Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th February 1809.
Reference Number: 18090215
Reference Number: f18090215-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 15th of FEBRUARY, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Nathaniel Newnham , esq. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. James Shaw , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; John Princep , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. William Plomer , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

George Peck

William Ball

Thomas Wollard

John How

John Kimpton

John Sikes

John Wright

William Downing

James Atkins

Absalom Grey

George Atkins

William Robinson .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Richards

John Shephard

Moses Magwood

Thomas Bennett

John Hurwood

Original Lyle

John Hollier

John Garling

William Wiley

John Denziloe

John Robinson

George Corderer .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Goodcheape

Peter White

Thomas Gurney

Thomas Austin

Thomas Garrod

Gilbert Slater

Thomas Turner

Peter Bateman

Paul Hooker

John Kent

Grantham Mead

Naaman Key .

Reference Number: t18090215-1

175. JAMES CROW was indicted for that he on the 25th of November , feloniously and violently upon Mary Frossy, sometimes called Mary Fossit , spinster , did make an assault, and her the said Mary Fossit , did ravish and carnally know .

The prosecutrix being called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-2

176. GEORGE JAMES, alias STEVENS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of October , a silver gravy spoon, value 3 l. a silver toast rack, value 7 l. a white dress, value 15 s. an apron, value 3 s. two pair of sheets, value 2 l. 12 s. 6 d. three napkins, value 4 s. four table cloths, value 3 s. 6 d. five towels, value 4 s. 9 d. two pair of stockings, value 6 s. a work bag with cottons and threads, value 7 s. a pincushion, value 1 s. two tooth brushes, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a hair trunk, value 15 s. a spice box, value 3 s. two head dresses, value 7 l. a parrot and cage, value 3 l. 3 s. a boy's profile, value 5 s. a fan, value 5 s. and a pair of shoes, value 6 s. the property of Rebecca Sainthill .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-3

177. MICHAEL CONNER , JAMES KELLY , and JOHN CARR , were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway on the 9th of December upon David Samuhda , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch, value 10 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. two gold seals, value 5 l. six pound weight of currants, value 4 s. 3 d. his property .

DAVID SAMUHDA . On last Tuesday evening a little before six, in the Upper Clapton road , a little beyond the four mile stone, nearly opposite of a new building, a house of Mr. Crayden, I was called to stop by four footpads, two of which had pistols; I was in company with a gentleman of the name of Swaby, who is in court; we were in a single horse chaise; I did not stop untill I heard the pistols cocked, and then I thought I might as well pull up. A man then came up to me on the whip side, I was driving; he presented a pistol to me and demanded my money; by that time they all had taken their stations; there was one man at the horse's head, another had hold of the reins, there was another by the side of the gentleman that was with me, that is Mr. Swabey's side; he presented a pistol to him. There was a general cry, perhaps of them all, I cannot say how many of them, out with them, out with them. Soon afterwards, or perhaps during it, Mr. Swabey was forcibly dragged from the chaise; the chaise flap having been torn, he was dragged into the road. I had by that time got my hand into my pocket and delivered money to one of the robbers, the man by me with the pistol.

Q. How much money was it - A. From the best calculation I could make, I believe it to be upwards of three pound; to the value of three pound I am certain in gold and silver; he said that would not satisfy him; I told him it must, I thought it sufficient. He demanded my watch, and desired me to be quick in giving it.

Q. Did you give it him - A. Yes, I did. It was a gold watch, gold chain, and two gold seals; the watch was capped and jewelled. He then stood upon the step of the chaise, desired me to unbutton my coat, and rifled my left hand waistcoat pocket, from which he took a pair of scissars, a small paper parcel containing cards, addressed to a brother of mine, and a small piece of liquorice. I merely mention this to state the scissars and piece of liquorice were returned to me as of being of no use to them; he returned them at my stating they were of no use to them, but kept the cards. He then felt the slash pocket of my driving coat, and asked what was there, I said nothing but halfpence for the turnpike; he said he did not want these, but he put his hand in there and took the halfpence; and I believe there was a six pence there, I am not certain; at such a time I believe it is impossible to be collected: shortly after that I found somebody coming on the step of the chaise of the other side, which I was glad to see; it was Mr. Swabey getting in after having been rifled. I looked round anxiously for my friend, it disengaged my attention from the men, after hearing one of the prisoners say, do not kill him; previous to that I saw three men engaged with him; they had quitted my horse and reins and were engaged with him.

Q. Did you say you heard one of the prisoners say do not kill him - A. Yes.

Q. What time was that - A. Shortly after they had dragged Mr. Swabey out of the chaise.

Q. Which of them was it - A. I was just going to mention it; I should name it as Carr, the man who robbed me; it was the man that robbed me, he said do not kill him.

Q. His name is Carr is it - A. Yes; except roughly handling, he used no improper language. Mr. Swabey got in the chaise and I drove away.

Q. Was there any thing else taken from you - A. Yes; I concluded the currants were taken out of the chaise; my whole attention or the greatest part was taken up with the man that held the pistol to my head. The currants did not appear to have dropped on the road; when they were brought to Bow street they were not soiled.

Q. How many pound - A. Six pound; I cannot swear that they were taken out of the chaise, the parcel had not the appearance of being dropped in the road. I am certain they are my own; they contain my address and the stables were I put up; I did not miss them till the next morning, my confusion was too much to enquire what was taken out of the chaise.

Q. You said there were four persons, were there - A. Yes, I know none but Carr; that is not to be positive of them, they have the appearance of the men; I am sure of Carr to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Q. You do not swear positively - A. I do not; I

would rather he would be let loose upon the public than my conscience be burthened.

Q. Then according to your best knowledge and belief you will swear no further - A. No further; under such circumstances it is impossible to be collected at all times, perhaps.

Q. You were quite alarmed I suppose - A. I cannot say I was; I was more alarmed for the fate of my friend, who was dragged by the three men so far; I did not know what became of him; the other three I could only see their persons generally; as to their faces I had no opportunity of seeing.

Q. You did not take any notice of their dress - A. No further than there were two in jackets and two in coats; one man was in a light coat; the man in a light coat is not taken.

Q. What had Carr on - A. The same jacket he has on now; Carr and Kelly were in jackets; I did not know it was Kelly until I saw him in Bow street, then I did not know his person except from his figure and his dress, then I thought that to be the man. Carr I believe to be one of them, and he had the same jacket on he has on now.

Q. What do you say of the other prisoner, had he the same coat on he has now - A. I believe so; they were too soon removed out of my sight; it is impossible to speak precisely, they were at some distance.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. It was on the 9th instant you were robbed - A. Yes; on Thursday, a little before six in the evening.

Q. What was the length of the place from where you was robbed to Ratcliffe Cross - A. I cannot say.

Q. What distance were you from Whitechapel, was it an hundred yards - A. I should suppose two or three miles from Whitechapel.

Q. Then Ratcliffe Cross is a considerable distance from where you was robbed - A. Yes.

Q. Is Upper Clapton in Middlesex - A. I believe Upper Clapton is in Middlesex.

MR. SWABY. Q. Where you in the chaise with Mr. Samuhda on Thursday last, in Upper Clapton road - A. I was; I saw four men, one particularly caught my attention, who was on the wrong side of the road, where there was no foot path. Mr. Samuhda was on the whip side, he called out to Mr. Samuhda to stop, and directly pointed a pistol to him; and another man came on the other side to me with a pistol, and another man unarmed. They desired me to get out of the chaise; the flap being up they tore it open, and dragged me out on the road; two came to me at first, then another one came up to me; having my chaise coat on, they broke it open, it being buttoned at the top; they felt in my waistcoat pocket, they found no watch nor money in my right hand pocket; in my left hand waistcoat pocket there were three pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. Had they any pistols with them - A. One had; that man is not taken; after I was dragged out, I took notice of one man in particular; his name is Kelly. I am quite sure he is one.

Q. Did you take notice of the other - A. Nothing further than his height and size, generally; I cannot speak assuredly to him.

Q. Then you will not swear as to the others at all - A. No.

Q. Did you observe the man that presented the pistol to Mr. Samuhda - A. At first I saw him, I could not swear to him.

Q. Was he like one of the prisoners - A. In form he was; that was all I could discern, he was like Carr.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. When was Carr taken in custody - A. I understood since, he was taken the morning after the robbery.

Q. You went to Bow street the next day - A. (Mr. Sumuhda). We went to Bow street the same evening.

CHARLES FROST . I am one of the patrols of Bow street office.

Q. On Thursday night were you in the road between Newington Green and Ball's pond - A. Yes; Loyd and Upton, two patrols, were with me; I saw four men coming from Newington Green way, towards town. Loyd was first, Upton next, and I was last; I saw four men pass by, I said to Loyd, let us go and frisk these men, I think they are the men that did the trick on the Hampstead road; accordingly I went back to Carr, who was the last man; I said do not be alarmed, we are officers, I must search you; before I had got the words well out of my mouth, he gave a jump and went towards Newington Green.

Q. Did he run - A. A little he did; I pursued him, he put his hand between his jacket and waistcoat, as if he was going to pull something out; he took a short turn round, and went towards Ball's Pond; I pursued him towards the turnpike, I called out stop him; when I came near the turnpike, a man in a soldier's great coat fired a pistol at me; he was one of the four men, he had a light coloured soldier's great coat on; he has made his escape. At the shock of the pistol going off I did not know whether I was not shot; I lost sight of them.

Q. What time of night was it - A. It was about seven o'clock, to the best of my recollection; we did not take Carr till the next morning about seven o'clock at his lodgings.

Q. Then they both made their escape for that night - A. Yes; we apprehended Carr the next morning; we went to one Kelly in Vine court, Broad street, Ratcliffe Cross; there were five patrols went with us.

Q. What time did you go there - A. About two o'clock on Friday morning; when we went there we found Carr in bed; there were two more in the room, we brought them with us; the name of one was Mullins, and the other was Welch; they were discharged by the magistrate, and Carr was committed.

Q. What did Carr say to you, or you to him - A. I asked him where Conner was, he said he was not come home; I then told him he must go along with us.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. You do not mean to say it was Carr that you saw - A. By the waistcoat and breeches it was the same; it was on Thursday night we stopped them. I found on Kelly a knife and some money.

COURT. Are you sure it was Carr you saw on Thursday night with the men - A. Yes, with respect to his dress it was.

Q. Was it the same man that you saw the next morning - A. Yes.

Q. You say you found Carr the next morning at two o'clock at his lodgings, that was Carr - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the same man that you met the night before - A. His dress answered the same description, being dark I could not possibly see his face. Here is a

pound note, eleven shillings in silver, a crown piece, a half crown, two shillings, and three sixpences; there is a gentleman in court that has spoke to one of the sixpences.

Mr. Samuhda. The half crown piece appears to be what I had in my pocket; having no idea of being robbed, I took no further notice of it; I would not attempt to swear to it.

JOHN UPTON . Q. Were you in company with Frost - A. Yes, and Lloyd. We met four men coming from Newington Green, towards Ball's Pond, about seven o'clock in the evening; we agreed to go back and search these four men. I laid hold of James Kelly , and Lloyd laid hold of Michael Conner ; I told Kelly I was an officer, and I wanted to see if he had any pistols about him; I immediately rubbed the prisoner down, and found no pistols on him; I searched him outside, no further; the prisoner said he would not be detained by me, nor by any of the party that was with me; while I was doing that, I saw the prisoner that John Frost had was running away, and Frost after him.

Q. Which of the prisoners was it - A. I cannot speak to his person; he doubled from Newington Green, and to Ball's Pond, and Frost after him. About two minutes after that, I heard the report of a pistol; I told the prisoner Kelly that he must go along with me; we took him to the office; he was searched in the public house by John Frost ; he took from him eleven shillings and a pound note, to the best of my recollection; and one shilling and five pence halfpenny.

Q. Are you sure that Conner is the person that Lloyd had hold of - A. I am.

- LLOYD. Q. You were in company with Frost and Upton on Thursday night - A. Yes, between Newington Green, and Ball's Pond.

Q. How far was that from Upper Clapton - A. It might be a couple of miles, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you meet any men - A. I met four men; we took them in custody; we passed them, and just turned back; I laid hold of Conner, the big one; I told him I was an officer belonging to Bow street; I went to search him, he had this parcel in his hand; I asked him where he got it, he said he purchased it in the country; he said he would give me a fall; by his saying that I put my hand into my pocket, and took my pistol and put it to his head; I told him I would blow his brains out, if he stirred hand or foot; he said he would go with me any where; with that we brought him up to the office.

Q. Did you take a parcel from him - A. Yes, this is the parcel; I took it from his hand; it has been in my custody ever since. I am sure that is the parcel, it contains currants; the note I took out of his pocket.

Q. Is that parcel directed - A. Yes; it is directed for Mr. Samuhda; he told me it was sugar when I took him first, he had purchased it in the country, it was his property. When he came before the magistrate, he said he did not know whether it was sugar, or what it was; he had picked it up in the road; it had never been down in the road, it was quite clean.

Q. What sort of a night was it - A. It was a very dark, rainy, disagreeable night; the roads were very dirty all the way we went.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I take it for granted you found nothing at the prisoner Carr's lodgings belonging to the prosecutor - A. No.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I went with the rest of the party; we proceeded down Ratcliffe cross.

Q. Then you went with Frost and the other officers - A. Yes, on the Friday morning; on going up stairs there were two beds in the room, in one of the beds laid Carr alone, in the other were the two men that were discharged; I asked Carr where Conner was, his bed fellow.

Q. You had never seen Conner - A. No, he said he was his bed fellow. Going down stairs into the other room, I observed his stockings were about this high in wet, rather over his ancles; I asked him how they came so, he said they were the mark of half boots.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Do you not know that Carr is a ballast heaver - A. I was informed so.

Q. They are always in the wet heaving the ballast into the barge, are not they - A. Very possibly they may; I do not know much about it.

COURT, to Mr. Samuhda. Be so good as to look at that parcel, is that the parcel that you had in the chaise with you that night - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know it - A. I know it by it being usual to receive such from my grocer; it has my name upon it; D. Samuhda, esqr. Butler's stables, it is so directed.

Q. You are quite sure it is the same - A. Yes.

Conner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

Kelly's Defence. I am innocent of what is found against me.

Carr's Defence. They took me out of bed.

MARY KALEY . - Mr. Alley. What is your husband - A. A ballast worker. I keep a house No. 2, Vine court, Ratcliffe cross.

Q. Did the prisoner Carr lodge at your house - A. He did.

Q. Do you remember the day he was taken in custody, upon a charge of this robbery - A. I do; on Friday morning, two o'clock.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing him the evening before he was taken in custody at your house - A. I saw him at six o'clock at my house; at half after six he drank tea with me and my husband, and James Cannon ; he was not out of the house above half an hour, from two o'clock in the day, till he went to bed. He went to bed as the watch was crying ten o'clock.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. He was in the house all the time, barring to go to a shop over the way; he was never out of the house half an hour all the time, till ten o'clock he went to bed, and two more lodgers went to bed with him.

Q. Who furnished him with a light when he went to bed - A. My husband.

COURT. Was he in the house all the time - A. No, he went out of the house to get tobacco or provision; he might be out half an hour, not more.

Q. What shop was it - A. It was over the way; he went to a shop to get bread or tobacco, I cannot say.

Mr. Alley. What sort of a shop - A. The tobacconist's.

Q. What business is he - A. A ballast trimmer.

Q. What distance is Ratcliffe cross from the river - A. It is close in the neighbourhood.

Q. He went to bed at ten, and he drank tea with you at half after six - A. He did.

Q. How long had he lodged with you - A. About four months.

Q. What sort of hours did he keep - A. Very good hours indeed; he was never out one night during the time.

COURT. How was he dressed that night - A. He wore a jacket, he wore no long clothes.

Q. Had he strings or buckles to his shoes - A. Thong strings to his shoes.

Q. How high did the shoes come up - A Not high; they were common shoes.

CHARLES KALEY . - Mr. Alley. Do you remember the day Carr was taken in custody - A. I do; on Friday morning, two o'clock.

Q. On the evening before that, do you remember whether or no you drank tea at home - A. I drank tea at home.

Q. At what time did you drink tea, and who was in company with you - A. Why Carr, my mistress, and another young man came in, his name is James Cannon .

Q. How long did you continue to observe the prisoner Carr during that evening - A. He was at home from two o'clock, from the time he had his dinner, until six o'clock.

Q. Did you see him after that - A. Yes, till ten o'clock; I was not more than half an hour out of the man's sight from six till ten.

Q. Had he been out of the house any length of time from six till ten - A. Not as I observed, any more than going into the street to buy an article that he wanted. He went to bed exactly the watch went ten, I know, because the watchman had a passage through the court.

Q. How long had he lodged at your house - A. Between three and four months; I cannot tell precisely to a week, but it is about that time.

Q. How has he got his livelihood - A. By working on the river.

Q. What character has he borne till the time of this accusation - A. I never saw any difference with the man during my acquaintance with him; he is an honest man to his agreement, as ever I saw of him.

COURT. Was Carr at work that day - A. No, he was not.

Q. What dress had he on - had he on the same dress as he has on now - A. A velveteen jacket, just as you see the man has now.

Q. What kind of shoes were those that he wore - A. Common shoes, long quarters.

JAMES CANNON . - Mr. Alley. Do you know the last witness, Kaley - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the day in which Carr was taken in custody - A. Yes, I do.

Q. On the evening before that you were at Kaley's house - A. Yes, twenty minutes past six; I had a cup of tea with Jack Carr , Kaley, and his wife; I staid there about five minutes; I do not lodge at Kaley's. I have known Carr about four months; he is a good character as far as I know. I am a ballast man.

COURT, to Mahew. You told us you observed his stockings were wet upon his legs - A. Yes, about as high as the calf of his leg; I asked him how it came so; he said it was a pair of half boots that he wore that made them so. When he was at our office his shoes were no higher than mine; I saw his shoes that he had by the bed side, they appeared to be wet all over at the time. I cannot say that they were as wet as though they were dipped out of a tub.

Carr. On Wednesday last I worked in boots on account of keeping the gravel and the wet from my feet. I keep the boots in the barge; my stockings were not wet, they were dry as they are now.

Mayhew. That it is the same answer he gave me at the office; his stockings were not muddy.

JURY. My lord, we wish to know if Carr has been positively sworn to - we understand not.

COURT, to Frost. Do you take upon yourself to say that Carr was the man that you saw the night before - A. Not positively to swear, no more than by his person and dress; his waistcoat I noticed particular to be white.

JURY. You cannot swear to that man - A. I wont.

CONNOR - GUILTY, DEATH .

KELLY - GUILTY, DEATH .

CARR - NOT GUILTY .

The prosecutor recommended the prisoners to his Majesty's mercy .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-4

178. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's way upon Lewis Swabey on the 9th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will six halfpence his property .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-5

179. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Hawes on the 8th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a silver watch, value 2 l. a seven shilling piece, two shillings, and a sixpence, his property .

JOSEPH HAWES . Q. Were you robbed on the 8th of February last - A. Yes, about ten minutes before six, just this side of Chalk farm , on the hill.

Q. What day of the week was it - A. On Thursday last. I was coming along by myself, I heard some people before; I could not see; I came on further, I saw one laid in the road, one next him, and one of the side of him; they were all in the road, I came by them as they were there; one jumped on the path and ran by me, he seemed to have something between his legs, so that I could not see what it was; he sung at the time rumti-de-udledy; he said, Jack, put your hat on, you'll catch cold; that was to one of them behind; then I began to be in fear; I came on, looking over my shoulder, I gained ground upon them; I had not gone many yards before he called out Stop; I took no notice, but went on, looking behind me; he holloaed out Stop, the second time; I kept on my pace as usual, and the third time he holloaed out Stop, the person by the side of the watch box sprang out; they had all three pistols, which they all three cocked against my head; then they demanded my property. I told them I was only a working person, I had nothing to lose.

Q. Did you stop - A. I was compelled to it, they demanded my property; they said there was no time to be lost; they said they must have it. A person in a great coat pulled out my watch from my pocket.

Q. What kind of a great coat had he on - A. A light coloured great coat, seemingly to me like a soldier's.

Q. The man in a light coloured great coat pulled out your watch - A. Yes; having done that, they took hold

of me by the shoulders, swung me round, and told me to go back to Hampstead. The same man that had the great coat on took the watch; took a seven shilling piece, two shillings, and a sixpence, from me. I went back; they told me there was a party more in the road, and if they stopped me, to tell them that my business was done, and they would let me go. I went nearly about thirty yards back. I met some gentleman, I said are you going to town; I came to town with them.

Q. Can you tell whether the prisoner was one of the three that you saw - A. I think he is by his person, and his dress, and his height, I think he is the person that holloaed out stop.

Q. Could you at that time make sufficient observation, to be able to speak to him - A. Not further than by his dress; I was in too much fright when I saw the three pistols.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner at the bar - A. On Friday, in the same dress that he is in now. When I came down the road, at the pound, I saw some of the gentlemen of Bow street. I told them what happened.

Q. Have you since seen any of your property - A. There is a sixpence in the hands of Mr. Frost, which I think is the same I had, but I cannot swear to it. I never saw the watch afterwards.

THOMAS FROST . I am police officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday, I found no money at all on him. There were a few halfpence at the watchhouse, he said he was dry, I gave him the halfpence from the money that I took from Kelly.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-6

180. JAMES BRITTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Catherine countess dowager of Morton , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-7

181. JEREMIAH ELY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Plumer Windus , on the night of the 30th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a cask, value 5 s. and six gallons of rum shrub, value 3 l. the property of William Plumer Windus .

JOSEPH PECKHAM . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's parish. On the 30th of January I was on my duty in Greenhill's Rents; I saw the prisoner sitting on a cask, he said he was going to carry it to the Pied Bull, Islington; he wanted a coach for his master; and while I was speaking to him, a coach came to the corner of Greenhill's Rents; he took the cask up, I said where did you get that cask from, he said a man gave it him at the corner of Long lane; he wanted me to lay hold of it, and lift it upon his shoulder; I would not; I thought if I took the cask, he would run away.

Q. Did you secure the prisoner - A. Yes, I took him to the watchouse. This is the same cask.

THOMAS SHORT . I am clerk to Mr. Windus. Mr. Windus lives about four or five hundred yards from where the cask was found; it had been in the warehouse, I had seen it within the hour; I cannot say whether the door of the warehouse was open or not; there were some people that came in the warehouse when the cask was supposed to be taken; it is Mr. Windus's cask, it contains six gallons; I marked the cask myself; it is valued at three pounds, that is less than prime cost. The warehouse adjoins the dwelling house, there is an internal communication.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-8

182. EDWARD HORWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a gelding, value 15 l. the property of Samuel Pilkington .

SAMUEL PILKINGTON . I live in the parish of Hanwell, in Middlesex; I am a blacksmith . On Saturday the 4th of February, I had a horse of mine taken out of a field belonging to Mr. Green; the field was in the parish of Norwood .

Q. Is that in Middlesex - A. Yes; I saw the gelding about three or four o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th; I missed it about five the same evening.

Q. What was the value of it - A. Fifteen guineas.

Q. You had not lent it to any body - A. No, it was standing in the field. On the Wednesday following I saw the horse again at Hanwell, in the custody of Trott, an officer of Hatton garden office; he brought it me to look at; I am sure it is my own horse; it is a very remarkable horse, he had a good many white hairs in the tail; he had a cut tail.

JONATHAN TROTT . I belong to the police office, Hatton garden.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 4th of this month - A. I did, in Cow cross, in the parish of St. Sepulchre; about half after six o'clock at night, as near as I could judge; he had a horse with him; what occasioned my curiosity of stopping was, his being in conversation with a person we call a knackner, that buys horses to kill; he was trying to sell it; I went to him and asked him the price of the horse; he told me he did not know what he could take for him at that present moment, if I would let him have two guineas, and when he called again to London I was to let him have the remainder what I thought it was worth.

Q. Then he fixed no price did he - A. No, he did not; I asked him if the horse could draw; he said yes, very well, it belonged to a person of the name of John Perry , he was locked up in Aylesbury gaol for debt; I then asked a person to lay hold of the horse; I seized the horse; I did not tell him so at that time; I went to look at the horse's head; I then took the prisoner into a public house; at that time he was dressed like a waggoner; he had two turnpike tickets twisted on the band of his hat; I told him then I thought he had stolen the horse; I took the tickets out of his hat, I perceived one to be Hammersmith gate, and the other Kensington; I said I presume you brought the horse that way; yes, he said he did; he attempted to get up to go away, while I was waiting for the man returning, whom I had sent to a livery stable with the horse;

when he found I would not let him go, he begged for me to go to Bayswater turnpike with him to follow his waggon, and his brother waggoner would convince me that he had the horse from John Perry , that was locked up in goal; I told him I should not think of going at that time of night in the dark with him; I was single handed; I took him into the Hat and Ton, Hatton Wall; he then said he did not like to divulge before so many people, but if I would go in the other room he would tell me the truth of it.

Q. Had you made any promise to him that it would be better for him to tell - A. No; nor threatened him. I went with him into another room, he then told me that he took the horse from a field near Hanwell, who it belonged to he could not tell: I asked him then if any body was concerned with him; he said there was not. I took him before the magistrate: he was committed. On the Wednesday I took the horse to Hanwell, and there I saw the prosecutor, he owned the horse, and there was a great number of people that knew the horse about the place; they all told me it was Mr. Pilkington's horse.

Prisoner. I never told him that I took the horse out of a field at Hanwell.

Trott. I solemnly declare, on the oath I have taken, he said what I have related.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Oxford road to meet a waggon; I called at the Coach and Horses to have a pint of beer, this John Perry was in there; I knowing of him he let me have the horse; he asked me which way I was going; I said as there were no waggons coming up to town I should return; he said he knew a man that had half a dozen glandered horses to sell; he asked me if I knew where to sell them, he said I have a horse just by; he and I both came down from Brentford to Hyde park corner; I got a note from him to take the horse to Cow cross; he said I might sell the horse if any body would buy him; when I came to Cow cross they asked me what I asked for the horse; I said I would not ask any money on him, they might advance two pounds on him, the horse belonged to John Perry .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-9

183. CHARLOTTE SMITH and MARY ANN HASLAM were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , eight yards of muslin, value 11 s. 4 d. the property of Francis Cole , privately in his shop .

FRANCIS COLE . I am a linen draper , 28, Little Newport street, St. Ann's, Westminster . On Saturday the 4th of February, between five and six o'clock, the two prisoners came in the shop; they asked to look at some muslins; I was in a room behind the shop, I saw them come in. When they went out I heard my young man, William Smith , say that he had missed a piece of muslin; he went in pursuit of them, I followed him; we brought them back; I desired them to walk into the room behind the shop; as they were walking along the shop Charlotte Smith put her hand under her pelisse and attempted to put something on the counter; the young man caught hold of her arm, and he put it on the counter; it was eight yards of muslin. I sent for a constable.

Q. What was the value of the eight yards of muslin - A. Eleven shillings and four pence was the cost price.

Q. Who was in the shop when the prisoners were there - A. My young man and errand boy.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Cole. On the 4th of February I saw the prisoners come into the shop; they asked for half a yard of long lawn; after I had shewed them that, I shewed them some worked muslins, I then shewed them some plain muslins, they bought the eighth of a yard at four shillings a yard, and then went away. Having lost muslins before, it induced me to number the pieces, and put it down on the wrapper; after they were gone out I counted the pieces, I found a piece missing, I told Mr. Cole; I followed them and brought them back; when they came in the shop I saw Charlotte Smith put her hand under her pelisse and draw from thence this piece of muslin, she attempted to put it on the counter, I sprang upon her and took the muslin from her hand; I took them and the muslin into the back room and sent for a constable. There were seventeen pieces in the wrapper when I counted it before, and when they they were gone there were only sixteen. I examined that particular piece that day, before they came in.

The property produced and identified.

Smith's Defence. I have been brought up in the greatest respect; I am very young. I went in this shop with this young woman; it was not my intention to take it; I never had any occasion for it.

Haslam was not put on her defence.

Smith called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

HASLAM, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-10

184. RHODY KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , twelve pounds weight of soap, value 12 s. the property of Robert Hopkins , Abraham Lincoln , John Burgass , and Abraham Fuller Hopkins .

ABRAHAM LINCOLN . I live at No. 60, in Barbican ; I am a soap boiler .

Q. Who are your partners - A. Robert Hopkins , John Burgass , and Abraham Fuller Hopkins ; no other persons are interested in the business but myself and them three. The prisoner was our servant, he had been our servant about four years; some time since we received information that we were robbed by our labourers, which led us to watch the labourers; in general we saw the prisoner and another labourer go to the house of Ann Hayward , No. 23, Charterhouse street. On Friday night last, in consequence of suspicion, we were induced to get the police officers to attend the premises against the time the labourers left work, which was about eight o'clock in the evening, and after they went out they were instantly brought into my partner's house, and the search of their persons commenced instantly. On the prisoner was found three cakes of soap placed in the waistband of his breeches before, two half cakes from his pockets, and two half cakes were in the crown of his hat; upon this being found in his possession he begged for mercy, and said it was the first time he had committed any offence of that sort.

Q. In what part of your manufactory would cakes of soap be deposited - A In the cutting room.

Q. What weight was this altogether - A. As near as possible fourteen pounds; they are laid in the indictment at twelve; the wholesale value would be about fifteen shillings; nothing was found on the other labourer.

JOHN BURGASS . At the time the men came out I was stationed at the gate; I stationed myself there in order to identify these men as they came out; I told the officer they were the men. On their being searched I saw the soap taken from the prisoner; he went down upon his knees and said he was a most ungrateful man, he was sorry for what he had done. He was a confidential servant, he used to lock up the premises.

WILLIAM SHERRIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner as he was coming out of the gate into the dwelling house, and searched him; - these three cakes of soap were found in his waistband of his breeches, and there was in his hat a cake broke in half, and the other was in his pocket; I also found upon him a memorandum on paper of soap, and two guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; they took three guineas and a half that does not belong to this.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-11

185. RICHARD BYGRAVE was indicted for that he on the 3d of February was servant to John Austin , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did take into his possession 1 s. 7 d. and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the sum of seven pence halfpenny, part of the same money .

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a cornchandler , I live in Aldersgate street .

Q. Did the prisoner live with you - A. He did, about four months; he served in the shop, and he has been in the habit of receiving money in the shop, and payments for my corn as he delivered it to the customers.

Q. What do you know of his having embezzled the amount of your seven pence halfpenny - A. I learned the statement from my wife and servant; I was in the country at the time.

LYDIA AUSTIN . Q. Are you the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you know of this man having concealed money of your husband's - A. On Wednesday the 1st of February my husband went out of town; on the Thursday I asked the servant if Richard had been much engaged; she said yes. I went into the shop, he gave me less money than I expected.

Q. Had he been serving in the shop that day - A. Yes. In the evening of Thursday I gave her a slate, and told her to take down every thing he sold in the ensuing morning, with the money that he received. The money he took for the articles sold the girl told me was one shilling and seven pence. The shop opens between seven and eight, and about nine o'clock when I came down, the girl gave me the account. I asked the prisoner what money he had received; he said the money was under the desk; I took it, it was eleven pence halfpenny; I asked him if that was all; he said yes; he was not taken up till Mr. Austin detected him.

Mr. Alley. Is your servant a scholar - A. She can write and cast accounts in a common way.

Q. Of course you do not know whether that account is right or not, you depended upon her - A. Yes.

Q. The slate is not here - A. No, it was copied on paper and rubbed out of the slate.

Q. I thought so - and the gentleman who was present copied it - A. The girl copied it from the slate into paper.

Q. That paper is to be produced here today - A. Yes; I copied one, and she copied another.

Q. Which was copied first you cannot say - A. No.

COURT. Were there more than two copies made from the slate - A. One by a gentleman in the family; there were three copies. Mr. Austin has the copy that the girl made.

Mr. Alley. Have you the copy you made yourself - A. No.

Q. Whether the copies are right you cannot say - A. No.

CATHERINE FRITH . I was servant to Mr. Austin at this time. On Friday morning I made an entry on a slate of what money the prisoner took, and what goods he sold; I had the slate up stairs in the kitchen; when I heard the customers come in, I went in the shop and staid till they went away; then I went up stairs and put down the article sold and the price on the slate; I took a copy on paper from the slate, and rubbed the articles out of the slate.

Q. Had you shewn the slate to your mistress before you rubbed out the sum - A. Yes; my mistress took the first account; a gentleman took it from my mistress's, and I took it from the gentleman's.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-12

186. RICHARD BYGRAVE was indicted for that he on the 4th of February was servant to John Austin , and was employed to receive money for him, and that being such servant so employed and entrusted, did secrete, embezzle, and steal the sum of four pence halfpenny, the property of his master .

CATHERINE FRITH . Q. On the Saturday morning about what time was it that this transaction took place - A. Between eight and nine, before my mistress came down stairs. I heard the customers come in, and I came down stairs, as I did on the Friday morning.

Q. What did the customers purchase - A. There were two purchases that came to ten pence.

Q. Then they were customers that came in before you shewed your slate to your mistress - A. Yes.

Q. Did you stay during the time that they dealt with this young man - A. Yes; I heard the bargain, and saw the money paid in both instances.

Q. Did you enter these bargains on the slate - A. Yes, separate as they occurred. I shewed the entry on the slate to my mistress; it was copied by my mistress.

Q. Did any other person take a copy of it - A. No.

Q. Did you look over your mistress's copy - A. Yes; I saw it was correct with the slate.

COURT. Is that copy here -

Prosecutor. I believe it is at home; I thought I had it in my pocket book.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-13

187. REBECCA GOULD was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 14th of January , a sheet, value 5 s. the property of John James Debatt .

JOHN JAMES DEBATT . I live at No. 26 in the Poultry , I am a pastry cook ; the prisoner was my servant , she lived with me a month.

ELIZABETH DEBATT . The prisoner was my servant; there had been several things missing; I had no suspicion of the prisoner till I was told by one of the servants, that she had a person come to her of a morning, that took things from her; in consequence of that I went into her room; I saw in a bundle of her wearing apparel a body of a chemise; on the Saturday morning I was led to suppose that this woman would come again; under these circumstances I was up before the servants were; she did not come. Mr. Debatt in the course of the morning forbid her going behind the counter, which she had been in the habit of doing; she said she would not stay without she did; I was up stairs; she came up and said I shall leave you this evening; I made no answer; about ten in the evening she came down, she said she had done what she had to do and was going; she asked if I would wish to see her clothes; I said most assuredly I should; she then went up stairs and brought her clothes down in a bundle; I opened the bundle on the table; she asked me if there was any thing that belonged to me; I said there was not what I expected to see; I said I want to see the body of a chemise, and I think you are making it of one of my sheets, I saw it last night; she said no, I could not see them last night for they were gone to Lambeth to be made; she refused to turn out her pockets; I sent for an officer, and while the officer was coming she began to unpin her things from under her gown; when the officer came she dropped the things; there were this body of a chemise and the remainder of the sheet; on comparing the two together I am sure it was my sheet; it was marked D. at the top, I. and E; it is worth five shillings.

ROBERT WATTS . I am a constable; I was sent for; Mrs. Debatt searched the prisoner; I was present; the prisoner said she was very sorry for what she had done, if Mrs Debatt would forgive her she would pay for the sheet.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Imprisoned One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling , and until that Fine be paid .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-14

188. JOHN MILLIGAN was indicted for that he on the 2nd of December , was clerk to James Lee , John Scott Martineau and James Wilkinson , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive valuable securities for and on their account, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, a banker's draft, value 72 l. their property, and that he on the same day, feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the said draft .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-15

189. JOHN MILLIGAN was indicted for that he on the 2nd of January , was clerk to James Lee , John Scott Martineau and James Wilkinson , and was employed by them to receive valuable securities for and on their account, and being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a banker's draft, value 49 l. 19 s. For and on their account, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-16

190. ROBERT READ was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of January , the carcase of a sheep, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Edward Cock .

JOSEPH SMUTER . I am a patrol of Lime street ward. On the 18th of January, about a quarter past six in the evening, I saw the prisoner pass me with a carcase of mutton on his shoulder; I turned round and asked him where he got that sheep from, I collared him, and stopped him two or three doors down St. Mary Axe; he told me he brought the carcase from Mr. King in Leadenhall market. Mr. King is a carcase butcher and salesman both, I believe; I took him back into Leadenhall market; Mr. King's shop was shut up, there was no sheep out nor nobody killing; I then took him to the watchhouse; I thought it was stolen, because he throwed it down coming down Lime street; I got a young man to take it up and to assist me; when he threw it down he begged I would not hurt him; I put him in the Compter; I kept the sheep at the watchhouse till the next day; I produced it before the lord mayor.

