Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th September 1808.
Reference Number: 18080914
Reference Number: f18080914-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 14th of SEPTEMBER, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Bailey , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Nathaniel Newnham , esq. Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. James Shaw , esq. Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. John Prinsep , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Edward Monday ,

James Blake ,

George Wassey ,

John Dorrington ,

George Wynne ,

George Courtney ,

William Fry ,

Joseph Brown ,

John Chambers ,

James Lind ,

William Grove ,

Henry Mackrael .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

William Bernet ,

Robert Harris ,

Thomas Kay ,

Thomas Wilson ,

John Hewit ,

John Marshall ,

Samuel Dolman ,

John Pike ,

James Beale ,

Richard Gascoine ,

Phillip Beddal ,

Charles Foothead .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Robert Barron ,

John Riorden ,

Thomas Collinson ,

Charles Mitchell ,

Thomas Rlle ,

Charles Wright ,

Robert Hornby ,

Robert Appleton ,

James Barclay ,

Rowland Rily ,

Samuel Barge ,

George Arundel .

Reference Number: t18080914-1

542. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of September , a silver watch. value 9 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. a steel chain, value 6 d. and a key, value 1 d. the property of William Dando .

WILLIAM DANDO . I live at No. 6, Hare street, Hoxton, I am a cabinet maker ; I lost my watch last Monday was a week in Bartholomew fair , between seven and eight in the evening; as soon as I went out of the fair I missed it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the fair - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You thought you had lost your watch, you offered a reward for it - A. Yes.

COURT. Are you sure that you had it in your pocket when you was at the fair - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN GODDARD . I am a watch finisher, I live at No. 3, Chequer alley, Bunhill row; I work below; the prisoner came in and said he had bought a watch.

Q. What day was that - A. On the Tuesday week, about twelve o'clock; he said he knew me some years back; when he came in the shop, he said Mr. Goddard, I should be glad if you would tell me the value of this watch; he said he had given two guineas and a half for it; I told him he was not hurted, I thought it was worth more; he said as the watch was worth more, he would wish to wear it; he asked me if he could have his own name put upon it; I said yes. I took it to pieces and took it to the gilder's Mr. Dando sent to me, to enquire if I had such a watch; I said yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The prisoner did not desire you to conceal this - this transaction was all open and fair - A. Yes. I took it to pieces before his face and put it in the window.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Wednesday the second of September I went to the house of Goddard, I found the prosecutor there and another officer. I waited there about twenty minutes; the prisoner came in; on taking the prisoner into custody, I found this seal with the prosecutor's name, which he knew, I found out the prisoner's lodgings, I found there a boy and a girl hard at work, I have no knowledge of the prisoner; he said he knew me, he was a hard working man, look at my hands; I bought it of a Jew.

(The property produced and identified)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-2

543. SARAH FORECAST was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Short , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 26th of July , and stealing therein one gown, value 12 s. two petticoats, value 12 s. and a pair of breeches, value 20 s. the property of the said Thomas Short .

ANN SHORT . I live at No. 35, Hare street, Bethnal Green : my husband's name is Thomas Short .

Q. Did you lose any property out of your apartment - A. I did, on the 26th of July between the hours of three and four in the afternoon. I left my apartments about twelve o'clock; I left nobody in my apartment; there might be people in the house; I have only the apartment; there is no lock to my door; I fasten it with a nail; I came back between the hours of three and four and missed my property; the door was open and the nail that fastened it was taken out.

Q. Have you seen your property since - A. Yes, at Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, Wheeler street.

Q. What did you lose - A. One gown, two white petticoats and a pair of breeches; I value the whole at a guinea. When I came out I saw Sarah Forecast coming up from my cellar; the cellar door and the kitchen door, in which my property was, both met together; when Sarah Forecast came out I asked her what she had been doing; I said to her you have opened my door; she replied first she had been to the privy, and afterwards she had only been to the cellar. I bind shoes for the prisoner; I work at my mother's, she was three times that morning at my mother's for upperleathers; she never came to my place; she left me at my mother's at three o'clock just before I missed my property.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, No. 36, Wheeler street, Spitalfields. On the 26th of July, a woman, with a child in her arms pledged two petticoats, a gown, and a pair of breeches with me, for twelve shillings; I gave her a seven shilling piece, and four and eleven pence in penny pieces, deducting one penny for the duplicate.

Q. Do you know who it was brought it to you to pledge - A. I would rather believe the prisoner to be the person, than to be confident the other way; but I am not confident.

THOMAS LAMPORT . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner was a constant customer of mine. On the 27th of July, the prisoner came and redeemed three articles, that she had pledged before; she paid me five shillings and seven pence, three farthings; she tender'd me a seven shilling piece and I gave her the change.

JEREMIAH STEELE . What are you - A. I am a shoemaker, the prisoner worked for me; I had some conversation with her about some things she had taken out of pawn on the 27th of July, she said she had taken nothing out of pawn on that day, only a child's gown for six pence; I was informed she had taken three articles out of pawn; I asked her if she had any money from Tom, the man she lives with, she said no, he would give her no money, if it was to save her life; I told her that I suspected that she had taken Mrs. Short's things away; she had only one shilling and sixpence of me on that day.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of what I am blamed as the infant within me; when I went to Mr. Steele, I carried him four pair of shoes: his woman that he lives with, sells coals; I asked her for some; I crossed over the way to a butcher to buy a sheep's head; I ask'd the woman if she would let me go into the yard; when I came out of her yard I went into the cellar, I took up the bag of coals, and went home; the prosecutrix sent a girl to watch me home; I had not been home long before the mother and she came; she said if I would give the tickets up, she would forgive me; she said I was afraid to let her look in my box; I told her she was welcome; she looked in my box and in my bedstead, she could not find them; she said I do not think it is you, it must be somebody else, because the door was fastened curiously with a nail; she said a woman saw me come

out; I went to the woman; the woman said it was not me, it was a lustier woman than I am; my husband brought me home a pound note from the West India docks; I went to Mr. Lamport immediately and took out the articles while I had the money.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-3

544. THOMAS PARSONAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a hammer cloth, value 10 s. the property of John Newman .

JOHN NEWMAN . I live in Windmill street . On the 10th of August, early in the morning, I lost a hammer cloth; it was on a glass coach in the yard.

Q. Did you afterwards see the hammer cloth again - Yes, I saw it at a public house in Whitechapel; the prisoner confessed to me where it was; I told him it would be the worse for him if he did not tell me where it was.

THOMAS WEST . I drove the carriage; I saw the hammer cloth at Mr. Fordham's public house after I missed it.

JOHN SCAITES . I was at the public house at Aldgate when the hammer cloth was offered for sale; I do not know the man that brought it if I was to see him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-4

545. ANN MOLINEAUX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July , from the person of Thomas Moss , a seven shilling piece, nine shillings and sixpence, and two promissory notes, value 5 l. each, his property .

THOMAS MOSS . I am a post chaise driver . On the 23d of July, about ten o'clock at night, I was going along Charing Cross ; I enquired of a man for a lodging; the prisoner came up and said she could shew me a good one; she took me to a house; I told her that was not the house that I wanted to go to, I wanted some refreshment, I was fatigued with coming off the road; she said d - n you, will you give me some gin; I took out my purse and gave her sixpence; when the gin was brought in I drank one glass and the girl that was with her had a glass and the prisoner likewise. I then said I must go; she tore my small clothes and drawed out the purse, the candle was put out in an instant, she fastened herself in the room.

Q. What became of you - A. The prisoner forced me out in the passage; I remained at the door till I got a watchman and then I charged her with the constable.

- I am a constable. When I came I knocked at the door; the prisoner gave no answer till the third knock; I told her if she did not open it I would break it open; she then opened it; I searched the place, I could not find any thing about her nor in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor had another woman with him before he came to me; the constable knows I had no bottle or glass; he said I fetched some gin.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you any other woman with you - A. No.

Q. What money did she take from you - A. She took my seven shilling piece and the two promissory notes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-5

546. THOMAS HEDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of George Daniel Harvey .

GEORGE DANIEL HARVEY . On the evening of the 2nd of August, about eleven o'clock, I was passing through Lombard street , I felt a person's hand in my coat pocket: I immediately seized the wrist with one hand and collared the prisoner with the other hand; immediately I collared him he passed his hand two or three times and his companions went off with it; I secured this man and put him in the watchhouse. I lost my handkerchief.

Q. You did not see it I suppose - A. I am confident that I had the handkerchief two or three minutes before, because I used it; the prisoner was searched at the watchouse; there was a duplicate found on him of two or three handkerchiefs.

WILLIAM HARMAN . I was constable of the night; the prisoner was delivered into my custody; we found nothing on him but a duplicate for two handkerchiefs pledged by a young woman the day before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home up Lombard street; this gentleman collared me; he said he caught my hand in his pocket; I might touch the gentleman's pocket to be sure, but with no intention to pick his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-6

547. JAMES WATLEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, upon Peter Muller , on the 6th of September , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. a tin box, value 3 l. five guineas, and two seven shilling pieces his property .

(The prosecutor being a foreigner was examined through the medium of an interpreter.)

Q. Ask him where he lodged in September last at the time when he lost the money - A. He lodged with me; my name is Nicholas Agent , in Wentworth street, Whitechapel.

Q. Ask him when it was he lost his property; what time of the day or night - A. The 6th of September, between twelve and one in the morning; he is a sailor ; he was coming from the water side, and was going home.

Q. Was he in Wentworth street when it happened - A. Yes; near his own lodgings.

Q. Is that in Whitechapel - A. One side, and the other side belongs to Spitalfields.

Q. Is that side the Whitechapel side - A. Yes.

Q. Let him give an account of what happened to him there - A. First of all when he came opposite of the Princess of Wales, public house, that is the Spitalfields side, the prisoner laid hold of his arm and told him that he, the prisoner was a watchman.

Q. Was there any other person near him in the street - A. He did not see any body about the street at the time. The prisoner took him into a public house and told him he must treat him or else he would not let him go; he found himself in a difficult situation; he asked the publican if he could not sleep there, he would pay him any money; the prisoner was by at the time; the publican said he had not a place for him; the prisoner said, never mind, I will bring you home.

Q. Did he call for any liquor or drink any thing - A.

Yes, they had two or three glasses of liquor, and the prosecutor paid for them; the prisoner called for it.

Q. Did the witness drink any - A. No.

Q. What happened next - A. He went out, and the prisoner had hold of his arm; as soon as he got out in the street he met with another man, and he laid hold of his left arm.

Q. Had he seen that other man before - A. No; every now and then they both put their hands in his pockets; he tried to keep them off with his elbows: that was till he came to our door, it is only about an hundred yards off; when he came to my door, the prisoner told him it was not his lodgings: the prosecutor replied here is the number, pointing up to the number; then the prisoner said now I shall take you away to a prison; upon that the prisoner and the other man held his hands; he was with his back against the door, he knocked with his elbow against the door; there was a woman stood a little before these men, and a fiddler came and played the fiddle, when they made the noise; upon that he says, I opened the window; the prisoner had then his hand in his pocket, and when I opened the window, the prisoner said to the other man let him alone now, and then they both went away and left him.

Q. What became of the woman and the fiddler - A. They all went one way; the witness put his hand in his pocket, as soon as the prisoner left him, and found all his money was gone; I came down and opened the door; he exclaimed to me, all my money is gone.

Q. What pocket was the money in - A. His breeches pocket.

Q. When had he last felt that money that he had in his pocket, before that time - A. He had his hand in his pocket, and felt it after he came out of the public house; it was loose in his pocket; he is sure he felt it.

Q. What sort of money was it - A. Five guineas, two seven shilling pieces, one West India joe, and his protection box.

Q. Is he sure that he had that protection box and that money when he came out of that public house - A. Yes.

Q. Was he sober - A. Yes.

Q. Had he ever seen the prisoner before - A. No, only just before he went into the public house.

Q. Did he see the other man before he went into the public house - A. No.

Q. Did he tell the landlord of the public house of that man who brought him there against his will, and that he wished to get rid of that man - A. No.

Q. How came he not to tell the publican that that man brought him in against his will, and that he did not choose to treat him - A. He says he was afraid, because the man told him he was a watchman.

Q. Did he see any thing of the fiddler or the woman before the man first laid hold of him and took him into the public house - A. They came up at the time he was at my door.

Q. Now was there any body in the public house at the time he was there with the prisoner besides them and the landlord - A. He saw two or three women, but they were all ready for starting out of the house.

Q. Did he say any thing to them, or did they drink any thing with him - A. They said nothing to him.

Q. Had any of these women any of the liquor that he paid for - A. No, not as he knows of.

Q. Did he go into the public house after that he lost his money - A. He did; I went with him.

Prisoner. He says he was not in liquor - I wish to know whether he remembers what night it was - A. It was Tuesday the 6th of September.

NICHOLAS ARGENT . Q. The prisoner lodges at your house - A. Yes; he is a foreign sailor.

Q. Did he belong to a ship that laid in the river - A. No; he was not at work on the 6th of September.

Q. Do you recollect being called up at any time - A. I do, between twelve and one, on the 6th of September; I was in bed and my shop was shut up; I heard a thump at the door, and I heard the fiddle playing; I looked out of my window, I asked who is there; he said Peter; I saw two men, and I saw the fiddler besides Peter Muller ; they left him at the moment I opened the window; I thought I saw a woman, but I'll not be positive; they all went away and left him alone, and the fiddler played the fiddle; at the same time I went down stairs, just as I came out of bed, and opened the door, and let the prosecutor in; after I let him in he began to cry and complained of being robbed; upon that I went down with him to the Princess of Wales, to enquire after these people; I saw the landlord; I had first to go up stairs and put my clothes on, before I went to the public house.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prosecutor having money - A. Yes; I had seen his money a day or two before; I saw he had several guineas and foreign coins.

Q. Was he in liquor or was he sober - A. He was more sober than he was in liquor.

Q. And you had known him some time - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know the prisoner I suppose - A. I do not.

Q. Was the prisoner a watchman in your neighbourhood - A. I do not think he is.

Q. You did not know the person of the prisoner when you looked out of the window - A. I saw two men, I cannot speak to the prisoner.

WILLIAM SCREEN . Q. You keep the Princess of Wales public house in Wentworth street - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you remember on Monday night or Tuesday morning seeing the prosecutor come into your public house - A. Yes: the prisoner came in with him; they came in very quietly together and called for three glasses of peppermint.

Q. It was after twelve at night - A. It was before twelve at night, on Monday the 5th of September.

Q. Had one hold of the other - A. No.

Q. You did not see it - A. No.

Q. Do you know who called for the liquor - A. I believe the prosecutor called for it.

Q. Can you recollect - A. I believe it was the prosecutor that called for three glasses of peppermint; I served the liquor; the prisoner drank one, and the prosecutor drank one, and there was a person standing by, he ordered her one; the prosecutor paid for all three; I saw a couple of shillings in his hand; he gave me a shilling to charge for the three glasses.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. I had seen him before, he is a weaver ; they both went out together.

Q. Did you hear him speak to you for a lodging

Yes: the prosecutor asked me for a lodging.

Q. Did he tell you for why - A. No; I told him I could not, I had just let my beds.

Q. Was he anxious to get one - did he offer you any money - A. No.

Q. Did you observe and thing of the men - A. No, only good nature.

Q. There was nobody but these women in the house - A. No.

Q. Did the women and them go out together - A. I do not think they did; they waited for some liquor. The landlord and the prosecutor came to my house very near an hour after; they asked me whether I knew the prisoner; I told them if I was to see him again, I should know him.

Q. How far is Argent's house from your house - A. About two or three hundred yards off.

Q. You are sure the prisoner is the man with whom he was in the house, and drinking with him. - A. Yes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . Q. You are an officer - A. I am, of Lambeth street, Whitechapel. In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner; I found him on Thursday morning between six and seven o'clock at No. 5 in a court, George street, Spital fields; he was in bed, in a one pair of stairs room with two girls of the town; I told him what I apprehended him for, and took him to the office and searched him; I found two guineas in gold, and a seven shilling piece; he said it was his own. I returned him the seven shilling piece; the two guineas I have now.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday night I saw this man, he was in liquor, he catched hold of me and said will you have something to drink; I went with him into that gentleman's public house; we had some peppermint; he went out of the house, and I saw no more of him till the Thursday morning I was taken out of bed.

Q. to Griffiths. The prosecutor did not know the two guineas - A. No he did not.

GUILTY . DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080914-7

548. WALTER DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , a pewter pot, value 2 s. the property of David Mc Callan .

DAVID MC CALLAN . I am a publican , I live at the Manchester Arms, Manchester-square . I can only prove the property.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough street. On the 31st of July I was passing along Portland street, I saw the prisoner on the other side of the way. I followed him and took this quart pot out of his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a publican that stopped me.

Foy. He was about stealing more pots; I sent a publican to him, he was saucy to him; when he saw me he said Mr. Foy you may take the pot out of my pocket; I knew he would have made off if he saw me at first.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-8

549. SARAH DIBBLE, alias SARAH JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , a silver table spoon, value 11 s. the property of the Reverend William Hall .

REV. WILLIAM HALL . I live in Shadwell , I am the clergyman of the parish, the prisoner was my servant ; I lost the spoon on the 27th or 28th of July. On the 30th. of July I charged her with it. I said I would have it found, and that the prisoner knew where it was. On Wednesday the 3d of August, I enquired and found the spoon at Mr. Edward Macham 's.

EDWARD MACHAM . I live with my father, he his a pawnbroker in Shadwell. On the 3d of July the prisoner pledged a spoon at our house.

Q. Did you see her bring it - A. No. On the following Monday; she came and said she was going to make a bill up, she wanted to sell it she took it out of pawn, I weighed it; my mother told me to give her seven shillings for it.

Q. She sold it to you then - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HEWIT . I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office. The spoon was delivered to me by Macham. I have had it ever since.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence nor called any witness to her character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-9

550. WILLIAM PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , three pieces of copper, value 3 s. the property of George Dodgson .

WILLIAM POLLIT . I am foreman to Mr. Dodgson, he is a patent pump manufacturer , Lower Shadwell ; the prisoner was in his employ. On the 9th of August I missed between four and five pound weight of copper, out of the front shop. I watched the prisoner the remaining part of the day; I saw him go to the bellows of the forge and take the copper out, and put it under his apron and walk out of the shop; I followed him twenty or thirty yards from the shop, and brought him back where he dropped two pieces of copper, and he gave me one piece in my hand; he said that was all.

Q. Had you charged him with any thing - A. No. farther than asking him what he had got in the street. I detained the prisoner till Mr. Dodgson came home.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going from my dinner and going along Beleman street, I picked it up and took it home.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-10

551. ERASMUS NELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , a silver watch value 30 s. the property of Nicholas Kent .

NICHOLAS KENT . I live at the Ballast Lighter public house, Star street, Shadwell . On the 3d of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I missed my watch from out of the bar; I had seen it a little before seven o'clock; I was not present when it was taken.

JOHN MURRAY . I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 3d of September in the evening Mr. Kent delivered the prisoner into my custody; he said he was the man that took the watch, and had sold it to Mr. Middleton.

I went to Mr. Middleton's house and got the watch.

EDWARD MIDDLETON . I live at No. 2, Fox lane, Shadwell, I am a coal heaver. On the 3d of September, between seven and eight at night, the prisoner came and asked me if I would buy a watch; I gave him thirty shillings for it. I delivered it to the officer Murray and Kent as soon as they came and enquired for it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I never saw Mr. Middleton.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-11

552. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , nine yards and three quarters of British lace, value 10 s. the property of Robert Kenyon , privately in his shop .

ROBERT KENYON . I am a haberdasher , I live in Little Newport street . On the 2nd of August in the evening, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner looking at some lace pinned on some calico inside of the door; I saw her unpin it; she stood outside of the door, reached her hand in and unpinned the lace; it dropped inside of the door; she picked it up and put it in her pocket and walked along the street with it; I stopped her and asked her what she had got in her apron; she said she had nothing. I opened her apron and saw the lace.

Q. You saw her take it away, and the lace you found in her apron was your lace - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing by the shop I put my foot on the lace; the mud is on it now. I stooped down and took it from under my feet. When he asked me what I had in my apron. I said that which I picked up coming along; he said there was a party that frequently robbed his shop; he would let me go if I would let him know who they were.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex, jury before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-12

553. JOHN SMITH , SARAH LEFEVRE , and CATHERINE GILES , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Wills in the King's highway, on the 31st of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN WILLS . Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 7, Woodbridge street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar - A. I have seen them before; Smith is a labourer in the place where I work. On Saturday night the 31st of July, about ten o'clock, as I was returning by Osborne street , Lefevre accosted me, she asked me to give her something to drink; we went into the first public house we came to; I ordered her a glass of brandy; I went home with her and was some time in her apartment. I left her a little before twelve o'clock.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner Giles or Smith - A. No; it was on the ground floor. I waited at the house when I came out for a watchman; none came by. About two o'clock on Sunday morning I heard the three prisoners now at the bar coming from Lefevre's room; they came out of the house together and I laid hold of Lefevre, she had robbed me of my watch; I charged her with the robbery; Smith took hold of me by the right side of my collar; I had Smith in my left hand, Giles was endeavouring to pull Lefevre away; Smith said, you b - r, let the woman go, it is my wife, meaning Lefevre was his wife; I told him I did not care whose wife it was, she had robbed me, and I was, determined to bring her to account for it. Smith made an assault upon my person, he laid hold of my coat, tore it, and put me in bodily fear. Giles said, bl - t his eyes, take his bloody handkerchief off his neck; Smith then directly untied my silk handkerchief and took it from my person; I cannot say what he did with it. In the scuffle I was knocked down, I believe by Smith; they left me on the ground covered all over with blood and went towards Osborne street; I saw no more of them that time. I am sure of their persons, I have seen them before at different times; this happened on Sunday July the 31st, and the women were apprehended on Monday. I saw Smith again the next morning we were both going to work; I saw him on the following days; he was apprehended on the Thursday; then he went out of the warehouse by a prohibited way; when he saw the constable was coming to take him into custody he resisted; he was taken.

COURT You say you saw the prisoner Smith in Whitechapel on the following Monday - A. I beg your lordship's pardon; I saw him in Whitechapel on the Tuesday, about ten minutes past seven in the morning; we were both going towards the West India dock; we walked about one hundred yards together. On Wednesday I saw him going towards the dock; one of our foremen was in company with him; I asked him if he knew that man, he said he did, he told me his name was Smith.

Q. If you had enquired for Smith on the Tuesday you might have found him - A. I dare say I might. I did not.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth street office. I apprehended Lefevre in company with Coombes (my fellow officer) in Wentworth street, on Monday about half past ten in the morning; going along Giles was pointed out to me: we took them both to Giles' room. Lefevre submitted to be searched; Giles throwed the plates and dishes at my head; I was forced to get assistance to take her. Smith was brought to the office on the third day by the constable of the docks; he said nothing, and nothing was found on them.

Smith. When I came home from work on Monday night, as usual, I heard Catherine Giles was taken. I immediately went down to the officer to speak to her.

Griffiths. He was there in the evening. I did not know at that time that he was wanted.

Smith's Defence. I have worked at the dock almost ever since they have been made. On Saturday night, after I had taken my week's pay, I went to the public house and had a pint or two of beer; at half past nine o'clock I returned home, I had my supper and went to bed; I never got out of bed from that time till half past four o'clock in the morning; I have a witness that knows I was in bed and asleep when this man came up to the door and said his handkerchief was taken off his neck.

Lefevre's Defence. This man was in my room for two hours; I believe for one hour he was in the room by himself; I went out to get something to drink;

when I came home he was gone out; he came and charged me with having stolen his watch. After that he staid at the door a long while. When I came back to the door he still staid at the door; he said he would take me in custody. Smith and Giles got up about four o'clock in the morning; he laid hold of Giles, I told him to let her alone; he said he would not, he would have her in custody; then I pushed him away from me, and we all three went towards Osborn street. I really think Smith is innocent of meddling with him or taking the handkerchief from his neck; so is Catherine Giles .

Giles' Defence. This man and I were asleep in the bed, and this girl knows the same.

MARY SMITH . On Saturday night, between eleven and twelve o'clock I came down to look for my husband, his name is Richard Smith ; this man stood at the door, he said he was robbed, he was all over mud, and no handkerchief on his neck. Catherine Giles and John Smith were fast asleep in bed at the same time. I live in the same house. This was the Saturday before that Monday on which they were taken.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-13

554. ANDREW KINGDON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Mann , no person being therein, about the hour of five in the morning on the 22nd of July , and stealing there in seven silver tea spoons, value 7 s. a stock buckle, value 6 d. two silver table spoons, value 10 s. two silver salts, value 3 s. two silver pepper casters, value 20 s. two silver milk pots, value 20 s. and a silver punch ladle, value 20 s. his property .

THOMAS MANN . I live at No. 4, Anson's Game, in the precinct of St. Catherine ; I occupy the house; early in the morning I went out of my house.

Q. Was any body in the house when you went out - A. Nobody; I shut the door after me and locked it, with the key on the outside; it is only a common lock. I am sure I locked it. I come back about half past five, I could not have been absent longer than ten minutes; then I took the outside shutter down; I had taken the pins out when I went out: when I had taken the shutter down I had put the key in the lock; I could not unlock it; I thought I had strained the lock. I took the latch in my hand, I found the door was open.

Q. Do you recollect when you went out pulling your door to and locking your door - A. I always take the key with me. I recollect putting the key in to unlock the door.

Q. Did you put the key in the door when you went out - are you sure of that - A. To the best of my recollection I did; I do not recollect that ever I forgot it. We are all frail creatures.

Q. To the best of your recollection you did lock it - A. Yes.

Q. You lifted up the latch, and then the door opened - A. Yes, and immediately the young man at the bar come down stairs before I got into the house; I had hardly entered the door when he came down with a pistol in his hand; I think it was in his right hand; but he did not offer to do me any mischief.

Q. Did he say any thing to you - A. Not a syllable; he rushed by me instantly, and immediately went into the street; directly after he passed another came down, he passed into the street the same way; I attempted to lay hold of him, I slipped my hand and fell down; I did not fall, properly; I recovered my fall, I got up again and made an alarm and cried stop thief; the man that went out last made a blow at me, it just touched the fore part of my face, it did not hurt me, and then he ran away immediately; I pursued after him about a dozen yards, not more, I was not capable of going far; then I made an alarm, a neighbour pursued him; I returned into my own house, I went up stairs into my chamber, I found all the things taken out of the drawers and throwed on the floor, and the plate was put on the drawers.

Q. Had all these things been in the drawers when you left the house - A. Yes; the drawers were not locked.

Q. What things did you find on the floor - A. Sheets and shirts.

Q. None of them are mentioned in the indictment - did you find any of the things in the indictment on the floor - A. The bag with the silver things in it was put on the drawers in the same room.

Q. What silver things were they - A. Two silver pepper casters, two silver salts, seven silver tea spoons, two table spoons, a punch ladle, a stone stock buckle, two milk pots, all silver; there was one milk pot in the chamber, the other was in common use below stairs, it had been removed from one table to another; all the others were in a bag in the drawers, where they had been many years. The seven tea spoons remained in the box on the table not taken out.

Q. How soon after that did you see or hear any thing of the prisoner - A. I suppose it night be ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; some children informed me he was at the watchhouse; I went in the watchhouse and found him in custody.

Q. Could you undertake to say that it was the same man that rushed by you - A. I have no doubt of the man; I wish I had.

Q. That is the first man - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what coloured coat he had on - A. Something of a darkish coat.

Q. Do you know the colour of the other man's coat - A. It appeared to me it was a dark coat; I was told it was a green coat; I did not observe myself.

Q. You did not know him before - A No; he is quite a young man; I hope he will not do so any more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. At the time you left your house you had no suspicion about the door being locked - A. No.

Q. Therefore you had never taken any precaution about locking the door - A. No, I did not: it is a common thing for me to lock the door; it is possible. I might not have locked it: possibly I might be deceived about it.

Q. Now with respect to the person of the prisoner, when you returned you saw a person running down stairs, which you believe to be the prisoner at the bar - A. I am very certain of it.

Q. You had only a moment to observe him - A. A very little time.

Q. It was merely a person coming down and rushing out - A. He walked slowly across the room; when I first saw him I was about as far from him, as from him to me in the court now.

Q. Had the man a hat on - A. Yes; a round hat.

Q. Does any body live in the house besides yourself - A. Nobody.

COURT. These things that you have given an account of are you a judge of the value of them - A. I valued them just as it came in my head; I do not know the weight of them.

CHARLOTTE WOOLING . Q. How near do you live to Mr. Mann's house - A. Four doors offer my house faces the bottom of this court: from my place I can see Mr. Mann's door; it is on the right hand going in.

Q. Do you remember the day when there was an alarm at his house - A. Yes; it was on the 22nd.

Q. Did you see Mr. Mann go out - A. No: I did not; I came out of my own house to open the window shutters, between five and six o'clock in the morning. I saw a man go very hastily into Mr. Mann's house dressed in green clothes.

Q. Was it a light or a dark green - A. Between a light and a dark green; I cannot say exactly; I only saw one man; the door was open. I saw him run in; I saw nobody near; I saw Mr. Mann about ten minutes after go to his window and take out the bolts; immediately he went up the court he put his hand up to the window and took out the window pin; I saw him put his left hand into his right hand pocket, as I thought, to take out a key to open his door; he then went in doors; he had not been in above a moment before I heard Mr. Mann say what do you want here, you villians, you have come to rob me; two men instantly rushed out of the house; in the scuffle Mr. Mann slipped down; Mr. Mann recovered himself again, he called out stop thief, and when he called out stop thief I saw the man in the green coat turn round and strike him in the face; that is the man that came out last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You say it was about ten minutes from the man in the green coat going into the house and Mr. Mann returning - you did not keep your eye all the time upon the house - A. No.

Q. Therefore in the mean time the second man might have got into the house - A. He might.

JAMES BRIANT . I live at 42, Lower East Smithfield. When Mr. Mann gave the alarm, I was in Red cross street, up by my stables; that is not more two hundred yards off from where Mr. Mann lives; they called out stop thief; it was about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning; I then started from the stable and ran to Dean street; there I saw the prisoner running down Dean street; I called to him, and says, pray what have you been doing this morning; he said, nothing; I made way for him to go by; I catched hold of him as he past me; I said as you have done nothing stop till these people come up; Mr. Parrot and Dunstan came up; they are not here; I told these people they could take care of him; they took him to this gentleman, the officer of the parish. I went with them a little way up the street.

Q. Did you see him searched - A. I did, in Dean street; a bag was found in his right hand pocket. (The bag produced containing skeleton keys.)

JAMES WALMSLEY . I am constable of the parish of Aldgate; of that part that lies in the county of Middlesex.

Q. Do you recollect being called upon when there was a cry of stop thief - A. I do, I was in bed at the time; I got up; he was in custody when I arrived at the watchhouse, I saw Parrot there: I saw the last witness immediately after I opened the watchhouse door and had put him in; I secured him; then I found upon him a silk handkerchief and a watch, chain and seal; the watch has been restored to him by the direction of the magistrate; I found nothing of consequence upon him but some money; the prisoner said he had lost a five pound note; the bag was put into my hand by Parrot, I believe; that I have produced.

MR. BRIANT. I held the prisoner by the collar while Parrot and the soldier took the bag out of his pocket; I saw it taken out; I afterward saw it at Mr. Walmsley's house; I said I thought it was the bag that they took out of his pocket.

Q. Have you any doubt about it - A. None: I think it is the same.

Q. Constable, where these things in the bag - A. Yes, twelve skeleton keys. I produce the plate it has been in my custody ever since.

Thomas Parrot and William Dunstan were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that plate; are there seven silver spoons - A. There are, in this little box; I reckon they are worth seven shillings; two silver table spoons, I value them at ten shillings; two silver salts, three shillings the two pepper casters, I do not know whether they are worth twenty shillings or no; the two silver milk pots, I believe they are worth twenty shillings, and the punch ladle two shillings.

Q. The articles that you give account of, contained in the bag and the box, were they removed from the place where you left them - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am intirely innocent of the affair.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080914-14

555. MARY FORSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Francis Rogers on the 24th of February , three gowns, value 30 s. two petticoats, value 10 s. two shawls, value 20 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two caps, value 2 s. a ring, value 2 s. a pair of earrings, value 9 s. a watch value 3 l. a bat, value 2 s. a feather, value 1 s. eight guineas, two half guineas, a seven shilling piece, a crown piece, a half crown, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Noble .

JOSEPH NOBLE . Q. Where do you live - A. In Palace yard ; Mr. Rogers was the housekeeper, the house is pulled down; I had only the shop .

Q. Did Mr. Rogers live in the house in February last - A. Yes, and his wife and family. His Christian name is Francis.

Q. Was the prisoner, Mary Forster , at any time in your service - A. Yes, about six weeks; she came about Christmas.

Q. Did she lodge in your house - A. Sometimes she lodged with us and sometimes she lodged with a gentlewoman in Mill bank; she was always with us in day time.

Q. When did she leave you - A. On Wednesday the

24th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Had you discharged her - A. No, I did not know of her leaving me.

Q. Did you pay her by the week - A. We had not made any agreement with her what we were to pay her.

Q. Did you miss any of your property that day - A. Yes, that day only; I came home about six o'clock from my work; I was not at home when she went.

Q. Did you lose any thing from any place - A. I had got a little bureau with a drawer in it, which I always kept locked, and I carried the key in my pocket. I found the drawer had been opened by some means or other, and the contents taken out; the lock had been forced open.

Q. How was it when you went out to work that day, do you know whether it was safe when you went out - A. It was safe on the over night; I did not see it in the morning: I had looked at it the over night, it was safe then.

Q. What did you lose from that drawer - A. Seven guineas, two half guineas, a five shilling piece, a half crown, and a silver watch; they were all safe in my drawer on the over night; I had looked at them.

Q. Did you ever see any of the things again - A. No, nor did she ever come back again; I did not see her till she was apprehended.

Q. What shop was it - A. An oyster shop.

Q. Did you sleep there - A Yes.

Q. You did not find the watch again nor the money - A. No.

MARY NOBLE . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the 24th of February, the time when your husband came home and found he had lost some of his property - A. Yes, I was at Mr. Carter's coffee house, at the house of commons. I went to help the cook there, I was sent for.

Q. What time in the afternoon was it - A. Between four and five o'clock.

Q. In what state did you find your things when you came home - A. The prisoner had left a young woman in the care of the room.

Q. When you came home did you find any of the things out of their place - A. Yes, I found my gowns were taken out of the drawers.

Q. Were the drawers open - A. Yes; I had left them unlocked; I missed three gowns, two petticoats, two caps, two shawls, one white handkerchief, one gold ring, a pair of earrings, two pair of stockings, one seven shilling piece, one pound note, one guinea, a black beaver hat and a feather; the hat was taken out of the hat box. I had seen them all that afternoon, just before I went from my home.

Q. Who did you leave at your home when you went out - A. I left Mary Forster in the care of my place, nobody else.

Q. Did you know that Mary Forster was to go away - did she tell you that she was to leave you that day - A. No; she never came back again.

Q. How soon after that did you see any of your things that you had lost - A. I never saw any till the day I apprehended her, the first of September last.

Q. That was more than seven months - this was in February, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then see any thing that belonged to you - A. Yes, I saw the black beaver hat, it was upon her head; it is in the possession of Mr. Gillmore.

JOHN GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen square office; the prisoner was delivered into my custody by a man of the name of Lloyd, at a public house near our office, on the 1st of this month; at the time she was delivered to me she had this hat upon her head; nothing else was found upon her; I asked the prisoner what she had done with the rest of the property; I told her she might tell me or let it alone which she thought proper; she said she had sold them at different places; one of the gowns she had sold on board the Victim, where she had been concealed, and she had been part of that time at Gravesend; when she was examined before the magistrate she confessed to every article except the ear rings; she said the prosecutor was very right about every thing but the earrings, she knew nothing about them nor did she know that she had seen them.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at that hat - A. That hat is mine; I put my little boy's buckle into the hat band; it was a little rusty; I took some sand and scratched it the band and hat I know; I had it just as I was married; about seven or eight months altogether.

Q. Did you see all them articles before you went out to Mr. Carter's - A. Yes; the money in the drawers I saw in the morning; I took some of it out to go to Covent garden market. I saw it every day there.

Q. What might be the value of all the things, the gowns, petticoats, and other articles, without the money - were they worth one pound altogether - A. The clothes were worth four pounds.

JOHN LLOYD . Q. Were you the officer that took the prisoner - A Yes, I took her in Broad street, Bloomsbury, she had the hat on; Mrs. Noble challenged the hat, and I took it off her head; the prisoner said it did belong to Mrs. Noble; Mrs. Noble was present at the time I took her; she asked her what she had done with the silver watch, she said she had not got it; the money she acknowledged; she named about eleven pounds five shillings that she lost in all; she said the watch she tied to her petticoat strings, it dropped down in the coach, and she lost it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080914-15

556. THOMAS GOWER was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Thomas Hall , on the 1st of September , a tin box, value 1 d. two guineas, two half guineas, fourteen seven shilling pieces, eighteen shillings, and three bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of William Rogers .

WILLIAM ROGERS . Q. Did you lose any property lately - A. Yes, about eight or nine days before the prisoner was committed. He was committed last Friday.

Q. That is about a fortnight ago, is it not - A. Yes. I lost twelve pounds nine shillings and six pence; it was in a little tin tobacco box; three bank notes, value 1 l. each, three half guineas, two guineas, fourteen seven shilling pieces, and eighteen shillings in silver; I had left it at my lodgings, at Mr. Joseph Hall's, No. 19, Well street, Mile End New Town ; Mr. Joseph Hall lives in the house.

Q. When had you seen them there before you lost them - A. It is about a month ago since I saw them.

Q. Then it was a fortnight after you saw them, before you missed them - A. It was about eight or nine days.

Q. What part of your lodgings were they in - A. They were in the garret, in the room that I used to sleep in; they where locked up in my box; I did not lodge there at that time, but my box remained there; Mr. Hall knew my box was there; I had left it there before, when I went out to service.

Q. Have you been in the habit of leaving your box in the lodgings - A. Yes; I never lost any thing before; Mr. Hall made no objection to my box being there. He knew that I left my box.

Q. Did any body lodge in the same room with you - A. Yes; there was three lodgers besides me; the prisoner was one of them.

Q. Have you seen any of the property since - A. Mr. Griffiths has got three notes and one of the guineas, and the tin box that they were in.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner - A. Yes; on Thursday the 8th of this month, at No 19, Well street, Mile End New Town, at Mr. Hall's; I searched him, he had nothing upon him but a watch. On the Friday the prisoner told me that he had hid the property.

