Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th January 1809.
Reference Number: 18090111
Reference Number: f18090111-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 11th of JANUARY, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. One of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt.; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart.; Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. William Domville , esq. John Atkins , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Gray

William Rosser

Ralph Massey

John Smith

Benjamin Sadler

William Henley

George Woolley

Thomas Woods

William Ewsters

William Brass

John Thomas

Thomas Dobican .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Oliver

John Warren

William Gibbs Roberts

Thomas Fisher

James Smith

James Hardy

Thomas Humley

John Shelton

Henry Ramsey

James Whitehead

John Smith

George Potter .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Richard Packer

George Tarrington

Michael Biggs

James Foreman

Christopher Dresser

John King

John Lampert

Daniel Vellom

Joseph Hancock

Thomas Alwright

William Berry

Joseph Hurdley .

Reference Number: t18090111-1

89. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , two sheets, value 5 s. a table cloth, value 2 s. and a coverlid, value 3 s. the property of the governors of the London hospital .

SECOND COUNT the property of Catherine Leblone .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ELIZABETH ABBOTT . I am a nurse in the London Hospital .

Q. In the month of December last, was the prisoner a night nurse - A. Yes.

Q. Before the 21st of December had you missed any thing - A. Yes, a sheet, a tablecloth, and a cover-lid, I missed at one time.

Q. On the 21st of December had the prisoner been out - A. Yes; she came home about eight o'clock in the evening, quite intoxicated with liquor; she was unable to go up stairs; I and Jane Pierpoint undressed her and put her to bed; we were obliged to cut all the strings of her clothes, and on shaking the pockets four duplicates fell out. These are the duplicates.

JANE PIERPONT . Q. Did you assist in undressing of the prisoner - A. Yes; after her pockets were taken off I turned them bottom upwards, shook them, and the duplicates fell out

BENJAMIN MATTHEWS . I am a servant of Mr. Burton, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On the 8th of December last, the prisoner pawned a sheet for two shillings and sixpence, in the name of Ann Edwards ; on the 15th of November I took in a table cloth of her for two shillings; on the 1st of December I lent her two shillings on the second sheet.

CHRISTIAN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker in the Minories; I took in a coverlid of the prisoner, I lent her one shilling and sixpence on it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken ill; I owed some money to a person who threatened to summons me; I took these things to make up the money.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-2

90. MARGARET HARRINGTON, alias FALBY, alias PEGGY SULLIVAN , was indicted for that she at the general quarter sessions of the peace, holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 29th of November, in the 44th year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was sentenced by the court to be imprisoned in New Prison in Clerkenwell for the term of one year, and at the expiration of that term to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; that she on the 1st of December last, a piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a shilling, as and for a good shilling unlawfully did utter to Joseph Ballard , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL. - Mr. Arabin. You are clerk to the solicitor of the Mint - A. I am; I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner; I took the copy from the clerk of the court; I have examined it with the original in the court; it is a true copy. (Read in court.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . - Mr. Arabin. You are clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of New Prison, Clerkenwell - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the same person as described in November sessions, 1808 - A. Yes, she was.

COURT. What was she tried for - A. For uttering counterfeit money; I was present when she was tried and convicted; she was sent to be imprisoned one year in New Prison, and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years to come.

Mr. Arabin. Did you take her into custody - A. I did; I am sure of her person; she remained one year in Mr. Newport's care.

JOSEPH BALLARD . - Mr. Knapp. You are a fruiterer in Covent Garden market - A. I bring it there to sell.

Q. Look round and tell me whether you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar on the 1st of December last - A. I do; I saw her at Covent Garden market; she came to purchase a basket of apples, of the price of four shillings and sixpence; she turned them out of my basket into her own and gave me four shillings and sixpence; I signified to her that the money was bad and that twice she had given me such money as that; I do not remember exactly the words that I spoke; she said give it me again and I will give you a seven shilling piece.

Q. Did she shew you the seven shilling piece - A. She never shewed me a seven shilling piece.

Q. Did you part with the money that she had shewed you - A. No; she signified that she had lost her pocket or left it at home, I do not know which, and run away immediately; I pursued her and caught her, and brought her back with great difficulty; I got a porter in the market to assist me; she was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Do you know Bergin - A. Yes; he came afterwards; there were several that had hold of her.

Q. Did you go with her to the watchhouse - A. No, I saw her well secured; I could not leave the fruit.

Q. Did you keep possession of the money - A. I did, I have kept it ever since; I produce the four shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner. Mr. Ballard is telling a parcel of lies.

COURT to Ballard. Had you known the woman before - A. I am not perfect in that.

JOHN BERGIN . - Mr. Arabin. You are a salesman are not you, and where - A. Yes, at Covent Garden.

Q. On the 1st of December do you recollect the first witness being there - A. Yes, and the prisoner also.

COURT. Where was she - A. In Covent Garden market, a few yards from my stand; when I heard of the piece of work, then I went up; a porter had her in custody; then there was a great many people round her; they said she had more in her hand.

Q. Did she hear the crowd say she had more in her hand - A. I think she must, they said it loud enough; I saw some papers in her hand, I caught hold of her hand, and after great difficulty I got her hand open, and with assistance I took from it seven bad shillings; they were in paper.

Mr. Arabin. Before you took this from her hand, did you see any thing drop from her hand - A. Three shillings dropped from her hand on the ground; as I was getting the others I saw the three shillings drop from her hand; I had them given to me; the three shillings were never out of my sight.

Q. Did you afterwards take the paper from her hand - A. I took the paper and the seven shillings altogether from her; the three shillings besides sell out from between her fingers. I have had these shillings in my possession ever since; they have been locked up in a box; these are the same, there is ten altogether.

EDWARD RUSSEL . Q. What are you - A. I am a fruit salesman in Covent Garden. I saw the prisoner in custody; she was trying to get away from them, she ran up against me and laid hold of my arm; I thought she was going to put some of the money about the cuff of my coat; I pulled my arm away and she dropped a sixpence from her hand; I picked it up; that is the sixpence, I have had it ever since, and kept it separate from any other.

MR. JOHN NICHOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. I now put into Mr. Nicholls' hand the four shillings and sixpence that was first tendered - A. They are all counterfeits, and very bad.

COURT. They were never coined in the Mint - A. No.

Q. I now put into Mr. Nicholls' hand the ten shillings that were produced by Bergin - A. These are all counterfeits, and the sixpence that Mr. Russel picked up is also a counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up in the morning, I went to market, I had a guinea in my pocket; I met three or four women that I knew, I had not seen them for upwards of a twelvemonth; I took them into a wine vaults to treat them with half a pint of gin; we had three half pints of gin there: I called for change of the guinea to pay for the gin; she offered me all halfpence, I told her they would not take them in the market; then I called for another half pint, that was four half pints; there was a man came in, she asked the man to change the guinea for me; he said he would if he could; so I reached the guinea to the man, and then I paid the woman for the four half pints of gin; she gave me a bit of paper to put the change in; I put the change in my hand till I came to the market; I went round the market; I asked a man what was the price of a bushel of apples, he said six shillings; I came over to this man, I asked him what he asked, he said some seven shillings and some five shillings; I said I could not make the money of them; he said have that bushel of apples at four shillings and sixpence; so then I reached him four shillings and sixpence out of my hand; this four shillings and sixpence he reached to another man; that man said it was good; he reached it to another; I said there is so much reaching of the money, reach it to me if you do not like it, I will give you a seven shilling piece; then I went to put my hand into my right hand pocket, I found I had not my pocket on, my child took it out of my hand in the morning when I got up; I told him to leave the apples in my basket till I went home and brought him the seven shilling piece; I told him I got change of the guinea in the morning, whether good or bad I did not know; with that he got hold of me and dragged me from one to another; I said do not use me ill, I am willing to go very easy if you get a constable; I thought he would have taken my life away from me; I was sick six weeks, he gave me such a beating; he dragged me to the watchhouse and got me down in the hole, he began to lather me; the women could not get him out.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-3

91. ANN MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December , a cheese, value 10 s. the property of Frances Hill , window.

WILLIAM CORY . I conduct the business for the widow Mrs. Hill, a cheesemonger in Thames street. On the 16th of December we were taking in a load of cheese from the Custom house quay ; it is customary with us to take a certain number at a time; we loaded five on a stall board; the prisoner came by in about five minutes afterwards and took one of these five and put it under her cloak.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it - A. No, I was informed by a child that she had taken a cheese off the stall board; he shewed me the woman, I pursued her and found it under her cloak; I brought her back into the shop and took the cheese from her and took her before the lord mayor.

WILLIAM BERRY DODSON , the constable, called, and not appearing in court with the property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-4

92. RICHARD GURNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a memorandum book, value 6 d. five receipt stamps, value 1 s. the property of William Pearson .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded -

GUILTY .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-5

93. ANN GREEN and MARY COX were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , eleven yards of ribbon, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Yorke .

ANN YORKE . I live in Fleet market. On Saturday last, between four and five o'clock, the two prisoners were in my shop; my husband is a butcher , I keep a haberdasher's shop on the other side of Fleet market . I know nothing of the transaction myself.

ANN FISHER . I went into Mrs. Yorke's shop on Saturday afternoon between four and five o'clock; the two prisoners were in Mrs. Yorke's shop; the tallest of the two prisoners took a ball of blue ribbon out of the first drawer that shopwoman shewed her, she said there was none in that drawer that would not; the shopwoman shewed her another drawer of ribbons; and she took out another ball of ribbons; I asked the shopwoman if she had another person that could serve; she

directed me to go to the parlour; I went to the parlour and called Mrs. Yorke.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners take the ribbons - A. I saw Ann Green take two balls, one out of the first drawer and the other out of the second drawer. She concealed them under her great coat; a gentleman in the house stopped them; he picked up the balls of ribbon.

MR. WHEATLEY. I was at Mrs. Yorke's in the parlour; she said there were two women in the shop that she suspected of taking something; I came out and charged Ann Green with having taken something; she endeavoured to give it to the other; I endeavoured to take it from her, she dropped it on the floor. I picked it up and gave it to the officer when he came.

Q. You are sure you saw Ann Green drop it - A. Yes.

JEMIMA WICKES . I am shopwoman to Mrs. Yorke. On Saturday last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came in the shop together; they asked to look at some ribbons.

Q. Which of them asked - A I do not know which, they both spoke together; I shewed them a drawer of ribbons; I suspected the motion of Ann Green's hands, I did not see them take any thing; they both put their hands in the drawer and took the ribbons to look at them together; I called Mrs. Yorke; Ann Green was charged with having the ribbon; I had spoke to the witness Fisher; she said she had seen her take it. When I charged Green with having the ribbon, she let it drop.

The property produced and identified.

Green's Defence. I met with this young woman, I asked her where she was going, she said she was going to buy two yards of ribbon for her head; we saw some ribbon in the window, we went in the shop and asked what the price of it was: the shopwoman said she had some in the drawer that came to eight pence; she took two pieces of ribbon to take two yards off; it rolled off the counter; the gentleman came round and said I dropped it.

Cox's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a couple of yards of ribbon with this young woman; the gentleman came round and said this young woman had some ribbon; he turned round and knocked the ribbon down with his elbow; I never put my hand in the box.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-6

94. JOHN MILES SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , a great coat, value 30 s. the property of Richard Temple .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I live servant with Dr. Temple, Bedford row . Last Friday week, a little after nine o'clock in the evening, there came a knock or a ring at the door; I opened the door, the prisoner asked me was the doctor at home; I said at this moment he is just gone out, but I expect he will be in soon; he said have you any body in the house that can give me an answer to this letter; I told him yes, if you walk in possibly they can; he gave me a letter into my hand, I told him to walk into the hall; this is the letter: he came into the hall, and I shut the door; I left him in the hall and was going up to my mistress in the drawing room with the letter, I heard the street door open when I was half way going up; I saw the prisoner lay hold of the blue great coat, he let it go and took this one; there were two great coats hanging up in the hall when he took this one; he got towards the door, I jumped down after him; when he saw me he went to shut the door; I got my knee against the door and kept it open; I went to lay hold of him, he let the great coat fall off his arm, made a swing, and got away from me. I picked up the great coat.

Q. At the time you picked up the great coat was it without the street door - A. Yes; he ran towards James street; I pursued him; the watchman sprang his rattle, he turned down King's road, I was as near him as possible; I saw a man lay hold of him, he was never out of my sight. (The letter read.)

The property produced and identified.

WILLIAM HINDE . Q. Do you remember on Friday sennight hearing the cry of stop thief - A. Yes; I was just below Mr. Garrow's door in Bedford row; I saw the prisoner running and several others after him.

Q. Did you see that servant, the black man - A. Yes; the prisoner turned towards King's road; I stopped him; the servant came up, we took him back to Dr. Temple's house, and from there to the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I will endeavour to occupy the time of the court as little as possibly I can. I have been in the habit of teaching privately; from the unexpected loss of several scholars, I was a long time almost without employment, with a family of six children; I was obliged to let my rent run very much behind; the consequence was I was not able to pay the debt, for which I happened to be arrested; and having spent all the money I could raise by my clothes to support myself and family while I was in prison; I got released by a lady who was my scholar; I then had a situation to go into the country, but unfortunately my wife was taken in labour six weeks before she expected. I have since got some little employment by writing. I have now another child; the youngest is five months, and the second not twenty months, driven to the utmost distress; hearing my little children crying for bread, and I had none for them, on my coming by Dr. Temple's house the coat struck me - I had not strength to resist the temptation, but yielded to the weakness of my nature.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-7

95. JOHN BAKER, alias TURNWELL , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Catherine dowager countess of Morton, about the hour of eight at night on the 5th of October , with intent the goods and chattels of the said dwelling house then and there burglariously to steal .

SECOND COUNT for like offences, stating it to be the dwelling house of Catherine Douglas , widow , commonly called the countess dowager of Morton .

THIRD COUNT the dwelling house of Catherine Douglas only.

The case was stated by Mr. Andrews.

JOHN FOY . Q. You are a constable of Marlborough street - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of information that you had received, did you proceed in the month of October to lady Morton's house - A. I did.

Q. Did you go to a house where Decaux lived - A. I did.

Q. Where is lady Morton's house - A. In Park street, St. George's, Hanover square , the back of it goes into Park lane. The house that Decaux lived in is opposite of lady Morton's house.

Q. What day of the month was it that you went to Decaux's house - A. On the 4th, about half after eight, I went into the parlour.

Q. What time of the night was it that you saw any person come to lady Morton's house - A. At half after twelve, I saw five persons.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Baker - A. I did not.

Q. Did you observe the persons of these five men particularly so as to know them - A. I did not.

Q. Are you able to say whether Baker was one of these five men - A. I cannot say that.

Q. What did these five persons do - A. Three of them went to the iron area gate, and two of them went to the street door, they looked at each; the watchman was coming past crying half after twelve; they went away, I saw no more of them that night. On the 5th, about half after six, I went to lady Morton's house before it was dark; in my way to the house, about half after five, I was crossing Chapel street, I observed five men standing at the post at the corner of Chapel street in Park lane, two of them was Starkey and Lasper; I had known them before, they had their faces towards me; I did not know any of the others, their backs were towards me. I went on to lady Morton's house, where Jackson, one of the constables, was waiting; I walked about some little time to get unobserved in the house by the people that were there. After I had been there a little time my brother and Budgell came in; I found Jackson in the house, he had gone earlier in the evening. We four officers then went down into a room that opens out of the house into the area, we remained there some time, I suppose at least an hour, then I heard the area gate unlock, and some persons come down the steps to the area door, I heard them attempting to unlock it, they were as much as twenty minutes changing the keys; I heard them changing the keys; they could not unlock it; and some person, that seemed to me as if he was standing upon the top of the area steps in the street, called out d - n you, send it in; I believe it was the one at the door then said, hand me down the jemmy.

Q. That means an iron crow - A. Yes. I heard the crow directly put into the door, they began to wrench it at the outside, after wrenching it several times and stopping now and then. There was a bell hung behind the door; when they wrenched the bell rung, they stopped a bit then, at last they wrenched it open; one of them came into the passage immediately and called to the others, come along, it is all right; some of the others said, now get a light; I heard them go along the passage, and it seemed to me to be the feet of four people by the sound, as nigh as I could guess; they went up stairs, I could hear them walk about the back parlour, over my head; I had pulled my boots off before that; I went up after them, my brother, Thomas Foy , Jackson, and Budgell, followed me; we had no light; I saw there was a light in the back parlour, I went into the parlour immediately, there I saw four men, three in one corner of the room, and one by the fire place, nearer to me.

Q. Did you know either of them men - A. I did not.

Q. Did they see you - A. Yes; they put out their lights immediately, they seemed to me to have two lights. I laid hold of the one nearest me by the fire place, it was dark then, I held him for a second, I had only got one hand to lay hold him, I had my cutlass in my other hand; he struck me across the breast and shoved me to the other side of the room, and then I was close to these people, I then heard a striking against the wainscoat near me; I thought it was a crow at the time.

Q. Did it appear to you that they were striking at you - A. I thought it then; there was nobody else in the room as I know to assist me at the time; I drew a pistol and fired at the place where the noise came from; I followed them up into a little passage about as big as where I now stand; then there were four of us in this little place; they shoved me back again; as soon as they shoved me into the room I heard a door burst open; I called to the other officers to bring me a light, which they did immediately; as soon as they brought me a light I followed them into the yard, I saw which way they had gone, through a door that leads into the back yard.

COURT. The door that was open communicated to the back yard - A. To the back yard: when I got out there I saw Starkey had got on the back office.

Q. Describe the situation you found him in - A. I found him getting up from off his knee upon the coping of one of the back offices; there is a side wall adjoins the house; he was getting off that and getting on one of the offices; I ran round and got into Park lane, he had jumped off the wall and broke his leg, he was laying under the wall; I had him taken back to the house and I went back to examine the place.

Mr. Andrews. Did you observe what became of either of the other three - A. I did not then; they must all have escaped the same way. One of them went over the wall of the next yard; I did not see him, we found that afterwards. When I returned to see the state of the house, in the parlour I saw a man's hat and some blood, and the ball of the pistol sticking in the door; I found an iron crow, six skeleton keys, and a piece or cotton of a candle, where Starkey had gone over the parapet of the wall; he had dropped them before he got over.

COURT. Where was it you found them - A. This door out of the parlour opens to a flat which covers a kitchen below; then along the yard there is another place which makes it level with Park lane wall; that was where I found them and that was where I saw Starkey getting up, where I found them. I sent Starkey to the infirmary to be taken care of. I found the door that leads into the yard broken open, with the lock broke; the door they went out of. The door of the area into the house was broken open with an iron crow; it was evident the door had been forced with a crow, and I have no doubt but that is the crow; I compared the crow to the marks, it tallied; I matched the skeleton keys, none of them would unlock the area door; one of them opened the area gate.

Q. Shortly after this Lasper was taken into custody - A. Lasper was taken immediately after; Cavill was not taken for a fortnight after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You did not know Baker till he was taken up - A. I did not.

Q. This offence was committed in the month of October - A. Yes.

Q. And Baker has been recently taken up - A. Yes.

PETER DECAUX . Q. What are you - A. I am a

carpenter and joiner.

Q. Where were you living in October last - A. No. 4, Park lane; the house is nearly opposite to lady Morton's house; we can see what passes at lady Morton's door.

Q. On Thursday evening about the 1st of October, tell us what you observed - A. As I was going home from my pay table, King street, Swallow street, about half past eleven or a little more, I saw five men standing at lady Morton's door. I passed by them, I came round and I saw one I knew of the name of Cavill. The watchman came by calling past twelve, he disturbed them. I observed Thomas Cavill , he had worked with me for a week or a fortnight; as to the others I did not know them at the present time; after I had passed them, I came round to my own door to go to bed; I saw no more of them that evening. On the Sunday I went to the Bleeding Hart in Drury lane; Cavill told me that he used that house at the time he worked with me. I saw Starkey, Lasper, and Cavill, at the Bleeding Hart, in company with the prisoner.

COURT. Did the prisoner make a part of the company, or was he by himself - A. He was with them and drinking with them. John Cavill mentioned lady Morton's house. I did not hear the man at the bar say any thing about it.

Q. How near was Baker at that time to Cavill - A. Close, by touching him at the same table.

Mr. Andrews. Are you able to say that Baker, the man you saw on the Sunday, was one of the five men you saw about lady Morton's house - A. That I can not say any thing at all about. I went again to the Bleeding Hart on the Monday, there I saw the prisoner Cavill, Lasper, and Starkey, they were in company then; the prisoner and Cavill went down to Park street to look at the house.

Q. How do you know that they went to Park street - A. They mentioned it when they came back; I heard them say they were going to Park street; Cavill said to Baker, will you take a walk with me, Jack the Baker said he would go with him; I sat there till they returned; they might be gone about two hours or more, they returned both together, Cavill and Jack the Baker. Upon their return, Lasper said to Cavill, well, what do you think of it, how is it; (Lasper and Starkey had remained in the tap room all the time); the prisoner at the bar said, I think it is a good thing; they then called for a pot of porter and drank together; then Cavill said, I will go and see where so and so is and borrow the tools. Jack the Baker, the prisoner, made answer, I will go with you, Cavill replied with all my heart; they came back again, Lasper said how is it, the prisoner answered, why he is gone to Croydon fair with his girl, we must leave it alone to night; both Baker and Cavill said so. I then came away. I went again on the Tuesday to the Bleeding Hart. Jack the Baker and Cavill went to this person again, they did not mention the name; they went again after the tools, they came back and said it was all right.

Q. Which of them said that - A. Cavill said it was all right; Cavill asked what time they should meet, the prisoner said about nine o'clock, Lasper said he thought it as good a time as any; but where they did not mention in my hearing; they were to do the trick at eleven, Cavill said that. I then proceeded to Marlborough street, and gave information to the officers.

COURT. What time of the day was it you went to the Bleeding Hart - A. About three in the afternoon; it was about seven o'clock when I came away from the Bleeding Hart.

Q. You say you went to the public office - A. I went to the public house opposite of the office; I acquainted Mr. Foy of it, he spoke to his brother officers; I told them to be at such a place, and I would secure them a place whereby they should be secure from the sight of them, at the house kept by my wife for lady Steward: I lived at that house with my wife, I would be there ready to let them in about nine o'clock; the officers came on Tuesday evening, I put them in the front parlour; we then waited there till about half past twelve o'clock; at that time there were five men came up to lady Morton's door; I was then in the front room along with the officers; five men went up the steps of the street door, three of them came down to the area gate, and the others might be upon the steps for about a minute or two; the watchman came and called half an hour after twelve o'clock; they then dispersed, I saw no more of them that night.

Q. Did you distinguish who they were - A. The prisoner was one, I am sure of that; it was a bright moon light night at the time, and I had taken particular notice of the persons before, I knew them all by sight, and the names by which they called one other I took down on paper, and the description; I went the next day to the Bleeding Hart, about ten in the morning, and saw Cavill, Lasper, Starkey, and Jack the Baker, they were all in company together; I heard them talking about meeting Jem Britten at five o'clock; Cavill then said it was all right; the prisoner said I have got a jemmy, it is a d - d good one; when I heard them say they were to meet at five o'clock, I immediately went and gave the officers information; Jackson came about five o'clock, John Foy came about half past five; the other officers did not get in till near six; I went to lady Morton's house about five o'clock. As soon as I acquainted the officers to meet me at the house I went to inform the girl of it; after Jackson and me were in house I heard a knock at the door; this was about half after five or a little better.

Mr. Andrews. It was not dark then - A. No, it was not; Lasper came up to the door and knocked; I opened the door and pulled my head back; the woman of the house and my wife were in the house at the same time; my wife answered when the door was opened; he asked whether general Douglas lived there.

COURT. Did you see who the person was that asked the question - A. Yes, I had placed myself behind the door to observe through the crack; I observed him and the rest of the men on the pavement, I saw them between the hinges of the door, I knew their faces.

Mr. Andrews. Tell us who they were - A. There was Lasper, Starkey, Jack Baker and Cavill; there were five altogether; four standing at the bottom of the steps at the time Lasper was standing at the door, asking if general Douglas lived there; the answer was made to the men there was no such a person there; they immediately then went away. I stopped in the house till John Foy came in, and then I went out; that was about a quarter to six o'clock; exactly I cannot say.

Q. What direction did you take - A. I turned to the right towards South street; I saw the five men, Lasper, Starkey, Jem Britten, Cavill, and the prisoner; I am

sure the prisoner was one of them. I then followed them up South street into South Audley street, round to Chapel street, down to Park street again.

Q. Making a little circuit and then returning to lady Morton's house again - A. Yes; still keeping in company together; after they came into Park street, they went into Park lane; my wife and the young woman of the house were coming out then; Cavill and the prisoner followed the two girls in Grovesnor square; I followed them at a distance; they came back after seeing them into the square; they returned to their partners; Cavill said it was all right; they went round to South street, to my lady Morton's house; I was still keeping my eye upon them, I was in South street, I stood by the public house. They went up to the gate of lady Morton's house, all five; Starkey and Jem Britten remained at the gate, the other three passed on a little way.

COURT. What time in the evening was this - A. That I cannot say, it might be about seven o'clock at night.

Mr. Andrews. Was it dark - A. It was duskish; they opened the area gate and went away; by persons passing they were disturbed.

Q. Did you observe how they opened the area gate - A. They opened it with something they had in their hands, I cannot exactly say what it was; as soon as they opened it Starkey said it was all right.

COURT. How near were you to them when he said that - A. I was about three doors off, standing at the public house the corner of South street; as soon as the people had passed they returned again, three of them then went down the area steps, Starkey, Britten, and Lasper; they were trying at the door some considerable time; I heard a bell ring, I supposed it was the bell of the door, and I heard the door crack; I was then opposite, at my own door; I supposed the door was then opened; just before that one of them, (Lasper,) came up the steps and halloed out bring the jemmy this way.

Q. He came up the steps - A. Yes, just to the top; the prisoner and Cavill were standing at the corner of South street about three house off.

Q. Fix exactly, if you can, the hour, what time in the evening it was when you heard the bell ring - A. It might be seven o'clock, past seven, it might be a quarter after, as near as I can tell.

Q. How was the light at that time - A. It was dark at that time, it was duskish; I was about four or five houses off; it was not very dark and it was not very light.

Q. Were there any remains of the light of the day - A. No, very little indeed; it was so dark that I could distinguish a person about three houses off by the lamps.

Q. Was it in your judgment any remains of day then - A. No, not any; it was not real dark nor real light.

Mr. Andrews. Could you have discovered their faces without the assistance of the lamps - A. I could the distance I was off them at that time.

COURT. It was duskish but not dark - A. Not so dark as it was afterwards; it was darker afterwards, before the moon got up; at that time there was no moon to be seen.

Mr. Andrews. After the three men what became of the other men - A. Cavill went down immediately after the jemmy had been called for, and left the prisoner at the bar at the corner of South street; I kept my station opposite watching; the prisoner then went to the back of the house into Park lane as soon as Cavill had left him.

Q. Did you observe what the men at the area gate did after this - A. No, I could not; I remained at the front of the house, and after hearing the report of a pistol about a quarter of an hour afterwards; in a few minutes after the report of the pistol, I saw the prisoner come running from Park lane into South street and down Park street to the front of the house; he came as if from the back of lady Morton's house to the front of it; when he came into Park street John Foy was coming out of lady Morton's house; he immediately ran away back again into Park lane; I saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Then if I understand you right, you say thought it was a little duskish, there was still remaining light enough to distinguish a man's face about three or four houses off - A. Yes, by the light of the lamps.

Q. You have told my lord and the jury that you knew Cavill - A. I knew his face; I had worked with him a week.

Q. You did know him - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Of course he knew you - A. He might not be so exact as to look at me.

Q. You knew his house of call - you knew that he resorted to the Bleeding Hart, he told you that - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you knew that Cavill was to be found at the Bleeding Hart - A. I did not know it till I went.

Q. How came you to go there - A. I went in there for curiosity, the same as before mentioned, because I thought there was no good going on; he had given me an invitation to go there, but I did not go there then; that day I took the liberty to go there.

Q. You had no invitation on that day from him nor had you given any invitation - A. No; I expected to meet him, and there I did see him.

Q. Why Cavill must know you - could Cavill forget you - A. I do not know.

Q. There were other people in the house, were there not; other people might see him as well as you - how far did you sit from him - A. About as far as I am to you.

COURT. You did not make yourself known to Cavill at that time - A. No, nor to any body else; I did not speak to him; I only called for my beer.

Mr. Arabin. There were other people in the house besides you and these men you have been describing - A. There were only these thieves and bad women.

Q. And yourself - no honest person would use the house would they - A. Oh, yes.

Q. Do not you know there were other people there - A. Of course there were other people there at times.

Q. Might not they pay attention to what passed - A. I do not know they did.

Q. You went to this house Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday - A. Yes.

Q. And you were always fortunate enough to go at the time that some of these people were there - A. Yes, and I always found them there.

Q. You went there expecting to find them there, and you found them there - never by accident that you was too late, you always found some of them there - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted that during the number of times you were there, other people besides these men and yourself were in the tap room - A. Yes.

Q. Are any of these men here - A. I do not know.

Q. These men were constantly talking of this robbery - A. Yes, at times.

Q. Speaking of it in the manner you have told the jury and my lord - mentioning time, place and name, loud enough for every body to hear - A. So loud that I could hear it.

Q. Did not you think it very extraordinary that these men should be so rash as to talk before you - A. Being a common house for thieves, I naturally thought they were not very particular in speaking; they might think the people were thieves like themselves.

Q. You had known him two years before - when did you first know it was the house of call for thieves - A. When I first went.

COURT. Did you know it was a house where their guests were reputed thieves - A. Only as I had heard.

Mr. Arabin. Honest people go sometimes there, because you went there - A. I do not know.

Q. You followed these men constantly in the street on the night of the robbery - were they not likely to see you dodging of them - A. I do not know.

Q. You have told my lord and the jury that you were some distance from them, yet they spoke so loud of this robbery that you heard them - A. I am only speaking of what passed in the house.

Mr. Andrews. About the iron crow being handed down you heard in the street - A. I heard that about three houses off.

Mr. Arabin. How many yards was that off - A. It might be twenty yards off; I did not measure it; I suppose it might be between twelve and twenty yards.

Q. You would have the jury believe they talked so loud that between twelve and twenty yards you heard what they said - A. I do not understand your question.

Q. You have said you were between twelve and twenty yards off, yet you heard what they said - A. I heard them call out for the jemmy; I was nearly opposite then.

COURT. At what distance were you when they talked about the jemmy - A. When Lasper came up to the top of the steps I was opposite of lady Morton's door; it might be ten yards across the street.

Mr. Andrews. Did you not say just now that you heard some conversation in the street between the prisoner and Cavill - A. When they followed the girls they came back and said all was right; then I might be about twenty yards off; I was at Chapel court at that time.

Mr. Arabin. You know as a carpenter that is sixty feet - A. Yes.

Q. You were so cautious, that you might know their names you took down their names on a piece of paper - A. I did.

Q. You had nothing to do in planning of this, previous before you gave information - A. No.

Q. Now, Mr. Decaux, how much reward do you expect - A. That I do not know nothing about the reward, I did not till last sessions; my lord informed me as last sessions. I know it now.

Q. You must know that the greater the number that are convicted the greater would be the reward - A. Of course I knew it after I was told it.

Q. Do you not expect the reward - A. Of course I do now.

Q. Do you not know that if this young man is convicted there will be a reward too - A. That I do not know.

Q. You know he is indicted of a similar offence - you know there is a reward now - A. I do.

Q. Do not you expect part of the reward if that young man is convicted - A. Of course I do.

Mr. Andrews. Did you know any thing about this reward about the conviction of these persons till you were here last sessions - A. No.

Q. You happened to be employed once with Cavill, you then learned from Cavill that he used the Bleeding Hart - A. No, I only received information from him to go to that house; I never went.

Q. Was your reason for going to the Bleeding Hart to find out Cavill there - A. Yes, and to learn the intentions of these suspicious men.

Q. You had no share in counselling or advising this robbery - A. Upon my oath I had not.

COURT. How long before this month of October was it that you had received this invitation from Cavill - A. I believe very near two years; I never had any communication with Cavill after that period; I never saw him before.

Q. When you followed him had you disguised yourself in your dress - A. No; I had not the same clothes on, I had an apron on.

WILLIAM JACKSON . Q. You were sent for to go with Foy to lady Morton's house in October last - have you heard Foy examined here to day - A. I have. On the Wednesday I went to lady Morton's house between five and six; I remained in the room below stairs.

Q. Did you hear any attempt made at the door - A. I did; a knock came at the door at seven o'clock; then they stopped a while and came again in about a couple of minutes.

COURT. You had no light with you - A. No, only a dark lanthorn.

Q. How do you know what o'clock it was - A. I heard the clock strike; it was after I heard the clock strike that the knock was made at the door; in a few minutes after that knock I heard the key go into the area gate; that gate was unlocked, and then they walked away for a few minutes; it was after the second knock that I heard them open the area gate; then I heard them come down into the area, and after trying the door with different keys for about twenty minutes, one of them halloaed out hand down the jemmy; then they made a violent crash at the door with the crow; the bell that was fixed within side of the door rang very loud; they then stopped for a while; one of them said behind the door, thrust it in, or burst it in, with the crow; then the door flew open and the bell rang loud some time; some of them came in and said it was all right; it was near eight o'clock when the door was bursted open.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner Baker - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. You are not able to say whether he was one of the five men that were taken - A. I am not.

THOMAS FOY . Q. Do you know the prisoner Baker - A. I do not; I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. Were you and your brother in the lower room at

lady Morton's house on the night of the robbery - A. I was. I went to the house about half past six; I had been down stairs about half an hour when a knock came to the door; it was a few minutes after seven.

Q. How long was it after this that the area door was opened - A. I think by the time that they were trying the keys it might be twenty minutes or a quarter to eight, it might be less rather than more.

Q. How soon afterwards did you come out - A. As soon as I could find out the street door, in about two or three minutes.

Q. Describe the state of the night - A. I observed it was a moon light night; the moon was not so high as to be seen, there was light enough came from it. I concur with my brother in what passed in the house.

Cross examined by Mr. Arabin. You did not see the moon - A. I did not.

Q. Then you could not tell whether it was the light of the moon, or the remaining day light - A. Yes, I could; it was light of one side of the street and dark of the other.

Q. You know nothing of the young man - A. I do not.

AGNES BUTCHER . Q. You are a servant to lady Morton - A. I am.

Q. What is her name - A. Catherine Douglas ; her house is in Park street, St. George's, Hanover square.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. I do not, I never saw him before to my knowledge. On the night of the robbery I went out at half past-six, I locked the lower part of the house, both before and behind, I locked every door myself; I returned down the street at past seven; I saw one of the prisoners that was convicted opening the area gate: I did not see what he did afterwards.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090111-8

96. JOHN EVERCALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Rutter , about the hour of two, on the night of the 3d of April , and burglariously stealing therein, twenty pieces of Irish linen, value 60 l. five hundred yards of cotton, value 50 l. one hundred yards of muslin, value 30 l. the property of William Rutter .

WILLIAM RUTTER . I am a linen draper , No. 4, City road, in the parish of St. Luke's , I have a house there.

Q. Have you any partners - A. No.

Q. Of whom did your family consist at that time - A. My wife, a maid servant, a shopman, a boy, they all slept in my house.

Q. When was it this happened - A. On the night of the 3d of April last; I was last up that night; I fastened the doors at one o'clock in the night.

Q. You went to bed about one in the morning - A. I secured the doors of the shop and the windows likewise. The door opens in half, and has two shutters, which was secured by two iron bars on the outside, and fastened on the inside and locked; the shutters were perfectly fast, with iron bars and pins to secure them.