JOHN VINCENT . I am servant to Mrs. Elizabeth Cork ; I slaughtered the sheep which I saw in the watchhouse and before the lord mayor; I left it on the shambles in Leadenhall market .

Q. Whose sheep was it - A. Mrs. Cork's; it was killed on the Tuesday and left on the Wednesday's market, not sold; I had seen it on the Wednesday many times; I last saw it about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Are you sure the sheep that you saw before the alderman was the same sheep that you slaughtered - A. Yes; we put our mark on every sheep that we kill.

Q. What was the value of the carcase - A. About thirty shillings; I have seen the prisoner in the market, but not that day; I believe he was a drover.

EDWARD COCK . I am a watchman at Leadenhall market, in the wholesale part of it; Mrs. Cork's shop was one of the wholesale shops that I watched.

Q. Are you answerable for any meat that is stolen from thence - A. Yes, I am answerable for any damage, and every thing that is left out in that market at dusk; they look for me to be answerable for all till the morning they come again. This sheep hung under the market place; I came on at dusk on the 18th of January.

Q. That would be before six o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been on that night before six o'clock - A. No; my wife was just coming out with the lamps to take charge of it; I am paid sixpence a score for watching; sometimes we set up for two pence halfpenny a night, and less than that when the weather is very cold; on that night I went in pursuit of a carcase of mutton they had been taken the preceding night.

There is eleven salesman that I have the watch over.

Q. Had you received your charge that evening - A. No, I was not here; my wife said she was there lighting up, I know then it became my property; I have paid partly for the last sheep, but I have not paid all; I am paying the owner for the loss.

JAMES MARTIN . I am a butcher, I live at Rotherhithe; I carcase at Leadenhall market.

Q. Was this man your watchman - A. No; he is the watchman of Mrs. Cork, who does my commission business.

Q. Is it the custom for this man to pay for the loss of any carcase of mutton - A. Yes; I have had it from Mrs. Cork, and she has had it from the watchman; I saw the carcase of the sheep before the alderman, I knew it to be mine; my sheep were hanging up at Mrs. Cork's shambles to be sold by her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going round Leadenhall street, I saw a man, he had a sheep on a rail; he asked me where I was going; I said to Whitechapel; he said he would give me sixpence to carry it to the bottom of Houndsditch; I told him I would. This man stopped me at St. Mary Axe, he asked me where I was going: I said I did not know rightly; I told him there was the man that I had it of, and when I turned round I did not see the man; I suppose he had ran away.

Q. to Shuter. Was any person by him at the time - A. I saw a little man or a lad walking behind him, they were saying something as they passed me, but what I did not know; I did not see him afterwards; after I stopped this man he did not make his appearance.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Imprisoned One Week in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-17

191. GEORGE CRAFT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , a cheese, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Boyer .

JEREMIAH THRUBSHAW . I am an officer of the city. On Tuesday, the 7th of this month, about half after six o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another against Mr. Boyer's shop; I saw the prisoner go into the shop, he came out and went and spoke to his companion, who was waiting at the end of Skinner street, about two or three doors off; I saw the shopman come to the door, then I heard a whistle; I ran directly and fetched Shephard the constable, I shewed him the prisoner and his companion; the prisoner was then standing at the window, the window was not open, the door was; I was on the other side at a little distance; Shephard crossed the way; in a few minutes I saw the prisoner running with a cheese under his arm, he was about two doors from Mr. Boyer's shop when I first saw him with the cheese; a cart coming by prevented me from seeing whether he went into the shop or not. Shephard ran before me and catched hold of the prisoner; the prisoner twisted about to get away from Shephard, I took hold of him; I requested Shephard to take up the cheese, the cheese was then lying on the ground.

Q. Was there any other cheesemonger's shop nigh there - A. No. I never lost sight of him sufficient for him to go by any other cheesemonger's shop; I took him in the shop and searched him, I found this whistle. I saw him put his hand upon a cheese before I fetched Mr. Shephard.

JOHN BOYER . I am a cheesemonger , 113, Bishopgate without .

Q. On the 7th of January did you lose a cheese from your shop - A. Yes; it was taken from near the door: in less than ten minutes before it was taken I saw it safe. I saw the prisoner come into my shop, there was another man in the shop at the same time; the prisoner went up to where some bacon was and looked at it; I turned myself round to weigh some bacon for the other man and the prisoner was gone; that gave me a suspicion that he had taken something, his not asking for any thing. I came round the counter to see whether I had lost any thing, I perceived the cheese was missing; I then met the two officers with the prisoner and the cheese in their hands; the officers asked me if that cheese was my property; I told them it was. The prisoner asked me to forgive him, he said he was told to do it, and he would never do so again.

Q. What is the value of your cheese - A. Thirty shillings; it weighs thirty four pound and a half.

- SHEPHARD. I am a constable. In consequence of information from Thrubshaw I saw the prisoner next door to Mr. Boyer's shop, passing with a cheese under his arm; I got hold of him; he dropped the cheese.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past the gentleman's shop between the hours of six and seven, this affair happened; this gentleman took hold of me, and after I went in the house they put me in confinement; another man was brought in, and when I was taken up before the gentlemen that other man was acquitted and I was sent here.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Imprisoned One Month in Newgate , and Publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-18

192. SOLOMON ALDER and RICHARD KINCH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , nine gross of whip sticks, value 50 l. the property of Francis Pichford and Samuel Nokes .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

SAMUEL NOKES . I live at No. 10, Marylebone lane; I am a whip maker , in partnership with Francis Pichford .

Q. Do you use a vast quantity of sticks in your business - A. Yes, for whip sticks, On Saturday the 21st of January I went to the warehouse in Globe yard, South Molton street ; I had a quantity of sticks there at that time, they were safe there that afternoon.

Q. In consequence of any thing that you heard did you go there on the Monday following - A. I did; I found the staple was broken and the property was taken away; I thought there was about the value of fifty pounds worth of sticks taken.

Q. Had you at any time bought of the prisoner any sticks - A. Yes, the last purchase was 15 l. 12 s. it was the week before Christmas; they carried them to the warehouse and deposed them there. On the 23d of January I went to Mr. Griffiths to make enquiry; both the prisoners came there while I was there.

Q. Did you see any sticks there - A. I did; I claimed

them as my property.

COURT. Did they come with sticks or without sticks - A. They were there and the sticks were there, and afterwards the prisoners came to receive the money; I saw some sticks in Mr. Griffith's possession, which I knew to be my property.

CHARLES GRIFFITHS . I live in Holborn, I am a whipmaker. On Monday morning the 23d of January, the prisoners came to my house and offered a quantity of sticks; when I came down I found them in the back premises; one of the men (Ward) was looking over them; the foreman came into the shop out of the counting house, and said a man was enquiring to know whether any sticks were brought to my house; the prisoners were there waiting for the money.

The property produced and identified.

Alder's Defence. I buy this stuff of the woodmen and farmers in the country.

Kinch's Defence. We deal in this kind of stuff all the winter. We bought them of a man in a long brown coat, just by the Green Man and Still.

ALDER, GUILTY , aged 23.

KINCH, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-19

193. MARY HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , a bank note, value 20 l. the property of Charles Frederic Holmer , esq . in the house of Martha Atkins .

CHARLES FREDERIC HOLMER , ESQ. Q. Where did you live in February last - A. No. 16, Cork street, Burlington gardens, in the parish of St. James', Westminster . I lodged there with Mrs. Atkins.

Q. Did you lose any property there - A. I did, on the 1st of February last; I lost a twenty pound note; I saw the note on the evening of the 31st of January, and missed it on the 1st of February; it had been placed in a writing desk which had been locked up in a cupboard in my drawing room.

Q. Was your writing desk locked - A. No; the cupboard was locked, and the key kept in a small drawer in the glass; the prisoner lived in the house, she was Mrs. Atkins' servant .

Q. Did she know that you used to keep the key in the glass in the drawer - A. I do not know. I have seen the bank note since in the possession of the officer. The money belonged to some money which Mrs. Atkins sent down to Oxford for me; I went down to Oxford on the 27th of January; I received it on the next day at Oxford.

Q. How many bank notes did you receive of Mrs. Atkins - A. One hundred and twenty six pounds I received of Mrs. Atkins.

Q. Was that all in bank notes - A. It was.

Q. Are you sure the bank note you lost was one of those you received of Mrs. Atkins - A. I am.

Q. Did you take any account of the number or the dates - A. Not I, but Mrs. Atkins did before she sent them me.

Q. Are you able to say that which you lost was the one you received from her - A. Yes, because I had no other money, except that I had from her.

Prisoner. If Mr. Holmer will forgive me this time I will never do so again.

MARTHA ATKINS . I am a widow; I keep the house, it is in the parish of St, James's, Westminster.

Q. Was the prisoner in your service - A. She was.

Q. Do you remember sending down any money to Mr. Holmer, at Oxford - A. I sent him down the money on the 26th of January; this is the number of the notes; I took it before I sent him them.

Q. Then before you sent them you made out a list of the numbers - A. Yes, I only took down the numbers; the list does not contain the dates, only the numbers.

Q. Have you since seen a note, the number of which corresponds with those - A. I saw it at Marlborough street, in the officer's hands; the officer has it now.

WILLIAM CRAIGG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Mrs. Atkins' house, in Cork street, on the 1st of February; I searched her; I asked her if she had heard any thing of a twenty pound note that Mr. Holmer had lost; she said she had heard of it; I asked her if she knew any thing about it; she said she did not, she knew nothing of any note but a one pound note which she had in her box, I was very welcome to look at it; I then asked her if she would let me look at was in her pockets; she put her right hand in her right hand pocket; I supposed she was pulling something out; I laid hold of that hand and pulled it out myself; in her hand was this green leather purse; I asked her what she had got there; she said nothing; I said I must see what was in it, I opened it and in it was this twenty pound note.

Q. to Mrs. Atkins. Is that one of the notes that you sent - A. I believe it is the same note; it is the same number, 1464 for twenty pounds.

Q. You say you took the number of the notes - A. I wrote no more than twenty pounds, 1464.

Q. How long has the prisoner lived with you - A. She came to me on the 20th of January, she had been with me a fortnight; I made a mistake, she came to me on a Friday.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor lost woman; I have no friends nor no nothing, I leave it to you gentlemen; that is all I have to say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on the ground of her being an artless woman .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-20

194. WILLIAM HORNET and THOMAS DIMMOCK were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , two sacks, value 2 s. and four bushels of oats, value 18 s. the property of Deborah Barnard .

JOHN BARNARD . I am the son of Deborah Barnard . The two prisoners were in my mother's employ.

Q. Is your mother a farmer at Enfield - A. Yes. On Sunday morning, January the 22nd, a man of the name of Star came and informed me that Hornet had offered him some oats that morning; I told him to see Hornet again and to agree with him if he could.

- STAR. I am a labouring man at Enfield highway; William Hornet owed me some money, I asked him for it on Sunday morning; he owed me half a crown; he said I might have some oats that he had; I told Mr. Barnard of it; I agreed with him to have them on Thursday; Hornet and Dimmock brought them into my yard; he said I should have them at three shillings a bushel. These are the sacks that they were brought in.

The sacks produced and identified.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

HORNETT, GUILTY , aged 34.

DIMMOCK, GUILTY , aged 25.

Severally whipped at the Cart's Tail at Enfield , and imprisoned One Month in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-21

195. ELIZABETH ASHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , a coat, value 20 s. and a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of William Gentle .

WILLIAM GENTLE . I live at Enfield , I lodge with John Richardson ; I was robbed on the 7th of February of a coat and a pair of small clothes; they were taken out of my bed room.

Q. What are they worth - A. Thirty shillings both together; I saw them on the 6th of February when I went to bed; I missed them on the 7th of February. I went down stairs and asked Mrs. Richardson if she had done any thing with my clothes, she said no. On the 8th of February I found them at Mr. Hart's shop at Tottenham, he buys and sells old clothes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, she lodged in the same house with me in a different room.

GEORGE HARWOOD . I am a constable of Edmonton. I apprehended the prisoner; the clothes were produced before the magistrate; I have had them ever since.

ELIZABETH HART . I am the daughter of Judah Hart . On the 7th of February the prisoner brought the things to sell, I gave her twelve shillings for them; I gave them to my father to look at; they were kept in the shop till my mother took them before the magistrate; the clothes that the constable has are the same that I bought of the prisoner; I asked her if they were her's, she said yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person that took them; the way I came to have them, the woman I met gave them me, and asked me whether I knew where to sell them; I said yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-22

196. HENRY STEVENS , GEORGE ALEXANDER BREMMER , and WILLIAM THOMPSON SKIRRARD , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Aireton , about the hour of three at night on the 14th of January , and burglariously stealing therein five violins, value 4 l. his property .

EDWARD AIRETON . I live in Church street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster , I am a violin maker , I keep a shop there; on the 14th of January I lost five violins.

Q. Do you know what time you lost them - A. About three o'clock in the night.

Q. Had you shut up your shop the night before - A. Yes; the shutters were taken down; I forgot to screw them.

Q. Then any body could take them down on the outside - when the shutters were taken down, what prevented them from taking any thing out of the shop - A. They were taken out by breaking the window.

Q. The window was broke was it - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen the window so the evening before - A. It was broken, it had been cracked, and I had put some putty to keep it tight, the window does not slide or open; nobody could get any thing out except through one of the panes; one pane of glass had been cracked, but kept together with putty; that was the window that was broken.

Q. Was that sufficiently strong, so as to require same force to break it open - A. I think so; it would not have fell out without being touched.

Q. Have you seen any of the violins since - A. I saw two about half after three in the morning; I was alarmed in the middle of the night by the watchman; I went to the watchhouse; there I saw the three prisoners.

JOHN BRIXEY . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watchhouse by the watchmen, past three o'clock on Sunday night the 14th of January; the violins were brought with them; they have been in my custody ever since.

JAMES MANN . I am a patrol; on the 14th of January I was on duty.

Q. Did you see the prisoners before the shop was broken open or after - A. After. I saw three or four of them at Mr. Aireton's window, I heard a noise when the shutters were pulled down, I was but three doors off; there was a great noise of the shutter, and then a breaking of glass in a moment; I ran to the place, I saw three or four people run; I pursued Stevens, I saw him with one hand coming out of Mr. Aireton's window, and one of these fiddles dropped out of his hand; I catched hold of Stevens' collar, we had a good roll in the snow; I took Stevens to the watchhouse; I saw the others brought into the watchhouse, they were apprehended by other people.

Skirrard. I wish you to speak whether I was one of the party or no - A. No, I do not pretend.

WILLIAM WALSH . I am a watchman. On the 14th of January I was on duty; this patrol and me were on duty; he just came up and challenged me whether all was well; we heard a shutter come down as plain as though we were by it; in about a minute we heard the glass fly; we went up immediately, I struck at Bremmer with my stick, he throwed his arm forward, and let a fiddle drop; I pursued him, I was not fifteen yards from him all the time; I saw Bremmer stopped by Buckley, another watchman; I went afterwards and picked up the fiddle and took it to the watch-house. The fiddle was given to Brixley, the constable of the night.

- BUCKLEY. I am a watchman; I was on duty on the 14th; I heard a watchman cry out Stop thief, and he sprang his rattle; I catched Bremmer, he was carried to the watchhouse; I delivered him to them watchmen.

JOHN KELLY . I am a watchman.

Q. Were you on duty on the 14th - A. I was, in St. Giles's parish, about an hundred yards from Mr. Aireton's; I heard the rattles sprung, and the cry of stop thief; I saw two men run from the place where the shop was broken open, I stopped Skiddard; the other man run away. When Skiddard saw me coming he cried stop him, they were running towards me; the other man changed his direction, the prisoner Skiddard stood still and cried stop thief; Skiddard had nothing

with him, he told me he was coming from a club, and that he was not one of the persons at all.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of these two violins - A. Not so much as forty shillings.

Stevens' Defence. I was coming by that place, this man ran after me and catched me; I had been to a public house with my father, my father had left me and I was going home.

Bremmer's Defence. On Saturday evening I went to Well street with an acquaintance, and after having a supper with him I was returning home to my lodgings in Drury lane; on my going on I kicked my foot against something, it proved to be a violin: a watchman knocked me on the back part of my head; I heard the cry of stop thief, and for fear of being thought one of the party, I run.

Skiddard's Defence. I was passing from Baker street, Manchester square; coming along I heard the watchman say, there is thieves, pursue them; I ran behind this watchman ten yards; he ran after the man down a court; I run back again and passed the place; he turned back and ran after me; I stood still and said I am not one of the part.

STEVENS, GUILTY, aged 19.

BREMMER, GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

SKIDDARD, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-23

197. FRANCIS DRIVER and JAMES THACKERY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Hugh Wilson , about the hour of three at night, on the 28th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein fifteen yards of printed cotton furniture, value 15 s. and four shawls, value 5 s. his property .

HUGH WILSON . I live at No. 4, Oxford street , I keep a linen draper's shop in the parish of St. Marylebone. On the 28th of January my shop was broken open; I saw the windows secured myself; I went to bed at past twelve o'clock; between three and four o'clock in the morning I was alarmed by the knocking at the door; on coming down I found the shutter of the glass door was down.

Q. Would that admit a person in - A. The pannel of the shutter was taken out, a boy might have got in, I do not know that a man could. I missed about fifteen yards of printed cotton and some shawls.

Q. When had you seen these things the last time before they were stolen - A. The day before; there was an interior door in the shop where these things hanged; the arm was introduced through the hole of the pannel.

CORNELIUS MAHONY . I am watchman of St. Giles'. On the evening of the 28th of January I was on the watch, I was near Mr. Wilson's shop, I was standing at the corner of Crown street; I saw three men within four yards of the prosecutor's shop; I cannot swear to the men; a watchman secured Driver.

Q. Did you see Diver do any thing - A. No; I did not. He secured Driver about four minutes afterwards.

Q. How near to the shop was Driver - A. I cannot know that.

JOHN KELLY . Q. You were with Mahony were you not - A. Yes. I saw Francis Driver with his back up against the shutter; when I got within a few yards to him he ran away; I took him that night. I found a bottle of phosphorus and some matches in his right hand pocket when I searched him. When I first saw him his back was against that part of the shutter that was broken.

THOMAS CARTER . I am the officer of the night. Two watchmen brought in Driver and charged him with a felony, between two and three o'clock. I searched him and found a box with matches; the name of Driver is on the box.

Q. to Mahony. Did Driver remove away from that place where you saw him - A. I did not see him at the shop at all.

Q. to Kelly. At what distance from the prosecutor's shop did you secure Driver - A. He came about half an hour afterwards, looked at the shutter, he said they had been a long time doing it. He had been lurking about that evening Immediately I looked in his face I knew him again, I secured him.

EDWARD CROCKER . I apprehended Thackery, he was brought into our office and identified by Mahony.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-24

198. CHARLES FISHER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Lingham , about the hour of seven at night, on the 6th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a pair of pantaloons, value 2 l. 2 s. his property .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of John Bainbridge .

WILLIAM WOOLFERY . I am shopman to Thomas Lingham , 137, in the Strand ; he is a breeches maker and taylor . On the 6th of February I saw the prisoner open the shop door; the shop Mr. Lingham occupies himself; he lets out the dwelling house to John Bainbridge .

Q. How did the prisoner open the shop door - A. He unlatched it between seven and eight in the evening: it was a cloudy night, there were plenty of lights in the shop.

Q. Was there any body in the shop - A. There was nobody in the bottom part of the shop; there is a gallery goes round the shop; the men were in that gallery; I saw him unlatch the shop door and take a pair of pantaloons off the brass wire; upon seeing that I caught the prisoner by the collar; I was just outside of the shop when he came out; he had the pantaloons with him, then he struggled; he was rather too strong for me, and directly I let him go he let the pantaloons go away from him; I ran after him and called stop thief. He was stopped by George Lovell , at the corner of Burleigh street. I never lost sight of the prisoner; I am sure he is the same man.

Q. Who picked up the pantaloons - A. I do not know, the gentleman is not here. These are the pantaloons, I saw them in his hands.

WILLIAM HARDING . Q. Do you live with Mr. Lingham - A. Yes. I can swear to the pantaloons; I cut them out, and I can swear to the man's work that made them; the pantaloons were in the shop five minutes before the man was brought back. I was in the shop when he was brought back by George Lovell .

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the pantaloons

- A. Yes, he said he knew nothing of them. I only left the shop and went up in the gallery, it was all done in five minutes.

GEORGE LOVELL . On the 6th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner on hearing the cry of stop thief, I caught hold of his jacket; I brought him back into Mr. Lingham's shop.

Prisoner's Defence I was coming from my work at the West India docks, and coming down the Strand I heard the cry of stop thief; I naturally ran, as well as any other man that was in the street; that gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-25

199. ROBERT HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , twenty seven yards of linen cloth, value 40 s. the property of Mary Lumley and Ann Lumley , in their dwelling house .

MARY LUMLEY . I live at No. 22, Chapel street, Paddington , I keep a shop ; I am in partnership with my sister, Ann Lumley . On the 21st of January last, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, he asked to look at some Irish; I shewed him some at two shillings per yard; he snatched the cloth out of my hand and ran out of the shop; I alarmed the street with the cry of stop thief; he was brought back and cloth by Charles Johnson .

Q. Is the cloth here - A. I do not know, the witness Charles Johnson promised me to bring it here last night.

CHARLES JOHNSON was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-26

200. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Robinson , from his person .

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I live with my father, No. 8, Edward street, Portman square, a wig maker. On Sunday the 5th of February I was standing in the middle of St. Giles' church , I found a person press me; I turned my head over my shoulder, I saw it was the prisoner; the pew opener approached me, and at that instant I felt a hand in my coat pocket, and as I stepped into the pew I felt the handkerchief drawn out of my pocket; I turned round, I saw the prisoner hastening out of the church; at that time he was not more than a yard and a half from me; I pursued him and stopped him at the south door; I said my friend you have got a handkerchief that does not belong to you; he said have I, he immediately took it out of his hat and gave it me; it was my handkerchief; I can swear to the pattern, having had it a year and a half.

WILLIAM PITT . I am one of the beadles of St. Giles' church; the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner to me; I brought him back and put him in the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into St. Giles' church, I saw a silk handkerchief lay on the ground, I picked it up; the gentleman said you have got my handkerchief, my friend; I gave it him immediately.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-27

201. SARAH BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , a tin box, value 1 d. a seven shilling piece, and two shillings , the property of Mary Crawley .

MARY CRAWLEY . Q. Did you on Saturday the 17th of December lose any money - A. I lost a tin box, two shillings and a seven shilling piece in it; I went into a shop in Charles street, Drury lane , I paid a shilling and laid the box down on the counter; I went out and left the box behind me, and when I came back to the shop the box was gone; I left the prisoner in the shop, and when I came back she was gone; I got the box again from Mary Horton .

MARY HORTON . This woman came in one day to buy some bread; she complained of having lost a box, with two shillings and a seven shilling piece in it; Mrs. Webb delivered the box to me without any thing in it; I gave it to the owner.

CHARLOTTE WEBB . On the 18th of December, in the morning, the prisoner delivered a tin box to me with three and sixpence in it, in order to buy her a pair of shoes; in the afternoon of the same day she came in liquor and demanded the box of me; I gave her the box with the three shillings and sixpence in it; on the Tuesday morning she delivered me the empty box; I delivered the box to Mary Horton ; about three weeks ago I asked the prisoner how she came by the box and money; she said Mr. Anderson in Clare market gave it her, with ten shillings in it.

The box produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this chandler's shop to get change of a pound note, and crossing the way to where I work, I found the box in the middle of the road; there was no money in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-28

202. MARGARET BROWN and CATHERINE SULLIVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of February , five silk handkerchiefs, value 33 s. 4 d. the property of Thomas Appleby .

THOMAS APPLEBY . I am a silk mercer , 23, Cranbourn street . On the 10th of this month, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop, they asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed them several; I saw Catherine Sullivan lay one piece by the side of the counter; Brown said she liked none of the patterns, she would go outside and look at the window; she came in again, I took out a variety of patterns from the window; she held them up so as to screen Sullivan from my sight, I saw Sullivan conceal one piece, she put it under her pelisse; Brown fixed on a pattern; I cut her off a handkerchief of the price of seven shillings; she said she had only got two shillings to pay off for it, she would come the next day and pay the remainder; she left the handkerchief till next day, she said put the name of Brown upon it. I laid hold of the other and sent for a constable; then I saw the handkerchief on the floor, I did not see it drop, it could not have dropped before I laid hold of her, because I had seen that part of the floor immediately

before.

Brown's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a silk handkerchief; he shewed me several, I did not like them; I pointed to the window to one pattern; he took it down, he asked seven shillings for it; I told him I had no more than three shillings; he cut the handkerchief off and immediately jumped from the counter and seized this woman; I never saw her before; he said good woman, I have nothing against you.

Sullivan's Defence. When he cut off the handkerchief for this woman he jumped over the counter and seized me; he did not give me time to look at a handkerchief.

The prisoners called each one witness, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-29

203. WILLIAM COPELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , a remnant of woolen cloth, value 3 s. the property of William Gilpin .

JOHN RAYSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Gilpin, he is an army clothier ; the prisoner was in his employ. On the 26th of January I asked Copeland whether he had any thing about him that he should not have; upon which he took off his hat and pulled out a remnant of cloth and gave it to Carter.

Q. Do you know whether that cloth was the prosecutor's - A. It was very much like that he had been employed that day in cutting; it was about half a yard.

Q. What was the value of it - A. From two shillings to half a crown.

Mr. Knapp. You did not miss any - did you - A. No.

JOHN CARTER . When I was in the act of going to search Copeland he took off his hat and took out this piece of cloth; I believe it might be the same that he was working.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-30

204. WILLIAM CLOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , a bed, value 5 s. a bolster, value 1 s. a blanket, value 1 s. a pair of sheets, value 1 s. a kettle, value 6 d. and a frying pan, value 6 d. the property of Henry Baker , senior, in a lodging room .

HENRY BAKER , JUNR. I live in a court in Hackney road ; my father keeps the house there, I live with him; his name is Henry Baker .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he had lodged with us a fortnight. On the 21st of January he took the things away; on that day he was apprehended at the Jane Shore, Shoreditch; he confessed he had sold the things, and had three shillings off on the bed; the bed was worth about five shillings. I went to where he had carried them and claimed the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I own I took the things; it was so cold I could not work; I had been without bread two or three days. Mr. Baker told me if I would tell him where the things where he would forgive me; I told him; he had them sent back immediately.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-31

205. JOHN DICKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of February , two remnants of cloth, value 5 s. the property of William Gilpin .

JOHN CARTER . I am Mr. Gilpin's foreman; he is an army taylor ; the prisoner was in his employ about two years. On the 26th of January, when I was going to search the prisoner, he walked up stairs to the cutting room of his own accord; I saw a piece of cloth in one of his hands; he let it fall; I picked it up by his feet.

JOHN RAYSON . On seeing the prisoner retiring up stairs, I desired Carter to follow him; there was a piece of cloth laying at his feet, whether he put it there or whether it dropped off the board, I cannot say.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-32

206. JOHN OSBOURN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , two jackets, value 2 l. 5 s. two pair of trowser, value 10 s. and a child's frock, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Kinnersley .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH KINNERSLEY . I am a man's mercer ; I live in St. Martin's court, at Westminster , behind the infirmary; I had a garden and a summer house. On the afternoon of the 4th of February, I left two jackets, two pair of trowsers, and a child's frock, in the summer house; on the next day at noon I went there and found they were gone, and the summer house door was open.

THOMAS STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Kinnersley. On Saturday afternoon, the 4th of February, I fastened up the summer house, after my master had left it; the two jackets, two pair of trowsers and the child's frock were in the summer house when I came away.

GEORGE STOKES . I am servant to Mr. Sherrinew, pawnbroker, Strutton ground; I believe the prisoner at the bar brought these things to me; it was on Monday evening, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock; I cannot downright positively swear to the prisoner; I believe there might be many people like him, and I might be deceived.

Q. But the person, be he who ever he may be, what did he bring - A. Two jackets and two pair of trowsers; he asked twelve shillings on them; I suspected them to be stolen things, I put them down on the counter, and told the lad to go for a constable. The lad had scarce got out of doors when the prisoner ran out; the shop was full of customers; I was in a deal of confusion; I cannot swear positively to him, so as to acquit my conscience; I believe the prisoner was not one minute in the shop; the prisoner was apprehended the next day; I saw him before the magistrate.

Q. Did you then, or did you not, believe him to be the man that was with you the day before - A. I did, but I made this observation, that there were many faces alike.

MR. MONDAY. Q. I believe you caused this man to be apprehended - A. I did. He was pointed out to me by the last witness; the moment I saw the man I asked the last witness is that the man; he said yes, that is the man; the prisoner denied it, and said he knew nothing of it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called

any witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-33

207. EDWARD BURWOOD was indicted for that he on the 26th of March , was servant to Martin Sutton , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 s. 8 d. for and on account of his said master, that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

MARTIN SUTTON . I am baker ; I live at No. 4, Collingwood street, City road ; the prisoner was in my employ.

Q. Was it part of his business to collect money for you - A. Yes, and he should have rendered me an account of it every night; I took an account of the bread he carried out.

Q. Do you know of his receiving any of Mr. King - A. Mr. King will speak to that.

MR. KING. I am a victualler.

Q. You used to get your bread of Mr. Sutton - A. I did; I always paid the prisoner every day, when he brought it.

Q. to prosecutor. When did the prisoner leave you - A. On the 29th of April, about a year ago; I never received any money from Mr. King from the 14th of March, to the 23d of April.

Q. to King. Can you speak whether from the 14th of March to the 23d of April, you paid the prisoner any sums of money - A. Certainly I did; I cannot specify any sum on any day.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-34

208. EDWARD BURWOOD was indicted for that he on the 19th of March , was servant to Martin Sutton , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 2 s. 9 d. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-35

209. EDWARD BURWOOD was indicted for that he on the 23d of April was servant to Martin Sutton , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 2 s. 9 d. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete and steal the same .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-36

210. LUKE BARTLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , a jacket, value 8 s. the property of Lyon Henry and Jacob Allen .

LYON HENRY . On the 30th of January, I went to the Welch Harp public house ; the prisoner came up to me and asked me if I had a jacket to sell; I told him I had one; I gave him the jacket; he tried it on, he said it was too small for him: he gave it to another man, and the other man put it on, and they both ran away.

Q. Did you ever get the jacket afterwards - A. No.

Q. Whose jacket was that jacket - A. My partner's and my property; I value it at eight shillings.

JACOB ALLEN . Q. You are partner with Lyon Henry - A. Yes; I was with him at the Welch Harp on the 30th of January; we went into the public house to get a pint of beer; at the same time we had some things that we bought, we looked them over; the prisoner came up to me and asked the price of the jacket, he tried it on; it did not fit him! she gave it to another man; the other man tried it on, it did not fit him; then they began to talk Irish, I did not know what it was; the prisoner and the other man went towards the door; my partner came up and said give me my jacket; the prisoner gave my partner and the man a shove, and shoved them both out of doors; I saw no more. I went and put my things in the bag.

ISAAC SEWER . I am a private soldier. I was in the Welch Harp at the time; the jew asked twelve shillings for the jacket; the first man pulled it off, and the other man put it on; the jew and the man that had the jacket on went off together; the prisoner staid in the house for ten minutes afterwards. The prisoner did not hand the jacket to the other man, he took it off the table.

CHARLES CRAYDON . I am a lodger.

Q. Do you recollect the jew coming in - A. Yes, after the prisoner; the jew laid coats, waistcoats, and jackets on the table; this first man tried the jacket on, it was too straight across the shoulders; it did not suit him; I saw him lay it on the table; another man in company took the jacket up and went out with it; the prisoner remained in the room ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-37

211. AMELIA PETTS and JOHN BELLARS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , a handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of James Gray , privately in his shop .

JAMES GRAY . I am a linen draper ; I live at 35, Bishopgate without . On Tuesday the 7th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came in my shop both together; they asked me to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I was near the door engaged with other customers; I requested them to walk further into the shop, and told Wood, one of my young men, to shew them some silk handkerchiefs; he shewed them some silk handkerchiefs; after looking at a variety of patterns, and laying aside a certain quantity, meaning to purchase them if we could agree for the price; among these, several were taken from the window; he had occasion to leave them to go to the window; after that the young man was looking over them again; he came to me and said he missed one handkerchief that he had taken out of the window, and requested me to look sharp after the man and woman; I told him to let them pay for what they had engaged and I would have them taken in custody; they went out after they had paid for the goods; I went towards the spot where they were; he asked me if I had seen the handkerchief, meaning the handkerchief that he had lost; he said I laid it on the counter among the others to shew to this man and woman, and on looking for it he missed it; we proceeded to take the things off the counter one by one; we could find no handkerchief of the description; the female prisoner had a

muff; she repeatedly said to me, I dare say, sir, you will find the handkerchief somewhere by and by among some of the goods; I said I rather wish to find it now I went out for an officer; my young man came to me, and said the woman had pulled it out of her muff; when I went in it was found. The female prisoner said she would give me any thing if I would let her go; I said I should not do any thing of the kind.

Mr. Gurney. How many persons were there serving in the shop at this time - A. Two besides myself - Wood and Vennymore - he is not here.

Q. What was the amount of the money the prisoner laid out with you - A. The young man took seven pounds nine shillings, instead of seven pounds nineteen.

Q. Your young man cast up ten shillings too short, and what he cast up Bellars paid - A. Yes.

Q. And when you took him up you kept the goods and the money - A. No; the lord mayor wished him to take the goods; he would not take them; there were seven other silk handkerchiefs found on him that did not belong to me.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Gray. On the 7th of February Bellars and Petts came into Mr. Gray's shop and asked to look at some handkerchiefs; I shewed them a variety of patterns; Bellars laid some of one side; I fetched some other patterns out of the window, and among them was a pattern which Petts put in her muff; when I missed it I went to Mr. Gray and told him my suspicion; Bellars looked out eighteen silk handkerchiefs; I told him they came to seven pounds nine shillings; I made a mistake, they came to seven pounds nineteen; he paid me for them; I put them up in paper. I said there is one particular pattern in the shop I should like to find; we searched for it; the woman seemed to be in a flurry; I saw her draw the handkerchief from her muff at the time Mr. Gray went out; I jumped over the counter before ever she had an opportunity of taking her hand off it; I said, madam, I see you this moment take it out of your muff, do not deny it; Mr. Gray came in; she said she would pay two pounds, or an hundred pounds if she had it, to let her go; Mr. Gray told her he could do no such thing; she said to Bellars, you have no occasion to stop, you may go.

ROBERT SAPWEIL . I have got the handkerchief, I have had it ever since.

Mr. Gurney. I believe you asked him whether he had any objection to tell you where he lodged - A. I did; he told me; and there I found some other goods. I found six handkerchiefs upon him, which I think he said he bought at some shop near St. Paul's, he could not tell me what shop; when he was in the Poultry compter, he said perhaps it might be near Fleet market; I went down from Bishopsgate street, Cheapside, St. Paul's, Newgate street, up Fleet street, so far as Bonsor's; I could not find out where he bought them.

The property produced and identified.

Bellars' Defence. I am quite a stranger to London, I am a licenced hawker ; my goods being low, I came to increase my stock. On my going into this gentleman's shop, I asked him to let me look at some silk handkerchiefs, I told him I wanted to sell them again; he fixed his price. I purchased two dozen in the whole; I paid him for them; they were laid of one side. I asked him after that if he would be so kind to make out a bill, I told him I would stop a few minutes. I was not in a hurry. If this woman behaved any ways imprudent it was unknown to me; I could not think she would be guilty of any thing of the kind.

Petts' Defence. I might have the handkerchief in my hand; I do not know that I had; I took up several, but I laid them down again.

PETTS, GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings .

Fined One Shilling and imprisoned Fourteen Days in Newgate, and until that Fine be paid .

BELLARS, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, Mr. before Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-38

212. ZIBA FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , thirty pound weight of copper, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Joseph Sills , Jonathan Sills , and John Winter Pidgeon .

JOHN WINTER PIDGEON . I am proprietor of Hambro' wharf ; Joseph Sills , Jonathan Sills , and myself are the firm.

