Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st June 1808.
Reference Number: 18080601
Reference Number: f18080601-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 1st of JUNE, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose, knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. One of the Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer Sir William Leghon, knt; Sir John William Anderson, bart. Sir Charles Plicey bart, Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , esq. Sir Matthew Bloxham , knt. George Scholey , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Joseph Ashton ,

Thomas Harvey ,

James Bramwell ,

George Bartey ,

John Shipley ,

Ambrose Seal ,

William Good ,

John Dobson ,

Daniel Skinner ,

Isaac Akerman ,

Luke Severn ,

Thomas Dawson .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

Thomas Furniss ,

Edward Hawthorn ,

John Brock ,

John Hunt ,

Robert Dorham ,

Tobias Gainsford ,

Samuel Furniss ,

Edward Blissett ,

John Simpson ,

John Mackey ,

Harry Pulsford ,

Charles Reeve .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Thomas Hatcherd ,

Francis Edwards ,

William Cain ,

Thomas Kerl ,

Samuel Outch ,

James Carver ,

Thomas Lambert ,

Richard Eaton ,

Thomas Hodgson ,

John Topham ,

Savage Ewers ,

Benjamin Ayres .

Reference Number: t18080601-1

365. JOHN REID was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of February , a cotton quilt, value 5 s. the property of William Watkins , in a lodging room .

RACHEL WATKINS . I am a married woman; my husband's name is William Watkins ; he keeps the Old Crown in Swan-street . We let lodgings, furnished and unfurnished; the prisoner lodged with me nine days; he had a furnished room; he went away on the 3rd of February. and I missed the quilt from off the bed. I have not seen it since.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any thing of the property. I leave it all to your generosity.

Prosecutrix. On the day the prisoner left the house, he came in and asked for the key; I gave it him; he went up stairs to the room; in less than ten minutes he went quick through the room with a bundle; I knew that he had no bundle his hand when he came in; I went up stairs, found the key in the door, and the quilt was gone; he was scarce out of my street door when I missed the quilt.

Jury. Why did not you pursue him. - A. Because I had nobody in the house but myself and two small children.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-2

366. DANIEL ALLEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charlotte Milton , she and others of her family being therein, about the hour of eight in the forenoon, on the 1st of March, and feloniously stealing therein, a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Charlotte Milton , widow .

CHARLOTTE MILTON . Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 196 Ratcliffe Highway ; I keep a milliner's and haberdasher's shop .

Q. You have no husband alive. - A. No.

Q. You are the only person concerned in the business of this shop. - A. Yes; I have a little son and a servant girl.

Q. What time was it your house was robbed. - A. On Tuesday the 1st of March.

Q. Had your house been broken into before the 1st of March. - A. Yes; on the the Wednesday evening before that a square of glass was broke or cut through; I lost on the Wednesday, two caps, two silk handkerchiefs, a stock stiffner, and about thirty five yards of British lace. On the Tuesday morning following that, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, from the information the servant girl gave me, I perceived the same pane of glass broken, which had been repaired.

Q.Was the same pane taken out, or broken. - A. It was not all taken out; it was broken, and about half out; I missed a plad handkerchief which laid against the glass.

Q.What was the colour of the handkerchief. - A. A green and dark blue; I had seen it the evening before lying near the pane of glass that was broken.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning. - A. A quarter before eight: my servant girl got up before me, she saw nothing of it; I saw nothing of it; the neighbours gave me to understand that I was robbed and that they knew the parties.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. It was a quarter before eight o'clock when you discovered the window had been broken. - A. Yes.

Q. It was quite light at that time. - A. Yes.

LEITH DUNBAR. Q. You live at Ratcliffe Highway, do you. - A. Yes; I am a cooper. On Tuesday the 1st of March, a quarter before eight, I came down stairs with intent to go to work; as I was coming I saw two men standing at Mrs. Milton's window; the prisoner was one; I stopped at the watchhouse; the prisoner looked very hard at me; they both went away.

Q. How far were they from you when you first saw them. - A. It was about three doors off where I first saw them; they turned up another street; they came back in about a minute or two; they looked very hard at me again.

Q. You stood where you was. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know who the other man was. - A. His name is Nathan Levi , he is a crown witness; the prisoner at the bar I knew before; they looked hard at me again and went away again; they came back again to Mrs. Milton's shop; in the mean time. I shut the door and went into the lock up house and looked through the iron grating at the end of the lock up house.

Q. Was that lock up house on the same side of the way as Mrs. Milton's - A. There is only a pavement of about a yard and a half wide between it and the houses adjoining Mrs. Milton's; after I stood there some time, I saw the two prisoners there again; I saw them trying to force the windows in with their thumbs, both of them; the prisoner went about four doors off; there were two or three people coming by; a milkman came by with his pails; the prisoner went down with him towards Shadwell, about twenty doors off; they got out of my sight; while I was gone Nathan Levi turned round and missed him; in about a minute and a half after he missed him he saw him coming towards him.

Q. You saw him too. - A. Yes. They both came to the window again, they both tried the pane of glass with their thumbs again as they did before; I saw the prisoner take and put his hand into his pocket; I could not observe any thing that he had in his hand, they both stood close together. I heard the window in about half a minute crack; they both walked away directly.

Q.You did not see either of them put their hands to their pockets after you heard the crack did you. - A. No. When they walked away I went out of the watch-house and crossed over the way to the public house; I told a gentleman that these two men, that were over the way had broke a window; they came back to the window while I was at the public house, and forced a piece of the window in.

Q. Did both of them or one. - A. Both of them together; I saw Nathan Levi making a motion as it to catch the pieces of glass as they fell that they might not make a noise by falling on the pavement; they both went away again; then I perceived them at the bottom of Ship alley; I was looking through the window of the

public house; while I turned my head to speak to a gentleman to go out to detain them, they both went away; I did not see them go away, I saw they were gone from the place where they had been standing; after that at the opposite public house, next door to Mrs. Milton's, two or three porters came out from the Red Lion to look at the window.

Q. Do you know who had given the alarm to them. - A. Yes; Mr. Ayres went out of the public house where I was and told them; in about five minutes after that I went to Mrs. Milton's shop. I perceived the window was broken, and one or two handkerchiefs were rumpled; Mrs. Milton came into the shop, I asked her if she had lost any thing.

Q. Had you seen any of Mrs. Milton's family in the shop during the time this was done. - A. No; after it was done the servant girl came out.

Q. You do not know this, do you, whether the window was broke before they came up to it. - A. No, I could not; it was a bow window, and this was one of the farther side.

Q. What is Allen. - A He is a bricklayer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You were examined at Lambeth-street office. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you then say it was only Levi. - A. I said both of them.

Q. You were watching at the time and permitted a capital offence to be done; why did not you take them. - A. I was afraid to go out.

Q. It was in open day. - A. Yes, but there were very few people passing.

ROBERT COMBS . I am one of the officers of Lambeth-street office. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday the 5th of March, at the Prince of Wales in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; as I was bringing him up to the office he made a spring from me and ran best part of half a mile before he was stopped; I cried out stop thief; he was stopped by a gentleman; I got up to him, I searched him, and found a new red spotted silk handkerchief in his pocket, two guineas, a large knife and a small one; Nathan Levi said, this is the little knife that he cut the window with.

Q. Was the prisoner by at the time he said it. - A. No.

NATHAN LEVI . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a butcher by trade.

Q. On the 1st of March do you remember being with the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you go with him. - A. I went on Ratcliffe Highway. About a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, as we were going past Mrs. Milton's shop window, we looked in, we saw nobody there, we walked away and came back again; then the prisoner at the bar took out a knife from his waistcoat pocket and cut a pane of glass, and I shoved a piece of the pane of glass in; we both walked away and went up a turning; we both came back together, we stood with our faces to the window so as nobody should see us; then I pulled the handkerchief out of the window and gave it to the prisoner; we walked away with it, and went down Wentworth-street, Whitechapel.

Q. What sort of a handkerchief was it. - A. A plaid silk handkerchief; it looked like puple and green.

Q. What do you mean by saying it looked like purple and green. - A. It was a dark blue with a kind of a red and green.

Q. Do you think you should know the handkerchief again if you saw it. - A. Yes.

Combs. The handkerchief has never been found.

Nathan Levi . When we came to Wentworth-street, Daniel Allen gave me the handkerchief to sell; I sold it to a man for half a crown; I believe his name is George Rose ; I never saw him before nor since; he lived in Wentworth-street; I gave the prisoner the half crown, he gave me a sixpence and nine penny worth of halfpence.

Q. to Combs. Had you this account from this man, of Rose. - A. I never knew any thing about it, till he told me of it when I was fetching him from the house of correction to day.

Mr. Alley to Nathan Levi . You have been in prison ever since the transaction. - A. Yes.

Court to prosecutrix. You came down stairs about a quarter before eight. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time you said this was done, your maid servant and boy was in the house. - A. My son was in bed, and the girl was cleaning the fire irons in the parlour.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I resist the charge; I can take a solemn oath that I had no hand, act, or part, in robbing with that man; I met the man in Ratcliffe Highway promiscuously; he is put up to this by the officer; Mr. Combs took a duplicate from me which that man gave me instead of a shilling, when I met him in Whitechapel.

Q. to Combs. Do you remember taking a duplicate from the prisoner. - A. Yes; it was a duplicate of a waistcoat; I went to the pawnbroker's and took it out; nobody owned it; I delivered it to him.

GUILTY , - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-3

367. MARY EVERSALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Rutter , about the hour of two at night, on the 4th of April , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, twenty pieces of Irish linen, value 60 l. five hundred yards of printed cotton, value 50 l. and one hundred yards of muslin, value 30 l. his property.

WILLIAM RUTTER . I live at No. 4, in the City Road, in the parish of St. Lukes . On the 4th of April my shop was broken open.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. Not till one o'clock; I fastened the door myself, it was fastened in every respect; I was the last person that was up in the house.

Q. In what state did you find it in the morning. - A. The maid was up first in the morning, she saw a reflection of light through the shop door; in consequence of that she came up to my room door and informed me that the shop had been broken open; it was about five o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was it light then. - A. Quite light. I immediately came down and saw that the door was left upon the latch and that it had been cut by boring a number of small holes with a common gimblet in one of the pannels of the door; after they got the piece out they could put their hand in and unscrew the iron bar; after that they took down the half shutter and took out one of the squares of glass in the shop door; the squares are very large; it appeared that they got in at one of the squares; after

which the shutters had been put up again, and a piece of paper of the colour of the door, was pasted upon the hole of the door, and the gimblet that they had bored the holes with, they tied the lock back with it.

Q. What did you miss. - A. I missed twenty pieces of Irish linen, value sixty pounds, about five hundred yards of printed cotton, value fifty pounds, and two wrappers full of my best muslins, figured and plain, about the value of thirty pounds; they were taken from three shelves, which were empty in the morning.

Q. Do you know any thing more. - A. On Thursday morning the 7th of April, I received a letter by the post; I went to Worship-street and shewed the letter to the magistrate; I had a warrant to search the prisoner's house, No. 45, Seward street, Brick-lane, St. Luke's; I went there in company with three officers on that same Thursday; we went first into the parlour even with the shop; in a chest of drawers, which was in the parlour, we found a piece of muslin. This is the piece of muslin; we found nothing else belonging to me.

Q. Is that yours. - A. From the texture of it, the breadth, the quantity, and the situation in which it was placed, and missing it the next morning, I believe it to be mine; it had a fag end on it then, it has not now; the private mark and the fag end has been cut off. I cannot swear to it; I have not any doubt that it is mine; it is worth about ten shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understand you to say, that when you discovered your house to be broken open, it was at five o'clock in the morning. - A. Yes; it was day light.

Q. There was a great deal of force used with respect to this house of yours - there must be a good many more persons than one. - A. Yes.

Q. The gimblet being used, the pannel taken out, and the paper stuck upon the hole; I take it for granted you think there were more persons than one. - A. Yes; it must have taken a considerable time.

Q. The way they got in was through a pane of glass, do you think it likely that a woman was doing this. - A. I do not pretend to say it is.

Q. What size was the pane of glass. - A. I never took the dimensions exactly, it was large; I suppose about fourteen inches in width, and eighteen or twenty in length, too the best of my recollection; the whole square of glass was taken out, any moderate size person could get in.

Q.Have you enquired whether this woman is a married woman or no. - A. We asked for her husband when we went to the house; we went to the house for the purpose of seeing her husband, and searching the house; I did not see the husband.

Q. Did you ever hear that upon a conviction of a burglary there was a forty pounds reward. - A. I have heard of it for trials in the city; I did not know there was for the county, it was not for that.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer of Worship-street office. In consequence of this warrant; I went to the house of Mrs. Eversall on the 7th of April; I saw Mrs. Eversall, I asked her if her husband was at home; Bishop, Kennedy, and Mr. Rutter were in company with me: she answered that her husband was not at home; there was some other woman in the house besides her; I told her that I had a warrant to search the house. I read the warrant, and then asked her if she had any goods in the house answering that description; she answered no; we then proceeded to search a back room behind the shop. In a draw of a chest of drawers, we found this piece of muslin; she said, she had bought it, but she did not know from whom; we searched different parts of the house, we found nothing more that belonged to this robbery; in searching up stairs, behind a chest of drawers we found a small piece of paper covered with dust; I took it out, I asked Mrs. Eversall what that paper contained; she said garden seed; I opened it before her, and found it contained bank notes to the amount of two hundred pounds and upwards; she then said it belonged to her husband, she knew her husband had a private plant; but she did not know where it was, nor to what amount these notes were I brought away; I knew there had been notes of that kind advertised; I could not find the owner of them. I produce them. I went a day or two after to the prosecutor's house, and saw the way the entry was made; there were holes bored in a square form with a small gimblet, and then it was cut by a knife; after the piece was taken out the hole was about as big as your arm; it was to undo the fastening.

Q. Did not it appear to be the work of some man instead of a woman. - A. Yes; they do it that way, because if they are taken, they suppose a gimblet would not be considered as an instrument of house breaking.

Q. Do you know how the woman came to be indicted. - A. No.

Q. You speak very sensible - it seems that you think a woman could not do this. - A. I do not believe it was done by a woman. Bishop found some pick-lock-keys.

Q. Do not you think she was the receiver more than the thief. - A. I have no doubt of that.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-4

368. HYAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Twining , Elizabeth his wife being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 9th of May , and feloniously stealing therein eight silver table spoons, value 5 l. his property.

GEORGE BRITTEN . Q. Who do you live with. - A. Mr. George Twining , in Great Russel street . On Monday the 9th of May, I heard the prisoner come into the kitchen; he come in at the area gate, and walked across the kitchen, and went into the pantry.

Q. Are you the butler. - A. Yes; I heard him walk out again.

Q. Where was your master's plate kept. - A. In the pantry; the pantry door goes out immediately from the kitchen; it was open, the plate was in the pantry, it laid on the table; when I heard this man walk out, I was in the back kitchen; I went into the front kitchen, then I saw the prisoner at the top of the area steps: I went into the pantry to see what I had missed; I missed eight silver table spoons; I went directly after him, and caught him; I brought him back into the kitchen; he denied he ever had been in the kitchen at all; I could see the print of spoons through his coat, at his breast; I asked him to unbutton his coat; he did not give me any answer, but walked directly into the pantry; he asked me where the plate was; he id not take it away, he did not know where it was; I took hold of his coat and pulled him back from the pantry

door; then he directly pulled the spoons out, and laid them down on the table and said here is your spoons, be friends, and let me go and say no more about it; I told him I could not let him go; an officer was sent for, I gave him up to the officer; these are the spoons; I have had them in my possession ever since; there is my master's crest upon them; they laid on the table in the pantry; they are my master's property.

Q. And the pantry door was open. - A. Yes; the area kitchen door was shut; I heard the door shut after the man came in the kitchen, and I heard it shut when he went out; I had seen the door about two or three minutes before; the door shuts of itself.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that when you went into the back kitchen you shut the door. - A. Yes, I had, but whether it latched I cannot say; there was nobody down stairs but me and the cook, she was in the back kitchen with me.

Q. How long had you been in the back kitchen before you heard the door shut, and heard a person walk across the kitchen into the pantry. - A. About half a minute

Q. You and the cook were in the back kitchen - what other persons of the family were in the house. - A. Mrs. Twining was at the top of the house, and the house maid was in the house.

Q. What may be the value of these spoons. - A. They are worth five pounds at the least.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Bloomsbury square, to the colonel of the regiment, that I belonged to; and when I came from there, I came to this gentleman to get my pension; I have been a soldier in Germany; when I came up to the house, this man came up to me; he says I beg your pardon, was not you in our house; I said I did not know; he said he wanted me to go with him; I told him I would, I asked him who wanted me; I followed him, he said the gentleman of the house has lost some silver spoons; I said, I was sorry for it; when I went in there was an iron door, I could not open it; he opened it, and when I came down in the kitchen he opened a drawer; out he runs again, and ran up stairs; he looked very hard upon me, I thought it very comical, I thought of no harm; when he came down stairs, he said open your coat; I did, there was three and sixpence which the colonel's lady gave me, and he found an old German letter on me; I said my good man here are your spoons, they were laying under the table; the woman took the spooms, she gave them to him: he ran up stairs, he came down, he said send for a constable; the constable came I was taken in custody; I never was before any judge or jury before.

Q. to Britten. I heard you say positively that when you brought him back and took him into the pantry, you saw the print of the spoons on his coat. - A. Yes, and he took the spoons from under his coat and laid them down.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

Of stealing in the dwelling house goods to the value of forty shillings, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-5

369. THOMAS HEANY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , in the dwelling house of James Allardice , five shirts, value 50 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. four pair of stockings, value 10 s. a cap, value 2 s. five guineas, five bank notes, value 1 l. each, a bank note. value 5 l. and another bank note, value 20 l. the property of James Allardice .

JAMES ALLARDICE . I am a slop seller ; I live in Conduit-street, in the parish of St. Georges, Hanover-square ; the prisoner was my errand boy . On Monday, the 25th of April, myself and my wife went out, I keep another servant, she was out, leaving Thomas Heany in possession of the house from nine till twelve o'clock; about the hour of twelve I returned again and my wife; at that time we knew nothing of what had happened; on the Tuesday morning following, I wanted to give change for a forty pound note; I went to my iron chest to get my money, and when I had introduced my key. I found it would not go round; I then pulled it and found it was open; and when I took the book out I found all the money was disconcerted; it was differently folded to what I generally put in the cash book.

Q. Was it cash or bank notes. - A. It was bank notes in that book; on looking over the money I found a twenty pound bank note missing; likewise when I looked to the cash in my purse, I discovered two guineas in gold missing; upon examining the drawer of the iron chest I found it had been forced open; I sent for an officer; he searched the prisoner; some money was found on him in my presence, two one pound notes, a guinea and two seven shilling pieces.

Q. Do you know these notes. - A. I do not. He was then taken to the office and examined, and Mr. Conant gave me a warrant to search the aunt's house; we had a suspicion that the twenty pound note might be deposited there. The officer, myself, and another witness went to the aunt's house in Chandos-street, Grosvenor-square; in a pair of drawers we found a pair of corderoy smallclothes, five new shirts, two calico and three linen; the two callico shirts were taken away from my house that morning, on the 26th, a little before eight o'clock.

Q. How do you know. - A. By the information of his aunt; I had not missed them, nor had we any suspicion; likewise there were four pair of thread stockings found in his aunt's apartments. On the 28th he was brought up the second time to be examined; he there acknowledged that my twenty pound note he had secreted in a roll of blue cloth; I promised that if he would tell me where the money was, I would save his life.

Q. Then we must not hear any thing more about what he said.

Q. In consequence of that did he direct you to go to any place where you might find the property. - A. He did; he told me that if I would let him go to my warehouse up stairs, in my house where he had deposited the money in such a roll of cloth, I might find the money that I had missed. On the officer and myself going to the warehouse at the top of the house, I found the twenty pound note, in the roll of cloth where the prisoner informed me, along with it were two guineas, with an additional sum of three guineas more; five one pound notes and a five pound note; that overplus quantity of money he said was his own; I charged him with having taken a twenty pound note and two guineas; he had been previously robbing me; he told me then the five one pound notes, and the five pound note, and the three guineas were his own; before Mr. Conant he

acknowledged that the whole was my money.

Q. Did he take them at one time or how. - A. He did not say; about a fortnight before I missed my money in the iron chest; I left the keys in the hurry of my business.

Q. Did you miss all this money at one time. - A. No, I only missed the twenty pound note and two guineas at one time; I charged him with it; he acknowledged taking it, and he acknowledged the remaining part of the money was my money, which no doubt it was.

JOHN WARREN. I am an officer. On the 26th of April I went to Mr. Allardice's shop, he gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing him of a twenty pound note and two guineas; I took him into custody, he was committed for re-examination; on the Thusday following he asked me whether he could speak to his master; he asked his master if he would spare his life and he would tell him where all his property was; then we went to his warehouse, up in the garret, where the prisoner slept; in a bale of cloth we found the money, bank notes and cash; he told us where it was. I had a search warrant against his uncle's house in Chandos-street, there I found five shirts. Here is a twenty pound note, a five pound note, and five one pound notes, and five gnineas, I found in a bale of cloth in his master's warehouse; he said it was his master's property, that he broke the drawer of the iron-chest open with a fork; there was a mark of the fork on it.

Prosecutor. He told his aunt that I let him have these shirts that were found at his uncle's as part of his wages; the notes I can say nothing to; I have no private mark upon them; all the things I found at his aunt's I can swear to; they have my private mark; these shirts are my shirts.

Q. What are they worth. - A. Ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. This is my first offence; I leave myself to the mercy of the court; I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury on account of his youth.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-6

370. MARY MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , privily from the person of Nathaniel Webb , two bank notes, value 40 l. each, a bank note, value 30 l. five bank notes, value 20 l. each, five other bank notes, value five other bank notes, value 5 l. each, and another bank note, value 10 l. his property.

NATHANIEL WEBB . Q. Who do you live with. - A.With lord Montgomery. I am a coachman .

Q. When did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. I saw the prisoner at the bar on the night of the 9th of May, at half past twelve o'clock; I saw her as I came out of the Coach and Horses door, Dover-street.

Q. In short you picked her up. - A. No, she accosted me.

Q. We will come over this part of the case. You took her to your master's stable. - A. Yes, we went there, in Strutton-street, Piccadilly .

Q. How long was she with you. - A. She might be there about ten minutes.

Q. Had you any money in your pocket when you took her in the stable. - A. Yes; I had two hundred and forty five pound in my pocket; it consisted of two forty pound notes, one thirty, five twenty's, one ten, and five five pound notes.

Q. How long before you fell in company with the prisoner at the bar had you felt it before. - A. I was confident of it; not two minutes before, it was in my left hand breeches pocket.

Q. You say she was about ten minutes in your stable - A. Yes.

Q. Did she go away. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you perceive that your money was missing. - A. I missed it in two minutes; I went into Leicester Fields and back again; I could not find her. I got up about half past five o'clock and went to the landlord of the public house, the Coach and Horses, in Dover-street.

Q. Had you been drinking there with her. - A. No; I knew that she used that house; I asked the landlord if he knew a person of that description; he said he did; the wife knew her name to be Mary Miller ; I went down to the office; the officer found her.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square office. Upon the application of Mr. Webb me and my brother officer, Renny, went in search of the prisoner.

Q. You at last found that she was at Rochester. - A. Yes; I followed her to Rochester. I started at two o'clock in the morning, Tuesday the tenth of May, I found her at the Duke's Head at Rochester, where she had slept; she was not then up; it was about eight o'clock in the morning when I found her; I requested the servant maid to knock at the door to say that she wanted the candlestick to clean; she got up to open the door to give the maid the candlestick; I stepped in and kept her in her shift, as she was; she asked what brought me there; I told her she had brought me there, I wanted her and a few of the bank notes; she requested me to let her dress herself; I told her she should not dress herself till I had searched the room.

Q. You put her in the hands of your brother officer. - A. Yes. She said it was of no use to search the room, to go to the bed; if I would look under the pillow, I should find all I wanted; we did look under the pillow; I found bank notes to the amount of two hundred and fifteen pounds; I found one for thirty pound, one forty pound, five twenty pounds each, two five pound each, one ten pound, and twenty five one pound each; I found in gold, three guineas and a half, thirteen seven shilling pieces, a dollar, four half-crowns, and twenty shillings in sixpences and shillings together, and fourteen pence in copper, making in the whole two hundred and twenty five pound ten shillings and eight pence; I told her that was not all that I wanted, for she had taken two hundred and forty five pound; she said that it was all that she had got left, she had been buying some new things that were under the bed, and the rest she had spent; she said that she should not have taken it from the man, only he had behaved so very mean to her; he had only given her a shilling, she thought she had a right to help herself to more.

Q. to prosecutor. Have you seen any of the notes. - A. No, none; but the officer has got them; I know the thirty and the forty; there are no marks on any of them.

THOMAS RENNY . I am an officer of Queen-square office.

Q. You went down to Rochester with the last witness,

Gillmore. - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard the account he gave. - A. Yes; I was a witness to all the account he gave is true; this bundle I found under the bed; these were the things that she said she had bought.

Q. to prosecutor. How came you to have so large a sum of money about you. - A. The two forty pound and the thirty pound I received from lord Montgomery.

Q. It was all the money you had - A. No, not quite.

Q. How long have you lived with lord Montgomery - A. About six years; I live with him now.

Q. You say this woman was with you about ten minutes - A. Yes.

Q. Did you feel her hand during the time she was with you within any of your pockets - A. No, I did not.

Q. The moment she was gone, or before she was gone, had you any suspicion that your pocket had been robbed - A. No. About two minutes afterwards I found that I had been robbed.

Q. But before, had you any suspicion - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. It was about half past twelve o'clock Sunday evening I met this man; he asked me to go with him in the stable, I refused to go with him into the stable; he said I need not be afraid of going into the stable with him. When we got into the stable I asked him what he would give me, he said he had no money about him; he went out and borrowed a shilling; I staid with him about ten minutes. Going out of the stable I kicked my foot against it; I picked it up.

Q. to prosecutor. You talked of a forty pound note that you know - A. Yes; this is a thirty pound; there is William Mullins upon it.

Mr. Fitzpatrick. That is the cashier's name.

Court. That is nothing at all.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-7

371. SARAH BLACK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May , a shift, value 1 s. a silk pelisse, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a fruit knife, value 1 s. and a pocket book, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Sherman .

MRS. SHERMAN. My husband's name is Thomas Sherman ; the prisoner at the bar was my servant . I missed the clothes mentioned in the indictment of the 17th of May, she was taken up on that day; she was to have left my service on that evening.

Q. Did you find any thing upon her when she was searched - A. Yes, my shift, it had my name upon the bosom.

DANIEL BISHOP . I found the petticoat and silk pelisse. When the prisoner was charged with stealing, she was asked where they were; she immediately said they were up stairs in the room where she slept; the prisoner shewed me into the garret; between the sacking and the bed she produced these articles tied up in this handkerchief - a silk pelisse and a cotton petticoat. In her pocket I found a silver fruit knife.

The property produced and identified.

Q. to prosecutor. I suppose these things are worth seven shillings - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. The very first beginning of it was my master came down in the morning, he left my mistress in the bed; he wanted to behave very improper with me. When I told my mistress of it, he said he would fix me, because I would not hold my tongue. I put the things under the bed, not with intention of taking them away; the things would have been found.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-8

372. JAMES CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May , six shifts, value 6 s. three tablecloths, value 10 s. three sheets, value 10 s ten pillow cases, value 5 s. an apron, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Shepherd .

LYDIA SHEPHERD . Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes; my husband's name is John Shepherd . I live at No. 2, Bath gardens, Hare walk, Hoxton . I am a laundress; my husband is a labourer in the East India warehouse. On the 13th of May, I had hung out a quantity of linen to dry, I took it in in the evening; and the next morning when I looked it over, I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. No, I never saw him before I saw him before the magistrate.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . Q. You are a patrol - A. Yes. On Friday evening the 30th of May, I was coming from Kingsland Road, about a quarter past nine o'clock, it was dark; the prisoner passed by me with a bundle under his arm, gathered up loose, not tied up as they are now. I stopped him, and asked him what he was carrying, he answered some linen that he brought from his wife, to carry to the manglers; he said his wife was a washer woman in Cooper's Gardens; he was coming from Kingsland Road towards Shoreditch.

Q. Was the place where you met him between Hoxton and Shoreditch church - A. Yes. I asked him what manglers he was going to take it to, he said to one in Crab Tree row, in Hackney Road; it is about a hundred yards distance from Cooper's Gardens.

Q. Near town or further from town - A. Further from town I asked him how he came in Kingsland Road, as he was going to the manglers with it; he told me he had been of an errand for his wife with the bundle; I told him it was an unlikely story, I should go to the mangler's and know the truth.

Q. You apprehended him - A. Yes; I took him to the mangler's in Crab Tree row, she said she neither knew him nor his wife. I took him and the bundle to the office. I delivered the bundle to Mr. Armstrong; he has had it ever since.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. Valentine delivered you that bundle - A. He did, and charge of the prisoner. I have kept the bundle ever since the man was taken on Friday the 13th. On Sunday I found the prosecutrix out, I desired her to come to the office. On Monday she came, saw the things, and knew them.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking by the Black Horse, Kingsland Road; I was looking over the fields, I saw them lye down in the ditch; I stepped over the bank and picked them up.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-9

373. TABITHA GRANT was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 29th of April , fifty pound weight of potatoes, value 4 s. the property of John Whitbread , and Richard Morrison .

RICHARD MORRISON. I live at Edmonton . I am partner with John Whitbread ; I employed John White to watch, he sat up several nights; the banks were robbed after he came away; I desired him to call me on Friday morning the 29th of April, which he did at half after three o'clock I desired him to go over the banks and I followed him immediately; at the time I came up to him I discovered him with a woman, I saw a quantity of potatoes laying by her, I asked her what business she had there, she said it was the first time of her coming. I took her to the constable and gave her in charge, and kept the potatoes ever since under lock and key; these potatoes had been taken from the bank; the bank contained about seven ton.

Q. What was the quantity taken away - A. About fifty pound weight.

Q. Do you know where she lived - A. In Meeting House lane, within about half a mile from the place.

Q. You do not know whether she had any children - A. No, only what she informed the magistrate that she had two children.

JOHN WHITE. Q. Are you servant to Mr. Whitbread and Morrison - A. Yes, I was employed to watch the potatoe bank. On the 29th of April, about half past three, I saw the prisoner, she went to the potatoe bank, she turned the straw of oneside and pulled about a bushel of potatoes into her apron.

Q. Whereabouts were the potatoes - A. In the field, in the parish of Edmonton. I apprehended her with the potatoes in her apron; there is a foot path in the field, it is a bye road. She threw the potatoes down, and begged of me to let her go. I told her it was more than my life was worth to let her go.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress for my children.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and privately Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-10

374. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , seventy pound weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of Samuel Seabrook , affixed to a building of his called a house .

Second count for like offence, stating it to be a building generally.

SAMUEL SEABROOK . I live in Bowling alley, White Cross street.

Q. You have a house somewhere about Bethnal Green - A. Yes, it is repairing; I left it in the care of Mr. Farrer that lives next door.

Q. You lost some lead from it - A. I did; on the 23d of April the lead was affixed over the garret window.

Q. Did you see the lead that was taken from the prisoner - A. I did, I saw it at the office in Worship street; a few days afterwards I saw it tried upon the top of the garret window, it corresponded correctly; it appeared to be about half of it. I believe it to be the lead that came off there.

JOSEPH FARRER . You live at Bethnal Green - A. Yes, I had the house in charge, I live next door. On the 23d of April last, about four o'clock in the morning, I heard something fall, as though it came from the top of the house, it fell very heavy. In the morning I found the gate and the door of the house open; I looked at the ground were this fell, there was an impression on the ground. I heard of a man being in custody for stealing of lead; that very morning I sent to Mr. Seabrook to come forward to see if any thing was lost; accordingly it appeared that this lead belonging to the top of the window was gone; I went with the officer and saw the lead fitted; every thing seemed to correspond exactly. There was only half of it.

- BOOTH. I am a watchman. On the 23d of April, about half past five, I saw the prisoner at the bar just on the other side of the madhouse at Bethnal Green.

Q. What had he upon him - A He had this lead and a chopper in the sack; I took him to the watchhouse, and afterwards I went back and fetched the lead; I took the lead to the office; I was present when the lead was fitted upon the top of the garret window; it appeared to fit.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You are an officer of Worship street office. - A. Yes; on the 23d of April last, I took the prisoner from the watchhouse to the office; the lead was brought in a sack by the watchman, and there was a chopper in the sack.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday morning, between five and six o'clock, as I was coming up Back Cow-lane, I found this lead in a ditch; I took the lead up in order to take it to the first public house I came to; upon the watchman asking me what I had; I said what was that to him; I said it was some lead that I had found; he might have it if he would.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-11

375. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for that he on the 19th of April , one piece of false, feigned and counterfeited piece of money, made and coined to the likeness and similitude of a good and lawful piece of money of this realm, called a sixpence, falsely and traiterously did forge and coin, against the form of the statute and against the duty of his allegiance .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JEREMIAH SHRUBSOLE . - Mr. Knapp. You are a constable of the city of London. - A. Yes. On the 19th of April I went to Mrs. Harwood's house, No. 3, Fleur de Luce-court, Black Friers, about three o'clock; I had a search warrant against that house; Mrs. Harwood, the prisoner's sister; was not at home; I asked if Mrs. Harwood was at home; her husband said she was not. After I had been there some time there was a knock at the door; I desired Mrs. Jones to open the door; the prisoner at the bar came in; Mrs. Jones said the prisoner at the bar was the man that she had the warrant against; I told him him I wanted him; he asked me what it was for; I told him did not he know that Mrs. Jones had been robbed; he answered what of that, I know nothing of it; he set his fist and put himself in a position as if in a Posture of defence; I told him it was of no use; I took hold of him and tied his hands with a handkerchief; I found nothing

on the premises that led to the robbery that I was in search of; I searched the prisoner when I had secured him; in his waistcoat pocket I found a canvas purse; in it there were four good shillings and four sixpences; there were some halfpence and some keys; I took him to where the robbery was committed, and I desired Mrs. Jones to fetch the little boy down; I took him from there to No. 15, Robin Hood-court, Shoe-lane, where I learned that he lodged; I went up two pair of stairs, the prisoner went up with me; I sat him down in the window; I looked at a large chest that was there; I asked him if it was his chest; he said, yes; I told him I meaned to open it; he told me there was a key in his pocket; I took it out and the key did open it; I could not open it immediately; he told me to weigh heavy down upon it, and it did then open it; the first thing I took up was a drab coloured great coat; in the side pocket I found a crape hat band; in shaking the coat out I perceived a paper drop; I took the paper up; there were nine sixpences in it, and I thought they were of the same sort that I saw in his purse; I asked him if they were his; he said they were his; I took up a waistcoat; I opened it and shook it, another small paper dropped out; I took it up; in it I found some sixpences with a kind of stamp on them; they answered to what I had seen before, but they were brassy, not coloured.

Q. How many sixpences. - A. Eight, and a seven shilling piece with them. There was a velveteen pair of breeches laid folded up in the said chest; when I took the breeches up I found by the side of it another paper, that contains some kind of cuttings that came off these sixpences; I found next a kind of a christmas-box. I asked him what he did with them things; he said it only contained children's play things, it contained different metal watch keys; the next thing that I found was some aqua fortis with the bottle three parts full, but the jolting of the coach has spilled some out of it; it is half full now; in taking the remaining clothes out, I found stamps and punches; these stamps, all but that stamp, was found in a chest; I found that stamp by the side of a box of charcoal; if you compare them with the marks on the sixpences, these stamps correspond to them; I found some metal rolled up in a paper, some brass, and a pair of small scales; I found some sand pa per, some that had been used and some that had not been used; I found in a box some cream of tartar with some shot at the bottom; I found two crucibles, one that had been used, with some metal at the bottom, and the other apparently had not been used; I found an oyster shell with some grease in it; and a small pocket book with some India ink in it; this is all I found that time in the chest. After I searched the other part of the apartment, I found this box on the shelf; I found this cutting punch; when I found these things the prisoner's wife seemed to be very resolute; I searched her in the prisoner's presence; I found nothing upon her but a snuff box and a few halfpence; I did not take her in custody, but she followed me to the compter; going along a little girl stood close to her; when we came to the compter I desired Mr. Leadbetter to bring her in; I went with Leadbetter again to the house in Robin Hood-court; then I brought away two hammers, a kind of a block, two flat irons and this pair of gloves; they looked as if they had been stained with a aqua fortis; I had seen the things the day before, but I did not bring them away, not being upon such a thing before; I compared the cutting punch with the marks on the block, they tallied the same as it does upon the iron; Leadbetter told me that this was a material thing, I should have brought them away; and when I compared the flat iron to the punch I perfectly saw it was marked with it; I went with Mr. Powell on the day following, on the Wednesday; I shewed him the things that I left behind me; Mr. Powell desired me to take away a large mallet and a bench or table; the mallet appeared as if they had been working on that metal, and I found a tag stained and burnt with aqua fortis.

Q. Was there any thing with respect to the window, - A. Yes; there was a window curtain tacked down that completely hid the window it being a kind of a gauzy nature it let the light through.

Q. At the time that you took the prisoner did you observe any thing with respect to the person of the prisoner. - A. When I took the prisoner he seemed to be very resolute; I told him it was of no use; Mrs. Jones's husband said he would knock his head off if he offered to resist; as he held his hand up I saw his thumb stained, I thought it was bruised; I did not know it was aqua fortis at the time; I asked the prisoner when I took the things out of the chest if they were his; he said they were: and when I took the different things out of the chest he said they were trinkets for the children.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . - Mr. Knapp. You are an officer, you went with Shrubsole. - A. Yes; when we came to the Poultry compter he told me to bring the woman in; she seemed to be wanting to put her hand in her pocket.

Q. Was the prisoner by. - A. He was not. I went with Shrubsole when he took them things away. The next day I found a pair of tongs and this pan on the woman.

Mr. Alley. You are not to give them things in evidence.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . - Mr. Knapp. You assist the solicitor of the mint. - A. I do.

Q. You are acquainted with the different process by which coining is completed. - A. Yes.

Q. Will you explain to us what is the use of the different articles that have been found. - A. The crucible is for melting the metal; after melting the metal, previous to casting it into the ingot mould, this sort of thing, that is an ingot mould.

Court. That is one thing produced. - A. Yes; after being cast in the ingot mould, the ingot mould would be sent to the flatting mills, of which there are many in this town, and it would be flatted into plates which might be flatted into any thickess it might be wanted for; for instance, for either a shilling or a sixpence. You have some sissel which has been produced on the examination; I matched the sissel with the cutting punch as well as I could, and it appeared to correspond with respect to the circle, it corresponds with the cutting punch, and I compared the cutting punch with the iron; it corresponded with the marks on the iron.

Q. Explain to the jury how this is done - A. This plate is fixed upon that block, and held between the legs; the man sitting and the plate put on this iron; then with the mallet it might be cut out, and if the punch passes through the plate it would leave the marks of the punch on it, there are many marks on the iron;

it appears to have been very much used; by holding the block in that position between the legs it would prevent any particular noise from being heard, any more than the chopping of wood; which I desired the officer to use, by placing it between his legs, and not letting it touch the floor, it appeared like chopping of wood, it effectually answers the purpose; I compared the sissel with the finished money, it appeared exactly of the same metal. After the blanks are cut out by the punch, the edges are smoothed by the file, which was produced by the officer; this file has metal in the teeth of the same sort as the finished money and the blanks; here is sand paper, which is used for smoothing the surface preparatory for the colouring; here is a pair of pliers for holding the piece while these two operations are performing, by smoothing the edge with the file and smoothing the surface, and it might be done on such a thing as that bench, which is produced by constant use; the edge would be wore away in the manner this is; these blanks after being finished in the way I have described, would be heated over a fire made with charcoal, which here is charcoal produced.

Court. For what purpose is that - A. To soften the metal preparatory to the colour, it takes the colour the better; the blanks are then put into a pickle of aqua fortis; and the aqua fortis alone upon a blank of this description, would raise the colour of silver, as the blank contains a certain portion of silver incorporated with the base metal; I satisfied myself in that particular. I took one of the finished sixpences, I entirely divested it of the silver on the surface, and I coloured it again with the assistance of aqua fortis; that likewise fits this punch, apparently cut out of a plate; the blanks after remaining a certain time in the pickle of aqua fortis are taken out and put into cold water, they then appear quite black; the next thing to be used then is cream of tartar, which is here produced; which being rubbed on the surface it takes off the black, and then the silver colour appears; the appearance of the silver being very bright, in order to make it appear as if they had been in circulation, then the grease and blacking in the oyster shell is used to take off the brightness, and to make it appear as if they had been in circulatation. With respect the small letters, that is not at all necessary, it is only to make a greater deception, as many people are in the habit of marking of money.

Q. Are some of these marked with the small letters that was found - A. Yes; I compared them with some of the little punches, I found them to correspond upon examination; I accompanied Shrubsole upon the third search, as he mentioned some things, which I thought were material to be produced, as this bench, which appears to have been worked by some person, with this coin that has been produced.

Mr. Knapp to Shrubsole. Produce the coin that you took out of the prisoner's pocket - A. That is the coin that I first took out of the prisoner's pocket.

Mr. Powell. The bench appears to have been used with aqua fortis, which has been used in colouring of metal.

Q. Now looking at that money, Mr. Powell, tell me whether these three sixpences are finished for circulation, are they such as a coiner would make compleately for circulation - A. Certainly.

Q. Now look at these others, here are seven others - A. They are finished for circulation; they have the blacking upon them, which I mentioned to be the last process; they appear to be recently done; they have never been in circulation.

Q. Are these of the same sort of the three that were produced before - A. Yes; save only the appearance of the blacking, they are exactly the same.

Q. Now look at the others - A.These are blanks in a preparatory state for colouring; they are sixpences which are quite prepared for the colouring; here are two which are not in quite so forward a state; six are perfectly finished for colouring, and the two which are not in quite so forward a state, having only the edges filed, but not the surface scoured.

Court. What are all this coin - A. They are all sixpences.

Q. Could the purpose of coining be compleatly carried on by the articles found - A. Yes: the whole is compleat.

Q. Those that are finished, and those in a less finished state - do they all appear to be done from the same materials - A.They do.

Q. Those that have the appearance of grease upon them, do they appear to have been recently done - A.They appear to have been very recently coloured.

Mr. Knapp. How long have you been acquainted with this process that you have been describing - A. About fifteen years.

Q. Are you perfectly acquainted with it - A. Perfectly so; I have seen a great many hundred cases.

Court. Are they such as would pass current for good sixpences - A. Certainly.