Q. How does your shop communicate with the dwelling house - A. The stairs of the house face the shop door; there is an inner door that goes to the stairs the stairs are not in the shop, they are not enclosed by a wainscot.

Q. You go into the house by the shop door - A. Yes; there is no other outer door.

Q. During the course of the night did you hear any noise or any alarm - A. No; my maid saw it first; she got up about five o'clock, or a little afterwards; I received the information from her, upon that I got up immediately and went down stairs.

Q. Was it light then - A. It was day light. I saw that the door of the shop had been broken open by cutting a hole in one of the pannels of the door shutter; it was cut in a direction that they could put their arm in and unscrew the fastenings of the bar with their hand. This is the whole of the pannel, I had the carpenter to take it out; they cut out the whole square of glass. In the morning the door was shut and on the latch, the shutter put up, and the bar fastened as before, the lock was tied back, and the hole in the pannel was covered over with paper the colour of the pannel; it appeared that they cut the hole of one square, so that a person could go in and unfasten the door.

Q. Was that square of glass large enough to let a person in - A. Yes; large enough to let any middle sized person in.

Q. In what state did you find your shop with respect to the goods - A. I found three or four shelves empty; the first I missed was a pile of Irish linens which stood on a small counter near the door, I will not be positive whether they stood on a stool or the end of the counter. I missed a quantity of printed cottons, and two wrappers of muslins; this was on the 3d of April. On the morning of the 6th or 7th of April I received a letter by the post, giving me some information, in consequence of which I had a warrant from Worship street office to search the prisoner's house, No. 45, Seward street, Brick lane, St. Luke's, three officers went with me. The prisoner keeps a chandler's shop ; in the parlour behind the shop, in a drawer of a chest of drawers, we found a piece of muslin; in other parts of the house we found a quantity of skeleton keys, and other articles not belonging to me; I found nothing belonging to me but the piece of muslin. The prisoner was not at home at the time of the search.

Q. How do you know that this house, No. 45, belonged to the prisoner - A. The landlord is here to prove it. I saw his wife at the time I searched the house.

Q. What you found there was part of a piece of muslin - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to know it was part of the property that you lost - A. Yes. The officer has it here; I never found any other part of my property.

Q. Where were the keys found - A. In one of the cupboards up stairs, in a small bag, and two or three pair of pistol cases with them.

Q. When was it you saw the prisoner after having searched his house - A. Never, till last Thursday at the Mansion house; I have understood ever since, he has been out of town.

Q. In consequence of having found the muslin at the prisoner's house, did you ever afterwards go to the prisoner's house to enquire after him - A. No. In consequence of the prisoner being absent the prisoner's wife was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say that your maid servant came down first in the morning - A. Yes; we heard her go down stairs, she returned immediately and gave me the alarm.

Q. When you came down you saw it was day light - A. It was sufficiently day light, I could see all over the shop, I saw what I had missed without a candle.

Q. Now the only thing that is produced is a piece of muslin - that is a very small part of that which you lost - A. Yes.

Q. Supposing it is yours, that piece of muslin has been produced before upon a trial that you charged the wife with a burglary - A. Yes.

Q. For which she was tried in June sessions and acquitted - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did you then venture to swear to the muslin, and remember what was said was taken down - A. What I then stated I will now say; from the length and breadth of it, the quantity and texture of it, I believe it now to be mine, but I have since found something more.

Q. Did not you then upon its being produced upon the trial of this burglary, examine it carefully in court - A. I examined it as carefully as I could.

Q. And had not you done so at the police office before the magistrate - A. I had so, but not in the light so much as what I have at home.

Q. Now attend to me, did not you state as your reason for believing it to be yours from this circumstance; the quantity, length, breadth, and texture; their being no marks that you could not swear to it - A. I said the fagg end being turn off, my private mark being gone, I could not swear to it.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the manufacturer who manufactured the article for you, does not he manufacture for half the town besides - A. I do not presume to say he does not.

Q. The woman was tried in June for this, and she was at home at the time of the search - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you find there were other people in the house at the time - A. Yes, there was an old man in one of the back rooms.

Q. In what room were the keys found - A. It was in a back room.

COURT. You was asked what you said upon the trial of the woman about the piece of muslin being your property; you say you have since discovered something else - A. After the trial, when I left the court, I parted with all the officers in the court, they gave me the muslin wrapped up in paper. I then went directly home, I will not be certain whether I laid the muslin in the shop or my man. I immediately went up stairs; during the time I was at my dinner, I had another try to see whether I could match it. I came down stairs and asked my shopman to assist me, and looking to see if we could trace any of the marks; we found the smallest quantity possible of my shop mark, the top of an O and a W; it is sufficiently perceivable.

GEORGE SEYMOUR . I live at Hoxton.

Q. Do you know a house that is described No. 45, Seward street; who did that house belong to in April last - A. To me. John Eversall , the prisoner at the bar, lived in it; he had lived there then about nine months before April; he was my tenant till Michaelmas last; whether he was resident in the house on the 3d of April I cannot say. I never was in the house after I let it him.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer of Worship office. In consequence of a search warrant, I went to No. 45, Seward street, with Bishop, Kenedy, and Mr. Rutter; when I came there, I saw the prisoner's wife; I knew the house before. I then read my warrant, and proceeded to search; in a back room below stairs, even with the shop, I found a piece of muslin in a drawer, which was handed over to Mr. Rutter; this was on the 7th of April. In a bed room up stairs, there was a great coat hanging behind the door; in the coat pocket we found some wax taper; in a closet in the same room we found a large black bag; that was all that we found that had any thing to do with this that I could see. I kept the muslin from the time I found it, till Eversall's wife was tried; it was then by the order of the court returned to the prosecutor. After I returned it back to him, I went to the office; he returned at seven o'clock the same evening, and desired me to take care of it. It was then sealed up by me in this paper, and put into a warehouse where Mr. Armstrong keeps a key, where we deposit all property that is taken under warrant. Armstrong unlocked the door and gave me possession of the bag that this was in.

Q. The prosecutor has said that he sent the officers after the prisoner - A. We have been continually enquiring after the prisoner in the neighbourhood; we never went to his house.

Q. When was it you saw him in custody - A. I saw him yesterday week at the Poultry Compter.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. Were you with Vickrey when this house No. 45, Seward street, was searched - A. Yes; I was prisent at the finding this piece of muslin; it was found in a drawer in a back room adjoining the shop. The wife and another woman was in the house below. I searched the one pair of stairs back room; in a small closet that was locked, I broke it open, I found twenty one keys, and six pistol bags.

Mr. Gurney. There was a lodger in that room - A. I was given to understand so; he was sent for, and came, he said that was his bed room.

The property produced and identified

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-9

97. SAMUEL GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , twenty five yards of Irish linen, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of Christopher Phillips Joslyn , in his dwelling house .

MARY MOORE . On the 9th of December last I was going of an errand; I saw two men go into Mr. Joslyn's shop.

Q. Do you know the person of either of them - A. I I am sure the prisoner is one of them; I saw a hand take a piece of cloth from the window on the inside, then the two men came out immediately; I turned myself short round, and put my hand upon each shoulder of the prisoner, and told him it was not his property; he had the piece of cloth between his coat and waistcoat; I saw the end of it hanging down by his knees. I called Mr. Joslyn, stop thief, Joslyn; the other that was with him come and gave me a push of one side, and they both ran off. This was about four o'clock; I did not see them afterwards.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a patrole. On the afternoon

of the 9th of December, about ten minutes after four o'clock, I was coming down Shoreditch; I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running towards me; directly I caught hold of him, he dropped a piece of cloth from under his arm. I secured him, and took up the cloth; this is the piece of cloth, I saw him drop it; Mr. Joslyn came up immediately afterwards. I searched him; in his pocket I found a quantity of thread.

CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS JOSLYN . I live at No. 3, Old street road, St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; my shop is at the bottom part of the house, I am a linen draper, haberdasher and hosier ; I was at the back part of my house, I heard a cry out, Joslyn, stop thief; I ran into the road, I saw the prisoner with something under his arm running towards Shoreditch; I pursued him; the officer was coming up Shoreditch; he saw him and stopped him. I was almost at his heels when he stopped him.

Q. Did you see the officer pick up the piece of cloth - A. I did; I know it is mine, it cost me two pounds five shillings; I saw it ten minutes before it was taken in my shop window

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-10

98. ANN GRUNDWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , a hat, value 6 s. 3 d. the property of Thomas Frederic Salter .

THOMAS WESTWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Salter, he is a hatter , No. 17, Beech street, Barbican . On the 30th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop in company with another woman; she asked to look at some hats, she said she would call the next day and bring the little girl; she went away and did not purchase any. In about five minutes after she was gone I missed a hat from the counter; I went after the women and overtook them; the prisoner was looking at the hat that I had lost, I saw the hat in her hand, I asked her for it, I told her that she had stolen it; I was going to take the hat from her, she immediately threw it behind her and said she knew nothing at all about the hat; I took her back to the shop and gave her in charge of the patrol; the other woman made off, I did not see what became of her.

Q. Had you seen this hat on the counter before - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen the hat since - A. Yes. I am sure it is my master's property.

Prisoner. Ask him if I was the person that took the hat and throwed it away.

Witness. Yes, you was the person that throwed it away.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent of what I am here for.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-11

99. SUSANNAH BURNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , fifteen yards of printed cotton, value 15 s. the property of John Harvey , and James Lamming .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a servant to John Harvey and James Lamming , they are linen drapers on Ludgate Hill . On the 30th of December, about half past three in the day the prisoner came into the shop, I was the only person that was in the front shop; I suppose she was more than five minutes in the shop.

Q. While the prisoner was there did Ashford, one of your shopmen, come down - A. Yes; the prisoner then went out, she bought nothing, Ashford followed her.

COURT. Are you sure the prisoner was the person - A. Yes.

ROBERT ASHFORD . I am a servant to Messrs. Harvey and Lamming. On the afternoon of the 30th of December, at half past three, I came down, I saw the prisoner going out in a great hurry, I immediately followed her two doors up a passage, to Mr. Patmore's, a pawnbroker's; I stopped her, I told her that she had taken something from our house; I took hold of her arm and saw the print in her hand; I told her she had stolen that print from our house; she said she had, and she was in great distress, and hoped I would let her go; I told her I could not. I took her back to our shop and took the print from her.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-12

100. HARRIET JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , a shawl, value 10 s. the property of John Harvey and James Lamming .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROBERT ASHFORD . I am shopman to John Harvey and James Lamming . On the 31st of December, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked to look at a print that was at the bottom of a pile of goods, near the door; I told her I could not take them all down for her, we had got others that she would like as well; she left me and went to the shawl counter; I saw her look round to see if any body was noticing of her, I seemed to take no notice of her; after standing at the shawl counter five or ten minutes she left the shop; I followed her to the door; just after she got out of door she turned round to see if any body was looking; I immediately went after her, put my arm round her waist, and brought her back again to our shop, I took her up stairs, and directly I got her into the kitchen a shawl dropped from her pelisse; I saw it drop from her; I picked it up and told her it was our property.

JOHN BALL . Q. You are shopman to the prosecutors, I believe - A. I am; I attended all that afternoon at the shawl counter; I shewed her nothing, nor did she buy any thing. When she quitted the shop Ashford followed her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner. Do not you recollect a lady being along with me buying a shawl that came to fifteen shillings - A. There were other ladies in the shop, one lady

bought a shawl that came to sixteen shillings; I saw the prisoner come to the counter alone.

Mr. Gurney. What is the value of that shawl - A. Ten shillings.

Q. to Ashford. Did you see any person in company with the prisoner - A. I saw her talking to a person in the shop; she followed a person out, I did not see her come in with any body.

Prisoner's Defence. The shawl and the other piece of print I bought over Blackfriars bridge; I met a man and a woman, they had several prints and shawls, they asked me if I would buy a shawl and a gown print; I asked him the price of this print; he said eighteen shillings; I told him I would give him nine shillings and sixpence for the print; he took it, and I gave him ten shillings and sixpence for the shawl.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-13

101. HARRIET JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st December , nine yards and a half of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of George Vipond .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Vipond, linen draper , Ludgate Hill .

Q. In the afternoon of the 31st of December did the prisoner come into your shop - A. Yes, she was in our shop; she bought nothing at all.

Q. After she was gone did you miss any thing - A. I missed a piece of print that I had just before been measuring over. Soon afterwards I found she was in custody next door; I went in and this piece of print was shewed me, and I recognized it.

ROBERT ASHFORD . Q. On the 31st of December, in the afternoon, you took the prisoner in custody - A. I did; she was searched in my presence; this piece of print was taken from her by Kimber.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This piece of print I bought with the shawl of one person, on the other side of Blackfriars bridge, as I was coming from Deptford; I bought them of a man and woman; I never saw them before, nor since.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-14

102. WILLIAM LOVETT and HENRY FLETCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , a sack, value 1 s. and five pecks of barley, value 6 s. the property of John Roberts , esq .

JOHN ROBERTS , ESQ. I live in John street; I have got a country house in Middlesex. Lovett was a thresher , and Fletcher took care of my farm horses .

WILLIAM HORROD . I am a servant to Mr. Roberts. On the 16th of last month I went into the barn were Lovett was threshing of barley; I told him he would be able to thrash it all out the next day; he said no, he should not be able to finish until Monday. I then took up the fork to see how much there was, I stuck it in a sack; I took it up, I asked him what it was; he said he did know any thing at all about it; I found it contained barley, I told him so; he then said he had gleaned it up for Joseph, and he had not taken it away. I then left the barn.

Q. Who is Joseph - A. He is an odd man, he takes care of the pigs and cows. After the men had left their work I went into the barn, I found the barley there; I marked the sack. On Sunday morning I found it was gone; I acquainted my master; we searched about and found it in the horses' bin covered over with straw; we took out a sample of it. At night the sack was marked by the constable.

- I am a constable. I found this sack in the corn bin in the stable; I saw Lovett come out of Mr. Roberts's gate with the sack upon his shoulder, between five and six on Sunday evening; Fletcher came out of the gate with him into the lane, I followed them and brought them back to Mr. Roberts. Upon examining the sack I found it contained barley; it corresponded with the sample; that is the sack.

Mr. Alley. The sack is not his master's - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Fletcher called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LOVETT, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

FLETCHER, GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-15

103. JAMES WOGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November , two sheets, value 12 s. two watches, value 5 l. two chains, value 2 s. two keys. value 6 d. two shifts, value 10 s. three shirts, value 1 l. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. a blanket, value 8 s. a counterpane, value 8 s. a pelisse, value 10 s. a great coat, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 6 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and an umbrella, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Pink , in the dwelling house of John Karne .

ELIZABETH PINK . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Thomas Pink , we live at No. 205, Brick lane, Spital fields ; John Karne rents the house, and we hire a one pair of stairs.

Q. Did you miss any thing out of that room - A. Yes. On the 4th of November I went out at eleven o'clock in the morning, I left William Sindall in the room, he slept in the room, he was going to sea in two or three days; the prisoner boarded with us. After eleven o'clock at night I and my husband went home; I missed a sheet from off Sindall's bed. In the morning when I got up I looked for the sheet, I thought I might find it; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Did Sindall lodge in the room that night - A. No; he was to sleep there, but he did not.

Q. You say the prisoner boarded with you - did he come back wards and forwards as usual - A. No; I did not see him till the 2nd of December, then I met Wogan about seven o'clock in the evening in Chiswell street; I told him he was the man I wanted; he said what did I want him for; I told him I wanted the property that he had robbed me of, and the money he owed me; he told me it I would let him have his liberty he would pay me the money he owned me, he had got none of my property but the umbrella; I asked him why he did not come to his meals as usual; he said because he was afraid I would put him in prison; I told him if he

was not guilty of robbing me, why not come and help to find the thief that did rob me; he told me that he had left the umbrella with the woman that he had slept with the night before; he told me the place: I went there and found it. I have never seen any of the other things. My husband and I took him to Worship street office.

Q. When you came home on the evening of the 4th of November, was your room door locked - A. Yes, and the key left with the landlady below; when they came home they asked for the key, it was given them.

ANN BARRY . I lived servant with Mrs. Pink when she kept the Nag's head public house, Whitecross street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Wogan - A. Yes, I have seen him often at that house, before Mrs. Pink removed from the public house. On the 5th of November he came into the tap room with an umbrella in his hand, and asked me for a needle to repair it; I gave him a needle, he could not make use of the needle, he asked me to repair it for him; I did; he said it belonged to the captain's daughter, he should get anger if he did not repair it.

Q. Did you see any thing else that he had - A. Only a watch that he had in his pocket; I did not particularly observe the watch.

Q. Do you know that umbrella that you mended - A. I do; here is the place that I mended.

Prisoner. When it was rainy I was in the habit of borrowing the umbrella.

Mrs. Pink. That is the umbrella that was in my possession; I never allowed him to make use of it.

Q. Had Sindall ever come back to you again - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The night before this affair happened Mr. and Mrs. Pink, Sindall and me, went to the play; I had the umbrella the night before; I was going home, I left them close to Smithfield; Mrs. Pink said, I shall not be at home tomorrow, I am going to my sister's child christening, there is some cold shoulder of mutton in the cupboard. The next morning I went to the Nag's Head with the umbrella about one o'clock in the afternoon; I went to Mrs. Pink's, I went up stairs and knocked at the door, no answer was given to me; I went and asked the landlady it any body was at home, she said she did not know, there had been a great many people up and down; I borrowed five pence of the landlady, I told her I should go to the Bell. When I was at the Bell Sindall came in, he said he heard me knocking, he told me had the landlord of the Three Pigeons in the room, and a woman of the name of Lawson; he and I went to Mrs. Pink's room, and when I was going I said I would lock the door and take the key down to the landlady; he said no; I went down stairs, and saw no more of Sindall till the Saturday morning; going down Whitecross street I met Sindall with Mrs. Pink's great coat on his back; he said he was going home; I have never seen him since, I went to the house on the Monday; neither Mrs. Pink nor the landlady was at home; I met the landlady, she told me of this, and told me Mrs. Pink would prosecute me. I being innocent, was afraid of being put in prison; when I went with Mrs. Pink to the office there was no officer to prevent me from going away. If I had a mind to resist I might.

Q. to prosecutrix. Had you been to the play the night before - A. Yes; they went to the play with us; Sindall and the prisoner had the use of the umbrella; I took it from them when we parted in Smithfield.

MARTHA STEVENS . I live in Gloucester court, Whitecross street; I have known the prisoner eight years, or rather better. Mrs. Pink came to me and informed me of the robbery on the day following; she told me that the other young man had robbed her, she did not suspect that the prisoner was the person; she asked me if I had seen him; I told her I had not.

Q. Do you say upon your oath that she said she did not suspect him - A. Yes, she said so several times.

Q. But she wanted to know where he was - A. Yes. I told her I did not know.

Q. When had you seen the prisoner the last time - A. On the Saturday morning, as I saw Mrs. Pink in the evening; I saw him about ten days afterwards; I went to Mrs. Pink's house, she was not at home; I left word with the landlady I had seen him; Mrs. Pink told me that she had been down to the father and mother of the young man, that his father said he had a watch in his pocket and a bundle; he had one of Mr. Pink's shirts on, and one of the pair of stockings in the bundle was marked in full length with his name, and that a gentleman at his father's asked him what the watch cost; he said two pounds, and that he had another watch.

Q. What do you know of that umbrella - A. That umbrella was left with my landlady in the room below and a letter for Mrs. Pink; I delivered it into Mrs. Pink's hands.

Q. Mrs. Pink, in fact had you been down after the other man Sandell - A. Yes, at his father's.

Q. Had you traced a number of things into his possession - A. I had.

Q. Therefore you had good reason to suspect that the other man Sandell was in possession of a number of things - A. Yes.

Q. And you told that young woman so - A. Yes.

Q. You have never found the things, you only heard it from the father of Sandell - A. I only heard it from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-16

104. DANIEL GEARY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of December , a bay gelding, value 30 s. the property of William Cockbill .

WILLIAM COCKBILL . I live at Walham green.

Q. What are you - A. I go out to any hired work that I can get.

Q. Had you a bay gelding - it belonged to you did it - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it before you missed it - A. It was turned upon a common belonging to Fulham parish, called Wormwood Scrubs ; I had turned it out myself on the day before the Thursday that I lost it.

Q. Had you seen it after you had turned it out on the Tuesday - A. I did not see it my self, Mr. Berryman saw it on the Wednesday before it was taken away, I missed it on the Thursday.

Q. Had you missed it before you received any information that it was gone - A. Yes.

Q. What Tuesday and what Thursday are you speaking of - how long ago - A. The Tuesday and Thursday before Christmas.

Q. Did you ever see that gelding of your's again - A. I saw it on the Friday following; on the next day Mr.

Berryman brought it me.

Q. What sort of a horse was this - A. It had but one eye.

Q. Did you use it in the way of your employment - A. Yes; I used to draw it.

Q. Where is that horse now - you had it again, had not you - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure the horse that Berryman brought back is your's - A. Yes; because it was marked J C on the hip, my father marked him, and put that on him. It was my horse; I had nothing for him to do, I said I would turn it up; my father then said he would mark it for me.

Q. How the horse was taken you cannot tell yourself - A. No.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. No.

ARCHIBALD WALTERS . I live in Hampstead road, I am a labouring man.

Q. Do you deal in horses - A. No; I go about with fish.

Q. What have you to say about any bay gelding - A. I was in Camden Town crying my fish on the Thursday before Christmas day, about twelve o'clock, I bought the horse; I met the prisoner leading the horse along.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No; he was quite a stranger to me.

Q. What sort of a horse was it - A. A bay horse, it had one eye. I asked him if he was going to sell the horse, I thought he was coming out of the country, and was going to sell the horse; he said yes.

Q. Had you any other horse at that time - A. No. He said he was going to sell it; I asked him what he asked for it; he said a guinea and a half; I told him that was too much, I put my basket on my head and was going away; I told him I would give him sixteen shillings for it; he stood a bit, I went on, and when I returned again he said I should have it; I asked him then where he lived; he told me he lived in the Kilburn Road, two doors from the Black Lion.

Q. Did you ask him what his name was - A. No. He said that he had this horse, and that he worked him in the Brick carts at Kilburn, the weather was so bad he could not draw bricks, he turned the horse up the lane, he thought he had better sell it than let it lie starving about the hedges; I told him I would trouble him to go home with me; I gave him twelve shillings in Camdem Town; he led the horse to my door, I gave him a seven shilling piece, he gave me three shillings and delivered the horse to me; then he left me.

Q. Then all that time you did not ask him his name - A. No.

Q. How soon did you see this person afterwards - A. I saw him on the Saturday morning afterwards, I met him in Paddington road with another horse.

Q. Was this before this horse had been claimed - A. Afterwards. I spoke to him; he said, good morning, and asked me where I was going; I told him I was going to Paddington to pay five pounds for some rags I had bought of my brother; I then asked him where he got that old horse he was leading of; he told me he bought it of one Tom Hoare that lived at Henley.

Q. Did you say any thing to him respecting the horse you had bought of him - A. Not at that time.

Q. Did you know at that time that the horse had been claimed - A. Yes. He said I gave him a bad shilling; I told him if I did I did not wish to do it, I would change it for him; he gave it me; I told him we must go to the public house and have something to drink, and then I would change it.

Q. Did he give you a shilling - A. He gave me a large sixpence.

Q. Was that what you gave him for a shilling - A. He said it was, I did not know it; we went into the King's Head public house, Tottenham court road; I asked for some purl, and shut the door, and told him that he had stole the horse that I bought, and that it had been stopped; he said he had not; I told him I was sure he had; he then sat down and said he did, he had done it for distress, he had a family, and his children wanted bread. I then sent for Mr. Crocker the officer - he took the man in custody.

Q. Now tell us after you had bought the horse of the prisoner what you did with him - A. When I bought the horse and brought him home, I found he would not suit me; I went to sell him again.

Q. Had you tried him in the cart or any thing - A. No.

Q. How did you find out he would not suit - A. He was lame.

Q. Had not you seen that when you bought him - A. Yes, I had.

Q. When did you go to sell him again - A. The same afternoon.

Q. Had you intended to sell him again when you bought it - A. I did not know; if he had suited me I should have kept him. On the same afternoon I sold him to one Mr. Cross, going down towards Battle bridge.

Q. Where did you meet with Mr. Cross - A. In the road going along.

Q. Is he here - A. No. He lives in Maiden lane, Battle bridge, he is a knacker; I agreed to sell him for twenty shillings and sixpence; he wanted me to trust him; I would not; he then gave me three shillings earnest; he said he would fetch the horse at seven o'clock at night, if I would keep him for him; I then took him home and told him I would; this was on the Thursday; he never came for the horse; I tied the horse up and gave him some hay. I called upon him the next morning to know whether he meaned to fetch him or no; he said he would come for it about ten o'clock. I went out with my goods, when I came home the horse was there; this was about two o'clock on the Friday; I said to my wife I would take him to Smithfield to sell him.

Q. Did you take him to Smithfield to sell him - A. Yes.

Q. You had been yourself in Smithfield market - A. The young man that I took with me held the horse while I was talking to a man that I had bargained with to sell the horse; I saw him in Smithfield just as I was going in. The young man's name is Wood that held the horse for me in Smithfield.

Q. Then I understand you to say you saw this Cross in the market - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sell the horse then to him, or did he pay for it - A. No; I went to him, we had a few words; he said if I would bring the horse up to him he would pay me; accordingly I went to fetch the horse to him; the horse was standing in the market; I halloaed for

the young man; I saw a great mob about the horse and that it was stolen.

Q. Was any body there that owned the horse - A. Yes, Berryman claimed the horse; I went to Berryman, I told him that young man knew nothing about the horse, that I had brought it from Camden town; I told Berryman I bought the horse; he said the horse belonged to Cockbill his neighbour.

Q. What became of you at the time that he took the horse - A. They wanted to put me in the counter; they knew me, and I begged of them not to put me in; he took the horse down, and I was to go to him the next day; I was told to come to him at Walham green, Fulham.

Q. The next morning you told us you met the prisoner as you described - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to Walham green before you saw him - A. No; I went afterwards to Walham green, and informed them after he was in custody.

Q. Then it was you yourself that had him taken in custody - A. Yes.

Q. Then you swear that horse that Berryman took away was the same horse that you had bought of the prisoner the day before - A. On the Thursday.

Q. Well this was on the Friday that the horse was taken away - A. Yes.

Q. And on the Thursday you had bought it of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Jury. When you paid the prisoner the twelve shillings was any person present - A. Mr. White.

Q. He is not here - A. No; he keeps the Britannia in Camden town. It was in the road where we bargained, fronting of that house.

Q. When you paid the other four shillings was any other person present - A. That I paid at my own door, my landlord was present then.

COURT. He is not here - A. No.

JAMES BERRYMAN . My son took the horse home from Smithfield; he found the horse first and told me of it; I was in Smithfield, just opposite of the George. I live at Walham green.

Q. You are a neighbour of Cockbill - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the gelding that he had, that was blind of one eye - A. Yes, I know it; he told me on the Thursday that he had lost it.

Q. Did you happen to be in Smithfield market in search of that gelding - A. No; I happened to be there, my little boy was riding a horse about there for sale; he saw the horse there, he pointed it out to me; Walter's man was holding the horse, he said his master belonged to the horse; I told him Mr. Cockbill owned the horse, that he had lost it; I told him to put it up against the George door until his master came; he did; Mr. Walter told me he bought it the day before in Camden road; I told him I did not know what to do, whether to stop him and the horse too, as it was not mine; he said there were people there that knew him; so I let him go and stopped the horse.

Q. He let you take that horse, did you take it back to Mr. Cockbill - A. Yes; I took it home that night; Walters told me he would come down to Mr. Cockbill, according he did come down the next morning about ten or eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you know at that time that the prisoner was apprehended - A. He mentioned it the next morning when he came down, that he had got the prisoner that he had bought the horse of; I afterwards saw the prisoner at Bow street. I never saw him before as I know of.

HENRY CROKER . I am a constable of the parish of St. Pancras. On Friday evening the 23d of December, I saw Walters, he mentioned to me that he was in trouble.

Q. Did you see any thing of him on the Saturday - A. On the Saturday morning I was sent for to the public house, where he was with the prisoner, at the King's Head in Tottenham court road; then he told me that was the man that he purchased the horse of.

Q. Did he say that in the hearing of the prisoner - A. Yes, I believe; the prisoner said it was through distress that he did so.

Q. Did the prisoner deny that he had sold the house to the man - A. No, he did not deny it; he said something about being in distress; he told me he was the person; I secured him and took him to the watch-house. Walters related to me the situation he was in; I went with him to Walham green, and let them know that he was come according to his promise, and that I had got the prisoner in custody; I took the prisoner to Bow street; I told these people to come to Bow street.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-17

105. WILLIAM DOWLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peter Parker , about the hour of seven, on the night of the 15th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, two planes, value 10 s. two saws, value 14 s. one oil stone, value 3 s. a chisel, value 9 d. a gouge, value 4 d. a jacket, value 4 s. a rule, value 2 s. and a pair of compasses, value 9 d. the property of John Dyer .

PETER PARKER . I am a victualler ; I live at the Shepherd and Dog, East Smithfield, St. John's, Wapping ; I live in an adjoining part while it is being new built. On the 15th of December, about seven in the evening, I heard a noise in the apartment that is getting ready for a coffee room, where the carpenters had left work; I went to the side door of the coffee room, I asked whether any body was there in that room; the carpenters had not left the key of that room; I could get no answer; on my speaking I heard somebody fall over some deals. The door is a sash door, not glazed, the carpenter had nailed a board across inside, that nobody should get inside; it is a side door to the coffee room, that communicates to the yard; I saw the board up; it was up for security, to prevent people from getting in through the sash. When I heard the noise of some person falling over the deals I immediately put my back to the door and burst it open, and called for a light; when I came into the room, there is a place erecting for a bar, I found the prisoner lying on his back with all the smaller part of the tools about him.

Q. You mean the tools left by the workmen - A. Yes, they always left their tools there; the large saw and small saw and large plane, I found lying by the door, laying where the door was broken open.

Q. Where was it you observed the board that was on the sash - A. I observed that as soon as I put my hand against the door it laid by the side of the door; there was an oil stone, a gouge, and many other articles that

I do not know the name of, as I am not a carpenter.

Q. Where these within the bar where the man was lying - A. Close to him, about his feet.

Q. You had not seen in what part of the house these tools were left when the men went - A. No.

Q. Can you name any other of the articles - A. There was a flannel jacket and a two foot rule.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner when you found him - A. Yes; I asked him how he came there; he gave me a good deal of abuse, he pretended to be very much intoxicated in liquor, I could not get a reasonable answer for a long while; there was a pair of folding doors, I found them fast; I noticed it particularly; the sash of the front was not glazed, no more than them at the back; it was nine foot from the pavement to get at them; there were no steps erected.

Q. Could any body have got up to that height - were the sashes large enough to creep through - A. Yes, I think they were.

Q. Then if any body had got there, was there any thing to interrupt their passage, from where you found the prisoner - A. No; they could come to the side door on coming through the room.

Q. Were there any other place where there was a possibility of any person coming in without breaking - A. No; there were two sashes backwards; they were both fastened, I examined them.

Q. Do you know the person to whom these tools belonged - A. Yes, to John Dyer , one of the carpenter s, he is doing the business; I sent for a constable, I took him to the watchhouse; in searching of him, I found this pair of nippers and this turn screw, which he had left, I found among the tools; and the mark of the door, where the lock had been wrenched off, tallied with this turnscrew; he said the nippers were his own, he said he had a turn screw, but he did not know where it was; I would not suffer the tools to be removed till the next morning, when the carpenters came; I did not know in what situation the carpenters left the tools; the first carpenter came about seven in the morning; it was then we found the turn screw among the tools.

JOHN DYER . I am a carpenter, I am employed in Mr. Parker's house.

Q. Did you leave your tools in the place - A. Yes: I left work about a quarter before five; I secured the front door by a piece of wood on the inside, no person could open them without being on the inside; the back door I locked myself.

Q. Did you observe the sash door was not glazed - A. The back part of the sash door was not glazed; I locked that door myself.

Q. Did you observe whether the board that was put up on there was up when you left the building - A. Yes, I put it up myself. I am sure it was on when I left the building.

Q. In what part of the room did you leave the tools - A. I left the tools in one corner of the room; it is a coffee room, parted off with benches for gentlemen, where we were working; I put some on the seats of the box and some on my work bench.

Q. Was any of these tools left by the back door - A. No, quite the contrary; I left them twenty seven feet from the back door where I found them in the morning.

Q. Now look at them tools - A. They are all my tools, with my own mark on them, the planes and the saws; I am positive they are the same tools that I left in Mr. Parker's house.

Q. Did you go there the next morning - A. Yes, about a quarter after seven; I found this large saw and the planes at the entrance of the back door, the planes of one side and the saws of the other side of the passage; I found the others in the part that is parted off for the bar; the large plane was twenty seven feet removed from where I left it, going the nighest way, and the smaller tools twelve feet off; the key of the back door I gave to my partner William Chapman ; I went to the public office with the prisoner, he told me he was groggy, he did not know how he got there; he told the magistrate that he was sleeping below, and some person shoved him up there.

Q. Did you see this turnscrew - A. Yes, I picked it up myself; in picking up the small tools I found the strange one among them; we did not see the back door had been tried with this thing for two or three days afterwards.

Q. Who had the turnscrew in the mean time - A. The officer.

Q. When you were there did you perceive the board that had been put up over the sash door - A. Yes, laying by the side of the door.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . Q. You are one of the workmen employed along with the last witness, are not you - A. Yes. When we quitted the house I received the key from the last witness; I had it in my possession all night.

Q. Are you sure that it had never been used for opening of the door - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened on that day to be looking out for work, and meeting with some of my partners I got drunk. Coming along there the cellar is quite open; I happened to stumble; there I lay till one of the labouring men came up and said you had better go and lay among the shavings; I laid there till Mr. Parker came; his wife alarmed him first; they cannot say that I ever removed any of the tools.

Q. to prosecutor. You had not observed any thing about the door with the sash in it from between five and six o'clock, and the time you received the alarm - A. No, it was impossible, because it was dark. I generally tried the other door with my hand when the carpenters had done work. I dare say I had that night.

Q. You will not take upon you to say you did - A. No.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090111-18

106. JAMES MACKAY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, in a certain passage, upon Joseph Isaacs on the 18th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 6 d. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a gown, value 9 s. a pee lisse, value 4 s. two table cloths, value 8 s. and a handkerchief, value 3 s. his property .

JOSEPH ISAACS . I was going home with my wife on the 18th of December, going down the court where we live; this man followed her; we walked fast and he walked fast; we walked slower, he walked slower; when we stopped I asked him what he wanted; he left her and came and laid hold of a bundle that I had

in my hand, and he wanted to take my watch out of my pocket; I hit him a blow with my stick; I let the bundle drop to have the use of both my hands; he had hold of my watch chain; when the watchman came he let go.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-19

107. WILLIAM HATCHMAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Ann, the wife of Jesse Fieldhouse , on the 4th of December , putting her in fear and taking from her person, and against her will, a straw bonnet, value 5 s. and a lace veil, value 1 s. the property of Jesse Fieldhouse .

ANN FIELDHOUSE . I am a married woman; my husband's name is Jesse Fieldhouse .

Q. Did you lose a bonnet at any time - A. Yes; I lost my hat and my veil on the 4th of December, between five and six in the evening.

Q. Where were you walking at that time - A. I came through Turnmill street ; I was going as far as Pancras.

Q. Who was with you - A. Richard Roberts .

Q. Did you observe any boys near you - A. No, none at all.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. No, I did not.