JOHN HALL . I work for Messrs. Sills and Pidgeon, they are wharfinger s. I had suspicion of the man, I watched him; I saw him lurking about the copper, something disturbed him, and he walked away from it. I went up to him and asked him why he did not go and look out for work, why he loitered about there, we had nothing for him to do, I told him; he went away. Then I went into the counting house upon my business; when I came out I saw him come away from the copper again; I had suspicion that he had got something, I was standing and talking to him; he said only look what a lot of ice there is in the river, it is enough to overturn a barge; I turned my head to look at the ice, he stooped, I heard the copper fall; I turned round and saw the copper falling, one corner just touched the ground just as I saw it; he said halloa; I said you shall go before Mr. Pigeon now; I have looked after you some time; he said, don't let me go, bless your eyes do not; I called a man on the wharf, and he called Mr. Pidgeon; he was then taken to the counter.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down to look for work as usual; I staid on the wharf twenty minutes, I stood talking to this man just by where the copper was piled; one of the pieces of copper fell down; when I turned round he said you want to steal the copper; I said I did not; he said you shall not run away, you shall see Mr. Pidgeon; I said I would as soon see Mr. Pidgeon as any one; I had touched nothing, nor nothing had I upon me, nor never laid my hands upon the copper.

Q. to Hall. How far was he from where the copper stood - A. About six yards from the copper from what I saw; he had the copper behind him, under his great coat.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-39

213. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a box, value 6 d. the property of Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ALGERNON WALLINGTON. Nicholas Brown is my

partner; we keep the Castle and Falcon in Aldersgate street .

JOHN SMITH . I am bookkeeper; I have the entry of a box directed S. Wilson, 55, Houndsditch, it came by the Coventry waggon; the box was called over to me, and the carman put it in the cart; the carman went with the cart.

RICHARD WERDNER . I am the carman that had the box, directed to Mrs. Wilson; we stopped in Milk street to deliver a truss to Mr. Smedley in Monkwell court; when I went from the cart I left it in the middle of the cart; I came back again, I missed it.

Q. How long were you gone - A. About two minutes. I left nobody with the cart, it stood against the end of the court; when I came back to the cart the box was gone; Maynard was gone to look after somebody. In about a minute I saw Maynard returning with the prisoner in custody; we took the prisoner home to the yard; he begged to go home to his mother.

JOHN MAYNARD . I am porter to Messrs. Brown and Wallington. I went from the inn yard with the cart; the cart left me in Cheapside, I delivered two parcels there. In going down Milk I observed the prisoner get upon the near wheel of the cart, I saw him take the box out and get down again and walk towards Cheapside; I met him; he put the box under his coat; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said nothing; he threw the box in the cart and ran down Milk street.

COURT. I thought he had left the cart when you saw him - A. He was about ten yards from the cart when I first met him; when I spoke to him he turned round towards the cart and threw the box in immediately and ran towards Aldermanbury; I pursued him and catched him in Aldermanbury, by the Baptist's Head; he desired us to take him to his father and mother. I delivered him to Mr. Frost the constable.

Mr. Knapp. Did you see the box that he had throwed into the cart - A. Yes; it was the box that I had seen before to be delivered in Houndsditch; I am sure of the person of the boy; I never lost sight of him; I was nearly within an arm's length of him all the way.

MATTHEW FROST . The prisoner was given into my care, and the box and a pair of stockings; I have had them ever since.

Q. Do you know the boy - A. No; he told me his father lived in Black Eagle street; I went there; I could not find him; the next day he said his mother was dead; he still persisted his father lived there. I searched him at the inn; I found a knife, a penny, and a letter; the letter he said he picked up in the street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a man went in the cart, he said he would give me two pence to hold it; he went up a court and staid a great while; I went to the cart and put the box in again; that man halloaed after me and I ran away.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-40

214. CATHERINE WARNOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , thirteen shillings , the property of Vincent Figgins .

VINCENT FIGGINS . I am a letter founder , I live in West street, Smithfield ; the young woman at the bar lived as nursery maid in my family. I had lost small sums of money at different times; to endeavour to discover the thief I marked a quantity and put it in the place from which I had lost it before.

Q. When was it you marked it - A. I marked it a fortnight before I missed it.

Q. Then that is the 22nd of January - A. Then that is the day I marked it.

Q. Where had you placed it - A. In a drawer in the iron book case, in my accompting house, it was in a bag; it was there safe a fortnight; I counted it every morning.

Q. Had she access to your accompting house - A. No. On Sunday the 15th of February I missed thirteen shillings out of two pounds.

Q. Had your money been changed in the course of that fortnight - A. No; it had never been out of the bag only on the place where I counted it; I sent for an officer on the Monday and called the servants together, and told them what was the officer's business; the money was found in this prisoner's box; her box was unlocked. I have another maid servant and an apprentice.

Q. How did she get at this chest of your's - A. That I can only speak to from conjecture. I had one key in my pocket, and the other in the drawer in the accompting house.

Q. How could any body get at it - A. By taking it out of my pocket in my bed chamber while I was asleep when the children were taking away between seven and eight o'clock. Sunday morning I lay late; I laid my clothes in the chair, I suppose she took it out of my pocket and returned it again; but that is all supposition. There was no violence in the least upon the lock. It is a good lock, I do not think it could easily be picked.

Q. When you charged her with it what did she say - A. She said she had put a few shillings in her box, part of the last quarter's wages, and begged to be forgiven after it was found.

GEORGE WARREN . I am a constable. Mr. Figgins sent for me on Monday morning; I went to the house; the prisoner said Mr. Figgins was very welcome to look at what money she had in her box; a man brought the box down stairs; I asked the young woman if she had any money in her box; she said half a guinea and some silver; she put her hand into the box and took out a morocco purse; I emptied it on the table; there was half a guinea and some shillings; Mr. Figgins looked at the shillings and said they were the shillings he had lost.

Q. How many shillings - A. Thirteen shillings; she seemed confused at the time; she said she hoped her master would forgive her.

Mr. Figgins. The man that brought the box down happened to be a jobbing carpenter, that happened to be in the house at the time; my wife and he went up stairs.

Q. How long had the carpenter been in the house - A. He had not been in the house half an hour.

Q. If you had all gone up together it would have been much better - here is a box found open, and that man comes down with it, whether he put it there or any body else, we do not know - the other maid went to your room, did not she - A. The coat laid in a chair near the door, and the door was not fastened.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; my box was open, any body might put them there. My father is a soldier in the Isle of Wight; my mother is just returned from him. I have no friend in the world.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-41

215. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , two pound weight of bacon, value 1 s. the property of John Sankey Pugh .

JOHN SANKEY PUGH . I am a cheesemonger in Fore street, Cripplegate . On Saturday the 21st of January, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the shop serving a customer; the prisoner came to the window, snatched off a piece of bacon, and ran away with it; I saw it; I ran out and cried stop thief; I saw the prisoner run up the middle of the street, he nearly crossed over the way, turned short back, and went up Moor lane; I pursued him, a gentleman catched hold of him; I lost sight of him during the time I went round the counter; the bacon was found in the middle of the street. When I brought him back he was rather intoxicated; he said it was wrong of us to take him, he was running after our thief.

THOMAS EDGAR . I am an officer. I had charge of the prisoner, I took him to the Compter; the next morning the prisoner said he was very sorry for what he had done, he was very much intoxicated, and wished me to intercede with the prosecutor to let him go to sea.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first time I ever was in confinement; I am a stranger to town. I heard the cry of stop thief; I followed the mob, I was not in the shop. I came from Guildford.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-42

216. JAMES DURDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , a coat, value 4 l. the property of Richard Barker , esq.

JAMES DUDFIELD . I am coachman to Mr. Barker, No. 15, Golden square. On the 14th of January I put the box coat inside of the carriage, and the carriage in the coach house at Mr. Bush's yard in Swallow street ; about nine o'clock the next morning I went to the carriage, I found the door open and the coat was gone. On the evening of the same day I took the prisoner on suspicion; he lodged at the public house the corner of the gateway; there is a door from the public house into the yard; he was seen in the yard that evening at eight o'clock. When I charged the constable with him, I wanted to know how he came by them good clothes he had on. The next morning we asked him to confess if he knew any thing of it.

Q. Did you promise him any favour - A. Yes.

Q. Then we cannot hear what he said - A. We found the coat at Mr. Levi's, Hemming's row, according to his direction.

MOSES LEVI . I live at No. 14, Hemming's row, I am a shop keeper. On Saturday evening the 14th of January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop and told me that he had got a second coachman's place, he would sell his box coat what he brought from Yorkshire; the clothes he had of me came to three pounds five shillings; I took the box coat for three pounds five shillings; the same coat I received of the prisoner was claimed by the coachman on the Monday morning.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed for want of money to buy these clothes; I asked one of the men in the yard if he would lend me two pounds; he said he had not got the money; he would lend me the coat if I would sell it, I might pay him when I liked.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-43

217. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , a pair of sheets, value 12 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. five gowns, value 3 l. two bed gowns, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. three frocks, value 3 s. three shirts, value 6 s. four shifts, value 4 s. twelve neck handkerchiefs, value 12 s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. and a blanket, value 3 s. the property of George Henley , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH HENLEY . I am the wife of George Henley; I live at No. 3, Cock court, St. James's, Westminster .

Q. Did you lose any property lately - A. I got it back again.

Q. Did you lose it for any time - A. No. I caught the prisoner in my room between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, on Friday the 3d of this month.

Q. Had you known him before - A. No: I never saw him in my life before.

Q. How long before that time had you been out - A: I had not been out five minutes.

Q. What was he doing there - had he got any thing - A. Yes. My child came for me; when I came in the room he said he came in for some shirts, and ordered my child to go out for me; he had a letter in his hand.

Q. Was the letter for you - A. When I came in I turned round to look for the man, I saw he was in my bed room; I asked him what he wanted.

Q. He did not tell you that he came for some shirts - A. No; he told my child that.

Q. When you came in your room you found him in your bed room - A. Yes.

Q. Did your child fetch you - A. Yes.

Q. What was he doing - A. When I came in he had taken the blanket and laid it on the floor; he took all my linen that I had ready for folding, he took it off the great box and put it in the blanket; I said to him who do you want; he heard my voice, he came out of the bed room with this letter in his hand; he said he brought this linen from one Ned Thompson ; it was my own linen in my bed room that he was packing up. He had two shirts in his pocket, they were my own shirts; he took them out and swore at me if I spoke a word he would knock me down; he threw the things at me and said, blast you, if you speak a word, I will knock you down.

Q. Had you said any thing to him at the time further than asking him who he wanted - A. No.

Q. When he threw the shirts at you had you been in the bed room to see whether he had put the linen in the blanket or not - A. No; I had not time.

Q. At that time you did not know that he had been

putting any linen in the blanket - A. Just the minute after I cast my eye round, then I saw it was my own linen.

Q. When he threw the shirts at you did he stay there, or what did he do - A. No; he made his way to the door; with that I run towards the door to him, to insist upon him telling me the meaning of that letter in his hand; with that he came into the room to me, he swore if I came after him he would knock me down; this was on the ground floor.

Q. Was your bed room on the ground floor - A. Both; I still followed him, and cried Stop thief.

Q. When he said if you followed him he would knock you down, you followed him - A. Yes; he made the best of his way out of the house and went away.

Q. Was he stopped - A. Mr. Webb stopped him, I was there at the time; while I cried stop thief he swore he would stab me.

Q. Were you near him when you cried stop thief - A. I was close to him.

Q. How far did he go from your house - A. He went into Compton street out of Cock court.

Q. How far had he got when you stopped him - A. I dare say about ten yards or more.

Q. Did you know they were your shirts that he threw at you at the time - A. I was sensible at the time he threw the shirts at me they were my own shirts.

Q. You say he had put some of the linen in the blanket - A. Yes.

Q. Where had you left the linen when you went out of the room - A. I left it in my bed room on a box - the door was shut, but not fastened; any one could go into my bed room that opened the door.

Q. Did you see him while he was in your bed room at all - A. I saw him packing up my linen in the bed room; I could see him in my other room; when he was in the bed room he was packing the things up.

Q. Did he give you any letter did you say - A. No. I insisted upon his giving it me, or upon his telling me what it was, but he would not leave it me, nor let me see what it was.

Q. Now you must enumerate the different articles that he put in the blanket - A. Five gowns - they are worth three pounds, they were almost new, every one of them.

Q. Whose were they - A. They were different people's gowns; I had them to wash, I am a washerwoman. A pair of sheets, twelve shillings; a waistcoat, five shillings; two bed gowns, five shillings.

Q. Would they have sold for the price you have mentioned - A. Yes, and more; one waistcoat, four shillings; three frocks, three shillings; three shirts, six shillings; four shifts, four shillings; twelve handkerchiefs, twelve shillings; two pocket handkerchiefs, one shilling; one pillow case, one shilling, and one blanket, three shillings.

Q. Where had the blanket been before - A. It laid on my child's bed; they were all the things that I took in to wash, except the three frocks; they were mine.

Prisoner. I did not pack them up, nor did I put the shirts in my pocket.

Q. to prosecutrix. Did you see him pack any of the things up - A. I did; the two shirts he threw at me when he came in the front room; then he took them out of his pocket; there is no marks on the shirt; I took them in of a man; they were to be mended; there is some holes on the shoulder; I am certain these are the shirts.

ROBERT WEBB . Q. Do you know any more than you stopped the prisoner - A. No; he had nothing on him but a clothes brush; the officer pulled it out of his pocket. When I called out Stop thief, he said he would cut my bloody eye out; I stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. What she has said is very false; she did not see me packing the things up, nor the shirts were not in my possession, nor in my pocket.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 36.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-44

218. JAMES LOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , a pearl and amethyst broach, value 2 l. 2 s. a diamond half hoop ring, value 7 l. 13 s. a diamond ring with serpent shanks, value 3 l. 3 s. and a diamond ring, with hair, value 9 l. 9 s. the property of Matthias Bilger , senior , and Matthias Bilger , junior .

The case was stated by Mr. Andrews.

MATTHIAS BILGER , SENIOR. I keep a jeweller's shop , I live at 43, Piccadilly .

Q. Have you a partner - A. Yes, my son; his name is Matthias Bilger , junior.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in your shop in the month of December last - A. On the 9th of December in the evening, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came in the shop; when he first came in I was not in the place; I was called into the shop, and then I saw the prisoner in the shop: I am perfectly certain the prisoner is the person, though he is differently dressed now; he said he wanted something of a diamond broach and a ring; I then showed him the assortment we had; he could not suit himself, and said he was going out of town; I said if he would call again in about forty minutes I would endeavour to shew him some more; he then went away.

Q. Did your son continue all the time the prisoner was in the shop - A. Not the first time.

Q. Did you miss any of the goods after the prisoner went away - A. Not at this time; we missed them the next morning. The prisoner returned in about forty minutes, I was in the shop; he then looked at several articles that I procured, there was none that quite suited his mind, he wanted something of a cluster of diamonds; there were none that suited him; my son made a drawing of one that he thought would suit him; he then went away without purchasing of any thing. The next morning we missed a double row diamond half hoop ring, a pearl and amethyst broach, an amethyst and serpent ring, a diamond and chased, and a diamond ring; that was for hair; that is four articles; we advertised them by hand bills. I did not see them till the prisoner was taken to Bow street.

Q. Are you sure that the articles you have mentioned were in the shop at the time the prisoner was there - A. Yes. When he came into our shop he had his hair very neatly powdered, and appeared very much like a gentleman; wore an eye glass; he was vastly clean; I never suspected a person less than him, and he wore whiskers then.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any other partner besides your son - A. No.

Q. Has he any other name besides Matthias - A. No.

Q. A considerable part of the time the prisoner was in your shop, Mrs. Bilger was there - A. The first time she was in the shop, but when my son came down she went away.

Q. She was there at the time the prisoner was there a second time - A. She was in the parlour behind the shop.

Q. Which room is all open to the shop - A. Yes, there is only a curtain.

Q. Have you any shopman besides - A. We have a porter, he was in the shop, the furthest part off.

Q. Is your son here - A. He is.

Q. What articles are here that you know are yours - A. There are two rings; I missed them the next morning; that was at the time my son was going to return the articles that we had borrowed. When he came in the last time and saw the articles that we had borrowed, then them rings were missing.

Q. The rings that were missed the next morning, were they missed by your son or by you - A. By us both. When we found one article missing, then we searched over the shop.

MATTHIAS BILGER . Q. You are in partnership with your father - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop on the 9th of December - A. Yes, I am sure he is the same person; he was dressed in black, with his hair powdered, and an eye glass; my father spoke to him first - I was present.

Q. How soon did you miss any of your goods - A. On the next morning we missed a pearl amethyst broach, a double row brilliant half hoop ring, a rose diamond, and amethyst cluster ring, a ring for hair, with brilliants round.

Q. Are you sure that these articles were in your father's shop on the 9th of December - A. I am; I had seen them there; the prisoner bought nothing. I did not see them afterwards till they were brought forward at the public office in Bow street; after the prisoner was apprehended.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I received private information. I went to the Butcher's Arms, Clement's lane, where there were a quantity of pick pockets. I, and Smith together, took him on the 31st of January. I searched him, and found two pocket books, a knife and fork clasped together. I found this pair of scissars in his right hand pocket.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Brydges' street, Covent Garden.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. I do. On the 15th of December he left a ring with a coloured stone, I advanced him three guineas upon it. On the next day, a hand bill from Bow street came in, I carried them forward. I have a double cluster ring that I took in of a female, on the 10th of December.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner at any time about that ring that was brought by the woman - A. I had. On the 14th of December I had a conversation with the prisoner about this ring; I then asked him whether his lady, a few days before (I supposed the woman to be his wife) had not pledged a ring for five guineas; I supposed him to be the husband of the female who left the ring; to which he seemed surprized.

COURT. Was that ring pledged for five guineas - A. It was; the prisoner, I think, came the next day, at the time he left this ring with me; he then said that he had made enquiries at home, and learned that the ring which I had mentioned the day before, was left by his wife, and enquired the reason for my asking the question.

Mr. Andrews. Did he describe the ring - A. No, he did not; he only said the other ring. I lent three guineas on the ring the prisoner brought; I suppose that is near the value of it.

Q. to Bilger, senior. Look at that ring, and tell me whether that is your property - A. I am quite certain of this.

Mr. Gurney. It is one of the rings that you borrowed - A. No, I have had it a considerable time; it is an article that was bought, and then I had it altered; it was done to my own fancy; I could almost venture to say there could not be another like it

Mr. Andrews, to Bilger junior. Look at that ring, and say whether it is your property - A. I a can venture to say, I am positive that it is my father's property. It is an amethyst and rose diamond ring.

Mr. Gurney. You did not work upon it, did you - A. I did not.

MR. BRUCHART. I am a working jeweller and diamond merchant.

Q. Do you know that ring that is produced - A. I do; I made it for my own stock, as I supply shopkeepers. It is a double row brilliant half hoop ring; I manufactured it. On the 9th of December Mr. Bilger, the elder, called on me between six and seven o'clock; he borrowed that ring of me with several others.

Prisoner. Mr. Bilger, the elder, has swore that he saw no more of me after I was in the shop that night, till I was apprehended. He swore at Bow street, that I came again on the Monday night, which was the 12th of December, to look at some articles.

COURT. No such thing - I have got the examination.

Prosecutor. I said, I did not see the articles till I saw them at Bow street; I saw the prisoner; he came again on the Tuesday afterwards.

Q. What day was it he came first - A. It was on a Friday, and he came on the Tuesday after; he wanted to know the estimate of the ring; that a drawing of was shewed him; however he wanted to see some watches, and he wished also to see some loose diamonds, not set. I have another son, that son went out because he know of the robbery; I thought that my son went for a constable in order to stop him.

Q. Did you send him - A. No; then he had measure taken of his finger, and left directions; he called himself Mr. Deacon, No. 13, Cursell street, May fair; that is the direction I took from his own mouth; he left us without purchasing any thing; giving the order I went to the house, it proved to be an empty house.

Q. How came you not to stop him - A. I had a doubt in my own mind what to do; my son went out and observed an accomplice; that son is not here.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH .

The prisoner, when asked his age, answered nineteen; his age was ordered by the court not to be taken, he appearing much older.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-45

219. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a gelding, value 45 l. the property of John Young .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

JOHN YOUNG . I live in Ormond yard, St. George the Martyr .

Q. In consequence of some conversation with a person did you expect the prisoner to call upon you, about the purchase of a horse - A. According to Mr. Bott's directions. On the 16th of January, on Monday, about a quarter before three, as I stood at the gateway, the prisoner came and asked me if my name was Young, or if I knew such a person as Young; I told him my name was Young; he said he had come to me from a person of the name of Bott, concerning of buying a horse; I told him Mr. Bott had been waiting for him three quarters of an hour, he could wait no longer, he was obliged to go, but that he had looked out a horse which he wished Cooper to buy; he said he hoped that I should not take him in, for that he had bought a horse, a little time ago, of Mr. Marsden in Tottenham court road; he said he gave forty five pounds for him, he had but kept him a little while and he was not worth ten pounds; therefore his father would not suffer him to buy any other horse but what Mr. Bott approved of; then I shewed him the horse; he very much disputed the horse's age; I told him he was rising six years old; he said he thought he was older, but he was not a judge; he asked me the price; I told him forty five guineas; he said he thought it was too much; he said Mr. Young who will you leave to be the arbitrator of this horse; I told him I did not see that he wanted any body, any further than Mr. Bott, the farrier, and if he thought it too much money, as he was recommended by Mr. Bott, I would let him have him at forty five pounds, and if Mr. Bott said that was too much, he should have him for less, and if not, he was to give it; Mr. Bott was to set the price; then Mr. Cooper and I walked together to Mr. Bott; Cooper said he hoped I should not deceive him and take him in; his father was in want of a good gig horse, most likely he would be a good customer to me. Mr. Bott assured me that he knew the prisoner and his father very well, that he had done business for the father sixteen or seventeen years; and that his son went seven years to the school with the prisoner, that he knew it to be a worthy family. The prisoner asked Mr. Bott if he would pass his word to permit him to ride the horse to Hammersmith to his father; Mr. Bott said he had good parents, I need not be afraid; the prisoner said his father was so very ill, he was not able to get out; we parted on the Monday; on the Tuesday, about three o'clock, the prisoner came to me at my yard in Ormond street, and said that his father was very ill; he should be much obliged to me if I would let him ride the horse to Hammersmith, to shew his father; that he would call on the Wednesday, the day following, and tell me what his father said; which he did not.

Q. Did you let him have the horse on the Tuesday - A. I did; I let him him have the horse, saddle and bridle that he rode off with; he did not return the next day.

Q. When did you see him again - A. On the Thursday, in Red lion street, Holborn; I saw him upon the horse; he said oh, Mr. Young, I was just coming to you.

Q. Which way was he going - A. Towards the Foundling; he was going down Lamb's Conduit street, towards my yard; he said he supposed I was rather surprized that he did not come yesterday; I told him I was; he said his father was so very ill that he was not able to get out; he said he should not have come then, but business called him, that he was obligated, and he was going to take a ride as far as Barnet; but the weather was so very bad, that he did not think he should; I said if it is not particular business turn back, you will get your death, and the horse's too; he said he would, the weather was very severe; he said he hoped that I would go to Hammersmith on Sunday morning, and to be with him time enough for breakfast, and to spend the day, and then his father could settle with me concerning the horse; I asked him if he liked the horse; he said very well; we parted; I then went to Mr. Bott; the younger Mr. Bott, and me went to Hammersmith on the Thursday; the prisoner directed me to a white house, behind Hammersmith church; we went there, we found the house, but no such person lived there; we were directed by a Mr. Price to Chelsea; when we came to Chelsea we met the prisoner's father in the street; he lived at No. 1, Cheney row.

COURT. When did you see your horse again - A. On the Friday, at Mr. Dixon's repository, Barbican; I came to London and searched for the horse.

Mr. Knapp. This young man belongs to a very respectable family - A. He does.

Q. You would not have parted with the horse unless it had been for the recommendation of Mr. Bott - A. I certainly should not; I certainly parted with the horse from the respectability of the prisoner's family, and the recommendation of Mr. Bott.

Q. You said there was a price agreed upon between you, of forty five guineas - A. Yes; he never abated me a shilling; I asked him forty five guineas.

COURT. Did you sell it for forty five guineas - A. I never sold it at all.

Q. You say you met him on the Thursday - was there nothing said between you and him of meeting on the Sunday for the payment of the horse - A. No further than I was to meet him on Sunday at his father's, and his father would settle it.

Q. What did you understand by the term of settling with you on the Sunday - A. Of course I thought if he was an honest man he would settle with me on Sunday.

Q. You understood you were to be paid the price of the horse on the Sunday - A. Yes.

Q. If he had brought you the money you would have been satisfied - A. If he had brought the money I should have been satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-46

220. WILLIAM BUCKLE was indicted for that he on the 14th of January , upon Jane Wardle , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Jane Wardle , feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-47

221. SAMUEL NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of January , twelve yards of waistcoating, value 5 l. the property of John Crowe in his dwelling house .

JOHN BIRCHENALL . I am shopman to Mr. Crowe, No. 15, Titchborne street, Haymarket, in the parish of St. James .

Q. Did the prisoner ever come to your shop - A. I do not recollect that he did. On the 18th of January, we missed a piece of toillinet, the young man in the shop had put it in the window in the morning.

Q. When had you seen it before - A. I cannot recollect; I had seen it within a fortnight; I have seen it since at Bow street in the possession of the officer; there is my master's hand writing upon the stuff.

JOHN SMITH . On the 19th of January I was going up Brewer street, between five and six in the evening, I saw the prisoner pass me, I went after him directly, knowing him before; he had this under his coat; I asked him what he had got there; he said it was his own property. I took it from him and took him to the office; I did not ask him any questions. That is all that past.

Mr. Arabin. Did not he say he bought it - A. He did before the magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-48

222. MARY SHIERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , two guineas, the property of George Holborn , in the dwelling house of Cornelius Crawley .

GEORGE HOLBORN . I am a journeyman baker .

Q. Were you in Crawley's house - A. Yes.

Q. What is Crawley - A. I do not know; I went there with the prisoner.

Q. Which of you proposed going there - A. We proposed between us of going there.

Q. She or you must have known the house before - A. She knew the house before; we agreed to go to bed together.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. Yes, a little.

Q. What time of the night was it - A. Between eleven and twelve.

Q. Did you go to bed together - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to bed had you any money about you - A. Yes, two guineas in my breeches pocket; I put my breeches under the bolster, we had not been in bed above five minutes before I missed my money; the candle was put out; I heard the two guineas rattle in the purse that I had; I directly got up and accused the prisoner with taking the two guineas; I missed my money, I could not find it in my pocket; it was in a purse; she said she had not done any such thing; there was no other person in the room; I got up and made a noise, the woman of the house came up, I do not know her name; I asked her for the purse; she said here is the purse if that is what you want; she said she had no money at all; I said I was sure she had, and if she did not give it me I would charge the watch with her; when we got out I charged the watchman with her; he took her to the watchhouse. I saw the money while I was in the room with the prisoner, before we went to bed together.

Prisoner. Were not you drinking with two more, a young man and a young woman that was in company with me - A. There was a young woman in company with the prisoner, I was not in company with her; one of the young chaps that was with me went with this young woman.

COURT. One of the young men had another girl - A. Yes.

Q. The purse that the prisoner gave you was your purse - A. It was.

Prisoner. The young woman came and knocked at the door and borrowed four shillings and sixpence of him, we had nine or ten glasses of rum and gin; we went into five or six different houses.

Prosecutor. I did not drink in any of them.

COURT. Had you been drinking at these houses with the prisoner - A. I drank part of a pint of beer.

Prisoner. And some gin.

Prosecutor. I lent a young man that was with me four shillings and sixpence, and this young woman I gave six shillings to; I had nothing left but two guineas and a few halfpence.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a watchman; the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing him of two guineas; she was searched at the watchhouse and the two guineas were found at the bottom in her shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the constable that I had two guineas about me, and told him to take it out of my shoes.

Edwards. She did not tell me that she had them in her shoes. Crawley's house is in Prince's court, Whitcomb street .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-49

223. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , three silk handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Griffiths Richard Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GRIFFITHS RICHARD FOULKES . I keep a shop in St. Martin in the Fields , I am a linen draper. On the 28th of January I was coming in the shop, the prisoner was going out with a great coat under his arm; I saw some silk handkerchiefs under part of his coat not covered; I said to him these are my silk handkerchiefs; my young man came round the counter and secured him; I searched the great coat and there were two quantities of print in it. The great coat belonged to a woman that came in with him; the woman went away; I found fourteen yards of printed cotton in the great coat he had under his arm.

Q. What is the value of the handkerchiefs - A. I value the three handkerchiefs at ten shillings, and the cotton at ten shillings; I had seen them in the shop the day before.

EDWARD STEVENS . I am shopman to Mr. Foulkes.

Q. Were you in the shop when the prisoner came in on the 28th of January - A. Yes; the prisoner and a woman came in together; the woman asked to look at some printed cottons; I shewed them some; they were close together at the time; they bought seven yards; I shewed them a vast deal of different patterns; the prisoner bought three yards of linen at two shillings per yard; he paid me six shillings for the linen; he gave me a seven shilling piece, the shilling was to be left on the gown till nine o'clock in the evening; they asked me to shew them some silk handkerchiefs, I shewed them a great many different patterns; the prisoner bought one silk handkerchief at seven shillings, which he paid for; they went off; the boy in the shop saw the silk handkerchiefs under the coat.

Q. Is the boy here - A. No.

Q. The boy had seen him take them perhaps - A. I cannot say whether he did or not; Mr. Foulkes came in at the time, and saw the same as the boy. I went to Bow street for an officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with a woman in the street, I asked her if there was a linen draper's shop nigh hand, she said yes; she went with me into Mr. Foulkes' shop; the woman looked at a piece of cotton for a gown, I looked at some Irish linen at two shillings a yard; I told him to cut me off three yards; I paid seven shillings for a handkerchief, and six shillings for the linen, and a shilling was paid for the woman's gown. I was coming out of the shop, the woman asked me to carry the coat while she tied up her apron; the little boy came to me, and said, I had some of his master's property. I went and laid the coat on the counter, and what I had bought, on a great many things; they searched the coat, and told one of the gentlemen of the shop, to go to Bow street for an officer. I was brought into this business; I was quite innocent, I know nothing of the woman; I never met with her before.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-50

224. THOMAS TIBBETS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , six waistcoats, value 2 l. 2 s. seven shirts, value 21 s. two pair of breeches, value 30 s. a pair of boots, value 10 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Richard Barrs , in the dwelling house of George Evans .

RICHARD BARRS . I am servant to captain Bradford.

Q. Did you lose any clothes - A. Yes; I left them at George Evans '. I went abroad on the 26th of April.

Q. Have you seen your goods since - A. Yes; I found one pair of stockings on the prisoner's legs; and the other I found at the pawnbroker's.

Q. When did you see them on the prisoner's legs - A. At Marlborough street office.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No.

GEORGE EVANS . Q. What do you know of this - A. The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 20th of December.

Q. Had you in your custody a box belonging to Barrs - A. Yes, it was in the one pair of stairs; the prisoner lodged in the one pair of stairs, there are two rooms on a floor; whether the box was in the first room I do not know; you go into one room to get in the other where he lodged. I missed the property on the 5th of January.

Q. Was Barrs abroad at that time - A. Yes. On the 5th of January, the maid went up stairs to clean the room, she found the box that was under Barrs' broken open.

Q. Was the property gone out of Barrs' box - A. Yes; there were some things left, paper and other things; every thing of any value was gone. The prisoner quitted my house immediately; he was in the room when the box was discovered to be broken open.

Q. When did the prisoner leave your house - A. On the 5th of January; on the morning the box was discovered to be broken open.

Q. When he left your house, did you discover whether Barrs' box was broken open or not - A. No; it was on the next day, or in two days after I discovered it; Barrs' box was corded; I found it out by it being light; I undid the cord, and found that all the things were gone. Barr's box had been uncorded and corded up again. I suspected the prisoner, and as soon as Barrs came from abroad, I sent for a constable and apprehended him; he was searched at the watchhouse, and duplicates were found on him at the office. Barrs said the stockings that he had got on were his.

ALEXANDER BALL . I am constable of St. George's, Hanover square. I searched the prisoner on the 10th of this month, at the watchhouse; I found nine duplicates in his breeches pocket. When he was at the office, a pair of stockings were taken off his legs; the prosecutor has them. I found a shirt at Mr. Lichfield's, the pawnbroker, he has given it up; he could not swear to the prisoner.

MR. LYONS. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 33, Chandler's street. I received a shirt on the 26th of December; to the best of my recollection, I think it was the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not break the box open, nor did I pledge these things.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing the stockings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-51

225. JAMES GUMBLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a silver watch, value 5 l. the property of Samuel Gibbs in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL GIBBS . I live in Crown yard, Swallow street, in the parish of St. James', Westminster , I am a coachman ; I live in an apartment over a stable; the prisoner is a relation; he came there to see me on the 4th of February.

Q. Were you at home at the time - A. No, my wife was at home; I kept my watch hanging up over the fire place; I had seen it in the middle of the day, before I went out.

ESTHER GIBBS . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Were you at home on the 4th of February, when the prisoner came to your house - A. Yes, I let the prisoner in; he came to ask me if his aunt was there; he went into my sitting room; the watch was hanging up over the fire place.

Q. Did you go out of the room while he was in it - A. Yes, leaving him there; and soon after he was gone I missed the watch.

Mr. Knapp. This lad is a nephew of the prosecutor's - A. Yes.

Q. He came there for the purpose of seeing his aunt - A. Yes.

Q. You know of the watch being taken by him - A. Yes, he told me so; he took it by my consent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-52

226. ISAAC SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , a thread case, value 2 s. a pair of sleeves, value 1 s. 6 d. half crown, and a seven shilling piece , the property of Alice Lyne .

The prosecutrix being called, and not appearing in court, her recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-53

227. MARY COUZENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , four pounds weight of beef, value 2 s. a dish, value 6 d. and an iron stand, value 6 d. the property of Walter Steele .

WILLIAM SOUTHWORTH . I recollect on the 22nd of January the prisoner took away a baking belonging to Walter Steele .

Q. What was it - beef - A. I could not see: it was covered up; she took it away from No. 49, James street .

Q. Are you a baker - A. No; I was in the baker's shop; I saw the prisoner come in and take it away; it was brought to the oven by Mr. Smith.

Q. What is the baker's name - A. Walter Steele .

THOMAS STEELE . I am the son of Walter Steele , my father is a baker.

Q. Do you know any thing about this woman taking away a baking - A. On the 22nd of January she came to the bakehouse, she asked for a bit of beef and potatoes; our foreman drawed it out, he asked her whether that was it; she said that was her bit of beef; she took it away; the beef belonged to Mr. Smith; soon after she went Mrs. Smith the owner came, and the beef was gone.

JOHN PUGH . Previous to the prisoner going to Mr. Steele's she came to my house, she came down in the bakehouse; there was a bit of beef standing on the board, she said that is my beef; I asked her for the ticket; she said her sister had not brought a ticket. Just at the time she said it was her's a person came in with the ticket, the fellow of it was in the dish, and claimed the beef. There was another piece of beef drawed out of the oven; she said she had made a mistake in the first; she owned the second dish; the first was a round dish, and this was a long one; a person brought a ticket and claimed that; she stood five minutes and there was another bit of beef drawn; she said that is mine, I know it by the dish. I did not let her have it, as I always give tickets.

MR. SMITH. On the 22nd of January I carried a bit of beef to Mr. Steele's myself.

Q. What is it worth - A. Two shillings and ten pence. The prisoner's sister produced the stand; it is my own making.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night my mother bought a bit of beef and gave two shillings and six pence for it. On Sunday she sent my little sister to the bakehouse with it; when she came back I asked her where the ticket was; she said they had not given her a ticket; I did not ask her particular which bake-house she had taken it to; she told me she had taken it in James street; I went to fetch it; I went to this gentleman's, the corner of a court in James street; he said I do not let bakings go without a ticket; I asked for my dinner; I paid the two pence in the shop; I brought it home and knew nothing but what it was the same.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-54

228. RICHARD COLE and JAMES SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , four yards and a half of carpet, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Cooke .

JOSEPH COOKE . I live at 59, Margaret street , I am an upholsterer . On the 3d of February, on my return from a gentleman's house, I saw Cole and three or four others, and having been robbed on the Saturday before, I suspected, seeing Cole with three or four others, he was going to rob me; I placed the constable at the door; I went in and shut the door after me; I placed myself behind the partition. I had not been there long before James Smith came in.

