pound weight of candles, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Brotherton , widow .

ELIZABETH BROTHERTON . I live at Teddington , I am a midwife ; I missed the things on the 9th of March; I looked for some of my cotton, I found it missing; I asked my servant girl what had become of it; she first told me she knew nothing of it. I told her I would take her to the justice; she then confessed.

MARY APPS . I live servant to Mrs. Brotherton.

Q. What do you know about these things that she lost - A. Mistress and master went went out one day; I was cleaning the fender one day in the washhouse; this woman came in; she said you are all alone; I said how do you know.

Q. What is your master's name - A. Mr. Hall; the prisoner said she saw them go out, and she had come to see the house; she went up stairs, and went to my mistress's box; two ladies came to the house, and wanted my mistress and master; I went down; they staid in the parlour a quarter of an hour, and she was up stairs all the while; after the ladies were gone, I heard a trunk lid fall; I went up stairs, she told me to go for a pennyworth of needles for her, and while I went for them she was gone; when I returned I saw her coming out of her own gate; I got in doors before she did; she went up stairs again, went to the box, and took some cotton, two pair of black silk stockings, some black satin, muslin, candles, and soap, four pound of each; she gave me a shilling not to tell my mistress.

Q. How old are you - A. Fifteen; I never told my mistress till I went before the justice.

Prosecutrix. I went to the prisoner; she told me that she had a cap and had burnt it, for fear I should own it.

Q. Did you find any stockings - A. No, nor the printed cotton, nor the soap or candles.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-96

404. WILLIAM WHITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , thirteen pound weight of iron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Purrier .

WILLIAM PURRIER . I am a whitesmith , I live at 249 Whitechapel-road . On the 8th of March I saw the prisoner take this iron; I made a hole through the partition on purpose to observe him; he put it in his trowsers.

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am an officer. On the 8th of March, about a quarter past one, I took the prisoner in custody in the Commercial-road; I searched him, and found this iron concealed under his waistcoat and trowsers.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the honourable jury and the court; I hope they will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-97

405. AGNES COOMB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , two gowns, value 15 s. a shift, value 6 s. two petticoats, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. and two towels, value 1 s. the property of Richard Comer .

MRS. COMER. I am the wife of Richard Comer . On the 14th of January the prisoner lodged in the same house with me; she asked me to come and nurse her child while she went to market; she asked me if I had locked my door; I told her yes, but I had left the key in it; I asked her to leave the door ajar, that I might hear if any body went up stairs; she returned in about half an hour, and said she did not get change for a one pound note, would I stop a little longer; I said I would; then she was about three quarters of an hour before she returned again, and in that time my husband came home. I went up stairs to my room, leaving her room; my husband was never out of the room, nor I was never out of the house after that. On Sunday morning my husband asked me to give him a waistcoat out of the drawer, I went to my drawer, it was stripped. I lost all the articles contained in the indictment.

Q. Have you found any of the things - A. She told me on the 6th of April where to find some of them, and there I found them.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, Chandos-street, Covent-garden. On the 16th of January were pledged at my shop, two gowns, two petticoats, a shift, and a handkerchief for twelve shillings, by a woman; I do not know her person.

Q. to Mrs. Comer. Where did the woman tell you, that she had pledged them - A. In Chandos-street.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-98

406. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , two shawls, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Craig .

JAMES NEWLAND . I am shopman to Joseph Craig , linen draper , 360, Holborn . On the 4th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, a boy said to me look at that woman at the door (we have goods out of the door). I overtook the prisoner about twenty yards from the door, she had two shawls upon her arm; I took her back to the shop and sent for a constable. The prisoner said she had picked them up from off the ground.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw something drop, I did not know but it might be a pocket handkerchief; I picked it up, and threw it careless over my arm; if in case I had stole it I should have hid it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-99

407. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , a violin, value 39 s. the property of George Warner .

GEORGE WARNER . I am a seafaring man ; I was at the Hampshire Hog, Rosemary-lane , on the 5th of April, about twelve o'clock at night; I called for a glass of liquor, and while I was going to take it, the prisoner said you may as well give me a glass; I looked round and saw the man in such a situation I gave him a glass. I held my violin in my hand, he took my violin and ran out of doors with it. Afterwards the prisoner made his brags in the house that he sold it for seven shillings, but he would not tell me where. I gave thirty-nine shillings for it but three

days before.

Q. Was he drunk - A. No.

MRS. SMITH. I saw the prisoner with the fiddle in his hand, he went out of doors with the fiddle.

WILLIAM BEEBY . I took the prisoner at the Hampshire Hog, he acknowledged that he had the fiddle.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said I sold the fiddle. I cannot say whether I had it or not, I was very much in liquor, and when I was accused of taking it, I went down to the Hampshire Hog.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-100

408. MALCOLM SUTHERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , two boards, value 3 s. the property of William Howlett .

WILLIAM HOWLETT . I live at No. 28, Brook-street, Ratcliffe. On the 10th of April I lost the boards from a scaffold, in a new street, Stepney-causeway .

JOSEPH BARLOW . I am a watchman in Ratcliffe. On the 10th of this month, about one o'clock, the prisoner came to me with two planks on his shoulder, and asked me the way to Limehouse; I went out of my box and shewed him the way to Brook-street; when he came there he throwed the boards off his shoulder; I laid hold of him and called another watchman to my assistance; we secured him.

Mr. Peat. Is it usual when persons have stolen things about them, to come to a watchman - A. No, I never saw such a thing before.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was desired by a man in the street to bring these boards down to Limehouse. I went and asked the way to Limehouse of that man.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-101

409. ALEXANDER BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a pillow, value 5 s. the property of Philip Chapman .

ELIZABETH CHAPMAN . I am the wife of Philip Chapman , hair-dresser , I saw this man run away with the pillow. On the 31st of January, at ten o'clock at night, I made the bed, the pillow was there and all the things was right; he went to bed; the prisoner lived with and worked for us; on the next morning, about a quarter after seven o'clock, I heard him go out of doors; I looked after him; I saw a bundle under his arm; I went down stairs and looked in his bed, I missed the pillow.

Q. Have you ever found your pillow - A. No.

Mr. Gleed. Did not he take out a summons to get his wages - A. No; he had five shillings on the Sunday, and three on the Wednesday.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent man.

BENJAMIN TURNER . I live in Snow-hill, up the passage, I am a hair merchant; I have known the defendant six or seven years, he is an upright honest man. Mr. Chapman called at my house, he asked me for a man; I told him I could not provide him with a man upon the account of Brown; he asked me what Brown said; I told him; he said he had not lodged and fed him as a man ought to be fed and lodged, and he was going to summons him for eight shillings; he asked me where Brown lived; I told him; he said blast him or damn his eyes, he would do him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-102

410. JAMES BOWBRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , 3 l. 2 s. the property of John Davies .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declinining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-103

411. JAMES WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , fourteen yards of velveteen, value 30 s. the property of John Thwaits .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Thwaits, linen-draper , 306 High Holborn . I was serving two customers in the shop, I perceived a man's arm come round the door post and take a piece of velveteen that lay on a box near the door; I immediately went out and saw the prisoner crossing the road; I caught hold of him and he gave me two pieces of velveeteen from under his coat; I brought him back to the shop and delivered him to the officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was real necessity; I did not know what I had when they took me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-104

412. MARY WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , a silver table spoon, value 12 s. the property of John Morgan .

ANN MORGAN . I am the wife of John Morgan , I live at No. 38 Coram-street ; I hired the prisoner to wash for me; I lost the spoon out of the drawer on the 21st of March last; I saw it afterwards in Marlborough-street.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Berwick-street. On the 21st of March the prisoner offered the spoon to pledge, she asked a guinea upon it; she said it belonged to a person of the name of Ryland; I desired her to go and fetch the person it belonged to; about two hours afterwards she came back and said she had found it; upon which I went up with her to Marlborough-street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it under the sink.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-105

413. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of April , two quartern loaves of bread, value 14 d. the property of Thomas Granger .

THOMAS GRANGER . I am a baker , I live at No. 1, Westmoreland-place. On the 3rd of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I took my bread out; at the corner of Great Marylebone-street, Wimpole-street , I saw the prisoner go up to my barrow, and by detecting him twice before, I went into the Portland Arms and watched him at the window; in a few minutes I saw him take two quartern loaves out of the barrow; I then walked out of the house and took him with the

bread; I sent for an officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it under necessity.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-106

414. JOHN SLOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a pair of boots, value 5 s. the property of John Williams and James Franklin .

JOHN WILLIAMS . My partner's name is James Franklin , we are pawnbrokers , No 7, Church-street, Bethnal-green . On the 20th of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Barnes brought in the prisoner, and he had the boots in his hand. They hung up at the door for sale; they cost me five shillings. When the prisoner brought me the boots in the shop he asked me the price of them; I told him seven shillings; he pulled out some money, but what I cannot say.

JAMES BARNES . I live in Wheeler-street, I am a porter. On the 20th of March, between four and five o'clock, I was going by Mr. Williams's shop, I saw the prisoner up against the side of Mr. Williams's door reaching something down; he dropped them; he stood a little time with his back to the door and put them under his coat, and walked away; I went after him and brought him back, I asked him what he was going to do with the boots; he said he was going to buy them; I told him that was not the way to buy them; I took him back, and the boots, and delivered him up in the shop.

Q. Do you know the man - A. Yes; I have attacked him once before; he is a cabinet-maker.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time this took place I was so inebriated with liquor that I was not able to conduct myself; I took the boots down, and seeing some defect I attempted to hang them up again, but I was taken with a giddiness in my head.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-107

415. ANN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. and three pint pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Hathaway .

JOHN HATHAWAY . I am a publican , I keep the Rose in Wimpole-street . From information of the next witness I overtook the prisoner, I found upon her a quart pot and three pint pots. There was another woman with her, she made her escape. I value the two pots at two shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAM HARLEY . I am a coachman, I live in Harley-mews. On the 27th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking out of my window, I saw the prisoner in the passage of a lodging house facing of my window, I saw her pick up two or three pots, put them into her apron, and went off; I immediately run down stairs and went to Mr. Hathaway, I saw the prisoner run down Wimpole-street in a different direction to his house; Mr. Hathaway pursued her, I saw him take hold of her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first offence, I lived servant with Mr. Kirby, he keeps the Poultry compter; I at this time had no where to go to; this woman persuaded me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-108

416. MARY PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , a bed, value 1 l. a bolster, value 4 s. two blankets, value 4 s. a pillow, value 2 s. three curtains, value 3 s. a counterpane, value 4 s. a looking glass, value 4 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a footman, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 8 d. the property of John Rusholme , in a lodging room .