Q. What conversation had you with him that led to that - A. I heard a word drop, that the prisoner acknowledged that he had done the robbery; I went to him and ask'd him what he had done with the twelve pounds; he said part of it was hid, and if I went to Mr. Hall's garden, at the bottom of that garden, close against the privy door, the left side going in, he had burried it there, just by the passage; I went there immediately along with Miller, my fellow officer. I dug up about six or seven inches in the ground, and there turned up the box exactly in the place he discribed; the tin box was tied round with string; I opened the box, I found it contained three one pound notes, one guinea and four shillings in silver; the prisoner said he gave two pounds fifteen shillings for the watch, out of that money; I told him that together with the money found made seven pounds. I asked him how he counted for the other five pounds odd; he said he had spent it. I told him I must keep the watch, as it was bought with that money, which I did. When he was asked for his defence before the magistrate he said he had robbed the young man. I produce the box with the money in it.

HENRY MILLER Q. Did you go with the last witness to search for this property. I did and found it as he has described. I know no more of it.

JOHN GOWER Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner on this transaction - A. He told me he had a little sum of money he did not tell me how he got it nor any thing about the box.

Q. to prosecutor. Can you speak to that box - A. Yes, there is on it,

"Every man his rights," and two red marks; there is no marks of my own upon it.

Q. Do you know the number of your notes - A. No, I had no marks on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I had the money; I did not undo the box, the box was open; I was very much in liquor when I did it; I resigned up what money I had when I was charged with it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-16

557. MARY MANTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , four silver table spoons, value 3 l. the property of Richard Colley Wellesley , commonly called lord Wellesley, marquis Wellesley, and earl of Mornington - a silver watch, value 30 s. and a gold key, value 1 s. the property of William Travis , in the dwelling house of the said Richard Colley Wellesley , commonly called lord Wellesley, marquis Wellesley, and earl of Mornington .

- HOLCRAFT. I live servant with John Crouch , pawnbroker. On the 1st of July the prisoner brought a table spoon to pledge; it had a nobleman's arms on it; I asked her whose property it was, she said it was her own, she had a number of others; it appeared to me to be a new spoon; I thought she came dishonestly by it; I asked her if she had any thing else to pledge; she said no. I told her I thought she had some more spoons. I took her into custody and sent for an officer; the officer examined her, and found nothing upon her of any value. The officer has the spoon and the watch.

JOHN GOUGH . Q. Have you got the spoon and the watch - A. I have.

Q. You know nothing more than the last witness - A. Nothing more.

Holcraft. They are the same articles that she produced to me.

LEWIS LYNN . Q. Do you live with the marquis Wellesley - A. Yes, as butler.

Q. Do you know his title - A. Earl of Mornington and marquis Wellesley; I believe his name is Colley Richard .

Q. Look at that spoon - A. I know it belongs to the marquis Wellesley's; I know it by the coat of arms and and the four stags upon it; they are particularly marked, because they were for the servant's use; they were in the custody of the steward's boy, in the steward's room; the boy himself missed the spoons, his name is Matthew Franklin .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No; she had nothing to do about our house.

MARY TRAVIS . Q. Do you live with lord Wellesley - A. I do; I am housekeeper.

Q. There is a silver watch - look at it, do you know that watch - A. I do: it is a silver watch; I used to hang it on a nail, by the side of the chimney piece, in my room; I saw it before I went up stairs, and when I came down stairs I missed it.

Q. What day was that - A. Sunday the 31st of July. I have no doubt it is my watch; my husband's name is William Travis .

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mary Manton - A. No, she had nothing to do about our house.

MATTHEW FRANKLIN . I am steward's boy to lord Wellesley; I had the care of the spoons. On Sunday the 31st of July I missed four spoons, I had laid them for dinner in the steward's room; I knew they were all right then. I went out for about half an hour to attend a young lady from church; when I returned I missed them.

Q. to Mrs. Travis. Were you at home on that Sunday at the time the cloth was laid in the steward's room - A. I was. I went up stairs into the rooms to see that every thing was done right; when I came down to my room I missed the watch; I asked the boy if he had taken my watch; he said no. He immediately came into my room, and said somebody has taken the spoons.

Q. Could any person come into that room from the

street - A. Yes, any person coming down the area might come into the room.

Prisoner's Defence. That spoon and watch was given to me by a woman to pawn for her; the woman said the watch was her husband's, and the spoon she found.

GUILTY, aged 44.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080914-17

558. JOHN MACKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , three table cloths, value 2 l. and a sheet, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Farrow , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS FARROW . I live at the George at Holloway, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington .

Q. Did the prisoner ever sleep at your house - A. Yes, on the night of the 10th of August; I did not miss any thing till the Saturday following; he went away on the Thursday morning. I missed three table cloths and one sheet; they were in a middle room in a box in the attic story.

Q. Was that box locked - A. To the best of my knowledge it was; it is a trunk that Mrs. Farrow keeps the linen in, near the room in which the prisoner slept; I have seen the sheets and table cloths in the possession of two different pawnbrokers.

JAMES CROSS . I am shopman to Mr. Ashley, a pawnbroker, No. 45, Gloucester terrace, Commercial road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I cannot swear to him; I think I recollect something of his features. These table cloths were pawned at our house on the 11th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

WILLIAM THOMAS LAMLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, No. 91, Houndsditch, a pawnbroker. To the best of my recollection the prisoner on the 11th of August pawned a sheet and a table cloth; I issued the duplicate; I will not take upon me to say positively it was the prisoner, as some time had elapsed before the discovery had been made.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot say any further than this - I am guilty of the charge - I lay myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-18

559. WILLIAM GOOD, alias SWINBOURNE , was indicted for that he on the 5th of February , with William Wallis , one pocket book, value 1 s. a miniature picture set in gold, value 21 l. and eight guineas and a half guinea, the property of Alphonso Maclean , feloniously did steal .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case stated by Mr. Reynolds.

ALPHONSO MACLEAN . Q. Your name is Alphonso Maclean - A. It is.

Q. Where was you on the 5th of February last - A. On the 5th of February last I was going down the Minories.

Q. What business are you - A. None.

Q. Between four and five o'clock on the evening of the 5th of February last, where was you - A. Going down the Minories .

Q. Were you alone, or in company - A. By myself.

Q. Did any thing occur to you there - A. Yes, there did; there were four or five gentlemen, I knew none of them; which men came at last, sometimes two before me and three behind me; and sometimes the contrary.

Q. Sometimes three before you and two behind you A. Yes. In consequence of a cart being round the corner it stopped close to the window.

COURT. The cart stopped round the corner, was it unloading - A. I cannot say what it was doing, it stopped close to the window.

Mr. Reynolds. Did any thing happen to you - The passage was very narrow between the cart and the window; in consequence of that some of the gentlemen were before me and some behind me, that had walked down with me; they forced close to me.

Q. Do you mean those before, or those behind you - A. Both ways; they forced themselves close to me. During the time the men hustled me I lost a gold mounted miniature picture, eight guineas and a half in gold, and odd silver; I cannot say how much.

COURT. What was all this in - A. The silver and the eight guineas and a half were in a small morocco pocket book.

Mr. Reynolds. In what pocket - A. My right hand coat pocket; I had no great coat on.

Q. How lately before had you observed your pocket - A. Not five minutes before.

Q. Where was your miniature picture - A. In the same pocket, I believe; it had a small morocco case made to fit, with a small gold chain and a small swivel.

Q. When you missed these articles what did you do - A. I put my hand into my pocket to prevent my property from being lost, as I was coming down the Minories.

Q. Did you do that while any of these men were behind you - A. I did. The cart came close to the wall, I put up my hands to prevent the cart from pressing me against the windows; I turned round in a fright, I asked a person if I had dropped any thing; the time was so short that I did not know whether I had dropped any thing, or whether it might be taken.

Q. What became of these five men - A. They were all dispersed directly the alarm was given.

Q. Then you made an alarm directly - A. Instantly. I asked if I had dropped something, and some gentlemen that were present, one of which was Mr. Baron, told me I had been robbed.

Q. You said they were all dispersed, how do you mean dispersed - A. They were gone one one way and the other the other; one ran into a shop.

Q. What did you observe with respect to either of the others - A. I did not see what became of them - one man afterwards was taken, Mr. Good.

COURT. One man ran into a shop, and the other man ran across the way - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Which man was that - A. A tall man in a light great coat; he ran down a passage, we could not take him; Mr. Baron was with me.

Q. Look at the prisoner, was he one of the five - A. He was one that was present.

Q. Was he one of the five - A. Yes, there were more people present.

Q. He was one of the five that surrounded you when your things were lost - did you observe him at the time, which way he went - Recollect yourself - you know it is some distance of time - recollect yourself again, you know you attended before the lord mayor the next day, whom we have here now - A. I did not observe which way he went.

Q. Recollect yourself - I am endeavouring to assist your memory - you were before the lord mayor the day after it happened to you - did you make any observation respecting the prisoner Good - A. I do recollect he walked away from the corner of the Minories, the corner of the right hand.

COURT. What, across the way - A. Yes.

Q. How soon was he taken - A. It was a very short time afterwards.

Mr. Reynolds. You have told me you have no doubt that he was one of the five men that hustled you - A. I have no doubt; but I cannot say who was the person that took the property.

Q. I did not ask that question - the man that you pursued to the shop he was taken - A. Yes, he was close to me at the time the property was lost.

Q. Now, sir, you have stated that five persons hustled you - were there any other persons than these five - A. Yes, there were other people.

Q. Were there any others close to you - A. Yes, there were; there were more people pushing at me.

COURT. If I understand you right, there were five people following you down the Minories, you put your hand into your pocket to protect your property - A. I did.

Q. Just as you came to the cart you took your hand out, you was hustled, and you lost the pocket book and the miniature picture - A. Yes.

Q. Which of the five men it was that took it you cannot say - A. I cannot.

Q. The prisoner was one of them - A. He was one of them; and he was one of them that followed me down the Minories.

Mr. Reynolds. This was on the 5th of February - we are now come in September - how came it that you were not here before - A. After I had been before the lord mayor the wife of William Good came to me.

Mr. Gurney. I object to that. -

Mr. Reynolds. I would put this question to you - have you been a witness in this court from February down to this time - A. No, I have not.

Q. Was not you under recognizance before the lord mayor to appear here - A. I was.

COURT. Why was not you here - A. Application was made to me by the wife, and after I had missed the second session I did not like to attend.

Q. Do not you know it was your duty - A. Yes, but I was afraid.

Mr. Reynolds. I will ask you whether you was not subpoenaed to attend the second sessions - A. I was.

Q. After the second sessions were not you subpoenaed to attend - A. I had one subpoena; it was the second session, I believe, that I was subpoenaed.

COURT. Why were you afraid to attend - A. Because I had not come forward as I ought to have done. I did not like to come.

Q. You might have applied to somebody - A. I did not like to name it to any body.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. This was between four and five o'clock in the afternoon on the 5th of February - A. Yes.

Q. It was not very light then - A. It was between light and dark.

Q. It is a very public street, there were many people passing and repassing - A. Yes.

Q. And there were more than five persons surrounded you - A. Yes.

Q. I think I heard you say that you suspected that you had dropped it - can you say whether you dropped it, or whether any body took it - A. I cannot, because I stopped and asked if any body had picked it up.

Q. You have never been able to find any of your things ever since - A. No.

Q. Then am I to understand you to say, whether you dropped it, or whether it was taken from you, you cannot say - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Reynolds. You cannot say whether you dropped it, or whether it was taken from you - A. I cannot.

Q. Did not I understand you to say that your hand was guarding your pocket at the time you was between these men - A. It was so.

Q. Your money was in your pocket book - was the money and the pocket book and the miniature picture, separate from each other - A. They were in my coat pocket, and separate from each other.

Q. Now, how could you drop it - A. I cannot say how it was dropped.

Q. Then why have you said, you could not say whether you dropped it or no - if the miniature picture was in one parcel, and the pocket book in another, and your hand upon it, how could you have dropped it - A. My hand was in my pocket, but when the cart came so near upon me, I took my hands out of my pocket, to prevent the cart from hurting of me

Q. Do you mean to say that you told the lord mayor that you might have dropped it - A. I mean to state, that at the time I was before the lord mayor, I told the lord mayor that I turned round and asked the people if they had picked it up.

COURT. You never said any thing to the lord mayor about that - you said to the lord mayor the moment you took your hands away from your coat pocket, you missed them, they were in your pocket before - A. It was.

JOHN BARRON . Q. Where do you live - A. No. 1, Sparrow corner.

Q. Do you know Mr. Mc Lean, the prosecutor of this indictment - A. No further than the knowledge I had of him when that affair took place; I saw him on the 5th of February last, between four and five o'clock, round the corner; he was coming from the Minories, passing my door.

Q. Did you see any person near him - A. I saw five persons near him, of which the prisoner was one.

Q. How was the prisoner with respect to Mr. Mc Lean; before or behind him - A. Behind him, I knew at the moment they came round the corner that he was the person they intended to rob; I had observed the characters before in the neighbourhood; I recollected the faces of the whole of the five men; I had seen them very often every day; four or five times in the course of the afternoon.

Q. Then you have no doubt of the prisoner being one of them - A. I have no doubt at all.

Q. Did you see any of them do any thing - A. Two doors below my house a cart was unloading some furniture;

the cart backed over the pavement, which made the passage narrow; it was in that situation or in that identical spot the property was taken from the prosecutor: I sprang over to that narrow part to take them, where the passage was impeded; I observed him to be completely surrounded by them at this time; he was in the centre of the whole; I observed some of the hands of some of the parties at his pockets, but I could not positively say which. Three of the men went forward, of which the prisoner is one, Wallis is another; Wallis went into a shop; one of the five men turned round and went towards the Minories again; Mr. Mc Lean turned round and seemed greatly agitated; he asked if any person had seen a miniature picture drop; he had lost a miniature picture: I told him I thought I could point out the man that had committed the robbery; I then took Mr. Mc Lean into the shop where Wallis was: he went into a clothes shop under pretence of buying a coat; he was very much agitated; I took Mr. Mc Lean into the shop, and had him secured; the prisoner Good was one of the three men that went down Rosemary lane; Good was not pursued, he was taken in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, as the prisoner Wallis was being taken to the watch-house; I kept the custody of Wallis, while Kinnersley brought Good to the watchhouse: I pointed out Good to him, he was on the opposite side of the way to what we were walking.

COURT. You are sure that man is the same person - A. Most assuredly Good is the same person.

Mr. Bolland. Did Mr. Mc Lean attend at the watch-house - A. He did.

Q. Was Good there - A. He was. Mr. Mc Lean said that he had observed the prisoner Good as being of the party that had followed him, and was sometimes before him and sometimes behind him, from Aldgate down the Minories.

Q. Did Mr. Mc Lean say any thing about the loss he had sustained, and what - A. He stated that he had lost a miniature picture; the other property was not mentioned till the next day, and he stated his reason for not mentioning that was, his agitation was so great for the loss of the miniature picture. They were taken the next day before the magistrate.

Q. Was it possible in the situation you were in that the pocket book could fall from Mr. Mc Lean without your seeing it - A. Totally impossible without my seeing it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How many persons were surrounding Mr. Mc Lean - A. Five; I am quite positive there were not a creature else by the spot; it was a fine night and by no means dusky; there were no other person near Mr. Mc. Lean by twenty yards, excepting me; I was the nighest person to him; there was only one door between him and me.

Q. Do you mean to swear and to be understood that nothing could be seen to drop from him though he was surrounded by five persons - A. I do swear it.

Q. How long after this had taken place did you see the prisoner at the bar - A. About fifteen minutes; he had taken a circular direction; he had gone down Rosemary lane and come into the Minories; he was not in the same neighbourhood as the robbery was done; that was in Sparrow corner.

Q. Is that in the city of London - A. Yes, I am confident of it; and am certain he is the man.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . - Mr. Watson. What are you - A. An officer of the ward of Portsoken. On the 5th of February Mr. Barron came to me and told me there was a robbery; I went with him to Mr. Cumberland's house.

COURT. You took Wallis in custody then - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. When you were going from there what happened - A. I saw Good, the prisoner, going up from Sparrow corner up the Minories; Mr. Barron and I had got hold of Wallis; Mr. Barron said there is Mr. Good the other thief, that was in company with him at the time; Mr. Barron went with Wallis to the watch-house; I went up to Good and told him he was a per- that I wanted, and I knew him well by being in the Minories before; I took him in custody to Aldgate watchhouse; he said for God's sake take me to a public house; do not search me in the street.

COURT. Did you tell him upon what suspicion you had taken him - A. Yes, on suspicion of a felony, in the presence of a numerous mob of people: I took him to the watchhouse and searched him; and found in his pocket a sham note and a few halfpence.

Mr. Watson. When you took him to the watchhouse was Wallis there - A. Yes; and Mr. Barron; Good then said in the presence of Mr. Barron; if the gentleman would advertise the property no doubt but it would come to light; he said it several times, and he said it going along to the compter; he said that he was no thief, that he was innocent of the charge that was alledged against him.

Q. Now I will ask you as an officer how many sessions have you attended in order to give evidence on this prosecution - A. Every sessions since last February.

Q. Have you ever seen Mr. Mc Lean here - A. No, 1 have never seen him here; I have seen him elsewhere.

COURT. Has the property ever been found - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. The anxiety that Good had upon his apprehension was his not being searched in the street - A. Yes.

Q. There were a vast many people there, he told you to take him into a public house and search him - A. Yes; I searched him and found this note, some halfpence and a clasp knife; they frequently fling the property away when they are taken.

Mr. Watson. Did you expect that he would fling the property away - A. I did, because the inhabitants had complained to me of them. I knew them; I have known him for a fortnight or three weeks.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time the prosecutor told me that he lost his miniature picture in the watchhouse; I told him he had better advertise it, probably he might find it again. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - were I such a character as the witnesses represent me to be, I should not have held the situations in which I have been entrusted; in the year 1794 I was appointed principal agent to the navigation company, which I held eight years and a half, and in the course of which time many thousands passed through my hands to the general satisfaction of my employers, when I left that situation I went into the coal business; at the time this happened I was looking for another situation near Tower Hill; I was not in company with any one when I was walking up the Minories; I was accused of the charge which

I am now accused of; the prisoner Wallis is a stranger to me.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-19

560. THOMAS BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , six glass decanters, value 1 l. nine glass goblets, value 1 l. 5 s. twelve drinking glasses, value 12 s. two glass salts, value 2 s. two glass lamp tubes, value 1 s. one glass lamp, value 6 d. a glass, value 6 d. a muffineer, value 2 s. a stone mug, value 2 s. two glass cruets, value 1 s. four other glass cruets with silver tops, value 4 s. two finger glasses, value 6 d. six panes of crown glass, value 6 s. seventy two cotton lamp wicks, value 2 s. six pound weight of brass, value 2 s. and six pound weight of iron, value 6 d. the property of William Collins

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM COLLINS . Q. I believe you are a glass manufacturer , in the Strand - A. Yes; the prisoner lived with me as porter .

Q. During the time he was in your shop had you lost several articles in glass - A. Yes. He had the care of my warehouse.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that you entertained did you cause his lodging to be searched - A. Yes; I did not attend the search; his lodging was entered in my book in Harp alley, Fleet market; the officer produced before the magistrate a quantity of glass that was found there.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. You are a police officer of Hatton Garden office - A. Yes.

Q. On the 17th of August last, did you search the lodgings of the prisoner - A. I did, in Harp court, Harp alley, No. 1. up two pair of stairs; there I found a great quantity of glass; all the articles enumerated in the indictment; I went to Mr. Collins' house, after I had been to the prisoner's lodgings; I began with him as though I was a dealer in glass; I first of all asked him where he lived; he said No. 1, Harp court, Harp alley; I informed him I was an officer, and was come to take him in custody on suspicion of robbing his master of a quantity of glass; he made some little hesitation at first, at last he said if he was taken in custody he must go; he seemed in great agitation; I told him there was another officer on his premises with a great quantity of glass; he then said he had taken it from his master, he was sorry for it; I took him away in a coach to Fleet market, left the gentleman in the coach with him, and went up to Hancock the officer to his lodgings; after that we took him to the public house near the office; there he said to his wife, my dear, I have only been married fourteen days, in fourteen days I shall be no more; I took particular notice of that; I searched him, I found two ounces of arsenick; I have had the property ever since in my care.

JAMES HANCOCK . Q. You are an officer - you found these things with Trott - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I am sorry thus to address you on my unfortunate case, which I lay before you; I own that I have done wrong; had I thought that to my distress would follow the distress of my wife and four children, I never should have done so; I never knew what it was to lose my liberty, till this unfortunate case now before you; I can assure you I did not steal the articles to make a property of them, only for my own use, and for ornament, and sorry I am that I have done so; I never did a fault of this kind before.

GUILTY , aged 39

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-20

561. JOHN DREWITT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , an umbrella, value 20 s. the property of John Willats .

JOHN WILLATS . I am hard wareman . I live at No. 23. in the Poultry ; between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, on the 20th of August, I saw the prisoner put his hand in the shop and take an umbrella and run away with it; I immediately pursued him, calling out stop thief, a man without his coat; he was without a coat; upon his entrance into Walbook he was stopped; the umbrella he dropped behind him; which was brought to the Compter with him.

Q. Did you see him drop it - A. No; but it was my property that was taken up.

Q. Are you sure that he was the man that you saw in your shop - A. I have no doubt but that he is the man.

Q. When the umbrella was brought back it proved to be yours - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say when you took me that you was not sure whether it was me or another man without a coat - A. I said I was sure it was you, and I am sure that it is you; he had on a sort of a jacket with light sleeves; I thought he was without a coat, only a waistcoat on, but it proved the next day to be a jacket; I was very sure he was the man.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am an officer; the man was brought to the Compter; I took him in custody; the umbrella was delivered to me by the prosecutor; I have kept it ever since.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Lombard street at the time the outcry was; I was near the Mansion house door, the people were in a mob; this gentleman came and said I was the man, as I was without a coat; I answered I knew nothing about it; the umbrella was picked up in the road; I asked him if he could swear to me; he said it was either me or another man without a coat; it was dark just about nine o'clock.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-21

562. WILLIAM VALENTINE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , a pair of boot tops, value 2 s. the property of John Skipper senior , and John Skipper junior .

JOHN SKIPPER , JUNR. I am in partnership with my father; there is no other partner; he is a shoe manufacturer , No. 77, Great Tower street ; the prisoner was a servant employed in our shop . On the evening of the 11th of August, I went out at five o'clock, leaving the shop and the contents in the care of the prisoner; on the following day, finding that some goods were gone, that I had left in the shop the preceding evening; I called upon the prisoner to give an account of it; he acknowledged having seen them

after I left, but knew nothing more about them; I told him if he was innocent of the charge he could have no objection to my searching the room; by his consent I went to his lodgings in Little Bell alley, Coleman street; he gave me the key of his box; the key of the room was with his landlady; he authorised me to ask for it; I there found a parcel of leather, which is here; there is only one part that I can swear to, which is the boot tops; I can swear to them without any difficulty, from the general appearance; there is no mark on them, but they having passed through my hands that very morning, I could not be possibly mistaken.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses who, gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-22

563. ALEXANDER ISRAEL and JOEL JOSEPH were indicted for that they on the 3d of August , from the person of Michael Mucklow Zachary , a pocket book, value 10 s. and an order for the payment of one hundred pounds, value 100 l. feloniously did take away, but without such force or putting him in fear, so as to constitute it a robbery .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MICHAEL MUCKLOW ZACHARY . Q. You have a place in the custom house - A. Yes. On the 3d of August between three and four o'clock in Fleet street , I was returning into Mitre court, going into the Temple, where I live; when I was in Mitre court Mr. Hill came up to me and asked me if I had lost any thing; I felt in my pocket and missed my pocket book; it contained a variety of letters, and I think there was a one pound note in it, but I will not be positive; there was also an hundred pound draft and memorandums in it.

Q. Did you go in search of the prisoners - A. I did, I went across the way to Flower de luce court with Mr. Hill; as we were passing up the court in the back room of a public house, the window was quite open, Mr. Hill saw three men and I saw three men, I could not see enough to distinguish them; they were looking over a pocket book; they were looking over papers in the pocket book, I could see the red flap to it. We then went for a constable and got one; we returned; as we were going up Flower de luce court presently came a man very near between the constable and myself; Mr. Hill then said that is one of them, I will swear to; that was Joseph. I laid hold of him, and the constable laid hold of him on the other side; there were two more, I believe; one I saw distinctly, his back was towards me. Mr. Hill ran after him. I took Joseph to my chambers in Fig tree court, I left him with my servant and one or two more men. I then went to look after Mr. Hill; I presently found Mr. Hill, he said that he had found the other man, but not knowing where I went to, he was obliged to let him go. When I got into the chambers we searched Joseph, we did not find any thing upon him; he was taken in custody; he said he knew nothing of other man; I said how came you in company with him, he replied it was very easy for one man to pass for another. Mr. Hill coming in he swore to him; he went up to Mr. Hill and said you make a great mistake, or told a story. Joseph said he was a person that belonged to very respectable connections. He was taken to the Compter.

Q. How soon did you see the other prisoner - A. The next day, at Guildhall.

WILLIAM JAMES HILL . Q. You are clerk to Messieurs Robinson and Lee of Lincoln's inn - A. I am.

Q. Was you in Fleet street on the 3d of August in the afternoon - A. Yes.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you saw the prisoners, any one of them, or both - A. Both of them, between Bouvelie street and Mitre court. About four o'clock on that day I was passing down Fleet street, I observed three men pursuing the prosecutor; their conduct and actions led me to suppose their intentions were to rob him; I observed Joseph frequently point to the prosecutor's left hand coat pocket; I having proceeded about an hundred yards, watching their actions narrowly, Joseph turned round and observed I was so doing. In order to elude that suspicion I crossed over the way. When they lost sight of me, and when I had crossed over to the opposite side of the way, Joel Jackson made a sudden stop; he walked continually the whole of the way before the prosecutor; when Joseph and the third person closed in behind the prosecutor, so as to prevent passengers from observing what they were doing; I had a side view, I could see what passed - when I distinctly saw Joseph put his hand into the prosecutor's left hand coat pocket, and withdraw something red, which had the appearance of a pocket book; - the pocket book apparently then went from the hands of Joseph to the third person, that made his escape; they then all crossed over the way together and went up Flower de-luce court. I met them in the middle of the road, in about the middle of Fleet street; I ran and overlook the prosecutor in Mitre court; we both agreed to pursue the prisoners, and going up Flower de luce court I saw Joseph in company of Israel and the other man, they were both looking over some papers which they had in their hands; the pocket book lay on the table, I saw the strop of it; the other part was covered over. We then got a constable, and were upon the point of going into the house, when they all came out; Joseph being the first man I gave charge of him, he was instantly secured and taken to Mr. Zachary's chambers. I followed Israel up Flower de luce court, overtook him and secured him; he asked me what I secured him for, I told him he was charged with a robbery: I begged him to go back with me; I brought him into the Temple. Not knowing where Mr. Zachary lived, and no person assisting of me, the prisoner threatened me for taking him without any proper person. I being a novice in the business let him go; he said if I would not let him go, he would do for me; these words I noticed; I let him go then; I saw Israel the next day and Joseph, at Guildhall; I am quite certain to both their persons.

PETER JONES . Q. What are you - A. I am constable of St. Dunstan in the West; I apprehended Joel Joseph . I searched him, I found nothing on him: I saw Israel run up Flower de luce court; he is the same person that I saw before the alderman the next day.

EDWARD TIPPER . I am an officer of the City. Joseph was brought to the Compter; in the course of a little time afterwards Israel came; in consequence of the description given me, I took charge of him.

Israel's Defence. I was coming along, I met a young

man that was going to the compter; I went with him; I know nothing about it; it is a thing I am quite unacquainted with.

Joseph's Defence. I was out about my business; on my returning home I was taken by the collar; I did not know for what; I know no more of it than a child.

ISRAEL, GUILTY , aged 27.

JOSEPH, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-23

564. JOHN MORGAN , RICHARD CHAPMAN , JOSEPH COOK , and JOSEPH DANIELS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , six live geese, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of William Mason ; and two live goslings, value 6 s. the property of John Cox.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ELIZABETH COX . Q. You are the wife of John Cox - A. Yes; we live at Hillingdon ; my husband is a labourer .

Q. How near do you live to the canal - A. About a mile; I had two goslings; I saw them on the over night, I secured them in my yard; they were not in a poultry house. In the morning I was awakened by hearing the noise of the geese; I got out of bed and called my husband and brother and told them the geese were stolen; they had left the gate open; about a quarter of an hour afterwards I went out a washing.

JOHN COX . Q. You are the husband of the last witness - A. Yes; I got up about six o'clock; I went to my labour, I returned about seven o'clock; I went to Mr. Perry, the justice; there I saw Mr. Mason; I went with him to the navigation; I saw the track of naked feet out of my brother in law's yard, down to the navigation, I saw the track of one man's naked feet only; I saw the mark of shoes.

WILLIAM MASON . Q. You are brother in law of Mrs. Cox - what did you do in the morning when you heard these geese were stolen - A. It was between two and three o'clock when my sister called me; I got up directly; I missed six geese, and the gates were open; on the over night I had placed them in the barn and left the barn door open, because I thought it might be too hot for them; between two and three o'clock in the morning my father and me traced the print of naked feet backwards and forwards to the water; there were the print of several more feet, but not without shoes or stockings; we traced them down to the barge in the river; at six o'clock William Read, the constable, went with us and Cox joined us; we went to search the barge, the constable went to them; they were at breakfast; he said they were his prisoners.

WILLIAM READ . Q. You are the constable of Hillingdon - did you go with the search warrant - A. Yes; a little after six I went to Mason's yard; I saw in the yard and outside, the track of naked feet, and the mark of a dog's foot; there were four tracks of shoes: we traced the marks down the road to the barge; when I got to the barge I saw the prisoners; I knew Chapman to be one of the men that worked the barge, I told him I wanted him, I had a warrant against him for stealing of geese; I asked Morgan if he was not master of the barge; he said he was, and they were his men that were standing close by; I then told them they must all go with me; Chapman and Cox had no shoes on; I told Morgan. I must search the barge; he said, and welcome, he was sure there was nothing there; I saw the stain and dung of geese and a few feathers littering about the barge; I asked for the key of the fore cabin; he said he would go and fetch it; and went on shore; he did not return so soon or quick as I expected with it; I looked at the other end of the barge where they sleep; I saw some fowls laid uppermost and some ducks, then I saw two goslings; I saw Morgan, as I thought, rather in a shuffle; I handcuffed him; Cook made use of desperate words, he said he did not mind two or three men; I took hold of his collar; he kicked me on my legs and kicked me on my private parts; I told him I would chop his head off if he resisted any more; after I secured him I broke open the cabin; the father of the prosecutor brought the key afterwards, and there I found eight live geese, one hen, and three or four ducks; the parties came and swore to the property; Cox owned the dead goslings the moment he saw them; the live ones Mason owned, and other persons six of the others; after they were taken to the magistrate and after they were examined, we divided them and put them in confinement at Uxbridge; they offered me some money if I would get it made up.

Mr. Alley. I dare say you would rather lose a few guineas rather than to stand in the Old Bailey bar - A. Yes.

- MURRAY. Q. You are constable of Uxbridge - A. Yes. There were two of the prisoners put into my custody, Cook and Chapman; I went at nine o'clock at night to carry them some beer and bread and cheese; after they had their supper I locked the door and staid outside to hear if any conversation passed between them; one of them said they could not swear to us last night, and the other said if it had not been for your bare feet they would not have found us in the morning.

RALPH MASON . Q. You gave the key of the cabin to the constable; from whom did you get it - A. From John Morgan ; I gave it to William Read .

The property identified.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

MORGAN, GUILTY , aged 20

CHAPMAN, GUILTY , aged 21.

COOK, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

DANIELS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-24

565. PETER CASSIDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of July , in the dwelling house of William Healy Cook; nine guineas, three bank notes, value 1 l. each, two bank notes, value 5 l. each, and a bank note, value 10 l. the property of Ann Oliver .

ANN OLIVER . At the time I lost the money I lived with William Healey Cook in Somerset street . On Friday the 15th of July I went to my trunk, I there missed upwards of thirty five pounds; I had seen it on the Monday before; it consisted of a ten pound note, two five pounds, three one pound notes, nine guineas, I do not remember what the other was; the ten pound note we traced to a linen draper's shop in Holborn. It is not here; it is in the bank.

Q. How do you know the ten pound note you speak to is yours - A. No further than my husband has the number of it; he is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. This property was locked up in your trunk, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever given the keys of that trunk at any time - A. Long before; but not a great while before I have not.

ROBERT BETTS . I am a publican. I know the number of the ten pound note; I gave it to Ann Oliver - No. 2710. I went to Messrs. Bruce and Simpson, Bartholomew lane; I got the number.

Q. Is any person of that house here - A. No.

WILLIAM BATEMAN . I know the prisoner at the bar to be the person that I took a ten pound note on the 10th of September.

Q. Do you know where that bank note is - A. At the bank of England; I did not observe the number of the note; he gave me the name of Mullen; I put the name on the note.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-25

566. ROBERT ABBOT was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Humphrey Heath , on the 25th of August , a pocket book, value 6 d. five Spanish doubloons, value 15 l. a bill of exchange, value 60 l. and eighteen bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of James Hill .

JAMES HILL . I am a shoemaker . On the 25th of August I was at the Carpenter's Arms , kept by Humphry Heath; I had occasion to go into the privy; I had some loose papers in the pocket book; I examined the papers, and put the pocket book on the seat of the privy; I came away and left it there. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards I missed it; I returned to the public house and made some enquiry about the book. I went to Bow street.

Q. Was your pocket book or money found - A. No. I never saw the pocket book or the money.

Q. You did not see the prisoner there, did you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-26

567. MARGARET DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of July , four guineas, a half guinea, a seven shilling piece, and five shillings , the property of Thomas Morgan .

THOMAS MORGAN . I am a labourer . On the 19th of July last I lost my money, four guineas and a half, a seven shilling piece, four shillings, and two sixpences. I went with the prisoner to No. 3, Church lane, St. Giles's . I had felt it in my pocket about ten minutes before I went in the room, and I counted it in the purse before I went to bed; she saw me count the money.

Q. When did you miss it - A. Not till the woman came up and awoke me; I was fast asleep, it was between one and two o'clock in the night time.

Q. What time was it when you went with her - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Who came and awoke you - A. The servant of the house; the prisoner was going out, the servant maid would not let her go without coming up to see whether I had lost any money or not. I examined my pocket, I found no money in it; I went to lay hold of her, she cried out murder. The watchman came and searched her; he found upon her four guineas and a half, four shillings, and two sixpences.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. I heard murder called; I went in the house and searched the prisoner; I found four shillings, two sixpences, and some halfpence in her pocket. In her shoe I found four guineas and a half and a seven shilling piece. I gave the money to the watchhouse keeper.

JAMES PERRY . I am watchhouse keeper of St. Giles's. When the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, I received from the last witness four guineas and a half, a seven shilling piece, four shillings, and two sixpences and some copper; they have been in my possession ever since.

Prosecusor. All I can say, the guineas were all old guineas, and these are old guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the purse in the room; I had five shillings and some halfpence in my pocket before I saw this man; I did not open the purse to see what was in it. I found it on the floor.

Q. to Lane. Was the money in the purse when you found it - A. Yes, in her shoe; only the silver was loose in her pocket.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-27

568. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of August , a metal chain, value 6 d. a key, value 3 d. and a seal, value 6 d. the property of Sumpter Johnson , from his person .

SUMPTER JOHNSON . I am a hair dresser , I live at No. 9, Old street. On the 16th of August I was coming along Whitecross street , the prisoner made a shove at me, he attempted to take the watch out of my pocket, the chain broke; he took part of the chain away, which consisted of a key and seal; the watch remained in my pocket. I took him within three or four doors; I secured him till the watchman came and assisted in taking him to the watchhouse.

Q. What time of the night was this - A. Between one and two in the morning. I had been to Montpellier gardens with a benefit society to dinner.

Q. Were you the worse for liquor - A. I had been drinking a good deal, I was not drunk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. Were you not nearer drunk than sober - A. I was more tired.

Q. You were tired with drinking perhaps - when did you begin to drink - A. I began about four o'clock to dine.

Q. There were a great many friends - you were cheerful, and the glass went round - A. I had plenty; we had four bowls of punch.

Q. You found nothing on the prisoner - A. The watchman found it in the road where he was taken.

JOHN TOWNES . Q. Did you take charge of the prisoner - A. No, I did not take the prisoner to the watchhouse.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer of the parish of St. Luke; I was not on duty that night. Mr. Hall delivered me the watch and chain. I got Mr. Hall the beadle to attend that night. I took the beadle before the magistrate the next morning.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex, jury before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-28

569. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , two silver tops, value 3 s. 6 d. a writing book, value 1 s. a cut pepper caster, value 1 s. 6 d. nine glass cruets, value 1 s. 6 d. two glass squares cut for painting, value 4 s. 6 d. a soup glass with plated cover, value 1 s. 3 d. seven silver caps, value 13 s. 6 d. two plated tops, value 3 d. a cut thumb bottle, value 3 d. a smelling bottle, value 4 d. a cannister stopper, value 2 s. a glass mug, value 3 s. 6 d. two numbers of the British Trident, value 1 s. two numbers of Middleton's History of England, value 1 s. a glass watch bottle with silver top, value 1 s. 4 d. a cut square, with silver cap beading, value 4 s. three cut smelling bottles, value 2 s. 6 d. one cut square silver mounted, value 3 s. one cut soap glass with plated top, value 3 s. a cut soap glass, value 1 s. a cut smelling bottle with silver cap, value 1 s. 6 d. a cut smelling bottle, value 1 s. a diamond cut soap glass, value 2 s. 6 d. two cut square silver caps, value 8 s. two cut soap glasses, value 2 s. a mustard glass, value 3 s. 6 d. three cut ink glasses, value 6 s. three pair of cut squares silver caps, value 1 l. 4 s. a pair of cut squares capped, value 3 s. a pair of diamond cut soap glasses, value 6 s. 6 d. a cut glass with silver cap, value 6 s. a cut tumbler and plated top, value 1 s. 6 d. two plated pepper tops, value 1 s. twelve silver caps, value 18 s. two silver cruet mounts, value 6 s. a silver ink mount, value 4 s. a cut square cap, value 4 s. two cut tumblers, value 1 s. 6 d. seventy five silver caps, value 1 l. 15 s. fourteen best silver caps, value 17 s. thirty four silver caps, value 18 s. a silver handle, value 4 s. a cut ink stand with plated top, value 10 d. nine plated tops, value 1 s. 6 d. two razors, value 1 s. two knives, value 8 d. thirty eight penny pieces, and sixty halfpence, the property of John Wheeler , in his dwelling house .