Q. You had concealed yourself in the shop - A. I had; it was between five and six o'clock.

Q. Was your shop door fastened or not - A. It was not. Smith came in first and presently Richard Cole came in; Smith came quite close to me, I did not attempt to take him, I waited till Cole had stole something; this Richard Cole went up to the window and took a piece of carpet down, he gave it to somebody outside of the door, I saw him give it. Mr. Jones, whom I got to assist me, he was with me concealed in the shop; he laid hold of Cole, I laid hold of Smith and took him out of the shop.

Q. Did you get your carpet again - A. I did not. With the assistance of the constable we took them to Marlborough street office.

THOMAS JONES . Q. Were you with Mr. Cooke on the 3d of February last - A. I was standing behind a place ready waiting for them, I saw Smith come in first, he tapped with his finger at the door three or four times, we could hardly hear him; then he walked up towards the parlour door, about ten or twelve feet; then Cole came in and handed the carpet down from the window and handed it to somebody else; I ran immediately across the shop and took him by the collar; Mr. Cooke took Smith in the shop.

Q. Had you seen Cole and Smith together before they came in the shop - A. No; I had but just come home from my work.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you seen Cole and Smith together before they came in your shop - A. Yes.

Q. You have no doubt about their persons have you - A. No doubt whatever; I had seen them several times about the street before they made the attempt in the shop.

Q. How long time had elapsed since you saw them first, and the time they came into your shop - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Had you seen them speak together at all - A. Yes.

Q. Did Smith say what he wanted in your shop - A. No; when I seized him he never spoke a word.

Cole's Defence. I never was in Mr. Cooke's shop in my life. I was going along Margaret street when the person laid hold of me; he said he saw me take it out of the shop; I said it was false.

Smith's Defence. I was passing by Mr. Cooke's door a man observed to me that there were three or four people round the shop; he said it was a pity but that somebody would let them know it; I knocked at the door; nobody came; and then I walked in, and stamped with my foot; nobody made answer; then I immediately walked up to the parlour window; Mr. Cooke and Mr. Jones ran out immediately.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you hear any body knock at the door - A. I heard somebody knock, it was so low I scarcely could hear it.

Q. Did you hear any body stamp with their feet - A. I could scarcely hear it.

Q. Was it done in such a way as a person would do, if a person wanted to give a signal - A. By no means.

Q. When you saw Smith did he tell you he came into the shop to give you notice - A. No, he never uttered a word.

Q. to Jones. Did you see Cole in the shop, or out of the shop - A. In the shop.

COLE, GUILTY , aged 24.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-55

229. JOHN EXLEBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a sow, value 40 s. the property of Charles Cliff .

CHARLES CLIFF . I live in the Commercial road, St. George's ; where the pig was stole, was at a trap ball ground, in the parish of Stepney, one hundred yards from my house; from information I went down to the stable, where the sow was; I heard the sow rush about the stable as if attacked by somebody; I waited for a few minutes expecting they would lead the sow out; but not being so, I put my cutlass in the window, I felt a man; I called to him to come out; he came out; coming back we found the sow with her head almost cut off and her belly ripped open.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-56

230. WILLIAM HENLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of overalls, value 5 s. the property of John Bedford .

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a groom to Mr. MacNamara, in the Adelphi .

Q. Did you lose a pair of overalls - A. Yes, on the 4th of February; they were my own property; I lost them out of the stable. At half past eight o'clock at night, I locked the stable door and hung the key up in its usual place; about eight o'clock the next morning I went to the stable, I missed them out of the bin.

Q. Did you ever find the things again - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner at Marlborough street office, and the overalls and the waistcoat.

GEORGE GILL . On the 4th of February, the prisoner was brought in the watchhouse by two patrols, with this property.

ROBERT REID . I am a patrol. On Sunday morning, the 5th of February, past three o'clock, we saw the prisoner in Grosvenor market; the property was tied up in a horse cloth; we took him and the bundle to the watchhouse.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I used to work in the yard; I went into a house in Drury lane, the man that was with me, gave me these things to carry; when the watchman took me up he ran away; I told them so at the watchhouse; I was very much in liquor at the time.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-57

231. JAMES HOLDSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , a coat, value 36 s. the property of John Robert Parker , esq .

JAMES WALLER . I am coachman to Mr. Parker; I left my great coat in the accompting house of Mr. Gray, Bell yard , on January the 21st, in the evening. On the next morning I went for my coat, I could not find it.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I saw him in the yard on Saturday, and he was there at twelve o'clock on Sunday. The coat belonged to my master.

MARGARET FIELD . I live in Monmouth street; I keep a cellar; my husband is a shoemaker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not think I should know him, he had on a different dress.

Q. Look at the prisoner again - do you believe him to be the man - A. No, I do not think it is at all like him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-58

232. JAMES HOLDSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , a coat, value 16 s. the property of Richard Keen .

RICHARD KEEN . I am servant to Mr. Gray, Bell yard ; about five o'clock on Sunday, the 22nd of January, in the afternoon, I left my coat in Mr. Gray's stables; I missed it at eleven the same night; the prisoner worked in the yard, he absconded on the Sunday.

RICHARD COTTERILL . I am a salesman in Monmouth street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. He is very much like, if he is, the man that I bought the coat off; I cannot swear to him; I gave sixteen shillings for the coat.

VALENTINE HOWELL . I took the prisoner; he said he would point out the house; I took him into Monmouth street; he did point out the house where he sold the coat; the prisoner was dressed in the same dress he is now. The man said he bought it of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I neither stole the coat, nor sold it.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there to be kept to Hard Labour , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-59

233. ELIZABETH JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , five pounds weight of ham, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Hoare .

ANN HOARE . I am the wife of Thomas Hoare .

Q. Do you know the prisoner Jackson - A. I do not. On the 19th of last month I lost five pounds of ham from off the window of the shop; I saw a woman take it; I cannot swear to her face again.

Q. What was the value of the ham - A. Eight shillings.

Q. Did you perceive what it was when she took it - A. Not at the time.

Prisoner. I went into this shop to ask for three halfpennyworth of soup; at the time I went out she asked me if I saw any body in the shop, besides myself; she took a bit of candle and looked round the

shop and said she had lost something, kept me three hours, and found I had nothing; after that I was taken up.

Prosecutrix. I went into the shop on perceiving the inner shop door open; I saw the person taking something off the window; I holloaed out her, she returned into the shop from the street door, when I called her; I went into the shop and accused her with it; she came into my shop before seven, she was taken to the watch-house before eight; I sent for a constable.

HENRY CRESWELL . I am a constable belonging to St. Ann's. I was sent for at half past seven, I searched the prisoner and found no ham upon her; I saw a suspicious person looking in the shop window; I discharged the prisoner and told Mrs. Hoare I would find it out: I followed the woman to Grafton street.

Q. Did you find any thing - A. I followed the two women to Grafton street to a chandler's shop; I looked in the window, I saw part of a ham on the counter, I went in; the prisoner was in the shop; I asked the landlady if the ham belonged to her; she said no, she said the prisoner offered to sell it her; the prisoner denied the fact.

MRS. STONELY. I keep a chandler's shop; I live in Little St. Andrew's street, Seven Dials. The prisoner came in my shop about half after seven o'clock, I do not know the day of the month, it was on the day the constable came in and apprehended her.

Q. On that evening did the prisoner offer you any ham to sell - A. Yes; I did not chuse to buy it; she asked for a farthings worth of beer, and while she was drinking it the constable came in; he left the ham in my charge till he came again.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. After I was discharged from the prosecutrix's shop a woman came to me and asked me if I could tell her where Mr. Broome's carpet warehouse was; she asked me if I had any halfpence; she said she had four pence; she took me into a place and gave me a glass of elder wine; this woman was going into a chandler's shop. I told her I was very dry, I would go in and get a farthings worth of beer; I was drinking when the gentleman came in; when the ham or something, I did not know what it was, was on the counter; I asked the gentlewoman if she would buy that; I did not know what it was.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-60

234. WILLIAM IGO was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , a coat, value 10 s. and on umbrella, value 5 s. the property of Ann Boddington , spinster .

ANN BODDINGTON . I live at the duchess of Bolton's, I am a single woman.

Q. Did you lose a coat and umbrella in January last - A. Yes; on the 14th, about the middle of the day, they were taken out of the servant's hall; I had seen them about an hour before.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am porter to her grace the duchess of Bolton; I saw the prisoner on the 14th of January last coming up the outer steps with this letter in his hand.

Q. He was coming out of the house was he - A. Yes; I called to him twice to know his business; what he had been about; he had got the things concealed upon him at the time; I then went and stopped him and asked him what was his business; he told me he wanted a Mr. Charles Moore ; he had a letter in his hand directed to Charles Moore ; I told him he went a very improper way to find Mr. Charles Moore ; I advised him to knock at the front door and the porter would be the proper person to ask; he went away, I did not see the things at the time till he went away, then I saw through the hind skirt of his coat the end of the umbrella; I went down stairs and asked my fellow servant if she had seen a man in the house; she said she had not. I pursued the prisoner and took him in Charles street, Grosvenor square, turning into a mews with a great coat and an umbrella on him; I took him him to the watchhouse; I delivered up the property to the beadle.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work six weeks; I was seeking for work. On Saturday morning I found this letter, it was directed to Charles Moore ; I thought if I found the owner of this letter I should get something; the letter was directed to Portman squre; I was directed to Grosvenor square, and there they told me they thought it was four or five houses off; I went down the area steps; being out of work I was guilty of this; I saw the door open; I saw nobody there, which was the occasion of my taking them.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-61

235 ANN KELLY and MARY MURRAY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , eight lambs wool socks, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pair of lamb's wool gloves, value 1 s. the property of Robert Kenyon .

ROBERT KENYON . Q. Are you a shop keeper - A. Yes, I live in Little Newport street . On a Saturday last month, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, both of the prisoners came into my shop to look at some ribbons, lying in a basket on the counter; they asked me the price of one of them; I told her ninepence a yard; there was a yard and a half of it; she asked me to cut her off a yard, and bid me less than the yard came to; I could not take it; they both walked out of the shop; there were a quantity of lambs wool gloves and socks laying at the end of the counter, close by both of them, they stood together; Murray, when she got out of the shop she was running along the window, and the other after her; seeing a deficiency of socks on the counter, I ran after them; when they saw me following of them, Kelly dropped a single sock on the ground.

Q. Did they look back to see you - A. Yes; I came up to Kelly and told her I wished to search her; Murray walked into a door place, that led up to a billiard room; it was in Earles court that I stopped them; Murray had a milk pail in her hand, she cried out milk there; when she returned out I saw a sock laying on the ground from where she came from: I then took them both back to my own house; before I searched them one of them flung three odd socks on the ground.

Q. Had you counted the socks and the gloves before they came into the shop - A. No, not to know how man there were; I found nothing upon either

of them.

MR. FITZPATRICK. I am a milliner and straw manufacturer; I live in Earles' court. On the 28th of January, I found a quantity of socks and gloves behind my street door, when I came to shut it at night. I delivered them to Mr. Kenyon.

Q. to prosecutor. You received them socks of the last witness - A. Yes; I can swear to these being mine, a pair of lambs wool socks and gloves; there is a ticket to the socks.

Q. Do you know where Fitzpatrick lives - A. Yes. That is where Murray went to cry out milk.

Kelly's Defence. Not being accustomed to speak in a court like this, I have taken the liberty to state a few lines in writing. It is truly unfortunate in me, not having it in my power to employ a counsel; I was never out of the prosecutor's sight from the time I went out of the shop till he laid fast hold of me; he conducted me where I was searched and nothing was found on me; all this time I was either under his hands or his eye, so it was impossible for me to drop any thing without his seeing it; I was searched and nothing was found on me. I trust this will perfectly convince you of my innocence.

Murray's Defence. I was going about my own business. I met this person, we went into the shop to buy a bit of ribbon; she did not purchase it; they searched us and found-nothing on us; there were a great many people in the shop besides us.

KELLY, GUILTY , aged 37.

MURRAY, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-62

236. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , from the person of Seymour Huffam , a pocket book, value 3 s. a bank note, value 10 l. a bank note, value 5 l. three bank notes, value 2 l. each, two bank notes, value 1 l. each, a bill of exchange for the payment of 30 l. and a bill of exchange for the payment of 50 l. his property .

SEYMOUR HUFFAM . I am a merchant , I live in Bush lane, Cannon street. On Saturday the 14th of January last, between one and two o'clock at noon, I was walking on the right hand of Cheapside towards the Exchange, with a friend of mine, the next witness; we came to one of the streets where there was a stoppage, occasioned by a cart coming up the street; when I turned and saw the prisoner at the bar close to me. I took particular notice of the man from various circumstances; about two or three minutes afterwards I felt a sort of a twitch at my pocket, I did not immediately take notice of it, not being used to carry my book in my outside pocket, till about a minute afterwards, when I exclaimed to my friend, I have lost my pocket book, and I added, that vagabond that is behind me has taken it; I then observed the prisoner cross the street, and my friend wanted to persuade me that I had left my pocket book at home; I told him that I had not, and we agreed to follow the man; when he got on the other side of the way to Lawrence lane, he was joined by a tall stout man, at least a taller man than himself, and shouter, they went down Lawrence lane in conversation; the prisoner turned round and saw myself and my friend following them; one went on one side of the way and one on the other.

Q. They divided - A. Yes; and when they arrived at the end of Castle court they turned sharp round there, this prisoner and the tall man; we immediately ran as fast as we could in order to obtain sight of them; we lost sight of them about two seconds; I saw them in close conversation, justling something between them; and when we came up to them at the end of Castle court that leads into Monkwell court, my friend swore at the man, and said you have robbed the gentleman of his pocket book; they appeared both of them very much confused; I observed they were in the act of dividing the spoil, and the appearance of the pocket book, the lock is nearly torn off; the pocket book was in one of their hands, but their back being towards us I could not see which it was; one of them threw the pocket book on the right hand up the court; my friend went immediately after the pocket book, and the big-man slipped under my arm and went back through Castle court; the little man immediately ran down Monkwell court, I after him, full cry; he was stopped by a man in Lad lane; I came up and took him; my pocket book contained twenty three pounds in bank notes, which at present they are in the same state as when left, and two bills of exchange, one for fifty and the other for thirty pounds.

Q. Are you sure this is the man that was by you - A. I will swear that this is the man that was behind me, I took particular notice of him, he had got a pair of sporting garters on.

Mr. Arabin. This occurred if I understand you right in Cheapside - A. Yes; about noon, it was one or two o'clock.

Q. We, that know Cheapside, know that there is a great concourse of people there about noon - A. Yes.

Q. You said that there was a stoppage there - how long did the stoppage last - A. I think it lasted about a minute and a half.

Q. That would collect a great number of people - A. Perhaps about thirty.

Q. You could not know every person in the crowd - A. No.

Q. A person inclined to go on might slip through the carts - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw the prisoner throw the pocket book away - A. I have been given to understand since it was the big man.

COURT. Although you cannot swear to every man in the crowd, you can swear this was one of them - A. I can.

JOHN HEATHEY . Q. You were in company with Mr. Huffam - A. I was: we were walking down Cheapside till we came to Bread street; a cart was passing down, which caused a stoppage; we had not proceeded above ten or twelve doors further down, when my friend said he had lost his pocket book; I asked him if he had not left it at home, he said no, I have lost it, and that is the man that I suspect that is going across the street; we crossed the street after him, and observed a man as big again as himself; he joined this man, and they went down Lawrence lane in conversation together; the stout man made a stop once about half way down; the prisoner at the bar then looking back, and seeing of me, pulled his companion by the elbow and went further on till he came to a court; they turned suddenly up; we both ran towards the end of the court; when we got there we were very

much surprised to find these men very near at the top of the court; we agreed both to run after them up the court, which we did; I got there rather first, perhaps a yard or two, and to my surprise I found this prisoner and the stout man-with the pocket book in their hands.

Q. Who had the pocket book - A. The stout man; they both had their hands together; the big one had the book, the prisoner's hand was to his; I immediately exclaimed he had robbed the gentleman of his pocket book; they appeared in great confusion, and the stout man threw the book away; I ran and picked up the book, at the same time calling out stop thief; we pursued him down Monkwell court into Milk street, and he was stopped in Lad lane; the stout man made his escape; he ran back in Castle court; we immediately carried the prisoner to the Mansion house.

MR. WESTON. I am a warehouseman in Monkwell court. I saw the prisoner at the bar, he was in company with another man; their hands were together; I did not see the pocket book at that time; it appeared more than a common bustle; I looked very attentively, and I saw the pocket book thrown by one of them up the court on the right from where they stood. The prisoner ran down the court, and the other man up Castle court; one ran one way and the other the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I had taken a baker's shop for some time past; a person promised to pay me all the money he owed; I was going after the money, as I was obligated to pay it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-63

237. JOHN HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , two quarts of oil, value 4 s. the property of sir Charles Price , bart. Charles Price , junior , and Ralph Price .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

RALPH PRICE . Q. What is the name of your partners - A. Charles Price , bart. Charles Price , junior, and myself; our warehouse is in William street, Bridewell hospital .

Q. On the 4th of February was the prisoner in your employ - A. He was.

Q. You had reason to suspect the prisoner - A. I had.

Q. Had you a servant of the name of Conelius Walker - A. I had.

Q. From any information that Cornelius Walker gave you did you observe any thing of the prisoner - A. I merely observed that he was going to dinner about one o'clock, I called him back and asked him if he knew of any person that was robbing of us; to which he answered, no; I then asked him if he robbed us himself; he denied it. I sent for a constable.

Q. Where was this - A. In our private accompting house. And having information where the oil was concealed I desired the constable to search his beeches. The constable found a cannister containing some spermacetroii concealed apparently under the waistband of his breeches; it was in a tin cannister made flat for the express purpose of concealing the oil.

Q. Had you oil of that description in your warehouse at that time - A. A great quantity of oil like that.

Q. I believe you cannot swear to the identity of this oil - A. No; only we had some oil like that.

Q. How long had he lived with you - A. I am not quite certain - from four to six months.

CORNELIUS WALKER . Q. Were you in the employ of sir Charles Price on the 4th of February last - A. I was warehouseman.

Q. Were you directed by Mr. Ralph Price to watch this man - A. Three or four days previous I was. On the 4th I was directed to observe him and to inform Mr. Price when he went out of the yard; I observed him, through a key hole, to go up into the loft after he was clean.

Q. Was it customary for persons in his kind of employment to go there after they were cleaned - A. I conceive they have no occasion to go there after they are clean. I immediately gave information when he was going out of the yard.

RICHARD WHEELER . I am a constable. On the 4th of February I searched the prisoner, I found this tin cannister upon him, I took it from his small clothes, under his apron.

Q. Was it inside of the waistband or outside - A. Rather inside, covered over with his apron; I took it out from that part; the cannister contained two quarts and better than half a pint of spermaceti oil; the tin cannister of oil was was kept up by his small cloathes, and covered over with his apron. There was another accused as well as him; he was discharged by the magistrate. The prisoner did not say any thing as I observed.

Mr. Price. The cannister contains sperm oil, such as we have in our premises.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, I am now truly sensible of my error, and hope that when your lordship and the gentlemen hears my case, you and they will have mercy on my unfortunate situation. The oil for which I am here was, as I am led to believe, among the men in the warehouse, a perquisite that they in general had themselves, it was the drainings of every returned cask; my wages being little, and my wife and young child being dangerously ill, I unfortunately took the oil to keep a light for them; and that down to this time I always bore a good character for honesty and sobriety. I have a wife and three children. I crave the clemency of the jury.

Mr. Price. The oil is good oil, it is not drainings from the casks; I never heard of such a thing as perquisites in my life.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-64

238. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a hundred gross of buttons, value 19 l. thirty nine pounds twelve ounces weight of silk twist, value 83 l. and a wrapper, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , and Matthew Pickford , John Vaux , Thomas Vaux , and Jonathan Higginson .

MARY GARWOOD . I live at No. 9, Nag's Head court, Gracechurch street, my husband is a taylor. On Saturday morning, about ten o'clock, I was going down Wood street , I saw the prisoner come to the tail of the waggon and move a bale which was in the waggon; I stepped back a little, I saw the prisoner draw the bale out on his left shoulder and walk away with it; about the space of two yards from the tail of the waggon it slipped off his shoulder, a man jumped out of a passage

that goes to a public house, and lifted it on his shoulder again; upon which the prisoner went on; I stepped up to the carman, I told him the man had taken a bale out of his waggon; I said there is the man going with it; I pointed out the man; upon which the prisoner was taken.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a carman to Mr. Pickford, the Castle inn, Wood street. On the 11th of February, we loaded Mr. Pickford's cart; we drawed the cart out of the Castle inn, into Wood street; I gave one truss off to my partner, to deliver in Little Love lane; I was in Wood street, going to draw into Lad lane; this good lady informed me that a man had taken a truss off the cart; I pursued him round the corner into Maiden lane and laid hold of the man with the truss upon his shoulder; the moment I laid hold of him by the breast he dropped the truss and attempted to escape; I did not let him go away, he was taken into the Castle yard, Wood street.

MATTHEW FROST . I am a constable; I produce the wrapper; I took the prisoner to the Compter; I came back again, and put a mark on the truss. The truss was taken before the magistrate; it contained twist and buttons; the contents were agreeable to the invoice.

JOHN SAMUEL JACKSON . I am clerk to Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , Matthew Pickford , John Vaux , Thomas Vaux , and Jonathan Higginson ; they are proprietors of the Castle inn, Wood street .

LOWDEN SACK . I am a warehouseman.

Q. What did the truss contain - A. Sixty four bags of buttons, and upwards of thirty seven pounds weight of twist; the whole was worth about an hundred pounds; it was coming to me. It came from Leek in Staffordshire.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going down Wood street, a man asked me which way I was going; I told him down Barbican; he put it on my back; he told me he would satisfy me; I carried it down Maiden lane; the carman came and laid hold of me by the collar, and said I had his property. I did not see where he got it from; he had a white apron on, and apparently a fustain jacket. I live at No. 2, Bell court, Bell alley.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-65

239. CATHERINE SWIFT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , a cloth pelisse, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Thurlwall .

WILLIAM THURLWALL . I am a silk mercer ; I live in Holborn ; I can only swear to the goods.

DAVID ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Thurlwell. On Tuesday last, the 14th of February, I was serving a customer about half after five o'clock, I heard a noise at the door; in consequence of which I ran towards the door; I observed the prisoner folding up a cloth pelisse, which hung up inside the shop, about three feet from the door; I saw her in the act of giving it to another person; they found they were pur- pursued; they let the pelisse fall between them; I overtook the prisoner about six yards from the door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Holborn last Tuesday evening, to see a friend of mine in Glay's inn lane; I was five doors past his door, he tapped me on the shoulder and said he wanted me to come back; he took me back to the shop where there was a pelisse; he said a woman came to his door and took that pelisse; I said I knew nothing of it; I went on my knees and begged his pardon; he was going to let me out, an officer came and took me. I know no more of the pelisse than a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Fined One Shilling , and confined One Month in Newgate, and until that Fine be paid .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-66

240. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , from the person of James Phillips , a pocket book, value 1 s. two bank notes, value 5 l. each, a warrant for the payment of 7 l. 17 s. and three bills of exchange for the payment of 16 l. each, his property .

JAMES PHILLIPS . I am a timber merchant ; I live in the Edgeware road. On the 28th of January, past one, I had some business in Furnival's inn , and coming from there to the debtors' side of Newgate, I lost my pocket book.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge who took it - A. No. The contents of it were two five pound notes, three bills of exchange of sixteen pounds each, and a banker's check of seven pounds seventeen shillings; I had the book at the other place; when I came to this place I lost it; the check was in the book to the best of knowledge; Mr. Moore gave me the check four days before; I had not seen it since.

JEREMIAH MOORE . On the 28th of January, Mr. Phillips and I were coming to London; just by the debtor's door at Newgate, there were three or four ran against Mr. Phillips; as soon as we got inside of the debtor's door of Newgate, he observed that he had lost his pocket book; I then observed to him that he had a check of mine for seven pounds seventeen shillings, that I had given him some days previous; it was payable at Mr. Lefevre's; I immediately ran off to Mr. Lefevre's as fast as I could; I was desired by the clerk to stop a little while, in all probability it would be brought into the house; I stopped about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and the check was brought in by one Farmer, a ticket porter; I followed the porter at some distance, until I was at the Antigallican coffee house; when I came there, the porter said he was not in the place; in consequence of waiting three or four minutes, I saw this young lad, the prisoner, he was standing inside of the outer door, as if he was looking for the porter; I went and took hold of him, I said my lad, I believe you are the gentleman that I am looking after; the porter came out and said this is the man that gave me the check; I went immediately to Mr. Lefevre, and from there to the Mansion house.

JOSEPH FARMER . I am a ticket porter, at the Old Stock Exchange. The prisoner came to me and gave me a check to get it cashed; I am certain the prisoner is the person that gave it me; I took it to Mr. Lefevre. The gentleman was in the house, that owned the check; he came after me and secured the prisoner, and took him to the Mansion house.

MR. CHURCHYARD. I am a clerk to Mr. Lefevre's banking house. The last witness produced a check at our house; this is the check. On the return of

Mr. Moore with the porter and the prisoner, there was another lad came in, which Mr. Moore seemed to know as well as the prisoner, when they jostled him in the Old Bailey.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the Mansion house; I searched him; I found upon him five one pound notes, and a sham bill for one hundred pounds; he gave no satisfactory account to the lord mayor, how he came by these notes; the lord mayor ordered me to keep them.

Q. to Moore. Look at that check - A. The 14th of December, that is the date of it; that is the check I gave to Mr. Phillips on the Thursday before this happened; I have no doubt of it in the least; I took this check in payment; I kept it till the 26th of January, I gave it to Mr. Phillips, as he was going in the City, for him to call at Mr. Lesevre's and get the money for me.

Q. There was a boy came into the banker's shop - A. When Mr. Phillips was stopped; I noticed two boys; I suppose there were four or five; these seemed to be about ten in all; I was noticing a man asking Mr. Phillips if that was Newgate; he said it looks like Newgate.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner near him then - A. I did; I told Mr. Churchyard; I saw no boy in the office; there might have been a lad; I never saw any lad there.

Q. You say, this note you gave to Mr. Phillips on the 26th of January, you were with him on the 28th - A. Yes. On the 27th Mr. Phillips was coming to town, he did not come; on the 28th I said I would come with him. I know the note was dated the 14th of December, and payable at Mr. Lefevre's, seven pounds seventeen shillings. I told Mr. Lefevre so in his shop.

Q. to Phillips. What did you do with the bill that you received from Mr. Moore - A I put it in my pocket book, and to the best of my knowledge never saw it any more; I never took it out to my knowledge.

Q. Do you remember the date of it - A. No; I know when the check was produced; he told me it was payable at Cornhill, and when I was at Cornhill I should have looked to see where it was drawn.

Q. Do you remember any of the persons that were about you at Newgate - A. No.

Q. Has any of your other property been found - A. No.

Mr. Gleed. In your pocket book had you any notes of the value of one pound each - A. No; I had two five pounds notes, no lesser.

Q. Do you recollect the time when you received a bill from Mr. Moore - A. I recollect it was on the 26th, and I recollect putting it in my pocket book.

Q. Had you taken the book out of your pocket for the purpose of looking into it - A. Many times.

Q. Had your pocket book in the course of that time been out of your possession - A. Not to my knowledge; I never make a practice of taking my pocket book out of my pocket; when I take my coat off I leave my pocket book in it; I had in my pocket book a great number of memorandums and receipts, that I cannot show now.

Q. On the 28th, at the time when you were before Newgate, you lost your pocket book, might not you have lost the note that I have in my hand, between the 26th and the 28th - A. I do not know but I might.

Q. Of course you took out the pocket book for various purposes between the 26th and the 28th - A. I had; I went back to the chambers to see whether I had left it there; I knew not where I lost it; at No. 10, Furnival's inn I knew I put it in my pocket; when I came to Newgate I found I had lost it; I went back to Furnival's inn to see whether I had left it there.

COURT. Are you apt to lose notes out of your pocket book - A. Never before.

Q. You keep your notes so careless in your pocket book - A. Yes; I put it among papers, where I do not put notes.

Q. Because it belonged to your friend - A. I cannot say whether it was there or not.

COURT. That is the burthen of your story, you cannot say whether it was there or not.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-67

241. FRANCIS RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of January , an hempen bag, value 2 s. the property of John Shelton .

JOHN SHELTON . I am a victualler, and wharfinger , Puddle dock, Thames street .

PETER - . On Friday night I was in my master's house; I saw something between this mans jacket and waistcoat. Mrs. Shelton insisted upon seeing it; he pulled out an old nose bag, afterwards he pulled out this bag; when he was at the watchhouse he did not behave as he ought to do, to ask master's pardon.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carrying coals up stairs into the kitchen; I kicked my foot against the bag on the stairs, I took it up.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-68

242. THOMAS BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , a cask, value 16 s. and thirty one gallons of raspberry brandy, value 30 l. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a wine and brandy merchant ; my accompting house is in London wall ; the prisoner was a labourer under my ticket porter.

JOHN DUNN . I am clerk to Mr. Clark. On Thursday the 9th of this month, between the hours of one and two, the cask was standing on the outside of our door, for the purpose of being removed into Wood street; it contained thirty one gallons of raspberry brandy; when I came to the door I missed the cast and the man; from information I found the prisoner coming out of a stable yard in Moor lane; I took hold of him by the collar; I asked him what he had done with the rasberry brandy; he said follow me, I will shew you were it is; he shewed me where he put it; he had put it in a corner of the yard and covered it with horse dung; he was very much in liquor; in fact he was so much so, if he had not been in liquor I do not think he would have done so; he bore a very honest character.

Q. Are you sure the cask was your master's - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-69

243. THOMAS HARRIS and WILLIAM

TOOMBS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of February , forty pounds weight of soda, value 25 s. and thirty pounds weight of pearl ash, value 7 s. the property of William Whitwell .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. On the night of the 2nd of February I was in company with Crosswell and Valentine. At the hour of ten o'clock we met the two prisoner's both together about an hundred yards from Mr. Whitwell's soap manufactory; I stopped Harris and asked him what he had got in the bag, and where he was carrying it from; he said he found it on the road near the turnpike gate; I took him into the public house to see what it was, I thought it was salt; they said they did not know what it was. I took them to the watchhouse.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I stopped Toombs, he had that the bolster case under his arm; he said what he had got he found; I took him into the public house, I found the bolster case contained something white, I did not know what it was; I searched him. I found two pieces of the same sort in his pocket; he said he did not know what it was, nor how it came there.

GEORGE NEWNING . Q. I believe for some time past you have been employed by Mr. Whitwell - A. Yes. I know Toombs, I lodged in the same house with him; I knew Harris before the 2nd of this month. On the 2nd of this month I was in a public house along with them in Long alley, Moorfields.

Q. Had any transaction passed between Toombs and you - A. Yes; I had lent him money at the time; I was in the public house, I told him I was very short of money, I had not enough to keep me the week; he asked me if I could not contrive some means for his paying me; he asked me if I could not get some soap down at Mr. Whitwell's; I told him I could not; he said he must have something got and something done; I told him there was nothing but some soda and some pearl ash where I watched; then they said they would fetch some bags; they did, and I put them in my pocket, and took them with me to the manufactory; they told me they would be there by nine o'clock, or soon after.

Q. After you had got there what did you do with the bags - A. I put these articles in. They came about half past nine, I unlocked the gate and put these bags down just by the gate post. Harris came and took the bags; there was another man at a distance, I could not see who it was; after they were gone I locked the gate and went in to watch. A day or two after I was apprehended and taken to the watchhouse.

Mr. Alley. So you were a watchman set to take care of this property - you thought it as well to be a thief as a watchman - A. They took me by surprize, gave me some liquor, and made me foolish.

Q. They gave you some liquor, made you foolish, and then you thought you would be wicked - you got the property in the bags ready for them - A. They swore if I did not get it ready they would murder me.

WILLIAM WHITWELL. Q. I believe you are a soap manufacturer in Bethnal Green - A. Yes; I have been robbed of soda and pearl ash at various times.

Q. Is that pearl ash - A. It is white ash in an unfinished state, it is not in a state for sale; I had a quantity of that in an unfinished state in my warehouse; the pearl ash is of the value of six or seven shillings; the other is soda, undried. I had a large quantity of that in my warehouse; the soda is of the value of twenty shillings.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Toombs called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HARRIS, GUILTY , aged 49.

TOOMBS, GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-70

244. HYMAN JULIAN was indicted for that he with WILLIAM JONAS , on the 4th of January , upon Robert Nixon , a subject of our lord the King, feloniously and wilfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut him, in and upon his right side, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, with intention to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

And that he, the prisoner Hyman Julian , feloniously and wilfully did counsel, aid, and abet the said William Jonas , the said felony aforesaid to do and commit, and then and there knew and was privy to the said offence.

ROBERT NIXON . I live at No. 1, Huntingdon street, Kingsland road. On the 4th of last month me and William Clements and his son were coming from a sale at Pentonville, towards Islington ; the prisoner and a man of the name of Jonas came up behind me; we were upon the turnpike road; the prisoner came up to my right hand and the other to the left, they began to shove me about with their elbows; I said what are you going after; the first word one of them said was, you b - r; I do not know which of them it was; William Clements , my brother in law, came back and told them to make use of better words; directly this here man struck Clements in the face, and the other hustled me a little farther in the road from them; he struck me, I had a stick, I knocked him down with it; he came again, and I knocked him down the second time; I heard a voice say, you b - r, draw your knife.

Q. Who was it said that - A. The prisoner. As soon as I heard that voice I immediately turned to the left, Jonas followed me; I had the same clothes on then as I have now; he struck me with a knife, I suppose. The officer took the knife away from him when he got him to the watchhouse. I was cut through my clothes, it ran into my back as far as the back bone. I have the shirt I had on here; he cut through my coat, waistcoat, breeches, and shirt; after he had done that I believe I knocked him down; I walked away; I saw no more of them; I have never seen Jonas since.

Mr. Gurney. As to the man you call Jonas he was an entire stranger to you - A. He was; I never saw him before, nor since.

Q. Therefore whether his name was Jonas or Smith you know not - A. I do not.

Q. How long did this last altogether - A. A very short time.

Q. In the course of which short time you knocked him down twice or three times - A. Twice, I am certain of; I did not like to stop after the word knife was

mentioned.

Q. Did you knock him down after that - A. I am not sensible whether I did or not.

Q. Do you not know that the other man was knocked down more than once - A. I cannot say, he was at a distance from me.

Q. Did you go away until the prisoner, whom you had knocked down twice, called watch - A. He made a noise when he was down, I do not know what.

Q. Were not both knocked down, and did not both call out watch - A. I cannot say; the one that came to me I knocked him down.

Q. I ask you upon your oath did not they both call out watch - A. The man that I knocked down, he called out watch.

Q. Upon his calling out watch you and your companion went off directly - A. No, we did not; we did not make any stop; we moved on the same as usual.

Q. Did you or did you not, upon your oath, move to go off until they called watch - A. I do not know that we did; after the word knife was mentioned I was afraid.

Q. You did not perceive at first that you were cut - A. I shortly after did; as I was going along I said I feel the blood running.

Q. Which of your party was taken up for assaulting of them - A. I do not know any more than I am told.

Q. You had been drinking freely, had not you - A. I had been drinking about two hours and a half.

Q. Did not the prisoner charge you with tripping him up - A. No; only with knocking him down.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-71

245. WILLIAM SALTFLEET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a tea tray, value 3 s. the property of William Davenport .

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I live at 25, the corner of Queen street, Westminster ; I keep a cutlery and Japan shop .

Q. Did you lose a tea tray on the 4th of February last - A. I did; about six o'clock in the evening I heard the door pushed open; I immediately went to the door and found the tea tray out of its place; the tray was taken from behind the street door, and on my looking up Queen street I saw a man going along, I run after him, I saw he had a tea tray under his arm. I took hold of it and said, my friend that is my property; he gave it me; I then stepped into the middle of the road; I told him he must not depart from me, he had stolen it out of my shop; I did not lay hold of him, I was alarmed; he walked on very fast and I after him; I told him if he did not stop I should have him apprehended; he ran, and I called stop thief; he stopped and made an attempt to come to me; I ran away from him and called stop thief again; then he stopped and came back running down Dartmouth row; I took hold of his coat and brought him into the shop and sent for an officer; he was never out of my sight after I took the tea tray from him; the greatest distance he was from me probably was five or six yards; I valued the tea tray at three shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the case laid to my charge. He told the magistrate that he believed I was not the man that took it. I was intoxicated at the time.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-72

246. CHARLES WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , ten yards of sarsnet, value 2 l. 16 s. the property of Nathaniel Roberts and John Bellamy Plowman , in their dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT for lik offence in the dwelling house of John Bellamy Plowman .

