Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th April 1808.
Reference Number: 18080406
Reference Number: f18080406-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 6th of APRIL, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right-honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Archibald Macdonald , Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Soulden Lawrence , One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart; Sir John Eamer , knt; Charles Flower Esq . Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Richard Lea , esq. Josiah Boydell , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys Esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

William Bennett .

William Hawkins ,

William Farnell ,

Charles Merritt ,

Richard Baylis ,

John Crozier ,

Joseph Radford ,

John Redford ,

Alderman Austin ,

Joseph Woodhead ,

John Glover ,

John Matthew Smith .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

James Hutchinson ,

George Cooper ,

James South ,

John Giles ,

George Dobson ,

William Paas ,

John Wright ,

Samuel Richardson ,

George Cook ,

Thomas Borer ,

Joshua Robbins ,

David Higginbotham .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Richard Holditch ,

Thomas Parker ,

William Marshal ,

John Smith ,

Aaron Ditch

Ranan Stewart ,

James Lee ,

Edmund Harper ,

Robert Elliott ,

William Thomas ,

George Watler ,

George Shewbridge .

Reference Number: t18080406-1

267. TIMOTHY KEENE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of March , thirty pound weight of fat, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Berry .

THOMAS RAINE . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Berry , wholesale perfumer , Greek street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann .

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. He was a labourer there; we were in the habit of melting our own fat, for the purpose of making into pomatum; we allow the men the pugs, after the fat is melted; that is the refuse, the skins. In consequence of a letter we received from a tallow chandler, we suspected that we were robbed of fat to some amount. On the 19th of last month I saw the prisoner take out a quantity of fat in a bag; I went after him and saw him selling this fat in Mr. Briant's shop, a tallow chandler in Greek street.

Q. Are you sure it was the same fat. - A. I am sure. I followed him and the fat; I have no doubt but the fat I saw him take was the fat I saw him selling.

Prisoner. I have been in the shop sixteen years. I shewed Mr. Raine the waste of the skins, and the fat was the scrapings of the floor.

Witness. As he passed me, he said you see it looks very brown; I saw it was brown at the top; I took no further notice of it.

ROBERT BRIANT. Q. You are a tallow chandler. A. Yes. On Saturday I bought the fat of the prisoner, I gave him eight shillings for it; the top of the fat was what was allowed them, the refuse of the skins; at the bottom of that was suet; I gave him three pence a-pound for it. If I had seen the bottom I should have allowed him sixpence a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold nothing but the scrapings of the floor and the pickings of the skins.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-2

268. JONATHAN NEALE and SAMUEL NORRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , sixty four pigeons, value 3 l. 4 s. the property of William Pope , esq.

Second count for feloniously stealing sixty four tame pigeons, value 3 l. 4 s. from a certain dove cote, belonging to William Pope , esq.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM POPE , ESQ. Q. You live at Hillingdon, in the county of Middlesex . - A. Yes.

Q. I understand you have a dove cote in your yard under which is your coach house. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 17th of February was your dove cote perfectly safe when you and your family retired to rest. - A. It was. In the morning when I got up I discovered one of the windows of the pigeon house had been broken open; in consequence of that I went to Mr. Fox's, the Old Hat, as I very well knew a great many pigeons were shot at there.

Court. How far is that from your house. - A. About seven miles from my house in the road to London. I saw Mr. Fox, I enquired of him whether he had bought any pigeons that morning; he acknowledged that he had, about six o'clock; I think he said five dozen and four; in consequence of that I sent Laban, my man, there immediately to identify them.

- LABAN. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Pope. A. Yes. On the morning of the 18th of February, about a quarter before seven in the morning I discovered my master's dove cote had been broken.

Q. Do you know how many pigeons there were on the over night. - A. I do not.

Q. Were there more than five dozen. - A. Yes, a good many more.

Q. How could any body have got to the window. - A. Not without a long ladder; there was a ladder in the rick yard.

Court. You mean the ladder in the rick yard would have reached that window if it had been set up against it. - A. Yes. When I got in the pigeon house there were several pigeons in the pigeon house; the top of it was stuffed with hay.

Q. Is it so stuffed of a night. - A. No; only as the thieves this night stopped them for the convenience of taking them; I informed Mr. Pope that the dove house had been broken open; I went to the Old Hat, I enquired for Thomas the ostler; he shewed me some pigeons in a basket, they were alive.

Q. Was your pigeons all wild, or some tame and some wild. - A. Some tame and some wild; they were a mixed breed; by that reason I knew them. There were two pigeons that I knew, I found them at the Old Hat, they were a lead colour, and feathered nearly down to the toe; I had missed those as a part that were taken. I turned two of the pigeons out, and one was shot at.

Court. Did you ever get any back. - A. No.

Q. What day did you go to the Old Hat. - A. On Thursday.

WILLIAM READ . Q. You are a constable, you were desired to go and apprehend Neale. - A. Yes; I went to Hounslow on Saturday morning, I was there by day light; I could not find Neale there; I came home again. On the Saturday afternoon I found Griffin at Hounslow, I told him for what I apprehended him; his wife said that she knew that he was not with them when the pigeons were sold at the Old Hat. Griffin lodged in Norris's house.

Court. What is Norris. - A. It is a small shop, with a few things in the window.

Q. What is Neale - A. He is a carpenter. I started again at three o'clock to Housnlow. On Monday morning I took Norris at Hounslow in bed; I told him for what I took him; he said Griffin was a fool. I took him to Hillingdon, he was committed; I took him to Clerkenwell prison.

JOHN COOK . Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes; I apprehended Neale at the Waterman's Arms, the Surry side of Westminster bridge; he made a desperate resistance; I succeeded in taking him. I told him what I apprehended him for; he said Griffin had told a lie, he did not fetch the ladder out of the rick yard, the ladder was put up against the dove house for him to get up.

JOSEPH FOX. Q. You keep the Old Hat, we understand.

- A. Yes.

Q. I understand that the diversion of pigeon shooting goes on very much at your place. - A. It does.

Q. Did Mr. Pope call on you on the morning of the 18th of February. - A. Yes. On that morning a little after six, I bought five dozen and four pigeons of the prisoner Neale; I gave him fourteen shillings a dozen. I said to him I have heard of a number of depredations, I hoped there were nothing of this kind, he fell a laughing and said you may depend these came from about thirty miles up the country; Mr. Pope's man brought two out that he knew to be his master's pigeons.

Q. Had you known Neale before. - A. Yes, I had bought pigeons of him before, at various times.

Q. You said Mr. Pope's man brought two pidgeons out; had those pigeons that he brought out their feathers down their legs. - A. I did not take notice.

Q. Did Neale come to you alone with the pigeons. - A. No, there was another man with him. I think I should know him.

Q. Did you afterwards desire your ostler to give a description were these men might be found. - A. Yes, and he went with the constable to help find them out.

THOMAS BARNABY . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am the ostler at the Old Hat.

Q. Do you remember Laban coming to you. - A. Yes, he went and saw the pigeons. I was present on the morning they were brought; Neale and another man brought them between six and seven, I knew Neale before, he goes by the name of the carpenter.

Q. After these pigeons were recognised by Mr. Pope's servant, did you go with the constable to find Neale. - A. Yes, I went with him to Hounslow.

JOHN CRUTCHLEY . - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live, I live at the Vine Inn, Hillingdon; the church yard parts my house from the prosecutors.

Q. Do you remember seeing either of the prisoners on the 18th of February. - A. Yes, both of them; they were in company together, they came in I believe about three o'clock in the afternoon; they staid about an hour and a half, there were four of them two of the four went out, Griffin and another went out, and staid more than an hour. Neale staid in my house and another man; Griffin came back after they were gone, and asked where his partners were; I said they were both gone.

Q. Are you quite sure that the two prisoners at the bar were two of the four that where at your house on that day. - A. Yes.

ANTHONY GRIFFIN . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a labourer, I live at Hounslow.

Q. Were you in company of the two prisoners, and a man of the name of Jakeman. - A. Yes, we started from Hounslow at one o'clock in the day; we all went together to Hillingdon, we there stopped at the Vine, and had some victuals and drink, afterwards Samuel Norris and I went out, and we passed the prosecutor's house.

Q. Did you know the prosecutor's house before. - A. No, we passed by there to see whether there was a dove house or not; we returned to the Vine, then Jakeman and I came out, and left Neale and Norris, to pay the reckoning; Jakeman and I passed by the prosecutor's house, and gave another look, we expecting the two prisoners were following of us, they were not, we went back to the Vine, they were not there; we found them at the Adam and Eve; we all stopped at the Adam and Eve till the landlord told us it was time to shut the house up.

Court. What time was that. - A. Between ten and eleven; we then left the house and went to Hayes to a dove cote up a lane opposite the Adam and Eve; not finding a ladder to that dove cote we went back to Hillingdon, it was then about one o'clock; there was a light in the prosecutor's house, we went into the prosecutor's yard, we got some hay and laid down in the waggon till two o'clock, then we took the ladder.

Q. Who took the ladder. - A. I think Jakeman and Neale. I took the hay; we then set the ladder to the dove cote; Neale took the hay up to stuff the holes of the dove cote, then we shifted the ladder to the other side of the prosecutor's house that we might not be seen, I went up the ladder first and pulled some tiles off, I found I could not get in by reason of some rafters. Neale pulled out some laths from the window and got in; he then handed me out at different times five dozen and five pigeons; one pigeon was smothered before he got to the bottom of the ladder, then there were five dozen and four.

Q. What did you with the dead pigeon. - A. I carried it home.

Q. Where did you live yourself. - A. I lodged at Samuel Norris's at Hounslow. We put the pigeons in three bags and two baskets that we had with us and came on the road to Windmill hill near Hanwell. Norris and I then delivered the pigeons to Jakeman and Neale.

Mr. Knapp. How were these pidgeons to be disposed of. - A. They were to be taken to Mr. Fox at the Old Hat. I received the share of my money; Jakeman paid me. I asked Neale if Mr. Fox knew how we got the pigeons, he said yes, he did not care how we got them; he said he had described to him where the dove cotes were.

Neale's Defence. He has said a very false thing about Mr. Fox, Mr Fox never told me such a thing in all my life

Norris's Defence. He has spoken false about Mr. Fox.

NEALE, GUILTY , aged 32.

NORRIS, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-3

269. MARY HARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , in the dwelling house of Samuel Northwood , thirty seven guineas, forty one half guineas, sixty seven shilling pieces, twenty two dollars, a crown piece, one hundred and thirteen half crowns, seventy nine shillings, thirty nine sixpences, and twenty one bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SAMUEL NORTHWOOD. Q. You live at the Old Parr's Head at Islington . - A. Yes, the corner of Cross street, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington ; the prisoner was a lodger in my house, she had lodged with me better than two years and a half; she had the second floor over my bed room.

Q. Did any body live with her. - A. Yes, Robert Hardy , her husband; I had frequently lost money, I did not know how it was lost; in my presence, about

eleven o'clock on Saturday the 26th of March, my wife marked two half crowns; when she went up stairs she found that her pockets had been moved, and the money was gone.

Court. What pieces were they. - A. Two half crowns; I went up stairs to bed, and found they were gone; I saw her mark them and put them in her pocket just before going up to bed.

Mr. Knapp. You went to bed. On the next day what did you do. - A. In the morning I got Mr. Mason the officer; I told him the circumstance; we went up stairs and knocked at the prisoner's door, she opened the door; I told her that I had lost money from time to time, and I had suspicion that she had taken it. Mr. Mason asked her whether she had any objection to shew what she had got in her pocket; she pulled out some money, a knife, and a key from her pocket; then she hesitated about pulling out any more; Mr. Mason told her he must search her; then she pulled out a purse; Mason took the money from the purse, he took out the two half crowns; I immediately knew them.

Court. What did you do with the two half crowns. A. Mr. Mason took them in his possession.

Mr. Knapp. Were these half crowns that were taken out of the parse the half crowns that you had so marked and put into the pocket of your wife. - A. Yes, I am sure of it; upon their being found, the prisoner said it was her own money; I desired Mason to search further, I was sure there was more money; he went to search a box, which the niece said was her's; the prosecutor, when she found Mr. Mason was going to open it, said it was her's; in the box was a little red trunk, containing a quantity of silver, and a one pound note in a paper box; in a silk glove was a large quantity of guineas and some notes; there were two of the notes with my initials on them.

Mr. Gurney. It is not pretended that these notes were lost at the same time, the only loss that evening was two half crowns; it is not affected to be said that any thing else was lost at that time.

Mr. Knapp. Did you miss the notes at that time. A. No, before.

CHARLOTTE NORTHWOOD . Q. We understand on this night you had marked two half crowns, and put them in your purse in your pocket before you went to bed. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with your pockets when you went to bed. - A. I undressed myself and laid my pockets in a chair; I came down for my child, leaving the room without any body in it; when I came up stairs again I looked in my pockets and missed the two half crowns.

Q. Have you seen the half crowns that were found upon the prisoner. - A. Yes, I am certain they were mine, they were loose in my pocket.

The half crowns produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing the two half crowns only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-4

270. THOMAS HUMPHRIES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Esther Kindsey , about the hour of six at night on the 24th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two feather beds, value 10 l. two bolsters, value 10 s. two pillows, value 5 s. and three counterpanes, value 2 l. her property.

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

ESTHER KINDSEY . Q. On the 24th of October last had you a house No. 39, Southampton row . - A. I had.

Q. What parish is that house in. - A. In the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; I let it ready furnished; if is not occupied by tenants I occupy it myself; I occupied it then. I went out between five and six in the evening, I locked the door of the area and likewise the area gate, and took the key with me; when I went out it was dark and rainy; I returned home about eight o'clock, I found the area gate remained as before, I found the area door unlocked, and I found the street door open; the watchman had been previously put in to take care of the house.

Q. When you searched the house did you miss any of the goods. - A. I went up stairs, I missed two beds, two bolsters, two pillows, six blankets, three counterpanes, two white and one coloured.

Q. What is the value of the two beds. - A. I dare say I could not buy them for fifteen pounds; the counterpanes are worth three guineas; one was quite new, it never had been on the bed nor wetted.

Court. What do you mean, by that you occupied it yourself, did you sleep there. - A. I did.

Q. Therefore when you went out that night had you an intention of returning to sleep there. - A. I had, most undoubtedly.

JAMES SIMMONDS . Q. You are an upholsterer, living at No. 44, Southampton row - A. Yes, I live within five or six doors of the prosecutrix's house.

Q. On the 24th of October last were you near her house in the evening. - A. I was going down the street; passing her house towards Russel square (it was about half past six in the evening), I saw two men coming out of her street door, with large bundles on their backs, they appeared white, as if they had counterpanes over them; each man had a large bundle; one man was a taller man than the other; I think the tallest man came out first; Bradey was the shortest man. They went up King street, toward Holborn; I passed the short man, he throwed the bed down in King street, I passed him; the tallest man passed on; I pursued him, he was about two hundred yards before me, he was going as I conceived towards Holborn; I went down King street, the way I thought he went, however I lost him. I returned to the house No. 39, and saw the door open.

Q. Had you an opportunity of looking at the tall man, so as to know his person. - A. I did not look at his person; from what I saw of him I believe he is much about the same size as the tall man.

JOSEPH FIELDING . - Mr. Pooley. You live at No. 34 Kingsgate street. - A. I do, I am a baker's peel maker; and I buy odds and ends in the brokery way.

Q. Do you know Michael Bradey . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Thomas Humphries .

- A. I saw the man at Bow street.

Q. On the 24th of October did Bradey come to your house. - A. Yes, Bradey and Humphries.

Q. Is that the man. - A. I cannot say positively it is the same man; I think it is, but he is so strangely altered; I think the man was taller and stouter, if he is the man he is so altered it staggers my recollection; they brought me two feather beds and offered me them for sale.

Court. Was the man who came with Bradey, and that offered the feather beds to you for sale, was he a man whom you had known before by the name of Thomas Humphries . - A. Yes, I had bought little odds and ends of both of them before, either both together or separate, I cannot say which; they told me they were two brothers. They said there were two feather beds and asked me if I would buy them; I said no, it was all a folly to bring them to me, they were too good for me; I desired them to take them away; the man called Humphries said he would call a coach; he went away directly the things at that time laid in my shop on the floor, they brought a coach a little higher up in the street; Bradey staid in the shop; the coach came in about a minute; the two men took the bundles away, I saw no more of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. When these two two men came to you that evening you had been drinking a little beer. - A. Yes, I was half asleep by the fire side.

Q. You were half drunk. - A. I was not sober.

Q. You now say that the prisoner which you now see, and which you saw at Bow street, you think he is neither so tall nor so broad set as the man who came with Bradey. - A. No, I stand five foot nine, and the man Humphries was near as tall as me; when I saw the man at Bow street I looked hard at him, I thought it could not be the man Humphries.

Q. Then if he is the man you think he is strangely altered. - A. Yes, he is strangely altered; I should pass him a dozen times in the street and not notice him.

Mr. Pooley. You were sober enough to identify the person of Bradey. - A. It was fresh in my memory, and Bradey staid by the goods all the time.

MATTHEW MATTHEWS . - Q. You are a hackney coachman. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 24th of October last, in the evening, do you recollect your coach being called from the stand. - A. Yes, I was standing at the Pilgrim in Holborn.

Q. How near is that to Kingsgate street. - A. About an hundred yards. A man called me, he asked me if I would take two beds to Broad street, Carnaby market; I told him I would for two shillings. I went up Kingsgate street opposite of Eagle street, when I got there the beds were brought to the coach by two men.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him. - A. I cannot say I know him; the beds were put in the coach; one rode on the box with me, and the other rode behind; I believe one was rather taller than the other; the tallest rode on the box; we stopped opposite Mr. Bainbridge's house.

Q. Did they take the beds in Bainbridge's house. - A. I believe they did; I have seen the name on the house since. It is a looking glass frame manufactory.

JOHN FOY . - Q. You belong to the police office Marlborough street. - A. Yes.

Q. You were examined on the trial of Bradey, on the 26th of October last; did you go to Bradey's lodgings. - A. I did, I saw a boy coming out with a bundle wrapped up in a shirt; I stopped him and took him into the parlour where he had come from; Bradey was in that parlour he was getting out of bed. I examined the bundle, I found it contained a crow and three double Skeleton keys.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the house of Mrs. Kindsey. - A. I did, I tried the keys to the kitchen door that leads into the area; one of them unlocked the door without any difficulty; I afterwards went to Mr. Bainbridge's house in Broad street, Carnaby market.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called no witnesses to his character.

Court. Upon the evidence of Mrs. Kindsey there can be no doubt but what a burglary was committed in her house by some persons after she had left it locked, by stealing in it two feather beds and other articles; you find that she proves most distinctly that she locked up the house between five and six, when she returned between seven and eight she found it broken open. The question for you is whether you are satisfied the prisoner was or was not, the other man that was concerned in this burglary.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-5

271. EDWARD BASSETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Robert Hutchinson .

ROBERT HUTCHINSON . Q. Did you loose a handkerchief on the 1st of April last. - A. Yes, I was going along the City road about a quarter past seven in the evening; I felt something pulling my pocket. I turned round, I saw the prisoner close to my back, he ran off immediately, and I followed him; a gentleman of the name of Rogers was walking along with me, he joined in the pursuit and caught him. I asked him for my handkerchief, he denied having it. I have never seen the handkerchief since.

MR. ROGERS. I was walking along with Mr. Hutchinson in the City road; he turned round sharp he said he had lost his handkerchief. Mr. Radford stopped him; he got away from his hands; I pursued him and took him. I was present when he was searched; nothing was found on him.

Q. You did not see the handkerchief go from the person of Mr. Hutchison did you. - A. No.

HENRY RADFORD . On Friday night the first of April, I was in the City road; I saw the prisoner take something from one of the gentlemen's pocket, I cannot say from which.

Q. Did you see where it went. - A. No, he immediately ran off; I caught him by the collar.

Prisoner's Defence. About half after six o'clock, I took a walk up the City road; I found it later than I thought it was; I wanted to go home quick; I run round Tabernacle walk; no sooner than I began to run I heard the cry of stop thief when they took me

I said I know nothing of the handkerchief - they found nothing on me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-6

272. AMELIA JOHANNA HENRIETTA ROUBERG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March, a saddle, value 4 l. and a bridle, value 5 s. the property of Goswin Bruck .

GOSWIN BRUCK. I live in John's row, Brick lane, Old street . On the 13th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I returned home with my mare, saddle and bridle; I delivered the mare, saddle and bridle into Edward Long 's care. he took the mare, saddle and bridle into 'the stable, then I went away; in about an hours time I returned, I missed the saddle and bridle.

Q. Did you ever see it afterwards. - A. On the Tuesday following I saw it at Worship street office.

EDWARD LONG . I am servant to the last witness.

Q. Do you remember his bringing his mare, and delivering his bridle and saddle to you. - A. Yes, I took the mare into the stable; the prisoner was in the stable; when I had took the saddle off the mare she said she would take it down to my master.

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. She was a servant to my master; when she had the saddle on her back I gave the bridle into her hands.

Q. Where did you see the bridle and the saddle again. - A. At Worship street.

JAMES GEARE . I am an officer. On Monday the 14th of March, from information, I found the prisoner in an alley adjoining Essex street, Whitechapel; I searched her and found a duplicate upon her. I questioned her how she came to have it, she said she was in liquor; I went to the pawnbroker, and ordered him to attend the office.