ANN MARIA RUSHOLME : My husband's name is John Rusholme , I live at No. 21, Chappel-path, Somers' Town . On the 25th of March the prisoner came to my house; she lodged in my house a fortnight, she had a two pair of stairs front room at four shillings a week, furnished; she worked at the straw bonnets; she did not pay the first week, I let it alone till another week. On the pay day of the second week I went into the room, she was laying upon the sacking, and all the articles were gone contained in the indictment. The first thing I missed was the looking glass, I asked her what she had done with it; she said she had pledged it at Mr. Wadmore's. The officer and I went to the pawnbroker's, and there I found all the things except the counterpane and pillow; they have never been found yet.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a servant to Mr. Wadmore, pawnbroker, Charlton street, Somers Town. On the 5th of April the prisoner pawned a flat iron with me for eight pence, on the same day a bolster was pledged for three shillings and sixpence; she came afterwards and borrowed sixpence more on it. On the 7th of April she pawned a looking glass for four shillings; a bed was pledged before I came to the shop, she had half a crown more upon that; the bed was pawned for fifteen shillings. On the 5th of April a curtain I took in myself, and two articles that I did not take in.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. The prisoner was brought to the office. I went to Mr. Wadmore's and ordered them to bring the articles. I took some duplicates from her, they correspond exactly with the things. I know the prisoner very well; I know her father; after she got along with a young man, he got her to do this, and then he went away; she believes she is pregnant by him.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-109

417. ROBERT KEYS and JAMES READ were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Edward Coleman .

EDWARD COLEMAN . I keep the Green Man at Hodson Green, in the parish of Wilsdon . On the 19th of February the two prisoners came to my house together, they asked for lodgings, my wife made up a bed for them; they went to bed between six and seven o'clock. On the morning of the 20th the prisoners came down about seven o'clock, my wife was up; they said mistress, how much is the lodging; she charged them eight-pence; they said we have no

money now, we will call in the evening, and then pay for it; Keys had the sheet wrapped round him, under his coat; my son and my wife saw it, they were gone before I came down; I got up and followed them with a horse, me and another man; we overtook them in about a mile and a half, they were in the middle of a field; he chucked the sheet into a ditch before we could apprehend them; my son saw them; I know it was one of the sheets that was in the room; when we took them they said they knew nothing about it.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am sixteen years old, I am son of the last witness; I recollect the prisoners coming on the 19th of February, and going away on the 20th; they said they would come back in the evening and pay. As they were going away, I saw a sheet put round Key's body, and his coat buttoned over it.

Q. Did you stop them - A. No, I told my father; he got up, and he and I joined in pursuit of these men; we caught sight of them in a field; Mr. Saunders laid hold of them; I saw them throw the sheet into the ditch. I picked it up.

The property produced and identified.

Keys' Defence. I lived with Mr. Webber, a butcher, 268, Oxford-street; I had just left him.

Read's Defence. I am innocent of what I am brought here for; I was helper in stables; the last place I lived at was Mr. Moore's in David-street, Grosvenor-square.

KEYS, GUILTY , aged 20.

READ, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-110

418. MARY ANN HOLT and ANN WELLS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , from the person of Isaac Hill , a promissory note, value 1 l. three bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note, value 30 l. his property.

ISAAC HILL . I am a tallow-chandler in Ratcliffe Highway. On Friday the 3d of March, I left home with notes to the amount of 84 l. - a 30 l. bank note, a Portsmouth one-pound note, and three one-pound bank notes I noticed.

Q. Now, sir, in the course of the day had you drank so as not to be sober - A. I had drank a little, and the liquor affected me.

Q. In the course of the night did you pass Catherine-street - A. I did; I had been to Tothil-street to buy tallow; returning home I met with the two prisoners, they began hustling me about my breast pocket, they felt so as to ascertain I had a pocket book there; they followed me; I was going to the alamode beef shop; this was about half past eleven o'clock at night. In Nag's-head court they asked me to treat them; I took them to a public house, I believe, I treated them, I went home with them to their lodgings; I felt the pocket-look safe not five minutes before I went into their lodgings; I did not count the notes, I saw the bulk of them, I thought they were safe.

Q. Did you, when you went into their lodgings, lay down on the bed - A. I did, and went to sleep; they were both in the room when I went to sleep.

Q. Did they lay down on the bed with you - A. They did not: I did not pull off my clothes; I awoke in the morning between three and four o'clock, the women were gone; my pocket-book was in my pocket, but the notes were gone; upon that I raised an alarm.

COURT. Where was this house that you went to - A. No. 3, Nag's-head-court, Drury-lane.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your alarm, did Mr. King, the constable, come to you - A. He did.

Q. How soon after that did you see the prisoners - A. In the afternoon.

Q. Did you know them again - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the notes that you had lost - A. I did; I went before the justice, I there saw the notes.

Q. Was there any note that you could swear to - A. Yes, the thirty-pound note, I wrote Blackit upon it.

COURT. How came you to go with a couple of women - A. I did not know who they were.

COURT. You do not mean to be believed, because you cannot think the jury will believe you; if a man got into a scrape, he ought to tell the whole truth - who can believe that you did not know what these women were, and that you went there to lay down on the bed.

EDWARD KING . I am a constable of St. Clement's Danes. In consequence of an alarm made by the prosecutor, I went to No. 3, Nag's-head-court, Drury-lane.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the prisoners occupied that room - A. I can only speak from information; I have seen them come out of the house and go in - and from information I received there, I went to No. 7, Bembridge-street, about half past seven the same morning; I took with me Booth the patrol; I went into a one pair of stairs back room, there I found the two prisoners; on my entering the room, Ann Wells threw a bunch of papers under the fire place, without my saying one word to her.

Q. Did they know who you were - A. Exactly so. I directly picked them up; I found it consisted of six one-pound bank notes, and a Portsmouth one-pound note; Booth then took her and searched her. I afterwards searched Holt; I found a thirty-pound, a twenty-pound, and ten five-pound notes; I and Booth took them away; all these notes were produced at the office. I have the thirty-pound note and the Portsmouth note; the other notes were given back to the prosecutor.

MARGARET HILL . Q. When your husband went out on the 3d of March, did he receive any notes from you - A. I gave him eighty-four pounds in notes - one note was a thirty-pound bank note, Blackit on the back, and a Portsmouth one-pound note.

The property produced and identified.

Holt's Defence. On that evening we were walking in the Strand, between the hours of twelve and one; this gentleman asked me where I was going; I said home; he was very much intoxicated indeed; he said he had some property; he gave them me to take care of; this young woman knows nothing of it; I went to get something to drink, I stopped longer than I ought to have done; these gentlemen came and took me; the gentleman was so drunk at the first examination, that he could not be examined.

Wells's Defence. I never saw the gentleman till I saw him at Bow-street office, I met her going down Drury-lane, she said she was going to get something to drink, she had a friend at home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-111

419. JOHN STEPTOE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a pair of blankets, value 14 s. the property of Henry Blyth , in a lodging room .

HENRY BLYTH . I live at No. 169, St. John-street, Clerkenwell , I rent the house. On Saturday the 25th of March, the prisoner's wife took a room of me; he came to live there with his wife, in a ready furnished room at seven shillings a-week; he had only been with us two days when Mr. Stanton the officer came: the prisoner and his wife were out; when his wife came home, I followed her up stairs, I went into the room and found two blankets missing; they cost me twenty-four shillings, I value them at fourteen shillings. I found the prisoner at the office in custody.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer at Hatton-garden office. On the morning of the 28th I took the prisoner in custody at Mr. Page's shop; in consequence of information I received from Mr. Page's servant, not on this charge, I asked the prisoner where he lived; he told me; I went to Mr. Blyth's house, when the prisoner's wife came home; we went into his room; they said they had lost two blankets.

- NIGHTINGAL. I am a servant to Mr. Page, pawnbroker, Liquorpond-street. On the 28th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to pledge these blankets; he said they were his own blankets, but we had information before that he had been robbing his lodgings; we sent for an officer; he said he lived in Gray's-inn-lane.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-112

420. JAMES LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. a counterpane, value 5 s. and two yards of cloth, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Jones, grocer, Crown-street, Finsbury.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I only know him by making and mending my shoes. On the 26th of February, I went to my sister at Fulham; she asked me to bring a parcel for her; a tea caddie, a counterpane, a piece of linen cloth, and a silver watch, the watch I locked up in the cadie, and all which I left at the prisoner's room till I called for them; it was Sunday half past two o'clock in the afternoon I took them to his house, as I could not get into my master's premises, nor did I like to carry them about on a Sunday. On the 6th of March his wife came to me, said they had quarrelled and separated, and that the things were left at the landlord's house; he had a room there, No. 8, Silver street, Clerkenwell; and when I called they were locked up in the prisoner's room, the prisoner had the key; this was on Wednesday, the 8th; on the following morning, the landlord came down to me with the constable to inform me they had broken open the room, and they found the things had been taken away.

Q. Have you ever found your property - A. Yes; they were at the pawnbrokers.

Q. How came you to leave the things from the 26th of February, till the 8th of March - A. I knew the prisoner very well; they were left there for my sister; he had always behaved very well, I do not want to hurt him.

JAMES RAMSEY . On the 7th of March, the prisoner pledged this watch for a guinea.

JOHN BURGES . I live with a pawnbroker; I produce a counterpane and a piece of linen, pawned on the 7th of March, for four shillings by the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife and I fell out; I got a drop of liquor in my head; I thought I could make free from knowing him, I did pledge them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-113

421. JAMES HUTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of February , a saw, value 4 s. the property of Robert Carr .

ROBERT CARR . I am a carpenter , I work for Mr. Riddolph and Scarr, Bunhill-row . The prisoner is a painter and glazier , he worked in the same shop; I was off work two days and a half; when I returned again I missed my saw, I think it was about the 24th of February; I had left it under my bench.

WILLIAM HITCHEN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a saw pawned on the 22nd of February by the prisoner for two shillings.

EDWARD TRING . I am headborough of St. Luke's. On the 27th of February I apprehended the prisoner for stealing some tools from the shop; Mr. Riddolph gave me the ticket of the saw out of his desk.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-114

422. ELIZABETH BROWNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , three curtains, value 4 s. a counterpane, value 1 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 6 s. and a flat iron, value 8 d. the property of Thomas Norwood , in a lodging room .

THOMAS NORWOOD . I am a weaver , I live in Three-King-court, Whitecross-street ; I let the prisoner a ready furnished lodging for four shillings and sixpence a-week; the prisoner lodged with me a month. On the 13th or 14th of March she left the lodgings, she owed me a week's rent; she pawned the key for a quartern of gin; I paid for the gin, and the landlord gave me the key; I went in the room; I found missing a pair of sheets, the bed curtains, bolster, and a flat iron.

MR. GILBERT. I am a pawnbroker. On the 2nd of March was pledged with me, two curtains for four shillings, 4th of March, two sheets, one for half a crown, and the other for three shillings; 6th of March, a patchwork quilt, for one shilling and three-pence; on the 9th of March, a bolster, for two shillings. They were all pledged by the prisoner, except the bolster; that was pledged by the prisoner's daughter.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pledge them with intention to defraud Mr. Norwood; I entreated Mr. Norwood to let me stay till Saturday, and then I would

make up all the articles.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-115

423. THOMAS KEDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of March , a pair of chaise bridles, value 14 s. two pair of reins, value 14 s. a pair of spurs, value 3 s. three straps, value 5 s. two sacks, value 2 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Richard Gypson .

RICHARD GYPSON . I am a stable-keeper at Stanmore ; the prisoner was my ostler , he lived with me about five weeks I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment out of my stable on the 24th of March.

Q. Why do you accuse him - A. He absconded from the premises. I was up early on the morning of the 24th of March; he did not come to work; I followed him up to town, I heard of him on the road; he had a wife in town; I went to the police office, Westminster; we found where he lived, he was not at home; we heard of him at the Bricklayer's-Arms in the Kent-road; we found him there; he had sold part of the things to a man in court; the rest he had left in the custody of the ostler at the Bull in Kent-street. We took him in custody.

ROBERT COX . I drive the Greenwich stage for Mrs. Scott. The prisoner sold me two pair of reins at the Bricklayer's-Arms for seven shillings.