MR. JOHN NICHOLLS . Q. You are one of the monier's of his Majesty's mint - A. Yes.

Q. Are these counterfeits or not - A. They are counterfeits.

Q. How many are there - A. Six; here are eight in an unfinished state, and a counterfeited seven shilling piece, which is not perfectly finished.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. There are none of them that would deceive you - A. Not if I looked at them attentively.

Q.You are the monier of the mint - could you have been deceived with these - A. I have been deceived before; I certainly might have been deceived without I had paid great attention to them.

MARY WILSON . Q. Where do you live - A. I live at No. 15, Robinhood court, I occupy the one pair of stairs; the prisoner occupied the two pair of stairs.

Q. The two pair of stairs that he occupied is the room that the officers came and searched - A. Yes.

Q. How long has he lodged there - A. About a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know what business he followed - A. I know nothing of him but an honest hard working man.

Q. That is not an answer to my question - do you know of your own knowledge how he got his living - A. He used to work for a brass founder in Shoe lane.

Q. Do you know whether he carried on any business in the room that he occupied - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Are you much at home or a good deal out - A. I am a good deal out.

Q. Have you made any observation to the noise that you have heard him make in his room - A.Nothing but that of chopping of wood, or breaking of

coals.

Q. Have you heard it frequent - A. No.

MARGARET WEST . Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 15, Robinhood court, Shoe lane.

Q. Look at that iron - A. That is my mother's.

Q. Did you ever lend that iron - A. Frequently; I was in the habit of lending it to Mrs. Wood, the prisoner's wife; I have lent it her several times, and she has been in the habit of using it many times since she has been in the house.

Q. Have you ever made any complaints how it has been used - A. Yes; she told me the children had been knocking buttons on it - I live in the three pair of stairs.

Q. Do you know what business he carried on - A. He worked at a shop in Shoe lane; he had been out of work for about five months.

Q. How was he with respect to his being at home during that five months - A. Sometimes he was at home and sometimes he was out.

Q. Have you been disturbed by any knocking in the room that he occupied - A. He frequently was up in the morning early; I frequently heard knocking. I never went into the room no further than to get a light.

Q. Did he let you go into the room - A. No; he always took the candle and gave it to me out; I frequently found the door locked when I went to it, when he was at home.

Prisoner's Defence. I never made any bad money in my life; it was the least of my thoughts of ever thinking of trying to do such a thing.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-12

376. BENJAMIN RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , two reams of paper, value 14 s. the property of George Longman , and John Dickinson , and ROBERT PASSLEY , for feloniously receiving the same, he knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

NICHOLAS DAVIS . - Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I am a porter, I stand at the top of Fleet market. On Saturday the 30th of April, a little before eight o'clock in the morning, I was at the top of Fleet market.

Q. Did you see the prisoner Randall come from Ludgate hill. - A. I did; he came from the hill, and came upon the stand, and Robert Passley was close to him at the time he received the parcel.

Q. You know Messrs. Longman's and Dickinson's. - Yes, it is of the other side of Ludgate church; he was coming from their warehouse.

Q. When he came to Passley, what did he say to Passley. - A. He asked him to take them two reams of paper for him to Goldsmith street.

Q. Where is that place. - A. Near the King's printing office near Gough square. Passley asked him if he did not know the way; he said if you do not, if you will go with me and pay me I will shew you. Then they parted from the street and went into Mr. Temple's wine vaults the corner of Fleet street.

Q. Did you know Randall before. - A. I have seen him come out of Longman's and Dickinson's, I knew he was their porter. They did not remain long in the wine vaults; Randall came out first and Passley almost immediately followed without any reams of paper, he went in again and took out one; he took it down to Mr. Goddard's, wax and tallow chandler; he went into two or three shops first; when he came out of Mr. Goddard's he left the paper behind him. I then followed him up to Harp alley; and then I came up to my stand, I saw him come up to the wine vaults and take out the other ream of paper; he went to Mr. Goddards with it; I saw Mr. Goddard receive the paper and give him some money.

Q. Did you see him join Randall afterwards. - A. No, I did not; then I told the officer what I had seen, and that I would go with him and shew him from where the property was stolen; I went to Mr. Longman's and gave the information, and afterwards I went to Mr. Goddard's shop door, but I did not go in.

Randall. - Q. Did you see me give the paper to Passley. - A. No, you went into the liquor shop the corner of Fleet market, you had the paper then.

Passley Q. Did you see me receive the paper from Randall A. No.

Q. Did you know the paper to have been stolen then. - A. by his saying take the paper to Goldsmith street, I suspected it.

Passley. If I had known the paper to have been stolen, I should have concealed it.

MR. GODDARD. - Mr. Gurney. On Saturday the 30th of April, did the prisoner Passley bring any paper to your house. - A. Yes, two reams of paper. I had seen the prisoner twice before that. He came to me that morning, he asked me if I wanted any paper; I asked him the price, he said twelve shillings, six shillings a ream; I asked him how he came by it, he said he had it by the waggon from the country, it was returned for goods sent; he appeared like a waggoner; I had no suspicion of him.

Q. He brought you two reams and you paid him twelve shillings. - A. I did.

Q. Shortly after Mr. Ford, Mr. Longman's clerk, came and you gave him the paper. - A. I did.

THOMAS RICHARDS . - Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I am a porter of Fleet market. On the morning of the 30th of April, I was in the wine vaults; I saw Passley's coat laying in that open place and a ream of paper upon it; I went to the end of Fleet market, I saw the first witness.

Q. Did you see any thing either of Passley or Randall afterwards. - A. Yes, I saw Passley come and fetch the paper away about an hour after that; he and I were together and Randall came up to him; I did not observe what Passley said, I was then four or five paces off. I observed them talk slightly together; I saw Passley put his hand in his pocket and give Randall some money, I could not see how much, it was about half after nine o'clock when he gave the money, and about eight o'clock when he fetched the paper away.

CHRISTOPHER STADLEY I am an officer, I received the paper from Messrs. Longman and Dickinson.

MR. FORD. I am clerk to George Longman , and John Dickinson. Randall has been their porter for about a twelvemonth; from information, I perceived two or three reams of paper missing; I received the paper from Mr. Goddard; it is the property of Messrs. Longman and Dickinson.

Q. What is the value of the paper - A. Fourteen or

fifteen shillings.

Randall's Defence. I did not take the paper, it was given to me in Ludgate-street by James Mills , he desired me to carry it down Fleet market; I took it to the gin shop, and delivered it to Robert Passley ; I did not sell it nor did I receive the money for two hours afterwards and Mills had a part.

Passley's Defence. I took the two reams of paper to Mr. Goddard's shop, and received twelve shillings; I returned the money to this man; I did not know that they were stolen.

RANDALL, GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

PASSLEY, GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-13

377. ISAAC ISRAEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a publican , I keep the sign of the Duke of Clarence, Hackney Road ; the prisoner was in my house on the 11th of May, about three or four hours; he went out about seven o'clock. I was standing in the bar, a woman called at the window and said there is a man gone out of your house with a pot under his coat; I followed him and stopped him, and told him he had got one of my pots he said yes; a quart pot he dropped a bag that he had under his arm, it was picked up, and another quart pot was taken out of it, which was my property.

Q. They were both your property - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say for himself - A. He wished to give me the pot and for me to say nothing about it.

Q. You say he had been four hours at your house, had he been drinking all the time - A. He might have had some beer; he was asleep part of the time, he appeared sober; I have known the man being in the neighbourhood some time.

Q. What is he - A. He buys clothes; he lives in a court in Hackney road; I served him with beer.

- SHRUBSALL. Q. You are a constable - A. Yes, I live in Hackney road; I was standing at the door, I saw Mr. Smith have hold of the prisoner; the prisoner had a bag, it was tied at the mouth of it; he dropped it at the door; I took the prisoner from Mr. Smith; a woman brought the bag to me; I opened the bag and took a quart pot out. I delivered the prisoner and the two pots to Vickery the officer at Worship street.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will consider my age, I am four score and two, I am a poor old man and as lame as a cricket; I was in liquor; he knows it fast enough; there was one gentleman, a butcher, gave me three half quarterns of gin.

SHRUBSALL. He was sober, he did not want to own the bag; he begged me not to say any thing about the bag; the other pot he said he was going to fetch some water in.

GUILTY , aged 82.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-14

378. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Robert Stovell , on the 29th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 4 l. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

ROBERT STOVELL. - Mr. Adolphus. You are a sawyer living at Richmond. - A. Yes.

Q. Last Saturday you had been to Isleworth - A. Yes.

Q. You went to the King's Arms public house in that parish - A. Yes, I was in company with the man that I worked with; after I had been there some time I saw the prisoner; I went away at the same time with him. Nothing happened till we came to the Rails End, then he went his way and I went my way; in less than a quarter of an hour I heard a voice crying halloo! I answered; when I came a little further, he said come here; when I came up to him he was sitting down and his hat was over his eyes; I asked him what he wanted I lifted the hat over his eyes to see who he was; it fell down by his side.

Q. Did you put it down by his side or did it fall down. - A. I put it down by the side of him; he got up with vengeance to strike me; I was afraid, and started, and just below the boat house he knocked me down; that is fifty yards from the place; there he used me very ill and knocked me down; and robbed me of my watch; I got up and followed him to get my watch; he knocked me down again; I got up again, ran after him thinking to get my watch; down he knocked me again; he started and came to the Campsot, then he knocked me down again.

Q. How many times did he knock you down. - A. I cannot say. it was a great many times.

Q. When was this. - A. Last Saturday night.

Q. Are those marks on your face from the blows that he gave you. - A. Yes; he knocked me down. I laid hold of the pallisades or else he would have thrown me into the Thames.

Q. Was this after he had taken your watch. - A. Yes. I followed him and when he came to the meadows he knocked me down; I begged for mercy, I said do not kill me. I halloaed out murder for assistance; he fixed me down, he clapped his hands on the back of my neck and pushed me down, and he put his knee into my loins: it was enough to squeeze me all to pieces. Just after that a gentlemen coming from Richmond to Iseworth came to my assistance; the prisoner made off; we attempted to pursue him but he got away from us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. What time was it you went to the public house. - A. Just before eight o'clock; I stopped till after eleven.

Q. How much did you drink in the course of that time. - A. I cannot tell you exactly. There were three of us in company.

Q. Had you not half a dozen pots of beer. - A. No; it might be four.

Q. Who paid for all the beer. - A. We paid between us.

Q. Was not you obliged to pay for a pot against your inclination. - A. No, I was not against my inclination.

Q. Did not the landlord compel you to pay for a pot of beer when the reckoning was settled.

Court. Why do not you answer the question. - A. A pot of beer was brought and I paid for it.

Mr. Walford. It comes to that at last that you was obliged

to pay for it. - A. I did pay for it.

Q. You followed the prisoner to Rails End. - A. That was my way home.

Q. When you came to Rails End, did you not say he had used you very ill in making you pay for a pot of beer. - A. No.

Q.Did not you take his hat and tear it about and strike him - A. No.

Q. You swear that. - A. Yes.

Q.Have you never heard of any such a thing as a reward for a person convicted of a highway robbery - A. I have heard it.

Q. How much do you expect to get, answer the question - How much do you expect to get if you convict the prisoner. - A. Forty pound.

Q. When he kneeled upon you why did not you resist, you are as strong a man as him. - A. He is a great deal stronger than I.

SEDDON BAMFORD. - Mr. Adolphus. At twelve o'clock at night were you coming from Richmond to Isleworth. - A. As near as I can recollect I was in a meadow going from the bridge towards the Rails End Ferry; about the middle of the meadow, as near as I can recollect, I heard some desperate blows and cry of murder.

Court. What time of night was it. - A.It might be twelve o'clock. I ran towards the place, in my way there stood a tree; I retired behind that tree for a few seconds to see whether there was a number of them or not; I could see nobody standing up, I saw something down in the meadow, it appeared dark and looked about this high (witness describing); then I saw a man get up and stand straight up, whether it was my voice that occasioned his getting up I cannot say; then he stooped and ran stooping away; I ran and halloed murder; as I ran I saw the prosecutor getting up and he ran the same way that the man run: I lost sight of the person that was running away; I could not possibly swear to the person of the prisoner. I ran towards a farm yard in search of the person of the prisoner; I could not find him; I returned back to see if I could find him any where in the meadow; the prosecutor came up to me.

Mr. Adolphus. What state did he appear to be in. - A. He was in a very bad state, he could hardly walk; I ordered him to take hold of my arm and support himself; I advised him to go back with me to Isleworth. When we came to a light in the town I saw a great deal of blood about him and his eye knocked up.

Court. The man that you had seen run away you do not know whether it was the prisoner or not. - A. I do not.

MICHAEL KEYS . - Mr. Adolphus. You are the constable of Iseworth. - A. Yes; I was sent for on Sunday morning to go to the Rails End; when I came there I saw Stovell, he told me he had been robbed of his watch last night and had been very much abused; he had the appearance of that; I asked him who did it; he pointed to the house where the prisoner lived; I went to the prisoner's house; his wife denied my searching the house; after being there about two hours, I found him in the middle room where two poor people lodged; he was hid; the bed clothes were put close up at one end of the room; I asked the woman what was there; she said, only the bed and the clothes. Another constable present, he put the clothes down and saw the prisoner's feet; I called a soldier, who assisted us; we secured the prisoner; I told the other men to hold him while I looked to see if I could find any bloody clothes or the watch; I found nothing in that room; I searched the garret, between the bed and the sacking, I found this shirt. I perceived there was blood upon it.

Q. You never found the watch. - A. No.

Q. Did you tell the prisoner what was the cause of your apprehending him. - A. I told him that the man had been robbed last night, I wanted to find the watch; he at first said he had neither beat the man nor got the watch. I found half a dead sheep; as fine mutton as ever was in a putrid state.

JOHN SLOCOMB . - Mr. Adolphus. What are you. - A. I am a constable. I came in the room and had the prisoner in custody while Keys made the search. The prisoner owned to me that he had beaten the prosecutor; he denied knowing any thing of the watch. No watch was found.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, there were me and my two comrades that were working together; we went into the King's Arms at Isleworth, to pay for beer that we had in the week; after we had been drinking there about an hour, in came the prosecutor and forced himself into our company; we had three pots of beer during the time he was in our company; as we were all going out of doors, my partner said here is four of us to drink three pots of beer, I think this man has a right to be a pot as he has been drinking part of ours; he said he would not, he had no money the landlord came up and said to him you owe me some money for tea and beer you had in the morning; the prosecutor said he would not pay him; I said he has been drinking our beer, we want him to be a pot and he will not; the landlord locked the door and kept us all in till such time the man had paid for what he had in the morning; then my prosecutor said is the pot of beer to come in; I said, yes; he said send it in, I will pay for it; the pot of beer was brought in and all four of us drank it up; then the door was opened and all of us went out; I wished one of my neighbour's good night, he went away home; my wife, and myself, and the other mate that was at work with me, we went down the street together. In the middle of the street I wished him good night. The prosecutor still kept following us, saying that we were a parcel of good for nothing rascals to impose upon him to make him pay for a pot of beer; I said my friend the pot of beer is settled for, drop it; there is no further to say about it; I said my friend the best place for you is on board a man of war; he came up and gave me a thump on my head and knocked me down in the road, I got up, pulled off my jacket and he and I fell a boxing; we were all in liquor. With the blood that came from my nose and from his head, that is the reason of my shirt being in the condition it is in; the prosecutor said he had enough; I picked up my jacket, my wife and I came home; coming along the road he followed us very sharp, and at the corner of a public house I bid him good night; I said good night my friend, he made no answer; I said to my wife go in doors, I must do my occasions; I set down by the corner of the wall, to do my business; in the mean time I heard somebody on the other side of the bridge halloo out halloa; I answered him; the prosecutor came back and says halloo; he came up to me and lifted up my hat; he put it down;

he took the hat afterwards and ran away with it; I says to him as he was going over the bridge, my friend you have got my hat; he said he had not; as soon as I had buttoned up my small clothes, I pursued him; he dropped the hat, I picked it up and returned home.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you been drinking any liquor with the prisoner - A. Yes; I drank some of his and he drank some of mine.

Q. Where had you been that day. - A. I had been up to Mr. Munn's.

Q. Did you receive your wages - A. Yes, I received eleven shillings and tenpence; I put it in my pocket.

Q. Had you your money in your pocket when he took your watch away - A. Yes.

Q. Did he take any of your money away - A. No.

Q. Did you ever find your watch - A. No.

Q. Did you ever advertize it - A. No.

ROBERT ARNETT . - Mr. Walford. Were you in a street at Isleworth near twelve o'clock last Saturday night - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I met the prosecutor with a hat upon his head and a hat in his hand, I never spoke to him; I met the prisoner upon the bridge without his hat, he was buttoning his breeches up; I spoke to him, I said my friend where are you going this dead hour of the night without a hat; he said that man had taken his hat off his head, as he was sitting in the corner easing himself; the prosecutor dropped the hat, and the prisoner went and picked it up; I persuaded the prisoner to go home and go to bed, as it was a drunken affair among themselves.

Court. You know them both - A. Yes, by sight; the prosecutor is a sawyer, and the prisoner is a gardener ; one lives at Richmond and the other at Isleworth.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-15

379. JAMES CARPENTER , and MARY CARPENTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , twelve pair of silk stockings, value 6 l. the property of James Paul Hummell , in his dwelling house .

JAMES LOCKWOOD . I live with James Paul Hummell , King street, St. Paul, Covent Garden . On the 13th of February the two prisoners came into our shop, and enquired for an article which we had not got, according to the pattern that she had in her hands. I told her we could make the article if they would wait for them; they said it was for a gentleman, they would go and enquire, and perhaps return; the woman said she would buy a pair of half stockings, some people call them socks; I shewed her some and she bought a pair and paid for them; she gave me half a crown, I had to return her sixpence; we have two tills, I had to run from one counter to the other; I fetched sixpence and gave to her; prior to that I had sold twelve pair of stockings to a gentleman; I was putting them up intending to send them home, when the prisoners came into the house. I rolled them round with the paper they were then in, with intent to serve the prisoners; I pushed them near to the end of the counter, there were more goods on the counter; these silk stockings laid next to the prisoner; when I had given them the change, and they had gone out of the shop, I missed the dozen of silk stockings from the counter, that I had rolled round with the paper; I ran out of the house to look after the prisoners, I did not see any more of them till the 14th of April; I caused them to be apprehended in Covent Garden.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. You never saw the prisoner in the house before - A. No. They were in the shop about ten minutes, talking about the hose and looking them out.

Q. Two months had elapsed before you saw them - A. Yes.

Q. A number of people come in the shop - what made you recognize them - A.He had a light great coat on, and a hand basket in his hand; he had that coat on when he was taken, and the hand basket.

Court. That hand basket was convenient to put any thing in - A. Yes.

Q. These twelve pair of silk stockings were sold - A. Yes, to Mr. Scott, but they were not delivered; we were obliged to buy another dozen to deliver to him.

MR. ROWLAND. I am a friend of Mr. Hummel's.

Q. Were you in his shop to assist on the 13th of February - A. I was out when the prisoners came in the shop; I found them in the shop when I returned, as I walked through the shop I saw the man take a parcel off the counter; I am positive to the man; he put it into the hand basket he had in his hand; the woman had a parcel in her hand, which she put in her muff when they went away; the first witness said, I will see if the hose are all right; after the prisoners were gone he missed twelve pair of silk stockings.

JAMES LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 14th of April, I apprehended the man prisoner in Russel-street, Covent Garden; he had this basket in his hand.

JOSEPH TOWNSHEND . I was with Limbrick; I apprehended the woman; I only found on her person a bit of silk.

Q. to Lockwood. Have you ever been able to trace the property - A. No; the stockings cost me seven pounds ten shillings.

James Carpenter 's Defence. I am innocent.

Mary Carpenter 's Defence. I never was in the shop to the best of my knowledge, nor do I know where the shop is.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-16

380. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , seven tablecloths, value 20 s. the property of John Gudeon .

ANN CATHERINE HAYES . I live servant to Mr. Gudeon, 119, Wardour street . On the 19th of May at half past six o'clock in the evening, I was going up to the three pair of stairs room, I perceived my mistresses door open.

Q. Had you seen it shut before that - A. About a quarter of an hour before that I locked it myself; I left in the room a quantity of things, among which was some tablecloths in a basket; finding the door partly open, I went up to the door, I said who is there, I pushed the door open, I perceived the prisoner just behind the door, apparently putting things into a sack, down by the side of him, which was the tablecloths out of the basket he was putting in the sack.

Q. Was your street door open - A. Yes; it is a French eating house; when I pushed the door open, I said what do you want here; he made answer, and said

he is a coming; I said who is coming; he took me by the shoulders with one hand and apparently wishing to put me in the room that he might get out.

Q. What did he do with the sack - A. He dropped it down by the side of him, the sack did not belong to my mistress. I did not go in the room, I kept on the landing place where I was. I collared him with both my hands tight; I said you are a rogue and a thief; instantly he gave me two hard blows on my head, he gave me another blow on my head and another in my face, all with his fist, he gave me a black eye when he gave me the last blow in my face; I let go of him because it hurt me very much; I called out for assistance as loud as I could; when I let go of him he ran down stairs as fast as he could run, and I after him; he got half way out of the passage, my master came out of the kitchen and caught him, and with the assistance of the gentleman in the parlour he was secured; after the officer came I went up with them and looked at the sack; there were seven tablecloths put in the sack. The officer took the sack and the tablecloths.

Q. You are sure the tablecloths were in the basket when you locked the door - A Yes, ten tablecloths; the next day my mistress picked up three pick lock keys on the stairs.

JOHN GUDEON . Q. You keep the eating house in Wardour street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 26th of May last, that your maid called out for assistance - A. Yes, I came out of the kitchen, and with the assistance of some gentleman in the house I secured the prisoner.

Prisoner. I never struck the witness at all; I was rather groggy.

Q.(to Hayes.) Did this man appear to be in liquor - A. He was thoroughly sober.

JAMES BUDGELL . I was sent for, I went into the parlour where the prisoner was setting; I handcuffed him, and then I took him up stairs with me; I examined the bag, the mouth of it was open; this is the bag, there were seven tablecloths in it. I took the bag and the tablecloths, I have had them in my custody ever since. Here is a key that was found on the stairs, it opened the door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up the street to enquire for a brother in law of mine; the street door was open, I went up one pair of stairs; I knocked at the door, I saw the door of a jarr, nobody answered. I went in and came out again; this young woman asked me what I wanted, I told her I had made a mistake. I was wrong in the house. I might shove by her, the young woman seemed to be falling of one side; I was going down stairs when I found I was in the wrong house.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-17

381. MARGARET RAINEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Edward Stephens on the 9th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will two seven shilling pieces, and a bank note, value 1 l. his property.

EDWARD STEPHENS . I am a journeyman coach-maker , I live at No. 2, Capel court, Long-acre.

Q. Are you a married man - A. Yes; on the 9th of April, about eleven o'clock at night the prisoner met me in Parker's lane , she asked me if I would give her something to drink, I told her I would give her nothing to drink; she pressed me very much to go to her apartment which was the next door; after some time I went.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was perfectly sober.

Q. How came you, a married man and perfectly sober, to go to her apartment - A. I cannot give any account for it. After I was in her apartment some time I found her hand in my pocket; I found that she had taken a one pound bank note, and two seven shilling pieces; when she took her hand out I told her that she had robbed me of my money.

Q. That I suppose was no more than you expected - A. Yes, people do not expect to be robbed. I told her that she had robbed me of a one pound note and two seven shilling pieces, I saw her stoop down and put something into her stocking; I asked her to take her stocking off to see whether she had the quantity of money there that I had lost; she pulled the stocking down and one seven shilling piece fell out she put her foot upon it; I got it away; I asked her for the remainder, she immediately took up a poker and knocked me down. I got up and took the poker away from her; then she took a knife out of her pocket. she swore she would stick me if I offered to say another word. I got the knife away from her after some time, then she called three or four men's names and put the candle out, and by the assistance of these men I suppose she was got out through a trap door into the street; it was sometime before I could find my way out; the room was down stairs; they shut the door below. I was obliged to go up stairs and go out that way; when I got out in the street I saw the prisoner standing with some men; I saw the patrol, I gave her in charge.

Q. You did not see any man in her room did you - A. No. She was taken to the watchhouse, nothing was found upon her.

Q. What did you loose after all - A. One pound note and two seven shilling pieces.

Q. I perceive according to your own account, you were strong enough to resist her upon different occasions that you have mentioned, I want to know how you came to let her take the money away - A. I could not prevent it.

Q. You were strong enough to take the knife away, then why could not you take the money from her; you have indicted her for her life, by taking violently and forcibly from you. I want to know why you did not prevent her from taking it. - A. I could not.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a patrol. In going my round I heard a great noise in Parker street, Drury lane; when I came there, there were from fifty to a hundred people; I saw the prisoner in the crowd; the prosecutor came out of the house he had been confined in, he gave charge of the prisoner for assaulting and robbing of him, his face was scratched and tore as if with nails and all over blood; the blow of the poker was under his hat. I took the woman to the watchhouse, she was searched, I found nothing on her but to the amount of sixpence. The prosecutor had a seven shilling piece that he said he took from the woman after she robbed him, and he had the open knife that he took from the woman.

Q. Was he sober - A. He was sober; he told the constable where he lived, and that he had a wife and family.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my lord about eleven

o'clock at night I went for a kettle of water at Queen-street pump, this man asked me to go to a public house; he said I should have something to drink; I said, no; he followed me home, he asked me to go for something to drink; he said he had four children and a wife, he gave me a shilling, I went for a quartern of gin, and I went down stairs; he said, I am robbed; he opened his breeches and there fell out a seven shilling piece; I said I have a right to half of that; he took me by the neck and said he would kill me; he half choaked me; he was half intoxicated. I am innocent of the charge.

Q. to prosecutor. When you saw this woman first, had she her kettle or any thing with water in her hand - A. No, nothing at all.

Q. How many children have you. - A. Four; I never told her; I have five now; I had four then.

Baxter. She might have heard the constable examine him; he examined him as strict as he did her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-18

382. THOMAS ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , seven pair of women's shoes, value 30 s. the property of Henry Boulton Wheatley .

HENRY BOULTON WHEATLEY . I live at No. 31, Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital ; I keep a general sale shop . On the 11th of May, in the afternoon, I had occasion to go to Tottenham court road; on my return from it, from information, I found seven pair of shoes was gone; I pursued and took the prisoner.

ROBERT COLTON. Q. Do you live with Mr. Wheatley. - A. Yes. On the 14th of May, about half past five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take seven pair of shoes, which were hanged at the door of my master's shop for sale; I was in the shop behind the counter.

Q. Did the prisoner see you. - A. No. He unhooked the shoes, I ran after him; I never lost sight of him; as soon as I called out stop thief he dropped the shoes from behind his coat at the corner of Berner's street; I did not stop to pick up the shoes; I kept running after the prisoner till I saw my master coming up Charles-street. The prisoner ran till he dropped the shoes, and then he walked till he got into Wardour-street.

Q. Your master was coming up Wardour-street, was not he. - A. Yes; my master saw me close behind the prisoner. He caught hold of him.

Q. You are perfectly sure you saw him drop the shoes. - A. I am.

Q. Who picked them up. - A. I cannot say. These are the shoes; they were hanging up by the string; the prisoner threatened me that if I did not leave him, he would fall upon me and kill me. There were two of them; the prisoner took the shoes, the other was looking at some things; I followed the prisoner.

Mr. Wheatley. In consequence of information I received when I went home I pursued the track I was informed they went; I turned down Holland-street, and met the prisoner coming out of Wardour-street into Holland-street and the boy close behind him. I took him by the collar and he was taken to the watchhouse. The shoes were brought back to my shop; I believe my wife picked them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I had just come from Mr. Steward the cooper in Phoenix street; I come across Soho square, and coming up Wardour-street I met that gentleman, he collared me and took me to Marlborough street.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-19

383. JOHN KENTON , alias BROOKS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , three toy watches, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Swaine .

JOSEPH SWAINE . I live in the City Road , I keep a jeweller's shop . On the 7th of April, about half past one o'clock in the afternoon, John Kenton, alias Brooks, he is well known by different names, I saw him break my window with a knife, at the same time I saw him draw the three toy watches out of the hole that he had made; the hole was not large enough for him to put his hand in; I went out and took him, I took him to Worship-street office.

Q. Did you find the watches upon him. - A. No, I did not; there were two more in company with him.

Q. You are sure you saw this. - A. I am sure I saw this.

Q. Had you seen the watches there soon before this. - A. I had put them there a few hours before that; I have never seen them since.

Q. You had not seen him lurking about before this happened had you. - A. No; when I took him he said he had not been near the window; he attempted to get away from me, but I held him so close I prevented him.

Q.What was the value of your toy watches. - A. Seven shillings each.

Prisoner's Defence. He took me into the house, searched me, and found nothing upon me.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-20

384. ANN MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , a ham, value 12 s. the property of Isaac Whitnall .

ISAAC WHITNALL . I live at No. 6, Fenall-street, St. Luke's ; I keep a cheesemonger's shop, and deal in hams . On the 4th of May, about half past six in the evening, I was behind the counter, the witness informed me that the prisoner had just taken a ham out of the window; the window was a little open; he pointed to the woman; I immediately pursued her and overtook her; I pulled her cloak of one side and found this ham; this ham is mine, I can swear to it.

SAMUEL DEER . I live opposite of the prosecutor. On the 4th of May, about half past six in the evening, I saw the prisoner stand close to the prosecutor's window.

Q. Did you see any other woman with her. - A. No, nor nigh her then. The window was partly open. I saw the prisoner take the ham, put it under her left arm, and cover it with her cloak; I immediately ran over and told him that a woman had taken one of his hams; I pointed out the very woman to him; I stopped at the door and never lost sight of her; the prosecutor overtook her, I saw him lift up her cloak and take the ham from he. She said if she had not been in liquor

she would not have done it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street, a woman gave me the ham while she tied up her stocking, and directly she gave it me that gentleman and another came up and took me; the woman ran away.

Prosecutor. I saw no other woman.

GUILTY , aged 30

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-21

385. FRANCES MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of April , a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. and a brass skillet, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Winch .

ROSE ANN WINCH . My husband's name is Thomas Winch; we live at No. 11, City Garden Row . On the 12th of April last, I was going out of the parlour into the passage; I saw the prisoner open the street door, I went up to her and said; who are you, have you been up to Mr. Cooper; she said, yes, Mr. Cooper is a lodger of mine; I thought she was wrong, I called at the bottom of the stairs to know if he was at home; and found him not at home; I ran three doors off to where he was; I understood from him he did not know her; we pursued her; I lost sight of her while she turned the corner; she was taken at the City Arms, she was sitting drinking beer; when I went to her I saw her with a bundle in her apron; when I let her out of the house and when I saw her at the City Arms she had this same bundle in her apron; I asked her what business had she in my passage; I told her she was the person that was in my passage; she said she had no business there, she had done wrong and she would have given me the things again. We sent for an officer; he searched her, she had a skillet, a pair of shoes, and a candlestick, I knew them to be mine; I had seen the skillet and the candlestick about an hour before.

ROBERT COOPER . I lodge with Mr. Winch. On the 12th of April Mrs. Winch came to me at the house where I was pointing out a woman then going up the row; we both pursued the prisoner; I lost sight of her as she turned the corner; I saw her afterwards; she had a brass skillet, a candlestick, and a pair of shoes in her apron she owned; that she had taken the property; she said she was very sorry for it, and hoped they would forgive her.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along where that lady lives; I met with a woman that I had known a short time, she gave them to me; I happened to go into that lady's passage, I did not know what they were; that is my brother's apron that the things are in.

Q. to prosecutrix. Was there any other woman in your house - A. No, nor yet in company with her.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-22

386. SARAH NIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , a bank note, value 40 l. four other bank notes, value 4 l. and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of Henry Garner .

HENRY GARNER . I live at No. 7, Queen street, Glocester place, Marylebone.

Q. Sometime in April last, you were in possession of some bank notes was not you - A. Yes; I received them on the 18th of April; a forty pounds bank note, a two pound note, and four ones; I put it into a leather purse. I put the purse, I suppose, into my breeches pocket.

Q. What do you mean by you suppose you did - cannot you recollect it - A. I am almost sure I put it into my breeches pocket

Q. What situation of life are you in - A. I am a groom ; I was groom to Mr. John Barry , I live with Mr. Henry Myers now.

Q. How came you to be possessed of this sum of money - A. It was left me by my aunt, between me and my brother; my brother lives at East Ham in Essex.

Q. Were you at that time in the service of Mr. Barry - A. No, I had just left Mr. Barry then; I was at my own lodgings.

Q. Did you sleep on the night of the 18th at your own lodgings - A. Yes; I came home about nine o'clock and went to bed about ten.

Q. When you went to bed, I suppose you left your breeches by the bedside, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. How many people lodged in the house besides yourself - A. Six or seven; I slept with my father only.

Q. When was the first time that you missed these notes - A. I missed the whole on the 19th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I put my hand in my pocket for some silver, I missed my purse.

Q. Had you been any where that day, that you might have supposed your pocket might be picked - A. No; I had been in no company at all that day.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No, no more than a person let me know after I advertised it, that she had got it; I never saw her before.

Q. What day was it you advertised it - A. I put the advertisement in the next day, it came out on the 21st; then I got information from Sedgely where the money was.

Q. Had you no drawers in your father's room that you might have put it in - A. Yes; but I meaned to go with it to my brother on the Sunday following.

Q. You lost it on the 19th, between four and five o'clock - A. Yes; between Green street and my lodgings. I missed it when I got to Green street, Grovesnor square; I knew I had it ten minutes before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. How you lost it you cannot say, probably it dropped out of your pocket - A. Probably it did.

THOMAS SEDGELY . I am a shoemaker, I live in Downe street, Piccadilly.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, many years; she is a chair woman. On the 19th of April, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came to me and her sister along with her, she told me she had a good find; she said if I would let her sit down she would shew me; she pulled out a black leather purse and desired me to look at what was in the inside; she said she had changed a one pound note; I looked in the purse. I found three one pound notes, a two pound, and a forty pound bank note; she said she found it in Oxford street; I told her it was a good find, it was of consequence, as it was such a sum of money there was do doubt it would be advertised; they agreed to leave it my hands; they

did leave it in my hands I told them after they left it in my hands that if there was an advertisement for it, I would wish them to give it up; I said I dare say there would be a ten pound reward for it, and that would do her more good than if she had kept the whole; I told her I would look after the newspapers, and when it was so I would go with her and see that she had the bounty; the next morning as soon as I came to my business her sister came up to me at six o'clock, I had not been with her two minutes before I saw the prisoner and another person with her, that I did not approve of; they both came to me, and the prisoner asked me for her property; I told her that as she made a demand of it I should give it her; I was very sorry she had altered her disposition, I would have no more to do with it; I fetched the money from my home; they came to me at my stall, there I left them. On my return I met Saunders and his wife; Saunders asked me to let him look at the notes; I had a better opinion of him than them drunken brutes; I delivered to Saunders the leather purse, containing the three one pound notes, one two, and a forty pound note; this was Wednesday morning I delivered it up; on the Thursday it was advertised; I led such an abuseful life by the woman after I delivered it up, that I could not do my business; then I went and found the young man that belonged to it; from thence I went to Marlborough street and related the matter to a magistrate.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. You told us you knew the prisoner - I believe you know the prisoner can neither read nor write - A. I believe she is a stranger to both.

Q. Did you tell her in distinct terms, what the notes were - A. I did.

Q. Did you give her a pound - A. No; she told me she had changed one of the one pound notes.

ROBERT SAUNDERS . Q. You are brother in law to the prisoner, are you not - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember meeting Sedgely - A. I met him on Wednesday morning close to his stall; he gave me the purse, which he said he received from my sister in law; I never took the purse out of his hand, nor opened it, till I saw my sister in law; she asked me for it, and I gave it her.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. Can you read and write - A. Yes, both.

Q. Then when this purse came into your hands how came you not to open it - you did not suppose there was any value in it, did you - A. I did not; he did not tell me the value.

Court to Sedgely. Did you tell Saunders what value was in the purse - A. I did, I am positive of it.

Q. You say it was advertised the next day, which was Thursday - did you give any information to the prisoner that it was advertised - A. I did; her brother in law was with me at the time that I saw the advertisement; it was in the mouths of every body almost; I told Nixon the same day; I told her the same day, upon her saying that she had not got the money, that if she did not content herself about it, I would go and settle the business at once; when I found she was not satisfied, I went and let the prosecutor know.

Q. Then if it had not been for that you would not have discovered it - A. Yes, I would, because it was advertised in a pitiful manner, that it was lost front a poor man, if he did not get it, it would be his total ruin.

Q. to prosecutor. You tell me your money was safe at between four or five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon - you went from Glocester place where you lodge to Green street, Glovesnor square; in going to Green street did you go near Oxford road - A. Yes, I went across Oxford street.

Q.You do not recollect meeting any crowd of people - A. No, nor any person coming near me.

Q. Did you find you had lost it at Green street, or when you returned to Glocester place - A. I found I had lost it just after I came out of Green street.

JAMES KENNEDY. I went from Marlborough street to apprehend the prisoner, on the 22nd of April, about ten o'clock in the morning; the prisoner was rather worse for liquor; I searched her pockets, I found nothing but a few halfpence, I asked her what she had done with the young man's forty odd pounds; she said she had spent it; I asked her which way she could spend so much money in so few days; she said she paid ten pounds to an undertaker for burying her husband; I asked her where the undertaker lived; she could not tell.

Q. You found none of the money on her - A. No; the purse was never recovered.

WILLIAM ROGERS . Q. You have heard what Kennedy has said - A. Yes; it is perfectly correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I came along Oxford road, I picked up this money at the corner of James street, on Easter Tuesday afternoon, I believe it was between three and four o'clock; I opened the purse, what the papers was I could not tell, I could not read; I went to Thomas Sedgely, I asked him to look in it; he told me to go to the public house, he would come after me; he came, he set himself down, he took out the notes, and put the pocket book of one side; I asked him whether I should be in danger if I changed a one pound note; we had a pot of ale; I told him to keep it till the next morning; I went to him the next morning and asked him if he had got the notes, or had heard any enquiry about it; he said no; he delivered it to Robert Saunders ; when I delivered the notes to Sedgely, he never told me what the notes were; Saunders gave me the notes and the purse, I put them in my bosom; I got rather a little in liquor, I fell asleep, and whether they were taken from me, or I lost them, I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-23

387. THOMAS TOMLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May , a bank note, value 2 l. the property of Rachael Huberton .

RACHAEL HUBERTON . On Friday the 13th of May I went to Somerset house, from the prisoner's house; I boarded with him.

Q. Where does he live - A At No. 75, Wheeler street, Spitalfields ; I received at Somerset house nine pounds seventeen shillings and sixpence, on my husband's account; he was lost in his Majesty's ship the Blenheim, about a twelvemonth ago last February; I went to receive his wages; I received a five pound note a two pound note, and two ones, half a guinea and a seven shilling piece; I believe I had boarded with the prisoner about fourteen or fifteen weeks, I paid him a five pound note.

Q. How much did you owe him - A. I believe that

was all, to the best of my knowledge; the next morning a young woman came and asked me to take a walk with her; I left a two pound note and a prize ticket in the prisoner's drawer, in his room where he slept; that was about ten o'clock in the morning; I went out with this young woman, and when I came home again I went to the drawer to look for my two pound note, it was gone; the prisoner was then setting in an arm chair; I said Mr. Tomling have you got my two pound note; he gave me a great many abusive names, and got up and knocked me down, and then his wife got up and knocked me down, tore my cap, and my handkerchief; then I went to Worship street, there was no magistrate sitting; I came home to the prisoners place, the door was padlocked: I went to the White Horse facing the prisoner's house; the prisoner was sitting there with a pint of beer and a pipe; I said Mr. Tomling have you got my two pound note; he told he had not, d - d me several times; Mr. Bridges the headborough came, he told him if he had got the young woman's note to give it her; he said he had got no two pound note nor the worth of a two pound note; the officer took him to the watchhouse, searched him; in his left hand breeches pocket he found the two pound note.

Q. When you saw the note again did you know it to be your note - A. All that I know it by, is it being a new note; I cannot swear to the number.

JOHN BRIDGES . Q. You are an officer - A. Yes. On the 14th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for to the White Horse in Wheeler street; when I came there the prosecutrix gave me charge of the prisoner; in his presence she told me she had lost a two pound note; he said no such a thing; I told him if he had got the note, he had better give it to the prosecutrix; he said he had got no notes; I took him to the watchhouse; after having him there a little while, I searched him; in his left hand pocket I found this two pound note; he was very tipsey when I took him to the watchhouse.

Prosecutrix. I know this is the note that I took at Somerset house by the marks here; there is a wrinkle in the paper.

Prisoner's Defence. When she went to the navy office to receive the money, my wife went along with her; she received nine pounds odd, she gave her the notes to bring home; when they got home and had a mouthful of victuals, then she wanted to know what she was in my debt; fourteen weeks I supported her, besides money that I had laid out for her at different times, that made the whole six pounds thirteen shillings and seven pence halfpenny; she said she could spare me no more than five pounds; I told her I did not desire no more at. that time, because she would want some money to buy a few clothes to make herself decent to get herself into service; she has informed your lordship that she paid me a five pound note; she had no five pound note amongst them; she was paid in three two pound notes, and three ones, she paid me two two pound notes, and a one pound note I went over the way to pay a score at the public house, I paid the landlord a two pound note and a one pound note; and the other two pound note was to take some things out of pawn, that I had pledged to support her before she went away; she had been drinking gin; then she went to her landlady where she lodged to pay her; she paid that woman a two pound note, she I believe paid it in a mistake for a one pound note, and after she recollected herself, she went and got it changed; she kept drinking that night, went to Well street playhouse, came home with a soldier; she went out and got more gin; the next morning she came again at six o'clock, then she was so drunk that she began to cascade over the bed. A young woman of the same fraternity as herself called upon her, they set off together, and went drinking at the public house; she came to me about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was over the way at the public house having a pint of beer; she said Mr. Tomling I want my note; I said what note, I never saw the note; she said I will have it, if you have not got it Mrs. Tomling has; I said I cannot tell what she knows, I thought the woman was joking; the officer was dubious of taking the charge, he thought it was all fun that was going forward.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-24

388. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Christopher Waring , he and Elizabeth his wife being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 26th of May , and feloniously stealing therein a shirt, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. an ink stand, value 1 s. and a carpet, value 15 s. the property of Christopher Waring .

CHRISTOPHER WARING . Q. Where do you live A. I live at Hampstead ; I keep a house there.

Q. Are you a labouring man - A. No, I cannot labour, I have lost the use of my left arm; I let out lodgings. On the 26th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the house. I heard some small noise, and I went to the door.