- NEED. I am journeyman to Mr. Christie, 59, Lower East Smithfield. On Saturday evening the 12th of March, about nine o'clock, the prisoner brought this saddle and bridle to pawn, she said she brought it from her master, Dr. Fisher, at Wapping; I lent her a guinea and a half upon them.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-7

273. JOHN DENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , a petticoat, value 5 s. and spencer, value 2 s. the property of John Condon .

MARY CONDON . On the 23d of February I was out of doors; Mrs. West informed me that she had watched the prisoner to No. 15, Cranby street, he had taken something out of my house; I went there, I saw the prisoner, he stood on the top of the kitchen stairs; I asked him for the petticoat and spencer, he denied it; I charged him with a constable.

Mrs. WEST. Q. Did you see this man take the things out of the house. - A. No; I saw him folding something up at Mrs. Condon's window, No. 3, Cranby street; I told Mrs. Condon; I pursued with Mrs. Condon. I am sure it is the same man.

Q. Did you see what sort of things they were when he folded them. - A. Yes, they were black, they were the same sort of articles as the spencer and petticoat produced now; I am sure it is the same man.

SUSANNAH SMART . Q. You live opposite of Mrs. Condon's house. - A. Yes; I saw a man pack up something black; they were two articles.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, have you any reason to believe it was him. - A. I was looking through a two pair of stairs window, I could not be certain; I saw a man pack up something at Mrs. Condon's window; they were hanging out for sale.

HENRIETTA FRENCH . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; on the 23d of February, between five and six in the evening, that man brought a black petticoat and spencer; he offered them for sale, he asked seven shillings for them; I told him I wanted nothing of the kind; he went away for about five minutes, he returned again, then he offered them for five shillings; I did not buy them; when Mrs. Condon came I was going out; a person in my room told me he had left them.

Q. How come he to leave them. - A. I look upon it he saw Mrs. Condon coming, so he made off; I delivered the things to the owner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the business, good or bad.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years ,

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-8

274. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , an umbrella, value 7 s. and a hat cover, value 2 s. the property of John Man .

JOHN MAN . I live at No. 8, Henrietta street, Pimlico ; on the 10th of March I lost an umbrella and an hat cover; they hung at the shop door for sale; I had seen them ten minutes before they were taken.

GEORGE SMITH . I saw the prisoner take the umbrella and run away with it; I ordered him to lay it down three times as he was crossing the road, but he still kept running away; I ran after him and took him; he threw the umbrella away in a stone mason's yard.

Q. Do you know any thing of the hat cover. - A. They are both here.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along a man got this umbrella from the shop, he told me to go over the way to the same public house where I had been drinking; I do not know how he came by it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Imprisoned Fourteen Days and Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-9

275. CHARLES VINING was indicted for that he being servant to Philip Rundell , John Bridge , and Edmund Waller Rundell , was entrusted and employed by them to receive money and valuable securities for them, that he being such servant and so employed, on the 29th of January did receive for and on account of his said masters the sum of twelve

pounds seven shillings and nine pence; and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-10

272. DANIEL HARCOURT , and MARK BROWN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Nicholas Humphries , about the hour of eight at night, on the 28th of February , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, seven pieces of Irish linen, value 10 l. his property.

NICHOLAS HUMPHRIES . I am a linen draper , I live in Church-street, Bethnall-green . On the 28th of February, about seven o'clock I went out, I returned at eight o'clock, I was informed my house was robbed; on examining I missed seven or eight pieces of Irish linen.

Q. How had you left the house. - A. I had locked it.

Q. Do you sleep in it. - A. No, I have two men that sleep in it; the men went out at ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. How long before the hour of eight o'clock, when you missed this linen, had you seen it before. - A. At ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Had you been in your shop from that time that you had seen it till seven o'clock. - A. Not altogether; it was Sunday at ten o'clock I went to my house in Church-street; I looked round to see what was in my shop, I saw the Irish linen there; I continued there about an hour; I went home, and returned again at seven; I went out again, and returned at eight; then I was told that some thieves were taken.

Q. Where did you see the pieces again. - A. At Worship-street; I saw four pieces that I could swear were my own.

Q. Were there any marks of violence on your shop. - A. When I returned I found the door as I left it.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street, attached to Worship-street office. On Sunday evening the 28th of February, a little after seven o'clock, being out on duty with Mason, Valentine, and Rice, in Church-street, Bethnall Green, I saw the two prisoner together at the corner of a street in Church-street, Bethnall Green. I knew Harcourt before; by the light of the lamp I knew Daniel Harcourt 's face, I did not know Brown at that time. Daniel Harcourt turned round, looked at me, and ran away. Brown was on the left hand side of me, and Harcourt on the right. I followed Harcourt till he got a little way down the street, I took hold of his collar, he dropped these two pieces; Rice was behind me, he picked them up. Harcourt then squatted down on the ground; I called him by name, I said it is of no use, you must go to the office, he said he would be d - d if he would; he then wrenched himself from me, and ran three or four yards from me, I caught him again; as soon as I caught him the second time I heard something drop on the stones, that I picked up the next morning, Rice came up and catched hold of him by the other side, we took him into the public house secured him and searched him; in his pockets I found a small key and a knife; after he was searched I borrowed a candle and lanthorn of the landlord of the public house, to see if I could find what I heard drop, I could not find any thing that night; I went early the next morning; in the channel in the mud I found this skeleton key; I took it to Mr. Humphries' shop, which is not fifty yards from the place. I gave the key to Mason; he tried the lock of the door, it unlocked it very easy.

EDWARD RICE . Q. Did you pick up the linen. - A. I did, here it is; there are two pieces just; when Gleed took hold of Harcourt he dropped these two pieces.

Q. You have heard Gleed's evidence. - A. I have, it is true what he has related.

- VALENTINE. Q. Did you see the two prisoners together. - A. I did, and I saw them separate I took hold of Brown by the collar, seeing he was carrying something underneath his coat; he then dropped two pieces of Irish linen; when I asked him what he was carrying of, he wrenched himself out of my hands.

PETER MASON . I was of the opposite side of the way to what they were, I ran over the way seeing a bustle; I saw Brown in the hands of Valentine. I tried the picklock key the next morning, it unlocked the door with a great deal of ease.

The property produced and identified.

Q. to prosecutor. They are above the value of forty shillings. - A. Yes.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel, called no witnesses to character.

COURT. There are two things for your consideration, if the crime of stealing to the amount of forty shillings is made out; or whether this was his dwelling house, and whether it was a house in which people slept; he tells you he employed these men, and directed them to sleep there, neither of these servants are here: another thing for your consideration, is, whether they were taken at that time of night so as to constitute it a burglary. At what period of time, between ten in the morning and seven at night these goods were taken from his dwelling house is not stated. Harcourt after he is taken, is found throwing something away; in the morning the officer told you he found this skeleton key, which being applied, it was capable of opening the outward door at that time of night: this key was thrown away about fifty yards from the shop; you are to form your conclusion, that it took place at that time of night. Night had commenced when these men were taken; it is left for you to say whether it was taken after dark; it is left in a state for you to infer, that if they were but fifty yards from the place that it was recently committed. The next question for your consideration, supposing these circumstances to be so, it would be, whether these goods to the amount of forty shillings were stolen in the dwelling house. In the dwelling they were at ten o'clock in the morning; if you give credit to this person, he has told you he saw all his linen there, and in proper order; and in the evening when he came again, he says he saw they had been disturbed, his attention having been drawn to it. And he has said upon this linen being shewed to him, two of which being shewed to him which dropped from Harcourt, and the other two by Brown, which the officers have produced; and told you were concealed under their clothes, and the prisoners they were endeavouring to rescue themselves from the custody in which they were. Mr. Humphries has said they have his marks upon them, and that they are above the value of forty shillings; so then there is no doubt but they were the identical things that were in his shop: upon their being taken, one of them dropped a

skeleton key, would unlock the door; the other is at that time assisting in carrying part of the property, which had been stolen away, through the probable means of that key. If you are not satisfied, the next question for your ultimate consideration will be, whether they were stolen by them at all; we have no evidence before us how they got in, unless they got in through the means of that false key into the dwelling house. If you should be of opinion that they got into the house by means of the false key, you will find them guilty of stealing in the dwelling house. On the other hand, if you are not satisfied, and are of opinion that this house of the prosecutor's has not been sufficiently proved to be his dwelling house, you will in that case find them guilty of simple larceny.

HARCOURT, GUILTY, aged 31.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 22.

Of simple larceny only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-11

273. ANN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , two silver spoons, value 6 s. the property of John Tanner .

JOHN TANNER . Q. Did the prisoner live with you as a servant . - A. Yes. On the 4th of March I missed two spoons. a desert spoon and a salt spoon; she had lived with me two or three days; I told her we were sure that she had taken them, if she had pawned them to give up the duplicates; she said she had lost the duplicates, she had pawned them at Mr. Mangar's in Brick lane.

JOHN WHITTAKER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Mangar; the spoons were pledged at our shop by a girl, on Friday the 4th of March; I advanced her three shillings on them; the girl that pawned them was like the prisoner; she came alone, but whether it is the prisoner I cannot say.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress said if I would own to it she would not trouble her head no more about it, she would give me a new gown and a dollar, and then I owned it.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-12

274. ELEANOR THOMPSON was indicted for making an assault in the King's highway upon William Bates on the 20th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a seven shilling piece , his property.

WILLIAM BATES . Q. Did any thing particular happen to you on the 20th of February last. - A. Yes; as I was going home from my sister's in Boswell court, Queen square (it was about eight o'clock when I left my sister); as I was going through Keppel street, Russel square , this Eleanor Thompson stood there.

Q. Was she standing still there. - A. She was standing there against the mews; she got hold of me as I passed; then she asked me if I would go along with her; I asked her for what; she told me.

Q. What did she say to you. - A. I leave you, your honour, to guess what she said; then she talked to me and put her hand against my pocket, where I put my seven shilling piece.

Q. What pocket was it that she put her hand to. A. Against my left side waistcoat pocket; then I took my seven shilling piece out of my pocket; I was afraid she would take it away from me; she got hold of my hand and got it out of my hand, and as soon as she got my money out of my hand she called up another woman; then they went across Russel square; I followed them into Dyot street, I kept asking them for my money, they told me they had not got it; I told them that Eleanor Thompson had taken it out of my hand; she went into a public house, I got hold of her, she went out of that public house into another in Bembridge street; Edward Lewis was calling the hour of half past eight. I gave him charge of her.

Prisoner. Did you not offer me sixpence many nights before. - A. No.

EDWARD LEWIS . I am a watchman; the boy charged the woman with stealing a seven shilling piece from him. I did not see her searched.

- SPENCER. I was the officer that took charge of Eleanor Thompson , she had three shillings and four pence about her; she offered to make it up with the prosecutor, she acknowledged the guilt of robbing the boy; she was in such a flurry because I was going to take charge of her, she said she would send for her mother; she was very ready in acknowledging her guilt of robbing the boy, and she would make the money up provided a prosecution did not come forward. The next day I took her to Marlborough street.

WILLIAM DENNIS . I was at the watchhouse that night, I was beadle of the night; this young lad brought in Eleanor Thompson for robbing him of a seven shilling piece; when she found she was going to be charged she was very willing to make it up, she said she had not got money enough, she would send to her mother to make the money up.

Q. to Bates. Did you try to keep the seven shilling piece out of her hand. - A. Yes.

Q. Then your hand was forced open. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Then the prisoner was too strong for you. - A Yes, she was.

Prisoner's Defence. About eight o'clock at night I left my mother, she gave me four shillings to buy tea, sugar, and so forth; this boy said if I would give him change for half a crown he would give me something to drink; then he asked me to change a seven shilling piece; I told him I could not; then he said he had lost a seven shilling piece; I said go and find it. He came all that way for me to go and get a candle for him.

COURT. In order to constitute this a highway robbery, it is necessary that violence should be used, that the money, or whatever it was, must be taken by violence; the lad has told you that his hand was forced open by the prisoner, she being too strong for him.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before the Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-13

275. WILLIAM COOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of March , a cask, value 5 s. and twelve gallons of peppermint, value 6 l. the property of John Hall , in his dwelling house .

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a constable belonging to the City of London. On the 30th of March, about half after seven in the evening, I saw the prisoner and four other persons.

Q. Who was with you. - A. Pim my brother officer; they were looking at the shoemaker's shop at the corner of Foster lane. They went from there and we followed them up Newgate street; they turned down St. Martin's Le-grand, we saw them go into Mr. Hall's public house the corner of Round court; I and Pim stopped at the corner of St. Martin's Le-grand, they staid in about four or five minutes to the best of my recollection; we saw them come out; they all went down a court that goes into the King's arms tavern facing of Mr. Hall's house; they stood all five of them in this court facing of Mr. Hall's house. I and Pim walked down to see what they were after: we saw the prisoner at the bar run across the road with that cask across his shoulder, he ran across into New rents.

Q. Had he that cask on his shoulder when he went into Mr. Hall's. - A. That I did not see.

Q. Had he any cask when he was looking into the shoemaker's shop. - A. No, he ran up New rents. I stopped him in the court that leads into Mouldmaker's row; when he saw I followed him he instantly threw it down and with a great struggle we secured him; we took him to the counter; I had the cask, it was full of liquor containing peppermint; while I went in with the prisoner to Newgate some person unknown opened the off door of the coach and threw the cask down and broke in one of the staves of the head, and spilled about five gallons of the liquor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You say while you were handing the prisoner out of the coach into Newgate, some person threw the cask of peppermint out. - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot accuse him of that. - A. I said some person unknown

RICHARD PIM . Q. Did you watch the prisoner and his companions from Foster lane to Mr. Hall's. - A. Yes.

Q. When he went into Mr. Hall's had he any cask. - A. None at all, when he went in.

Q. Did you see him come out. - A. Yes, they staid in a few minutes, how long I cannot say; they came out together and went across the way.

Q. How near were you to them. - A. About thirty or forty yards; when they crossed the way we went down, knowing them to be people of bad character; when we went down we saw the prisoner run across the way with a cask upon his shoulder; we followed him took him, and the cask to the counter; the cask was full.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. How do you know it was full. - A. Because it was so heavy, and by its sound it appeared to be quite full, and I know a great deal ran out by Newgate door.

Mr. Arabin. That might be and yet the cask not full.

Court. Now I will ask you whether you do not know the sound of an empty cask. - A. Yes, there was no sound in it all, it was like a lump of lead.

JOHN HALL . I live in St. Martin's le grand, in the parish of St. Leonard, Foster lane.

Q. On the 30th of March, had you any cask of peppermint in your house. - A. Yes, (the cask now produced), it was filled with peppermint cordial, it was quite full.

Q. What part of the house was it in. - A. It was in the bar; I saw it between the hours of nine and ten in the morning, I am sure that is the cask, I know it by the mark upon it and by the guage mark.

Q. What is the mark besides the guage mark. - A. Howell and Co.

Q. What is the value of the cask and the liquor. - A. The value of the cask and the liquor is, I believe, seven guineas, not less.

Q. Is that your dwelling house. - A. It is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You say you know this cask by some mark, is that your own mark. - A. No, Messrs. Howell and Co.

Q. Messrs. Howell and Co. send casks to other houses. - A. No, not with the same guage mark.

WILLIAM BROOKS . Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Hall's. - A. Yes, I can swear to the cask, it has got Messrs. Howell's name to it.

Q. Was such a cask as that in your master's house. - A. Yes, it was standing there at seven o'clock in the evening, it was outside of the counter, under the window by the side of the counter.

Q. What was it filled with. - A. Peppermint; I saw it there between seven and eight; I missed it when I lit the lamps.

Q. When did you light the lamps. - A. Between seven and eight.

Q. to prosecutor. Produce that which remains of the liquor. Have you examined that small cask. - A. Yes, it is the same liquor which I had of Messrs. Howell and Co.

Q. You mean it is the same kind of liquor. - A. That is what I mean.

Mr. Arabin. Is peppermint cordial a different liquor from that. - A. No, it is the same liquor.

Prisoner. When I was committed the prosecutor said the cask was not full by a considerable deal.

Prosecutor. I said I had only tasted it; there might be a glass or so out.

Court to prosecutor. Is it called peppermint as well as peppermint cordial. - A. It is generally called peppermint when we buy it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-14

276. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for privily stealing from the person of John Gadsby a handkerchief, value 6 d. three seven shilling pieces, three promissory notes for the payment of 5 l. each, three bank notes, value 1 l. each, a bank note, value 2 l. and a bank note, value 10 l. his property.

JOHN GADSBY . I belong to the Huntingdon militia ; I came into London with three of my comrades on the 7th of January; going down Saffron hill between six and seven in the evening, my comrades wanted to buy some oysters; we went into the oyster shop, the man could not accommodate us, he wished us to go into the public house; we went to the public house, we had as many pots of beer as came to one shilling and nine pence, and liquor altogether; we came to the bar to pay for it. Briggs one of my comrades had given me his money to take care of; when I came into the bar White the other comrade gave me his money; Butler and Moore

were coming in at the time I was tying White's money in the handkerchief; they never passed no farther than me; as I was standing at the bar I put the handkerchief into my right hand pocket; I was talking to the landlord of the house. Butler told me to hold my tongue; Moore was standing close behind me. I kept on talking to the landlady for a minute or two; they had quitted the house. I put my hand into my pocket and immediately missed the handkerchief; just afterwards a woman of the name of Chapman told me that they were the men that picked my pocket. We went down to Butler's house, he was not at home all night.

Q. How much was the money. - A. Thirty one pounds eleven shillings and sixpence; I have never recovered one halfpenny of it.

Q. Are you sure he is the man. - A. Yes, he is the man that stood close behind me, and Butler was of the side of me.

JAMES WHITE . Q. You are a soldier in the same regiment. - A. Yes; I gave Gadsby a ten pound note and two one pound notes, I gave it him before the landlady of the Thatched House, Field lane, he tied it up in a pocket handkerchief, along with the other young man's money that he had; he put it into his right hand breeches pocket just before we left the house; we were going to have a glass of something at the bar, Moore and Butler came round Gadsby; Mrs. Murphy said, young man, you had better take care of your property, you do not know who you have got about you; he held it up in his hand and shook it before that; while we were taking a glass of liquor a young woman came out of the house to talk to one of our comrades, Gadsby desired her to go about her business; Butler and Moore were behind Gadsby, and Butler desired Gadsby not to make a noise; we were going to leave the house, the landlady said we will accommodate you with another room; we were going up stairs to another room to have a pot or two of ale, Gadsby put his hand into his pocket and missed his money.

Q. Had any body else been near Gadsby before. A. No, they could not get near him, because one stood of one side of Gadsby and the other of the other side. I am certain he is the man.

JOHN BRIGGS . I am a private in the same regiment. We went to the Thatched House in Field lane; we had some beer there, and Gadsby went to pay for it; when we were coming out Moore and Butler stood behind Gadsby.

Q. Are you sure Moore was one of them. - A. Yes, I am sure he is, he stood of one side of him and Butler of the other.

Q. What money did you give Gadsby. - A. Three five pound notes, two pound, and a one pound, half a guinea and a seven shilling piece; as soon as Gadsby turned away from the door he missed the handkerchief; it was gone out of his pocket.

JOHN HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the night of the robbery I was in company with Stanton and the beadle of St. Andrew's; we called in at the Black Dog, St. Giles's, we saw Butler and two other men drinking; I think it was rum and water; I cannot say whether one of the other men was the prisoner or not, they were strangers to me. Not knowing of the robbery I did not take so much notice as otherwise I should have done. After Cartwright apprehended the prisoner I received him; he said he was innocent of the charge. I told him it was very well if he was innocent; he said they can do nothing with me, they can only give me a seven pennyworth.

Q. What did he mean by that. - A. I understood seven years transportation.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-15

277. ELIZABETH SCHOLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , two gowns, value 15 s. two bonnets, value 1 l. 10 s. an umbrella, value 10 s. two sheets, value 10 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a shift, value 3 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of John Peggs , in his dwelling house .

JOHN PEGGS. I am a publican , I live in Jane street, Commercial road ; the prisoner lived servant with me till the 22nd of March, I missed her about a quarter past seven in the evening: when she was gone, we missed all the articles enumerated in the indictment. I found her on the 24th of March in Montague street, Whitechapel, she was in a one pair of stairs room. I found this umbrella and two bonnets.

Q. Did you find the gowns. - A. No gowns; a silk handkerchief and a pair of sheets she had sold for four shillings. When I found these things she hoped I would give her mecry, she would come back and work it out.

Q. Did she deny them being your things and that she had taken them. - A. She did not; she told me where she had sold the sheets; she said she had no thoughts of taking them till the minute she throwed them out of the window into my back yard. She come down and took them out.

Prisoner's Defence. I never did such a thing before in my life; I confess I thought they would not hurt me.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-16

278. ROBERT PROSSER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March , eight bed sackings, value 2 l. the property of John North and William Frith .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN WILTSHIRE . Q. You are a bedstead maker, living in Bett's street, Ratcliffe Highway. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do. In the month of August he told me to make a bedstead for him; it was made, and my man carried it home.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after it was carried home. - A. Yes, I saw him at his house in St. Catherine's lane, Wapping; he then said I have a quantity of sacking, it has been brought by a relation for me to dispose of.

Prisoner. I deny that.

Court. I know you deny it because you say you are not guilty, you deny the whole of it.

Witness. He said if I had no objection, he knew they would suit me, to take them in exchange for the bedstead.