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

JOHN BELLAMY PLOWMAN . I live in Chandos street, Covent Garden ; my partner's name is Nathaniel Roberts ; I am the resident partner that sleeps in the house; Joseph Snugs is a nominal partner, he has no interest in the business. I had repeatedly found that I had lost both goods and money; my suspicion fell upon Charles Walker , I charged him with the robbery.

Mr. Knapp. What did you say to him at the time you charged him with the robbery - A. I told him that he had robbed me of some money, and that he had a very serious thing to encounter.

Q. Did you mean by the serious thing that he had to encounter what he had robbed you of - A. Yes.

COURT. That is a threat.

Mr. Const. Did you afterwards-find any of your property in his possession - A. I did not. On examining his drawers I found these two books marked A and B. I took the prisoner in custody; he was in custody the middle of Sunday.

Q. Did you see any thing that you had been robbed of - A. Yes, of the pelisse; I saw a pelisse in the possession of Mrs. Wilson that I suspected to be my silk; I have got silk, and I have satisfied myself that is my property.

Q. Is that book you produce the prisoner's hand writing - A. It is. The two pounds sixteen shillings; June 1808, to Mr. John Wilson .

MRS. WILSON. Q. How did you get that pelisse - A. Mr. Wilson bought it for me; I had it of my husband.

Q. Who delivered it to you - A. The dress maker; I never saw it till it was made up.

JOHN WILSON . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do; I have known him for this eleven years past.

Q. Have you had dealings together - A. When I have had occasion for any things of this kind. I recollect the pelisse about the month of June or July last; Mr. Walker being in the house of Plowman and co. I desired him to bring the patterns; the pelisse was ordered and the stuff was sent, whether to my house or not I am not certain; I afterwards received it.

COURT. Do you know whether that is the same - A. I cannot say: the mantua maker might have changed it; it was such a kind of silk as this; I never saw it before the mantua maker sent it me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-73

247. CHARLES WALKER was indicted for that he on the 9th of December , was servant to Nathaniel

Roberts , John Bellamy Plowman and Joseph Snugs , and was empowered and entrusted by them to receive money for them, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 l. 7 s. for his said masters, and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same ; - and

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

MRS. CHASE. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Chase, the surgeon, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Walker - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember at any time buying any silk of him - A. Yes; I chose the pattern sometime about the the 14th of September; I ordered sarsnet and persian for a pelisse; I bought it of Mr. Walker, and paid him for it; I think I paid him about three pounds seven shillings. This is it; this is the persian, and that is the sarsnet.

Q. You did not see Mr. Plowman on this occasion - A. No.

COURT. You did not go to the shop - A. No; I knew he lived there; he sent me some patterns; he was an acquaintance of mine.

Q. Did you buy it of him on his account - A. No; knowing he was at Mr. Plowman's I bought it of him, as the servant of Plowman and co. of course. I made the pelisse myself.

JOHN BELLAMY PLOWMAN . Q. Who are your partners - A. Nathaniel Roberts ; we are mercer s, living in Chandos street .

Q. The prisoner was with you last December - A. He was.

Q. Look at that silk which Mrs. Chase has produced, and tell us whether that is part of your property - A. I will swear that I bought this of Mr. Lesuse, of Spital fields; I am satisfied that is part of my property; the persian I am not certain of; the sarsnet is mine.

Q. Was the prisoner entrusted to sell goods and to receive the money for the house - A. Certainly, and to bring it to account.

Q. Has he brought to account three pounds seven shillings, or any other sum for that article - A. I believe not; I have examined the books with very great care; the cash book I have brought here, in that book it should have been entered; it was his duty to bring it to account, and saw it so done.

Mr. Gurney. Might it not happen that a person might bring the money into your till, nevertheless omit to make the entry in your book - A. He might so, but that would be found out and corrected at the end of the week; the cash book is settled every week.

Q. That is provided there was no error in casting up the accounts - A. That is almost impracticable, if you were to see the books.

Q. Have they not been found frequently to disagree - A. They have.

Q. Can you state upon your oath, that the sarsnet of the pelisse, that that is what you had in your possession - A I cannot swear it, but I have no doubt it is mine.

JOHN GEORGE . I am clerk to Messrs. Plowman and co.; I have brought the cask book; I have examined the book; I do not find any entry of it, nor any money given credit for it.

NATHANIEL ROBERTS , Q. You are partner to Mr. Plowman - A. I am.

Q. Was any money brought you on account for that silk - A. No, nor any part of it. I have examined the book twice over, with all the care I could, it is not entered there.

JOSEPH SNUGS . Q. You are a nominal partner in that house - A. I am. I have also examined the book to see whether there was any money brought to account for that silk; there is no entry of the name, nor any money brought to account.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that is the same silk - A. It has every appearance.

THOMAS CRAIG . I am shopman to Messrs. Plowman and Roberts.

Q. You enter in that book - A. I do, and they that give the money should see it done; I have examined that book; I do not find any entry of three pounds seven shillings for this article.

Q. I believe you are the person that keeps account of the money paid out of the till - A. Yes; I keep a petty cash book.

JOHN LESUSE . I am a weaver.

Q. Look at that silk, at the remnant first.

Mr. Gurney. That is a remnant that came from the shop.

COURT. Not that piece the lady brought - A. No.

Mr. Const. Did you sell that piece to Mr. Plowman - A. I think I did, I cannot be sure; I think it is our making.

Q. Now look at the pelisse, is that part of it - A. It has every appearance of being so.

Mr. Plowman. I brought that remnant from my shop this morning.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you had it - A. To the best of my belief, in August, 1807.

Q. Can you positively say that remnant was in your house, December 1807 - A. I can, I have no doubt I had it.

Mr. Lesuse. I have looked at the pelisse; I have no doubt that the pelisse was made of part of that which Mr. Plowman has produced, is the remainder; it has a particular selvage; it might be imitated, but I could discover it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-74

248. CHARLES FLOWERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Lines , about the hour of seven at night, on the 7th of February , and stealing therein; five hundred and eighty yards of baize, value 60 l. the property of Joseph Lines , Thomas Josling and Lewis Ferraire ; - and

THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM WARD . Q. Are you coachman to Mr. Lines - A. Yes; he lives at No. 33, Finsbury square .

Q. At the back of the house there is an entrance from Wilson street - A. Yes; the coach house door opens in Wilson street; the coachhouse adjoins the accompting house; you come through the house to come into the accompting house, and the coachhouse and the accompting house is under one roof; they are partitioned off by boards; I stoop over the coachhouse.

Q. In the beginning of this month were there any bales in the coachhouse - A. There were two.

Q. On the evening of the 7th of this month, at what time did you leave the coachhouse - A. At six o'clock, it was then dark; when I quitted it the bales were safe; I locked the door and returned at nine o'clock; I found the door had been forced open, as if with an iron crow; I found one of the bales, the cords had been cut, and all the contents were gone except three pieces. There were two pieces of baize, one red and the other blue, laying against the door, and one piece in the wrapper.

LEWIS FERRAIRE . Q. I believe you are in partnership with Mr. Joseph Lines and Mr. Josling - A. Yes; we are merchant s; Mr. Joseph Lines resides in the house in Finsbury square.

JEREMIAH THRUBSHAW . I am a City constable. On the 7th of this month, a little before nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Sun street; I met the prisoner with two others; they were coming from Finsbury square towards Bishopgate street; the prisoner had a velveteen jacket on, and the buttons covered with the same.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before - A. I knew him as perfect as my own brother; I have known him for several years; he had this piece of baize upon his left shoulder; I first passed him a little; the others that were with him were in conversation together; I heard the word Wake, it is a slang word among thieves, that they are to be put awake to it; I heard the word Wake distinctly; I turned short round and went between the prisoner and Mr, Matther's shop window, which had a very great light; it gave me a perfect view of his countenance; the instant I looked at him I knew him perfectly well; I asked him where he was going with it; he said what was that to me.

Q. Did he know you - A. I do not suppose he did. I told him I was an officer and insisted upon knowing where he was going with it; I changed the stick into my left hand, for my right hand to have hold of him; he threw the load against me and made his escape; he ran as hard as ever he could run; I called out stop thief; I throwed the load into Mr. Matthers' shop; the next morning I gave information to Bishop the officer. This took place on the Tuesday evening; on Thursday morning he was taken in custody. I am positive he is the same man.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am a police officer of Worship street office.

Q. In consequence of information from the last witness, did you and Bishop apprehend the prisoner - A. I did, on Thursday morning, about seven o'clock, in bed; I told the prisoner he must get up and go with me, which he did very readily; I searched him and the place; I found nothing relative to the case.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. You apprehended the prisoner with Armstong - A. I did; on the bed where the prisoner lay I found this jacket; it is a velveteen jacket.

Q. to Thrubshaw. Is that like the jacket the prisoner had on - A. Yes, it is.

Q. to Ferraire. We understand, there were two bales in the coachhouse - A. Yes; they contained baize of that description.

Q. How many pieces does a bale contain - A. Some fourteen and some sixteen.

Q. What is the value of this one - A. Between five and six pounds. The thirteen pieces that were taken away altogether were worth between sixty and seventy pounds; I have no doubt of this piece being one of the thirteen that were lost. They are only for exportation; they are the property of Mr. Lines, Josling and myself. This bale was marked C. G. No. 1.

- STURTON. I am book keeper to Messrs. Lines and co. These two bales were deposited in the coachhouse by Mr. Lines' order; I saw them when they were there; I think we had them about the middle of December; I never saw the contents of them. The marks on the wrappers were C. G. No. 1, C. G. No. 2. I know by the invoice that the bales were so marked; they were received from the house of Beckwith Smith.

THOMAS PRESTON . I am clerk to Mr. Beckwith Smith, the manufacturer, at Rochdale; he supplies the house of Lines and co. with haize.

Q. About the 5th of December last did you pack two bales of baize for Mr. Smith - A. I did; I marked that wrapper myself; it was sent off from Rochdale on the 5th of December; that wrapper contained sixteen pieces of baize, red and blue, and this piece of baize corresponds in every respect with the sixteen pieces of baize contained in that wrapper; it has the mark of my employer, in cotton letters, B. S.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what these men swear upon my charge; I had not that jacket on that evening, nor the day before; I had the same clothes as I have this present time.

WILLIAM HUNTINGTON . I am a dyer's labourer; I work for Mr. Shebott and Dovell, in White row, Spital field. On the 7th of this month, I was in the Angel tavern from ten minutes to seven till ten o'clock; I never saw the prisoner before that evening; I was there when he came in; there were two men came together, they called for a pot of porter; they came in before eight o'clock; the prisoner continued in the public house till the clock struck nine; I did not see what became of him afterwards. He had a dark brown coat on, a velveteen waistcoat and breeches; that is the dress he had on and no other dress.

Mr. Gurney. You work for the dyers - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons were in this public house - A. Altogether seven; there were four soldiers, they appeared to be on travelling orders; I was drinking with Thomas Hedge and the publican's brother, Mr. Gillman; I went there alone, and met Hedge there by chance; we had two pints of porter between us.

Q. The prisoner came in before eight o'clock - A. Yes; he came in with another person; I cannot tell the other person's name; he is not here; he was a tallish thin faced man something in the horse dealing way; they came in together in company, and drank together; they had nothing but one pot of porter all the time.

Q. Is the landlord here - A. No.

Q. Whereabouts is this Angel - A. It is the first public house in Whitechapel near Brick lane; Mr. Hedge went away first, I joined no other company; the clock had struck ten when I went home.

Q. What day was this - A. Tuesday week, the 7th day of this month.

Q. When was you first of all applied to come here - A. Last Friday was a week; by the gentleman that

was in the prisoner's company, he is not here.

Q. Then he took you to Mr. Harris - A. No; the prisoner's wife took me to Mr. Harris; she has paid me for my trouble at other times, but not then. I live at No. 55, Fashion street.

Q. It was a very lucky thing that as the prisoner did not know you his friend should find you out - A. On Friday evening he came into this house. I was in the house drinking with Mr. Hedge again; he recollected me and asked me to be a witness; he took me last Sunday to Clerkenwell to see the prisoner.

Q. Did not the man then tell you who he was - A. No; I do not know what he is now, nor his name, nor where he is to be found; he came to me to day about ten minutes after eleven o'clock and fetched me out of my master's premises and gave me a paper and a shilling and told me where to come to, and away he went.

THOMAS HEDGE . I am a wood cutter.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Huntington - A. Yes; I was with him at the Angel tavern on Tuesday night; I recollect seeing the prisoner there that night, last Tuesday was a week.

Q. What time did you go there - A. Twenty minutes before eight.

Q. Do you recollect what time the prisoner came in - A. To the best of my knowledge five or ten minutes before eight; we had been drinking porter there; this man said sit a little further Stumpey; I said you have no call to call me stumpey, you are stumpey enough yourself. I went away from the public house past nine o'clock; I left the prisoner there.

Q. How many persons might there be in the public house - A. There were four soldiers, a young man and me drinking together, and the publican's brother, Gillman, he was rather intoxicated; I am sure it was the prisoner that was there, he had a brown coat on.

Mr. Gurney. You went there twenty minutes before eight - A. Yes; I had only about two minutes walk from my own house.

Q. And you looked at the clock before you came out - A. Yes.

Q. There were four soldiers there, another man drinking with you, and the publican's brother - was the publican there too - A. He did not come in all the time, nor his wife; my daughter kept the tap room; she lived at the house about two months.

Q. So the prisoner said, sit further up Stumpey, you moved and he sat down - A. Yes; he drank with another man.

Q. Who was the other man - A. I do not know him; the other man was in two or three minutes before him; they did not come in together; he was a thin, tallish man, thin faced; I have seen him since, I saw him at the Angel last Sunday, he came in while Huntington and I were drinking together; he said there is the two men that were drinking together on Tuesday night; Huntington asked him what song he sung on Tuesday night; he said he sung part of three songs. The prisoner's friend asked Huntington whether he knew the person that was sitting on the seat next me; Huntington said he did not take so much notice of him as the old man did; we went to the prison on Sunday to see the prisoner; he told me the man that called me Stumpey was taken up; and I saw the prisoner on Thursday where he was taken to.

Q. What was it the people drank that night at the public house when you saw the prisoner - A. The prisoner and the other man had a pot of porter; I suppose between Huntingdon and me we had three pints of porter, we might have four pints for what I know. I left the prisoner there when I came away; and Huntington and I came away together.

Q. You are quite sure that you did not leave Huntington behind you - A. I do not know whether he was behind or no; I came out first.

COURT. When did you last see the man that came to you in the public house - the prisoner's friend - A. I saw him to day about eleven o'clock; I saw him at my work; he came to fetch me.

Q. When the prisoner and his friend came into the public house did they appear as if they had been running - A. No, not at all; they were quite cool.

ELIZABETH HEDGE . Q. In the beginning of this month did you live at the Angel tavern - A. Yes, as a servant of all work; the tap room was chiefly left to me.

Q. On the 7th of February do you recollect your father being there in company with Huntington - A. I do; and I recollect the person of the prisoner perfectly well; I recollect the prisoner coming in a quarter before eight, he called for a pot of beer and gave me a sixpence; I took notice he had lost one joint of his finger. He continued in the tap room till after nine, then he went away.

Q. How many persons were there in the tap room - A. Three soldiers, Huntington, my father, and another man, I did not take particular notice of him; there was no other person there, man or woman, that I am sure of.

Mr. Gurney. How long had the prisoner been in before Huntington and your father came in - A. My father and Huntington came in a few minutes past seven.

Q. Did you draw beer for them - A. I did; I at first drawed a pint: they had five or six pints.

Q. Have you any doubt that they had at least six pints - A. No; I have not.

Q. Who went away first, the prisoner or your father and Huntington - A. The prisoner; he went away better than an hour before my father and Huntington; he went away about a quarter past nine, and my father and Huntington went away a little after ten.

Q. You did not see any body that the prisoner drank with - A. No; he sat by my father, and the other man sat next to the prisoner; he had a pint of beer and the prisoner had a pot; I never saw the prisoner before; I have seen him this morning in the dock.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-75

249. MARY POWELL , MARY SMITH , and MARY BROWN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of William Arkinstall , on the 31st of January , a bank note, value 10 l. and a bank note, value 1 l. his property .

MR. MIDDLETON. I am a cheesemonger; I lodge at No. 31, Creed lane. On Wednesday, between one and two o'clock at night, I was passing through Fleet street , and crossing by Salisbury square, I saw the prisoner Powell, she had hold of a gentleman's arm: when I came up to her she said to the gentleman that

was with her, oh, how drunk I am; the gentleman said if he could get assistance he would take her to the watchhouse, he had taken her to two watch boxes, and neither of the watchman were in the box; he asked me if I would assist him; I told him I would; when he asked me to assist him, she had her hand as though she was concealing something; I laid hold of her hand to prevent her from throwing any thing out of it; when she was taken to the watchhouse she took the notes out of her pocket, and was giving them to Smith; a young man prevented her, and brought the notes to the constable.

THOMAS WALLIS . On Wednesday, the 1st of February, between one and two o'clock in the night, I saw the prisoner Powell run into Shoe lane, and the prosecutor after her; I turned up Shoe lane; the prosecutor told me had been robbed; Mary Powell was present; he took her to the watch box; she had her gown up as if she was going to put something in her pocket; she was joined by Smith and Brown in Fleet street; he took them all to the watchhouse; when they were in the watchhouse I saw Powell's hand out as if she was going to give Smith something; I took Smith's hand away and put mine, and took a ten pound note and a one pound note out of her hand; the watch-house keeper took it of me.

ALEXANDER ROGERS . I was constable of the night; the three prisoners were brought in the watch-house; I took charge of them and sent them to the Compter; I received these notes of the watchhouse keeper.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am watchhouse keeper; these women were brought into the watchhouse between one and two o'clock in the morning; I received a ten pound and a one pound note of Wallis.

Q. Where is the prosecutor - A. I believe the constable has been to his house several time; he is gone to Portsmouth, I believe.

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-76

250. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , fifty pounds weight of raisins, value 30 s. the property of Joseph West .

JOSEPH WEST . I am a grocer ; I live in Shoreditch, On the 12th of December, my man went out with the cart; he brought home one frail of raisins short.

Q. Have you any partner - A. No.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer. On the 12th of December, near six in the evening, I was coming up Bishopgate street , I saw Mr. West's cart with a hogshead of sugar, and several baskets of raisins in the cart; the cart was coming on gently, I saw the carman looking behind his cart, as if he had lost something; I said nothing to him, I walked a little further; I saw the prisoner and another man with this frail of raisins on his head; as I got up to them the prisoner said Ding it; the man that had them on his head went into the middle of the street and I after him; I took them off his head; I got hold of the raisins in one hand and the man with the other; the prisoner came from off the path into the middle of the road, and struck me a violent blow between my eyes; with that and other assistance, and with my holding the property, the man was rescued from me; I called out stop thief as loud as I could, and my holding the basket of raisins I could not pursue them; they all got away that time.

Q. He said Ding it - what does Ding it mean - A. I suppose seeing of me it was to throw the property away; with the lights of the shop they all saw my face before I got to them; I had a perfect sight of the prisoner and the man before him, but not of the man that had the basket of raisins on his head.

Q. Are you sure this is one of the men - A. I am certain it is; I knew the prisoner.

Q. Are you certain it was him that said Ding it - A. The word Ding it was said by one of the men, but which of them I cannot say; I am sure this is the man that came across and struck me.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a carman; I was going home from Jacob Darwin 's, in Rood lane with a hogshead of sugar and five baskets of raisins; I walked most of the way behind the cart, till I came to the New London tavern; there was a good many coaches standing, I was obliged to go by the side of the horse; I had not been walking by the side of the horse above two minutes before I saw a man walk away from behind the cart with a basket of raisins; I thought it was mine, I directly went behind the cart and found I had lost a basket of raisins; I cried stop thief; Mr. Cartwright had got the man; it was very light; I saw three men in company; I believe one of them struck the officer; they made off towards Threadneedle street.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know whether he is one of them - A. I have not the least knowledge of him.

Q. to West. Look at these raisins, are they yours - A. I really cannot say; the baskets are so much alike, though we have no doubt.

Q. to Phillips. Can you say that basket, that Cartwright stopped, was taken out of your cart - A. I believe it was; the man went away from the cart with that basket, and the same basket Mr. Cartwright stopped the man with directly.

Mr. Alley. Do you mean to swear that that is the basket you lost out of the cart - A. I do not.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of the charge; I never struck Cartwright in my life, nor gave him an angry word, nor never was in company with any body that did.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-77

251. JOHN NASH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , eleven ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. the property of the United Merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH ELLINGTON . Q. You are the king's locker stationed at the East India company's warehouse - A. Yes; and the prisoner was a labourer in one of their warehouses in Fenchurch street .

Q. On the 15th of February what happened - A. I rubbed the prisoner down; just turned two o'clock; I

saw something full in his pantaloons, his pocket stuck but; I asked him what he had got there; he said his pocket book; I said you must pull it out; then he said I will go back with you; we went back into Mr. Bell's office, in the accompting house; I took it out of his pocket, I found it was tea; eleven ounces; he begged hard of the warehouse keeper to forgive him; he had a large family, and it was the first time. It is black tea.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am an assistant elder to this warehouse; there was tea in the warehouse; I heard the prisoner say it was his first offence; he begged forgiveness. The tea is worth about eighteen pence or two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I can tell you in what way I came by this tea, I found it laying about the warehouse; I had not a bit of paper to put it into, I put it in my pocket with full intention of taking it down to the accompting house; we were all very much hurried in our day's work, we did not leave the warehouse till the clock had struck two; it slipped my memory, when this gentleman asked me what I had got in my pocket; I said my pocket book; I did not recollect then; I had my pocket book in my other pocket; I recollected when I asked him to go back. I really forgot that I had the tea in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-78

252. JOHN SPALDING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , two shirts, value 20 s. four handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Scrudmore Bird Davies , esq .

SCRUDMORE BIRD DAVIES , ESQ. The prisoner was my servant ; I live 82, Jermyn street , in lodgings. I have missed several articles previous to my detecting him; the prisoner had lived with me near three months. In consequence of information, on the 7th of February, the officer came to my lodgings; I immediately rung the bell for my servant to come up; he came up; I immediately charged him with having a shirt of mine on him, and a neckcloth; the officer made him undress and the shirt and neckcloth proved to be mine. The officer went up into his room to search his drawers, and there we found a neckcloth and a pair of stockings. Previous to my sending for the officer, in going through Oxford, I found myself reduced so, that I was obliged to go to my brother in Oxford for some things; he lent me six neckcloths; two of which was found in his box.

Q. You never gave the prisoner liberty of wearing them - A. Never.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am parish officer of St. James's. On the 7th of February I was sent for; I went up stairs into the drawing room; the bell was rung and the servant came up; Mr. Davies accused him with having taking taken away his linen; he seemed very much confused and denied it; I searched him; Mr. Davies said he had a shirt of his on his back; he said he had; he had the shirt and handkerchief taken off, they proved to be Mr. Davies's; I searched the prisoner's drawers, I found a handkerchief with the mark, a great part of of it picked out, and one pair of stockings with the mark picked out.

FRANCES DAY . I am a laundress to Mr. Davies. The prisoner brought me these things for his own to wash; I knew them to be Mr. Davies's; a shirt and three handkerchiefs; he had taken the marks out and put his own name to them; I knew them to be his master's; I informed Mr. Davies. I was present when he was searched; the officer found the shirt on his back, and a handkerchief; and a handkerchief in his drawers, and a pair of stockings. The shirt is marked S B D, No. 8; and the handkerchief is marked S B D; the handkerchief found in his drawers there is two letters picked out, and John Spalding wrote with ink at the corner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. One of these shirts I never had, they were sent with my own things to be washed. One shirt of my master's I took the liberty to put on; mine was not clean; I waited upon my master's brother, Mr. Thomas Davies at Bath; he left them things behind him; I have not seen Mr. Thomas Davies since. I did not steal them, they only lay in my room.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-79

253. MICHAEL CONNELLY , RICHARD EVANS , and CHARLES EVANS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Long , about the hour of seven at night, on the 25th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing seven knives, value 5 s. his property .

RICHARD LONG . I live in Holborn, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; I occupy the house.

GEORGE ROWLAND . I am an apprentice to Mr. Richard Long . On the evening of the 25th of January I was sent out a few doors; I stopped about ten minutes; when I came back I saw the three prisoners at the window; I went past and took no notice of them till I had got a few doors beyond; then I came back to the window to see what they had been doing, as they had gone away; I found there was a hole in the window. It was then about half past seven.

Q. What business does your master carry on - A. A cutler.

Q. One of the panes was broken - A. Yes; there was a piece out; it was cracked before; I had observed it about an hour and a half before. It might have been cracked about three weeks, or more.

Q. Was the shop door fastened - A. Only with the latch. I observed one of the panes of glass were broken; I observed that the knives that were in the tray had been pulled about; I did not know then any were taken away; I saw they were standing a few doors lower, and seeing they were lurking about I went after them.

Q. Did you go into the shop before you went after them or not - A. No; I pursued them, they ran away. I catched Michael Connolly in Bloomsbury market; he ran there, stopped all of a sudden, and put his hands in his breeches pocket. He was never out of my sight.

Q. Can you say positively that he was one of the three that you saw at the window - A. Yes. I asked him where the other chaps were that were with him;

he said nobody had been with him; I asked him if he had not been in Holborn; he said no. I brought him home, he was searched; nothing was found on him.

Q. When you first saw him how near was he to the window - A. Standing as close as he could with his face towards the window; the big one was standing in the middle of the two little ones; they were looking up Holborn, one of them, and the other down. I took Charles Evans in Holborn. I asked Connelly where the other boys were; he said in Holborn; I saw the little one looking out for him, as I supposed; I went and took him. Charles escaped; I left him at the door; I thought the watchman would take care of him. The officers took Charles afterwards.

EDWARD CROCKER . I am one of the patrols of Bow street. I was going down Holborn with one of my brother officers, we heard there was a boy in custody at Mr. Long's; he was delivered to us. We asked him where the other two were; he said he did not know, at first; after we had searched him he told us where they lived, in a street, the first turning round Brooks' market, it went into Leather lane, Holborn; and as we were coming out of the door Richard Evans was at the door; I asked him what his name was; he said Evans; he was a lamp lighter , he lived at No. 15, Beauchamp street, Brook's market. After searching him in the public house we went down to the lodgings, up stairs, a little boy opened the door; I asked him if Evans lived there; he said no; Charles Evans was there drinking tea; his mother was ill in bed. On Blackman searching about he found there were five knives in a tumbler on the mantle piece; Blackman called me to look at them; I took two, Blackman took out the other three. We asked Charles Evans where they came from; he said his brother Dick gave them to him to bring home in Holborn; and going up Holborn, he told us Connelly, another boy, was with them; he shewed us the window, and the hole in the pane of glass; they got the knives through by a wire; he said the big boy broke it with a knife. We went to Mr. Long with the knives; he identified them as his property.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I was with Crocker; I found this knife and box of gunpowder on Richard. This knife is ground up for the purpose to star the glaze, as they call it.

Q. Did you find any knives in Beauchamp street - A. Yes; five, in a small tumbler over Charles's head, where he was drinking his tea; he said his brother Dick gave them to him when he was in Holborn, to carry home; we brought him up Holborn; he took us to the window, told us it was Connelly that broke the window with a knife, and drawed the knives out with a wire; he shewed us the very place. When I laid hold of Richard he said he was a lamp lighter; his father lived in Beachamp street, in a front room, two pair of stairs; he was a lamp lighter.

The property produced and identified.

Connelly's Defence. I know no more about the knives than a child unborn.

Richard Evans's Defence. I am quite innocent of it.

Charles Evans 's Defence. The knives were given to me by a boy for fifteen marlows; I came home and put them in a tumbler on the mantle shelf. These gentlemen came and gave me some beer, and told me to say that I took them out of the window, and that if I did I should be forgiven.

Q. Is the boy here that gave you the knives - A. No.

Q. to Crocker. Did either you or Blackman, or any body tell Charles Evans, if he said he took them out of the window he should be forgiven - A. No, nothing at all of the kind.

Q. to Blackman. Was any thing of the kind said to Charles Evans - A. No, no promise of any kind whatever; it was his own voluntary act of telling.

Connelly called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Richard and Charles Evans called one witness, who gave them a good character.

CONNELLY, GUILTY, aged 14.

RICHARD EVANS , GUILTY, aged 14.

CHARLES EVANS , GUILTY, aged 12.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-80

254. MARY CLARK and MARY RAWLINS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of William Brown and William Brown privately in their shop .

WILLIAM BROWN . I live in Ratcliffe highway ; I am a linen draper ; I am in partnership with my cousin, of the same name. I was present when the prisoners came in the shop, on the 3d of February about two o'clock.

Q. Had you any customers in the shop - A. I had two; I was waiting upon them at the same time, but I saw the prisoners.

Q. Who was in the shop of your own people - A. A young man of the name of Bishop, a brother of mine, George Brown , George Pobjoy , and myself. The prisoners came in the shop, they wished to look at some print for an apron; the shopman shewed them some; I and my young people went up to dinner. I left Pobjoy and Bishop in the shop.

GEORGE POBJOY . The prisoners came into the shop, they wished to look at a piece of print for an apron; I shewed them several pieces they, fixed upon one; I cut them an apron off; they were both together; I do not exactly know which of them had the apron; they afterwards wished to look at a piece of print for a gown; they went further up the shop, where there were several goods on the counter, and I shewed them a great many pieces; I got over the counter left the prisoners; I went to get another piece, and while I was getting it out I just looked round; I saw Clark fumbling against the counter; Rawlins was standing between her and me; I put the print down, and after a little conversation I cut them off six yards, for which of them I do not; they both agreed to have it cut off; they wished to pay me a shilling in part of payment, for that and the apron, and to come in about an hour to pay the remaining part; I took the shilling of them, and put the gown and apron up, and they were going; I went up stairs to my master and told him I suspected the prisoners; he said do as you like; I came down; they went out, and I went out and looked after them; they went up a little court, about ten doors from the house, and came put almost

directly; I and a young man of the name of Fisher followed them and told them to came back, that we did not exactly approve of their paying off a shilling on the gown and apron; they seemed rather confused; one of them said what is the matter, I cannot say which of them it was; the other said, never mind, we will go back; I went to the door nearly back again with them, and then went back and got a constable, and brought him to the house, and when I went in Mr. Brown said never mind; he gave me a piece of print into my hand, it was quite warm.

Q. to Brown. The last witness, you gave a piece of print into his hand - A. Yes; the prisoner Mary Clark , I saw her take the piece of print from under her apron, and put it on the counter; this is the piece of print she put on the counter, and this is the piece of print I put in my lad's hand the moment he came back; it is mine, I can swear to it.

Q. to Pobjoy. Was Mary Clark near that place when she was fumbling - A. I cannot say; there were a number of prints on the counter where she stood. I am sensible that Rawlins is not so guilty as the other.

Clark's Defence. I went with Rawlins to the prosecutor's shop to purchase two yards of cotton at a shilling a yard, and six yards of print at two shillings and two pence per yard, for which we left two shillings for a deposit; we were going away, and we asked the shop boy if it was all right; he said stop, I must go up stairs and make the necessary memorandum; the boy returned; we went away, and got half a mile, when the boy came up to us and desired us to come back; the prosecutor stood at the door; the prosecutor charged me with taking a green print from under my apron, he said it was there before I went away; he said upon my return I put it down upon the counter; I deny it positively, I might as I passed touch such a print, but not to my knowledge. I get my living by shoe binding.

Rawlins' Defence. I am young and pregnant; I am a married woman; I was never accused of a criminality before.

Clark called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Rawlins called one witness, who gave her a good character.

CLARK, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

RAWLINS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-81

255. JOHN GREENAWAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Southey , about the hour of twelve at night on the 19th of January , and stealing therein three pair of breeches, value 5 l. 6 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 3 l. 10 s. two yards and a half of kerseymere, value 1 l. 7 s. 6 d. ten pair of braces, value 2 l. 10 s. and ten dozen pair of men's gloves, value 10 l. his property .

SAMUEL SOUTHEY . I am a leather breeches maker and glover , 330, Oxford street, in the parish of St. James' .

Q. Was your house broken open on the 19th of January last - A. On the 20th, about two in the morning, I was awakened by hearing a noise in the shop; I immediately got up and looked out of a two pair of stairs window; the two pair of stairs is very low; upon looking out of the window I saw two men in the street' I called out watch; no watchman came; the prisoner looked up in my face for near five minutes; there was another man, he got out of the window; there was three of them altogether; two of them went towards Swallow street, and the prisoner ran down Argyle street; the two men went down Swallow street with a bag of the things they had taken from the shop; when I saw the three men run off I went down stairs and examined the shop immediately.

Q. How had it been broken open - A. One end shutter was forced down, and the pane of glass was broken; they put their hands in and unpinned one of the front shutters; they then cut a pane of glass out; the pane is very large, large enough to admit the body of a man; the man got into the shop. When I came down stairs I missed all the articles stated in the indictment; the value of them altogether was between twenty four and twenty five pounds.

Q. When had you seen these things in the shop - A. The night before, about ten o'clock, I had seen them all there; I fastened the shop up myself; the shutters were put up and the windows were whole at ten o'clock. I am confident the prisoner is the man that stood at the door; the snow was on the ground, and the lamp at the door being directly over his face, gave sufficient light for me to distinguish his features.

Q. How long might you be looking at him - A. Near five minutes; he was looking up the whole time, I could see his features completely; had I have met the man in the street for this twelvemonth I should be confident of the man; he had a velveteen jacket and small clothes, the same that he has on now.

Q. What kind of a waistcoat had he on - A. I could not tell, his jacket was buttoned.

Q. Had he shoes or boots on - A. I could not see, nor his stockings I could not see what they were; he had the same dress on when I saw him at the office.

JURY. Are we to form an opinion, that while you were looking out of your two pair of stairs window, and was calling out watch, that the man remained five minutes staring up at you - A. He did.

Mr. Alley. Did not he come voluntary to the office, he and a man of the name of Flowers came without being in custody, he had been waiting at the public house - when you come Griffiths went to the public house and brought the man over - A. He did; I said that is the man, in the yard, when I saw him.

Q. You would wish us to believe that the man came in the same dress - give me leave to ask you whether you do not know that there is a reward of forty pounds - A. I have lived long enough in my country to know that there is a reward; I do not do it for the sake of the reward; I have heard there is a reward of twenty pounds for the officers.

Q. Was one article of your property found - A. Not a thing.

Q. How long after you were robbed was it that the prisoner was taken - A. It was seven days after the robbery that he was apprehended.

Q. Did you take up another man - A. Flowers was brought to the office for me to look at.

Q. Was there not any body else taken upon your information - A. There was not; I could not swear to any other; I did not see any of their faces but the prisoner's.

Q. You continue to be positive to the man, and that he continued looking at you for that time - A. I do.

Q. What sort of a hat had he on - A. I do not know.

Q. If a man had a cocked hat an you must know it - A. He had a round hat on.

Q. If a man stood under you, having a round hat on, the flap would of necessity obscure his face - A. No, unless it was bent down it would not.

Q. You, in a two pair of stairs window above him, the light of the lamp between you and him, the light of the lamp must fall upon the flap of his hat, that must shade his face - you said he had a round hat on - A. Yes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of the public office, Whitechapel. I received information from the other end of the town that a shop had been broken open in Oxford street; I sent to a person of the name of Flowers, and desired him to call up to me; he did, at the public house near the office; I told him that there was a complaint against him and a man of the name of Greenaway; I asked him if he would call upon him and bring him to me on the Friday; they did come to the house at time appointed; I said not a word about this; the reason of my desiring them to come was upon my receiving this information. I desired them to wait till two, and if the gentleman did not come by that time, they should go home; they did stay, and just before two Mr. Southey came to the office; Mr. Southey described the person of the prisoner to me, he said he was dressed in a velveteen jacket and breeches; I fetched the men; he looked at the two men, they were both in the same dress partly; he pointed out this man, he said he would swear to him; then I told them to walk into the office, I would put them both to the bar, which I did; an examination took place; he positively sworn to this man before the magistrate; the other was discharged. My brother searched the prisoner's lodging, no part of the property was found.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a lamb - so far from my being in connexion with any one in that robbery, the night after the robbery was done, I was obligated to pawn my bed for two pounds to support my wife that was lying in, and my five children. I am innocent in ever having acted hand or part, or even knowing the part of the town where he was robbed; my circumstances were so low I could not afford any body to look after my wife; I was obligated to make away with my things to support her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-82

256. JOHN SELLICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , two pair of stockings, value 4 s. and three pair of sandals, value 2 s. the property of Zachariah Book , privately in his shop .