Q. Was your wife in the house at the time - A. Yes; about thirty yards from the door, I saw a man putting his shoes on.

Q. Look at the prisoner, did you see him. - A. Yes; I saw him putting his shoes on, he was sitting; after he had put his shoes on, he had got a basket, he put a green apron over it and tucked it all round to cover it; he pulled up his small clothes, and took this basket and walked away; I returned into the house, and shut the door. I turned my head and missed the carpet out of the little hall; I called to my wife to ask her about the carpet; she told me she knew nothing of it; I pursued the prisoner and took him.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before - A. I had seen him before; I hit the prisoner on the side of his head, and then I took hold of his collar and brought him back to my house with the property with him.

Q. Did he carry the basket or you - A. He carried it himself; I took him to the beadle and delivered him and the basket and all.

Q. You examined the basket did not you - A. Yes; the basket contained a carpet, shirt, stocking, one pair mine and two pair my wife's, and a tin ink stand; I knew them to be my property; there were some rags also.

Q. You told me you heard a small noise - A. Yes.

Q. Where was you - A. I was in an adjoining room to where he took the things.

Q. I suppose the passage into the adjoining room is by the hall - A. Yes; the street door leads into the hall.

Q. How long before you heard the noise had you been in the hall - A. A few minutes before.

Q. Was the carpet then in the hall - A. Yes, in a chair rolled up; the other things were in the kitchen.

Q.I suppose you go from the hall into the kitchen - A.Yes. the kitchen door is always open.

Q. What room was your wife in - A. She was up stairs in the garret, in bed.

Q. When you was in the hall was the street door open or shut - A. Shut, I am pretty certain of that.

Q. Being the street door, you generally keep it shut A. Always, except any person is in the hall or is coming in.

Q. Are you pretty sure that no person had come in the hall sometime before you heard a noise - A. I am sure of that.

Q. How does your street door fasten - A. With a spring lock.

Q. How does it open on the outside - A. With a key; when we come in we shut it too, it locks, and when we want to come in we open it with a key.

Q. A stranger then who had not the key must open it by force or with a false key - A. Yes; there is no latch at all; he must come in by a false key or by force.

JOHN EDWARDS . Q. You are beadle of Hampstead - A. Yes.

Q. On the 26th of May do you remember the prosecutor delivering the prisoner to your care - A. Yes, and a basket, I have had it in my care ever since; this basket was searched before he went to the watchhouse; Mr. Waring recognized his property; I searched him at the watchhouse, I found a number of pick lock keys in the prisoner's pocket; there is a turnscrew, phosphorus bottle, matches and every thing for house breaking; I found all these things in his pocket.

Prosecutor. There is one key which I verily believe would open it, I did not try it.

Q.Look at that carpet - A. It is my carpet, the shirt is mine, one pair of stocking is marked E W, that is my wife's stockings mine is not marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I humbly beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-25

389. DAVID SWINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , a trunk, value 10 s. 6 d. a pocket book, value 5 s. two pair of gloves, value 5 s. five handkerchiefs, value 10 s. seven caps, value 7 s. seven shirts, value 7 s. three pair of sleeves, value 3 s. two gold pins, value 5 s. and a necklace, value 2 s. the property of Ann Smith , spinster , in the dwelling house of John Lenox .

ANN SMITH . I live at No. 4, Mill-street, Dock Head; I am a single woman. On the 28th of April, my trunk, with the articles mentioned in the indictment, was left at Mr. John Lenox 's house; he is a publican. he keeps the Bell, in Bell Yard, Gracechurch-street ; the trunk was lost out of Mr. Lenox's house.

Q. Was the articles found. - A. Yes.

JOHN LENOX. Q. You keep the Bell public house, Bell Yard, Gracechurch-street. - A. Yes. I received three trunks belonging to this young woman on the 28th of April, they came from Kennington where she was living as servant at that time; I received them by the Clapham errand cart, to go to Mill-street, Dock Head; about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the same day, the prisoner came into my house; he passed me, he turned back and asked me for change of a two pound note; I could not give him change, so I answered him instantly; I saw no note, he said very well, I will have a glass of ale, I have money enough to pay for that; he paid me for the glass of ale, he walked into the back room with the glass of ale; the back room was facing of the tap room; at the same time there were eight or nine coachmen in the taproom; I did not see him go out; my servant gave me information that a man was gone out of the house with a trunk under his arm; two of us set out after him; there are two passages in the George and Vulture tavern, we missed him; I went home again; I found that the other man had not found him; I set off after him again, I met him in Wathing-street with the trunk under his arm, he was going towards St. Paul's and I was going home; I had given it up; I asked him what business he had with that trunk; he said that he had brought it from St. Margaret's hill, that it came from Margate, that I must be mistaken; I desired him to give me the trunk and go back with me, and I would let him know where it came from; he said he would go back with me any where; he gave me the trunk; in taking hold of the trunk I found it open; he walked very quietly with me as far as Walbrook and then he broke out of my hand; he ran up Walbrook, I called out, a gentleman set his shoulder up against him and throwed him on his back; I got hold of him by that means again; I had got the trunk in my hand; after that he struggled and got from us again into a yard where there was no thoroughfare, he was stopped; we got sufficient assistance then and took him to the compter.

Q. Are you sure he is the man that was in your house - A. Yes, I am.

Q. After he made his escape from you was he ever out of your sight - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You received three trunks from the Clapham carrier - A. Yes; I put them in the passage myself.

Q. You had not opened them to see what was in the trunks - A. No.

Q. You could not swear to the trunk - A. It was a nice new trunk with A. S. upon it, the initials of Ann Smith 's name.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a constable belonging to the city. On the 28th of April last Mr. Lenox gave me charge of the prisoner; I searched him, I found upon him a one pound note, one seven shilling piece, and four shillings and sixpence in silver, a small knife and these bits of paper he was tearing up; this is the trunk Mr. Lenox gave me in my care.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, with respect to the charge that is alledged against me, I know nothing of, but with respect to the circumstance; at the time I was charged with stealing these articles, I had been drinking, and when I do so I am in such a state I am incapable of knowing right from wrong on account of a violent confusion in my head; since then if I drink freely I am totally deprived of my intellects; therefore my lord I humbly submit my case to you.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of his good character.]

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-26

390. ISAAC REGUS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ellen Craggs , no person being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 25th of April , and feloniously stealing therein, five gowns, value 1 l. 10 s. three petticoats, value 12 s. two pair of sheets, value 10. a pair of pockets, value 6 d. and a shift, value 2 s. her property

ELLEN CRAGGS . I live in Little Montague court, Little Britain .

Q. Do you keep the house. - A. No; it is Mr. Walton's house.

Q. Who lives in the house. - A. There are three families lodge in the house.

Q. What apartment have you. - A. I have the lower apartment, the parlour.

Q. Where does Mr. Walton live. - A. In the front house; it has no connection with his dwelling house.

Q. Who lives in the one pair. - A. Hannah Reeves .

Q. When did this happen to you. - A. On the 25th of April.

Q. At what time. - A. I went out of my apartment about half after two o'clock.

Q. Who did you leave in your apartment. - A. There was no person in my apartment; I am an alone woman; I left every thing safe, and these things were in my drawers, the drawers were not locked; they were taken out when I came home.

Q. What time did you return. - A. I returned about five o'clock, I went into Mr. Walton's house, then they told me that I had been robbed and that my place was broken open.

Q. You found your place broken open. - A. Yes; the window was broken; he had got in by lifting up the sash; he broke the window all to pieces in getting out; it is a large sash; I found my door safe, the key was in my pocket. In the drawers there were a pair of sheets, five gowns, three petticoats, a shift, a pair of stockings, and a silk handkerchief, they were all taken out.

Q. Were any of these things found afterwards. - A. Yes, on the floor; I can only say it is my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have said Mr. Walton lives in the front house. - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any yard between your house and Mr. Walton's. - A. Yes, it is all separate.

Q. You have said the person that came in your house came in at the window. - A. Yes.

Q.How do you know that. - A. Because he got out of the window. I left the door locked and found it locked; I observed the window; before I went out I bolted one of the bolts of the window shutter before I went out.

Q. You keep no servant. - A. None at all. Going out at that time of the day, I did not imagine any thing of the kind. I am a poor old woman.

Q. Did you take the key with you. - A. I had it in my pocket; I have only one key to my room.

Q. Does any body do any thing to your room by way of cleaning it. - A. I do all myself; I am eighty six years of age.

HANNAH REEVES. Q. You live in the same house, do not you - A. Yes; I was up in the two pair of stairs room with a very old gentleman that was ill, he lives in the two pair of stairs room, I heard a noise at Mrs. Craggs' window, I went down two pair of stairs as quick as I could; nobody answered; I opened the street door, which was locked; I said to him what do you do here, he said, uh! to me; then he got on a table that stands under the window, then he put his arm to the glass and broke the window; I cried a thief, very loud.

Q. Did he break the glass. - A. Yes; then he broke out the wood of the bottom sash and throwed himself out; the moment he got out I collared him and stopped him, and John Davis assisted me that moment he was secured.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About a quarter past three o'clock.

Q. You did not go into the room. - A. No; the thief was kept the there till the constable came, then he was taken to prison; when the constable came back then we entered the room and all these things were in his handkerchief; no one went into the room but the constable; we stood at the window; I stood at the window; I saw all the things on the floor bundled in a handkerchief.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a carpenter; I was at work at Mr. Walton's candle manufactory, fixing of a press; a little after three o'clock I heard a great noize, the lady called a thief; I heard a great breaking; I went out of Mr. Walton's back door; I saw Mrs. Reeves having hold of him by the collar. I assisted and took him directly. William Price came out then and took him of the other side, when the constable came; I put him into the charge of the constable.

WILLIAM PRICE . I live at Mr. Walton's. About a quarter after three, I heard a breaking of glass and the witness Davis crying out a thief; I ran out and took hold of the prisoner till the constable came.

SAMUEL ADCOCK . I am a beadle; there are the parts of the frame that was knocked out; after I took the prisoner to the compter, I came back again, I found this bundle on the floor; these things were tied up in this handkerchief just across, not at both corners.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at these things, are they your property. - A. Yes; they have been my property these fifty years; a lady left me them fifty years ago; they are good things, they are neither dirty nor ragged.

Q. What may be the value of them altogether. - A. I do not know indeed; I did value them once.

Q. Are they worth twenty five shillings. - A. Yes. Mr. Knapp. You have had them by you fifty years. - A. I had them in the year fifty three.

Q. Who told you to value them at twenty five shillings. - A. I do not know; I should think they are worth more.

Q. This man is indicted for stealing goods to the value of five shillings; if they are found to be worth five shillings it would affect his life; do you mean to say that they are worth five shillings. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated with liquor at the time.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-27

391. MARY MARTIN, and MARGARET LYONS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May , seven yards and a half of lace, value 15 s. the property of John James , privately in his shop .

JOHN JAMES . I am an haberdasher , I live on Holborn bridge, in the parish of St. Andrew .

Q. When was it this happened. - A. On Friday the 13th of May, between the hours of three and five; the constable brought the prisoners in; he took from one of the prisoner's bosom seven yards and half of lace, which was my property.

Q. Have you any partner - A. No.

ELIZABETH PEACHCY. I am shopwoman to Mr. James on Holborn hill. On Friday the 13th of May, between the hours of three and five in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into the shop, the youngest of them asked for ribbon; the lace box was on the counter, she took up some lace and asked me the price of it; I told them it was too dear for them. I took up some other lace and told them the price; they asked me if I had none cheaper; I told one of them no; one of them walked out of the shop and the other followed; I did not shew them any ribbons.

Q. Was there nobody else in the shop - A. There were three or four customers on the other side of the shop, Mr. James and a shopman.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. Three months.

Q. If you had looked pretty sharp you might have seen what passed - A. I was paying attention to my business.

Q. There was nothing done by them to take off your attention - A. I looked at them.

Q. They did not send you to the other end of the shop to get lace - A. No.

Q. Are you sure these are the women - A. Yes.

THOMAS CARTER . I am porter to George and William Bayley , Newport street. On the 13th of May I was coming by Mr. James's door, I saw one of the prisoners drop part of the lace; she picked it up and walked on a few steps, and the other prisoner came up by the side of her; she gave the lace to her, and walked across the way; she went as far as Swan yard, and the other followed her; I went into Mr. Jame's shop, and told the shopman of it; the shopman and I followed them, I pointed to him the person that had got the lace, her name is Martin; she run across the street to Fleet market; we brought her back to Mr. James's shop; a constable going by brought Lyons; I could see the lace in Martin's bosom, she took it out in Mr. James's shop.

(The property produced and identified)

Martin's Defence. I went into that gentleman's shop to buy a quarter of an ounce of thread; a tall young woman served me, not that lady; at the corner of Fleet market I picked up the lace, close by the grocer's shop, and a young man tapped me on the shoulder, he said I had picked up something that did not belong to me; I said if it belonged to him he might have it; the street keeper came up to me and took me; I never saw this young woman before; she came up when somebody catched hold of her.

Lyon's Defence. My mother goes out with a barrow; I asked her if she would buy me a ribbon; yes - she said, when she came home if she had money enough; she had not money enough, I went and pledged something for a shilling; I was coming by Mr. James's shop, I asked the price of ribbon, they told me; coming out of the shop I saw a mob at the corner of Fleet market, I went over and somebody laid hold of me, and said I was the person that was in the shop too; this young woman, I never saw her before to my knowledge; I know no more about it than any of you do.

Lyon called no witness to character.

Martin called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-28

392. MARY ANN TYRELL , and ANN SIMMONS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , twenty six yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. 13 s. 8 d. the property of Edmund Trundle , privately in his shop .

EDMUND TRUNDLE . I live in Newgate street, in the parish of Christ Church , I am a linen draper . On Saturday morning the 14th of May I had been walking out; on my return home about seven o'clock I passed through the cloisters of the Bluecoat school, where I saw the two prisoners with two or three people standing by; when I came up to them Mr. Shaw, who was speaking to them, asked me if I knew any thing of the piece of linen, it was there present; I looked at it and instantly discovered it to be my own; I asked them how they came by it; Tyrell answered that a woman gave it her; I asked her if she knew that woman; she said she did not; not satisfied with that answer, I took charge of the linen and the two prisoners, and requested Mr. Shaw to fetch an officer; he did; I delivered them into his custody; the linen was in its proper place the night before.

Q. When had you left the shop - A. About five o'clock.

Q. What passed from between five o'clock and the time you got home, you cannot tell - A. Certainly not.

JOHN SHAW. On the morning of the 14th of May, about seven o'clock, from information that two girls had gone down the Bluecoat-school, I went after them. I found Simmons in possession of a piece of Irish linen, I looked at it and found it was not mine; I asked her how she came by it; she said a woman gave it her; as I was asking her these questions Mr. Trundle came up; I asked him if he knew that piece of cloth; he owned it; I marked the cloth with the initials of my own name, and gave the cloth to him, and went for a constable.

JOHN MANNING . I am shopman to Mr. Trundle. On Saturday the 14th of May, about a quarter before seven in the morning the two prisoners came into the shop, they asked to see some shawls; I shewed them several, but none of them suited; the box of Irish linens were near them, with the lid off; the prisoner Tyrell looked at the shawls, and the other sat herself on the box of Irish linens; I found they were not likely to become customers, I declined shewing them any more.

Q. You suspected them, did you - A. No more than I should other strangers; they walked out; there were three of us in the shop.

Q. Did not you observe any thing on either of the prisoners - A. No, I did not observe any thing of the kind.

WILLIAM DAWES . I am shopman to Mr. Trundle.

Q.Has he any partners - A. No; I was in the shop all that morning.

Q. Had you sold any of these pieces of Irish - A. No. none had been sold that morning by any of us; I saw them come in and I saw them go out; I did not observe they had any thing with them; I suppose she drawed it through her pocket hole.

Q. Did you observe her hand in her pocket - A. I did not.

The property produced and identified.

Tyrell's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a shawl, I came out again; a gentlewoman asked me to hold the parcel; I did. I asked Ann Simmons to look at and see what it was. They came up and took me to prison.

Simmons' Defence. I went to buy a shawl; a woman came to me and said will you hold this here; she gave it into my hands to hold, and directly she went away I opened to see what it was. Two gentlemen came and laid hold of me.

TYRELL - GUILTY, aged 17.

SIMMONS - GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-29

393. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for that he on the 2nd of January in the 42nd year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously and falsely did make, forge and counterfeit, and caused to be forged and counterfeited, and willingly acted and assisted in forging and falsely making a certain acquittance and receipt for money, to wit, for 1 l. 10 s. 3 d. with intent to defraud our Lord the King .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged receipt and acquittance with the same intention; and

Four other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Fielding.

MATTHEW BEECHER. - Mr. Knapp. You are a glazier - A. Yes.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A serjeant in the guards, I believe.

Q. Was you employed to do any work in the duke of York's chapel, Jeffry's buildings - A. Yes, at Tothill street, Westminster, in the year 1806.

Q. Did you make out any bill for that - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill, and tell me whether that is your hand writing - A. Yes. that is my bill.

A. What are the charges that are contained in that bill - A. Three sash squares; nine shillings and nine pence; twelve ditto, fifteen shillings; twenty two squares of lead, five shillings and sixpence; that is all. The sum total is 1 l. 10 s. 3 d.

Q. Have you any recollection without looking at your book, whether that is the sum that you delivered in originally - A. No, it was not.

Q. Where consists the alteration to what it was originally - A. When I wrote the bill out it was one pound and three pence.

Q. Were there any alteration in the number of sashes - A. No.

Q. Does there appear upon looking at it any alteration - A. Yes, the 2 is made 12.

Q. It was 2 ditto, and now it appears 12 - A. Yes; it was 2 sashes, and now it appears to be 12 sashes.

Q. What is the other alteration - A. A 1 before the 5.

Q. So that there are three alterations - A. Yes; it is now 1 l. 10 s. 3 d. whereas it was before 1 l. 0 s. 3 d.

Q. Now, sir. take this book in your hand, and tell me whose book that is - A.Mine.

Q. Was the insertion there your hand writing - A. Yes.

Q. When did you make the minute of what appears there - A. That is my wife's writing.

Q. Then you did not write it -

COURT. You said first of all that is your hand writing in the book - A. It is my book.

Mr. Knapp. The question is whether the insertion of the bill in that book is your hand writing - A. Yes.

COURT. The bill in the book, or the bill out of the book - A. Both.

Mr. Knapp. When did you make the entry of that bill in your book - A. I wrote it from my state, as I generally take off my work.

Q. Does the entry in the book correspond with the account you have given in court - what is the entry in the book - A. One pound and three pence; - three sash squares, 9 s. 9 d.; twenty two squares in lead, 5 s. 6 d.; two sash squares, 5 s.

Q. From looking at your book, and looking at that bill you have in your hand, are you certain that the alteration took place after you had been paid the money - A. Yes.

COURT. How much have you been paid - A. I have not been paid.

Q. You did not receive the money, but your wife did - A. Yes. I do not know that she gave it to me.

Q. Was you present when the receipt was given - A. I was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. This was in the beginning of the year 1806 - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted you have not any distinct memory of it without looking at the book - A. I remember the amount of the bill.

Q. Then your memory is better this sessions than last sessions - A. I remember that.

Q. Perhaps you have a perfect memory of all your bills - A. I have a very shallow memory except any thing that happened soon.

Q. You have a very shallow memory, but you remember this distinctly - this is an exception - then from January 1806, down to the beginning of the present year, you call soon - A. I do not call it soon.

Q. How soon was the enquiry made - A. About fifteen months ago.

Q. You think you remember this - that you did not receive the money - A. I did not.

Q. It is received the 2nd of January 1806 - that is your wife's writing - A. Yes.

Q.It should be 1807 - A. Yes.

Q. You were not by at that payment - A. No.

Q. You do not recollect at all the transaction of receiving the money of your wife - A. No.

Q. Now, Mr. Beecher, can you venture to swear that these figures which have been inserted are not yours - A. No, they are not mine.

COURT. You are sure the different 1's are not your hand writing - A. They are not.

Q. You speak to three 1's, there is a 1 before the 2,

making it 12; and 1 before the 5, making it 15; and the 1 before the 0, making it 10 - these three are not your writing - A. They are not.

SUSANNAH BEECHER . - Mr. Richardson. Are you the wife of the last witness, Matthew Beecher - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill and receipt for glazier's work - I see the sum total there is 11 s 10 s 3 d. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the receipt at the bottom your hand writing - A. I think it is the receipt - S. Beecher.

Q. Did you receive any money of the prisoner, Mr. Moore - A. I did.

Q. What was the sum that you received - A. One pound and three pence was the amount of the bill. I did not take the halfpence.

Q. You received one pound, not taking the halfpence - A. I did.

Q. Do you remember how the bill stood with respect to the 12 ditto - A. To the best of my recollection it was 2.

Court. The 12 was 2 - A. Yes.

Mr. Richardson. The charge for that which is now 15, how was that at that time - A. I think it was 5.

Q. In the sum total, which is now one pound ten shillings and three pence, I think you before said was one pound and threepence - A. Yes it was.

Q. Look at the book, that bill is your husband's hand writing - A. Yes; it is one pound and threepence.

Q. There is a receipt at the bottom of that, whose hand writing is that - A. That is mine; I wrote that soon after I received the one pound; I cannot say whether it was the same day, but I am inclined to think it was.

Q. Did you deliver the receipt when you wrote it to the bill to the prisoner - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Now, Mrs. Beecher you say you think that the figure 1 was not before the 2, and the 1 before the 5, you think that was not there, but you will not venture to swear it - A. I think it was not there.

Q. Because you find your bill is not that, is not that one of your reasons - A.If it had not been enquired about early, I should not have recollected any thing about it.

Q. My question is this - whether part of the opinion you form upon the subject does not arise upon comparing it with the book, and seeing what it ought to be - A. I cannot say to the contrary, had I not the book to look at, but it might be so.

Q. You now think that these figures were not there at the time you signed it - A. No.

Q. Do not suppose that we put any sort of blame upon you, your belief is partly founded upon looking at the book, not knowing what it ought to be - A. I should not have recollected what is in the book without looking at the book.

Q. I am not asking you with respect to the book; you do not remember, I dare say, whether or no you read the bill over line by line - A. I think I looked at the bill at the time.

Q. The question is, whether you have any recollection of reading it over article by article at the time - A. No, I do not know.

Court. Mr. Beecher, who gave you the order - A. Mr. Moore gave me the order.

Mr. Fielding. For the duke of York's chapel - A. Yes.

JAMES MARTIN . Q. You are a serjeant in the Coldstream guards - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Moore - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that bill - I believe you were employed to make out that account for him of the 25th of June - A. Yes; it is my hand writing.

Q. Look at the articles there, and the bill which accompanies it, and see whether that is a voucher - A. I cannot say as to the voucher; this is my hand writing; the prisoner desired me to make it out, and to deliver it at the War office to Mr. Gamble.

Q. Then this account was made by you; he producing the different bills to you to make it out - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Did he produce the bills to you, or give you the accompt - A. I cannot possibly say, he must give me the accompt.

Q. Whether it was made out of vouchers or by a rough copy, you cannot say - A. I did not mark the vouchers.

Q. Where did you make out this entry - A. In the Coldstream orderly room.

Q. How many people were there - A. A great many people.

Q. They were not locked up - A. No; all the non-commissioned officers had access to that room.

HENRY HARMON . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are late quarter master to the Coldstream regiment - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was a serjeant - A. Yes, he was quarter master serjeant.

Q. Do you know this chapel in Tothill street, Westminster - A. I do.

Q. Was that a chapel into which the army resorted - A. It was converted into a chapel for the guards

Q. The repairs done to that chapel would be to be paid by the war office - A. Yes.

Q.Look at that account and tell me whether that is your signature - A. That is my signature.

Q. By whom was that account produced to you - A. By the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you recollect at about what time it was produced to you by the prisoner - A. I cannot take upon me to say to a day or two, whether it was in the latter end of December or the beginning of January I cannot say.

Q. At the time that accompt was produced to you by the prisoner, was the voucher produced to you. - A. The voucher accompanied the bill and was brought at the same time.

Q. Upon the voucher's being produced, and correspondence appearing between the bill and the voucher, you signed it. - A. I speak upon the bill, not upon the voucher; I speak upon the general accompt.

Mr. Gurney. You was not at home when the vouchers were entered. - A. I was not.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar. - A. For ten years.

Q. Have you ever known a man in his situation of life, who ever bore a better character. - A. To the best of my knowledge no man in the regiment ever bore a better character.

Mr. Knapp. At the time of the examination of the voucher that these tick marks were put on, did that take place after it had been left at your house. - A. Yes; it might have been left there two or three days; the

prisoner was there.

Q. When you delivered that accompt to the prisoner, for what purpose was it you delivered it to the prisoner. - A. In order to be sent to the chaplain general, Mr. Gamble.

REVEREND JOHN GAMBLE. - Mr. Fielding. You are chaplain general to the war office - A. Yes.

Q. The chapel in Tothill street, Westminste, is under the direction of his royal highness the duke of York - A. Yes.

Q. The expences thereof are defrayed by the war office - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive at any time this particular packet from Moore - A. Yes; I received the half yearly accompt from Moore; they were left upon my desk in the war office.

Q. Mr. Harman inspects the bills under you - A. Yes.

Q. You deliver it into the war office - A. Yes.

Q. It was stopped in the war office - A. Yes. (The bill and receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I declare before God and this court, that I never altered any bill.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-30

394. MARY WEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , two shawls, value 7 s. the property of James Janeway .

THOMAS POWELL . I am shopman to James Janeway ; he is a linen draper in Parliament-street . On Monday the 2nd of April, about six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar, in company with another woman, came into the shop and asked me to shew them some caps; while the other woman was looking at some caps, I observed the prisoner pulling the things on the counter; the other woman paid for the cap, and they both went out.

Q. What was on the counter - A. There were shawls and other things on the counter; before they had been out two minutes they returned again, and the other woman desired me to shew them some ginghams for frocks; the prisoner took her apron up as soon as she got to the counter and just looked at it, she threw it over some things on the counter; I observed her putting her hand under her apron and pulling some things off the counter; I shewed the gingham to the other person; she bought half a quarter of a yard; she gave me six pence, it came to three pence; when I went to the till for the halfpence, I told Mr. Janeway that I thought the prisoner had been taking some thing off the counter. I laid hold of her immediately; I told her that I thought she had something belonging to us; she asked me what I meaned, and shook herself, and the two shawls dropped from under her clothes; while I got over the counter she ran out; I followed her and took her about an hundred yard off, brought her back and gave charge of her to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. He did not find the shawls on me.

Powell. I saw you drop them.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-31

395. SACCHAR , GLOSSE and SAVAU were indicted for that they on the 25th of April , upon one Imambacchus , feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, did make an assault, and that they with certain sticks which they then and there held in their hands, him the said Imambacchus at divers times did strike and beat, thereby giving him divers mortal wounds, blows, and fracture of the scull, of which he languished, and languishing did live till the next day, then he died, and so the jurors say that they in such manner as aforesaid did kill and murder him .

Second count, that the aforesaid Sacchar, feloniously and at divers times did strike and beat the said Imambacchus, thereby did give him one mortal blow, and fracture of the scull, of which he died the next day, and that Glosse and Savau were there aiding, confuting, and assisting the said Sacchar in the said murder last aforesaid.

The prisoners stood charged with the said murder upon the coroner's inquisition.

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SARAH WILLIAMS . - Mr. Gleed. Where do you live - A. At No. 22, Cable court, Cable street. I am an unfortunate girl.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Imambacchus - A. Yes; Manbacchus they called him; I knew him before the the 25th of April last; altogether I had known him about four or five weeks.

Q. During that time you cohabited with him - A. I believe I had before the 26th of April.

Q. Do you know the persons of the three prisoners at the bar - A. I know Glosse. I have no knowledge of the others, I may have seen them.

Q. On the evening of the 25th of April where was you - A. I was at the Blue Gate public house, Blue Gate Fields, in Ratcliffe Highway ; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. When you first went into this public house were you sober - A. I had been drinking; I was not intoxicated.

Q. Did you have any thing to drink in that public house - A. Soon after I went in, I drank there, and I drank till the time I went out.

Q. During the time you was in the public house, do you recollect any person coming in - A. There were three Malays Glosse was one, I recollect seeing him stand by the fire and two others; one of the others gave me money.

Q. Was Imambacchus there - A. I afterwards saw him come in.

Court. That was the deceased - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. In what part of the public house might you be sitting - A. I was sitting in a box next to the door.

Q. Did the deceased or the prisoner Glosse sit in the same box as that in which you were sitting - A. I do not recollect any other person sitting in the same box, but a young woman that lived in Bluegate-street; she sat on the opposite side of the same box.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and Glosse - A. Glosse asked me once or twice to go out; I was drinking; I did not like to go out; I did not go out. I do not

recollect any thing more. Before I left the house I was very much in liquor indeed.

Q. Do you recollect the fact of leaving the house - A. I cannot recollect how I got out of the house; but when I was out of the house I saw a fight.

Q. When you got out of the door of the public house can you recollect by what persons you were surrounded - A. I recollect there was a great many men.

Q. Can you tell of what description they were; do you know the difference between a Malay and a Lascar - A. Yes; I think they were Malays.

Q. Do you recollect the deceased being at the door - A. I only recollect seeing him brought away from the door; I cannot recollect the beating.

Cross-examined Mr. Gurney. You were examined the next day before the justice - A. No; I was examined before the coroner's jury.

Q. I suppose you were likely to recollect more correct directly after, than you can at this distance of time. Do not you remember saying that as you were coming out of the door the deceased was fighting with some of them men - A. I remember there was a fight at the outside of the door between the deceased and the Malays, as far as I can recollect the fighting was with sticks; the deceased was a Lascar and the prisoners are Malays.

Q. One of the Malays who had been in the house that evening gave you a seven shilling piece - A. Yes, that was none of the prisoners.

Q. That was to go with him - A. Yes.

Q. When the deceased came into the house he wanted you to go with him - A. I do not recollect, he wanted me to go with him; I remember his sitting by me.

Q. Do you remember whether the deceased had a stick or not - A. I do not recollect that; he generally carried one with him.

SARAH SMITH. - Mr. Knapp. You are servant at the Blue Gate public house - A Yes.

Q. Was you at home on the evening this took place - A. Yes, it was on Monday evening; I do not recollect the day of the month.

Q. Do you remember seeing the last witness, Sarah Williams there - A. Yes, she came in between six and seven o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Do you remember the deceased, the person who was killed - A. Yes, his name was Manbacchus, he came in about eight o'clock; Glosse came in soon after the deceased, and another man.

Q. Do you know the difference between a Malay and a Lascar - A. Yes; Glosse, and the man that came with him, were Malays. When Glosse first came in he stood by the fire; then he went and sat down in the box with Sarah Williams a good bit, he wanted to get Sarah Williams out, she refused to go out; he took her round of her waist, and wanted to get her out; she would not.

Q. When Glosse went and sat by Sarah Williams , where was the deceased at that time - A. At the other table.

Q. After he laid hold of her and wanted to get her out, what took place - A. They sat a bit longer together; then they went out of the house, Sarah Williams and Glosse did.

Q. What became of Manbacchus - A. He went out after them, he followed them; that was about nine o'clock.

Q. Before they went out had any words passed between Manbacchus and Glosse - A. No, none.

Q. Did you observe in the house whether Glosse had any stick in his hand - A. I saw none.

Q. Had Manbacchus any stick - A. No.

Q. Had the man who came in with Glosse any stick - A. No. Directly they went out I went out; Sarah Williams put her back against the window; Glosse was pulling her about.

Q. You wished to remove Sarah Williams from the window - A. Yes; Glosse removed her away from the window. I came in doors then.

Q. Was she drunk - A. She was in liquor; - they went away from the window, and stood a little further up; the minute I went in the house I heard the sticks; my mistress told me to go out for fear the windows should be broke.

Q. Did you hear more than one stick - the noise that you heard did it appear many sticks or few - A. A few. I went out, and my mistress gave me the shutters; I shut up the window and my mistress shut up the door.

Q. At the time you went out to shut up the shutters, did you observe any persons, and what were they doing - A. I saw two persons, tall people, but who they were I cannot tell; it was dark; they were beating a man with sticks that was down in the channel.

Q. Did you know the person of the man who was laying in the channel that they beat with sticks - A. It was Imambacchus.

Q. Do you know whether they were Malays or Lascars that were beating him that was laying down - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Do you remember what effect these blows had upon Manbacchus - A. I do not. I went in immediately.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. Perhaps you know that Sarah Williams at that time cohabited with Manbacchus - A. No; I know that she had been with Manbacchus two or three weeks.

Q. And while she was in the room Glosse put his arm round her, and wanted to get her out of the room - A. Yes.

Q. They all went out, Glosse and Sarah Williams , and Manbacchus behind them - A. Yes.

Q. And you heard immediately the clashing of sticks against each other - A. Yes.

JAMES STEVENS . - Mr. Gleed. Where do you live - A. I live next door to the Blue Gate, I am a rope maker. On the evening of the 25th of April I was sitting by my own fire side about ten o'clock; I heard the noise of sticks on the ground; I went to the door; I saw some men of colour ill using some other man on the ground, opposite of the Blue Gate door; when they had ill used him as long as they thought fit, they went away about twenty or thirty yards.

Q. When you say they, how many do you mean - A. Six or seven; they were beating him with sticks as he lay upon the ground; I could just observe it as I stood at my own door.

Q.How many of them had sticks - A. I did not take notice, it was very dark indeed; when they walked away about twenty or thirty yards they returned again; there was a word or two passed between them, they all stopped, and two or three made their way to the Blue Gate door; they got the man up to the door;

I kept at my door; I saw the sticks going at the man when they placed him at the door; they ill used him till they brought him to the ground.

Q. What do you mean by ill using him - A. Giving him violent blows with sticks; the deceased fell a second time; they all went away then. I went to the Blue Gate door, and saw the deceased lay on the ground.

Q. Were any persons standing near the deceased at that time - A. There were two or three round about him, I believe they were Lascars, they were persons like the deceased; I saw them take him away; I did not follow them no further than my own door. When I came up to the Blue Gate door I saw a violent blow on his forehead, it was bleeding very much; he laid on the steps, I did not hear him say a word.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You say it was a very dark night - you was not there at the beginning - A. No.

Q. You could not tell how the blows first came, because you were attracted by the noise - A. Yes.

COURT. Could you discern whether any of the Lascars were in liquor at all - A. No; I could not discover.

JOHN THURLOW . - Mr. Knapp. You live in Back lane, Shadwell - A. Yes.

Q. On the night this happened had you been at the Blue Gate - A. Yes, I went in about a quarter before eight; I saw Sarah Williams there, and three or four of the coloured men; I staid there till just before ten o'clock; I went out first.

Q. Before you went out was there any quarrel between the men of colour and this woman - A. Not a word nor a blow.

Q. Had they any sticks - A. They had none; the woman was very drunk indeed; I cannot say whether the men of colour were drunk or not; I paid no attention to them. About two minutes after I came out of the house I heard a noise; as I went down Shadwell High street I saw seven or eight men coming up from Shadwell High street towards the Blue Gate.

Q. Did you see Sarah Williams, and the men that you had seen in the public house, after you had got in the street - A. No.

Q. When these men came up Shadwell High street, what did you see - A. I went into a shop and staid about two minutes, then I came out and heard a great noise.

Q. How near was this shop that you had gone into to the Blue Gate - A. About fifty yards.

Q. Where did the noise that you then heard, as you was coming out of the shop, proceed from - A. From opposite of the Blue Gate; it was a noise as if a parcel of sticks were ratling; then I saw four or five men of colour come down the street again from the Blue Gate.

Q. Had they sticks in their hands - A. I did not take notice; then I heard a man groan; I went up to him, the man was laying with his back towards the Blue Gate door; I saw his face all over blood; then I saw three or four men of his own colour take him down towards Shadwell High-street.

Q. Were these four or five men that you describe going down Shadwell High street, men of his own colour - A. Yes, but different men.

Q. You did not know these men no more than the rest - A. No.

DENAR. (The witness was examined through the medium of an interpreter, Mr. Gould Junior,

Q. Ask him whether he is a Lascar - A. Yes.

Q. Ask him what was the deceased name - A.Imambacchus.

Q. On the day the deceased was killed, ask him if he was in his company - A. He says he was, at the Blue Gate public house; the Serang gave him and two more a pound between them; him, Ismael, and Emear were going to the public house to get change, they saw Imambacchus and the girl coming out; upon their coming out he saw the Mallay strike him, that is Savau; he struck him upon the head violently with a stick, and then when the second man, Glosse, struck him, Imambachus fell; and when he was down he heard him, Sacchaar, say beat him; then they all three Savau, Glosse, and Sacchaar struck him, while he layed on the ground; the deceased cried out they have beat me, I shall die, die; he saw the blood coming from his head; then they went away; he, Ismael, and Emaer went away, and gave the alarm to the house to fetch Imambacchus away; then some of his countryman came and fetched him home.

Q. Had he, or Ismael, or Emaer, any sticks - A. They had none.

Q. Had the deceased - A. No, nothing.

Q. Had the three prisoners any sticks - A. They had large sticks for fighting, such as they are accustomed to walk with.

Q. Ask him when he saw him at the public house door whether there were any more than the girl and Imambacchus - A. He says, he saw no more come out than the girl and Imambacchus; he did not see Glosse till they came up to beat him, then he saw Glosse and the two other prisoners.

Q. Did there appear to be any words between the deceased and Glosse and the other prisoners - A.He says, I did not hear a word till Imambacchus called out he was beat.

Q. If there had been any blows given by Imambacchus from the time that he came out of the house to the time that he complained of being beat, must not he have seen them - A. Imambacchus did not, he must have seen it.

Q. When did he see Imambacchus again - A. When the men brought him home, he says he staid with him.

Mr. Gould. I sent to my father, he went for a surgeon; he died the next morning.

Mr. Knapp. I suppose, Mr. Gould, you saw this man after this happened - A. Yes, I saw him when he was brought in at the door, he was groaning, he could not speak; he was brought in about half past ten at night; the servant called me up the next morning a quarter before six; I went up and saw him dead; I had left the Serang to take care of him.

ISMAEL. - Mr. Gleed. Ask the witness if he knew the deceased Imambacchus - A. Yes, and he knows the three prisoners at the bar; Sacchaar and Glosse belonged to his ship, he has known them sometime; and Savau he has seen him at his quarters, he does not know him any other way.

Q. On the 25th of April last did the accompany the last witness to the Blue Gate - A. The Serang gave them a pound; he went to the public house with Denar and Emaer, it was about ten o'clock; when he got to the public house, he saw Imambacchus and the girl coming out of the public house; Imambacchus had hold

of the girl's arm; he said to the girl come home.

Q. At that time did he see either of the three prisoners there - A. Not then; they came up directly after they came out, he did not hear them say any thing; Savau struck him first over his head; Gloss struck him, and he then fell down. When Imambacchus was down Sacchar said lick him; they then beat him and went away.

Q. What was it that they beat him with - A. With large sticks.

Q. Did he see any blow given by Imambacchus to either of the prisoners - A. He did not see Imambacchus strike any; he had his umbrella in his hand to defend himself from the rain; he went away directly to the house to tell some men to come to their assistance.

AMAER. - Mr. Knapp. Ask him whether he was outside of the door of the Blue Gate public house - A. He was outside about ten o'clock at night with Demar and Ismael.

Q. How soon after they got there did he see the deceased, Imambacchus - A. Almost directly; the girl was with him; he did not see no one else.

Q. Does he know the prisoners at the bar - A. He knows all three, he saw them that night, almost directly after the deceased and the girl came out of the house.

Q. Had Imambacchus any stick in his hand at the time he came out of the house - A. He did not see any thing in his hand.

Q. Ask him whether the three prisoners had any sticks - A. Yes, they had sticks.

Q. Had Imambacchus any conversation with the three prisoners before any blows were given - A. He did not hear a word pass; he saw Savau strike Imambacchus, and next he saw Glosse strike him; when Savau struck him, Imambacchus fell. Glosse and Sacchar struck him when he was down, and blood came from his mouth and his head; he went away to inform the people of the house.

Q. During the whole time he was observing these blows, did he observe Imambacchus strike or attempt to strike - A. No. There were more men, but only three struck him.

HINTON DOCKER. Q.You are a surgeon - A. Yes; I live in Jewry-street, Aldgate.

Q. Was you called on this unfortunate occasion to see the body of the deceased - A I was; on Monday the 25th of April; I saw him in one of the rooms where the men are boarded by the East India company; he was laying in a state of stupor; there were three wounds upon his head.

Q. Did these wounds appear to be inflicted by a sharp instrument - A. They did not appear to be done by a sharp instrument; the edge, of the wounds were ragged; there were three wounds quite to the scalp.

Q. How long did you attend him - A. I only saw him in the night; I was called about half past eleven o'clock; he was in the same state when I left him as when I first saw him. I did not see him after till he was dead.

Q. When you had seen him and left him, did you entertain any hopes of him - A. It was my opinion he would die by his laying in that state of stupor; I opened the head; I entertain no doubt that the wounds were the occasion of his death.

SACCHAR. - GLOSSE. - SAVAU.

Guilty of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Year in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-32

396. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for that he on the 12th of May , upon Sarah, the wife of John Wood a subject of our lord the King, feloniously and wilfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously did strike, stab and cut her in and upon her belly and right hand, with intent in so doing to kill and murder her .

Second count for like offence, with intent to disable her.

Third count with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

SARAH WOOD . I live at No. 7, Cumberland place.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 12th of May, last - A. Yes, at the corner of George-street; I first met him at the corner of Marybone-lane; we went into the Angel to have a pot of beer; we went in about half past seven o'clock, and the prisoner and I came out of the house about half past eight; we walked from there towards George-street, Portman-square, which is my direct road, and he asked me the question of going home to his lodgings with him.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. I had seen him for five months, but never to carry on any correspondence with him; he asked me to go home with him; I refused it; by this time it was near a quarter to ten o'clock.

Q. Had you been all that time with him, from half past eight till almost ten o'clock - A. Yes; he detained me in the street and would not let me go. About this time we came to George-street, Portman-square ; he asked me the second time to go with him; I refused it; then he drawed the knife and struck it in the left side of my belly.

Q. What is your expression, he struck you, or out you, or stabbed you, or what.

Q. He stabbed me, sir; then he went to stab the right side of my belly; I held up my hand and he cut this part of my hand; here is the mark of it now. H

Q. How did the knife go into your hand. - A. By my holding out my hand to defend the knife from going into my belly, he struck the knife into my hand.