Mr. Bolland. What was the amount of the bedstead; your charge. - A. About five pound six shillings; I never saw him before he applied to me for the bedstead; when the first bedstead went home, he ordered another, he said I have some new sacking; and I will look them out.

Q. What was to be the amount of the second bedstead. - A. Three pounds ten shillings; I told him I had no objection to the sacking, and my man took part of the sacking.

Mr. Gurney. Did you receive them of him. - A. Yes, I was there and he was there.

Mr. Bolland. What quantity of sacking did you receive. - A. Here is his receipt I received; in the whole thirteen pound one shilling, is the amount of the whole of the sacking; when I had the sacking first there was nothing suspicious, but when the second parcel came home they were much out of the common size; it was such as I imagined a person would not send to him to dispose of, because they were things that were used perhaps once in a twelvemonth; when my business led me into the city I called upon Mr. North. I called several times, I did not see him till the latter part of the year. I knew I should see him at the latter part of the year; he is a customer to me, and I am to him; not having an opportunity of seeing Mr. North, I wrote him a letter giving him information that I believed a person in his employ was not honest.

Q. What did you finally do with the second part of the sacking. - A. Part I used and part I sent to Mr. North by my porter. The prisoner told me he worked for Mr. North.

THOMAS WELLS . - Mr. Alley. I believe you are a rider to the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. After this transaction had taken place do you remember the prisoner being brought to Mr. North's house. - Q. Yes, on the 17th of March; when the prisoner was brought there three sackings were there, and Mr. Frith, Mr. North's partner was there; Mr. Frith, myself and the constable, were together in the accompting house; Mr. Frith desired the prisoner might be sent in; when the prisoner entered, Mr. Frith said, Mr. Prosser, I have sent for you on a business which I do not understand, and which I am unwilling to believe; pray where did you get this sacking, pointing to the sacking, it lay before us; the prisoner hesitated, and at length said they were brought to him; but said Mr. Frith they have our own marks on them; you sold them to Mr. Wiltshire, he suspected that you could not get them honestly; he informed us and sent them home; Mr. Barker can swear to our marks.

Q. Who is Mr. Barker. - A. Mr. North's apprentice; and I would rather have suspected any man than you, who have been in the house so long, we may have been robbed this twenty years; while Mr. Frith was addressing the prisoner, the latter cast his eyes over the sacking as if disappointed, on discovering the marks, his countenance altered, he stammered out I confess; then says the constable (Murphy) stepping forward, you must go along with me; I saw the prisoner, accompanied by the constable, leave the house.

Q. What are the partners names. - A. John North and William Frith .

EDWARD MURPHY . - Mr. Bolland. Where you present at the time Mr. Wells has been speaking to, when Mr. Wells and Mr. Prosser was there. - A. Yes, what Mr. Wells has said is verbatim what passed I can take my oath.

Q. Did you make any search on the prisoner's premises. - A. I did. I went to No. 2 St. Catherine's lane; when I entered the house, I asked the woman that opened the door, if her name was Prosser; the prisoner afterwards told me it was his premises; there I found mops and brushes to the tune of thirty pound and upwards, and I left a vast number behind me that we were suspicious of; I took them in two coaches.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The sacking I bought fifteen month's previous to my being accused; I keep an open shop, and buy and sell things; they were brought to me two dozen of them, the man said he was going into the country; he was under the necessity of selling them. I gave after the rate of four shillings and sixpence each for them.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-17

279. JOHN MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , a pocket book, value 6 d. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Robert Clark .

ROBERT CLARK . Q. What are you. - A. I am master of a vessel . On the 21st of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was crossing the road in Gracechurch street ; just as I stepped on the curb the prisoner met me in the front. I found myself a good deal jostled.

Q. Was there any one behind you. - A. I do not know; I found myself very much entangled with the prisoner at the bar, in the front of me; I immediately clapped my hand upon my pocket, and missed my pocket book; I seized him by the collar immediately, I said I had lost my pocket book, I told him he had got it; I immediately saw the pocket book fly from his hand, into the street, under the horses; at that moment another man rushed in between us and broke my hold of him; I never lost sight of him till he was stopped.

Q. Was he running away. - A. He was stopped about two yards off; the coachman of the Clapton coach assisted in getting the papers up, and the pocket book was given into the constable's hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. With whom were you walking with at the time. - A. A young woman of the name of Stevens. I have very little knowledge of her, she had hold of my arm.

Q. You do not mean to swear that you saw the pocket book in his hand. - A. No, I saw it go from his hand; the papers were loose.

Q. Do you recollect the young woman saying, that is not the man. - A. She never said so.

HANNAH STEVENS. As I was crossing Fenchurch street a man knocked me on my bosom; he immediately said, I have lost my pocket book; I saw the pocket book; I saw the pocket book under the horses feet; the pocket book was picked up by a little boy, it was given to the captain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Who was it struck you. - A. The prisoner struck me with his left hand; it nearly shoved me down.

Q. Did you see the pocket book throwed away. A. No; I saw the papers scattered about; I carried the pocket book into the tobacconist's shop.

Q. Do you recollect saying, captain, that is not the man. - A. No.

GEORGE GOODWIN. I am a post boy; me and Mr. Butler the coachman and his son, were talking together in Gracechurch street, about eight o'clock; I turned round on hearing a noise, I saw the captain holding the man by the collar; immediately the captain gave the coachman the umbrella, I saw the pocket book fly between the captain and the prisoner, and the papers flew on the curb, it was all picked up immediately; as the captain gave the coachman his umbrella, a tall man rushed in between the captain and him, and the captain lost his hold; I catched hold of the prisoner, and held him till the waterman came up and assisted me.

THOMAS SCOTRAM . I was coming along just at the time the gentleman had fast hold of the prisoner; I saw the pocket book laying down; I did not see it fall; I came along just at the time it was down; there was a scuffle, and the post boy catched hold of the prisoner; he held him till I came up.

FRANCIS PAGE . I am a constable; when the book was brought to me, it was sealed up; I took out of the man's pocket a ten pound note, nine one pound notes, a sixteenth of a lottery ticket, a duplicate of a watch, and one note for four hundred and fourteen pounds and fourteen-pence; that I delivered up by my lord mayor's orders to the prisoner.

Q. to prosecutor. Was there a one pound note in the pocket book when you lost it. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the charge against me. I was coming from London Bridge towards Moorfields; directly I came up to the gentleman he said he lost his pocket book; the girl immediately cried out, do not hurt that man, it was not him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-18

280. ELIZABETH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 6 d. and a seal, value 6 d. the property of Solomon Akroyd .

SOLOMON AKROYD . I am a carpenter , I live at No. 10, Duke street, Blackfriars-bridge. On Saturday night the 27th of March, about half after twelve, I was turning Fleet street going towards Blackfriars bridge , the prisoner met me; she asked me for some money; I had nothing but three halfpence, I gave her that for fear she should put her hand and take my watch; I told her I wanted to go home; she attempted to take the watch twice.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was a little in liquor. I knew that she took the watch from me, and gave it to a man; the man stabbed me under the right side at the time she gave him the watch.

Q. Did you go any where with her. - A. No, she followed me.

Q. How did she get your watch. - A. She lowered the flap of my breeches to take out the watch.

Q. A chain or a string to your watch. - A. A chain.

Q. Why did not you put the chain of your watch in, that she might not lay hold of it. - A. I had not such a thought.

Q. What did the man stab you with. - A. With a knife at the end of a stick; I kept fast hold of the prisoner, and took her to the watchhouse; the man went away after he got the watch, I never saw him afterwards; I never saw the man before he came up to me, and asked me what business I had with the woman.

Q. Was she sober. - A. Yes; I believe she was.

Q. What kind of a stab was it. - A. Just by the hip.

Q. You had not been any where with this woman. - A. No.

Q. How far did she walk with you. - A. Right across Bridge street; when she took my watch, I said to her you have got my watch, you shall not go till you give me my watch; then she gave the man the watch.

JOHN BOLLARD . I am a constable; the prosecutor brought this woman into the watchhouse, about two o'clock in the morning; he charged her with robbing him of his watch; I searched her, and found nothing on her; nor did he at the time mention any thing about the stab at the watchhouse, although he was about twenty minutes in the watch-house; he told me that he saw the watch go from her to the man.

Q. You know nothing about the stab. - A. On Monday he told me of it, and shewed it me; it was not deep, it was upon the hip bone, about the eighth of an inch.

Q. Was the man sober. - A. He was rather the worse for liquor.

Q. to prosecutor. It was two o'clock instead of half past twelve. - A. I did not know it, he told me before I had made a mistake of the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home at one o'clock in the morning, I live over the water; I was crossing from Union street, I saw that man and two men with him; he wished me good night; he laid hold of me and gave me three halfpence to take a liberty with me; then he said I had taken his watch. I am innocent of it, he was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years ,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-19

281. JAMES HURT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of Richard Wright .

JOHN MORRIS . I am waiter to Mr. Wright, he keeps the Four Swans in Bishopsgate street , James Hart came to our inn, he asked for a glass of rum and milk; I took him a glass of rum and milk into the coffee room, he drank it and paid me for it; he gave me a penny for myself; after that he waited about some time in the coffee room; when I went out of the coffee room, he went to the fire place, and when I went in he went into the box writing; the glass stood before him, and the spoon laid under his elbow; he waited there some time. I suspected that he would take either the glass or the spoon.

Q. He was watching of you, and you watched him. - A. Yes; when he watched me away he came out with the spoon; I met him at the coffee room door, I went into the coffee room to see whether the glass or spoon was there; the glass was, but the spoon was not; I went after him and caught him at the top of the gateway, I brought him back into the coffee room; coming up with him in the gateway he took his handkerchief out with the spoon, and throwed the spoon before me; I pulled him to the spoon and picked the spoon up, and took it to the coffee room. This is the spoon, it is Mr. Richard Wright 's property.

SARAH WATSON . I am servant to Mr. Wright. As the waiter was bringing the prisoner back I saw him throw the spoon away in the gateway.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. Wright's coffee room to write a letter; I laid the spoon on the table, took out my handkerchief over the spoon; taking up the handkerchief promiscuosly I put it in my pocket. When I was attacked by the waiter I was confused; I might drop the spoon from my handkerchief; I had no intention of wronging Mr. Wright. It was done by accident.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-20

282. GEORGE STANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of March , thirty five yards of baize, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of William Watson and Henry Nicholson .

WILLIAM WATSON . On the 19th of March, about half past six o'clock, Mrs. Nicholson was buying some cups of a woman fronting of the door; a little boy came across the way, and asked me how many pieces of green baize I had at the door; on looking I found one of them was gone; I enquired which way the man was gone, and I followed after him. I came up to him in Wardour street.

Q. What street do you live in. - A. Greek street, Soho, I am a silk mercer and lace man; when I came up to him I asked him where he was going with the green baize; he made no reply, but immediately pitched it from his shoulders, and ran away. I halloed out stop thief, he was secured by Mr. Taunton.

THOMAS WILSON . Q. How old are you. - A. Twelve last March; I was going by Mr. Watson's at the same time as the four men were; one of them took the baize from under his arm, and ran up the street with it.

Q. Did you see where he got the baize. - A. Yes, from inside the door, I immediately went and asked Mr. Watson how many pieces of baize he had at the door; Mr. Watson said two; I told him there was a man run up the street with one; I told him I saw him turn up Queen street. I did not see him stopped.

Q. Look at the prisoner, was that the man that took it. - A. They all four looked at it.

Q. But he was the man that took it. - A. Yes.

LEWIS HERMEN PENDRICK. On Saturday evening the 19th of March, about half past six, I was coming from my work in Wardour street; I passed down Greek street, within five doors of Mr. Watson's shop; I observed the prisoner and three others with a piece of green baize carrying before them, as if to conceal it.

Q. Which of them. - A. The prisoner at the bar. I waited at the corner of Compton street, to see if any body would pursue the men; I scarce waited two seconds before Mr. Watson ran out of the shop and pursued the men; I waited at the shop till Mr. Taunton, and Mr. Watson brought the prisoner back with the baize.

Q. The prisoner was the man with the baize. - A. Yes.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer; I was passing in Wardour street at the time; hearing the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running very fast, I stopped him till the prosecutor came up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to look for a cousin of mine, that worked for a cabinet maker in Oxford road; I went to a public house, and could not meet-with him; I went down Wardour street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I was running with a number of people, that gentleman stopped me; I said I am not the man, I never saw the baize.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-21

283. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , a watch, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of George Blancken .

JOHN BLANKEN . On the 27th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning I lost my watch; it hung on a post in the mill house.

Q. What business are you. - A. A grinder of sugar; my master is a sugar refiner. The prisoner came in the mill house, and stopped there a good bit by the post; when I fetched a bit of hay for the mill horse, he went away; there were nobody in the mill house but me and the prisoner.

Q. What reason have you to suspect the prisoner. A. Because I missed the watch when the prisoner went away.

Q. Was the prisoner in the mill house when you come back with the hay. - A. When I came with the hay, saw him just inside of the gate; he saw me he said he must go home. I saw the watch yesterday.

WILLIAM NEED . I am journeyman to Mr. Cristie, pawnbroker, Lower East Smithfield. On the 27th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pledged this watch with me; I lent him a guinea and a half upon it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the watch; he said he would lend it me, I asked him for it.

Jury. Did you ever lend him the watch. - A. No.

Q. Did he ever ask you for the watch. - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-22

284. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of February , six ounces of silk, value 30 s. the property of John Francis Desanges and Robert James Hendrie .

JOHN FRANCIS DESANGES. I am a dyer in Wheeler, street, Spital fields. Robert Hendrie is my foreman .

Q. Is he not a partner. - A. He is not my partner. This silk was sent to me to dye, part of the bundle from a gentleman in the country, and part from a gentleman in Wood street.

Q. Is not his name in the firm. - A. His name is not in the firm; I allow him five per cent upon the profits of the business, besides a certain salary; he was formerly a master. I do not look to him to make up any loss. If I get a thousand pounds at the close of the year I give him fifty pounds, besides the salary; his name is put on the bills to those customers that he used to deal with alone; that is to induce them to deal with me.

Q. You do not charge him with a twentieth part of the ingredients for which you dye. - A. No, I do not.

Court. This indictment is not properly sustained in evidence; therefore the prisoner must be acquitted.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-23

285. JAMES BURKE was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Evans on the 22nd of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, one guinea, five half guineas and five seven shilling pieces , his property.

JOHN EVANS . Q. Where do you live. - A. At the Turk's Head, Phoenix street, St. Giles's. On the 22nd of February, about four o'clock, I met with the prisoner in Bridgwater gardens; I had business to do in Fleet street, so we went up Goswell street into Fleet market.

Q. Had you been in the Catherine Wheel public house. - A. I only stopped there to drink a pint of beer with the landlord; coming out I met James Burke, I gave him something to drink; I drank part of a glass of gin with him, and I tasted part of a glass of brandy and shrub at a chandler's shop, along with some old customer's of mine; then I went down Fleet market with the prisoner into Fleet street; we stopped at the Angel, I drank a glass of gin and peppermint, and throwed the other in the saveall; I drank there only one glass, I paid for two; then I went up Fleet street, I called at Mr. Radley's the brandy merchant, to order some goods; I cannot say whether I drank any thing at Mr. Radley's or not; I tasted some shrub and water. We then went up to Wych street, we had a glass of mulled wine in the new mulled wine shop; from there I went to Mr. Kendrick's in Drury lane; we had there two shillingsworth of rum and water between five of us, then I went to the Black Dog.

Q. What had you there. - A. Two small glasses of brandy and some cold water; after that I treated the prisoner with another glass at the Compasses; I had none there.

Q. At this time you were pretty drunk. - A. No, I was not, I was in liquor certainly; I was merry, I could walk.

Q. Then you do not reckon any body drunk that can walk. - A. Yes I do; when I came out of the Compasses I was going home; the prisoner was about two paces behind me, he catched hold of this arm, I felt him put his hand into my waistcoat pocket; as soon as he felt me endeavouring to put my hand into my waistcoat pocket, he put his elbow against me, and with his other hand he shoved me down in the middle of the street, and then he ran away. When I got up I put my hand in my pocket, I found I had lost my money.

Q. What had you missed. - A. I cannot tell exactly; I had two guineas, six or seven half guineas, about six, seven, or nine seven shilling pieces; I had felt this money at the Black Dog, I saw it there when I was paying for the liquor.

JOHN HANCOCK . I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of February; I found none of the property on him that the prosecutor could speak to.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, my poverty prevents me from having counsel to defend me. I have every reliance upon your lordship's humanity to ask these questions of the prosecutor, which I have no doubt will state my innocence.

Q. to prosecutor. The house that you went to first in Drury lane was the Compasses, Kendrick's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you tell Kendrick when he desired you to have some more rum and water; that you had no money. - A. I do not recollect; I might say so in a joke.

Q. Did not you apply to the prisoner to lend you a shilling at the George. - A. I did; he lent me a shilling for the purpose of paying for the rum and water; I did not pay it with his money, I borrowed a shilling out of a joke.

Q. I understand how you will force in that - I ask you now, upon your oath, whether upon the man applying to you for more rum and water, you did not tell them you had no more money, and whether you did not borrow a shilling of him to pay for the rum and water. - A. I believe I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-24

286. WILLIAM ELAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , fifteen pound weight of pork, value 12 s. the property of Aquilan Cole .

HUGH COLE . On the 27th of September the prisoner came to my father's shop in the name of Mr. Wild of Enfield; he said he wanted fifteen pound of pickled pork.

Q. Was the pork taken from you. - A. Yes, my father cut him fifteen pound of pickled pork; he told my father that I was to take it along with him into Bishopsgate street.

Q. Did your father consent that you should take it to Bishopsgate street. - A. Yes, I took it in the tray; he said my father should give change for a pound note; the price of the pork came to twelve shillings and sixpence; the change was seven shillings and sixpence; he said the cook should pay me; he took me into a shop and gave me a twopenny bologna sausage; then he went on further to a public house and called for a

quartern of anniseed; he gave me one glass, then he went into Shoreditch and up a court, and told me to wait till he came to me.

Q. Had he at that time taken the pork from you. - A. He was taking the pork from my shoulder, I told him he must not take it, I must go with him; he said he must take it or else they would think he was drunk; he took it from me, carried it up the court, I followed him, he let it fall in the mud, then I took it again; he took me further up some other courts and down a street, and came into Shoreditch again; then he went down a court with bushes in it; I held him and cried.

Q. Did he take the pork from you. - A. Yes, in this court. I asked him to go into a public house and buy a penny candle; I got him into the public house and then he took the pork away again.

Q. Then you never lost it. - A. No, I got the pork again; I took it off his shoulder when he was standing in the public house to get the candle; I went out of doors, he wanted to swindle me out of the pork and the change.

Q. Did he offer you the one pound note or the change. - A. No. I cried outside of the door, and at last a gentleman came up to me. I told him what was the matter; a watchman was going by, I gave charge of him. He never offered me the seven and sixpence; he told my father he bought the pork for his master.

- HILLIARD. On the 27th of February, I was coming home, near one in the morning. Going along Bethnall green road, where I live this boy, was standing just by the turnpike, he was crying. I asked him what was the matter, the boy told me this man had been buying some meat of his father, and he had got seven shillings and sixpence change; the boy got the meat, and he said he could not get the change from him, and he said he must not go home without the change; when I saw how the business was, I said you had better give charge of Elam. The only complaint that he made was not paying the one pound note, or returning him the change; he did not charge him with stealing the meat.

Prisoner's Defence. I live in White's gardens, Bethnall green road; I brought the lad there with the meat, I asked his father to give him the change, not to give it to me; he said it made no odds which of us had it; when he came to this place it was dark, he did not like to go down; I had no intention of taking it from him; I sent in no name; he asked me if I knew Mr. Wild of Enfield, I said I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-25

287. SUSANNAH TRUEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , in the dwelling house of Sarah Roberts , three bank notes value fifteen pounds .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

SARAH ROBERTS . - Mr. Walford. Q. Where do you live. - A. I live just by Islington turnpike ; the prisoner lodged with me, I had a very honest character with her. On the day before this transaction happened, I had three five pound notes in my pocket book. On that day I went to London, I returned between eleven and twelve at night; I unlocked my door and went into my own room, and directly I went into my own room the prisoner called me. I went into the prisoner's room to get a light, I sat down and she asked me if I would sleep with her; I thought as it was very cold and her bed was warm, I would; she got out of bed and untied my things; I went to bed. The prisoner untied my pockets and put them in the chair, she went across the room and shut my door; in the course of the night I awoke, I might have been asleep two hours; I always put my pockets under my head. I felt for my pockets and missing them, I asked her where she had put them; the prisoner said they were very safe, they were in the chair.

Q. Did you say for what purpose you wanted your pockets. - A. Not then, afterwards I said I would get a little water, or a little tea; I had a bad cold and sore throat; she said I should not get out of bed she should get it herself; she got out of bed and gave me a little water.

Q. Did she make tea for you. - A. Yes; after that I asked her to get an apple out of my pockets with an intent to get my pockets; she said I should not have the apple it would hurt me, she would get up and make me a cup of tea. I desired her not, but she would she lit the fire made tea and gave me two or three cups of tea; after that she came to bed again. I did not sleep at all afterwards, I said I would get up and go into my own bed, on purpose to get my pockets; the pockets were then on the chair by her bedside where she had put them, she told me to compose myself and go to sleep.