Q. What happened to you as you were walking - A. As I got up to Pear Tree court I had a blow on this side of my head.

Q. You had a blow on the side of your head - did you see where the blow came from - A. I did not; it was from a person behind me; it was not a violent one, it stunned my ear; immediately after that my hat and my veil went right off my head.

Q. What sort of a hat was it - A. A round hat, made of straw.

Q. Do you call it a hat - A. Yes, it was a turban hat.

Q. Is that a different thing from a bonnet - A. Oh, yes, sir, it is; it was not a bonnet, it was a hat.

Q. Was the veil over this hat, as you call it - A. No, it was pinned inside; I had pinned the veil to my hair and the hat was over it.

Q. Might it not have gone off with the blow - A. No, it was pulled off.

Q. Then the veil was pinned to your hair and not to the hat - A. No.

Q. What did you observe next - A. I directly turned round and saw the person run up the court that took it up.

Q. You mean, you saw a person run up the court with a hat in his hand - A. Yes, and the veil.

Q. Did you not see him take it off - A. No; he ran up Pear Tree court.

Q. Did you take notice of his person so as to know him again - A. No further than by his dress; he had on the same kind of a jacket as he had on the Tuesday.

Q. What happened then after he ran up the court - A. I lost sight of him; this was on the Sunday; I did not see him after till on the Tuesday when he was taken up.

Q. Do you know whether at all the same person that you saw on the Tuesday was the same person that you saw running - A. No.

Jury. You only saw the back of him did you - A. No.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. You say this was in the month of December, and in the evening - A. Yes.

Q. You received a blow on the side of your head - should you suppose it a blow, or occasioned by some person snatching your hat - A. I had a little baby in my arms, just five months old; it was not a violent blow; my hat went off immediately.

Q. Suppose a person that made a blow at you, the sensation of that would be very different from a person taking your hat - A. I believe it was both.

Q. The veil was under your hat, could a person see that - A. Yes, they could.

Q. Must the person behind have seen the veil, or not - A. Yes, they must.

Q. This was in Turnmill street, that is a street very much frequented - A. I do not know.

Q. Were there any persons passing and repassing at the time - A. I saw no person; I hooted out stop thief; no person came to assist me; the hat was put on without any fastenings, but the veil was pinned.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I was thirteen the 27th of last October.

Q. Do you know it is a wrong thing to tell a lie - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a bad thing to tell a lie when you are sworn - A. Yes.

Q. What do you think will happen to you if you swear falsely - if you tell a lie when you are upon oath - A. God Almighty will not love me.

Q. Were you walking with Mrs. Fieldhouse on Sunday - A. Yes; I was going up Turnmill street along with Mrs. Fieldhouse.

Q. Had Mrs. Fieldhouse a child with her in her arms - A. Yes, she was carrying of it.

Q. Did you see any boys near her walking in the street - A. Yes, there were three.

Q. Whereabouts were they in the street - A. They were standing by two courts opposite of Castle street.

Q. Did you pass them as you walked along - A. Yes.

Q. Were they standing on the same side of the way as you were walking - A. They were standing up against a house; we passed them; they said let the lady pass.

Q. When you had passed did they remain there stand still up the house - A. No; they followed us up to Clerkenwell green; then two of them left us; they went away, and Hatchman followed us up to Pear Tree court.

Q. Had you seen William Hatchman before - A. Yes, many times; he lives in Sharp's alley; I know him well.

Q. He followed you to Pear tree court - A. Yes; and he hit Mrs. Fieldhouse a blow on the side of the head.

Q. Were you before Mrs. Fieldhouse or behind her - A. We were both together; the prisoner was behind us; he crossed over the way first and then crossed over again, and come behind her, and hit her a blow on the side of the head, I saw him do it; I saw him come behind her and hit her a blow on the side of the head.

Q. What did he hit her with - A. With his fist; then he took the bonnet and veil off and ran up Pear tree court.

Q. Did you observe particularly how his hand went when he hit her - A. He clenched his hand and hit her, I saw him; I am positive sure it was him, I run up

the court along with Mrs. Fieldhouse; the court is a thoroughfare.

Q. Did he run through the court - A. There are three places where he could go through. Another man ran round with me to see whether he came out of a public house; but he did not.

Q. Did you see him afterwards when he was taken - A. I saw him afterwards; I think it was on the Tuesday that I saw him.

Q. That was after he was taken - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Where do you live - A. At Pancras.

Q. What time in the evening was it - A. Between four and five on the 4th of December. It was quite dark.

Q. How happened you to be watching him, and to see him cross over the street - how happened it that you did not look strait forward - A. I heard somebody behind, I just looked back and saw him, I knew him, living in Sharp's alley.

Q. As it was dark how could you see him - A. I could see him; there is a shop there with a light, they call it the Flying Pleman's, he sells pudding; that was close to where it was done.

Q. Are you quite sure that he doubled his fist to make this blow - A. I am quite sure that he doubled his fist; he took his fist to give the blow, and his other hand to take the bonnet off; it was both at one time.

Q. Then he did not draw his hand back, but put his other hand and took the bonnet off - A. Yes; that was the way it was done.

Q. How long had you seen him before he snatched the bonnet - A. I had seen him about ten minutes, I dare say, while we were going up Turnmill street.

GEORGE MANSFIELD . I lodged at the White Bear in St. John street in the beginning of December.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Hatchman - A. Yes, I know him.

Q. Do you recollect any evening or night his coming to your lodging - A. It was on a Sunday night, I did not take any particular notice of the day of the month.

Q. Do you remember the time he was taken up - A. Yes. It was on the Sunday before he was taken up; I was a bed; the landlady came up and said there was a boy that wanted me; when I came down he said his father and mother were out, or a bed, I do not rightly recollect which; so I offered the landlord six pence.

Q. Can you at all guess at what time of the night it was - A. It was between six and seven in the evening; I had been a bed from eleven o'clock in the forenoon; I was very ill.

Q. And he came up, did he - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. Yes, a woman's bonnet made of straw.

Q. And you call it a woman's bonnet - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the difference between a woman's bonnet, and a woman's hat - A. No.

Q. Had he any thing besides the bonnet - A. Yes; a bit of gauze, I call it, in the crown of it; he left the bonnet there, and told me it belonged to a young woman of the name of Bet Dutch. He slept all night with me, and left it with me; in the morning he went away.

Q. In the morning what became of this bonnet and this thing inside of it - A. This young woman came for it.

Q. Did you know her - A. Yes, by seeing her about; I delivered it to her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. You lodged at the White Bear - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not had the misfortune to be suspected of this yourself - A. No.

Q. Have you never been accused of this - A. No, never.

Q. The next morning the young woman came for it as he himself said she would - A. Yes.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I received information on the Monday morning; I went to a certain place where I knew they used to resort, I did not find him there; on the Tuesday morning I met with him at a house in Turnmill street; I took him in custody and took him before a magistrate; he was committed for re-examination; I took Mansfield in custody for the offence; it turned out he was at home at the time; he was kept in custody till the Friday, the examination came on, then he was discharged, he was admitted as an evidence.

Q. Did you take up the girl - A. No; she has absconded ever since.

Mr. Walford. You did suspect the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. And you had him in custody - A. Yes.

WILLIAM FOWLER . Q. You keep the White Bear public house in St. John street - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect on Sunday evening the prisoner coming to your house - A. I do; he came to get a lodging there.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. No, nothing at all but what he stood upright in.

COURT. You say he brought nothing with him but what he stood upright in - A. Not as I saw.

Q. And he stopped some time - A. Yes, he stopped and had something to drink.

Q. When he came to your house did he enquire for any body - A. He enquired for nobody particular.

Q. Did any body come and speak to him - A. No.

Q. Where did he lodge in your house - A. Why, in my house, he slept in the first story, the first room.

Q. Who slept in that room - A. There was a young man slept in that room of the name of George. The young lad came in and asked for him; I said I believe he is gone up to lay down in the bed.

Q. Then the prisoner asked for George - A. He did, that is very right.

Q. Did you call him down upon that - A. Yes; he came down in the tap room; George asked me if I could accommodate him with a bed, he said he would satisfy me whatever I pleased; I said you have got the bed yourself, surely accommodate your friend.

Mansfield. The young fellow brought up the bonnet in his hat.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth and good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-20

108. DAVID BENSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Schneider , about the hour of six at night, on the 3rd of

January , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, a bear muff, value 36 s. the property of John Schneider .

JOHN SCHNEIDER . I live at No. 4, Holborn, the corner of Gray's Inn lane , I am a furrier ; the shop is part of the dwelling house; I occupy the whole of the house. On Tuesday evening the 3d of January, about six o'clock, I was up one pair of stairs at tea; I heard the cry of stop thief; I came down stairs in about five minutes, a gentleman brought the prisoner into the shop, and said this is the man that ran out of the shop; I looked about the shop before he was brought in; I saw the muff was gone from withinside the shop window.

Q. Have you seen the muff since - A. No. It was worth about thirty six shillings.

Q. Who was in the shop when you was up stairs - A. The shopwoman was in the room adjoining.

MARTHA TOMKINS . Q. You are shopwoman to the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Where were you in the evening of the 3d of this month - A. In a room adjoining the shop, there was no person in the shop. About six o'clock I heard the door open; the shop door was only fastened by a latch; when I heard the noise of the door opening, I instantly went forwards, I found the door open, and upon my missing a muff at the corner of the window by the door, I called out stop thief; I had seen the muff ten minutes before, and no body had been in the shop in the mean time; I staid in the shop; the prisoner was brought back in three minutes time.

Q. The muff has never been seen, has it - A. No.

Q. Was it light enough by the light of the lamps to see if any person was running away - A. If I had been near the door I might; as I was not near the door I could not.

ELEANOR REYNOLDS . Q. You are servant to Mr. Schneider are you - A. Yes.

Q. In what part of the house were you when this transaction happened - A. In the kitchen; the kitchen door is fronting of the shop.

Q. Did you hear or see any thing on the evening of the 3d of this month - A. I did; I was putting some water into the tea pot, I heard the shop door open; the shop woman ran immediately to go into the shop; I did not see any body in the shop, I saw a man's arm in the shop; I put my head on the left side of Mrs. Tomkins.

Q. Then she might see the man as well as you - A. She had a young child in her arms, which might have prevented her.

Q. Did you see any thing done by the man's arm - A. I saw him take something; I was not certain what it was; he took it from the right hand side corner of the window.

Q. Had you seen the muff there before - A. I had not seen the muff there before, but I know there always was one lay there.

JOHN EDDING . I live at 148, High Holborn, I am a cheesemonger. On Tuesday the 3d of January, about ten minutes past six, I was going up Holborn, I heard a woman say stop thief; I was about four or five yards from Mr. Schneider's door. I saw a man run from the door; I did not see any thing in his hand; he ran across the road as fast as he could; I followed him; he crossed over and came back again; I called out stop thief.

Q. You did not perceive that he dropped any thing - A. No; it was very dark; I should not have been able to see a muff if it had laid before me, without I had trod upon it; I caught him on the pavement; on his return there was a coach passed between us, then he slackened his pace.

Q. Had you the opportunity of particularly observing his person - A. I had not; I saw nobody else there. I never saw him before; I could not swear to the man that I took; only the person that I followed I brought back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Pimlico; I had been to a house there two or three days. About two or three o'clock I came home to my wife and drank tea; when I came out of the court just by, I heard a cry of stop thief, I ran after the man, I missed him; a man came after me and said he believed I was the man. I said I did not know, I believed he was wrong. The master of the shop laid hold of my ears and wrong them well.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090111-21

109. SARAH GEORGE and MARIA NODES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , a cloak, value 9 s. a bed, value 30 s. a bolster, value 2 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 6 d. two napkins, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Eleanor Brooks , widow , in the dwelling house of John Rafey .

ELEANOR BROOKS . Q. Are you a widow - A. I pass for a widow; my husband for twenty four years has been at sea, he has not been heard of, his name was John Brooks ; I lodge in Musgrove buildings, Homerton , in John Rafey's house; I have only a one pair of stairs front room.

Q. Do you know either of them women at the bar - A. I know Sally George very well; the other I do not know so well.

Q. Did she lodge in the same house with you - A. Yes, in the next room.

Q. Did the other woman lodge in the house - A. Yes, she came just before I went out nursing.

Q. When was it that you went out upon this occasion of nursing - A. I think it was on a Saturday. I cannot recollect.

Q. How long was it before you were alarmed with the loss of your things - A. I had been absent five weeks from my lodging.

Q. I suppose you meaned to return to your lodging - A. Yes.

Q. Was the furniture in the room your own or your landlords - A. It was my own.

Q. When you went out upon this occasion who did you give the key of your room - A. Sarah George .

Q. What was she to take the key for - A. I was very ill before I went out; she was very good in doing things for me, and so I liked the girl; I told her to take care of my bed and keep it aired; I did not know but I might not return ill again.

Q. Had you mentioned to her how long you supposed you should be absent - A. She knew I was to be absent a month; I was absent five weeks.

Q. Had you returned in the space of that time to your lodging - A. I believe I might be once, but I cannot recollect.

Q. How far was it of that you went to nurse - A. I think it was a mile.

Q. When was it while you were absent from your lodgings that you received any alarm that brought you back - A. On the Saturday morning before my month was up on the Sunday; it was a Saturday in Christmas time.

Q. Was it the Saturday before Christmas day - A. No, it was Saturday morning: after I received some information from the landlord and his wife, they came to me.

Q. In consequence of something they told you did you go to your lodgings - A. Yes.

Q. When you returned to your room what did you discover - A. A naked room; my drawers were stripped of my clothes, and my box was stripped.

Q. Among other things did you miss the articles in the indictment - A. Yes, and more.

Q. You missed a cloak, a feather bed, a bolster, two pillows, two napkins, and two chairs - A. Yes, out of my room.

Q. When did you see these articles again - A. On the Saturday; that same day I saw them: Sarah George came to me where I was nursing, saying that she would help me home with my things; that was after my landlord and landlady had been to me. Then I told my master, where I was, that she was the young woman that had robbed me.

Q. Then after having found that you missed these things from your room, you had gone back to the place where you were nursing - A. Yes.

Q. And then Sarah George came to you - A. Yes; my master sent for an officer; she was taken in custody on that same day.

Q. Where was it that you saw you things again - A. At George Corbyn 's house; I saw all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Where is George Corbyn 's house - A. In Shepherd's lane, Homerton. They were delivered to Mr. Griffiths; I knew them to be mine.

JOHN RAFEY . I live at No. 13, Musgrove buildings Homerton; I rent the house and live in it.

Q. You let some part of it, we understand in lodgings - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Brooks coming to lodge with you - A. Yes; she came at the half quarter before Christmas; she had the one pair of stairs front room, and furnished it herself.

Q. Did the prisoner Sarah George come to lodge with you - A. Yes, they both came within a day or two; Sarah George lodged there seven weeks, the other prisoner came about a fortnight after; she lodged in the same room with George.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Brooks going out to nurse as you understood - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know that the key of the room was left with Sarah George - A. Yes.

Q. When was it that you made any observations about this matter - A. On the 30th of December, a little after seven in the evening, I was coming home from my work; I saw Nodes carrying a box just by Homerton chapel, about fifty yards from my house; she was going as from my house.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and her - A. No; I heard her come in a little while after, that I took to be her; I did not see her; I was busy in a little back room; a little while after Sarah George came in and left a candle in the room while she went out; I was in my lower front room.

Q. Was the candle alight - A. It was in a candle stick; she used commonly to leave the candle there while she went out, it had been lighted; in about ten minutes she returned into the house again, lighted the candle she had left with me; she did not stay up stairs above a minute, and then she came down again; I had suspicion that they were leaving my room just for the week's rent; I saw something in her hand which I took for a candlestick.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner with her at that time - A. No; I heard her speak to the other prisoner when I was in the back room; on my having suspicion that they were leaving my lodgings, I ran up stairs, I saw both doors locked; Sarah George's room door, and Mrs. Brooks' room door; I saw a light through the key hole, in Mrs. Brooks' room; I saw the bed and curtains on fire.

Q. You mean the feather bed - A. Yes, the bed and curtains; I bursted open the door and tore down the hangings of the bed, and put the flames out, and cried out fire; I saw Mrs. Brook's drawers were stripped, and the room pretty near stripped of the things.

Q. Till this time you had not been aware of any thing being missing from Mrs. Brook's room - A. No; I saw the things the next day at George Corbyn 's house in Shepherd's lane; I knew a great many of the things.

Q. Had she more beds than one - A. Yes.

Q. Then part of the articles you saw was a bed at Corbyn's - A. Yes.

Q. It was on Friday you discovered what you have mentioned and on Saturday you saw the things at Corbyn's - A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. Brooks had told us that Mrs. George was apprehended at her masters where she was nursing - A. Yes.

Q. When was Nodes taken - A. On the Saturday, just by the room where the goods were taken; I was there.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner Nodes had access to that room as well as George - A. I do not think she had so much.

Q. Had you ever seen her there - A. I cannot say that ever I had.

Q. George and Nodes lodged together in the same room in the house - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. You did not know any thing of the state of the room before you went up to it that day - A. No.

Q. You do not know whether the things were there before - A. I do not know whether they were that day or not.

Q. How do you know they were there any other day - A. I knew Mrs. Brooks had a great many nice clothes, and many other things; I moved her goods from her lodgings to my house.

Q. But whether Mrs. Brooks, or any body else might have taken them away, you cannot say of your own knowledge - A. Mrs. Brooks was not at home to have taken them away.

GEORGE CORBYN . I am a coachman; I live in Shepherd's lane.

Q. How far is Shepherd's lane from Musgrove place - A. About a quarter of a mile from Rafey's.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I have seen

them since they came to lodge at my house.

Q. When was it they came to you - A. They came last Monday was a fortnight and took the room.

Q. Did they come together - A. No, George came first.

Q. Did you know her before that time - A. No; she took the room of my wife, I was not at home, I did not see her then; I saw her on the Wednesday, and I saw Nodes on the Thursday; I saw them go into the room on the Thursday with several bundles; they brought in the bed between them. On the Friday night they came into the room; the things were found in my house on the Saturday by Sharman, the constable; they were left that night in the room, and both the prisoners were taken to the cage; they were both brought there on the Saturday, and Mrs. Brooks came and owned the things; the things were delivered to Mr. Griffiths.

WILLIAM SHARMAN . I am an headborough. On the 31st of December I took Sarah George where Mrs. Brooks was nursing; the other I took from Corbyn's.

Q. Did you see the things that were found in the house - A. I did; they were left there that night; they were delivered on Monday to Mr. Griffiths.

Q. Did you see the things that were set fire to - A. Yes; at Rafey's.

Q. Was the fire in more than one part of the hangings - A. Yes, several places, and one place in the bed, and in the sacking, and the curtains; there were some shavings between the tick and the sacking.

DEBORAH RAFEY . Q. You are the wife of John Rafey - A. Yes. I was not at home at the time; I saw the appearance of fire in the room; Sarah George was left in trust with the key.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I went to Corbyn's to fetch the goods away, I found them in a little room up one pair of stairs; I have had the care of them ever since.

The property produced and identified.

George's Defence. I leave it to the gentlemen of the jury.

Nodes's Defence. The same.

George called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GEORGE, GUILTY, aged 17.

NODES, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-22

110. GEORGE DYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , eight ducks, value 1 l. and four drakes, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Arnold Lockley .

WILLIAM SHEATH . I live in Westham, Essex , I am Mr. Thomas Arnold Lockley 's gardener. I lost these ducks last Sunday night, they were in a hen house; I missed them on Monday morning, I had seen them on the over night, between four and five in the evening; they were locked up in the hen house in an enclosed yard; I lost eight ducks from the poultry house, and five from the fattening house, and three chickens besides I lost.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of taking them - A. On Tuesday morning I went to Leadenhall market, I found twelve out of the thirteen; they were all alive.

Q. Are you sure these ducks are your master's - A. Yes; they had a private mark on them, and one of the drakes had but one eye.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man - A. He lived about a quarter of a mile from us; I cannot say I know him, I know his wife very well.

DENNIS RIORDEN . I was in Leadenhall market; the prisoner ran away when he heard the market people say he stole the ducks.

JOHN ROGERS . I buy and sell things in Leadenhall market; I live in the Borough. On Monday I bought these ducks of the prisoner.

Q. Sheath came to you and claimed some ducks - A. Yes; I bought the twelve ducks of the man at the bar; on Tuesday Mr. Sheath claimed them; I took them home on the Monday night; on the Tuesday I brought them to sell. I gave two shillings and two pence a piece for them.

Q. to Riorden. You had heard that this prisoner had sold the ducks to Rogers - A. Yes. When he heard the market people tell me that he was the man that sold the ducks he ran away and I ran down Lime street after him and catched him; I asked him how he came by the ducks; he told me he picked them up on the road; I brought him into the Poulterer's Arms and sent for a constable; the constable took him to the Poultry compter.

GEORGE HANCOCK . I am a constable of Leadenhall market. On Monday morning, about a quarter to six, the prisoner asked me where Mr. Rogers was; I told him he was gone to light his pipe, he would be there directly; he asked me if I could procure him a basket; I did. Mr. Rogers bought them in the market, and paid a market price for them; he returned me the basket.

Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. Yes; I am sensible of it, by his being in the market before.

Q. What was he doing in the market before - A. Selling poultry, I believe.

Q. Did you see how many ducks there were - A. No, I did not know till after he was taken.

JOHN PENNER . I am an officer of Cheap ward. Mr. Lockley's gardener sent to me because the officer of Leadenhall market would not take charge of this man; I took him to the Compter.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I work at the London docks; I was coming up in the morning, I saw a man with some ducks, he asked me to buy them; I gave him two shillings a piece for them; I came up to the market and sold them to Mr. Rogers for two shillings and two pence.

Q. to Sheath. How did he get the hen house open - A. He got into the yard by knocking the paling down, and then he wrenched the door open.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-23

111. CHARLES JAMES, alias EDWARDS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October , six hundred yards of cambric muslin, value 50 l. the property of Margaret Thompson , widow , Philip George Thompson , and Robert Cuth Thompson , in a certain boat on the navigable river Thames .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN M'QUEEN . Q. Are you in the service of Messrs. Holdsworth and Hall, who are packers - A. Yes; they reside in Crosby square.

Q. On a day previous to the 26th of October had you packed some trunks for Mr. Davis - A. Yes.

Q. Among them were there four trunks marked PD 6, 7, 8, and 9 - A. Yes.

Q. What did the trunks contain - A. One hundred and four pieces of cambric muslin.

Q. When they were packed where were they sent to - A. To Porter's quay; I loaded them in the cart; they were sent to Porter's quay by Alder our carman.

JOHN ALDER . Q. You are carman to Messieurs Holdsworth and Hall - A. I am.

Q. On the 26th of October did you take these trunks to Porter's quay and deliver them there - A. I did, at Porter's quay, in Thames street .

PHILIP GEORGE THOMPSON . Q. You are the occupiers of Porter's quay - A. No, Messrs. Holdsworth and Hall; I am the lighterman attending at Porter's quay; my partners names are Margaret Thompson , Philip George Thompson (myself) and Robert Cuth Thompson .

Q. On the 26th of October last did you receive from the last witness any packages marked PD 6, 7, 8, and 9 - A. Yes; I shipped them between eleven and twelve in a lug boat laying off Porter's quay; the tide not suiting, I thought it proper to keep them on the quay that night.

Q. Was the prisoner in your service - A. He was an apprentice to my father; Dale, the accomplice, was a regular watchman, his business was to watch the craft of a night.

Q. Did you attend to see him that night on the watch - A. I did, between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. How soon the next morning did you see your craft - A. I did not see it the next morning; the lug boat had gone her journey by another man.

Q. After you had discovered that James was in custody upon this, did you bring back the trunks again - A. I did, myself; I went to Blackwall and got it before it was received into the ship out of my own lug boat, the trunk No. 8.

Q. When you found it had been unpacked, and repacked - A. Yes; it was so well done I could not discover it; when I came to open it I found fifteen pieces of muslin, and upon the top of it were stumps of brooms.

Q. Did these fifteen pieces fill the trunk - A. Oh no, not much above half; on the muslin were stumps of brooms and the birch, to the amount of two brooms, I suppose.

COURT. It filled up the vacancy - A. Exactly so.

Mr. Gurney. And done so neatly that your eye could not discover that it had been unpacked - A. No.

Q. You and your partners are responsible for these goods when they are delivered to you - A. Yes; the trunk is here.

Q. to Macqueen. Is that one of the trunks that you packed - A. It is; the mark at the bottom is PD No. 8.

Q. Is that the sort of goods that you packed for Mr. Davis - A. It is.

Mr. Gleed to Thompson. Have you mentioned all the names of your partners - A. I have.

Q. When the trunks were delivered to you, were they delivered to you in person - A. They were not.

Q. So that you did not make the mark PD - A. No. There were twenty four trunks put in the boat.

Q. Are you able to say that the trunks that were put in the lug boat, that is one of them before you - A. I will take my oath of it.

Q. They were covered up in matting - A. They were so; this side of the trunk is left outside; the merchant gave me the numbers; we prick them off; the matting does not go round, it covers the top; the mark is on the bottom.

Q. You say this man was an apprentice of your father's - A. Yes; I believe he had been out of his time in November.

Q. Where the lug boat was, it was not in the river Thames, but in one of the creeks - A. No, it was in the Thames.

Mr. Gurney. You yourself received them on board the lug boat, and you are quite certain they are the same - A. I am quite certain they are the same.

EDWARD ROBERTS . Q. What are you - A. I am one of the patrols of East Smithfield.

Q. On the night of the 26th, or the morning of the 27th of October, were you in East Smithfield - A. I was. Between four and five in the morning I saw four men come out of East Smithfield, down Butcher row; two of them kept on the side I was on, and two crossed over on the other side; the first was the prisoner at the bar, he had a bundle under his arm; I crossed over; the hindmost man I elbowed, and thought he had nothing; I followed the prisoner into a dark entry, I was about five or six paces behind him, when he put the bag down by the corner of a house in the dark entry; I went up to him and asked him what he had got there. he said nothing; I put my stick to the bag, and at the same time I kicked my foot against it; I went to put my hand to lay hold of him, at the same time I kicked the bag farther away; he made a spring and ran away.

Q. Did you find the bag contained any thing in it - Yes; I ran after him; before we got out of the dark entry a man in a blue coat got between us; I made a blow at his head in order to knock him down, but I missed it; I continued pursuing the prisoner; he ran into my partner's hand at the top of Dean street; he was stopped at the top of Dean street by Adams. I never lost sight of him before he was stopped.

Q. How far was this dark entry where you left the bag to where the prisoner was taken - A. About one hundred and fifty yards or two hundred yards; I told Adams to take the prisoner to the watchhouse. I went back to the dark entry for the property. I found the bag contained five pieces of muslin.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. How long is this dark entry - A. About twenty yards.

Q. How far behind the men that was running from you might you be at any time - fifteen yards from him - A. No; I think I should have got hold of him if it had not been for the man that ran between him and me.

- ADAMS. Q. You are another patrol of East Smithfield - were you on duty on the morning of the 27th in East Smithfield - A. Yes. The prisoner was running up Dean street as hard as he could run; the last witness was close to him. I took him to the watch-house.

GEORGE DALE . Q. Were you a watchman in the employ of Messrs. Thompson - A. I was, at Porter's quay.

Q. On the night of October the 26th were you on the watch - A. I was, at Porter's quay.

Q. In the course of the night did any person come

down to you - A Not on that night, but on the 27th, which was two o'clock in the morning.

Q. Who came down to you - A. Charles James .

Q. Do you mean the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I do, sir.

Q. Where were you when he came down - A. In the lighter, called the Providence; the lug boat was along side of it in the same quay; he called to me by name, he said halloa, Dale; I answered; he said were you asleep; I said no, but I had been; he said shall we get to work; I said at what; he said with them Peters, meaning the trunks; I told him such things could not be done without making a noise; he said poh, you are afraid of your shadow, we can take them down the lighter hold, I have got Thomas Long here; he said directly to me what do you say; I said I do not know; with that, he goes up the scuttle of the lighter, went upon the quay and brought Thomas Long down. He then proceeded into the lug boat and handed two trunks over to Thomas Long ; Thomas Long took them from him and brought them along the deck, he came to me and said take hold of them.

Q. Did you take hold of them - A. I did; I put them down the scuttle of the lighter; Charles James came in out of the boat and went down into the hold of the lighter with Thomas Long , they shut the skuttle of the lighter over them: I went up on the quay, I walked there some time, when I heard a knocking on the skuttle of the lighter: I went into the lighter; I lifted the skuttle up, I perceived a light in the hold of the lighter.

Q. Were there no light when you left them - A. None at all; Charles James said to me, I wish you would get me a broom; I asked him what he wanted with the broom; he told me to break up and put in the trunks; I immediately went on the quay, to a place called the tackle house, where we had got upwards of sixteen brooms and implements for the lighters; I from there brought him four old brooms; I gave them to him and the scuttle was shut; I walked the lighter's deck; in the course of that time I heard a knocking repeatedly as if they were nailing; after that was done, I lifted up the scuttle and asked if they were done; they said yes; there was a light then; Charles James came on the deck and asked me if we should get the trunks over into the boat again, and return them in their place; I said yes.

Q. Did you do it - A. We did do it.

Q. You restored the trunks to the lug boat - A. We did.

Q. After you had done that what did you do - A. Charles James returned out of the boat, after he had replaced the trunks; he went down in the hold and called me; when I came down, he asked me what I was going to take; I asked him what he had got.

Q. Was Long there too - A. Yes; he said cambrics.

Q. Did you find there were cambrics there - A. I did not know, I was no judge.

Q. Were they such as things as these - A. They were.

Q. Did you take some - A. I did; they asked me first how many I could take; I said I did not know; with that Thomas Long presented one piece to me; I put that in my pocket; he then gave me another; I put that in my pocket; he gave me two more, which I put under my waistcoat, around me; Long was down in the hold; Charles James came up with a bag; Long came with a handkerchief.

Q. Where did you all go to - A. Down East Smithfield, I was behind them; we came down the Butcher row; there came a person and passed me as if he was going forward to him that was a head of me, and when we got down the dark passage I heard him say to James, what have you got there; I walked right on and escaped, and saw no more of Charles James till I saw him at the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. How long have you been watchman to Messrs. Thompsons - A. Not very long; I have been a watchman some years.

Q. Then on the 27th you began the night by going to sleep - A. It is impossible for a man to be up sixteen nights upon a stretch without some sleep

Q. Sometimes it is impossible for a man to be honest - A. Very true.

Q. You are not a very young man - A. No.

Q. The prisoner is a young man - A. A great deal younger than me.

Q. Have you told all that passed - A. No; you have not asked me.

Q. The first thing that was said to you, was, shall we go to work - A. Yes.

Q. You understood it at once - A. I did, because he called the trunks Peters himself before; in taking in the goods, he said here comes the Peters. I did not know what the Peters were till he told me.

Q. You being a watchman did not know what Peters were - A. No.

Q. It was a strange term - A. It was a strange term.

Q. You understood it at once it was to break them open and steal the contents - A. That is without a doubt.

Q. Now the term Peter being a strange term to you and you understood it immediately - it did not occur to you to take him into custody immediately - A. No.

Q. You reasoned with him - A. I did.

Q. Of avoiding detection - A. Yes.

Q. Pray how long have you known Long - A. Not long.

Q. Have you known him a month or two - A. No.

Q. Is he a young man or not - A. I cannot say; by the appearance of the man in the dark I could not say whether he was young or no.

Q. Was not Long a man that you knew perfectly well - A. He was not, I never had any connection with him whatever.

Q. You soon acquiesed with them - A. I was as culpable as them.

Q. Perhaps you proposed it - A. No.

Q. Then perhaps you were shocked at the proposal - A. I was not.

Q. Then the first time it was proposed to you, you being an honest man till that moment, you consented to it at once - A. I did.

Q. At the time these things were taken into the hold who got the candle - A. Thomas Long .

Q. They had the light below - did he strike a light - A. I do not know, because the scuttle was shut over.

Q. How do you know that he got a light - A. Because he brought the implements with him.

Q. How do you know that he brought the implements with him - A. Because the other was unprepared seemingly; I saw a light, I cannot positively say which got a light.

Q. Pray about fetching these brooms, did you ever fetch brooms before - A. I have fetched them for my master.

Q. It was a matter of astonishment to you when the brooms were asked for - A. It was; I never heard of such a thing before.

Q. Were you a person known as a watchman that had the guard and protection of this place - A. Yes.

Q. And these men knew the fact - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to make the jury believe that these men, knowing you were the watchman, came and proposed it to you at once - A. They did.

Q. When the property was dropped in the dark entry were there four men - A. With the man that took Charles James , that made the fourth.

Mr. Gurney. If there was any other man walking there you did not notice him - A. No.

Q. to Thompson. What is the value of these five pieces of cambric - A. A guinea each, the five is worth five guineas.

Q. You have to pay for them - A. I have.

Q. What is the total number lost out of the trunk - A. Out of this trunk eleven.

M'Queen. There were twenty six pieces in each trunk, and there is fifteen left.

Q. to Thompson. Did you see James when he was in custody - A. I did.

Q. Before you tell us what he said, did you make use of any promise or any threat - A. None whatever. He sent Smith the officer to me, to say that he would tell me every thing that passed: he told me that he had been opening two of the trunks in the boat; that he assisted with Long and Dale in taking as many pieces as they could; that it being the first time he had ever done so, he hoped I would be merciful to him.

Q. to M'Queen. Did you with your own hand pack up the whole of these trunks - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Davis was the owner of the goods - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. The man that has turned evidence against me often times got me to do that I should not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth and believing it to be his first offence .]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-24

112. THOMAS HUMPAGE was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Margaret Howell , spinster , on the 7th of January , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will a bank note, value 5 l. and three other bank notes, value 1 l. each, her property .

MARGARET HOWELL . I live at Mr. Moggridge's, No. 101, Fleet street, he is a shoemaker; I am his sister in law. On Saturday, about five o'clock in the evening, I was returning home from Messrs. Robarts, and co. bankers, in Lombard street.

Q. What did you receive there - A. A five pounds note, and three ones bank notes; I had got as far as the Mansion house, the prisoner laid hold of my arm, he said young woman, have you not been to the banking house, you must return back to the banking house immediately, the notes are wrong; I returned from the Mansion house to the first turning, George street , I had the notes in my hand; he snatched them out of my hand and ran up George street; I immediately ran after him and cried out stop thief; he was stopped in St. Swithin's lane; John Raine stopped him.

Q. Did you gave him the notes to look at - A. No, he snatched them from me.

Q. Then you did not intend to part with them - A. No.

Q. Had you seen him before - A. I saw him at the banker's steps when I came out.

JOHN RAINE . I am a merchant. On Thursday evening, near five o'clock, I went through Lombard street into St. Swithin's lane; as I turned out of Lombard street into St. Swithin's lane I heard the prosecutrix screaming out stop thief, I was at the corner, I saw the prisoner; he turned round the corner out of Bearbinder lane; I prepared to meet him; I turned him up against the window; the person who was behind me, I do not know which, laid hold of him first; I believe we both laid hold of him as near as possible together; I had hold of him in the front and the other behind; he dropped his arm as if he was going to throw something down; I kept my eye on his hand; I saw him rise it again, and he put the notes into the bridge of the shutter, where the shutters slide in; I took it out immediately; there were plenty had hold of him at the same time; I took the number of the notes, and gave them to the prosecutrix; I went to the banker to see whether she had taken them from Messrs. Robarts.

RICHARD MOGGRIDGE . I am a boot and shoemaker, in Fleet street; I know nothing of the transsaction, only sending my sister with a check. I have the notes; I received them from my sister.