Q. Your right hand was it - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a cut was it upon your hand - A. There is the mark on it; upon this I ran from him and I went on the other side of the way for assistance; I met a coachman that was standing there; he asked me what had happened to me, and while I was talking to him there came another coachman; he passed at the time and he helped to support me down George-street.

Q. Were you in great pain - A. Yes.

Q. Did the wound in your belly give you great pain - A. Yes; it gave me more pain than my wrist.

Q. Did you bleed much - A. Yes; a great quantity from my hand.

Q. Did you perceive any blood from the other wound - A. Yes.

Q. When the second coachman was helping you down George-street what become of she prisoner - A. He left me, and walked away, after he had stabbed

me.

Q. You did not perceive where he went to then - A. No; when the coachman was helping me down George street I saw this man coming back again; I told the coachman that was the man; he answered he was the man and delivered up the knife to the coachman; the coachman said, deliver the knife into my hands, and supported me to the public house, the corner of George-street. Another coachman stepped up seeing me in the situation I was in, he supported me likewise; this coachman called the watch; the watchman came and they supported me to the watchhouse.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. The watchman took him upon my giving charge of him; he was brought to the watchhouse; when I came to the watchhouse I gave the knife up to Mr. Howell, the watchhouse keeper, and from there I went to Middlesex hospital.

Q. You went to the hospital that night - A. Yes.

Q. Was your wounds examined there that night - A. Yes, and dressed; the gentleman is here that dressed my wounds.

Q. You was wounded in your belly, was you - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell how deep the wound was - A. No. I remained in the hospital from the Thursday night I went in, till the Tuesday following.

Q. Were your wounds quite well when you came out - A. No, neither of them; the wound in my belly is not quite well; but I can do any work with my hands.

Q. You say the wound goes on well - A. It goes on well now if it comes to no worse.

Q. You say you knew this man for five or six months before - A. Yes.

Q. What way of life have you been in - A. I was very ailing and went in Marybone infirmary.

Q. You are out of place, you do not get your living in a regular way - A. I get my living by service.

Q. I think you told me you never had any connection with the prisoner - A. No; I have had a little discourse with him; he has pressed me to live with him; but I would not; and this night refusing him made him make use of the instrument he did.

Q. Do you know what way of life he was in - A. He told me he has been a sailor.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask her whether she did not promise to go down with me as soon as I was shipped - A. I was at Marybone workhouse; I came out of there on a Friday; he remained in the workhouse when I came out, he eloped out of the workhouse when he found I was gone.

Q. Are you a married woman - A. Yes; my husband's name is John Wood .

Court. Did he ask you to go down to a ship - A. He has often asked me; I always refused it.

Prisoner. She has asked me get her things out.

Prosecutrix I always kept myself with the greatest distance from him; I never did ask him.

WILLIAM HARLEY . Q. You are a gentleman's coachman are you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing that young girl that stands by you on the 12th of May last - A. I saw the man and she stand against the pales in George-street, Portman-square; the woman was leaning against the pales and the man was leaning a little way from her against the pales.

Q. Did she appear at all to be in liquor - A. No; I asked her what was amiss with her; she told me she had been cut; I asked her who it was that did it; she told me that was the man that stood by; I asked the man what he did it for; he said it was no business of mine, it lay between them two selves; I went to the woman; I asked her whether I should do any thing to him; she told me to get the watchman to take him.

Q. Did you go for the watchman - A. Yes.

Q. The man did not offer to go away - A. No.

Q. Did he appear to you to be in liquor - A. No; not at all.

Q. Did you observe any thing in his hand then - A. No; he had nothing in his hand then. The watchman took him to the watchhouse; and I helped the girl to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you perceive that she was bleeding - A. Yes, very much.

Q. Did she appear faint and weak - A. Yes; very.

Q. She was able to walk with your assistance and another young man - A. Yes; I laid hold of one arm and he of the other; we led her and supported her a good deal.

PETER FLANNAGAN. Q. You are a watchman of Marybone - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being called to the assistance of this young woman on the 12th of May last - A. Yes; about half past ten.

Q. to prosecutrix. I understood you to say that you and the prisoner were together from the time you came out of the public house till about a quarter before ten o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the time these wounds were given - A. Yes.

Flannagan. It was half past ten when I was called; when I came over the prisoner was leaning against a rail in George-street; they pointed to the prisoner and said that is the man that stabbed the woman; he was standing about two or three yards off the coachmen, and she was standing between two or three coachmen; I took him prisoner and brought him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you perceive that the young woman was wounded - A. I did not; I took him down to Manchester square, and I desired my comrade watchman to help the woman on; I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; when he was confined in the watchouse he said he had put about that length of the knife into her body; he put his hand to his finger and shewed the length.

JOHN CORNISH . Q. You are likewise a watchman - A. Yes, in Marybone. On the 12th of May last, about half past ten o'clock, on the south side of Manchester square, Flannagan told me to come and assist him; he had hold of the prisoner; he told me to help the woman along; the woman was in a very weak state, and blood all over one arm; with that we went to the watchhouse and charge was given of the man; and we were going to lock him in the hole; Mrs. Howell, the watchhouse keeper's wife said the blood was coming through her clothes; the prisoner replied I know I have done it, I have put it so far into her; shewing by his finger up to the second joint.

Q. Did you see any knife - A. I saw the knife given by Sarah Wood , to Mrs. Howell, the watchhouse keeper's wife.

JONATHAN HOWELL . I am the watchhouse keeper of St. Marylebone; when they brought the prisoner

in the watchhouse, Sarah Wood told me she had been stabbed; her hand was very bloody and she seemed very weak; I think she must have lost a great deal of blood. I proceeded to search him; I found nothing; Sarah Wood said here is the knife he done it with.

Q. He had not got the knife - A. No; the knife was given to me by the woman; there is blood upon it now.

Prisoner. Did I ever mention about stabbing her - A. Yes; you mentioned what the watchman said; you said you put it into her.

CHARLES HENRY PODMORE. I am the house surgeon of Middlesex hospital: Sarah Wood was brought on Thursday the 12th of May, about eleven o'clock at night; on examining of her, I found a wound in the lower part of the belly; it was two thirds of an inch long, and about the same depth; it was the lower part of the belly below the navel.

Q. I suppose the plaits of the petticoats that she wore, prevented the wound from being deeper - A. I suppose so.

Q. If it had penetrated deeper, I need hardly ask you whether it would not be dangerous in that part of the body - A. It would. There was a wound in the palm of her hand near the wrist, about an inch and a half long and about half an inch in depth.

Q. Was a wound in that part of the body dangerous - A. It might have been; had it been a little more of one side it would have been near a large artery.

Q. That had the appearance of a cut - A. Both of them were incised wounds.

Q. Did you take any notice of the petticoats being cut - A. No.

Howell. I did.

Q. to Podmore. Would a stab occasion such a wound as that - A. Yes.

Q. You mean the edge of the knife took an oblique direction rather than a direct one - A. Yes; I was just going to say that.

Q. How long did you attend her - A. She was brought in on the Thursday night and I discharged her on the Tuesday; believing her fit to be an out patient. She presently recovered of her wounds; they did not appear to be dangerous.

Q. You discharged her believing the wounds not to be dangerous - A. Yes; she was an out patient.

Q. When did you last see the wound - A. I cannot say that I have seen the wound since she has been in the habit of coming there; the dresser has dressed it.

Prisoner's Defence. She promised to go down with me on board an Indiaman; that very evening she went into the Cross Keys, Marybone lane, and got drinking with six people. I did not cut her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-33

397. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Tyler , on the 23d of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a half guinea, two seven shilling pieces, one shilling, and two halfpence , his property.

WILLIAM TYLER . On the 23d of May, between nine and ten in the evening, I saw the prisoner in High-street, St. Giles's; she came out of a liquor shop; she took me home to her apartment.

Q. I suppose you went home with her - A.No; I had an article in my hand which she took away.

Q. What was your article - A. A wire sieve.

Q. She took hold of the sieve and took you home with her - A. Yes; I did not like to let go, and she took me home with her; she used me violently ill, and said I should not go out of the room till I had paid her some money.

Q. Did not you cry out - A. No. I was afraid; I was in a nasty dirty place in Dyot street , in a one pair of stairs room.

Q. Whereabouts did you meet with her - A. Almost opposite Oxford road.

Q. Did you go up stairs with her - A. Yes, she went up first.

Q. Why did not you come out when she used you ill - A. There was a parcel of fellows at the door would not let me come out; she said I should not go out of the room without giving her some money; I took my purse out of my pocket and gave her a shilling; when I got my purse out I missed my purse.

Q. What did she take from you - A. A half guinea, and two seven shilling pieces; she took all that was in my purse; it was found in the room.

Q. How long were you in the room - A.Not a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you cry out for help - A. No.

Q. So you staid there a quarter of an hour and then you went away - A. Yes.

TIMOTHY LANE. I am a watchman.

Q. Did you at any time in the course of last month see the last witness - A. Yes, about the 23rd of May, between the hours of nine and ten o'clock at night; this boy came to me crying, he said he was robbed of his money; I asked him at what house; he did not know the house nor the name of the street, he said he knew the girl; I took him into two or three public houses, she was not there. I went into another, she was there; he said there she is; I took her to her room, I found the key in her pocket; I unlocked the door, and found the purse under the window with half a guinea, two seven shilling pieces, and a penny in copper.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met with this young man in Russel street, he was very tipsy; he asked me if I had a room of my own, he gave me a shilling; on account of his being so young, I would not have any thing to do with him; I took the candle and lit him down stairs; I found the pocket book on the floor; I was going for a pint of beer, I met the watchman and this young man; they accused me of the robbery; he said I wronged him of so much, at the same time it was a falsity.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-34

398. ANN POWELL and ELIZABETH JOSEPH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , twenty one yards of printed crambric, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Finney Sirdefield , and William Sirdefield , privately in their shop .

FINNEY SIRDEFIELD. I am a linen draper , I live in Newgate street .

Q. Have you a partner - A. Yes, William Sirdefield . On the 28th of April last, between three and four o'clock, the prisoners at the bar came into my shop and desired to see some cottons for a gown; our apprentice was selling a man a handkerchief at the time; then I

showed the women some gowns myself; when my apprentice had done with the man he came to the prisoners and I left him; he shewed them the cottons; I went to the other part of the shop, and was called by him, on his discovering that one of them had taken something; we took it from them and I saw it.

Q. What did you take - A. Twenty one yards of cambric from Ann Powell , it was under her petticoat.

Q. Did they come in together - A. They did, they appeared to be in company together; when I talked of detaining of them Ann Powell made a great resistance; when a customer came in we sent for a constable.

Q. Now sir, the cambric are you sure that is your property - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WATSON. I am an apprentice to Mr. Sirdefield. I was engaged at the time these women came in cutting a man off a handkerchief; directly I was disengaged I came to the women; I shewed them a quantity of prints but none of them seemed to take their fancy; they asked me to go to the window to see if there was not something pretty to take their fancy, which I did several times; the prints that I brought from the window did not seem to please them, and they being rather difficult I thought I would not shew them any more; I turned the same goods over again, thinking that might persuade them to take some of the goods I had shewn them before; there was one pattern in particular which I had shewn them, and which I was looking for, which they seemed to like better than any of the rest; I looked for it and could not find it; I observed Ann Powell 's gown more bulky than before; as an excuse I leaned across the counter, and asked Ann Powell to let me see the quality of her gown, as she was rather particular she might like something of that quality; and looking at the quality of her gown, I felt something like a piece of print; I then went on the side of the counter the woman were on, and looking at the ground I saw one end of the print rather below Ann Powell 's petticoats; I then called Mr. Sirdefield to let him see that I took it from her, and when I took it from her it was quite warm; I gave it into Mr. Sirdefield's hands immediately.

The property produced and identified.

Powell's Defence. I went into this shop to look at a gown; the young man brought a great quantity of patterns on the counter, one of them fell down; I was going to pick it up; the young man jumped over the counter and said I was going to steal it.

Joseph's Defence. I went into Mr. Sirdefields, I asked for a bit of cotton for an apron; he shewed me the print; I bid him the money; he said he could not take it; I was going out, the gentleman jumped over the counter and said she was going to steal a print; as to this woman I never saw her before in my life.

Powell called no witnesses to character.

Joseph called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

POWELL - GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

JOSEPH - NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-35

399. HARRIOT STEADMAN and ELIZABETH WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , twenty nine yards of calico, value 1 l. and twenty yards of sheeting, value 14 s. the property of George Wyburne , privately in his shop .

GEORGE WYBURNE . I live at No. 29, Ludgate Hill , I am a linen draper . On Monday last, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was informed that two suspicious characters had been in my shop, they were pointed out to me; after a short time Wood came to the door; I stopped her, supposing that she had got something under her clothes; in taking hold of her arm and going about a yard or two from the place where I laid hold of her, she dropped a piece of cotton which I took up, and I took her up stairs with me; I then sent word down by the young man requesting to bring the other prisoner; on his bringing the other prisoner she dropped a piece of cotton.

Q. You did not see that - A. No; I sent for a constable and gave them in charge.

Q. You did not see the woman drop any thing - A. No.

Q. That is the shop for cheap goods - A. Yes; I took it some time ago of Messrs. Clark, Boyd and French.

Q. You have no partner have you - A. No.

Q. What did she say when you laid hold of her arm - A. I asked her to go up stairs with me, and I asked her where the piece of cotton was; she said she had never seen it.

Q. Where did this conversation pass - A. In the shop.

Q. You had a great many customers in the shop - A. A number at the time, there might be twenty persons in the shop.

Jury. Did you see the piece of goods drop from the prisoner - A. I saw the piece of goods drop.

Court. How do you mean drop - A. The goods under her clothes, I saw the piece of goods drop from under her clothes.

Q. When you laid hold of the woman and moved the woman, then you saw the goods on the floor - A. Yes; she dropped the piece of goods; when I laid hold of her and moved her, then I saw the goods, she dropped that piece of goods.

Jury. You said first after you had moved the woman then you saw the goods on the floor - A. On moving the woman she dropped the goods.

PETER MORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Wyburne. On Monday evening, about seven o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop. Mr. Wyburne gave the information to attend the prisoners.

Q. After they had been in the shop sometime you suspected them - A. Yes, Mr. Wyburne ordered me to take charge of Steadman; I immediately took hold of Steadman's arm and moved her from the counter; she then dropped a piece of sheeting from under her petticoats; I desired her to walk up stairs and I went for a constable.

Q. How long had they been in the shop - A. About two or three minutes.

Q. Mr. Wyburne said he went up stairs and desired you to bring up the other woman - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see her take the sheeting - A. No.

Jury. Did they come in together - A. I believe they did.

Q. How do you believe they came in together, you did not see them - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Steadman's Defence. I went into the shop, there were several people waiting to be served; this gentleman laid hold of me as I moved from the counter; there was a piece of sheeting, half on the counter and half off; I never saw it with my eyes, nor yet the other prisoner; the shop was amazing full.

Wood's Defence. I was not in company with the prisoner; I never saw her before; seeing the shop full of people I went in to look at some flannels; the gentleman asked me to step up stairs with him; he says you have got something about you; I said no, if you please to bring any one into the room and search me; then he picked up a bit of cotton. I could not get to the counter to take any thing for the crowd of people.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-36

400. CHARLES BROMPTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , two pair of shoes, value 14 s. the property of Henry Wyatt , privately in his shop .

HENRY WYATT . I am a shoemaker ; I live at No. 82, Snow hill.

Q. Where did you live at the time this happened - A. At No. 13, Long-lane, West Smithfield , in the city of London; at that time I kept both the shops. On the 14th of April I went from 82, Snow Hill, to 13, Long lane; I saw the prisoner in the shop as soon as I opened the door, with my sister in law.

Q. What time in the day - A. Before five in the afternoon; the prisoner was trying on a shoe; I saw the shoe was too small for his foot; the instant I opened the door, my sister in law seeing me, left him and went into the back parlour; I took the shoe from off his foot; I took another pair which was too large for him; the prisoner arose up and placed the chair he was sitting in in the middle of the shop; I moved the chair and desired him to sit down, and gave him another pair of shoes to try on, which fitted him; a soldier came in soon after and stood inside of the door; the prisoner asked me the price of the shoes; I told him; he offered me money for them; I told him I could not take it; I looked at him and saw him very much agitated; I looked down his great coat, I saw something bulge out. I seized his pocket and felt that they were shoes; I desired the soldier to hold his pocket and not let him take any thing out. I got an officer; he searched him; he took a pair of shoes out of that pocket; I saw they were mine; the officer put his hand into his other pocket and drew out another pair of shoes; I saw they were mine; the officer searched his pockets and could not find any money whatever.

(The property produced and identified)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-37

401. RICHARD READ was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of May , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Isaac Cohen .

ISAAC COHEN . I live in Angel court, Throgmorton street; I am clerk to my brother, Abraham Cohen . On Saturday the 7th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, as I was going down Alderman's Walk, Bishopgate street , I felt something being taken out of my pocket; I turned round and saw the handkerchief in the prisoner's hands; on looking at him he ran away; I pursued him and caught him, and took the handkerchief from his hands.

Q. Where did you apprehend him - A. In a stable in Camomile street.

Q. Did you tell this to the magistrate that this felony was committed upon you in the city of London, and you detected him in the city - A. Yes.

Q. What could induce you to take him to Worship street office - A. He wanted to go home to his father in Shoreditch. I have the handkerchief here; it has been washed since, therefore I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-38

402. THOMAS JEFFS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a basket, value 2 s. a chisel, value 6 d. a punch, value 1 d. and a sawset, value 1 d. the property of Samuel Powell ; a trying square, value 2 s. a rule, value 1 s. the property of Simon Ford .

SAMUEL POWELL . I am a carpenter ; I work at the River Terrace, City Road . I lost the tools on the 13th of April; we left them in the building safe at seven o'clock, on the evening of the 12th; at five o'clock the next morning I went to work; as soon as I opened the door I saw a board taken away from the window; I saw part of my tools laying separate on the bench by itself; then I went up stairs and found a chest broken open and some of the tools on the floor.

Q. You lost a great many articles, part of which you found upon the prisoner in a basket - A. Yes.

Q. A basket, a chissel, a punch, and a sawsett; these were all your property; they were afterwards found upon the prisoner - A. Yes. I lost a great many more.

Q. You suspected the prisoner - A. I did, because of his being there on the 12th; he came to speak to a young man that he knew, and by that means we had suspicion of him; we made enquiries after him; we found that he went by the name of Bond; it passed on for a fortnight afterwards; we fell in with this man as we were going to work near the City road: we asked him where he lived; he told us near Smithfield. Two or three mornings afterwards he was taken; he was coming down the City road; we sent a man after him. He was taken in Little Britain, in Mr. Briant's shop; when I went into the shop, I asked this man if he wanted any hands there; he said no; I saw my basket under the bench where the prisoner was at work and my tools were in the basket; I took it up and said it was my property; he said it was not; I took charge of him till an officer came.

SIMON FORD. On the 13th of April I lost my tools from a building, River Terrace; I was present when they were taken from Mr. Briant's shop; I was in company with Powell; my tools were in the basket that Powell claimed.

(The property produced and identified.)

- COCKMAN. I am a constable; as I was taking the prisoner to the counter, at Ironmonger lane, he asked me where I was going to take him; I said to the Compter; he swore he would not go any further; he knocked me down: I was all over mud as if I had been thrown into a mud cart.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called

four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and during that time to be Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-39

403. JAMES MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , three shirts, value 7 s. and a shawl, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Bond .

BENJAMIN BOND. I am Chelsea pensioner .

Q. What is the prisoner, Miller - A. He belongs to the twenty second regiment of foot . On the 17th of May, I missed two shirts and a shawl out of my knapsack, from the royal hospital at Chelsea .

Q. Did the prisoner sleep there - A. No, not in the same house.

Q. These shirts were in your knapsack - A. Yes, and the shawl was rolled in the shirt. On the 19th of May I missed another; on that morning I had the prisoner taken up; he owned to taking the whole, when I spoke to him about it.

PHILLIP COATES . I live in Turk's row, Chelsea, I keep a clothes shop. On the 17th of May, in the afternoon, the prisoner and another man in company with him, came into my shop; the man that was with the prisoner said I have got a shirt, and I would as soon sell it to you as any other man; I bought the shirts and the shawl.

Q. Then all you know you bought the shirts and the shawl of another man in company with the prisoner - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have served the King twenty years, I am wounded; I have lost a thumb, and I have two cuts in my head; I never had such a thing brought against me before.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-40

404. SARAH EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Robert Johnson , on the 23rd of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a sixpence, eighteen halfpence, and a bank note value 1 l. his property .

ROBERT JOHNSON . I live at Portsea; I came to obtain some pension money at Greenwich. On the 23rd of April, near eleven o'clock at night, I was coming from St. Martin's lane towards the Haymarket , I met the prisoner, I asked her the nighest way to Piccadilly; going along she asked me to give her something to drink; I gave her a pint of ale; we stood at the liquor shop while she drank it.

Q. Did not you go into any room with he. - A. No; we came out of the liquor shop; she then began to board me, she came to close quarters, she felt at my pantaloons.

Q. Did you feel her hand in your pocket - A. No, but I felt her very busy about my person; I took hold of her hand, I never let go of her afterwards.

Q. What was in her hand - A. I smelt her hand and I knew there was a one pound note in it.

Q. Did you open her hand - A. No, I could not; I kept my hold; she threw my hat over my head, still I would not let go my hold; she slapped me on both sides of my head, then I called the watch.

Q. Did she get away with any thing of your property - A. No; I did not let go my hold; after that I went to the watchhouse to have her safe moored, there I delivered her up to Gregory the constable; he had a good deal to do to get her hand open, he unscrewed her hand, she dropped the one pound note; it is my property.

Q. You saw the note drop did you - A. Yes, I knew it to be mine by the smell of it, and by the name on it; I happened to have a bottle of bergamot in my pocket; it was stained with it.

JOSEPH GREGORY . Q. Was you constable of the night - A. I was; I produce the note; Johnson came in the watchhouse in a strange kind of a state, with his handkerchief tore off his neck, and with a thick rough coat on; he had hold of the girl, he brought her in; he says I have boarded her at last; he delivered her into my custody; I thought he was joking, the woman said nothing was the matter; he said she had got a note of his; she said I will be damned if I have; Johnson said it was wrapped in a piece of brown paper, and he knew the note by the smell of it. I desired her to open her hand; she refused it; I rubbed her hand and got it open; I took this note out of a small bit of paper, the same paper it is in now.

Q. Has it any particular smell - A. It has now, of bergamot.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the note; he wanted to take great liberties with me, he hit me upon the breast; I called the watch, I gave charge of him, and he gave charge of me.

Prosecutor. I did not give her the note, I gave her nothing but something to drink.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of simple larceny only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-41

405. THOMAS KING was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Robert Wortley , on the 9th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a silver watch, value 2 l. a seal, value 6 d. and a metal key, value 1 d. his property.

ROBERT WORTLEY . On the 8th of April, I went away from home at four o'clock to pay some money; I paid fifty pounds; after that called upon a friend of mine; it rained very hard the forepart of the night.

Q. It was a rainy night and you staid with your friend - A. Yes, at his own house, up by the Horns at Kennington.

Q. What time did you leave his house - A. I cannot very well say, I suppose about twelve o'clock.

Q. Had the weather cleared up about that time - A. It was a very fine morning about that time.

Q. Had you been drinking with your friend - A. Yes and I smoked a pipe along with him; I was not the worse for liquor; I cannot say I had not been drinking liquor because I had; I was not tipsey.

Q. Probably you were a little forward in liquor - A. No.

Q. You were a little fresh - you was in a different state to what you was in the morning - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect at all how much you drank - A. No.

Q. What did you drink - A. Some ale, and a glass of wine and water.

Q. Now, you say you set off at twelve o'clock at night to go home from Kennigton - A. Yes, to go home to Bromptom; going home this young man overtook me near by the Asylum, Westminster bridge; he walked and talked with me; there were nobody about at all till we came past the opera house in the Haymarket .

Q. What o'clock might it then be - A. I suppose it might be about one o'clock.

Q. What business do you follow - A. A master baker ; then there I received a blow in my neck, in my throat, by the side of my neck.

Q. Who gave you the blow - A. The prisoner at the bar; I saw the stick coming to my throat, which made me scringe from it; he was behind me when he struck me; he thrust the stick forwards.

Q. Was there any body in sight, near you but him - A. Nobody.

Q. You knew it was the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know it was the prisoner at the time - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that you coversed with him did you take such notice of his person - could you swear to his countenance from what you saw of him before he was apprehended - A. Yes; I told the watchman what kind of a man he was, and what kind of a stick it was, before I saw him.

Q. What sort of a night was it - A. It was light.

Q. Not moon light. - A. I cannot possibly say whether it was moon light or not.

Q. Was it a star light night - A. Yes, light enough to see any body.

Q. When he struck you or pushed you in the way you have described, was it a violent push - A. Yes, and it staggered me and I lost sight of him.

Q. When it staggered you what did you feel - A. I felt my watch go.

Q. Did he take it from you as you was staggering - A. Yes.

Q. When he drew the watch out what did he do - A. He ran away, and I ran after him; I ran the other side of the street and called out stop thief.

Q. Did he cross to the other side of the way - A. I do not know which way he run; he ran up the Haymarket, I called stop thief; the watch took him; I thought he would run to Whitcomb street when I found I was robbed so, I run to the other side of the way.

Q. Then I understand you for a while you lost sight of him - A. Yes, for a while, till I saw him in the watch-house.

Q. You did not see him apprehended then - A. No.

Q. You saw him at the watchhouse - A. Yes; this watchman came and asked me if I was the person that was robbed.

Mr. Andrews. You are not to say what the watchman said to you.

Court. A watchman came up to you - A. Yes.

Q. How long after you was robbed - A. About four or five minutes; he asked me what sort of a man he was that robbed me; I described the man to him; he said we have got a man in St. James's watchhouse, we have no charge against him.

Q. Did you go with him to the watchhouse - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw the prisoner did you know him to be the same man that had walked with you midway from Kennington to the Haymarket - A. Yes.

Q. You knew the prisoner to be the man - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any doubt about it - A. No.

Q. Did you ever get the watch again - A. The watchman found the watch; he threw it away.

Q. How did you come by that stick - A. The watchman took it from him.

Q. Can you take upon you to swear, before you received that blow or push, that the prisoner had such a stick as that. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you noticed the stick - A. Yes, I had noticed the stick.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. You had been drinking with your friend - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it when you set out from this house - A. I suppose about twelve o'clock.

Q. Did you dine with your friend - A. No.

Q. You drank beer and wine and water - A. Yes.

Q. You was not sober - A. I was not drunk.

Q. Was you sober enough to know what you were about - A. Yes.

Q. You mean to swear that - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you arrive at your friend's house - A. I cannot tell exactly; I left my house at four o'clock.

Q. How long is this ago - A. The 8th of April.

Q. That is lately enough to recollect the circumstance; I want to know what time did you arrive at your friend's house at Kennington - A. Perhaps six or seven o'clock.

Q. Was you drinking at your friend's all the time till twelve o'clock - A. It rained very heavy, I could not get a coach.

Q. Were you drinking all that time - A. I was, and talking.

Q. How much did you drink in the course of that time - A. I cannot tell you I am sure.

Q. The prisoner met you at the Asylum - A. Yes.

Q. And walked with you over the bridge to the Haymarket - A. Yes.

Q. It was not a very light night - A. It was a light night, a star light night.

Q. When you came to the opera house you received a blow - A. It was a little higher up.

Q. The blow came from behind you - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know, as you describe the blow was given behind you, how you could see it coming - A. I saw the blow coming, though I did not expect it.

Q Had you known the prisoner before - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. Yet you take upon you to be very certain as to his person - A. I am certain to his person.

Q.Nothwithstanding you had been drinking.

ALEXANDER MACKEY . I was watchman then, in the Haymarket on St. Martin's side.

Q. You are an old soldier, are not you - A. Yes; I got in the house last Monday.

Q. Do you remember on that morning the cry of stop thief - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the morning do you think it was - A. Nigh two o'clock, I heard him cry stop him, he has run away with my watch; I saw a man run across the Haymarket towards St. James' street; I ran to stop him, he turned the post and ran into Oxendon street, I

ran after him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. Never; he crossed Panton street and came into the Haymarket again; here I took him. I took him to St. James' watch-houses because I caught him in St. Jame's.

Q. Did you overtake him - A. Yes, and took him to the watchhouse; I had another watchman with me.

Q. Another watchman came up in the way, he was running - A. Yes, and he was stopped between us both.

Q. Did you call out - A. Yes, I called out stop thief, and another watchman coming up a contrary way, the prisoner stopped.

Q. Before you took the prisoner did you see him do any thing - A. No, he made no resistance.

Q. I suppose your companion seized him as well as yourself - A. Yes, he took hold of his arm, and I took him to St. James' watchhouse.

Q. Did you search him - A. Yes, in the watchhouse; I found nothing upon him he; had the stick with him; we took it from him when we took him to the watch-house.

Q. You found the watch did not you - A. Yes; I went out to look for the prosecutor, I brought him into the watchhouse; he swore to the man and the stick; I went and searched the track in which I had followed him, as the man said he had been robbed of a watch; I thought he might have throwed it away; in Oxendon-street I found the watch upon the pavement.

Q. Are you sure that it was in the track that you and the prisoner ran. - A. Yes, I am sure of that; I noticed the track, I made several blows at him to try to knock him down.

Q. You carried the watch to the watchhouse did you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you shew it to the prosecutor - A. I did; the prosecutor swore it was his watch; he said his own name was in the watch; this is the watch, I have had in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you perceive whether the prosecutor was in liquor - A. He had been drinking for certain, but he was more in a passion with the man, than he was affected by drink.

Q. Did he appear to you to be a man that was so drunk that he did not know what he was about - A. Far from that; he was capable of any business whatever.

Q. You should have thought that he was capable of any thing - A. Yes.

Cross examined by Mr. Andrews. You searched the prisoner at the watchhouse - A. Yes.

Q. You found nothing upon him - A. Nothing.

Court to prosecutor. Look at that watch and seal - A. That is my watch it has my name upon it; I am confident of it being my watch; I had it in my pocket before I felt the blow, and I felt it go.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the Haymarket towards St. James' street; the prosecutor ran away from me, the watchman attempted to stop me, and I was taken to the watchhouse; the prosecutor came in the watchhouse soon after I was taken in, he said I had robbed him of his watch; I denied the charge; a watchman came in soon after and said he had found the watch.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his former good character.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham

Reference Number: t18080601-42

406. ELIZABETH ROLLINS and SARAH ANN WARD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Southgate ; Joseph Simpkin , Ann Rowley , and others being therein, about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 23d of April , and stealing therein, a coat, value 12 s. a watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 6 d. a seal, value 6 d. and a key, value 1 d. the property of Joseph Simpkin .

JOSEPH SIMPKIN . I live at No. 6, Gate street, Lincoln's Inn Fields ; I lodge with Samuel Rowley .

Q. Do you remember any thing happening to this house where you lodge - A. On Saturday morning, the 23d of April, at half past six, I went out to work; when I returned to dinner at one o'clock, I went into my room as soon as I had done my dinner, I missed my watch and great coat; I found the room door open; to the best of my belief I left it shut; it fastens with a spring bolt; I went round to the different pawnbrokers to injorm them of the number of the watch and the maker's name. It was taken to Mr. Hicken's to be pledged, at Bow street, Covent Garden; I can only speak to the property.

ANN ROWLEY . Q. Are you a married woman - A. Yes. The prosecutor lodges with me; I live in Mr. Samuel Southgate 's house.

Q. Who was in the house at the time this was taken - A. I cannot exactly say; I think the last witness was and my husband was there; I know nothing further than the door being open; the house was not broken open.

WILLIAM HICKIN . I am a pawnbroker; I received this watch from Ann Ward on the 25th of April. I asked her whose watch it was; she said it was a persons who was outside of the door; she called her in, that is Rollins, the other prisoner; she came in; I asked her how she came by it; she said she found it near Great Turnstile; I told her I had received information to stop it, on the Saturday; I took her to Bow street the next day; the magistrate enquired for the other prisoner; I searched for her and took her.

JAMES LIMBRICK . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street office; Rollins was brought to me at the Brown Bear , Bow street; I searched her; I found a duplicate of a great coat pawned for twelve shillings, the pawnbroker produced the next day.

THOMAS NEWTON . On the 23d of April I took in a great coat of Rollins, to the best of my knowledge.

(The property produced and identified.)

Rollins's Defence. On Saturday night I was coming down Middle Row, Holborn, I picked up this watch and ticket of the coat; I kept the watch till the Monday, I did not know what to do with the watch; I met this young girl; I asked her to pledge it; this girl went in and the gentleman stopped her, and had me fetched in.

Q. to Mrs. Rowley. Did you see either of the prisoners about the house - A. No.

Ward's Defence. I was coming down Hatton Garden, I met this girl; she said, were are you going; I said of an errand for my mistress; she shewed me his watch;

she said will you do a favour for me; I said what is it; she said to pledge a watch for me. Not knowing it was stolen I went in to pledge it.

Rollins called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Ward called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

ROLLINS - GUILTY, aged 14.

Of simple larceny only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

WARD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-43

407. RICHARD BECK was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Green , the said Richard Green and others of his family being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon on the 16th of April , and stealing therein, four thousand nails, value 6 s. eight territs, value 16 s. and twelve buckles, value 16 s. his property.

RICHARD GREEN. I live at No. 45, Rupert street, near the Hay Market ; I am a sadler's ironmonger .

Q. On the 16th of April last, had you occasion to leave your house for a short time - A. Yes, for a few minutes, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock; when I left my house, I locked my shop door, and left the key in the door; I left my wife in the house up stairs, my workmen were in the back shop in the yard; it is detached from the house.

Q. When you locked your shop door, where did you go to - A. I went to the end of the street; and I returned in a few minutes, and when I entered the passage; I saw the prisoner at the shop door which was locked.

Q. Had you ever known the prisoner before - A. Yes; he is a sadler and harness maker by trade; he had often been in my shop; I saw him pulling my door to as if to lock it; he had hold of the key; I asked him what he wanted, his answer was, that he wished to know if I had heard of a situation for him; I answered that I knew of nothing for him; I then asked him how he could take the liberty of opening the shop door, saying that I knew he had been in; which he denied; I then asked him if he would walk in the shop; he went in with me; at the same time one of my men came in; when I went into the shop, I looked at that part of the shop where I had frequently missed goods before; I observed some things had been taken away; on turning to the prisoner, I saw his countenance very much change; I then looked into his outside pocket and observed a brown paper parcel in it; I then asked him how he could have the impudence to ask me for a situation when he came to rob me; he turned the goods out of his pocket; my servant assisted him in so doing.

Q. What did you find upon him - A. I found four paper parcels of nails, such as sadlers use; the four papers contain four thousand; we sell them at one shilling and ninepence a thousand; one paper containing twelve plated trace buckles, and one paper containing eight plated territs; I knew the things when I saw them, I looked at the place where we kept them; I missed them.

WILLIAM JAKEMAN . Q. You remember coming into the shop do you - A. Yes; I took them out of his pocket and gave them to the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went out I bought a couple of awl blades; when I went to Mr. Green's the door was not locked; I found it open; I pulled out my awls and things which I had in my pocket; I know I was intoxicated, and whether I put them things in my, pocket I do not know.

Prosecutor. He was a little intoxicated.

GUILTY, aged 42.

Of simple larceny only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-44

408. WATKIN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , two shirts, value 12 s. two neckcloths, value 6 s one night cap; value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. four quarts of port wine, value 8 s. four quart bottles, value 1 s. a quart of Madeira wine, value 1 s. a glass bottle, value 3 d. three quarts of beer, value 3 s. three other bottles, value 1 s. a quart of brandy, value 2 s. and a medal, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Bird , esq.

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

JOSEPH BIRD . ESQ. Q. Where is your place of residence - A. In St. James' Place ; the prisoner was my footman ; I had a fair character with him.

Q. Was he entrusted with the care of your cellar - A. Never; I kept the keys of the cellar locked up in a bureau.

Q. In consequence of some suspicion did you cause the prisoner to be apprehended - A. I did; on the 25th of April.

Q. Was you present when the prisoner's apartment was searched by the officer - A. I was.

Court. Just state what you mean by the prisoner's apartment - A. Where he slept in the servant's hall.

Mr. Walford. Had any of the other servants access to that hall - A. The other servants had access to it, certainly.

Q. Where was he first taken - A. At the corner of the street; he was taken to the office for examination. I was with the officer when his box was searched in the servant's hall, the box was locked. In that box was found a medal, which I believe to be mine; it is worth a shilling.

SARAH PLATT . Q. Are you servant to Mr. Bird - A. Yes; I am house maid.

Q. Do you recollect seeing any property in your master's house, and where - A. I saw a pair of stockings of his about a week before the prisoner was apprehended in the prisoner's room, but I said nothing about them. On Saturday the 23d of April. I saw two picklock keys in the coal cellar, under the beer barrel, a medal, shirt, handkerchief and a pair of stockings; the shirt, and handkerchief were marked J. B. my master's mark; I left all the things there; on the 25th of April I took the officer to the coal cellar, we found one of my master's shirts there, I then went into the servant's hall with the officer; I saw him search the prisoner's box.

Prisoner. Did you see me put them things there - A. No; I saw you draw a cork of a bottle of wine when Mr. Natsbold's groom called upon you; I saw you take it from a place where I saw wine; you took it from the bottle rack; I did not taste it.

Q. Did you ever see me have them keys - A. No; but they were found with the things that were there; I saw you have the wine.

Q. Did you ever see me do any wrong in Mr. Bird's house - A I never see you do any thing wrong; you took particular notice of the side board, and you was very much confused when you saw me.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable of St. James's. On the 25th of April I took the prisoner in custody; I went into the cellar along with the servant; I found a shirt there; I searched his box, I found the key upon the prisoner; in his box I found this medal, he said it was not his, some of Mr. Birds servants had false keys, they had put it in out of spite; I took him and the shirt to Marlborough-street office.

Q. The place where you found the shirt was open to all the other servants. - A. It was.

Prisoner. Did not I say I bought that medal in a lane in Cheapside - A. On the second examination you did; when I apprehended you, you was in such a confused state you could not tell.

RICHARD SMITH . - Mr. Walford. You are a coachman to Mr. Bird - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time search the place where the prisoner slept - A. Yes; on Tuesday the 26th I found a pair of stockings behind the candle box in his room, and a handkerchief; and I found a bottle of wine in the small beer cellar; I also found three bottles of port the same day.

Q. to Sarah Platt . Do you recollect finding any keys - A. Yes; I found them behind the wooden frame of his press bedstead, two quires of writing paper, and this bit of soap.

Mr. Bird. One of these keys opened my bereau; I was in the habit of keeping in my bereau the key of my cellar; the same key opens my linen drawer which contained my shirts and neckoloths. I kept that medal in the bureau and the writing paper and soap.

CHARLOTTE KING . I live at the White Lion, Lower Brooke-street.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I have known him three or four years. On Sunday the 24th of April he came to my house, he left with me a small parcel saying he should call in a few minutes.

Q. Did he call again - A. No; I heard he was apprehended on suspicion of robbing his master; I sent it to Mr. Bird's house.

Q. Did you examine the parcel - A. No, I sent it by the chairman that was at the house.

FRANCIS CAVENDISH. Q. Did you receive a parcel from the last witness any time - A. I did; she gave it to me to carry to Mr. Bird's house; I delivered it to the girl and was going away; she called me back, and then I saw Mr. Bird.

Mr. Bird. I opened that parcel myself; it was delivered by Cavendish; it contained a neck handkerchief, a pair of stockings, and a night cap; they are all marked.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction nor how it happened from that day to this; I never saw the keys till I saw them on the table.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-45

409. JOHN MAYDEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of April , a saw, value 9 s. nine planes, value 16 s. 6 d. a stock and bits, value 4 s. and nine gouges, value 3 s. the property of John Bassam .

JOHN BASSAM. I am a carpenter .

Q. Sometime before April the 16th had you left any tools in a chest at Mr. Hillington's - A. Yes; I left them on the 18th of October, in a chest at Mr. Hillington's, he is a master carpenter; I had worked for him. On the 16th of April, I went for my tools; I missed a rip saw, a long plane, seven bead planes, a square rabbit plane, a stock and part of my bits, and nine gouges.

Q. Do you know what the prisoner at the bar is - A. A carpenter; I have seen the rabbit plane since, I can swear it is mine.

WILLIAM SPENCER . Q. What are you - A. I am a carpenter; I worked with the prisoner seven weeks, part of the month of April, and part of the month of May. On a Sunday evening I called in at a public house in Oxford road, I met with a few friends, they asked me what tools Maydew had; I said he had but one trying plane. I said that I saw the prisoner deface a rabbit plane and seven bead planes.

Q. You saw these things in possession of the prisoner - A. Yes, and I saw him plane the name off at the end of all the planes in a room, where he and I was at work for Mr. Shillitoe.

Q. Had you any conversation with him at the time he did it - A. No; I reported it to the public house, and took particular notice that I should know the rabbit plane again; I was requested to bring the rabbit plane to the public house, I did; the prosecutor said, I will swear it is mine.

Q. Did you tell any body at the time you saw this done - A. Yes, I told this gentleman at the King's Arms opposite the Pantheon.

Q. Where was it you saw the prosecutor examine the plane - A. At the King's Arms; I was desired to bring it there for inspection, on that day I said to Magdew is this rabbit plane yours; he said yes; I took it without his observation and took it to the King's Arms in Oxford road.

CHARLES HILLINGTON . Q. We understand you are a master carpenter - A. Yes, in Great Knight Rider street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he came to work for me in June, 1807; Bassam came to work for me on the 22nd of August, 1806, he worked with me till the 18th of October following; he then left his chest of tools with me.

Q. Was the chest locked - A. I do not know; they were left in the shop where the workmen were; Bassam came for them on the 16th of April last, then he informed me he had lost some tools; I then recollected that about eight months after he was gone, Maydew worked for me, he had a large plain with Bassam's name upon it; he took that plane away with him, when he left my employ on the 25th of July last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. It is a common practice for workmen to lend their tools - A. Yes.

ALLEN BRADEY. Q. What are you - A. I am a carpenter; I received a duplicate from John Maydew in April last; he said he had some tools at a pawnbrokers, but he did not know what they were; they were at a pawnbrokers in Brewer street; he asked me to fetch them out, which I did; I brought them to him; they were some bead planes, I did not know the size nor the number.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you remember going to the King's Arms in Oxford road - A. Yes; I was sent for last Monday was a week to look at the plane, and the plane is my property, it was a square rabbit plane; I took it from Spencer and kept it; the officer had it afterwards.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. These planes which the prosecutor accuses me of, I bought about four or five years ago at a sale in Oxford street; I can swear they are my property, I bought them and paid for them at the Duke of Cumberland's Head, there is a sale every week there of that sort.