JOHN WHEELER . Q. Was the prisoner you apprentice - A. Yes, for five years.

Q. Did you miss any of your property in August last - A. Yes; I missed it at various times. I found silver tops and glasses in the prisoner's box; the box was locked; I found the key in a hole in the cieling over his bed; I found in that box a soap glass, seven silver tops, plated tops and silver tops, a glass mug, and two keys: one of the keys belonged to my shop door, and the other key belonged to his father's street door.

Q. Had he any business with the key of your shop door - A. No. he had not.

Q Did you find any thing else there - A. Yes, there were two glasses for painting, a quantity of penny pieces, and halfpence to the number mentioned in the indictment, I found a guinea and a pound note.

Q. You cannot speak to them being your own - A. Certainly not; I sent for an officer prior to this; he was present when the box was searched; these two keys were found tied together; the officer came, he went to his father's house.

Q. Did you find any box that those keys fitted - A. Yes; I did not attend the search up stairs, I was present when the box at his father's was opened; it was brought down stairs locked; the officer had the key; that box contained a variety of articles which I had missed.

Q. Are there any of these articles that are worth forty shillings - A. No, there is not.

Q. Can you say on any one day that you missed articles to the value of forty shillings - A. I could not say that.

JOHN PITWAY . I am a cabinet maker. In the morning I went up into the prisoner's room, I found a small hole in the cieling, where we found two keys, one opened that box: as soon as we found there was property belonging to Mr. Wheeler we called the prisoner up and asked him how he came by that property; he said to his master, I suppose you will say that money is yours: we got little else from him.

Q. Did he deny the box being his - A. No; I know nothing more than what Mr. Wheeler has stated.

THOMAS STANTON . I am an officer; I searched for the property at Mr. Wheeler's, and this box was found at his father's house; every thing is in it now as it was when I found it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am exceeding sorry for what I have done; the property I took to my father's house; I did not make away with any of it; I meaned to keep it bye and bye and set myself up in business with it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-29

570. ABRAHAM HUNTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Hubble , no person being therein, about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 15th of July , and feloniously stealing therein a coat, value 30 s. three waistcoats, value 15 s. and a gown, value 15 s. the property of Samuel Hubble .

SAMUEL HUBBLE . I am a labouring man , I live at East Acton ; I look after a house, for which I am paid by the week; it is Mr. Finch's house.

Q. How long ago was it that any body lived there - A. Above half a year; the house was broke open the 5th of July; my wife was last in the house.

AMELIA HUBBLE I am the wife of the last witness; I went out between seven and eight o'clock in the morning to work; the door was fast, the gate shut, and the windows down; I left no one in the house; I returned about eleven o'clock, the house was broken open; I lost a coat, three waistcoats, and a gown.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No; I catched him; he ran away from me, and throwed the clothes into the ditch.

Q. Did you see him - A. No. Elizabeth Mason brought the clothes home to me.

ELIZABETH MASON . Q. Did you give any clothes to the last witness - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner throw them into the ditch; another man took them out and delivered them to me.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Year .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-30

571. ELIZABETH MACLIN , and ELIZABETH SPENCER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Cadwallader ,

about the hour of twelve at night, on the 29th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, three pair of pantaloons, value 15 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. and a jacket, value 10 s. his property .

ELIZABETH CADWALLADER . I am the wife of Henry Cadwallader ; I live at No. 4, Pettit court, Hanway street .

Q. Who occupies that house - A. My husband. On the 29th of July, between the hours of ten and eleven, I finished washing; I left a blue cotton striped jacket, two waistcoats, and three pair of pantaloons in a pail of water, close by the kitchen door, for the purpose of hanging them out in the morning; in the morning they were gone; I heard a rustling as I thought in the morning between three and four o'clock; when I got up between seven and eight o'clock, I found the yard door open; I had fastened my doors on the over night and the windows.

Q. How did you find your front door - A. Shut; it goes on a spring lock. I have seen one pair of pantaloons since.

JAMES ALDER . Q. You are a pawnbroker, are you - A. Yes. On the 29th of July, Elizabeth Spencer brought a pair of pantaloons, they were not dry when she brought them; I sent for the prosecutrix; she came and claimed them.

The property produced and identified.

WILLIAM CRAGG . I am a constable belonging to Marlborough street office. Mr. Alder brought the prisoner Spencer up to the office and delivered her in my charge; I asked her how she came by these pantaloons; after some hesitation, she said she would take me to the person that gave them to her. I went with her to a house in a court by Fitzroy market; I went up one pair of stairs to a room door, she put her mouth to the key hole; she said it is me; the door opened. There was a woman behind the door; she pointed to the woman, and said that is the woman I had the pantaloons of. The prisoner Macklin did not deny it.

Macklin's Defence. I was going up Tottenham Court road, I met a young man, he asked me if I would go along with him; I agreed; when I went with him he had no money, he said, about him, but he would give me that which would fetch me half a crown; I went to this woman and asked her to pawn them for me; I said the same at the magistrate's as I do now.

Spencer's Defence. She came to where I lodged in the course of the day; she asked me to pledge them; I took them to Mr. Alder's, they stopped me; she said they was hers.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-31

572. ELIZABETH HART was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 14th of July , from a certain person to the jurors unknown, who on the 13th of July, in the King's highway, feloniously did make an assault upon Joseph Hall , and did take from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. 5 s. and that she afterwards the said watch, so feloniously taken away by a robbery, did conceal and have, she knowing it to have been taken away by a robbery .

The counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-32

573. MARY LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of August , a pewter half gallon pot, value 4 s. three pewter pint pots, value 3 s. and a leather strap, value 2 d. the property of James Harris .

JANE TIWIN . I was in the service of Mr. Harris at the time these pots were lost. On the 16th of August in the morning, I put three pint pots and half gallon pot at the corner of Saffron court ; about five minutes afterwards I came back; my pots, strap, and all was gone.

JAMES WALLER . I live opposite Saffron court, where the pots were lost; I saw the prisoner take up the pots and walk away with them.

ROBERT STANTON . In consequence of information, I pursued the prisoner to a house No. 61, New Gravel lane, and there I found her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-33

574. MARY DOWNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , a watch, value 20 s. a seven shilling piece, three shillings, and a six pence , the property of John Archer .

JOHN ARCHER . I am a letter founder . On the 28th of August I was at the Catherine Wheel in Bridgwater gardens : I was asleep when I lost the watch, seven shilling piece, and the three shillings and six pence; I was very much in liquor, but I can recollect I had the property about me at the time. I had been asleep from ten o'clock at night till one; the prisoner and two young men had been in my company; when I awoke they were gone. The watch was brought to me on Sunday, by some of the party that stole it; I was not at home; the watch was not found upon the prisoner. I was very drunk. Whether I gave it her to take care of I cannot say; I have often gave her my money and watch before to take care of.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-34

575. GEORGE ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , a silver watch value 20 s. the property of Elizophiad Edward Troughton .

ELIZOPHIAD EDWARD TROUGHTON . I am a watch case joint finisher. Last Sunday fortnight, about half past ten o'clock at night, I was tying up the seat of a child's chaise in Golden lane , near Brackley street; the prisoner came up to me, he said what have you broke the chaise; I said yes; he asked me if he should tie it, and after he had tied it I asked him to have a glass of gin; we went to the wine vaults and had a glass a piece; then he asked me where I was going to, I said Berry street, Clerkenwell; he said he lived close by me, he would go part of the way home with me; when we came opposite of Fann street, he said as I had treated him he would treat me with a drink of beer; we had two pints of beer and then he went with me to my own door. When

we got to my door he asked me what o'clock it was; I pulled out my watch, I told him about twenty minutes to eleven; he said I do not think it is so late as that, hold the watch up, I will look; I did; he made a snatch at the watch, took it, and ran away and I after him; I called out stop thief, and he was taken.

JAMES SIMPSON . I am the superintendant of the watch; I took the watch out of the prisoner's left hand jacket pocket at the watchhouse.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Leaping Bar last Sunday; I was pretty groggy: the prosecutor asked me to repair his chaise; I did; he gave me the watch in the public house, what for I do not know, I told him I lived at No. 8, Hatfield street.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-35

576. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , two yards of packing cloth, value 2 s , the property of William Jackman .

WILLIAM JACKMAN . I live at No 58, Mansfield street, Goodman's fields ; I am an army clothier . On the 1st of August, I lost a piece of packing cloth, about two yards.

PETER NICHOLLS . I was with Mr. Jackman when James Silvester gave the information. I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I overtook him about an hundred yards off, I found the packing cloth concealed under his great coat. It was delivered to Isaac Nicholson.

ISAAC NICHOLSON . I am the beadle of the parish; the packing cloth was delivered to me on the first of August. It has been in my possession ever since.

JAMES SILVESTER . Q. You gave information did you - A. Yes. On the 1st of August I saw the prisoner go up the yard; presently after he came out with some-under his coat, I did not know what it was; I saw him go into Mr. Jackman's warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I took that piece of coarse cloth to wrap round me; that is all the harm I have done.

GUILTY , aged 86.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-36

577. ANN HEALY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , seven yards of lace, value 11 s. the property of Charles Brooks .

THOMAS THRELFALL . I am shopman to Mr. Brooks, linen draper , Duke street, Manchester square . On the 18th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into our shop, she wished to look at some handkerchiefs; I saw her take the lace at the time I was getting the handkerchiefs: I put my hand into her pocket and took it out; I acquainted Mr. Brooks of it; she said the lace was not ours, she had bought it in a shop in Oxford street; I can swear to it being Mr. Brook's lace.

WILLIAM ROW . I am a constable; the lace was given to me by the last witness.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy a bit of lace, I had two pair of shoes in an handkerchief on the counter; he found, the lace under the handkerchief on the counter; he says he found it in my pocket; so I leave it to your honour. I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-37

578. JOHN COTTERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , seven handkerchiefs, value 14 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown .

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable of the parish of St. James's. On the 31st of August I was attending the theatre in the Haymarket ; at the time the play was over there was a great crowd; I heard a gentleman say you d - d rascal you have got your hand in my pocket; I walked towards the prisoner, seeing him in a confused state; I catched hold of him, and Barnes laid hold of him on the other side, it was at the box door; I took him over to the public house to search him; we found two or three handkerchiefs in the inside of his hat; and two or three we found in his pockets; I found a napkin in his pantaloons; he begged I would be decent and not unbutton his pantaloons; I put my hand further down and I took out another handkerchief; I stroked him down the calf of his leg, I found a bulge, I tore the pantaloons up and took out another handkerchief; I found seven handkerchiefs and a napkin; I asked him how long he had taken to that trade; he said it was the second night he had ever practised the trade; he was a pewterer; he said he was out of employ and if I would forgive him he would not be guilty any more; we took him to the watchhouse; we made enquiry and could not find who the handkerchiefs belonged to; one of them is marked G. P. No. 1.

THOMAS BARNS . I am a constable, with the other witness.

Q. Have you heard the account that he has given, and is it true - A. It is true.

Prisoner's Defence. The property I bought in Coventry court in the Haymarket.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-38

579. MARY WHITTAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , two gowns, value 18 s. a child's frock, value 2 s. the property of William Bradley ; a candlestick, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Jarvis .

SARAH BRADLEY . Q. Are you the wife of William Bradley - A. Yes. On the 26th of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down the kitchen stairs, I met the prisoner; I went down stairs and missed my property, it was taken from the kitchen; I followed the prisoner and overtook her; I asked her to deliver those things that she had taken out of the kitchen; she dropped the flat iron, and I took out of her apron all the things mentioned in the indictment; I asked her if she was not ashamed of herself in taking them; after a little time she said she was.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no knowledge of the people, nor have I any knowledge of the charge; I have been in distress; my husband was on board of a man of war for two or three days, I had not a bit to eat, and whether I did the deed or did not, I cannot say, I was so distracted with liquor, having had adrop upon an empty stomach.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-39

580. THOMAS HATTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a deal board, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Moore .

JOHN MOORE . I am a blind maker . I lost a deal board on the 9th of this month from my yard in the City road .

Q. Have you seen it since - A. Yes, I saw it when he was detected, about noon on Friday last.

MR. HANLEY. About eleven o'clock it rained very hard; I stopped at the public house reading the newspaper; I saw the prisoner with the board, he asked the landlord if he would buy it, he said no; the prisoner took the board up Peerless row; I stopped him near the constable's house, I asked him whose board it was; he then said it was a scaffolding board, he was taking it home to his master; I seized him by the collar, I told him I would see whose board it was; he then said he saw it fall out of a cart in the City road, he called to the man to take it up in the cart, the man said he had plenty of them, he might take it. During the time the constable came; I then gave charge of him, I insisted he should go before a magistrate; the constable said he knew where he worked, he would take him to his master; he then confessed that he had taken it away from Mr. Moore. Mr. Moore came and owned the board.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer of St. Luke's. On the day mentioned in the indictment, I took the prisoner, plank and all; he said he got the plank out of Mr. Moore's yard.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I worked at Mr. Moore's, I took this scaffolding board in mistake, I thought it was one of my master's scaffolding boards, being all over lime. I was going to carry it to the French hospital.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-40

581. MARY GAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a pair of shoes, value 6 s. a towel, value 8 d. a shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and two children's shirts, value 2 s. the property of Stephen Boisson .

STEPHEN BOISSON. I am a weaver , I live at No. 2, Cock lane . On the 8th of August in the forenoon, I was up in the shop at work with the rest of the family; I thought I heard the latch of the chamber door go, the latch was without a clicker, and it fell heavy; I went to the shop window, looked out, and saw the prisoner outside of the door. I sent my wife after her.

MRS. BOISSON. I went after the prisoner and brought her back; she had the property in her lap; they were taken out of the one pair of stairs room; I had seen them there in the morning, and they were taken at noon.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person coming out of the chandler's shop dropped them, I picked them up; they were rolled up in a towel; the shirt has been mended since I saw it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-41

582. ANN RAPHAEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of July , a shawl, value 5 s. three petticoats, value 13 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a bonnet, value 3 s. the property of Richard Chard ; - a shawl, value 5 s. a shift, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a cap, value 1 s. a piece of lace, value 6 d. a a pair of pockets, value 1 s. the property of John Cryer .

ANN CHARD . I live at No. 4, John's row, Brick lane, Old street . On the 18th of July, about ten minutes after six in the morning, I left all the articles mentioned in the indictment in my room; the prisoner lodged in my house. About a quarter before eight I returned; my property was gone, and the prisoner was gone: I left nobody in the house but her and my two children; one is four years old and the other is six years old. I intrusted her in the same house, she worked in the same manufactory as me.

Q. Did you desire her to take care of the children in your absence - A. I called her up to go to her work - she never has been to the manufactory since.

Q. Is Richard Chard your husband - A. Yes.

MARY CRYER . I left my shawl and other things in Chard's care, about five or six weeks ago; I owned the shift on the prisoner's back.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton garden. I apprehended the prisoner about a fortnight after the robbery; I have a shift that was on her back, it was owned by Mary Cryer I found no other property on her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. While I was at Hatton Garden office, at the lock up house, Mrs. Chard said she would not hurt me if I would deliver the duplicates up.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Of stealing the property of John Cryer .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-42

583. MARY LASHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , a piece of lace, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a hair necklace, value 10 s. and six remnants of lace, value 15 s. the property of John Abbot , junior.

JOHN ABBOT . I am a shopkeeper , I live at No. 1, Berner's street, Oxford road ; the prisoner was my servant . The first time that I missed some property was in March; I got a search warrant; the officer searched the prisoner's box in my presence; I found part of the things mentioned in the indictment, a remnant of lace, a hair chain necklace, and a variety of other articles.

Q. How did you know it to be your property - A. The stockings I knew by the private mark; I had the counterpart of the remnant of lace in the shop, and the mark on the hair necklace I can swear to.

JAMES ALDERS . These remnants I believe the prisoner pawned with me; it was pawned for twelve shillings on the 2nd of May.

THOMAS CHIYENS . I am a pawnbroker. A remnant of lace was taken in on the 11th of June; I cannot positively say who pawned it.

WILLIAM CRAGO . I am an officer. I found a duplicate in a green paper; concealed in the prisoner's bosom;

it was for an article for twelve shillings at Mr. Chivens's. I found another duplicate in her box, pawned at Mr. Alder's for twelve shillings; another ticket for lace at Mr. Harrison's, and another ticket Mr. Abbot went with the ticket and took it out himself.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called my witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury; before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-43

584. RICHARD SKINNER and THOMAS WEST were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September , a hat, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. three knives, value 1 s. 6 d. a watch, value 1 l. 1 s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Edward White , from his person .

THOMAS EDWARD WHITE . Q. What are you - A. I am employed in Apothecaries' hall. On the 2nd of September, after spending the evening. I was returning home; drinking a good deal of wine and other things, and being a good deal overtaken with liquor. I was very sick at the corner of Long lane; by some means I went to sleep at the corner; I know no further.

Q. You laid down - A. I sat down, as I understand. I was violently sick, and a perspiration overcame me.

WILLIAM GULLEN . Q. You are a watchman - A I was off my watch at that time; I was going home about five o'clock; I was walking down Long lane; I observed White sitting at a door, he had lost then his hat from his head, and the shoes from his feet cash, and every thing else that he had about him.

Q. That you cannot say what cash he had; you could see whether he had hat and shoes - A. I was then walking towards my place; I observed as I walked along Skinner and West, they were about as far as you may say a quarter of a mile off; Skinner had the hat swinging in his hand, West was walking with him, and he took out from under his coat, as it were, a pair of shoes, and gave them to Skinner; Skinner asked him what he was to give him; but as to the answer I do not know; he took and put his hand into his pocket and pulled out something, which I supposed to be money; I could not ascertain whether it was or not; afterwards they went in the French Horn alehouse, Beech street, and I went in after them; and when I came out I got assistance and took them in custody; when they came out from thence we came up to Mr. White in Long lane; he was up then and quite awake; I gave them over to the officer.

Q. Did you find any thing upon them - A. Yes, the hat and shoes: the watch and handkerchief has not been found; there was a pen knife picked up by a gentleman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say that Skinner bought of the other prisoner a pair of shoes - A. I cannot say how that is; he gave him the shoes, and Skinner gave him something; what it was for I cannot say.

Q. This was a considerable distance from where the man was sitting on the stop - A. Yes, it was in Barbican that he took the shoes and gave him something.

Q. The prosecutor has told us he was exceeding drunk - he did not know what he was about - A. I do not think he by any means knew what he was about; I asked Skinner which way he came by the hat and shoes; he told me did not know; he was as drunk as the other; they were all drunk; I cannot say West was as drunk as the other.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a watchman in St. Sepulchre's. On Friday morning the 2nd of September, I was returning from my duty, about a quarter after five o'clock; I was going down Beech street; the former witness was standing by the French Horn; Skinner and West came out from the French Horn; Skinner had a hat and shoes concealed under his coat; a person there said he had property that did not belong to him; he made a blow at him; I immediately took hold of Skinner, I said you have got that which does not belong to you, they belong to that person sitting in Long lane; he replied I am innocent; I said so much the better for you if you are innocent you shall go back with me, then we shall know whether you are innocent or not.

Q. Is West a watchman - A. I understand he is a watchman in Aldersgate street.

Q. Was he drunk too. - A. No; nor did Skinner appear to be so drunk at that time, but at the Barley-Mow he got more liquor and appeared worser than he did before; he then throwed some things from his pocket; the penknife was the only thing that was picked up; I secured Skinner in the back room; West made his escape by the assistance of some drover. The hat and shoes were delivered up to the officer; there was some money found upon Skinner; the watch was not found.

MR. KENDRICK. On Friday morning the 2nd of September, I saw the prosecutor sitting on the step, with his head leaning against the door post, without hat and shoes, his sob pocket was cut open, his breeches pocket turned inside out, and his waistcoat pocket likewise; I received information that two men had gone up Long lane and Barbican with the hat in one of their hands; I immediately went after them; I found them at the French Horn in Beech street, they were drinking at the bar. Skinner said he could dispose of the property; I followed them out; I told Skinner he must go with me; he put himself in a posture of defence and said he would not, with horrid oaths; directly Gullen and Davis stepped up; Skinner was going to knock me down; they seized Skinner; I laid hold of West, we brought them back to the Barley Mow, Long lane; Skinner was taken in custody; - a penknife and fifteen shillings were taken from his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Skinner's Defence. I was in a state of intoxication; I might pick them up in the street as they were laying about, I cannot say; I never saw the prosecutor.

West's Defence. When I came from my duty I met with Skinner, we went to the French Horn to have a glass of liquor; the reason I had the shoes, we were playing and walking about together; I never was in Long lane at all.

Skinner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-44

585. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS and JOHN BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of August , ten pair of cotton stockings, value 19 s. the property of John Stirtevant . privately in his shop .

JOHN COMPTER . I am shopman to Mr. Stirtevant,

hosier , Bishopgate street . The two prisoners came into my master's shop and asked to look at some worsted stockings; I shewed them some; objection was made to them; upon which they were put away, and Williams advised Brown to have cotton ones; I shewed them several sorts of cotton stockings; they made choice of one pair; I put them on one side; they asked to look at some worsted ones; I went back to get some worsted ones; when I came back I missed a paper of stockings from off the counter; I said nothing; they made choice of a pair of worsted. While we were agreeing for the price, Williams walked out of the shop with something under her apron, she ran across the street; I pursued her; I took hold of her gown; she dropped the stockings and I picked them up; I brought her into the shop and sent for an officer; when I came back the man was gone; in about half an hour he came in the neighbourhood; then he was taken.

Q. Are you sure that he was the person that was in your shop - A. I am positive he is the person. they came in together; I knew no other than that they were man and wife.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am a constable; I searched the woman, she had no money about her at all.

The property produced and identified.

William's Defence. We went into Mr. Stirtevant's shop, we locked at two pair of stockings, he did not like them; the witness pursued me about an hundred yards from the shop; he knows I did not drop the stockings in the street; they were dropped in the shop.

Brown's Defence. I know nothing of the fact.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY, aged 22.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-45

586. NICHOLS KIEF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , two pair of stockings, value 4 s. 3 d. the property of Robert Ireland .

ROBERT IRELAND . I live at No 78, Holborn bridge I am air hosier on the 15th of August, about two o'clock in the day, I went up stairs to my dinner, I left my son in the shop; I had been up stairs but a few moments before I was called down in the shop, where I found the prisoner at the bar and another woman looking at some cotton stockings, to which they made some objection; the woman in company with the prisoner affected to change her mind, she said she would have, black wortsed stocking, I sold her a pair of black worsted stockings for which she paid me, and they went away. I then returned up stairs; in about two or three minutes I was called down again, the boy seemed a great deal agitated, he told me that the two women had turned into the shop again, and one of them had stolen a pair of stockings, and that both had run away. I pursued the prisoner and overtook her; she came back with me. I observed to her, as she was crossing the street, that she had something in her apron; she attempted to shake them out. I requested her to carry them down to the shop, and not to have a mob about us; she took them out of her apron in the shop and laid them on the counter; The prisoner said she had a pair of black stockings, the other woman had bought them. I asked her who the other woman was, she affected to know nothing of her; I said it was a very improbable story, I should send for an officer; she went down upon her knees and said at my property was restored, I should be no loser; begged I would forgive her. The officer searched her; he found a pair of cotton stockings, my property, in her pocket.

ROBERT IRELAND . Q. You are son to Robert Ireland - A. Yes. On the 15th of August the prisoner and another woman came into the shop and asked to look at some cotton stockings; I shewed them some, and then they said they would have some black ones. I called my father down; he served them with a pair of stockings at two shillings and five pence; then my father went up to dinner. They came in again, the other woman said she would give me one and eleven pence for a pair of black worsted; the prisoner at the bar went to the end of the counter and took a pair of black worsted stockings; when my father came down. I told him which way the prisoner was gone; he went after her and brought her back. I am sure this is one of the women.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. That woman gave me the black stockings; I was obligated to pawn a pair of white stockings I had just been and taken them out of pledge.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Month in Newgate and find One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-46

587. MATTHEW COLE was indicted for that he on the 11th of July , was servant to Robert Pearson , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money, for and on his account, and that being such servant, so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his custody 8 s. 9 d. On account of his said master, that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

THOMAS PEARSON . I am a baker in Fore street, Cripplegate ; the prisoner came to me on Thursday July the 6th, and continued with me till the Monday following; he set spunge on the Monday afternoon, went out and stopped all night; he came the next morning between nine and ten o'clock. I told him he might go about his business, I should not employ him any longer. The next week Mrs. Sibley brought a bill back for which he had received the money the week before, and had not brought it to account.

Q. Had you received the money - A. No.

Q. How much was the money - A. Eight shillings and nine pence halfpenny.

Q. Was he entrusted to receive money for you - A. Yes, and he was to account for it; here is the bill that Mrs. Sibley gave me.

Q. Whose writing is Matthew Cole to the bill - A, The prisoner's.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did he ever bring this to account - A. He did not.

CATHERINE SIBLEY . Q. You are a married woman, are you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you deal with Mr. Pearson for bread - A. Yes. I paid that bill to the prisoner; he gave me that bill and receipt on the 11th of July.

Q. to prosecutor. What day did the prisoner quit your service - A. On the 19th of July. I believe; it was Tuesday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money in the afternoon, I got a little in liquor, I spent the money; I am very sorry for it indeed. I sent a man to Mr. Pearson to tell him when I got a constant place, that as soon

as I had staid a week I would pay him the money. Instead of that he deceived me, he did not go.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-47

588. ANN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , two pair of sheets, value 1 l. 10 s. and a towel, value 2 d. the property of George Alsop .

ELIZABETH BROCKWELL . I am a widow, I take in mangling, I live in White Lion court, Tower street On the 19th of August Ann Taylor came and asked for Mr. Alsop's linen; I told her they were not done, they would be done in a couple of hours; she said that would not do, Mrs. Alsop was going out, she wanted the sheets to air them. Seeing that she was a stranger, and not the person that brought them, I said I did not know which were Mrs. Alsop's things; she said Mrs. Alsop's things has a plain petticoat, without any tucks. I looked in the bundle, and found it answered with her description; with that she stopped, and I mangled four sheets for her, and gave them to her and a towel.

Q. You are sure that is the woman, are you - A. Yes. I went to Mrs. Alsop's house in the evening; she requested me whether I had done her things, I said not all of them, she had got the sheets; she said she had not seen the sheets nor the woman. The prisoner is the person I delivered the sheets to.

MRS. ALSOP. I am the wife of George Alsop

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know nothing of her. I sent the woman that washed them to the manglers; the prisoner lived with that woman. The prisoner never brought the sheets to me.

SARAH BOURNE . I am a pawnbroker in East Smithfield. On the 19th of August, the prisoner pledged two pair of sheets; I lent her a pound upon them; she said they were her own.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with Mrs. Roberts that washed for Mrs. Alsop; she asked me to do her a favour, she said Mrs. Alsop was going to lend her some things to pay her rent, would I pledge them for her, I said the woman would not give me the things, being a stranger; she told me there was a petticoat without tucks. I went and pledged them for this washerwoman. We were both taken up; Mrs. Roberts begged me not to mention her, they could not hurt me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-48

589. THOMAS THATCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of August , a seven shilling piece , the property of John Casey .

MRS. CASEY. I am the wife of John Casey ; we sell fish in the street , in Mile End road . On the 6th of August, between two and three o'clock, my husband sold sixpennyworth of salmon to a gentleman facing the door, he gave my husband a seven shilling piece, my husband gave him change; he handed the seven shilling piece over to me to look at it, and before I had time to look at it the prisoner twisted my hand and took it out of my hand.

Q. Did you know him - A. Yes, many years before; I thought he was in sun; he never returned it to me; I asked him for it, he only laughed at me

Q. What is the man - A. He is gate keeper of Mile End poor house .

Q. When did you take him up - A. I gave him liberty from Saturday till Tuesday, then I sent my boy down to see if he would pay the seven shilling piece; he only laughed at him.

Q. What magistrate did you go before - A. In Lambeth street.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. You have sworn to tell the whole truth, do you know that - A. Certainly.

COURT. You know you have taken God to witness that you will tell us the whole truth - A. Yes, I have.

Mr. Gurney. You have not told the whole truth - my lord asked you what magistrate you went before, and your answer was you went before the magistrate in Lambeth street - that was the Tuesday after - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath did you not the same evening you lost the seven shilling piece, go before Mr. Thelwall the magistrate - A. I did not tell the magistrate that.

COURT. Woman you are sworn to tell the whole truth - did you go before that gentleman - A. I did.

Mr. Gurney. You went and told him the same story that you have told to day - A. No, sir; I told him he took the seven shilling piece; he told me to summons him and get the seven shilling piece back again. I went to a constable, he told me the court had no business with a street robbery.

Q. You have known this man many years - A. A matter of two or three years.

Q. And he knew you - A. Yes.

Q. You were trying whether the seven shilling piece was good - A. My husband handed it over to me to look at it.

Q. This man said I will tell you whether it is good or not - he took it out of your hand - A. No, he twisted it out of my hand.

Q. Did not he say if you would examine your salmon kit you would find it there - did not the seven shilling piece fall in the salmon kit - A. I do not know where it fell.

Q. Upon your oath, did not both of you search the ground to see whether you could find it - A. I did, I could not find it.

Q. Did you look in your kit - A. I did not, nobody asked me; the kit was not within two yards; he twisted it out of my hand.

Q. Upon your oath was not he searched upon the spot, and no seven shillings found - A. No; upon my oath he walked into the middle of the road; he was twenty yards off when he was searched.

Q. Nothing was found upon him - A. No, but he might easily shift a seven shilling piece.

Q. Were you sober - A. I will swear I was sober.

JOHN CASEY . Are you the husband of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Was she sober - A. Yes, and I was sober; we have never a drop hardly any day till we have done our business; I was selling pickled salmon that day; I sold six pennyworth of salmon to a gentleman, he handed me a seven shilling piece, I handed it to my wife and desired her to look whether it was a good one; the prisoner twisted her hand and took it out; I entreated him several times to give it her back, but to no purpose. I said I would go to a constable, he said I could not be too quick about it; I went to two before I could get

one. At the turnpike we met the prisoner in the high road, he was coming towards us. I wanted to stop him for the officer to search him; he begged me not to lay my hands upon him - I did not. He said he was going into Mr. White's upon business, and when he came out Mr. Wright searched him and dismissed him. On the Tuesday following I brought him before the magistrate.

Q. Not before - A. Unless my wife went, she might go, I did not.

Q. Who did she go before - A. I believe he went before Mr. Thellwall; I believe so, and am sure of it. He gave some advice but that advice would not do.

Q. He gave her advice and dismissed the complaint - A. I do not know what he did; we went to a police officer; he said he would go and fetch him without a warrant; the people of the workhouse would not let him come without a warrant, so the magistrate wrote a few lines that the man that kept the gate was charged with a felony; so they delivered him up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You were as sober as your wife - A. We were both sober; and if we were any otherways we ought not to be robbed.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a constable. I was sent for on that day; when I went I conceived that they were both in liquor. I took him into a room and searched him; I found three shillings and sixpence in silver.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. From their story, and from what you saw, you thought you were not justifiable in taking the man in custody - A I did.

COURT. You acted right.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I am totally innocent of taking the seven shilling piece; at the time of this event taking place, I was a pauper in the poor house, Mile end, I had the care of the outward gate, as porter. On the day mentioned, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard the cry of pickled salmon by Mrs. Casey; I went out to get three penny worth of salmon; when I came out Mr. Casey was trying a seven shilling piece by ringing it on the stones; when his wife asked him to let her try it, and when it was in her hand I very foolishly put my fore finger in her hand and said let me try if it is a good one; at that time she shut her hand and confined my finger, I pulled my finger out of her hand; at this time the seven shilling piece might have fell out of her hand, but I did not hear it fall; the woman accused me of taking it from her, which I know I did not; several people collected together about the spot, and Mr. Beckit, master of the workhouse, came out and said I should be searched; I went over to the public house and was searched; I had only three shillings and six pence about me, and no gold. I have known the prosecutor and his wife several years, and was rather intimate with them; it is about two years since I was afflicted with a rupture, I was obliged to go into the poor house; my late master, Mr. Mount, has known me forty years; I had no inducement to steal being well provided for in the workhouse, they allowed me fourteen shillings a week; and they have further informed me of reinstating me to my situation at the gate. I am innocent of taking the money, nor do I know what became of it; it was lost by the prosecutor or his wife.

MR. BECKIT. - Mr. Gurney. You are master of the workhouse; in consequence of this charge being made did you come upon the spot - A. I did.

Q. Were the prosecutor and his wife both sober - A. They were both drunk, but the woman was the most affected with liquor.

Q. They made the charge against him of this seven shilling piece. - A. They did; he was taken into the parlour and searched directly. I have known the prisoner twenty years; I never knew an honester creature, I should not be afraid to trust him with money untold.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-49

590. HENRY LOCK was indicted for feloniously forging on the 21st of November , a certain order for the payment of ten pounds, with intention to defraud Messrs . Walpole and co .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged order for the payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention; and

Two other counts for feloniously forging, uttering, and publishing as true, a like order for the payment of money, with intention to defraud Thomas Baverstock .

The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case stated by Mr. Const.

THOMAS BAVERSTOCK . Q. What are you - A. I am a victualler ; I kept the Crown and Cushion, Princes street , in November last.

Q. Where is Princes street - A. Leading from Barbican to Bridgewater square.

Q. What had you been previously in before that time - A. I was an apprentice to a water gilder.

Q. Had you ever been in the watch line - A. Yes; such as gilding watch cases; I served my time in Charter house lane; my employer lived in Red Lion street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Did you during that time know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, perfectly well; he was a watch case maker.

Q. Look round and tell me whether you recollect him now - A: I do; he had a wen then upon the right side of his face; there is no wen now, there is a scar.

Q. Does that scar appear to you to be where the wen was - A. Exactly so. On the 21st of November, about seven o'clock, the prisoner came to me at the Crown and Cushion, and he asked for change of a fifty pound bank note; he said it was for Mr. Richards of Bridgewater square; I knew Mr. Richards, he is a watch case maker; I told him I could not give him change; he went away; in ten minutes he returned again, I was in the tap room, Mrs. Baverstock called me out and told me the prisoner had come to; change of a check; I came out to him, he wanted he said change for a check of ten pound; he gave me the check, and I gave him a five pound bank note and the rest in cash; he produced a check upon Mr. Walpole's house. After he had got the cash he took a glass of rum and went out.

Q. In consequence of some suspicion that you entertained what did you do - A. I went to Mr. Richards.

Q. Look at that check - is that the check that the prisoner presented to you - A. It is the check, this is my hand writing. In consequence of the enquiries I made at Mr. Richards, I went to Mr. Walpole's, they

refused my presenting it, it was after hours, and they did no business; but when I wished to know whether it was a good one they took it very politely and told me; from that I went to Hatton Garden, knowing Trott the officer, to lay an information against him. I did not see him till about a month ago, then he was in custody.

Q. Are you quite sure that the prisoner at the bar whom you saw at the magistrate's, was the person that you had formerly known, that had the wen on his face, and is now the prisoner at the bar - A. I have not the slightest doubt in the world; I verily believe he is the man; at the time he came to me he had the wen on his face, which he has not now. I have no other doubt.

COURT. If you have a doubt you must say it - A. I cannot say that I have; I really believe to the best of my knowledge that he is the man.

Q. If you have any doubt you must say it - A. That is all the doubt about it; I verily believe from my soul that he is the man, he not having the wen on his face is all the doubt I have about it.

COURT. Then you have a doubt about it.

RACHAEL BAVERSTOCK . - Mr. Const. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I cannot swear it is the man, he had a wen on his face.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-50

591. JOHN LOCK was indicted for feloniously forging on the 20th of April , a certain order for the payment of six hundred pounds, with intention to defraud George Grote and William Willoughby Prescot .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged order for the payment of money, with the same intention; and

Four other counts for like offence, stating his intention to be to defraud sir Charles Price , bart. John Sidbar , Thomas Horncastle , and divers other persons.

The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Const.

CHARLES JACQUES . Q. You are secretary to the commercial dock company, of which sir Charles Price is the chairman - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so in April last - A. I was.

Q. Do you know the names of the persons forming that company - A. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Sidbar , and Thomas Horncastle .

Q. In what manner are disbursements made, are they made to you to pay all the articles that may be due - A. They are, sometimes.

Q. Do you remember in April last having a draft, subscribed, sir Charles Price , John Sidbar , and Thomas Horncastle , of which you wrote the body of that draught - A. I remember on the 1st of April such a draught being delivered to me.

Q. Do you know the draught - A. That is the identical draught, I am certain of it; that is for twenty one pounds, which I filled up and wrote myself

"London, 1st of April, 1808; Messrs. Grote and Prescott, pay Charles Jacques , or bearer twenty one pounds, on account of Commercial dock company. Sir Charles Price, bart. John Sidbar , Thomas Horncastle ."

Q. Are each of these the hand writing of the different gentlemen - A. Yes.

Q. On the 1st of April tell us whether you saw the prisoner - A. I did; I had known him before, I suppose between three and four years; he called on that day and paid me ten pounds, a debt which was due to me; that was the occasion of his calling.

Q. Had you a check book lying there - A. Yes, it was laying on the table.

Q. Had you occasion to send this draft for twenty one pounds to the bankers, or were you about to do it - A. I called a porter, a messenger who was down stairs, to take it in the presence of the prisoner; the prisoner said I will give you cash for it; I called the man back, and he gave me cash for it.

Q. After he gave you the cash what became of you - A. I am not certain whether it was before or after he gave me the cash that I went out of the room; I was out of the room for five minutes, not longer, some person wanted to speak to me; I then left the prisoner in the room and no one else; when I returned, I do not recollect any thing particular; he staid some time and then went away.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. I think on the 13th of April, the prisoner called upon me in the accompting house and told me he was going out of town; and left me an order for a bedstead which he said he would sell me cheap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You said you was not certain of the time when you left the room, whether it was before or after that he gave you change for this check - A. I rather think it was previous.

Q. This check of twenty one pounds was paid the next morning at your bankers - A. I do not know, I believe he left me too late on the first of April to present the check that day.

WILLIAM HUSK . - Mr. Knapp. You are clerk to Messieurs Grote and Prescott - A. I am.

Q. Look at this draft for six hundred pounds, and tell me whether you recollect it - A. I do; it was presented to our house on Wednesday the 20th of April, by a man of the name of Jones, a ticket porter; I was present.

Q. Do you remember paying any check for twenty one pounds - A. That check is likewise my paying; I do not recollect to whom I paid it; the twenty one pounds is drawn on the 1st of April and paid on the 2nd.