The property produced and identified.

JOHN ASHTON . I am a merchant. On my returning home from the Change, near five o'clock, I observed the prisoner made a snatch at this young lady; on hearing her scream I ran; the prisoner is the person, I am sure; he was stopped when I came up to him.

- NICHOLLS. I live at No. 36, St. Swithins lane, almost opposite of Bearbinder lane, I am a green grocer. I stood at my door, I thought I heard a cry of murder; I ran into Bearbinder lane, I saw a mob of people and the prisoner at the head of them; I made a catch at him and tore the skirt of his coat clean off, and turned him round; I catched hold of his collar with both my hands; then Mr. Raine came up and took hold of him; I have the skirt of his coat now, there is a handkerchief in it and some cards.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I only know the prisoner was brought to me; I took him to the Mansion house; the right tap of the coat is torn off; it appears a spencer now.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing the Mansion house, towards home, I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran as well as the others; they took hold of me, being the foremast man; I ran faster than the others.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-25

113. TULLY M'CONE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , a table cloth cover,

value 10 s. ten pieces of carpet, value 10 s. a quarter of a pound weight of thread, value 1 s. and seven yards of canvas, value 6 s. the property of John Brown , Herbert Broom , and John Harris .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN HARRIS . Q. You, I believe, keep a carpet warehouse in Leicester fields - A. I do, with my partners John Brown and Herbert Broom . The prisoner has been in our service for a twelvemonth back; in consequence of suspicion he was taken up by the officer on Tuesday the 27th of December last.

Q. Had you before that missed these pieces of carpeting - A. On Saturday evening the 24th, I missed not only the piece mentioned in the indictment, but a large quantity of wrappers, above an hundred yards, which is not in the indictment; the table cloth cover I did not miss till it was found.

Q. How lately before had you seen the pieces of carpeting - A. It was about six weeks before that I had employed him to assist me in sorting a number of patterns, among which were these mentioned in the indictment; these are the patterns. Donaldson the officer went to search the lodgings; I accompanied him.

Q. Before you went to search did you enquire where he lodged - A. I did; he told me he lodged at 23, Exeter street in the Strand; a young man in the warehouse told him he knew he did not; he persisted he did; the officer took a key from him, he stated it was the key of his room door; he also described the room to be a back room up two pair of stairs; I accompanied the officer; I found he did not lodge there. I afterwards found out he lodged in Berwick street; I am not sure whether it is the Black Swan or the Black Lion. The constable took two keys from him; one unlocked the chamber door, and the other unlocked the prisoner's trunk; there was a shirt in that trunk; inside of that was a green cloth table cover; I immediately knew it to be the property of my partners and myself, from the private mark that was attached to it. I received from the hands of the landlord other articles - pieces of carpeting and thread.

JOSEPH TOURNIER . I keep the Black Lion in Berwick street.

Q. In the month of December last did the prisoner lodge with you - A. Yes, about three weeks before Mr. Harris came to search. I gave to Mr. Harris some pieces of carpeting which the prisoner gave me.

Q. Did he state to you how he came by those pieces of carpeting - A. Seeing my bed room door open, he said landlord, you have no bedside carpeting; I said no, I cannot afford them; he ran up stairs and brought down these pieces of carpeting; I asked him how he came by them, he said they were his perquisites, he did not want any thing for them; I was in a hurry, I throwed them down in the room; when Mr. Harris came I delivered them to him.

ANN TOURNIER . Q. Did you receive a canvas wrapper from the prisoner - A. I did. The prisoner asked me if I wanted any thing to make wrappers of; I said I did; he said he had something by him ever since he kept a house of his own; I asked him how much he asked for it, he said ten shillings. I gave it him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. That table cloth cover I bought last May in the street; it never belonged to Mr. Harris or his partners.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-26

114. VINCENT ALESSI was indicted for that he on the 11th of November feloniously did forge and counterfeit a bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note with the same intention; -

And several OTHER COUNTS. for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Garrow, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was -

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-27

115. VINCENT ALESSI was indicted for that he on the 25th of November , feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful cause had in his custody and possession two forged bank notes, each of them for the payment of 5 l. he at the same time well knowing the said notes to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT that he without having lawful excuse had in his custody a certain other forged five pound note, he knowing it to be forged.

Mr. Garrow, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was -

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-28

116. JOHN NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting on the 21st of November , a bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

SECOND COUNT for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note with the same intention -

And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only stating it to be a promissory note, with the same intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Garrow.

SARAH TAYLOR . Q. You are the wife of John Taylor - A. Yes.

Q. Your husband keeps a public house in High Holborn - A. Yes, the sign of the Three Compasses.

Q. Do you know Alessi - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the 25th of November last - A. Yes, between eight and nine o'clock at night. He came and asked if we had any good old port wine; my husband was standing just by him when he came in; he told him he had some very good; Alessi asked the price of it; he told him it was four shillings and sixpence; he asked whether with the bottle or without; he told him it was four shillings and nine pence with the bottle; he said he would take two bottles.

Q. Were the two bottles delivered to him - A. Yes; he gave me a five pound bank note; I had not sufficient change; I sent Simmonds out to get change; my husband came in, and asked what the gentleman was waiting for.

COURT. I thought you said he was standing by - A. Yes; but he went out and came in again.

WILLIAM SIMMONDS . Q. Do you lodge in the public house kept by Mr. Taylor - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 25th of November receiving a bank note to get change for the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Alessi, was he present at the time - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go for the purpose of getting it changed, and where did you go to - A. To Mr. Newman, the opposite neighbour, he is an oilman; I gave the note to Mr. Newman.

Q. Was that note that you gave to Mr. Newman the same that you received from Mrs. Taylor - A. Yes.

JOSEPH NEWMAN . Q. You are an oilman, No. 119, High Holborn - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on Friday evening, the 25th of November, the last witness, Simmonds, coming to your house with a bank note - A. Yes, very well, he brought it to get change.

Q. Should you know that note again if I was to shew it you - A. I put Taylor and two H's, which means High Holborn.

Q. Look at that note and tell me whether that is the note that you received from Simmonds - A. Yes; I am quite sure of it.

Q. Now that note you gave change for - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with that note which you received from Simmonds - A. I gave it to Taylor in the course of a minute; I had had not finished 1808 when Taylor came in.

Q. You were writing when Taylor came in - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How soon after was it when you gave it back to Taylor - A. In the course of a minute or two.

Q. Had you mixed it with any other before you gave it back - A. Oh, no; I am quite sure of that.

Q. Nor that any other person had - A. No other person had any thing to do with it but myself; I had not finished writing upon it when Taylor came in.

JOHN TAYLOR . Q. You are the husband of Mrs. Taylor that I have been examining - A. Yes.

Q. Take that note in your hand - do you know that note - A. I do.

Q. Did you see that note at Mr. Newman's - A. Yes, I received it of Newman; my name is on the back of it, and with the name of Vincent Alessi .

Q. John Taylor , Vincent Alessi - when did you write that - A. In two minutes after I had it from Mr. Newman in my own house.

Q. Then are you quite sure that is the indentical note that you received from Mr. Newman - A. Quite sure.

Q. How was it that you went to Newman's - A. I suspected Vincent Alessi the moment he entered my house.

MARY MEREDITH . Q. I believe you lived servant with Mrs. Neave - A. Yes; she lived at that time No. 20, King street, Soho.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Vincent Alessi - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of him in November last - Yes; I saw him at No. 20. King street, Soho, at my mistress's house.

Q. Did he give you any order to buy any thing for him - A. Yes, a pint of wine.

Q. What did he give you to pay for it - A. A five pound note; I took the note to Mrs. Dearlove, the corner of Dean street, she keeps the Bunch of Grapes.

Q. Does she sell wine - A. Yes; she keeps a wine vaults. I delivered the note to Mrs. Dearlove, she gave me the change; Mrs. Dearlove is here; that is the woman I delivered the note to.

MARTHA DEARLOVE . Q. Did you receive any note from the last witness in the beginning of November last - A. Yes; on the 11th of November.

Q. Did you make any mark on the note - A. Yes; This is the note I had from the last witness, it has my own writing on it; Mrs. Neave, 11th of November, 1838; E D on the top for Elizabeth Dearlove, my mother's name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Mrs. Dearlove, I take it for granted you receive many notes - A. Not bad ones.

Q. You mark all your notes - A. Yes; with my mother's name.

Mr. Bosanquet. This is marked with Mrs. Neave's name - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any other note that you received from Mrs. Neave on the 11th of November - A. No.

Q. to Mary Meredith . Is that the person to whom you delivered the note - A. Yes.

Q. Did you carry any other note to Mrs. Dearlove on the 11th of November except that one which is laying here - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. Alessi, come forward.

Q. to Meredith. Is that the person you have been describing by the name of Alessi - A. Yes; this is the same person that gave me the note.

COURT. This is not the same note as was tendered to Mrs. Taylor - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. It is the second note, it is not in the indictment.

VINCENT ALESSI . Q. Your name is Vincent Alessi - A. Yes.

Q. You are an Italian by birth - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. When did you first become acquainted with him - A. In Birmingham.

Q. How long ago - A. In the beginning of October last.

Q. Does he live at Birmingham - A. I think so.

Q. You understood so - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any dealings with him in October - A. I believe in October, at Birmingham.

Q. Did you afterwards see him in London - A. Yes.

Q. When was that - the first time - A. I believe in the month of November, I am not certain.

Q. Where did you lodge in London - A. At No. 39, Haymarket, the sign of the Lemon Tree.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes.

Q. Did he lodge there during his continuance in town - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he continue in town at that time - - A. Four or five days, I believe.

Q. Had you any dealings with him at that time in the Haymarket - A. Yes; with some notes.

Q. Tell us what transaction you had with him in the Haymarket with some notes - A. He came there; he had nineteen five pound bank notes.

Q. I will just ask you whether your former dealings with him at Birmingham had been with bank notes A. Yes.

Q. He came to the Haymarket, he had with him

nineteen five pound bank notes, what did he and you do with the bank notes - A. We passed some.

Q. What did you do with them - A. He sold them all to me.

Q. What price did you pay him for nineteen five pound notes - A. Thirty shillings each.

Q. Was that all that you paid him - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with these bank notes after you bought them - A. I passed him some of them.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Taylor in Holborn - A. I do.

Q. Did you pass any one of these bank note to Mrs. Taylor - A. I went there to pass one, and they said it was bad; I gave it to the wife, and then the husband said it was bad.

Q. You was detained for uttering a forged bank note, and of course have remained in custody ever since - A. Yes.

Q. Now was that bank note which you delivered to Mrs. Taylor, one of the nineteen which the prisoner had sold to you in the Hay market - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You are sure of that - A. I am quite certain of it.

Q. Did you at any time visit a young woman of the name of Neave - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you visit a young woman in Dean street, Soho - A. I cannot say I remember.

Q. Did you not give a young woman there a bank note - A. I do not think I ever saw her before, I cannot recollect.

Q. After you were in custody, did you tell any body where you got the bank notes from - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. I now produce the first letter.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . Q. You are in the office of the solicitor of the bank - did you serve any copy of that notice to the prisoner at the bar - A. I did, on the 7th of January. (The notice read.)

Q. to Alessi. In consequence of the information that you had given, did you write a letter of which this is the copy - A. Yes.

Q. That is in your own hand writing - A. It is.

Q. You wrote a letter of which that is a draft of it - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver the original which you so wrote from that draft, which is a true copy, to Mr. Westwood - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Westwood, that letter was delivered to you to put in the post, by that draft it was a correct copy of it, and so of the rest - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards put that in the general post office - A. I did.

Q. A copy of this wrote on the 10th of December 1808, you put in on the 10th of December - A. I did, at the general post office, Lombard street.

Q. to Alessi. Did you in consequence of that, Alessi, receive this in answer - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of your receiving that letter from Birmingham on the 12th, did you write this on the 13th - A. I did; I delivered it to Mr. Westwood.

Q. to Westwood. Look at that, did you in like manner put that in the general post office, Lombard street - A. I did. (The letters read.)

First Letter. Dated London, December 10, 1808; signed Vincent Alessi , and addressed to Mr. John Nicholls, No. 3, Digby street, Birmingham.

"Dear friend,

"I am resolved to go to America with my friend, therefore I shall want some of them candlesticks as I told you; if you could come to London as soon as possible, bring me twenty dozen No. 5; twenty four dozen No. 1; and four dozen No. 2; but I will give you no more than two guineas for your journey. Please to let me know when you will be in town, as I shall wait on you at my lodgings; send me a line immediately by return of post.

I am your humble servant, VINCENT ALESSI ."

A letter signed I N; dated Birmingham, December the 1th, 1808; addressed to Vincent Alessi , No. 39, Hay market, London.

"Dear sir,

"I received yours; in answer to which I can say, I can be in London about tomorrow week and not before; if that will be soon enough, let me know by return of post, and I will be punctual to my time; when I hope I shall have the pleasure of seeing you.

I remain your humble servant, I. N."

COURT. There is no proof of it being his hand writing and so I shall leave it to the jury.

Mr. Garrow to Alessi. Did you in the month of November write any other letter to Nicholls, except the two you have been speaking of - A. I wrote some other letter to Nicholls; I do not know whether it was in the month of November or December.

Q. Did you write any other letter to him after you were taken up, except the two that you gave to Westwood - A. No.

Q. This is the last letter; this is the one that was found upon the person of the prisoner; you saw this letter found upon him - A. Yes.

Q. At the time he was apprehended you saw the officer take this out of his pocket - A. Yes.

Signed Vincent Alessi . dated December 13th 1808, addressed to Mr. John Nicholls , No. 3, Digby street, Birmingham.

"Dear friend,

"I received your letter, and I understand that you cannot come before the time that you have mentioned, which I think will do very well; because we shall not go away before Christmas; if you can come on Sunday I shall like it best; let me know; I have no more to say than I remain your humble servant,

VINCENT ALESSI ."

Mr. Garrow to Alessi. In this first letter you talk of candlesticks, No. 2, and No. 5 - A. Yes.

Q. What do you mean by these candlesticks - A. Notes; candlesticks No. 2, two pound notes; and candlesticks No. 5, five pound notes; and candlesticks No. 1, one pound notes.

Q. What does a dozen candlesticks mean - A. One note.

COURT. There is twenty dozen mentioned - A. That is twenty notes.

Q. The dozen is only colour; then twenty dozen only means twenty - A. Yes; and four dozen means four notes.

Mr. Garrow. Had you ever any dealings with the prisoner for candlesticks - A. We talked about candlesticks.

Q. You never bought any candlesticks of him - A. No.

Q. When you wanted a supply of forged bank notes, how came you to call them dozens of candlesticks - A. Because the first thing that we talked was about candlesticks,

of which I had a notion of buying some, not of him.

Q In short, by whose direction did you describe forged notes by dozens of candlesticks - A By Mr. Nicholls' direction.

Q You have told us at the time of this correspondence you were in custody - A Yes.

Q Of course you were not at the Lemon Tree - A No.

Q Were you taken to the Lemon Tree by Foy and some other person - A. I was.

Q When was that - A I do not recollect the day.

Q Was it at the time according to the letter from the prisoner at Birmingham, when you expected him to arrive - A Yes, it was on that day.

Q How long had you been at the Lemon Tree before you were informed that the prisoner had come there - A About three or four or five hours.

Q Upon that you were permitted to go into a room by the officers, separated from them by a partition - A Yes.

Q Did you agree with the officers for any signal that you were to do, if any certain event happened - A Yes.

Q What were you do - A To put on my hat when I was certain that Mr. Nicholls had the notes in his possession.

Q What did the prisoner and you do after you went in to him - A We talked about this business about the notes; I asked him if he had brought them with him.

COURT. What did you ask him - A What he had brought, if he had brought these things; I did not mention what; he said yes; I asked him for a pencil and and little piece of paper; I think he cut it from that letter.

Mr. Garrow. He took out some letter from his pocket and tore some paper off, which you believe was this - A I cannot say it was that.

Q But you believe so - A Yes.

Q What was you to do with the pencil and the piece of paper - A To cast up all the notes - 20 dozen, No. 5, according to what I had ordered, at thirty shillings each, and to see what they came to.

Q Was the price of the same proportion of the smaller notes as the large ones - A Yes, at six shillings for a pound; that was the price of all.

Q So that you were to pencil the number of each, and cast how much six shillings in a pound would come to - A Yes; then I made out the account, and said it comes to so much money.

Q Do you recollect how much it came to - A I do not recollect it.

Q But you mentioned to him how much they came to - A I did, and I put down the price of the notes, and two guineas for his journey.

Q How came you to put down the two guineas for the journey - A Because in my first letter I proposed two guineas for the journey.

Q Upon your putting down this money on the paper did you say any thing to him that this was a large purchase that you were making - A. Yes.

Q Do you recollect what he said - A One must get rid of them in the way of trade. When I was certain he had got the notes, I said now we will go up to my room, it is cold, I will put my hat on.

Q Then as soon as you put on your hat the officers came in and secured him - A Yes.

Q Now Alessi, when you were taken for uttering this note to Mr. Taylor, you were not permitted to go back to your lodgings again - A No.

Q You were not in your own room when you met the prisoner - A No, in the club room.

Q This room that we are talking of, is a room parted off by a separate partition from the club room - A Yes.

Q Did you see the officer bore the hole through the partition, so that they could see what passed before the prisoner came - A Yes.

Q When you went out on the day that you were taken up for uttering the note to Mr. Taylor, had you left any forged notes that you had bought of Nicholls at your lodgings - A Four.

Q Four of that nineteen that you spoke of - A Yes. I left these four behind the mantle shelf in the crevice of the partition.

Q I believe you, after you were in custody, directed somebody to that crevice to find these four notes - A I did, to Mr. Westwood.

Q You described to him the crevice where to find the four notes - A Yes.

Q to Westwood. Did you, from the direction of Alessi, go to his lodgings and find these four notes - A I did; these are the notes; I found them concealed in a crevice behind the mantle piece, wrapped up in brown paper.

Q You found them readily by the decription that Alessi had given - A I did. There is four five pound notes.

Q to Alessi. You are aware that you are acquitted of those charges that were against you - A Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How long have you been in this country at this time - A About five months and a half.

Q What, besides forged bank notes, have you been about this time - A I wait to go over to Holland to go into my own country.

Q I did not ask you what you are waiting for - have you been about any other business besides forged bank notes - A No.

Q Have you had forged notes from any other person besides the prisoner - A No.

Q I do not ask you the name - do you mean to swear that you have not had dealings with another person resident at Birmingham - A Yes, I will swear it.

Q How long were you at Birmingham - A Seventeen days the first time.

Q. By saying the first time, I presume you have been there more than once - A I have been there three times in all.

Q How long were you there the second time - A. A day and a half.

Q How long the third - A Half a day; I came back directly.

Q On the business of forged bank notes - A Not the first time.

Q Only the second and third - A Yes.

Q You say you have not had any dealings with any other person for forged bank notes - do you mean to say that you have not given information of others for forged bank notes - A I did not receive bank notes from any other person but Nicholls. The first bank note that was shewn me was by another man.

Q Had you dealings with that other man - A No.

Q But you had conversation with another man on

forged bank notes - A Yes, because he shewed it me.

Q. As a matter to deal in, did he shew it you - A Yes; he asked me if I wanted to buy it.

Q Then whether you had this note among others that you uttered to Mr. Taylor, or whether you had that note of the prisoner, or of the other person, we are to take upon your credit - you have no other person to shew it - A No.

Q You were taken up upon uttering that note to Mr. Taylor, is it so or not - A I do not know.

Q When were you taken up first - A On the night of the 25th of November, I believe, at Mr. Taylor's.

Q Then if you were taken up at Mr. Taylor's, do not you know that you were taken up for uttering the note - A I went to Mr. Taylor's for two bottles of wine, I presented that note; they said it was a bad note.

Q Did not you know that the very moment you were taken up, that you were taken up for uttering of it - A I knew I was taken up for that; they said it was a bad one.

Q How long have you lived in England altogether - A I have been in England three or four times.

Q Altogether how many years, about fifteen years - A No, it is fifteen years since I first came.

Q Have you lived several years in England altogether - A Yes.

Q Then you know you were taken up about giving the forged bank note to Mr. Taylor - A Yes; on the 25th of November.

Q And from that time you were kept in custody till within this half hour - A Yes.

Q Perhaps you then began to think you should be hanged - A I do not know.

Q Now you must know, therefore you must tell - A I cannot tell that.

Q You cannot tell me what you thought - do you mean to state that upon your oath - A That is the last thing a man can be done to; I hope I should not be hung in this country.

Q But as you were caught putting off a bad bank note you thought very likely you should - A I do not know that.

Q Do you man to say that you did not know that they hung men in this country for putting off bad notes - A I did not know it.

Q You swear that - A I swear that; I knew that people that forged bank notes they were condemned to die; but I did not knew that a person was to be hanged for passing them.

Q Perhaps after you were taken up you were let into that secret, that they hang people for passing them - A No, I could not speak to any body, except a friend of mine.

Q I suppose you spoke to the turnkeys - A No, I never spoke to them.

Q No person spoke to you and told you that you were likely to be hanged - A I do not remember it; I did not ask any body.

Q Then let me ask you whether you did not learn from any body that you were in danger of being hanged for putting off forged bank notes - A I cannot recollect it.

Q From neither the gentleman of the bank, or them who took you up, or from the turnkeys, you cannot recollect being told that you were in danger of being hanged, or likely to be hanged - A I cannot say I recollect it.

Q However you were determined not to be hanged if you could help it, so you desired to be a witness - A Certainly.

Q Then did not you hope and believe that if you could catch Mr. Nicholls, or any body else, you should escape yourself - A I did not know any thing about that.

Q I dare say you did all this for the sake of public justice - A I do think I did; I did not know whether my life was in danger or no; but at the same time I did it for my own sake.

Q That is, you hoped if you were in danger of the halter, you should escape by doing this - A Certainly, that is the general case.

Mr. Gurney. I know it is.

Mr. Garrow. You have told us that you never received any forged notes from any other man - A. No.

Q Did you ever correspond with any other about forged notes - A. No, never in my life.

Q Never by letters, nor by the denomination of candlesticks, did you correspond with any body but the prisoner - A No.

Q Who first made the proposition that you should buy forged bank notes of Nicholls - A Another man.

Q In whose presence - A Nobody was present.

Q Was that before you were acquainted with Nicholls - A Yes; I saw Nicholls that evening.

Q You refused to buy the one the man offered you - A I did.

Q When you saw Nicholls, tell us what passed - A I went to a public house to ask for a person who was clerk to some person at Birmingham, about seven or eight years; I met with the man that showed me the first note; I told the other man, that I had it in contemplation to go over to Spain, with some hardware goods; after this time the landlord and one man went out, this man stopped there; I had said before, I had been to one Johnson, a brass founder, to buy candlesticks with small figures; this man who offered me the forged one pound note, he said he could afford to sell candlesticks as cheap as any other man in England, he thought they would go in Spain; then he offered me dollars, which he said were more current in Spain; he said if they were liable to go in Spain he could serve me. Mr. Nicholls came, he said the other man said he would not come himself, but that he should come.

COURT. You understood from Nicholls that the other man sent him - A Yes.

Mr. Garrow. You understood from Nicholls that the other man who had been talking about candlesticks had sent him - A Yes; Nicholls came and said he could not produce me a patent candlestick, but he shewed me a one pound note, and a two pound note; he said do you want to buy any thing of that sort; which I objected to buy at that time.

Q. Did he mention the price - A. Yes; he said half a guinea for a one pound note; I told him that the other man said only six shillings; well, he said, if the other man said six shillings, if you have a mind to buy, you shall have them for that; I objected to buy them at that time.

Q How soon did you see him again - A I do not remember, but I know I bought some three or four days afterwards.

Q In about three or four days you had your first dealings with him - now attend to this question - upon the oath that you have taken, did you apply to him to sell you forged notes, or did he apply to you - A It was the other man that proposed to me.

Q And then this man came to you - A Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean to swear to the court and jury that the prisoner proposed to sell to you and you to buy of him - A Yes, I can swear so.

Q At that time you declined having them - A Yes.

Q Was that from a principle of honesty or the fear of being found out - A I do not know.

JOHN FOY . Q You are one of the police officers - A I am, of Marlborough street.

Q. Did you go at any time in December last with Alessi to the Lemon Tree in the Haymarket - A I did.

Q Did you search him before you went there - A I searched him on getting there, in the room.

Q Had he any notes about him - A Not any.

Q You expected some person to come there - A I did.

Q Did you concert a room for receiving the prisoner - A Yes.

Q What room did you fix upon - A. The club room.

COURT. What day was this - A The 20th of October. I have written the date upon the note.

Mr. Bosanquet. Is that your hand writing - A It is; it was on the day I wrote that; it was on the 20th of December.

Q You fixed upon the club room for receiving him - A Yes.

Q Did you search that room as well as Alessi - A I did; I am sure there were no notes in that room.

Q Who was in company with you - A William Craig , my brother Thomas Foy , and William Jackson , they are officers also; I placed myself in a room that adjoins the club room.

Q What sort of a partition is there - A A thin partition between that and the other room.

Q Had you any means of seeing into this club room and what - A I had, through a small hole in the wainscot.

Q Did you make that hole expressly for the purpose - A I did; I bored a hole with a gimlet.

Q How long had you been there before any body came - A From seven o'clock in the morning till half after three in the evening.

COURT. Do you recollect what day of the week it was - A No, I cannot recollect; I think it was Tuesday.

Mr. Bosanquet. You were there from seven o'clock in the morning till about half after three in the evening - did any person then come there and ask for Alessi - A Yes, the prisoner, Nicholls, came up into the room; I did not see him until he came into the club room.

COURT. You had left Alessi in the club room by himself - A Yes.

Mr. Bosanquet. You had the means of seeing through the hole what passed - A Yes.

Q About half after three the prisoner came - A Yes, he came into the club room.

Q What passed between Alessi and the prisoner in your sight, you looking through the hole - A They asked each other how they did.

Q Had you previously agreed with Alessi upon any signal being given - A That he was to put on his hat when he ascertained that the person that was to come to him had got the forged notes about him. After Nicholls had taken off his coat he sat down by the fire opposite of Alessi; Alessi asked him when he arrived in town; he said he had just come to town; Alessi asked him how long he was going to remain in town; the prisoner said he was going out of town at seven o'clock that evening. They were drinking together, they had got rum and water, and after some other talk that did not seem to belong to this business, Alessi asked Nicholls for a pencil, which he gave him, and a piece of paper, upon which Alessi seemed as if he was casting up an account; when he had added it up he said, well Mr. Nicholls, you will take all my money this time; Nicholls said never mind, endeavour to get it back again in the way of business; at this time Alessi was reaching back for his hat, which lay behind him as he sat in the chair, and said to Mr. Nicholls it was very cold; Mr. Nicholls then said to him put on your hat, sir, which Alessi did immediately; I then immediately went into the room and took Nicholls into custody; I searched him, a pocket book I found on him, and a small brown paper parcel in his left hand close coat pocket; his pocket book was in his great coat pocket.

COURT. That paper parcel was in his close coat pocket - A Yes.

Mr. Bosanquet. Was it in that paper that you hold in your hand - A It was; I wrote the date on it, I marked the contents and each separate note.

Q Look over these notes and see whether these are all the notes - A Yes.

Q Were all these notes marked by you, and were they in the parcel - A. They were; there is twenty five pound notes, twenty four one pound notes, and these are the four two pound notes, all marked by me, they were in the same parcel.

Q Now look at that letter, is that letter marked by you - A Yes, it is; I found it in his pocket book, dated December 13th, 1808. I asked him how he came possessed of the notes, he said he had found the parcel in the street; I asked him if he meaned any street in town; he said, yes.

Q Did he mention what street in town - A No; I did not ask him; he said yes, but did not mention the street; afterwards he said that some friend at Birmingham had given him the parcel and two letters to put into the post office, and he had two letters in his hand.

Q Was the parcel directed to any body - A No; it was exactly the same as it is now.

Q Did you understand him that the parcel as well as the letters were to be put in the post - A. No; it seemed to me as if he meaned the parcel had been given to him, and no account of the notes. The pocket book, I recollect, was in his right hand coat pocket, he had pulled his great coat off; in his left hand coat pocket were the letters.

Q You before said the pocket book was in his great coat pocket - A Yes; but I recollect it was in his close coat pocket; I recollect he had pulled his great coat off.

Mr. Garrow. In the first letter of Alessi's there is no direction to the letter but London, in the answer there is the Haymarket.

COURT. I observed that. I want to know when it was the four notes were found.

MR. WESTWOOD. I found the notes concealed in

the mantle piece on the 10th of December, the same day the letter was directed to Nicholls.

WILLIAM CRAIG . Q You are an officer of Marlborough street - A I am.

Q You and Jackson and Thomas Foy , went with John Foy to the Lemon Tree - A I did.

Q You were placed, we understand, in a room between which there was a slight partition to the club room - A We were.

Q Had you the means of seing through the partition, of observing Nicholls when he came in - A I did see him.

Q Did you go into the club room with the other officers - A I did, immediately; I secured the prisoner by the left arm; I observed John Foy find a brown paper parcel in his right hand coat pocket.

Q Look at the notes, and see whether your name is put upon them - A I know them to be the same notes that were taken from him; I saw them all found; I have not the smallest doubt they are the same.

Q Did you observe the pocket book found - A I did, and there were two letters taken out of his right hand.

Q Did you observe any other letter - A Not immediately; John Foy upon opening his pocket book found some letter, I understand; I had the prisoner in custody, I did not pay any attention to it.

Q Did you hear John Foy put any question to the prisoner where he had found these notes - A I did; the prisoner said he found them; after a few moments he said he had received them with two letters, I understood, to be put in the post office.

Q The letters were to be put in the post office - A I cannot say how that is.

JURY. Did you count these notes - A I did; there were twenty five pound notes four two's and twenty four ones.

Mr. Arabin. Did you mark these notes yourself - A I did.

Q Have you looked at them in court - A I have.

WILLIAM JACKSON . Q Did you attend the examination of Foy and the last man - A I did.

Q. Is the account true - A It is.

THOMAS FOY . Q. Did you attend to the examination of John Foy and Craig - A Yes; the account that they have given is true.

JOHN CHRISTOPHER . Q You are the landlord of the Lemon Tree - A I am.

Q Did Vincent Alessi lodge at your house - A He did.

Q Look at the prisoner Nicholls, do you know him - A He was at my house twice; he came first to my house soon after Alessi came from Birmingham.

Q How long before Alessi was taken up - A A week or a fortnight; I am not quite correct in that.

Q When Nicholls first came to your house he was a stranger to you - Perfectly so.

Q Who did he enquire for - A For Alessi. I told him he was not at home, but it was likely that he would be in presently; he seemed to be at a loss what to do; he had the appearance of a traveller; there was a good room and a fire up stairs; I asked him to go up stairs and sit down.

Q Was it Alessi's room - A No, the club room. I told him he might have lodgings in my house if he wanted; he continued in my house four or five days.

Q Was Alessi and he much together during the time he remained there - A A great deal.

Q You remember the circumstance of Alessi not coming home at the time he was taken in custody afterwards - A Perfectly well.

Q Do you remember Mr. Westwood coming to your house - A Perfectly well.

Q Was he shewn into Alessi's lodging room - A Not by himself.

Q Did Mr. Westwood go into Alessi's lodging room - A He did, I was present; he did not find any thing the first time of his coming.

Q Was it occupied by any body - A No, I kept it locked up.

Q Were you there when Mr. Westwood was there a second time - A I was.

Q The first time was immediately upon Alessi being taken up - A It was.

Q In the course of some days he came again - did you see him find any brown paper with any thing in it - A I did; he found it behind the wooden mantle shelf in a little crevice; he looked behind; there he found a little brown paper parcel; it contained four five pound notes.

Q From the time of Alessi being detained, and to the time that the bank notes were found, had you kept it locked up - A Yes; no person was in the room but myself; I always kept the key, and my wife at times when I went out; I asked her particularly about it.

Q Some time after this Alessi was brought there by the officers of the police - A He was.

Q Did they go with him into one of the divisions of the club room - A They did; they went into the farther part of it, it is partitioned off.

Q Were you at home when the prisoner Nicholls came - A I was, I waited at home on purpose.

Q You were apprised of the object of their visit - A Of the whole.

Q How long after the officers and Alessi came, did the prisoner come - A The officers came at seven o'clock in the morning, and the prisoner Nicholls did not come till about three in the afternoon, or a little after.

Q Who did he ask for - A Alessi. Upon Nicholls' coming Alessi was permitted to go into the other room by himself, and Mr. Nicholls was shewed up to him; I shewed him up myself, and then went down stairs.

Q You know no more of it till after he was taken in custody - A I know the officers were watching him; I saw him searched.

Q You have no doubt that this is the person that came to your house both times - A I am quite convinced of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Is your wife here - A She is not here.

Q She had the key sometimes - A When I went out, twice, I left the key in the drawer, and told her where it was.

Q You told us just now that your wife had the key - A She knew where it was.

Q She could get access to it if she wanted it - A She never wanted it.

Q Then if she pleased she might have given it to any other person - you keep a common lodging house - A Yes.

Q In the course of a year you have many people like travellers coming into your house - A Yes.

MARY HOUGHTON . Q You are a servant at the Lemon Tree - A Yes.

Q Do you remember Alessi lodging at your master's - A Yes.

Q The prisoner Nicholls, did he at any time come to lodge at your master's - A Yes, he did, four or five days I believe.

Q Was Alessi and he much together while he remained - A Yes, in day time; they had different sleeping rooms.

Q Were you at home when the officers came with Alessi in custody - A Yes.

Q Were you present when Nicholls came - A Yes, he asked for Alessi.

Q Then he was shewn up stairs and soon after taken in custody - A Yes.

Q You are sure he is the same man - A Yes.

JOHN LEE . Q You are an inspector of the bank notes, employed by the governor and company of the bank of England - A I am.

Q I am now going to put in your hand the first note, the note uttered by Alessi to Mrs. Taylor, look at that note and tell me whether that is a note of the governor and company of the bank of England - A It is not; it is a forgery; it is not the cashier's name, it is altogether a forgery. (The note read.)

Q We are now going to prove the note that was uttered by Mrs. Meredith.

Mr. Arabin. The prisoner said he did not recollect any thing of that transaction.

Q Look at that note, is that a forgery - A It is in every respect.

Q These are the four what was found in the crevice in Alessi's lodging, are they a forgery - A The whole are a forgery; the signature and filling up, the paper, and all, are a forgery.

Q Now I am going to put in your hand the twenty five-pound notes found upon the prisoner - A I have seen them before, they are all forgeries in every respect.

Q Now look at those twenty four ones - A They are forged, and the four two pound notes they are forged likewise.

Mr. Garrow. Look at the one stated in the indictment and compare it with the hand writing of all the other five pound notes - I will ask you whether it appears to you that they are filled up with one hand writing, and whether they are from the same plate - A I have not a doubt of it; I have examined them before.

COURT. Are you speaking of the twenty five pound notes, or the notes in question - A All the five pound notes appears to be filled up by the same hand writing, together with the note in question, and they are all of the same date, the 8th of April, excepting one which is only as it came from the plate; it has no writing at all.

Q Does the bank in any possible instance part with any of their paper - A I should think not.

Q Did you ever know of the bank parting with any impression of their plates that is not filled up with current notes - A Certainly not.

Mr. Garrow. The first note which has been shewn to you, which we call Taylor's note, and the four compared by you with the twenty five pound notes, or more correctly with the nineteen - they appear to be struck from the same plate - A Undoubtedly, and they are all filled up by the same hand.

Q The imperfect one is from the same plate - A Yes, it is.