ZACHARIAH BOOK . Q. Where is your shop - A. 253, High Holborn, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields ; I am a hosier and glover . On the 7th of February, the evening before the fast, I lost five pair of stockings and four pair of sandals, they were hanging inside of the door post; I know nothing of the taking of them, I only know that I missed them; this was on the Tuesday; on the Thursday, when I went to the office, I saw two pair of the stockings and three pair of the sandals. I had seen them three quarters of an hour before they were taken.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On Tuesday the 7th of February, about seven in the evening, I was in company with Ekelsoe and Deer in Holborn, at the corner of Kingsgate street; I had just before heard a whistle; I looked, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner of Kingsgate street, I knew him, I asked him what he was at there; I think he replied nothing. I laid hold of his hand, and desired my brother officer to lay hold of the other; I asked him what he had got, he said only some stockings. I took him into a liquor shop, and found these things in his bosom; I have had them in my custody ever since; he told me he found them things in Holborn, he picked them up. It was a dirty night, and the stockings were not muddy, they had no appearance of having been dropped in the dirt.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Book's - A. Two or three hundred yards or more; Mr. Book is the corner of Dean street, and this is the corner of Kingsgate street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work; I went down to the Cross Keys, I got some work to do. I was coming home on Tuesday night along Holborn, I picked up these stockings; I saw three men running before me; I cannot say whether they dropped them or not; I was at the corner of Kingsgate street, I was going to the public house to get a pint of beer.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the value two shillings and sixpence only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-83

257. JAMES CARTER and THOMAS CARTER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , a cloak, value 7 s. the property of Robert Squire , privately in his shop .

ROBERT SQUIRE . I sell linen drapery , Field place, Battle bridge . On the 27th of January last, about half past five, the two prisoners came into my shop, they asked to look at a pair of stockings, which I shewed them; the young one, James, said they would not do; asked to look at others, which I shewed him; he put his hand in the window, and took out two pair of little children's; I took them from him. I told him I never permitted any body's hand but my own in the window. He then asked to look at others, which I shewed him.

Q. Did you know them before this time - A. I never saw them before. The man, Thomas Carter , was standing near the door, just within the shop; Thomas went away; and James, after looking at another pair or two, went away, saying they would not do; neither of them bought any thing. In a quarter of an hour I saw them pass the window, with a number of other people, and on my going to see what was the matter, I saw a scarlet cloak, my property, in the hands of a neighbour, Mr. Bignall; on which I went and seized both the prisoners.

Q. How soon had you seen the cloak before the prisoners came in - A. Perhaps two or three hours before that I had noticed particularly the cloak. Thomas Carter struck at me. Mr. Bignall searched him; I took the younger.

RICHARD BIGNALL . I live about an hundred yards from the prosecutor, I am a coal dealer. On the 27th

of January, about half past five, I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner Thomas Carter pull a scarlet cloak from under his coat and look at it, or a pelisse, something similar to that; I saw him speak to a woman, as though he offered it for sale, at the corner of Charles street, nearly opposite where I live; I went over the road, I asked him what he had got; he replied what is that to you; I caught him by the collar, he made some little resistance; I asked him the second time what he had got under his coat; he denied it; I insisted upon knowing; I suspected he had stolen it from a neighbour, a pawnbroker; he made resistance; I throwed him down and took it from him by force; I told him he would go back with me if he came honestly by it. Passing by Mr. Squire's door Mr. Squire came out and owned the cloak which I had in my possession. At Mr. Squire's door the young one ran in between us, and asked me what I wanted with his brother. The oldest said he had bought it of a dustman and gave four shillings for it. James said he bought it of Mr. Squire and gave three shillings for it. The cloak has been in my possession ever since.

The property produced and identified.

James Carter 's Defence. The East London militia came up from Greenwich; my brother was drinking about with the soldiers; I went into this shop, I looked at two or three pair of stockings; my brother was gone off; I lost him; I went to look for him.

Thomas Carter 's Defence. I had the cloak under my arm, I never had it under my coat.

JAMES CARTER , GUILTY, aged 13.

THOMAS CARTER , GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-84

258. RICHARD WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , two sacks, value 8 s. the property of James Kidd .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN PETERS . I am waggoner to Mr. Kidd, he resides at New Brentford . On the the 28th of January I had been to Hammersmith with my master's waggon, I brought some empty sacks; I had eleven quarters seven bushels of wheat put in them, and two bundles of empty sacks at the top, and two bran sacks stuffed in behind; one sack was marked with my master's name, and the other with Mr. Griffith's name, he lives at Walham green; he delivered me that empty sack to put bran in, and to be sent back to him.

Q. What time of the day did you arrive at the Three Pigeons - A. About five o'clock. I took the waggon under the gateway, shut the gates up and left it there; when I put the waggon in I took out my coat, and then I saw the two sacks at the tail of the waggon; I missed these two sacks on Monday morning, the 30th of January. I have since seen them in the possession of Mr. Collit, the constable; I am sure they are the two sacks I left in my waggon at the Pigeons inn.

RICHARD BELL . I am a carrier from the Angel at Brentford. On Sunday the 29th of January, in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, he asked me if I would buy a sack of wheat; I told him no. He went down my yard; I followed him. I saw two sacks with wheat in them, in one cart, and another sack in another cart; he asked me leave to let him leave them in my stable till the evening, he would fetch them away; I gave him permission to put them there. He went away and I locked the stable up and kept the key myself; the next morning I was summoned on a jury at Westminster hall, I was obliged to be up early; I saw the two sacks that were marked with Mr. Kidd's name, and one in the name of Griffin. I gave Mr. Kidd information. I left the sacks in the stable and locked the stable door. He was to be with me on Monday evening, but I was not at home till after ten o'clock at night, then I understood he was apprehended. I delivered the three sacks to Mr. Collit the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to sell the sacks; I was to have five shillings for selling them.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-85

259. JAMES GLEEK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , two printed copies of Henry Cartwright in sheets, value 7 s. a volume of Goldsmith's History of England, value 1 s. a volume of poems, value 1 s. a volume of the Farmer's Boy, a poem, value 1 s. 6 d. a volume of Telemachus, value 2 s. two printed copies of Salmon on Fares in sheets, value 3 s. a printed copy of Cotton's Visions, in sheets, value 2 s. two printed volumes of Philip the Third, History of Spain, value 10 s. a printed copy of the Officer's Widow, in sheets, value 1 s. two printed copies of the Old English Baron in sheets, value 1 s. two printed copies of Gambado's Horsemanship in sheets, value 10 s. two printed copies of Gulliver's Travels, value 3 s. a printed volume of Domestic Cookery, value 3 s. a printed volume of the Elements of Natural Philosophy, value 1 s. a quire of paper in sheets, value 1 s. and an alphabet of types, value 1 s. the property of William Wilson , in his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT for stealing two hundred and sixty five sheets of paper, value 3 l. and an alphabet of printer's types, value 1 s. the property of William Wilson , in his dwelling house.

WILLIAM WILSON . I live in St. John square, in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell ; I am a printer .

Q. Did you lose any books in January last in sheets - A. I have been losing them this twelvemonth. I only know by the witnesses.

HENRY JONES . Q. What do you know about this transaction - A. I saw the prisoner take the second volume of Philip, History of Spain; I cannot say whether it was before Christmas or after. I was in the warehouse gathering books; the prisoner was an apprentice to Mr. Wilson.

Q. Did he take any thing else on that day - A. No; he took the whole of that volume, he said they were allowed him.

Q. What are you - A. I am a warehouse boy. I saw him take Cotton's Visions; that was on another day before he took the other. I saw him take them; he put some in his bosom and some in his breeches.

Q. Did any body else know that he had took them - A. Yes; John Knight saw him.

Q. How came you not to tell - A. He said we might tell master if we liked, but we must not tell the warehouseman, because he would make a bother about it.

THOMAS KNIGHT . Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners taking the second volume of Philips's history of Spain - A. I cannot say rightly, when it was.

Q. Who know of it besides you - A. Henry Jones , and Edward Brown ; they were in the warehouse at the same time; it was about a month before he was taken up.

Q. Did he take one volume the same day - A. Yes; all at one time; he put some under his coat, and some under his breeches.

Q. Did you tell any body of it - A. No, he told us he was allowed them; he took Cotton's Visions before; I cannot recollect how long before.

Q. Did he take the whole book at the same time-A. Yes, he did; he took it in the same manner as the other.

Mr. Gleed. Did he tell you also that you might tell your master what he had done - A. Yes, but we must not tell the warehousemen, because he would make a bother; he doubled them and put half a dozen sheets in his waistcoat, and half a dozen in his breeches; I went round the table where this pile stood, I examined them; Philip the Third, King of Spain, I know that he took the whole book.

JAMES HANCOCK . I went in company with my brother officer, Ekelsoe, to the prisoner's lodgings, and I found these books in his mother's apartments, No. 7, Great Sutton street.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of one volume of Cotton's visions - A. The prime cost is more than a shilling; two volumes of Philips, history of Spain, sells for a guinea.

Q. In your bargain with the prisoner, did you allow him to have any copies of the books - A. No, nor no person is allowed any such thing; that is not the custom of the trade.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-86

260. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Patterson , about the hour of seven at night, on the 12th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a great coat, value 5 l. the property of James Patterson .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of Thomas Hemmings .

THOMAS HEMMINGS . Q. I believe you are a coachman at Mr. Patterson's stables in Chapel mews in Marylebone parish - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any room over the stable - A. Yes, where I slept.

Q. Has it any communication to the house - A. The stable has not; it joins to the house, but the door is nailed up.

COURT. That will do.

Q. On January the 12th were you there - A. At half past four I unlocked the stable; I was then in the stable ten minutes.

Q. Was any body in the stable then - A. No; then I locked it up, and came again about a quarter before seven.

Q. Was it dark or light when you left the stable - A. Just getting dusk.

Q. Was it light enough to distinguish one man's face from another - A. Oh, yes.

COURT. Then there is an end of the burglary.

Q. When you came back at seven o'clock, how did you find the door - A. When I came back the prisoner at the bar was at the door; I asked him what business he had there; he replied, it is my premises; he drew a pistol from his left breast and cocked it in my face; he held his right hand out in this manner, as much as to defy me from touching him; he said to me, you b - stand clear; he ran away.

Q. You followed him, did not you - A. Yes; he ran along Chapel street, Portland chapel, up Edward street into Foley place.

Q. Did any thing happen while you pursue I him - A. No.

Q. Did you overtake him - A. Yes; before I took him I came up close to him twice, first, he said you b - , I will give it you; he snapped the pistol in my face, at which I saw the fire very plain; he proceeded on again about fifteen yards, to the corner of Duke street, till Anthony Gower stopped him. I cried out stop thief all the way.

Q. Gower and you ran and secured him - A. I helped, and secured him of course, and staid by him till he went to the watchhouse.

Q. Where did you see your great coat last - A. About half past three I saw the coat before I went out; I left it upon a box between the carriage; it is a box that I keep things in, and I saw it when I came back, about twenty minutes after seven.

Q. How long had you been from the stable, from the time you first saw the prisoner, and the time you saw the coat - A. About half an hour; I found the great coat in the place where I had put it; here is a witness will tell about that.

Q. When did you see the prisoner the first time - A. About a quarter before seven, in my stable. When I went to the door he opened the door and came out of the stable; I asked him what business he had there, he told me it was his premises.

WILLIAM GOODFELLOW . I heard the coachman cry stop thief, up the yard; I immediately ran down, and almost met the prisoner; the coachman was close after him, running; in the mean time I ran after the coachman; between the watchbox and the pump in Chapel street he threw that crow down; I immediately went and picked it up; I went immediately to a person that was standing back, took the lanthorn out of his hand, and found it.

Q. Did you go to the stable that evening - A. When the man was taken, the boy and I went to the stable, the boy pushed the stable door, the great coat laid against the stable door; he was afraid somebody was there; I went in and there was the great coat, it laid close to the door.

Q. How far was that place from the box in the stable - A. I cannot rightly say.

VALENTINE HOWELL . Q. Did you search the prisoner on the evening of the 12th of January - A. I did; I found eleven picklock keys and a bottle of phosphorus; them two keys opened the stable door as well

as though it was made for it; these are phosphorus matches.

Q. to Hemmings. How long had you the great coat - A. About four months; it cost me seven guineas and a half.

Prisoner's Defence. This is my first offence; I have not a friend in the world to come to speak for me, they are all in my country.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-87

261. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for that he on the 12th of January , feloniously, wickedly, and unlawfully did present a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, at Thomas Hemmings , a subject of our lord the King, and did then and there attempt by drawing the trigger of the said pistol so loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, to discharge the same against the person of him the said Thomas Hemmings .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded -

GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-88

262. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for that he on the 12th of January , feloniously, wickedly, and unlawfully did present a certain pistol, which was then and there loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, at William Gower , a subject of our lord the King, and that he then and there did attempt by drawing the trigger of the said pistol so loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, to discharge the same against the person of him the said William Gower .

To this indictment the prisoner also pleaded -

GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-89

263. SUSANNAH PURCELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Terry , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon on the 15th of February , Joseph Glover and others in the dwelling house then being, and stealing there in, a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 3 s. the property of Frances Norton , spinster .

FRANCES NORTON . I live in Crown Court, Rosemary lane, in the parish of Whitechapel .

Q. Do you rent a room there - A. A young woman of the name of Mary Staines rented it with me, we rent it of Thomas Terry , he lives in the same house; I work at Mr. Scott and Quinton's glass manufactory in East Smithfield; I went out of my room at seven o'clock in the morning, I did not return till six at night, I left no one in the room; when I went out I locked the door and took the key with me; I returned at six in the evening, I found the door open, it appeared to have been bursted open; the hasp is loosened and part of it off.

Q. When you went up in the room, did you miss any thing - A. Not till the next morning; my landlady desired me to look over the things; I then searched the box, I missed a shawl and a handkerchief, I had seen them on that day, before this young lass broke the door open. The prisoner nursed a child in the house while the mother went to work. Mrs. Terry's sister, the prisoner, was in the house after I came home at night; at ten o'clock in the forenoon of the next day I came home; I spoke myself to the prisoner about it, and then Mrs. Terry spoke; I asked her how she came to break the door open; she strongly denied it, she said she would tell my landlady, the landlady would not tell her father, he would beat her. I do not know what further passed; they went out of the room.

Q. What are these things worth - A. Between four and five shillings.

Q. What age is the girl - A. Between fourteen and fifteen.

JOHN MANTON . I am apprenticed to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, Cable street, Whitechapel. To the best of my knowledge, the prisoner is the person that pawned the shawl and handkerchief; I cannot swear that she is the girl.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody; she told me she fell against the door and burst it open; she opened the box, and took the shawl and the handkerchief out.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. She told me if I would tell her the truth she would not hurt me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090215-90

264. JOHN KING , GEORGE CARRINGTON , and RICHARD LLOYD , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a brass candlestick, value 3 s. the property of John Membray .

JOHN MEMBRAY . I keep a public house in Percival street, Clerkenwell . I know nothing of it myself.

WILLIAM MEMBRAY . Q. Were you at home on the 25th of January last - A. Yes.

Q. Were the three prisoners at your house - A. Yes; I am positive they are the same; they had a glass of gin each; John King took a candlestick off the counter in the bar; it had a candle in it, but not lit; he put it under his coat. I saw him take it.

Q. Did you see him take it openly - A. Yes.

Q. Did he know that you saw him take it - A. No. I was in the tap room, my mother was in the bar.

Q. Do you mean that he took it openly or privately - A. I think he meaned privately. When I saw King take it, I went up to him and took it from under his coat; then Lloyd said he was going to take it into the taproom, and then the three prisoners went out. I did not try to stop them. I was afraid; there was no person in the taproom.

Q. Were they afterwards taken - A. Yes; I saw King taken by Mr. Cook, a baker; he was taken to Hatton Garden office.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a baker. I was going along the street, I saw two of the prisoners quarelling together; I saw all three of them. William Membray said one of the young men had stolen a candlestick at his house. I apprehended King directly; the others ran away.

JAMES HANCOCK . In consequence of the information I received from Carrington, I apprehended Lloyd at the end of Chick lane.

The property produced and identified.

King's Defence. We went into the house to have something to drink; we happened to have a glass of gin first; I had some bread and cheese in my hand. One of them said we must go in the tap room and have some beer; I took up the candlestick, and the young man said the candlestick does not belong to you; one of them said we are going to take it into the tap room.

Carrington's Defence. We agreed to go into the tap room; King tood the candlestick and put it under his arm; he was going to drink his glass of gin; he had bread and cheese in the other hand; we all went out of the house together; we were three hundred yards out of the house before we were taken.

Lloyd said nothing in his defence.

King called two witness, who gave him a good character.

Carington called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Lloyd called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090215-91

265. JOHN SAMUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a sheet, value 2 s. and a blanket, value 2 s. the property of James Mac Corman in a lodging room .

MARY MAC CORMAN . I live in Chequer alley, St. Luke's ; my husband's name is James Mac Corman . This day three weeks, the prisoner lodged with me one night, he was to pay threepence for the night; when he was gone the next morning, the 1st of February, I went up and examined the bed; I missed the blanket and a sheet; I found the prisoner at a public house in Golden lane.

JOHN PRINCE . I am an officer of the parish of St. Luke; I apprehended Samuel at the Angel and Porter, for robbing of his lodgings; I searched the prisoner; he said he would shew me where he had sold them; he took me to the place, and the woman produced the things.

MARY LEVY . I keep a shop for wearing apparel in White cross street; the prisoner brought these things to me; I gave him four shillings for them.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-92

266. JOHN AVERY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , a pair of breeches, value 8 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. and a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Abraham Lyon Moses , and Abraham Levy .

LEWIS LEVY . I am clerk to Abraham Lyon Moses and Abraham Levy , slop sellers , No. 21, Nightingal lane . On Saturday the 21st of January, having suspicion of the prisoner, I went to the house of Mr. Moses over the way; the servant of Mr. Levy came and said the prisoner must go to the London docks, in order that I might examine a bundle he had.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. He was a porter at our house; the prisoner went into the kitchen and took a bundle, which he said he was going to take to the washerwoman; I told him to leave it and go to the docks; he took it up stairs and locked it in his chest, and went cut; some time after he returned the officer came and searched his chest. He found in his bundle a pair of corded breeches, two waistcoats and a shirt.

Q. Was the box locked - A. Yes.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am officer of Lambeth street. On Saturday the 31st of January, I searched the prisoner's box; I found a pair of breeches and two waistcoats tied up in a bundle; the shirt was loose in his box; the box was locked; I took the key from the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, the crime alledged to my charge is the first that ever was imputed to me; I cannot account how the property in question came into my bundle; I should be sorry to lay an imputation upon any one person in particular. I had it in my power to defraud my masters to a considerable amount; on the evening I was taken in custody the woman servant asked me to go for some milk; I said I would oblige her, as there was no one else in the house; I put the bundle on the table and went out of the house, I could not get any; the woman said she would go; she went out and brought in one of the clerks; she had egress to every part of the house, the same as me; she and I were never in the habits of friendship; I hope my master will give me the character I deserve, and the honourable court and jury will pity my case; my fellow servant afterwards told me that she or me should leave our situation. It was certainly put into my bundle unknown to me.

Miller. He said when I took him it was the first time, he hoped his masters would be as partial to him as they could.

JURY. Was the servant and him at variance - A. No, they were very intimate.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-93

267. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , four pounds weight of beef, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Reuben Deer .

SARAH GREGORY . I live with Mr. Reuben Deer , he is a butcher in Drury lane, and 175 High Holborn; this theft was committed at 175, High Holborn . On Monday the 13th of February, about half after eleven, as near as I can guess, coming past our shop door in Holborn, I saw a woman go into the shop, and take this piece of beef off the shop board; I waited till she came out; I then asked her what she had got there; she said what was that to me; I insisted upon seeing, I pulled her coat from her left side; the little boy came out and saw me take it from her, and while I held her she struck me; I let her loose, I did not like to be hurt; she attempted to strike the little boy, and escaped; I saw her taken again in about half an hour.

Q. Are you sure it is the same woman - A. Yes, I will take my oath of it.

JOHN KIMBLE . This woman looked out some bits of meat in the shop; I was serving a customer; I saw Mrs. Gregory take it from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy a bit of beef; I saw a bit of beef laying in the window; before I had power to do any thing, she asked me was I going to steal the beef; the woman struck at me; I throwed the bit of beef down and a shilling or two, I do not know which; I had half a crown in my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-94

268. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 13th of February , six yards of calico, value 5 s. the property of Charles Clark , Thomas Boyd and Thomas French .

JOHN ABBOT . I am shopman to Charles Clark , Thomas Boyd , and Thomas French . On Monday the 13th of this month I was standing behind the counter serving the customers, I observed the prisoner standing in the door way, she came pretty near to the customer I was serving; I saw her draw this calico from under some goods and put it under her coat; she then went out of the door; I told the next witness; he brought her back, and I saw the piece of calico lay at her feet; I did not observe it drop. It was not on the ground when she went out.

JOHN BLUNDELL . The last witness informed me that the prisoner had taken some calico off the counter, I stopped out and brought her back; I took her three yards in the shop and stood behind her, I recollect feeling something catch my legs; I conceived it to be her petticoats; a gentleman present saw the calico drop from her; he said there is the calico under her coats; I turned round and saw the calico that must have touched my legs: I recollected the calico; I saw it an hour before; this is it. I am sure it is my master's property.

JAMES ROGERS . I saw that calico drop from under her petticoats.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the calico. The constable searched me and got nothing else but one shilling and sixpence, a thimble, and a key.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-95

269. JOSEPH BROOME was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , a box, value 1 s. twenty five pieces of worked muslin, value 100 l. and a piece of worsted net, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Birkett Jackson , and Thomas Lewes .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

EDWARD PROCTER . Q. You are the proprietor of the Bell Savage, Ludgate hill - A. I am.

Q. Does the Southampton coach put up at your inn - A. It does.

Q. What day of the month was it you missed the box - A. On the 14th of January; there was a box directed to Messrs. Lewes, Jackson and co. St. Paul's church yard, was missing; in consequence of that I went with the coachman and Francis Cousins to a house in Drury lane; it is a corner house. I planted one at at each door and went up to the two pair front room door; I heard a noise as if a box was breaking open; I went up quietly and come down again; I sent for an officer of Bow street; Sayer and Atkins came; I remained at one door and the coachman at the other. When the officers arrived we went up stairs together to the same door and pushed the door open, we went in and saw the prisoner in the act of having some goods out of the box; we saw the box had been broken open, and a poker laying by the side of the box; some of the goods laying on the table, I think; I am positive there were some on the carpet, and some was remaining in the box; there were twenty five pieces of worked muslin, and one piece, I believe it is called worsted net. The prisoner, when he saw me, wrung his hands and begged me to forgive him, he said he would never do so any more; I told him he must take his chance. We then took the prisoner to Bow street. He had lived porter with me about a fortnight before.

Q. How long had he lived with you - A. About three or four weeks; just about the busy time of Christmas; perhaps a month; I cannot say to a day or two.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a porter at the Bell Savage, Ludgate hill.

Q. On the 14th of January do you remember seeing the prisoner come there - A. Yes; I was taking the baggage from the coachman who was at the top of the coach; I left some of them unloaded from the coach in the yard while I was taking the packages to the warehouse. It being dark I could not see the directions, only the size of the box.

Q. Did you see a box afterwards at the prisoner's lodgings, or at Bow street - A. I did. By the size of the box I believe it to be the same that I took from the coach that night. When I returned for the two other boxes the prisoner was standing by, I asked him to lift up one box, he did so, and he said he would bring the other to the warehouse; I missed him and the other box both together.

FRANCIS COUSINS . I am a porter at the Bell Savage. On the 14th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner there; he had a pint of rum; I saw the prisoner go out of the yard, he came in the yard again just after the Southampton coach arrived; in about twenty minutes after I saw him coming out of the yard with a box on his shoulder; he let it fall; he ran across the road and went down Dolphin yard. I saw the box again at Bow street; I believe it was the same box by the size.

JOSEPH BIRKETT JACKSON . My partner's name is Thomas Lewes , we call ourselves warehousemen , we live in St. Paul's church yard.

Q. Were Messrs. Lock, Gibson, and co. of Southamptont, customers to you - A. Yes; very old and regular customers to us.

Q. Did you ever send them more goods than they wanted in order to be returned by the mail - A. We have done it frequently, probably once a month; what they did not chuse they returned back. I can produce the entry of the goods that were sent.

COURT. Produce the box, there is no occasion for the entry.

- SAYERS. I believe this is the box that I found at the prisoner's lodgings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it. I went up to my lodgings to get some money of a woman that belonged to me, I saw the box there; I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-96

270. DARBY CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a silver watch, value 10 s. the property of William Rogers .

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am a biscuit baker , I live at No. 7, White Hart court, Castle street, Leicester Fields .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. Last Monday

week, about four o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by some person in the room; the prisoner laid in that room; he was not at home when I went to bed. About four o'clock I was awoke by some person at my bedside; I called to know what it was; the person answered so low I could not tell who he was; I put my hand over the bed side and felt the prisoner, and I felt for my watch in my hat; I found it was gone. I put my hat under the bed, and my watch in my hat; I called to the prisoner again, he said he was looking for something of his own; I told him there was nothing about my bed that belonged to him. I got up, and found my clothes in different directions to where I had left them. The prisoner asked me if I was going to get up; he said it was too early for me at present; I told him I knew my business, I must go and call my master up. I got up, called my master up, and gave charge of the prisoner; the watchman secured him; by that time my master was up; he came out with a light. I saw the prisoner's hand move; the watch was picked up by my master about two or three yards off, in the direction that the prisoner's hand moved.

Mr. Alley. How many lodged in that room - A. Four; my bedfellow was not at home.

Q. You and the prisoner had been very good friends - A. No.

Q. You were not friends, you were very great enemies - A. No.

Q. Who went out of the house first, you or the prisoner - A. I went out first, and the prisoner closely followed me.

Q. You never complained to the prisoner of his taking your watch - A. I did not, I was afraid of the prisoner; I knew there was another man in the room besides. I never had any quarrel with the prisoner.

ISAAC WARNER . At four o'clock on Monday morning I was alarmed by a knock at my door, I thought it was the man come to his work; there came a second knock. I went out undressed. The moment I opened my door, my man exclaimed the prisoner had robbed him; I asked him of what, he said his watch, and he was afraid of some money, but he was not certain, as he found his clothes misplaced. I told my man and the watchman to see that he did not throw any thing away. The moment I spoke the word, I saw the prisoner's hand go back, as if he threw something away; I told the watchman that he had thrown something away. I got a candle and looked for what he had thrown away, in that direction; I picked up a watch four yards from him; then I went with the watchman to the watchhouse and left him there.

Mr. Alley. I suppose the glass of the watch was broke - A. No, it was not, it was bruised.

JOHN - . I am a watchman. Soon after four the prosecutor came to me in a very great hurry, with his clothes half on; he said a man had robbed him, he said this is the man, he has got my watch; I laid hold of the prisoner with my left hand, he gave a struggle to disengage my hand; he immediately up with his fist; I gave him to understand that if he did not deliver himself to me I would knock him down. We got him nigh to Mr. Warner's door, Mr. Warner opened the door; the prosecutor told him the man had robbed him of his watch; he said take care of him that he does not throw any thing away; instantly he threw his left hand back and let the watch fall in the street. Mr. Warner said he has thrown it away now, watchman. Mr. Warner brought a candle, looked in the direction he saw the hand go, and found the watch three or four yards behind him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had met some friends, they kept me late; I came home about four o'clock in the morning, I could get no light; I began to tussle about the room; this man began to abuse me, he got up, I asked him where he was going, he said to get a light; I said do not get a light, I can find out my bed; I followed him down, he said he would be up to me some how or other.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Imprisoned Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-97

271. JOHN DOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January a truck wheel, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Acocks .

THOMAS ACOCKS . I am a plaisterer and bricklayer , the prisoner worked with a smith , a neighbour of mine. I lost my truck before my door on the 26th of January. About seven o'clock in the evening I found a wheel of it at St. Giles' watchhouse; that is all I know.

TIMOTHY LAKE . I am a watchman. I was calling the hour of nine o'clock on the 26th of January; at the bottom of Dyot street I saw the prisoner and another man, the other man was trundling a wheel in the foot way; I asked the man where he had the wheel from; he said it was his own, and if you have any suspicion you may come and see; with that he trundled the wheel along the channel. I told the other watchman to go along with him and see whether all was right; the prisoner's mother has been to me at the watch-house, and asked me if I would take a bribe, and make a flaw in the indictment. I am sure the prisoner is one of them.

MATTHEW LEE . I am the other watchman. This watchman bid me go along with him; I went along with him to Bowl yard, St. Giles's. The prisoner took the wheel; then the other man ran away; the prisoner came to Nottingham court, he put the wheel against the side of a house; he said the other man bid him bring the wheel there, that was his house; I said you must come along to the watchhouse; he said he would not; he threw the wheel away, and then he ran away.

Mr. Smith. The other man ran away, the prisoner called after him - A. Yes; the prisoner was drunk.

Q. He did not attempt to run away till the mob told him - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going home I met Cheeseman; he asked me to trundle the wheel; I called after him when he ran away. When I put the wheel down the watchman said he would put me in the watchhouse; I said I would not go. I staid there some time, and then I ran away.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-98

272. JAMES HOUSE was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 22nd of January , twenty five pounds weight of iron, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Taylor .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a bargeman ; I lost some iron at Chelsea on the 22nd of January.

Q. Where was it - A. In my barge.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner - A. I suspected him, and I had a search warrant.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A fisherman at Chelsea.

Q. Where did you go with the search warrant - A. To the prisoner's house, there I found this iron.

Q. Are you sure it is your iron - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You are the rummest fellow I ever saw - you say you lost some iron out of your barge - A. No; out of another man's barge; I put it there for safety.

Q. You do not mean to swear positively that that is your iron - give me yes or no - A. To the best of my belief.

Q. Say yes or no - A. I do not want to transport the man; I have no doubt of it being mine.

Q. You found it in the prisoner's cellar; the cellar was open, you had an opportunity of going into it, you found it among lumber in the cellar - A. No, the cellar was empty.

WILLIAM PECK . Q. What do you know about this iron - A. I had a search warrant. I found this iron in the prisoner's cellar, he was at breakfast; I told him I had a search warrant. The prosecutor said it was his property; I brought it away.

Mr. Alley. The cellar was open and there were lodgers in the house - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-99

273. MORGAN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a pewter gallon pot, value 4 s. the property of John Steward .

JOHN STEWARD . I am a publican , I keep the Cooper's Arms, Lower East Smithfield . On Saturday the 11th of February, about four o'clock, the prisoner came in the house with some more coal porters; Joseph Gallaway asked me if I would trust him with a gallon of beer; I did, and they had the second gallon of beer; they drank it all out. At half past five Gallaway came out, seemed vexed, and said somebody had taken the pot; he would go and search for it.

Q. You found the pot in the evening - A. Yes; it was brought by a person where he had offered to sell it.

Mr. Knapp. You were stupid, and the prisoner and his companions were all drunk - A. The prisoner was a little forward in liquor.

Q. Do you think that he meaned to steal it - A. I think he meaned to steal it, or else he would not have offered to sell it.

JACOB COHEN . I am a slop seller in Rosemary lane. On the 11th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came very much intoxicated to our shop with a gallon pot in his hand, I was serving some customers with cotton shirts, he did not offer to sell it; I took the pot off the counter, I asked him where he got this pot; after some hesitation he said he picked it up in the street; I saw it belonged to the Cooper's Arms, Lower East Smithfield; I sent the boy down to Mr. Steward.

Mr. Knapp. Do you think he knew what he was about - A. I do not think he did.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-100

274. JAMES PUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , seven pounds weight of parchment, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Francis Phillips ,

FRANCIS PHILLIPS . I am a stationer , 62, King street, Bloomsbury ; I lost the goods that are here; I do not think that I can possibly swear to them; I do not think it necessary to give the court any farther trouble.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-101

275. THOMAS RUMBALL and GEORGE CRICK were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of William Cox .

WILLIAM COX . I am a smith ; I lodge at No. 1, Basket alley, Golden lane .

Q. What are the prisoners - A. Two soldiers belonging to the West London militia . I lost the articles on Tuesday night when I came home to my lodgings; and when Thomas Rumball came home that night he was challenged with it by the landlady; he denied it; he said he would not be guilty of any such thing; then she challenged George Crick ; they were both taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Have you ever found your things - A. Yes; at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES SPICER . I am a parish officer of St. Luke. On the 17th of last month, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoners; as I was taking them to Bunhill row Crick said he could draw a light as to the stockings; I locked them up for an hour and a half; I went back to them, Crick said to Rumball if you know any thing of the other things I will thank you to acknowledge to this man; Rumball told me I might find the breeches at Mr. Birkett's in St. John street, the duplicate was between his bed and the sacking; I went back, and my brother officer picked it up and gave it to me. He said he had sold the waistcoat in Rosemary lane for half a crown.

THOMAS NEWTON . I am servant to Mr. Birkett, pawnbroker, 167, St. John street. Rumball pawned these breeches with me on the 17th of January for four shillings.

MR. WEST. I am a pawnbroker, 19, Tabernacle walk. I took in these stockings of Crick on the 17th of January, I advanced a shilling on them.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

RUMBALL, GUILTY , aged 18.

CRICK, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-102

276. ANN SELMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , a silver table spoon, value 10 s. three silver desert spoons, value 14 s. and two

silver tea spoons, value 4 s. the property of Moses Franco .

MOSES FRANCO . I live in Spital square .

Q. What is this girl - A. She is the daughter of my washerwoman - previous to the 18th of January, for about two months, we had missed at divers times eight silver table spoons. This girl came backward and forward; the servants suspected her. I know no further than she said.

JANE DELANY . I am servant to the prosecutor. About the middle of December we lost three spoons, and so on till the beginning of January. I was determined to find out who was the thief; there were no strangers came backwards and forwards to the house. I put two spoons out, one on the table and the other on the dresser; I cannot exactly tell the day of the month; it was in January. I went up stairs, and when I came down in the kitchen I missed the spoon off the table; the prisoner left in the kitchen. I went up stairs and acquainted my mistress of it. My fellow servant came down and asked if we knew any thing of that spoon; the girl was then in the other kitchen. My fellow servant asked me to turn my pockets out, and then asked the prisoner; she turned one pocket out, it contained nothing but a pair of gloves; she said she had no other pocket; my fellow servant put her hand to her side, felt she had a pocket, and desired her to turn out what she had; she had no spoon in her pocket, she had put the spoon up between her frock and her stays; my fellow servant took it from her person. We then acquainted our master with it. The prisoner then said she took it up by mistake, and asked did we mean to say that she had stole it; we asked her what she did with the others; she with a great deal of persuasion acknowledged that she had pawned them.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, 172 Shoreditch. On the 11th of January I took in a desert spoon for five shillings and sixpence, and a tea spoon for two shillings and sixpence, of this girl.

WILLIAM LEVY . I am servant to Thomas Smith . These are the articles that I took in of the prisoner.

Q. Here are silver spoons pawned in November and December, and here is a crest on one of the spoons - you took in all these yourself - A. Yes.

Q. On the 18th one is pawned - on the 19th another - on the 10th a desert spoon, and on the 26th another - day after day here is articles pledged by this girl in the name of West, Long Alley - where is the spoon that was found upon the prisoner in the house - A. (Vickrey) That spoon was mixed with the others; that is not in the indictment, only the spoons that were in pawn.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never will do any such thing again.

GUILTY, aged 12.

The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy, and were of opinion the pawnbroker was highly reprehensible for taking them in with so much facility of such a girl .

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-103

277. SUSANNAH HARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , a gown, value 16 s. two petticoats, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a habit shirt, value 2 s. and a shift, value 3 s. the property of Frances Nightingal , spinster .