JOHN FRY . - Mr. Walford. What are you - A. I am a stone mason, I live at No. 12, Gate street, Lincoln's Inn Fields,; I have known the prisoner eleven months, he hears a good character for honesty; Bassam said first, before he took a slip out of his pocket, that it was his property; the slip had been worked with a plane, it would not fit, and then he said it was not his property.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18080601-46

410. MARY LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of April , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 22 s. the property Robert Burnett , privately in his shop .

ROBERT BURNETT. I am a linen draper , No. 20, Glasshouse street, the corner of Swallow street, Golden square . On the 20th of April the prisoner came into my shop to look at some stockings; she bought a pair, and then she enquired for some muslins or muslin handkerchiefs; she bought one; I believe she was talking about the cheapness of our goods; I watched her, I saw her hand on the counter frequently; she went out of the shop after she had paid for what she had got, and when she had got a few paces from the door I went after her and brought her back into the shop; she dropped the print from under her petticoats; I gave her in charge of a constable.

JOSEPH GREGORY . Q.Are these the goods that you took from the prosecutor - A. They are.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of it - A. They are valued at twenty two shillings; it was laying on the counter, I did not see her take it, large as it was; she moved very slowly when she went out of the shop and talking to us of the price of our goods; I rather suspected that she had it between her legs.

Q. How far was she from the door when you went after her - A About eight or nine yards; when I brought her back in the shop the things dropped from her.

Gregory. The prisoner downed upon her knees and begged for mercy; when I took her to the watchhouse she begged I would solicit Mr. Burnett for mercy for her as she was in distress.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased these articles, I had nothing to do with that print; they certainly must have been dropped there before; I certainly wrote to him for mercy; it is a disgraceful thing to be brought into a court, guilty or not guilty.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18080601-47

411. THOMAS RUSSELL and JOSEPH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , three printed copies of the Asiatic Annual Register, value 1 l. four printed copies of Fergusson's Lectures, value 1 l. two printed copies of Fergusson's Astronomy, value 10 s. three printed copies called Oddy on European Commerce, value 5 l. eleven other printed copies called Cicero's Letters, with Remarks, value 11 l. the property of James Asperne , in his dwelling house.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. On the morning of April the 26th. did you go to the house of Mr. Asperne, in Cornhill - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you go down stairs into the cellar - A. I did.

Q. How soon after you had concealed yourself there did the dustmen come - A. About four or five minutes.

Q. How many dustmen went down - A. Two.

Q. Do you know who these dustmen were - A. The two prisoners at the bar; when they went down first, the younger man, Smith, took the shovel and filled the basket; they took a candle with them down in the cellar.

Q. So that you had the means of seeing them distinctly - A. Exactly. The younger one Smith filled the basket, and Russell took it up stairs; when Russell came for the second basket, Russell said is there any thing in this, speaking of the second basket; Smith said no, it shall be in the next; then Russel took the candle and looked at the back part of the cellar, and went to where there was some wood; he looked to see if there was any body there, he went then to the coal cellar, and went to where they clean the knives; he returned to the basket and took this bundle and put it edgeways into the, basket and covered it over with dust; he took it from the left hand side of the cellar warehouse, he took it from a place where there were five in a parcel, and took the others and covered the vacancy so that it should not be discovered.

Court. How many did he take away in the third basket - A. This one; then Russel took this one and the basket on his shoulder, Russell said to Smith there is one there, and I will put another in the next; then Smith went to the other side of the warehouse, and took this bundle, and put into the other dust basket and covered it with dust over it; I then threw down my concealment where I was in the cellar, and ran up stairs immediately, bolting Smith in the cellar; I took Russell in custody with the basket and this bundle on his shoulder before he got to the cart; I took him to the Compter directly; then I came back to the cellar and took the other prisoner, and took him to the Compter.

Mr. Gurney. When you came back to that cellar and found Smith, where had he put that parcel which you saw him put in the basket - A. On the coals.

Q. He had taken it out and put it on the coals - A. Yes.

Court. Then the other parcel had been removed from the dust basket and put on the coals - A. It had.

Mr. Gurney. Have you had them parcels in your custody ever since - A. I have.

Court. Which is Russel.

Prisoner. My name is Russell.

Cartwright. It was Russell that filled the basket and put the bundles in the basket.

Smith. I never laid hold of the shovel in my life.

JAMES ASPERNE . - Mr. Gurney. You are a bookseller we all know, what parish is your house in - A. St. Michael 's, Cornhill.

Q. We understood that Cartwright was placed in your cellar by your desire - A.Exactly.

Q. Had you deposited works in quires in your cellar - A. Yes; it is a warehouse where we keep part of the stock in the cellar.

Q.Was there among them three copies of the Asiatic Annual Register - A. Yes, there is.

Q. What is the value of them - A. One pound; four other copies of Fergusson's Lectures, value one pound; two copies of Fergusson's Astronomy, value ten shillings; three copies of Oddy on European Commerce, value five pounds; eleven copies of Ciceros' Works with Remarks, they are worth eleven pounds; these are contained in these two bundles; I could not purchase them so low as a dealer.

Q. Was you at home when the two prisoners came in - A. I was, I saw them come in; I assisted the officer, I saw him apprehended in the court.

Russell's Defence. I leave it to the court, it is the first offence; I hope you will have mercy on me.

Smith said nothing in his defence.

RUSSELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-48

412. MARY WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , eighteen yards of calico, value 15 s. the property of Robert Potter .

ROBERT POTTER . I am a linen draper , my house is locally situated in the City of London.

Q. Have you any partners - A. Not any.

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am servant to Mr. Potter On the 14th of April, between the hours of two and three o'clock, the prisoner came in the shop to look at some prints; I shewed her some that laid on the counter; she did not approve of them; I went to the shelf to take down some others, and the instant I took them down and turned my eyes towards the counter I saw her shuffling something under her petticoats, which led me to suspect her; I desired the porter to inform my master; my master came down stairs, he asked me who was the prisoner; she had bought two yards of print of me, and Mr. Potter took the money.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Potter in the hearing of the prisoner what you had observed - A. I did, Mr. Potter took the money for the print; then he said to her I believe you have got something which is not your own, he took hold of her; she resisted and was very abusive; she said no man should touch her.

Q. Did he attempt to search her - A. Yes; he told her to be quiet, he would send for a constable and have her searched in a room up stairs; while they were taking her up stairs, before she was half out of the shop, I observed a-piece of calico, in the middle of the shop, in a tumbled state; it had the appearance as if a person had attempted to fold it in a small parcel to carry it away; I am sure it was one of the article for sale in my master's shop, it had my master's mark on it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understand this I your shop mark on it; do not goods sold at your shop go out with the shop mark on them - A. Yes; sometimes at the finish of a piece.

Q. How do you know that this piece might not have been sold before with the shop mark on it - A. I will not venture to swear that there was not precisely the same mark on a piece of calico sold before.

Court. Had you sold an entire piece of calico to this woman - A. I had not; she bought two yards of print at a shilling a yard.

JOHN SALMON . I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of this woman; I found her in the shop, a little way from the counter; the prosecutor ordered me to take her up stairs and search her.

Q. Before you went up stairs had you looked on the spot where she was standing, to see if any thing was on the ground - A. I did not; I watched her for fear she should drop any thing. When I got her into the room; I searched her; I saw no property on her; Mr. Potter said he was very certain that he saw some property about her when he attempted to search her; the prisoner said she was quite innocent; Mr. Potter went out of the door; he brought in a piece of calico; he charged her with taking it; he ordered me to take her in custody; she set herself down in the arm chair and turned her arms into the holes of the arm chair to prevent me from taking her; I was under the necessity of sending for Dodson.

Q. Then you both together secured her - A. Yes; she then said she hoped we would overlook it; it was the first time, and she never was in a prison in her life.

WILLIAM BERRY DODSON . I was sent for by Mr. Potter; I found her up in the dining room; Mr. Potter charged her with robbing him of a piece of calico: I took the piece of calico along with the prisoner; she suffered me to search her; she was very quiet with me and said nothing.

Q. to Mr. Potter. What passed after your foreman gave you the information - A. Mr. Mitchell pointed out the prisoner to me; I then asked her what she bought, she told me two yards of print at a shilling a yard; I folded the print up and took the money for it of the prisoner and gave her the piece of print; I told her that she had some property about her that we suspected was not her own; she was then standing close by the counter; she denied the charge; I pulled her gown and apron of one side, I saw something white, which I supposed to be calico; I then moved her about three yards from the counter; there I kept her and sent for an officer; when the officer came I gave her in charge.

Q. How did she behave herself before the officer came - A. I did not mean to say how she behaved herself, but if you wish it I must. She behaved very riotously indeed; I had some very respectable customers in the shop; she said I was going to ravish her.

Q. Did you direct your eye to the spot of ground where she stood - A. I watched her very narrowly, and I am very much astonished I did not perceive the goods drop. After the constable came I picked them up myself.

Q. Were the goods picked up at the precise spot in which you held her - A. They were.

Q. Supposing a person had been looking at goods on the counter could these goods that you found by any accident have fell on that spot - A. It is impossible.

Q. Had she been removed up stairs before you picked

up the goods - A. I gave her in charge of the constable and was following her up stairs; Mr. Mitchell informed me that the piece of goods lay on the floor; I went back and found the goods upon the very spot where she stood.

Q. Did you charge her with having taken them - A. I did, and she denied it; I persisted in my charge and desired the officer to do his duty; at that time there was but one.

Q. How came the second to be sent for - A. The woman was very riotous, that was the occasion of my sending for the second officer; before the second constable came, she said she was extremely sorry, hoped I would forgive her and this was the first offence ever she had committed. The calico had my shop mark upon it; it cost me about ten pence a yard; there is eighteen yards of it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into Mr. Potter's shop; I asked the gentleman to let me look at some pieces of cotton for an apron; I choosed a piece; he cut me two yards of it; Mr. Potter came into the shop and asked me if I had not got some stolen property; I told him I did not know what he meaned; he said he was very certain I had a piece of Irish or a piece of print; I never laid my hand upon any thing in the shop.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-49

413. SARAH KETTEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , five handkerchiefs, value 4 s. 2 d. the property of Finney Sirdefield and William Sirdefield .

WILLIAM WATSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Finney Sirdefield and William Sirdefield ; they are linen drapers in Newgate-street .

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 11th of April last - A. I did, between twelve and one o'clock. At the time Sarah Kettel came to my masters' shop I was cutting off a man a handkerchief; Sarah Kettel asked me whether the price was sixteen pence or no; I told her I had said the price was fourteen pence, but I would cut her off one for a shilling; she then told me to cut her one off; I did, and left it on the counter.

Q. Was there any other person in the shop at that time - A. There was; there were both the Mr. Sirdefields; the young man and the boy; they were all engaged.

Q. Did you cut her one off - A. I did; she did not pay me; I then turned to the man, put his handkerchief into paper, took his money, and went to the window to see whether it was good; I then came back to the counter with intent to put her handkerchief up into paper. On my coming back to the counter I missed one of the two pieces of handkerchiefs which I had shewn to the man before and which the prisoner was looking at; I then went on the side of the counter that the woman was of, thinking it might have fell down; she was standing close by the counter; I could not see it there; I looked at the woman and I saw the corner of it under her gown; she was covering it up with her arm as fast as she could.

Q. How many handkerchiefs did that piece contain - A Five. I took hold of the handkerchiefs and asked her where she got them from; she told me she bought them in Cheapside; I directly then sent the boy for the constable; when he came I gave her in charge.

Q. Before you delivered her up to the constable did you see that the handkerchiefs were your master's property - A I did.

Prisoner. Did I not lay a seven shilling piece on the counter for you to take for the shawl - A. No; I am quite certain that you never offered me any money.

Q. to Watson. She did not attempt to bargain for or cheapen this piece that she had taken - A. No; nor did she tender any money.

Q. Did you understand that the whole she attempted to buy was this single handkerchief - A. Yes.

JAMES WOODMAN. I am a beadle. I was sent for to take charge of this woman; I took her in custody. I have had the piece of handkerchiefs ever since.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this shop to buy a cheap shawl; he shewed me several; he said he would warrant this to be a strong shawl; and then I seeing these shawls lay by me I turned myself round to look at them; he said I have cut your shawl off; I said I have put seven shillings down on the counter; I had my gown tucked up under my arm; I looked round to look at these shawls; he then said I came in as a shoplifter; I said I did not understand it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-50

414. JOHN OVERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , one flat, value 2 s. 6 d. and forty two pound weight of butter, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Stephen Cullum and George Cullum .

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I am servant to Messrs. Cullums, buttermen , Clare Market. On the 9th of May, about a quarter before eight in the morning, I went to Newgate-street to receive some flats of butter from the waggon; they were pitched in the street; I was leaning against them, and the prisoner came by and asked me and my fellow servant to have something to drink; we went to the first house from where the butter stood in Newgate street , about fifty yards from the butter.

Q. How many flats of butter might there be - A. Twenty five.

Q. Did you leave them in any body's care - A. No; he drank his glass and threw down sixpence and went away; he and my fellow servant had a glass of gin each and I had a glass of rum and milk; I had a slight suspicion of him going away abruptly; I had two pence to pay; when I got down to where the flats of butter were, I found only twenty four, there was one missing; in consequence of that I made enquiry; and from information I went down Warwick-lane; upon Ludgate Hill I got sight of him; he had the flat with him; my fellow servant took the flat of butter from him; I took the flat and my fellow servant took him to Mr. Cullum's shop in Newgate market; there he was delivered to Woodman the beadle.

Q. Do you know how the prisoner got his living - A. No; I heard he kept a chandler's shop at the Colonade Brunswick square; I have seen him before many times at the shop in Clare market; he has dealt for butter there.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am a porter. On Monday the 9th of May, as I was going down Newgate-street, I saw the prisoner go down Warwick-lane with a flat of butter on his shoulder; my fellow servant, Griffiths, informed me there was a flat of butter lost; I pursued after the prisoner and overtook him on Ludgate Hill, by the church, with the flat of butter on his shoulder; I tapped him on the shoulder and asked him whose flat of butter he had got; he said it was his own; I took it off his shoulder, and I saw it was directed to Stephen Cullum , Clare Market; I told him he must go with me to Mr. Cullum's shop in Newgate Market; as I was going along Stationer's court, he begged me to let him go, he said he would give me a guinea if I would let him go, he was very sorry for what he had done; I told I would not take it; I asked him how he came to do it; he said he had a wife and family and he did it for want. I told him it was our loss and not our masters; he said he knew it very well; when he came to Mr. Cullum's shop in Newgate Market, he begged him to let him go, he said it was his first offence; he refused, and then he was charged with a constable.

STEPHEN CULLUM. I live in Clare-street, Clare Market; I am a butterman; I am in partnership with my brother, George Cullum . The prisoner was brought back to my shop and the flat of butter; it contained forty two pound; the butter has been sold.

Q.Is that the flat - A. I have no doubt of it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy, by the jury on account of his good character.]

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-51

415. MARY TOLEMAN , alias CRAWLEY ; was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , two yards of printed cotton, value 7 s. the property of George Bartrup .

LEVIL OLIVER. I am shopman to Mr. Bartrup, linen draper , 295, Holborn . On the 7th of January the prisoner came into the shop; she asked me to see some silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Did you shew her any - A. We never wait upon these kind of people. I took this remnant of print from her.

Q. Did you see her take it - A. Yes; I was alone and saw it; I followed her out of the shop, brought her back to the door, and took it out of her hand, and I sent for a constable; I am confident it is my master's cotton, it has the shop mark on it; it hung on a horse in the shop.

Q. How comes it to be that she was not tried before this, in June - A. She made her escape from Read the officer as he was conveying her to prison; he was knocked down.

WILLIAM READ. I am a constable of Hatton garden; the prisoner was delivered into my custody on the 7th of January, near eight o'clock.

Q. How comes it that she has not been tried before this - A. I was taking the prisoner with another, they were tied together, down to the House of Correction; somebody coming along run against me, whether by accident or design I cannot say, then she made her escape; she has been since in New Prison for stealing a kettle, and was confined two months.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know the man's shop, nor any thing of it.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-52

416. JOHN WELFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , fifty yards of green baize, value 5 l. the property of Joseph Croten , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH CROTEN. I am an haberdasher , I live at No. 76, Drury lane ; I keep the whole house.

Q.Is that house in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields - A. It is.

Q. Do you know any thing of the loss of this green baize - A. At the time it was taken I was not at home.

JOHN BIRD. Q. What age are you - A. I am fourteen next August.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath - A. I have taken two oaths.

Q. What obligation does an oath impose upon you - A. A false oath is very wrong.

Q. Do you know that you call God to witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe that God will punish you in the next world when you have taken an oath, if you do not speak the truth - A. Yes.

Q. You are apprentice to Mr. Joseph Croten - A. Yes; I have been his apprentice two years.

Q. Did your master lose any green baize on the 26th of April - A. Yes, about twenty minutes after six in the evening.

Q. What part of the shop was it lost from - A. It was standing up, inside of the shop, tied up with a string near the door.

Q. Did you see the person take it - A. No.

Q. Before you was informed that it was taken, how long before that had you seen it safe yourself - A. I had seen it safe ten minutes before it was taken.

Q. How came you to learn that it was taken - A. Because the next witness brought it into the house; I knew it was my master's property by the marks.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner near your house that day - A. I had not; I served a man that came into the shop with two yards of tape at three halfpence a yard, that I believe to be connected with him.

Q. You cannot perhaps be certain of that - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Did you see the man in custody when the baize was brought in - A. No, the baize was brought in before they took the man; it has been in our custody ever since; this is the baize that was at my master's door, with four more pieces; it has my master's hand writing on it.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of the baize - A. Five pounds is the lowest; it cost me six pounds nine shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAM DEER. I am a carver and gilder, No. 9, York place, Banner street, Old St. Lukes. On the 26th

of April, about twenty minutes after six in the evening, I saw the prisoner he had nothing with him; I saw him enter the shop of Mr. Croten in Drury lane; I saw him stoop near the door where the baize was, I saw several pieces by the door, what they were I do not pretend to say; he was stooping by the green baize, I watched him, I saw him cut the string, and take up two pieces of green baize; he crossed over the way from Mr. Croten's shop with the two pieces and he went into Clare court; I looked at him very hard and followed him. I called out stop thief several times. I was joined by several other people in the cry, upon my crying out stop thief; he ran when the report became general of stop thief; some one made a thrust at the prisoner as if to take him; immediately the baize fell from him on the ground; I picked up the green baize; the other people pursued him.

Q. You was not present when he was secured - A. I was not.

Q. Are you quite sure that he was the man that took the green baize - A. I looked upon him very hard, because I thought I should be called upon. I am quite positive he is the man; I brought up the baize and took it to the shop; he was not brought back while I was there; I saw him on Thursday the 28th following, in the evening, at Bow street; this was on the Tuesday.

Q. Did you then recollect his person - A.Perfectly.

Q. You staid no longer than to deliver the baize - A. No; I delivered it to the young lad in Mr. Croten's shop.

Q. Was he dressed then as he is now - A. No, he had a great coat on then.

Q. Are you quite sure the green baize was within side of the shop - A. I am perfectly sure it was inside of the shop.

JOHN WILKINSON . I keep the Green Man public house, Bow street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on this 26th of April - A. Yes; I first saw him in Clare court, nearly opposite of the shop where the goods was taken from; I was taking to a friend in Clare court when I heard the cry of stop thief.

Q. Had he any thing with him when you heard the cry of stop thief - A. He had this bundle of green baize upon his shoulder: the prisoner was running; I fronted him as he was coming towards me, I attempted to stop him, he chucked the property at me; I followed him from Clare court into Wych street, he turned down Blackmoor street and into Drury lane, and at Astley's I saw he was getting the start of me, I called out stop thief; I never lost sight of him, he was stopped in my presence; I went up to him in a second after he was stopped; I am quite positive that he is the man that threw down the baize; when the man stopped him I saw him put his hand into his pocket and drew out his knife.

Q.Had he time to open it - A. No, he had not time to open it; I seized his hand to prevent mischief; I secured him and brought him back to Clare court; they told me the shop where the property was taken from; then I took him to Bow street.

Prisoner. Did you see the knife in my hand - A. I did; I laid hold of your thumb and wrenched it back; the knife fell and a boy picked it up.

Q. Did I make any attempt with the knife - A. You did not, you might.

Court to Deer. Did you see him open the door - A. He pushed the door open; the door went on a pulley I believe.

Bird. The door we keep on a leaden pulley.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-53

417. FREDERIC EDGAR was indicted for that he on the 1st of April , upon Sophia Batley violently did make an assault, and her the said Sophia Batley against her will feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

The prosecutrix and witnesses not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-54

418. JOSEPH MOODEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of April , privily from the person of James Bowden , a handkerchief, value 6 d. two hundred and six pounds in monies, numbered, a bank note, value 20 l. a bank note, value 10 l. a bank note, value 5 l. and a promissory note, value 50 l. his property.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-55

419. HELEN ALLISON was indicted for that she about the hour of twelve at night, on the 7th of May , being in the dwelling house of George Thomas , did steal a bonnet, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a shawl, value 8 s. a pair of stays, value 1 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. six caps, value 4 s. two binders, value 6 d. three ribbons, value 4 s. a pair of shoes, value 6 d. three pair of silk gloves, value 1 s. the property of Martha Horsey ; and a shawl, value 6 d. the property of George Thomas .

GEORGE THOMAS . I am a journeyman smith , I live at No. 16, Clerkenwell close, in the parish of St. James .

Q. Do you keep the house - A. No, the house is let out in tenements; I have the ground floor, one room; the landlord does not live in the house; the prisoner fell out with her husband, and I let her sleep three nights in the room with my sister, till the prisoner had made it up with her husband.

Q. The prisoner is a married woman - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sleep there likewise - A. Yes, we have two beds, it is a large room; I am a married man; me and my wife and three children slept there. On Saturday night the 7th of May I let this woman in about twelve o'clock at night, she brought her supper in her hand; I went to bed, and she sat by the fire to eat her supper, I just got in a sleep, this woman had been plundering my sister's box.

Q. You did not see that - A. No; she had been outside of the door and came in again; I awaked just as she came in the room, I saw her take an apron off my sisters bed; she said she must go out in the yard.

Q. Where was your sister then - A. She was in bed and asleep; when she went out I put my breeches on and looked after her, I could not see her at the door; I went back and awaked my wife and sister both, I told them they had been robbed; I saw the two boxes had been taken out of their places, I looked into the

box, I found something was taken out; I went in search of the woman, I could not find her that night; on Sunday evening I found her concealed in a privy in Pear Tree court, that is the next court; when I found the woman she asked me what I wanted; I asked her what she had done with the things besides what she had got on; she replied if you prosecute me you cannot get the other things, I have lost them; these what I have got on you may have; I took her to my home, and charged a constable with her; she gave the constable the clothes that belonged to my sister and my wife.

Q. What is her husband - A. A journeyman smith.

MARTHA HORSEY. Q. You are George Thomas 's wife's sister - A. Yes; my brother awoke me when he found the things lost; I looked at my box and saw it empty; before I went to bed I saw the things all safe. I lost all the thing mentioned in the indictment; I am a servant out of place, I came away from my place with a violent fever.

Q. When she was brought back what did you find upon her - A. She had my bonnet on, a pair of shoes, a pair of gloves, apron, stockings, and a white handkerchief.

Q. to Thomas. Where is the property - A. Joseph Raymond the constable has got it.

JOSEPH RAYMOND was called, but not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-56

420. FRANCIS SPENCER and ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Thompson , on the 1st of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a handkerchief, value 10 d. two guineas, half a guinea, three seven shilling pieces, and four bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

WILLIAM THOMPSON. I am a Greenwich pensioner .

Q. When did you meet with this assault - A. On the morning of the first of May, between one and two o'clock, I met with Frances Spencer in Ratcliffe highway, I was in liquor, I could not find my way home; I I asked her to shew me the way home, instead of shewing me the way home she took me to her apartment in Seven Star alley, St. George's in the East ; I told her that was not the house I wanted her to shew me; she said I might stay there all night, she would not shew me any further I sent her for a drop of liquor; she brought the money back, she said it was bad; she did not return me the seven shilling piece; I sent a half guinea next, she brought some gin; she said she could get nothing to eat it was too late.

Q. How much liquor did she bring - A. I cannot recollect whether it was a pint or half a pint; I was a little in liquor between ten and eleven o'clock; one began to beat me with the poker and the other with the fender.

Q. Then you slept there I suppose - A. I was sitting on the foot of the bed, with half of my clothes on and half off.

Q. I suppose you laid down and took a nap - A. I do not recollect at all; I was sitting on the foot of the bed all the time to the best of my knowledge. I could not lay down nor could I walk.

Q.How came you to stay there from between ten and eleven o'clock, till one in the morning - . I was not able to stand on my legs or else I would not have staid there so long; they beat me so I was hardly able to walk, they would have murdered me if I had not got assistance; the constable came up; when she saw the constable come she said she was sorry she had not murdered me at first. They took all the money I had from me.

Q. When did they take the money from you - A. Before they began to beat me.

Q. Which of them took the money from you - A. I do not know; the constable found the money, they took two guineas, half a guinea, and three seven shilling pieces.

Q. How did the constable come - A. I cried out for assistance; some of the people in the street went for a constable.

Q. When you come there did you find the prisoner Smith - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not go to bed with the prisoner Smith - A. No, not to the best of my knowledge.

Q. On your examination you said I met the prisoner Smith in the street, I went with her to her room, I remained there till about five o'clock in the morning. I went to bed with Spencer, when I awoke I discovered the prisoner Smith. I found I had lost four one pound notes; I then challenged the prisoner with the robbery; which is the truth what you then said or now - A. I speak the truth; I told the justice the same.

Q. When did Smith come into the room - A.Ann Smith was in the room when I came home.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a constable belonging to the public office, Shadwell. On the first of May a young man came to me, he said there would be murder done in Seven Star alley, at the lower house on the left hand side; he shewed me the room. I found Spencer's arms bloody from her finger up to her elbow; I found the man in the room bleeding at different parts of his head; he said he was struck with a fender by Spencer, and a little woman had struck him with a poker; Smith was not there, she came in a few minutes; I said to Spencer why did you rob this man and want to murder him; she said I am very sorry and made use of very bad expressions that I had not murdered him; she said she would not be searched there but she would in the other room; the rooms were all over blood; I found this protection box. Ann Spencer had the protection box; in the protection box was two one pound notes, a half guinea, three seven shilling pieces, and a red pocket handkerchief that the man, had; I found the certificate of the discharge of the man it laid on the floor, and likewise some gentleman's address where he took some prize money. I found on Spencer a few halfpence which the magistrate ordered me to give her; she said it was his money, but he gave it to her.

Q. You did not find the other two one pound notes - A. I did not; Smith had been to a Jew's in the alley there; he keeps a bad house.

(The property produced and identified.)

Spencer's Defence. I met the man between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night, he had another young lass with him; he asked me to have something to drink, I said no, let him go with his own woman; he said he would not go with her; he gave me a seven shilling piece to get something to drink, he had only seven shillings in silver in the morning, he

asked me to give him something to drink; I said no I would not; he said I should get up; he struck me with the fire shovel. I too up the fender to bar the blow off; the other young woman was not in the room at all; when she saw him beating me she came and wiped my hands with her apron; the tin-box is not his; I have had it ever since the beginning of last summer.

Smith's Defence. I know nothing of the affair, nor about the money; there was a terrible piece of work, I ran up stairs and wiped her nose. Mr. Brown took me. I know nothing at all about it.

Q.(to Brown.) Was Smith's hands bloody - A. Yes, they were both obliged to wash themselves before I took them out of the house; the water was as bloody as though it came from a beast.

SPENCER, GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-57

421. SARAH BURGESS , alias JONES , and HANNAH GAGAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , twenty four yards of printed cambric, value 2 l. and fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 14 s. the property of Samuel Hoskins , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL HOSKINS. I live at 222, Shadwell High street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwel , I am a linen draper . I can only speak to the property.

ROBERT GREATHEAD . Q. You are shopman to Mr. Hoskins. - A. Yes. On the 29th of April, between six and seven o'clock, the two prisoners came into the shop together, they said they wanted a gown. Gagan had a brown great coat on and the other had a cloak on. The first thing that I shewed them was twenty four yards of buff printed cambric, they both made answer that they did not like a buff colour. I left it on the counter and proceeded to shew them many more; I found a great difficulty in finding one to please them, but at last after giving a great deal of trouble they fixed upon one pattern; they did not want to take the gown with them but to pay three shillings on account, and laid the gown by till the rest should be duly paid.

Q. What was it to come to - A. Seven yards at one shilling, and ten pence a yard; the next morning I missed this twenty four yards of buff printed cambric; we were shutting up the shop when they came in, and we had no person in after them nor the next morning; there were some customers in at the same time, people that we knew very well; they left before they went; one of them lived with us, and the other is a responsible tradesman.

Q. What time did you miss it the next morning - A. Between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Did you ever find the things again - A. They have owned to it, but we have never found it; about that day three weeks, the prisoner Gagan came in, she wanted a piece of cotton for a frock; I knew her again. I took the identical pattern which they had laid by; I asked her if she and another person had not laid that by, leaving three shillings on account; she said that Burgess did, she added that she had not spoke to her for a fortnight. I saw that she was affected; I told her that evening they were there I missed this twenty four yards of printed cambric; I told her I had given a description of both the persons that they might be apprehended in case I might be out of the way; that I was very glad I had the opportunity of apprehending her myself; I should send for an officer and have her taken in custody; the officer was sent for, and before he came she confessed to me that she did not steal this but the other prisoner Burgess stole it; that she did not know that she stole it till she crossed the street, and that she shewed it to her, and when she saw if she advised Burgess to take it back again. Burgess told her to mind her own business; when the officer came she gave information where Burgess was to be found, but it was not a true one.

Q. You never found the piece have you - A. We found fourteen yards more which they stole the same evening, it is in the court now. The prisoner Burgess before the magistrate convicted the other of stealing one gown on her back, and one in pawn which we have brought forward.

Q. Who was the other person in the shop - A. The boy which we have not brought here.

Burgess. The print that he had at the pawnbrokers, which is seven yards, I bought on Ludgate hill; I told him that I had a ticket that I had lost, and when he saw that seven yards, he said it was his property.

RBOERT BROWN. On the 20th of May, I was sent for to Mr. Hoskins to take a woman into custody; I found Gagan in the shop, he said that was the woman I was to take in custody; I asked her where she lived, she said in Bell court, Bell alley, Golden lane; Mr. Greathead said there was another woman concerned in the robbery; she told me if I would go to the corner of Long alley, at a pawnbrokers, I should find a person of the name of Burgess; we could find no such person there, she misled us; I received information from a woman in Bell court, that Burgess was at the George, in Compton street, Clerkenwell, there I found her; we then proceeded to a pawnbrokers on Snow hill. I searched her at the public house, and found some duplicates; we could find no property of Mr. Hoskins, we took them before the magistrate. Gagan acknowledged that she was there, that Burgess had taken the piece of print; she went across the way, she immediately asked her what she had got there, and desired her to take it back; Burgess told her to mind her own business; we had a hard matter to keep Burgess quite till Gagan was done; the magistrate asked Burgess what she had to say, she said that good for nothing hussey has told against me; that night she stole fourteen yards of print out of the shop; that gown on her back is part of it; and the other part is in pawn for seven shillings at the pawnbrokers Wellclose square. I will go and shew you where it is; accordingly I went there with Burgess, and there we found seven yards of print pledged for seven shillings; we could trace nothing of the twenty four yards. Burgess said she believed the other must have lost it.

Q. When Gagan accused Burgess with stealing the twenty four yards, did she deny it - A. She said that Gagan stole it.

Q. When Burgess said that Gagan stole the fourteen yards, what did Gagan say to that - A. She did not deny it.

Burgess. I told him I had one ticket which I had lost. I shewed him where it was in pledge, seven yards for seven shillings.

JAMES DALEY. I am a pawnbroker, No. 5, Ship

alley, Well close square.

Q. What is your master's name - A. Gideon Grisdall . The prisoners both came together; I took it in pledge on the 29th of April; seven yards of print for seven shillings, in the name of Mary Jones ; I am sure these are the two women; I gave them a duplicate.

Gagan's Defence. I bought the gown on Ludgate hill, I gave eighteen pence a yard for it; he asked me whether I had not a gown put by, he said did I not take a piece of cotton; he said if I would only own to taking of the cotton he would take four shillings a week for it; I told him I could do no such thing, I never had it.

Greathead. I know the pattern very well; there were exactly fourteen yards of it; I am sure it was our own cotton, they had divided it exactly; we went immediately and saw the cotton was gone; they had tore the fag end off.

Burgess's Defence. I bought that cotton and gave eighteen pence a yard for it on Ludgate hill; this young woman bought a gown about a fortnight before, she gave me a pattern when I bought mine; I pledged it on purpose to pay off another; and when I saw another that I liked better, I paid three shillings off it. He told me he kept them in general six months; I told him I should fetch it between this and Whitsuntide.

Q.(to Greathead.) What is the worth of the cotton - A. About two shillings and two pence a yard.

BURGESS, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 20.

GAGAN, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-58

422. SAMUEL WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , two trunks, value 10 s. twenty five yards of Irish cloth, value 50 s. eleven petticoats, value 21 s. ten gowns, value 2 l. 10 s. two yards of cambric, value 5 s. ten pair of gloves, value 10 s. eight pair of stockings, value 12 s. two yards of dimity, value 5 s. a Morocco case, value 1 s. four yards of black lace, value 5 s. and a spencer, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Simpson , in a boat, on the navigable River Thames .

THOMAS SIMPSON . On the 11th of May, I was at Hungerford stairs waiting for my boat coming from the city. I keep a boat both for goods and passengers ; I waited at Hungerford till about two o'clock; she came from the city. I stood upon the stairs when she came in; I saw the two trunks and the prisoner in the boat.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know. I went up the stairs to go to my house with my lad from the boat; my lad had rowed him from the city; I said who is that man, he said he had given him a cast from Blackfriars; I returned and went down the stairs and my lad likewise; and when I came to the boat's head, good god said I them trunks are out of the boat and the prisoner too; I turned round to the coal wharf; I saw one of the trunks at the corner of the gateway.

Q.Who had them at the corner of the gateway - A. I suppose this man, the prisoner; my lad found one at the other end of the wharf on a barge.

Q. Whose wharf is that - A. Mr. Cranage's coal wharf at Hungerford.

Q. Then you yourself do not know how they came on that wharf - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoner with them at all - A. No.

Q. Then all you know is that you lost two trunks from your boat, the prisoner was there when you saw the trunks in the boat, and when you returned the prisoner and the trunks were gone - A. Yes.

MARY MILLS . I live at No. 7, Bridge street, Blackfriars. I delivered the trunks to the waterman's apprentice.

WILLIAM BIMMISH . Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Simpson - A. Yes.

Q. You received two trunks from Mary Mills - A. Yes, I put them in my boat at Blackfriars; when I took these two trunks in the boat, I saw the prisoner standing on the barges; he asked me to give him a cast; I gave him a cast to Hungerford; when he came there he said he would go to Putney; I left him in the boat and went up along with my master for the cheese; when I came back I missed both the trunks and the man too; I had got some cheese on my shoulder; I throwed them down; I looked round, I saw the prisoner going with one of the trunks on his shoulder up Mr. Cranage's wharf.

Q. Where was the other - A. On a barge; I cried out stop thief; I took the trunk from the barge and put it in the boat; he was stopped, and I put the trunk that he had on his shoulder in the boat; I lost sight of him.

Q. How soon afterwards was he stopped - A. In the course of five minutes.

Q. Are you sure this is the man you saw with the trunk on his shoulder - A. Yes; I am sure he is the man.

DAVID MACKEVOY . I am a waterman.

Q. Do you ply at Hungerford - A. Yes; I was eating my dinner at Hungerford, I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran out of the door, I heard Mr. Simpson say that it was the second time that he was robbed; I turned round the Globe door, I saw the prisoner running along by the bottle warehouse very fast; I ran after him, he run up Hungerford, and up Church lane; he went up Church court singing out, stop thief, there he goes; he was crying out just at the head of me, stop thief, there he goes.

Q. Was any body running before you - A. No, not a soul; I was the next person after him; he ran up Duke's court; he stopped to tie up the handkerchief on his leg, and there I catched him by Mr. Payne's the bookseller; he went behind the watchhouse.

Q. Did you lose sight of him - A. No; he was very remarkable by having this handkerchief round his leg; I did not lose sight of him at all.

Q. Then you secured him - A. Yes; coming along Duke's court, I asked him what he robbed the poor waterman for; he said it was his intention to rob him.

Prisoner. That is false, I never said it was my intention to rob him.

Witness. The same words he said when I bought him to the public house and gave him up to the officer.

JOHN GEORGE . I take care of the boats and keep the shores clean; as soon as the waterman went up, they left the prisoner in the boat, I saw him, I was close to the boat; the prisoner came out of the boat and took both the trunks; he had one on the right shoulder, and the other on the left; he came over the head of the boat, up a plank into the barge, and there he dropped one of the trunks down in the barge, and the other he dropped under the arch way.

Q. Are you sure he is man - A. I am certain he is

the man.

ROBERT TOWNSHEND . I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow street; these are the two trunks.

Q. to George. Are these the two trunks that the prisoner had - A. They are the two trunks that he had.

Q. to Mrs. Mills. Are these your two trunks - A. These are my two trunks; these are the same that was delivered to go by Simpson's boat; they contain twenty five yards of Irish linen quite new, it is worth two pounds ten shillings; eleven dimity petticoats, value one pound; ten gowns, a piece of cambric, ten pair of gloves, sundry pieces of muslin, some black lace, and a spencer.

Q. Are the whole of these worth forty shillings - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself upon the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-59

423. JOHN COMMINS , alias BLEY , was indicted, and the indictment stated on the 12th of April, in the 42nd year of his Majesty reign, that the honourable sir Simon Le Blanc , knight, one of his Majesty justices of the court of King's Bench, did make a certain order reciting that his Majesty had been graciously pleased to extend his royal mercy to the prisoner and several other offenders, who were liable to be punished with death by the several trials of court martial, that is to say that John Commins , together with others, on condition of their being severally confined for certain times, and kept to hard labour on the river Thames, the prisoner for the term of his natural life; and it further stated that he was delivered to the superintendant legally appointed for the charge of offenders sentenced for hard labour on the said river, in pursuance of the said conditional pardon, and that he afterwards on the 21st of September in the 42nd year of his Majesty's reign at Woolwich, in Kent , without any lawful cause did escape from his place of confinement .

Another count in like manner, only stating it to be a different time.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am clerk to Mr. Hoskins, who superintends the convicts at Woolwich; I have a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I received from the the secretary of state's office.

Mr. Gurney. Were you clerk at that time - A. Yes.

Q. Did you yourself receive it at the office - A. I did.

Q. You did not receive the prisoner at the same time - A. I presume I did not.

Q. Perhaps you never received the prisoner at all - A. I must have seen him twice, but I do not know him.

Q. All you prove is that you received that paper from the secretary of state's office - A. I can prove the two signatures; I saw Mr. Templer and Mr. Barlow resign it on Saturday.

Q. This is a paper you received five years ago, and that paper you took to Mr. Templer and Mr. Barlow for them to re-sign it - A. I did.

Court. Did you apply to Mr. Barlow, clerk of the crown, for that; on whose behalf did you apply - A. As the prosecutor, on my own behalf, as I might be able to prove it.

Q. What did you ask him for - A. I went to get a copy of the record, and at the same time I produced that certificate; they re-signed it that I might be able to prove it in court. (The certificate read)

WILLIAM BRIDLE . I am chief mate of his Majesty's Retribution Hulk, it lays off Woolwich, in the county of Kent; it is that side of the river.

Q. How long have you been chief mate - A. About three years; at the time Commins was received I was second mate of the ship; Commins was received on board.

Q. Who is the superintendant - A. Captain George Read; Mr. Hoskins is the overseer of the convicts; captain Read commands all the hulks on the river Thames; Mr. Erskine is the overseer of the convicts.

Q. Who is superintendant - A. I suppose that it alludes to the captain, commanding the ships, him or his deputies.

Q. Then you do not know who is the person that is called the superintendant - A. Captain Read, and in his absence the chief mate.

Q. Did you see this person come on board - A. My memory will not allow me to say.

Q. Did you receive any order - A. I saw no order; it is about five years ago.

Q. How long did he continue there - A. He was on board the hulks four or five months, somewhere thereabouts, I cannot exactly say.

Q. What became of him at the end of that time - A. He made his escape.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-60

424. SARAH MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , three guineas, two half guineas, a seven shilling piece, and eight shillings, the property of Alice Elias widow , in the dwelling house of Jacob Moses .

ALICE ELIAS . I am a widow; I have a stall in the Exchange; I went down to my son at easter time for two or three nights; when I go to bed it is a rule with me to put my pockets under my head; I had been there two or three nights and then I went home; I had no suspicion. I put my hand into my pocket and missed three guineas; in about ten days afterwards I went down to my son's again; before I went to bed I counted my money; when I got up in the morning, I found my pocket further under the pillow than usual; when I went down stairs the prisoner said she was glad I was come down, I said why; she said I am going next door to my aunt's; when she was gone I told my money, I missed three guineas, two half guineas, a seven shilling piece, and eight shillings; the prisoner was servant to my daughter; I went up stairs and told my daughter; my son came down stairs and accused her with it; she denied it; he said if you will only give the money back we will say nothing about it; she still denied it.

JACOB MOSES . The prisoner lived servant with me; when I came down stairs my mother in law and the prisoner were together in the kitchen; she told me she had been robbed of some money; I told the prisoner that there were no strangers in the house; she denied it; I sent for an officer; I had suspicion as she had been out to a person she called her aunt, I find it is not her aunt; I went with the officer to her, he searched her pocket and found a half guinea; the aunt directed us to a box, in which we found a handkerchief belonging to the prisoner; we found three guineas and a seven shilling piece tied up in the corner of it.

SARAH BROWN . Q. Are you the prisoner's aunt - A. I am her cousin; I live next door to Mrs. Moses; the prisoner came into my room in the morning, about half past seven o'clock, I was ill in bed; she said you have been very kind to me, in washing for me while I have been at Mr. Moses', she gave me half a guinea in gold, I never asked her how she came by it; I knew I was a common lodging house, they had sailors there, I thought they might have given it to her; I had a box that stood about a foot from the bed, I did not see her lift the lid, I heard it fall, whether she put any thing in I do not know.