Court. You did not say any thing about your pockets. - A. Not then.

Mr. Walford. Q. Did you go to your own bed. - A. No, I said I had got a very sore throat, I would have half a pint of raisin wine; she laid a bit and said I will have coffee for breakfast, she said she would get me the raisin wine; a little after seven o'clock in the morning she got up; I said I would get up too, then I asked her to give me my pockets; as she sat by the side of the bed she gave me my pockets. I put my hand in my pocket, I found I had lost my book and three five pound notes; she got off the bed and catched her own pockets and put them on, she said do not make yourself uneasy you will find them again. I had them in my pockets when I come here; then she pulled the clothes off the bed with a pretence to look for the notes. I told her they could not come there out of my pockets.

Q. Were they in your pocket book or were they loose. - A. In a small pocket book; I went into my own room, the prisoner came in after me, she took a half pint bottle from the shelf, she went to the oil shop at Islington, opposite of my house, for some raisin wine; she came out from there and went to the grocers shop; I watched her out of my window, she went to the oil shop again and brought home the raisin wine, and two ounces of coffee; she made breakfast and drank two cups of coffee. A gentleman came out of the country, I told him I was very uneasy, I had lost three five pound notes; the gentleman was going to take the number of the notes, he thought I recollected the number of the notes, I did not; it frightened the prisoner, she went out; I sent for a constable, I followed her with the constable and

he apprehended her.

Q. When she was apprehended what did she say. A. She had not got them; I was present when she was searched, there was five pounds fifteen shillings found upon her; I asked her as we were going down the street to our home, how she could say she did not take them, when she had changed one at the grocer's shop; she told me, if I would say nothing to any body she would tell me all about it; she begged to me in my own room; I said tell me what you have got to say; I sent to the grocer's, I found she had changed one five pound note at the grocer's shop; she told me she had taken it.

Q. You do not know the number of that note. - A. No.

Q. You cannot distinguish that note to be your own. - A. I cannot; she told me she had taken the liberty of taking my notes.

Prisoner. Did not you come home very much intoxicated in liquor, you said you had been with a gentleman in a coach. - A. I did not; I came home with my sister.

Q. You said you came home in a coach with a gentleman, and you had been to the Circus coffee house. - A. I said so out of a joke.

SAMUEL LACK . Q. In consequence of any information of the last witness did you apprehend the prisoner. - A. I did; I took her to the public house and searched her; I found two guineas, eight half guineas, and ten shillings in silver; she said if Mrs. Roberts would forgive her, and if I would go to town with her, she would make up the money.

ROBERT READ . Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your shop at any time. - A. Yes, on the 10th of March, near eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. Where do you live. - A. I live nearly opposite of the prosecutrix in High street, Islington; the prisoner was served by the young man, with sugar and coffee to the amount of four shillings and four pence; I was out of doors, I was called in the shop to change a five pound note; she gave me the note; I asked her what name I was to put on it; she said Roberts, over the way; I put down Mrs. Roberts High street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the shop for two ounces of coffee, I gave him the five pound note; he asked me the name, I said Roberts. Mrs. Roberts came home about half past twelve at night; I heard her come up stairs, I said is that you Mrs. Roberts; she said yes; I said here is a light; when she came in my room, she said she would have something to drink; I said I have nothing to give you to drink; she said I have had such a sprig. I wish you had been with me, she had been to the Circus with a gentleman, but there is no harm; I sat upright in bed and helped off her peliffe; I said Mrs. Roberts will you go in your own bed or will you lay down here; she said I will come to bed with you; she took her pockets off, wound the strings round, and laid them in the chair; she said her husband always knew when she was in that state because she talked so much; she said she could not go to sleep; at half after one I gave her some cold water; she laid down again, then she said she had a pain in her stomach; I asked her if she would have some tea; no, she said there is an apple in my pocket I will have that; I said you have the stomach ache, do not have that; I got up, made a cup of tea, and gave it her; she laid down again, she said she wished it was time to get up, she would have a little raisin wine; I said when you get up a cup of coffee will do you good; when we got up she said I have lost my pocket book; I said surely the person you was with last night has not taken it from you in a joke; no, she said he was too much of a gentleman; she laid down sixpence and I got the wine, and I made breakfast for her, and before we had done breakfast a gentleman came in; she asked if I was going to town; I said I was going to Wormwood street. I went to town and on my return Mr. Lack met me,

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-26

288 ANN MACMANUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a shift value 3 s. the property of John Potter - and ANN ROLT for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing it to have been stolen .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. Did you at any time get from the prisoner Ann Rolt a duplicate. - A. Yes. On Friday the 26th of February, I went with Mr. Potter to Mr. Barratt in Bridgewater gardens, where a shift was pawned for three shillings.

JOHN POTTER . Q. You are master of the workhouse of the parish of St. Luke. - A. Yes; Macmanus was a pauper in the workhouse ; she said she had taken the shift off the bed, where the woman slept in the ward, and had given it to Mrs. Rolt on the Sunday when she went out.

Q. What are the names of the churchwardens. - A. Lewis Charles Miles and John Lucas .

Q. What are the name of the overseers. - A. Thomas Alford, James Cole , William Scott and John Brown.

MR. BARRATT. I live in Bridgewater gardens, I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of February Rolt pledged a shift for three shillings, in the name of Ann Rolt ; she had pledged goods at my house before.

The property produced and identified.

Macmanus said nothing in her defence.

Rolt's Defence. I am innocently brought into it; she told me they were her own; I never knew where she was, she told me she was in servitude.

Rolt called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

MACMANUS, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

ROLT, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-27

289. ANN MACMANUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , a pair of gold earrings, value 3 s. the property of Ann Banks - and ANN ROLTS for receiving the same goods knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABTEH BANKS. Q. You are a pauper in this workhouse of St. Luke's. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you a pair of gold ear rings there. - A. Yes.

Q. You are a married woman, are not you. - A. Yes, my husband's name is John Banks .

Q. When did you miss them. - A. On the 10th of last January I missed them from out of my housewife,

- PRIOR. Q. Have you got the earrings here. A. Yes.

Q. Were these pawned with you by any body. - A. Yes, by a person of the name of Ann Rolt .

Q. Was it the prisoner at the bar. - A. I cannot say, I cannot be positive of her person.

Q. When you were examined, was not you asked whether you knew her by sight. - A. Yes; I said I knew her by sight, by seeing her at different times.

Q. Were you the person that took in the earrings. A. Yes.

Q. And you recollect the woman by sight - can you say that is the woman. - A. I cannot say it is the woman.

Q. Did you take them in of the woman in the name of Ann Rolt . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know her by the name of Rolt. - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with a search warrant to search the apartment of this woman. - A. I did, on Friday the 26th of February; I asked her about the earrings, I told her to recollect herself, for Macmanus said she had pawned a pair of gold earrings at Mr. Lucock's for three shillings; she told me where the duplicate was, she hoped she had done no wrong; she said she had them of Macmanus. I received the duplicate from Mrs. Bartlett.

SUSANNAH BARTLETT . Q. Look at the duplicate - did you receive it from Ann Rolt . - A. Yes, I gave her one shilling for it.

MRS. EDWARDS. Q. You are the mistress of this workhouse. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with Macmanus respecting these earrings. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any promise made to her. - A. I discovered her at first with some property in her pocket, which she had stole from one of the family; I then asked her about these earrings, she denied having them. I told her I was sure she was the thief; she hesitated; I told her she must tell me, or she must tell somebody else; she then said she had taken them and she had given them to a woman of the name of Turner, or of the name of Rolt, I do not know which.

(The property produced and identified.)

Macmanus's Defence. I am very sorry I did it; if you will forgive me I shall be thankful.

Rolt's Defence. She told me they were her own - I knew no other.

MACMANUS, GUILTY , aged 19.

ROLT, GUILTY, aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Rolt was recommended to mercy by the jury .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-28

290. ANN MACMANUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , a shift, value 1 s. 9 d. the property of John Potter - and MARY TURNER for feloniously receiving it, knowing it to have been stolen .

Second Count for like offence, charging the property to belong to the church wardens and overseers of the poor belonging to the parish of St. Luke .

ELIZABETH EDWARDS . Q. You are the matron. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you lose this shift. - A. I cannot say with certainly, it was several weeks back; the shift was for the use of Mrs. Bocock; the woman is since dead.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On searching the prisoner Turner's lodgings, I found the duplicate of a shift pawned for one shilling and nine pence, at Mr. Barrett's, Bridgewater gardens.

MR. BARRETT. On the 16th of February the prisoner Turner pawned the shift in the name of Mary Turner ; I produce it.

Q. Mrs. Edwards, look at the shift. - A. I think I am sure this is the shift.

Q. Are you sure or are you not. - A. I will not venture to swear that is the parish shift, though I am fully convinced it is; the marks are here that fit the stamp, but the letters are defaced to a blot.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-29

291. ANN MACMANUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , a cotton gown, value 3 s. the property of John Voyer - and MARY TURNER for feloniously receiving it, she knowing it to have been stolen .

HARRIET VOYER . Q. Did you lose a gown in October last. - A. Yes, a lilac cotton gown; I lost it from the workhouse; I was in the workhouse at that time; I missed it on a Saturday evening, between six and seven o'clock, I cannot tell the day of the month; I pulled it off on the Friday.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . In searching the prisoner Turner's lodgings on Friday the 26th of February, I found this duplicate of Mr. Barrett's, Bridgewater gardens, a gown, three shillings, 19th of October; Turner said that she had pawned it, she did not know she was doing any wrong.

MRS. EDWARDS. Macmanus said she had taken the gown, and carried it to Turner or Rolt, I do not know which.

JOHN BARRETT . Q. Was the gown pledged with you. - A. Yes, I lent Mary Turner three shillings upon it.

The property produced and identified.

Macmanus said nothing in her defence.

Turner's Defence. When she came to my house she brought the gown, she told me it was her own; she asked me to pledge it for three shillings; I gave her the three shillings for it.

MACMANUS, GUILTY , aged 19.

TURNER, GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-30

292. JAMES FROST was indicted for that he on the 16th of June was servant to James Pearceall , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money, and valuable securities, for him, and that being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession three one pound bank notes on account of his said master ; that he afterwards on the same day feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES PEARCEALL . Q. Have you any mills in Brick lane, Spital fields. - A. Yes, for the purpose of throwing silk.

Q. I believe also you are a silkman in Cheapside, in partnership with Mr. Green. - A. I am.

Q. Has Mr. Green any thing to do with this mill. A. Nothing at all.

Q. From the year 1804 to the year 1806, was the prisoner a servant in your employ at that mill. - A. From the 1st of March 1804, till the end of the last year, the prisoner was in my employ at that mill.

Q. Was it his duty to receive silk of persons and deliver it back to the owner and receive the money. A. It was.

Q. Did he account to you for the work he received, and for the work he did. - A. Yes, once a week, at my house in Cheapside.

Q. When he accounted with you on Saturday evening did he bring a book with him. - A. He did I have the book here.

Q. I believe you have a delivery book and a disbursement book. - A. The delivery book is considered as a ledger, it has the charge made in it.

Q. Look in the delivery book, next after the 13th of June 1806. - A. The next delivery is the 18th.

Q. Be so good as to tell me whether there is any account rendered to you of a sum of three pounds received of Mr. John Gower . - A. There is none.

Q. Has he at any subsequent period accounted to you for that sum of money received of Mr. John Gower . - A. Never.

Q. On the last day of the year you had a general account of the year. - A. I had; he did not then account for it.

Q. You had a final account on the 13th of October 1807, he did not account for it in that. - A. He has not; I have examined them all, and in no account is it rendered.

Q. Is there any sum of thirteen pounds ten shillings, including this three pounds of Mr. Gower. - A. There is none.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Did the prisoner ever account to any other person but you. - A. Sometimes the clerk was in the accompting house when I was not in the way; the book is all in his hand writing.

ROBERT BENTON . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Pearceall and Green. - A. I am.

Q. Did the prisoner occasionally account to you on Saturday evening. - A. He did usually account to me when Mr. Pearceall was not there.

Q. Did the prisoner ever account to you for any money received at the mill, unless that which was put down in his book. - A. He never did.

Q. And the book was kept in his own hand writing. - A. It was.

Q. Look at the book, at the settlement of the 18th of June, can you tell whether it was settled by you or Mr. Pearceall. - A. I cannot.

Q. You say you never received or accounted for any sum of money received by him, unless it was in the book. - A. I never did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. You have two books. Sometimes the entry was made in one book and sometimes in another. - A. No, the books were kept by the prisoner for his own distinct work.

Court. Are these the entries made by the prisoner. A. They are.

Q. Were there never but one book presented by the prisoner. - A. There were three distinct books for the same business - one a winder's book, one a drawer's book, and one for the cash entries.

Q. Which of these three distinct branches does this business apply to. - A. The cash book.

Q. The cash book is for the entries of the money he received. - A. Yes.

Q. Does the cash book contain the account of the silk that is delivered and received. - A. No, it does not.

Mr. Gurney. The cash book is the cash and delivery book. - A. Yes.

Court. You produce the cash book; on the 18th of June is there any entry of money received on that day. - A. There is none.

Mr. Gleed. Whoever settled the account of the cash book it was taken back to the prisoner. - A. It was.

Q. It was suffered to continue in his hands. - A. Yes, till the next week.

Q. The amount of the cash book at the end of the year amounted to a considerable sum. - A. It did.

Mr. Gurney. If Mr. Pearceall did not account you did. - A. Yes, always.

Court. If I understand you right, there is what he calls a cash book, in which he is to make an entry for the winding and throwing. - A. Yes.

Q. And that is the book he brings to you of the money he receives for winding and throwing. - A. Yes.

Q. In that book there is no entry of money received on the 13th of June. - A. There is none.

JOHN GOWER . Q. What are you. - A. I am foreman to Messr. Lane and Dalton, silkmen in the city.

Q. Did you apply to the prisoner to throw any silk for you. - A. Yes, I did; this paper is the delivery of the silk that he did throw, it is written by him, forty five pounds seven ounces; I delivered it to him, he charged thirteen pounds ten shillings for it; I paid him three pounds, four pounds nine shillings, and six pounds one shilling.

Q. On what day did you pay him. - A. He accounted for it on the 12th of June; I do not know on what day it was.

Q. First of all you paid him three pounds. - A. Yes. I gave him a bill for the four pound nine, and the six pound one I paid him by a bill; I received this receipt from him.

Q. to prosecutor. Is this receipt the prosecutor's hand writing. - A. I believe it is

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. At the time you employed him you employed him as a person on his own account. - A. I cannot say exactly.

Q. You went before the magistrate. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say at the time you employed the prisoner, you employed him on his own account. - A. I always considered that West and Frost received the silk from me; I had silk throwed before, that by West, senior, the father.

Q. You had employed these mills before when Mr. West and Frost were there. - A. Yes.

Q. You delivered this silk to Mr. Frost. - A. Yes, but, I did not know under what character he acted; I paid Frost three pounds, which I told you he said he wanted to pay the winders; I paid it to Frost, and the bill was made in his name.

Mr. Gurney. You had employed Mr. West when he was there. - A. Yes.

Q. You say he applied to you, and said he wanted three pound for his winders. - A. Yes, that was the very silk.

Court. This was a throwing mill, therefore you did not enquire whose mill it was. - A. I did not; I employed him and paid him for his work.

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Pearceall, this mill was for the benefit of Miss West. - A. Yes.

Q. Had the prisoner any privilege of working on his own account. - A. No; he was a servant to me, I engaged with him.

Mr. Pooley. Did not he work for himself to a Mr. Harper. - A. I never knew that till after he was taken in custody.

Mr. Gurney. Would he have remained an hour in your service if you had known it. - A. Certainly not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-31

293. JAMES MOORE , JOHN SMITH and WILLIAM DAVIS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Theodore Hill , about the hour of eight at night on the 26th of March , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, a metal watch, value 30 s. a gold key, value 1 s. a gold seal, value 5 s. a gold ring, value 10 s. a diamond ring set in gold, value 20 s. a lace frill, value 1 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. his property.

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of John Wilcox .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THEODORE HILL . Q. I believe you are a butcher . - A. I am.

Q. Where is your house situated. - A. In Bear alley, Fleet market in the parish of St. Sepulchre .

Q. On the evening of March the 26th had you left your house. - A. I had left it in the morning.

Q. Who was the last person that left it in the evening. - A. My wife.

MRS. HILL. Q. On the evening of March the 26th, at what time did you leave the house. - A. Between two and three in the afternoon.

Q. Did you leave any person in it. - A. No.

Q. Did you lock the door. - A. I did.

Q. Did you leave the house perfectly secure. - A. I did, I took both the keys with me; the dining room I locked that once and took the key, and I locked the street door twice and took the key of that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Are you sure that your doors - did you try the doors to see if you had locked them. - A. I turned the key and locked both the doors.

JULIA APPTREE - Mr . Gurney. I believe you live in Bear alley, opposite Mr. Hill's house. - A. Yes, at No. 18.

Q. On the evening of Saturday the 26th of March did you see any person near Mr. Hill's house. - A. Yes, two gentlemen.

Q. At about what time did you see them. - A. About a quarter or twenty minutes past eight.

Q. Was it very dark. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any thing they did. - A. They were dressed in brown clothes; I heard the knocker of Mr. Hill's door go once, which caused me to pay attention. I heard it lock and unlock several times afterwards. I went down the alley ten or fifteen yards and saw two more who were talking together, one of them had a drab coat, and the other a light drab; they crossed the way and came up towards Mr. Hill's.

Q. Did you see where they went to. - A. I did not, I did not stop.

Q. Did you see where the other two went, who were standing at the door. - A. I did not; I went strait up to my own shop. I sent Mr. Skinner to acquaint Mr. Hill.

WILLIAM SKINNER . - Mr. Gurney. Where do you live. - A. I live in Somerset street, Whitechapel.

Q. Where you on the evening of March the 26th sent down to Mr. Hill's to give information. - A. I was.

Q. Then did you and Mr. Hill and William Hall come up together to the house. - A. We did, Sir; when we came up to the door William Hall, Mr. Hill's servant, unlocked the door and found it fast on the inside, it was bolted; we were there a minute, or hardly that; we heard some people running down stairs. I suppose in putting the key in the door some noise was made, of course we knew it was two or three by the footsteps, they made a great noise by running down; they wanted to be out very quick; the door at the top was opened big enough to get my arm in, or another man's arm through; the top inside bolt was forced; Mr. Hill's young man turned the lock at the same time, or else I believe they would have pushed out; they ran down stairs for the purpose.

Q. (to Mr. Hill.) Does the door open inside or outside. - A. The door opens outward, it pulls out in the street.

Skinner. The young man turned the key at that moment; you may depend upon it they would all have got away if they had not been prevented.

Q. You would not have let them if you could have helped it. - A. Truly so.

Q. Did you send Mr. Hill then for assistance. - A. I believe a person there did.

Q. After Mr. Hill was gone what then. - A. We entered the house; we forced the door open, there were a great number of people, we thought we were strong enough, we forced the door open and got in; I was the second person that got in, William Hall was the first; when I got in I laid hold of Moore; I found him standing against the door, I never left him after I found him, till I left him in St. Sepulchre's watchhouse.

Q. What did you observe. - A. I observed him shifting very much; I thought he wanted to pull out a pistol, he could do nothing.

Q. Did you hear any thing drop from him. - A. I did not.

Court. What do you mean by shifting. - A. He was feeling in his breeches and waistcoat pockets. I thought he had a pistol there, and I thought it my

duty to take care of that; I thought myself in an awkward situation, I kept hold of him till I delivered him in the watchhouse.

Mr. Gurney. How many persons did you find in the house when you got in. - A. Three besides William Hall.

Q. How many thieves did you find in the house. - A. I do not know how many thieves, that must be proved.

Court. You found three men in the house. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Have you been called upon before to apprehend thieves. - A. Never before.

Mr. Gurney. You have behaved exceeding well.

SAMUEL BURDEW . - Mr. Gurney. Were you one of the people that came to assist in entering this house. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. You were next after Skinner. - A. Yes.

Q. Who did Skinner lay hold of. - A. He laid hold of Moore, I laid hold of Smith. I found Smith at the further side of the dining room, up one pair of stairs; I caught hold of him by the collar, I held him, he ruffled about a good deal; I thought he was feeling for something to defend himself; he said you have got me, have not you. I said I have and I mean to keep you; I took him to the watchhouse myself; I never loosened him at all.

Q. Did you observe Moore in the custody of Watkins. - A Yes, he was in the custody of Watkins.

Q. Did you observe any thing respecting Moore. - A. I did not; I saw the watch upon the ground, a little ways distant from the prisoner. I had hold of him in the middle of the dining room.

Q. Was Moore in the dining room. - A. He was taken in that room.

Q. How near was the watch to Moore. - A. Not a yard and a half, on the floor. I saw it trod upon.

Q. Who apprehended the other prisoner. - A. William Hall .

Q. Was Hall with you when you caught Smith. - A. Yes, Hall had his prisoner in his possession.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The watch was found within a yard of Moore, in the room where he was. - A. Yes.

Q. There were a great many people in the room. - A. Not at that juncture of time; I called to a young man that I knew to pick the watch up, I said there lays some money.

Q. That shews how sober you were, you took the watch for the money. - A. There was the watch and the money too.

Q. Before you saw the watch was there not any other person in the room besides the prisoners; there were other persons in the room before Moore. - A. There were three other persons in the room.