SECOND COUNT for stealing the same goods, the property of John Jones .

FRANCES NIGHTINGAL . I am a single woman, I am a servant .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know. I lost the things on Wednesday last; I lodged at No. 65, West street; I sent them by my landlady's little girl to the washerwoman; she had been out about a quarter of an hour, and several people came home with her and said that she had lost the clothes.

Q. How they were taken you do not know - A. No.

ELIZA JONES . Q. How old are you - A. Seven. My father is a porter.

Q. You can say your catechism, can you - A. Yes; and I can say the lord's prayer, and can say the commandments.

Q. One is, thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a bad thing, or a good thing to tell a lie - A. A bad thing.

Q. You are going to call God to witness that you will speak the truth and nothing but the truth, if you tell a lie you will be punished here and hereafter - will you speak the truth - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Nightingal - A. Yes.

Q. Did she send you any where - A. She sent me to the washerwoman with a bundle of clothes, the washerwoman lived in Plow yard, Fetter lane. As I was going along, the woman met me, she asked me where I was going; I told her. When she came to the pastry cook's at Bartlet's buildings she bought a bun, she gave me some of it; she sent me for three or four more buns; when I came back she was gone. I had left her at the corner of Bartlet's buildings .

Q. What became of your bundle - A. She took it before I went for the buns; she gave me three halfpence to buy the buns.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. Twelve oclock.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman that gave you first of all part of a bun, and then gave you three halfpence for three buns, and took your bundle from you - A. I am sure it is the woman.

JACOB JOLLY . Q. How old are you - A. I am going on thirteen. On the 15th of February, a little boy came into our shop, No. 56, Turnmill street and asked for some cakes; my mother asked him who they were for; he said a lady at the door; he had a bundle with him; he said the lady was a little way down the street. He went out, he came in again, and asked for sixpennyworth of cakes of any sort. My father went out, and I went out; I went one way and he another in pursuit of the woman; I overtook the woman and called for assistance, and I had the woman taken up to Hatton Garden office.

JOHN HUNT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden; the prisoner was brought to the office upon another charge. I took this property out of her lap; this bundle belongs to the young woman Nightingal.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I have got a mother four score, at the point of death; this is the first offence. I hope you will shew me mercy.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Fined One Shilling , and confined Two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-104

278. ALFRED BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Zachariah Book .

ZACHARIAH BOOK . I am a hosier and glover , 253, High Holborn . On Monday the 13th, about eight o'clock at night, I told the boy to put up the door shutter; a woman immediately picked up a pair of sandals and brought them in; I went to the door to see if there was any thing else missing, I found there were a pair of stockings and two pair of sandals missing; at that time Mr. Ley brought in the prisoner with a pair of stockings and two pair of sandals.

Mr. Pooley. Have you any body in trade with you - A. No; no partner.

Q. Where were the stockings and the sandals before you missed them - A. Hanging up inside of the door, I pinned them across a string. I had nobody in the shop for two hours, and I was watching the shop attentively; I dropped a bill down, and while I stooped to pick it up the stockings were taken.

MR. LEY. I live next door to Mr. Book. On Monday the 13th of February I was standing in my own shop, about eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner looking in my window; I saw him go from thence to Mr. Book's shop window; I immediately went to the shop door; I saw the prisoner take one pair of stockings and two pair of sandals, he tore down three other pair with them; he ran away very fast; I pursued him and took him within an hundred yards; he was not more than four or five yards from me all the time.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday evening I was having footing with my shopmates; being intoxicated I was going home.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined One Shilling , and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-105

279. WILLIAM LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a brass cock, value 6 d. and nine pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Anthony Ben .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

ANTHONY BEN . I live at No. 43, Brick lane, Spital fields.

Q. In the month of October last were you repairing any houses - A. Yes, in Stepney causeway ; the prisoner was a bricklayer employed by me in repairing my buildings; there was a leaden pipe, three quarters bore, affixed to the building by a bit of iron to support it; it was a water pipe with a brass cock for the purpose of supplying the tenants with water; it stood outside of the house.

Q. On the 14th of October last do you recollect being at the Kings Arms public house - A. Yes; I went to pay the men at four o'clock, there were three carpenters, a bricklayer, and a labourer; the prisoner stopped about twenty minutes behind, then he came in and sat down by himself in the tap room, separate from the other men; I paid the men; after that I went down to the building, I missed the brass cock and the pipe; I saw it that day, before I went to the public house.

Q. What might be the value of the pipe - A. About two shillings and sixpence, and the cock sixpence.

Q. Some time after that you met a man of the name of Cummings - A. I did, on the 6th of this month; I missed the lead and the cock on the 15th. On the 17th of October I had some information from some children in the neighbourhood.

Q. Was he and you upon good terms - A. We were upon good terms, I had no difference with him whatever except in this transaction.

Q. Has he brought any action against you - A. He has; that was after the 15th of October, he brought in a balance of seven pounds odd due to him; I paid him four pounds to get rid of him because he was a troublesome man.

Q. When had you notice of trial - A. About a fortnight ago; he was apprehended a week after that, When the officer went to apprehend the prisoner the prisoner said he would not go without he shewed his warrant; the prisoner made his escape.

JAMES CUMMINGS . I live at 44, Brook street.

Q. The place where you live commands a prospect of Mr. Ben's premises - A. On the 15th of October last I was at work at my own shop, at my bench under the window, I could see the premises very plain, even the ground; I saw the prisoner standing with his back towards me, he had a piece of leaden pipe in his hand, between two and three foot long; it seemed to be something of the leaden pipe that belonged to the premises, I did not observe the cock to it; he was standing about five or six feet from where the pipe stood. On the 6th of February I communicated it to Mr. Ben. I accompanied Mr. Ben and Mr. Partridge to apprehend the prisoner; when we went to his house he was not at home; we went then to No. 15, Quaker street, he escaped through the roof. I apprehended him; I said Lawrence, I want to speak to you; he said do not hurt me; I said there is so and so after you; I told him I would conceal him, for the purpose of drawing him forward; I said how silly you were to steal the water pipe: he replied so I was, but good luck to you, you are a good fellow; do not say a word about it.

Q. When was it you, Partridge, and Mr. Ben went to apprehend him - A. On the 14th; Valentine's day.

COURT. How came you not to tell Mr. Ben of it on the 15th of October - A. I had no acquaintance with him then; I did not suspect that he was going to steal the pipe till a woman accused him.

Q. Whereabouts is your shop - A. No. 44, Brook street, in the second story room.

Q. Could you see the premises where the cock was - A. Yes; even to the foundation; if a shilling laid close to the foundation I could see it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-106

280. BENJAMIN WEEDON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of January , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Boosey .

MARGARET BOOSEY . I live at No. 84, King street

Bloomsbury , my husband's name is Samuel Boosey , he is a servant . On the 18th of January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I lost the sheet from off the landing place, it was upon a line up one pair of stairs; it was found afterwards in the street.

THOMAS CAREY . As I was coming past where the prosecutrix lived (I lodge up Lucas court) I heard the door open, I saw the prisoner come out of the door; the prosecutrix house is the corner of Lucas court, the private door is up the passage; as he came out of the door I saw him shoving something under his coat with his left hand, and directly as he went out of the court this woman came out; she said, did you see any body come out of the house; I said a man, pointing to the prisoner; I pursued him; he ran up a passage, and went between a cart and the stable; just after he got past the cart he dropped the sheet; I saw him drop the sheet, it catched my left foot; I pursued him and catched him before he got into Swallow street.

Q. Lucas's court goes into Swallow street - A. Yes. I did not pick the sheet up; I went after the prisoner; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. I should like to know if he means to swear that I came out of the house with the sheet - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I deny that.

GEORGE BROWNE . I occupy the lower part of the house. I was standing in the back parlour, I heard Mrs. Boosey run down, she asked me if I saw any one go out; I said no; heard a footstep; I ran out; I saw the man, I followed him; I lost sight of him for a moment; immediately I turned round the corner, there I saw him; a cart rather baffled me; he went against a stable and a cart, I gained ground on him; the sheet lay on the ground, I did not pick it up.

DAVID DONALDSON . As I was coming from my work, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw a man running, and another man very close after him running; the first man I saw him drop something white between the stable and the cart, and I went round behind the cart and picked it up; I found it to be a sheet. Another gentleman was along with me. I made an observation, this is a curious place to dry sheets in. I had no sight of the man that dropped the sheet; Mrs. Boosey came up and claimed the sheet; just by that time the two last witnesses brought up the prisoner; he was taken to the office.

JOHN WARREN . On the 18th of last month the prisoner was delivered to me; I searched the prisoner; I found two skeleton keys in the crown of his hat, and another small key also; this is a tobacco box; there is matches, tinder, and steel in it; the flint was dropped out in the office, I had no opportunity of finding the flint. These two large skeleton keys I found in his hat. This small one was up his coat sleeve; the tobacco box I found in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up King street, I was laying hold of a young woman; I left her for three minutes; I thought of course I would overtake her; I told her to go into Swallow street; I ran after her, and while I was running to catch her, as I thought, there was a man running before me; he threw a bundle at me, which was them things altogether; I catched them altogether, they were in a white cloth, I catched them at my breast; I know nothing further of them than that. Them keys were not in the crown of my hat, my hat was knocked off in the scuffle. When he took my hat off, he said what have you got in your hat; there was nothing in it; I acknowledge the whole kit of them was in my hand.

MRS. PITT. I live at No. 7, Maiden lane, Covent Garden, I take in plain work for my livelihood. The prisoner called on me on the 18th or 19th of January, it was Tuesday evening, it was to take me out to buy some things for his wife. We were going on from Swallow street to the end of Major Forbes' passage, he let go my arm and told me to go on; not seeing him come back I looked back, I saw the prisoner; a man that was running threw something at his breast; in the fright I run back, I missed him.

Q. Now how much of this is true - A. I have told you every thing that is true.

Q. You are sure it was Tuesday evening, are you - A. Yes, to my certain knowledge.

Q. That happens to be neither the 18th or the 19th - A. I went out with him. I have known him about sixteen years.

Q. What relation are you of his - A. I am no relation of his; I have known him so far as if I was his own sister I could never have known more of him.

Q. Has not he been abroad - A. I never could know that, I have been out of town.

Q. Upon your oath has not he been out of England - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You cannot say he has not been out of England - A. I have been out of town for a twelvemonth together; I never heard of his being out of the kingdom, if he has it is more than I know; I have been out of town for fifteen months together; I always heard that he was about his business. He resided about Covent Garden and Long Acre.

Q. Do you mean to say that you never heard of his being at Portsmouth, or Plymouth, or at Woolwich - A. No; I did not trouble my head about him.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-107

281. JOHN GANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , two pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of John Henson .

JOHN HENSON . I am a publican , I keep the King's Head, Swinton street, Gray's inn lane .

Q. When did you lose your pots - A. Saturday before last, they were left at a door, after they were done with, in Gray's inn road.

SARAH CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Henson. I saw the pots hanging at No. 2, at the top of Swinton street, I saw the prisoner take them off and go down Swinton street; I went in and told my master; he was pursued; he hung them on the rails again and made off.

Mr. Henson. I followed him up the street, he turned the corner and hung the pots on the rails; I took him and accused him with stealing my pots; he abused me and denied it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say, I leave it to his lordship and the gentlemen of the jury.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-108

281. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , a sheet, value 3 s. and a counterpane, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Wheeler .

MARY WHEELER . I saw the prisoner with the counterpane; I asked her what she had got; she said only some rags; this was on the 14th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; she had this counterpane under her arm; I went and told my mother, then I ran after her and took it away from her; my mother asked her what she was going to do with it; she said only to pawn it; she was in our house as servant.

JOSEPH WHEELER . I sent the prisoner for the pots in the morning; she never came back again; she told me where she had pawned the sheet.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-109

282. WILLIAM WESLEY was indicted for that he on the 2nd of May , was servant to William James Roberts and Berks Thompson , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, and being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 l. for and on the account of his said masters, and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM JAMES ROBERTS . Q. Have you a partner of the name of Berks Thompson - A. Yes. We have a farm on Wynchmore hill; the prisoner was in our employ in that farm.

Q. Did you empower him to pay and receive money - A. Yes, for the small stock; some sheep and some pigs; he had of course power to receive the money and to account for them; the account was finally settled with me every quarter; the money that was to pay the men on the farm, was sent down to Wesley, on his application; or the balance of that he might have received in the course of the week.

COURT. Then it was weekly settling - A. Yes, only finally settled at the end of the quarter. At Michaelmas and Christmas the accounts were finally settled.

Mr. Knapp. Have you no other partner than the gentleman you have mentioned - A. I have not.

Q. How long had the prisoner been in your employ - A. Four years; we found him on the premises when we took the farm.

Q. I understand the prisoner can neither read nor write - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner accompt to you in this book - A. He did.

THOMAS WARBOYS . Q. I believe you live at Enfield - A. Yes.

Q. About Easter last did you buy a pig of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you learn of him whose property it was - A. Yes, Mr. Roberts'; I agreed to give him five shillings and sixpence per stone.

Q. Who delivered the pig to you - A. Himself, the bookkeeper, Webber, and the carter delivered the pig to me.

Q. What did the whole price of the pig amount to - A. I never made any calculation; I told him I would pay part of the money in a fortnight; on the 2nd of May I sent it by my man Thomas Wager ; I wrote the receipt and sent it by Wager, he brought it me back signed as it is now; I sent him three pounds; on the 4th of June he called upon me for the remainder, he told me it was two pounds fifteen shillings; I went over and paid it to a haybinder, that worked on the premises; I paid it on the 4th of June.

THOMAS WAGER . Q. On the 2nd of May last, were you sent to pay any money to the prisoner - A. I was sent to pay Wesley three pounds on the account of Warboys; I carried a receipt, this is the receipt. I saw the name of William Wesley signed to it; Webber signed it by his desire; I gave the money into the prisoners hands myself. (The receipt read.)

"May the 2nd, 1808.

"Received of MR. WARBOYS the sum of three pounds, part of payment for a fat hog, at five shillings and sixpence per stone.

WILLIAM WESLEY ."

PHILIP WEBBER . Q. You are a labourer near Winchmore Hill - A. Yes.

Q. Have you acted as bookkeeper to the prisoner Wesley - A. Yes; I used generally to go of a Sunday, if I was wanted oftener he came for me; I then made such enties in the book as he occasionally wanted.

Q. Look at the 5th of April last, killing two pigs, two shillings, did you make that entry - A. I did; I killed the pigs, the two shillings was paid to me; I was present at the delivery of the pigs to Mr. Warboys.

Q. Was that pig that was delivered to Mr. Warboys one of these two, for which there is two shillings charged for killing - A. Undoubtedly it is. I was present when Wager paid three pounds; I signed the receipt with Wesley's name, by Wesley's desire. This was on the 2nd of May.

Q. Now look in the book and see if there is any entry of three pounds received of Mr. Warboys, does it appear on the 2nd of May, or afterwards - A. No; that is the book I kept for Wesley. Some time after he expressed himself as though he thought he never should get the remainder of the money.

Q. Did he at that time give you directions to put down the three pounds - A. I never received any directions to put down the three pounds; he said let it be till I receive the remainder, it will make a short account.

Q. Did you after that under his direction make up the book for the quarterly settlement - A. Undoubtedly I did; that was at Midsummer. The balance was then struck and settled, without that three pounds being brought to account.

Q. Did you use to cast up the book once a week - A. Yes; I used to come on a Sunday, take his directions, and cast up the book, On Friday the money was sent up to pay the men.

Q. If you had ever received directions from him to set down that three pounds, should not you have done it - A. Undoubtedly I should.

Q. to Roberts. Did you ever receive of the prisoner the sum of three pounds, which was received of Mr. Warboys as part of payment of this fat hog - A. I never

did.

Q. How often did you visit this farm - A. Sometimes once a week, and in harvest oftener.

Q. When was it you caused the prisoner to be apprehended - A. I believe the beginning of February he was not discharged from the farm upon this; after he was discharged from the farm, I discovered this.

GEORGE BARKER . Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Roberts and co. - did you settle these accounts - A. They were made at the farm, and sent up to me to adjust.

Q. Did you on the part of Messrs. Roberts and co. receive any sums which were not stated in the book - A. Certainly not.

Q. Have you examined the book to see whether there is any account of three pounds received of Mr. Warboys - A. Yes: I never saw such an account.

Q. to Roberts. The prisoner was to account every week for the money he received - A. Yes.

EDWARD LEWIS MEYER . Q. I believe you are also a clerk to Messrs. Roberts and Thompson - A. I am.

Q. Have you examined these books from the 2nd of May downwards, to see whether there is three pound down as received from Mr. Warboys - A. I have, carefully; I am positive it is not set down.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and family, which I have supported by my honest industry, and till the present instance I never was impeached or suspected of dishonesty, as will be specified by persons who will come forward for my character. I am totally innocent of having committed any offence; in the employ I was in I was obliged to employ a person to keep my accounts. I was always in the habit of informing the person of every article I sold, he was to set it down in the book; I understood it was done by him.

Q. to Roberts. Is that two pounds fifteen shillings brought to account - A. It is not.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-110

283. WILLIAM WESLEY was indicted for that he on the 10th of September was servant to William James Roberts and Berks Thompson , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, and that being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 l. 5 s. on their account, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN MOORE . Q. In the beginning of September last did you purchase a quarter of a load of hay at Mr. Roberts' farm - A. Yes; the prisoner came to me I believe, on the 10th for the money; my wife paid the money; I throwed down a guinea, and my wife throwed down four shillings; I asked about a receipt for the twenty five shillings; he said I cannot write, as soon as I get home I will strike it out of the book. I knowing the man, and Mr. Roberts having a stable close to Barnet Hill, I thought all would be right.

Q. How was this hay delivered - A. He brought it in a cart, and William Footman with him.

PHILIP WEBBER . Q. Did you keep the books while the prisoner was in the employ of Messrs. Roberts and Thompson - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the bottom entry in that page, you see there a quarter of a load of hay, 1 l. 5 s. was that written by you - A. It was, by Wesley's direction.

Q. That is charging Mr. Moore with the hay - A. Yes; it is charged there on the 3d of September.

MR. MOORE. I bought the hay a day or two before the fair, and on the 10th I paid it.

Q. to Webber. Is there any entry in that book of that one pounds five shillings being paid by Mr. Moore - A. Never; I never received any account that he had been paid by Moore; if I had I should have entered it in the book.

Q. Were you ever directed by the prisoner to cross it out of the book - A. No; if I had, I should undoubtedly have done it.

Mr. Gleed. You were the accomptant - A. I was.

Q. You knew how your books were kept - A. Yes, I did.

Q. There is an entry of a delivery - A. Yes.

Q. You know this man could not read, as well as not write, and you know that he trusted to you to put it down, you knew the fact of the hay being delivered. because he told you to put it down - A. I asked him if he had ever received it, he said it was left for Mr. Roberts to fix the price, Mr. Roberts was to make the charge.

Q. How long have you been an accountant - A. Ever since he has been in Mr. Roberts' employ, three years and a half.

Q. Were the accounts made up once a week or once a fortnight - A. Invariably once a week.

WILLIAM JAMES ROBERTS . My partner's name is Berks Thompson.

Q. You have a farm at Winchmore Hill - A. I have. The prisoner was in my employ, he was entrusted by me and my partner to sell hay, and the small stock on the farm, and to receive the money.

Q. Had you ever received any money of him except on the footing of this book - A. I have not.

Q. Have you ever received of him the one pound five shillings which he received of Mr. Moore - A. I have not.

Q. I believe you applied to Mr. Moore for this money after the prisoner was discharged - A. I did; not knowing that he had paid the money to Mr. Wesley, I found him on my book as debtor; I did not apply to Mr. Moore till January.

GEORGE BARKER . Q. These accounts used to be sent to you for your checking - A. Yes.

Q. Has that one pound five shillings ever been brought to account to you - A. I believe not; I have examined the book carefully.

Q. Have you ever received any money, except what is accounted for in that book - A. No.

EDWARD LEWIS MEYER . Q. Have you examined the book to see whether this one pound five has been brought to account - A. It has not.

Prisoner's Defence. I never wronged my masters to my knowledge; whatever I sold I told the bookkeeper to put down, whether he did or not.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Whipped in Jail , confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-111

284. MICHAEL WOOD was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 26th of January , thirty pounds weight of hay, value 21 d. the property of George Ramsden .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

GEORGE RAMSDEN . Q. You are a colourman and live in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel - A. I live in Whitechapel road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I know him very well, he lived at a mill in the Commercial road .

Q. Had you occasion to put a horse of your's in a stable adjoining his stable - A. I had; I put him there about the latter end of September, he had been there about three months; the stable belonged to me, it adjoined the mill; the horse was in a very good condition when I put him there first; I gave fifty guineas for him, I sold him last week for about fourteen pounds. I sent my man there regular with from four to five trusses of hay a week.

Q. In consequence of some certain circumstances that you observed did you speak to Coombes the officer - A. I did; about the 25th of January; I watched the prisoner first; Mr. Coombes advised me to put a label in the truss of hay, we sent a man down to the stable with it, and my brother, and Mr. Coombes the officer likewise followed me; I saw the hay put in the stable and the door padlocked; this was the 25th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, it was moon light, but dark. I, and my brother, and Coombes went into an adjoining garden for the purpose of watching; we saw him go past; he staid there about a quarter of an hour; the prisoner went in about three or four minutes after the man had deposited the hay in the stable; we saw the prisoner go into the stable and take away the hay; when he took the hay out of the stable he came back the same way close to me, and when he came near we immediately rushed upon him; he flung the hay out of his arms; he was apprehended immediately. I saw him throw the hay down; we all three rushed out together.

COURT. Did you lose sight of him before he was laid hold of - A. No, he was apprehended that very instant; he said he hoped I would forgive him, it was the first time. After the hay was picked up we got a candle and found the label in it. We took the prisoner to the office; I went back to examine the padlock of the stable door; we found the staple drawed; this is the adze that drawed it out; I found it on the ground by the padlock.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of a truss of hay - A. About three shillings and eight pence.

Coombes. I have the label; it is both our hand's writing.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Whipped in Goal and confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-112

285. THOMAS SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a tin case, value 1 s. 6 d. a pint of rum, value 1 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 10 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a neckcloth, value 1 s. the property of George Foster , a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Mary Lyons , spinster ; and one pair of pantaloons, value 1 s. the property of George Kinnard .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GEORGE FOSTER . Q. You keep the Britannia, Blackwall - A. I do.

Q. Had the prisoner at the bar been lodging at your house any time - A. About a twelvemonth; he was introduced to me by Mr. Frazer, his master; he came to me very ill; he staid with me about a twelvemonth.

Q. Had you communicated to you by any body, or by the person of Solomon, any circumstances that occasioned you to suspect the prisoner - A. I had, about four weeks ago; in consequence of that I had him taken up by an officer.

Q. Did you find any property on him - A. Articles of my own wearing apparel; I saw them found in the prisoner's box.

Q. In what room did you find them in his box - A. In a room adjoining to where he slept; in his box.

Q. Where had these things that you found in his box been deposited before - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Had they been in your possession - A. Certainly; they were my property; the room that his box stood in was a drying room for the linen; sometimes I kept them in my own bed room, and sometimes in that drying room where he slept.

COURT. I thought you said the drying room was the next room to where he slept - did you lose the things contained in the indictment - A. The wearing apparel.

Q. Did you lose a tin case and a pint of rum - A. I cannot say the rum; I lost a shirt, a pair of stockings, I believe them to be mine, and I lost a neckcloth.

Q. Who was Mary Lions - A. A niece of mine, and George Kinnard was a lodger. I did not miss them till his box was opened.

Q. Had you ever given him these things - A. Never. I am quite certain of that.

ELEANOR FOSTER . Q. You are the wife of George Foster - A. I am.

Q. Did you miss any of your husband's property - A. I did not miss them until his chest was searched; it was searched in my presence, I then saw they were my husband's.

JOHN SOLOMON . I am a shipwright, I lodged at the Britannia at this time, and the prisoner lodged there at the time.

Q. Do you remember the day laid in the indictment any thing attracting your notice respecting the prisoner - A. Yes; when I came down at half past six, before it was light, as I went along the passage to get into the back yard, I found the bar door open, I heard a rumbling noise in the kitchen; I went down as far as the kitchen door, I found that door open; I said to the prisoner, Tom, is that you; he said yes. I went out backward where I wanted to go to, and when I came back the bar door was shut to. That is all I know. I went out to work, when I came home at breakfast time I told the prosecutor of it.

MR. LITTLEPAGE. I am a headborough. On the same evening I went to the Britannia, I took charge of the prisoner about a quarter past eight at night; Mrs. Foster told me that he had been robbing them for six or seven months, of what she had been working hard for; he said indeed he had not, it was all his own

property.

Q. Did you search the prisoner's box - A. Yes; after I had taken him to the watchhouse; I found in his box, it was unlocked, twenty five one pound notes, twenty two guineas, twenty seven seven shilling pieces, four shillings, fifty four new halfpence and penny-pieces, and sixty three new farthings; there was a canteen of rum, a broken glass with bitters in it, two twopenny loaves, a shirt marked Foster, the name in full length, a new neckcloth with G F on it, a pair of stockings, and a pair of pantalooons, with a rule in one of the pockets; they are all here in the box.

COURT, to prosecutor. Is that the box in which you found the things - A. Yes.

Q In what state did you leave the bar the over night when you went to bed - A. It was fastened in the state that it usually was, I fastened it with two buttons.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of this, I have witnesses to come forward.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-113

286. MARY MACK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , fifteen basons, value 2 s. 6 d. two garden pots, value 6 d. and six salt cellars, value 4 d. the property of James Doyle .

JAMES DOYLE . I keep an earthenware stall in Covent garden market .

WILLIAM WREN . I am a watchman.

Q. Is your stand near Doyle's stall - A. Yes, it is part of my beat. On the 8th of February, I was calling half after four, I saw a basket between Doyle's stall and another stall; I called Sheene, another watchman. I said there were thieves there; as we went round we found fifteen basons deposited in a place not far from there, and four salt cellars; they were about sixty or seventy yards from Mr. Doyle's place; I left my brother watchman to keep watch for who should come for this earthenware; while I went and called Mr. Doyle to let him know that his place was broken open; as I was going away my partner called to me and told me that he had stopped a woman towards the earthenware; when I came up to Sheene I found it was the prisoner; my partner asked her where she was going at that time of the night; she said she came from Charles court in the Strand, she was going out to wash in Hatton garden; he asked her to shew her hands; her hands looked dirty, not like a washerwoman's hands; I told my partner to keep her in custody till I brought Mr. Doyle; we took her in the watchhouse and searched her; in her pocket we found two salt cellars and a knife; Mr. Doyle believed the salt cellars to be his. The prisoner said she was going through the market she picked them up. The padlock had been forced off Mr. Doyle's shop.

- SHEENE. I am a watchman in the Piazzas, Covent garden; as I was calling half past four, the last witness told me had he found some earthen ware, when I came to him he said there was an empty basket, he believed the people had been robbed; looking further we found these basons; a quarter before before five the prisoner was coming round Mr. Bailey's shop in the road; I observed her turn back when she saw me. I followed her and took her in custody.

Q. Did you see her meddle with the earthenware - A. I did not; before she altered her direction, she was coming towards the earthenware; when I stopped her I asked her to go with me; she entreated me to let her go, she was going to washing in Hatton garden, and she came from Charles court in the Strand; I asked her to shew me her hand, her hand was quite dirty; we took her to the watchhouse and searched her; these two salt cellars was in her pocket and a knife; she first said she lived at No. 14, and then No. 7; we went to Charles court, we could not find what part of the court she lived in.

Wren. Before I called Sheene I heard a foot go through the market; I went after him, he was about twenty yards from me; he got towards James street; I did not know of any depredation being done at that time; I thought I had no right to stop him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the market, I picked up the two salts; the knife is what my boy cleans the shoes with; I have four children.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-114

287. THOMAS SMITH and THOMAS THORN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , a quart of gin, value 1 s. 4 d. and a pint and a half of gin, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Jackson .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

JOSEPH JACKSON . I am a distiller , residing in Compton street, Clerkenwell ; Smith was my carman and Thorn my distiller .

Q. Had the carman and distiller access to the different backs of spirits - A. Yes, every day.

Q. Did you at any time, and when, discover that you had lost various quantities of spirits - A. I did; in January, and before in October and November; in the early part of January I took the stock myself along with the excise officer, and one cask of brandy was missed of four gallons; my suspicion fell upon the prisoners. On the 21st of January, I went through the accompting house into the cellar, Thorn and Smith was in the cellar; I said Thorn your mistress wants you to go of an errand. When Thorn came back he went into the same place again, and when he came back again, I said Thorn you have been a long while getting your beer; he went further into the cellar, than where the beer was, that gave me suspicion; I there found a quart bottle filled with peppermint; I put it in the same place, it remained there till the Monday. On Monday, the 23d, at night, I found a bladder in the cellar behind the same cask where the bottle was; on Tuesday, in the evening, on examining the stable, in one of the stalls I found a bladder containing gin.

Q. Had the prisoners access to that stable - A. Yes, both of them. On Friday the 27th, Matthews the officer came to my house; we examined more minutely; on a load of straw were four empty bottles, apparently emtied of spirits; the bladder in the stable was full; Mr. Matthews thought it right to get a search warrant, and when we came back the bottles and the bladder were gone; the prisoners returned between one and two, and went to their work again, and continued there till

night; the officer came to my house again at half past four o'clock; they were taken in custody on Friday morning.

Q. Did you look in these places - A. I did; the bottles were returned there empty; and looking at them just before the time they went away the bottles were filled in the tub in the cellar under the distil house, and the bladder was filled in the stable; they left business about six o'clock; at the time they were going away, Mrs. Jackson desired one to go through the gates, the other to fasten the gates and go through the house. I went into the cellar, I found that the bottles had been removed; I came in and mentioned it to the officer; the officer went out and brought them back to my house; I saw a bottle that I had seen before in the tub, and a small bladder that I had seen before in the cellar; there was gin in both; the gin in the bladder corresponded with the gin in the vat. Smith then said, Oh! God, what have I done, I have been robbing my master, it will transport me. Thorn said there was no great harm in it, or something of that.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. Were you applied to, to go to Mr. Jackson's - A. I was. I first went into the cellar; I found this bottle in the tub, that was about one o'clock, the bottle was full; I went into the stable; this bladder was full of gin, it was in the manger, covered with hay; I thought fit to have a search warrant to search Smith and Thorn's premises; we came from the office; the bottle and the bladder and the prisoners were gone away. When the prisoners returned to work, Mr. Jackson went backwards, and he saw the things all filled again. As soon as the prisoners were gone out I followed them; Thorn went out of the house; I came up with them and catched one in each hand; Smith turned round and struck me; Trott came to my assistance. I searched Thorn, I found this bottle in the waist of his breeches, buttoned with this loop; the bottle was full of gin at the time, it contained about a pint and a half. I was present when Trott searched Smith; he found this bladder full of gin in his coat pocket; I had seen the bottle in the cellar, I am pretty well sure it is the same bottle, and the bladder is apparently the same bladder I saw in the stable. I took notice of this string.

Q. Did you go and search these premises - A. I did; I found this bottle of gin and bottle of peppermint; this cloves and gin was found at Smith's house, the other I found at Thorn's, and more gin in the stone bottle.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. Are the circumstances that Matthew has stated true - A. They are; I searched Smith; he had got a blue coat on his arm; we took them into Mr. Jackson's, I handcuffed them together; I searched his coat that he had on his arm; I took the bladder out of it, it contained a quart of gin; Thorn was shedding tears; Smith said, good God! what have we done, we have stolen our master's liquor, we shall both be transported; I told Thorn nor to fret, they were not tried yet, they did not know what would be done. Thorn said it was the first time, he was very sorry for it.

Mr. Knapp. In short, they both shewed as much contrition as persons who had been committing such an offence could - A. After they were handcuffed and secured.

Smith left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Thorn left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 24.

THORN, GUILTY , aged 24.

Whipped in Jail , and confined Two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-115

288. WILLIAM POWER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , a pocket book, value 6 d. a pair of gold earrings, value 7 s. twenty three pawnbroker's tickets, value 10 d. and four guineas, the property of Elizabeth Purcell , widow , in her dwelling house .

ELIZABETH PURCELL . I am a widow, I am a housekeeper, No. 8, Bainbridge street : In September last I lost my pocket book, containing four guineas, a pair of earrings, and several pawnbroker's tickets that I pawned my goods for. I lost them on a Sunday.

Q. Do you know what month it was in - A. No; it is more than four months ago since I was robbed of it; the pocket book was in my pocket, I had my pockets on. The prisoner came in my house about eleven o'clock that morning, he asked for Ellen Roney ; he sat down in the chair and asked me something about her; I told him I knew nothing about her i he staid with me about half an hour.

Q. Where were your pockets at this time - A. Tied about my person on my side.

Q. Did you miss your pocket book before he went away - A. No, nor for a long while after. I took my pocket book to get change; I am not certain whether I put it in my pocket, or left it on the table.

Q. Did you go out of your room while the prisoner was there - A. I went backwards; I was not more than ten minutes gone; the prisoner stopped in the room alone till I returned; then in about twenty minutes he went away.

Q. Was it not odd that a stranger of this sort should stay with you all that time - A. He talked about something, I did not think he came to do any harm; I often had seen him and sold him wood when I kept a shop.

Q. How long was it after the prisoner was gone out was it that you missed the pocket book - A. About an hour after I missed it, and I went after him; I did not see him till about eight o'clock the next morning; I asked him whether he had my pocket book, as there was nobody else in the way; I told him I knew he took it; he called me a fool, and said he did not take it away. I have never seen my pocket book from that time to this, nor my money nor my earrings.

Q. What was the business that led you out of doors - A. I went backwards in the yard; I went and looked in the privy myself; I could see the soil, there was no such thing there.

Q. Was the prisoner near enough to you when you were chatting together to take it out of your pocket - A. I do not think he was; he was of one side of the way and I of the other.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am a constable of the public office, Bow street. I took him on the 7th of February for an assault; I searched him, I took a key from him, I opened his box, I found a pocket book containing

a parcel of duplicates, there was no money or ear rings in it; I took the duplicates out; the landlady said the prisoner owed her a good deal of money. In the scuffle the book was gone; I went to the different pawnbrokers and saw the articles relating to these duplicates; the pawnbroker said they were Mrs. Purcell's.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. What she says is all a lie, from fist to last; she was drunk; she is a bawdyhousekeeper, a thief, robber, pickpocket, and whore. Mercy, mercy, do not murder me.

GUILTY, aged 49.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Whipped in Goal , confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-116

289. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , a truss of hay, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Ridge .

MARK GUMIS . I am a labourer to Samuel Ridge , a farmer at Edgware; the prisoner was carter to Mr. Ridge, and having strong suspicion that he had taken things from the premises I watched him; on the 22nd of January, about half past eleven at night, he came up the yard with a lanthorn, he went into the stable to look after the horses as usual; I was at the kitchen window, about seventeen yards from the stable door; he was in the stable about half an hour; I saw him come out with a truss of hay on his shoulder, he carried it down the yard where his cart stood, loaded ready to come to Shoreditch, to a cow shed in Cock lane.

Q. What was the cart loaded with - A. A load of hay. I could not see him lay it on the cart, there was a garden hedge prevented me; when he came back to the stable I went to the cart, I found two trusses and a half instead of one and a half, which is the usual allowance; I put a twig of birch into each truss to know the truss again; my intention was to find out the receiver, as he had to go to London and back again. After he was gone with the cart I followed him; it was moon light; I kept as near as I could all the way to London; the hay was on the cart at Hendon, and at Golder's green, and at a watering house, the Black Cap, the hay was on the cart, and between the Black Cap and Battle bridge the hay was gone.

Q. Did you ever speak to him about this truss that was missed between Camden town and Battle bridge - A. Not till Monday morning; it was Saturday he started. On the Monday following I told him I wanted to know what became of the two trusses of hay that I missed out of the lost, one on Thursday morning and one on Saturday morning, because I had counted the trusses and knew where he took it from; he said he never took out any hay but what was for his horses; I told him I did not ask about what he had for his horses, that you had out of the hay rick, I ask you about two trusses that you had out of the lost; he always denied taking any more than a truss and a half for the consumption of his horses.

Q. Do you know whether it might not have dropped - A. It was not likely, it might be possible.

Q. What is the value of a truss of hay - A. Three shillings.

Mr. Alley. When you say it was not likely to drop off, you do not mean to say it might not fall off - A. It might possibly fall off.