JOHN SMITH . On the 30th of April, when I got to Moses' house he charged her with robbing his mother; she strongly denied it; I went to the aunt's, I found the aunt in bed; I found in the aunt's pocket half a guinea and a seven shilling piece; Sarah Williams was in the room, I found five shillings in silver on her; this handkerchief was in the box; in a corner of it I found three guineas, and a seven shilling piece.

Q. There is none of the money marked - A. Mr. Moses will swear to the handkerchief being the prisoner's.

Q. to Moses. Is that the prisoner's handkerchief - A. It is.

Q. to prosecutor. Is any of the money marked - A. Not as I know of.

Prisoner's Defence. The first money that my master gave me was half a crown. then he gave me a guinea, and then half a guinea, and another time a guinea, and a seven shilling piece for his own pleasure; I put it into my box, and afterwards I put it into my handkerchief.

Moses. I never paid her any money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-61

425. CATHERINE THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , a petticoat, value 5 s. a gold locket, value 10 s. a silver locket, value 5 s a garnet ring set in gold, value 30 s. a paste ring, set in gold, value 10 s. a shirt handkerchief, value 1 s. a cloak, value 1 s. a shawl, value 2 s. eight saucers, value 8 s. five cups, value 2 s. a milk pot, value 2 s. four dishes, value 4 s. four plates, value 4 s. a bason, value 2 s. two window curtains, value 3 s. two table cloths, value 9 s. a sheet, value 2 s. and a gown and coat, value 12 s. the property of William Patrick Donelly , in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

WILLIAM PATRICK DONNELLY . I live at No. 1, Charles street, Somers Town . The prisoner left my service on the 28th of April; she had lived with me eight months; upon finding that we had lost the articles I produced a search warrant; Craig, the constable, I, and my wife, went to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 22, Chapple path, Somers Town; the constable found the things in the room in a box.

ELIZABETH DONNELLY . I am the wife of Mr. Donnelly.

Q. Do you recollect what day it was you and your husband went to the room of the prisoner - A. About a week after she left my service. I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment two days after she left my service.

Mr. Alley. This poor girl, you had a good character with her - A.Yes; she behaved exceeding well during the eight months she lived with me, and she was treated with the greatest kindness.

WILLIAM CRAIG . Q. You are a constable - A. Yes. In consequence of a search warrant, I went to No. 22, Chapple path, Somers Town, on the 5th of May I searched the premises; I found a number of articles; I took all that Mr. and Mrs. Donelly claimed; there is a gold locket and these things; I proceeded to a house facing the small pox hospital; I found the prisoner there; I searched her and found this pocket book and these duplicates.

WILLIAM BAIT. I live at No. 22, Chapple path, Somers Town.

Q. On the 5th of May was the prisoner a lodger in your house - A. I am a lodger; she lived in the same room with me; I was at home when the officer searched her box; it was the box that the prisoner brought.

RICHARD DUNBAR . On the 4th of March I took in a gown and a petticoat; I believe of the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-62

426. MARY WHEELER and CATHERINE WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May , privily from the person of Andrew Wilson , a leather pocket book, value 6 d. a bank note, value 100 l. a bank note, value 50 l. a bank note, 2 l. and two other bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

ANDREW WILSON . Q. What are you - A. I do not follow any business particularly.

Q. When did you lose this pocket book - A. On the 17th of May; I went to the Swan in Rosemary lane for a cart to take a load of goods to my house; I was directed to Mr. Bolton's in Whitechapel; I met the prisoner Wheeler near the end of Essex street, Whitechapel; we went up Essex street together.

Q. What passed between you and her - A. She said would I give her something to drink; I went into her apartment in Essex street ; as I entered her room I felt a hustling, I missed my pocket book; there was nobody but Wheeler with me then.

Q. I do not understand you - you felt a hustling that is with a number of persons, here was only one - what time of the day was this - A. Soon after one o'clock; coming by Aldgate I took out my pocket book to look for a direction, I returned it into my pocket again; I do not know whether I felt it after that or no.

Q. When you went up in the room, you staid some time there I suppose - A. A very short time; when I missed my pocket book I asked her for it; she said she had not got it, and called out murder, when the prisoner White and a number of other persons rushed into the room; I thought myself in danger, I let the prisoner Wheeler go; White said if you give me a shilling I will tell you were she is gone, and I will endeavour to procure the book for you; I gave her a shilling, and then a second, and then a third, and a fourth, and then I found it was a trick.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. You live at Barking in Essex - How many does your family consist of -

A. No one but myself.

Q. You were quite sober - A. I think I was, I had drank a pint of ale.

Q. Was you sober, or as they call sober in Barking - A. I was sober.

Q. You did not go to her apartment to look for a cart - A. No.

Q. The last time you saw your pocket book was at Aldgate - A. Yes.

Q. How far is it from Aldgate to Essex street - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. You passed a great many of his Majesty's subjects from Aldgate to Essex street - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot say whether any of them took it - A. No.

Court. Was it never found - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-63

427. CAROLINA GRANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , a dollar, value 5 s. a half crown, and two shillings, the property of Thomas Dunn , privily from his person .

THOMAS DUNN . I lodge with Mrs. Ayscough in Bridges street, and I live with Mr. Murray, bookseller. On the 30th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was standing opposite of the corner of Bridges street in Great Russel street; the prisoner came about me, I desired her to go, I was talking to a friend at that time; I wished him good night and crossed the road and left him; on turning round I saw the woman following me down Brydges street , she came and catched hold of me several times; I told her. I would have nothing to say to her, I was going to bed; she slung herself about me, and picked my pocket; I felt her hand in my pocket, I laid hold of her by the arm and told her she had robbed me; I put my other hand in my pocket, I found a dollar, a half crown, and two shillings gone; I then told her if she did not immediately give it me I would take her to the watchhouse; she denied having it, and wanted me to go home with her; I told her as I did before, I would have nothing to do with her; I called the watch three times, no watch coming; three young men passed me; I desired them to send me the first watchman they saw; immediately I saw a watchman turn the corner, they called to him and he came to my assistance; I told the watchman the girl had robbed me; I heard the money drop into her pocket as I took hold of her arm; in taking her to the watchhouse she made several attempts to put her her hand in her pocket; I was obliged to pull her hand out; going through Covent garden I found her hand in her pocket and out fell a shilling or two; I desired the watchman to pick it up, she was taken to the watch-house; there was found upon her a half crown piece, two shillings, and a dollar.

EDWARD GREENWOOD . I am a beadle; a little before twelve o'clock the prosecutor came in the watch-house with the prisoner and two watchman, relating that he had lost a dollar, half a crown, and two shillings; she pulled off her pocket, I found half a crown, and two shillings upon her; he seemed to know one of the shillings; I took her into the yard, she stooped as if to pull up the heel of her shoe, which caused a suspicion in me that she had hid something in the gutter; I saw this dollar standing in the gutter on the ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I got that dollar out of the change of a half guinea that day; and I had four shillings in silver; he wanted to come home with me; I never saw a halfpenny of his money.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know one of the shillings - A. There is a star on the opposite side of the reading; the other shilling has a stamp upon it; I know both the shillings. She offered some money to the watchman; he would not take it.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-64

428. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May , a bottle, value 3 s. and five gallons of oil, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Vicars .

JOSEPH VICARS . I am an oil merchant ; I live in Paul's wharf, Upper Thames street . On Tuesday the 10th of May, I was standing at my bed room window, a little before seven o'clock in the morning, I saw my porter, Thomas Croft , and the prisoner standing together, they stood a little while in conversation; the prisoner then left him and went up the street; my porter came over the way and rung the bell; one of the servants let him in my gates that lead down to the wharf; I keep my oils at the back of my premises; I watched my porter; he opened the gates that lead into the street and went to a stable, which I have nearly opposite, of the other side of the way; while he was there a few minutes, the prisoner came with a basket in his hand and went down the gateway, leading to where my oils are deposited; immediately after Croft, the porter, brought the horse down the gateway; about five minutes after that I observed White go out of the gateway with a basket on his shoulder, and apparently something heavy in it; I immediately went out and followed him up St. Peter's Hill into Old Fish street; I asked him what he had got upon his shoulder; he said nothing of mine; I said I supposed he had got some of my property there; he immediately threw the bottle down with all the force he had upon the curb stones and broke it all to pieces; I tasted and smelt it; the bottle contained rape oil; it was of a similar quality to the oil that I had in the warehouse; it was a five gallon stone bottle. It appeared as if it had been full by the quantity spilled on the ground; it cost me four shillings and three pence a gallon. I secured him; some friends coming up at the time, I sent for a constable.

Q. What became of the porter - A. I took him up to Guildhall; Mr. Alderman Combe thought the evidence could not be brought home to him; they were obliged to let him go; I have never seen him since. I asked him how he got the oil; he did not make any answer particular; he did not like to be kept in the street; he desired to be taken into a public house.

Jury. When the basket was taken into your warehouse was it empty or had it any thing in it. - A. It appeared to be light; he was swinging it in his hand as he was carrying it.

Q. What may be the weight of five gallons of oil - A. About thirty seven pound; with the bottle forty three pound.

HENRY WILLIAM BRITAGE . I keep the Fortune

of War in Upper Thames street. On the Friday before that he came to my house with an empty basket, at half past seven in the morning; he called for half a pint of beer; he asked leave to leave the basket there till he called for it; I gave him leave. On Tuesday the 10th of May I saw him; he came about half past six in the morning and took the basket away. My house is about four doors from Mr. Vicars.'

Q. Do you know whether there was an empty bottle in the basket - A. The basket was empty.

OWEN JONES . I a publican on Bennett's Hill, about three hundred yards from Mr. Vicars'; there was a basket left at my house one morning; who left it I cannot say; the prisoner called for it on the same day that Mr. Vicars was robbed, I believe, but I cannot say.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a porter; I work for Mr. Perkins, chemist, Bennett's Hill.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen him; I do not know how he gets his living; I saw him on the morning he was taken, standing at the end of Mr. Vicars' warehouse; I went down their gateway to borrow a truck for my master; I left the prisoner there; he was alone and had nothing with him; I did not see him do any thing.

- VICARS. I am Mr. Vicars' son; I saw the prisoner talking to our porter in Thames street, a few minutes before seven o'clock.

Q. Had he any thing with him when he was talking to your porter - A. No; the gates were then shut; about half after seven o'clock I saw the prisoner come down the gateway with a basket in his hand.

Q. Did it appear to be light or heavy - A. He was swinging it about in his hand.

Q. Had he any business or employment down your gateway - A. None; there was no business carrying on there but our oil warehouse; in about five minutes he returned again; he had something covered with straw in a basket, which he carried on his shoulder, it appeared to be heavy; I and my father followed; when I laid hold of him we asked him where he got it; he said he did not bring it from our premises; my father said he was sure he did; before he said that, he chucked it upon the curb stones and broke it; it appeared to be a five gallon bottle; we sent for a constable; he stooped down and washed his apron in the channel, which was all over oil; I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. The porter is not here - A. No; we turned him away directly; I tasted the rape oil; it appeared to be of the same quality as the rape oil-in my father's warehouse.

JOSEPH COWARD. I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. Mr. Vicars charged him with stealing a bottle of rape oil.

Q. Did you see any oil in the street at the time you came up - A. Yes, a large quantity on the curb and part of it in the channel. The prisoner said to me, are you to take me; I said, yes; I was very sorry to see him in that situation; I had known him before; I asked him what could induce him to steal it; he said he was employed by a man at the warehouse to carry this bottle of oil to a pitching block at the corner of Fenchurch street.

Q. Did he say who that man was - A. No.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. He was a porter to Messrs. Howell and Atlee, Thames street.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent; I was hired by a man to carry it to a pitching block in Fenchurch street; he said he had got another house to go to; he would be there as soon as I was.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-65

429. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Percy Sadler .

PERCY SADLER . I live in Great Portland street, Cavendish square, I am a revenue officer of the excise . On the 13th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking in Bishopgate street in company with a lady.

Q. What part of Bishopgate street - A. About the midway between Sun-street and Union street; about ten minutes before I knew my handkerchief was safe.

Q. You have got side pockets to your coat - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A I did not until I received information from the lady that was with me, that a man was picking my pocket; I turned round immediately; I saw the prisoner close to me, I caught him by the collar and told him unless he instantly gave me the handkerchief that he had taken from my coat pocket I would knock him down; his reply was that he was innocent, how could I charge him with such a thing; as I held him by the collar, the lady said he has dropped your handkerchief, loud enough for him to hear; I looked upon the ground and saw the handkerchief laying by his feet; I picked up the handkerchief and saw it was mine; I took him into a shop and sent for a constable; it was a silk handkerchief worth two shillings.

Q. Did he appear to be deaf when you spoke to him - A. No; he answered me immediately.

Q. Are you quite sure that your handkerchief was in such a situation that it could not be dropped by an accident - A. Yes.

MARY AGNUS STEVENSON . I was with Mr. Sadler on the 13th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, when he lost his handkerchief; I observed the prisoner following of him few paces, which induced me to look round, I saw him in the act of drawing the handkerchief out of the right hand pocket of Mr. Sadler; I made a motion with my elbow to him that there was a man picking his pocket; I never took my eye from the man till he drew the handkerchief out; then he wound the handkerchief round his left hand with his right hand and put it into his bosom; Mr. Sadler turned round immediately and took him by the collar; the prisoner protested innocence; he took the handkerchief from his bosom; he held his hand behind him and dropped it on the street.

Prisoner's Defence. As you and your spouse was walking along, the handkerchief dropped from one or the other. Does it stand to reason that a man seventy years of age should do so; I never did such a thing in my born days; I picked it up in the street, I meaned to give it to the gentleman; he charged me with an officer.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and Publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-66

430. JOHN TORTOISESHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April, two boots, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of Benjamin Clark .

- BURNETT. I live at No. 23, Great Chapel street, Soho.

Q. What business are you in - A. I am in no business at present; I lived with Mr. Clark at the time the boots were taken; Mr. Clark lives at No. 8, Lower Holborn , a few doors from Castle street, in the City of London. On the 2nd of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop, there was no one in it but myself; I shewed him some boot tops; he asked the price of them; I told him some five shillings, some five and sixpence, and some six shillings; he said my lad I think you make a mistake; he asked me whether there was any body else there than me; I told him no; he asked me whether I could fetch any body belonging to the shop; I told him yes if he would wait a minute; he said do not be gone long because he could not stop; I went across the way, to the other shop I fetched John Clark , my young master; when I went back the man was gone. I looked round and missed two boots, they are not fellows; my young master pursued after the man; I waited in the shop; the prisoner was brought back in about twenty minutes with the two odd boots; we had the fellows of them in the shop; I am sure the prisoner is the man I left in the shop, and the boots are my master's property.

JOHN CLARK . I am the son of Benjamin Clark , the owner of these boots.

Q. Has your father any partner - A No.

Q. We understand his shop is in Holborn near to the end of Castle street - A. Yes.

Q. On the 2nd of April in the evening did this boy come over to you - A. Yes; I had stepped over the way from one shop to the other to speak to my father; the boy came from over the way and said I was wanted; when I came to the door I saw a man run out of the opposite shop from which the boy had come; I immediately ran after the man I had seen come out of the shop; he turned down Grays' Inn lane; I stopped him at last in Bell court, I never lost sight of him, he was returning to face me, the court is a thoroughfare, I suppose he did not know it; I threw him down; when he was falling he let one of the boots fall to save himself, the other he held; I brought him back to the shop; the boy said that was the man that came in for the boot tops; the prisoner desired me to let him go, it was the first offence that ever he committed; I sent for my father, I said if he was agreeable it made no difference to me.

Q. When you saw the goods did you know them to be your father's manufactory - A. Yes; there is my writing in them, they are two odd boots; I found the fellows to them in the shop.

Q. What is the value of the boots - A. They are worth a guinea.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming through Bell court, coming from my doctors, whom I have had medicine for three years, ever since I came from sea, I heard somebody halloo out stop him; I saw something lying down; I was going to stoop to pick it up; Mr. Clark knocked me down, he ran past me seven or eight yards, he came and asked me what I was going to do with the boot; I said I did not know; he said I had been stealing them out of his shop.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury.]

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-67

431. EDWARD TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , ten penny weights, twelve grains, of gold filings, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of John Lovell .

JOHN LOVELL . I am a working jeweller , No. 40, Aldersgate street ; the prisoner had worked for me near seven months on the 19th he left me; prior to that I had missed gold filings, which induced me to bring the box wherein it was contained out of my shop into my own bed room; the prisoner came in the morning at six o'clock, his usual time, as I imagined to his work; about eight o'clock in the morning I went into the shop, I found he had collected his tools together and left me

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How long was it before you caused him to be taken up - A. It was not more than two days afterwards.

Q. Did you know where he lived - A. Yes; I sent my lad after him, he could not find him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him afterwards - A. Yes, I had; I cannot say whether it was the next day or no.

Court You had conversation with him before he was taken up - A. Yes, once; he left my employ on the 19th of April, Easter Tuesday.

Mr. Knapp. When did you take him into custody - upon your oath did you take him into custody till the Saturday after - A. He was not taken into custody till the Saturday.

Q. What did you mean by telling the jury and my lord that it was not more than two days - A. I did not immediately recollect.

Q. He went away on the Easter Tuesday, Thursday was the day you had the conversation with him. and Saturday was the day he was apprehended - A. It was so.

Q. Did not you go to his house several times to see if you could see him - A. Yes, I did see him.

Q. Did not you tell the constable he was to take him up for leaving his work - A. No, for taking a beak iron.

Q. Did not the prisoner say it was his own iron - A. Yes.

Q. Did not it turn out to be the prisoner's beak iron - A. No: I claimed it as mine.

Q. You have not put it in the indictment - A. No, I mentioned it to the magistrate; the prisoner had pledged it; he told me if it would be of any service to me, if I liked I might take it out; so I sent my lad to take it out, the prisoner gave it me.

Q. Did you ever charge him with stealing these filings until the Saturday when you came before the magistrate - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner ever come after you to any house - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that - A. I mean to swear it.

Q. Did he not come after you at the time he was taken into custody - A. No, he was apprehended at a public house on Saffron Hill.

Q. Was not the prisoner desired to come to that public house and there he was apprehended - A. Yes; I left word with his master.

Q. And there you gave him the meeting - A. Yes; but he did not know that I was there.

FREDERICK MASTERS . I am a refiner; I am son in law to Mr. Woolman, Little Sutton street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Did the prisoner sell you any gold filings at any time - A. On the 19th of April the prisoner brought a piece of solid gold to the accompting house; it weighed ten penny weights and twelve grains.

Q. Have you got the piece now - A. No; it was made use of among other gold; it has been melted when it came there in a small crucible; he left it and called the next day, which is the usual way. I paid him the next day; it came to a guinea.

Q. What time of the day was this - A. He came about two in the middle of the day, and he called the next day about three o'clock.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know what quantity of filings you ought to have in that box - A. I do not; there were more than ten penny weights missing.

Q. You have boys have not you - A. I have two apprentices.

JAMES MEREDITH . Q. Do you know this man Taylor - A.Yes he worked for my master.

Q. Do you know any thing of your master missing any filings - A. Yes. On the 19th of April, when my master and the two lads were gone down to breakfast, the prisoner went to the cupboard where the gold filings was; he took out a little stone bottle out of it; he asked me if I would go and fetch him a little water to drink.

A. Did you go down - A. No, I took the bottle with me and stood behind the door; I looked through the crack of the door; I saw the prisoner leave his workboard and come to the cupboard; he took the box down where the filings was kept and put it on the lower shelf; my mistress called me down for a letter; I went up directly into the workshop and the box was removed into its proper place in the cupboard.

Q. When did you tell your master or mistress what you had seen - A. On the Wednesday morning, I told my master.

Q. What time on Tuesday did you see your master again - A. About half after nine o'clock.

Q. Had the prisoner left the shop then - A. No, he left the shop about one o'clock.

Q.(to Masters.) What time of day was it when the prisoner brought the gold to you A - . About two o'clock.

Q. You live in Sutton street, Mr. Lovell in Aldersgate street; what time would it require to melt filings into a solid mass - A. That would depend upon what fire he had, if he had a fire to light it would take an hour; and if he had a fire ready lighted it would not take half the time; and it would cool in a very short time.

Mr. Knapp. - (to Mr. Lovell.) I apprehend you could not swear to that piece of gold that was sold to Mr. Masters. - A. I could not.

Q. And the filings you could not swear to - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The box that Mr. Lovell alludes to, is metal filings. The tin box he puts what they call gold filings; the method of Mr. Lovell's work is all common; indeed the last metal that Mr. Lovell had was twelve shillings an ounce; and that gold that man had was forty two shillings an ounce; Mr. Lovell's metal I could not reduce it into a solid piece.

JAMES CROSSLEY . - Mr. Knapp. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Twelve years; he is a neighbour. I live in Blue anchor alley, I never heard any thing wrong of him.

Q. Have you had any dealings with him - A. I let him have three quarters of an ounce of gold. I had been fifteen years saving it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-68

432. BARTHOLOMEW WATERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , two glass lustre pans, value 5 s. one hundred and eleven glass drops, value 1 l. twenty eight dozen of gilt pans, value 14 s. four brass sockets, value 2 s. one brass hook, value 6 d. and a yard of brass chain, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Price .

THOMAS PRICE . I am a glassman in the Strand ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 11th of April I was walking down the Strand; when I got facing of my own window I saw the prisoner take some drops and put in his pocket, he was taking them from a lustre; I then went into my shop, it was about eight o'clock; he left work in a moment then. I was so much alarmed I said nothing to him that night about it; he went out. On the next morning about six o'clock he returned to his work again, I called him into the counting house, I told him I had seen him rob me the night before; I asked him where he lodged, he told me three or four places, but he never told me where he did lodge. I sent for an officer; Miller came and took him to Bow street.

Q. Did you afterwards find any of these things - A. I went with Miller and saw some of these things in Burleigh court, Burleigh street; we saw his wife there in the lodgings; we found the goods mentioned in the indictment; the pans I know to be mine, I believe them all to be mine; they have no particular marks, they are like our patterns; the glass drops he took away the night before were more valuable than those we found.

Q. Have you never discovered those drops he took away that night - A. No.

- MILLER. I am an officer of Bow street. I took charge of this man on the 12th of April; when we came to the office he told me where he lodged. I went with Mr. Price to his lodgings in Burleigh court; Mr. Price said he had robbed him; the prisoner said he had not.

Q. Did you shew him the things that were found there - A. I produced them in his presence before the magistrate; he told the magistrate that he brought them in his bundle from Dublin.

Q. to prosecutor. Is there any thing that you can particularize as yours - A. These pans are the same patterns as were in our shop.

Q. Can you venture to say that other shops cannot have pans of that make - A. I cannot.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - these articles are all my property; these spangles, that Mr. Price calls drops, I brought from Dublin with me; the other articles, the pans, I got them made

and had cut by my brother, I made them for a lady that employed me to make a pair of candlesticks; my brother cut them in this old fashioned way; the lady would not have them. The brass chain I made myself; I purchased the spangles, with a great many more articles. It is impossible for Mr. Price, or any body else, to swear to the things found on me; throughout Dublin and London there are similar articles, they are of the commonest sort; Mr. Price knows nothing of the trade. If I had had a mind to defraud Mr. Price of any articles these are not the things that I should take, when there were things of the newest patterns that would be worth something. There is no one in the trade that would give any thing for them; they are worth nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-69

433. JAMES TOLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1th of April , eleven deals, value 3 l. the property of James Jeffreys .

The case was stated by Mr Knapp.

JAMES JEFFREYS . Q. What are you - A. I am a victualler , living at the King's Arms, Wilkes street, Spitalfields.

Q. Had you any houses that you were finishing in that neighbourhood - A. I was building two houses in Grey Eagle street ; I had twenty three deals in the yard between the houses; I bought them of Mr. King; I had them in my possession ten months; I missed eleven on Easter Monday, between six and seven in the morning; I had seen them on the Saturday evening at six o'clock.

Q. In consequence of missing them on Monday morning, what did you do - A. I told the carpenter, Sherry, to go to his work; Sherry said he suspected they were in the neighbourhood; I said to him if you will follow your employ I will put up with the loss; he went away and came back again; in consequence of the information of Sherry, I went into the yard of Mr. Knight, a sawyer and timber merchant in Old Nicoll street, Bethnal Green; when I went in I saw some deals; I said, Sherry, them are my deals; there were ten standing by the saw pit.

Q. Did you know them by any mark upon them - A. Yes; I have had them in my hands at different times, and them deals being so long by me, and endeavouring to use them for the best purposes; four deals I know by the marks on them; there were the marks of three shores on one, and three nail holes, and one of the deals found was a very clean one, fit for mouldings; that was a yellow deal.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of these deals - A. Eight shillings a piece.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes; he lived in Lamb-street, Spital fields.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You knew him very well and he knew you - A. Yes.

Q. You and him took a bit of ground together - A. No, not taken the ground; I took the ground and he built the houses; we had some words and I discharged him.

Q. And after you discharged him, you spoke well of him and he of you; he and you were not good friends at the time these deals were lost - A. No, not very good friends nor no enemies; when I met him in the street, he did not look at me in a civil manner, or else I should have been ready to meet him.

Q. After you missed the deals you got Armstrong the officer, and you met the prisoner; he went with you to Mr. Knight's - A. Yes.

Q. And you know these ten deals to be yours - A. I swear to four in particular, and the others I have a perfect knowledge of.

Q. And you say you know one of them by the mark of a shore and by the nail holes - A. Yes; we had been taking down two houses; they had been standing some time; we have been using them from time to time; that brings me to a perfect knowledge of that board.

Q. So that you know the faces of all of them - A. Yes.

Q. What is the mark of the three shores; does your shores leave a different print from others - A. No; that is not likely; when we use a deal we look to the quality; it is the quality of the deal as well as the marks I know it by.

Q. That makes you, a cautions man; swear to the deal - A. Yes.

Q. Your deals are very remarkable, they have some nail holes; your nail holes are different from all others - A. No.

Q. You are of the same opinion now as when you found them in the timber yard - A. Exactly.

Q. And you have always said you have maintained that opinion. Have you never said that you was satisfied that he was innocent - A. Never in my life.

Q. And that you would rather have given fifty pounds than to make the charge - A.Never; and here I am upon my oath, I never said anything of that kind in my life.

Court. When you went to Knight's was he in custody of Armstrong - A. Yes.

PETER KING . - Mr. Knapp. You are a timber merchant - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Jeffrey, the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sell him any deals - A. A great many.

Q. Have you been shewn any deals which were found at Knight's - A. Yes.

Q. Were any of them those that you sold to Mr. Jeffreys - A. Yes, by the general appearance.

Mr. Gurney. All you mean is they are the same kind of deals - A. Yes; they are the same length and the same thickness, and of the same quality.

Jury. What deals are they - A. They are Frederick stud deals.

Mr. Knapp. Was there any thing particular found on any of the deals, that particular made you recollect them - A. There was one deal that was very curly.

MR. SHERRY. Q. You are a carpenters; you work for Mr. Jeffrey - A. Yes; I was employed to finish some houses in Grey Eagle street, I saw the deals there on Saturday evening six o'clock. On Monday morning I missed them eleven deals; I found ten on the same morning at Mr. Knight's deal yard in Old Nicolls street. I knew them as soon as I saw them before; I got into the yard; I knew them; there were eight of them standing up inside by the gate and two of them laying down by the saw pit.

Q. Are you able to say whether any or all of them are Mr. Jeffrey's deals - A. I can, some.

Court. What length are they - A. Some twelve foot, some eleven, and some ten. This is Mr. Jeffreys deal

it has three nail holes; the other deal has a knot.

Jury I may have ten deals in my yard like these.

Sherry. There is four deals that I know; this deal has a chop at the end.

Jury. That is a chop when they were timber, before they were deals.

Sherry. This is the fourth deal; I know that deal, it has a large swell; I took particular notice of it, it is a very irregular deal.

JOHN MURPHY . - Mr. Knapp. Do you know any of the deals - A. I have the knowledge of all the deals, and that last deal I can swear to. About seven months ago the plumber came to lay on a pipe for the water; there were twenty three deals in Grey Eagle street; Mr. Jeffrey desired me to remove them to the adjoining house, and one of these deals he took notice of; instead of one of the edges being square is is round; it is a very rough shaggy deal, one of the ends is round, and a knot in the middle with a hole in it; I made some marks on it with the paving hammer, chopping some wood for the plumber to make a fire.

WILLIAM JEFFREYS . Q. You are the brother of the prosecutor - do you know these deals - A. I believe the whole of the deals that were found at Mr. Knight's are my brother's; I have looked at them a great many times, and put them of one side, not being fit for the purpose; I am sure they are the deals, equally the same as I am of the tools I work with. I was in the employ of my brother, and had the care of the work.

EDMUND KNIGHT - Mr . Knapp. You are a sawyer and timber merchant - A. Yes, in Old Nicoll street. On the 18th of April I received, between seven and eight o'clock, ten deals of Mr. Tolley; I was ordered to saw them with three cuts in each. On the 29th of March be brought some of the same description as he brought on the 18th.

Q. Were the deals that Mr. Jeffreys and the witnesses saw in your yard, the same deals that he brought - A. The same deals. On the 18th of April he took away some deals.

Mr. Bolland. Have you at any time had any conversation with the prosecutor about this charge - A He made a remark the day he went to Hicks' hall when we went to find the bill; I asked him whether the business was done, he said he believed it was. I said I wished the deals had not come into my place on account of the trouble I had had; Mr. Jeffreys said he would rather have lost a fifty pound note that they had went somewhere else.

Mr. Knapp. You are one of the defendant's bail - A. I am.

Mr. Bolland. How long have you kept this yard - A. Since the 24th of October; Mr. Wright kept the yard before.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship street. I took the prisoner in custody on Easter Monday. I went with Mr. Jeffreys to Mr. Knight's yard; these four deals were particularly marked by him.

Prisoner's Defence. These deals that these people make mention of belong to me, and they have belonged to me nine months, which I can prove by the bills and receipts.

JOHN CURLEY . - Mr. Gurney. Are you carter to Tolley - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the morning of Easter Monday taking some deals to Mr. Knight's yard - A. Yes, I took them from Mr. Tolley's yard in Grey Eagle street, and delivered them to Mr. Knight. I found them in the yard, outside the shed.

Q. How lately had you been to the yard before that A. On the Thursday before that.

Q. Can you say whether the deals that you took away on the Monday morning were there on the Thursday - A. I cannot; I have seen deals there, and I left deals there when I took these away.

JOHN LANE . Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 5, Old Nicoll street, Bethnal green.

Q. On Thursday the 26th of last month were you in company with the prosecutor at a public house in George yard, Whitechapel - A. I was; I remember his saying to a person he knew, I am sorry for Tolley, I believe he is innocent, I am sorry for what I have done. I did not know the man nor Mr. Jeffreys at that time.

COURT. You knew the prisoner before - A. I have known him upwards of eight years; Mr. Jeffreys I never saw before, nor the man he was in conversation with.

Mr. Knapp. Did he begin that conversation to the stranger saying any thing to him - A. There was talk before and after; he tossed up with me for a pint of beer and I tossed up with him; it was a bad house; there was more conversation, but I could not hear; there were a parcel of bad girls in the house, they made a noise.

COURT. I should be glad to take the exact words that Mr. Jeffreys said - A. My best recollection is this, that Mr. Jeffreys did say these words - I am sorry for Tolley, I believe him innocent, and I am sorry for what I have done.

Q. That is all that you heard - A. That is all that I can recollect; there was more said than that.

Q. to Jeffreys. Were you in company with this man at this public house - A. I have some recollection of the man's face.

Q. Did you make use of that expression - A. Upon my oath I did not.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-70

434. ANN TALFAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , a gown, value 6 s. a cloak, value 1 s. 6 d. and a spencer, value 1 s. the property of John Smith .

MARY SMITH . I live at 196, White Cross street , my husband's name is John Smith , he is by trade a shoemaker, we sell shoes, clothes, millinery, and haberdashery . On Monday the 16th of last month a person came into the shop for a pair of jean shoes; I tried them on, she said they would do; the customer wanted some pocket handkerchiefs, I went round my counter to get the scissars to cut the handkerchief off; I saw the prisoner at the bar come in, she asked me the price of a gown that was hanging on the shop door, I told her about five shillings; I did not watch her, I did not suspect her. When I had cut off the pocket handkerchief she took it in her hand, and said how good it was for the money; she went out; I did not know that she had any of my property; a neighbour opposite gave me some information. I saw the prisoner run over the way, and I almost flew after her; I never lost sight of her only as she turned the corner of a court; I stopped

her at the first door of the court; I took a white gown, a white cloak, and a nankeen spencer, out of her hand.

ELIZABETH SPENCER . On the 16th of May last I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner in Mrs. Smith's shop; as Mrs. Smith was busy, I saw her take something down; she then went to the counter, and the article that Mrs. Smith was shewing to the other woman the prisoner laid hold of with her left hand, while she tried to conceal the property with her right; in a short time afterwards I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the sleeve of something hanging down before her; I directly ran over to Mrs. Smith and told her of it, and she pursued her and took her at the back door of our house, with the property in her hand.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this lady's shop, I asked the price of a gown; she fitted it on me; I had a bundle with me. I was stooping to fasten my shoe at the step of the door: at that time I laid my bundle down; I must have taken them up in a mistake. From that time I have been in confinement. I have been robbed by the prisoners, which has been a severe punishment to me.

MARY HOWSE . I live at No. 38 in the Borough; I have known the prisoner since she was a child; she had an annuity of twenty pounds a year, I believe she has it now; she is a mantua maker, she was a very honest and sober woman till her husband's death, that has made some alteration in her; she is deranged at times.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-71

435. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , thirty four yards of broad cloth, value 20 l. the property of John Henry Burchell , and William Waslord .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford

WALTER FURMAN . Q. Are you the foreman of Messrs. Burchell, and co. - A. Yes, I am to John Henry Burchell , and William Walford , they are dyers at Old Ford .

Q. Had you on the 14th of May any pieces of broad cloth to dye - A. Yes; twenty four pieces I had hung out close by the dye house in the yard; the prisoner is a labourer, he assisted me in hanging them out.

Q. How long has the prisoner been in Mr. Burchell's employ - A. I do not know; I have only been there ten months myself, he was in the premises before I went there.

JOHN WHEATLEY . Q. Where is your place of residence - A. I live at Waltham Abbey now.

Q. Was you at Old Ford on the night of the 14th of May, at your father's house - A. Yes.

Q. Is your father's house near the premises of Mr. Burchell - A. Yes.

Q. Was you awoke in the middle of the night by the barking of a dog - A. I was, by my father's dog; I jumped out of bed, I looked out of the window, I saw a man going along my father's yard, towards the little house that stands at the bottom of the yard; I thought this man went behind the house, I lost sight of him for ten minutes; I was up stairs all the time; I saw a man with a white jacket on come up the same way; he went down, he had a bag at his back; I slipped on my clothes, ran down into my father's room; I told my father I thought there was somebody going to rob the little house in the yard; I asked him for the pistol, I got the pistol in my hand and ran down stairs; on opening the fore door I saw a man going along the road towards Mr. Burchell's enter field, with a bag at his back; I ran across the road with the pistol in my hand; he throwed the bag behind the gate, and stood up along side of it; I said my friend what have you got here; he answered there is nothing broke; I not knowing the meaning of that, said I want to know what you have got in the bag; he answered it did not belong to him, I know nothing at all about it; I said my friend if it does not belong to you I will take it, and you come along with me; he instantly followed me to my father's house; I did not take hold of him.

Q. Did he see your pistol - A. Yes, he did; after I got the bag into my father's house, I went down to Mr. Green, he manages Mr. Burchell's business.

Q. What did you do with the man - A. I left him at my father's house; Mr. Green came and took the man to Bow, and Mr. Paxton put him in the watch-house.

Prisoner. You say you left me in your father's house; you did not. I live at the next door to your father's house; I went home to bed.

COURT. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, I am sure it is the prisoner.

EDWARD PAXTON . - Mr. Walford. Are you a constable of the parish of Bow - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner and when - A. Early on the 15th of May, between one and two o'clock, I was in bed, I heard a violent knocking at the door; I got up, the prisoner was brought to my door. After I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, I went and got a bag of broad cloth from the last witness; I have had it ever since; it was wet in the bag.

Q.(to Wheatley.) Was the bag of broad cloth that you gave to the constable; the same that you took from the prisoner - A. It was.

Q.(to Paxton.) Have you measured it - A. Yes, there is seventeen yards and a half.

Q.Did you walk about the premises in the way the prisoner was described to come - A. I did; I found two more pieces of broad cloth rolled up laying over the wall in the field, where Wheatley had seen the prisoner near this little house.

Q. Did you compare these pieces with the piece you have in your hand - A. Yes, they appear to sit altogether; in length they made thirty four yards.

The property produced and identified.

Q.(to Furman.) Where you had hung this piece of cloth were there twenty four there - A. No, only twenty three; there were twenty four the day before.

Prisoner's Defence. Wheatley says very false, he says he saw me coming out of the ground and pitching it behind the gate; he never did; I was coming home, I went behind the gate to make water; I was not five minutes behind the gate, when this young fellow and two more came in with him and asked me what this bag was: I dont know says I, I have no call to it; he says I will have call to it; he took me to his father's

house. I went up into my own room and went to sleep; he went down to Mr. Furman and Mr. Green; they called me up; they took me out of bed up to the constable.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-72

436. GEORGE SELBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , a hat, value 11 s. the property of Daniel Pedder .

DANIEL PEDDER . I am a hatter , No. 1, Beech street . On the 24th of May, about one o'clock at noon, my back was toward the door; I saw my apprentice run by me out of the door; on looking out I saw him hold the prisoner with one hand, and take a hat from him with the other; I ran out and brought the prisoner into the shop, I sent for a constable and gave charge of him.

JAMES SPENCER. I am an apprentice to Mr. Pedder. On the day the prisoner stole the hat I was at work; I saw him pass the window with a hat in his hand, I saw the ticket on the crown, I thought it was one of ours; I ran after him, I catched him about three doors from the public house; I took the hat away from him; he said he picked it up, or found it, I do not know which. Mr. Pedder came and brought the man into the shop.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met with an acquaintance; we had been drinking a little, I got myself too far in liquor, more than I ought to have done; I passed by the prosecutor's door about twelve o'clock in the forenoon, I saw this hat, I thought I would purchase it; I saw the apprentice at work, the apprentice saw me; I took this hat, I put my foot on the door, I saw another acquaintance going by. I called to him, he did not see me; I being in liquor I went a yard with the hat in my hand, when I found somebody came behind me and give me a kick; I had a knock on the pole of my neck, I had a second and a third kick; I was knocked against a woman; I could have got away, but I stopped; I did not like to knock the woman down.

Prosecutor. The prisoner was very forward in liquor I believe.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-73

437. THOMAS MORAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of Christopher Meynell .

CHRISTOPHER MEYNELL . Q. What are you - A. I am a chemist and druggist , I live at No. 30, Skinner street, Snow hill. On the 8th of May as I was going through St. Giles's, about half after one, there was a number of people in St. Giles's church yard ; I went into the church yard; after I had been there a short time I felt a person behind me drawing something out of my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner had got my silk handkerchief out of my pocket, he had got it in his hand with his hand behind him, with an intention to put it in his pocket; I asked him where he had got it, he said he knew nothing at all about it; I laid hold of his hand which he had got it in, and gave him into charge of the beadle.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am beadle of St. Giles's. On Sunday the 8th of May last, I was attending St. Giles's church; just as the people were coming out of the church there was a great crowd; some person called out there is a thief; I saw the prosecutor with the prisoner in his hand; I went up to them; I took a silk handkerchief out of the prisoner's hand.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming by the church, I saw the handkerchief lay on the ground; I picked it up; I never offered to move from the spot. The gentleman turned round and said it was his; he has false sworn to say I took it out of his pocket. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-74

438. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for that he being servant to John Kelly , was entrusted to receive money for him, and that he being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, 1 l. 16 s. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second count for like offence, stating that he received the money from James Hatchard .

JOHN KELLY . I am a bookbinder , No. 7, Water street, in the Strand; the prisoner is an apprentice of mine; he has served about two years. About the beginning of last November I sent the prisoner to Mr. Hatchard, bookseller, Piccadily, to require the payment of one pound sixteen shillings; he brought me back word that they could not pay it, that there was a mistake in the ledger, in the entry of the name, it being credited to one Mr. Swan, the printer, instead of myself; I immediately sent him back to inform them that Mr. Swan was the printer, but not the seller; he brought back word that when they saw Mr. Swan and ascertained that it was right, they would settle with me; from that time till the 8th of May I have sent the prisoner more than a dozen times. On the 12th of May I went myself; I found that the bid had been settled on the 12th of December last, and that the prisoner had received the money.

RICHARD RICHARDS . I am clerk to Mr. Hatchard, Piccadilly.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge of the money being paid to the prisoner - A. No, I was not the person that paid it; I come here with the ledger to prove that it was paid; there is a receipt in the ledger; the prisoner signed it.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that the prisoner's hand writing - A. I am sure it is his hand writing; I know his hand writing a well as my own.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-75

139. JANE DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , a muslin frock, value 2 s. the property of Maria Beardwell , widow .

MARIA BEARDWELL . I am a widow. On the 15th April, between the hours of six and eight o'clock, I lost the frock; I had hung it out in the yard to dry. I live in Great Barlow street, High street, Marybone ,

HENRY HOWARD. I am a constable. I was sent for on the 15th of April to Mr. Price's in William street, Marybone, he had took a woman on suspicion of taking a frock from his house; I searched the prisoner, I could not find his frock, but I found a white muslin frock wrapped up in a coarse apron; she was very unwilling to give it me; I took it from her.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. About eight o'clock in the evening. I took her to the watchhouse. In about half an hour there came an owner for it, Mrs. Beardwell.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It laid down on the place; I was very much distressed. I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-76

440. THOMAS HUTCHINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , a wooden box' value 1 s. and fifty five squares of glass, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of James Taylor and Christopher Hickes .

Second count laying them to be the property of Richard Shutt .

CHRISTOPHER HICKES . My partner's name is James Taylor , we keep an errand cart from Hampstead to London. On the last day of April I received this box from Mr. Shut in the New road , I was to carry it to Hampstead ; between nine and ten o'clock in the evening it was on the tail of my cart fastened with a rope many times over it; the rope was worth seven shillings; it was cut in five pieces. A man of the name of Ray came and asked me whether I had not lost a box from behind my cart; I looked, and said yes; he said if you will go with me I will shew you where you may catch the man; we both run together on the road after the man; then he went into a field, and there he dropped the box; I saw him get over in the field with the box on his shoulder; he dropped the box before Ray laid hold of him. I laid hold of him by the collar, I brought him into the road; some gentlemen coming along the foot path, I asked them to assist me; they took care of the man while I went and got the box; then I charged a constable with him.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. It was dark, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. You had not observed the person of the man in the road before you got over the rails - A. I had not.