JOHN HOLLOWAY . I am ostler at the Bull in the Kent-road. The prisoner brought to me a sack, a pair of bridles, three luggage straps, and a cord; he said they were to go to Dartford. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. I found a pair of spurs in a room which the prisoner and his wife rented, and a sack; I searched the tea-chest; I found a two-pound note in it, which I brought away; I took that handkerchief off the prisoner's neck, the prosecutor claimed it. I searched the prisoner; I took twenty-two shillings from him, because I heard he had taken money for his master's hire.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came from my place my wife sent me for a bundle of things, and when I came to town I did not know that the things were in my sack.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-116

424. ANN BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Thomas Argent .

THOMAS ARGENT . I am a publican , I keep the White-horse , Mile-End-road . On the 13th of April the prisoner came to my bar, the pots stood outside of the door; I saw the prisoner take one quart pot, and then she went into my house; I went in directly after her; she was just returning out; she had something to drink at the bar; she went out, I followed her, and found the quart pot concealed under her cloak. I took it from her and sent for an officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first offence I ever did in my life; I did not mean to do it, it was an accident.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-117

425. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , eleven shillings and sixpence , the property of Sarah Saxby ; widow .

SARAH SAXBY. I am a widow; the prisoner was a neighbour of mine; I go out charing, and take in needle work , and I have a little coming in to help to support my child.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She is a married woman ; her husband is a porter. On the 6th of March she came into my room as a neighbour, it was about half past five o'clock; I took out a half-crown piece and eleven shillings and six-pence, she saw me take it out and put it in a housewife, and I put the housewife in a box; the box was not locked; afterwards she saw me put the money and housewife in the box; she bid me good evening. I went out for a quartern loaf; she left me, as I thought. When I came back I met the woman on the stairs; I had been gone about ten minutes. On my going up stairs I heard somebody running down very last; I said who is there; she made a stop, and did not answer; I put out my left hand, and felt her hand in her pocket; finding it was a woman, I said who is it, why not answer; she said Bailey. I asked her why she did not answer when I first spoke to her, she said that her husband and her had some words; I asked her why she did not come and stop in my room and not stop there. When I went into my room, she asked me if I would come down stairs and take a drop of something to drink; I told her no, I was obliged to to her, I did not want any thing; I was going up to my box to put some money in, but I had forgot some butter that I wanted; I came down and went for the butter, and when I went into my room, thinking to put the money in the box, the housewife, instead of being folded as I left it, it was unfolded, and eleven shillings and sixpence was taken out; there was only the half crown left; I said to my child who has been here, and what has become of my money.

Q. How old is the child - A. Eleven years old; - the prisoner is the only person that had been in my room that day.

SARAH SAXBY . Q. Can you read - A. I can; I have been taught my catechism; it is a very bad thing to tell a lie.

Q. You know your mother came home, and she had some money - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see where she put it - A. Yes, she put it in the housewife in the box; Mrs. Bailey saw my mother put it in the housewife and put it in the box; Mrs. Bailey bid my mother good night; my mother went out for a quartern loaf, I laid across the foot of the bed because I had the head-ach; Mrs. Bailey came up again, and came in without knocking at the door; she asked me what I laid there for, I said I had the head-ach; she said that is a good girl, lay still; she took something out of the box, kept it in her hand two or three minutes, and then put it in again; I was getting up to look to see what it was; she said lay still; she went out; my mother came home, met her on the stairs, and asked who is there.

EDWARD THREDWAY. I had a warrant to apprehend

the prisoner. I went to her house, she was not at home; the prisoner came down to the office in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. About six months ago this woman lodged in my two pair front room; then she took a room opposite of my house; she came on Saturday, and asked me to lend her a guinea, to get a gown out of pledge; I could not lend it her. On Monday she said can you lend me your great coat and bonnet, for me to go and receive a pound note; I did; when she came in, she asked me to have something to drink; she came to me in the afternoon, she said it was very cold, and she had sent her little girl to the pawnbrokers with a pound note; I asked her whether she was not afraid of sending her little girl for fear of taking bad money; she replied, she should only have three shillings out of it; and she came in the evening very much intoxicated; she said, I am robbed, I said by whom, she said your daughter, then she said me; I went up to her room and asked the child if she saw me, the child did not answer, the mother answered yes; hearing the officers had been after me, I went up to the office, knowing myself innocent. Every time she is in the habit of taking the money, she always loses the money, she is so much in the habit of drinking.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-118

426. WILLIAM HENDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a jacket, value 2 s. three augers, value 1 s. three chisels, value 6 d. and a file, value 1 d. the property of John Steel .

JOHN STEEL . I am a wheelwright in John-street, St. George's in the East . On the 26th of March, about half past ten at night, I was called up by the watchman; he informed me that my workshop had been broken open.

EDWARD BEANE . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner coming out of Mr. Steel's workshop. I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. to prosecutor. Where did you find these things - A. I found the jacket on his back the next morning, when he came before the magistrate. The other things were taken out of a chest, and tied up in a bundle, but not carried off the premises. He had broken through the pannel of the door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the things in my hand, only the jacket; I went into the house and fell asleep, I had no lodgings, and the dog made a noise; he came and took me.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-119

427. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , two frocks, value 3 s. two petticoats, value 3 s. five caps, value 3 s. a gown, value 6 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. and a child's coat, value 4 s. the property of Martin Butler ; - a great coat, value 30 s. a child's cap, value 1 s. a half handkerchief, value 6 d. and a shawl, value 2 s. the property of Charles Patterson .

JANE BUTLER . I am the wife of Martin Butler , my husband is a sailor , I live in Blue-Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane. Mrs. Patterson and I tied up our things at my house, we were going to Portsmouth to see our husbands; the prisoner carried the bundle; all our things were tied up in my shawl.

Q. What day did you lose it - A. On the 16th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, we all went together from my house over London bridge, within half a mile of the turnpike, to go by the waggon; we lost one another on the road; the prisoner had the bundle, she said she would go and look for Mrs. Patterson; she never returned. We had to come home again through the loss of our bundle. I found the prisoner about ten o'clock at night in Rosemary-lane; she told me she was knocked down and robbed of the bundle.

MARY PATTERSON . I am the wife of a seaman, my husband's name is Charles Patterson . I was going down to Portsmouth to see my husband, with Mrs. Butler; we gave our bundle containing all the things mentioned in the indictment to Mrs. Thompson to carry. When we came to London Bridge. I left Mrs. Butler; I asked them to stop at the church, I went to buy a bottle, and when I came back, I did not see either of them. I went on the road, thinking I should overtake the waggon, thinking they had got in; I overtook the waggon, they said there was no such person in the waggon. I came home, I did not see the prisoner till I heard she was in Whitechapel watchhouse; I knew her a great many years, I never knew any harm of her. The shawl that was found on her neck, had every appearance of one I put into the bundle, but I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-120

428. THOMAS WILLOUGHBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , five boot legs, value 16 s. the property of Thomas Ward .

THOMAS WARD . I am a currier and leather cutter , in Cock-court in the Strand .

DANIEL HOLLWELL . I am a servant to Mr. Ward. On the 6th of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in the shop to buy a piece of leather; in the mean time he was looking out the leather, I saw him take five boot legs off a board in the shop window; one pair he put in his breeches, one pair in his hat, and the single one he put in his coat pocket. After being served with what he wanted, he went out of the shop door. I followed him, and told him to come back, that he had some of Mr. Ward's property; he came back, and the legs were taken from him.

JOHN ROWLEY . I followed the prisoner a few yards from the shop door; I asked him if he had not got some leather that he had not paid for, he said he had not; I asked him to go back to the shop, he readily went; I then asked him again, he said yes. I found a pair in his breeches, a pair in his hat, and one boot leg in his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took any thing before.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-121

429. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , a tablecloth, value 10 s. an apron, value 2 s. and a pair of snuffers, value 1 d. the property of Edward Lapinere .

EDWARD LAPINERE . I am a publican in Sampson's Gardens . On the 13th of March the prisoner came in my house, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and remained there till three in the afternoon; the prisoner went backwards, as if she was going into the yard; she went into the kitchen, she was gone near a quarter of an hour; she came back and sat down in the taproom; a woman came in with some cakes, she bought of this woman three pennyworth of cakes; she went to the bar to give the children a cake a piece; my wife saw her tablecloth through the pocket hole of her gown; I lifted up her gown and saw it was my tablecloth, it was wrapped round her as a petticoat; I fetched an officer, and then the tablecloth was laying at her feet.

MRS. LAPINERE. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 13th of March the prisoner came into the bar to bring the child a biscuit; I saw my tablecloth through the pocket hole of her gown, I said Mary, what do you do with my cloth; she said it was not mine; I said it was; she then said if it is your's I did not mean to take it away. I called my husband to see it.

JOHN GILLMAN . I am an officer. When I came to Mr. Lapinere's I saw the tablecloth laying at the prisoner's feet; knowing her, I searched her, I found a pair of snuffers in her pocket, and the duplicate of a check apron pawned at Mr. Murray's.

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 6, Nightingale-lane. On the 13th of March the prisoner pledged this check apron for one shilling and sixpence.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-122

430. RICHARD BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , ten pound weight of mutton, value 7 s. the property of William Smith .

MARY SMITH . My husband's name is William Smith, he is a butcher , No. 52, Penton-street, Pentonville . On the 1st of April, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go out of the shop, I directly followed him, I overtook him, I asked him what he had been taken out of our shop; he said, I was only in fun; he had got a piece of breast and neck of mutton; he threw it down on the pavement; he was going to run away, I had him stopped and brought back to the shop; my husband came and sent for an officer. This mutton was ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the shop, nor had I the mutton at all.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-123

431. JOHN PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , twenty-eight pounds weight of sugar, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Croft and Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS . I am in partnership with Thomas Croft, we keep the Nag's Head stables , Whitechapel . On the 27th of February, about half past eight o'clock, I was going up my yard to look after the horses, on my return I went to shut the warehouse door it opens inwards, I put my left hand in, I caught hold of the prisoner, I said who is here, twice; the third time he said it is me; I said who is me; I caught hold of his collar, he had the parcel under his left arm; I brought him out of the door. The parcel was to go to Rumford; I called for assistance; my partner came to me; we secured him; I immediately put my name on the parcel.

FRANCIS KELLY . I am a porter; I delivered this parcel on the 27th of February to Mr. Lewis's post-boy; I know the parcel.

ROBERT GRAY . I received this parcel from Francis Kelly . I put it into the warehouse.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I am a hackney coachman; I went out that day for one of the men; he asked me to go for his great coat.

Q. How came you to go into the warehouse - A. It is no warehouse; if I had been a mind to thieve it I might.

COURT. No, you could not; he got hold of you by the collar.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-124

432. DITCHAM NEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of March , a shovel, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Fowler .

THOMAS FOWLER . I live in Red-Lion-street, Spitalfields , I keep a shop, and sell shovels ; the prisoner is a smith . On the 11th of March, in the morning, I went out to take a walk, I came back about half after eight in the morning, the men were gone from their work. When I came up to the street door the prisoner was coming out of the passage with a shovel, he had it by his side; he had removed it about two yards from where it hung up; when he saw me he jumped back and threw the shovel down against the partition; he advanced to the door and said can you give me a job; I said you rascal, I will thank you not to steal my shovels; I gave him a kick on the backside, and told him to go about his business; he called me very shameful names; then I said I will charge a constable with you. This is the shovel he had by his side; it is mine.

- BRUMMIS. I saw this man come in very softly in the passage of my uncle's house; he took down the shovel and went towards the door with it; my uncle came and met him with it; when he saw my uncle he threw it against the partition; my uncle sent for a constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up to Mr. Fowler's steps, I knocked at the wainscot, nobody answered me; I returned back and clapped my hand upon a place, but as to touching any thing else I never did. When I came to the last step I met Mr. Fowler; I asked him for a job; directly, he said you villain, you are come a thieving; he gave me a kick; I said what do you kick me for; he sent for a constable; I was taken to

the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-125

433. JAMES HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Thomas Radnor .

THOMAS RADNOR . I am a publican , I keep the Sugar Loaf , Bell-yard, Temple-bar.