Q. What are the names of the partner s in Mr. Prescott's house - A. George Grote and William Willoughby Prescott .

WILLIAM JONES . - Mr. Const. What are you - A. I am a ticket pocket of the City of London.

Q. Do you remember in April going to Messieurs Prescott for payment of a draft - A. Yes, on the 20th of April.

Q. From whom did you receive that draft - A. From a young man of genteel appearance, in St. Michael's alley, Cornhill, at the George and Vulture tavern ; the place where I apply for my labour.

Q. Had you any particular instructions to go with this draft - A. I had a paper given me; the person that employed me called after me, saying he would rather have twelve fifties, that was contradicting the order in part; I presented the draft to the clerk; he rather hesitated, and shewed the draft to the clerk near him, they afterwards paid me in three two hundred pound notes; for which I went to the bank and got twelve fifties; I took them to the East India House, to the secretary's office, that was the place appointed; I enquired for Mr. Jackson, the name given me; there was no person in

the office that knew him; a person came up to me while I was enquiring of the messenger at the door; I immediately went with the person to Langbourne coffee house, and I saw the person that employed me under the gateway.

Q. Should you know this person again - A. I think I should if I was to see him; it is a long time ago, I cannot say.

Q. Look round and see whether you see him - A. There is no person in the court that answers the description.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-51

592. JAMES HANKEY and THOMAS HUMPHREY were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Aaron Woodward , on the 12th of July , putting him fear and taking from his person and against his will, a guinea, two half guineas, a bank note, value 2 l. and sixteen bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

AARON WOODWARD . I am a leather breeches maker ; I live at No. 24, King street, Westminster. On the 12th of July, between five and six o'clock, I was seeing a rowing match in Mill bank road ; I lost twenty pounds and two shillings; I was hustled by some persons that my life was almost gone out, they hustled me about two or three minutes; I was ready to faint.

Q. Do you know who the persons were that hustled you - A. Humphrey was one; and I saw Hankey put a screw thing in my pocket and turn it inside out; I saw in his hand when he was going away; I had two half guineas, a guinea, sixteen one pound notes, and a two pound note; they were bank of England notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Mr. Woodward, you went to see the rowing match - I suppose you meaned to bet, or else you would not have took twenty pounds in your pocket - A. No; I took it with intention of paying some of it away as I returned. There was a great crowd in Mill bank road; it was a pretended fight and I went to see what it was; I was shoved into the crowd; Humphrey was one, and Hankey was another, and one I never could find, behind Humphrey, and there was of the name of Tallboys; I could have taken Hankey the same night if I had help; I saw him and four more in less than an hour after; I knew he was the man that robbed me

Q. You know that if you can convict Hankey and Humphreys you will have eighty pounds reward - A. I do not want any reward.

Q. I am not asking you that - I am asking you whether you do not know that you should have so much - A. I never knew any thing about it.

Q. How old are you - A. I am fifty two.

Q. And you mean to say that you never heard of a forty pounds reward - A. There is a reward, but I do not know the meaning of it.

Q. Then what you told me two minutes ago is not true - you have heard it - A. I might have done.

Q. I am not asking you what you might have done, have you not heard there is a forty pounds reward - A. I cannot say, but that I have heard such things; I do not know whether they are true or not.

Q. I dare say you do not believe it is true, that there is a reward of eighty pounds if you convict the two prisoners - A. It may be so, I do not know.

Q. What do you believe - A. I dare say it is so, I do not know.

Q. You have not charged any other person but the prisoners and Tallboys - A. No.

Q. Did not you charge another man with being the man that hustled you - A. I did not charge him; he was the outside; I thought he was one of my friends; he was not.

Q. Upon going up to him did not you take hold of his collar - A. I did not so help me God.

Q. Did not you take him by the collar in the presence of twenty people and the officer - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know any officer belonging to Queen square office - A. I know no other than the Raneys.

Q. Do not you remember taking an officer to the cook's shop and taking up another man - A. I took him up, I discharged him; I thought he was the man; I found he was not; I did not want him to go before the justice; he said he would go before the justice.

Q. Then you charged Tallboys with being one of the men - A. I am sure he was one of the hustlers.

Q. Tallboys was taken before the magistrate, the magistrate did not believe he was one of the men, he was discharged - A. He was discharged with bail.

Q. Did not you, upon Tallboys' brother coming forwards as bail for him, say he was one that hustled you - A. I did not; I thought he was my nephew, he was not.

Q. Upon Hankey's father coming forward for his own son, you said you were in the hustle - A. He was in the hustle, he got hoisting up a stick, he did not hustle me.

Q. Do not imagine that I said he did hustle you - did not you say before the magistrate that he was in the hustle - A. I did say so.

Mr. Bolland. How many people did hustle you - were there ten - A. I cannot say how many.

Q. What time in the day do you state this robbery to be committed - A. Between five and six o'clock. Humphries was taken up about half after six.

Q. Have you never said that this robbery was committed about four o'clock - A. Never.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am one of the officer of Queen square office. I was upon the bank at the time this man complained of being robbed, I was very near being robbed of my watch myself; I went to the public house and left my watch. When I came back, I saw the man, he said he was robbed; I stopped upon the bank about half an hour, I took Humphries in custody, he was in company with a young woman. On Thursday my brother officer Raney and I went to a public house in Windmill street, St. James's; the prosecutor pointed out Hankey, he also pointed out Tallboys: they were taken in custody, Tallboys was discharged.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How many persons did the prosecutor point out - A. Tallboys and Hankey; he said Hankey was in the crowd, he did not say much of the person of Hankey, that I thought I was not authorised to take him in custody. He said he saw him upon the bank.

Q. Did not he charge him of robbing him - A. No.

Q. Did you see Baker in the boat - A. I jumped in the boat after Baker left it to see the rowing match.

Q. You were there at the time of the bustle; upon your oath, did you see either of the two prisoners in the bustle - A. I did not: I saw Hankey's father in the

bustle with a stick in his hand five minutes before I heard of the robbery.

WILLIAM RANEY . I know nothing more than being with Gillmore, and apprehending the two prisoners.

Q. Who was with Humphreys - A. A young woman when I apprehended him at the Roebuck.

MR. EDWARDS. I am a wire worker, I live in Compton street, Soho.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prosecutor after he had been robbed in Mill bank - A. Yes, in less than five minutes after the bustle I heard him say to a person that asked him whether he was the gentleman that lost the property, he said yes he was; he was then asked if he could recognize any of the parties; yes, he said, a man in a butcher's frock, and that was the only man he should know.

Q. to Gillmore. When you apprehended the prisoners had either of them a butcher's dress on - A. No.

- BAKER. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a Bow street police officer - A. I am.

Q. Do you know Hankey - A. I do.

Q. On the afternoon of the rowing match did you see him at the Roebuck public house - A. I did, about six o'clock.

Q. Was you upon Mill bank at the time this man was robbed - A. I cannot say, I believe I was in the Roebuck at the time.

Q. Do you remember coming out of your boat - A. I do, I went immediately to the Roebuck.

Q. How far was your boat from the Roebuck - A. Not above two minutes walk. When I went to the Roebuck Hankey was coming out of the door. I went backwards in the ground, I saw him return in about four or five minutes, with bread and cheese in his hand into the skittle ground; there was no playing at skittles as I observed, they were sitting smoking and drinking porter.

Q. Did Hankey continue there for any length of time - A. About an hour, or three quarters of an hour, then he turned into a room where there was dancing; he continued there longer than me.

Mr. Bolland. When you came into the Roebuck did you see Humphries there - A. Yes, he was in company with a young woman, she was sitting by his side; he staid about three quarters of an hour, he went away with the young woman, he told me he was going to take tea.

- BICKNELL. Q. What are you - A. I am a silversmith, I live in Compton street.

Q. Was you at the Roebuck, Mill bank, on the afternoon of the rowing match - A. Yes, I went there about five o'clock in the afternoon; Hankey was there. I came away about eight o'clock, and left him there.

Mr. Bolland. Did you see Humphries - A. I did, he was sitting by the side of a young woman. I left him there.

- HUNT. I am a weaver by trade, I live in Portland street. I was at the Roebuck at Mill bank on the afternoon of the rowing match, I was there before four o'clock; I saw Hankey there playing at skittles, I staid there two hours; I left Hankey there; I went out a little while; when I came in Hankey was eating some bread and cheese; excepting the time I went out I never missed him at all; Humphries was sitting there with a young woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-52

593. LETITIA MEGIT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , a diamond ring, value 30 l. the property of David Gass , privately in his shop .

The prosecutor being called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-53

594. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 24 s. and four yards of linen, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Blowers , privately in his shop .

JOHN GUDGEON being called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-54

495. JOHN CONWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of July , a glass tumbler, value 6 d. one guinea, two half guineas, and a seven shilling piece, the property of Joseph Francis , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH FRANCIS . I am a publican , I lived at the corner of Neptune street, Ratcliffe highway .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he came to my house on the 18th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, with another man, he called for three pints of porter, he paid for the two last pints of beer; the other man had set off from him; he went to the tap room back again, and he stood and watched me for a long time. One of the customers desired me to draw him a pint of beer; I carried the pint of beer into the parlour, and when I went back from the parlour I saw him walk out of the bar. I pursued him directly.

Q. You suspected him - A. Yes; then I found him sat down in the first box in my tap room, he had his hands between his thighs, and that handkerchief with blue spots covered it over. When I came to him, I said my friend what have you been doing in my bar, he said he was not in my bar; I told him he had. I lifted up his right hand, I found my tumbler, I took it from his fist.

Q. Was any money in the tumbler - A. Yes, seven seven shilling pieces, two half guineas, and a guinea, was in the tumbler.

Q. Did you loose that money out of the bar - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the money the last time before it was stolen - A. Just about ten minutes before, after I had given change to my customer.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am an headborough. On the 18th of July, about a quarter after eight o'clock in the evening, I went and apprehended the prisoner; the prosecutor told me that he found the property upon him, in the presence of the prisoner; the prisoner said he did not take it from the bar, he took it up from the tap room floor.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw a glass there since I was born.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 60.

First Middlesex, jury before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-55

596. TIMOTHY JEFFERIES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , a silver watch, value 50 s. the property of John Marshall , in his dwelling house .

JOHN MARSHALL . I live in Duke street, Picadilly; I keep the Bunch of Grapes ,

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 27th of August last - A. I did; the prisoner took it; he was a lodger in my house.

Q. Did you see him take the watch - A. I saw the watch in his custody; I had lent the servant girl the watch; he brought the watch down stairs and gave it to my wife; he said he was a police officer, and he would take care of it; after he gave the watch to my wife he sat down in the tap room; there was some little dispute between my servant and me about her spoiling some fish me over night; he made a demand of the watch, and he said he would take charge of the girl.

Q. What was he to take charge of the girl for - A. I do not know.

Q. Had there been any charge against the girl for stealing the watch - A. No. He sat down in the tap room, after he had demanded the watch, and minutely looked at it; he said there was some private mark, he wanted to see; after that the dispute between me and my servant was all made up; I asked him for my watch; he said I will not give you the watch now, never mind, I will take care of the watch; the next morning he went out early, he returned on the following day very much in liquor; he told me he had left the watch at Hounslow, then he said at Brentford, and afterwards he said at Knightsbridge; I sent for an officer; after the officer had taken charge of him, he said he had left it at the Castle at Brentford; he said he was sorry for what had happened, he meaned to fetch it the following day.

THOMAS BARRETT . I am a publican at Brentford. On the 28th of August, the prisoner got off the coach and asked me for one shilling and sixpence to pay for coach hire, I lent it him; he asked me to lend him sixpence to go up the town with; he came back and dined with me; after dinner he told me he had no money, he would leave the watch in security for what he had.

Q. How much did he leave it for - A. I lent him in the whole twenty five shillings and eight pence on the watch; he had been in my house five or six times; he represented himself as a police officer.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the night the talling out was between the girl and the mistress, I came down with the key of the girl's room in my hand; I said the girl is leaving the house; yes, Mrs. Marshall said, I wish I had Mr. Marshall's watch out of her room; I went up and got it and gave it to Mrs. Marshall; she throwed it down on the glass: I said you will break the glass of that watch; I said give it to me; which she did. On the Sunday morning I got a little in liquor, I went down to Brentford to Mr. Barrett's, as he has said; I pulled out the watch and said I will leave it till tomorrow, and then I will come and redeem it; about twelve o'clock at night, I returned home, Mr. Marshall sent his girl up to me to know what I had done with the watch; the answer was the watch was safe enough, I would bring it back tomorrow evening; I had no intention of keeping his watch; I am a pensioner; I have served his Majesty sixteen years; I have a shilling a day; I could go and get the money at any time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-56

597. THOMAS BROWN and THOMAS SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , nine silver table spoons, value 9 l a marrow spoon, value 15 s. and a silver soup ladle, value 5 l. the property of Darcey Tancred , esq . in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ANN WILLIAMS . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Darcey Tancred - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so on the 21st of August - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Where does he live - A. He lives in Stone building, Lincoln's inn ; he lives there with the family; he has a kitchen there, and his chambers are immediately over the kitchen.

Q. Were you at home on the 21st of August - A. Yes; I had not been out of the house the whole day; in the evening I was sitting at the kitchen window, between seven and eight o'clock, I heard the alarm of a foot above my head; I thought to myself it was the dog at first, but the dog was in the kitchen; I went up stairs, there is double doors; I opened the door I found, Thomas Smith , the boy , in the room; I holloed out; the window was open to the garden, and likewise to Stone buildings; after I gave the alarm, I asked him what brought him there, and what he wanted; he said do not be alarmed I want my hat; your hat. I said, how came it here; he said I throwed it in; I said you villain you come to thieve; he said do not be alarmed, I have not come to rob you; I said you have come to rob my master, and that is worser; I brought him down stairs; the first person I saw was Garret, he took him.

Q. How long before had you been in this room - A. It was not above ten minutes before I brought him down that I was in the room; it might be four o'clock when I was in the room, and I saw all the things safe in the knife case.

Q. How did you find them this time when you took the boy in custody - A. When I brought the boy down I went up again; I found the knife case in the check handkerchief.

COURT. With what - A. Nine silver spoons, the soup ladle had been on the side board, that was in the check handkerchief, and the marrow spoon was in the handkerchief.

Mr. Knapp. Are you sure they were all safe in your master's knife case between three and four o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. Does that check handkerchief belong to you - A. No, nor to any body else in the house; the knife case always stood on the side board, I found it on a large table.

Q. Are you sure these spoons are your master's - A. Yes.

- GARRET. Q. You are the gardener to the society of Lincoln's inn - A. Yes.

Q. You were called upon this occasion by the last witness - A. Yes; I took the boy and delivered him to Barker. I said there are more thieves up stairs; I went up stairs and come down again; this Brown was

pointed out to me; he was standing right opposite to Mr. Tancred's window; Mr. Wynn's servant said that man was with the boy; the man said it was a pretty story that he should come to look at the thieves, and that he should be taken in custody.

EDWARD HARRIS . - Mr. Knapp. You are a servant of Mr. Wynn's, living at No. 5, in the Old square - A. Yes. On Sunday night, just about six o'clock, I was sitting at the window, I saw the two prisoners some behind the chapel, to the front window where I was sitting; they were in conversation together, but not very near together; when they came in the square opposite of the window the boy turned to the lost and me other to the right; they were in conversation when they came round the corner. The boy turned to the left and the other turned to go to the bottom of the square; they turned and came nearer together and went to the bottom of the buildings; I saw nor heard no more of them till the alarm was given that they were thieves.

Q. You went there and pointed out Brown as being with him - A. Yes; I am positive sure that Brown was with him, and I am positive sure of both.

SARAH BELL . Q. You are a laundress of Lincoln's inn - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on this day, a little after seven o'clock, you were going to Mr. Bembow's chambers, Lincoln's inn - A. Yes, No. 1, Stone buildings.

Q. Do you know the boy Smith - A. Yes, I saw him sitting at Mr. Tancred's window; the sash was open, one leg was in and the other out; he had the appearance as though he was trying to get out.

Q. What time was this - A. Between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Did you give any alarm upon that - A. I did, had immediately went over; then the boy went in again.

Q. Did you see Brown upon that occasion - A. I saw Brown in two or three minutes against the rails opposite of the window; I saw him no more till he was brought down.

Q. Are you sure the man that was brought down was Brown - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH PAYNE. Q. You are a laundress of Lincoln's inn - were you at the window of sir Thomas lomer - A. Yes, at No. 8, Old Buildings, it looks towards Stone buildings.

Q. Did you and at what time see the prisoners - A. At half after six, I saw them both going up the buildings and coming down together, and then they stood at the corner, No. 6, and talked together some considerable time; I was going then to leave the chambers: I saw no more of them.

Q. Are you you sure they are the two persons that you saw going up and down the buildings - A. I am very sure.

Garret. This is the handkerchief they were in, and these are the articles.

Q. to Ann Williams . Whereabouts is the value of these spoons - A. They are worth about a pound a piece, one soup ladle is worth about five pound, and the marrow spoon about fifteen shillings; I am quite sure they were Mr. Tancred's property.

Smith's Defence. I came out of my mother's house about half after five o'clock on Sunday evening; my mother had an own sister that lived with her; all of a sudden she left my mother and went to live in Lincoln's inn; I work at coal heaving; I had only an opportunity to go to look after her of a Sunday; I went to this house, knocked at the door, and asked if a person lived there of the name of Smith; she said, no; and directly called out thieves.

Brown's Defence. About three months ago I returned from sea; I went to work at Mr. Fellow's, Blossom street, Spitalfields; my master discharged me upon his death bed; I had some prize money to take; I had lost my prize certificate; on this day I was told that if I went to Swan yard, I should see an officer belonging to the ship that was invalided, where I should get my ticket again; I went through this inn, Clement's inn I think it is; they told me it was the best way to go to Somerset house; I heard the cry of stop thief; I went to see what it was: they took hold of me, and said that is him; the prisoner Smith I never saw before with my eyes till they brought him out.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-57

598. CHARLES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a gold watch, value 6 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. a gold key, value 5 s. the property of Mary Ann Carey ; in a metal watch, value 30 s. a metal seal, value 2 s. a gold key, value 5 s. a gold ring, value 4 s. and a metal chain, value 1 s, the property of George Carey in the dwelling house of John Carey .

GEORGE CAREY . I live in the Strand with my father John Carey, the house is his; it is in the parish of St. Clement's Danes.

Q. Did you at any time lose any thing from your house - A. We lost two watches, one watch was mine, a metal watch; I missed it on the evening of September the 10th at eleven o'clock; I had left it in a bag attached to the bed furniture.

Q. When had you seen it before - A. About seven o'clock in the morning; I have seen it since in the possession of the pawnbroker.

Q. Was there any other watch lost besides yours - A. Yes, a gold watch, the property of my sister; I had left that in the bag with my own watch; I left that watch in the bag on the preceding evening; I did not look at the gold watch after that.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. He was employed in painting our house at the time the watches were lost.

Q. Is you sister here - A. No.

Q. How do you know the gold watch is her's - A. The watch is chipped on the dial plate; I have seen the watch, I can positively swear it is her's, she was not in the habit of wearing it; I have seen it frequently; it was given to her.

ROBERT STARKE . I live with Mr. Collins, pawnbroker, Long acre. On the 9th of September, a metal watch was pledged with me; I believe it to be pledged by the prisoner, I cannot positively swear it. It is worth about fifty shillings.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your watch - A. It is my watch, chain and seal, and there is a gold ring to it.

WILLIAM FORSTER , I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of September a gold seal was pledged with me,

Prosecutor. That is the property of my sister.

THOMAS LIMBRICE . I am one of the patrols of Bow street. On the 10th of September, the prosecutor's father came to me to apprehend the prisoner; I apprehended him; I found about him a gold watch; I found it in his fob, this is the watch, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. I can positively say that watch is the property of my sister. I had seen it the night before I missed it.

Q. What is your sister's name - A. Mary Carey .

Q. Can you form a judgment of the value of that watch - A. I cannot say, it is a gold watch.

Mr. Starke. It is worth six guineas.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-58

599. ROBERT PITCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , a coat, value 30 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. two shirts, value 16 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Burdon , in the dwelling house of Thomas Heaton .

WILLIAM BURDON . I lodge at Thomas Heaton 's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lodged in the same house with me, that night, the 12th of September; the things were taken in the morning; I went out about six o'clock in the morning; about half past seven I was sent for; when I went out I left my property safe locked up in my box, and when I returned I found the prisoner in the possession of the landlord in the tap room, and my property on the table.

THOMAS HEATON . I keep the Elephant and Castle, the corner of Margaret court, Oxford market . On Saturday about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner applied for a lodging, he said he lived in a gentleman's family. On Monday morning, about seven o'clock, I heard the prisoner come down, I looked at him very hard, I saw a pair of white cotton stockings in his hand; I stopped him, I found upon him a drab coat, a pair of breeches, a pair of white cotton stockings, two handkerchiefs, and two shirts.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-59

600. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a bill of exchange, value 20 l. an order for the payment of 15 l. 8 s. a bank note, value 10 l. two bank notes, value 5 l. each, and three other bank notes, value 2 l. each , the property of Thomas Paytherus , Thomas Field Savory , and Thomas Moore .

THOMAS FIELD SAVORY . I live in New Bond street , I am in partner ship with Thomas Paytherus and Thomas Moore ; the prisoner was my servant, a porter . On Wednesday the 10th of August I entrusted him with one bill of exchange of twenty pounds, a check of fifteen pounds eight shillings, upon the house of Robarts, drawn by Robarts, a ten pound bank note, and some other property, making in the whole sixty one pounds eight shillings; he was to carry it to the house of Ladbroke and co.

Q. Did he return again - A. No, he did not; he was taken to Bow street on the 13th.

ADAM PATRICK . I am a publican, I live at the Horse and Groom, King street, Seven Dials. On the 13th of August in the evening, the prisoner and a woman came in with some oysters, he pulled out some bank notes, the woman asked him where he got all that money; he did not seem to wish to give an answer; the woman insisted on knowing where he got the notes from; he burst out a crying, he said he had robbed his master of sixty one pounds; I made him turn his pockets out. Here are the notes that were produced at that time.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went with some company to Sadler's wells; we went to a public house, where I had something to drink; when we came out I went home with them; one of them gave me a night's lodging, two of them were brothers. In the morning we went out to a public house by Bedfordbury, we changed one of these five pound notes; when we came back again one of the young men said he would have nothing to do with the notes, because they were stolen. I had a ten pound note in my hand, one of the young men asked me for it, I gave it him, he went off. In the afternoon we went to a public house, where the young man got the ten pound note changed; they said he had been gone about half an hour. The next morning I saw him, I asked him if he had changed it, he said yes, he asked me whether I would have a guinea of it; I said no. There was a man snatched a two pound note out of my hand; I went into Mr. Patrick's house, I had something to drink, I had a five pound note; a young man said he knew Adam Patrick very well; I changed the five pound note there, he kept two pounds for himself, the young man did; they kept me drunk all the time. I went in the house with a woman, a young man came in and asked me if I had robbed my master. A constable was fetched, and I was taken.

GUILTY, aged 16.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his youth .

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-60

601. FRANCIS HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a gown, value 16 s. and a cloak, value 1 l. the property of Eleanor Turner .

ELEANOR TURNER . I lost the gown in Blue Anchor court, Rosemary lane , I took a lodging there, at Mr. Philips's house, the prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 26th of July I went out between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I returned about eight in the evening; my box was broke open, and my property gone.

Q. You do not know that the prisoner took it - A. No.

GEORGE HOSKINS. I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged the gown and cloak with me for twelve shillings on the 26th of July.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came to lodge with me, she was to pay a shilling a week for her lodging; when I came home her daughter asked me to pledge the things, she bid me to ask fifteen shillings; I went to the pawnbroker's and asked fifteen shillings he offered me twelve shillings, I took it; when I came

back she asked me for the money, I would not give it her till the mother came home; I gave her the ticket and the money. I have witnesses to prove that the daughter broke open the box and took the property our.

FRANCES CONNER . I live opposite to the prisoner. I have known the prosecutor's daughter rob her mother. I saw the daughter last night; she told me she gave the prisoner the gown and petticoat to pawn, and she said the mother offered her half a guinea last night not to appear.

MARY MAHONY . The prisoner lived next door to me, and the prosecutrix and the daughter lodged with the prisoner; the daughter told me that she gave her her mother's gown and cloak to pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-61

602. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , three thousand nails, value 4 s. the property of Henry Martin and George Gardner .

CHARLES EMERY . I am shopman to Henry Martin, and George Gardner , John street . On the 3d of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and asked for a bradawl handle, opposite of him stood some flemish tacks; he went out and he returned for a gimblet which I served him; during the second time he was in the shop. I missed eight or ten thousand nails, done up in paper, each paper contained one thousand; I went round the counter and discovered one paper of these tacks under his hand; they were removed from the place where they stood; he then said he wanted a pennyworth of nails like these; I said he could not see what these were, I mentioned my loss to him; he said he knew nothing of them I beckoned to the porter, and immediately the prisoner ran out I pursued him, and caught him in Charter house lane; on coming back to the shop I searched him, and found one of these papers on his person; I sent for a constable; he was searched again; we found two thou sand more in his pocket; these are the three thousand found upon him. They are the property of my employers.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-62

603. ELIZABETH COLLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , twelve yards of printed cotton, value 24 s. the property of Simeon Brown .

RICHARD HALL . I am shopman to Simeon Brown , he is a linen draper in Russel court . On Wednesday the 10th of August, the prisoner came in the shop and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I showed he the silk handkerchiefs; in the mean time there came in two ladies; I immediately throw the silk handkerchiefs of one side to attend the ladies; the prisoner went further up the shop, where there laid a quantity of prints on the counter; the patterns of most of them I noticed, not liking the appearance of the prisoner; I saw her take this print and put it under her petticoats; I charged her with it; she denied it; presently after she dropped it by the side of the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop with a working man to buy him a silk handkerchief, his counter was full of printed cottons and linens; the woman stood of one side of me, and the man that I went in with of the other; he said he missed the print and one of us had taken it; the man wanted to push me out of the door; I would not go with him; I insisted to stop till the constable searched me; he took the print from the side of the counter.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-63

604. JAMES DARKING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a seven shilling piece, and three shillings the property of Thomas Green .

ELIZABETH GREEN . I live in Worship street , I am the wife of Thomas Green; the prisoner was a lodger of mine; he had left me; on the 24th August he came into my house with intention of paying me; he waited for his brother some time, he did not come; he said he thought if I would send my little girl with the change of a note, he would pay me; I sent my little girl; he took the change; my little girl said he came out with a five pound note, but did not give it her; I did not see him again till I went to him with the constable; he would have paid me then but the officer would not wait an officer came by and said he was a deserter ; he was taken to Worship street, and I was bound over to prosecute him; he took ten shillings from my daughter; I do not think he meaned to defraud me of it; he always behaved very orderly in my house; he lived with me ten months, I had no reason to doubt him.

Q. Your daughter only knows that she delivered him the money - A. Yes.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-64

605. MARIA DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July four sides of bacon, value 4 l. the property of Edmund Cotterill junr.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS BONNER . Q. Are you servant to Mr. Cotterill - A. Yes.

Q. On the 11th of July last, did you bring any bacon from Bridge Warf to Mr. Cotterills warehouse - A. Yes, in Vine street near Grays Inn lane ; the bacon was done up in bales; four sides in each bale; I brought them in the waggon about eight o'clock in the evening; I placed the waggon about two yards from the outside of the gate in the street; I left the waggon about half after eight o'clock; there were thirty bails in the waggon at that time; about five o'clock in the morning my master came to me, he said I was a bale of bacon short.

ABRAHAM JACKSON . I am a servant to Mr. Cotterill.

Q. On the 13th of August did you look over the waggon - A. Yes; I found twenty nine bales and the wrapper of the thirtieth, it was cut to pieces, and it was left and the bacon was gone.

JOHN BURKE . I live in Tothill street, about a hundred yards from Mr. Cotterill's. On the night of the 11th of July, a quarter after one o'clock, I went to the door; I found Diana Collins there, Maria Duff stood about forty or fifty yards off; it was a very light night.

Q. Did you know them before - A. Yes; they were

neighbours; there were three flitches of bacon have into my house by Diana Collins ; I chucked it out, and said what do you bring these stolen goods to my house. I shut the door and saw no more.

SARAH NICHOLS . Q. You live opposite of Burke - A. Yes. On the night of the 11th of July, I saw the prisoner and Collins at Burke's door; there were three flitches of bacon, and each of them took one and carried them up Horn alley; they put one under my window, I was looking out of the window at that time, I was ill and in labour; I heard Collins say to the other, there is Mrs. Nicholls looking out of the window, and we shall be done. They took all three from the place; Mrs. Collins took two, and Maria Duff took one.

ANN HAZLEHURST . I live at No. 2, Back hill; the back of my kitchen goes into White Bear yard, where the prisoner lodged with her father and mother.

GEORGE WOOD . I am a police officer. On Tuesday the 12th of July I went to the lodgings of Duff's father, No. 1, White Bear yard; there I found up stairs a piece of bacon dressed.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner lived with her father and mother - A. She afterwards told me she did, and behind the door in the privy there were two or three pieces of bacon in this bag, and two or three pieces in that wrapper; my brother officer on the next day brought some more bacon to the office; I compared if, it made three sides, and the piece that was dressed and the pieces undressed, answer in the quality; it was green bacon.

JOHN HUNT . I was with Wood on the first search; I afterwards went on the following day, and found five pieces of bacon; they altogether made up three sides.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of July; when I took the prisoner down to the prison she said she was very sorry for what she had done, she was very much in liquor when Mrs. Collins came to her, and she did not know what she was about when they went down to the waggon.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . On the morning of the 12th of July I found a side of bacon near Liquorpond street, against the wall. I took it to Mr. Cotterill's.

EDMUND COTTERILL . Q. On the morning of the 12th of July did you miss one bale out of your waggon - A. Yes: I have examined the last side brought by the last man, and the three sides brought by the officers. I have compared them with the rest of the bacon in the waggon load, and they corresponded in all respects. I have not the least doubt of their being my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 12th of July I was coming down Tothil street, I was apprehended; I met with that young woman on the over night, and coming down Tothil street, at Mrs. Barker's door I saw something; what it was I cannot say; I asked her what it was; when Burke chucked it out she said it was her property. When I came home I was taken in custody.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-65

606. THOMAS DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of July , a shirt, value 3 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and a half shawl, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Bailey .

SAMUEL BAILEY . I am a sawyer . On the 17th of July, about a quarter before two o'clock, I was sitting at the step of a door in Leather inn , when the prisoner came up to me; the prisoner is a watchman ; he says holloa, my friend, what do you do here; I said I am resting myself; he said you had better go and sit in my box, you will get robbed here of your bundle perhaps; I went and sat in his box; I put the bundle under me and fell asleep; at three o'clock in the morning he called me and said he was going to lock up his box. When I got up I said where is my bundle, he said how do I know, somebody has robbed you perhaps; I said if any body has robbed me it is you; then he abused me; I told him if he did not return the bundle by Sunday eleven o'clock, he would hear from me.

JONATHAM TROTT . I am an officer of Hatton garden office. I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday the 17th of July; he denied any knowledge of the bundle, nor had he been towards home, he said.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer. On Monday the 18th of July I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and between the head of the bed and the wall I found the property. I have had them in my custody ever since.

DAVID DAVIS. I am a hair dresser, I live at No. 2, Vine street; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me, there were three beds in the room; about half after two o'clock in the morning on Sunday July 17, I heard somebody come up stairs and the door open; the prisoner rolled against the bedstead, I asked who are you, he said it is Day; he proceeded towards the window with a bundle in his hand, he drew the curtain of one side, I then could see; the handkerchief in his land appeared to have something tied up in it; I asked him what made him there at so early an hour, he said he had been to the washerwoman's for his shirt, stockings, and handkerchiefs, and he should put them in the bed; he went down stairs, I did not see him afterwards till he was in confinement. On the Monday a young man that slept in the same bed produced the bundle from between the bedstead and the wall. I saw what was in the bundle, I advised him to put it where he found it; he did.

WILLIAM HEREDITS . I am a watchman. Day came past me between two and three o'clock on Sunday morning, he had something under his watch coat. I watched him to his lodgings, No. 2, Vine street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. At half past twelve o'clock, as I was returning to my box, that gentleman sat against Rose's door in Leather lane; I asked him where he was bound for, he replied that he lodged at the King of Prussia, and they were gone to bed; he asked me to let him sit in my box, he did, he sat in my box till two in the morning; I found myself dry, I went and had a drink of water, the weather being hot; I turned sick, I knew I had a quartern of gin at home; at half after two o'clock I went home and drank the gin, if I had not drank the gin I must have died; I came down and stood against the Griffin door, Hatton Wall. At half after three o'clock I roused that gentleman, he told me he lost his parcel out of the box. Where I lodge in Vine street the door is never fastened, and as for Heredit's, although he is a watchman, he has been to my box at different hours of the night. I have been in several engagements with lord Nelson, I was with him at the battle of Trafalgar. I leave it all to your mercy. I am innocent of the fact.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-66

607. ANN FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , sixty penny pieces, and five hundred and eighty four halfpence , the property of William Plant .

WILLIAM PLANT . I keep a wine vaults , Crown street , Finsbury square. On Saturday night the 27th of August the prisoner came into the house, and walked into a private room connected with the bar, and then took six papers of halfpence and penny pieces, each containing five shillings.

Q. Do you see her take them - A. I did not; I had seen them safe a minute before.

Q. Did you find them upon her - A. Yes; two papers in her pockets; and two in each hand; she begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. At that time I was in great distress.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-67

608. WILLIAM GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a basket, value 6 d. a linen cloth, value 6 d. and thirty three pounds weight of butter, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of John Hammon .

JOHN HAMMON . I live in Sommers town . On the 24th of August, about half past five in the morning, I missed a flat of butter, thirty three pounds, and a cloth; from information I went to the watchhouse, and saw the flat there; it had my direction upon it.

JOHN WILSON . I am a costermonger. On the 24th of August, I was going along Somer's town, I saw this gentleman and two more go into Mr. Hammon's yard.

Q. Was the prisoner one that went into the yard. - A. That I cannot say; I saw him come out again; they had nothing when they went in as I saw. I watched them out, and one of them had a flat upon his head; I followed them till I could get some assistance, I met Francis Goldsmith ; the prisoner and another man had the flat; then James Burbury caught hold of it; he was taken to the watchhouse, and the flat of butter was carried there directly.

FRANCIS GOLDSMITH . I met the prisoner coming up the street, as I was going down the street; I saw him take hold of the flat of butter from the other young man's hand; there were two other persons carrying it when I first saw it; when I apprehended him he was carrying the flat with another young man.

Q. How came you not to apprehend the other - A. He was rather too young in the legs for me.

Q. Did the prisoner attempt to run away - A. No.

RICHARD WHITEHEIR . About twenty minutes past five o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was bought to the watchhouse by these two men and other; I did not open the flat till I went and called Mr. Hammon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the yard, nor had I the flat in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-68

609. WILLIAM LANGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July ; three gowns, value 30 s. three aprons, value 3 s. two shifts, value 4 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. three pair of stockings, value 4 s. 6 d. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 12 s. 6 d. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. eight caps, value 8 s. a work bag, value 4 d. and three ribbons, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Marsh , Isaac Luke Marsh , Samuel Marsh , and Isaac Marsh .

Second count the property of Mary Skull .

MARY SCULL . I am a widow woman; the property was in the waggon; it was mine; I came up in Mr. Marsh's waggon from Burnham in Norfolk; the prisoner was in company with me.

Q. Where did you lose this property - A. From Ponder's End , on the 30th of July; I saw it when I got out of the waggon at Ponder's End, and when I went up in the waggon again I missed it, and the prisoner was gone.

WILLIAM LARK . I am the patrol of Highgate. On Saturday the 30th of July, about four o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with two bundles, he said he had got nothing but his own.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Near London, as the waggon went on, the two bundles fell out of the waggon; I jumped down and took them up; being a stranger, I came along to London; I met with two watchmen, they took hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-69

610. WILLIAM FAINT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of John Irving .

JOHN IRVING . I am a taylor , I live at No. 3, Denmark street. On the 5th of this month, about twenty minutes past ten at night, as I was crossing the end of Long lane, Smithfield the prisoner came up and snatched the watch out of my pocket; I followed him directly and called out stop thief; after he snatched the watch out of my pocket he turned down a court, leading out of Long lane. An officer was not above five doors from the place; by his assistance we caught him at the bottom of the court; the watch was found thrown over a wall, just by where he fell; on our bringing him out of the court, he was rescued by a person that came up; he ran away again; I pursued him into Charterhouse square; he was then taken by the assistance of the watchman; we then took him to the watchhouse.

JOHN WINTER . I am an extra officer of the City of London: I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was the first person running, it was four or five doors down Long lane; the prosecutor was close to his heels; I pursued close to the prisoner; he fell down as he entered the court; he got up again, he ran again, and fell down again at the bottom of the court; I caught him and attempted to search him; I was very much baffled by somebody coming up, in getting him up to the top of the court we were surrounded by a party, and the watchman was knocked down, and I was knocked down; I got up again and ran after him, with the

assistance of the watchmen in Charterhouse square, he was secured and taken to the watchhouse; the watch was found by a man who saw the whole transaction. It was in St. Sepulchre's I caught him, in the county of Middlesex.

JAMES HAINES I am headborough of St. Sepulchre's, Middlesex; I was night watch; the last witness and the watchman of Charterhouse square, and the prosecutor, brought the prisoner into the watchhouse; I took charge of him.

JAMES WATERS . I am watchman of Charterhouse square.

Q. You know nothing but the apprehension of the prisoner, do you - A. No.

JOHN BUNNY . I am a carman; I found the watch; it was thrown over a wall three foot high in Three Fox court; I delivered the watch to the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out on Monday afternoon, I had been in Oxford road. On my returning home in the evening, I came through Smithfield market, I just turned off the pavement by Long lane, I was knocked down and accused of being a thief, which I am innocent of I declare.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-70

611. WILLIAM WALLIS was indicted for that he on the 5th of February , a pocket book, value 1 s. a miniature picture set in gold, value 21 l. eight guineas and a half guinea, the property of Alphonso Macklean , feloniously did steal .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate and find One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-71

612. EVAN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a trunk, value 3 s. two pieces of tabinet, value 7 l. three shirts, value 15 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. six towels, value 6 s. a quilt, value 1 l. two waistcoats, value 8 s. a pair of shoes, value 7 s. a bat cover, value 1 s. 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. 6 d. a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. and two bottles, containing whiskey, value 7 s. the property of John Smith , in the dwelling house of William Davis .