Q. Were there more persons than one in the field - A. They said there was another, but I did not see any other; I was not so far from the man when he dropped the box from his shoulder as I am from you; I am sure I saw the prisoner drop the box, although it was dark. The box was white, and I had him directly.

WILLIAM CREW . I am foreman to Mr. Shut, he is a glass merchant ; I cut the glass, and saw it packed and delivered to Hickes.

JOHN RAY . I am a steel worker. As I was coming home from my work, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was fourteen or fifteen yards behind my boy, he told me there were two men had taken a box from a cart; I saw nothing of it, I did not see the man till I collared him in the field, and he fell with his back on the bank.

WILLIAM RAY . Q. How old are you - A. I am fourteen years old. I was on the Hampstead road with my father; I saw two men going along the path, I saw one of them go into the road and the other followed him, they went towards the cart; I saw one of the men take the box from behind the cart, he took it on the other side of the way; my father came up to me; I said I believed the man had taken the box from behind the errand cart; my father ran up and asked the errand cart man whether he had a box behind the cart, he said yes, he had; my father said he would shew him where it was; my father in jumping over the hedge fell in the ditch; my father got up, ran after the man and collared him. I am not sure the prisoner is the man that had the box; I am sure he is one of the men that were in the path.

WILLIAM KEIGHLEY . I live in Kentish town. I was coming down when the man was brought there; I knew the prisoner very well. I took the prisoner in charge, I have had the box in custody ever since, his name is Thomas Toney ; Crocker took him for robbing of a gentleman in Fitzroy square; he has been seven years, and came home again about eighteen months ago; I have seen him come round Camden town with a donkey.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. When I was coming home I saw the man with the box, I jumped over the hedge to stop him; he ran away; that man stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-77

441. ANN HODGES , JUNIOR, was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , a gown, value 6 s. the property of Alexander Welch ; a gown, value 5 s. of Mary Ann Sinclair ; three yards and a half of linen, value 11 s. a shawl, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of William Pike ; - and

MARY ANN HODGES for feloniously receiving on the same day, two gowns, value 11 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. being part and parcel of the same goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PIKE . I am a fruit salesman , I live at No. 3, East street, Spital fields market; I keep a shop in the market. On Wednesday the 4th of June I was not at home; Saturday morning I was sitting in my son's shop; this woman prisoner and her daughter came by, she had a handkerchief on the fellow of this; I followed her down the market to my shop, then I put my hand to her elbow, I said I want to speak to you, I think you have got my handkerchief on your neck, and my daughter's gown on your back; she said if they are your things Mr. Pike you shall have them, for I have bought them; I said do not strip here; I called my daughter out; she knew the things better than I did. The other gown we found in her room afterwards. I sent for an officer and sent her to the watchhouse.

Q. Do you know any thing of the woman - A. I have seen her before; I know nothing of the child.

SARAH WELCH . I am the daughter of the last witness, I am a married woman. On Wednesday the 4th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was going up stairs in my father's house, our servant halloaed out who is there, I answered her it is me, by the time I got up one pair of stairs the younger prisoner got up two pair of stairs; and when I got up two

pair of stairs, she was asking a person whether Mrs. Cotton lived there; I told her, no, there were no lodgers in the house; I went into the two pair of stairs front room and sat down; I thought the girl was gone down stairs; in about five minutes the servant went down stairs, when she had finished making her mistresses bed; she called out have you taken the belcher silk handkerchief off the bannisters; I said I had not seen it; she said she had not seen it; she said she hung it there about five minutes before she went up to make the bed. We went into the front room; we missed three yards and a half of new cloth out of the window; we missed from the sofa two gowns, a buff shawl, and a pink frock; we had seen them all there about an hour before. On Saturday, the 7th of May, my father sent for me out; he asked me if that was the girl that came into our place on the Wednesday; I told him it was; I am sure it was the girl; she had a dark gown on, a pink frock, and a brown beaver hat; I am sure she is the same. I saw the elder Ann Hodges with my gown on, and my father's silk handkerchief.

Mr. Knapp. At no one time did you see any one thing in the possession of the girl - A. No.

Q. Have you ever recovered any thing but the gown and handkerchief - A. Yes; two gowns and the handkerchief; one gown was on her back and the other was found at her house

MARY ANN SINCLAIR . I am servant to Mr. Pike. I was making my mistresses bed on the Wednesday, I heard somebody come in at the street door; I asked who was there; Mrs. Welch answered me; the girl came into the two pair, where I was; she asked for the name of Mrs. Cotton.

Q. Did she come into the room where you was - A. No; she came into the passage; I met her in the passage; I told her no Mrs. Cotton lived there; I went into the room and finished making the beds. In about five minutes afterwards I went down stairs; I missed the belcher handkerchief off the stairs; I called to Mrs. Welch and asked her whether she had taken it; she said no; I went into the first floor; I missed the cloth out of the window, and I missed a gown.

Q. You afterwards saw the gown - A. Yes; on Saturday, in my mistress's stall.

- I was headborough of the parish of Christ's Church at the time this transaction took place. On the 7th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for by Mr. Pike to take the prisoners into custody; I conducted them to the watchhouse; when I got them to the watchhouse I took the gown and handkerchief off the elder prisoner; I asked her where she got them from; she said that the daughter told her a bargain was to be bought in Wentworth-street, of a woman of the the name of Mrs. Wells; I went from one end of Wentworth street to the other, no such person could be found; I took also two boxes from the prisoner, containing thirty duplicates, nine leading to this property. At the prisoners lodgings I found another gown and shawl; the elder prisoner told me this gown and shawl belonged to the servant of the prosecutor, I should find it there; she told me she had bought them of Mrs. Wells for ten shillings. The mother said she had been drawn in by the child recommending her to the bargain.

(The property produced and identified.)

Ann Hodges , senior's, Defence. I know not the house were the things came from; I purchased them for eleven shillings. I gave all the intelligence I could of the woman that I purchased them of. If I had stole them I should not have worn them on my back.

Ann Hodges , junior, left her defence to her counsel.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

HODGES, JUNIOR, GUILTY , aged 11.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

HODGES, SENIOR, GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-78

442. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a gown, value 5 s. a shawl, value 4 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. a pair of boys stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. two aprons, value 1 s. 6 d. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Mary Bellendine .

MARY BELLENDINE . I live at No. 2, Holborn court , I take in washing . On the 26th of May, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I went up stairs to have a cup of tea, and in the time I was up stairs I lost all my clothes; they were all tied up together; I left them in the back kitchen.

Q. How long had you been up stairs - A. Twenty minutes.

ALEXANDER CUMMINGS . I belong to the East India company's warehouse. On Thursday the 26th of May the prisoner came into the passage of the house where I live, which is next door to the prosecutrix. I thought I heard something in the passage; I opened the door to see; she was standing there; I asked her what she wanted; she asked for a Mrs. Mills; I told her no such person lived there, nor never had; she said she supposed she came to the wrong house; she went away. In about five minutes afterwards I was standing near the window, I saw her go by with a bundle before her; I thought directly that she had been doing of something what has proved she had been doing of; I directly went to the street door to take particular notice of her dress and her person as high as I could, in case any thing should happen; in about half an hour the alarm was given that this person had lost her things; I told her what I had seen, and advised her to go to the pawnbrokers to stop them.

ELIZABETH BELLENDINE. Q. Are you daughter to the other witness - A. Yes. I went up stairs, and a girl that lives in the next kitchen came up to me, and says your mother has been robbed again. I found it was true. Cummings said have you been robbed; he told me the description of a person he had seen; he advised me to go to the different pawnbrokers; I went to Mr. Lee, the pawnbroker; I described the things; he said he had just taken such things in, and when I saw them I knew them to be my mother's things; Mr. Lee detained her when she came to pledge the apron and shawl; he came to my mother and shewed her them.

MR. LEE. I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 48, Broad street, Bloomsbury. On the 26th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pledged a bundle of things with me for five shillings in the name of Mary Smith ; as I was going to tie them up, she said she wanted a half shawl out of the bundle; shortly after the last witness came and asked me if I had taken in such things; I said I had; she took some out, she wanted them to carry home; the prisoner came the next day to pledge the half shawl and apron; I went

to Mrs. Bellendine, and told her I had detained the prisoner.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person - A. I was not quite positive to her person; I said to her are they your own, she said yes, they were all her own, her name was Mary Smith .

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Friday was a week I was going for some thread in Broad street, St. Giles's; a woman said she would give me sixpence to go into that gentleman's shop to pledge the handkerchief and apron. He asked me if they were my own, I said no, the woman was out of doors that they belonged to; he asked me to stop till he fetched the woman in that gave me the handkerchief and apron. If I had gone the day before it is not likely that I should have gone there the next day if I had known the things were stolen.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-79

443. CHARLES HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , four pieces of leather, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Peter Duncan .

PETER DUNCAN . I am a currier and leather cutter , Fore street, Cripplegate . On the 12th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop and looked at some pieces of marked leather; I was in the shop attending some other customers; he stopped about a quarter of an hour in the shop, and he brought a small piece of leather to the counter for me to take the money for; I think it came to three pence; he paid it and was going away; one of my young men came forward and said he had got some leather that he had not paid for. I desired the young man to lay hold of him and bring him back; he did so.

Q. Did you find any leather about him - A. Yes, he had a leather apron on, and under his apron he had a canvas bag hung round him, concealed by the apron; the side of the bag was open, and in the bag were four pieces of marked leather; he begged very hard that I would forgive him, as it was his first offence.

Q. Did you know the man before - A. I had seen him frequently; twice a day sometimes; he had come often and bought trifling articles.

WILLIAM FOSSIT . I am shopman to Mr. Duncan. When the prisoner was in the shop I observed him secreting leather under his apron from the hole where the leather was kept; in doing which he dropped one piece of leather; he left it on the ground; he took up a piece of leather he had previously laid on the counter, and gave three pence for it; when he went out I called after the man, I said you have got some leather you have not paid for; he said he had not. I brought him into the shop, I searched him, I found the four pieces of leather in a canvas bag under his apron; the prisoner begged Mr. Duncan's pardon, he said it was the first time he had ever done such an offence, if he would let him go he would never come in the shop any more.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish this court to shew me as much favour as they can. I am the father of twelve children; I have a wife and three children.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-80

444. JOHN BROWN and CHARLES BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , two rings, value 10 l. and a pin, value 4 l. the property of Edward Taylor , in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

EDWARD TAYLOR . Q. You are a jeweller living in Leadenhall street - A. Yes.

Q. On the 25th of May did you see the prisoners in your shop - A. Yes, I recollect when I came down stairs they were there; it was a little after seven o'clock.

Q. What order did you receive from the prisoners - A.Mrs. Taylor was receiving an order for mourning rings, with mottoes round them.

Q. Had you any conversation with them. - A. Yes, I had.

Q. At the time they were in the shop, did you observe any thing particular in their conduct - A. I did not; they were only shewn one tray of rings by Mrs. Taylor; they were laying on the counter when I came into the shop; in that tray were the rings and the pins in the indictment.

Q. Did you see them there - A. I do not know that I saw them there that day; I saw them before frequent; they were some of the most valuable rings, therefore we look after them first.

Q. Upon your taking the order the prisoners went away - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of some information did you follow after them - A. Yes.

COURT. They gave you an order to make rings - A. They gave an order; I requested a deposit, as it is always customary with strangers; they ordered two at three guineas each, and one at a guinea and a half, I believe.

Mr. Gleed. Did they say what time they should want them - A. They said they should want them on the Saturday following; this was on the Wednesday.

Q. How long after they left your shop had you reason to suspect them - A. When I missed the property, about five or six minutes after they went; I missed the the rings and the pins; the boy had been previously sent after them, he said they came in a chaise. I went up Cornhill, in Mr. Fearn's shop, nearly opposite the Royal exchange.

Q. What is Mr. Fearn - A. A jeweller. Upon goin there I found the two prisoners at the bar, giving a similar order; they were both of them conversing to Mr. Weddal about mourning rings; I shut the door to, I put my foot against it; I told Mr. Weddal I wished to speak to them when he had done with them; the tall one immediately turned round and said he would wish to speak to a lady who was at a coffee house hard by, and if the lady would wait the time he would give them the order.

COURT. He would give Mr. Fearn the order - A. Yes. I said that I wished to speak a few words with him before he went; he swore at me and struck me a violent blow on my forehead.

Q. Was that all you said to him - A. Yes; I kept my right foot against the door, I seized him by the coat,

which tore all down the left side; I told him I should hold him right or wrong as he struck at me; he struck at me several times; I took hold of his collar and secured him; I requested Mr. Weddal to secure the other, which he did; we took them into Mr. Fearn's parlour, and some rings were shewn me by Mr. Weddal.

Q. Were the rings produced to you by Mr. Weddal your property - A. I identified two out of the thirteen, which are the subject of the present charge.

Q. Did you find your pin - A. No, the pin was not found at all.

Q. Where Mr. Weddal picked up these rings you do not know - A. No.

HENRY SHAW . Q. You live I believe, with Mr. Taylor - A. Yes.

Q. On the 25th of May do you recollect the two prisoners coming to Mr. Taylor's shop - A. Yes.

COURT. Look at them and see whether you are sure they are the persons. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. When the prisoners came in you and Mrs. Taylor were only in the shop - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a tray of rings being shewn them by your mistress - A. I do; when the tray of rings was shewn them, the short one took his handkerchief and wiped his mouth; afterwards he took his glove to wipe his mouth; then soon afterwards he said he had hurt his eye with the finger of his glove; my mistress thinking that he had hurt his eye very much sent me to get a glass of spring water to wash his eye with; I came back with the spring water, and he dipped the corner of his handkerchief in it; I saw him looking over the rings with his hand; I could see underneath that he was hooking them up on his little finger.

Q. That was the little man that did this was it - A. Yes; then he took his handkerchief and wiped his eye again, and stamped his foot, and said what pain he was in.

Q. Then the handkerchief could cover the ring if it was on his finger - A. Yes; then the tall one said you had better go into the chaise if your eye is so bad.

COURT. Was the chaise at the door - A. No, I saw no chaise; the tall one had a riding whip in his hand.

Q. He had a jockey whip. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that all you saw done by either of them - A. No; my master came down into the shop directly I heard the tall one say you had better go into the chaise; I went round the counter unbeknown to them and let down the lock and bolted it; then as my master was standing in the shop, I touched him on the hand, and asked him to come into the parlour, and then I told him what I had seen softly by ourselves; my master went round the other side of the counter, and took the order of them; the tall one gave a brass ring for the size of his finger, and a piece of hair to put into the mourning ring. I stood at the door till my master wished them good evening. I then opened the door and let them out; my mistress sent me after them to see what sort of a chaise they had come in; I went to look and they went down Lime street; I came back and told my mistress which way they went, and when I came back my master was gone after them.

Q. Are you quite sure these are the men - A. Yes.

EDWARD WEDDLE. Q. You live with Mr. Fearn, who is a jeweller - A. Yes; I am his shopman.

Q. On the 25th of May last, do you remember the two prisoners coming into Mr. Fearn's shop - A. I do well, it was somewhere between seven and eight o'clock; their object was to buy pearl and mourning rings.

Q. Did you say to buy or to order - A.They wanted to buy at first when they came in, and before they went away they wanted to order.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Taylor coming in - A. I do, he came in towards the latter part of their being there.

Q. You have heard the account that Mr. Taylor gave - do you recollect what passed - A. I do; when Mr. Taylor came in he spoke to me over the counter; he said I believe you know me, sir; I told him yes; upon that I saw him shut the door rather in a hurry, and set his foot against it; he appeared rather agitated.

Q. Did the prisoners see him - A. Yes, I believe they did; after that I drew my rings back, and the two particular rings, that I had been shewing them, I did not see at the moment at the place; I looked again at the place and I saw them; after that I saw one of them strike Mr. Taylor; Mr. Taylor said he wished to speak to them after they had done with me.

Q. Who was it struck Mr. Taylor - A. The tallest one, Charles Brown , I think with the whip in his hand.

Q. Did he say nothing more than that he desired to speak with them when they had done with you - A. Nothing else; upon that a scuffle ensued, and I saw him strike Mr. Taylor several times.

Q. Then there was nothing that past in your presence that would create a quarrel - A. Nothing but civility upon the part of Mr. Taylor; upon that the door opened, I do not know upon what reason, and they both went out in the street, Mr. Taylor and Charles Brown; I was sure all was not right, I secured the short one; the tall one was brought back, and pushed with his back against the counter, and after we had taken them from the counter and put them in the parlour, I found thirteen rings upon the counter in a purse, lying close by them.

Q. Were any of the things the property of yourself and master - A. They were not.

Q. Was there any body by at the time to put these rings on the counter besides the prisoners - A. I saw nobody at all.

Q. Could any person have left these rings on the counter before they came in without your seeing them - A. I am quite sure they could not; I went round that very counter a few minutes before; these are the two rings which Mr. Taylor has claimed.

Q. Have you kept them ever since that Wednesday evening - A. I have.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these two rings - A. These two are my property.

Q. Are you quite sure that these two rings were kept in the tray that you shewed to the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. How lately had you seen them in the tray - A. I cannot exactly say. I generally saw them there every day when I am serving in the shop.

Q. Can you say that you saw them on the day that you shewed them to the prisoner - A. No, I cannot, they were kept in the tray in a very regular manner; I arranged the rings before I left the shop; I said I missed two rings of the quality of these rings; one of them is marked the other is not; it is marked with a private mark, what we give and what we sell for; it is marked

inside on the gold; it is never erased, it goes out to the purchasers with it.

Q. Can you say these two rings are your property - A. Yes.

Q.What is the value of them - A. Ten pounds; they are worth more, and cost me more than twelve pounds.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. Andrew Undershaft.

COURT. You are the entire tenant to the house are you - A. Yes.

Q. Did they appear in mourning - A. Yes.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am a constable.

Q. Do you know any thing more than taking the prisoners in custody - A. I searched the short one, John Brown; I found there four parcels of human hair and some brass rings.

Charles Brown 's Defence. I might have brought the most respectable people in town; I wish to meet my unfortunate fate unknown to my friends as much as I can.

John Brown said nothing in his defence.

JOHN BROWN, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 18.

CHARLES BROWN , GUILTY , DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-81

445. ANN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , a gown, value 3 s. 6 d. a petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas New .

MRS. RICE I am a washer woman in the London Hospital; Joy New lived in the London Hospital, her husband's name is Thomas New , I believe; I do not know him.

Q. Had you a gown and petticoat to wash for her - A. I always wash for her.

Q. Do you know that on the 6th of April, she lost a gown and petticoat - A. The loss of the gown was on the 4th of April, she brought them on the 3d.

SUSANNAH WEAVER. Q. Did you see Joy New bring her clothes down on the 3d of April - A. I saw a bundle lay but I never opened them.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a servant to Thomas Dexter , pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On the 6th of April, the prisoner pledged a gown and petticoat; I advanced five shillings on them; Mrs. Marshall came the next day and claimed them for Joy New .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-82

446. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of April , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of John Parsons .

JOHN PARSONS . I am a painter ; I came to London on Saturday some time before the 16th of April; being late I wanted a lodging; I met with the prisoner at the upper end of Holborn; she said she would shew me a lodging; she brought me to her room; she deceived me, being a stranger; she locked me up in the room and went out and took the key along with her; in the morning she came and said she had got this article; I bought it of her.

Q. After having slept with her you bought the watch of her - A. I bought the watch of her on the 16th of April, I did not sleep with her; I took the watch out of pawn for one pound and gave her a crown for herself; I laid my arm on the table when she went out of the room: she came in and took the watch from me; this was on the next Saturday.

Q. Why did not you lay hold of her to prevent her from taking it - A. I did; she was like to tear me all in flitter; when I called the watch she held me firm that I could not stir; she held me by the hair of my head.

Q. Where was this house - A. In New street, St. Giles's; a watchman came to my assistance.

Q. Was the watch ever found again - A. Yes, it was found by the officer.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. On Saturday night the 16th of April, a little girl came to my box; she said there was murder calling in New street; I went with the girl to the door No. 2, New street.

Q. What sort of a house is it - A. I believe there are different girls of the town lodge in the house; I found the man and the woman in the passage, he told me the woman had robbed him of his watch; I searched the prisoner, I could not find the watch.

JAMES BUDGELL . I am an extra officer of Marlborough street. On the 18th of April, as I was going to lock the prisoner up, she said d - mn him, if I could not give him the watch now if I chosed; I searched her and found this watch.

ELIZABETH CUMMINGS . I am a housekeeper; I live in Camden town; I have some houses in St. Giles's; I was in town this Saturday night; coming past this house I heard watch and murder cry; I saw one of the lodgers at the door of the house; and I saw the prosecutor within; the woman had hold of him by the coat; I asked the man what was the matter; he said he had been robbed; I pushed the door open with my knee; then they wanted to give the man an old gilt watch; I told the man not to take any but his own; there is none else in the house but common women. Mr. Dancer is the owner of the house, he is the clerk of Bedford chapel; he is a fine man to say amen.

Prisoner's Defence. I have washed his clothes for these six months; he came to my house on Saturday evening; I told him I had a duplicate of a watch to sell; he said when he took his money at Somerset house he would pay me for his washing; he was to give me three pounds for the watch; instead of that he only gave me one pound five shillings.

Prosecutor. I was to give her five shillings and no more; she never washed for me; she robbed me of a shirt the first night.

Q. She robbed you of a shirt the first night, and you go to her the second night. Did you know this to be a place for common women of the town - A. Afterwards I did; she told me it was her brother's watch that died.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-83

447. ALEXANDAR MACKDONALD was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Christopher Mackcrae , on the 1st of February , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a bag, value 2 d. a bank note, value 100 l, a bank note, 2 l. four other bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a warrant for the payment of twenty four pounds, value 24 l. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

CHRISTOPHER MACKCRAE. Q. I believe you are a baker - A. I am; I live at No. 5, Great Peter street,

Westminster; the prisoner is a journeyman baker , he lives at Deptford; I have known him six years. On the 1st of February, about half after two o'clock, I was first in his company at the White Swan in Rosemary lane; I met him afterwards in Leadenhall street.

Q. At the time you were in his company had you any notes, or drafts in your possession - A. Yes; I had a hundred pound bank note, a check for twenty four pound, a two pound bank note, four one pound notes. I had them in a sample bag in the inside coat pocket.

Q. During the time that you were in company with the prisoner, did you take them out - A I did, in the back room in the White Swan; I asked Mackdonald to look at this check; I said I am not used to these checks, as I am of gold and bank notes; when I shewed him the check he could see that I had bank notes in my pocket; at the same time he gave his opinion, and another man sitting by said he knew Mr. Milton very well, the check was a very good one; I put the check into my bag, and put the bag into my pocket again; the prisoner and the other man had an opportunity of seeing me put them in my pocket; there were a good many people sitting there, but none that took any notice that I could see; they were playing at cards; this was about half after two o'clock in the afternoon; I had been to market to pay this money, but I was too late; I left the house in about a quarter of an hour; I met the prisoner again in Leadenhall street, about three quarters of an hour.

Q. Did you and he join in company together - A. No; I had something else to do; at eleven o'clock at night I saw him on the Surrey side of London bridge; he was walking the same road it appeared to me.

Q. What passed between you - A. Nothing further than countryman how do you do. I went into the Mitre, Tooley street, and had a pint of porter; when I had drank the pint of beer. the landlady of the public house told me it was time to go home; going home over Westminster bridge , of the Middlesex side, I was attacked by three men dressed in coal heavers clothes, with soldier's weather coats upon them; they hustled me about; one went to take the money out of my right hand pocket; the others came and took the sample bag out of my left side pocket, with the notes and check in it; then they run away; I ran after the men as fast as I could; I saw this Mackdonald plain, I could not catch him; he had a slouched hat on.

COURT. Had they all slouched hats - A. Yes. There was a lamp that gave me a light.

Q. Are you able to say who was the man that took the bag out of your pocket - A. Alexander Mackdonald was the man, most undoubtedly; his face was well known; after trying to catch him in vain, I went home. It might be then within ten minutes of twelve.

Mr. Gurney. How soon did you make this charge against the prisoner - A. I did not make the charge against him till the 7th of May, because he owed me six pound ten shillings and sixpence. I had a better opinion of him when I lent him the money that that he would become a thief and rob me on the highway; he promised to bring this money forward; I was persuaded to get the money first and take him up afterwards.

COURT. When did he pay you this money - A. Two days before that; after that I went to Bow street; the prisoner was taken before the magistrate and there bailed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How long after the robbery was committed was it before you went to Bow street - A. From the 1st of February, till the 7th of May.

Q. That is near four months; had you been making any complaints against the prisoner or any body - A. Yes; I had been to Mr. Bligh about the business; but I did not tell him of the prisoner; I was afraid he would fly; I wished Mr. Bligh to go and see whether he could find the other men that were with Mackdonald; I supposed them to be two soldiers; he went up to the horse guards to see if he could see any loose people about; I told him that all three had soldier's clothes on, and great coats on, such as they call weather coats.

Q. Did you describe to him that the three persons that robbed you had soldier's clothes on with slouched hats - A. I did.

Q. Did you describe at that time that the prisoner was one of three - A. I did not.

Q. You gave him instructions to take up three persons - A. It does not signify to bother me; the prisoner at the bar is the man that robbed me.

Q. Upon your oath did not you tell Mr. Bligh to take up three persons - A. Two.

Q. Do you mean to swear that - A. Yes; I told him there were three men that robbed me.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time you gave instructions to Bligh - A. Yes; he was very busy on the subject.

Q. Did the prisoner hear the charge to Bligh that you gave against the three persons that he was to take up - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he was not there - A. He came up soon afterwards.

COURT. You told me the prisoner was present - A. He was there; he came soon afterwards; I was in Mr. Bligh's house; this prisoner came there.

Q. How many public houses might you have been in this day - A. What day.

Q. What day, indeed! I do not believe a word of it - A. I do not care whether you do or not.

Q. How many public houses had you been in - A. Not above five.

Q. Had you drank in each of the public houses - A. Yes.

Q. What had you been drinking of - gin - A. No, porter; gin is not my liquor.

Q.When you came to London bridge was you drunk or sober - A I was sober enough to know what I was about; I had my senses about me as much as I have now.

Q. Have you been drinking this morning - A. I have had two half pints of porter, and a glass of gin and bitters.

Q. I thought gin was not your liquor - how came you to take it this morning - A. I had a pain in my breast.

Q. Was you sober when you attended at Bow street - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. You attended the night afterwards - was not you turned out of the office because you was beastly drunk, was not you told by the magistrate to go out, and did not he order the officer to turn you out - A. Yes, I was told so; I was not drunk

Q. Have you ever recovered any of your property A. No.

Q. So this man, supposing your story is true, had all

the four months to squander oway your money, and you never charged him of robbing you till the 7th of May, for the purpose of getting your six pounds - A. It is so.

Then I leave you with the jury.

COURT. How was the prisoner dressed - A. He was dressed in boots, blue coat and waistcoat, and a round hat; he was dressed like a gentleman; he had the same dress when I met him on the Surry side of London bridge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-84

448. SUSANNAH ANGEL , alias ARCHANGEL , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , half a yard of black silk, value 2 s. a flat iron and stand, value 1 s. two brushes, value 1 s. the property of Mary Munday ; three gowns, value 6 s. three petticoats, value 3 s. a shift, value 1 s. a cap, value 6 d. two pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. a tippet, value 6 d. two pair of stays, value 2 s. a gold pin; value 1 s. seven pair of stockings, value 7 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and a velvet hat, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Munday , spinster .

MARY MUNDAY. I go out a charing ; I live at No. 7, Elbow lane ; I rent a two pair of stairs front room.

Q. Does any body live there in that room - A. Nobody; my daughter visits me and is with we when she is at home.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She is a servant in the house; there are no other lodgers.

Q. All you know is, that you lost the things. - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH MUNDAY . Q. You are daughter to the last witness. - A. I am. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Do you know who took them - A. No.

WILLIAM REID. I am an officer. On the 25th of May last I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Red Lion passage, Red Lion square; I found all the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner said she was very sorry for it; she told me where the gold pin was; some of the things were torn up, she was going to make it up into other things; and she said she was never happy after she had taken them.

Q. to Mrs. Munday. Had she left her place - A. Yes, she had; she was married last Easter Tuesday.

Prisoner's Defence. I humbly beg for mercy.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutrix.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-85

449. RICHARD ABRAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , a silk umbrella, value 20 s. the property of John Calcraft , esq.

MICHAEL PEACOCK . I am footman to John Calcraft , esq. No. 34, Sackville street . On the 28th of April, a little after nine in the evening, the prisoner came to our house, he brought two pieces of music on false pretence, he said they were ordered out of Holborn; he sent the boy down stairs; in the mean time he came through the folding doors of the hall and took from a peg an umbrella; I was in the drawing room, and just as he was going out of the door I came down stairs and detected him with the umbrella in his hand; he asked me what I wanted with him, I told him if he waited a minute I would let him know; I expected the butler up stairs in a moment to give him an answer; he asked me what I meaned by speaking to him in that manner, and walked away down the hall, and said because I suppose the umbrella was standing there, and I took it to walk about with it; he then walked backwards and forwards in the hall, and in a hurry; he put down the umbrella; the umbrella took my attention; I stepped towards it. In the mean time he got the door in his hand and got out; I pursued him and cried stop thief. In about the middle of the street he rejoined me in the cry of stop thief; he was stopped by Cunningham; we took him to the watchhouse and gave him in charge of the constable of the night; he refused to give him name, he said his name was Up! This is the umbrella.

Prisoner. Did you observe me in the inner hall - A. I did.

Q. Did you see me take down the umbrella - A. I did; the folding doors generally stand open; he came in as if he knew the way.

- BROWN. On the 28th of April the prisoner came in, he said here is some music for you; I told him our people were not at home, they were gone to the play; he asked me if any of the servants were at home, I said yes; he said it take it down to the butler, it comes to twelve shillings, perhaps he will pay for it; I did; the butler was reading it; we heard a cry of stop thief; the butler ran after him and he was taken to the watchhouse.

- CUNNINGHAM. Q. You stopped the man in the street - A. Yes; I was going by, and seeing the man chasing the prisoner, and cry out stop thief, I laid hold of him; we took him to the watch-house.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was delivered by the justice in Marlborough street to prison, I was informed by the clerk, as well as the governor of Tothill fields prison, that I should be committed for petit larceny, and I should be tried at Westminster sessions; I thought by the time the Westminster sessions came on I should be able to procure counsel. Thank God I have a clear conscience, which is as well as a counsellor. I must beg leave to observe that if I had meaned to take the umbrella, I should not have waited; when the footman came down and accused me of taking the umbrella, I was at least four yards from the door, and the door shut; if there was any thing wrong, it was in my deceitful friend who said he was butler at No. 34, Sackville street. When I was accused of theft, I thought I would leave the house to prevent any blame upon the butler; unfortunately I misunderstood him, or he gave me the wrong address; I declare to Almighty God, that it was my most distant idea to rob Mr. Calcraft. I shall leave my case in your hands and bow with submission.

Peacock. He went next door to a neighbours, to a gentleman of the name of Taylor, but the butler did not believe his story.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-86

450. ANN COVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of April , five pound weight of pork, value 4 s. and a plated spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of James Field .

JAMES FIELD . I am a cheesemonger , No. 30, Queen street, Ratcliffe . On Wednesday the 27th of April, between one and two o'clock, I was in doors eating my dinner; my wife's sister said there is Mrs. Covey in the shop; I knew her before, she lived in Stepney parish; I said it was no such thing, for Mrs. Covey was in confinement; I directly arose from my chair, looked in the shop and saw Mrs. Covey going out of the door; she had not gone but a few yards be fore a little girl said that she stole a piece of pork; I said to my lad run after her and stop her, which he did; he stopped her in Anchor and Hope alley; at that time I came up to her; then she denied having any pork about her; I looked under both sides of her cloak and could not see any; my lad was then behind us, he caught hold of the pork in her hand, under her cloak; I insisted upon having the pork; she said she would give it me if I would forgive her; I then said that I ensisted upon having it directly; she then took it from underneath her cloak, and threw it on the ground; I gave the pork to my lad, he took it home, and I took her back into the parlour, and sent for Mr. Godfrey the officer; she asked me to give her some water; I told her I had none, I gave her some beer; she was drinking when Mr. Godfrey came in, he took her in charge; in the meanwhile I turned my head to speak to Mr. Godfrey, she took a spoon out of the corner of the bufet; my little girl said that Mrs. Covey had taken a spoon; Mr. Godfrey found in her right hand a shift and some potatoes; in hustling of her the spoon fell out from under the peak of her stays.

RICHARD THOMPSON. I saw the woman come in and go out; I am sure it is the same woman.

Q. Where was the pork - A. Laying on the tub; I pursued her; I asked her whether she had any pork; she said no; I felt the pork in her hand through her cloak; my master insisted upon having the pork; she laid it down in the mud; I took it up and went home with it.

JAMES GODFREY . I am an officer. On the 27th of April I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; while I went to get the pork, I heard the child say she had stole a spoon; I asked her where it was; she said she had not got it; I searched her and found a tumbler, a shift, three potatoes, and threepence three farthings; I gave her a shake and out dropped the spoon; I said are not you ashamed of yourself for stealing of it, I suppose you thought it was silver; yes, said she, I did; she said never mind you can do me no harm, you can only send me where I have been before. I have heard that she was convicted a few sessions ago; she was sentenced for six months confinement.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated with liquor; I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-87

451. THOMAS CRIPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , two great coats, value 10 s. the property of Henry Ulliard .

DAVID HEY . I am constable, I live in the Harrow road, Paddington. On Thursday week the prisoner was brought to my house by the prosecutor on charge of stealing two great coats.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know; the prosecutor was ostler to the Wheat Sheaf, Paddington; I took the prisoner in custody; he said he would shew us where the great coats were; he said he stole the property, he was in distress; we found the property in a watchman's cottage at the bottom of Circuit street, New road.

Q. What did the prisoner say - A. He said, he was sorry for it, and he hoped the prosecutor would forgive him; the prosecutor said he would let him go if he confessed. The prosecutor is not here.

JOHN SALMON . I am a watchman; whether it was Thursday or Friday night, I am not sure, I was in bed, the prisoner came in with these two great coats; he offered them to my wife; I saw the man and the clothes; I believe she purchased the clothes, and when I went out on the watch the officer came for them. I gave them to him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-88

452. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a table cloth, value 2 s. four knives, value 4 s. three forks, value 2 s. and one knife, cloth, value 1 d. the property of Samuel Hislop .

SAMUEL HISLOP . I am a schoolmaster , No. 5. Old street . - On the 26th of May, I heard a bell ring; I went down stairs, and found Jane Dunn , the lodger, below in the passage; she asked me if I had any person in the house to do any thing for me; I answered no; she said I saw a woman go out of here with something under her arm, she is crossing the road now; I pursued her, she looked back and dropped the things wrapped up in a tablecloth; I brought her back to my house and asked her how she came to take the things; she said she was in great distress, that made her take them; she said if I would let her go she would never do so again.

JANE DUNN . Q. You lodge in this house of Mr. Hislop's - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner in the passage on the 26th of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. You are sure she is the woman - A. Yes; when I saw the woman I rung the bell; Mr. Hislop came down; I went with him in pursuit of her; crossing the road I saw the prisoner drop the property.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-89

453. PETER JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , two planes, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Peeke .

SAMUEL PEEKE . I am a carpenter . On Tuesday the third of May, I was at work in Torrington street, Russell square ; on that evening I left work between seven and eight o'clock; I locked up the house and left these two planes in it; on the 4th of May, when I came about five o'clock in the morning, I found the door open; I found two planes gone.

ROBERT FLOWERS. I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody on suspicion of stealing a hammer; I found on him a quantity of duplicates. I took the tools out of pawn with intention to find the person that belonged to them; the prisoner said he bought the planes on the 4th of May, he give two shillings for them. The planes were pawned for one shilling and sixpence.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Tottenham court road drinking a pint of beer; there came a man in with two planes; he offered them for sale; I bid him two shillings for them; as for stealing the tools I am as innocent as a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped One Hundred Yards in St. Giles's, till his back be bloody .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-90

454. JAMES TOLLSON and JOSEPH LEBECK were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , seven bushel of oats, value 30 s, and a sack, value 2 s. the property of Benjamin Severn and Frederick Benjamin King .

WILLIAM WINNING . I am servant to Bejamin Severn and Frederick Benjamin King , they are wholesale grocers , there is no other partner; I lived with them twelve years last October.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. Were they in the employment of Messrs. Severn and King - A. No, they were two persons that came to Messrs. Severn's yard for dung.

Q. Where is Mr. Severn's yard - A. In Whitechapel .

Q. Does he keep stables and horses - A. Yes.

Q. Then I suppose his stables were in his yard - A. Yes. I was informed on the 14th of May, before four o'clock in the afternoon; I was at my own house.

Q. Somebody informed you something which made you come back to your masters - A. Yes.

Q. Then you returned to your masters - A. Yes, I made my way to this yard as fast as I could.

Q. What was the prisoners about when you came into the yard - A. They had loaded the dung which they had come to fetch away.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Severn and King kept their oats in that yard - A. They kept it in the lost over the stable.

Q. Had they any oats in sacks at that time - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Was the stable door open when they loaded the dung - A. I am not sure.

Q. You found the dung loaded on their cart; did you find any oats or any sacks of your masters in the cart - A. There were three sacks in the cart.

Q. Were they laying open in the cart - A. No, covered up with dung.

Q. Any oats in the sack - A. Yes, there were about seven or eight bushel of oats in three sacks; I cannot say exactly.

Q. What did they say in consequence of your finding the sacks in that situation - A. Our foreman came along with us, he accused them of taking the oats.

Q. Did he tell them where he suspected they had taken them. - A. No, he charged them with taking the oats; they said what they had got did not belong to the place; they did not take it from there.

Q. They said it did not belong to your master - A. Yes.

Q. Did they say who they did belong to - A. No, not then. Mr. Bishop sent for the officer then, Mr. Griffiths.

Q. Did the officer come directly - A. Yes.

Q. When Griffiths came did the foreman charge him with the thest then - A. Yes, they said it did not belong to our yard; they persisted in it that it did not belong to our yard. Mr. Griffiths secured them; he searched for the oats first, and found the oats upon them; at this time the oats had not been found.

Q. At this time you did not know where the oats and the sacks were - A. No, we only suspected they had got them; Mr. Griffiths took one of the sacks from the side of the cart, under a small quantity of dung that was over it; the others were near the bottom of the cart; the cart was tilted up to find them.

Q. Then they were discovered by shooting the dung - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where this cart came from - A. Yes, from Eastham.

Q. What time in the day did they arrive in your yard - A. I cannot tell; it was about four o'clock in the day when I was sent for.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You know that Tollson is a servant that drives up hay to town, and the other prisoner a labourer - A. I have heard so.

Q. Did not they repeatedly say that the oats did not belong to you; I do not know whether you are countryman enough to know that turnpikes allow them to take any weight of manure; if there is a board or a sack then they are weighed; and if they have only a board above their weight then they are compelled to pay the penalty. You missed no oats, and they constantly denied them being your oats - A. I know nothing of the oats.

HENRY WINNING . I came to the yard; I sold them the dung, and I went from the yard into Whitechapel; and I came back into the yard again at four o'clock; they bought the dung before they loaded it, at eleven o'clock in the day; I went from the yard at three o'clock, and returned at four; and they had loaded it.

Q. Had you the care of the corn and the sacks - A. I had, it was not kept in sacks; it was loose in a bin.

Q. Had you seen the corn bin shortly before you left the yard that day - A. I had.

Q. What quantity was there in the corn bin that day - A. There may be as near as I can guess five or six quarters loose in the bin.

Q. Could you when you returned perceive that any quantity had been taken from that bin - A. I could, there was an apparent deficiency in the bulk.

Q. As near as you could guess what quantity might be missing - A. I saw there was some quantity gone, and it appeared to be lessened about six or seven bushel.

Q. Had you any sacks in the bin - A. Yes, some was lying on the bin.

Q. When you found there was a deficiency in the bulk of the corn, did you see there was a deficiency in the sacks - A. Yes, there was; there should have been twenty sacks before these men came.

Q. How many sacks were there when you perceived

this bulk of corn was diminished - A. There were nine teen sacks left that was missing; the sack that was missing is marked with a stripe; it is my masters sack there is two blue stripes on it.

Q. Where was that sack found that you are now producing - A. In the loft.

MR. GRIFFITHS. He only produces that sack to shew that it corresponds with the sack that was taken away.

HENRY WINNING . I went and informed my master that there was a sack short; our foreman, Mr. Bishop, stopped them and sent for an officer; we charged them with having stolen the sack and the oats I said as soon as the sack was taken out it was my master's sack.

Q. They were charged with it and denied it - A. Yes; they said what corn they had it belonged to them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Did you mark your master's sacks - A. No.

Q. These stripes are not your master's marks, they are the maker's marks - A. Yes.

COURT. He only proves that this is a sack the same as his master's was.

Mr. Arabin. I will ask you whether you do not know that these men who come to town with heavy loads, who are fond of their teams, they bring more corn than they are allowed, and that if the turnpike man see anything in the cart he will make them pay toll.

COURT. Though farmers' men may take some more corn than is allowed them by their masters, six or seven bushels is an enormous sum, they could not want six or seven bushels, the horses stomachs could not hold it.

Mr. Arabin. Did you see any corn scattered about on the outside - A. No.

WILLIAM GARRED . I am servant to Mr. Breeze the cooper; I saw the oldest man of the two, Lebeck, I saw him coming out of the stable; the youngest man was loading of the dung in the cart; Lebeck made a motion when he came out, and the young man answered him; he came out with his oats, as much as he could carry, he lifted it up on the cart wheel; the man on the cart pulled it up, it was tied with a straw band, the band broke, and while he was making a hole to put it in, and with the putting it in, he fell down on the oats on his belly; I only saw one sack, that was the first sack that was pulled out of the sack when the officer was sent for; I was in sight of them; there is a paling that parts one yard from the other, there is a hole in the paling, and my young master looked through the crevise; I went to the the foreman, I did not see him; I came back again, I told Harry Winning what I had seen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Did you see the cart come into the yard - A Yes.

Q. You did not keep your attention upon them the whole time - A. I did not; I can safely say that they did not bring any thing in a sack in the yard; there was nothing but empty sacks in the cart to my knowledge; they had two bags in the cart; I saw them before my young master called me.

Q. The stable door was open - A. I do not know whether it was or no; the cart must come into our premises first, before it went into Mr. Severn's yard.

COURT. If there had been three sacks in the cart when it came in must you not have seen it - A. I must.