JOHN BRADLEY . I am a servant. On the 26th of March, a few minutes after ten in the morning, at the top of Arundel-street, I met the prisoner; Rebecca Wingrove was following of him; she told me that he had been stealing Mr. Wilson's pint pot; he then ran away, I followed and overtook him; I told him he must go back with me; he did, I took him down Arundel-street where the pot belonged to; he put his hand in his pocket and took out a pint pot; I told him he had got another out of the same pocket; he took a quart pot that had on it the name of Radnor; Mr. Radnor was sent for; he came and owned the pot; the pint pot belonged to Mr. Wilson.

REBECCA WINGROVE. I saw John Bradley take the quart pot out of his pocket; I told John Bradley I saw the prisoner take a pint pot of Mr. Wilson's.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-126

434. JOHN CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , fourteen pound weight of iron, value 6 s. and four pound weight of plated metal, value 4 s. the property of John Michey .

THOMAS LLOYD . I am foreman to James Michey , coachmaker , White-lion-street, Norton Falgate ; the prisoner was a jobbing hand at Mr. Michey's . I saw the iron and plated metal at the office; I know it is part of Mr. Michey's stock in trade.

Q JOHN RAY . Q. You belong to Worship-street office - A. I do; I stopped the prisoner on the 13th of April, about a quarter before eight o'clock, as I was passing Shoreditch; he had this bag in his hand; I asked him what he was carrying of, he said a little old iron; it was near to the George public house. I took him in there; I examined the bags; the little bag was in the large bag; the iron screws are old; they are all useful articles. The prisoner said he was a jobbing coachmaker, he worked for Mr. Lloyd, White-lion-street, Norton Falgate; I went to Mr. Lloyd the next day; he came and claimed the things.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-127

435. JOHN BROWN and MARY CASSEE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of April , three silk handkerchiefs, value 16 s. the property of Jonathan Ingham and William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a linen draper , 96 St. John-street , my partner 's name is Jonathan Ingham . On the 12th of April, about three in the afternoon, both the prisoners came into our shop together, as if they were acquainted with each other; the man asked to see some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed them a great variety of patterns. After they had looked them over, they fixed upon one, which I cut off; in the mean time I saw the man prisoner put his hand underneath something on the counter and take out three silk handkerchiefs; I perceived him put them under his apron; this was while the woman engaged me in conversation; it was done in a very sly manner, he did not suspect that I saw him do it; I took no notice of it. The woman asked to see some calico; she bought half a yard of calico and paid sixpence for it; the man gave seven shillings for the silk handkerchief. Then I called my partner down; I whispered to him that this man had got some silk handkerchiefs; the prisoners were then in the shop. In consequence of that the prisoners suspected that I had discovered them stealing the handkerchiefs; he put his hand under his apron, and I saw him drop them on the floor; they both went out of the shop. Mr. Ingram immediately called the man back and desired him to stop, which he did, and the woman together came back.

Q. What part of the shop did he drop these handkerchiefs - A. Where they were buying the calico; that was as far from where the handkerchiefs were as from here to the window; ours is a very large shop, I charged him then with stealing the handkerchiefs; he denied it; at the same time I saw the handkerchiefs on the floor, which he had dropped. We set for a constable, and they were sent to Hatton Garden Office.

- HAINES. I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoners. Going to Hatton Garden the prisoner was rescued from me; the court were sitting; we were obliged to go to Hick's-hall, and get Read to assist us.

The property produced and identified.

Cassee's Defence. He served me half a yard of calico; I gave him a shilling and he gave me a sixpence. I came out, and I soon perceived a great many people about the door; I went back to see what was the matter, I went into the shop, that gentleman said I was in the shop likewise; he gave this man and me in charge of the constable; I never was in company with the man in my life.

Brown said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Cassee called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

BROWN - GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

CASSEE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-128

436. EDWARD BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 16 d. and a pewter pint pot, value 8 d. the property of Thomas Henderson .

THOMAS HENDERSON . I live at the Cannon public house, Portland-road . I know the pots to be mine.

EDWARD HOLMES . I am a coach painter; I brought the prisoner to Mr. Henderson's house; he took the pots from No. 35, Upper Titchfield-street, the pots

were on the area rails, he put them in his apron; I live opposite; I spoke to him, he ran off, I pursued him about an hundred yards, he had the pots in his apron; I asked him where he was going with them, he said he did not know, he did not mean to do any harm.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. About nine weeks ago I was walking up Paddington, we had a pint of rum, we asked them for a bowl; no, they said, you have got the rum, go and get your pots from where you got your rum; we saw some pots, I took them, the man over the way called out, I thought he meaned to take them; I wanted the pots to get some new milk from the cow, about twenty yards off; he came and took me.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-129

437. THOMAS YEO was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , four quartern loaves of bread, value 4 s. 11 d. the property of John Collier .

JOHN MOURTON . I am a journeyman baker , Mr. Collier is my master , Clipstone-street, Fitzroy-square.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Thomas Yeo - A. Yes; I saw him on the 4th of April, about one o'clock at noon, I was serving my customers with bread; I had a large basket on a wheelbarrow; I had occasion to go home to my master's shop for a crusty loaf; I left my basket. On my return I saw the prisoner with four quartern loaves, two under each arm; I pursued him and took him; I never lost sight of him; I brought him back to my basket, he threw two loaves down in the basket and two down in the dirt; I took him to the shop, he was sent to Marlborough-street; he was a stranger to me, only seeing him the week before taking two quartern loaves from Mr. Hardy's man; I am sure they are my master's bread.

Q. Are four quartern loaves worth four shillings and eleven pence - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me take the loaves out of the barrow; it was not his bread at all.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-130

438. WILLIAM THOMPSON SKIRROW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , a velvet spencer, value 8 s. the property of John Turner .

JOHN TURNER . I keep a silk mercer's shop , No. 3, Cranbourne-alley, Leicester-fields . On the 22nd of March, soon after nine o'clock at night, I had a black velvet spencer pinned inside of my shop door to some calico; I believe a little after nine o'clock I had seen it safe; as I stood inside of my shop I heard the calico tear; there were three youths in Cranbourne-passage, I searched them all; I found the spencer under the prisoner's coat, I brought him back and sent for a constable. When I overtook them they had got three doors up the passage going into Newport-street.

Q. What became of the other two - A. I did not take them, I only took the prisoner; he had the spencer under his coat; when I took the prisoner he denied that I took it from under his coat; he said I took it off his shoulder.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was thrown over my shoulder; immediately the gentleman searched the other two, he let them go; they ran away.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-131

439. ANN SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of March , two gowns, value 4 s. and a waistcoat, value 1 s. the property of Jacob Joseph .

CATHERINE JOSEPH . My husband's name is Jacob Joseph ; my house is in Crown-court, Type-street, St. Luke's. The prisoner lived with me as a servant ; I had discharged her about half an hour before she took the things from my mangler's; on the 31st of March she went to the mangler's and got them in my name; I met her and found the gowns and waistcoat upon her, I asked her what she was going to do with them; she said they were her own property; I told her they could not be her property, when she knew she had taken them to the manglers; she went to throw them at me, and abused me very much; I then sent for a constable. The gowns are mine, and the waistcoat is my husband's; they are worth five shillings.

MRS. EDWARDS. I am a mangler; I live in Crown-court, Grub-street ; I mangle for Mrs. Joseph. Ann Slater delivered these two gowns and this waistcoat on the over night at Mrs. Josephs's house, as her mistress's things; the next morning she came and said Mrs. Joseph wanted these things; I delivered them to her.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with Mrs. Joseph some time before this, she keeps a bawdy house; the reason I left my mistress was, her girls kept bad hours, they came home at two o'clock; I was very cross; she told me in the morning she would pay me, she did not; she said she should want the things by nine o'clock in the morning; I told the mangler my mistress wanted them; I took them from her with intent to iron them, as I knew they were wanted.

Q. to Edwards. Does this house that Mrs. Joseph live in bear the reputation of a bawdy house - A. In my mind it would bear that character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-132

440. JOHN TAVENER and GEORGE TYLER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , half a bushel of oats, beans and chaff, value 2 s. the property of William Sinott .

THOMAS IZARD . On the 5th of April I saw John Tavener , the driver of Mr. Sinott's cart; the cart had three horses; he took the nose bag from the shaft horse, it contained about half a bushel of provender; he gave the nose bag to Tyler; he is the man that serves the horses with water at the Three Brewer's public house; Tyler emptied it into a sack and returned it on the shafts again. I informed a gentleman of it, he acquainted Mr. Sinott.

Q. What are you - A. I am servant to Mr. Sutherland, No. 9, Norfolk-place, Lower-street, Islington.

WILLIAM SINOTT . I am a scavenger ; Tavener was my servant . On Wednesday the 5th of April, I sent him out with his team as usual; I live at the corner of Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell; he was to go backwards and forwards to Mr. Rhodes at Newington; he drove my team; he had a nose bag loaded with oats, beans and chaff, for each horse; they were half

bushel bags, and they fill them at their own discretion for the horses to eat, and for no other purpose. In consequence of what was told me I had the prisoners taken up.

Tavener's Defence. In the morning I went on to Newington to load the bricks; there I had the nose bags on the horses; I returned to this place, which is a mile and a half; I never stopped any where any time, no other than to take my beer; I sent my horses on the road.

Tyler's Defence. I never saw such a thing transacted in my life.

Tavener called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tyler called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

TAVENER, GUILTY , aged 34.

TYLER, GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-133

441. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , a ladder, value 15 s. the property of Pament Hemmings .

JOHN AMORY . I am one of the patrol of Bow-street. On Saturday night last, about half past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the Ball's-pond road, nearly half a mile from Mr. Hemming's building at Ball's-pond; he was in the middle of the road with a ladder on his left shoulder; I laid hold of him, and asked him where he was going to take the ladder to, and where he brought it from; he said he was going to take it to Mr. Parsley, a master bricklayer, opposite the Turnpike-gate, Islington; he told me he brought it from behind Newington-green; I left him in custody and went to Mr. Parsley's house; he said he had no such ladder there; I told the prisoner Mr. Parsley said he did not work for him, and he had no such ladder there; I told him this in the Half Moon public house; the prisoner then said he had borrowed the ladder of a man at the Cock and Castle, Kingsland. Mr. Hemmings has seen the ladder and claimed it.

PAMENT HEMMINGS. I am a builder ; I live in Brunswick-street, Hackney-road. The ladder was taken away from a building of mine at Ball's-pond ; I have seen the ladder, I know it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took the ladder, not with any intent to steal it, but to put a tile on my house on Sunday morning, with a view to return it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-134

442. JOHN SMITH , WILLIAM SLADE , GEORGE JASPER PAXTON , GEORGE BIGGS , EDWARD KINGSBURY , and GEORGE LAREMOUTH , were indicted for a conspiracy .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL BRITTEN. Q. You are a master packer, I believe - A. Yes, No. 20, New Basing-hall-street.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Thomas Barret - A. He served his apprenticeship with me.

Q. Did he afterwards work for you as a journeyman - A. Five or six years.

RICHARD WOODWARD . Q. You are a master packer - A. I am, I reside in Great Trinity-lane.

Q. Are you a member of the packer's club - A. Yes.

Q. That meets at the Crown and Cushion, Moorgate - A. Yes; I have been a member of that club seven or eight years.

Q. Were you present when the 29th article in that club was made - A. I was.

WILLIAM CLARK . Q. Look at that notice, and tell me whether you served that notice, and on whom - A. I served this copy of notice upon all the defendants this day week; I served them all personally.