Prisoner's Defence. Master has said at different times in the stable he did not care how much hay I had for the horses, so as I did not waste it; I never did waste it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-117

290. SARAH PINCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of January , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Gardner .

SAMUEL GARDNER . I live at 110; Pennington street, St. George's in the East , I am a shoemaker . On the 18th of January, between the hours of two and four o'clock, I lost my silver watch from off the mantle shelf; the prisoner lodged in the house. On the 20th I found it at the pawnbroker's, pawned for twenty four shillings. The prisoner was taken up on the 19th of January.

Q. Did you cause her to be taken up - A. I did; she went out that evening and came home very late, very much in liquor; my suspicion fell upon her; I told her when she was taken up if she would own to it it would be the better for her; there was some money found upon her.

EDWARD BROWNRIC . I am servant to Thomas Parker, pawnbroker, No. 5. Ship alley, West close square; I believe the prisoner at the bar to be the person that pledged the watch, but I cannot swear to it, on the 18th of January, betwixt the hours of three and four in the afternoon; I advanced one pound four shillings on the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Gardner was unwell; I went into Mr. Gardner's apartment; she requested Mr. Gardner to go out and get some brandy; he did; she drank the brandy and got better. When I went out I left two women in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-118

291. MARY MC'NALLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s. one hundred and fifty two penny pieces, and three hundred and forty six halfpence , the property of John Phillips .

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a cheesemonger , I live at No. 22, Cable street, Well close square , the prisoner nursed my wife, she was very ill.

Q. Where were these things - A. They were in a little parlour adjoining the shop.

Q. When did you lose them - A. On Sunday morning, January the 22nd; I had a suspicion of the prisoner; I was going up stairs; I put my young man to watch to see if she went nigh the half tub of penny pieces.

JOHN GRANNELL . I am servant to Mr. Phillips.

Q. You watched the prisoner - A. Yes; on Sunday morning, I saw her go to the tub of halfpence; she took some and came back to the fire; I do not know what she did with them, she had them in her hand; she went again to the tub, took some, and then went back again; what she did then I do not know; I then told my master that I saw her take some; he said very

well, that is right; he went and asked her, did she value her life; she asked him what he meaned by it. He told her that she had robbed him; he asked her to give him his money; she said she had none; he said he would send for an officer; she said put your hand in my pocket; he said no, take your pocket off; she did, it contained two shillings, one penny halfpenny farthing.

EDWARD SMITH . Q. You are an officer - A. Yes. On Sunday the 22nd, I took the prisoner in custody; I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found twenty six shillings more of copper; here is one paper tied up; the boy swore to his tying them up before the magistrate, and this handkerchief I found at the lodgings.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief.

Grannell. One of the paper of halfpence was tied up by me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had thirty shillings in copper by me, before I went into Mr. Phillips' house, by my own working for; the boy is mistaken.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Fined One Shilling , and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-119

292. WILLIAM QUICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , six forms of printing types, value 4 l. the property of Robert Wilkes .

ROBERT WILKES . I live in Chancery lane . On the 14th of January, about six o'clock, I was going from one part of the premises to the other, I heard a noise in the passage; I approached to see what it was, a man came out in a confused manner; I asked him what he had been doing there, after talking to him, all I could get from him was that he had been in the office to see William; I suspected that he had been upon no good; I had to direct a letter for the post, for which I had to go to another part of the premises, and on returning I had to go into the passage where the noise had been; on opening the door into the passage this form, that is in court, fell against me; I went after the man; he was gone, he had ran away; I concluded from the form being so heavy that more than one was concerned in it; I immediately shut to the printing office door; I waited there about half a minute, I heard a foot seemingly in confusion going backwards and forwards; after waiting about half a minute I saw the prisoner, I knew him, he had worked for me a twelvemonth before that; he said in a confused way, Mr. Wilkes I came to see if you would have given me work; I had no doubt then but he must be the man that was concerned with the man that ran away; I was then anxious to get him up stairs, I said, certainly go up stairs, I will give you plenty of work; he said very well and went up stairs; I listened and observed that he did not go further than the second flight of stairs; I heard him stop there; about half a minute after that I heard him come down stairs again; when I saw him approach I called loud why do you not go up stairs, and I will come up to you; instead of going up again he ran down as fast as he could and knocked me down, he aimed at the door to get away; I stood at the door to prevent him going away, he knocked me from the door to get away, we struggled about half a minute he attempting to get away; I then fearing violence called out murder; about a dozen men came down from the top of the house and secured him. This is the form of types, we had two stolen; one I detected him with; we found three on the stairs that they were in the act of taking off when I discovered him. This is my property.

WILLIAM MASON . At that time I was in the employ of Mr. Wilkes. On January the 14th, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in the composing room; I heard the cry of murder; I then proceeded with more persons down stairs; I found the prisoner and Mr. Wilkes in a small room down stairs; I secured the prisoner.

WILLIAM COOK . I was up stairs, I heard the cry of murder; the prisoner came up in the composing room, about ten minutes previous to Mr. Wilkes crying out murder, he asked for Mr. Wilkes; he was answered he was not there.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked with Mr. Wilkes about thirteen months ago: I suited myself with a better situation, I went to work in St. Paul's church yard; I went to Mr. Wilkes again, I asked for work; he told me he could not give me work then, I might call in a few days; I called upon his apprentice, he told me to come at five o'clock; I went again at five o'clock into the composing room; they told me Mr. Wilkes was down stairs at tea; I went down and asked Mr. Wilkes for work; he was busy writing a direction; he pushed me, and then I pushed him and knocked him down.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-120

293. ADAM ROULETTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , five pounds weight of sugar, value 4 s. the property of Sir John Eamer , knt. and John Harmer Eamer .

JOHN HINTON . I am clerk to Sir John Eamer and son. On the 14th of February, I was going up the yard, I saw one of the warehouse doors half open, I thought some one was in there; I went and saw the prisoner in the warehouse; I saw sugar in his hands; he appeared to be very much confused at the sight of me; I asked him what he wanted there; he wanted to see George; I told him George was gone; I came out of the warehouse, he followed me, and as he came down the yard he past me, I thought his pockets looked full of something; I followed him into White cross street; I saw sugar drop out of his right hand pocket as he was walking along the street; I was sure it was my master's property: I laid hold of him, he begged me to forgive him, he had never been a thief before; I took him back and sent a man into Wood street to inform my master of it. The officer came and took the sugar out of his pocket which weighed five pounds; some was raw sugar and some was lump.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the yard, the door was open, I thought I might take some sugar, it would sweeten my wife's and childrens tea, that was all; I never did such a thing in my life before.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-121

294. JOHN SAITS and HANNAH WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. the property of Philip Price .

PHILIP PRICE . I am a publican ; I live at the Horseshoe and Magpie, Saffron hill . On the 3rd of February, both the prisoners came into my house between eleven and twelve o'clock, and called for two or three glasses of rum; after they had drank and paid for what they had they both went out together; the pots were drying in the taproom by the fire; while they were there my servant found two of the pots missing; I followed the woman down to her lodging No. 2, Saffron hill; I asked her what become of the pots; I took her back to my house; the man prisoner came in to know what was the matter; I felt a pot on his side under his coat and another in his pocket; I laid hold of him, in the scuffle he got me down; I got up and knocked him down; I kept him till I sent for Wood the officer, he took the pots from him. The prisoners have lived together, they do not live in the house; I heard the woman say that she had lived with the man prisoner five or six years, he had used her very ill. The man prisoner offered me a seven shilling piece not to send for an officer, when I had him down.

The property produced and identified.

Sait's Defence. I had been out of doors some time; I turned again into the gentleman's house for more liquor; I did not know how the pots came about me than a child unborn.

Ward said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave a good character.

SAITS, GUILTY , aged 46.

Fined One Shilling , and confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

WARD, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-122

295. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , three yards of carpet, value 3 s. the property of John Harlow .

JOHN HARLOW . I am a broker and auctioneer in Shoreditch ; I lost these carpets, on the 31st of January, they were nailed up against a gateway, where I had a sale; I saw them in the course of the day at twelve o'clock; I did not see them afterwards.

CHARLES FORDHAM . I am employed by Mr. Harlow, I nailed the carpets myself to the gates about ten o'clock on the 31st of January, they remained there till twelve o'clock, that was the last time I saw them; when the sale was over in the evening, between five and six o'clock, I went to take the carpets down; they were gone.

THOMAS OWEN . I am a taylor. On the 31st of January last, between the hours of five and six o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop in a very great hurry with something in his hand, he threw it behind a tub in the shop; I went to see what it was, it was a couple of pieces of carpets; I was rather uneasy at the man throwing it in in that kind of way; I sent my brother round to the brokers; I found in Spital square Mr. Harlow had lost two carpet; in about an hour and a half the prisoner returned again, and passed up to the place where he had put them; I told the prisoner I must know where he got them; he made answer it is all right; I sent for an office, he came and took him in custody.

JOHN VICKREY . I took the prisoner in custody at Mr. Owen's house, and the carpets; he had then the carpets with him; I asked him where he had got them; he said from a sale in Spitalfields, he did not mean to keep them; he had been employed to hold the candle for the auctioneer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my bread by attending sales; there being nobody there when the sale was over I took the carpets down; I asked the girl in the shop if I could leave them there; I did not throw them behind a tub, nor any thing of the kind. When I went to fetch them from this gentlemen's house I told him I was going to take them to Mr. Harlow's house. I had been holding the candle for Mr. Harlow two hours, of course I expected something for my trouble.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Whipped in Goal , confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-123

296. ISAAC WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , two boots, value 30 s. the property of John Mark Cowen .

JOHN MARK COWEN . I am a boot maker , I live at No. 341, in the Strand . I lost the boots on the 14th of February, they were taken from my shop window; they hung at the outside; they were two odd ones.

ALEXANDER OSBROOKE . I had some boots stolen; on 14th of February the pawnbroker sent to me; I discovered that they belonged to Mr. Cowen by the mark at the bottom.

JAMES HULME . On the 14th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to Mr. Lane's shop to pledge the boots, he wanted a pound on them; he said his name was Isaac Watson , he lived at No. 4, Horton street, Clare market. I told him they were two odd boots; he said he had them a fortnight; the prisoner said he had the fellows to them at home. Mr. Osbrooke having lost boots the week before I sent to him; Mr. Osbrooke sent to Mr. Cowen.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out drinking, I got intoxicated; coming along Drury lane a middle aged man asked me to pledge them boots for him; I went to Mr. Lane's with them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined One Shilling , confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-124

297. MARY WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , a cap, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 2 s. and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Susan Winter , spinster .

SUSAN WINTER . I live at Mr. Forbes', Paul's Head, Paul street, Finsbury square , I was housemaid and the prisoner was pot girl ; I lost my cap and petticoat on Thursday night after last day from off the kitchen dresser.

Q. Why do you accuse her with it - A. The mother brought them out of pawn on the Monday following,

the pocket and apron; the cap was on her head.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-125

298. WILLIAM BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , one half hogshead cask, value 4 s. the property of William Mead .

WILLIAM MEAD . I am a stable keeper at the Cross Keys, St. John street, West Smithfield . On the 26th of January, I saw the prisoner come into the yard. I went out and asked him what he wanted; he said their cart was coming with two hogsheads of gin; I asked him whose cart it was; he said Mr. Hodges of Bank side; I continued in the yard with the prisoner; he was talking about Mr. Hodges' servants stealing gin from him; I left him and went into Smithfield and returned back again: I said is not your cart come now; he was sitting on a hamper in the yard; I went in doors and missed him off the hamper: it was a vinegar half hogshead; I went out and saw him taking it down the yard; there were six in the yard, two of them were taken away; I thought he was gone to take them to this cart; I went in pursuit of him; in a little time I saw the prisoner coming from Smithfield; he made a way for Turnmill street; I pursued after him and he then met me; he said master I will pay you for these six casks; I said I do not think you have any right to them; he said the cart was up the street; he took me up Turnmill street; the cart was not there; I took him back to the yard.

Q. Are you sure this is the man that took the hogshead out of your yard - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Q. In short no cart came to the yard - A. No; I told him I would send for an constable; he cried and said he had sold it to Mrs. Beale.

MRS. BEALE. I live at No. 73, West Smithfield; I am a cooper and turner; I bought a cask at that time of the prisoner; I gave four shillings for it.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer; I produce the staves.

Prosecutor. I can only swear that I saw the prisoner take a cask out from the yard.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was at Hatton garden office that gentleman could not swear to the staves.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-126

299. GEORGE GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of February , two handkerchiefs, value 8 s. the property of Joan Jones , spinster .

JOAN JONES . I live at No. 1, Bothwright buildings, Hackney ; I keep a milliner's and haberdasher's shop . On the 7th of February, about six o'clock in the evening. I thought I saw the prisoner's face looking at the window; a lady coming in at the interim, I shewed her into the parlour, and staid with the lady about two minutes and a half; I heard something in the shop, I observed the prisoner standing in the shop; I came instantly in the shop. I asked him very rough what he wanted there; he making no reply I asked him a second time; he said some shoe strings; I shewed him some shoe strings; he gave me a shilling in my hand; I supposed the shilling to be bad, I held it in my hand and looked at the prisoner and he at me; he appeared confused at the time; he suddenly took up the shilling and ran out; I came round the counter, I missed two handkerchiefs that lay in the window; I went to the shop door, I did not see any thing of him; a lad told me he saw him put the handkerchief in his pocket. I am certain he is the person, he has been in my shop several times.

JAMES SHEPHARD . I apprehended the prisoner, I searched him, and found nothing.

CHARLES HAYLOCK . I was going past the window, I saw the prisoner in the shop; I saw him take something out of the window near the door, and put it in his side pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this lady's shop and asked for a pair of shoe strings, I put down a shilling; she said it was bad one; I took it up and went out, and the next day I was in a public house at Shoreditch the lady gave charge of me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in Jail , confined Six Calendar Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-127

300. ANN HARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , eleven yards of printed calico, value 13 s. the property of John Harris .

HENRY FOLEY . I am servant to Mr. Harris, linen draper , in Picket street, Strand . On Thursday the 26th of January, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked to look at some striped stuff, which we could not shew her that moment, being busy; she placed herself against a pile of printed calicos, took one piece and put it under her cloak; she then went of the other side by the stuff.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a bit of stuff; there was a bit of calico fell off the counter, I picked it up; Mr. Harris called over before I had time to put it down; he took me down into the kitchen, sent for an officer, and took me out of the back door; I have been here a month; my husband is on board a man of war. I have four small children.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-128

301. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a silver watch, value 2 l. two seven shilling pieces, and a shilling , the property of Thomas Connelly .

THOMAS CONNELLY . I am a gardener . I lost my watch and fifteen shillings; I met the prisoner in Long Acre on the 17th of January, about half past nine o'clock, she asked me to go home with her, and I did, to No. 5, Vine street ; I went up to the room where she lodged, I gave her a quartern of gin; I drank a glass of it and she the rest; after that I gave her the price of a pot of ale and a pipe of tobacco. I was sober. I stopped there till twelve o'clock; she wanted me to stop all night; I consented. I laid my clothes on the table on one side of the bed, she came round that side of the bed to draw the curtains; I had left my breeches, coat, and waistcoat on the table; I think that is the time she took it; she called another girl in

and desired her to go for a quartern of gin or aniseed; the girl brought in the liquor; at the same time the prisoner said she was hungry, she would go out and get some bread and cheese; I wanted her to stop; she said she would be in in a few minutes; she got up and put the candle out and went out; I got up, I found I had lost my watch and my money out of my breeches.

JOHN BEETHAM . I was on duty; coming to the top of Vine street, the prosecutor said he had been robbed. On the next day, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I went to the house, the landlord told me the prisoner was up stairs in liquor. She owned to me that she pawned the watch in Cranbourn alley. She had not above a penny about her when I searched her.

GEORGE DELANEY . I am a pawnbroker. That watch was pawned at our house by the prisoner. I lent her twenty shillings on it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor at the bottom of Long Acre, I told him I was going home to warm myself; he asked me where my home was; I told him close to Chandos street; he asked me if I cohabited with any man; I said no. He gave me six pence to get some spirits; he asked me to bring a pipe of tobacco and a pot of ale; I did; we went to bed together; after I was in bed I said I should like to get up and have some supper; he said I might get up. I went immediately with the watchman and shewed him where the watch was pawned.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Fined One Shilling , confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-129

302. LAZARUS LEVY and EDWARD SHORTLAND were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of January , two saddles, value 15 s. two pair of traces, value 4 s. and a horse collar, value 1 s. the property of William Coker .

WILLIAM COKER . I am a stablekeeper , 25, William street, St. George's in the East .

JAMES WINDEY . I am a constable. By the information that I received I went to Shortland's apartment, No. 53, Cable street, I saw the pair of traces, two saddles, and a collar; I supposed them to be stolen. The other prisoner came backward and forward to the apartment; Levy said they were his own property.

WILLIAM WALTER . I am servant to Mr. Coker. I found the stable broken open, there were two saddles, two pair of traces, and a collar gone. On Tuesday morning I went and saw the saddles and traces; I know that they belonged to my master; I am certain the saddles are my master's.

The property produced and identified.

Shortland's Defence. I was in the habit of going backwards and forwards, and likewise a great many other young men were in the habit of going there to the young women; the landlord of the house desired me if I had any friends or any thing in the apartment belonging to the young women, to take them away; accordingly I did, and went to a public house in East Smithfield; Mr. Windey came and accused me of a felony.

Levy said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses his character.

Shortland called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LEVY, NOT GUILTY .

SHORTLAND, GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined One Shilling , confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-130

303. SARAH MARSHALL, alias TURNER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , a habit shirt, value 2 s. and a cap, value 2 s. the property of John White .

ISABELLA WHITE . I am the wife of John White . The prisoner was my servant ; she had lived with me about three weeks.

Q. Did you at any time lose a habit shirt and a cap - A. Yes; I think about the 17th; I lost them out of my house, No. 12, Poland street ; my husband is a cabinet maker . The prisoner came to live with me about three days before I was confined to my bed; in the mean time the girl did not suit me, I told her I must get another.

Q. What was it that led you to charge her with this - A. I lost several more things while she was in my service. On the 17th of January she went away without her box being searched; she came to me for a character; I told her I had missed several articles; I mentioned the cap, I did not know any thing of the habit shirt; I missed the baby's cup, it was worth more than a guinea; I told her if she would tell me of it I would be as favourable as I could.

Q. After that I must not hear whether she said any thing about it or not.

Q. When did you see that cap - A. On the 27th my husband and the servant who now lives with me went to her lodgings and brought her box; she was with them herself; she said she could not tell about the baby's cap; she believed the habit shirt was in her box by mistake; upon looking at them I knew them to be mine.

JAMES KENNEDY . When I apprehended the prisoner I asked her if she had any box; she said yes; she shewed me her box; I found the cap in one of her boxes and the habit shirt in another; the prisoner said they came into her boxes through a mistake.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my mistress's shirt and cap; I cannot give any account how it came in the box; I left Mrs. Whites' house; I brought one box away, and left another behind me; I had no lock on the box; I think somebody must have put them in; I washed them and if I put them in, I did not intend to take them away; I went to Mrs. White's and asked her to give me a character; she told me she had lost spoons and a variety of articles; I told her if there was any thing in my box I would return them.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-131

304. ANN MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , thirteen pounds weight of beet, value 6 s. the property of James Mucklow .

JAMES MUCKLOW . I am a butcher in White cross street .

Q. Did you at any time lose thirteen pounds weight of beef - A. I did, on the the 4th of February; I was

outside of the shop at the time; my wife called to me and told me that a woman had stolen some meat; I stopped her in the act of carrying it away; it was near twelve o'clock on Saturday night.

Q. Had you observed her about the shop that evening - A. Yes; when I caught her, I recollected her face; she had got her arm round it, and a cloak to cover it as well as she could; she is a single woman .

Q. What did she say when you stopped her - A. She said she was not going to take it; she set herself down on the stones; I was determined, by knowing of her, that she should go to the watchhouse.

MRS. MUCKLOW. I was standing in the shop; I saw the prisoner come to the stall; she did not see me, my husband was near to her; she looked at him, his back was towards her, she immediately took the beef, put it under her right arm and turned away; I called out to my husband and told him to stop her. I sent for the constable.

EDWARD TRING . This is the beef; I marked the beef and gave it to Mr. Mucklow to salt it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it up in my hand, the gentlewoman said that woman is going to take it away; he beat me and tore every thing off my back; I did take it up in my hand, I own, and put it down again.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-132

305. SAMUEL YATES was indicted for that he on the 21st of January was servant to James Daviss , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 s. 9 d on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JAMES DAVISS . I live at No. 19, Lamb street, Spitalfields, I am a coal dealer ; the prisoner was in my service, he was entrusted to receive money for the coals he sold for me; I charge the prisoner with receiving three shilling and ninepence of Mrs. Rogers, for two bushels of coals, and not giving me the money. On Tuesday the 24th of January Mrs. Rogers called upon me; my man had been to her; the prisoner was present; I said to him there is another two bushels you have received the money, this good woman has paid you; Mrs. Rogers said you know I paid you.

MRS. ROGERS. I live in Corbett's court, Spitalfields ; I deal with Mr. Daviss for coals.

Q. Do you remember having two bushels of coals of him the beginning of January - A. I had two bushels of coals of him before the lad came for the money.

Q. Was the prisoner the person that brought the coals - A. Yes, he brought them all; one bushel on one Saturday and another on the next Saturday. On the 21st of January, he came for the money for the two bushels, about nine o'clock at night; I paid him three shillings and ninepence, the whole demand; I went to Mr. Daviss to order in more coals, Mr. Daviss asked me whether I had paid for the two bushels; I told him I paid the lad, I said to the lad you know I paid you; he did not deny it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to the corner of Catherine Wheel alley, Petticoat-lane, I received the money there for the coals, it was all silver; I put it in my pockets; just before I got home I took the money out, it was a French half crown and a bad shilling; I did not like to give it mistress, I thought she would say I was stupid; I went and changed the shilling, the half crown she did change, she said she never gave it me; I had to pay for a sack of coals; I had not money enough to take home to my mother; I drawed it of Mrs. Rogers, intending to pay my master the next week; my master found it out before I could make it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090215-133

306. JOHN ANNIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS PUGH . I live on the Pavement, Moorfields, in the city of London.

Q. In the month of November last had you occasion to export any articles to Antigua in the West Indies - A. Yes; on board the Russia Company, captain Grisdale; I employed the defendant as my shipping broker , in consequence of the captain's recommendation; this was about the 5th of November.

Q. Where did you give Annis instructions to enter your goods - A. At Lloyd's coffee house.

Q. As shipping broker it would be his duty to make

the entry of the goods - A. I understood so.

Q. Did you give him, at the time he made the entry, a list of the goods that he was to enter - A. Yes.

Q. Was that list that you so gave to the defendant copied from that I give to you - A. It was, with the exception of one article of forty pounds. (The paper read.)

COURT. How much do it make in all - A. Four hundred and forty pounds sixteen shillings.

Q. One article, 5 T H, the sum was not put down in the paper that you gave him - A. No, it was not. I said to him there were several articles in that trunk, he must put down what was necessary.

Q. Did he, from your dictation, put down the articles in that trunk - A. He did; I told him what value to put upon that trunk; forty pounds.

Q. Therefore then it became a complete copy of this - A. Yes, it did.

Q. After you had given him these instructions did you yourself take the goods to the West India docks - A. I did; he said he would meet me there if he could. On Tuesday the 5th of November I took the goods; I did not find him there; I left the goods there.

Q. How soon after did you see him - A. I think, to the best of my recollection, I did not see him till Saturday the 12th, he came to me at my house in Moorfields, he came into the shop; he said he brought his little bill and put it down on the counter.

Q. Is that the bill which he brought to you - A. Yes, that is it. (The bill read.)

"London, November 9th, 1808, Mr. Pugh to John Annis , nine shillings and six pence convoy duty on three hundred and thirty four pound; thirteen pounds eight shillings commission on three hundred and ninety four pounds sixteen shillings; and two pounds, making a total of fifteen pounds sixteen shillings and six pence; settled, John Annis ."

Q. At the time that he produced this to you did you make any observation of convoy duty three hundred and thirty four pounds sixteen shillings, and commission three hundred and ninety four pounds sixteen shillings - A. Yes, I did; he said the commission was always paid upon the whole sum, though the duty was not; the linen and cotton went free.

Q. Upon his stating this to you did you give him any money - A. Yes; I paid him the amount; I paid him eleven pounds in notes, four guineas and a half in gold, half a crown, and six pence; I believe I asked him where the paper was that I had given him to enter the goods by; he said he had mislaid it; I asked him if the business was done, and how it came to be so long before it was done, and whether they were put on board; he said no, they were not, but that they should be done, that he would go down to the docks that morning and get them on board.

COURT. Did he say the entry was made - A. He had charged the entry; he told me that the goods were not put on board, but he would take care and put them on board that morning; this was Saturday the 12th of November; I told him I wanted to see him again, and where I should see him; he said he would meet me at Lloyd's that day at four o'clock; I met him that day at Lloyd's, I asked him if the business was done; he said no, some part of them was opened; I said for God's sake, for what reason; he told me to be quiet and easy and all would be well about them, that he should see me again on Monday, he would give me a better account of them.

Mr. Gurney. Did any thing then pass about the entry - A. No, nothing at all. On Monday the 14th of November we met again at Lloyd's, I asked him if they were then put on board the ship: he said no, they were not, but that all but the linen were stopped and opened; I said it was very odd they should be opened, for what reason: he said be still and quiet, and if nothing was said to them it should all be right again; I told him I could not think of any reason why they should be stopped; he told me if I would be quiet he would put all to rights again.

Q. How soon did you meet him again - A. I saw him again at the custom house; I went down to the custom house and enquired about the goods; that was on Wednesday the 16th I saw him again.

Q. Did you find that your goods had been stopped - A. I found that they had been seized by the officer.

Q. Was it stated in the prisoner's presence on what ground they had been seized - A. No, I believe not.

MR. MILLER. Q. You are a collector of customs for the port of London; of the customs outward for the port of London - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the defendant, Annis, coming to make any entry of goods on the 11th of November last - A. No, I cannot; I have some hundreds come to me on a day.

Q. Look at this paper - A. This is my hand writing.

Q. You saw that signed - A. I dare say I did; I believe it to be signed in my presence.

Q. This is a declaration of the value of the goods for the purpose of exportation, for what purpose is that entry made - A. For the several duties; one in the middle is the convoy duty upon that entry; I cannot speak to that.

Mr. Const. That is your hand writing, that is all you prove - A. Yes.

Q. When the defendant made an entry of this before you, he put the value of the goods, you put the charge from the value of the goods - A. Yes; the exporter makes it out and I sign it; that is my hand writing.

MRS. FAVEY. Q. Have you had any opportunity of knowing the defendant, Annis's, hand writing - look at that and see whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I did not see him write it; I believe it to be his hand writing.

Q. Look at that and tell me also whether you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I believe that to be his hand writing.

Q. Now look at that, that is another paper, do you believe that to be his hand writing - A. I cannot say as dto that; I do not think that to be his hand writing. (The receipt read.)

"Russia Company, William Grisdale , Antigua, British bottom; John Annis ; Irish linen, one hundred and twenty five pounds; two hundred weight of wrought iron, wearing apparel in packages, total value sixty nine pounds ten shillings; I, John Annis , do declare that I enter the said goods, value sixty nine pounds ten

shillings; witness my hand, John Annis ; signed in the presence of J. Miller."

JOSHUA STURTING CROSSLEY . Q. I believe you are one of the searchers of the customs for the port of London - A. I am.

Q. Is this the copy of the entry of these goods for Mr. Pugh, that was entered, shipped on board the Russia Company - A. It is. (The entry read.) Total value sixty nine pounds ten shillings; signed John Annis .

JOHN DODSON . Q. Did you receive the convoy duty on these goods - A. I did.

Q. That is at the rate of four per cent - A. It is.

Q. What is the sum received - A. Two pounds sixteen shillings as the duty upon the value of sixty nine pounds ten shillings.

Q. You received the money of whom - A. That I cannot tell. I signed the receipt at the time.

Q. Did you receive any other money upon these goods than that two pounds sixteen shillings - A. Not upon the account of these goods.

Mr. Alley. What is the date of that - A. The 8th of November, 1808. The cotton went duty free.

Mr. Const. What did this case contain - A. Wearing apparel and leather, sixty nine pounds ten shillings.

Q. Is there any thing upon the face of that of three hundred and sixty four pounds eight shillings - A. Not at all.

Mr. Gurney. Does that paper contain the marks of all the packages to be shipped on board - is there not the mark of every article - A. There is.

Q. The person that exports he declares the value so declared - A. He does, he pays upon the warrant; I have only received for the value of sixty nine pounds ten shillings and no more.

Q. to Crossley. You told me before you were one of the searchers - A. I am.

Q. Did you search the goods that are contained in that declaration - A. I did.

Q. Marked in the described there - A. Justly so.

Q. Did you observe the sum in which they were entered - A. I did, sixty nine pounds ten shillings.

Q. In consequence of the smallness of that value did you open the goods - A. I did, and I found them to be of large value.

Q. What did you find the real value of these goods entered sixty nine pounds ten shillings - A. Perhaps three or four hundred pounds, or more; vastly exceeding the entry; I thereupon seized them.

Q. After you had so seized them did Mr. Annis come to you - A. He did, and his excuse was that in the hurry of business he had committed the error.

Q. You knew he was a person acting as a shipping broker - A. I never saw him before this transaction.

Mrs. Favey. I believe you shipped some goods on board the Russia Company, and employed Annis to ship them as broker - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know whether the articles A. F. a trunk of ironmongery and sadlery were your property - A. That was my property; he entered it as ironmongery; they was shoes.

Q. Upon forty nine pounds ten shillings the duty would be two pounds would it - A. Yes.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090215-134

307. GEORGE HAMMAR was indicted for wilfull and corrupt perjury .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090215-135

308. GEORGE THOMPSON and THOMAS NORMAN were indicted for that they about the hour of four at night, on the 5th of February , the dwelling house of James Coles unlawfully did break, with intent burglariously the said dwelling house to break and enter, and the goods there being burglariously to steal and carry away .

WILLIAM LEAF . Q. Where do you live - A. In Fleet street, I am a haberdasher ; I am the prosecutor; I know nothing of the transaction.

Q. Whose house was broke open - A. James Coles , he is my partner; I am in partnership with Benjamin Severs and James Coles .

Q. Neither of the other partners live there - A. No. The house is in Fleet street, No. 110, near Fleet market, in the parish of St. Bride .

Mr. Gurney. I presume the rent and taxes are paid by the firm - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you and Mr. Severs keep a room to sleep in - A. No.

Q. You have all of you access to the shop and warehouse - A. To the warehouse.

Q. What was the part attempted to be broken open - A. The warehouse; it has an opening into Poppin's court; the warehouse is part of the house.

JOHN SHENTON . I am a publican, I live at the Red Lion, Poppin's court, Fleet street. On Sunday morning, the 5th of February, my wife awoke me, she told me somebody was breaking into the house; I opened the window, I saw three men at Mr. Leaf and Severs' warehouse, they were standing against the warehouse; the watchman came to cry the hour of half past three, and they dispersed; I got into bed again; presently I heard the noise of moving some shutters, I got up and dressed myself and came to the one pair of stairs window; I watched them alternately, sometimes at the window and sometimes at the door; that part of the shutter that they first attempted to break they left off, it made such a noise; they began another shutter with a center bit; after they had made a small hole with the center bit the watchman came by; they dispersed the second time. When he came at four o'clock they had made a very visible hole, then Norman stood with his back towards the hole, and his face towards me, and the others went away. The watchman asked him what he was doing there; he said he was in liquor, he was going home to Stonecutter street; they had some conversation relating to some gin. After the watchman went to his box; they went to work again; the prisoners and another there were three and at times there were two. Thompson and Norman came back, they continued to work, excepting when the watchman came round at half past four, then they dispersed as they did before, taking the precaution to daub the shutter that they had cut with some mud that they took out of the gutter. About a quarter before five these men were very attentive to work; I armed myself with a small poker, went and collared Thompson, and struck Norman; a scuffle ensued, they gave me a few slight blows

with their hands; I turned my attention towards securing one; I beat the one that I laid hold of till I thought he had sufficient and he was in my power; then I turned to Norman, he ran away; while I turned round to Norman, Thompson ran down the court; I pursued him at about two yards distance; I was about two yards distance from him all the way down the court till we came to the bottom; two watchmen were turning into the court, they rather impeded his progress; I came up to him, collared him, and turned him over to the watchman; I heard a voice say what is the matter; I turned round and saw it was Norman. I gave him in charge likewise; they were both taken to the watchhouse.

Q. You saw them at half past three - A. Yes; and when they were taken it was a quarter before five.

Q. Did you observe the persons of these men - A. The lamp gave a very indifferent light, I could not swear to their features ; when I gave a knock at Norman I had a full opportunity of seeing; he had the opportunity of running away and going to Fleet street; but when he returned and asked what was the matter I was convinced he is the same man; I am now quite satisfied in my own mind he is the same person; the other man there can be no doubt of him; I never lost sight of him.

Mr. Gurney. Before the alderman you were not quite so certain as you are now, you then said you thought he was dressed like the man, and his voice was like the man that you heard speak to the watchman - A. Yes.

Q. While you were taking Thompson, Norman came behind you and asked what was the matter, his voice corresponded with the man you had heard before and you gave him in custody - he was not committed when the other man was - A. He was; and after being committed he asked leave to bring some people to prove where he was at the time; he brought some person to prove where he was at two o'clock; the next day he was to bring people to prove further; then he could not prove so far as he did the day before.

Q. You do not mean to speak positively to Norman - A. His going out of my sight does not enable me to speak so positively as to Thompson.

Q. The man who did escape, whoever he was, you gave him a pretty sharp blow on the neck with the poker - A. I fancy I did.

Q. In point of fact he was examined and no mark found on his neck - A. Yes.

GEORGE AIRES . I am a watchman, my beat is in Poppin's court, Fleet street. When I went the hour of four Norman was standing with his back to the shutter; I asked him what he was standing there for; he said he was looking towards Mr. Shenton's window; he wanted a glass of gin; he said he could get one; Shenton knew him very well; I told him he had better go on; he said he would. I went up to the top of the court; he asked me if there were no houses open where he could get a glass of gin, he would give me one; I told him there was a night house in the Old Bailey where he might get some; he wanted me to go with him; I told him I could not go, nor I would not go; he told me that he lived in Stonecutter street; I told him to go down Poppin's court into Harp alley, to Stonecutter street, or to go down Shoe lane; he went down Poppin's court; I went down to the watch-box, and then I went about half way up to where the noise was, I heard a noise of screaking; the noise ceased a bit and then began again; I could not think what it was: I thought it was some people moving their goods, I thought I must watch if in case any body moved their goods away I should be blamed; I went up the court, then Mr. Shenton was pursuing after these men; Thompson was stopped at the end of Poppin's court, Harp alley ; when we got him a little way down Harp alley Norman came up and asked what was the matter; then Mr. Shenton gave charge of him; I laid hold of him and took him to the watch-house along with the other.

Q. After the long conversation that you had with Norman about the gin, had you the opportunity of observing him so as to be able positively to tell that he is the man - A. Yes, I had, at the end of the court.

- ROGERS . I am beadle and constable of St. Bride's. The prisoners were brought into our watch-house between four and five in the morning; I took the charge from Mr. Shenton; they were searched in the watchhouse and no implement was found on them at all; I was in the room when Norman was stripped at Guildhall; there was no marks of any blow on his neck or body.

Mr. Gurney, to Leaf. How was the house broken - A. The shutter was cut through the wood but not through the plate ; they had attempted two places, one place was cut with a slight mark, the other was cut a round ring through; about five inches diameter was taken out of the wood part, leaving the iron plate on the inside; the iron plate was nailed to the wood.

COURT. Mr. Shenton, you said you heard a noise - A. Yes; it was something like a splitting of the shutters; a screaking noise.

Thompson's Defence. I had been out to a money club that I belong to, I stopped very late; I went to sleep on a bench. I live in Shoe lane; coming home very late some young girl picked me up and took me down this court; in the mean time the young girl took me down somebody rushed upon me and struck me with the poker; I ran; I did not know but it was somebody belonging to this girl, and they were going to use me ill.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner Norman.

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 23.

NORMAN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Two Years in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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