Q. You have heard talk of six or seven bushels of corn; if there had been six or seven bushels of corn contained in the three sacks it must have caught your eye, you must have seen it - A. I must.

Q. Supposing that there had been sacks in the cart containing so much corn. do you not think you must have seen it - A. I must have seen it.

JOHN GREEN . Q. Are you a cooper - A. Yes, I work for my brother.

Q. For the cart to come into Mr. Severn's yard, must it go through your yard - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the cart come in did you - A. Yes.

Q. At that time did you see any appearance of corn in sacks in the cart - A. I did not.

Q. Did you notice the cart sufficient to say whether there were sacks of corn or not - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see any thing done at the time these people were loading the dung - A. Yes; I saw one man bring out three sacks of corn from the stable.

Q. Where was you at this time - A. I was in our yard, looking through a hole; there is a paling between our yard and Mr. Severn's yard; I was behind that paling looking through a hole.

Q. I believe you said you saw him bring three sacks of corn from the stable, did he bring them at three different times - A. Yes.

Q.How came you to be looking towards the stable at that time - A. I saw them whispering together, that induced me to watch.

Q. What day did they go with these sacks of corn - A. They put them in the cart underneath the dung; I told my brother's man, and he went and gave the information.

Q. When the officer came, did you see the sacks taken out of the cart - A. I saw the sacks taken out of the cart after the officer came.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. These men constantly denied having any corn but their own - A. Yes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . Q. You were sent for upon this business - A. I was; I searched the cart after I went in the yard; the men were charged with stealing the corn by Mr. Bishop, the foreman; I asked the men whether they had any corn in the cart, they said they did not know whether there was any there or not; if there was any they brought it with them; I desired the cart might be searched; I got somebody to go upon the top of the cart; I asked the two men if they had any more, to save us unloading of it; they said they did not know that there was any more, if there was they brought it with them; I desired the cart load of dung to be shot out, and then they found the other two sacks, they tumbled out. (The sacks produced.)

Q. What quantity of corn was there - A. I had it measured; it wanted much about a peck of eight bushels.

Q. to Winning You have seen these sacks, look at them - does one or more of them bear a resemblance to your master's sacks - A. One of them appears to be the same as my master's; the other two I know nothing of.

Q. What is the value of the corn - Griffiths. They are valued at thirty shillings.

Q Are they worth twenty - Winning. Yes.

Lebeck's Defence. We took up the corn in Whitechapel; the man said he would satisfy us if we would carry it down the road for him so far as the Plough at Mile End.

Tollson's Defence. The man asked me in Whitechapel to take the corn down to the Plough; he told me

he would give me half a gallon of beer. Just after we had loaded the dung I asked this man to give it me up, to cover it under the dung, because of the weighbridge, because my master might be angry about it. While we were loading the dung I laid it behind some sugar hogsheads, because there were some pigs there.

JOHN MAYBRICK - Mr . Arabin. Where do you live - A. In Fetter lane.

Q. What are you - A. I am a stationer.

Q. Were you on the 14th of May last in Whitechapel market - A. I was.

Q. You said you lived in Fetter lane, what is the number of your house - A. I live at 122, Fetter lane. I do not rent the house.

Q. How long have you lodged there - A. Twelve months.

Q. You said in the course of the day you was in Whitechapel market - A. I was.

Q.Do you recollect any cart there with the name of Savage upon it - A. I do recollect it. I observed the name of Savage, but not where the place was; I saw two men.

Q. Do you mean to say you saw the two men at the bar or one of them - A.I saw one; that was Lebeck.

Q. At what time of the day was it - A. It was about two or three o'clock.

Q. Did you see any thing put in that cart - A. Yes; I saw one or two sacks.

Q. Were these sacks empty or full - A. They appeared to be full or partly full; but I did not observe particularly; they were brought by a man that appeared like a cornchandler or a farmer.

Q. You saw him put the sacks into this cart - A. I did.

Q. I do not know whether you observed him for any time - A. I did not; I was in a chaise cart waiting for a friend of mine.

COURT to Griffiths. Was you present when the prisoners were examined - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the magistrate's hand writing - A. Yes.

Q.Look at that and see whether it is Mr. Davis's writing - A. Yes.

Q. Now Mr. Maybrick, where is your shop - A. I do not keep a shop.

Q. Where are your premises - A. At that house, No. 122.

Q. What sort of stationary do you sell; are you a law stationer or what - A. Common stationary; I am a pocket book maker by trade.

Q. How long have you been in that trade - A. It is impossible for me to say; I served my time to it.

Q. I think it very possible for you to tell how long you have been in that trade - A. I told you to to extent how far back.

Q. How many years have you been in that trade - A. About nine years.

Q. That is something like an answer; why did not you give me that answer at first; about nine years you have been in that trade; have you lived in Fetter lane all that time - A. No, I have not; I lived in St. Ann's passage.

Q. You was waiting there for a friend - A. I was.

Q. Who did you live with in St. Ann's passage - A. I kept a house there.

Q. Where is St. Ann's passage - A. Noble street, Foster lane, Cheapside.

Q. You are a pocket book maker by trade - A. I am.

Q. How came you to say you was a stationer - A. Because those that are in the trade describe themselves as stationers, and because stationary is the highest profession in the trade.

Q. Do you deal in stationary - A. No.

Q. Do you deal much in pocket books. - A. Yes.

Q. Who do you deal with in stationery - A. Mr. Holdsworth, in Cannon street.

Q. How do you know it was on the 14th of May - A. It was on a Saturday; whether it was the 13th or the 14th, I will not be certain.

Q. Are you quite sure it was on a Saturday - A Yes.

Q. What time of the day on Saturday - A. Between two and three o'clock, as near as I can say.

Q. I do not expect you to say within a quarter of an hour. What business was you upon, and what part were you in - A. I was with a friend; he went to buy some hay at Whitechapel market in a chaise cart.

Q. What is your friend's name - A. Jones.

Q. Where does he live - A. He lives in Houndsditch.

Q. What number - A. Twenty seven. He is a stationer.

Q. He is a stationer too, is he here - A. Not as I know of; I have not seen him here.

Q. You were conversing together at that time - A. Yes; I was not conversing with him when I first saw these men; he was in the market purchasing the hay

Q. You were waiting his return in the market - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you call upon him - A. He came to me.

Q. He came to you in Fetter lane to go to Whitechapel - A. He did not come particular to me; he was going to Bond street.

Q. What time of the day was it when he called upon you - A. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock when he called upon me.

Q. He called upon you, he was a stationer; he went into Bond street; that is further off from Whitechapel - A. I know it.

Q. Do not be angry with me. Who did he go to - A. He went with me to Mr. Faulder's to take some work.

Q. What work did he get there - A. He did not get any, he took some.

Q. What work; that he had to bind - A. Yes.

Q. It was twelve o'clock when he called upon you to go with him to Bond street - A. Yes; and he called in Broad street, Bloomsbury.

Q. That is St. Giles's. You walked all round that way - A. No; we did not walk, we rode.

Q. He keeps a horse and cart - A. Yes; he serves largely in the country; he keeps a chaise cart.

Q. He left his goods at Mr. Faulder's, part of them, and part of them in Broad street; who did he call upon in Broad street - A. Mr. Wright; he left some paper there.

Q. And books at Mr. Faulder's - A. Yes; then we went to Whitechapel.

Q. Is it your custom to ride out with this gentleman - A. No, unless he meets me, or we go in the country.

Q. How near was your chaise cart in Whitechapel

to this cart - A. It might be two or three yards, or not so much.

Q. Then you must be close to the cart - A. No. I was not close to the cart; I was at the head of the cart; the men were not at the head.

Q. Why if your cart was two or three yards off, your cart must be near to them; now this was not Goswell street - A. No.

Q. You are quite sure that you do not mistake Goswell street for Whitechapel market - A. No.

Q. Have you ever seen this man before - A. I have seen him at Mr. Jilts's; I know him by sight, and that is the way how I came to be brought here, I was subpoenaed.

Q. Did you know his name - A. Yes, when it was mentioned to me.

Q. You had heard his name before - A. Yes.

Q. You first of all said you observed the men - A. I did not observe the other man; I knew Lebeck, I did not observe much of him; it was not my business to observe them.

Q. Which cart staid longest in the market, your's or their's - A. Their's staid longest.

Q. You are quite sure it was their cart - A. Yes.

Q. Which way did their cart go - A. I cannot say, I did not see the cart go.

Q. Do you know such a place as Windsor terrace, City road - A. Yes, because I have a house there.

Q. Did you ever live there - A. No, I intend living there, the house is not finished; I cannot live there.

Q. How long have you had that house - A. About two months, or not quite so much.

Q. Now, if there should be any difference between you and them were they took in these sacks of corn, I suppose they are the most likely to remember than what you are - A. I should suppose so.

Q. What kind of a man was he that delivered them this corn - A. He was dressed like the prisoners, something in the country way.

Q. What had he - A. Some sacks of corn.

Q. How did he carry them - A. He carried them on his shoulders.

Q. Where did he come from - A. I do not know.

Q. What were in these sacks - A. They appeared to be sacks of corn, they seemed to be full of something.

Q. How many were they - A. I observed two, but no more.

Q. Now I will tell you what account the prisoners gave when they were before the magistrate - the prisoner James Tollson says, I and my fellow servant brought the corn into the cart at Goswell street; were you in Goswell street - A. I was not in Goswell street; if I had seen it put into the cart in Goswell street, I could not say that it was in Whitechapel.

Q. Was you present, Griffiths, when the examination was taken - Griffiths. I was.

Q. This is the magistrate's signature - A. Yes, it is.

Q. to Maybrick. When was it you saw him - A. About the 14th of May.

Q. How came you to know this that your attendance would be necessary here - A. It was told me; I had a subpoena sent me.

Q. Did you hold any conversation with Lebeck about this - A. No.

Q. You never told this story to Mr. Jilts - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about it - A. No, I never had to any body; Lebeck might have told this to him, and that might be the occasion of my being supoenaed.

Q. You told me that you saw the man put them in at Whitechapel - A. Yes, Whitechapel.

WILLIAM SWAN . I am an auctioneer, sworn in the City of London; I live in Hosier lane, Smithfield.

Q. Do you know that man who has been just examined, Maybrick - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him - A. A very short time, indeed, sir.

Q. Did you see him on Saturday the 14th of May - A. Yes.

Q. In what part of the town - A. In the Old Bailey, both morning and afternoon.

Q. What part of the Old Bailey - A. The Rose over the way.

Q. Did you see him there at twelve o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. How long was he afterwards at the Rose in the Old Bailey - A. Till four o'clock; he took and arrested a man of the name of Samuel Williams , and the man never owed him a single halfpenny.

Q. Was he in arrest at the Rose - A Yes.

Q. Are you sure that he was staying with this man under an arrest from twelve o'clock till four o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the officer that had Mr. Williams in arrest - A. Nightingal.

Q. Are you sure that Nightingal had him under arrest from twelve o'clock till four - A. Yes; Mr. Hickes was the attorney.

Q to Maybrick. Upon your oath, was not you at the Rose on that day, in the Old Bailey, from twelve o'clock till four - A. I was not.

Q. Had you arrested a man of the name of Williams on that day - A. No, I had not; it was the day before, or the Thursday.

Q. Will you swear that it was not on a Saturday - A. It was not.

Q. Was Nightingal the officer - A. He was.

Q. Where does he live - A. In Fleet lane. I was at the Fortune of War when Mr. Williams was arrested.

Mr. Swan. I dare say the landlord of the house will recollect it; I beg the court pardon if I have done wrong.

COURT. No, you have done right, it may further the ends of justice.

Mr. Swan. Mr. Williams is a very respectable man in the Borough, he was the man that was arrested; the fact was I bailed Williams on that day.

Tollson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Lebeck called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

TOLLSON - GUILTY , aged 24.

LEBECK - GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-91

455. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , a leather trunk, value 10 s. three waistcoats, value 8 s. two pair of breeches, value 12 s. a pair of drawers, value 1 s. and a yard and a half of brown holland, value 1 s. the property of John Macknamara , esq.

SAMUEL HUFF . I am servant to John Macknamara esq. No. 8, Derweston street, Portman square.

On the 4th of April, I packed up all the things mentioned in the indictment, the trunk was put in the carriage; I can only speak to the property.

Q. All you know is that this trunk and the things contained in it are your master's property - A. Yes.

- BROWN. Q. You are in the life guards - A. Yes. On the 15th of April, as me and my comrade were returning from the stables, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock in the evening in Bank street , between King street and Dorweston street, I saw a man in the front of us, he was about twelve or fourteen yards from us with a trunk on his shoulder; we heard the cry of stop thief, and instantly saw the prisoner lay the trunk down on the pavement; he instantly made for the middle of the road; I ran after him, and after his making a little resistance, I secured him on the road; I detained him till Mr. Macknamara came up asked him from where he had taken that trunk; he said some gentleman had given him two shillings to carry it some way for him; he asked him where the gentleman was, and where he was going to carry it to, he said he did not know; Mr. Macknamara cried out where is this gentleman that employed this villain to carry this trunk; the prisoner asked Mr. Macknamara to let him go; he said he would not, he knew he had stole the trunk out of his chaise at the door; while he went up to fetch his great coat, which he had forgot. There were no watchman or constable there; I took him to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I know nothing more than what my comrade has related.

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked to carry the trunk by a gentleman, apparently to me; when I heard the cry of stop thief, I laid down the trunk; the man that employed me ran away.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-92

456. ELIZABETH MARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d. of May , a coat, value 5 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of James Roffe .

JAMES ROFFE . I am a school master ; I live in Greville street, Hatton garden . On Monday the 23d. of May, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for in a hurry down stairs, where I saw the prisoner with my property in the passage; she had been brought back.

ANN FELLOWS . On Monday the 23d. of May, in in the afternoon, as I was coming down stairs, I met the prisoner at the bed room door up two pair of stairs; I asked her what she wanted, she said you must not go in here, they are talking; she asked me to go up stairs to get her some water; I said there is no water up stairs; she asked me to go down stairs to get her some water; I went, I saw somebody coming along, the prisoner tapped me on the shoulder, she said she would be here again soon; she put her hand into her pocket to give me a penny; I refused it. A gentleman came down stairs; I told him there was a woman gone out of the house, but I did not know what she had got; the gentleman went and fetched her back.

JOHN LANCASTER BURDECK . I am a lodger of Mr. Roffe's.

Q. I suppose you are the gentleman Ann Fellows alludes to - A. Yes, I was coming down the first pair of stairs; I saw the prisoner at the foot of the stairs talking with this little girl; I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle in her apron; after she got out of the door the girl said she suspected that she was after no good; I ran after her and brought her back; after which Mr. Roffe came down stairs, and the property was found in her apron.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-93

457. JOSEPH PIGOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May , two pounds weight of horse, hair, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Holmes .

THOMAS HOLMES . I am a hair and rag merchant . On Monday the 27th of last month, I had a waggon load of rags and horse hair come into my warehouse, No. 130, Shoreditch ; I was away from home at the time my man was unloading the waggon.

PETER MASON. I am an officer of Worship street. On Friday the 27th of last month, I was going through Shoreditch to go to Worship street; I saw a waggon at Mr. Holmes's warehouse unloading of bags; I saw the prisoner, who was the driver of the waggon rolling up the tilt to cover the goods; when he had rolled it up, he put it on the forepart of the waggon, and went immediately to the mouth of one of the bags and endeavoured with his hands to close it; I went up to the warehouse to see Rouse, Mr. William's man; I asked him if Mr. Williams was in the way; he said no. If you have got any message I will deliver it to my master; I said no, come with me to the door, he did so; I asked him if the prisoner was employed by his master; he said no, he was a person employed occasionally to draw goods from the wharf; I then desired the prisoner that was upon the top of the waggon, to chuck down the tilt; he seemed confused and asked me what I said; I said chuck down that tilt directly, which he did. I then desired Rouse, Mr. Holmes's man, to unroll the tilt, as it was rolled up; in unrolling it he found this quantity of horse hair rolled up in it. I desired Rouse to take care of the horse hair; I gave him that handkerchief to tie it up in; he did so, and when the waggon was unloaded I took him down to the office; on going down to the office he took this knife out of his pocket, and said he found it in London wall; it was open as it is now. I told him I was very sorry he had a knife, for if he had not he could not have cut the mouth of the bag; he said he did not cut it open, it was partly sticking out and he pulled it out, and he could not think what possessed him to do it; he did not know what to do with it when he had got it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

The prosecutor, and jury, recommended the prisoner to mercy.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-94

458. MARY ROE was indicted for feloniously stealing

on the 25th of April , two shirts, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Mason .

SAMUEL MASON . I am a taylor ; I live in St. Ann's in the county of Middlesex. On Monday the 25th of April, I sent my shirts to be washed; about two o'clock the same day I was sent for to the police office to claim my property.

ELIZA CUMMINGS . On the 25th of April I was looking out of my one pair of stairs window; I saw the prisoner unpinning the two shirts, folding them up, and putting them into her pocket; I called out to her that the property did not belong to her.

Q. Where was she when she was unpinning these shirts - A. In an open yard that goes down an alley far from the street; I told her again that the property did not belong to her; she still kept on. I ran down stairs as fast as I could and went to the causeway where she was; she was running up Stepney causeway; I called out stop thief; she was taken from behind some buildings; she was brought back to where she stole the shirts.

Q. What made you suspect her - A. Because she pulled up her petticoats, and put them into her pocket. I was confident that she was not the person that belonged to them.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the things in my hand, no more than I have this instant.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-95

459. THOMAS SHERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , two pair of women's shoes, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Stephens .

THOMAS STEPHENS . I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 13, Great Chesterfield street, Marybone , I keep a shop there, the prisoner was an apprentice of mine. On the 10th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went out, I left the prisoner at the bar cleaning himself in my room. In half an hour I was sent for to come home.

Mr. Walford. This man had given you the sum of twenty guineas in order for you to teach him his trade - A. He certainly had.

Q. You wished to get rid of him - A. No, I did not. I told him he would be of great use to me.

Q. Had not you promised to give him three guineas - A. I had, it was by his own proposal; I had not paid it him, I was to pay it him on the following day, but as we found my property on him, and he was going out of the house with them, he was taken in custody.

Q. Was he not in the habit of selling shoes for you - A. Not a pair.

Q. Will you venture to swear that he never sold for you a pair of shoes, nor recommended to you a customer - A. He was at the business before he came to me; after he had been with me a few weeks he said his aunt wanted a pair of shoes; I let him have a pair at the wholesale price; he always paid me for the shoes as he had them.

Q. Then he had bought shoes of you at the wholesale price - A. He had so, by single pairs.

COURT. This man was an articled servant to you - A. He was articled to me for eighteen months, he was with me about six months; he gave me twenty guineas; I was to board, wash, and lodge him, and learn him his business.

Q. What did he want you to give him - A. Three pounds or three guineas, and find him in work, and then he was to board himself.

Q. He did sell some shoes for you, did not he - A. I cannot say he did; I sold them to him first; what he did afterwards I cannot say.

Q. Might not he take shoes and sell them - A. No; he had always a measure for the shoes that I sold him, I did not sell to him at haphazard more than once; they were two pair of shoes of a size.

Q. You did trust him with two pair of shoes - A. I did, without having the money for them; he brought them back again.

Q. Have you got the articles here - A. No.

Q. I ask you now upon your oath did you or did you not, either before he was in custody or after he was in custody, at any time say to the prisoner that you would give up the prosecution if he would give up the articles - A. I did when he repented he had done the crime. He said Mr. Stevens, I am sorry for what I have done, this is the first time I robbed you; I told him if he would give up the articles and go about his business, he might do for himself, or else he would come to be hanged; he said the articles were at an attorney in High street, St. Giles's; then I said Thomas you must go through the regular business of the law.

Q. He was not to give up the shoes but the articles - A. The articles; nothing was said about the shoes then; he delivered me the shoes before the magistrate.

SUSANNAH STEVENS. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 10th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, as the prisoner was coming out of the back room door, he had this two pair of shoes, and the pair of shoes he had bought in the course of the week, under his arm; I looked very hard at him and he at me; we had missed shoes repeatedly, I said Thomas what have you got in that bundle; he made no reply but went back, stood at a box, and endeavoured to shove the two pair of shoes into the drawer at the bottom of the box; I said Thomas, is this your property; he said he had them in his possession ever since last Sunday; I told him another night he should not sleep in the place for he had been continually wronging us; I told him I did not wish to hurt him the least in the world only that he should not sleep in the house any more; I sent for the beadle; he wished to take him into custody; I would not let him till my husband came home.

Mr. Walford. The prisoner used to board with you - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever any quarrel with the prisoner - A. Yes; he was impertinent to me and he had more power over my husband's property than I had; we had a great many words.

Q. You know he had given your husband twenty pound - A. Yes.

Q. And you know that if your husband got rid of him at six months a great part of that would be profit - Ao. No; I do not think so.

Q. Was you present when your husband offered to drop the prosecution if he would give up the agreement - A. When the officer took him in my custody; my husband said if you are of the mind to go about your business and destroy your agreement, I will do nothing against you; he said he was sorry for what he had done, he had lodged them in an attorney's hands; he

first said that he had destroyed them.

ROBERT FLOWERS . On Sunday the 10th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. Mrs. Stephens said he had stole two pair of shoes, her husband was out, she did not know what to do. I recommended her to keep the prisoner locked up and send for her husband; I locked him up; Mr. Stephens came home in about three quarters of an hour; I was sent for again; Mr. Stevens desired me to bring the prisoner forward; he informed me that he did not wish to hurt the prisoner, if he would destroy his indentures before me; his reply was, he had already done that; Mr. Stephens imagining that was false, said I must take him in custody; the prisoner then said he had lodged it in the hands of an attorney in High street. On the Monday morning I took him to Marlborough street office; the indentures were delivered to the prisoner at the office, and I believe delivered up to the prosecutor.

Mr. Walford I take it for granted you have told us every thing that passed in your hearing; no such conversation passed in your presence, as that he was sorry he had robbed his master, that was the first time - A. There was nothing passed than what I have related.

Q. And if he gave up the articles he offered to give up the prosecution - A. He did so.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have paid that sum of money to the prosecutor; and his wife frequently taking up unlawful weapons to throw at me, I told my prosecutor that I would go from him. On the Monday following I asked him for three guineas, I told him I would pay him in the course of the summer; and he has never set down to work with me the whole time I have been there, above one fortnight. I could make a thread when I went to him - but what could I learn from him. The shoes I bought of the prosecutor on the Monday before; I gave him eight shillings and sixpence for them.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-96

460. JOHN BULLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of May , three pound weight of bacon, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Cuff , senior, Thomas Dickenson , and Joseph Cuff , junior.

JOSEPH CUFF , junior. Q. Who are the partners in your business - A. My father Joseph Cuff , and Thomas Dickenson , we are cheesemongers in Whitechapel . On the 31st of May we found that a side of bacon was cut during the drying; the prisoner was our private watchman , he had the care of the drying; the young man that I set to watch came forward, which was the signal, and then I saw the prisoner in the street; I desired him to come back; I asked him for the bacon, he said he had not got any; I said you must go into the accounting house till I get an officer: he put down his great coat before he came to the accounting house; I took it up and searched it in the prisoner's presence; the bacon was in it.

Q. How do you know it was your bacon - A. It corresponded with the side of bacon it was cut off.

Q. It fitted the bacon on the side where it was cut out - A. It did; I found the bacon; the prisoner made use of an oath, and said it was the first time,

ROBERT FREIND . I am an officer of Whitechapel; I produce the bacon. I fitted it with the side of bacon. The prisoner said it was the first time.

WILLIAM CHRISTIE MABBOT . I am warehouseman to the prosecutor; I went into the stove where the bacon hung to dry; I perceived that the bacon had been cut in the night; the prisoner was upon the premises. Upon searching the stove I found a piece of bacon. I informed my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the great coat up under my arm; going out my master called me; I dropped my coat, my master asked me about the bacon, I knew nothing about it; he opened the coat and found the bacon. I did not know who put it there.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-97

461. JOSEPH HARBOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of May , eleven penny pieces and seventy halfpence , the property of Samuel Bligh and James Bligh .

JAMES BLIGH . I am an ironmonger , No. 75, Whitechapel .

Q. Have you any partners - A. Yes, my brother Samuel Bligh is the only partner; the prisoner was our errand boy . On the 6th of May he came a little after six in the morning. In consequence of suspicion I marked the halfpence and penny pieces that were left in the till on the over night.

Q. How much was there left in the till - A. Thirteen shillings and sixpence in penny pieces and half pence; about eight o'clock I went to the till and counted the money; there was a deficiency of about four shillings and sixpence in copper coin; I asked him what money he had in his pockets, he said he had three pence halfpenny; I desired him to produce it; he did so; I examined and found it was not mine; I asked him if he had no more about him, he said no; I asked him if he was sure he had no more about him, he said no, he had not. On asking him a third time, he said he had more, but it did not belong to him, it was given to him by his mother; he pulled out about sixpenny worth; I saw by the marks they were mine; I desired him to put them in his pocket again; he was searched; there was four shillings and three halfpence found upon him, all marked money; I told him they were mine, he denied it and said it was his mother's; I told him it had my mark upon it, he seemed confused; I told him to take them in his hand, he would see a small cross upon them; then he said he took them from the till.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-98

462. SARAH LAMB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of April , a pillow, value

1 s. 6 d. a pillow case value 6 d. a sheet, value 1 s. 6 d. and two pound weight of feathers, value 5 s. the property of John Thomas , in a lodging room .

MARY THOMAS . My husband's name is John Thomas ; we keep a house in Angel and Porter court, Golden lane, St. Luke's . On the 18th of April, the prisoner took a two pair of stairs front furnished room; she had a bed and bedding for her use and was to pay four shillings a week; she staid in the house only from the Monday till the Thursday; I had a mistrust of her, I followed her up stairs; on the Thursday I found the sheet and the pillow missing; she had begun to take the feathers out of the bed; they were scattered about, and she had been sweeping the feathers under the bed; the pillow and sheet were in pledge, the pillow case I have not found; she owned to the pillow and the sheet, but the feathers she did not own to; I sent for an officer and had her secured.

JAMES WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 30. Barbican; I know the prisoner; she has been in my shop several times. On the 19th of April, about the middle of the day, she came to my shop and pledged a sheet and a pillow in the name of Mary Smith ; I advanced her three shillings upon them.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The duplicates I gave up to Mrs. Thomas; the feathers that I am accused of I know nothing of them; the bed tick is very old; in making the bed the feathers flew out and I had no white thread to mend it. I told Mrs. Thomas if she would wait till Saturday I would make it good.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-99

463. HUGH PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , a pair of trowsers, value 6 d. two one pound bank notes, and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of John Le Cruz .

JOHN LE CRUZ . (The witness being a foreigner was allowed an interpreter.) Q. Ask him what he is - A. He is a sailor .

Q. Ask him whether he lost a pair of trowsers, a two pound bank note, and two one pound bank notes - A. He says he did; he cannot say on what day he missed them; he had seen them safe a day or two before he missed them in the chest, in Parson's house; there were other men lodged in the house, there were no others in the room with him. He says this happened in the night time; he had a light in his hand and was going to open his chest; the prisoner laid hold of him behind, he put his hand in the chest and pulled the trowsers out; the bank notes were in the trowsers pocket; Mrs. Parsons and her servant was by at the time; he told the prisoner he had got paper money in that pocket, to mind and take care of it; they beat him and pulled the trowsers out of his hand.

Q. Did he complain to the people of the house or give any alarm - A. He did not; the next day he went to the justice.

Q. What time of the day did this happen; taking away the trowsers and the notes - A. About eleven o'clock at night.

Q.How did he come to have so much money about him; a two pound note, and two one pound notes - A. He received it at the India house.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . Q. Were you at the office when this man made the complaint first - A. I was; there came a charge with the prisoner of robbing the prosecutor of four pounds, and a pair of trowsers; I brought him up he had an hearing that evening; the prosecutor said upon his oath that he was going to unlock his chest, they took the key from him; Mrs. Parsons took the trowsers out of the chest, she called the maid to take the trowsers up stairs; he said he had a two pound note and two ones in his trowsers pocket.

JOHN WEYPOLE . I am clerk to Mitchell, Phipps, and co; agents, Leadenhall street.

Q. Did you in the month of May pay any money to this man - A. I was witness to it being paid; he was paid on the 3rd of May in Leadenhall street; he received above twenty pounds, in small notes, for pay as a seaman.

Mr. Walford to prosecutor. Ask him whether he did not go and drink with common girls - A. He certainly went with girls

Q. Ask him whether he did not charge Mary Holland with robbing him of ten guineas, or ten pounds in notes - A. He said that in a joke at that time, but she did not rob him of so much.

COURT. How much did she rob him of - A. Four Spanish dollars, three seven shilling pieces, and two one pound notes; that was before he received his money at the India house.

Mr. Walford. When he came to the prisoner's house who paid for the porterage of his trunk - A. The prisoner paid it, and the prisoner lent him two shillings.

Q. When the prisoner robbed him of his trowsers how much did he owe him for his lodgings - A. He thinks he owed him twelve days board and lodging at one pound a week, and three shillings and eleven-pence to the prisoner's wife.

Q. Ask him whether he ever left his handkerchief with the waterman to pay his fare because he had no money - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-100

464. WILLIAM MACKAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. the property of William Banfield .

WILLIAM BANFIELD . I live at No. 30, Windmill street, Tottenham court road . On the 10th of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I heard my wife screaming; I saw my my wife and this man scuffling in the passage; when I came in I saw him drop my sheets from his person, I secured him; I have kept the sheets in my custody ever since; my name is upon them, they were in a drawer in the parlour.

ANN BANFIELD . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A.Yes; it was between two and three o'clock when I saw him, he was coming out of the parlour door, and I was going in; I had been out, I kept the sheets in a pair of drawers in the parlour; I asked him what he wanted; he said nothing; I screamed out, and my husband came to my assistance; these are the sheets, they are worth ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took them out of the drawers, she cannot say I did; I saw them laying in the passage, and I took them up as I was going along the street.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-101

465. JOHN PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , nineteen yards of carpeting, value 2 l. 17 s. the property of John Fothergill .

ESTHER FOTHERGILL . I am John Fothergill's wife, his shop is No. 188, Gray's Inn lane .

Q. What time of the day was this carpeting missed - A. Between the hours of four and five, it was safe about a minute before it was missed. The carpeting was placed outside of the door; part on the pavement and part on a chair; I was sitting at work about six yards from where the carpeting lay; I could see a part of it as I sat, and when I turned my eye that way, I missed it. I went to the door the carpet was gone; I saw the prisoner at the bar with it: he was walking towards Holborn, I pursued him; he turned into Maryland buildings. I was very near him; stop thief was called; he turned his head and looked at me and dropped the carpeting; I knew it to be my carpeting; he was brought back to my shop and taken in custody.

MR. SENIOR. I am a baker in Kentish town; I was coming from Kentish town on the stage; I saw the prisoner walking along with the carpetting; a few paces beyond Mrs. Fothergill's door. I saw Mrs. Fothergill come out and look round; I kept my eye upon the prisoner; he went into Maryland buildings, and when he came out at the other end then I jumped off the coach and ran after him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him - A. No further than while I was turning the corner; I am quite sure he is the man.

Q. Where did you catch him - A. I run him down Tash street, through Baldwin's gardens into Black horse yard; there he went into a stable and shut the door after him; when I took hold of the man I found I knew him; I said to him I know you; he said do not hurt me Mr. Thurgood, my name is not Thurgood though he called me so; going down Liquorpond street, I delivered him into the officer's custody.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-102

466. HENRY WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of May, two printed books, value 5 s. the property of Richard Rodwell and John Rodwell .

RICHARD RODWELL . I am a book seller , No. 436, Oxford street , I am in partnership with my brother John. On the 31st of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and the books were brought into my shop.

BENJAMIN SNOW . I live in High street; I am a plumber; my people were at work at the front of Mr. Rodwell's house. I was giving them directions; I saw the prisoner come to his window and take the books; they were outside of the window on a stand; I informed Mrs. Rodwell; she told two gentlemen, they brought him into the shop, he was taken about three or four doors off.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the books up merely to read.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-103

467. EDWARD CUSHION was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , six table knives, value 1 s. 6 d. five forks, value 1 s. 6 d. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of John Priest .

JOHN PRIEST. I keep the Bell and Mackreal at Mile End ; about the 19th and 20th of April, the prisoner was coming from my back kitchen; I went to him, searched him, and found these knives, forks, and candlestick; I took them out of his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was removing from my lodgings; I put them in my pocket, his wife came and said I had something in my pocket; I said there was nothing belonging to her; they were taken out of my pocket, and all I had in my pocket besides.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined One Month Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-104

468. WILLIAM DONNINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May , a saw, value 4 s. the property of Robert Roberts .

ROBERT ROBERTS . On Tuesday the 17th of May, I was at a house opposite of the London hospital; I went up stairs to sweep some dirt away; I left my saw on the stair case. I heard some person come in; I looked out of the window; I saw the prisoner going out of the house tucking something up under his great coat; he turned up the first alley on the right hand; I never lost sight of him but while he turned the corner; I came up to him, I saw he had the saw under his great coat; he said he was very sorry for it, he hoped I would forgive him; Mr. Combes took the great coat from him.

MR. COMBES I am an officer of Lambeth street, I took the saw from the prisoner.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. No, I find he has been a very respectable man.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, I was out of work; I saw the saw lay on the step of the door.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-105

469. SARAH LAFEVERE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , 8 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Fletcher .

The prosecutor not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-106

470. JOHN STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of May , a pair of pantaloons, value 3 s. and a pair of braces, value 6 d. the property of John Kasey .

JOHN KASEY . On the 7th of May, I lost a pair of pantaloons and a pair of braces; I lodged in Patrick Croney 's house, the prisoner and me slept together; I lost them out of the room.

Q. What is your reason for charging him with stealing

them - A. When I came home they told me he was gone away with my pantaloons and braces. On the 11th of May the prisoner was taken in custody; then he had my pantaloons on him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them out of the house.

GUILTY .

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-107

471. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a shawl, value 5 s. and a bonnet, value 2 s. the property of Israel Solomon .

MARY SOLOMON . My husband's name is Israel Solomon, he is a furrier , Rupert street, Covent Garden . On the 1st of April, about two o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop to sell a child's shirt; I gave her four pence for it. After I paid her I told her to go, she wished to stop a bit; I laid a bonnet not finished on the box in the shop; in a few minutes after she went out of the shop door I missed my shawl and my bonnet. On the Tuesday following I saw her in custody; I am sure she is the same person.

ELIZABETH HUSBAND . I keep a mangle and chandler's shop in Rupert street; the prisoner came in my shop on Friday the 1st of April, between the hours of four and five; she asked for nothing; a person that came in with her asked for tea and sugar; I saw the prisoner look on the drawer that we keep for mangling things; I said, my good woman I think you have got something that belongs to me. A shawl and a black bonnet was found upon her; they were claimed by Mrs. Solomon.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. She has got fourteen shillings of mine.

Prosecutrix. I never had any money from her.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-108

472. THOMAS GRIFFIN and WILLIAM BIRD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , an iron kitchen range, value 20 s. the property of John Boteler .

JOHN BOTELER . I live in St. John's lane . On the 26th of April I observed Edmonds the evidence looking over some music books; he shortly went away and returned again; I went across the way to the quaker's meeting house; I was informed by my mother in law that I had lost a kitchen range; I got intelligence that three men were seen going up Peter street with the range. The prisoner Edmonds was apprehended at Great Marlow in Buckinghamshire. I found the range at Susannah Mascal 's in Harp alley.

SUSANNAH MASCAL . Q. How did you come by that range - A. I bought it of some blacksmiths; my shop is No. 7, Harp alley, Fleet market; I do not know the persons I bought it of; their faces were black and dirty; the range was claimed by Mr. Boteler.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you see either of the prisoners at your shop - A. No, only the evidence; he has been my neighbour for five or six years.

- EDMONDS. I am a carpenter.

Q. You have been admitted king's evidence - A. Yes. I went with Bird and Griffin, they are smiths, to the prosecutor's shop; I was looking at some music under the window; I saw Griffin take the grate on his shoulder; and when I went from there I saw Bird with it. I did not know that they intended to steal the range.

Q. How came you to go to Great Marlow - A. On the report of a warrant being out against me.

Q. What became of the range - A. They went to Harp alley, I was close to the door when it was sold; they sold it for nine shillings and sixpence; they gave me three shillings.

Mr. Peat. You have already told the jury what sort of a man you are - would you have given this evidence was it not to save yourself - I ask you to give me a plain answer - A. I would do it to a person that would lead me into such a thing.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Bird called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Griffin called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080601-109

473. JOHN BARROW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , a saw, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Phillips .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a carpenter ; I was framing work in the field on the 3d of June; I left my saw in the field; I returned back in about half an hour, I was informed it was gone; I missed the saw; about seven o'clock I saw it in the custody of the man.

- RANDALL. I was at work in this field; I saw the prisoner take the saw, I followed him about an hundred yards; he was stopped; I saw him throw the saw away; some person picked it up and gave it me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the saw lay in the field; I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080601-110

474. JACOB JONAS , alias YOUKOFF , was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr Knapp.

HENRY VINT . Q. You are a warehouseman and shawl manufacturer living in Queen street, Cheapside - A. Yes.

Q. In November last had you sent any shawls for the purpose of being printed at Mr. Huson's Brown's lane, Spital fields - A. Yes, a considerable quantity.

Q. Do you remember in November last being at the theatre - A. Yes; in the beginning of the month of November; I was in company with Mr. Park; I there observed a young woman wearing a shawl in an unfinished state, which I was sure must have been stole from the premises of Mr. Huson, whom I had employed

to print them; it was a particular pattern of my own; I went to her, and she gave us her address; her name was Mary Faith , New street, Creed lane, at Mrs. Barnet's. I had a warrant for Mary Faith ; she was taken, and the handkerchief, before the lord mayor; I knew it was my handkerchief, it had my initials on it.

MR. HUSON. I am a printer of silks, Brown's lane, Spital fields.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Vint coming to you after he had been to Drury lane theatre - A. I do.

Q. Had you lost shawls previous to that time - A I had lost a good many; I am certain that shawl stolen from my house or shop is marked H. V.; this pattern was never worked for any body else but Mr. Vint, nor could it in that state have come into the market. It is worth now about two guineas and a half; had it been finished, about three pound.

MARY FAITH . Q. You was in Drury lane theatre in November last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being addressed by Mr. Vint and Mr. Parke - A. I do not.

Q. Do you remember a shawl being taken from your back - A. Yes; on the Tuesday after Lord Mayor's day; it was produced before the Lord Mayor; I bought it of Mrs. Barnet in New street, Creed lane.

Q. What did you give for it - A. She left it to my generosity, she not knowing the value of it; I paid her a guinea on account; I thought it was an India shawl and worth five pound.

Mr. Pooley. How long have you known Mrs. Barnet - A.Three years; I lived in her house two years.

Q. Has not Mrs. Barnet another house in Bow lane, Cheapside - A. Not now; I believe she had last winter.

Q. At the same time she had a house in New street; both of the houses were of the same description - A. No; one was a house that they sold oysters.

Q. And the other a house where they sold - what - A. It was a decent orderly house.

Q. Now that house in New-street, do you mean to take upon you to swear that is a decent orderly house, is it not a common bawdy house - A. Yes.

Q. And that house, which you called a decent orderly house in Bow lane, where they sold oysters, was a house of the same description - A. Yes.

MRS. BARNET. Q.Where do you live - A. New street, Creed lane, Ludgate Hill.

Q. Do you know Mary Faith - A. Yes; I let her have a shawl; I bought it a month before the gentleman came after it; it was produced before the Lord Mayor, that was the shawl that I let her have; I bought it of Jonas on a Thursday, between nine and ten in the morning; he came in the kitchen and asked to speak to me; he pulled out of his right hand pocket a brown paper with a shawl in it; he said it was a curious shawl; it came from abroad; I looked at the shawl; I told him I had two new ones of my own; my husband came up; he said you do not want a shawl, you bought one a little while ago; he said he wanted to dispose of it, there was no such a one in London; it was a great rarity, it came from on board a ship; he asked me if I had got a friend that I could dispose of it for him, as he wanted money; it came to three guineas and a half; I told him he might leave the shawl, I would if I could; he told me he would call the next day; he called the next morning and took breakfast with me; he asked me if I had disposed of it; I told him I had not; I gave him two guineas and a seven shilling piece for it; I afterwards let Miss Faith have it; she was to give me what she thought proper.

Q. Have you always kept decent houses - A. I have kept lodgings; but never any blemish that I have done.

Q.What made them keep a lanthorn at your door in Church row - A. Perhaps they did not want me there; I kept no women in the house. There were eleven rooms in the house.

Q. Eleven beds at the least in the house - A. No; I had not so many.

Q. You made half the number do - A. I did as I could.

Q. Then you went to New-street; how long have you lived in New-street - A. I have lived there near a twelvemonth; I kept it with propriety.

CATHERINE GREY . Q. Was you a servant to Mrs. Barnet - A. Yes.

Q. Did you live there in September or October last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the defendant Jonas - A. Yes; I remember letting him into my mistress's house; I cannot say how long it was before my mistress was taken up; Mrs. Barnet was not up when he came; I went up stairs and called her; when I came down stairs, then he asked me for a pen and ink; I told him we had none in the house, if he stopped a bit I would go over the way to the chandler's shop and get him one; when I returned with it, I told him to be as quick as he could, for the people would want it; he pulled out of his right hand coat pocket a shawl, and blotted the corner of it. This is the shawl, there is a blot on it. My mistress came down in the kitchen; he was desired to step up stairs; he doubled up the shawl, took it with him; they went into the parlour together.

Q. How soon after that did you see the shawl again - A. I cannot say; I went away to lay in; after laying in, I returned to my mistress; I cannot rightly say when; I cannot say whether I was absent two or three months.

ELISHA CRABB . I am a constable.

Q. Had you a warrant to apprehend Jonas - A. Yes; it was delivered to me a day or two after Mrs. Barnet was taken up on the 12th of November, I knew Jonas before, he lived about St. Catherine's. I knew Mrs. Barnet when she lived in St. Catherine's; they lived within sixteen doors of each other; I went to apprehend Joseph the same night I had the warrant; I did not find him then; I heard he was gone to Gravesend; I went to Gravesend the same night; I did not find him; I found him two or three months after; I cannot tell the day of the month, it was since Christmas; I apprehended him in his own house, in St. Catherine's; I used all diligence; I dare say I had not been there less than a dozen times, and Mrs. Barnet's husband was with me every time. I took him on the Friday evening; on the Saturday he had a hearing before the Lord Mayor. When I produced the warrant he said that he did not know Mrs. Barnet, or something to that purpose.

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant.

The defendant called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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