JOHN SMITH . I am a bed sacking manufacturer , I live at No. 60, Whitecross street. On Sunday the 24th of July last, between two and three o'clock, I returned from the country and left my things at Mr. Davis's, the Three Tuns, in Redcross street ; I took my trunk into the back kitchen and left it on the table; I did not come for it till about eleven o'clock the same night, they told me then it was taken away; the trunk contained all the things in the indictment.

Q. Did you ever find any of them - A. No; I received some information from a neighbour.

JEMIMA PEARCE . I am a tassel maker, I am sister to Mrs. Davis; I know that Mr. Smith brought the trunk to the Three Tuns between two and three o'clock, it was taken into the kitchen, and was there till a little before eight o'clock; I went up stairs to clean myself; the prisoner sat at the table where the trunk was in the same room; I left the prisoner and Mr. Lenty there when I went up stairs; I came down in rather better than half an hour and the trunk was gone.

Q. What became of the prisoner and the other man - A. They were there when I came down; I am confident the prisoner and Mr. Lenty were there.

MARY DAVIS . Q. How old are you - A. I am just turned of thirteen; I saw Mr. Smith bring the trunk into my father's house into the bar; he asked my aunt if he might leave it there, and if it would be in the way; she said he might take it into the kitchen, and as they were going along I called to Mr. Smith to take it up into the club room, but he took it into the kitchen, sat it on the table and left it there, and said he would call for it in about two hours; a little before eight o'clock the prisoner and Mr. Lenty came in; they called for a pint of ale; my father served them; they sat drinking there till about twenty minutes past eight o'clock; Mr. Griffiths went out; before he returned I went up stairs to my aunt and remained there about ten minutes; my aunt and me both came down together and went into the kitchen and the trunk was gone; we asked Mr. Lenty and the prisoner, he had returned then, who had taken the trunk; they said three men had been in and had taken it away; I immediately informed my father and asked whether three men had been there.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. How long before you went up stairs was if that Mr. Griffiths went out - A. He went out a very little time before I went up stairs; I saw him go out.

Q. When you went up stairs the trunk was there - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you know the prisoner did not take it out - A. Yes.

Q. You was not gone above ten minutes, and when you came down stairs the prisoner had returned to his company and the trunk was gone - A. Yes; I asked them who had taken the trunk; they said three men had been they and there had taken it.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I keep the Three Tuns in Red cross street. About a little before eight o'clock the prisoner and Mr. Lenty came in together; they called for a pint of ale; I served them, and I observed at that time the trunk lying on the table; they called for the second pint, which my servant served them; my daughter came to me some little time after the second pint, and informed me that the trunk was missing from the table; the prisoner came to the bar and informed me that three people had come in and taken the trunk away; they had drank a pint of beer and had taken the trunk with them; I thought it a singular circumstance that three people should pass my bar without my observing them; I was almost in the bar the whole time they were in the kitchen; the bar commands a view of the kitchen; I directly called each of my family and asked if they had served any beer, in the presence of the prisoner; they informed me they have not, nor had they seen any three people come into that part of the house; after this the prisoner and Mr. Lenty went out.

Q. What sized trunk was it - A. It was made portmanteau fashion, almost three foot long, there was ring at each end for the convenience of carrying it it was about fourteen inches over; it might be carried

under the arm: After the prisoner and Mr. Lenty went home, Mr. Smith came to my house about eleven o'clock, he found the trunk was gone.

Q. You are sure that this man came and told you that three men came in and took away the trunk - A. Yes; I dare say he will not deny it himself.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a labourer; Mr. Lenty is a painter, they lived in Cradle court.

JAMES WILSMORE . I live at No. 9, Cradle court, Red cross street, near the Three Tuns; I saw the prisoner come up the court with a trunk in the shape of a portmanteau.

Q. What time of night was it - A. Between seven and nine o'clock, I cannot be positive to the hour; he had hold of the two ends with the flap towards him; It was about two foot and a half in length; I saw him go towards his own house; I knew it was the prisoner.

JANE STRAHAM . I was at my father's window in Cradle court, Red cross street: It was after eight o'clock I saw the prisoner turn the corner with a little round trunk, laying hold of it by the two handles, and carrying it before him to his own door.

THOMAS - . I am a constable. On the 24th of July, about half past eleven at night, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Cradle court, I found nothing there; I apprehended him the next day at the London Docks.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

THOMAS LENTY . - Mr. Gurney. Where do you live - A. No. 10 Cradle court, Redcross street, I am a painter and glazier.

Q. On Sunday evening, the 24th. of July, was you with the prisoner - A. I was; it was mere accident; I met him at the corner of the court; I have known him some time; he asked me very kindly if I would accept of a glass of ale; we went back to the Three Tuns; it must be near eight o'clock.

Q. What room did you sit in - A. I had been in the tap room; the room that we went in afterwards was the kitchen.

Q. Did you see any trunk there - A. Mr. Davis, who keeps the house, pointed out the trunk to us.

Q. Where was the trunk - A. It was in a separate box from where we were sitting, on a table.

Q. How long did the prisoner and you stay there - A. We drank three pints of ale, and the second pint Mr. Davis joined us.

Q. During the time you was there did the prisoner go out a short time - A. Not to my knowledge.

Court. Then the prisoner did not go out at all to your knowledge - A. No; he did not.

Mr. Gurney. During the time you were sitting there, did any persons go into the kitchen - A. When we went in there was a person sitting where the trunk was, drinking a pint of porter, there were a great many people in the tap room, and a great many in the parlour, and there were a great many went out and in while I was there.

Q. Do you remember the trunk being missed - A. No; I do not remember any thing about the trunk being missed, I mentioned it first of all to Mr. Davis, and the prisoner mentioned it as we was going out.

Q. Before the time that you told Mr. Davis of it had you observed any person come into the kitchen - A. There had been some, how many I cannot say, there were two or three that come in two or three times, I believe there were three came in at one time, they were sitting at the extremity of the same table where the box was.

Q. During the time that you were there with the prisoner, do you think that it was possible for him to take the trunk away without your knowledge - A. It was not possible without being perceived.

COURT. He could not take it away, you know, he did not go out you have said.

JURY. Were you perfectly sober at the time - A. I was not perfectly sober, I had taken part of two sixpenny worths of brandy and and water some porter before I went in with the prisoner. I was a little forward.

COURT. Then you never saw any body take the trunk - A. No, I did not.

JURY. I think you said before, that you told the landlord that you saw somebody take the trunk - A. I never understood that any body mentioned it to the landlord.

COURT. The question was, whether you told him any person or number of persons took the trunk - did you or did you not tell the landlord that any number of persons took the trunk - A. I did tell him, to the best of my recollection, that two or three people came in and took the trunk.

Q. Your answer to the very question before was, you said you never saw any body take the trunk - how came the landlord to point out the trunk to you and the prisoner - A. When we came in the landlord came home, and when we went in the kitchen he said we have got a trunk brought here.

Q. And when you went out you told him you saw three people take the trunk - A. There w then a man sitting drinking a pint of porter; there was one, two, or three, I am not certain which; I ld almost swear three; I told Mr. Davis, as we were going home, that three men took the trunk.

Q. How long was that after the sister came down stairs - A. I do not know, I do not recollect her going up nor coming down.

Q. Do you recollect the daughter going up - A. No, nor coming down.

Q. Do you recollect their asking you about the trunk - A. No, they did not ask me about the trunk.

Q. You can be positive about that - A. They did not, but I cannot be certain.

Q. If three men took it, how did they carry it out - A. One man took it out, and laid it across his arm.

Q. Why did not you stop him - A. ad no authority, I did not know it was right to stop him.

Q. How many were there in the tap-room - A. Four or five.

Q. You are sure that Mary Davis and Miss Pearce never asked you what became of the trunk - A. I cannot say.

Q. Nor to your friend the prisoner that was sitting next to you - A. Not that I know

Q. You were by him the whole e, were not you - A. Yes, we sat together.

Q. They never either of them mentioned the loss of the trunk to you - A. No, nor to Griffiths, to my recollection.

JURY. How long were you i at house altogether - A. I had been at Mr. Davis from six o'clock till past seven, before I met with the prisoner.

Q. And you took no more the two sixpennyworths of brandy and water - A. I drank little there, I took two six pennyworths of brandy and water, at a friends in Lime street; I had been out away, I had been up to Islington.

COURT. What o'clock did you go into this house the second time - A. Nearly eight o'clock; and to the best of my recollection I staid there till nearly half past nine o'clock.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-72

613. SAMUEL HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of July , two deal boards, value 5 s. the property of William Clack .

The case was stated by Mr Knapp.

WILLIAM CLACK . I live in Budge row , I am a carpenter ; the prisoner occupied and worked in the sawpit in my cellar. On the day stated in the indictment I had occasion to go out; when I came home I saw the prisoner coming out of the shop with three deals upon his shoulder, and he was going at a very sharp rate; I suspected him, I spoke to his mate, and then I followed him; I observed him lowering them down the grating at the Bench of Grapes public house, Dowgate hill; I waited till he came out, I said, Howard, I do not like the appearance of this, light me a candle, and I will go and ok at these deals; I went down into the cellar and oked at them; I insisted upon their going home; two of them I took, and the other the prisoner brought home with me. When I came home with the deals I told him they were mine, he said they were not; I sent for a constable, he said he could send for a man that he gave a shilling to for planing them over; he sent his mate for this man, and when this man come I told him to speak like an honest man, and not to take the part a thief; he said that he never planed any over for him at all. I said to the prisoner, I think now I can convince you that these are my deals; I found three deals in my yard these three deals were cut off, the knots ent through each of them; I can swear to two of them. He then said he had made a mistake, he had taken them instead of other people's deals; I said that could be the case, there was not a planed deal in the ho out mine; they are my deals, I can swear to them two

DANIEL OLBUT . I am foreman to Mr. Clack. I was not at home when the deals were taken away. When I came home I found Mr. Clack and the prisoner matching deals in the shop; I know that the deals are my master, property, they matched together, the wood corresponded all through.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-73

614. MICHAEL KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on 13th of September , five pounds four ounces weight solder value 4 s. the property of Thomas Hill , and Humphrey Wood .

- JORDAN. I am warehouseman to Thomas Hill, and Humphrey Wood , they are oilmen ; the prisoner was their po. On Tuesday evening, the 13th of September, about seven o'clock, I found a bar of solder upon the prisoner; he was out of the warehouse in College hill , he in the street.

Q. You do not deal in solder - A. We had some plumbers at work on my master's premises; the solder was taken out of the yard; I had seen it there about an hour before it was taken.

Q. Did you see him go out of the house - A. He went out of the house along with me; he could not get out till I went out because the gate was locked.

Q. As soon as you got out you stopped him - A. Yes. I stroked him down, I felt it; I said you have got a bar of solder, and he gave it me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. You know, Mr. Jordan, I worked late and hard on Tuesday night, and you know I had a glass or two that was more than I could bear; I went to the cistern to was in my hands, I put my foot on the bit of metal, and unfortunately. I put the bit of metal in my pocket, for which I emplore the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-74

615. JOHN CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , four pair of candlesticks, value 22 s. the property of Thomas Ody and Thomas Mitchell .

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am in the firm of Ody and Mitchell, furnishing ironmongers , at the corner of Fetter lane, Holborn . The prisoner was our porter . On the 8th of September, I received information that the prisoner had been offering the candlesticks to pledge; I found him at Hatton garden office; I asked him how he came to take the candlesticks; he replied the devil tempted him.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer; I was sent for to Mr. Page's, pawnbroker, in Liquorpond street. I apprehended the prisoner and Cronan; he is admitted an evidence; I believe I took him in custody on suspicion of stealing one pair of these candlesticks; that is the pair; after that I went to his lodgings, and found these three pair of candlesticks.

HUGH CRONAN. John Connor gave me the candlesticks to go and pledge them.

Q. You did not take them yourself nor assist in taking them - A. I did not

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-75

616. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , ten yards of galloon, value 9 d. the property of Griffin Andrews .

JOHN STUBBS . I am shopman to Griffin Andrews , haberdasher ; he lives at the corner of Old Compton street . On the 12th of September, the prisoner came into the shop, about two o'clock, for the purpose of purchasing a yard of black galloon; she took the opportunity of taking a piece of magpie binding out of the drawer, measuring ten yards; she placed it in the palm of her hand, and was putting it in her pocket; I went round the counter, and seized her hand, and took her into the middle of the shop, that she might not

shuffle it on the counter; she then produced it to me, saying that she was asking the young lady that was serving her, to cut her off a yard of it. I know it is my master's galloon; I saw her take it.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband is a shoemaker; I was in the habit of going into that shop to buy binding; I took that piece up and said measure me a yard of this; I had it only in my hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-76

617. JAMES MARCLEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , fourteen pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Douglass , affixed to a certain building .

CHARLES DOUGLASS . Q. Do you live in Clerkenwell - A. Yes. The lead was taken from a new built house not finished, last Saturday morning; it is only part of a large quantity that was taken away. I had seen it all safe the night before.

JOHN WARD . I am a watchman; just before half past four o'clock, I saw two men in Prince's street; on their seeing me they turned back again and went up Vineyard street; I stopped the prisoner; I asked him what he had got; he said he had got a bit of lead, he picked it up in the street.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along I picked this piece of lead up; I was going to work.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-77

618. JOHN CRANE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , a diamond cross, value 60 l. two diamond broaches, value 70 l. a gold box, value 2 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. two topaz seals, value 90 l. four gold seals, value 10 l. three stone antiques, value 3 l. the property of Peter De Arsito , in his dwelling house .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, decling to offer any evidence; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-78

619. GEORGE ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Robert Smith .

Second count for like offence, the property of Hugh Chessley .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case was stated by Mr. Abbot.

THOMAS KING . - Mr. Myers. You are an officer employed in the bank - A. Yes.

Q. What is that note that you have in your hand - mention the number and the date - A. No. 8365, dated 29th of March, 1808; the cashier's name is so torn that I cannot tell it; it is of the value of five pounds; it was paid in the bank of England on the 6th of August.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I take it for granted your cash book speaks to all the notes that are taken in the bank - A. Yes.

COURT. Did you make the entry yourself in the book - A. No.

That is no evidence when it was paid in.

ROBERT SMITH . - Mr. Bosanquet. You are a surgeon in Sloane street, Knightsbridge - A. Yes.

Q. Did you remit any money to Mr. Chessley on the 2nd of August last - A. I did; a five pound note; I put it into a letter, directed to Mr. Chessley, on the 2nd of August; I took the description of the note at the time.

"No. 8365, dated the 29th of March, 1808; signed A. Hooper." I directed the letter to Mr. Chessley, No. 222, Shoreditch; I gave that letter to my servant Stephen Grimwood to put into the post.

Q. Did you seal the letter - A. I sealed it or wafered it.

Q. Do you know the note - A. I could not swear to it; I only know the number.

Q. Look at the note and see whether it corresponds with the description you took - A. The name of the cashier is torn off; the number corresponds, and the date.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say you cannot swear to the note except from the corresponding date or number; now for any thing you know there may be two notes of the same date and number - A. Yes, there may.

Mr. Abbot. We are certain to the contrary.

Mr. Knapp. Indeed, it has been proved.

COURT. You must have somebody from the bank to decide that.

STEPHEN GRIMWOOD . - Mr. Bosanquet. You are a servant of the last witness, Mr. Smith, of Sloane street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 2nd of August receive any letter to put into the post - A. Yes; it was directed to Mr. Chessley, Shoreditch; I took it into Mr. Blackburn's shop, Knightsbridge, the post office, I put it on the counter by the side of some other letters; Mr. Blackburn was in the shop himself; the box was emptied; it was between five and six o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You remember particularly this letter - A. Yes.

Q. Are we to understand you that you remember every letter your master gives you - A. No.

Q. Your memory is helped by being told that this letter was lost - A. No.

COURT. How long after was it that you heard this letter was lost - A. A week.

HUGH CHESSLEY . - Mr. Myers. Where do you live A. In Shoreditch.

Q. Did you on the 3d of August receive a letter from Mr. Smith containing a five pound bank note - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever receive a letter containing that bank note - A. I have not.

JOHN BLACKBURN . - Mr. Abbot. Where do you live - A. I live at Knightsbridge; I keep a receiving house for twopenny post letters and I retail newspapers.

Q. Was George Anderson in your employ on the 2nd of August - A. He was; he had been in my employ one year and a half, his business was to retail newspapers for me, to carry them to my customers, and fetching them from the printer's.

Q. In what place are the letters sorted that are put into your house - A. It is not the customary thing, or at least they ought not, to be sorted in the shop; they are to be sorted at the office in the back part of my house.

Q. Had the prisoner any thing to do in carrying them to the back part of the house, or to sort them - A. He used to make it his business to carry them into the back

office for the postman.

Q. Did he do that on the 2nd of August - A. He did.

Q. On the 4th of August did you give him any money for any purpose - A. I did; about six o'clock in the morning I gave him a two pound note, and two one pound notes, making four pound together for the purpose of paying three pound five shillings and one penny at the Times office for newspapers.

Q. Did he go out for that purpose - A. He did.

Q. When he returned did he deliver you the change - A. He was to go and buy the newspapers, deliver them, and then deliver me the change; he brought me back fourteen shillings and eleven pence.

Mr. Knapp. How long has this lad been with you - A. A year and a half.

Q. Did he come with a good character - A. He did, and I never had a ground of complaint against him; I once gave him a pound too much, he brought it me back again.

- PHILLIP. I am the publisher of the Times newspaper.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Perfectly well, by his being in the habit of coming for Mr. Blackburn's papers in the morning.

Q. Do you recollect his coming on the 4th of August - A. I cannot say.

Q. Just look at your book, and let me know what the amount of Mr. Blackburn's newspapers came to on the 4th of August - A. Three pounds five shillings and one penny. That note is the note I took on the 4th of August for them papers; I have marked it 4th of August, 8 for 1808. Bkburn abbreviated for Blackburn.

Q. Are you sure that you delivered the newspapers and change to the person that brought you that note - A. I am not sure that I delivered the change and the papers to the prisoner, but to the person that brought me the note most assuredly I did.

Mr. Knapp. Whether that was the prisoner or not you will not undertake to swear - A. I will not undertake to swear positively.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-79

620. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of James Absolom , from his person .

JAMES ABSOLOM . On the 7th of September, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was going to Clapham; going along Drury lane I turned up a court to make water, the prisoner came and felt all about me; I said let me alone when I make water; there were two women, but only this woman came up to me and took my watch away.

Q. When had you seen the watch about you - A. Not two minutes before I saw the parties in the lane.

Q. Was your watch found afterwards - A. Yes.

Q. Was she apprehended - A. In two minutes after.

Q. Did you lose sight of her - A. Yes; I met a watchman, I asked him which way these two women were gone; he said they had just passed.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a patrol.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner on the 7th of September - A. Yes, a little before two o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you find a watch upon her - A. No; when I proceeded to search her she stooped down, and when I had searched her I begged her to move, and the watch was found under her.

Q. Where did you search her - A. At No. 45, Charles street, Drury lane.

Q. Had she an opportunity of laying the watch down where you found it - A. Yes, when she stooped down she stooped close to the floor; the watch has been in my custody ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in bed that night; between eleven and twelve o'clock a woman that lived in the next room to me, she had a child about six years old that was very ill; she called to me and asked me to get her a light; I went down stairs to the watchman to get a light; as I went down there is a staircase window that goes down into the next house; as I went down by the light of the night I saw a woman run through the yard; I went to get the light, and when I came to the street door this man laid hold of me and said I had robbed him. I work hard for my living. The woman that I came down to get a light for would have been here, but she is in St. Bartholomew's hospital.

Prosecutor. That is the woman that was in the court with me, and nobody else.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-80

621. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of August two pounds and a half weight of butter, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Cook .

WILLIAM COOK . Q. Do you live in Clerkenwell - A. Yes. On the 26th of August, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was alarmed by the barking of a dog; I was in bed, I got out of bed, opened the window, and I looked in the front area, where I saw the prisoner with his hands in the butter safe; I called to him and asked him what he did there; he attempted to make his escape by climbing up the area wall. I then called the watch and sprang the rattle; which I heard answered in several places; it was a very fine moon light night; I directed the watchman where I saw him go; he turned down Weston street, which is the first turning. I presently heard he was taken.

Q. You do not pretend to say it was the prisoner by seeing of him - A. I do; I was about seven or eight yards from him; I was in the bed room on the second floor; he had a white jacket on. I should not have known him by his person.

Q. Did you miss any butter - A. Yes, two pound and a half; I saw the butter there the morning before the butter was gone, and the safe door was open.

- I am one of the patrols of Bow-street; I heard the rattle; I saw him coming down York street, Battle bridge, coming from Mr. Cook's, and eight or nine watchmen running after him; when I came up to him he knocked me down; I instantly got up and pursued him again; when I came to him again another of

my brother patrol was struggling with him; we secured him and took him to the watchhouse. Two pounds and a half of butter was found upon him.

JOHN HAMER . I am a patrol of Bow street. At the time this affair happened I was standing at my own door, I heard the rattle, I saw him coming down York street; I met him in the road and knocked him down. On his person I found the butter.

JOHN WHITTAKER . I am beadle of Somer's town. The man was brought to me; he was with me all Sunday; on Monday morning he made his escape out of the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along this butter I picked up in the pathway.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-81

622. MARY COX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of August , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I live upon Back hill , I am the wife of Thomas Davis .

Q. Did you lose a shirt in August last - A. Yes, on the 5th of August last; it was lost from a line at the window, where it hung for sale; it was taken between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I had been out; I hung it up there myself. When I came home I missed it from the line; I saw two women going a way, I followed them and I found it doubled up in the prisoner's apron.

JOHN HUNT . I am an officer. The shirt was delivered to me by the prosecutrix, on the 5th of August, I have had it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by that gentlewoman's door I thought the shirt would suit my husband, I went to my misfortune to the next door to ask the price of it; I went up a flight of stairs; when the lady came to me, she said you have a shirt of mine; I said I have, I was going to ask the price of it; she replied that door does not belong to me you hussey, you want to steal it.

Mrs. Davies. She was not at the next door, she was at the second door.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-82

623. SUSANNAH EADES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of August , a silk cloak, value 6 s. the property of Godfrey Lier and Andrew Barnet , privately in their shop .

GEORGE PAYNE . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, their names are Godfrey Lier and Andrew Barnet .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into your shop - A. Yes, on the 12th of August, she came in company with another woman to pawn a handkerchief; on her going out, she with the other women looked at the things in the shop; I presently missed the cloak and the prisoner. I pursued her and I overtook her with the cloak in her apron.

Q. How long before had you seen the cloak - A. About five minutes before they came in.

Q. What is the value of that cloak - A. Six shillings.

Q. That is not the prime cost - A. No, five shillings is the prime cost. It was on the ticket.

JOHN GARDNER . Mr. Payne sent to me to take the prisoner into custody. I produce the cloak.

Mr. Payne. That is the cloak, the ticket was on the cloak at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this shop to pawn a handkerchief, which I pawned for a shilling; there was another person with me, coming out of his shop I picked up the cloak at the door, I did not know but it might be dropped: I told him I picked it up. That is all I know.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-83

624. CHARLES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Sullivan , on the 16th of July , putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 3 l. three gold seals, value 3 l. and eight shillings, his property .

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a sailor .

Q. Was you robbed on the 16th of July last - A. Yes, in Nag's Head court, Drury lane , about five o'clock in the morning.

Q. What was you doing there - A. I was enquiring after a friend of mine.

Q. You did not live there did you - A. No, I live at the Queen's Head in Tavistock row, Covent garden.

Q. Who robbed you - A. The prisoner.

Q. Where did you first see him - A. I saw him and another man in the street, they told me they knew my friend, that he lived in Nag's Head court.

Q. Where was you when they first spoke to you - A. In Drury lane. I asked them it they knew a friend of mine, mentioning his name; they told me he lived in that court, they took me up two pair of stairs, and took my watch and seals; they took me up to a room where there was a woman lying in bed. They got hold of me and demanded my money; they took watch, seals, and eight shillings from me, they run away and I pursued them; a soldier stopped the prisoner in the street, I struck him with a poker; he got away from the soldier and ran into Change court. The prisoner was never out of my sight till he ran into Change court.

Q. What did you do when the prisoner was apprehended - A. He was taken to Bow street.

Q. You followed him into Change court - A. Yes, he was taken in the house of Wood and Martin.

Q. Did he run into that house - A. He ran into several houses.

Q. How soon was he taken into custody after he robbed you - A. I cannot mention the exact time, an hour and a half, I believe.

Q. Where had you slept that night - A. In a house, in Covent garden.

Q. Had you lived in that neighbourhood sometime - A. I never was in London before that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Smith. You are an Irishman, and you have no fixed residence here - A. No.

Q. You lived that night in Tavistock row, Covent, is that the house they call Mother Butler's - A. Yes

Court. Had you slept in that house - A. No, I slept in a house in Covent Garden.

Mr. Smith. What had you been drinking that night - A. A little grog; I was perfectly sober.

Q. What time in the morning did this happen - A. About five o'clock.

Q. You slept at some house, you do not know where - A. I am not used to sleep in the night, I got up to take a walk.

Q. You told his lordship that you slept at some house that night - A. So I did, somewhere in Covent Garden.

Q. You took a walk to see a friend, do you recollect the name of that friend. - A. Yes, John Sullivan , a seafaring man; a namesake of mine.

Q. You say you took a walk to see him - did you see him - A. I did not see him.

Q. Do you mean that you went out in the evening to see him, or that you got up in the morning and went in order to see him - A. I got up in the morning.

Q. Had not you and the prisoner and another man been drinking together - A. No.

Q. The name of the place where you went is Nag's head court - A. Yes, No. 4.

Q. Do you know the name of the woman - A. Ann Griffiths .

Q. These two men and you went up into this woman's lodgings - you got into the bed room and there this happened - A. Yes; they got me up there; they pushed the door open and got hold of me.

Q. Is it not the fact, that these two men went with you to this woman to sleep with her - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see this man before - A. Never in my life.

Q. You say he went down the stairs - A. Yes; after they had robbed me they both went down stairs together.

Q. You say when the soldier took him you gave him a knock with a poker - A. Yes.

Q. That was the way to make him run away; did you ever find your property afterwards - A. The case of the watch was found where it was thrown away.

Q. You are sure that you had not been drinking with this man at this time - A. I never drank a glass of liquor with him in my life.

Q. Not that morning - A. No; I met him in the open street in Drury lane.

Q. You accosted him first - A. I enquired where this man lived; they decoyed me down there, they said my friend lived there; instead of that there was a woman in bed.

Q. Was the other man taken - A. No, the other man ran away, he turned down a different street; I followed this man that kept strait on.

Q. Is Ann Griffiths here - A. No, she is a party concerned, she will not come.

Court. Who told you that John Sullivan lived there - A. The prisoner and the other man; I was told when I was at sea that he lived in Drury lane.

Q. Where did you come from, on the 16th of July you say you came to London - A. That day I came in an American vessel.

Q. What day did you get in the river - A. I got in Sea reach about the 5th of July, and staid in the river till the 16th.

WILLIAM BROWN . Q. What are you - A. I am a Bricklayer, I was standing on the threshold of Drury lane stage door, I saw these men and the prisoner coming down the street towards Nag's head court; the prosecutor was in the center, the prisoner had his left hand upon his shoulder; I took notice of them both, there, were only them three in the street; they made a halt and they told him this was the place to go up; then I had a sight of them because I was right perpendicular, I thought they were skylarking; they were not five minutes there before they come down, but when the prisoner came down I thought they were all joining together, I might have taken him if I had thought there had been any robbery; I saw this man run down, he wore a brown jacket, he had his hand under his jacket, he ran down the court and jumped right across the street he made, a false step when he came nigh to me, and the prosecutor ran after him with a poker; he cried out a robbery, when I saw he was near me I got up and pursued him, I saw the man double up by the play house; I ran down Vinegar yard to see if he would come by that way, instead of that he ran down Change court. As a soldier catched him a publican at the corner of Catherine street said the soldier would have him; I saw the soldier pursue him, the man turned down Change court and I took it easy; I pursued along with this man, he followed me up the court it is called Round court; I believe it is a very bad place; I was told that the man had got a knife and run into a house; I went and got a light; I saw the door was locked where he went out upon the top of the house.

Q. Did you see him go into that house - A. No; we pursued him so far I went over the roof of the house; I was not a constable or else I would have gone farther.

Q. Did you apprehended him - A. Not that time. I went back and got a constable and went to the place where he was robbed, and his hat was found there.

Mr. Smith. Did you find his hat there - A. No.

COURT. Was you afterwards present when he was apprehended - A. No; he was taken to the watchhouse with the woman; he was there before us.

Q. You saw him at the watchhouse, did you - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any mark upon him - A. Yes, a cut on the left hand side of his head, occasioned by the stroke of the poker.

Q. Did you see the blow with the poker - A. No, I was too far away.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before this happened - A. No; I was just come to my work; I work at Drury lane theatre.

Mr. Smith. You say you did not know this man before - A. No.

Q. You saw them altogether - you say Sullivan was elevated, you thought they were all skylarking together - A. Yes.

Q. It appeared to you that they were all of one party - A. It did, or I could have catched him.

JOHN WOOD . I am a taylor, I live in Maiden lane, Covent Garden. On the morning of the robbery, when I got up, in consequence of some information, I went up into my work shop, supposing a man might be concealed there; I saw the mark of his foot in the window where he had jumped down; I found the prisoner afterwards under the board where the men were at work.

Q. Were the men at work there then - A. The men were at work there at six o'clock; I found him there about eight o'clock, I believe; when I found him under the place I desired him to come out; he did; his head was most dreadfully cut behind, and his shoulders

all over blood; I asked him what business he had there; he told me he made his escape from some soldier who was going to murder him; I told him I wished it might be so, but under appearances, and from what I had heard, I thought it not right to let him go; I saw a beadle in the street, whom I called in; he took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you tell him what you had heard - A. I am not clear whether I did or not; he was very willing to go to the watchhouse; he seemed to wish to go.

DANIEL JOCOCK . I am a labourer, No. 9, Change court. On Monday morning the 16th of July, I was awoke by the noise of two people running down the court, I heard the alarm of stop thief; I saw a soldier run down the court following a man; when I had dressed myself I saw the soldier come back; he picked up something, I could not see what it was, with that the soldier made his way off; the prosecutor and the prisoner were gone into the Strand; the soldier let the prisoner go when the prosecutor came up.

Q. Did you see that - A. No.

Q. Then that is what you heard - A. In the course of the day I was at work in the cellar; I throwed some dead mortar of oneside, I saw something glisten; I pulled it out; it was a watch case. My cellar is at the first house in the court.

Q. Could a person, running away, have thrown it into the cellar - A. I cannot say; I should suppose he might, there is no window, only railing.

Q. Then there is nothing to prevent any person from throwing it into the cellar - A. There is nothing but the railing. I have had it in my custody ever since I picked it up in the afternoon between five and six o'clock.

Q. Then whether it was put there by the prisoner or any body else you cannot say - A. No.

Q. You saw a soldier run down the place - A. Yes; he either picked up something or put down something.

Prosecutor. That watch case is mine.

Q. Is there any mark upon it by which you know it - A. I never put any mark upon it.

Q. Then all that you can say, it is like yours - A. I think it is mine.

Mr. Smith. You bought that watch a little while - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know it by any particular mark - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. This gentleman, the prosecutor, met me in the morning at five o'clock, I cannot say the day of the month, I was coming down Drury lane; he asked me whether I knew John Sullivan ; I told him I did not; he said nevertheless in case you do not know his name, we will have something to drink; I said I am going to work at Mr. Clarkson's, Middlesex hospital; I went with him; the name of the court I cannot say, it comes into Drury lane; he asked me what I would have to drink; I said a glass of peppermint; then he said would I go with him to a friend's house; I said no: he pressed me very hard and he took me to Nag's Head court; he said will you come up stairs: I said no, this is a house for girls of the town, I do not like such places; I went out of the court; a young man said to me there is a man running after you with a poker; for what, I said, I have done nothing; the prosecutor came up to strike me, and as I was running down the street I was struck with the poker; I was stopped by the soldier; he then said I have had what I wanted of you, you may go now to Hell. I was not gone far before a man says he is coming again; I went into an old gentleman's house: he there said I had robbed him of his watch; I said is there any assistance; he came into the room and said he would murder me; I ran out of the window and went into that gentleman's house, and what with the blow and with the running, I went to sleep; when the gentleman came to me, I resigned myself up, I knew I was innocent, I wished right to take place.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-84

625. JOHN DOBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , three lambs, value 4 l. the property of William Small .

WILLIAM SMALL . Q. What are you - A. I am a farmer at Holloway .

Q. When had you seen these lambs - A. I had lost lambs frequently; the last time I watched them was with my man no the night of the 3d of September. On the 4th of September, I went out about ten o'clock as usual, I took a round to the fields, I had sheep in three or four fields, I went round to see that they were all safe; as I was coming round Maiden lane that leads from Highgate to Holloway, I looked over the stile, I observed the sheep seemed frightened, and I saw a man rise up. I had my gun in my hand, we got over the stile to see what the man was at; and before we reached him he went down upon his knees and caught a lamb in his arms; we went up to him before he observed us; his back was towards us, he was not above thirty yards off when we first saw him; my man went up to him on the left hand and I on the right; I asked him what he was going to do with the lamb; he immediately let the lamb down; he said he had been to Highgate to see his brother; he was in liquor and and wanted to lie down; which was not the case; I told him he must go with us; he swore he would not; I desired my man to lay hold of him; they had a scuffle; he got from the man; I took to my fowling piece.

Q. Did you take him at last - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Is this field in the high road to London - A. No, it is up by Maiden lane, that leads from Highgate to Holloway; there is a foot path in the field.

Q. How far was he from that foot path - A. About thirty yards; he had the lamb up in his arms ready to take away; he had two more tied, ready to take away from the very place where I first saw him rise from.

Q. Do you mean to say that he had the lamb completely in his arms - A. Yes, I am quite certain of it.

JOHN SKINNER . I went up to the prisoner, he was among the sheep; as he rose up from the sheep he was looking about himself; he went up to where the lamb laid asleep, he stooped and catched up the lamb, and when we came up to him he stood upright with the lamb in his arms; we came up close to him before he saw us. I catched hold of his collar, he said he would not go with us; he got away from me; my master came up with his piece, he said if he would not go with us he would shoot him; we then secured

him. In going down the field we saw two lambs tied.

Mr. Walford. Were all four of the lambs' legs tied - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search this man - A. I did not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-85

626. THOMAS JOHNSON, alias BENJAMIN JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July , a counterpane, value 10 s. the property of Edward Carney .

MARY CARNEY . I am the wife of Edward Carney , I live in James street, Oxford road . On the 30th of July I hung out the counterpane on a pole to dry at the two pair of stairs window; I perceived it was gone. I followed the prisoner and found it on him.

Q. How soon after you missed it did you find it upon him - A No longer ago than when he went out of our door and went into the next house. I followed him and took it from him.

The property produced and identified.

SARAH ALLISANT . I saw him pulling it off the line; he put it under his arm and walked out of doors.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any more of it than a child unborn; I was very much in liquor. Out of a joke a woman said take it and pawn it, and get some more gin.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-86

627. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a coat, value 35 s. the property of Albert de Frenne .

ALBERT DE FRENNE . I missed my coat on the 24th of August; I went to where the prisoner lodged and enquired for her; they said she had not been at home eight days, that gave me suspicion. The prisoner worked for me; the prisoner gave me the ticket; the officer has it.

Mr. TURNER. I live in John street, Golden square. On the 24th of August the prisoner pledged a coat between five and six o'clock in the evening.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor engaged me to work for him, and I was to learn him the flower business, for which he promised me two pounds. In the latter end of July I had not above two days work in a week; I asked him for the two guineas which he was to give me for learning him; he said he had no money, but he would give me something to pledge; he gave me the coat out of the drawer: I went and pledged it at that gentleman's shop for one pound fifteen shillings. I gave the ticket into Mr. de Frenne's hands.

Q. to prosecutor Was the prisoner to teach you the business of flower making - A. No.

Q. Did you give her the coat to pawn or sell - A. No; she delivered me the duplicate when I went to apprehend her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-87

628. EDWARD WRIGHT, alias MY-HEARTY , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , a pair of scales, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Raybott .

THOMAS RAYBOTT . I lived at No. 15, Gray's inn lane , when the robbery was committed; I was not at home at the time.

THOMAS FARRER . I had some business at the house of the prosecutor on the 21st of July; as I came to the house I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the scales; they were laying on the table in the shop, there was no person in the shop besides him. When I came in the shop he put them under his arm and covered a sack over them; he walked about half a dozen paces from the house, when I called Mrs. Raybott; she came down; during which time the prisoner walked away. I did not think myself authorised to take him myself; he was suffered to proceed up Holborn, he was detected in another robbery. I took the scales from him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 82.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-88

629. MARY ANN HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , seven pair of cotton stockings, value 14 s. the property of William Keatch .

- I live opposite of Mr. Keatch; I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Keatch's shop and take up a parcel; she put it in her apron and came across to where she had left her barrow, and went away with it.

MICHAEL WINDSOR . I took the woman in custody; the stockings have been in my custody ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the door.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-89

630. WILLIAM RUSSEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , nine pigeons, value 9 s. the property of Samuel Hagger .

SAMUEL HAGGER . I live at the Knave of Clubs, Shoreditch . I kept fifteen pigeons when I lost these nine, on the 9th of August.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. What sort of a place is this you keep your pigeons in - A. In a shed in the back yard; they go in and out at a trap door; I had fastened the door of the shed and the upper part; the pigeons could not go out till I let them out. When I went to them in the morning there were nine gone.

WILLIAM KEMP . I am a dealer in live poultry; I live in Whitechapel road.

Q. Were these pigeons brought to you at any time - A. On the 9th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought nine pigeons; the prosecutor had been to me and described them. I detained the prisoner with them. I saw Mr. Coombes, an officer of Lambeth street, going by; I called him in, he took him in custody; there were two other persons with him at the shop door, they did not come in; the prisoner offered them for sale, he asked me twelve shillings for them.

Mr. Bolland. I believe he told you he had bought them that morning - A. I believe he told me so.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-90

631. ROSE MACQUIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , eight pound eight of suet. value 4 s. the property of Thomas Hewit .

THOMAS HEWIT. I am a butcher , I live in Norton street, Portman place ; the prisoner at the bar was my servant ; I had no reason to suspect her till she took me eight pound of suet.