Q The same observations applies to Meredith's, as Taylor's, they are all the same date - A Yes.

Q I believe in the course of numbering bank notes the usual method is to put them up in fifty - A Yes.

Q So that to illustrate it, if the first of the fifty should be 1000 they would go on to 1050 - A Certainly.

Q That is the method of banking houses, and banking houses are supplied so, from the first to fifty and at last to four hundred - they never issue the same number of the same date - A. Never.

Q For instance you never have two of this day of the same number - A Never.

Q The note in the indictment is No. 7484, Taylors, note; 7489 Meredith's; those found in Alessi's room 7486, and found upon the prisoner's person 7634.

MR. TERRY. Q You are engraver to the bank of England - A I am.

Q I first shew you Taylor's note, is that a genuine bank note or altogether a forgery - A Altogether a forgery, plate and every thing.

Q I now shew you Meredith's, do you give the same account of that - A This is forged also.

Q I now shew you the four found in the crevice by Mr. Westwood - A I have seen them before, they are all forgeries; the twenty five pound notes, nineteen filled up and one blank, they are all forgeries; they appear to be all struck from the same plate; I have not the least doubt of it; it is impossible that it should be otherwise; there are defects that were not intentionally put in, and that exactly agress in every one of them.

Q Therefore you speak with certainty - A I do.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOHN ROCK. Q You are acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing, tell me upon your oath whose writing you believe that to be, that

"I. N. your humble servant I. N." - A I believe it to be Nicholls' hand writing.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

On the counts for disposing of and putting away.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-29

117. HANNAH SKIDDAY and MARY BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , twenty two yards of printed cotton, value 22 s. and a shawl, value 2 s. the property of William Brown and William Brown , privately in their shop .

JOSEPH POBJOY . I live at 118, Ratcliffe highway ; I am an apprentice to Mr. Brown, linen draper .

Q. Are there two Mr. Browns that carry on that business - A. Yes, William and William, they are cousins. On Saturday the 10th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, there were three of them came in, the prisoners were two of three, one went out; when they came in one of the prisoners said they wanted to look at some shawls; I shewed them some, I counted each shawl as I put it down; they did not like any of them; I went to get another, and when I returned I missed the uppermost shawl; I went round and mentioned it to Thomas Waitman ; I went and got a constable, leaving this youth to attend them; I came back with the constable; he let them

go outside of the door, they had not bought any thing; while they were going out the youth Waitman said he had missed a piece of print; the constable brought them back, they were standing just by the door. I picked up the piece of print just by Skidday's foot when she moved, I saw the dirt of her foot on it; he took them further up the shop and found the shawl, it lay rolled up on the ground.

Q. How near was that to the place where you had put the shawls - A. About four yards.

Q. How near was it to where either of the prisoners stood at the same time - A. About three or four yards off the prisoners when it was found.

Q. Did you perceive or suspect them doing any thing - A. No further than they were in the shop two months before; we missed something; I did not see them do any thing this time; I expected they would thieve. They had bid me a price for a shawl which I could not take.

JONATHAN WAITMAN . Q. You are likewise in the service of the two Mr. Brown's - A. Yes. When the prisoners came in I was folding up of goods. When Pobjoy went out I continued shewing them different kind of shawls; when they came in the shop there were a large quantity of prints laying on the counter; I took them all away to another counter excepting eight pieces, I counted them. When Pobjoy came in I gave them up to him; they stood bargaining for a shawl, bought nothing, and went out; Pobjoy and the constable followed them; they brought them back in the shop and this piece of print was picked up off the floor. I counted the pieces on the counter and there were only seven.

Q. You had not shewn any of these pieces to them - A. No, only the shawls.

Q. Now who was in the shop at the time - A. There was another man in the shop at the time.

Q. Do you know whether he was attending to any thing that passed - A. I cannot say. The place where the shawl was picked up was about four yards from that.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an headborough. I went with Pobjoy to Mr. Brown's shop, there I found the two prisoners; I let them go out of the shop and then I brought them back again; I told them they had got something that they had not paid for; about one yard from the door; I proceeded to examine the prisoner Skidday; in stooping down to look round her, the witness Pobjoy exclaimed, here is the piece of print; that was about six yards from where the print had been laying; I moved them further up in the shop, five or six yards; I observed the floor when I put the prisoners there, it was perfectly clean; on searching them for the shawl I picked up the shawl. Skidday was the person who dropped the print; who dropped the shawl I cannot say.

The property produced and identified.

Skidday's Defence. When I went out of the shop the gentleman laid hold of my arm and brought me back. I never made any attempt to go away; I could have got away if I pleased.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent of what I am here for.

SKIDDAY, GUILTY, aged 20.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090111-30

118. BENJAMIN BISHOP was indicted for that he on the 6th of January , feloniously and without lawful cause, was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term of seven years for which he was ordered to be transported .

Prisoner. My name is not Benjamin Bishop , it is John Brown .

MR. SHELTON. You are indicted in the name of Benjamin Bishop.

JOHN VICKREY . I am one of the officers of Worship street office. I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of a man by the name of Benjamin Bishop , from Mr. Shelton's office, the clerk of goal delivery; I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. (The copy of the record read.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I and Bishop apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of January last, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock, at the Catherine Wheel, Bridgewater Gardens , he was drinking there along with some other persons in the public house; he gave his name John Brown, that he lodged in the house of Mrs. Madden, Brackley street, Golden lane; I told him I had reason to believe his name was Bishop; I took him up upon that name; I enquired at the house of Mrs. Madden in Brackley street, she was not at home, nor could I see her; we took him to the office; he was committed and another day appointed, and Mr. Hanson attended. The prisoner behaved in a very good manner, not a word nor an action amiss whatsoever.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship street office. I know nothing more than being in company with Armstrong when he apprehended the prisoner at the Catherine Wheel, Bridgewater Gardens.

WILLIAM HANSON . Q. You are one of the turnkeys in Newgate - A. Yes. The prisoner was tried in December sessions, 1804, by the name of Benjamin Bishop ; I put him to the bar at the time.

Q. You are certain of his person, are you - A. I am certain of his person; he was cast for death; after that he was respited for seven years transportation. On the 19th of March following he was sent from Newgate to the Captivity hulk at Portsmouth. I was at the goal when he was was delivered to go to the hulk at Portsmouth.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the gates of Newgate last Friday morning three hours; if Mr. Hanson knew me he did not take me then.

Q. to Hanson. Was he in Newgate - A. I did not see him; there may be many people come in and I may not see them.

Prisoner. I was in the goal; he did not know me then; I was in the same dress as I am now. There is none of the other officers of Newgate that knew me. There is only that one man that says he knew me. I have been to sea; I only came home the 24th of last June; I have been at work ever since.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-31

119. THOMAS ROSE, alias CHARLES HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December , a box, value 40 s. and eighty pound weight of soap, value 4 l. the property of Samuel Thompson , in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL THOMPSON . I live at No. 15, Holley street, Clare market, in the parish of St Clement's .

Q. Do you keep a shop - A. Yes; the shop is the lower part of the house; I live in the house myself and

family.

Q. Do you recollect at any time seeing the prisoner in your shop - A. Yes, on Monday evening the 5th of last month, about half after five in the evening.

Q. Did the prisoner come in alone - A. There was another person with him; he asked for half a pound of candles, two pennyworth of wafers, and two pennyworth of wax taper. I served him with these things.

Q. Did you stay in the shop, or had you occasion to go out of the shop - A I had occasion to go out of the shop into the back room for a pair of scissars to cut the wax taper for the prisoner; when I came back he paid me and he went away; he went out of the shop.

Q. Did you see him go out of the shop - A. No; there were other other people in the shop; I was engaged.

Q. Did you miss any thing soon after they were out of the shop - A. Yes; in a minute I missed a box of soap, three quarters of a hundred weight; it was standing within the shop, about a yard and a half from the door.

Q. When had you seen that box before - A. About a minute before; when I missed the box of soap I immediately run out of the door and pursued him; I overtook the prisoner about twelve or fifteen yards from my door, in the street; he had the box of soap on his shoulder; I did not see the other with him; I laid hold of him by the collar, I told him he had robbed me; he swore at me a good deal, he would not lower the soap off his shoulder; I immediately called out stop thief; he smacked it off his shoulder as fast as he could, and began to run away off the pavement; I had hold of the tail of his coat at the same time; I had help; we brought him back. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q. Are you quite sure that he is the man that you served with the articles in your shop - A. I am quite sure of that; one of the articles, the candles, I served him the other man took; he was searched in the watchhouse. I did not see him searched.

Q. When you took up the box did you examine it - A. Yes, after I had brought him into the shop.

Q. Was there any mark by which you know it to be yours - A. Only by the mark on the box.

Q. What may be the value of the soap - A. It cost me eighty eight seillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Did you see them go out of the shop together - A. No.

Q. Did you see them go out of the shop at all - A. No.

Q. Why did you tell us you saw them go out together - A. They left me when I had done serving them. I was engaged.

COURT. He said they went out together, but he did not see them.

ELIZABETH CURTIS . Q. Were you in Holley street the day the witness has been speaking of - A. I was standing at a shop door.

Q. Did you see any body with a box - A. I saw a man come by and throw a box off his shoulder; then he ran away. Mr. Tompson ran after him and brought him back.

Q. How many yards did he run - A. It might be an hundred yards, pretty nigh, as near as I can guess. - Mr. Thompson was close to him when he threw the box down.

Q. Did he keep close to him when he ran away - A. I cannot say; I staid where the box was, I sat on the box on the pavement.

Q. Did you see Mr. Thompson bring him back - A. Yes, he and some other gentlemen together.

Q. Had you observed the man, so as to to know it is the same man that throwed the box down that he brought back - A. I think it is, I saw him at Bow street.

Q. And was it the same man that you saw throw the box off his shoulder - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. You did not know him before - A. No; me and some others took up the box and carried it to Mr. Thompson's shop; we let it fall out of our hands; it broke.

Q. What was in it - A. Soap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. How long did all this take up - A. Two or three minutes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and say whether that is the man that you saw with the box on his shoulder - A. Yes, I think it is.

Q. Have you never said you thought it was another man - A. No.

Q. Whoever it was that had the box on his shoulder, he went out of your sight - A. Yes, when he turned the corner.

JAMES LIMBRICK . I am an officer; I had this man delivered into my custody; I searched him. I found a piece of wax taper in his coat pocket. I shewed it to Mr. Thompson at Bow street office.

Prosecutor. It looks like the same, it is the same quantity that he bought, and the same colour; the paper is the same that I wrapt it up in. This is the box that had the soap in; there was eighty three pound and a half in it; it cost me eighty eight shillings. I weighed the soap three hours previous to his taking it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been as far as Leicester fields; on my return home I come into Holley street, and as soon as I came into Clement's passage I heard the cry of stop thief; a man dropped a bit of paper containing this wax taper; I picked up and I looked to see which way he was gone; the gentleman came up to me and said you are the man that came into the shop door and took the box of soap; he took the box of soap, he took me back to his shop, and when I got into the shop, he said do you think you are innocent, or that you are not; I said I am as innocent as you are, take me before a magistrate. I was taken to the watch-house; this man came in and said I will take you out of here; he took me to the office.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-32

120. JOSEPH ROYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , five dozen of tan sheep skins, value 4 l. the property of Arthur Aston .

ARTHUR ASTON . I am a leather seller , I live in Bread street, Cheapside; I gave the five dozen of tanned sheep skins into the charge of my porter on the 9th of December; he was to deliver them to a carrier at the George, Snowhill.

Q. What time was it you delivered them - A. Between four and five; he returned about six, saying his bundle was lost.

JAMES SLADE . Q. Are you the porter - A. Yes; I was sent with a load of goods in the cart to deliver at different inns on the 9th of December. I came to the Bull and Mouth inn, I had two parcels to deliver

there; I stopped there, and I carried them out of the cart into the warehouse, and when I came back to the cart again I found this bundle of leather missing; a man asked if I had lost any thing; I said yes, a bundle of leather; he said a man had gone along Bull and Mouth street with a bundle of leather. Bishop, the carman, and the man, went in pursuit of the man; they did not find him.

EDWARD PORTER . I am a watchman. On Friday evening, the 9th of December, about ten o'clock, coming up Red cross street, I met the prisoner; he was standing with a bundle of leather between his belly and the wall.

Q. I suppose you were passing by - A. Yes; I made a full stop to look at him; he asked me to help him up with it; I did, and went on, and the prisoner went on; I suspected he did not come honestly by it. I went to the watchhouse and called Mr. Hedger; Mr. Hedger and I went after him up Paul's alley; in a court in Paul's alley, heard something fall, then I laid hold of the prisoner and called Mr. Hedger; Mr. Hedger knocked at a door and got a light; he found the leather about three or four feet off him; then we conveyed him to the watchhouse; I asked him where the leather was; he said he knew nothing of the leather.

Q. Was he the same man that you helped up with the leather - A. Yes; I am sure of that.

Q. You had passed Paul's alley for the purpose of getting Hedger - A. Yes, and when Hedger and I came from the watchhouse, he went up Paul's alley; it is a thoroughfare; there I met him; I stopped him when I heard the bundle fall.

THOMAS HEDGER . I was ward beadle at the time; setting the watch near ten o'clock, Porter came and gave me information; in consequence of that I went down Paul's alley with Porter; the night was very dark, I overshot Porter; Porter turned into Jackson's court, and said I have got the man; I then laid hold of the man by the collar, took him three feet back and knocked at a door for a light; we accused him of having the leather; he said he knew nothing about it; and in looking about four feet from the man, in one corner, there was the leather; we then took the leather and the man to the watchhouse and searched him; we found nothing but a knife, a pocket handkerchief, a seven shilling piece and half a guinea.

Q. Were there any body else in either of these alleys - A. No, nobody but me, Porter and the prisoner.

JOHN PUGH . I was constable of the night. I asked him how he came by the leather; he said he knew nothing at all of it; I observed the tan of the leather on the shoulder of his coat, it was very visible then; I took him the next day to Guildhall; I opened the parcel, we found the bill of parcels where it was going; there we saw Mr. Aston's name; he appeared the next day at Guildhall, and identified the property.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-33

121. JOHN TRASS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of December , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Charles Broad , affixed to his dwelling house .

JOHN SLEEP . I am servant to Mr. Broad, in Devol's lane, leading out of Islington .

Q. On the night of the 9th of December were the water spout and the lead work of the house safe - A. Yes, between seven and eight in the evening.

Q. On the morning of the 10th did you observe any part of the water spout gone - A. Yes. I saw part of the lead in a field.

JOHN SHILLINGFORD . I am a servant to Mr. Laycock, he is a cow keeper and farmer. On the 10th of last month, about two in the morning, I and my fellow servant met the prisoner in a field called Eleven Acre, belonging to Mr. Laycock, in a field where there were sheep. We have lost a great many sheep.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Broad's - A. About a quarter of a mile; I was about thirty yards from him, I called out who is there; he said a gentleman; I said gentle or simple, I shall see who you are; I said where are you going, my friend; he said to Hornsey; I said that is not the way to Hornsey, he said he had lost his way: I said it is very odd you should come into this field among the sheep. There was no foot path in the field, only a dirty way where our carts were kept. He said he wanted to go by Ball's pond to miss the watchmen. I took him in custody and took him to Mr. Laycock.

Q. Is the road near the field - A. Yes, within a field. He begged us not to take him to Mr. Laycock, he said he would give us a guinea, or twenty pound, sooner than we should take him to the watchhouse, or to Mr. Laycock's, he said he was a very troublesome severe man, he said if he had known that we should have taken him he would have given us a run for it; I told him if he went nigh a hedge, we should have sent something in him that he was not aware of.

Q. How near was he from the hedge at the time you stopped him - A. Twenty five yards from the ditch, and three or four yards from a pond. I found the lead by the cart track.

Q. When was it you found the lead - A. It was day light when we found the lead; it was some pipe lead and some ridge lead; Mr. Broad saw the lead. We found some lead in a bag.

JOHN BUMPSTEAD . I was employed by Mr. Broad to put up this lead spout on the the 2nd or 3rd of December. On Saturday the 10th the lead had been taken away; on Sunday morning following I went to the house; I saw it was gone on the 11th; I saw it at the magistrates; I put it up myself, I made it myself; it is the same lead.

Q. What is it worth - A. Ten or twelve shillings.

Q. to Mr. Broad. In what parish is your house - A. In the parish of St. Mary, Islington.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a jobbing gardener , I do a deal of new work at Holloway; that day, having no employment, I went out to seek work; I am not in the habit of drinking much, that day I had drank a pint too much. I live at Lower street, Islington; I was in Devol's lane; there is a path to Mr. Laycock's field; in the second field I was stopped by these two men; they asked me what I was; I said a gentleman; I did not know I was in Mr. Laycock's field; they said they would take me to Mr. Laycock: I said I hope not; they said they must, they had lost a great many sheep. I went with them to Mr. Laycock, they called him; he said take him to the watchhouse; they took me to the watchhouse and made a charge of sheep stealing.

On that day I went out and drank more than usual; it was my nighest way home.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-34

122. DORINDA MEGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , a china bowl and cover, value 36 s. a china bowl, value 3 l. 3 s. and a china cup, value 6 s. the property of James Adams , esq . in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ELIZA TAYLOR . I am a servant to James Adams , esq. he lives in Berkley square, in the parish of St. George .

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar a servant to Mr. Adams - A. Yes, housekeeper ; I was lady's maid. On the day laid in the indictment I was in the housekeeper's room with the prisoner; the hall bell rang; Mrs. Megan, the housekeeper, went and opened the door, and left the door open; she returned through the room where I was sitting into the adjoining room, and said a poor girl has left her basket here; on my hearing a poor girl was at the door, I ran to the door in great haste, saying, if she is a poor girl I will give her something. At my coming to the door I was much surprised to find instead of a poor girl a friend of Mrs. Megan's of the name of Fitzgerald; I then said, oh dear, Mrs. Fitzgerald, if it is you, why did you ring, you need not be afraid of me, you had seen me this day week; this was in the evening between six and seven. Mrs. Fitzgerald came in with me immediately into the housekeeper's room; the prisoner then met us without a basket, and we all came into the sitting room together, and sat down for a minute or two; on coming into the housekeeper's room, the bed room door exactly opposite was wide open; the basket stood full of something in her bed room; it was a mat basket; after sitting a minute or two, struck with suspicion, I got up, saying I should go and see whether a dress was ready for my mistress, but in reality run down stairs and called Burrows, a man servant. I went to my master and made him acquainted with it.

Q. Had you seen the basket ever before that time - A. No, certainly never.

JAMES BURROWS . I am a servant to Mr. Adams. In consequence of what Eliza Taylor said, I placed myself on the stairs, about six yards from the door; I saw Mrs. Megan coming out of the housekeeper's sitting room; she opened the street door, and stood with it in her hand; Mrs. Fitzgerald came out of the same room with a basket, and went towards the street door; I stopped her about a yard from the door in the hall. After I had taken the basket from Fitzgerald Mrs. Megan wished to take it into her own room; I refused; and took it up stairs to my master in the dining room.

Q. What became of Mrs. Megan - A. She went into the sitting room.

Q. Was any thing taken out of the basket before you took it up to your master - A. Mrs. Megan took a paper parcel from the top. I opened the basket by my master's order; I found in it a china bowl and cover, a china dish or bowl, and a china chocolate cup, a blue and white mug, and a hand lanthorn; I left them there. Mrs. Megan was sent for into the dining room; I saw her go in; I saw nothing more.

COURT. Is the housekeeper's room on the same floor with the hall, and near the door - A. Yes; and the housekeeper's bed room is near her sitting room.

ANN FITZGERALD was called, and not appearing in court, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

JAMES ADAMS , ESQ. Q. This house in Berkley square is yours - A Yes; it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover square.

Q. You remember the information that Eliza Taylor gave you - she came to you on that day - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any directions given that Burrows should be placed any where - A I immediately gave directions for Burrows to be placed in a direction to to observe both doors, to Eliza Taylor .

Q. In consequence of these directions did Burrows bring that basket to you with these articles - A. He did. Burrows took out the articles; at the top of the basket was a bed tick; immediately after that there were the china, with paper put inside of them, and wrapped round with paper on the out; upon their being produced, Mrs. Adams said I will immediately swear to their being my property; the first thing I ordered was for the street door to be locked; then I sent for the prisoner to come up; I then asked her what she meaned by presuming to carry them things out of my house; she said, oh, they are some little things of my own. I then pointed to the things which stood upon the harpsichord, I said do you mean to tell me that these are your property; she said oh no, certainly not, sir, I put them in by mistake for things of my own; I believe, I then made use of a strong expression - do you know there are things in that basket for which you may be hanged; she said, oh no, she hoped not; I then said, you were to have left me in two or three days, I now tell you you shall not stay half an hour in my house. I then told her to take what necessaries she wanted for the night, and to leave my house immediately and to give up the keys; she then went down stairs. I almost immediately ran down to her in the housekeeper's room, there I found Mrs. Fitzgerald. I asked Mrs. Fitzgerald, in the presence of the prisoner, how she could presume to take any thing out of my house; she said she did not know they were mine. Mrs. Megan had told her they were her's, and desired her to take them home. I then said I could not contradict the assertion, as I had never seen her face before; I desired her immediately to walk out of my house; she immediately left my house, and the prisoner in about half an hour afterwards.

Q. How soon did you make any application to have her taken up - A. In the course of the next day; we looked about us, and she was taken to Marlborough street and committed. I have had the care of the things ever since.

COURT. You told us you asked Fitzgerald how she could presume to take any thing out of your house, her answer was she did not know that they belonged to you - I want to know whether Megan said any thing - A No, I think not.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090111-35

123. MARY SUDBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , eleven yards of velvet, value 30 s. the property of John Harris , privately in his shop .

JOHN HARRIS . I am a linen draper in Picket street . On the 6th of December, a publican in our neighbourhood, came to my shop and said he had a woman in custody, who was suspected of stealing a piece of velvet; I searched and found a piece missing. I went with him to his house, in Hemlock court, where I saw the prisoner and the velvet; I looked at the velvet, unrolled it and saw a small piece of linen affixed to it, with my mark.

JOHN LESSEL . I keep the Punch Bowl, Hemlock court. On the 6th of December, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in company with another woman into my private bar, and called for two glasses of gin; we observed her busy stooping down on the floor, as if endeavouring to secrete somethings; upon interrogating her she ran away; we followed her; Elizabeth Bignell , my servant, overtook her in Shire lane; she was brought back to my house; a sweep's boy brought in this velvet, in about a minute after, I believe; she protested she knew nothing of this velvet, it belonged to the other woman, whose husband was a taylor, and lived somewhere in Saffron hill; she had something, what it was I cannot tell; I never saw the bundle till it was brought in by the sweep.

ELIZABETH BIGNELL . I am servant to Mr. Lessel. On the 6th of December, between two and three in the afternoon, the prisoner came in with another woman and called for a quartern of gin; she stooped down to pick up something; my mistress asked her what she had there; she opened the door and ran away; I went after her; she throwed the bundle down the cellar; the sweep's boy picked it up and came and gave it into my hands; I am sure it is the same bundle she threw away.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the bundle till it was brought back by the sweep; he said he picked it up; I believe I was in the house a quarter of an hour before he brought it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-36

124. JOSEPH GRAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , twenty pounds weight of lead, value 3 s. the property of James Racine and James Archibald Jaques .

JAMES RACINE . I live in Hare street, St. Matthew, Bethnal green ; James Archibald Jaques is my partner; we are dyer s. The prisoner was a bricklayer's labourer , and was at work on our premises; in consequence of information I told James Brooks to follow the prisoner.

JAMES BROOKES I am an apprentice to Mr. Racine and Mr. Jaques.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was a bricklayer's labourer; he was at work on my master's premises. On the 30th of December, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw Joseph Grand go away from the premises with something in his hand; it appeared to me to be part of a leaden pipe.

Q. Do you know whether your master had on his premises any thing in the shape of a leaden pipe - A. Yes; I had it in my hand not ten minutes before; I followed and overtook the prisoner in Brick lane; I saw him crossing the way with two pieces of lead, one in his hand and the other under his arm; he went into an old iron shop; I went to him and told him to bring the lead back; the prisoner was in conversation with a woman in the shop; the prisoner with persuasion brought the lead back to my master; one piece of lead was on the shop counter and the other in his hand; I was not two minutes after him in the shop.

Q. Then he had not disposed of it - A. He had not; he brought it back to my master's premises: then I fetched an officer.

JAMES WOOD . I am an headborough of Shoreditch. I took Grand in custody; he begged Mr. Racine's pardon, and said he would never do the like again if he would let him go.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-37

125. ANN GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of December , two gowns, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Mary Bryers , spinster .

MARY BRYERS . I live in Duke's head court, Red lion street, Spital fields ; I am a pinheader ; I lodge and work there for Mrs. Bedford; the prisoner lodged in the same bed as I did. On Saturday the 3d of December, I sat up to wash my things; I was done at twelve o'clock, I sat up till two; the prisoner said she would do hers; I went to bed; the prisoner was up an hour after me, I heard her sluicing the water about; when I found she was gone I got up to look where she was; I missed out of my box a petticoat and an apron, and all my money.

Q. The money is not mentioned in the indictment - A. I missed two gowns and a shift, they were wet; my mistress's daughter found her about twelve days afterwards, and got a man to bring her back; she had then my old gown on, which I used to work in; I pulled it off to wash it; I never have found nothing but that gown.

Q. What was the two gowns worth - A. Eight shillings, the petticoat two shillings, the apron one shilling, and the two pair of stockings one shilling.

The gown produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The gown she lent me to put on and a pair of black stockings; she quarrelled with me; I said I would not stay and sleep in the house.

Prosecutrix. I did not lend her them; the gown I washed, and left it hanging up; it was wet and not fit to wear.

Q. You are a single woman - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-38

126. ROBERT MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of October , four pair of shoes, value 12 s. the property of Adam Dunford .

ADAM DUNFORD . I live in New Lisle street, Leicester fields , I am a shoemaker ; the prisoner was my shopman .

Q. Had you any reason from your own knowledge of charging him with stealing any of your shoes - A. I knew that I missed shoes for a considerable time past.

WILLIAM JOSHUA . I am a shoe maker; I live in Swallow street; I have known the prisoner two years.

Q. Did you at any time receive four pair of shoes from him - A. These four pair were bought of him; two pair I bought of him four months ago; he told me he supplied shops with his own work; at that time I did not know that he was shopman to any body.

Q. What did you give him for these four pair of shoes - A. About twelve or fourteen shillings; I shewed these two pair to Mr. Dunford, he claimed them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I suppose you deal with any body who brings shoes to you - A. Any body. I made enquiry where this young man lodged; he told me he lodged in Fitzroy market; he told me where he bought the leather; according to the sale of our goods I gave him a fair price.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of making shoes after I leave work at night; I buy some likewise; I bought them shoes.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-39

127. ROBERT PATMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , twenty pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of James Brown , affixed to a building called a house .

JAMES BROWN . I live at Hackney, I lost the lead from a new building in the parish of Hackney, intended to be called Sutton place . On the 21st of December I missed some lead from the back bow of the house, about a quarter of a hundred weight. I had seen it on the house one or two days before. The prisoner had been at work at the house several days before, as a bricklayer's labourer . On the 22nd of December I saw the lead, it was brought to Hackney by Kennedy the officer; I compared it to the building; it appeared to be the same. The prisoner then was in custody.

Q. What is the value of this quarter of a hundred of lead - A. Above five shillings.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a plumber.

Q. Did you furnish the lead for these new buildings - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the lead after it was brought back - A. I did; I fitted it and it corresponded with the vacant part of the house that it was stripped off.

JAMES KENNEDY . Q. You are an officer of Worship street office - A. I am. On the 20th of December, about a quarter before seven in the evening, I was out on patrol duty in company with Crosswell and Valentine, and going up Hackney road we met the prisoner, he was coming towards London, he had a bag on his shoulder; I asked him what he had there; he said they were his tools and a bit of lead; I examined the bag, I found it contained nothing but lead and a bit of iron, a kind of an hold fast for a window.

Q. What was the weight of the lead - A. I suppose about twenty pound or upwards. I asked him where he brought it from; he said from Mourning lane, Hackney, it belonged to a man of the name of Barnes, that worked for a bricklayer, and he was carrying it to a plumber's in Shoreditch by Barnes's order; he could not tell the plumber's name. When we got him down to the office he said what he told me before was all lies; he said he was coming out of Thomas's square, in Hackney, opposite the Nag's Head in Mare street, a young man overtook him and asked him to carry the bag as far as Shoreditch; what was in it he did not know. He was committed that night. The next day I went to Hackney, there I found Mr. Brown instead of Mr. Barnes; I saw the plumber fit it to the top of the house; it fitted exactly.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the matter; I took the lead to carry for the person, as I was coming home; I never saw that person but that evening; he asked me to bring it on the road for him and he would give me a pot of beer. As I was returning home I met these gentlemen; they detained me with it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped in the Parish of Hackney .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-40

128. ANN DOWNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November , half a guinea, three shillings, five penny pieces, and two halfpence , the monies of John Jennings .

JOHN JENNINGS . I am a baker in Goswell street road .

Q. Do you live in the house where the shop is - A. No; I have a house in William street, Brunswick square.

Q. Who is the inhabitant of the house where the shop is - A. I am the occupier; the prisoner belonged to the lodgers in the house.

Q. Did you at any time lose the money mentioned in the indictment - A. I did; it was either on the night of the 8th of November, or on the morning of the 9th, I lost it from my till in the shop; I left my shop about seven or eight in the evening; the shop has two doors, one door to the parlour, and one door into the passage: I locked the door that communicates with the parlour, and put a chair to the other door that leads into the passage, so that nobody could go inside without forcing the chair.

Q. How many lodgers have you in the house - A. Mr. Bugby and his mother; the prisoner was their servant . About five o'clock on the morning of the 9th of November I came to the shop, I entered the shop by the parlour door; I found it locked; when I came to the next door I found that the chair had been removed. On the parlour door I found that the box of the lock, the screws, had been drawn to enable them to open the door without unlocking it.

Q. Then a person had got in that way - A. Yes. I found the lock of the till had been picked, as I supposed; I left it locked; upon examining the till I found that half a guinea that was marked was gone, three shillings in silver, all marked, were gone, seven penny pieces, and two halfpence were gone. About eight o'clock the prisoner came down; I fetched the officer; at seven o'clock the prisoner came into my bakehouse to get a light, and then she went into her own kitchen. Wood

the officer, at that time was in the area, I told him she was gone into the kitchen; he went into the kitchen after her, he searched her, he produced half a guinea; I believed she gave up the silver. I saw the mark on the half guinea that I had put on it the over night. He searched her box up stairs and found the copper pieces that I had lost; all the money I had marked the over night.

Q. Did he produce any key - A. Yes, one that opened my till, and the other opened my tea caddy; I had lost them both.

Q. Upon this being discovered what did the prisoner say - A. She said it was the first time, and she hoped I would forgive her; I told her it was not the first time. I told the officer to take her away.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 9th of November I went to Mr. Jennings' house; the prisoner came down about eight o'clock; I followed her into the kitchen, told her what Mr. Jennings suspected her of, and said I must search her; upon searching her I found half a guinea, marked with a cross on the head side; I shewed it to Mr. Jennings, he recollected it; I found three shillings on her, all marked with a cross; I found the key of her box upon her person; I searched her box; I found five penny pieces marked with a 2, and two halfpence marked with a figure of 6; Mr. Jennings claimed them all. In her box I found two keys that Mr. Jennings claimed - one the key of his till, and the other the key of his tea caddy. The prisoner went down upon her knees, and begged for mercy very hard, she said she had done it last night, it was the first time. - Through a mistake last session I put the money into my pocket; the marks are worn out.

Q. That it is very incautious conduct - A. It is, my lord; I can assure you it was not done wilfully.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-41

129. JOHN WARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Matthew Toole , about the hour of twelve at night on the 24th of December , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 16 l. 9 s. the property of Matthew Toole .

MATTHEW TOOLE . Q. Are you an housekeeper - A. Yes, in Caroline court, Saffron hill ; I had four lodgers; the prisoner was a lodger of mine.

Q. What time did you go to bed on the night of the 24th of December - A. Between twelve and one.

Q. Did you secure your door and windows - A. This was about six o'clock in the morning; we all got up together, the prisoner, I, and two more lodgers.

Q. Had you any money in the house - A. I had eight guineas belonging to myself, and seven guineas and fourteen shillings belonging to my three lodgers.

Q. Had you any money belonging to this man - A. Not above two or three shillings when his way was paid.

Q. Where did you keep this money - A. In a box by the bed side.

Q. Did he sleep in the same room with you - A. No, in the next room, on the same floor; we had separate doors.

Q. How was your door fastened when you went to bed - A. It fastens with a latch; sometimes I fasten it and sometimes I do not.

Q. How lately before this had you seen this quantity of money of your's - A. I had seen it in the evening before; I went to the box to get money at five o'clock, it was safe then; when I went to bed I took my shirt out to put on in the morning, it was safe then.

Q. Does any body sleep in the same room with you - A. My wife and little child.

Q. Was the box locked - A. I think it was, I am not certain. This prisoner, my wife, and I, went to mass at six o'clock in the morning to Duke street, Lincoln's inn fields.

Q. At that time you did not know that you had lost the money - A. I was sure that I had not lost the money. When I went out to mass the prisoner went as far as Lincoln's inn fields with me, then he left me; it seemed to me as if he stopped to draw water.

Q. Did you see him at chapel - A. No; I went home a little after seven, I found the door wide open, and the box removed from the place where it had been; there was not a farthing of money in the box; somebody had removed it from the bed side to the door.

Q. Do you know that the prisoner had been back to the house - A. I did not see him till nine o'clock. There was one man remained in the house all the time; his name was Macdaniel.

Q. You do not know that the money was in the box when you went to mass - A. I really believe it was. I suspected Macdaniel then, because I had left him in the house; I sent for an officer, Wensley came, he searched Macdaniel and found nothing on him; I heard the prisoner was drinking; I went to the public house to him; I saw he was getting drunk; I give a dinner to my lodgers, it is customary on Christmas day, I brought him home to his dinner; after he had ate his dinner I sent for Wensley, he came and searched him, he found nothing but sixpence farthing in copper on him; we let him go. At night he came in dead drunk, and throwed his clothes on the middle of the floor; I got up in the morning, I took hold of his coat, I found it weighty; when he got up I said John, I suspect you have not been at work to get money; he said he would go to his brother; he ran down stairs, I ran after him and threw him down; I said he should not go. He threw a letter on the ground as he was running away, I picked it up; I caught hold of him by the handkerchief, I found there were money there; I took him to Wensley's house; he took the handkerchief off and found two guineas and a half. The prisoner took the handkerchief off and put the money in his pocket in spite of me.

Q. Did you know how much money he took out of the handkerchief at that time - A. No; when the constable got up he searched him, he found two guineas and a half in gold, two shillings, and some halfpence; he said it should be decided by the law, he would make us all sorry for robbing of him.

Q. I suppose none of the money that you had in your trunk was marked - A. No; but the half guinea I think I should know, it was crooked on the harp side.

Q. That is common - A. It is. I knew the letter that he threw down; that was in my box, with two guineas and a half in it, the night before; I have the letter here, it was addressed to me, it came to me from Ireland.

JOHN WENSLEY . I am a constable.

Q. Do you know what parish this house of the prosecutors

is in - A. St. Andrew , Holborn; I was sent for to search the prisoner, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I told him what I searched him for; he said if I found any more money upon him than some copper, I might do as I liked with him; I found only six penny-pieces and a farthing in copper in his pocket; he had no other money about him; I let him go; the next morning the prosecutor brought him down to my house.