Mr. Marriot. Whether they are of the company, you do not pretend to know - A. No. (The notice read.)

The KING against JOHN SMITH and the other Defendants.

"Take Notice, That you produce on your trial all and every singular book, paper, and writings, whereon are printed or whereon are written papers that contain the rules, articles, and regulating of a certain club and society of packers, now or lately held at the Crown and Cushion, Moorgate, that you lately were or are respective members, of which you the above-named John Smith and George Jasper Paxton now are or were lately stewards, together with all books, papers, and writings, whatsoever, in your power, of the above named society.

"W. and J. NEWMAN, Solicitors for the Prosecution."

"Dated 10th of April, 1809.

Mr. Bolland to Woodward. Do you know the persons of the prisoners - A. I believe they were all members of the society in April and May, and are now, except Laremouth; he is come in lately within a few months. I am not in the habit of attending it, therefore I do not know exactly.

Q. Do you know who were the stewards in April and May - A. I do not.

Q. Do you know who were the stewards in December last - A. I do not; all the defendants were members except Laremouth; I believe he is a member now.

COURT. How long do you recollect his being a member - A. Some months; he was not a member in April and May last.

Mr. Bolland. Has the society any rules - A. Yes, these rules are entered in a written book.

Q. Although you do not know who are the stewards, by whom was the book kept - A. By the stewards at the time, and they are stewards for three months.

Mr. Marriot. And no one of these defendants were stewards last Monday or Tuesday - A. I do not know that they were; Laremouth was a member three months.

THOMAS BARRET . Q. Are you are a journeyman packer - A. Yes.

Q. In December last did you quit the service of Mr. Britten - A. Yes, on the 24th of December I left Mr. Britten, and on the 27th I went into Messrs. Hodson and Hager's service; they have a warehouse in Mark-lane, and another in Cooper's-row in the Minories.

Q. Is that in the city of London - A. I do not know.

A gentleman in court. It is in the city of London.

Q. to Barret. Did you work on the 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th of December - A. Yes, at Cooper's-row one

day or two, and at Mark-lane; on Saturday the 31st of December I went to work at Cooper's-row.

Q. Did Biggs, Kingsbury, and Laremouth work for Messrs. Hodson and Hager - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to work on the morning of the 31st of December did they either of them. or all of them, say anything to you - A. Yes, Biggs, Kingsbury and Laremouth told me that they could not and would not work with me, it would subject them to a guinea fine if they did, by a new rule of the society; and while they were talking about it Mr. Hodson came in; they said if I staid there they should leave the employ; this was on Saturday morning.

Q. Did you know from them what night the club met - A. They told me on the preceding night - Friday night.

Q. Did they tell you what had been done at the club - A. Nothing more than they could not work with me; they said if I staid they would leave the employ; if I would wait another week for the decision of the club, most likely the club would decide it favourably for me; then they told me they would issue summonses for the week following, for next Friday night.

Q. You said while you were conversing with them, somebody came in - who was that - A. Mr. Hodson: He remonstrated with them on the impropriety of their conduct, and requested they would go to work; Mr. Hodson heard the particulars what they told me; Mr. Hodson asked them what court of justice would sanction their conduct; they said they did not know that that the law had any thing to do with it; Mr. Hodson then asked them if they were going to make laws of their own, or something to that purpose; they said no, they did not know that they were going to do that; then Mr. Hodson left them, requesting them to go to work.

COURT. What did they say to that - A. They said they would not.

Q. Did they assign any reason why they would not - A. They said a guinea was of consequence to them, they would not do it; then Mr. Shaw came after Mr. Hodson was gone.

Q. You said that they said that they would issue summonses for the club to meet the next Friday night - who was to do that - A. I suppose by the stewards; they said it should be done; they did not describe by what authority it should be done.

Mr. Gurney. You say Mr. Shaw, the foreman, came after Mr. Hodson was gone - A. Yes; he requested me to go to the mansion-house.

Q. Did he say that in the hearing of the three - A. I believe he did; they were in the same warehouse.

Q. Did he speak in a voice that they were likely to hear - A. Yes, I believe he did.

Q. However they were there - this was Saturday, the last day in the year - A. Yes; I went to the lord mayor on the Saturday.

COURT. Did they say any thing to Shaw when he said that to you - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. You went to the mansion-house - A. Yes, on the Saturday.

Q. Did you on the Monday go to the warehouse - A. Yes, on Monday the 2nd of January, I went to the warehouse.

Q. Did you see the three again - that is Biggs, Kingsbury, and Laremouth - A. Yes, I did; I told them that I had been to the mansion house to seek for redress; one of the clerks at the mansion house told me that if I would bring witnesses that these men had resisted working with me, something good could be done for me.

COURT. What reply did they make - A. They laughed it off with a joke.

Q. Did any thing pass at that time, or before the next Friday, respecting the club - A. I went to the warehouse two or three times; I saw them once or twice; I learnt from them that the business would be brought forward on Friday night at the society; they requested me, one and all, to attend the society on Friday night.

Q. Then from Saturday, when you had quitted the warehouse, until the Friday that you went to the club, had you done any work at Mr. Hodson's warehouse - A. Not any; because there were other men in Mr. Hodson's employ who belonged to the society, they all declared they would leave if I continued in Mr. Hodson's employ.

Q. Had you heard any of the other men make these declarations in the hearing of these defendants - A. Not any.

Mr. Gurney. There were other members of the club working there, you understood also they would have left if you continued working there - A. Yes; Mr. Hodson did send me into his employ into Pickle Herring, over the water. That was on the 14th of January.

Mr. Marriot. You left on Saturday the 31st - A. Yes.

Q. You now come down to Friday night, the 6th of January - on the 6th of January, in the evening, did you go to the Crown and Cushion - A. Yes; I went to the house the society is held at.

Q. The house where the society meets - at Moorgate - A. Yes.

Q. Did you there see either of the defendants - A. Yes; Biggs.

Q. Did you speak to Biggs - A. Yes; after waiting in the tap-room about an hour. I went at eight o'clock; I was coming out of the house, I had not seen any of them; I met Biggs in the passage; I asked him if the society had discussed the business; he said no, not yet, they were going to proceed upon it directly.

Q. Did he tell you where they were - A. No, he did not; they were in a room over my head; I believe he went up stairs.

Q. Did you see him again in the course of that night - A. No; I waited there till eleven o'clock at night. On the next morning I called upon Biggs to know the determination of the society; he told me that the society had agreed to allow me seven shillings a day for my loss time, until the Friday following. I went to the warehouse, Cooper's-row, then I understood from Mr. Hampton that it was for a week only.

Q. Pray what could you have earned in that week that you were idle and out of work - A. I could have earned upon an average three pounds ten shillings, if I had been in Mr. Hodson's employ; I received two pounds for the week before; I had worked four days; that I received on the Saturday night when I left work.

Q. Did you after that see either of the other men of the society - A. Yes; I went to Mr. Hodson's on the 14th of January and told them how the society had settled it; they said they could not work with me; I

told them Biggs told me if I did wait till next Friday night they would allow me seven shillings a day; on Saturday sennight after the 6th (the 14th) I went to Mr. Hodson's, Cooper's-row, I saw Biggs, Kingsbury, and Laremouth, the same three; I told them that Mr. Hodson had, sent me to work. - I must recal that if you please.

Q. Did you see either of them there when you went on the 14th - A. No, I do not believe I did. On the 8th of January I saw Biggs at my own house, the day after he told me about the seven shillings a day, he told me that Mr. Hodson had given him notice, and the other two defendants, to quit; but he should not have the week's notice, he should not go to work again.

Q. Why - A. Because he found himself much hurt that Mr. Hodson should give him a week's notice on this account. On the Monday following, the 9th of January, I went to Mr. Hodson's house and told him these three men had left.

Q. In consequence of that conversation did you see either of the defendants again - A. No. He desired me to go to Cooper's-row to work on the 9th of January; Mr. Shaw, the foreman, said it would turn the house into confusion.

Q. Was either of the defendants there at the time - A. Not either of them.

Q. In point of fact Mr. Shaw did not admit you to work - A. No; he said it would throw the house into confusion again.

Mr. Gurney. Were there at that time other members of the packer's club present when Mr. Shaw spoke - A. There were two or three, I am not certain which.

Mr. Marriot. You quitted on Saturday, the 31st of December - A. I did.

Q. Before any meeting of the club had taken place upon this business - A. There had been some meeting before that.

Q. These defendants told you something had passed, and that they hoped it would be got over in another week - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you was discharged from Mr. Hodson's employ - A. The 31st of December.

Q. Who discharged you on the 31st of December - A. I believe I may say Mr. Shaw.

Q. He paid you when he discharged you - A. No; it was not the usual custom to pay before the evening.

Q. You were paid in the evening and then you were fully discharged - A. Indeed I was discharged in the morning, because these men would not work with me.

Q. How soon after that did you go to work for him, or do any work any where - A. On the 14th of January; Mr. Hodson said he would try me a second time.

Q. These defendants were not there - I do not want to know what passed between you and him - have you continued working for him since then - A. No; I went to work on Saturday the 14th and quitted on the Monday following.

Q. Do you mean to say that you have not worked for Mr. Hodson since - A. No; I went to work for Mr. Britten on the 16th.

Q. Who did you work for between the 31st of December and the 14th of January - A. If I may call it work, I was at work for Mr. Britten.

Q. You lost a fortnight's employ, and for the three first days you were working for Mr. Hodson - there was no dispute about your working - A. Yes, there was; there had been some alteration before.

Q. You went working on till the morning of the 31st - A. Yes; I worked at Mark-lane one day; they carry on the same business at both; there was members of this benefit club there. On the 31st of December I was working at Mr. Hodson's, Cooper's-row, with Pearce, he worked with me at both places; I did not work with either of the defendants.

Mr. Gurney. You say that for three or four days that you had been at work for Mr. Hodson, there were alterations - A. Yes, they said they had; it would turn out favourable to me; they said I was not a packer, whereas, it may be said, two thirds of the society had worked with me at packing; the objection was made because I had not served my time to a packer only; because Mr. Britten was a packer and presser.

Q. Now you say on the morning of the 31st of December, you considered Mr. Shaw as discharging you - A. Yes.

Q. If you had been suffered, was it not your intention to come to work on the Monday morning following - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any reason to believe they should not have continued you in their service - A. No other than it was of consequence to him, so many in his house, that they should all leave his work on my account.

THOMAS HODSON . You are a packer, in Mark-lane - A. Yes, my partner's name is Hager, in Cooper's-row.

Q. Do you know any of the defendants - A. Three of them I do; Kingsbury, Biggs, and Laremouth.

Q. Were they in your service in December last - A. They were.

Q. Did any thing take place with these men; on the 31st of December - A. On that morning I was going from my house, in Crutched Friers; on my journey there; I met Mr. Shaw, my foreman.

Q. Tell us what you did in consequence of what Mr. Shaw communicated to you - A. I went on to Cooper's-row, and heard what these men had to say; they all three alternately spoke in turns; Biggs was the chief spokesman; they told me they had a law in their society, which prevented them from working with Barret, they were liable if they did to the forfeit of a guinea; and if they repeated it again, they were liable to be expunged from the society.

COURT. Does that society still exist - A. I believe it does; I told them not only that they were acting imprudently, but unjustly, and in a way that the law would take cognizance of.