Q. Why do you pitch on Moore. - A. I did not pitch on Moore.

Mr. Gurney. I did pitch on Moore.

Mr. Alley. Those who had Moore in custody they were in the room also. - A. They were in the landing place.

Q. Were not they in the room. - A. They were after the scuffle, they were part in the room and part in the landing place.

CHRISTOPHER WATKINS. - Mr. Gurney. Did you venture into the house to assist in apprehending the prisoners. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Moore drop any thing. - A. Yes, he dropped a watch; I sung out a light; a light came, the watch was picked up; I cannot tell by whom.

RICHARD JAMES . - Mr. Gurney. Did you go into the house to assist in taking the prisoners. - A. I went after they were apprehended into the house.

Q. Did you hear Watkins point out a watch laying on the ground. - A. I did not; I picked up the watch, I took it to the watchhouse; I gave it to the constable.

WILLIAM HALL . Q. I believe you are servant to Mr. Hill. - A. I am.

Q. Did you go up with your master and Mr. Watkins upon receiving the alarm. - A. Yes.

Q. You were the first who entered the house. - A. Yes, we went up into the dining room; I laid hold of two, Smith and Davis; I had Smith in my left hand and Davis in my right.

Q. Did you take Davis to the watchhouse. - A. I took him down stairs and gave him into the possession of people that I knew.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Did not they say that they went into the house in consequence of supposing some other persons were robbing the house. - A. No, they did not say so to me.

WILLIAM HOPWOOD . - Mr. Gurney. You are a constable. - A. Yes, I searched the prisoners after they were at the watchhouse. On searching Davis, in his pocket I found a laced frill and a pocket handkerchief.

Q. Have you a watch delivered to you by James. - A. I have, this is the watch.

Q. After you had searched Davis did you search Smith and Moore. - A. Yes, I only found three pieces of candle on Smith.

Q. Did you then go and look over Mr. Hill's house. - A. Yes, in looking over the house I found four picklock keys on the dining room carpet; I found one that unlocked the street door and one that unlocked the dining room door; this dark lanthorn I found on the landing place; I found a gold watch upon Moore.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You know there is a reward of forty pounds for a burglary. - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore I know if you have a reward of forty pounds you will do your duty. - A. I have done nothing but my duty.

Q. You found something that opened the door. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not find it upon any body. - A. No.

Q. You found it upon the carpet in the drawing room. - A. Yes.

Q. Nothing was found upon Smith and Davis. - Q. I found upon Davis a laced frill, and a pocket handkerchief.

Q. Where was Davis when you searched him. - A. In the watchhouse.

Q. Therefore you did not find any thing in the house upon him. - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Hill, after you had secured the prisoners, in what condition did you find the furniture of your house; in what condition was your

goods after the prisoners were lodged in the compter. A. I found the drawers all open, the clothes were thrown out, such as shirts, sheets, counterpanes, and various other kinds of articles, were strewed about the room, and papers of every description; and out of the top drawer in my bed chamber, I have two rings which I was desired to keep charge of. I found them on the landing place.

Q. What rings were they. - A. One a mourning ring, and the other a diamond ring.

Q. Be so good as to look at the watch picked up by James. - A. I know it to be mine.

Q. Where had you left the watch. - A. I left it upon the table in my room; it was taken from the bed chamber to the dining room; and there the watch was dropped.

Q. You assisted in taking the prisoners to the watchhouse. - A. I did. I found them upon the landing place.

Mr. Alley. There was nothing found upon these men. - A. Yes, there was upon Davis; I was at the watchhouse and saw it taken out of his pocket.

Q. You did not find any of your property taken away. - A. I found it removed.

Q. You did not find any thing taken out of your house. - A. Yes, a frill and a handkerchief.

Mr. Gurney, to prosecutor. Is that your handkerchief. - A. Yes, it is, and the frill is mine; the handkerchief was left in my shop about a month or three weeks ago, I took care of it till it was called for; it is a laced frill, I left the frill and the handkerchief in the upper drawer.

Mr. Alley. I dare say you make your frills in a fashionable way. - A. It is made as I like it.

Q. How can you say it is your frill. - A. I know it is my frill; I speak what I know.

Smith's Defence. I was coming by, I had been into Green harbour court to look for a friend; I was going from there into Shoe-lane, Caroline court, No. 19, where I live; coming by, I saw a mob about Mr. Hill's door, I curiously went into the mob, I saw them forcing the door open; I went up stairs with the rest of the people; when I got upon the top of the landing place, I was knocked down on the stairs, and was trampled over by many persons; I got up with great to do; I was taken into custody for what and for why I could not tell; I was taken into the room, and was violently ill used; afterwards I was taken to the watchhouse, where I was ransacked, and every thing taken from me, which I had, which was but very little; and I have been brought here as innocent as ever a young man in the world was.

Moore's Defence. I was coming by at the time, and seeing a number of people at the door, I went across, and when they forced the door open, I went up stairs with them; as soon as I got upon the top of the stairs, they caught hold of me and took me in custody; they said I was one of the men; I was troubled to get up stairs, there were twenty before me; I asked them what they wanted with me; they knocked me down in the room; I told them to use me well, I came up at the same time they did, what did they use me in that kind of a manner for.

Davis's Defence. I was coming by at the time; I went over with the rest of the people; there was a great mob went up stairs, I went with them; I saw a pocket handkerchief lay there; I picked it up, I did not know but what it was my own, and had dropped from me; a number of people laid hold of me. I was taken to the watchhouse.

MOORE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

DAVIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-32

294. JANE MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , three coats, value 4 l. eight shirts, value 3 l. 10 s. nine handkerchiefs, value 11 s. one pair of pantaloons, value 8 s. and one pair of drawers, value 2 s. the property of Andrew de la Berge ; three shirts, value 18 s. eight handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 14 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. 6 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Cisement Walters - a watch, value 3 l. and a watch key, value 6 d. the property of John Wingfield , in the dwelling house Philip Sirrell - and MARY EVANS for feloniously receiving on the 15th of March , a watch, value 3 l. and a watch key, value 6 d. the property of John Wingfield , being part of the aforementioned goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ANDREW DE LA BERGE. Q. Where do you live. - A. No. 7, Tokenhouse yard at Mr. Philip Sirrell 's.

Q. When did you lose these things. - A. On the 14th of March.

Q. Where were your things. - A. In my bed room; my linen was in the drawer, and my coats was hanging up in my room, in Mr. Sirrell's house.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. I understand at five o'clock; I went out at four and I returned at half past twelve at night.

Q. When you returned you found all these things gone. - A. Yes, my lord, I did.

Q. Why do you accuse Jane Morris of taking them. - A. Because in the evening she went away, and nobody knew where she was.

Q. Was she a servant in the house. - A. Yes, she was, and she left her place that evening.

Q. What was it you lost yourself. - A. Three coats, one pair of pantaloons, one pair of drawers, shirts, handkerchiefs, and cravats; I do not know how many; the greatest part of them were found on the next day, when Mr. Sirrell pursued her.

CISEMENT WALTERS. Q. You lodge in the same house. - A. Yes; I am a merchant of Hamburgh; I know no more than when I came home my linen was gone; I left the house on the 14th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I returned home about half past eleven at night.

PHILIP SIRRELL . Q. You keep the house No. 7, Tokenhouse yard. - A. Yes, in the parish of St. Margaret, Lothbury.

Q. Are you the owner of the house. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did the prisoner live with you. - A. Five days. On the 14th of March, about six in the afternoon, the washerwoman came for the linen to take to wash, which she usually does; my niece Ann Whitelocke went up stairs to look for the linen; she did not find the linen there; she came down and said, uncle, I have lost Walters' linen;

I searched the house I could not find it. I made enquiry for Jane, I found she was gone; I waited some time looking over the house, in hopes of finding what was lost; then I went in pursuit of her myself to Piccadilly, to a person who could inform me where her lodgings was, before she came to live with me; when I got there the family were all a bed; the next morning I went in pursuit of her to the same house; I met with the person I wished to enquire of, who went with me to her lodgings; when I went up in the room there was nobody there; I went away and going down Chandos street I met with Evans, who lodged with her; I asked Evans to inform me where Jane Morris was; she said she had not seen her that day, she had seen her last night; I threatened her if she did not tell me where she was, I would make a prisoner of her; I left her with the person who was with me, in a room in a public house; I went out about a minute and a half; the person came to me, and said she has confessed; she says if you will go to Covent garden, you will find her dressed in men's clothes.

Q. In what street was her lodgings. - A. In Vine-street. I then went into her room, I found her fitting in Mr. de la Berge's clothes; his coat and pantaloons, the waistcoat I do not know; I desired her to unbutton her coat and waistcoat, she refused at first, she did at last; I wanted to be satisfied whether I was right or not; I saw a bundle laying by the side of the bed, the person opened it, I found it belonged to Mr. Berge; I sent for a coach, took Evans up at the bottom of the street, and I took them both home to my house.

Q. What is Evans. - A. She is unknown to me, they were at work at army clothing work. When I brought them home to my house, I put them down in the kitchen; I desired my family not to let them come out of my house; I fetched Daniel Cartwright from the Mansion house, he searched Morris, he found half a crown in Morris's pantaloons pocket; in doing of that he was looking round, Evans was fumbling about her pocket, he saw something shine, he thought it was a silver spoon; he searched Evans, he took a watch from her that belonged to Mr. Wingfield; after I came from the counter, I went to the lodgings again, to see if I could recover any thing more belonging to Mr. de la Berge; I found various articles, one bundle tied up in the bed curtains by the bed side, which I took my knife and cut down; I brought it home and delivered it to the officer.

Q. Whose property was that. - A. Mr. de la Berges and Mr. Walters.

Q. Did you ask her about the watch. - A. Yes, she said she found it in the water closet in my house.

Q. How did Evans account for having the watch. - A. Upon account of breaking the glass to stop the watch she gave Evans the watch to have it repaired; Evans said a coat and two shirts were pledged in Chandos street; the gentlemen are here with them.

JANE MORRIS (to Mr. Sirrell). Was I not in liquor in your house that day, so that I did not know what I was doing of. - A. I did not see any thing amiss with you, I never conceived that you was tipsey; I was perfectly satisfied with you from the day you came in my house until you did the mischief.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two shirts pawned for ten shillings, on the 14th of March; to the best of my knowledge by Mary Evans .

JOHN WINTER . I am a pawnbroker. I live in the Strand. I produce a coat pawned by Mary Evans on the 14th of March for twenty five shillings.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes; I produce the shirts of different gentlemen, and the clothes she had on at the time, and a silver watch.

Q. Is there three coats. - A. (Mr. Sirrel). There is one lost and some linen.

Q. to Mr. Wingfield. Is that your watch. - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. de la Berge. Is that coat the pawnbroker produces yours. - A. Yes, these are my two coats, my name is on the sleeves; the shirts are all mine; two of them were quite new, and one of the coats was almost new; the black one was quite dirty on her when Mr. Sirrell took her.

Cartwright. This handkerchief she had on her neck; Mr. Walters owns it.

Q. to Walters. Are your things there. - A. Yes, one shirt and handkerchief is mine. I lost a pair of pantaloons that is not found.

Jane Morris 's Defence. I leave it to you, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury. I was very much in liquor.

Evans was not put on her defence.

MORRIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

EVANS, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-33

295. SAMUEL BOWNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , two pecks of coals, value 1 s. the property of William Ashby .

FREDERICK ROBINSON . Q. What are you. - A. My father works for Mr. Ashby, he is a corn chandler in Staines.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a farmer's servant .

Q. What do you know about these coals. - A. They were in a coal bin in the yard; I marked them, This is one that I marked.

Q. Is that all you know. - A. Yes.

GEORGE CLARK . I am high constable; the coals were taken from Bowne's house by a constable and myself; the coals were left at the prosecutor's.

Q. How do you know they are the same coals. - A. The lad went down and swore to the coals.

Q. You do not know they are the same coals that you found on his premises. - A. I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-34

296. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , three dozen of knives, value 30 s. and a mahogany knife box, value 20 s. the property of George Pearson .

SAMUEL HICKFORD. Q. What are you. - A. I am servant to Doctor Pearson. On the 28th of February, from Mr. Prosser giving information to one of our servants, I went into the dining room and missed the knife case from the side board.

Q. Had you seen the man in the house. - A. No. I then opened the front door, I told Mr. Prosser the article was gone; the prisoner was pursued and taken; I received this property and the prisoner, and sent for a constable.

MR. PROSSER. I am a grocer; I was passing down George street, Hanover square, I observed the prisoner come out of Dr. Pearson's house with this knife box before him, his great coat covering part of it; from his apparent agitation I supposed he had stolen it; I told the woman servant of it at the top of the area steps, that I thought he had stole it from their house; she informed the butler, he went up into the dining room and found it was gone; the next witness came up, he ran down Maddox street, and saw the prisoner; he came back, and informed me; we pursued the prisoner and brought him back to Dr. Pearson's, with the knife box.

Q. Where did you stop him. - A. In Bruton street.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. Will you swear that I am the man.

COURT. Yes, he does swear to you.

Pris. I was never in the house, nor do not know where the place is.

JOHN LITTLEJOHN . I am a servant to Mr. Walters; I was coming down George street, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock on Saturday the 20th of February; I met the prisoner with this knife case before him, about twenty yards from Dr. Pearson's door; seeing the last witness look after him, I particularly suspected him.

Q. You took such particular notice of him that you are certain he is the man. - A. I am certain he is the man; when I came up to the last witness, having suspicion, I asked him; he said he saw him come out of the door; I pursued the prisoner, I catched him in Bruton street, I asked him where he got the knife case; he said he picked up the knife case at a door in Bruton street; I took the knife case from him; Mr. Prosser came up; we took him back to Dr. Pearson's; that is the same case I took from him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. What I am accused of, I am as innocent as a child unborn; I was going down Bond street, I met with a gentleman's servant, he asked me if I was out of work, I said yes; I had just come from the Cape of Good Hope along with sir Home Popham; he said he would give me a shilling for carrying this case; I said a shilling would help me and my wife and family.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-35

297. MARY FRANCES JONES was indicted for the wilful murder of her female infant .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MARTHA TUCKER . Q. You are a servant to Mrs. Birkett. - A. I am; she lives at Clapton terrace.

Q. Mrs. Hewitson is the daughter of Mrs. Birkett. A. Yes.

Q. Was she upon a visit at her mother's house on the 3d of March. - A. Yes; the prisoner was Mrs. Hewitson's servant ; she was with her; they came on a Friday, and it would be a fortnight almost when this happened.

Q. During the time you have been speaking of, previous to this accident taking place, did you observe any thing with respect to the prisoner. - A. Yes, she was larger than general, I thought she was pregnant. On Thursday, about five o'clock, to the best of my recollection, she ate her dinner and complained of a pain in her stomach; her mistress and the family went out that evening and left three of my mistress's servants in the house; the prisoner wished to go to bed early, being very poorly; she went up stairs about eight o'clock; my fellow servant Elizabeth Mason took her up some tea; about twenty minutes afterwards I went up to take the tea things away, she said she was better; about ten o'clock I went up to feed Mrs. Hewitson's infant; I found the prisoner very ill, I ran down and alarmed Elizabeth Mason , she went up; in about five minutes I went up again; I was alarmed, I sent for my mistress home, she complained of a pain in her stomach; my mistress came home immediately, and Mr. Smith the doctor was sent for; we all thought she had a child; the doctor came, he asked Mrs. Birkett if she was a married woman. After the doctor was gone Mrs. Birkett asked her, she denied it; I remained with her all night.

Q. Were you present when Mr. Peelvin made a search. - A. Yes, that was on the Saturday.

Q. Did you see any pockets. - A. Yes; I found the pockets on the Thursday on the counterpane, at the top of the bed, near the pillow; I tied them up and placed them under her pillow that night.

COURT. How were they before you tied them up. - A. They laid loose on the bed. On Saturday when Mr. Peelvin was there, I took the pockets from under the pillow, I found a pair of scissars in them, with a little blood on them; I gave the scissars to Mr. Peelvin, he is the churchwarden; there was a penknife there, but there was no blood on it. I searched under the bed; I found a little black trunk under the bed with a female child in it, wrapped up in a gown which I have seen the prisoner wear.

Mr. Knapp. What was the appearance about the person of the child. - A. Its throat was cut with a bad edged instrument, or a pair of scissars; I said to Mrs. Birkett who was standing by, I had found the child, and that its throat was cut; the prisoner was laying then in the bed.

Q. Did you speak loud enough for the prisoner to hear you, when you mentioned the appearance of the child - when you first found it. - A. I suppose she must hear.

COURT. You said the child's throat was cut. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner upon that make any observations. - A. She did not speak.

Mr. Knapp. You said you took the infant out of the gown, what did you do with the infant. - A. I laid it on the boards till Mr. Smith came; he came about three quarters of an hour afterwards; he saw it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You say, what you said to Mrs. Birkett, the prisoner must have heard you. A. Yes.

Q. Was not she in that exhausted state that she might not hear. - A. She lay with her eyes shut.

Q. You say that the scissars that you took out of the pocket were laying on the bed, they were not concealed - what I mean they were not thrown away. - A. No.

Q. The penknife had not any blood upon it. - A. No.

Q. This was a very large child. - A. A very large child.

Q. You are not a married woman, but common sense tells you it must have been a very hard labour. - A. Most likely.

Q. You say you examined the box, in which you found a child. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you find another box in which apparently there were things for the child A. - I did not see that box opened; that was at Clapton, and she lived with Mrs. Hewitson, Catherine court, Tower hill.

ELIZA MASON . Q. You are a servant to Mrs. Birkett. - A. I was at that time.

Q. On the 3d of March do you remember the prisoner being at your mistress's house with her mistress. A. Yes; the prisoner was a person that I highly valued; I had no suspicion of her pregnancy; on the 3d of March we dined about six o'clock: the prisoner ate a very hearty dinner; after she had done she went up stairs, she complained that she was ill in her bowels - she came down stairs about eight o'clock.

Q. Who came down stairs. - A. The prisoner; she was confined up stairs with the infant, she only came down upon occasions; she came down about eight o'clock to provide for Mrs. Hewitson's child's supper, and for the night; she complained again of her being ill in her bowels, she apparently looked very well in the face; I smiled at her for saying the fish she ate for her dinner disagreed with her, I thought it was so simple a thing to make her ill; I asked her to take a cup of tea with me, she refused; about half past eight I went up stairs to dress myself; I asked her to have a little brandy, she said no; she was then sitting on the chair by the side of the bed, with her gown unpinned; she had a very nice colour, she put her hand to her stomach and apparently was in great pain; I then said what is the matter, are you very ill; yes, she said, I am very ill in my bowels; by her looking so well I did not think any thing of it. I then went out of the room and left her. About nine o'clock I went into her room again, she was then in bed with the cap on she had worn in day; I then asked her why she went to bed with her cap on; she spoke apparently confused, and rather smiled, said she should be up by and by; I concluded that she had fed the child; I asked her if she would have tea, she refused; I went down stairs and made tea; I took it her up, and staid with her till she hand drank part, I asked her how she did, she said she was better; I poured her out the remainder, she refused my staying with her; I then went out, it may have been three quarters of an hour before I returned; it was about a quarter after nine when I went out, and I returned to her about ten o'clock; Martha Tucker gave the alarm to me; I went up stairs; when I first entered the room at ten o'clock, on seeing the state of the room, I said Mary, what have you been about.

Q. What was the state of the room. - A. A great discharge of blood on the beside carpet, and on the floor.

COURT. That appearance had not been on the floor when you left the room last. - A. No. I am positive of its being done in the three quarters of an hour that I had left the room.

Mr. Knapp. What was the appearance of the prisoner at that time. - A. She was apparently dead, there was very little life in her; she spoke very well. I then said to her Mary, what is the matter, what have you been doing; she answered, I am flooded to death. I concluded that she had broke a blood vessel, as she said she had been sick; I was so much alarmed I could not stay in the room. Martha Tucker entered the room as I came out, I ran down stairs; when I went up again I found Martha Tucker in the room with her; Mr. Smith the doctor was sent for immediately, I asked the prisoner what was the matter with her; she said: nothing, many people were so.

Q. How soon afterwards did Mr. Smith the doctor come. - A. He came before eleven o'clock.

Q. You said that you knew the prisoner before. - A. Yes; I respected her as a prudent, modest, young woman.

Q. Do you know whether she was a married woman or no. - A. I never had the least suspicion that she was married; - when the doctor came Mrs. Birkett and I was in the room, he spoke very low, he desired us not to be alarmed, she was doing very well; the room was cleared up before Mr. Smith came; after Mr. Smith was gone I and Martha Tucker sate up with the prisoner till six o'clock;; - after I heard that it was supposed there was a child, I asked her if there was any, person she wished to see, she said no; I entreated if there was any thing to own to say it, she said she had nothing to own, she had done nothing; I told her she must know if she had known any young man, she said she had not; I mentioned the same things over to her, she strongly denied it, and said she had done nothing, she did not wish to see any body; she apparently had strong labour pains in the course of the night; I then went to her and asked her what was the matter; she said it was nothing, only she was faint; I told her fainting fits were strong ones.

COURT. Had you observed any thing about any, pockets that laid on the bed. - A. On Thursday night about ten o'clock, when I entered the room, I saw a pair of pockets laying on the bed close to her head on the pillow; Martha Tucker put them behind the pillow. I can swear I saw some stains of blood on them.