Q. You did not come down till the man had taken off his neckloth - A. No; he was struggling to get away from the prosecutor; when I came down on searching him, I found in his breeches pocket two guineas and a half in gold, and two shillings in copper in his waistcoat pocket; I observed to the prosecutor that there was a crooked half guinea; the prisoner said it was his own, and threatened us with law for taking his money from him; the prosecutor afterwards delivered me this letter; it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the half guinea - A. I remarked it being crooked at the tail of the harp.

Jury. I think you said that you was not certain that the box was locked - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Are you sure that you always kept the box locked - A. I am; my wife kept the key.

COURT. Did you look about for this man at the chapel - A. I did; I thought he was along with me; I stood at the door while the people passed out, and if he had been there I must have seen him.

Jury. Was Macdaniel in the house all the time you went to mass - A. He was.

Q. You did not lock the door when you went to mass - A. I bolted it inside, and went out of the window; when I came home I found the door open.

COURT. Had you seen that letter in the box that night - A. Yes, it was in the dimity pocket with my money, and the pocket book in my box.

Q. Did you bolt the door and go out of the window - you speak so fast I cannot understand you - A. I went out at the door, put my hand in at the window and bolted the door.

Q. How could the prisoner come in - A. The same way I went out.

Q. Did Macdaniel say he saw him come in the house - A. No.

Q. Was he up when you returned - A. No, he was in bed when I came.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only, but not of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-42

130. JOHN WEDDAL GUYER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Dennis , about the hour of five, on the night of the 4th of January , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing an umbrella, value 10 s. his property .

THOMAS DENNIS . I am a journeyman baker ; I live at No. 3, Chigwell hill, Ratcliffe highway, in the parish of St. George . On Wednesday the 4th of this month, between five and six at night, I saw the prisoner at my window; I saw him lift my shop window open; I was standing behind a screen that parts the shop and the sitting room; he put his hand in and took a silk umbrella from the inside of the window. that was there for sale; when he opened the window a board tell out, it had on it, lodgings for single men; I went out of doors after him into the highway, I could see nothing of him; the next morning I went to Shadwell office and described the man; he had lodged with me; he left his lodgings ever since the 8th of October.

Q. I suppose he and you differed about something - A. I never spoke to him after I was married to the woman.

Q. Do you find men for ships - A. I do.

Q. They are called crimps - you know the prisoner was a seafaring man - A. He is so.

Q. How long did he lodge in the house - A. Two years; he never lodged with me.

Q. How long have you been married to this woman - A. About three months on the 1st of October.

Q. The prisoner left your house by your account on the 8th of October - that is just a week after you was married to this woman - when did you take him up - A. On the 7th of this month.

Q. Did you ever find your umbrella - A. No.

Q. If you saw him so plain he could see you, you had lights in the shop I presume - A. We had.

Q. Then he could see you - A. That I do not know.

Q. Why did not you prevent him from taking it when he opened the window - A. If I had gone out he would not have taken it.

Q. You thought of the forty pounds - A. Yes.

MARY - . I am a poor woman, I sell fruit in the street; I have known the prisoner about two years; he lodged in this man's house.

Q. Where did he lodge after he left there - A. I do not know; as I was going for some coals at past five o'clock in the evening, I saw him look at this man's door, and when I came down the place he past me with an umbrella.

Q. You do not know whether it was his umbrella or whether it belonged to any body else - A. No.

Q. You did not see him lift up the window - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the crime; I lodged two years with the wife, before this man married her; it is nothing but jealously, he has owed me a spite ever since.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-43

131. EDWARD DEARMER and ELIZABETH DEARMER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , twenty eight yards of cotton, value 2 l. and three remnants of cotton, value 3 s. the property of William Miles , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM MILES . I am a calico printer , 282, High Holborn ; I know nothing of the transaction myself.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I am a taylor; I bought this bed furniture of Mrs. Dearmer, in the beginning of December; I gave sixteen pence a yard and sold it for eighteen pence; Mrs. Dearmer asked me, did I go to shops and sell this furniture; I said no; because she said if I did I was not to have it; I told my wife some time after what what Mrs. Dearmer said; she suspected she could not come honestly by it; I was determined

to find out whether it was stolen or not; I went to Mr. Miles's, shewed him a pattern; he claimed it.

ELIZABETH PALMISTER . I am a green grocer in Lambeth walk. About six weeks ago, I bought this bed furniture of Mr. Wallis, I gave eighteen pence a yard for it; he came again in two or three days afterwards, asked me for a pattern of it, I gave it him. This is the furniture I bought of Mr. Wallis.

WILLIAM BANNISTER . I am a calico glazer, 130, St. Martin's lane, the prisoner was my servant. On the 6th of December the prisoner was gone to deliver some goods at Mr. Miles's. I went with Mr. Miles to his house; the prisoner was taken from Mr. Miles's house to Bow street. When the magistrate asked him what he had to say, his words were, that he had got this piece in a sheet in a mistake, and that he had taken them; and his wife knew nothing of the matter.

Q. to Wallis. That bed furniture which you sold to Mrs. Palmister, you bought of the woman prisoner - A. Yes, this is it; it is twenty eight yards.

The property produced and identified.

Edward Dearmer 's Defence. I have always acted duly and truly for Mr. Bannister. What I said at Bow street was to clear my wife. I bought the furniture.

The prisoners called seven witnesses, who gave them a good character.

EDWARD DEARMER , GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

ELIZABETH DEARMER , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-44

132. ELIZABETH MARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , a watch, value 40 s. and a table cloth, value 10 s. the property of John Wright , in the dwelling house of James Lindores .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a servant out of place. On Wednesday the 4th of this month I lost a silver watch and a table cloth out of my room, No. 71, King street, Golden square ; James Lindores is the landlord. I was absent from home when they were lost.

ABRAHAM DRY . A watch was pledged with me on the 4th of January by Sarah Williams for half a guinea. I am a pawnbroker, 32, St. Martin's lane.

JAMES BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, No. 12, Long Acre. On the 4th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged a table cloth with me for fifteen shillings.

ELIZABETH WHITE . I keep a house in King's street, Golden square. On Wednesday the 4th of this month, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my house, went up stairs, and came down again. I went up stairs and looked out of my lodger's window. I saw her go into Mr. Lindores'.

SARAH WILLIAMS . Q. You pawned the watch, did not you - A. Yes; the prisoner gave it me to pawn; I gave her the duplicate; she is an acquaintance of my mother's.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine hillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-45

133. SUSANAH BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , four silver tea spoons, value 10 s. two looking glasses, value 3 s. a tea-board, value 2 s. a tea tray, value 4 s. a towel, value 4 d. and a handkerchief, value 4 d. the property of James Cruikshanks .

JAMES CRUIKSHANKS . I am a metal fan light manufacturer . I live in Gerard street, Soho ; the prisoner was my lodger's servant .

Q. When did you loose these things - A. At several times, within these fifteen months. I did not know of the loss of some of the things, until a few things were found.

JOSEPH WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, 22, Princes street, Soho. I have got four tea spoons, one pawned on the 3d of December, one on the 8th, one on the 13th, and one on the 31st of December, for half a crown each; pawned in the name of Mrs. Cruikshanks.

Q. Do you remember who the person was - A. No.

EDWARD THOMAS BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Lucas, No. 4, Rider's court, Leicester square. On the 1st of October the prisoner pledged a tea tray for four shillings, and a looking glass for one shilling and sixpence; 21st of May, a handkerchief four pence; and on the 19th of April, a looking glass for one shilling and sixpence; and on the 13th of May, a towel for four pence.

- STONE. I know nothing more than taking the prisoner in custody, and finding the things at the pawnbrokers; the duplicates were found behind Mr. Cruikshank's house door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was persuaded to have a try in the lottery; I meaned to replace them when I got my wages.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-46

134. SARAH NEED was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , three yards of silk, value 6 s. 6 d. two pair of pantaloons, value 6 s. a table cloth, value 1 s. five yards of stuff, value 6 d. four gowns, value 7 s. four petticoats, value 2 s. a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. two yards of muslin, value 1 s. a cloth coat, value 2 s. a surplice, value 6 d. and a cloak, value 15 s. the property of Edmund Spragg , George Burton , and Joseph Vickers .

GEORGE BURTON . I am an optician; I keep a shop in the Borough. On the 29th of December, I received information that something belonging to the Royalty theatre was pledged; the prisoner was mistress of the wardrobe .

Q. Who are the proprietors of the Royalty theatre - A. George Burton , Gilbert Sprag , and Joseph Vickers , were the three sole proprietors; Mr. Vickers and I, are at present the assignees.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 29th of December I was sent for to the royalty theatre; I searched the prisoner there; I found upon her seventy four duplicates; many of them led to a discovery of the articles stolen. I afterwards searched her house in St. George's fields; and there I found this fringe and two pair of drawers.

LOUISA MILBOURN . I live at No. 50, Chamber

street, Goodman's fields. I have pledged things for the prisoner by her orders.

GEORGE HOCKLEY . I live at 81, Cable street, Well close square. I have taken in a variety of articles which are claimed by the proprietors of the Royalty theatre; some pledged by Milbourne, and some by Hartley; a cloak, a muslin gown, and a piece of silk, I took in of Hartley; a muslin gown, of Milbourne, a coat, and a pair a pantaloons.

Q. to Miller. Have you the duplicates of these things - A. Yes.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, No. 7, London road, St. George's fields; a sheet and a gown was pawned with me on the 21st of November in the name of Burgess.

Louisa Milbourne . I pledged the coat and two pair of trowsers; I gave the duplicates to Mrs. Need.

MRS. HARTLEY. I pawned the articles by Mrs. Need's orders, I gave her the duplicates; Mrs. Need told me the things were her own.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-47

135. WILLIAM RUSSEL and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December , a bed tick, value 30 s. and a bolster case, value 10 s. the property of George Rawlins .

GEORGE RAWLINS . I am an upholsterer , I live at Walthamstow . On the 5th of December I placed a bed tick and a bolster case in my front shop; I then went out and shut the door after me; I was out about a quarter of an hour; when I returned the bed tick and bolster case was gone; I received information from Cowell.

ELIZABETH COWELL . I live at Walthamstow. I saw Smith, the prisoner, come out of Mr. Rawlins' shop between twelve and one in the day; he brought out a blue and white thing under his arm; the other prisoner was with him; they asked me for a needle full of thread, I gave it them; there was a soldier there, they all three went away together.

JAMES MARR . I am a seller of fish. On the 5th of December, between twelve and one, I was coming up Church fields, Walthamstow, I met Mr. Rawlins; he asked me whether I saw three men; I told him no; he told me they had robbed him; he gave me a description of them. When I came to Clapton, in the Back lane, I saw three men that answered the description; one of them had a bag under his arm, and a bit of bed sacking hanging out of the bag; I catched hold of him by the collar, I asked him what he had got there; he said nothing that belonged to me, and chucked the bag down to Smith; he said to him, that is not my bag, it is your's; he hit me on the breast and wrenched himself out of my hands; when I found he was gone up the Back lane I went to Smith and said if he is gone you shall not go. Russell went on, a gentleman on horseback went after him and stopped him; they got a constable and took them in custody, and I went to Walthamstow to let the prosecutor know.

The property produced and identified.

Smith's Defence. I never was in Walthamstow in my life; I was walking by the water side for a day's work, I was stopped by that man; I never had the bag in my possession.

Russel's Defence. I never was in Walthamstow in my life; at the time I was in Whitechapel having my dinner.

Prosecutor. He told me himself he begged the thread of the girl when he went out of my shop door.

RUSSEL, GUILTY , aged 19.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-48

136. WALTER WIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , half a bushel of apples, value 3 s. the property of Philip Cambrey .

PHILIP CAMBREY . I am a salesman in Covent Garden market . I was not there at the time it was done.

EDWARD HYAT . I am a porter in the market; I unloaded nine baskets of apples for Mr. Cambrey; the prisoner took one away and carried it twenty yards off; I pursued him and took him.

Q. What did he say for himself - A. He said he was making water, a man came and put it down by him; I saw him take it away, I had been watching him twenty minutes; he made several attempts before he took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was making water; he did not take the basket from me.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-49

137. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , four quart pewter pots, value 4 s. and three pint pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Cliffe .

CHARLES CLIFFE . I am a publican , I keep the George, known by the name of the Half Way house, Commercial road . On the 6th of January the officers brought the prisoner into my house with seven pots with my name on them.

PETER MASON . I am an officer of Worship street office. On the 6th of January, about six in the evening, I was in the Commercial road, in company with Gleed; we saw the prisoner walking in the middle of the road, he seemed to have something about him; we took him into a butcher's shop; Gleed took off his hat, there was one pint pot in his hat, some were in his pockets, and some behind him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time they represent they took me in the road, I was crossing the way to see where they belonged to.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-50

138. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , a basket, value 2 s. and two bushels of apples, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Weatherfield .

SECOND COUNT, the property of John Leary .

THOMAS WEATHERFIELD . I am a fruiterer in Covent Garden market. I only know of the goods being consigned to me; they were deposited in a warehouse belonging to Henry Pearson .

JOHN LEARY . I am porter to Mr. Weatherfield: I saw these goods counted in the warehouse; on the 5th of January I was called on to bring them to market; in bringing them up to market I missed a two bushel basket.

HENRY PEARSON . Q. You keep this warehouse - A. Yes. On the 5th of January, I saw the prisoner take out a two bushel basket of apples; he told me he was going to take them to Mr. Weatherfield.

JOHN HILL . On the 5th of January, there were four ordered to market, and instead of four there were only three; Mr. Pearson's son told me Chapman took one; I met with Chapman, the soldier, at Knights-bridge; the officer said to him you know what you are charged with; he said yes, but I do not mind it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with; I borrowed a knot of Mr. Pearson, I returned it; I never knew of the charge till one of my comrades told me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-51

139. EDWARD JORDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , four hundred and eighty penny pieces, and one thousand two hundred and forty halfpence , the property of John Boards .

SECOND COUNT the property of William Walker .

JOHN BOARDS . I am a farmer at Edmonton . On the 3rd of February, I asked the prisoner for five pounds in copper, which Mr. Walker sent me; he said he had lost them, and then he said he had shot them under the dung; he pretended to look under the dung for them.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a potatoe merchant , in St. John street. On the 3rd of December, I packed up five poundsworth of halfpence and penny pieces in this sack; I delivered them to the prisoner; he laid them on his dung in the cart and went away; I heard that he had lost them on the Monday; in about ten days afterwards he brought the same sack that I had sewed the halfpence up, full of potatoes; I am sure it is the same sack.

JOHN GILMER . I was at work in the field when the prisoner came home and shot his load of dung; I assisted him in shooting it; after I went home he came to my house and said he had lost five poundsworth of halfpence; he asked me to lend him a lanthorn and to go with him to see if he had shot them on the dung; I went with him, we could not find them.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a servant to Mr. Boards. On the 3rd of December, the prisoner came home with a load of dung; the servant girl came out, and asked him if he had brought any halfpence home; he seemed to be surprized, he said he had shot them out with his dung; he said he would go and look for them; he went and was gone two hours and a half; he returned, said he had not found them; he would go and look for them in the morning.

WILLIAM READ . I am officer; I apprehended the prisoner; he said he had lost them.

Q. to Walker. They have never been found, have they - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this bag from Mr. Walker, I put it on the cart; I saw it several times on the road; the last time I saw it was going up the lane to shoot the dung; I told the maid servant, when she asked me if I had any halfpence, I had shot them in the dung; I asked this man to assist me in shooting the dung.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-52

104. THOMAS FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , four quartern loaves, of bread, value 4 s. the property of John Chew .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a broker, I live in Berwick court .

Q. Has Mr. Chew any door that opens into that court - A. Yes, nearly opposite of my house; it is not Mr. Chew's shop door, it is the side door, the shop door is in Henrietta street. On the 17th of last December I observed a man walking to and fro my door for five minutes; then I observed the prisoner come out of Mr. Chew's private door; I saw him give four round quartern loaves to the man that was walking to and fro by Mr. Chew's.

Q. What door did the prisoner come from - A. The side door, I am sure of that; he gave the man four loaves altogether as they were baked in the oven; the prisoner went down stairs again immediately.

Q. What became of the man to whom he gave the loaves - A. He walked briskly on till he came to Gee's court, and then he made a run.

Q. Is this door kept open for customers as well as the front door - A. No; it is for the use of lodgers; I told Mr. Chew when he opened the shutters.

JOHN CHEW . I am a baker , I live at No. 2, Henrietta street, Manchester square.

Q. Where is your shop door - A. In Henrietta street, my house is the corner of Berwick court; I have a door in Berwick court for the use of the lodgers only, and a door in Henrietta street.

Q. On the 17th of December did you order that the prisoner should bring up the bread in consequence of some information - A. Yes; he brought up eighty seven quartern loaves about eight o'clock; Mr. French had told me ten minutes before that.

Q. Was eighty seven quartern loaves the quantity that there should be - A. Ninety one I put in myself. I am quite sure of it, it is always a regular quantity. I asked him whether they were all up; he said they were.

Q. Did he ever account to you for the remaining four - A. Never.

Prisoner's Defence. There have been a number of loaves sold out at that private door; Mr. Chew knows that he served a woman in the house, and that he cannot deny.

Prosecutor. I never knew in my life that a loaf went out that way.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-53

141. THOMAS FORD was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 29th of December , eleven pound weight of flour, value 4 s. and two twopenny loaves, value 4 d. the property of John Chew .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN CHEW . Q. Your bakehouse is down stairs - A. Yes.

Q. You have two doors to your bakehouse - A. Yes, one door goes into the street and the other to the internal part of the house; when we are not there we usually keep it shut. I knew the prisoner was robbing me; I did business as well as ever I did it, I found myself deficient very much; I went to Marlborough street and got an officer to come to my house. About two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 29th of December, I cut a hole in the bakehouse door to watch the prisoner, I saw him take his hat from one side of the bakehouse to the other, he turned his handkerchief on his hat and laid in two shovels of flour; he laid the corners of the handkerchief on the flour, he put the hat on his head, he went out of the bakehouse from the area steps; I went up the area steps.

Q. How much did he put in - A. I suppose as much as he did when the officer stopped him, four pound all but an ounce. I saw him go into the highway; when he was crossing the road I said Thomas, there is a cake belonging to Mr. Smith of Marylebone lane, perhaps he may want it; he said I am only going over the way, I will be back in five minutes; he came back in five minutes. I went down stairs, and just as I got to the bakehouse he put his handkerchief on his hat and put in two shovels full as before, doubled the corners, put the hat on, and took the cake with him; he went up the area steps and went out; he returned in about an hour. When he came back it got dark, so that he could not see without a candle; when he came to the shop door I said Thomas, you will not be able to see without a candle; he went down stairs, I went to the door where I had been before, I saw him wash his arms; I went up stairs, I stood in the shop; he said sir, the door is fastened; I said it is, there is a fresh batch of flour, I put a padlock on the door; I said I will come down and stop while you fill the copper; he said no, I will come up the same way and lock the door; I went up stairs, I saw the prisoner through a crack up stairs; he took a candle; I could see in the middle part of the bakehouse, I saw the hat in his hand, I had looked in the hat when I went down stairs for him to fill the copper, it had nothing in it then; I saw him take the hat across the bakehouse when I was in the sitting room. He after that came up stairs and said, here is a strange key of the bakehouse, I found it in the cellar; the officer seized him; he found in his hat the flour that is now here; there was four pound all but one ounce.

Q. Do you think there was as much upon a former occasion as there was then in the hat - A. Yes; much about.

Mr. Knapp. The two former quantities of flour you could not ascertain the weight - A. No; there were two shovels full; I think two shovels full to be four pound almost.

JOHN FOY . I took the flour out of this man's hat, four pounds all but an ounce.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to Mr. Chew as journeyman , I was to be allowed both bread and beer by Mr. Chew.

Chew. I did not allow him to take bread without asking me for it; he never took out flour without asking my leave; if he wanted flour he used it down in the bakehouse.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-54

142. ANN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , a silver watch, value 35 s. the property of John Von Essen .

JOHN VON ESSEN . I am a German. On the 7th of January, about eight in the evening, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel , she took me to her lodging; I was not there a quarter of an hour when I took out my watch to wind it up; she snatched it out of my hand and ran away.

Q. Did you give her any thing - A. Yes, five shillings. I did not run after her, I thought she would come back again, and that she was only in fun. I gave three pound ten shillings for the watch; I have since seen it at the pawnbroker's; I know it to be mine.

MR. HAYES. The prisoner pawned the watch with me, I lent her a pound on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the prisoner home to my own room; he asked me to go for liquor to drink, and then he asked to stay with me all night; I said if you give me a compliment; he said take my watch and pawn it. I went and pawned it for a pound; when I came home he was gone. On Sunday evening the constable came and took me a prisoner in my own room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-55

143. GEORGE ELLISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , seven deaboards, value 15 s. two thousand nails, value 3 s. and twelve iron clamps, value 6 d. the property of William Brass .

WILLIAM BRASS . I am a box maker . The prisoner worked for me on my own premises, No. 3, Water lane, Fleet street . On the 3d of December, from information I received from my apprentice, I applied for a warrant to search the prisoner's premises; I charged the prisoner with stealing some boards; he said nothing. In a loft above the prisoner's room the officers found the articles specified in the indictment; the boards I knew by having my chalk mark on them, and the nails and the iron plates are such as we use in our business. The prisoner, upon the officer producing them, said they were mine.

Q. What is the value of the boards - A. From fifteen to eighteen shillings, the nails half a crown, and the clamps, one shilling.

WILLIAM WILSON NICHOLSON . I am an apprentice to the last witness. Previous to the 3d of December I missed deals from my master's premises, I informed my master; I attended the search warrant at the prisoner's lodgings, and when the officer produced these things the prisoner said they were all my master's.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I went with this search warrant to No 7, Shire lane; I found the prisoner in the garret; I went with Mr. Brass, we saw a trap door in the garret ceiling that went to the loft; I found these seven boards and all these things.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-56

144. LEWIS JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , four silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of William Ilbery .

The prosecutor and witnesses being called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-57

145. MARY MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , a tea kettle, value 5 s. the property of Antonio Della Torre ; and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Barrett , spinster .

ANTONIO DELLA TORRE . Q. Did you lose a tea kettle from your kitchen - A. Yes; I live at No. 12, Lees street, Red Lion square . On the 6th of December, about noon, I saw the prisoner going out of my passage and water running from her; I looked out of door after I saw the water running from her clothes; I followed her and took the kettle from her.

ANN BARRETT . I am a single woman ; when the prisoner was brought back, I saw my apron; it was wrapped round the tea kettle.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am wrongfully accused; I was carrying the tea kettle for a woman that came from Crawford in Kent; she bought it of a jew woman in Whitechapel; I had a drop too much, it got up in my head; the gentlewoman that brought the kettle I had her all last week, she is gone home now.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-58

146. ADAM SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , seven penny pieces, and fifty eight halfpence , the property of George Furnis .

GEORGE FURNIS . I am a publican ; I keep the Rum Puncheon in Cross lane, St. Giles's ; the prisoner was a lodger of mine, he was a public house broker . In the evening of Christmas day, between nine and ten, I catched him taking the copper money; I heard the halfpence rattle; I was walking in and out of the bar; the money was in the bar, and the prisoner was in the bar; he had dined and drank tea with me that day.

Q. Did you afterwards leave him alone in the bar - A. Yes; I heard the halfpence rattle while I was in the bar; I have a tame jack daw about the bar, I supposed it was him at first; I was in hopes that it was, but to convince myself I put him in the cage; after that I heard him rattle the halfpence; there was nobody else in the bar at that time; I made believe to go into the tap room, but I did not go, I opened the door and let it go so, then I looked over the bar: the basket containing five poundsworth of copper, which I had counted up that day for the purpose of payment, was behind him on the ground; I saw him stoop twice, and I heard the halfpence rattle at the same time; he was sitting in a chair close to the basket; I saw his hand in the basket; the third time he was stooping I went round and catched him; when I seized him he dropped the halfpence from his hand on the ground; I said good God, Scott, what are you about; he said he did not know, he seemed confused; he then said he had like to have fell down; I said you shall not sit there any longer, I moved the chair; he said I know you are wrong; I said I was sure I was right, and put the basket on the table and began to count the halfpence; he said you have no occasion to do that, you cannot tell; then I said I insist upon you giving me the money that you have taken out; he put his hands into the flap of his small clothes and pulled out two handfulls; I counted them, I found I was deficient; when I first counted the copper I was deficient in three shillings of my five pounds; I made him untie the knees of his breeches; he shook out sevenpence halfpenny, that made up the three shillings; I asked him how he came to do it; he said he was mad or the devil must be in him.

ANN BARR . I was by when my master accused him of taking the halfpence; master bid him take out his money and put on the table; Mr. Scott put his hands into his small clothes and pulled out two handfuls of halfpence; master made him undo the knees of his small clothes; he did, and then the halfpence dropped out of the knees of his small clothes.

JOSHUA FIELD . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge; the prosecutor said he had three shillings in copper, which the prisoner had taken out of his basket; the prisoner said among the money you have, some of it belongs to me.

- PERRY. This is the copper money that was brought to me at the watchhouse; I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. There is three shillings in penny pieces and halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am accused of.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-59

147. MARY WALLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , a pewter quart pot, value 15 d. the property of William Francis .

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable of Hatton garden office. On the 12th of December, I met the prisoner just by the George at Hampstead, where this pot came from; it was about half past eleven in the forenoon; I was coming to London and she was going to Hampstead; she had not got so far as the George; I had not gone far down the road when she came running past me, she was coming towards London, she had a great coat on; I saw something sticking out; I stopped her, and said you have got something there; she said no, she had nothing but her own; I pulled her coat of one side and saw this pot. There is the George, Hampstead, on the bottom of the pot.

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I keep the George public house, Hampstead . That is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Hampstead a little past twelve, I saw the pot standing by the road side, unfortunately I took it up. I could not

read, I thought somebody on the road might tell me who the pot belonged to.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-60

148. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , three deals, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Woolcott .

THOMAS WOOLCOTT . Q. You have no partner - A. Yes, my son is understood as a partner; we had never any settlement made; he is understood as my partner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-61

149. JOHN CLEGHORN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , three yards of carpeting, value 5 s. the property of John Harding Chalkley .

JOHN HARDING CHALKLEY . I am a broker at No. 24, Smith's buildings, Battle bridge ; I only know I missed the carpeting from the front of the shop; when I came home I was informed the prisoner was detected.

JOSEPH KEY . I live five doors from the prosecutor's. On the 13th of December, about a quarter before five in the evening, from information I watched two lads that were walking backwards and forwards at Mr. Chalkley's shop.

Q. Was the prisoner one of these two lads - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner step into Mr. Chalkley's shop and take a piece of carpeting; I seized hold of him about five or six yards from the place where he first laid hold of it; the other ran away; I asked him what he was going to do with the carpetting; he said he was only going to look at it; he dropped it down when I laid hold of him; I picked it up and took him back to the shop.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see a young man, a smith, at Islington; when he laid hold of me there was no one with me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-62

150. ELIZABETH HIBBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , eighteen shifts, value 18 s. a shirt, value 1 s. twelve handkerchiefs, value 3 s. eleven aprons, value 5 s. 6 d. a tablecloth, value 1 s. three bed gowns, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. three pillow cases, value 2 s. and a petticoat, value 6 d. the property of the directors of the poor of the parish of St. Pancras; a shawl value 9 d. and a cap, value 9 d. the property of Elizabeth Gavin ; a petticoat, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of Mary Gibbons .

ELIZABETH GAVIN . The prisoner was a pauper in St. Pancras workhouse . On the 19th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, I found the kitchen window open and the prisoner was gone, and soon after the articles were missed.

JAMES GILLMORE . I took the prisoner up; on a second examination Mrs. Gavin was in the yard, she said the shawl the prisoner then had on was her property, and the cap on her head; I took it off her head.

MARY GIBBONS . Q. Do you know any thing of the linen being given to the prisoner to wash - A. Yes, she had eighteen shifts to wash, and all the articles that have been read over.

Q. Have you ever found any of it since - A. No.

Q. Were all these things worth ten shillings - A. More than that. I gave her the key of the kitchen to finish her work in the morning; between seven and eight I heard the alarm that she was gone out of the kitchen window, and all the property was gone; I never heard of her afterwards till she was taken; I lost a shawl and a petticoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I went away, I took nothing but my own.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-63

151. JOHN STRATTON and JACOB WITSCH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , a gallon of rum, value 5 s. the property of our sovereign Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to belong to his Majesty's commissioners of the excise; and

THREE OTHER COUNTS stating it to belong to certain other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN GEORGE . I am a Thames police constable. On the night of the 31st of December, I was on duty at the West India docks with Pearce, another officer; in going my round a little after ten o'clock, I heard a noise in the lighter, the Three Brothers, No. 443; she lay in Limehouse Bason ; I went on board of her, I found both the prisoners on board.

Q. What was the prisoner Stratton - A. An excise watchman ; the prisoner Witsch belonged to Mr. Drinkall, he was watchman of the craft; Stratton was walking athwart the forecastle of the lighter; Witsch was down below laying down on one of the breast hooks; Witsch asked who was there; I asked him if he had been bleeding any of them to night; he said no, d - n you, what is that to you.

Q. Were there any casks of rum on board - A. Yes; I knew Witsch six years; I asked them if they did not know me; Stratton answered he knew me very well; upon this I left the lighter and bid him good night. It was a moon light night but very cloudy.

Q. Was it sufficiently light from the moon for you to see at some distance - A. Yes; after I had quitted the lighter Pearce and I went behind some paling and secreted ourselves there, where we could see very plain what was doing on the forecastle of the lighter; we had not been watching there ten minutes before I saw Witsch come up from the forescuttle, he handed something to Stratton; Stratton immediately came on shore, he went over the lock gates and walked towards Lime-house; I followed immediately and overtook him, I took him by the collar and told him I must search him, that I suspected he had got something about him that was not legal: upon that he opened his great coat pocket, took out a bladder from his left side and threw it in the bason; I told him he had throwed a bladder in the bason; he said he had not, he insisted upon me letting him go; I told him I would not; he put his foot across and attempted to throw me in the bason; I drew a pistol

and told him I would shoot him if he made any resistance; Pearce came up; we gave him in charge of the centinel.

Q. How far did this take place from the lighter - A. I suppose about thirty yards. After I had put him in custody I saw Witsch come aft, go down below, bring something up and throw it overboard; I took a boat and a light and searched that part of the bason where Stratton had thrown the bladder in; I there found a bladder containing a gallon and a half of rum; this is part of it. I went on board the lighter, there was a great many puncheons of rum on board the lighter; I found a spile in one of the puncheons, the spile was sticking out seven staves from the bung hole; we afterwards took Stratton and Witsch to the round house; Stratton was very earnest for me to let him go; he wished me to keep the rum and to say nothing about it.

EDWARD PEARCE . I am a constable of the West India docks.

Q. On the 31st of December were you on duty with the last witness - A. Yes. A few minutes after ten in the evening I heard a noise on board the lighter, the Three Brothers, No. 443, the owners names were Drinkall and sons. George, my brother officer, went on board and stood on the foresheets, I remained on the key; the lighter touched the shore; I knew Witsch before, he was a servant of Drinkall and sons; George asked him if he had been bleeding any of them; Witsch answered, d - n you, no; George the officer then came on shore, we left the lighter and secreted ourselves behind an iron gate, commanding a view of the lighter; we looked through the railing, in a few minutes I saw Stratton come over on the lock gates; George ran from me and stopped Stratton, I heard something fall into the water after he had seized Stratton; when I went to George's assistance Witsch went from the fore sheets of the lighter to the stern sheet, went down below, and came up again immediately, he leaned over the quarter of the lighter, near the stern, but I did not see him heave any thing over board.

Q. Was he able from the situation he was in to lay any thing on the surface of the water - A. Yes; he then went and learned on the pump; I went and searched Witsch, I found only a knife on him; I brought him on shore and gave him in charge of the centinel. I saw George pick up a bladder that was floating on the north side of the bason; we searched the lighter and found a spile in the quarter of a puncheon, sticking out seven staves from the bung hole. As we were taking the prisoners to the watchhouse Stratton told us we knew such things were done, we had no cause to make it so bad without we liked; he wanted for us to take the bladder and let them go; that is all that past. Witsch said nothing, he behaved very well.

JOHN DRINKALL . Q. Have you any partner - A. Yes; my son, John Drinkall . I am a lighterman.

Q. Are you and your son the owners of the lighter the Three Brothers, No. 443 - A. We are.

Q. On Saturday the 31st of December had you taken on board that lighter any puncheons of rum - A. We had for Messrs. Tibson and co.

Q. The prisoner Witsch was in your employ as a watchman - A. Yes; he has been so about nineteen years.

Q. This rum was delivered into your lighter to go off into the victualling office - A. Yes; when the tide permitted.

JAMES GREEN . Q. I believe you are import and delivering officer of the excise at the West India docks - A. I am.

Q. Do you know of any puncheons of rum being delivered on board the Three Brothers lighter, on the last day of the year - A. Yes.

Q. At that time was there any spile in the quarter of any of the puncheons - A. No; if there had I must have seen it; our excise men make a spile as near the bung hole as possible. No. 39 is the cask that was afterwards found to have a spile in it; it contained one hundred and twenty five gallons, with the allowance upon it, when I dipped it.

JURY. What were the actual contents - A. There might be one hundred and twenty six and a half.

THOMAS BIGNALL . I am as excise guager of the port of London.

Q. On the 2nd of January did you examine a puncheon of rum, No. 39 - A. I did; I observed a spile in the quarter, seven staves from the bung hole; there would have been no spile put there except there had been a worm hole, and this cask appeared to me to be sound by the guage; I found it had lost the key allowance, from a gallon to a gallon and a half.

Q. What did you find the full contents of No. 39 - A. One hundred and thirty two gallons was what the cask was capable of holding; in it was one hundred and twenty five gallons; that is giving no tenth to the trader; if you give the tenth to the trader it should have another gallon. I guaged No. 30; I found it fifteen gallons deficient.

WILLIAM TIBSON , JUNR. Q. I believe you William Tibson , junior, William Tibson , senior, and Samuel Wright , are the owners of this rum - A. We are.

COURT. Were they ordered by you into the possession of Messrs. Drinkall - A. They were.

Scratton's Defence. The liquor was taken away before I went to the charge; I went to the office at four o'clock to get my certificate; it was near six o'clock when I got it; so that it might be committed while I was absent at the time; at the time I was absent the lighterman was absent looking after a boat.

Witsch's Defence. I was looking after a boat of my master's; when I returned I found a man had flung this out; it might happen at the time I was gone.

Stratton called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Witsch called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STRATTON, GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly whipped near the West India Docks .

WITSCH, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-64

152. JOHN GIRDLER was indicted for that he on the 4th of November had in his custody a bill of exchange for the payment of 29 l. 10 s. that he afterwards feloniously did forge an acceptance of the said bill of exchange, with intention to defraud William Levy .

SECOND COUNT for uttering and publishing as true a like forged acceptance of the said note, with like intention; - and

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, with intention to defraud Philip Holmes .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was -

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-65

153. MARY ELLIOTT and MARY GILL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Bennett .

THOMAS BENNETT . I live at No. 6, Cannon road, St. George's in the East , I am a linen draper . On the 5th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Elliott and Gill came in my shop and asked to look at some muslin; my shopman shewed them some; they bought a nail of muslin. They afterwards asked to look at some printed cotton for a child's frock, and while I was shewing them I observed Mary Gill to secrete a piece under her gown; they afterwards bought a yard and a quarter of printed cotton and paid for it; then they went out of the shop. I laid hold of the prisoner Gill, told her she must come back, I suspected she had got something that did not belong to her; I took her into a little room adjoining the shop, and from under her gown the piece of cotton fell from her.