GEORGE BIDDULPH . I live in Cleveland street, I am a tallow chandler.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. Yes, she brought eight pound weight of fat and suet; I bought it of her, I suspected that she did not come honestly by it. I watched her house to the prosecutor's; the prisoner is the same person.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my custody; she confessed that she sold the eight pounds of fat for four shillings; she said it was her master's.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-91

632. WILLIAM TURTLE SMITH and SOPHIA WILSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , four mahogany boards, value 6 l. the property of George Ireland .

GEORGE IRELAND . I live in Shoreditch , I am a sawyer, and I keep a timber yard ; - on the 22nd of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought back to our yard with one of the boards on his back; we looked and missed four boards from the rack.

Q. How soon before they were taken had you seen them - A. I had seen them in the morning; I knew the board that was brought back by the prisoner, it was marked with chalk by the man that cut it. I saw the three other boards the next morning at the Duke's Head, Wheeler street; I knew them all to be mine.

PETER ADAMS . I am a sawyer, I work for Mr. Ireland; I saw the prisoner come into the yard, he pulled about these boards, he looked about him, he saw me, he asked where master was; I told him outside of the gates; he took the board and left it at the gate, and then he walked away with it; my mate fetched him back to my master; he had then the board on his shoulder; I followed my mate; I saw him bring him and the board back.

WILLIAM DRAKE . Between the hours of three and four o'clock on the 22nd of July I was coming to Mr. Ireland, I saw the prisoner with a board on his shoulder.

ROBERT PAGE . I am a carpenter. Last Monday three weeks Sophia Wilson called upon me, I was in a public house in the Old Artillery ground; she said Turtle Smith had left some valuable mahogany planks in the street, he was going to get tipsey, and she was afraid they would be lost.

Q. Did she live with Smith - A. I have seen them together frequently; she asked me to be so kind as to get a place to put them in. I asked the people of the house, they gave me liberty.

Q. You got leave to put them in the public house - A. Yes; at the Northumberland Arms, Old Artillery ground.

MARY MARTIN . I keep the sign of the Crown, Bethnal green; - on the 22nd of August the prisoner came into my house and called for a pint of beer; they sat some little time, and the man went out, giving Wilson orders to stay in my house till he returned; he was gone twenty minutes or half an hour; he returned and drank part of a pint of beer; he then went out, and I saw no more of him

Q. Did she go along with him - A. No, she did not, she staid in my house from half past two till six, and never stirred out of the door.

PETER MASON . I am an officer belonging to Worship street office. I found the three boards at the public house; I apprehended the woman at the same house two or three hours afterwards; she said she knew nothing of the boards, only the man desired her to stay in that house till he returned.

Smith's Defence. I am perfectly satisfied with my trial. I was very much intoxicated in liquor; I am sorry for it; the woman is innocent.

Wilson was not put on her defence.

Q. to Adams. Did the prisoner seem very much intoxicated when he was brought back - A. Not very much; he might be a little.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

WILSON, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-92

633. JOHN FREELAND was indicted for that he on the 12th of August was servant to Richard Green , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, that being such servant , and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of. 5 s. 6 d. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal, three shillings, part of the same five shillings and six-pence .

RICHARD GREEN . I am a haberdasher , I live in Marybone street, Golden square . The prisoner Freeland was in my employ.

Q. And you employed him to receive money for you - A. Yes. James Budgell came to buy some articles in the shop that came to five shillings and sixpence, and when he was gone, the prisoner only gave half a crown. When any body serves the customers, we have a boy that takes the money from us; then the prisoner took eight shillings of a lady. Instead of taking the thirteen shillings and sixpence to the book, he only took ten shillings and sixpence, and only made a check of ten shillings and sixpence in the check book.

"August 12, No. 14, 10 s. 6 d." this is his hand writing.

Q. How do you know that he took eight shillings of the lady - A. There was a memorandum of it, he said eight shillings I believe.

JAMES BUDGELL . I am an assistant officer of Marlborough street. On the 12th of August Mr. Cragg spoke to me.

Q. What did you do - A. On the 12th I went to Mr.

Green's shop, I bought a quarter of a pound of fourpenny black thread, it came to thirteen-pence halfpenny; a quarter of an ounce of tenpenny white thread, that came to twopence halfpenny; I bought a black silk handkerchief, I gave four shillings for it; it came to five shillings and fourpence altogether; I gave the prisoner half a crown and three shillings, he gave me twopence halfpenny in change, the change was twopence, I did not return the halfpenny. I then walked out of the shop. I went to Cragg and told him what I had done.

Q. You was sent on purpose - A. Yes; the money was given me by Cragg.

WILLIAM CRAGG . Q. You gave the money to the last witness - A. Yes. I searched the prisoner's pockets, I found the three marked shillings.

Q. to Budgell. Did you have any marked shillings - A. Yes, three, I received them from Cragg.

JAMES CRAYDON . I am shopman to Mr. Green. On Friday the 12th of August, I was at a public house in the neighbourhood, I saw the three shillings which Cragg had marked; about a quarter of an hour afterwards I saw Budgell come in and buy the articles that he has specified. I have seen the shillings which were taken from the prisoner, and I know them to be the same that I saw at the public house.

REECE EVANS . I am Mr. Green's cash-keeper. Budgell came to the shop, and laid out five shillings and fourpence; he only brought me half a crown.

Q. Were you present when these goods were sold for five shillings and fourpence - A. No.

Q. Then you only know that the prisoner gave you half a crown - A. Yes; the prisoner took eight shillings of another customer; he brought me half a guinea, and I gave him half a crown change.

Prisoner. I lived with Mr. Green in the capacity of a shopman twelve months, and finding that he did not settle with me, I was under the necessity of purchasing a few articles. I kept back that money.

Q. to prosecutor. Were there any wages due to him - A. He never asked me for any wages; about a fortnight before this I asked him if he wanted any money; he said money was acceptable at all times; I meaned to pay him that week he was taken up. I have paid all my servants wages up to Midsummer.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to defraud Mr. Green eventually. I meaned to reimburse the money when he settled with me.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-93

634. WILLIAM WEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , a brass cock value 5 s. the property of Thomas Shearman .

MARY SHEARMAN . I live at the corner of Crown street, Finsbure square , my husband is a plumber and engine maker , his name is Thomas Shearman . On the 13th of September, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner came in the shop and asked me if Mr. Shearman was at home; I told him no; he turned round to the cocks, there was a quantity lying on the place. He untied his handkerchief and took cut an apple, and asked me if I would accept of an apple. He had left us, but was then engaged to come and instruct our apprentices. I told him I did not chuse to take the apple; being suspicious of him before, I looked at him, I saw him take the cock and put it into his handkerchief; I cast my eyes over the way, I saw Mr. Mosely, I begged of him to assist me; Mr. Mosely came directly; the prisoner then wanted to go out, I held him till Mr. Mosely came in, and took hold of him; Mr. Mosely shook him, he untied his handkerchief in the struggle; the prisoner shook his handkerchief, and the brass cock and three apples fell out of the handkerchief.

Q. When he shook his handkerchief was he standing near the place were the brass cocks were - A. No, he was in the middle of the shop.

Q. When you called Mr. Mosely was he standing by the cocks - A. No, he was then almost by the door.

CHARLES MOSELY . Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Shearman called out, Mr. Mosely; I went over, she had got hold of the prisoner by the coat; she said he had got something of hers in the handkerchief; I took hold of his elbow, he was not near the cocks in the window; I said what have you got in your handkerchief; he said nothing but a few apples; he was still holding of the handkerchief. I did not quit my hold till the apples and the cock fell under his feet.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the theft of the cock; I always did business to Mr. Shearman's satisfaction; I left him at the time he had not work enough to employ me, else he would have kept me on to work.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-94

635. JOSEPH DOLPHIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August a ham, value 10 s. the property of Stephen Buck .

STEPHEN BUCK . I keep a shop in Mary-le-bone lane , I am a cheesemonger . On the 27th of August, I saw the ham a quarter of an hour before it was taken.

MARY OSBORNE . I live opposite of Mr. Buck. On the 27th of August, at one o'clock at noon, I was looking out of my window, I saw this man take the ham away and go away; I gave an alarm; he was pursued till he dropped the ham; I saw him drop the ham and I saw him taken.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was going down Marybone lane, they attacked me for stealing a ham: I never took the ham at all.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury; before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-95

636. ELIZABETH RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of July , a great coat, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Potten .

BARBARY POTTEN . I live in St. Paul's, Shadwell ; I am the wife of Thomas Potten .

Q. Did he lose a great on the 18th of July last - A. Yes; out of the kitchen about half past two in the afternoon, I had seen it about half an hour before she took it, I was at my sister's next door at the time she took it. In consequence of what the next witness came and told me, I pursued her and overtook her, in about ten

minutes walk from my house; I asked her how she came to go in my house and take the coat: she hesitated, and at last said she did not take it she had got the coat on her right arm; she said she bought it; I said she could not have bought it, and I asked her to give it me back; she said no, unless I gave her three shillings; she said she gave two shillings for it; I sent for an officer, he took her in custody.

MARY HARRISON . I live in the same house with Mrs. Potten: I was in a neighbour's house; I saw the prisoner go down the court; she had nothing with her; then I saw her go into Mr. Potten's house; I saw her come out again with the great coat upon her arms; I did not know but my landlady was in doors; but she was at the next door at her sister's. I went to her.

Q. Do you know whose coat it was - A. My landlady's son, Richard Potten ; he is thirteen years of age, he lives with his father.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat of a man, I gave him three shillings for it, I bought it lawfully; I had it on my arm for sale; if the coat was sold I do not suppose I should get above sixpence profit.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-96

637. JAMES BALCHIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a saw, value 3 s. six planes, value 6 s. an oil stone, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Edwards ; two saws, value 8 s. fifteen planes. value 15 s. an oil stone, value 2 s. the property of Richard Sims ; a square, value 1 s. an oil stone, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Crow ; a saw, value 4 s. a plow, value 6 s. two planes, value 4 s. the property of Ellis Hobday ; two saws, value 7 s. a glue pot, value 5 s. and a sash filaster, value 5 s. the property of William Hobday .

SAMUEL EDWARDS . I am a journeyman carpenter . On the 26th of July I lost five saws and twenty planes out of Hemlock court , where I was at work.

Q You do not know of your own knowledge of the prisoner taking them - A. No.

RICHARD SIMS . I am a carpenter ; I lost four saws and thirty eight planes out of Hemlock court; I was at work with the last witness.

THOMAS HEDGE . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned a saw and a plane with me on the 30th of July.

JAMES BLAND . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned with me an oil stone and a trying square on the 28th of July.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things in Newgate street, at a wine vaults; I cannot exactly say the sign; it is the first wine vaults on the left hand as you come from Skinner street; one of the men that I bought them off was dressed in sailor's clothes; one of them gave me the name of Crow and the other Jackson; I purchased as many of the tools as I had money for; had I any more money I should have purchased the rest of the tools.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-97

638. JAMES GUNSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , 21 penny pieces, halfpence, and farthings the property of John Wells .

JOHN WELLS . I keep a public house in Clipstone street .

Q. Did you lose any money on the 11th of September - A. Yes, some then and some before; the money that I lost on that day was some of it marked.

Q. How much marked money did you miss - A. Thirteen pence from the till in my bar; the prisoner lived servant with me. I observed the prisoner go up stairs: I asked a person in the house to go up stairs and hear if he was counting money, and when the prisoner came down stairs I perceived he had something bulky in his pocket; he was going out of doors and I stopped him; I desired him to walk in. I felt his pockets, I found he had money in them; I sent for a constable, I had him searched, I found upon him fourteen shillings and eight pence; amongst that money there was thirteen pence that I marked the over night.

MR. LUDLEY. I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, I found upon him fourteen shillings and eight pence in penny pieces, half pence, and farthings. I produce them, I have had them ever since.

Prosecutor. I marked them with a penknife, a cross on the head of some of them, and a scratch on the other side of others; this one is marked on the king's nose.

JOHN MACKFRAIL . I saw the prosecutor mark the money; he told me there was part of the money gone on Sunday morning. I went up stairs, I heard the prisoner rauling halfpence.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 23,

Transported for Seven Year .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-98

689. MARY DALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , a gown, value 6 s. and a pelisse, value 5 s. the property of John Weatherall .

ANN WEATHERALL . I am the wife of the prosecutor; he is a gentleman's coachman .

Q. Did you lose a gown and a pelisse - A. Yes, on the 13th of August, out of my room.

Q. You did not see the prisoner take it did you - A No.

Q. When did you see your property before it was stolen - A. Not five minutes before; I was sweeping the stairs, the prisoner passed me.

Q. Was this in a lodging house - A. Yes, it was; she was going up stairs, I did not stop her, I did not know she was going up to my room; there are other lodgers in the house.

JAMES PERRYMAN . Q. You are a pawnbroker - A. Yes; a gown was pledged at my house; I cannot say as to the prisoner pawning it; the prisoner came a few days after the gown was pawned, and being informed by my young man that she was the person that pledged it, I detained her; she came to pledge something else. I asked her what she had done with the ticket of the gown that she had pledged on the 13th of August; she gave me the ticket.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any one to her character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080914-99

640. BENJAMIN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a coat, value 10 s. the property of Andrew Abernmanson .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of William Shirley .

WILLIAM SHIRLEY . I am a publican , I live at the Bull's Head, Ratcliffe highway .

Q. Was there a coat lost from your house on the 26th of July last - A. Yes, a sailor had left that coat, among other things, in my possession for six pounds one shilling, which I advanced him; I missed it between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I had seen it a few minutes before. The prisoner and four more had been in my house; I missed it in two minutes after they were gone. I have seen the coat since.

CHARLES WILLSMORE . I am servant to Mr. Rolfe, pawnbroker. On the 26th of July, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner pawned the coat with me.

The property produced and identified.

CHARLES MORRIS . I apprehended the prisoner - he told me he had pawned the coat at Mr. Rolfe's facing Shadwell church; I fetched the coat out the next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. There were five of us went into this public house, we were very drunk; the coat was given me by one of the company. I pawned the coat.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18080914-100

641. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for that he on the 27th of July was servant to sir Charles Price , bart. Charles Price , junior , and Ralph Price , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and bank notes on their account, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, six shillings and three one pound bank notes, on account of his said masters, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

MR. HISCOCK. Q. You are in the house of Hiscock, Edis and co. - A. Yes, in Blackman street, in the Borough.

Q. Had you any occasion in July last, and when, to send any person to sir Charles Price - A. On the 27th of July last I sent our porter, Joseph Gregory , to the house of sir Charles Price and co. in Blackfriers , for the hundred weight of glue in question - he brought the oil on the preceding day; he had three pounds six shillings to pay for the glue; he brought the glue without any bill and receipt, which I did not think of any consequence. I cannot recollect what sort of money I gave him, I should imagine in notes and silver.

JOSEPH GREGORY . Q. You are porter to Messrs Hiscock, Edis, and co. - A. Yes; on the 27th of July I went and paid three one pound notes and six shillings. I had received that from Mr. Hiscock.

Q. Who did you see when you went to the house of sir Charles Price - A. I saw the prisoner, I asked him for a receipt; he told me there was no occasion for a bill or receipt, he had got the money, he would cross it off the book.

Q. You paid that money for glue - A. Yes; I carried the glue home to my master.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have been in the habit of dealing with sir Charles Price and co. - A. Yes.

Q. Has it always been the practice for you to have a receipt - A. I always had, except twice. On the 14th of July I went for a hundred weight of glue, and I paid the money and had no receipt; and on the 27th of July was the other time. Mr. Charles Price was there on the 14th; he told me then there was no occasion for having a bill and receipt.

COURT. On this occasion, on the 27th of July, you contracted with the prisoner, and paid him for the glue - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the day was this - A. About half past two o'clock in the afternoon.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . Q. You are receiving clerk in the house of sir Charles Price - A. I am.

Q. State to the court what was the duty of the prisoner in that house in regard to his receiving of money - A. He was to bring the money into me.

Q. Did he deal with the customers that came to the house - A. Yes, and then they pay it over to me; it is the general custom of people who have the goods; they receive the goods of him, and pay the money over to me.

Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of receiving the money for goods - A. If there was no person in the way.

Q. It I had come to the house and received glue, and paid for it, what must be done with the money - A. It must be brought in to me.

Q. Turn to that book, 27th July, and tell me whether he entered on the 27th of July, an hundred weight of glue sold to Messrs. Hiscock and co. - A. There is no mention of the article.

Q. Does he give you any other entry - A. On the 28th of July there is an entry of ten gallons of train oil and one gallon, two pounds and a half, of neat's foot oil, sold to Messrs. Hiscock.

COURT. That is an entry of a contract made by him, in which he had taken the money and delivered the goods - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner then frequently in the habit of selling goods and taking the money - A. If nobody else was in the way.

Mr. Smith. It is your duty generally to receive - when you are not there the prisoner receives - A. When I am not there, there generally is another clerk. If there is no clerk there, of course he receives it.

Q. Is the other clerk here - A. I believe not; he was not at home on the 27th of July at half past two o'clock in the afternoon, because I was there.

Q. What time do you dine - A. At two o'clock, or half past one; I stay about half an hour.

Q. When you are not there, is it not customary to put the money on the inkstand - A. No; I never found any laid on the desk, nor on the inkstand, since I have been in the house.

Q. If a person receives money, who has not the key of the place where the money is deposited, he would lay it down till you came in - A. No.

Q. Are you certain that could not have happened - A. I am positive of it.

Mr. Bolland. Was you in the house during the whole of the transaction with Messrs. Hiscock's porter - A. I was in and out; I never received the money for the glue that was paid to the prisoner.

MR. CHARLES PRICE , JUNR. Q. Who are the partners

in the house of Sir Charles Price - A. Charles Price my father, myself, and my brother Ralph Price; we are the only persons that are partner s.

Q. State to the court the duty of the prisoner as warehouseman - A. If any body sends for goods to our house, it is his duty to deliver them and to give an account in the accompting house. If he receives any money he is to give it to Mr. Thompson, but the account of goods sold, he is to give it to any body in the acompting house. He was as clerk in our accompting house till I became very unsettled with a warehouseman; we then took him in as warehouseman; we took him in warehouseman from the very situation that Mr. Thompson now has.

Q. Was it possible that he could be ignorant or the duty of your house - A. No, we took him in warehouseman, because he knew the whole duty of the house.

Q. Did any examination take place of the prisoner in the accompting house. did you threaten him or promise him any favour - A. We neither threatened him or promised him, we charged him with the fact; he at first denied it. It was in the middle of August that we apprehended him, he was examined by us on the Thursday, the day he was apprehended; we charged him with having taken the money for this hundred weight of glue, he denied it; in consequence of which I believe myself said, we had evidence and could prove the fact; he then stated that he had received the money, and hoped we would let him go, he would do any thing that we wished; he desired me to intercede with my father and not to prosecute him; my father said as he had sent for a constable he could not let it pass.

COURT. Your warehouseman was authorised to bargain for goods and receive the money if they were paid for - A. He might receive the money; any person might receive money except the porters.

Mr. Knapp. Was not he entrusted to receive money in your business to the greatest extent - A. I put him in the warehouse because I thought he was confidential.

Q. Did it ever happen that if money was not brought in one day it was brought in afterwards - A. It was not allowed; if it had happened I certainly should have reprimanded them.

COURT. Has this money ever been paid to you or to any of your firm - A. It has not.

JURY. Has the money ever been offered to you or any of your servants - A. It has not.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say, as I said before the sitting alderman, that I certainly did receive the money, and there I placed it, I believe I have witnesses in the court that will prove that the accompting house as been left for a long time in a day, if you will please to hear them.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-101

642. WILLIAM REED was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July , a pocket book, value 10 d. the property of James Spencer .

JAMES SPENCER . I am a mariner . On the 23d of July, about half past three in the afternoon, I was in Cornhill under the center arch of the Royal Exchange.

Q. Had you a pocket book in your pocket at that time - A. I had; when I entered the Royal Exchange I felt my pocket book.

Q. How soon did you miss it - A. I had not entered the Royal Exchange before I felt it gone out of my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner with the pocket book in his hand; I seized him and he dropped the pocket book down on the flags; I charged him with stealing it; he fell on his knees and begged my pardon, and said it was another boy before him; I did not see any other boy, nor did I look; he was so near that I touched him turning round with my elbow; the constable seized him and the pocket book together.

Q. What was the value of your pocket book - A. Ten pence.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a constable. On the 23rd of July, I was in the lord mayor's justice room; looking through the window, I saw the prisoner and another in company with him come out of Lombard street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's person - A. Yes; I am sure he is the lad; I ran down stairs and ced him to the Royal Exchange; I kept my eye upon him; the boy that was with him was bigger than himself, but he was quite a lad. They made over to the Royal Exchange; I saw this Reed pick Mr. Spencer's pocket; I ran up instantly and he dropped the pocket book; I secured him and picked up the pocket book; the other boy made off; I have kept the pocket book ever since.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, and called one witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-102

643. JAMES COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , three pounds weight of soap, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Kent and David Montague .

JOHN DALLISON . I am foreman to John Kent and David Montague , soap manufacturer s. The prisoner was their watchman .

Q. What time did he use to come to watch - A. At six o'clock in the evening, when the men left work; there was one of the men and me removing a frame in which we put the soap in the manufactory; the man perceived a cake of soap, he pointed it out to me; it was concealed; it weighs about three pound; on seeing the soap in this place, I put a piece of tobacco pipe in one end, I thrust it quite in so as it could not be perceived, and then I put it where I found it; this was in the morning; we let it lay there till the evening, at six o'clock, when the men went away, we looked and it was there, the men were all gone away; and only the prisoner was on the premises, who was to watch. I saw the soap again at the Mansion house, with the tobacco pipe in it.

WILLIAM SHERRIN . I am a constable. On Thursday, the 26th of July, I went to Mr. Kent and Montague's, West street, West Smithfield, and waited there till the evening when the prisoner came to watch; about six o'clock he came on duty, I took him in custody; I asked him where he lived; he told me, No, 6, Vine court, Moor lane; I took him to his lodgings with me;

on searching his lodgings, in a large chest I found this cake of soap among his wearing apparel; I was present when Dallison examined the soap before the lord mayor; he said it was his master's soap.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness Dallison told me he would do for me the first opportunity, because I told my master he left the cutting room of a night.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined three Months in Newgate , and during that Time to be whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-103

644. JOHN DOUGLASS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , six pounds four ounces weight of tea, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT laying it to be the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

WILLIAM DOTHLE . Q. You are a labourer in the East India company's warehouse - A. Yes; the prisoner was in the same employ, he was a watchman , and I was a watchman. On the 11th of September the box I was stationed at that night was inside of the gate Jewry street warehouse.

Q. Had the prisoner a lanthorn and a great coat - A. Yes, that was in my box inside of the gate; we usually hang them there. On the 11th of September the prisoner came soon after nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. After the coat had been taken away, did you make any observation - A. No, we stood talking together till between ten and eleven o'clock, then I went inside; I found some loose tea scattered on the step going into the box; I went and asked the prisoner if he knew any thing of it, he said no, he did not; I asked him to come and look at it, he came in, he said he knew nothing of it. After that I made an excuse to go to the outside box belonging to him; I put my hand in at the bottom of the box, there I found a bag containing six pounds four ounces of tea; I kept the bag in my possession till the morning; the first person I shewed it to was Mr. Barber, the elder. When I found the bag he desired I would say nothing about it; I asked him how he came by it, he said he got it out of the cellar: he still begged very hard for his family's sake that I would say nothing about it, and wished to throw it away; I said I would do no such thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. How long have you worked there - A. For fourteen years.

Q. Have you worked for them the last year - A. I have.

Q. Have you not been out of their service at all - A. I was, for a few days.

Q. How many days do you call a few days - A. I was absent for five days.

Q. You did not ask leave of absence - A. No.

Q. Was not you suspended for your misconduct - A. I was suspended.

Q. Why do you hang back - I know you was suspended, and I know what you are after - when was you restored last - A. I cannot say the exact day.

Q. You petitioned the company, and you was restored - A. Yes.

Q. Your duty is to watch at the gate, and to see that no man takes any thing away - A. I only am to watch a particular set of men.

Q. Do you mean to say that if you see a man take any thing away that belongs to the company, you are not to stop that man - A. If I see him, to be sure I am to do that.

Q. How long has the prisoner been in your warehouse - A. Twelve or thirteen years.

Q. I dare say you can tell me that he has not been suspended - you know you have been - A. I have been, I do not deny it.

Q. What time do the men leave the warehouse - A. At three o'clock.

Q. It was on Sunday evening it was discovered - your box is inside, his outside - did you ever hear of any man taking tea of the Saturday night, and letting it be till eleven o'clock on Sunday night before he took it away - A. I never did.

Q. Can any man convey any thing out of the warehouse without being the subject of examination - does it not require great dexterity to escape detection, as they are rubbed down when they come out - A. Yes; one would think it impossible.

Q. And still carrying out six pounds four ounces, which is a large quantity, must not a man be discovered if he had that quantity - A. I suppose he must.

Q. You had this notable confession, that he took it out of the cellar - A. He confessed it to me himself.

Q. Nobody else heard it but you - what have you been suspended for - A. A person passed unnoticed by me, who had a little coffee and tea.

WILLIAM BARBER . Q. You are an assistant elder belonging to the East India company - A. Yes, and watch inspector. On Monday morning about six o'clock I rung at the bell of Jewry street warehouse, I asked Dothie if all was well; he shewed me a bag containing tea, it was in a basket; I saw the bag opened afterwards, I saw there was tea in it.

Q. to Dothie. Had the prisoner any thing with him when he came on duty - A. I saw him throw a basket down by the gate inside.

Barber. I saw a chest that was brought up from the cellar, it appeared to be plundered, the lead was torn; I compared the tea in the chest with the tea in the bag, it corresponded with some of the tea, it is not all of the same sort.

COURT. Had this chest the appearance of a broken chest, or of a plundered chest - A. It had all the appearance of a plundered chest, it had not the appearance of being damaged by a tall.

Q. What is the value of this quantity of tea - A. One guinea; the major part of the tea in the bag appears to be of the same quality as that in the chest. I have a sample of each.

Mr. Alley. Is it possible for any human being without connivance with the man at the gate, that it could be carried out - A. It is possible that it might be carried in the yard.

Mr. Gleed. Suppose a man got it out of the warehouse in his great coat, and got it into the yard, could not he take it into his watch box - A. Certainly.

RICHARD SMITH . Q. You are the King's locker - A. Yes; the bag and the tea were delivered to me on

the Monday morning; I produce it in the same state as it was delivered to me.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-104

645. HANNAH STEADMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , two petticoats, value 5 s. two habit shirts, value 1 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a cap, value 1 s. a silver soup ladle. value 15 s. two silver tureen ladles, value 10 s. two silver salt spoons, value 6 s. four silver tea spoons, value 8 s. a gold ring, value 5 s. four shirts, value 10 s. two gowns, value 5 s. twenty eight napkins, value 1 l. 8 s. six frocks, value 8 s. six caps, value 6 s. a silver gravy spoon, value 10 s. and six silver table spoons, value 1 l. the property of John Crabtree .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

MR. WOODMAN. Q. You are a constable - A. Yes. I took the prisoner into custody; she had been searched before I came to her; as I was taking her in to a little room along with Mrs. Thompson, she dropped a key, I picked it up; going a little further she dropped four more, in a handkerchief, I picked them up; I searched her and found no more.

Q. Did you try the keys to any drawers in the house - A. I did; this small key that she dropped, opened the till in the accompting house, and two of the four keys that were in the handkerchief, opened the drawers where the linen was; this bunch of keys were delivered to me by Mrs. Thompson; this key opens the ward robe. This property when I went into the room, where the young woman was, was laying on the floor.

MRS. THOMPSON. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Thompson, who is in the employ of Slack and co. cotton merchants, Newgate street - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Crabtree is abroad - what is his name - A. John Crabtree . When he went abroad his furniture was put into three different rooms, and there were some plate and linen.

Q. Where did Mrs. Crabtree go upon her husband's going abroad - A. Into the country. Mr. Thompson lives in the house, he manages the business; the prisoner was my servant .

Q. On the 24th of August last, did you discover any thing that excited your suspicion - A. I did; I went into the two pair of stairs back room, I put my hand on the bed, I felt something hard; I took from between the leather bed and matress a handkerchief, a soup ladle, two tureen ladles, two salt spoons, and four tea spoons; the whole of the plate and the linen belongs to Mr. Crabtree; I took the prisoner up stairs, I asked her if it was her handkerchief: she said it was, and she put it there, she informed me she found them in the garret; we then went up stairs into a bed room, her box was unlocked; I found there a bunch of keys; these are they keys I found in her box; then I searched her person.

JURY. Have you duplicate keys - A. No; she said these were her own keys; all the linen is Mr. Crabtree's.

Mr. Bolland. Did you search her person - A. Yes, in her pocket I found Mr. Crabtree's key, and a mourning gold ring. I am certain it is Mr. Crabtree's, his mother's name is on it; when I found these spoons the warehouseman and I were in the room with her; I wanted her to tell me where she had put the table spoons: I believe I told her it would be better for her if she did tell.

Q. In consequence of what she told you did you go any where - A. The constable did, he went with her. I afterwards saw half a dozen silver table spoons and a gravy spoon, that was the property of Mr. Crabtree.

Q. to Woodman. In consequence of what this unhappy girl said did you go any where - A. I went to Mr. Cotterill's, in Aldersgate street, a pawnbroker; she went into the shop with me, she asked for two spoons; the pawnbroker produced them. She went with me to Mr. Parker's, Fleet street, there she asked for four table spoons; they shewed us them; I told them I believed the ticket was done away with; she said nothing of the gravy spoon, it was at Mr. Parker's.

MARY HUNT . Q. You are servant to Mrs. Crabtree - A. Yes. I lived three years there, and when they went out of the house, I went into the country with Mrs. Crabtree.

Q. Look at these things, the linen - A. I have examined them all, I am certain they are my master's and mistress's property.

MR. ANGUS. I live with Mr. Parker in Fleet street. I produce a gravy spoon, and four table spoons. I do not recollect who brought them; I recollect the young woman coming with Woodman, and asking for four table spoons. The four table spoons, and the gravy spoon are all marked as she described with the letter C. They were pledged in the name of Elizabeth Carpenter .

JOHN SMITH . I live at Mr. Cotterill's. On the 6th of June, a pair of table spoons were pledged at our house by a woman, in the name of Mary Carpenter ; the prisoner came with Woodman, and asked for a pair of table spoons pledged there, with C. upon them. I produce them.

Mary Hunt . I am certain they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. In an agony of mind, too great to be described, I venture to address your lordship, most numbly entreating your pardon. - Conscious of my inability to speak at this awful moment, I have delivered in this paper, not that I have ought to say as an extenuation of a conduct so faulty as mine has been. Alas! my lord, I am a poor unfortunate girl, whose character never till this sad-business was called in question; I am almost sinking in shame and remorse for the disgrace I have brought, not only on myself, but my poor afflicted parents, who are hard working people. I fear unless your lordship compassionates my unhappy case, I shall be lost for ever. I can assure your lordship that it was done more from youth and inexperience than from depravity of heart. I did not till too late reflect seriously on the consequence of my crime, and though others may forgive me I cannot forgive myself, and the only conduct now in my power is to bear with due resignation the punishment that may await me. I have been unfairly dealt with; for on my confession I was promised a pardon, and that no officer of Justice should be sent for; in simplicity I did so, most candidly, and on my knees I begged forgiveness. I was placed in confinement. - To your consideration and humanity do I submit myself, and should I be so fortunate to regain

my liberty, no temptation, however strong, shall induce me to do wrong.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-105

646. WILLIAM WROASMAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , a gold watch, value 30 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 2 l. the property of Francis Warren ; and

EMANUEL JACOBS for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

FRANCIS WARREN . I am lieutenant of the 9th regiment of dragoons ; the prisoner is a private in that regiment, he formerly was my servant. On the 30th of August, I left my watch in the room, at Hounslow barracks , to go down to dinner; it was a gold watch; it cost me thirty five guineas, the seal cost me two guineas and a half, and the chain I believe five guineas, On the next morning I missed my watch; I received information from the serjeant major; Jacobs said he bought the watch of a dragoon; he said he gave two pound twelve shillings for it; he did not know the value of it; he bought it in the dark.

FRANCES RICHARDSON . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Gilbert - A. Yes, he keeps the Bell Inn at Hounslow.

Q. Do you remember on the 30th of August last, seeing both the prisoners at your house - A. I did, about nine o'clock in the evening; they were in the kitchen about a quarter of an hour; they both came in together; one went in the yard and the other went through the house.

ABRAHAM LAMBERT . - Mr. Alley. You are a constable - A. Yes. On the 31st of August, I got a warrant from Justice Anderson, at Belfound; I found Jacobs at the Bell at Hounslow, he was in the street when I took him; I asked him if he had not got Mr. Warren's watch, he would not answer me for a long time; the prosecutor was by me at the time; he at last said, I should not have it, he would go before the magistrate and deliver it to him; I then said I must search him; he then took it out of his right hand breeches pocket and showed it to Mr. Warren; Mr. Warren said it was his watch; Jacobs then put it in his pocket and said he would deliver it up before the magistrate; he said he bought it of a soldier Wroasmain was brought down from the bar racks to me; Mr. Warren asked Jacobs if that was the man that he bought it of; he said no, that was not the man, but the servant girl could tell the man; the girl was called; she said the soldier was the man that was with him; Wroasmain denied it, and said that he never had a watch. On my taking them to magistrate, they were quarrelling all the way, the soldier still denied that he ever sold him the watch; I took them before the magistrate and they were committed.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. I will ask you whether Jacobs ever denied from first to last that he had the possession of the watch - A. He never denied that he had the watch, but he refused to show me the watch.

Q. Did not he alledge he thought he had no right to deliver it to you, the constable, but that he ought to deliver it up to the justice - A. Yes, and before the justice he said he should deliver it directly.

The property produced and identified.

Wroasmain's Defence. I went into the Bell public house to ask for one of my comrades. I could not see him; I called for a pint of beer; I went to light my pipe in the kitchen, a man stood with a watch in his hand, I asked him what o'clock it was, he told me it wanted twenty minutes to nine o'clock. I lighted my pipe and went home to the barracks and was there at roll call.

COURT. You say you went in accidentally and you asked Jacobs, who stood there, what o'clock it was - A. Yes; but I could not say it was Jacobs.

Jacobs' Defence. I bought this watch for a pinchback watch; in the morning I found it was a gold watch.

WILLIAM GILBERT . - Mr. Knapp. You keep this Bell public house at Hounslow - Do you know the Jew - A. I have seen him at my house several times, he was a lodger at times. On the 30th of August he slept at my house. On the 31st I came down stairs at six o'clock in the morning, he stood in the passage, he asked me if the servant maid Fanny was getting up; I asked him what he wanted with her; he said he had bought a watch the night before too cheap, he would not wish to keep it; the watch was worth thirty-six guineas. A quarter master, Mr. Charters, lodged opposite, that belonged to the regiment; I called him over the way and informed him what the Jew had told me, that he bought it of one of his men; Jacobs produced the watch to the quarter master, the quarter master asked him if he knew the man that he bought it of; he said he did not, but referred him to the servant girl Fanny. Fanny told the quarter master she knew the soldier by sight, she had seen him at our house along with a farrier of the regiment. The prisoner Wroasmain was sent for to the public house; Jacob, went away from my house that morning, he said he was going to Twickenham, he would return at five o'clock in the evening; he offered to leave the watch in my possession; I refused. I was fearful of taking charge of it.

Q. You advised him not to deliver it up but before a magistrate - A. I did.

JOHN CHARTERS . Q. Are you quarter master of the regiment - A. I am. I was sent for by Mr. Gilbert to come over to his house; Jacobs produced the watch to me as Mr. Gilbert has described; I told him that I should go up to the barracks to make enquiries about it; he was very desirous I should; he said he was going in the country; he would be back by five o'clock in the evening.

COURT. Did you hear him offer to leave the watch with Mr. Gilbert. - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Was it possible for a man to take that watch, chain, and seal into his hand and not to know it was gold - A. I should suppose he must know from the weight of it.

Q. Did you desire him not to go away till the fact was enquired into - A. I did; I desired him to go to the barracks; he did not go; he said he would return in the evening and deliver it up to a justice.

Jacobs called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Wroasmain called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-106

647. MARY SPITTLE was indicted for that she on

the 28th of August, upon John Nairn , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, which she then and there held in her right hand, willfully, and maliciously, did stab and cut him, in and upon his left cheek, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him . And

Two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth street. I did not see the act done myself, and the prosecutor is not here; a person is here that saw it done. On Sunday, the 28th of August, I was applied to by a person, saying, that a woman in St. Catherine's had cut a boy's cheek open; I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. Had she any thing when you apprehended her - A. No. The lad did not appear according to his directions; I took a boat and found out his ship; his name is John Nairn .

Q. You do not know that his real name is John Nairn - A. No; I never saw him before that day; that is the name he gave in; I likewise found two other boys out in different ships; I brought them all before the magistrate, and they were bound over.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a mason; I live at No. 119, Cock Hill, Shadwell. On the 28th of August, I saw the boy, John Nairn , about six o'clock in the evening; he was standing at the corner of St. Catherine's lane.

Q. What sort of a person was he - A. He was a young lad about thirteen or fourteen years of age, I never saw him before. The prisoner passed me on the curb; the lad stood at the end of the lane close against the wall; she up with her hand and stabbed him in the cheek; she went away down the lane and went into No. 2. the lad's face bled like a pig; I am sure the prisoner is the woman, and there was plenty of room for her to pass; I was about two or three yards off them; he stood on the right hand side, she came on the left hand side; she crossed over the curb and passed him on the opposite wall; the lane is about four foot and a half wide; her face was towards me, and the lad's side was towards me.

Q. Then he might have touched the woman without your seeing of him, on her passing him - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any language by any of them before the blow was given him - A. No, it was done in the instant of her passing him; as I passed by she lifted up her hand and stabbed him in the cheek with a knife; I pursued her to No. 2, and and never left her till the officer came; the knife was found by the officer.

Q. What dispute this young man and the woman had you do know not - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy put his hand in my bosom, and I took up an oyster shell.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-107

648. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , nine shillings and a sixpence, the property of Isaac Lear , from his person .

ISAAC LEAR . I am a linen draper , I live in Love court, Middlesex street, Whitechapel . On the 30th of August, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I lost nine shillings and sixpence from my pocket; it was loose in my waistcoat pocket; I cannot say how it was taken; I was going home, through Broad place, near Petticoat lane, there were two boys fighting, and there was a mob standing there. I did not miss the money till I came home; about half an hour before my money was safe then.

Q. What reason have you for changing the prisoner with taking the money - A. I do not charge the prisoner; I never saw him before he was apprehended; I did not perceive him take it from me.