Q. Do you know where this house is that they meet at - it is very proper that the house should be noticed by the magistrate - A. They said there was such a law in existence, and they must abide by it; I further remonstrated with them, and wished them coolly to reconsider the matter fairly over, and told them they were wrong; I believe their answer was exactly the same; I believe I further added, they would see if they considered it fairly, that it had the effect of a direct combination and conspiracy again this individual, to starve him to death; they seemed to be totally inattentive to any thing said, and continued to alledge that he was not a packer, that he served his time to Mr. Britten, who was not a packer by trade, but a presser; I made answer, that I had worked myself with Mr. Britten

thirty years ago at the packing business.

Q. In consequence of this remonstrance of your's, meeting with no attention from them, what did you do - A. I was compelled, under the necessity of the case, and if the fact had been ten times worse I must have submitted; I was compelled to discharge him, I desired Mr. Shaw, the foreman, to do it; I said if you persist I will discharge him, but mind, you compel me to it, I shall not do it of my own will. I did it.

Q. Through their compulsion Barret was discharged on Saturday - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time after employ Barret - A. I did; although I did not consider myself in a situation to employ him in the packing business in the city of London, yet as we had some hops to press down for the merchants; I said he would do this surely, without giving offence, in the county of Surry; he was there a day or two, he did what there was to do in a day; there was nothing said to him that applies to these men; there was by others.

Q. Did you send him to work on the 9th of January - A. I should have observed that our foreman is at liberty to take in men and discharge men without our knowledge.

Q. Should you have discharged Barret without you had been desired by the men - A. No, I should not, most assuredly.

Mr. Gleed. What day was it you discharged the defendants, these three men - A. Whether it was that Saturday sen'night, or that Saturday fortnight, I cannot tell; it was not the fortnight; I said I would give them a week's notice.

COURT. How many men had you working with you, members of this club - A. I think we had five or six others, besides these three.

Q. Then that makes eight or nine men who were members of this club - how many men were there in your employ at the time - A. There were these three that I have named, six, and five others; those five are out of the question.

Q. Do you think that you should have lost these six men if Barret had continued there - A. I did; they saying that we must leave; I believe I may add that it was by compulsion, thy must leave.

Q. Then you would have lost nine men out of the fourteen if you had not discharged Barret - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen any thing in the conduct of Barret that made you wish to discharge him, or would you have continued him if they had not done this - A. I was entirely satisfied with him; I should not have discharged him only on this account.

JOHN SHAW . Q. You are foreman to Messrs. Hodson and Hager's - A. Yes.

Q. You remember Barret working for Messrs. Hodson and Hager, the last two days of the last year - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember while he was working there any objection being made to his working - A. Yes; the objection was made because he was not deemed a packer by the society, called the society of packers.

Q. Where does that society meet - A. At the Crown at Moorgate; I believe it is called the Crown.

Q. Were you present at either of the meetings at the Crown - A. At one of them I was.

Q. Which was it you was present at - A. When the ballot was.

Q. How many defendants were there, if any of them were - A. I cannot say.

Q. Now I ask you upon the oath you have taken, was either of them there, or not - A. Slade was there.

Q. Was Smith there - A. Smith, I think was.

Q. Who were the stewards - A. Slade, and I believe also Smith, were the stewards.

Q. Was Paxton there - A. I cannot say; I believe Smith was there.

Q. Do you believe Smith was there, or are you not certain of it - A. Smith was there.

COURT. Did you say that Slade was there, and a steward - A. Yes.

Q. And you said just now you believed Smith was a steward, and he was there - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Why do you believe that Smith was a steward - A. Because I have heard it mentioned since by one of the trade, I do not know who.

Q. Have you heard it mentioned by either of the defendants that are here, or in their presence - A. I do not know.

Q. Do the stewards keep the books - A. Yes.

Q. How are these books kept by the society - A. The accounts of the society are kept in a book, and a book for the articles; the books are kept in a box.

Q. How many keys are there to that box - A. I believe three.

Q. Who are the keepers of the three keys - A. The three stewards; the society has three stewards, who have each a key of the box, containing the books.

Q. Now this night of the ballet, when Smith and Slade were there, was Paxton there - A. I do not know.

Q. Was Biggs there - A. I think he was.

Q. Was Laremouth there - A. I do not know whether he was there or no.

Q. You say a ballot was taken - what was said before the ballot was taken - A. I do not know the particular circumstance; the question was whether Barret should be Barret should be deemed a packer and conti-

Q. What was the day of the ballot - A. I do not know.

Q. Was it the last week in December, or the first week in January - A. I do not know.

Mr. Marriot. Was it not after Barret had been discharged, and the other men had been discharged - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Was the ballot after they had quitted the service or before - A. Before.

Q. It was after Barret had been discharged, and before these men had quitted the service - A. Yes.

Q. Who did the ballot respect - A. Mr. Barret, and whether he was deemed a packer and to continue working, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Who had the chair - A. We had no chair, only the three stewards sit by the books.

Q. Who stated the question - A. One of the stewards.

Q. Whether Barret was a packer, and should be allowed to work; you do not remember which of the stewards said this - A. No; all the three stewards were there.

Q. How many spoke before the ballot was taken - A. I believe four or five; I am not clear of that.

Q. Did Biggs speak - A. I believe not. I do not remember Laremouth being there.

Q. Did Slade speak - A. He did, I believe; he rather

approved of his continuing working.

Q. How long was the matter discussed before the ballot was taken - A. About half an hour.

Q. Who took the ballot - A. One of the stewards.

Q. Do you remember which of them - A. I am not positive whether it was one of the stewards or not; it is the custom of the society for the stewards to take the ballot - the ballot was taken.

Q. What was the result of the ballot - A. A majority against Mr. Barret to work; I think the number 31 against him, and I think 10 for him.

COURT. Then you had forty-one journeymen meeting for this purpose -

Mr. Marriot. Some of them masters, as well as journeymen.

COURT. After the resolution had been taken, did any person protest against the resolution of the club - A. No.

Q. What is the amount of the funds of your club - A. I do not know.

Q. Mr. Shaw, remember you are upon your oath - I know I am upon my oath.

Mr. Gurney. Have you heard what are the sums in the funds - A. I have not.

Q. You have no belief on the subject, have you - A. I do not know - it may be six or seven hundred pounds; I cannot tell; it is only speaking at random.

Mr. Marriot. I believe you are foreman to Messrs. Hodson and Hager - A. Yes.

Q. The society does not consist of journey men only, but some masters, and some foremen, and some journeymen - A. Yes.

Q. Does the society meet every Friday - once a week - A. Yes.

Q. Do you relieve sick and distressed members - A. Yes.

Q. Is the steward an office that is taken in turn - A. Yes, taken in rotation, they must fine or serve; they change every quarter.

COURT. How do you know that they change every quarter - is that one of the rules of the society that is in writing - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Marriot. Has it been the rule and practice ever since you have been a member of the society, to change stewards every quarter day - A. It has; and to relieve sick members, and to bury their wives.

Q. That is the business the stewards are to superintend - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when these men made any objection to Barret, and in consequence thereof he was discharged - A. I do not recollect discharging of Barret at all; I think he went away of his own accord, at Mr. Kingsbury and others saying that it would be settled in the society.

Q. You think he took himself away, and went to work at his business of a hot-presser - A. I do not recollect who discharged him, but he went away from us to work at Mr. Britten's, I believe. I heard that after he had been to work at Mr. Britten's.

Q. You told us that you were at the ballot - A. Yes; I was only at one meeting; I should not have gone then, only at the request of Mr. Hodson and the young fellow, it was by their desire.

Q. On the 14th of February this man came to work again - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was that the day after the ballot he came to work a single day - A. He came to work after the ballot, but I cannot remember the day.

Mr. Alley. I understood you to say that Slade spoke in favour of this man's continuing at work - A. Yes, he did.

Q. He is one of the parties that is indicted for keeping this young man from his work - you do not know the fact that Smith was a steward - A. I do not speak positive, I cannot.

Q. Do you know that neither Smith or Paxton at this moment are stewards - A. They are not stewards at present, because they serve only a quarter.

Q. They were not stewards last week, of course, because they only serve quarterly - you of your own knowledge do not know that ever they were stewards - A. No, except Slade.

COURT. Are all these defendants members of this society - A. I have no doubt of that.

Mr. Gurney. You went to the meeting where the ballot was, at the desire of Mr. Hodson and Hager, to make observations - A. I went there by their desire, but it was never said to make observations; I went there to hear what they had to say.

Q. Can you recollect a little now what they had to say - A. What I say is a fact.

Q. What was the practice of the society with respect to any of its members that work with a presser that is no packer - A. They are to pay the fine of a guinea.

Q. And if he works a second time what is the practice - A. I think an erasure.

Q. Have you any doubt of it - A. No, not in my own mind.

HENRY WILLIAM EASTMAN . Q. You are a master packer - A. I am a packer, I live in Suffolk-lane.

Q. Did you ever belong to the club of packers - A. Yes, at the Crown and Cushion, Moorgate.

Q. What is the practice of that club with respect to any man that works for a presser - A. I can tell by myself: the first offence was a fine of a guinea, and the second time an erasure - he was expunged from the society. I was a member of the society, and employed a person of the name of Wilson; this person was six or seven years in my service, and had been a foreman over these men, but when I removed into Suffolk-lane, they had a ballot on it and fined me a guinea; they wrote to me that I was fined a guinea for employing Mr. Wilson. I paid my quarter-age. This was somewhere about July or August last.

Q. Did any thing happen upon your not paying that fine - A. They expunged me; and to this hour, no man of the society can work for me.

Mr. Gleed. You are a master packer - A. I am.

Q. And you belonged to the club - A. I did.

COURT. And now you are no longer a member of this club - A. I am not.

THOMAS GALE . Q. You are a journeyman packer, are you not - A. Yes; I have worked for Messrs. Hodson and Hager seven or eight months.

Q. Were you at the Crown and Cushion when the ballot was held respecting Barret - A. I was.

Q. Who were the stewards at that time - A. I do not know the stewards; Mr. Slade was one; I believe Mr. Smith was one.

Q. Have you any doubt of it - A. I think there is no doubt of it.

Q. Was Paxton one - A. To the best of my knowledge, but I will not be positive; I do not recollect

seeing him in the room that night.

COURT. He might be a steward without being in the room - A. Not having looked at the books, I cannot say.

Q. Who is the steward now, and has the custody now - A. I cannot say - the stewards were changed at Lady-day.

Q. Have you any doubts that Biggs is one of the stewards now - A. I have not; I think there is no doubt of that, Mr. Biggs is one. I cannot answer to the other men.

Mr. Bolland. You were present at the ballot, were not you - A. I was.

Q. Was Kingsbury, or Laremouth there - A. I cannot say, I do not recollect seeing them; I was there one night when the subject was discussed.

Q. Is Laremouth a steward now - A. I believe not.

Q. Is Paxton a steward or not - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. What was the question that was discussed - A. About Barret; there was a difference of opinion about Mr. Barret; some looked upon him as a packer, others as a presser - whether he was to be continued as a packer or a presser that was the question, and if he was to be continued as a presser, then he was not a packer; it went to a ballot - thirty against him and ten for him.

Q. What was the resolution - A. He was not a packer.

Q. Were all the three stewards present at the meeting of the ballot - A. I answered that question - I doubt of Paxton being present.

Q. Have you any doubt of Smith and Slade being present - A. No.

Q. Was Paxton a steward when the ballot was taken - A. I believe he was.

Q. What was to be done with Barret after the resolution, that he was not a packer - A. There were different opinions about it; it was nothing to me what others do.