Q. What became of the other woman - A. She went away directly I laid hold of Gill; Gill was taken to the watchhouse, and while the officer was searching her Elliott came in; then she was taken in custody. Elliott bought the nail of muslin and the yard and a quarter of cotton and paid for them.

The property produced and identified.

Elliott's Defence. I went to buy this child's frock. I did not know any thing of her taking it, or else I would not have gone with her.

Gill said nothing in her defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

ELLIOTT, NOT GUILTY .

GILL, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-66

154. MICHAEL MACABE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , a deal board, value 3 s. the property of John Elsdon .

JOHN ELSDON . I am a bricklayer , I live at No. 25, Harford place, Bedford square . I only know the board is my property.

OWEN SWINNEY . I am a watchman. On the 12th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner with this board and took him to the watchhouse and the board.

HENRY HOWARD . I was constable of the night when the prisoner and the board was brought into the watchhouse; the prisoner said it was his own board; I examined the board and found the name of Elsdon on it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the board up; it was lying in the street.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-67

155. GEORGE POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a glazior's diamond, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Windmill .

JOSEPH WINDMILL . I live at Kingsland ; the prisoner and I lodged in one bed. On the 6th of January I went out to work in the morning; I left my diamond in my box; on the evening I looked for it and it was gone. In the evening the prisoner came home and went to bed; I then charged him; he declared his innocence. In the morning the prisoner confessed that he had taken it out of the box and sold it to a pawnbroker for five shillings. I got up, put him in the charge of an officer. I found the diamond at Mr. Pearson's, where he had sold it.

THOMAS PEARSON . Q. You bought the diamond of the prisoner - A. He sold the diamond to me for five shillings.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18090111-68

156. MICHAEL RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , two pound weight of soap, value 20 d. the property of William Whitwell .

BENJAMIN NORRIS . I have the management of Mr. William Whitwell 's soap manufactory, Bethnal green, the prisoner was a labourer . On the 25th of December we missed one hundred weight of soap; we searched the prisoner's lodgings and found a small quantity of soap in an unfinished state; this is the soap, it was taken out of the copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I live in Clerkenwell. As I was coming home I picked it up in the street.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-69

157. ELIZABETH WELLER and MARGARET COLEBY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , thirty pound weight of iron, value 2 s. the property of John Freemantle , John Brandon , and John Desamoux .

JOHN MORTIMER . I am a smith; I work for John Freemantle, John Brandon , and John Desamoux, they are iron founder s, No. 11, King street, Goswell street . On the 15th of December, from information of the next witness, I pursued the prisoners, and as I turned the corner of King street to go into Goswell street, I saw the two prisoners, I went after them; I saw Margaret Coleby drop the iron from under her cloak. I fetched them back and left the iron in possession of the next witness.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a newsman. Passing by the premises of Mr. Freemantle, I observed Coleby take a piece of iron, it was laying about a yard and a half from the door in the street, it was just cast to appearance, it lay there to cool; the foreman was coming out of the shop when the girls had turned the corner; I told him, and he pursued them; the iron was given into my possession.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in their defence.

WELLER, GUILTY , aged 13.

COLEBY, GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-70

158. JOHN WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , seven pecks of oats, value 5 s. the property of Jonathan Passingham .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN FEAST . I am a labourer in the employ of Mr. Passingham. On Thursday the 22nd of December, I went to thrash in the barn, I found it had been robbed; there was a hole in the heap of oats I had left on the Wednesday evening, that made me know there were some gone; there were some beans scattered among the oats, there was a great hole in the heap and the heap was diminished; on Friday I found a lark in the heap.

Q. Do you know how West was employed at that time - A. I know he used to catch larks; I do not know what he was doing then; I locked the bar on the preceding evening and I found it locked on the Thursday morning.

JONATHAN PASSINGHAM . Q. On the Thursday morning in consequence of information from the last witness you went to your barn - A. On the Friday morning I observed there were a great many oats scattered about the barn; there had been a large fall of snow on the Thursday, where they were shed, from the barn door to the prisoners house door; there were oats scattered all the way to the prisoner's door; I got a warrant from Mr. Fraser the magistrate; we searched the prisoner's house; the children were at home, the woman was gone to sell the larks that had been catched the day before; I found a good deal of corn under the bed in tubs, some tick beans and barley; some cleaned and some not.

Q. Did you lose any barley - A. Not as I know of; we found some oats scattered under the bed; we found no oats in the house that I was looking for; we found oats in the poultry house, in an old bran sack; they are my oats and I will swear to them; we took a sample from the barn to the magistrate and compared them there.

COURT. You might as well have produced a sample to the jury, as well as to the magistrate - A. I have not brought a sample here from the barn; I am sure they are my oats.

Q. We can best judge of that by the sample from the barn with the oats here - A. The beans that were in the barn are among them; they are tick beans; there were tick beans among them in the barn, and there are tick beans with these.

Mr. Pooley. Do you know that the prisoner was a lark catching - A. He was; his wife was gone to sell them he had catched the day before. After the prisoner was apprehended I took him before a magistrate; as we were going along he said he hoped I should not hurt him.

COURT. Now be correct - A. I said what shall I hurt you for, you said they were not my oats; he did say that when he first came into the house; we went into Mr. Fraser's, into the hall; the magistrate said West, I am sorry to see you here upon such an occasion; he asked him how he came to do it.

Q. Did not the magistrate say you had better tell us how you came to do it - A. No; he said if he had not been drunk he should not have done it, he hoped I would forgive him.

Mr. Pooley. Do you, Mr. Passingham, looking at them oats, believe them to be yours - A. Certainly; there are two bushels half cleaned, about five shillings value.

Q. Did he say when he took them - A. He acknowledged before Mr. Fraser that it was eleven o'clock at night when he took them, and that he got up between the barn door and the barn rack.

COURT. Nothing of this sort was taken in writing - A. Nothing taken in writing while I was present.

Q. When you got to Mr. Fraser's, Mr. Fraser never took pen or paper in his hands - A. No, not in my presence.

Q. You told the magistrate what was your charge against him - A. Yes.

Q. What did you tell the magistrate - A. I told him that my man told me that my barn was broken open.

Q. Did the man tell you that the barn was broken open - A. No, he told me that somebody had entered the barn door; the door was fast when he left it and when he came there in the morning.

Q. What did you tell the magistrate in the hearing of the prisoner - A. I charged him with stealing the oats, my barn was robbed and I found the oats on his premises: after I said this the high constable was examined; the prisoner confessed it.

Q. Now the prisoner confessed, it is a short receipt - was that the next thing that followed - did not the magistrate tell him it would be much better for him to give an account of it - A. The magistrate said if he did not steal the corn he had bought it under the value; he gave him an hour to go to the public house, and if he would own who he bought it of, it would be the better for him; that was not my corn. This is my corn.

Q. I know that is the corn you claim - what was the question the magistrate asked him - A. How he came by the oats and beans.

Q. Upon your oath, did not he tell him it would be better for him to tell him how he came by it, and he would give him an hour - A. No, he did not.

Q. How came you to tell me the magistrate said he had better tell, and he would give him an hour to go to the public house - what did the magistrate say to the prisoner, before he said any thing - A. He asked him how he came by the corn; the prisoner said he had not stole the corn from me, he had bought it of somebody else under the value.

Q. And this you call a confession - was the prisoner sent back to the public house - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say before he got to the public house - A. He got in between the rack and the barn door.

Q. Had not the magistrate told him before that it would be better for him to give an account of it - A. No.

JOHN FINAL COOK . Q. Did you go to Mr. Passingham's barn on the Friday - A. Yes; I saw there were oats scattered about in the barn.

Q. Did you trace the oats to the prisoner's house - A. No; I went to the prisoner's house, I found the oats in the fowl house, they were in a sack.

Q. How soon after you found the oats was the prisoner

apprehended - A. In the course of an hour or two. I saw him at his own cottage afterwards; the prisoner there said he came by them honestly. We went to Mr. Fraser's into the hall; Mr. Fraser came to us.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Fraser wrote any thing down - A. I do not think he did. Mr. Passingham told Mr. Fraser that he had found the oats, and that he was ready to swear that they were his property; he told me he was ready to swear they were his property; he told him he had found them in an outhouse at the back of the prisoner's cottage; Mr. Fraser said he was sorry to see him in that situation - West, how did you come by them; he said, sir, I will tell you the truth; I got up between the barn door and the rack and got in; I was drunk or else I should not have done it.

COURT. Do you mean to say that Mr. Fraser did not say it would be better for him to tell - do you mean to swear that - A. I do.

MR. PEARCE. I am a constable, I was with Mr. Cook. I have had the oats ever since; they are the same.

Q. Do you know what the prisoner is - A. A thresher, sometimes, a brick maker, and a lark catcher in snowy weather. When I went after him he was a lark catching then.

BENJAMIN SHEPHARD . I am bailiff to Mr. Passingham. I went with Mr. Passingham to his barn door, I saw a quantity of oats laying at the barn door; we traced these oats from the barn door all the way on the snow to the prisoner's door.

COURT On the Friday - A. Yes; the 23rd. I found no oats beyond the prisoner's door.

Jury. Did you find any beans among the oats in the track - A. Yes; one at the door. I saw the oats brought out of the fowl house.

Mr. Pooley. Is there the same proportion of beans among them as with those in the barn - A. Yes.

Q. As far as you can form your judgment are they of the same description - A. Yes; I am sure of it.

COURT. That question is not worth while asking, if they would not bring a sample from the heap in the barn for the jury to tell for themselves.

Q. Without any sample from the heap in your master's barn to compare that sack of oats with, would you venture to swear they are the same - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the public house after I came home from larking, I was in liquor; going home I picked up these oats in the road; I carried them to the fowl house; in the morning when I got up I found they were oats.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-71

159. EDWARD SEALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December, a cheese, value 12 s. the property of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a cheesemonger , No. 4, Lamb's Conduit passage . On the 3d of December, between seven and eight o'clock, from the information of some boys, I overtook the prisoner with a cheese under his arm in Harper street; I pursued him to Boswell court; he dropped the cheese in Harper street.

Q. Did you see him drop the cheese - A. No; a lad picked it up that is gone to sea. I saw him have the cheese, that was when I first saw him; when I laid hold of him I told him he had stole a cheese; he said nothing. The officer has had the cheese ever since; it weighed about eighteen pounds.

JAMES HENLEY . I was standing nearly opposite of Mr. Taylor's door, I saw the prisoner go in Mr. Taylor's shop first, take something out of the shop, I think it was a piece of cheese, he came out and gave what he had taken from the shop to another one; there were three standing at the door while he went in.

Q. Are you sure that you saw him take something from the shop - A. I am quite sure, and he handed something to one of the other three. The prisoner went into the shop again and took a whole cheese; then Sealy and two more went down Theobald's road, the other ran up Red Lion square, shaking his head at Smith, another boy, and me, we were standing together; we went and told Mr. Taylor, Mr. Taylor came with us and we shewed him the men; I saw him overtake the prisoner; the prisoner dropped the cheese in Harper street; I saw him drop it.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-72

160. JAMES BUNCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , eight gallons of yeast, value 12 s. the property of John Blackburn , Edward Gale Boldero , and Edward Biley .

HENRY PERKS I am in the employment of Messrs. John Blackburn , Edward Gale Boldero , and Edward Biley , they are brewer s in Bembridge street, St Giles's .

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge any thing to affect this man with stealing this eight gallons of yeast - A. I saw the prisoner coming from the premises with a load of yeast, it was in a tub of a conical figure.

Q. Did you speak to him - A. I did not; I followed him to Hanway street, there I met an object which led me to another channel, which was a man proceeding to the premises of Mr. Blackburn.

Q. It is the custom of your brewhouse to sell yeast - A. Not in st[Text unreadable in original.]m quantities, we do not sell less than thirty gallons; but we do not deny brewers smaller quantities.

Q. When did you see him next after this time - A. This was about five minutes past eight in the morning; I saw him in the evening of the same, I told him that I had seen him take a pail of yeast from our premises, which he assented to; I asked him how he came to take the yeast; he said he had some before from the same source; he is a servant to Satchell and co, brewers, Winsley's street; he said he had it for their use.

Q. You told me before that you had no objection to indulge brewers with a small quantity if they wanted it - A. If they applied for it in a proper way; in such cases they come openly and make application in the accompting house; the application would be made to me, I am the accompting house clerk; or to the brewer, William Roberts .

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You are first accounting house clerk - A. I am.

Q. And regularly, and treating you with respect and reverence, they ought to come into the accounting house and apply to you - A. Application ought to be made in the accounting house.

Q. No doubt of it - we do not try men for want of respect - did not he state to you that he had been there and bought it, and not for the advantage of himself, and that in broad day light - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-73

161. JAMES STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , seven gallons of yeast, value 10 s. the property of John Blackburn , Edward Gale Boldero , and Edward Biley .

HENRY PERKS . Q. Now tell us what you have to say respecting James Stone - A. I left the other prisoner when he was going to Hanway yard; I then saw Stone with two empty pails on his shoulder; I followed him to the back part of our premises, where the yeast was kept; he did not come on the premises, he merely deposited a pail on the premises where the yeast was kept, I believe; I did not stop to see; I went round to the front and concealed myself. In about twenty minutes I saw two of our servants fill a stand with yeast and heave it up to the loading place. I then saw our two men look very anxiously about them, and heard a signal given, when the loading place gates were opened sufficient to admit the body of a man; an empty pail was brought in by one of our servants.

Q. Where was the prisoner all this time - A. Walking outside of the premises. This pail was filled with yeast, and was then taken out and placed on the head of Stone; the other pail was outside of the gates. I immediately rushed from my hiding place, and took the prisoner Stone in custody; he requested me not to detain him, he would tell me where he lived if I would let him go; he said he paid our tunman for the yeast; the tunman immediately absconded, and has not been heard of since.

JURY. You know it is not uncommon for bakers, or any body else, to go to the tunmen and get a quantity of yeast without the knowledge of the owners - A. Not at our house.

Mr. Knapp. I will trouble you with a question or two - whereabouts is the value o A. I fancy ten shillings.

Q. For one pail of yeast! it must be a very large pail - you are first clerk to a very important concern - with respect of yeast are you competent to form a judgment what the value of a pail of yeast is - A. I do not precisely know it.

WILLIAM ROBBINS . Q. You are the chief brewer - do you know this Stone - A. I think I recollect him when I come to look at him - he said he paid three shillings for the yeast to one of the tunmen who is run away.

Q. Do you know that he was in the habit of coming to one of your tunmen to buy yeast - A. No, it was never allowed for any man to come and buy without applying to the accounting house.

Q. Is it allowed in other places for the tunmen to sell - A. I believe it is.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-74

162. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , two tons of potatoes, value 12 l. the property of William Windmill and Charles Frederick Townshend .

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

THOMAS GALL . I am a labourer to William Windmill and Charles Frederick Townshend . On the 4th of December the prisoner came to our warehouse, he asked me whether I had any champion potatoes to sell; I said yes, at six pounds a ton; he told me he wanted two tons; he walked into the accompting house, wrote down

"No. 3, Lower Chapman street, St. George's in the East, Davis." I was to deliver them the next morning; I could not write; I gave my master the order, he booked it, and made a bill and receipt.

Q. Your master put it down to this man's account in the book - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-75

163. MARY GRIMES, alias GRAHAM, alias BARRINGTON , was indicted, and the indictment stated that Thomas Roughton , deceased, was a soldier and subject of our Lord the King, and who had served on board the Eurus, and that certain prize money was due to him for services done on board the said ship, that she well knowing the premises, on the 11th of October, did appear in her proper person before the worshipful Charles Coote , doctor of laws, then surrogate to the right honourable Sir William Wynn , master keeper of the prerogative court of Canterbury, to obtain letters of administration for the goods and chattels of the said Thomas Roughton deceased, in order to obtain his prize money, that she unlawfully, knowingly and feloniously did take a false oath to the purport and effect following -

"that the said Thomas Rotton , meaning Thomas Roughton , died intestate, that she the said Margaret was the lawful widow and relict of the aforesaid Thomas Rotton , meaning the aforesaid Thomas Roughton" - whereas in truth and fact, she well knew that she was not the lawful widow and relict of the aforesaid Thomas Rotton, meaning the aforesaid Thomas Roughton , with intent to defraud the governors of Greenwich hospital .

ELEVEN OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ROBERT STEWARD . Q. Are you in the navy office - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in any department under Mr. Hinman - A. I am.

COURT. What department is that - A. It is called the ticket office.

Mr. Pooley. Have you the muster book of the ship Eurus for the year 1796 - A. Yes, I have it here.

Q. Can you tell whether there was any part of the 87th regiment on board that ship - A. Yes, it appears so by the muster book; the muster book is dated October and November, 1796; the name of Thomas Roughton is in this muster book as a private in the 87th regiment, but supernumerary; he was on board from the 15th of October till the 11th of November.

Q. Have you among the supernumeraries in that book more than one person of the name of Roughton - A. No.

COURT. You have examined it with that - have you any other spelt so as to sound like it - A. No; I have looked through the list, I saw no name similar to Roughton, none to resemble it in sound.

Q. Of course there is no person found on the book

of the name of Thomas Rotton - A. None; nor is there a seaman of the name of Rotton.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS . Q. I believe you are clerk in the commissary office of muster's - A. I am.

Q. Have you the muster rolls of the 87th regiment from 1796 to 1800 - A. I have.

Q. How early have you the name of Thomas Roughton , a private in that regiment - A. I find that he was received from the 56th regiment into the 87th on the 11th of September, 1796.

COURT. How is it spelt - A. Roughton.

Mr. Gurney. How long did he continue to be a private on the muster rolls - A. From 1796 till July the 19th, 1800; then he was promoted to a corporal in major Butler's company; he appears to be a corporal from July, 1800, to the 15th of December, when it appears he died on December 15th, 1800.

Q. Is there any other name in that company resembling Roughton or Rotton - A. Not any that appears to be like it in sound in the regiment.

Q. Where is that muster roll dated - A. The muster roll is not dated; the regiment at that time was not in Europe, it was serving abroad.

EDWARD BATE , ESQ. Q. I believe you are deputy treasurer of Greenwich hospital - A. I am.

Q. Have you any account returned to you of the prizes taken by the Eurus frigate, taken from October, 1796 - A. I have; I received that prize list from the deputy agent, Mr. Allen.

Q. Is that returned by the agent as a document under the act of parliament - A. It is.

Q. Is that the official document of the prizes paid, and the money remaining in his hands - A. It is.

Q. Is that the documents by which you have paid some persons who have made claim to you, which has not been paid by the agents - A. It is.

Q. I will thank you to look at that account, and tell me whether you find any supernumerary of the name of Thomas Roughton - A. I do.

Q. What sum of money does it appear that he would be entitled to if living, or his representative if dead - A. Twenty four pounds one shilling and six pence.

Q. Therefore if he had been living and had come to the hospital and applied, you would have paid him that twenty four pounds one shillings and six pence - A. Certainly.

Q. He being dead, should you have paid that money if there appeared to be his executor or administrator - A. Surely.

Q. Who is the person who would be applied to for granting the check upon you for paying the money - A. The clerk of the check office, Mr. Smith.

Q. Any person claiming would apply to the clerk of the check office, he making out the check to you, and they presenting it to, you would have paid it - A. Certainly, upon their producing that document.

COURT. Was that sum more than one prize or one prize - A. One prize; a Dutch ship, captured on the 30th of October, 1796; the Waterland Walford, a Dutch prize.

MR. SMITH. Q. I believe you are the clerk of the check office, Greenwich hospital - A. I am.

Q. You are the person in that hospital who would be applied to by any person claiming prize money - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. I do, very well. On the 8th of October the prisoner applied to me at my office, Greenwich hospital; she stated that she had come to enquire for some prize money due to her late husband; I asked her husband's name; she said Thomas Rotton . it was so pronounced, I could take it for Roughton as well as Rotton; she said he was a soldier in the 87th regiment, in major White's company, and that he had been serving in the Eurus frigate, or that he was on board the Eurus frigate. I then looked at the prize list, the same that has been just now produced; upon the prize list I found the name of Thomas Roughton , and the sum of twenty four pounds one shilling and six pence was due to him; I then told her that if she was really the widow of Thomas Roughton , there was that sum due, but as there was a difference in the spelling of the name by the sound, I asked her how she spelt the name; she pronounced it Rotton, and the name was spelt Roughton; she said she could not read; it was Rotton or Roughton, she could not spell; according to their method of pronouncing it, it was Rotton. I then asked her what document she had to prove that she was the widow of this man; she produced this certificate, it purports to be a certificate from John Douglas , the minister of Dumfries; I am sure it is the same; I marked the date when it was produced, and my initials at the bottom.

(The certificate read.)

"Page 21, 680. Thomas Rotton and Margaret Wilson were married in the parish church of Dumfries in the year 1791, as appears by the register book of the said parish, signed, John Douglas , minister, and John Campbell , parish clerk." - Besides that certificate she produced a letter that she said she had received from her husband a little before he left England; I had but a little time to spare; it was a long letter, I did not take any particular notice of it. I then told her that the hospital had been defrauded by several persons of that prize money.

COURT. You did not keep that letter - A. No, I did not keep either; I only marked that certificate with my initials, and the date, I gave it her again; I am sure that is the same certificate. I told her the hospital had been defrauded by several persons of that prize money.

Mr. Knapp. Alluding to the ship Eurus at that time - A. Yes, that was the only ship in question. In consequence of that I must have same reference that I might enquire as to her identity before I could cause any money to be paid, and that she must take out letters of administration: I would in the mean time make the necessary enquiries. I then asked her where she was born, she said in New street in Dumfries, her maiden name was Wilson, and her mother Mary Wilson lived in New street, at that time she was speaking of, at John Campbell 's, he kept a chandler's shop there, and that she had a son, James Rotton , living at his grandmother's at Dumfries, and that she also had a sister named Mary Wilson , who lived at Dumfries, at the house of Robert Gilmore ; I told her if she was correct and certain that she was the widow of Thomas Roughton , she must go to the proctor's and take out the letter of administration; she then said she did not know any proctor. I therefore wrote a direction to Mr. Ward, and as Mr. Ward had made out letters of administration for some other persons who had defrauded

the hospital before, and which persons had been convicted. I wrote at the bottom of the paper -

"This is one of the fatal Eurus." - in order that he might be more particular. The woman went away then. I think on the 13th of October I received this letter and administration by the post; this is the letter of administration, and this the letter in which they were enclosed; the letter is directed to me at my house, by the post. On the 14th of October the prisoner came again. When she came again I told her that I had got the letter of administration, but still I could not pay her until I had got an answer from Dumfries, where I had written to enquire whether her statement was true; she then went away, and came again the 26th of October. Still I had received no letter. I told her so. She came again the 19th of November. I told her when she was down on the 26th of October I would write again, and I did write again. On the 19th of November I had not received any letter; she pleaded very strongly to be paid the money, as she was in great distress, and as I still told her I had not heard from Dumfries, she produced this letter, which she said she had received from her sister at Dumfries; the letter is dated the 2nd of November 1808, from Dumfries. Upon my looking at the letter I told her it appeared to have the twopenny post mark, not the general post; she said to save postage a person had brought it up and put it in the post at London. I told her the production of this letter, so far from inducing me to pay, confirmed me that she was an impostor; I told her from the circumstance of the letter coming this suspicious way, by the twopenny post; she protested that she was innocent. I told her that if she was, she might come again the middle of next week, and if she was not sure that she was the person that she had stated, she had better not come again. On the Monday following, which was the 19th of November - I must have made a mistake with respect to the date of her last coming, it was the 19th that I received the letter - she came on the Saturday the preceding, that it must be the 17th that she applied, and then it was that she produced the letter.

COURT. You said she came on the 19th - A. It was the 17th. On Monday the 19th of November I received this letter from the reverend Mr. Scot, one of the ministers of Dumfries.

COURT. That we cannot read - A. On the 25th of November she came again. I then told her that I had now proof of her being an impostor. My lord, if you would permit me, I was correct that she came on the 19th. On the 25th she came again; I told her I was confident that she was an impostor. I sent for Mr. Marter, the solicitor of the hospital, and after asking her several questions, Mr. Marter said we must send for an officer, which was done. She said she had three children, she said the youngest was six years old; I asked her how that could be, when she stated her husband had been dead nine years; she said, to tell the truth, she had been married again, about six years ago, to one Grimes, she was married at Dumfries by a Roman Catholic clergyman, his name was Peter Regan , and that she was married in a Roman Catholic chapel, her husband Grimes was a weaver, and that he died at Dumfries about three years ago; that she left Dumfries about two years ago; at the time she left Dumfries the reverend Mr. Douglas, who married her to her former husband, was living; she said that her former husband Rotton was born at Anan. After this she was taken to Bow street; she was there committed for farther examination that night. On the 25th I think she was brought up again; she then sent a message to me that she wished to speak to me before she went to the magistrate. I received the message from Adkins the officer. I went to her where the was, in the office, in the outer room, or the passage leading to it; she then stated to me that she was never married to Rotton, she asked me to forgive her; I told her it was perfectly out of my power, it was in the hands of the magistrate.

Q. Was this perfectly voluntary - A. It was perfectly voluntary. I never asked her any questions; she said she was never married to Rotton, she was not born in Dumfries, nor never had been there; on the contrary, that she was born in the north of Ireland, but that her mother was born at Dumfries, and that it was from her she had learned what she knew of Dumfries. I then asked her how she could take upon herself to endeavour to defraud the hospital; she said she had been led into it by two men named Vaughan and and Knight; I then told her they could not have led her into it at this time, as the former had been hanged and the latter had been transported nearly two years ago; she said it was on account of owing her landlady some money, who pressed very hard for payment, and she took this means for obtaining money to pay her.

COURT. Of course you apprehended it to be the same person - though the name may not be spelt quite right, you pay them - A. Yes.

JOHN PRIOR WARD . I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Pointer , a clerk in Doctors' Commons.

Q. On the 10th of October last did the prisoner apply to you - A. She did, at my office, in Godliman street in Doctors' Commons . When she first came into the office, she said she believed she was right, but she was not positive; that she had a note from a gentleman at Greenwich hospital, which she had lost; I asked her if it was from a Mr. Smith at the check office; she said she believed that was the name, that he had recommended her to obtain letters of administration for her, or to obtain administration, that her husband was on board the Eurus when they captured the prize, that the gentlemen told her I was wholly acquainted what was necessary to be done. I observed to her I hoped she was right, for there had been already one person hung, and several others convicted for obtaining money from the same ship, the Eurus; she assured me she was right, and produced a letter to me. I returned the letter to her.

WILLIAM ADKINS . Q. Did you at any time serve a notice on the prisoner - A. I served a copy of this notice on the prisoner last night, between eight and nine o'clock. (The notice read.)

Mr. Ward. I read the letter; it was addressed to Mrs. Margaret Rotton , and signed Thomas Rotton .

Mr. Pooley. You did not keep any copy of it - A. I did not. The letter stated, to the best of my recollect, that the writer Thomas Rotton was upon the point of sailing, and the latter part of the letter referred to another person on board, whose name I do not recollect; the prisoner observed that the other person was her brother, and that he was also entitled to the prize money; I asked her if he was also dead; she replied that he was; I asked her several other questions, the

purport of which her answer was, that her brother died a bachelor, and that he was without a father when he died; she wished to know if she could not also administer to him; I asked if he had left any mother alive; she said that when she left Dumfries, I think she stated about thirteen months back, her mother was then alive; in that case, I answered, it was her mother was to administer, not herself, but her mother might either renounce or give a power of attorney to act for her. After some conversation I told her it was necessary she should have a bondsman, and that if she would attend at the office to-morrow morning by ten o'clock, accompanied by a bondsman, I would prepare the necessary instrument ready for it; she told me that she had no money to pay for the administration, but if I would send it to Mr. Smith he would deduct the charges. On the next morning, at the appointed time, or nearly so, she came, accompanied by her bondsman; I then stated to her the purport of the oath that she was to take, and accompanied her to Dr. Coote's chambers, and there administered to her the usual oath taken by widows to obtain letters of administration of their husbands in the presence of Dr. Coote; the purport of the oath is -

"you do swear that you believe that Thomas Rotton died intestate, that you are his lawful widow and relict, that you will faithfully administer his goods by payment of his debts, and making distribution according to law, that you will exhibit a true inventory, and render a just account, if by law required, and that the personal property of the deceased does not amount to the value of forty pounds, so help your God." I then accompanied her and her bondsman into the perogative office, where they entered into the usual bond; we then came from the office into the street; she did not return to my office again; I promised to send her the administration by Mr. Smith in the course of a few days, and she might call on him on the Saturday. This was on the Tuesday that she was sworn.

Q. Before you have letters of administration you have a warrant made out - A. Yes; that warrant was made out by her instructions; this is the warrant, it is my hand writing; it is written from her instructions and from the letter she produced to me. (The warrant read.)

"11th of October, 1808. Appeared personally Margaret Rotten, widow, and alledged that Thomas Rotton , late a private in his Majesty's 87th regiment of foot on board the Eurus frigate, died in the West Indies, in the year 1797; that she is the lawful widow of the said deceased, whereof she begs letters of administration of all the goods and chattels, upon giving the usual security; the said Margaret Rotton widow, having been duly sworn, and that the property of she deceased does not amount to the sum of forty pounds; before me C. Coote.

Q. What is Dr. Coote - A. He is the surrogate to Sir William Wynne , knt. doctor of laws; Sir William Wynne is master keeper of the consistory of the prerogative court of Canterbury, lawfully instituted.

Q. Dr. Coote is doctor of laws - A. He is reputed as such, and acts as such. This letter of administration was issued, and which I sent to Mr. Smith; I know them by my hand writing, and this is the letter in which it was enclosed.

Q. Have you any doubt of the prisoner at the bar being the person - A. Not the least.

DR. COOTE. Q. What is your name - A. Charles Coote.

Q. Are you doctor of laws - A. Yes.

Q. What office have you in the commons - A. I am surrogate of the prerogative court.

Q. Who is the judge of the prerogative court - A. Sir William Wynne .

Q. Have you power to administer oaths - A. I have, and of granting letters of administration.

Q. You are a surrogate of that court - A. Yes; I administer oaths by that authority.

COURT to Ward. In stating the letter which was produced to you, you have not stated what was the date of that letter - A. I think to the best of my recollection it was 1795 or 1796; it was a letter of an old date.

Q. You have not stated in what terms it was written - A. It was written as from husband to wife; she was described as his wife in the letter.

Q. Why did not you mention that before - A. I might not have recollected that before; I am certain of the circumstance; she was described as his wife; it began my dear Margaret; she said it was from her husband.

Q. Were the words in the letter he calling her his wife, you cannot state that - A. No. It was a letter as from the husband to the wife, it appeared to me to be a letter that came from a sea port town; I think it was ship letter upon it, there was some post upon it; I had no idea at the time of being called upon.

Q. The administration, and the warrant for administration, stated that he died in the West Indies in year 1797 - A. She stated that her legal husband died about a twelvemonth after the letter.

Q. Which letter you recollect to be dated in the year 1795 or 96; you have put it down died in the West Indies, 1797 - A. Yes; that was from the information I received from her. (The administration read.)

WILLIAM ADKINS . Q. You are an officer of Bow street - A. Yes. The prisoner was brought to me at the office.

Q. Did you and your brother Harry search her lodgings - A. Yes, at No. 8, Eglin's court, Tooley street; the house was kept by Mrs. Flinn.

Q. Were you present when the pocket book was found - A. No; my brother gave it me.

HARRY ADKINS . Q. Were you and your brother at the search at these lodgings on the 29th of November - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any pocket book in these lodgings - A. Yes, in the cupboard near the door, in the kitchen. I gave that pocket book to my brother in the same state as I found it, and the same contents.

Q. to William Adkins . Is that the pocket-book that you received from your brother - A. Yes.

Q. Were the papers which are now in it, were they in it when he gave it you - A. Yes.

Q. On the 6th of December last, when the prisoner was at Bow street, did you produce the pocket book to her - A. I produced it to her as we were coming from the House of Correction, on Tuesday the 29th of November.

COURT. Then the same morning it was delivered to you you brought the prisoner from the House of Correction to Bow street - A. Yes; and I produced it to her soon after she got into the coach; I took out the pocket book, I asked her if this was her pocket book; she said

it was.

Q. Was there any certificate in it - A. There were seven; she said she had them from that unfortunate man, Vaughan; that he could write different hands, and that he had written them all; she said it was Vaughan and Knight that had been the cause of her doing this.

Mr. Gurney. Give us as near as you can the expression that she used - A. She said it was Vaughan and Knight had been the cause of her going down to Greenwich; that she would not have gone there but she owed some money to her landlady, Mrs. Flinn, and her landlady pushed her very hard for the money. She begged very much that I would let her see Mr. Smith before she went before the magistrate, that she would tell him the whole truth about this unfortunate business; I promised her that she should see Mr. Smith before she went before the magistrate. I then asked her if she had ever been married to a man of the name of Rotton; she said no, she never had.

Q. Has the pocket book and the inclosures been in your possession ever since - A. Yes; they have my initials on them. (The certificates read.)

MARY FLINN . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. I live at No. 8, Eglin's Gateway, Tooley street.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge with you at the time she went to Greenwich - A. Yes, she lodged with me at the time she went to Greenwich, and at the time she was taken up.

Q. How long had she lodged with you before she was taken up - A. I believe close upon two months.

Q. You had known her before that - A. Yes; I first knew her in May.

Q. What name did she go by when she lodged with you - A. By the name of Grimes; she had a little boy that went by the name of Tommy Grimes with her, that passed for her child; she was married when she lived in my house to one Joseph Barrington .

Q. At the time she was taken up she went by the name of Barrington - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever know her by any other name but Barrington and Grimes - A. No.

Q. Did you ever hear her called by the name of Rotton or Roughton - A. No, I did not; I took her to be a very honest woman.

ELIZABETH LAMBERT . Q. Did you at any time lodge at Mrs. Flinn's house - A. I did, about seven weeks; I went to lodge there the night before Mrs. Grimes came there.

Q. When she came there the next day did she bring any family with her - A. Only a child.

Q. When she came there what name did she go by - A. Mrs. Grimes; the child went by the name of Tommy Grimes .

Q. Was she married while you lodged there - A. No; I never knew her by any other name than Grimes; afterwards she was married to a man of the name of Barrington.

COURT. There was no man of the name of Grimes lodged with her - A. No, nor no one else, untill she was married to Barrington.

THOMAS CHARLTON . Q. You belong to the commons - A. I do; I am one of the registering clerks.

Q. Do you produce any warrant from there - A. I do; I am the subscribing witness.

Mr. Ward. This is the bond subscribed by me.

THOMAS CHARLES BURT . Q. Have you been lately down to Dumfries in Scotland - A. I have; I returned last Monday; I was there the week before last.

Q. Did you search to find such a street as New street - A. I did: I could not find any such street. There was one man that said there was one street called New street about twenty years ago, and this street was in the recollection of one person only.

Q. Did you search for any street called Broad street - A. I did; I made diligent search and could no such street; I should state that the names are not written up. I could only know by enquiring; I took some of the oldest and most intelligible inhabitants, and made the best inquiries I could to ascertain the fact.

Q. When you enquired for Broad street, did you enquire for any such person as James Johnson - A. I did; I could not hear of any such person as James Johnson .

Q. Could you find any such person as Mary Wilson - A. I could not.

Q. Did you enquire for a boy of the name of James Rotton - A. Yes, I enquired for James Rotton the son; I enquired for Thomas Rotton the father; I could find no such person as James nor Thomas, nor of their ever having been in Dumfries; the name was not known in Dumfries.