Q. What reason have you to believe you lost it in Broad place - A. There was a mob there; I stopped to see the boys fight; I passed through the mob. When the prisoner was taken to the office, nine shillings and six pence was found upon him; and a shilling and a sixpence, I believe to be the same I had.

Q. While you were in this mob did you perceive any person pushing against you or hustling of you - A. No.

SIMON DAVIS . I am a taylor; I work for Mr. Phillips, Windsor street, Bishopsgate street.

Q. Were you in Broad place on the 30th of August - A. Yes, I was going home between two and three o'clock; I saw Mr. Lear coming, I went to him.

Q. Did you know Mr. Lear before - A. He lived in our house.

Q. You went up to Mr. Lear, was he in Broad place - A. Yes, he was going towards the mob when I first saw him; there was a fight there, I saw him go into the mob.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near him - A. I saw him running about the place every minute among the mob; he was in company with another boy; he said to the other boy, I have made a good job, and he ran away.

Q. Was that after Lear had been in the crowd - A. Yes; he was going towards home then.

Q. Did you see him at any time near Mr. Lear - A. He stood between Mr. Lear and another man; I saw that.

Q. Was he close enough to have put his hand into Mr. Lear's pocket - A. I did not see him close enough to do that; I did not keep my eye upon Mr. Lear the whole time; I was not in the mob, I was standing upon the hill.

Q. How near was the prisoner to Mr. Lear at the time he stood between Mr. Lear and the other man - A. About a yard and a half; when I heard the prisoner say to the other boy, I have made a good job, I did not know that Mr. Lear's pocket had been picked.

Q. Was it after the time that you saw the boy within a yard of Mr. Lear, that you heard him say that he had made a good job of it - A. Yes, after that time; in about a quarter of an hour after I heard that Mr. Lear had lost his money, when he came away from there he said he had lost his money, nine shillings and sixpence; just when he got home, I said I thought I knew who had it; we went to look after the boy; we found him and Mr. Lear laid hold of him; Mr. Lear asked him if he would give him his money, or he would take him before a justice; they boy said he would go with him, and he did; I am sure he is the boy who was standing near Mr. Lear.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . Q. You are an officer - A. Yes. On the 30th of August Mr. Lear brought the prisoner to the public office, Whitechapel; he said he had picked his pocket of nine shillings and sixpence; I asked

the prisoner if he had any money about him, he said he had; I searched his pockets, I found nine shillings and sixpence, he said it was his own money; I asked Mr. Lear if he had any other witness, he said he had; he came in the evening with this lad with him: I shewed Mr. Lear the money; he spoke to one shilling and a sixpence, which I have kept separate ever since. I took the prisoner before the magistrate, there Mr. Lear claimed the shilling and sixpence as his own; - the prisoner said they were his own.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that shilling and sixpence - A. I believe it to be the same money that I had in my pocket; there are two marks on the sixpence, and a mark on the shilling; I recollected them by the mark, and I had seen them before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going of an errand with ten shillings and a penny for my father to Winfield street. I will take my oath that I never saw him before he laid hold of me in my life; I said do not collar me, I shall go with you.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-108

649. HANNAH JOB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , a silver watch, value 40 s. a hat, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of James Gosling , from his person .

JAMES GOSLING . I live in Golden lane, I work at Mr. Howard's tin manufactory, Old street.

Q. Did you lose a silver watch, a hat, and handkerchief - A. Yes, on the 2nd of August a quarter before five in the morning. I lost them in Red Lion court, Saffron hill .

Q. How came you there - A. I had not been in bed all night, I was in liquor; I had been dragged there from a house in Fleet market; I fell asleep there and was dragged out; I do not know the sign of the house; I spent my evening at the Empress of Russia, Islington. I left that public house about half past two o'clock.

Q. Do you know where you reeled to after that - A. I went to my mother's in Golden lane; I could not get in; I went to the Old Bailey, and had something to drink; from thence I went into Fleet market to a public house; coming out a woman got hold of me; I was too drunk to recollect her person.

Q. Then how you got into this court you do not know - A. No.

Q. How do you know you had your silver watch about you when you left the Empress of Russia - A. I had it between four and five in the morning, I looked at it then; I tucked the chain in my pocket to go to Fleet market.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch, your hat, and handkerchief again - A. No.

JUDITH MURPHY . I live with my mother in Red Lion court, Saffron hill. On the 2nd of August I was up a quarter before five o'clock; I heard a noise in the court, I saw the prisoner take the hat off the young man's head, his watch, and handkerchief; when she turned out of the court she gave it to the other woman that was with her; the prosecutor was very drunk; I saw the prisoner in two or three days afterwards; she was in custody. I am sure she is the person that took the watch.

JAMES HALEY . I am a soldier in the West London militia. On the 2nd of August I got up about four o'clock to get ready to go to my duty; I live in this court. On hearing a noise I came down stairs, I saw this young man and two women together in the passage, and when the woman, not the prisoner, saw me coming, she said the young man was her son, she said he went with the dirty whores, she would take his hat and his property, for fear he should be robbed of it; I saw them take the hat.

Q. Who took the hat - A. This woman took the hat off; the man was very drunk.

Q. Did you see any thing of the watch - A. No, that was not taken in my presence; they went up the court; I did not see her afterwards till she was taken by the constable; they left the young man in the passage; I thought it was the mother and sister; that is the reason I did not stop them.

JOHN WENSLEY . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 8th of August - I found nothings upon her.

WILLIAM READ . The prisoner was brought to the office by Wensley. I was ordered to look after the other woman; she has absconded.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at No. 11, Chick lane, at the time. On the 1st, 2nd, 3d, and 4th of August I was there.

JOHN GILES . I am a labouring man, I live at No. 7, Red Lion court, Saffron hill. On the 2nd of August, between five and six o'clock I saw the prosecutor, he was very drunk.

Q. Did you see him robbed - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know where this woman was at the time he was robbed - A. I do not. At the time I was getting up I heard a noise at my door, I opened the door, and saw a young man and two women at the door.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before this time - A. Yes, I have known her this twelve month. I can take my oath that she was not with the prosecutor. The two women made the man sit on the stairs, he had his hat on when I opened the door; I asked him what was the reason that he came to my place; the woman asked pardon; he said do not ask the Irish b - 's pardon, I will break out his daylights; he made a blow at me; I returned into my own room and shut the door. At six o'clock I went to my work, he was at my door, he was drunk then; he said nothing to me, his hat was gone.

SARAH GILES . I go out with the barrow, and my husband is a labouring man.

Q. Do you recollect the morning when this man was robbed - A. Yes, I was looking at him when he came to beat my husband; I looked at the women all the time; I know the prisoner, I am sure she was not one of the women.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-109

650. JOHN PALMER was indicted for that he on the 8th of September upon William Waller , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and that he then and there with a certain sharp instrument which he held in his right hand, did stab and cut him in and upon his head, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him ; - And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM WALLER . Q. You are a porter employed by Mr. Kimpton - A. Yes, he is an auctioneer; I was employed by Mr. Kimpton to take care of the house and furniture, No. 20, Manchester square, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. Was you in the charge of that house on the 8th of September - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you make secure the fastenings of the house that night - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon I shut up the door and the windows, and made them safe. I staid in the house till about seven o'clock; I went out then, having left the house secured; I returned between the hours of eleven and twelve o'clock the same night.

Q. Did you then find the house secure as to all its fastenings - A. Yes, I found it the same as I left it. I opened the door and went in, and locked the door. I put the chain on it; I went up stairs strait forward up in the room as usual.

Q. Where is your room - A. The right hand garret. I went strait forward in the room, and pulled the sash down; I returned back to the bed side, I pulled my coat and waistcoat off, and my handkerchief and shoes; I saw the blankets and the matress disturbed to what I left it in the morning; I said to myself, I did not leave them things in this manner; I turned round and touched the latch of the other garret; I had the latch in my hand; the prisoner at the bar catched hold of my collar.

Q. Where was he - A. He was between the doors of the two garrets. He immediately laid hold of my collar; I said Lord have mercy upon me; the prisoner said do not speak a word sir, lye down on the bed, that is all you have got to do; then he shoved me on my breast to the bed, sideways, and threw me on the bed; he stood over me, and the other man behind him, whom he called Joseph; he said Joseph, d - n him, fetch the pistol and we will blow his brains out, he will not lye still; with that I said to myself, if I must be shot, I must be shot, I then gave him a shove and darted to the window; then I received a blow on my head immediately.

COURT. Was it from the same man who had hold of you and pushed you - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure it was the same man, and not the man who stood behind - A. No.

Q. Had you got to the window then - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. That was before you got to the window then - A. Yes. I fell towards the window, and as I fell I lifted up the sash; with that I put my head out of the window and halloed out murder, as loud as I could; the people below halloed out come down and open the door; I halloed out I would, as quick as I could; I did, I unbolted the top bolt and unchained it, and the people outside shoving the door so violently to get in, they shoved me down, they knocked me backwards; the persons that were coming to my assistance did that; I got up and went to the door, and while I stood there there was the prisoner standing; the watchman had got him, he was outside of the door.

COURT. You saw the prisoner in custody - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You are certain it was the prisoner - A. Yes; I knew him directly. I said to him, you rascal, you are the man that hit me on the head; he never spoke to me.

Q. What kind of a blow was it - what effect did it produce - A. It was with a very heavy crow, I could not tell what it was done with; the constable found it was done with an iron crow: I bled very much and it made me very faint.

Q. You have been attended by a surgeon ever since - A. The surgeon is here.

Q. Are you well yet - A No.

Q. Now look round at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you have any doubt that he is the person - look at him stedfast, with caution and deliberation - A. That is the man.

Q. Have you any doubt upon earth that he is the man - A. That is the man.

COURT You have no doubt about it - A. I have no doubt at all about it.

Mr. Knapp. The other person has not been apprehended - A. No.

Q. Should you recollect his person - A. No, I should not.

Q. Could you take particular notice of this man so as to enable you to speak in the way you do - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was it a moon light night - A. It was, sir.

Q. You say he was standing over you when you laid on the bed - A. Yes, when I laid on the edge of the bed.

Q. How far was his face towards you - A. Within about a foot, or a foot and a half.

Q. Was the moon so bright that it gave you an opportunity of knowing him by his face - A. I could not tell the face of the person then, not till I come down stairs; he had on an apron then, and he had when I came down stairs.

Q. Then you entertain no doubt at all about his person - A. I do not.

Q. Did you observe his speech at all - A. I took notice of that; I could not observe his clothes.

Q. Was his voice particular - A. I noticed his voice, when he d - d me, and called for the pistol to shoot me, and as the door was opening I heard him speak in the area.

Q. Did the voice that you heard in the area correspond with the voice that you heard when he used violence to your person - A. It did.

Q. Then you knew him by person and by voice - A. I did.

COURT. I believe, if I understand you right, you have not the least doubt of his person - A. No, I have not.

HENRY DANCE . Q. What are you, sir - A. I am a solicitor, living at No. 17, Manchester square. On the 8th of September, about hall past eleven or near twelve o'clock at night, I heard a cry of murder several times repeated; on going into the street I perceived it appeared at the front garret of No. 20; several persons called out to the man who was crying, can you let us into the house; he said I am bleeding to death, I cannot come down, for they will murder me. Four or five of the strongest people began to kick against the door in order to break it open: while they were doing this, a man appeared behind the area, within the rails; he got over them and jumped down in the street; immediately I supposed him to be one of the persons belonging to the house: I laid my hands upon him, and said

what have they been doing to you; he said they wanted to murder the man that is in the house; I then said who the devil are you; he made no answer to that as I heard, and he was therefore seized by a number of people, among whom I was one, and James Cobourn another, and the watchman of our street was another; this was close to the threshold of the door; by this time it appeared the people had burst open the door, and at the door, amongst them, was William Waller in his shirt, bleeding very much indeed; I asked Waller if any person belonged to the house but himself; he said no; I said then this man must be secured and I will part with him to two watchmen; another watchman of the name of Schofield came up; I gave him to Schofield and Ducas; I turned from him, but I immediately recollected myself and turned back again, and said you and I shall probably meet again, and that I may be sure you are the right person let me look at you again; I examined him very minutely and then left him.

Q. You say you saw Waller come down in his shirt - A. Yes; as the door burst open he appeared bleeding behind the door; at that time there was an alarm that the other man had got over the houses; I went after him.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you have any doubt that he is the person that got over the rails - A. I have not the slightest doubt.

JAMES COBOURN . Q. What are you - A. I belong to the Barrack office; I live in Shepherd street, Manchester square; I was in Manchester square; I saw the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you see the person that come over the area rails of the house, No. 20 - A. Yes.

Q. Was that person the prisoner at the bar - A. I have not the slightest doubt of it.

Q. Did you see Waller, the prosecutor, come to the door - A. When the door opened, I did; I was one of the persons that bursted the door open; he was knocked down, he was lying down in the passage; he was bleeding.

Q. Did you see Mr. Dance take the prisoner into custody - A. I was one of the persons that assisted him.

Q. Did you hear Waller say any thing about him - A. I heard Waller say that was the man that struck him, immediately he saw him; then the prisoner was secured and delivered to the watchmen.

GEORGE DUCAS and WILLIAM SCHOFIELD . Q. Are you the watchmen that had the prisoner delivered over to you - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the person - A. He positively is; the prisoner is the person.

DUCAS. I had him fast before he came over; I challenged him while the gentlemen were kicking the door; I saw him in the area, he said he was one that slept below, he had nothing to do with him that was up stairs; I then said come along, if you do not belong to any body; he stepped his foot upon the top rail; I had hold of the skirt of his coat as he was jumping over, and kept hold of him; Mr. Dance and I kept him till my partner came up; I saw Waller come out; he immediately said that was the man that struck him.

COURT. Had any body told him that the man was in your custody - A. No.

Prisoner. He has said many things, that he knows nothing about it.

HENRY HOWARD . Q. You are a constable of that parish - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought to your watchhouse - A. I was not there when he was brought to the watchhouse. I went there about eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you see any crow - A. Immediately I heard the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, I went to the house, No. 20, Manchester square; I went down in the kitchen, there I saw Waller sitting in the chair, the surgeon was dressing the wounds; I said his head was not cut with a stick when I looked at it; I thought it was cut with an iron crow, or some sharp steel instrument. I then took the candle to go up stairs.

Q. What time did you go to the house - A. About a quarter after twelve; I went up stairs to see if there was any iron crow; on the two pair of stairs window I found this iron crow; I have had it ever since.

Q. Did you go to the watchhouse - A. Not till eight o'clock the next morning, then I saw the prisoner; I said he was in a pretty predicament; he said he could not help it.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I have seen him before; I asked him how he came by the picklock keys; he told me he picked them up in a little bag in the passage that comes out in the area below; I saw the picklock keys at the watchhouse.

Q. Look at that crow - is there any mark on the crow - A. I wrote my own name upon it.

Q. Look at the red mark - A. I did not perceive this rust.

Q. There is a little blood on it. - A. I think it is rust.

JURY. It is blood.

Howard. He said he found the keys in the passage in a bag, he took them out of the bag and put them in his pocket, he did not know what they was; I asked him whether the snuffers was in the bag; he made no answer whatever; I heard there was a pair of snuffers found upon him.

BENJAMIN BAKER . - Mr. Knapp. You are a constable of that parish - A. Yes; I searched the prisoner. I found in his left hand waistcoat pocket, a bottle of phosphorus, with matches ready and a paper.

Q. Is there any thing written upon it - A. Something with a pencil.

Q. Do you know what was writ upon it - A. No, I do not.

Cobourn. I read it. No. 13, Edward street, and a a house in Harley street; No. 30, Oxford street, and a No. 20, Mancester square; there was this word done.

Q. to Waller. Do you know these snuffers - A. I do; they are Mr. Kimpton's, and part of the goods I had to take care of; I had seen them in the course of the day, previous to the robbery being committed; they were in the second floor back room; I had seen them twice in the course of that day.

COURT. They are part of the goods that were in the house, you are sure of it - A. Yes.

THOMAS FOY : Q. You are one of the officers of Marlborough street - did you hear the prisoner at any time, and when and where, did he say any thing about this transaction - A. All that I heard him say, when he was below, he asked me this - Foy, if I struck this man with a crow, do not you think that I should have killed him with it; he did not say that he did strike him.

VALENTINE HOWELL. I produce four keys; these two keys I took from him at the watchhouse; they will open the door when double locked; how you like they will open it.

JAMES LOMAX . Q. You are a surgeon - A. I am.

Q. Was you called in to look at the wound this poor man received - A. I was; I live at No. 43, Dorset street, Manchester square.

Q. You looked at the wound. - A. I did.

Q. What kind of a wound was it - A. About an inch and a half in length; it was a cut wound.

Q. It was such a wound as could be done with this crow - A. Yes; it was at the back part of the head.

COURT. A cut wound is different from a wound given with a blunt instrument - A. It is; the wound was not made with a stick, but it was a cut.

Q. How deep was it - A. About the eighth part of an inch; it was no considerable depth; it was at the back of the head.

Mr. Knapp. You have attended him to this time - A. I have, and there was a small wound likewise upon the left arm.

Q. Did that appear to be given by the same sort of instrument - A. It did.

COURT. Then the conclusion you draw is, the blow fell slanting upon the head and come on the arm - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence I was going by at the time of the noise; I went down the area; I found a pair of snuffers and these keys. On-my coming up again I was seized by some people, and I was taken to the watch-house. I am quite unprepared for trial: I should have been glad for people to have been here that knew me years ago - Captain Rolles of the Lion, and the ship I was in in the Mediterranean, his name is Captain Ogle. I have been seven months on shore.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-110

651. SARAH Mc. KENZIE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , two promissory notes, value 1 l. each, nine bank notes for the payment of five pound each, and a two pound bank notes, the property of Joseph Fitzpatrick , from his person .

JOSEPH FITZPATRICK . I was invalided last month out of the royal navy .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A woman of the town. On the 25th of last month, when I came from Portsmouth, I saw her at the Three Crowns, upper East Smithfield; she spoke to me and I went to her lodging; before we went to her lodgings we went to the Ship in Distress; I called for half a pint of gin there; I drank one glass only, and she drank one glass of it.

Q. Were your sober - A. I was as sober as I am now; I had my money that I was paid off at Portsmouth; the notes were rolled up in this handkerchief, and the handkerchief was round my waist, and tied behind me; I went home to her lodgings in upper East Smithfield; she said she was in distress and she had no bed; I took the handkerchief off and gave her a Portsmouth one pound note.

Q. How much did your handkerchief contain - A. Nine five pound bank notes, two Portsmouth one pound notes, and a Plymouth note for two pound; when I gave her the Portsmouth one pound note, I told her to buy a bed; and after the gin was drank I went to her lodgings; I sat down in the chair and we talked together for five minutes, she took my handkerchief off; I did not think she had any bad design, I thought it was kindness; she turned her back to me and took all the notes, and heaved the handkerchief into my hat; she went down stairs; I called after her and asked her where she was going; she said she would be back directly; I waited for about three minutes, I observed my handkerchief in my hat, and the notes were gone; I run down stairs and went to the Three Crowns and the other public house; I could not find her; I got an officer, and we met her in the street the next morning and took her into custody.

Q. Did you ever find any part of your notes - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Did not you make up a hasty marriage with her, and did not you propose to find money to furnish a room and live with her - A. I did not do any such thing.

ROBERT COOMBS . On the 26th of August the prosecutor applied to me, I went with him into East Smithfield, I saw her coming along. I took her in custody. I searched her and found nothing; I took her to the Three Crowns, the landlord had a five pound note that he had left with him in the morning; the girl said he had given her a ten pound note; and afterwards she said he had given her a five pound note; she told me she know where the country notes were but she would not tell me; she said he had given her the bank notes; she had no gown on then, she has been new rigged out since.

Prosecutor. I had ten five pound notes. I left one with the publican; I then had nine five pound notes, a two pound note; and one of the one pound notes I gave her.

ESTHER RICE . - Mr. Curwood. I live at No. 33, East Smithfield.

Q. Do you recollect on this day the prisoner and the prosecutor meeting - A. Yes, the prisoner was at Mr. Taylor's door, the prosecutor came up to her, he gave her a pear, she asked him where he was going; he said he did not know; they went together to the Ship in Distress; I saw them sitting there and a young woman with them; they went out and went to the woman's lodgings; they came back to Mrs. Bourben's; he asked her if a five pound note would be of any use to her; yes, she said, if he would give it her; he gave her three one pound notes; he said buy yourself some things with it; she went four doors off and bought a bed, and the broker came with her to put the bed in the room. At the next public house he said have you got money enough to buy the things, she said no; he untied the handkerchief and gave her a five pound note; she said do you give me this, do not say I took it away afterwards.

COURT. So you saw him give her three one pound notes - A. Yes; one was a Portsmouth note and one was a Gosport note; and the other was a bank of England note.

Q. What is your way of life - A. I live with Thomas Taylor , a blacksmith; his wife is in the country.

Q. The prisoner is a poor unfortunate woman of the town - A. I believe she is.

Q. You know so - A. Yes, she is.

SARAH BOURBEN - Mr. Curwood. Where do you live - A. In East Smithfield; I was standing at my own door, the prosecutor gave three notes to the prisoner, I do not know the value of them; he asked her if five pounds would do; she smiled in his face and said it he would give it to her, he untied his handkerchief and

gave her three notes, for what I cannot say. This was on the 25th of August.

- GOLDSMITH. Q. What are you - A. I am a slopseller, No. 81, Parsons street, Ratcliffe Highway. On the 25th of August, between one and two o'clock in the day, the prosecutor asked me if I could furnish him with some second hand blankets, and he said they wanted sheets; I had no more than one; the prosecutor said never mind, we must make one do; after they bought them the prisoner gave me a country one pound note; I refused it; he then gave me a one pound bank note.

Prosecutor. I remember this shop very well: she had no more than a pound and one shilling, it was a Portsmouth note. I went there before I went to the Ship in Distress; when I left this shop I went to the Ship in Distress, there I gave her a two pound note; the woman that came here first bears an extraordinary bad character, and by all accounts she has deposited this money in that woman's hands.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-111

652. ANN GIBBONS and CATHERINE MANN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , in the dwelling house of Elizabeth Shaw , widow, a bank note, value 2 l. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Rooke .

JOHN ROOKE . I am a seaman . On Saturday three weeks I went into Elizabeth Shaw 's house, Newtoner's court, St. Martin's lane ; Ann Gibbons asked me up stairs; I went with her and gave her two shillings to be with her; I laid my tobacco box on the table, which had thirteen pound in it; previous to my going to bed Catherine Mason came and knocked at the door; and Ann Gibbons made an excuse to go to the door; she said that there was somebody wanted her; she went from the bed towards the table and took the box off the table; I came up with her at the landing place, she was puzzled a little to open the box; she took out a two pound note and a one pound note out of the box, and gave them to Catherine Mann over her shoulder; Catherine Mann ran down stairs so I held Ann Gibbons in custody till a constable came, and then I gave charge of her. I told him that the one that had run away was a carrotty woman; he found her. I am sure they are the women.

Q. Did you ever get your notes - A. No. I told Ann Gibbons if she would give me the two pound note I would say no more about it.

Gibbons's Defence. He laid hold of the bed clothes and shoved them out of the window; I told him to go out of my room; he broke the things about the room.

Mann's Defence. I lived next door to her; this woman cried out murder several times; he had hold of her by the hair of her head, in the door way, when I first saw her; I said do not kill the woman; he hit me on my head and on my shoulder; I innocently and foolish enough came to take her part. It is the first time I was brought before any gentleman in my life.

GIBBONS, GUILTY , aged 20.

MANN, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-112

653. MARY CRAGG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , in the dwelling house of Edward Lord , a gold ring, value 3 s. an umbrella, value 5 s. a promissory note, value 1 l. and three bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Richard Tickle

RICHARD TICKLE . I am a painter and glazier ; live in Cradle court in the Strand . The prisoner was my father in law's servant , his name is Edward Lord Last Wednesday morning on my going to my drawer I found my notes and pocket book were missing, and my ring and an umbrella.

Q. Where was your drawers - A. In my mother bed room.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with taking them - A. Because she absconded the same morning about half past six o'clock.

Q. Did you find your pocket book again - A. Y and a one pound note in it, and some small change my father in law and me pursued the prisoner; went to the Borough, there we found her in Tu court, Queen street, in the Borough; she was taken Bow street.

EDWARD LORD . Q. You are father in law of this young man - A. I am. I took her in a distressed g into my house as a servant about five weeks ago; wife missed some things a week ago last Saturday, a she found a duplicate of a gold ring.

Q. What do you know about these notes - A. On Wednesday last he missed the things and his pocket book; my little girl took me to the Borough.

Q. Where did the prisoner say she come from - She told me from Plymouth; my daughter went the office to get a servant; she saw her and followed her home. I know the Chatham bank note, the umbrella, pocket book, and gold ring; she had got about sixteen shillings change; she had taken coach to go Portsmouth.

JOHN FOX . I am a constable. I apprehended prisoner in Tuff's court, Queen street, in the Borough I found a pocket book upon her, a Chatham one pound note, half a guinea in gold, half a crown, and one shilling and sixpence.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 13

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-113

654. WILLIAM CAULFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of July , four towels, value 4 s. three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. and three caps value 3 s. the property of James Pocock .

SARAH WOOD . I live with Mr. James Pocock he is a carpenter at Layton .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On Friday morning, July the 22nd, we missed the articles; they were down the meadow, we left them there to bleach

SAMUEL OBERTON . I am a patrol of Hackney On the 22d of July, about half past four in the morning I saw William Caulford coming out of the back lane leading to Clapton church; it was at the end of Clapton fields in Church street; I stopped and asked what he had in his bundle; he said his own things

took him to the watchhouse and examined the bundle, and found these things; there were more things in the bundle.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . Q. You are a constable - A. Yes. I produce the things.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I live in Mile End New Town, I am a calico printer by trade; I have a wife and four children. On the 22nd of July. I set out to go to Waltham abbey, to enquire after work; when I got to Clapton I went over Lee bridge, I saw a bundle lye in the ditch; I picked it up, and returning towards Hackney, I went to the first public house to enquire who they belonged to: but I saw nobody up; I was then stopped; it did not occur to me that they were stolen, else I should not have gone the back way.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-114

655. ALEXANDER MACQUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a shirt, value 6 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS . On the 9th of August last, I slept in the Borough, at Mr. Mann's house; I am a cork cutter ; I lost the things from my lodgings, at Mr. Discomb's, the Three Crowns, Dowgate hill . They were all tied up in a handkerchief, I had left them in the garret.

WILLIAM DISCOMB . I keep the Three Crowns on Dowgate hill.

Q. Did the last witness. Thomas Lewis , lodge at your house - A. Yes, in the front garret, and a soldier lodged with him, of the name of Owen. I did not know that Lewis was going to leave my lodging. On the 9th of August the prisoner came to my house, about five o'clock in the afternoon, he asked for a lodging; he looked like a decent old man, I let him have a lodging; he was to sleep where Thomas Lewis slept; about nine o'clock he went to bed in that room.

Q. Did Thomas Lewis sleep there that night - A. He did not. About eight o'clock on the 10th of August he got up, he breakfasted and asked my leave to go and lay down again, he said he was poorly; I consented to it. Between ten and eleven o'clock I was coming out of the tap room. I met him just by the bar door, as he was coming from the stair foot; I thought he looked bigger than when he went up, his right hand pocket stuck out; I told him I thought he had something more than his own; he said he had not; I pulled out of his right hand coat pocket a shirt; he pulled out a pair of trowsers and a relief card, which this young man was relieved at my house, by the society of cork cutters; when they travel to town they give them so much money. Three handkerchiefs and a waistcoat was bound round his body; he was then taken in custody; I sent for Lewis, he claimed the things.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been upwards of twenty five years in his Majesty's service; I hope to God you will shew me mercy.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-115

656. ABRAHAM BENCELY was indicted for feloniously and sacriligiously stealing on the 4th of September , a surplice, value 30 s. the property of the united parishioners of the parish of St. Ann and Agnes, Aldersgate, and St. John Zachary ; - And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

CHRISTGIFT BRADSHAW . I am the wife of Christopher Bradshaw ; I am the sextoness of St. Ann and Agnes, Aldersgate . On Sunday the 4th of September. between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, after I had locked up the church doors, Mr. Barker informed me I had locked somebody up in the church; I unlocked the church and there I saw the prisoner; he had a turban on his head, he was in the bellfry; I asked him what he did there, he answered he had been asleep and his head was very bad.

Q. Did he answer you so as you could understand him - A. Yes, in very good English. I then desired him to come out of the church; he came immediately into the church yard; I told him he should not go till I saw what he had got; he said he had nothing but apples and pears; I put my hand round his waist. I saw something white; he had a turkian dress on; I pulled a surplice from him. I searched him round again and found apples and pears; after he was taken to the Compter I found two more surplices in the vestry, besides the one he had taken; there were three when I left the vestry, about a quarter of an hour before; there was one missing; I can swear to the surplice, I always attend the clergyman to take it off; I have no doubt it was one of the surplices belonging to the church. I have been sextoness four years.

JOHN BAILEY . I am church warden of St. Ann and Agnes, in the City of London. John Hutchins is the rector; our parish is united to St. John Zachary, there is only one church. John Conner is the other church warden.

WILLIAM COLE . I am church warden of the parish of St. John Zachary. John Goodwin is the other church warden. Our parish is united to St. Ann and Agnes.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am an officer of the City of London; I was going by at the time; seeing a mob about the church I went up to enquire; Mrs. Bradshaw informed me that the prisoner had been robbing the church; she shewed me the surplice; I asked the prisoner how he came to do so; he said Oh, God. I be so wicked; I took him to the Compter.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what I was about, I was deranged in my mind.

SARAH LEECH . - Mr. Knapp. What are you - A. I live in Bell lane, Spital fields; I have known the prisoner eight years, he is a good sort of a man; I never heard any thing against his character.

Q. How did he get his livelihood - A. By working as a tailor. About two years ago he received news from Gibraltar that his friends all died in the flames; that turned his head rather lunatic; he said his friends had left him some money in Gibraltar, and he would go and fetch it.

Q. Did it appear to you, after he had received this intelligence with respect to the loss of all his family, that he possessed his senses - A. I am certain it turned his head; I had constant opportunity of seeing it; he used to go out for five or six nights, and his wife did not know where to find him; he has been brought

home by a parcel of boys several times, with a rope tied round his waist; this sort of conduct happened down to three weeks of his apprehension. I saw him on the Saturday previous to his apprehension on the Sunday; he was then very melancholy, and said he would go to Gibraltar, he thought there was money there; I saw him on the Monday after; I asked him if he knew me, he said he knew nothing of me.

CHARLES GILL . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. He is a neighbour; I have lived two years in the place, I have taken him in doors when the boys have dragged him along the street; I think it was five weeks before this the boys were hunting him, he was all over mud and dirt, and stones in his pocket; it appeared to me that he was not in his proper senses.

VERDICT - That at the time he committed the act he was insane .

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-116

657. JOHN MIDDLETON was indicted for that he on the 1st of August , unlawfully and against the will of Edward Peall and John Penfold , did open a certain wrapper, value 5 s. containing thirty pieces of linen cloth, value 60 l. unlawfully did lay his hands upon two pieces of linen cloth, value 4 l. their property, with intent to steal and carry away .

EDWARD PEALL . I am a wholesale linen draper , John Penfold is my partner, our warehouse is in Newgate street. On the 1st of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the passage of my house, leading from the warehouse.

Q. Were any of your wrappers of linen in that passage - A. There were two packs standing close to the warehouse door; when I saw the prisoner he was in the act of taking some of the pieces of printed calico.

Q. Did it contain linen cloth - A. No, printed calico.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-117

658. SUSANNAH MARIA CHANDLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , six silver table spoons, value 5 l. three silver tea spoons, value 15 s. two silver salt spoons, value 7 s. and a silver butter knife, value 1 l. the property of John Brookes , in his dwelling house ; - And

JOHN HARRIS for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

ANN BROOKES was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-118

659. THOMAS DAVIDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July a bank note, value 10 l. the property of John Jewkes .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN JEWKES . Q. You are a servant to the duchess of Manchester - A. I am.

Q. On the 1st of July had you received a note from Mr. Noone - A. I had, about ten o'clock; Mr. Noone lived in the duchess's house. In the course of the day I put the note in my left hand breeches pocket: I had two shillings and a sixpence in that pocket. At one o'clock I went to the prisoner's house to get a pot of beer, I had my child upon my arm, I stood by the side of the bar; when I was served with the beer I paid the prisoner; I put my hand in my pocket and pulled out a sixpence, which was refused; when I took out the sixpence I felt the note then; I put my hand in my pocket and took out a shilling and got the change; went strait home with the beer.

Q. How soon after you got home did you discover that you had lost the note - A. About half an hour after I put my hand in my pocket, I found I had lost my note; I went back to the public house, I saw the prisoner and his wife; I said to them have you picked up a ten pound bank of England note, they said they had not seen any thing of it; I said I was afraid I had pulled it out of my pocket as I took the money out for the beer, as I had been to nowhere else; I said I will thank you to be doubly cautious for whom you change a ten pound note, and I will bring you the number tomorrow. On the 2nd of July I took the number before one o'clock, I gave him the number in writing, he took and chalked it up in the bar, I saw he put up the right number; I said now Mr. Davidson I will have this note advertised and offer a guinea reward for it, to be brought to his house, and I desired him to pay the guinea, which he said he would; I applied to him every day for a fortnight, to know if he heard any thing about it. I had notice from the bank; I had been to the bank for them to stop it.

Q. When you saw the number, did it tally with the number you gave to the prisoner - A. It did; I went to his house and produced the note that I got from the bank; the prisoner examined it, and said true enough, that is the number of the note you gave me; I said it was very odd that I had traced the note back to the very place that I lost it; he said he did not know how he came by it, he had taken it, but he did not know how he had taken it. I thought it a hard case that he should not know from whom he had taken the note, as he had the number chalked up in his bar. On the Sunday following I asked him whether he had found out who he took the note of, he said he did not know. On the Wednesday following of the Sunday, I said have you heard any thing more concerning of my note, meaning who he took it of; he said no; his wife said you should proceed farther in it; I said I will; - in consequence of that I went to Marlborough street, and an examination took place.

WILLIAM NOONE . This is the ten pound note that I gave to the prosecutor, I know it by the number and the date; I gave him this note between nine and ten o'clock on the 1st of July.

COURT. Had you taken the number and the date - A. I had not; when I looked at it I saw the number and the date; I told him I knew the number, but I would tell him the number and the date tomorrow; I was very busy at the time.

Q. Did you know the number - A. I did.

Q. You ought to have given it him that day - A. I was busy; I ought; I went to the bankers the next day to get the date.

Q. How came you not that day to give him the number - A. I had no reason.

Q. I can guess the reason - you was not perfect in the number - A. I was not certainly perfect.

Q. Then you should not have spoken so positively - you learned the number and the date from the bankers - A. Yes, from Messrs. Biddulph and Cox.

Q. You could not depend upon it by your own recollection

- A. I could not.

Q. Is there any body here from Messrs. Biddulph and Cox - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-119

660. JOZE KERTEIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Jonathan Murray , privately in his shop .

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker , No. 6, Nightingale lane . On the 9th of September, about one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and said he wanted to buy a watch; he gave me to understand in his language that he wanted to purchase a watch; there were watches in the window; he pointed to the watch, the watch he pointed to was marked four guineas and a half; I shewed him three watches, he did not approve of any of them; I shewed him the fourth, I reached it out of the window, and when I returned back to the counter one of the three was missing.

Q. When you shewed him the watches were they directly before him - A. Yes; and when I turned round to reach the fourth watch I left them there.

Q. Were there any other persons in the shop - A. One young man and a boy, no customers; my young man is not here. On missing the watch I jumped over the counter and took possession of the prisoner; I gave him to understand what he had done; he seemed to understand our language, though he could not express himself in English; he wanted to go away, I would not let him; I searched him in the shop, I could not find the watch about him; I then took him into the back parlour adjoining the shop, and made him partly undress himself. I then could find no watch; I then ordered my young man to search him; I was by when he searched him, he could find nothing upon him; I then called in one of his countrymen that was in the street, he could speak his language and could speak English; he searched him, and could not find any thing. I told him to tell him what he had done; he still denied having the watch, I then sent for an officer.

Q. Has the watch ever been found - A. Yes, by the officer.

JAMES WALMESLEY . I am a constable. About one o'clock I arrived at the prosecutor's shop; when I took the prisoner into the back room he would strip himself naked, he would not allow me to search him with his clothes on. I insisted upon his putting his trowsers on for decency's sake; when he was putting his trowsers on I saw the pendant of the watch in his hand, his hand was inside of the trowsers; on my seeing the watch, he let the watch fall through the trowsers, and it come out on the floor and broke the glass. I have kept the watch in my custody ever since. All the property he had about him was two shillings and four new half pence; the two shillings was tied up in the corner of his neck handkerchief.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, a native of Spain, lately removed from Portsmouth, where I had been three years a prisoner; I came to London to look for a ship to go home; I went into a public house and got some liquor, I cannot recollect what happened. I hope your lordship will look into my case, as I am a poor man, and ignorant of the English tongue.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

The prisoner was allowed an interpreter, and tried by a jury half English and half foreigners.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-120

661. DANIEL FERGUSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , two pair of breeches, value 2 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 6 d. the property of Cornelius Fogherty .

CORNELIUS FOGHERTY . I lodge in Nightingale lane, I am a labourer .

Q. Did you lose any clothes on the 3d of September - A. Yes, two pair of breeches and a pair of pantaloons; about one o'clock on the 3d of September, I went into the Red Lion public house, Nightingale lane , I had these things in a bundle; I placed them on my right hand, and being the worse for liquor I went to sleep; when I awoke I found my bundle gone and my money; the prisoner sat on my right hand, next to me; I found him there when I sat down.

Q. What liquor had you at this public house - A. Two half pints of gin and peppermint.

Q. What time did you awake - A. It was two or three hours before they could make any sense of me.

Q. You had some women with you - A. The women were not sitting in the same box, they were standing up; I knew them before.

Q. When did you see your clothes again - A. On Sunday morning I returned to the public house; I found the clothes in the custody of Daniel Mead . I am quite sure he is the man that sat on the right hand side of me.