Q. Do you know whose pockets they were. - A. No. person slept in the room but herself; I saw nothing of them when I left the room a quarter before nine o'clock, and they were there at ten o'clock; that is all I saw on Thursday night.

Q. Were you present in the room with Mr. Peelvin. A. I was; on Saturday evening, between seven and eight o'clock at night; I saw then a pair of scissars found in the pockets, with a stain of blood on them.

- GRIFFITHS. Q. You produce a pair of scissars. - A. Yes, and the pockets.

ELIZABETH MASON . These are the pockets, I can swear to them; and these are the scissars, the stain of blood I can swear to; I took particular notice of that; the prisoner was laying in bed when they were found, and the conversation was loud enough for her to hear every word.

Q. Did you examine the bed at any time. - A. I searched the bed after the doctor left the room. On Thursday night I saw nothing of the child, only a great discharge of blood; Mrs. Birkett then said she was as much in that situation as ever she was (meaning having

had a child or something of that sort), the prisoner replied no such thing madam. I searched under the bed, I saw this trunk; I moved it of one side, it was under the bed, I could see nothing; I never thought of looking into the trunk, nor did I see the child till it was laid on the floor, on Saturday night the 5th of March, between one and two o'clock; the child was wrapped up in a gown that the prisoner always wore, while she was at our house.

Q. Did you observe any thing about the child. - A. The child's throat was cut with an instrument that did not cut well, it was not cut strait; it was scolloped in and out, it appeared to me to be cut with scissars; it was a very fine child as ever I saw.

MRS. BIRKETT. Q. We understand that you live at Clapton Terrace. - A. Yes.

Q. This prisoner was with her mistress, your daughter, she was on a visit at your house. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner. - A. Very near three years.

Q. Do you know whether she was a married woman or a single woman. - A. I have no reason to suppose that she ever was married.

Q. Your daughter brought an infant to your house. - A. Yes, the prisoner had the care of it; she was servant to the child.

Q. We understand that you were out this Thursday evening. - A. Yes, I was out drinking tea and all the family; I returned home about a quarter before eleven. I went up immediately to the room where the prisoner was; I found her in a state which gave me suspicion that she had been brought a bed; she was in bed, I asked her what was the matter with her, she said nothing particular, she could hardly, make any reply; I believe she fainted away shortly after I came into the room. I said to her I thought appearances were very much against her; I did not know what to make of her situation. I did not exactly suppose that she might be brought a bed, I thought it might have been a bad miscarriage.

Q. I take it for granted, you were aware from what was found on the floor what had happened, you were told of it. - A. Yes. I went up and down several times till two o'clock in the morning, then I left the two servants with her, and told them if they observed any thing to let me know; there were no further appearances, I said to her the next morning that I had hurt her feelings by saying what I did last night; but appearances were so, that gave me suspicion, but I hoped it was not so; she said oh dear madam, it is not so, indeed; she was attended during the day by the family; Mr. Smith came again the next morning, she was then laying in a stupid kind of a way. He had strong suspicions of her; I told Mr. Smith I did not think she was capable of deceiving us so much; I could not believe it was so On the Saturday morning Mr. Smith insisted upon there being a child; he begged I would search immediately; I took Martha Tucker up with me; there was a small black trunk under the bed; she pulled it from under the bed; opened it, there were a few small muslin things on the top inside of the trunk and under it a bundle tied up in a handkerchief, we opened the handkerchief the child was found wrapped up in a gown, which was in the handkerchief; it was a fine full grown female child; it appeared to have some injury upon the throat. I was not near enough to examine it.

Mr. Knapp. That child that was so found was afterwards shewn to Mr. Smith. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This poor woman had behaved very well, you had a high opinion of her. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you discover any child bed linen. - A. There was some found, I understand; it was not brought to me, she only came to my house for a few days; her box was at her master's at Tower hill.

Court. At the time that you made the discovery of the box and the child in it, did you talk so loud that she could hear. - A. Yes, she appeared to be in a stupid state; she hardly appeared to be alive. I hope my lord the whole was more the effect of accident than design.

Mr. SMITH. You are a surgeon living at Stoke Newington. - A. Yes.

Q. On Thursday evening the 3d of March, were you sent for to Mrs. Birkett's at Clapton. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you there see the prisoner. - A. I did, I was desired to go up stairs, where I found the prisoner in bed; I was told by her attendant that she had lost a great quantity of blood; the prisoner at that time was very faint and languid; she could give very little account; upon my going down stairs to Mrs. Birkett, I expressed my suspicions, I did not give any directions that night because my suspicions were not very great. Upon my seeing her the next day I then discovered a disagreeable stench about the bed; which I knew from my experience could only be the placenta, or after birth; I then requested Mrs. Birkett to give directions to have the bed searched, and if she found any thing to send for me, for my inspection. On the Saturday morning about eleven o'clock I called again; I was shewn part of a mature placenta; I then told Mrs. Birkett that my suspicions were quite confirmed, that such an appearance could not be without there having been a child. I then proposed to Mrs. Birkett to have the room searched. In a few hours afterwards I received a note from Mrs. Birkett that she had discovered the child. I returned to Mrs. Birkett about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was then shewn a female infant, of full mature growth, with its throat cut.

Q. What sort of a cut was it. - A. An incised wound cut by scissars and notched, extending along the whole course of the neck to the jaw, where the would was long and deep; it was very deep near the jaw, and where the windpipe received the injury.

Q. What injury had the windpipe received. - A. It was divided.

Court. Would that require a considerable effort to cut the windpipe with these scissars. - A. It must require great labour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. When you talk of the windpipe being divided you do not mean separated. - A. No, it was an incision, a deep cut.

Q. Have you had an opportunity of observing in the course of your practice, that the naval string will twine itself round the child's neck, so that it is necessary to apply the scissars to cut the navel string.

A. It is necessary to cut the navel string always.

Q. Does it not frequently happen that the navel string will twine itself round the child's neck. - A. Frequently.

Q. So that it would choak the child. - A. No, it would break before it could produce suffocation.

Q. Do you not think that a poor wretched woman in attempting to assist nature might have done that injury. - A. It is possible.

Court. I understand you that the wound went upwards. - A. Yes, along the whole course of the neck.

Q. That notching that was done at several times could that be to assist the separation of the navel string. - A. It is possible that it might be.

Q. Does it appear that it would be a mode to separate the naval string from the neck, if the navel string was there. - A. I think not; the scissars appear to have had a forcible thrust of a considerable depth; I dare say more than an inch; the navel string is extremely easy, cut it is like cutting a piece of tape.

Q. Would there require any effort at all necessary for the purpose of separating the naval string, which might be cut as easy as a piece of tape. - A. None at all; it would have required no such force.

Q. You have seen the scissars. - A. I saw them before the coroner.

Q. Were they competent to produce the effect on the child. - A. Certainly.

Q. You have stated the appearance of the child, can you form a judgment of its being born alive. - A. Certainly; I think it was; but not being present, I cannot say, but taking all the circumstances together, the placenta and from the wound, it does not alter my opinion at all about it, but that it was born alive.

SARAH HEWITSON . Q. I understand the prisoner was a servant of yours. - A. Yes; she had lived with me eleven months.

Q. Did you ever understand she was married. - A. No.

Q. On Sunday the 6th of March had you any conversation with the prisoner. - A. I asked her whether she recollected the time that she was connected with any one; she told me about the beginning of June; I then asked her the reason why she did not leave me, knowing herself to be in that situation; she said, she did not know it would have happened so soon, she meaned to go to the parish; she had been asking leave to go to town, saying she wanted to see her mother.

Q. Did you examine any box of hers. - A. No, I merely locked it up, and set it to her.

Court, to Dr. Smith. You say the wound was a competent, and a valid cause to produce death. - A. Quite so, I saw no other cause whatever.

Q. Being of opinion as you have stated, that the child was born alive, do you therefore ascribe its death to that wound. - A. Entirely.

Prisoner's Defence. It was in my extremity that it happened.

SARAH WALKER . - Mr. Alley. You are the nurse that was called in to attend the prisoner. - A Yes. On Sunday morning I gave her some sut drops in tea, she being in pain; about an hour and a half after that I found the afterbirth. When Mr. Smith came at night I shewed it to him.

Q. Did you see her box brought down to her. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see it opened. - A. I did; there was sufficient to dress the child, a shirt, a gown, and a blanket.

GEORGE DOWNING . Q. I believe you are a surgeon, and have had an extensive practice of midwifery. - A. I have, a great many years.

Q. We have heard of the accident of the navel string twining round the child's neck. - A. It certainly occurs very frequent.

Q. I would ask you sir, from the opportunity that you have had of observing women in labour - is it not a thing likely to occur that a woman assisting herself, being totally ignorant, might have made an incision in the same way as described. - A. It is possible that she might by applying the scissars to extricate herself; if the navel string is round the childs neck as there is but a short distance from that and the uterus even for a practioner to cut the string; supposing the scissars had been both points sharp, one is obtuse, which makes it more difficult; in the agony of mind had they both been sharp pointed, she might have forced the scissars without any intent to commit murder; I should certainly have untwisted the string; there is a difficulty in getting the scissars under the string.

Q. You say sir in the situation described it, would be necessary to use some force to get the string. - A. I do say so, and it might be so, that there would be room enough to put the scissars under; it could not hardly be done by an ignorant person, and in fact hardly is ever done by a practitioner, without untwisting the string before they apply the scissars.

Court, to Smith. What was the depth of the wound, describe where the wound commenced. - A. In the inferior part of the neck, and stretched up to the jaw; it was about three inches in length.

Q. Can you form how many cuttings there might have been. - A. Three distinct ones. The navel string was round the neck of the child, I left it there.

Q. Did it appear to you that the incision made by the scissars could have been done by the person in the agony of labour to relieve herself from that. - A. It might happen.

Q. You could not see any circumstance to enable you to say whether it did happen so or not. - A. No.

Q. In conversation with the prisoner, did she suggest to you any thing of that sort. - A. I had no conversation with her, I only asked her how she did.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY,

Of the murder - Guilty of concealing the birth of the child .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-36

298. JEREMIAH BOWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , three pieces of chains, value 5 s. the property of William Mansfield Ship .

WILLIAM MANSFIELD SHIP . I am a clock and watch chain maker . On the 11th of March, from suspicion, I went to the prisoner's lodgings. I found the three pieces of chains.

- EDWARDS. I am a patrol belonging to Bow street. We went to the prisoner's lodgings in John's row, St. Luke's; we found the three pieces of chains in his room. I saw his wife, she said it was his room.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master has given me bits of chains several times; they are not worth a halfpenny to any body, they are of no use but as strings to put keys upon.

Prosecutor. I never gave him a piece so long.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-37

299. ANGUS MACGINNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of March , two blankets, value 16 s. a sheet value 5 s. and a counterpane, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Etherington .

MARY ETHERINGTON . On the 23d of March I was sitting in my inner room, No. 11, Chick lane ; the prisoner came down stairs with the blankets wrapped up in this quilt, and a sheet was concealed under his clothes; we stopped him and sent for an officer. We found this bundle before the officer came.

Q. What did it contain. - A. A pair of blankets.

Q. Did you see the sheet taken from him. - A. No; he went in the yard and my husband went after him; I did not see the sheet taken from him.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-38

300. MARY DOLPHIN and MARY LAWRENCE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Powell , about the hour of seven at night on the 22nd of February , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, a pearl sprig, value 10 l. a pair of diamond bracelets, value 7 l. twenty two broaches, value 20 l. sixty rings, value 30 l. two bracelets, value 3 l. and one earring, value 15 s. his property.

ROBERT POWELL . At the close of the evening, on the 32nd of February, I left my house on business. I returned home after the clock had struck seven.

Q. Pray how was it as to light when you went out. - A. I had lit up two or three candles in the shop.

Q. Was there light enough of the day to see without them candles. - A. There was. I returned after seven, I discovered my window broken, and property stole out; I left my wife in the shop at the time I went out; on my return I understood that she had left the shop about ten minutes; then I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were all in the same place, I had seen them all before I went out.

Q. Where the window was broken, was there access so as to put an arm in so as that they might be got away. - A. Yes, perfectly so.

Q. Was this a house in which you and your family sleep. - A. Yes, I occupy it and sleep there.

Q. You saw these things afterwards. - A. Yes, part of them - a pearl broach and two paste broaches were brought to me, and were produced at the office.

Q. Did you recognise them as part of the property that was taken away. - A. Yes, they were, and there were two or three cornelian broaches, which were produced by the pawnbrokers at the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. What parish is your house in. - A. St. Andrew ; I live at No. 88, High Holborn.

It is laid in the indictment in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields.

Q. Did you find any of these things afterwards besides what was produced at the office. - A. Not any one.

MRS. POWELL. When my husband was out my little boy was coughing, I returned into the back room about a quarter of an hour; after I went out of the shop my husband returned in and said the window was cut and the property was stolen; I went out of doors, and perceived twelve chains hanging half out of the window; I went into the shop, took a candle, and went down into the cellar; I looked into the area and found two cornelian broaches. About ten o'clock the same night Mr. Powell found some things in the street.

Q. You saw the goods afterwards when they were brought by the pawnbroker's man. - A. Yes; some part of them. I recognised them to be part of the goods that were taken away from the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. What were the goods that your husband found in the street. - A. paste star, a pearl earring, fellow to the one that has been since found at the pawnbrokers.

THOMAS ASHTON . Q. You are a pawnbroker. A. Yes. On the 23d of February the prisoner Lawrence pledged a broach with me for eight shillings in the name of Brown.

MR. PAYNE. A gold cornelian broach was pledged with me by Mary Lawrence, on the 23d of February, between eleven and twelve in the morning.

JAMES BLAND . I am shopman to Mr. Lane. On the 23d of February, about eleven o'clock, Mary Lawrence pledged five broaches with me, she pledged them in the name of Dolphin and Norris; she wished to have different broaches in different names. I advanced her twenty three shillings on them; I asked her no questions, I knew her very well, she pledged things with us for many years, chiefly wearing apparel and plate, such as table spoons and milk pots.

(The property produced and identified.)

WILLIAM ADKINS . I am one of the officers at Bow street. I apprehended the two prisoners at their house in Puckeridge street, St. Giles's; when I went into the house they were sitting in the front parlour, with several other people; I told Mrs. Lawrence that I wished to speak to her; Mrs. Dolphin got up, and said will you go into the next room; Bland the pawnbroker was with me; I went into the room with the two prisoners. Bland remained in the parlour; I told Mrs. Lawrence that

I must search her; she said very well; I was going to put my hands into her pockets, she said I will take out what I have got in my pockets; she took several things out, and one broach, among the rest. I produce the broach.

Q. to Mr. Powell. Is that your broach. - A. It is.

Adkins. I then asked the prisoner Lawrence what she had done with the duplicate of a pearl sprig she had pawned, she said she had destroyed it. I asked her how she came by the pearl sprig, she was going to answer, but Mrs. Dolphin stopped her and said I will tell you how she came by it. I said I have nothing to do with you; I only asked Mrs. Lawrence. Mrs. Dolphin would not let Mrs. Lawrence speak but would answer herself; then I said I will hear what you have got to say; she said she and her daughter were walking in Oxford street on Monday evening the 22d of February, between six and seven o'clock, and her daughter picked up the sprig. I asked her if she had picked up any thing else with it, she said she did not, that was the sprig she had pawned with Bland; he has not shewn it. I took notice of the broach at that time, she laid it on the drawers near to where she was standing, after that I said Mrs. Lawrence, I shall wish you to give an account how you came by the sprig; she said what her mother had told me was true; that she had picked it up in Oxford street; I then desired her to recollect herself, because what she told me then I should tell in another place. I then called in the pawnbroker Bland, that he should hear what they had to say; he came in, when they repeated what they had said again; they both said they found the sprig, and that only in Oxford street; when the pawnbroker came in, she said I beg your pardon there was the earring that I sold to you this morning, I found that with it.

Q. to Bland. Was any earring sold to you. - A. Yes, that was on the 24th when the sprig was pledged.

Adkins. I took up the broach that she took out of her pocket from the drawer; I asked her if that belonged to her, she said it did. I said I should put it in my pocket and take it for the present; she then said I forgot to mention that I found that with the sprig; I then asked them both many times if they found any thing else besides the earring, the sprig, and the broach that I had; they both said they did not; I knew Lawrence had pledged other articles. I searched the place and took them to the office.

The property produced and identified.

Dolphin left her defence to her counsel.

Lawrence's Defence. These things which I pledged I received from my mother.

The prisoners called seven witnesses, who gave them a good character.

DOLPHIN, GUILTY , aged 43.

LAWRENCE, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-39

301. MARY DEMPSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , a pint of rum, value 2 s. the property of John Todd .

JOHN TODD . Q. You are a publican . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lose any rum on the 10th of March - A. The prisoner did not take the rum away, she got in my bar, she was my servant . On the 10th of March I saw her in the bar, she went to the rum cask and began to draw rum; I went up to her and asked her what she meant by it; she put the bottle down.

Q. What was in the bottle. - A. Rum, I suppose there might be a pint and a half; when I went in the bar she passed by me and went up stairs and fetched her things down stairs and went into the parlour. I ordered my wife to stop her; I went to Worship street to get an officer. I locked the front door but she made her way out at the back door. On the next day she was apprehended at Mrs. Carver's house just by my back door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hard at work, I took a little. I did not think my master would hurt me for it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-40

302. JOHN WILDING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , sixty yards of carpeting, value 10 l. the property of Musgrave Blacklock .

There being no evidence adduced against the prisoner, he was -

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-41

303. MARIA JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , five cotton shawls, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Powdich , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. On the 19th of February last I was going up Holborn, near six o'clock in the evening on the 19th of February last; the prisoner at the bar was running very fast near to the end of Chancery lane; I looked after her, and underneath her bedgown I saw the fag end of something hanging out; I ran after her and laid hold of her, I asked her what she had got, she said what was that to me, she had nothing but what was her own; I said I am sure it is not your own, I will endeavour to find an owner for it. I went into Mr. Powdich's, and he and one of his shopmen said that was the piece of shawls that hung on the roller a few minutes before. I then unwrapped it from around her body, where it had been.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am shopman to Thomas Powdich, linen draper , 294, High Holborn in the parish of St. Andrew .

Q. Has he any partners. - A. No, he has none; near seven o'clock the officer Craig brought the prisoner to our shop.

Q. Was these shawls wrapped round her at that time. - A. They were.

Q. Look at these shawls, do you know whose property they are. - A. They are Mr. Powdich's, I know them from a private mark; I had seen them about half an hour before, they were hanging on a bar, found the door inside of the shop; the door opens inwards, it is a circular door, the whole of the property was within the shop; I put out the shawls myself,

they were not so far out as the door post, they were as far as a foot from the door post.

Q. Who served in the shop besides you. - A. There were two more, they are not here; I had not seen this woman nor missed the things before they were brought back.

Q. What is the prime cost. - A. Fifteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Holborn between six and seven in the evening, I saw these shawls laying in a paper a little below Chancery-lane; I took them up and put them in my apron; the man came up and asked me what I had, he said he suspected I had taken them; I said I had not; they took me at last to the shop, where they owned them.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-42

304. JAMES MIDDLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , a screen, value 7 s. a guinea, a seven shilling piece, five shillings, and a sixpence , the property of Ann Bradley .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SARAH MILLER . - Mr. Knapp. You are shop-woman to Mrs. Bradley. - A. Yes, she lives at No. 88, in the Srand.

Q. On the 5th of March, did the prisoner come to your house. - A. Yes, about half past eight in the evening, it was dark, he asked me to shew him some screens; he desired me to send a gilt one, and a plain one to No. 16, Beaufort's buildings, to a lady for choice; I told him the plain one was six shillings, and the gilt one was seven shillings and sixpence; he desired me to send them immediately; he supposed the lady would choose the plain one; he went out of the shop, he returned before I could have an opportunity to send the boy; he desired me not to delay, but to send them immediately; I sent them by the boy William Sillock ; the boy returned and said I must send change for a two pound note; he brought back the screen in his hand, he did not bring the note; I sent the boy to his mistress for the change of the two pound note; he went to his mistress for the change; the boy then went with the change, and he returned to me with the note; I saw it, and read it; it was a bad one.

Court. The boy could not read it I suppose. - A. Yes, I desired the boy to take it to his mistress; I am certain as to his person.

WILLIAM SILLOCK . Q. You are an errand boy. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember taking any screens by the order of the last witness. - A. Yes, to No. 16 Beaufort's Buildings, the prisoner stood at the bar, he said you are the lad with the screens, I said yes; he looked at the guilt one, he said this will do; he desired me to go back and get change for a two pound note, and bring another like the gilt one; I went back and got the change of my mistress; a guinea, a seven shilling piece, and six shillings; I went home with the two pound note.

Q. Can you read. - A. Yes. When I got to the shop I discovered price two pence in the middle of the note; I did not discover it at first when he gave me the note, he said this is a two pound note; I gave it to the shopwoman, she desired me to take it in to my mistress; I took it in.

Court. There was only one screen left. - A. No. I went back to No. 16, and they said there was no such person there.

Q. Did you find who lived there. - A. Mr. Whitfield the surgeon.

(The note read in Court).

'Two, No. 1802; I promise to pay to Christoper Credulous or bearer the sum of Two pence, on the circulation of guineas, the destruction of the rag manufactory, and the blowing up of paper money. I Edward Empty-pocket for Quilldriver.'