Q. Did you examine the register of marriages - A. I examined the book which they call the banns being published; I went to Mr. Scot, the minister, and requested to search the register of marriages of the church of Dumfries; I was told that they kept no register of marriages; but it was a register of the publication of banns; I examined that register for twenty five years back; as far back as 1785; I could find no such banns being published as that of Thomas Rotton and Margaret Wilson ; nor could I find the name of Rotton in the book.

Q. Did you enquire for a minister of the name of Douglas, of the same place - A. I did; I could hear of no such minister, and indeed it was impossible there could be, for I found in Scotland common people were familiar with the names of their ministers; from the restoration back to the present time I could not find such a name there.

Q. Did you enquire for any person of the name of John Campbell , parish clerk - A. I did, and could find no such person; they have no such thing as a parish clerk; the only person that I met with of the name of Campbell, was Charles Campbell , and he was the only man of that name that had been in the place for many years; I asked him if he had such a name as Wilson lodging with him; he said no.

Q. Did you enquire for any Roman Catholic priest of the name of Peter Ragan - A. I did, I could not find him; I enquired if there was any Roman Catholic chapel at that place; I could hear of none; I found a Roman Catholic priest of the name of Piper there; I asked him if he had known the name; he said he did not; if there had been a person of that name he must have known him, he was familiar with all of that persuasion there.

Q. Did you go to Anan to search any register - A. I did; I searched the register of baptisms for the name of Thomas Rotton , I could find none; I began in the year 1735, down to 1806. I think it right to state that

the registers of Scotland are very little to be depended on, certainly.

Prisoner's Defence. I will tell you the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, if I was dying, and going into eternity in ten minutes. This Thomas Rotton was my lawful husband; he belonged to his Majesty's 87th regiment of foot, under the command of colonel Doyle, in captain White's company, he belonged to, which in my letter he directed to me; the last letter I had from him was from Chatham, where they embarked to go abroad to the West Indies. Mr. Ward and Mr. Smith, read this letter; it was as loving a letter as ever a man could send to his wife and children. After he was at sea a few months he died, when, I cannot say; I believe, to the best of my knowledge, it is twelve years ago since he died; I cannot say exactly to the time. A letter was sent to let me know of his death; I did not receive it. A man of the name of Kelly, who was in the same company with my husband, he wrote home to his own friends for them to let me know that my husband died such a time in the West Indies; the exact time I cannot recollect, it being so long ago. Upon which, after some time, two or three years, I married a man of the name of Grimes, and after that, it was my misfortune he died; I was left a widow; misfortunes have been against me every way, and after I came to London, I may say to my misfortune, about two years and a half ago, not knowing any money was due to me until such time I came here, I, one day, shortly after I came here, met with a man belonging to the same regiment as my husband did; his name was Joseph Knight , he belonged to the same company as my husband did; I heard him mention this regiment, I was in his company at the time, I was at the same table, me and another woman. This man came in and two more; they had got a pot of beer at the table; I heard them talk about this regiment; I asked the man if he belonged to that regiment; he said yes; I asked him if he knew such a man as Thomas Rotton ; he said he did, he said that man belonged to the same company with himself; I told him that was my husband; he said he knew that man very well; then, my lord, he asked me how long I had been here; I believe I had been a month in London at the time; he asked me if I had received so and so prize money that was due to my husband; I told him I did not know there was any thing coming to him, I had not received any; then he told me there was such and such prize money due to my husband, and to be paid by Mr. Smith, of Greenwich; he told me it ought to be due to me; he knew my husband died before he received the prize money, that he thought, as I was his wife, I was the proper person to receive any thing that was due to him. He told me all about it, where it was to be paid and at what office; he put the question to me if I had got my marriage certificate; I told him I had not, I had had it, but I had the misfortune to lose it. This Knight told me that he knew a man that had been some kind of an attorney; he would get me to this man and he would put me in the way to get the money; I told him if he would I should be very much obliged to him. Of course I was in a strange country, it was all that was due to me. Accordingly he brought a man to his own apartment, the man called James Vaughan ; I told him all about my husband, and about my certificate being lost, that I had from the proper person that did marry me; he told me that this man would write me out a certificate, as I had lost the other. I will tell the truth before God, and all the people that are looking on me here. So accordingly he wrote out this certificate; I was ignorant and simple, I knew nothing of the consequence of it, and I do own, through distress, I applied for the money, I thought it was my property by right. That I had the papers that is laid to my charge, the papers that were found in my pocket book, I am as innocent of them papers as a child unborn. I can neither read nor write; I did not know the contents of them; they were given to me, and I kept them unfortunately.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18090111-76

164. SAMUEL GARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , a net, value 30 s. the property of James Lhonne .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JAMES LHONNE . I live in Hackney road . On the 12th or 13th of March I lost a net that covered my tulip bed, about seven yards by five; it was taken out of my garden; it might be worth thirty or forty shillings.

Q. Have you seen it since - A. I saw it early in this month at the prisoner's house; he lives in Turk street, Bethnal Green. I knew it to be mine.

Q. Had Moore been employed about your house shortly before the 3d of January - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Moore left you about eight or nine months ago - A. I believe he left me a week before last Christmas.

COURT. Did not Moore live in your service at the time you actually lost the net - A. No; I had the net when Moore was in my service; I believe he left me two or three months; it was last March 1808 I lost the net.

Mr. Gurney. Moore called upon you again to get into your service on the 3d of January, and then he gave you the information - A. Yes.

Q. Then he told you that he found some netting at the house of Garrett - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any reason to know that that honest Moore had a key of your garden gate - A. I have heard he had.

Q. Had you the misfortune for any person to escape while Moore was keeper - A. I had.

THOMAS MOORE . Q. We understand you formerly was in the service of the prosecutor - A. Yes; I left his service last Christmas was a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I lodged with him last March. I then saw some netting in his possession laying on the floor.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner about it - A. No, I only saw the netting for a minute or two; we spoke about it on the Wednesday following that I saw it; I asked him whether it came from Mr. Lhonne's. I knew that Mr. Lhonne had lost a net that covered his tulips; he told me he had been in Mr. Lhonne's garden, he had great difficulty in getting over the garden wall.

Q. Did you ever communicate this to your former master - A. I returned from the country the week before last Christmas; I then went and told Mr. Lhonne the circumstance.

COURT. Can you write - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. If one wants to know where an honest

servant lives, we shall know where to find you - where do you live - A. In Phip street, Holywell mount.

Q. In March you saw this net - have you not been working for Mr. Duffy in Finsbury square - A. Yes.

Q. He is the master with whom the prisoner works - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Duffy lately discharged you - A. Yes.

Q. At the prisoner's instance - A. I do not know that it was.

Q. How soon after Mr. Duffy discharged you, did you make this charge against the prisoner - A. About a week.

Q. How far did you go in the country last month - A. Into Northamptonshire.

Q. You told my lord you could write - then from last March down to the 3d of January you never told Mr. Lhonne - A. I could not while I was in the country; I dare say I should have told him if I had not been going in the country.

Q. Why did not you write so soon as you got down - A. I do not know that I had any particular reason.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-77

165. CHARLES WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January a silver watch, value 2 l. 10 s. a seal, value 6 d. a chain, value 1 s. and a key, value 1 d. the property of Hans Neeson .

HANS NEESON . I am a sailor . On the 5th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner and I were in a cook's shop.

Q. Had you a watch, chain, and seal, when you went into this cook's shop - A. I had. The prisoner went by the name of Bateman then; he goes by the name of Wilson now. I had the watch in my hand as I was going out of the back door; the prisoner took hold of my hand, and said let me keep your watch, you may lose it going along; I let him have it, I did not suppose he would run away with it; then I went into the back yard.

Q. Had this man been in your company - A. Yes, for two or three days; we were to sail together from this country; I was in the back yard four or five minutes; a man called to me and said the prisoner is gone away with your watch; we searched for the prisoner and could not find him. I have since seen the watch.

Q. Did you give him the watch to do as he pleased with it - A. No, I let him have it to take care of it.

ANN HEWITSON . I keep the Ship and Shears, Lower Shadwell. On the 5th of January, about half past ten o'clock, the prisoner came into my house, apparently very much in liquor; he asked me if he could sleep there as usual; I told him he could have the same bed he had before, he then took out a watch from his pocket, begging me to take care of it for him; he left it in my care till the officer had it, he said he gave five guineas for it; he then told me he had no money, to keep the watch until he got a ship, the captain would pay me; the sum was two pounds five shillings that I had let him run up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been to sea twenty one years. I never have been guilty of any action of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-78

166. JOHN HOSIER was indicted for that he on the 27th of January was clerk to George Lyne and Alexander Donaldson , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for them on their account, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 25 l. 5 s. 6 d. and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did steal and secrete 10 l. part of the said sum .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

MR. DUZADO. Q. On the 27th of January last, 1808, did you pay any money to the prisoner on account of Messrs. Lyne and Donaldson - A. I paid the prisoner a check for 25 l. 5 s. 6 d. dated 26th of January 1808; that is the check; I paid it on account of Messrs. Lyne and Donaldson, and this is the receipt. I cannot swear to the man; the receipt was written in my presence.

(The receipt read)

January, 27, 1809.

LYNE AND CO. Received twenty five pounds five shillings and sixpence.

Received for Lyne and co. Signed, JOHN HOSIER .

25. 5 s. 6 d.

ALEXANDER DONALDSON . My partner's name is George Lyne ; we are taylor s,

Q. In the month of January last, and some time before, the prisoner, I believe, was in your employ as a clerk - A. He was, six years last July.

Q. Was he employed and entrusted by you to receive money on your account - A. He was; I placed a deal of confidence in him as an honest man; that receipt is his own hand writing that Mr. Duzado produced.

Q. Is this the book that he made the entry first - A. This is the rough entry book kept by the prisoner entirely.

Q. Does he also make an entry in the cash book - A. He makes the entry there also; but that is Mr. Lyne's department; there is a letter B. that is Mr. Lyne's writing.

Q. The entry respecting Mr. Duzado is the prisoner's hand writing - A. It is.

Q. Look at that book, which is the entry of the ledger after the entry of Mr. Duzado - A. There is a B. Duzado twenty five pounds five shillings and sixpence, as a debt; 48 as the page of the ledger, in the prisoner's hand writing; 27th January, 1808, that signifies it to be paid on that day.

Q. Did the prisoner ever account to you any other way than in his rough entry book - A. In the cash book he accompted to Mr. Lyne; if I received money I always gave it to him, and he was to accompt to Mr. Lyne.

Q. Did you ever receive the money of him of Mr. Duzado's - A. He never paid it to me.

Mr. Alley. His duty was to receive money of a variety of people and to keep it till he took it to the bankers - A. Yes.

Q. His way of accompting himself was, by stating it in the book, and whenever he had a large sum to carry it to the bankers - A. Whenever Mr. Lyne ordered him to carry it.

GEORGE LYNE . Q. You are also partner in this house, we understand - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner we are told kept the cash book - A. Yes.

Q. When he had received money he was to enter it into the rough entry book, then in the cash book - when he accompted to you in the cash book did you

compare the sums in that cash book with any thing else - A. They were posted in the ledger; we have another clerk here that posted it in the ledger, and I made a signature here that it was right; I compared this entry with the entry in the ledger, I found it was right; then I put a letter B. to denote that they corresponded.

COURT. If it was found right with the cash book, then you put the letter B. to denote that it was right - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Does it correspond now - A. No, the entry in the ledger is twenty five pounds five shillings and sixpence.

Q. At the time that you wrote that letter B. page 48, the accompt in the cash book was the same as in the ledger - A. Yes; it is now only fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence; the one before the five appears to be upon an erasure, and in the rough entry book it now stands fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence, and that one appears to be upon an erasure similar to the other; the prisoner accompted for money that he received in that cash book.

Q. Take that cash book in you hand and tell me how much he has accompted to you for, as paid by Duzado - A. It appears only fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence, and casted up only as fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence, and paid into the hands of the bankers as fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence; it is fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence in the bankers book.

Q. Have you made the alterations in these books from twenty five to fifteen - A. I have not; I believe it to be his hand writing.

Q. By the entry being made as they are now, without some suspicion arising, you would not have found it out - A. I do not think I should; it would not have been detected unless we had refered to the ledger. He remained in my service till the 5th of November; on the morning of the 6th of November, I received that letter. (The letter read.)

Addressed to Mr. Lyne, Cecil street, Strand ; dated the 6th of November, 1808. Signed, John Hosier . Hockley street, Lambeth.

"SIR, I am extremely sorry that a very sudden circumstance has compelled me to solicit leave of absence for a few days; namely, my father in the country, is at the point of death; a friend of his has just this moment arrived in town for me; I would have come to Norwood, but the time is not allowed me; I told him it was impossible for me to go, without he was in great danger, which I understand is the case; he is likely to die without a will; I hope to be in time to prevent it; I had not the smallest knowledge of it before twelve o'clock this day. On Wednesday, or Thursday. next I hope to be in London again, perhaps before, I will not stay any longer; if I am not with him before his departure I shall not forgive myself; I have sent you a letter from my mother enclosed in this. In all probability it will at least be an hundred pounds in my pocket, which will be of great service to my little family."

Q. This satisfied you on account of his absence - A. Yes; this is the letter that was enclosed in it, which purports to be a letter from his mother. Addressed to John Hosier , Hockley street, Lambeth.

"DEAR SON, I am exceeding sorry to write this unpleasant news; your father is dangerously ill; he is desirous of seeing you immediately; Nancy, I suppose will not be able to leave her family, Your brother and sister are well, as are all friends in the country; I have a great deal more to say, but you must anticipate the prevention.

Your affectionate mother. A. HOSIER."

Mr. Lyne. In a few days I received this letter, Addressed to Mr. Lyne, Cecil street, Strand; Dated 9th of November, 1808, signed, John Hosier , Bridgwater.

" SIR, A friend who is going hence will have the goodness to hand this to you, the purport of which, is to crave your indulgence till Monday next, as my father is dangerously ill, and we expect every moment to be the last; I also take the liberty to inform you that I have left my wife without money, and if you will advance her a pound or two if she wants it, perhaps she will sooner do that than ask Mr. Hosier for it.

I am, sir, your most obedient humble servant, JOHN HOSIER ."

Mr. Gurney. How soon did you conceive a suspicion to look after him - A. I believe it was upwards of a fortnight. I traced him to Plymouth, there I found him at a public house at dinner, on the 5th or 6th of December; I found him in company with some passengers that were going to Philadelphia with him.

Q. Where did you find his baggage - A. On board the Volunteer, bound to Philadelphia; I brought him to town, and he was committed to trial.

Q. After he was in town did he send you that letter - A. He did.

Q. Before that had you made any promise to him - A. No.

Dated, 12th of December, 1808, Addressed to Mr. Lyne.

"MY DEAR SIR, Grant me pardon for the liberty. I have not had an opportunity of communicating to you alone; I am satisfied there are deficiencies in my accounts: the handsome manner you have behaved to me since I have been in your possession, compels me to be candid; the losses shall be restored; you mention the banker's book being the same. Let me see you before I go over to my examination.

I am, sir, your humble servant, JOHN HOSIER ."

MR. GOSS. Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Lyne and Donaldson - A. I am.

Q. Look at the ledger, 48, B - is there any charge there made to Mr. Duzado - A. There is twenty five pounds five shillings and six pence, as money paid; I copied it from the entry in the cash book; the cash book is now altered, it stands fifteen pounds five shillings and sixpence; when I copied it, it was twenty pounds five shillings and six pence; it has been altered since; it was posted about a month after it was received.

Q. Has that alteration in the cash book been done by you - A. It certainly has not.

Q. Was the original entry in the prisoner's hand writing - A. It was.

Q. Have you any belief that the figure one is his hand writing - A. I cannot say that I have, it is so simple a thing, merely making a stroke.

Q. Were there any other clerk besides him and you - A. No.

Q. to Mr. Donaldson. The rough entry book, have

you altered that - A. I have not. The whole of the rough entry is in the prisoner's hand writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry to be in so disgraceful a situation, of which I am innocent; I should have supposed that I was the last person in the world to be brought here by them; I was subject to their commands every hour. I admit I wrote the letters which have been read; it was done in consequence of the honour and the respectability of my family.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-79

167. JAMES HOWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , two iron anchors, value 30 s. the property of John Mills .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a servant to Mr. Mills; he is a lighterman .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, as a neighbour, Three Colt street, Limehouse.

Q. Did you miss any anchors from your master's barges - A. I heard they were gone, they were taken out of the barges laying at Bow creek . On the 27th or 28th of December last, as I was going by Mr. Wright's yard, I saw one of the anchors in the yard; it belonged to the barge Debought; it had been stolen some days; when I saw it I saw a second anchor laying in the shop; they were both belonging to Mr. Mills.

Q. What is Mr. Wright - A. He is an anchor smith. I told Mr. Wright I knew them to be my master's; he would not deliver them up; I went to Mr. Mills, and after going to Mr. Wright's a second time, I went to Shadwell office; Partridge the officer went with me to Mr. Wright's; I gave the anchors in charge of the officer; Mr. Wright and the anchors were taken to the magistrate.

Q. Are you quite sure that these two anchors belonged to Mr. Mills - A. I am quite sure of one, the second anchor; the other I believe to be Mr. Mills's.

WILLIAM COPE . Q. Do you know the other anchor, the Debought's anchor - A. Yes. I am a servant of Mr. Mills's; I worked in the barge; it was lost from the Debought on the 22nd of September, I missed it on the 23rd.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . Q. I am an officer. On the 28th of December I went to Mr. Wright's, in company with Hewit and Martin. On Mr. Wright's premises, there was one anchor lying in the yard, and one in the shop; I took the anchors and Mr. Wright to Shadwell office. The same day I went back to Mr. Wright's, there I found the prisoner, I took him to the office; he was committed for re-examination, and Mr. Wright was admitted as an evidence. I have had the anchors ever since in my possession.

WILLIAM LONGES . I am a servant to Mr. Wright. The prisoner and another man brought the anchor there on the Friday; he was taken on the Wednesday following; Mr. Wright was not at home when he brought the anchor first; the two men went out; they left the anchor, and returned again in the course of an hour; Mr. Wright was at home then; they said they had brought an anchor; master said he did not want one; they carried it away then. On the Saturday they brought it again into the shop; master told them the price that he would give - eleven shillings and nine pence; he gave them twelve shillings, because he had no small change; it weighed three quarters and eleven pounds; that is the anchor they brought into the shop.

Q. Who brought the anchor when they came into the shop - A. The prisoner brought it, and the other man bargained for it.

CHARLES FIELD . Q. Were you with the other witnesses at the time the prisoner came to your shop - A. Yes; I am servant to Mr. Wright. On the 23d of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and another man came with the anchor; the prisoner had the anchor on his shoulder, we told him master was not at home; they left the anchor, they called again in about an hour; they said to master we have got an anchor, they found it down the gallions, they found it by the anchor of their own barge grappling with it. I weighed the anchor, it weighed three quarters and eleven pounds, at three halfpence a pound; it came to eleven shillings and nine pence, old iron price. The other man did not like that price; they went away; the other man came back, the prisoner did not return the second time. That is the anchor that the prisoner brought the first time.

LUCY WRIGHT . Q. Are you the wife of John Wright - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home on Wednesday the 28th of December when the officers came there - A. Yes; after the officer came, the prisoner came and asked for Mr. Wright; he said there had been an anchor left there in the morning; I asked him whether he came there by appointment to see Mr. Wright, he said no; I asked him to come in, I had suspicion; I sent up to Shadwell office, the officer came down and secured the prisoner in our house; my husband was gone to the office about these anchors.

Q. Do you know who left the anchor there that morning - A. No.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am an anchor smith, I live at Limehouse New Cut, by the river side; the prisoner was one of the men that came on the Friday night before Christmas day; I asked the prisoner and the other man where they got the anchor; one of them said (I do not recollect which) they got it at Bow in the gallions, they picked it up with their barge's anchor; they told me they would not take my price, which was fourteen shillings a hundred, three halfpence a pound; they took the anchor away and returned on the Saturday night, and I gave them the money; this is not the man that received the money from me, the other man received the money.

Q. The anchor that you bought in this way was found on your premises - A. It was.

Q. There was another anchor found, how did you get that - A. I do not know, it was thrown over my pales on the Wednesday morning; I saw it at nine o'clock. This is the anchor that I purchased; it is a temporary anchor, the stocks are both deficient; one is temporary, and the other is broken. That is the one that was thrown over.

COURT. Did you ask either of these persons where they lived - A. No; nor who they worked for; they appeared as working men; they were both strangers.

The prisoner called two witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-80

168. ELIZA PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , a trunk, value 1 s. a cloak, value 2 s. a frock, value 1 s. and a cap, value 6 d. the property of Frances Anderson , widow .

FRANCES ANDERSON . I am a widow. I lost my trunk and the articles in it at Cross Keys mews, Marybone lane ; it was taken from the house on Christmas eve; I did not miss it till the Monday; I had seen it on Saturday, about two o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner slept in my room; the trunk was left in the lower room. On my missing the box, the prisoner denied knowing any thing about it, and afterwards she told me she saw the box standing about two yards from the door; her husband had given the box to the constable; the box contained all the things but the cap; the cap she took out of a bundle in my room.

MR. HOWARD. I got that box from Mr. Perry, the prisoner's husband; this cap I found on the prisoner's head; she told me she found the box in Oxford road, it fell out of a post chaise.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday evening I was going for a pint of beer; at a corner, about three yards from the door, I found that trunk; I left it at a house; I insisted upon my husband giving the box to the constable.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-81

169. WILLIAM PAINTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of January , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of coals, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Homer .

WILLIAM KING . I am a servant to Thomas Homer , coal merchant , Paddington . On Wednesday night last, me and James Haines were on the watch at Mr. Homer's wharf, we were placed in the counting house in the dark; a little before ten o'clock I heard the steps of a man go towards the stack; he returned; I came out and followed him down to a barge loaden with dung in the bason; he put something down in the barge; I stepped my foot on the barge and kicked my foot against a coal; I said it was you, was it; the prisoner replied well, I will take it back again; it was only one piece of coal, it weighed above an hundred weight; he took it back again, and would have carried it to the heap; Haines told him to put it down at the counting house. I have no doubt the coal was taken from my master's heap, but I did not see him take it.

WILLIAM HAINES . I am servant to Mr. Homer.

Q. You have heard what King said - A. Yes, it is the truth.

The prisoner called two witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-82

170. THOMAS PAVETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Peter Jobbings .

EVAN MATTHEWS . I am a publican. Peter Jobbings lodged in my house, he is a tailor , he is deaf and dumb. I believe he missed the shirt on the 13th of December, he has seen it since; I believe it to be his; the prisoner slept at my house.

SARAH THOMAS . I live in the house with the prosecutor's brother; his brother gave him the shirt; I made the shirt and marked it; I saw the shirt produced before the magistrate; I knew it belonged to Peter Jobbings .

JOHN HART . I am servant to Mr. Lowther, pawnbroker. On the 13th of December the prisoner pawned this shirt for three shillings.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of an other robbery; I found the duplicate of a shirt at his mother's lodgings; this is the duplicate.

Hart. I delivered that duplicate to the prisoner for this shirt.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The shirt that I pledged was my own shirt; I bought the shirt on the 12th in Petticoat lane; I was distressed for money, I pledged it on the 13th.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-83

171. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , a copper, value 10 s. the property of Chambers Ions , affixed to a certain building of his called a washhouse .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be affixed to a certain building of his.

CHAMBERS IONS . I live in Camden street, Islington . I only know that the copper was stolen.

MARGARET IONS . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw the copper in the washhouse on Thursday afternoon the 15th of December, between three and four o'clock; it was affixed in the copper hole; I missed it the next morning; the officers brought it on the next day; it fitted the place exactly.

SARAH COPPING . I am a servant to Mrs. Ions. Between ten and eleven o'clock I went to the washhouse, I saw the copper was taken out of the brick work.

JOHN FROST . I am an officer of Bow street. On the 15th of December, about half past five in the evening, I stopped the prisoner with the copper in the lower side, Islington; he had the copper on his head. Crouch and me took him in custody. When I asked him what he had got he threw the copper down.

WILLIAM CROUCH . I am an officer. I was walking before Frost; I heard a copper fall, I went back, he was in the hands of Edwards; I took him into the Bluecoat Boy, there I searched him; I found a night shirt on him damp; he said two men gave him the copper to carry, they were to give him a pint of beer to take it into St. John street.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090111-84

172. EDWARD MACGEE and WILLIAM DEFEE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , two pair of shoes, value 7 s. the property of Ann Bonney , widow .

ANN BONNEY . I am a widow ; I keep a shoemaker's shop , Nightingal lane . On the 12th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into the shop and asked the price of a pair of gaiters; I was shewing Defee, the youngest, a pair, the other turned back and took two pair of shoes off the chair and put them under his coat; I stopped him and took them away.

Q. Did the young boy buy any gaiters - A. No; he held me in conversation while the other took the shoes; I locked the door and detained them till the constable came.

The property produced and identified.

Macgee's Defence. I went into this shop with this boy, he cheapened a pair of gaiters; I was looking at an halbert that hung over the chair, my elbow knocked the shoes down; she called out thieves and locked the door.

Defee's Defence. I went into this shop to cheapen a pair of gaiters; I never saw the lad take them; I saw nothing of the shoes, but when the lady took them from him.

Macgee and Defee called three witnesses each, to character.

MACGEE, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

DEFEE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-85

172. JOSEPH PRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a white chip flat, value 5 l. the property of William Hughes .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN HAZARD . Q. You lived two years as servant to Mr. Hughes - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to live with Mr. Hughes - A. I do, it was about the month of March. On the second or third Sunday after he came in the service, as near as I can recollect, about ten o'clock, I saw him in the back warehouse; I was able to see him from the front warehouse; I saw him take some chips from the tub in the back warehouse, rolled them up and put them in his left hand inside coat pocket; on my observing that I communicated it to the cook, Mary.

Q. After you had communicated it to her, where did she and you go to - A. We went to the street door, I and the cook stood at the door; we saw him walk to the square.

Q. Did you ever communicate it to your master - A. No. I went into the country shortly after and did not return till lately; I communicated it to Mr. Bristow, I think on Friday, in the other week.

Mr. Knapp. The prisoner came to Mr. Hughes' in March last - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been with him before - A. I dare say above eighteen months.

Q. Can you write - A. Yes.

Q. This happened two or three Sundays after Mr. Pratt came - when did you go in the country - A. I believe in July or August.

Q. You constantly seeing Mr. Hughes between March and August, before you went into the country, but never said a word about it - A. No, nor to any body but the cook.

Q. How long did you stay in the country - A. I was altogether about three months.

Q. During the three months, till August, you went in the country, and the time you were in the country and since you have been at home, you have kept it in your mind, and never told any one but the cook - A. No.

Q. Were the cook and the prisoner upon terms of friendship - A. They were.

Q. Was it not by the desire of the cook, Mary Mayhew , that you communicated it to Mr. Bristow - A. She first told, and I was obliged to tell; Mr. Bristow came to me, and I told.

Q. He told you the cook had told - A. Yes, I was willing to tell if in case I had gone back to Mr. Hughes; I would have told it lately if Mr. Hughes had sent for me; but I was desired not to go by several people.

Q. I thought you told us just now that you had not told it to any - A. I have told it to different people where I have lodged; they told me not to go for fear I should get myself into trouble.

Q. But you never communicated it to Mr. Hughes, your master, at all - A. No.

Q. Nor would you have communicated it to Mr. Hughes at all, if Mr. Bristow had not come to you - A. Yes, I would; I was desired by the priest, and the doctor to tell.

Q. You have applied to the priest have you - A. Yes, I have; we confess to him.

Q. But untill you had been in the country, and till this priest gave you this advice, did you not say any thing about it - A. No.

Q. You have received absolution from the priest - A. No, not all.

Mr. Alley. You are now daily and hourly in expectation of the dissolution of your life - A. I am.

MARY MAYHEW . Q. You are in the service of Mr. Hughes - A. Not now.

Q. Were you in his service while the prisoner lived there - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a boy of the name of Hazard - A. Yes.

Q. Did the boy come and tell you something - A. He did; it was on a Sunday morning, in the latter end of March, or the beginning of April; after the boy told me Mr. Pratt came out of the warehouse; I and the boy were at the street door.

COURT. Did you observe Pratt come out of the warehouse - A. Yes, he passed by the side of me, as he went out of the door; I was as nigh to him as I am to you; I observed a roll of chips inside of his coat of the left side; I saw the rims of the chips in his bosom; I saw only the end of the bundle.

Mr. Gleed. Are you perfectly sure that at the end of the roll you saw chips uncovered - A. I did; Mr. Pratt went out of the house, nothing was said to him by me, nor by Hazard; I saw nothing more of him till Sunday night.

Mr. Gurney. So you knew Mr. Pratt was robbing your master - A. I knew no more than the boy told me.

Q. You saw the chips yourself - A. Yes.

Q. You went and told your master the same day - A. No; Mr. Hughes not being there of a Sunday I did not tell him.

Q. Then that was the reason because he did not sleep there of a Sunday - A. I did not tell him at all.

Q. Did you tell him the next day - A. No, I did not

say any thing at all about it.

Q. How long did you keep it a secret - A. Till last Saturday week; I saw Mr. Bristow, he questioned me, and I told him.

Q. How long did you remain in Mr. Hughes' service - A. Till September .

Q. Then you staid there till after Mr. Pratt left - A. I did; he left in September.

GEORGE BRISTOW . Q. You are now a foreman at Mr. Hughes's - A. I am.

Q. Were you in that situation the last year - A. Yes; for near the last three years.

Q. Do you remember a tub of chips being sent to your master in 1808 - A. Yes.

Q. What might be the value of the tub of chips - A. About two or three hundred pound.

Q. At that time how long had the prisoner been in Mr. Hughes' service - A. About a fortnight.

Q. Had you, or had you not, reason to suppose that the chips had been stolen - A. Every time I went to the chips I thought that they decreased faster than they came out; I thought it was my fancy, I did not suspect any thing.

Q. Did you afterwards examine the chips and find whether any quantity was missing - A. I did; and found there was the value of between sixty and seventy poundsworth missing.

Q. Was it the prisoner's department to go to the tub of chips - A. No person had a right to go to the tub of chips but myself.

Q. The prisoner, I believe, was employed in the fur department - A. And as corresponding clerk .

Q. In the month of May, or in August, or in both months, was any thing said by you or by Mr. Hughes to the servants respecting the chips, amongst the rest tell me only what was said when the the prisoner was present - A. I mentioned it once or twice to Mr. Hughes.

Q. Did Mr. Hughes mention it to the prisoner and the other servants - A. He did, in the beginning of August; Mr. Hughes consulted me and the prisoner together. When we found they were missing Mr. Hughes asked the prisoner whether he suspected any person; the prisoner told a long story of living with persons who had been robbed, and he told of one person that he had been the means of bringing to justice.

Q. How long did he remain in Mr. Hughes' service after that - A. I believe, till the latter end of August, or the beginning of September; I was in the country at that time; he went to live with a furrier in Gough square.

WILLIAM HUGHES . - Mr. Gurney. You have no partners, I take it for granted - A. No.

Q. You parted with the prisoner in August or September - A. The 27th of August he left me.

Q. And he was apprehended last Saturday week by you, upon this charge - A. Yes.

Q. Had any thing occurred to you just two days before you apprehended him, to make it convenient for you to appear a prosecutor rather than a defendant - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of this charge; it is entirely brought against me in order to prevent me from appearing in court against Mr. Hughes.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-86

172. RICHARD TAYLOR and GEORGE FREEMAN were indicted for a misdemeanour .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL GOSSETT . I am in partnership with William Pearson , senior, and William Pearson , junior.

Q. Have you and your partners a warehouse in Checquer yards - A. We have; the front of it is in Dowgate hill, and the side of it in Checquer yard .

Q. In the month of December was indigo in that warehouse - A. I rather presume there must have been; but there were valuable property there.

- PEACOCK. Q. Were you a servant of Mr. Myers, a bricklayer, in Checquer yard - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of Friday the 16th of December, what time did you go to Checquer yard - A. Half past five o'clock. I saw three men loitering about in Checquer yard, I did not seem to take any notice of them at all, I passed close by them, I saw all three of the faces, they were altogether; at that time it was quite a light morning, I could see across a ten acre field. I went into the stable and cleaned the horse; I came out again to the dung hole, I unchained the dung hole and went in it, it is about four feet deep; I saw these three men again, I watched them, I saw them walk up to Mr. Gossett's warehouse door; I saw Taylor, the soldier , wrench the door; I heard him whistle and say, I have got one off; I went into the accounting house and told the apprentice; we both came out together, he ran up against Freeman, Freeman dropped something; we walked on to the bottom of the court; I met a man, I said are you a watchman; he said, why; I said they are breaking into one of the warehouses; he said stop a bit. I was on the opposite side of the way where there is a wine vaults; I watched them, I saw Freeman and Taylor walk up to the door again, and when we walked down I saw Taylor at the door at work again; the others walked about, and just as I saw the watchman come I began to walk up the court; they saw the watchman, Freeman said, no nose; two of them ran up Bush lane, and Taylor came down towards Dowgate hill; the watchman took Taylor at the corner of the court; I came up immediately, saying, that was one of the men; Taylor struggled, he dropped an iron crow.

- WAINWRIGHT. Q. On this morning were you called by this lad that has just been examined - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend any person - A. Yes; Taylor; I took him to the Falcon public house; I searched him, I found the fife upon him; he struggled when I took him; I saw a crow drop from him, and I heard it fall; my partner came up. This is the crow. I asked the prisoner Taylor what he was; he said a fifer in the Tower Hamlets; I took the fife from him; he said he bought it at Mr. Gerrard's in Bishopgate street; I went back to the warehouse, I saw there were two strong locks broke off, and the door very much forced. I left the prisoner at the Falcon; I was away about five

minutes; when I got back I found him there; I took him away and put him in the watchhouse, and locked him up; while I was away, he got away from a small window in the watchhouse that opens into a church yard; he made his escape over another wall.

DANIEL DUNCAN . I am a drummer in the Tower Hamlet militia.

Q. On the evening of the 16th of December did you see Taylor - A. Yes; I went to the Robin Hood and Little John, Webb square, Shoreditch, there I saw Taylor; we went from there to another public house in Shoreditch; I found there a young man he wanted to see.

Q. Look round and see whether you know him - have you seen him since - A. I cannot say.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, was the man that you saw at the Mansion house the man that you saw at the public house with Taylor - A. I should not know him again; I went with Taylor and the man to buy a fife at Mr Gerrard's; as we were going along I heard the word Jemmy mentioned; which of them spoke I cannot say; Taylor came into Mr. Gerrard's after we were in the shop.

Q. Upon your oath have not you seen that man since - A. I cannot say; I do not know him if I was to see him.

Q. Look at the man at the bar - A. He is very much like him.

COURT. What do you believe - A. I believe he is much like him.

Q. Do you believe he is the man - A. He is a great deal like him, but I cannot swear to him.

MR. GERRARD. Q. I believe you are a musical instrument maker in Bishopsgate street - A. I am.

Q. On the 16th of December, do you remember any person coming to buy a fife - A. Yes, three young men; the soldier I am sure of; the other prisoner, I believe he is the man, but I did not take particular notice of him; that is the fife I sold to the prisoner first; I sold that fife to Taylor three days before; there is a particular mark on it.

Duncan. I beg your lordship's pardon, I think it is the man; he had a short jacket on at the time.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in Newgate .

FREEMAN, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090111-87

174. THOMAS DUGGIN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Mr. Alley. counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, Mr. before Recorder.


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