DANIEL MEAD . I am servant to Mr. Mead at the Red Lion public house. On Saturday the 3d of September, about one o'clock, the prosecutor came in; he had a bundle with him, he was not sober.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner being at your house at that time - A. Yes, he was in the same box with the prosecutor, he was drinking with the prisoner, and there were two or three girls about; the prosecutor fell asleep, he awoke about half past four; I missed the bundle belonging to the prosecutor when I wiped down the table; before he awoke I had a suspicion of the last man that went out, he being in the box. I ran to the door, I saw the prisoner walking up the lane, I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there; he said d - n you, what is that to you; he said the bundle belonged to his brother. I brought him back to the house, the prosecutor was asleep, he was too drunk to give any account of himself; we could not find whether he was his brother or no; we let the prisoner go. When the prosecutor awoke he said he was robbed; I said you are not robbed, I have got the bundle; he said he had lost all his money; when I shewed him the things he knew them.

Q. When was the prisoner taken up - A. On the Sunday morning. The prisoner would have choaked me provided there had not been people in the house to take me away from him. I have kept the things ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in this gentleman's house on Saturday when this man came in, he got tossing with three idle women; he asked me to have a glass of liquor with him; he asked me to look after the bundle; I told him while I was in the way I would look to it; I wanted some tobacco, I went to the chandler's shop

next door; this young man came up and said what have you got there; I said I would deliver the bundle to the man when he awoke; he took away the bundle from me and turned me out of the house: the next day I was taken in custody.

Prosecutor. When I came into the box I had three pounds eleven shillings; I had been at harvest work.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080914-121

662. MICHAEL HAUGHNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of July , four pieces of silver, called thirty penny Irish tokens , the property of Joseph Sage , Henry William Atkinson , Reuben Fletcher , John Nicholls , and Richard Franklin ; and

Eight other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.

REUBEN FLETCHER . - Mr. Reynolds. Are you one of the moniers of the mint - A. I am.

Q. Who are the moniers - A. Joseph Sage , Henry William Atkinson, Reuben Fletcher , John Nicholls , and Richard Franklin .

Q. Are the moniers of the mint answerable for any bullion entrusted to them - A. They are.

Q. What situation was the prisoner in the mint - A. He was one that pulled the fly of the press, he was a labourer employed in coining .

Q. What coining was going on on the 23d of July - A. Thirty penny Irish tokens; on that day fifteen trays were delivered out, of fifty pound weight each; they were delivered to them, blanks; I weighed some, and, I believe, Mr. Franklin the others; when they were delivered to us we re-weighed them; we missed four thirty penny pieces.

JOSEPH NICHOLLS . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are what they call an apprentice to the moniers - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the persons that brought back the trays - A. Yes; some of the trays he brought back.

MR. PARKER - Mr. Reynolds. Was you at the Tower on this day - A. I was, on the 23rd of July; in consequence of what I heard my suspicion fell on the prisoner; I was determined to watch him at the finishing of the work that day; he went down the mint, towards the stone kitchen; the moment he turned down the stone kitchen he ran very fast; I was obliged to run very fast to get sight of him; he run very fast till he got into the Minories; I followed him into Whitechapel, attended by Bishop the officer; there we took him and put him into an Hackney coach; I told him we took him on suspicion that he had been robbing the mint; he said he could not help it; I then asked him if he had got any pieces of money about him that they had been coining that day; he said, no, he had not; Bishop searched him, took off his shoes and hat; we could not find any thing of that sort about him at that time; I then desired him to take him to the office, Worship street; while Armstrong and I went to search his house.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. You are an officer of the police office, Worship street - A. I am. I apprehended the prisoner, in company with Mr. Parker, at the bottom of the Minories; we put him into a coach; he was searched there, and nothing was found at that time; we took him to the office in Worship street, I, in company with Vickrey, to a private room; we made him take off his clothes; I took his breeches up by the knees and shook them; I said to the prisoner, something rattles; he replied it is only my buttons; on searching the back part of the waistband of his breeches I found four pieces of coin wrapped up in a piece of paper; I gave them to Vickrey and proceeded searching him, and found nothing else.

Q. When you were in the coach with him did you tell him what he was charged with - A. Yes; he was asked if he had any pieces about him; he said he had none; we afterwards found them.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You were present when Bishop brought him to the office - A. Yes; he said take him up stairs and search him; I saw Bishop shake his breeches; when they fell on the ground, I said there is something in them; the prisoner said it is nothing but the buttons; in this bit of paper there were four pieces of coin, it was not in a pocket, it was in a place cut behind in the waistband.

Q. to Fletcher. Were these four pieces stamped at the same time - A. Yes, they were made from the same dye; they are perfect coin, they are called bank tokens.

MR. MOSELY. - Mr. Knapp. You are a magistrate of Middlesex and belong to the office in Worship street - A. I do.

Q. The prisoner was examined by you - A. Yes.

Q. Was that examination taken by you - A. It was. It is in my own hand writing and signed by me; it was taken from the prisoner's own mouth.

COURT. There was no promise made to him, was there, or did you threaten him to induce him to confess - A. No.

The Confession of the Prisoner.

"I acknowledge that I took the four pieces from the mint room where I worked on Saturday; they were afterwards found in the waistband of my breeches; they are the pieces that I so took; I never took but one before."

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-122

663. ELIZABETH LESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , two sheets, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 6 d. and nineteen pound weight of feathers, value 19 s. the property of William Field , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM FIELD I live at No 4, Broad Arrow court, Grub street . I let the lodging for five shillings a week to the prisoner and her husband; she came to the lodging on the 18th of June, she left it on the 11th of August; she paid the first four or five weeks as they came due, and after that they ran a fortnight; then they staid away two days; they having the key of the room, we got an officer, he broke open the room door; we found the sheets and candlestick gone; the bed had been opened and nineteen pound of feathers taken out of the bed; we got an officer and took her up.

Q. Why did you not take up the husband - A. I could not find him till two or three days ago, I saw him

in the street; she was the first that I met; I was determined to take her up.

Q. You was determined to take up the first you met - A. Yes.

Q. He continued with her and slept in the lodgings to the last - A. He did; they were both together.

Q. What did he pretend to be - A. A carpenter and sash maker.

MRS. FIELD. This woman took a ready furnished room of me in the morning, and her husband came at night; they lived together, they paid very regular; he paid one time and she another for the course of a month; they owed me a fortnight's rent when they went away.

Q. Have you seen the husband since - A. I have seen him a few days back, since the bill was found; I saw him yesterday at a public house door; the moment he saw me he went away.

Q. Why do you accuse her more than him - have you found any of the things - A. Yes, the sheets and the candlestick.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-123

664. ELIZABETH WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , a set of fire irons, value 1 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. two shirts, value 6 s. three sheets, value 8 s. a tea spoon, value 2 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d. two gowns, value 4 s. 6 d. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of William Smalt Southey .

SARAH SOUTHEY. My husband's name is William Smalt Southey , he is a silversmith , No. 2, Fann street, Aldersgate street .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She was a servant of mine. I missed a great many things at different times, I never suspected her of taking them; I wanted my gown to put on, I asked her for it; she told me she had forgot to wash it, and she had given it a woman to wash. I went to the woman and asked her if she had got the gown; the woman hesitated to tell whether she had it or not, at last she said the prisoner had been to her and told her that she had forgot to wash it, that she had left it in a tub; she told her, to tell me that she had got it. I then asked the prisoner for the key of her room; she refused to give it me; my husband insisted upon her giving it him. When she was going to give it him, she pulled out something from her pocket and put it into her stays; my husband took hold of her hands and told me to feel in her pocket; I took out eight duplicates of the things that I have got; she absconded; she was afterwards taken.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker, a servant to Mrs. Fothergill, No 106, Aldersgate street. On the 10th of December, a set of fire irons was pledged at our shop for one shilling and sixpence, by the prisoner; 12th of May, a handkerchief for one shilling, 1st of July, a waistcoat and a shirt for six shillings, and two sheets for five shillings, and a tea spoon for half a crown; 26th of July, a sheet for three shillings; all these things I took in of the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Year .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-124

665. ELIZABETH CREAMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , a half guinea, and nine shillings , the property of Charles Ryder .

MARY RYDER . I keep the White Lion public house in Oxford street ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 19th of August, a gentleman dined at my house; he rung the bell, he gave her a one pound note to pay for what he ate and drank; she secreted the note, and come and said the gentleman wanted change for a pound note and I was to take sixpence out of it; I gave her half a guinea and nine shillings; she returned into the parlour, I thought she was gone to give the gentleman change. I discovered that she had taken the note, and had not given the gentleman the change. The gentleman is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-125

666. ELIZABETH CREAMER was indicted for that she on the 19th of August , was servant to Charles Ryder , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant , and so employed, did receive, and taking into her possession, a certain bank note, value 1 l. for and on account of her said master, and that she afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-126

667. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , two stoves, value 10 s. the property of Martin Childs .

MARTIN CHILDS . I am a brazier in Castle street , Long Acre; from information I pursued the prisoner and took the two stoves from him; he was about thirty yards from my house; I brought him back to the shop and sent for an officer.

Q. Have you the stoves here - A. No; they were two stoves gone from my door, and the witness saw him take them.

ANN DOUBLEDAY . I saw the prisoner take up two stoves from Mr. Childs' door; he put them under his apron and walked away with them; I called out Mr. Childs, and asked if he had sold them; he said no; Mr. Childs went after the prisoner, brought him back and took the stoves away from him.

Q. to prosecutor. Was the stoves that you brought back with the prisoner your property - A. I have no doubt of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the stoves.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-127

668. JOHN ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , a jacket, value 7 s. the property of Siven Peter Lonquest .

The prosecutor being called and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-128

669. JANE HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of August , six yards of muslin, value 8 s. the property of Robert Harvey .

ROBERT TYSON . I am shopman to Robert Harvey , linen draper , 78, Aldersgate street .

Q. What do you charge this woman with - A. For stealing some cambric muslin at the door.

Q. This muslin was out in the street, was it - A. Yes; in the morning about ten o'clock, from information, I went out and took the muslin from her.

SARAH MILLISON . As I was passing I saw her take it and put it under her arm.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It hung in the street about six yards from the door.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-129

670. WILLIAM BROWN and MARY FARMER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , from the person of James Glynn , a silver watch, value 5 l. half a guinea, a seven shilling piece, a shilling, and a bank note, value 5 l. his property .

JAMES GLYNN . I am a sailor . On this day week, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was intoxicated in liquor; I went to the Black Horse, Nightinggale lane.

Q. Did you know the prisoner, before - A. I never saw either of them before I saw them in that house; there were some indifferent women in my company; the prisoner Brown came and abused me; I called for some liquor for the women; what it was for I do not know; I paid for it, they wanted me to go with them home; I told them I would. Brown told me he wanted to speak with me in particular; I went out with them; they got me into the Seven Stars; the landlord of that house is a German; I sat down there and treated the prisoners; the liquor overcame me. I laid my elbow on the table and clapped my hand to my head, and fell asleep; when I awoke I asked the landlord if I owed any thing in the house, he said no; I put my hand in my pocket, I could not find a farthing. I had the pocket book in my pocket; but the note and money were gone.

Q. What was gone out of it - A. A five pound note, half a guinea, a seven shilling piece, a shilling, and some halfpence.

- THOMPSON. I am a caulker. The first time I saw Mr. Glynn was at the Black Horse; he and Brown were together.

Q. Did you know Brown - A. I had seen him the day before. We had something to drink there; then the prisoner, prosecutor, and me, went to the Bee Hive, there we had half a pint of gin between us; we went from there to the Seven Stars, we had there a pot of ale and some gin; the prosecutor was pretty drunk; it was between five and six o'clock when we were in the Seven Stars; this Brown set of one side of the prosecutor, and the girl at the bar sat on the other side of him; she got up and took a seven shilling piece and a shilling out of his pocket, and he pulled his watch out; I got up and told the landlord of it; I went out backwards, and when I came in again Glynn was gone out of the house; directly I went to the Black Horse after him, and told him he was robbed; he was drunk and did not know it.

Q. Was you sober - A. I was disguised in liquor, but fresher than he was.

Q. Was you present and saw this watch and money taken from him publicly - A. Yes; there were eight or nine girls in the house.

Q. How came you to see it - A. I did.

Q. Has any of it been found - A. Not as I know of.

Q. What did he do with the watch after he took it out of his pocket - A. I do not know, I am sure, I saw him take it.

CHARLES SEALE . I am a sea faring man, just come from the East Indies. Last Tuesday night, I had been up to the India house for my wages, I went over London Bridge; when I was going by the platform, Rotherhithe, I met Brown: he asked me whether my name was not Charles Seale, he said shall not we go and have something to drink; we went into the public house and had a pot of beer and half a pint of gin; when we had drank the liquor, he said he had no money to pay for it, but he said he had a good watch; he said will you buy the watch; I said yes, go home with me to my house; he said he wanted three guineas for it; I said what is the number; he said I should not look at the number of the watch; the watch had a black string and seal to it.

CHARLES JONES . I live at Rotherhithe Wall, I keep a public house. On Tuesday week last, between six and seven o'clock, Brown came into my bar, he said Jones will you do me a favour; I said I do not know, what is your favour? he replied, will you let me have two guineas on this watch; I said no: I did not look at the number, the maker's name was Tobias.

JOHN SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner on the next day, on the Wednesday; on searching him I found a bank of England note, two seven shilling pieces, five shillings and sixpence in silver, and a few halfpence. I asked him how he became possessed of this bank note, he told me he took it for a run down voyage to Gravesend. On my looking at the note I found it was not issued from the bank at the time he stated. The next day he said that he had taken the note from his wife.

Q. How far is Rotherhithe Wall from Nightingale lane - A. It is the other side of the water.

Q. When you searched him, did you find any watch about him - A. No, none at all.

Q. to prosecutor. What was the maker's name of your watch - A. Tobias.

Smith. Before I apprehended the prisoner I called upon Mr. Tobias, I asked him if he had sold this man a watch; he said yes, he had given five guineas and a half for it.

Brown's Defence. All I can say in regard of this gentleman, I was in company with him, I was drunk along with him all the morning; there were a great many women of the town along with us, and this young woman was along with the rest. Robert Thompson was with us; we got groggy, and we parted; I know nothing of the charge.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

FARMER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-130

671. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of August , three shovels, value 2 s. and a kiln iron, value 2 s. the property of James Dean .

JAMES DEAN . I am a brick maker , I live in Isaacs place, Somers town. On the 6th of August, I went home about three o'clock in the afternoon being very ill; I left my men to pick the tools up, and to put them in the tool house. The three shovels and a kiln iron

is here.

JOHN PULBROOK . I am a bricklayer. On Saturday the 5th of August, I was coming down Colyer street ; on seeing a man come from the place where the men in general put their tools, and knowing of a number of tools having been lost from the same place before, I had a suspicion of this man, he had three shovels and a kiln iron on his shoulder; I stopped him; he said he was going to the men that belonged to them He was not going that way; I told him if that was the case there could not be any harm in my going with him to see whether he was right or wrong; he said the man lived at Battle bridge; he went that way for some distance, and afterwards he turned a contrary way down Weston street; I then told him that was not the way; he then said he was going to Cow cross; I took him by the collar and told him he should not go there till such time as he gave me satisfaction where he got these tools. I brought him back some distance; he then begged I would not hold him by the collar; I told him I would not if he would go quietly along; he then threw the tools down and ran down the street and I after him; I catched him at the bottom of the street; I went back with him to take the tools up. The constable of the district was coming past at the time, he took the tools in his possession; he told me if I would let him go he would tell me where he took them from. It was the very same place I saw him coming from; I told him I could not let him go; we took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM GOODALL . I was coming up Weston street at the time that Mr. Pulbrook had the prisoner; as I was going to take him he threw the things down and ran down the street.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton garden office; when the prisoner was brought to the office, he told me he opened the tool house and took the tools away.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Saturday night as I crossed the field, I saw them tools lying down against the door; I had been working in the brick field; I was in liquor. I was going to take them home to our moulder; I thought they were his tools.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-131

672. ANN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , a cock, value 2 s. the property of Robert Holmes .

MARY HOLMES . I am the wife of Robert Holmes , he is a publican ; we live in Great Cumberland street, Brunswick Mews, at the sign of the Pitt's Head . On the 25th of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the bar, she asked for something to drink; I served her some gin in a tumbler.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes, she said she was lady Lad's housekeeper ; she was sitting in the bar resting herself drinking her liquor; the cock came into bar, she picked it up with her hand and sat with it in the chair; I left her with it when I went into the parlour to take a pot of beer; it was a game cock; when I came back the cock was missing. She got up and bid me good afternoon, and went out with her hand in her pocket.

JAMES LYON . I am servant to Mrs. Holmes. I was going out at the time she dropped the chicken by her side; I asked her where she had got that chicken from; she said in Bond street; I said it is my mistress's chicken, give it me; she stroked my head, and said Lord child, I bought it in Bond street. I took the chicken and brought it in to my mistress, and my mistress said upon her oath it was her chicken.

Q. to Mr. Holmes. Was that fowl yours - A. Yes, I can swear to the fowl. When the woman came back I asked her how she could come in my bar and rob me; I insisted upon her being taken in custody.

Q. How was the fowl killed - A. The neck was not broke. I think it was stifled in her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 29th of August, I had been to Kensington; on my return I called upon Mrs. Holmes, I asked her to give me something to drink; she gave me some gin and water; I sat down and took the fowl in my hand; Mrs. Holmes was in the bar most of the time; when I went out there was a gateway, there stood the boy, and there laid the cock; he said it is dead; I took it up and said yes. I went to Mrs. Holmes; I told her I saw the boy with it; the boy said he saw it drop out of my pocket. I haved lived twenty nine years in St. Mary-le-bone parish, and nineteen years in East street, Portman square; where I brought up all my children and bore them all, and buried my husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080914-132

673. JOHN MAYBRICK, alias MILLBACK , was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Watson.

MR. FINCH. Q. I believe you are in the office of the City solicitor - A. I am; I produce the office copy of the record of the conviction of Tollson and Lebeck. I have examined it with the original, it is a true copy. (The copy of the record read)

JOHN LUDLOW . Q. You are the officer of the court here that administer the oaths - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar - in June sessions, at the trial of Tollson and Lebeck, do you remember swearing him in the usual way - A. Yes; it is the same person.

Q. Was he sworn as a witness for the prosecution or for the prisoners - A. He came and spoke on their behalf, I believe; he was sworn, I administered the oath myself.

JOB SIBLY . Q. Was you present in June sessions, upon the trial of Tollson and Lebeck - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember the defendant Maybrick giving evidence upon that trial - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect his person - look round and tell the court and jury whether you do or not - A. I recollect his person perfectly well.

Q. Have you got your notes here upon the trial of Tollson and Lebeck - A. I have.

Mr. Alley. What is that you have in your hand,

is it a copy of your notes - A. No, sir, they are the original notes.

Mr. Bolland. Read to the court and jury the evidence that the defendant gave upon that trial.

THE EVIDENCE OF THE DEFENDANT.

JOHN MAYBRICK . - Mr. Arabin. Where do you live - A. I live in Fetter lane.

Q. What are you - A. I am a stationer.

Q. Was you on the 14th of May last in Whitechapel market - A. I was.

Q. You said you lived in Fetter lane, what is the number of your house - A. I live at No. 122, Fetter lane. I do not rent the house.

Q. How long have you lodged there - A. A twelvemonth.

Q. You said in the course of the day you was in Whitechapel market - A. I was.

Q. Do you recollect any cart there with the name of Savage upon it - A. I do recollect it; I observed the name of Savage, but not where the place was; I saw two men.

Q. Do you mean to say you saw the two men at the bar, or one of them - A. I saw one of them, that was Lebeck.

Q. At what time of the day was it - A. It was about two or three o'clock.

Q. Did you see any thing put in the cart - A. Yes, I saw one or two sacks.

Q. Were these sacks empty or full - A. They appeared to be full, or partly full; but I did not observe particularly; they were brought by a man that appeared like a corn chandler, or a farmer.

Q. You saw him put the sacks into this cart - A. I did.

Q. I do not know whether you observed him for any time - A. I did not; I was in a chaise cart, waiting for a friend of mine.

COURT, to Griffiths. Was you present when the prisoner was examined - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the magistrate's hand writing - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that, and see whether that is Mr. Davis's writing - A. Yes.

Q. Now, Mr. Maybrick, where is your shop - A. I do not keep a shop.

Q. Where are your premises - A. At that house - No. 122.

Q. What sort of stationary do you sell, are you a law stationer, or what - A Common stationary; I am a pocket book maker by trade.

Q. How long have you been in that trade - A. It is impossible for me to say; I served my time to it.

Q. I think it very possible for you to say how long you have been in that trade - A. I told you to the extent how far back.

Q. How many years have you been in that trade - A. About nine years.

Q. That is something like an answer, why did not you give me that answer at first - have you lived in Fetter lane all that time - A. No, I have not, I lived in St. Ann's passage.

Q. You was waiting there for a friend - A. I was.

Q. Who did you live with in St. Ann's passage - A. I kept a house there.

Q. Where is St. Ann's passage - A. Noble street, Foster lane, Cheapside.

Q. You are a pocket book maker by trade - A. I am.

Q. How came you to say you was a stationer - A. Because those who are in the trade describe themselves as-stationers, and because stationary is the highest profession in the trade.

Q. Do you deal much in stationary - A. No.

Q. Do you deal much in pocket books - A. Yes.

Q. Who do you deal with in stationary - A. Mr. Holdsworth in Canon street.

Q. How do you know it was the 14th of May - A. It was of a Saturday, that is what I recollect it by; whether it is the 13th or the 14th I will not be certain.

Q. Are you quite sure it was on a Saturday - A Yes.

Q. What time of the day on Saturday - A. It was between two and three o'clock as near as I can say.

Q. I do not expect you to say within a quarter of an hour - what business were you upon, and what part were you in - A. I was with a friend, he went to buy some hay at Whitechapel market in a chaise cart.

Q. What is your friend's name - A. Jones.

Q. Where does he live - A. He lives in Houndsditch.

Q. What number - A. 27; he is a stationer.

Q. He is a stationer too, is he here - A. Not as I know of; I have not seen him here.

Q. You were conversing together at that time - A. I was not conversing with him when I first saw this man; he was in the market purchasing the hay.

Q. You were waiting his return in the market - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you call upon him - A. He came to me.

Q. He came to you in Fetter lane to go to Whitechapel - A. He did not come particularly to me, he was going to Bond street.

Q. What time of the day was it when he called upon you - A. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock when he called upon me.

Q. He called upon you, he was a stationer, he went into Bond street - that is further off from Whitechapel - A. I know it is.

Q. Do not be angry with me - who did he go to - A. He went with me to Mr. Faulder's to take in some work.

Q. What work did he get there - A. He did not get any, he took some.

Q. What, work that he had to bind - A. Yes.

Q. It was twelve o'clock when he called upon you to go with him to Bond street - A. Yes, and he called in Broad street, Bloomsbury.

Q. That is St. Giles's; you walked all round that way - A. No, we did not walk, we rode.

Q. He keeps a horse and cart - A. Yes, he serves largely in the country, he keeps a chaise cart.

Q. He left his goods at Mr. Faulder's - A. part of them, and part in Broad street.

Q. Who did you call upon in Broad street - A. Mr. Wright; he left some paper there.

Q. And books at Mr. Faulder's - A. Yes.

Q. You then went to Whitechapel - is it your custom to ride out with this gentleman - A. No, unless he meets me, or we go in the country.

Q. How near were your chaise cart to this cart - A. It might be two or three yards, or not so much:

Q. Then you must be close to the cart - A. No; I was not close to the cart, I was at the head of the cart, the men were not at the head.

Q. Why, if your cart was two or three yards off,

your cart must be near to them. Now this was not in Goswell street - A. No.

Q. You are quite sure you do not mistake Goswell street for Whitechapel market. - A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen this man before - A. I have seen him before at Mr. Jilt's; I knew him by sight and that is the way how I came to be brought here; I was subpoenaed.

Q. I did not ask you that - did you know his name - A. Yes, when it was mentioned to me.

Q. You have heard his name before - A. Yes.

Q. You first of all said you observed the men - A. I did not observe the other man; I know Lebeck; I did not observe much of him, it was not my business to observe him.

Q. Which cart staid longest in the market, your's or their's - A. Their's staid the longest.

Q. You are quite sure that it was their cart - A Yes.

Q. Which way did their cart go - A. I cannot say, I did not see the cart go.

Q. Do you know such a place as Windsor Terrace, City Road - A. Yes, because I have a house there.

Q. Did you ever live there - A. No; I intend living there; the house is not finished; I cannot live there.

Q. How long have you had that house - A. About two months, or not quite so much.

Q. Now if there should be any difference between you and them where they took in those sacks of corn, I suppose they are the most likely to remember than what you are - A. I should suppose so;

Q. What kind of a man was he that delivered them this corn - A. He was dressed like the prisoners, something in the country way.

Q. What had he - A. Some sacks.

Q. How did he carry them - A. He carried them on his shoulder.

Q. Where did he come from - A. I do not know.

Q. What was in these sacks - A. They appeared to be sacks of corn; they seemed to be full of something.

Q. How many were there - A. I observed two, but no more.

Q. Now I will tell you what account the prisoners have given when they were before the magistrate. - The prisoner, James Tollson , says, I and my fellow servant brought the corn into the cart at Goswell street - were you in Goswell street - A. I was not in Goswell street; if I had seen it put in the cart in Goswell street, I could not say it was in Whitechapel.

Q. to Griffiths. Were you present when the examination was taken - A. I was.

Q. This is the magistrate's signature - A. Yes, it is.

Q. to Maybrick. When was it you saw them - A. About the 14th of May.

Q. How came you to know this, that your attendance would be necessary here - A. It was told me; I had a subpoena sent me.

Q. Did you hold any conversation with Lebeck about this - A. No.

Q. You never told this story to Mr. Jilts - A. No.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with him about it - A. No; I never had to any body; Lebeck might have told this to him, and that might be the occasion of my being subpoenaed.

Q. You told me you saw the man put them in at Whitechapel - A. Yes; Whitechapel.

HENRY WINNING . Q. What are you - A. I am horsekeeper to Messrs. Benjamin Severn and Frederick King . On the 14th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning. I sold the load of dung to Tollson and Lebeck, the persons that were tried here; I was in my master's yard, Church lane, Whitechapel.

Q. What distance is that from the hay market in Whitechapel - A. About a quarter of a mile. I sold the dung in the morning to Tollson and Lebeck; I left the yard about three o'clock, they had not come for the dung then; from information I returned to the yard about four o'clock; the dung was loaded then in the cart under Tollson's and Lebeck's care. The name of Savage was on the cart.

Q. Had you any opportunity of looking into the corn in your master's loft in the morning - did you know the stars of the corn when you left the yard - A. Yes, I saw it in the course of the day; when I returned I discovered the corn which was in a bin in the loft diminished six or seven bushels; I missed that quantity, and a sack of my master's was missing; the sack was in the loft and laid by the corn; I informed Mr. Bishop, our foreman; he sent for Mr. Griffiths, the officer; when Mr. Griffiths came he proceeded to search the cart, there was one sack with corn in it found upon the top of the cart, concealed under the dung; - they shot the cart up and two more sacks fell out containing oats; one of the sacks belonged to my master; the three sacks contained about seven bushel three quarters.

Q. Did Tollson or Lebeck say anything to whom it belonged to - A. They said if they had any corn it belonged to them.

WILLIAM GARRED . Q. On the 14th of June last, was you servant to Mr. Brede - A. Yes; he is a cooper, he lives in Church lane, Whitechapel. To go into Mr. Severn's yard they must come into our yard. On the 14th of May, between three and four o'clock, I saw Tollson and Lebeck in Mr. Severn's yard; I saw Tollson come out of Mr. Severn's stable, with one sack of oats on his shoulder (I saw the sack examined afterwards at the office), he carried it to Lebeck; Lebeck was placing the dung on the cart; at the same time Tollson lifted it up as high as ever he could, and Lebeck pulled it up on the cart and laid it on the copse of the cart till such time as he had made a hole in the dung, and then he put the bag in the dung.

COURT. Did the sack appear to you to be full at the time he raised it up - A. It did.

Q. Where was you when you saw this - A. My young master called me, he was looking through a hole that was in the palings, I looked with him; right opposite that hole is the stable door; we could see them and they could not see us.

Q. Can you say whether or not, they brought any thing in a sack in the yard - A. I am certain they did not; they had nothing but empty sacks and a bit of bay tied up with a hayband.

Q. What time was it when they came in with the cart - A. I suppose it was a little after three in the afternoon.

COURT. If there had been any full sacks in the cart, must you not have seen them - A. Yes.

JOHN BREDE . Q. You are a cooper, you work for your brother - A. Yes.

Q. Was you present when Tollson and Lebeck were tried - A. I was.

Q. Did you see these two men, Tollson and Lebeck, bring a cart in Mr. Severn's yard - A. I did; for the cart to go into Mr. Severn's yard, it must first come into my brother's yard.

Q. Did you see Tollson and Lebeck do any thing in Mr. Severn's yard - A. I saw them whispering together; I was in our yard looking through a hole in the partition between our yard and Mr. Severn's yard; William Garred was with me. I saw Tollson bring or drag three sacks out of the stable; he brought them one by one, he put them into the cart, and the other one, Lebeck, laid them over with dung; the sacks were three parts full.

Q. Did you see Griffiths the officer - A. Yes; when he came into Mr. Severn's yard he searched the cart, he found three sacks, one at the top, and the others more at the bottom; they were all covered with dung. Griffiths was obliged to unload the cart to find them all. I saw no empty sacks after the dung was unloaded.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . Q. Were you called upon on the 14th of May to go any where - A. I was to go to Messrs. Severn's and King's premises; I searched the dung cart; I found three sacks in the cart, all covered with dung; one was at the top of the cart, covered with dung. I found the two others when I shot the dung.

Q. Was there any thing in the cart but the three sacks of corn and the dung - A. No; if there had been any other sacks I must have found them. I apprehended Tollson and Lebeck, they had the care and management of the cart; I took them to Lambeth street office; I was present when they were examined before Mr. Davis.

Q. Do you know the magistrate's hand writing - A. I do; that is the magistrate's hand writing; that is the same paper which was produced upon the trial of Tollson and Lebeck.

Q. Read what the examination says, and tell me whether you was not called upon to prove that, while Maybrick was under examination upon the trial of Tollson and Lebeck - A. I was.

(Read in Court.)

"The prisoner James Tollson says, I and my fellow servant brought the oats into the yard, a man put them into the cart in Goswell street. The prisoner Joseph Lebeck says the same. Taken before me, R. DAVIS."

ROBERT BARBER . Q. I believe you are a solicitor, in partnership with Mr. Brown - A. Yes.

Q. What is Mr. Brown's name - A. John Davis Brown . I live in the Charter house; Mr. Brown lives at No. 122, Fetter lane; our business is carried on there, and it has been carried on there since the year 1782, at No. 122, Fetter lane.

Q. Did the prisoner ever lodge there - A. Never; there has been no business carried on there, except the professional business by Barber and Brown. I only know the prisoner by seeing him at the bar.

FREDERIC ROBINSON . Q. Are you a clerk in the house of Messrs. Barber and Brown - A. I am; they live at No. 122, Fetter lane; I have lived there above five years.

Q. Are there any lodgers in the house - A. There is none.

Q. Did the prisoner live there for the last twelve months - A. No; there has been no stationary business carried on there. I do not believe I ever saw the prisoner before.

RAHAM REB . Q. What are you - A. I am beadle of Candlewick ward.

Q. Canon street is in that ward - A. Part of it; I have been beadle about nine years.

Q. Have you any body in that street carrying on the stationary business of the name of Holdsworth, or Holdsworth and co. - A None at all.

WILLIAM LEWIS . Q. Are you collector of the rates of Candlewick ward - A. Yes, part of it; I have collected the rates three years.

Q. Do you collect the rates in Canon street - A. I do, part of it.

Q. Has there been any person there of the name of Holdsworth a stationer, or Holdsworth and co. stationers, in Canon street, for this three years - A. There has not.

THOMAS PARKER . Q. What are you - A. I am the beadle of Walbrook ward; part of Canon street is in that ward.

Q. In that part of Canon street which is in Walbrook ward, is there any person of the name of Holdsworth a stationer there - A There is not; I never heard of such a name; Cadlewick ward and Walbrook ward comprises the whole of Canon street.

STEPHEN WINDMILL. Q. You are parish clerk - A. Yes, of St. Swithin and St. Mary Batho; part of Canon street is in our parish; there are thirty nine houses in our parish. in the ward of Walbrook.

Q. Was there any person of the name of Holdsworth for the last six years carrying on the stationary business there - A. Certainly not.

THOMAS CLOUT . Q. What are you - A. I am a cook, in the eating line, No. 2, Canon street.

Q. Do you know all the houses in Canon street, within the ward of Walbrook - A. Yes, for these fifteen years.

Q. Has there been any person of the name of Holdsworth or, Holdsworth and co. carrying on the business of stationary there - A. No, there has not.

GEORGE BROWNSER. Q. What are you - A. I am a slop seller; I live at No. 27, Houndsdicth.

Q. Have you any lodgers in that house - A. No. I was born in the house, and I have lived there ever since, and my father lived there before me.

Q. All the time that you have lived there, has a person of the name of Jones lived there, a stationer - A. No, there has not.

GILES APSEY . Q. You are a partner to Mr. Brownser - A. Yes, for seven years.

Q. During the time that you have been a partner there, has a person of the name of Jones lived there - A. No; I have been in the house eighteen years, and during that time there has been no such person.

EDWARD DAVIS . Q. Are you beadle of the ward of Portsoken - A. Yes.

Q. Is Houndsditch in that ward - A. Three fourths of it is; the other part is in Bishopsgate.

Q. Do you know the whole street of Houndsditch - A. Yes; there is but one No. 27; I have known that house twenty six years.

MR. FAULDER. Q. You live in Bond street - A

Yes; I am a bookseller.

Q. Does any man of the name of Jones work for you, who is a stationer or bookbinder - A. No such person works for me.

Q. Did a man of the name of Jones call on you on the 14th of May last to bring you work - A. We have regular binders; no such person of the name of Jones works for us: a person of the name of Jones might call at our house.

COURT. Did you ever employ a person of the name of Jones, No. 27, Houndsditch - A. No, I never did.

JOHN BROMBY . Q. What are you - A. I have been shopman to Mr. Faulder twenty one years.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Jones living at No. 27, Houndsditch, and has he been employed by your house - A. No.

Q. Did ever any man of the name of Jones call at Mr. Faulder's to being in work at your house - A. He did not; I never had any dealing with a man of the name of Jones for stationary or book binding.

PETER WRIGHT . Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 45, Broad street, Bloomsbury; I am a bookseller.

Q. Is there any other man of your name in Broad street, Bloomsbury, a bookseller - A. Not in that street, nor in the city of London.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Jones, a stationer - A. I do not.

Q. Then I need not ask you, hardly, whether any such man brought you any stationary to your house - A. Certainly, he did not.

WILLIAM SWAN . Q. What are you - A. I am a broker and coal merchant, also an auctioneer; I live in Hosier lane, Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the defendant - A. Yes, I know him by the name of John Maybrick . I saw him on the 14th of May going up the steps of Giltspur street compter about twelve o'clock; about ten minutes after twelve I was talking with Mr. Fisher, a sheriff's officer, No. 8, Old Bailey; he came there after he had done with Mr. Fisher; I saw him cross the way and go to the Rose. In about two minutes after that I followed him into the Rose in the Old Bailey. About one o'clock I saw him again in the Old Bailey, near Fleet lane. I saw him again about half an hour after that in the Old Bailey, and I spoke to him; that was about half after one o'clock; I saw him again at the Fortune of War, the corner of Cock lane, a little before three o'clock; I was in company with him from that time till half past four o'clock.

Q. Are you sure that it was Saturday the 14th of May that you saw the defendant. - A. I am confident of it.

Mr. Alley. How long have you been an auctioneer - A. Eight years; and I carry on the business of a broker and dealer in coals at Hosier lane; my wife carries it on; I generally go to see the coals measured out, and I sell a great many more than she sells; I have sold two hundred and ninety five chaldrons of coals since the 1st of January.

Q. You have had a great many sales since January last - A. No, only one; I sold a vessel at Portsmouth, that was before January; I have valued two or three persons in public houses; I have not had a sale since then. Before January I had one sale, the John and Elizabeth, but I gave it to another man.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner before June - A. Perhaps six weeks before.

Q. Were you subpoenaed on the trial of Tollson and Lebeck - A. No, I was not; I did not attend before the grand jury.

Q. You were upon good terms with the defendant - A. I never changed a shilling with him; I was neither upon good terms or bad terms with him.

Q. Then, in short, you were upon good terms - A. Yes.

Q. Had it happened that he arrested a friend of yours of the name of Williams - A. He was no friend of mine; he was a man I knew; that was on Friday the 13th.

Q. Upon your oath have not you sworn that it was the 14th - A. He was arrested in the city of London on the 14th, and on the 13th; I saw him.

Q. Did not you swear that you saw him at the Rose in the Old Bailey; is not that the fact; attend sir; because you know Williams was arrested on that day, that is the reason you know it was the 14th.

COURT. Give a plain answer to a question - is that your reason for your knowing that Maybrick had arrested Williams on the 14th - A. I saw Maybrick on the 14th, and that is my reason for fixing upon that day, because Mr. Williams was arrested.

Mr. Alley. You have told me that you were always upon good terms with the man; I ask you whether you did not say, because he had arrested Mr. Williams on that day, that you would put him in the pillory one day or other - A. So help me God, I never said that in my life.

Q. Then perhaps you have never been in prison - A. I never was in Newgate a prisoner; I never went there to see the prisoner Maybrick.

Q. Were you never in Newgate - A. Certainly, I have, but never a prisoner there; I have not been there for these twelve months, then I only went to see a person.

Q. Upon your oath, have not you been to the prisoner and proposed to him that if he would forego his claim in the action of Williams, you would not appear on this prosecution - A. Never, for Mr. Williams is a stranger to me.

Q. Have you ever been indicted for perjury - A. Yes, and they never met me; it is five years ago.

COURT. Was you indicted here - A. Yes, but it was removed by a certiorari; Mr. Morley was the attorney for the prosecution; it was not-moved by my desire; Mr. Const had a brief of mine. I wish they would try the cause.

Mr. Alley. Have you ever said in Nightingale's presence, that you would put this man in the pillory - A. I never did.

Q. Was it on the 14th or the 13th, that you saw the prisoner at the Rose - A. On the 14th.

JOHN NIGHTINGALE . Q. You are a sheriff's officer - A I am.

Q. Were you on the 14th of May at the Fortune of War public house - A. I was; I went to arrest Mr. Williams; I believe it was a quarter past four o'clock, I have known the defendant four, five, or six months; he was at the Fortune of War when I arrested Mr. Williams, and Mr. Swan was there a few minutes. I went to the sheriff's office to see the affidavit. Mr. Swan went with me.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Watson replied.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling , and transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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