Q. (to Sillock.) Is that the note the prisoner gave you. - A. Yes.

Q. (to Miller.) Is that the note you received from the boy, and which you afterwards gave him to give to your mistress. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of any such a crime; I know nothing of the parties.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-43

305. JAMES MADEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of February , two pound four ounces weight of tea, value 14 s. three pound four ounces weight of coffee, value 1 l. 1 s. an umbrella, value 4 s. a case of tooth instruments, value 5 s. the property of George Winter , and one pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Williams .

GEORGE WINTER. I live at No. 51, Newgate street . I am a grocer . On the 26th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I returned home; from information of Williams my shopman , my son took me into the back warehouse, and in a cask covered with a board was found two pound and a quarter of tea, and three pound four ounces of coffee; I desired the young man to weigh it, to mark the piece of sacking it was in; and also to write any name on a bit of paper and put it inside of it; that was done and the parcel put into the place where we found it in the cask. At nine o'clock, the usual time of shutting up the shop, I expected the men would come out; I procured a constable and placed him on one side of Newgate street, and I stood at the corner of Panyer alley, just against my own door; James Maden came out, I went up to him and asked him where he was going, he said to his washerwoman; there was a very small projection under his left side; I asked him what it was, he told me it was his linen; I felt at the parcel and told him I was sure it was not; I caught him by the collar, and called for the constable, who immediately came across the way; I told him to take out the parcel from under the prisoner's coat; he did so, and we then took him to the watchhouse; about a fortnight previous to this, we had watched him to a house in Gunpowder alley, Shoe lane; the beadle of the watchhouse advised me to search his lodgings; we did; and there we found a number of articles not in

the indictment; there was tea, coffee, spices, spirits, umbrella, scissars, instruments, handkerchief, mould candles, and large quantities of things; we brought them all home, and then returned to the watch-house; I then told the beadle that he might send him to the counter; we searched him again, we found in the front of his small clothes three pound and a quarter of coffee.

- ROBERTS. Q. What are you. - A. I am a constable. I saw the prisoner coming out of his master's house; his master called me over the way. I got this tea from him; we took him to the watch-house, we searched his lodgings, and found considerable goods there; then we searched him at the watchhouse, and took three pound and a quarter of coffee from him.

THOMAS WARREN . I am the under beadle; Mr. Winter and Roberts brought the prisoner into the watchhouse; before they took him to the counter I took this coffee out of his small clothes.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am Mr. Winter's shop-man. On the 26th of February, I heard the prisoner taking the coffee out of a bag at the further part of the shop; we sent him out upon his business; after a length of time, I found a parcel in a cask covered over; I desired Mr. Winter to be informed of it; I afterwards shewed Mr. Winter the parcel; I marked the sack, and wrote upon a bit of paper, and put the writing inside of the parcel, and laid it exact in the exact same place. I went with Mr. Winter to the place, where we had watched the prisoner to in Gunpowder alley; there we found tea, sugar and a great number of articles, with a pair of small clothes, which are mine; I saw the constable take the coffee out of his small clothes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, I have a wife and infant child, dependant on my labour, and this being my first offence, I ever was charged with; I humbly pray your lordship will procure me a lenient punishment, if I should meet with conviction.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-44

306. ELIZABETH SOUTHERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Clark , Thomas Boyd and Thomas French .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS CLARK . - Mr. Bolland. You keep a shop on Ludgate hill . - A. Yes.

Q. What are the name of your partners - A. Thomas Clark myself, Thomas Boyd and Thomas French .

Q. You are a wholesale linen draper on Holborn hill. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Who are your wholesale partners. - A. I have no other partners; I keep two wholesale warehouses and two retail warehouses.

Q. One of your retail shops is on Ludgate hill. A. Yes; I took it, I believe, last Christmas.

Q. You keep constables in your shop. - A. No, I keep porters.

Q. Do not you keep people in your shop to watch. A. I do; I keep them to do my business.

Q. Have you not a door for the people to come in, and another way for them to go out. - A. There is one way for them to come in and another way to go out.

Court. Is it not your shop on Ludgate hill that has candles burning at twelve o'clock at noon. - A. There has been a lamp burning there.

Q. The windows are blocked up. - A. They do burn lights.

JAMES POBJOY . - Mr. Gurney. On the 7th of March were you in Mr. Clark's shop. - A. Yes.

Q. At about what time did this woman come in. A. About three o'clock; I was there employed as a weekly porter, to assist whatever might be wanted, sometimes to carry out parcels. The moment the prisoner came in she went to the counter, about two yards from the shop door; she remained there a short time I observed her roll up a piece of buff print: I saw her roll it up with her left hand at the same time with her right hand, pulling other prints apparently over it, to cover it from the shopman; as soon as she had rolled it up, she put it under her arm; she had a shawl on; she immediately walked backwards from the counter, and others came in before her next the counter.

Q. Did she buy any thing. - A. She did not at that time; she turned round and went quickly across the shop to go into the passage, to go out of the private door; I followed her and asked her what she had got under her arm; she said what she had got was her own, she had seven yards of print and had paid half a guinea for it; I took the print from under her arm; I asked Mr. Latham when I got her in the shop if he had shewed her that piece of print; he said it was the moment before on the counter; I then took her back into the accompting house, and sent for an officer. There is twenty yards of print; that is what I saw her take from the counter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I did not understand you particularly, in what capacity are you employed. - A. As porter.

Q. A porter's place and a constable is two things, do you stand there to serve customers, or to watch the customers. - A. I stand there to serve the customers, and carry out parcels; I never go behind the counter; sometimes when the shopmen are up at dinner I cut off goods.

Q. What part of the shop did she go in to purchase. - A. Nearly the middle; the further lamp was lighted at the further part of the shop; it was lit to day at twelve o'clock.

Q. How many customers might there be that day. - A. Twenty or thirty.

Q. How many shopmen do you have to serve. - A. I do not know.

Court. Do not you know how many shopmen you have. - A. No, there may be about ten or eleven.

Mr. Alley. Are they all here to night. - A. No; the one that was serving the prints is here.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, did not the poor woman say at the time you stopped her, that she

was coming out of the dark part of your shop into the light to look at the article, for which she had made a deposit with your shopman. - A. She did not say that she was bargaining for the thing.

Q. You say you took the goods from her into your possession, and took her to the shopman; did not she say that she had bought seven yards, and had deposited half a guinea for it, if she approved of it on examining it in the light. - A. No such a thing; she said she had bought seven yards of print and paid half a guinea for it.

SAMUEL LATHAM . - Mr. Bolland. You live with Mr. Clark at that shop. - A. I did at that time; my duty was to serve customers with prints, with Mr. Hammond, he was nearer the window than me; I was about two yards and a half from the window.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming in. - A. I do not.

Q. Look at that piece of print, whose print is that. - A. Thomas Clark 's, Thomas Boyd 's and Thomas French 's; I took that print out of the window, and cut off eight yards for a gentleman; then I laid it on the counter and served another customer.

Q. Had you sold that print. - A. No, I had not.

Q. What is the value of that print - A. Nine-pence a yard; there is twenty yards of it; I know the pattern of it very well; the whole piece was twenty eight yards.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the gentleman half a guinea for the print.

Q. to Latham. Recollect yourself whether this woman purchased any thing. - A. She bought nothing of me, I am certain of it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-45

307. MARY MACGEE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Marshall .

ELLIS THOMAS . Mr. John Marshall lives at No. 8, Holborn bridge , he is a linen draper . On Saturday night the 5th of March, the prisoner came in the shop, while I was engaged, accompanied by a man; I knowing her to be a suspicious character asked her what she wanted; she then pointed to a piece of print that laid on the counter, and asked the price of it; I told her eighteen pence; the man who was with her told her it was too dear; I knowing the situation that I had left the goods at the door, I went to bring some of them in; on my return I saw the prisoner taking a piece of ell wide print from off the counter, and concealing it under her coats; I asked her what she had got under her coats; the man who was with her, ran off immediately. I put my hand up her coats, found the piece of print concealed above her knees; gave charge of her to the officer who was standing at the door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with a woman that owed me some money, she had a man with her at the corner of Field lane; she was a widow woman when I served her with milk; I asked her for the money she owed me; she wondered at my not serving her with milk as usual; I told her I had been in the hospital with a bad leg five months; she treated me and persuaded me to go in this shop with her, she would buy a gown, and change a pound note, and then she would pay me; I went in with her, this piece of print, whether it fell off his arm or from the counter I cannot say, however it dropped; he then said do you want to theive this; I said what do you mean by that. I gave him a short answer for suspecting me; the others went away, they were glad of the excuse for not paying me the money; I know no more of the cotton as I am a sinner to night than any of you, if I do I wish my hands may never close to night.

Witness. It was a tall man six foot high that came in with her; as soon as I took her the man ran away.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-46

308. HENRY SIMMONS was indicted for fe- feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , eight pound weight of brass, value 5 s. the property of George Penton .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GEORGE PENTON . Q. Where do you live. - A. I live in New street square, St. Brides's ; I received information of Dowding.

JOHN DOWDING. Q. You are a servant of the prosecutor. - A. Yes. On the 19th of February Mr. Devey came to our shop, he shewed me this brass; I knew it, it is my own invention; I do not believe there is any similar to it in London. Mr. Devey delivered the brass to me. I know that is my master's property.

MR. DEVEY. Q. You took that brass to the prosecutors. - A. I did; I received it from Mr. Wadsworth, I had such patterns from Mr. Penton's, I thought the work was his; the brass I bought of Mr. Wadsworth I took to Mr. Penton.

MR. WADSWORTH. Q. Did you sell any brass to Mr. Devey. - A. I did, I sold him three hundred weight; I cannot swear to that, my wife bought it.

MRS. WADSWORTH. Q. Did you-buy any brass of Mr. Brand. - A. I did; I believe it was near a quarter of a hundred.

MR. BRAND. Q. Did you sell any brass to Mrs. Wadsworth. - A. Yes; I am a wholesale collector of brass; as near as I can recollect I sold her thirty five pounds; I have no doubt that is the brass, it is very much like this; I bought it of Martin Hagan , No. 29, White Hart yard, Drury lane.

MARTIN HAGAN . Q. What are you. - A. I keep a clothes and a broker's shop, I buy and sell any thing.

Q. Do you know Mr. Brand. - A. I do, he buys all my bits of brass.

Q. Look at these bits of brass, do you recollect selling them. - A. There were similar to this went through my hands; I bought it of Simmonds the prisoner.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. No; I asked

him whether it was his own; he replied, do you think I would bring it without it was; he asked me what I gave, I said seven pence a pound. I with I had never seen it, I only got seven pence by it; he said he was a finisher of brass work, he had broke it, and so he sold it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 23d or 25th of February, I cannot justly say which, as I was at work, John Dowding called me out from work into a private room, he asked me what I had done with the links that I had taken out in my pocket; I said I did not know what he meant; he said the men had seen me take the links away; the men said they did not say any such a thing; Walters made answer and said, I was doing something, he did not like to work near me; I was taken to Queen square office; this man said he had seen me wrap up work in paper and take them away; he said it might be about three o'clock, and he missed them about five o'clock; that was a time I was never out of the shop; they called Hagan and asked him if he knew me, he said he did, he said I had sold him something similar to this. I never saw that man before that day. I hope this honourable court and jury will have compassion on me, I am an innocent man, and Mr. Penton. cannot say but what I was as diligent a man as eyer was in the factory.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-47

309. ROBERT RUXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , a horse collar, value 2 s. a pair of thill haims, value 6 d. and three spade trees, value 1 s. the property of John Eames .

JOHN EAMES . I live at Wenley Green, near Harrow on the Hill , I am a wheel wright ; the prisoner is a smith ; on the 2nd of March the prisoner asked me if I wanted a man; I told him no; my young man employed him to assist him in doing a job. On the 5th of March I lost a horse collar, and the other things; somebody had taken four pan tiles off and got into the place, and the mark of the prisoner's wooden leg was left in five places under the window where the tiles were taken off; I came to Paddington after him as fast as I could, and my man took him in St. Giles's.

THOMAS BAKER . I am an officer. On Sunday morning the 16th of March, about eleven o'clock, I took the prisoner, in company with Mr. Eames's young man, at the Rose and Crown, Broad street, St. Giles's, he was drinking with other smiths; I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I worked with this young man; the way the mark of my wooden leg came in the ditch, the first morning I came I went and peeped through the boards to see if it was a smith's shop.

Prosecutor. These marks were not there before the Saturday morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-48

310. ELIZABETH STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , a great coat, value 10 s. a pair of leather gloves, value 2 d, and a cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Christopher Brown .

CHRISTOPHER BROWN . I lodge at No. 1, Anchor court, Old street ; the prisoner was in the care of the adjoining room. I lost my coat, a pair of, gloves, and a handkerchief, out of my drawers. On the 16th of February I missed it; I saw the coat at, the office in Worship street on the 21st of February, it was produced there by the pawnbroker.

ELIZABETH PITMAN . The prisoner came to my mother and asked her to let me go of an errand for her, she said it was to pawn a coat of her husband's, what he had out of a clothes club. I took it and pawned it for ten shillings; I gave the pawnbroker the handkerchief to tie the coat up in; I gave the prisoner the money.

MR. STOCKS. The last witness pledge the coat with me; she gave me the handkerchief to tie the coat up in.

The property produced and identified

Prisoner's Defence. I had no money; I took the coat out of the drawer, I asked this young woman to pawn it. I offered the prosecutor the money, he would not take it; he would transport me if he could.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction . and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-49

311. MICHAEL COURSE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , ninety two pounds weight of lead, value 2 l. the property of Hill Darley , esq. affixed to a certain building of his called a house .

Second count for like offence, charging it to be affixed to a building generally.

HILL DARLEY. I live in the parish of St. James . Q. Was any lead taken from your dwelling house. A. Yes, it was lost on the night of the 23d of February, about ten o'clock; there was notice given to me it was gone; it was taken from an additional room; it was on the outside, just before the coping goes on the wall; I know no more than I compared the lead, it fitted exactly, it was new lead; the prisoner was one of the labourers.

THOMAS - . I am a watchman in Brewer street, St. James's; about a quarter past nine o'clock I was standing at the corner of Sherrard street, facing of Golden square; I saw the prisoner in the middle of the road with the lead loose on his shoulder; I followed him to the corner of Great Pulteney street, I asked him where he was going with it, he said he was going to his master's with it; I told him he must go along with me; I took him to the corner of Sherrard street again, then he threw down the lead and attempted to make his escape; I pursued him and left the lead in the street; I called out stop thief, I was about six or eight yards from him; at the corner of Marybone street a man laid hold of him; I brought him back to where the property was, I gave him into the hands of Mr. Warren the constable; I never lost sight of him; it is a narrow street, the lamps gave a great light all the way.

JOHN WARREN . The last witness delivered the prisoner into my custody; I took him to the watch-house, I have had the lead in my custody ever since. The next morning I took the lead to Mr. Darley's and compared it to the place; it fitted exactly.

JOHN TANNER. I am the plumber; I compared the lead, it fitted the wall exactly.

Q. What was the length of the wall. - A. About eighteen feet in the whole; I weighed this lead, it weighed eighty three pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I found this lead in the street.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-50

312. ANN GRACE and ELIZABETH MANDEVILLE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , three half guineas, and six shillings , the property of John Puddick .

JOHN PUDDICK . Q. What are you. - A. I am servant to Mr. Marsden, a horse dealer.

Q. On the 28th of March, did you meet with the prisoners any where. - A. Yes, both of them. They were standing at a door No. 5, Dyot street, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon; they laid hold of me by the collar and asked me to come in.

Q. Which of them laid hold of you by the collar. A. Ann Grace . Upon her taking hold of me by the collar I went into the room with them; when I got into the room they began shoving me about and putting their hands in my pockets. I gave them a shilling to get rid of them; they shut the door and robbed me of three half guineas and six shillings; they unbuttoned my small clothes by force.

Q. Which of them did. - A. Both of them. One of them put her arms around my neck, and Grace took the money out of my breeches pocket.

Q. How came you to let her do that. - A. The black girl , Mandeville, is a great deal stronger than I am.

Q. What did they take out of your pocket. - A. Three half guineas and six shillings, my pocket was turned inside out, and she had the money inside of her hand; I laid hold of Grace's hand and got two half guineas out of her hand; she called out to the other girl and said he has got some of the money, and he will have all the money back; while I was getting the money out of Grace's hand, Mandeville bit my wrist, cut the side of my head, tore my shirt, and gave me a black eye.

Q. Did Grace give any money to her. - A. Yes, half a guinea and six shillings, she gave to her all the money that I had not got back; I stood with my back against the door to prevent them going out, thinking I could get some assistance to have them taken up; finding no assistance I went to a public house, the next house but one to it, to wash my blood off; a constable was in the house, the constable went with me to the house to take them up, they were gone out of the house; we returned back to the public house, looked out of the window; I saw Grace walking up the street; the constable went and took her to the watchhouse; Mandeville was not found till the Thursday following; here is my shirt tore all to pieces.

JOHN SMITH . I am beadle for St. George's Bloomsbury; on Monday the 28th of last month, I was at Roach's, the Maiden head public house, Dyot street, about half past three in the afternoon; this young man came in all over blood; bleeding at his mouth and nose, and to me apparently bit and scratched upon his hands, and his shirt was all tore to ribbons; I took him with me immediately to No. 5; I did not find either of the prisoners there; we went back to the same public house; in the front room a little while after we saw Ann Grace come carelessly by; I took her to the watchhouse. On the Thursday morning following, as I was going into the same public house to enquire it they had seen any thing of her; Mandeville was coming out as I was going in; I took her.

Grace's Defence. I never saw any thing of the man's money nor clapped my eyes upon him till he took me a prisoner.

Mandeville's Defence. The same.

GRACE, GUILTY , aged 22.

MANDEVILLE, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-51

313. WILLIAM CHASE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Marshall , about the hour of eight at night on the 5th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty eight yards of calico, value 1 l. 1 s. thirty one yards of gingham, value 1 l. 7 s. and ten yards of bed ticking, value 1 l. 1 s. his property.

ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD . On the 5th of April, about eight o'clock, I saw this young man and an old man watching about Mr. Marshall's door; having suspicion I stood and watched them till the prisoner entered the door.

Q. Are you sure of the person of the prisoner. - A. I am.

Q. Was the door open. - A. I cannot tell; I saw him go in, I stopped at the door till he came out; he came out with four pieces, two dark and two light ones.

Q. Were there lamps in the shop that you could see. - A. I could not see the pattern, I could see the colour; the two dark ones were at his side, and the other two under his arm. I went into the shop and gave the alarm to Mr. Marshall, he pursued them.

Q. Did you see them taken. - A. No, I went of my errand about ten doors farther in the street, and before I returned the man was taken.

Q. Did you see the man. - A. Not till the next morning.

Q. Was the man that you saw the next morning the same that you saw go in the shop. - A. Yes; the prisoner is the same person.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a plumber, my wife keeps a haberdashers shop.

Q. Did this young woman come and give you any intelligence. - A. Yes; my wife missed them before she came in, and as I was coming out of my shop, I saw this young woman; she said there is two men took something out of your shop; I pursued

them and took one. I seized them both; I was obliged to let one go. I retained this man.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking very slowly. A man came along, he asked me to hold the things while he tied them up; this gentleman came and laid hold of me by the collar, he was on his knee tying them up; he got up and ran away when I was laid hold of.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-52

314. MICHAEL M'KAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , eight yards of calico, value 8 s. and four yards of brown holland, value 2 s. the property of Edward Johnson .

EDWARD JOHNSON . I live at Mill hill, in the parish of Hendon, I am a publican .

Q. Did you lose any goods on the 9th of March last. - A. Yes, I lost eight yards of calico, and four yards of brown holland; I left them in Mr. Etheridge's house, the Dog and Duck, Tottenham court road .

Q. How came you there. - A. I called there to have a pint of beer to refresh myself; I went out after a few more things and left them in the house; when I came back my parcel was gone.

Q. What reason have you for charging the prisoner. - A. There was no one in the house but the prisoner and a shoemaker; I saw the goods about two hours after they were found in his house; the landlord of the public house found them.

WILLIAM ETHERIDGE . Q. You are the landlord of the public house. - A. Yes. Mr. Johnson when he came back enquired for the parcel he had left; I then enquired who had left the tap room; my wife said an old man that was drinking along with the shoemaker; I suspected it was the prisoner. I went for a constable and brought him to find the prisoner, and Mr. Johnson and the constable were sitting in the parlour; this man came in as if he had not done any thing. I charged him with it, he made slight of it, and said he did not mean to keep it; I took him into the parlour and searched him; I told him it would be best to tell me where the bundle was, and I would endeavour to make it up with Mr. Johnson and him. He took me to his room, and there was the parcel; I brought him back to Mr. Johnson, and the constable took charge of him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little in liquor, I did not know what I was doing of; I came back to the same house and delivered the things up.