Q. Was he allowed to work as a packer - A. He was not, as I understood it.

Mr. Marriot. Was every thing done by the society by a ballot - A. Every thing that arose to a dispute, be it what it will.

Q. There was no contrivance of ballot upon this subject, but every thing of all kind was settled by a ballot - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Then I understand you to say that Paxton was not there - do I understand you right - A. I cannot undertake to say I saw him there; I noticed Mr. Slade more than any of the rest, because he was of Mr. Barret's side.

Q. Now with respect to Smith, you do not undertake to say he was there - A. Smith and Slade were present.

Q. You do not mean to be positive that Smith was there - A. I believe so; when a thing is doubtful I put my believe to it; I think he was there.

Mr. Bolland. Have you any doubt that there were two stewards present - A. It remains rather a doubt in my mind, because I cannot answer it upon oath.

ALEXANDER HAMPTON . Q. You are a packer - - A. Yes; I worked for Mr. Hodson seventeen years.

Q. Do you remember Barret working for him - A. I do; he left on the 31st of December last.

Q. Do you know why he went away - A. Of his own pleasure, I believe.

Q. Did you see Mr. Hodson talking to him that day - A. Not particular to him; I saw him talking to Biggs.

Q. Did Biggs, Laremouth and Kingsbury work for Mr. Hodson at that time - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge about Barret's going away - A. He was told by Biggs that it would be settled the next meeting in his favour, and went away on that account.

Q. What was meant by being settled in his favour - A. That he would be continued a packer by the society.

Q. Who had made any objection against Barret not being a packer - A. Some persons in the society; he had served his time to Mr. Britten, who was not considered a regular master packer.

Q. Did you ever hear Biggs, Kingsbury, or Laremouth, make any objection to him - A. No further. than there was a fine if they worked with him, or any person who was not considered a packer.

Q. Were you there both nights when Barret's case was taken into consideration - A. I was there the first evening.

Q. Who were your stewards, were they there at that time - A. There were three; I do not know all of their names; Slade was one.

Q. Was Smith one - A. I believe he was one; I have some doubt, because I have not the pleasure of knowing him.

Q. Was Paxton a steward - A. I believe he was; I did not know him.

Q. Which of these three stewards was present at the first evening of the debate - was the ballot the first night or the second - A. The second night.

Q. Was Paxton there the first night - A. I do not know whether he was there or not.

Q. Was Smith there - A. I believe he was; Slade was there, and Biggs; I do not think that Laremouth I think was there; Kingsbury was there.

Q. What was the debate of the first night - A. No particular debate; some said he was a packer, and others said he was not.

Q. The society met again, did they not, upon Barret's business - A. Yes, they balloted; then the question was, whether he was to be continued a packer or a presser; he was thrown out, he was not considered as a packer, the number was about thirty against him, and nine or ten for him; then he was not continued a packer.

Q. How did that affect Barret - A. That he must work at the pressing and not at the packing, and if any man worked with him at the packing they fined him a guinea, and excluded him the second time; I believe there was only one instance of it.

Mr. Marriot. You worked for Messrs. Hodson and Hager at the time the other men did - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the question originated with the society - A. It originated with individuals; some person called for a ballot; I cannot tell who they were.

Q. You said that you heard Biggs and Barret talking together - tell us what conversation passed between them - A. I heard Biggs and Kingsbury say that in all probability it would be finally settled in his favour, that

he would be considered as a packer.

Q. I would now ask you whether he went away upon that intimation, or was he turned away - A. He went away upon that intimation.

Q. You say this man went away of his own accord - A. Yes; he went away without stopping to be dismissed.

COURT. Have you heard what Mr. Hodson has said - A. Yes.

Q. Were you all paid on Saturday night as well as this man - A. Yes.

Mr. Marriot. Had Kingsbury, Laremouth, and Biggs been discharged from Mr. Hodson's service - A. They were discharged the following Saturday night that Barret left; Barret went on the 31st, and they were discharged on the 7th; the ballot was held on the 6th; I believe it was finally decided on the 6th.

Q. Was it decided the first meeting or the second meeting after Barret quitted - A. I cannot tell that; I went on the first club night.

COURT. You said they told him that in all probability it would be finally settled in his favour, on the next Friday - do these questions usually take place whether a man shall work or not - A. I never knew such a question take place before.

Mr. Alley. I do not understand you to speak to any of these three men, who were stewards, being present, excepting Slade; with respect to Smith you say you cannot be positively - A. No; I cannot undertake to say he was there.

Q. And with respect to Paxton you do not know him, and therefore you cannot undertake to say whether he was there or no - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. You say that Barret went away of his own accord - A. Yes.

Q. Did he tell you that he went away of his own accord - A. No.

Q. Have you heard what Mr. Hodson has stated - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when Mr. Hodson had an occasion of remonstrating with these men - A. Yes.

COURT. Upon the oath you have taken do you believe that Mr. Hodson dare to employ them after this - A. I think he might have run the risk of these men paying the fine.

Q. Do you mean to have it understood that you could believe that the workmen would have gone on with paying the fine of a guinea, and the second time they would have been excluded - do not you know that - A. I know it now.

JAMES BANKES . Q. You are a journeyman packer - A. Yes.

Q. Who were the stewards of this club in the latter end of December and the beginning of January - A. Slade, Smith, and Paxton.

Q. Who are the stewards now - A. Biggs is one; I cannot inform you of the others.

Q. Were you at the club on the night of the ballot - A. I was.

Q. Was Paxton there that night - A. I cannot tell; Smith and Slade was there.

THOMAS SEXTON. I am a journeyman packer; I was at the club on the night of the ballot; I do not know whether any of the defendants were there or no.

COURT. I want to know when a meeting is called for an ordinary purpose, whether it is the course to determine whether a man shall be employed in his ordinary business - A. It was a meeting for the purpose of settling it.

THOMAS COWPER. I am a journeyman packer; I work for Mr. Hodson. The reason for Mr. Barret leaving us was because the club had not settled in his favour, whether he was a legal person to work as a packer; if a packer works with a person that is not legal they will be fined a guinea. I have not been to the club since that fine has been made; I never knew any one fined excepting in Mr. Eastman's case; it is a modern rule.

JAMES STEVENS . Q. You are the landlord of the Crown and Cushion - A. Yes; where the society of packers meet.

Q. The club of journeymen packers meet there once a week - A. Yes.

Q. Where was their box kept - A. In a box in the house; it is here.

Q. Who are the stewards now - A. I do not know.

Q. to Woodward. When was this rule made - A. In April or May last. The rule was made in consequence of Mr. Eastman employing a man that was not a packer. That rule was to pay a fine of a guinea, if a man worked with him; and excluded the second time.

Mr. Marriot and Mr. Alley addressed the jury on behalf of the defendants.

SMITH, SLADE, BIGGS, LAREMOUTH, KINGSBURY.

GUILTY.

PAXTON, NOT GUILTY .

JURY. We hope the rigor of the law will not be exercised against the prisoners, and particularly against Smith and Slade.

Judgment respited till next Sessions .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-135

443. MARY CATMER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CHARLES PAYNE I am an apprentice to Mr. Burkett, chemist and druggist, 20, Fleet-street. On the 6th of March, in the fore part of the day, the prisoner came to our shop for a pennyworth of candied horehound, I gave it her; she gave me a six-pence, I shewed it to Mr. Fletcher, he kept the six-pence, and I gave her the change, and she went away. On the 8th of March she came again; she asked for a pennyworth of Spanish juice, I gave it her, she gave me sixpence, I gave her the change; I put the six-pence in the upper part of the till, where there was not any other money. Mr. Fletcher has the six-pence, I saw him take it. On the 14th of March she came again, and asked for half an ounce of cream of tartar, that came to two-pence; she gave me another six-pence, I took it to Mr. Fletcher, he nipped it with a pair of scissars; and there I saw the copper; he came and told the woman this was a bad six-pence, she must know of it, he had given her warning. I went for a constable.

COURT. The three six-pences were given to Mr. Fletcher by you - A. Yes.

JOHN FLETCHER . I am a chemist and druggist, living at Mr. Burkett's; I know the prisoner by coming

to our shop. On the 6th of March the prisoner came for a pennyworth of candied horehound, she gave Charles Payne a six-pence, he gave it me; that sixpence I put into a box by itself. On the 8th the prisoner came again for a pennyworth of Spanish juice; she offered another six-pence; I looked at it; I compared them together, I thought they were both of one stamp. On the 14th the prisoner came again for half an ounce of cream of tartar; she offered another six-pence; I cut it with the scissars, I saw it was a bad one; I told her she must be aware of it being a bad six-pence, for I had told her that the first she offered was a bad sixpence.

COURT. How came you to take them - did you know it to be a bad one on the 8th - A. Yes; I meaned then to have her taken up, but having no person in the shop, I could not. When she came on the 14th, then I was certain that she was an utterer of bad money; then I had her taken up. I have kept the sixpences ever since; these are the six-pences.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Look at these three six-pences - A. The three are counterfeits; they all appear new not to have been in circulation. They are of the same make.

THOMAS SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner. I searched her, she had near a shillings worth of halfpence about her.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 6th of this month I was not out, I was washing all day; as to the 8th I cannot say whether I was or no. On the 14th I was out with my fruit; I had a six-pence which I took at the pawnbrokers or at the market; I did not think it was a bad one, or else I would not have gone in the shop.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that Time, to find Sureties for her good behaviour for Two Years more .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090412-136

444. JOSEPH RUDDALL was indicted for that he on the 2nd of March , unlawfully and against the will of John Dyer , did force and put his right hand into his coat pocket, with intent the goods and chattels then and there being feloniously to steal .

JOHN DYER. I live at East-Ham in Essex, I live on my means. On the 2nd of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking up Fish-street-hill; I felt something against my thigh, presently afterwards I felt something pulling at my coat; I turned suddenly round and caught the prisoner's hand in my pocket.

Q. Was any thing in your pocket - A. A silk handkerchief; it was dark; he slipped down, and snatched his hand away from me; I caught him by the collar and challenged him with attempting to pick my pocket; he said he had not, and he hit me on the bosom; I hit him, and he ran away from me; I ran after him and knocked him down three times; he then begged for mercy, and said he would never do the like again if I would let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming over London-bridge, coming into Gracechurch-street my foot slipped of the curb-stone; I fell against this gentleman, he struck me three or four times; I strove to get out of the way.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-137

445. PHILIP TRAGGER was indicted for that he on the 4th of April , about the hour of three in the afternoon, the dwelling house of Christopher Moon did attempt to break and enter, with intent the goods and chattels therein feloniously to steal .

WILLIAM MOON . I am the son of Christopher Moon , his house is No. 4, Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn , a watchmaker's and silversmith's shop.

JAMES OBEE . I am a pawnbroker, I live near Mr. Moon. On Tuesday the 4th of April, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner was holding his coat of one side to prevent any body from seeing, and one of his hands was inside of a pane of glass in Mr. Moon's window; he was looking to see if any body observed him; the window was broken, and a piece of glass out; I was at that time speaking to Mr. Lloyd, I said, Mr. Lloyd look at that man; he saw us, and ran off; I pursued him, he ran up a court, where there was no thoroughfare, and got over a wall into Furnival's-inn-court; he ran up a one pair of stairs, and there he was taken.

Q. When he was apprehended were you quite certain that he was the person that had his hand in Mr. Moon's window - A. I am; we took him back to Mr. Moon's shop; I observed the glass out, the putty had been cut away and the glass starred by a knife.

DAVID LLOYD . I was in conversation with Mr. Obee, near this shop. Mr. Obee drew my attention, I observed the prisoner had a great coat on; he was standing at the corner of the window, he held the flap of his coat up; I saw him put his hand in the window and I saw him take it out; I supposed he was alarmed at seeing me look at him; he ran off; I pursued him, I never lost night him, till I saw him in the garden; I ran round to go into the inn, and then I saw him in custody; I said this is the man that put his hand in Mr. Moon's window; I am positive it is the same man.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer, the prisoner was delivered over to me at Mr. Moon's. I saw the widow something had been done at the bottom with a knife, and the glass broke out. I handcuffed him; he was rather desperate; I saw the prisoner rubbing his knee against the other ham; I immediately caught hold, and said what is here; it turned out to be a gold ring and a penknife, they were under the ham. The ring has been claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from home, going into the city to look for a job; going by the shop, I had the curiosity to look at it; I had got my hand against the shop window; some persons coming by knocked my elbow, my hand broke the glass; I run a- away for fear they should make me pay for the glass, as I had no more money about me; having been out of work twelve weeks.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-138

446. JOSIAH NIGHTINGALE , and JOHN LAWRENCE , were indicted for that they, on the 17th of February , about the hour of six, on the same day, the dwelling house of Christopher Alderson , Richard

Preston Prichard , and John Pearson , unlawfully did break with intent the goods and chattels therein feloniously to steal .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN PEARSON . Q. Have you a warehouse in Lawrence-lane, Cheapside - A. We have; my partners names are, Richard Preston Prichard , and Christopher Alderson . The house is in St. Lawrence Jury .

MR. HINKSMAN. Q. I believe you are a ribbon manufacturer , in Wood-street - A. I am. On the 17th of February I left my house about a quarter before six; at the time I got into Lawrence-lane the day light was gone. As I turned up Lawrence-lane, I noticed the two prisoners, and four more, in the act, as I considered them, to rob the warehouse of the prosecutors. Nightingale was at the window, and particularly active; and Lawrence was watching at the door; I stood opposite about eight minutes; I could see them from the reflection of the light within. It was evident they were attempting to make an entry. Nightingale was trying to make a hole in the shutter; I afterwards found a hole there, and the pin out. I saw them active; and from their motions, I concluded the job was done. I went over to Mr. Hixon, he and I went towards the warehouse; at the very instant as we came out of door, we walked towards the prosecutor's. Lawrence left the door of the prosecutor's and walked over the away; and when I had come to the door, a clerk of the house had opened the door; I said to him, are you robbed; I pointed out the prisoner Lawrence, I said that is one, we both collared him. I told the clerk to hold fast, as I saw there was going to be a rescue attempted. Three of them from the corner of Cateaton-street were coming up in a menacing posture, I let go Lawrence to take hold of Nightingale, he was one of the three that came; he put himself in a position for fighting, I said you are one, I will have you; he went by me to rescue Lawrence, he struck the witness who had hold of Lawrence, I closed with him; in the scuffle he fell, and I rather went over him; another of the party came up to rescue Nightingale; I then said I would have them both; the short one ran up Castle-court; I followed Nightingale into King-street, there I lost sight of him; he was brought back in four or five minutes to the warehouse. I have not the least doubt that he was the man that I had the conflict with. Lawrence never escaped at all.

Q. When Nightingale came back did you examine the state of his clothes - A. Before I looked I said his knee is dirty, as a corresponding proof of it. I am positive he is the man without that circumstance; I have seen his face before many times; and I am positive that Lawrence is the man that watched the door; when I went into the warehouse I found the window open, and I saw it open in the street. They had made a hole in the window frame; the pin had fell on the counter.

MR. HARKER. Q. You are clerk to the prosecutor's - A. I am, On the evening spoken of I heard an unusual noise at the window; at first I thought it was our private door; I sent my friend first, and then I came to the door, Mr. Hinckesman pointed out Lawrence to me, I went over and collared him, and brought him into the warehouse; he was secured.

Q. What species of goods were in the window that might be taken away - A. There were some bombazetts not half a yard from the window; they could be got out very easy. It is a Yorkshire warehouse.

NIGHTINGALE, GUILTY , aged 19.

LAWRENCE, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090412-139

445. JOHN SHERMAN was indicted for a libel .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM TUFFIN. Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Self, the plaintiff - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these two letters - did you receive them from the postman - A. Yes, on the 28th of November.

Q. The post-mark is the 28th of November, four o'clock; they are both marked the same way - at the time you took them were they both sealed - A. No; the one with parchment in it was sealed, the other was unsealed; I did not take them in my own hand, my mistress took them in; I saw it; I was in the shop at the same time; my master took one out of her hand.

Q. Did you see her read it - A. I did not; she went into the parlour.

Mr. Alley. They were both put in the same post office.

MR. SELF. I am a sign-painter, No. 60, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Do you recollect on the 28th of November last receiving these two letters in question from the postman - A. My spouse received them of the postman, and while she was paying the postman the four-pence I took one out of her hand, which was sealed and had an inclosure in it. She took the other into the parlour with her; she is near sighted, she could not read the whole, she could make out a few words; I opened one, and when I saw this inclosed I immediately went in; there was no writing on it, but only the inclosed; it contained a little slip of paper, I believe the words Michaelmas term upon it, with the Exchequer process; I read part, I did not read the whole; I went into the parlour and took the other letter out of her hand, and read it.

Q. That letter produced to you to day is the same letter - A. The very same.

Q. Look at that process and see whether that is the same - A. It is the same inclosure as when I received it.

Q. Now is this the other letter - A. It is the other letter.

[The Court was of opinion there was no occasion for reading the letter containing the libel, the whole of it being very vulgar and indecent, and written by some bad man, the jury should have an opportunity of looking at it themselves.]

Mr. Alley. This little slip of paper contains on it, Exchequer, Michaelmas term - you have seen the letter, and you have seen the writing on it, are you able to say from what you have seen of the defendant's hand writing, that that is his hand writing - A. I believed it directly I perused it - I mean the libel, and the superscription on the other.

COURT. You believe both to be the hand writing of the defendant - A. I do.

Mr. Alley to jury. Gentlemen, if you put the quarters of the sheet of paper together - the two letters together - you find they form one whole half sheet one

has been torn from the other - A. JURY. Yes.

Q. to plaintiff. Do you remember the day he was taken in custody - A. It was on Saturday.

Q. How long after that was it you received this - A. I cannot say whether it was the Saturday following, or that Saturday week that he was taken in custody.

COURT. Where was he taken in custody - A. In London, and as he was coming into this court to plead or to find bail, he said I was a false swearing villain I wanted to seek for his life, but he would do for me some way or other, if he got clear of this; they were the very words.

Mr. Gurney. I suppose there were some officer in the coach - A. There were two.

Q. You have a large family of children, I understood by my learned friend - A. I have none, but my apprentice and servant.

EDWARD HUGHES . Q. You are an attorney - A. Yes.

Q. Were you directed by Henry Miles to serve that process upon the defendant - A. Yes; I served it upon him myself, on the 14th of November, I gave it him.

Q. Was the name cut out at the time - A. No; his name was there and Henry Miles '; this was an action at the suit of Henry Miles ; the plaintiff's name is now cut out, it was not when I served it upon him.

Q. Now look at the slip of paper, and tell me whose hand writing that is - A. That is my son's hand writing.

Q. Was that at the top of the bill of costs furnished to the defendant - A. It appears so to me; the receipt is on the 16th of November; my son received the money.

HENRY MILES . Q. You were a plaintiff in that action - I will now ask you whether the plaintiff ever knew that you served that action on the defendant - A. I never saw him before last Friday night.

Q. Therefore there is no pretence in the least to say that he could have urged you - A. Not the least.

THOMAS PRIOR . I live in Wilderness-row, Clerkenwell; I am clerk to Mr. Rutland.

Q. On the 27th of December had you any conversation with the defendant on this subject - A. I had; I saw Mr. Sherman at Sadler's repository, Goswell-street; I remonstrated with him on his conduct to Mr. Self; I asked him how he could send such an infamous writing to Mr. Self; he said he knew nothing about it. I told him that he had been discovered, for the Exchequer process had been served upon him; he then said that it was through Mr. Self, the defendant, that it was served upon him, that Self was a perjured scoundrel, he would swear any thing; this was previous to the indictment being prefered.

WILLIAM FREDERICK HUGHES, JUNR. Q. Look at that slip and tell me whether you have seen that before - A. That is my hand writing; I furnished the defendant with the costs of Miles's action.

Q. Is that the total of it - A. I have no doubt of it; I received the money; the receipt is my hand writing, the rest is my father's.

Mr. Gurney, to Self. You have spoken to your belief of that being the defendant's hand writing - A. I have.

Q. Do you mean to say it is like his ordinary hand writing - A. It is, there is a similitude in it; I consider it written in disguise.

COURT. Look over that letter, the libel, and tell me whether you believe every word of that letter to be written by one person, and whether written in the natural character and hand writing, and whether you believe it to be the hand writing of the defendant - A. As to the words, I believe the whole of them to be disguised; I believe them to be written in one hand, and by the defendant.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a school-master, Charles-street, Covent Garden; I have known the defendant eight years, he is a plumber and engine maker. I know his hand writing perfectly well.

Q. Look at that letter, do you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I do not, it is nothing at all like it.

Q. Do you think it is his hand disguised - A. I should think not.

Q. What has been his character - A. An honest upright man.

Mr. Alley. Look at that writing, who wrote that - A. I do not know, it is not like his general hand writing.

COURT. Look at the superscription of that letter, is the direction of that letter the defendant's hand writing or not - A. Nothing like it.

Mr. Alley. Look at that, and tell me whether that is his hand writing - A. That has a similarity, it seems to be in imitation of his hand writing.

COURT. The word

"friend" - does that appear to be a natural or a disguised hand - A. Natural hand; it appears to be written by the same person as wrote the other.

Q. Look again, at the word

"Mr. Self," and say whether you believe that to be the hand writing of the defendant - are they not all alike - A. No; he writes a very loose kind of a hand - that is to the contrary.

CHARLES TITFORD . I am a linen-draper, the corner of Finsbury-square; I have known the defendant nine or ten years, we have been well acquainted as tradesmen.

Q. Now look at that, from beginning to end, and tell me whether you believe that to be the hand writing of the defendant - A. I certainly should not take it to be his hand writing; I have seen many of his receipts and bills some years past.

Q. Look at the direction, do you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I do not.

Q. Look at the word

"friend" - A. I certainly think it is not his hand writing.

Q. Look at the word

"Self" at the back of the paper, do you believe that to be his hand writing - A. It is not at all like the manner he wrote his bills out.

Mr. Alley. Whose hand writing is that - A. I think like the last witness, it has certainly a similarity to it.

COURT. Upon a view of it, if it had come to you on business, should you have thought it was his hand writing - A. I certainly should.

WILLIAM KELL. I am a wine and brandy merchant, Bishopsgate-street; I have known the defendant nine years; I had occasion to see his books concerning a dispute about a machine he was making for me.

Q. Look at that direction, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. This is not his writing.

Q. Look at the direction of that, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I do

not.

Q. Look at the word

"Self" to that, and say whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I do, it is more like it than any I have seen.

JAMES CLARK. I have had frequent opportunities of seeing the defendant write for eight or ten years.

Q. Look at that writing attentively, do you believe that to be his hand writing - A. Not the least resemblance of it, nor is the direction of it.

Q. Look at the word

"Mr. Self" upon that, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. It has a resemblance to it; I do not think it is.

The defendant called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Alley replied.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and during that Time to be placed in and upon the Pillory at the Top of the Old-Bailey, opposite Giltspur-street, for the Space of One Hour, between the Hours of Twelve and Two in the Afternoon .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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