GUILTY , aged 64

Confined Six Month's in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-53

315. PHILIP STRANG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , three shillings , the property of John Burke .

JOHN BURKE . I am a pork butcher ; the prisoner had been in my employ from the 10th of March until the 4th of April; I had suspicions of his being dishonest; I thought I would watch him. A person came in and bought something that came to three pence, and gave him a shilling; he took out three pence from the till, then he threw the shilling into the till, he put his hand into the till to get a sixpence; he had his hand in the till a considerable time; I thought he was taking money, he took the sixpence between his forefinger and thumb, and when he took his hand out of the till I very plainly could see that he had something under his back fingers and the palm of his hand; I was in the staircase that leads from the shop to the cellar; there was a cavity that I had a view of the till and the greater part of the shop. When the woman went away he began cleaning my boots, he took the brush in his hand, and then I perceived he did not open his back fingers; I pushed the door open, I said, Philip, what have you got in your hand, he said nothing; I took the brush out of his hand; he opened his hand and then said I have got two shillings; I told him he was a pretty fellow, his wages was not enough, he must rob me every opportunity; he denied it, said he was a going to put it in the till, and behaved insolent; I went for an officer; he searched him and found a shilling on him that I had marked; I thought he did not come honestly by the money, because I had not paid him any wages since he had been with me.

Q. Where did you put the money that was marked. - A. In the till. The next morning the officer brought him to my house; in his way to Worship street, the prisoner said he hoped I would forgive him, he would give up all his wages.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How many shillings had you marked. - A. Twenty, I dare say, in the same way with a cross.

THOMAS HART . Q. You are the officer, what did you find upon him. - A. Seven shillings and sixpence. One of the shillings Mr. Burke said he would swear to, that is the shilling.

Q. to Burke. Can you swear that to be one that you marked, and put in the till. - A. Yes, it has a cross.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-54

316. GEORGE WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , in the dwelling house of William Wykes ; 1 l. 12 s. 10 d. in monies numbered, two bank notes, for payment of 10 l. each, value 20 l. three bank notes, value 5 l. each, seven bank notes, value 2 l. each, and twenty four bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

And three other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

THOMAS COPE . Q. You are a bookkeeper to Mr. Mead at the Cross Keys inn. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you made up any parcel any time in this month to go to Mr. Small at Wellingborough. - A. Yes.

Q. From whom did you receive the property. -

A. From different butchers, and likewise from several poulterers.

Q. Did you make up any parcel on the 14th of March. - A. I made it up on the 13th, and sent it on the 14th.

Q. Was it by the direction of Mr. Mead. - A. Yes.

Q. What did the parcel contain. - A. Three five pound notes, two ten pound notes, seven two's twenty four ones, one shilling, and fourpenny worth of halfpence.

Q. Was that the whole of the money. - A. That was the whole of the money, except the different receipts; I put in a receipt which I paid for Mr. Nicholls of Iron ferry.

Q. Could you tell again any of the notes that you put into that parcel. - A. I could not tell any of the notes, except the receipt that I put in that parcel.

Q. Do you remember taking any of these notes of Mr. Sitzler. - A. Yes, one of them.

Q. Should you know that note again. - A. No.

Q. To whom was this parcel directed - A. To Mr. Spall at Wellinborough. I delivered it to John Clark , the porter in the yard, to take it to the waggon.

Court. Where was he to take it to. - A. To the Windmill inn.

JOHN CLARK . Q. You are porter to Mr. Mead. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the last witness Thomas Cope deliver you a parcel to carry to the Windmill inn. - A. He did; I cannot tell when.

Q. To whom was it directed. - A. I do not know; I took it to the Windmill inn, I delivered it into Mr. Wykes's hands.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You delivered a parcel - when you delivered it, or how directed, you cannot tell. - A. No.

WILLIAM WYKES. Q. You are the proprietor of the Windmill inn yard. - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is that situated in. - A. In St. Sepulchre, in the county of Middlesex.

Q. Can you describe to the court how the premises are situated that you occupy. - A. None of the premises are in the front of the street; on the left hand on the ground floor going up the gateway is the kitchen, bar, parlour, and another room backwards.

Q. Is that the house in which you sleep. - A. Yes.

Q. Does that house communicate to any other house. A. There is the washhouse beyond that, and the accompting house beyond that, and above the accompting house are two lodging rooms.

Q. Who sleeps in the lodging rooms. - A. The ostler and two bookkeepers, and the waggoners when they stop all night.

Q. What communication is there, and is there any between your dwelling house and this place for the servants. - A. There is a kitchen and a small paved wash-house that goes from the kitchen; in the washhouse there is a door that leads into the accompting house, and over the accompting house are these rooms situated.

Q. Look at that plan, and tell me whether that is the situation of your premises. - A. Yes, I can understand it perfectly well; this is the kitchen door, there is a way from the kitchen to the washhouse; the gable end of the house runs right through the washhouse into this accompting house.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in your service. - A. Yes, as ostler.

Q. Did you at any time receive from the witness John Clark any parcel. - A. Yes.

Q. State to the court what that parcel was. - A. It was a small parcel; I believe John Clark brought it from the Cross Keys; however he brought it to me and gave me two pence for booking it.

Q. To whom was it directed. - A. To Mr. Spall of Wellingborough in Northampton; he only said there was money in it. I booked it in a receiving book that we have, where we book things loosely, and laid it down in the accompting house in order that it might be booked in the coach book to go in the morning.

Q. Whose duty was it to book it in the coach book. A. John Rogers .

Q. Who has the key of the accompting house in the morning. - A. The prisoner has had it; John Rogers generally has the key of the accounting house.

Q. You know nothing of the robbery not till you heard of the loss. - A. No.

Court. What day was this. - A. I think it was the 14th of March I received it, and on the 15th I heard it was lost.

Mr. Bolland. Upon hearing it was lost what did you do. - A. I made every enquiry I could.

Q. Did you make any enquiry of the prisoner. - A. I do not recollect that I did.

Q. In consequence of the enquiry that you made elsewhere, what did you do. - A. I was not determined about taking the prisoner up till about eight o'clock in the evening. I went to Hatton garden office; Trott came down with Eklesoe and me, and we took the prisoner up in St. John street.

Q. Were you present when Trott searched him. - A. No, not the first time.

Q. Did Trott produce any thing to you. - A. Trott brought the prisoner up stairs and produced three one pound notes and two papers, a bill of parcels and a receipt, and there was a new watch likewise produced in the presence of the prisoner.

Q. Before you state any thing what the prisoner told you, tell me whether you said it would be better or worse for him if he did not confess. - A. Nothing was said to the prisoner at that time; we were occupied about looking at the notes and the watch; I gave my opinion the watch was new, that it could not be wore one day in my service, and that the bill of parcels had been found which was in the parcel that was stole, because it was a bill of parcels for goods paid for, and was enclosed in this parcel; the prisoner said that the papers did not concern any body, they were picked up in the street; I sent my young man to Rogers to enquire if that bill of parcels came with the parcel.

Q. Did Trott search him a second time. - A. Yes, Trott searched him a second time.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner then. - A. Yes; When Trott was searching him the second time I told him I would prosecute him; I wished him to say where the property was.

Court. At what place was this. - A. This was up stairs at the public house. Trott told him he had better tell us where the property was; he would say nothing at that time; Trott desired him and me to go up to one end of the room; he told me he would go into another room; in consequence of that we went into another room. When we got there I told him it was very evident

that he had taken this parcel, as the papers that was enclosed in it were found upon him; he must know where the property was; I would make no promise, his objection was that I had threatened him I would prosecute him; he then told me that the watch he had bought in St. John street.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Wykes, I am sure you do not mean to say any thing but what is the truth, of that I am quite satisfied; did not you make use of this expression, George, if you will confess, I will do what I can for you. - A. No such a thing; he told me that he paid for the watch a ten pound note and received the change, and I should find a good deal more money at his lodgings up two pair of stairs, No. 13, Northampton street; I should find the money in a box near to his door, it was in his jacket pocket, either on the top of his box or just withinside of his box; I went with Trott up to the pawnbroker's first, and left him at the Pewter Platter public house with the other officer; we went from the pawnbrokers to his lodgings, he had given us the key of his box; we went into the first room the door was open; we turned a little to the right to a door that went into the next room; his wife answered us, and opened the door; we found nothing in that room particular; Trott went back with the key of the box to the room where we went first into, he unlocked the box that was standing at the door; he brought out a jacket, holding it in this manner, hanging down, with the notes half out; Trott took them out to the amount of fifty seven pounds; we searched a little about, we found nothing else there as I recollect; we went to the Pewter Platter; the officer had taken him to prison. When I told him he had better tell me where the property was; he told me he had bought this watch with the ten pound note; he said there was a five pound note his wife. -

Mr. Bolland. We must not hear what his wife told you.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp This parcel was entrusted with you, and was booked for the Wellingborough coach, you are answerable for that property. - A. I do not conceive myself as answerable, because it was only booked as a parcel.

Q. However it was put in your office to go by the Wellingborough coach. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any partners. - A. No.

Q. Is the usual way to go into this accompting house to go into the bed rooms over it. - A. You must go into the yard to go to the bed rooms.

Q. Then in order to go to these bed rooms you must go through the yard and then up a staircase. - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure of this that you made no promise to him namely, saying George, if you will confess I will forgive you. - A. By no means.

Q. Did you not retire from Trott the officer for the purpose of getting from him what he had done with the property. - A. I thought he would tell me though he would not tell them.

Mr. Bolland. You found the property however in consequence of what he said. - A. Yes.

JOHN ROGERS . Q. You are bookkeeper to Mr. Wykes, at the Windmill inn. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time book any parcel directed to Mr. Spall of Wellingborough. - A. Yes, on the 15th of March I booked it in the office at the Windmill inn, about six o'clock in the morning; I marked on it No. 2, and laid it with the other parcels in the office; we always number the parcels that we book for the coach.

Q. Do you know how many you booked for that coach that morning. - A. Eleven; I entered all in the way bill, and locked the accompting house door, and left the key with the prisoner.

Q. Did you give the prisoner any directions what he was to do with the key. - A. I told him a young man would receive the key of him, and give out the parcels to the coach.

Q. Had the prisoner any thing to do with the accompting house. - A. No, that morning he had not.

SARAH IRELAND . Q. Where do you live. - A. I am servant to Mr. Wykes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the accompting house in question. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar on the 15th of March go in the accompting house. - A. No, I saw him come out of it at just a quarter after six o'clock in the morning.

Q. You of course know Edward Kepple . - A. Yes.

Q. Was he up at that time. - A. I heard the prisoner call him up; he called him young Dick, and asked him whether he was going to get up, it was past six o'clock.

Q. Then at the time you saw him coming out of the accompting house, Kepple was not up. - A. No, he was calling him up.

EDWARD KEPPLE . Q. You live with Mr. Wykes. A. Yes.

Q. You know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time on the 15th of March receive the key of the accompting house from him. A. Yes, at half after six in the morning.

Q. Did the prisoner on that morning call you, up. - A. Yes, when the Wellingborough coach came.

Q. Did you take notice with regard to the parcels. - A. Yes, I looked at the way bill, and looked the parcels over; I missed a parcel.

Court. What description should that parcel have answered to if you had found it. - A. Spall of Wellingborough, No. 2, in the way bill; I did not see the parcel.

JONATHAN TROTT . Q. We understand you were applied to by Mr. Wykes to apprehend the prisoner. - A. I was, on the 15th of March in the evening; I went to St. John street with Mr. Wykes; I then told the prosecutor I did not like to go into the yard, but to send the person out to me; a person was sent out to me, I made enquiry whether the prisoner at the bar was gone out; I was present at the apprehending of the prisoner; the prisoner was taken by my brother officer Thomas Ekelsoe , on the opposite side of the way.

Q. Did you go to him. - A. I did directly; I took the prisoner to the public house, the Bull I think it is, nearly opposite of the Windmill; I there

searched him.

Q. What did you find. - A. The first thing I found was a watch; I asked him how he came by it; he said he had it by him three years; on his saying that I looked at it, I said it could not have been long purchased; there was a mark inside of the silk so fresh and plain, I thought he could not have had it three years; my brother officer was searching his jacket pockets; while I was searching his small clothes he pulled out papers doubled up together, and threw them down to me to examine; among the papers is a bill and receipt, and a one pound note, doubled up of a heap, as if it was a piece of dirty paper; he was not searched before Mr. Wykes; then after that I took him up stairs to a private room, where Mr. Wykes was sitting; I then cautioned Mr. Wykes not to make him any promise, threat, or any thing else.

Q. Did you say this in the presence of the prisoner. - A. I did a great many times. He then begged to go with Mr. Wykes into a private room; I suffered them to go, Mr. Wykes said he would be answerable: they were there some time together, what passed I cannot answer for. I went in at last, they were so long, I said I could not wait any longer. When I went in he was then shedding of tears, he said he was sorry for what he had done, and he hoped his master would forgive him. (I forgot one thing; that was a key that I found upon him of his box, which I found before he went up to his master.) He said he was a guilty man, and part of the money he had stole was either on the box at home, or in the box, and that was the key that I had taken from him belonging to the box; I had learned before where he lodged; he then confessed that he had purchased this watch, and he would shew us where in St. John street, at a pawnbrokers, he would point out the shop; I went there and found he had changed a ten pound note.

Q. What is the pawnbroker's name. - A. Newton is the servant's name; and the five pound note he had received in change, he had given to his wife.

Q. Have you got that five pound note. - A. I found it at his wife's sister's her name is Kitty Payne; I had this note from her. I proceeded to his lodging; I found fifty seven pounds in his box, this key unlocked his box. There is one ten, two fives, seven two's, and twenty three one's; what makes the difference is the change of the notes, they are not the same notes.

HENRY SITZLER . - Mr. Bolland. You are a poulterer in Newgate market; had you received any poultry from Mr. Spall. - A No, sir; from Mr. Hopkins that came by Mr. Spall's waggon.

Q. Look at that five pound note, do you know that note. - A. Yes, by the name of Minter being on it; I sent my servant with fourteen pound, to be paid into the Cross-Keys to Mr. Cope.

Q. What is that servant's name. - A. Joseph Tee .

Court. Is that the five pound note that was delivered to the wife's sister.

Mr. Bolland. Yes.

Sitzler. That is the note I received of Mr. Minter, I wrote Minter on it; it is my own writing. I delivered that note with some others to Joseph Tee , to make up fourteen pound; to go to the Cross Keys.

Mr. Knapp. Did you know Minter before. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the habit of receiving notes of him before. - A. Yes.

Q. And then you put the name of Minter on it. - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. Had you received any other notes of Minter on that day. - A I had not; that is the same that I wrote Minter on it, and that I sent on the 12th of March.

JOSEPH TEE. - Mr. Bolland. You are a servant of Mr. Sitzler. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Sitzler deliver you any notes to carry to Mr. Cope. - A. Yes, on the 12 of March.

Q. Do you know what was the amount of them. - A. Fourteen pounds.

Q. Did you deliver these notes to Mr. Cope. - A. I did deliver these notes and five shillings and ten-pence.

Q. Had you any other five pound note of your own that you could possibly deliver in a mistake. - No, I had no other money about me; these I delivered to Mr. Cope.

Q. to Mr. Cope. Do you recollect receiving fourteen pounds five shillings and ten pence of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. How did you receive it. - A. Two five pound notes, and the rest in other notes and money.

Q. Did you put the notes that you received from that young man Tee, into Mr. Spall's parcel; I did. One was a country bank note, and the other a bank of England note. I put the Bank of England note in the parcel.

Trott. I found a guinea besides what I have mentioned, that is in the pocket book, and some silver which I gave him back.

KITTY PAYNE . - Mr. Bolland. Where do you live. - A. I live in Westminster road.

Q. Did Trott take from you a five pound note. - A. I delivered him one; I received it from my sister the over night.

Q. Who is your sister. - A. The prisoner's wife.

THOMAS NEWTON . Q. You are a pawnbroker living in Saint John street. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he at any time buy a watch of you. - A. Yes, on the 15th of March.

Q. Look at that watch, is that the watch. - A. This is the same, he paid for it in a ten pound note, this is the ten pound note.

Q. Is there any address written on that note. - A. I made a memorandum of the name of Thomas Grove , Three Cups Aldersgate street, he said he was ostler there.

Q. to Mr. Cope. Look at that bill of parcels, is that the bill of parcels that you put into the parcel. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Trott. when he took me up into the room to Mr. Wykes, he said George you had better confess to your master; I have had but little trouble with you, and perhaps he may forgive

you.

COURT, to Trott. Did you tell this man he had better confess. - A. No, I did nothing more than tell Mr. Wykes not to make any promise to him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of it being his first offence, and having had an excellent character with him .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-55

317. ELIZABETH MARTIN . alias MARWOOD , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , a gown, value 3 s, a petticoat, value 6 s, a sheet, value 4 s. and a bonnet, value 4 s , the property of John Lock .

JANE LOCK . I lost a gown, a sheet, a petticoat, and a bonnet, on the 24th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon. I had seen them about half an hour before I missed them.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner. - A. On the 27th I saw them hang for sale in Peter street; I owned the things. I went to Hatton Garden office for one of the officers; he went and took them down from the door.

JOHN MATTHEWS . On the 27th of February Mrs. Lock came to the office. I went with her to Mrs. Weale's house in Peter street; there I saw the things hanging at the door.

MRS. WEALE. Q. You keep this clothes shop in Peter street. - A. On Wednesday the 24th of February the prisoner came in my shop as an old clothes woman, she asked me if I bought second hand things; I told her I did. She had this gown, bonnet, petticoat, and sheet; I gave her thirteen shillings and sixpence for them.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Rosemary lane, and then sold them to this woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-56

318. ANN JOHNSON , MARY MILLER , and ELIZABETH SOAMES , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , five yards of marcella, value 16 s. five yards of calico, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Robert Burr .

ROBERT BURR. Q. Did you at any time lose a piece of waistcoats. - A. Yes, on the 28th of March I was at the Running Horse, Piccadilly , about eleven o'clock at night; I had the property mentioned in the indictment in the handkerchief. The three prisoners were all in the same box; I went out, leaving the bundle behind me.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am a pawnbroker, Westminster Bridge row, Surry side. On the 31st of March Marther Miller pledged a piece of marcella in the name of Elizabeth Briant . I have every reason to believe she is the woman, I cannot swear positively.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, I live at Chelsea; on the 30th of March two pieces of waistcoating were pledged with me by Miller.

MARTHA THOMPSON . Q. Do you know any of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know Ann Johnson. Last Tuesday week she desired me to pledge a marcella waistcoat piece for six shillings; I did, at Mr. Morrat's in York street. On Thursday she came to me and desired me to get it again, she said it was not their own, and they were in a hobble; she said three of them got it from a house in Knightsbridge; I got it out for them and delivered it to Johnson, and she gave it to Soames.

JAMES BLY . I apprehended the prisoners; I took them to the pawnbrokers, and they confessed they had taken the property.

(The property produced and identified.)

Johnson's Defence. These young women and me were coming down. Piccadilly; we met the prosecutor and three other men; they stopped us and took us into the Running Horse, Piccadilly, they gave us a great deal of liquor; as we came out of the house they asked us to go with them, they offered us too little money; they said why should they treat such as us and have nothing in return; they knocked this woman down and used us ill. We found this bundle in the street, and we pledged them. The prosecutor came down to us, he asked us if we had such a thing; we said we had pledged them; we were short of money, and we had laid the money out. He took us in custody, because we could not take them out again.

Miller and Soames' Defence - the same.

Q. to prosecutor. Is this true, that there was a quarrel between you and one of them was knocked down. A. No, they left me in the public house.

Q. Where was the parcel when they went out. - A. I did not take any notice of it when they went out.

Q. What state was you in. - A. I had been drinking. I was not tipsey, it was late, I was sleepy.

Q. Did you meet them in the street before you went into this public house. - A. Yes. A person that was with me, he knew one of them, he asked them to go with him; we all went in near at one time.

Q. Are you certain of this, that they went out of the public house before you. - A. Yes, I did not see them afterwards that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-57

319. THOMAS HODGES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , a hearth rug, value 10 s. the property of John Clarkson .

JOHN CLARKSON . Q. What do you know about taking this rug. - A. On the 20th of February I had a sale by auction at No. 19, Oxford street; one of the rugs were taken from the door post; I knew nothing of it till the officer brought the prisoner and the rug to me. I then recognised it to be my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Yours is a night auction, is it not. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say if they would give you a guinea you would not prosecute. - A. No.

Q. Did not you take any money. - A. I did not.

WILLIAM GILES . Coming down Oxford street I went into this sale; John Spencer said there were some men endeavouring to take the rug away which was at the door post; we both came out and watched them. I stood in the path right by the door, I saw Thomas Hodges pull it off the nail that it was hanging on; John Spencer called out stop thief, and so did I; with that he dropped the rug and ran up Hanway street; Spencer took the rug up. We pursued him till he was taken.

Q. Had you him constantly in view. - A. We lost sight of him turning the corner of Hanway street; when we came up to him he was in Mr. Piper's custody.

JOHN SPENCER . Q. Were you with the other lad

at this auction. - A. Yes, and I saw the prisoner in company of four or five more; they were all pulling the rug in turn that was nailed up; I did not see him pull it down, I saw him walk away with it; when I called out stop thief he threw it down and ran down Hanway street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the same night, and three young lads chucked the rug before me.

MRS. HODGES. - Mr. Knapp You are mother of the prisoner. - A. I am, he is sixteen years old; I heard of the misfortune, I solicited for my child; he said he had lost nothing, it was a great deal out of his way in putting the auction of one side; I said to the prosecutor pray forgive my child, whatever he has been guilty of; he said it was a guinea out of his way; I said if it has been a guinea out of your way, here is a guinea and a half, he accepted the guinea and a half, and I thought there would no more come of it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-58

320. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Clarke .

WILLIAM GAINES . Q. Is Joseph Clark here. - A. No; he lives an hundred miles off; I saw the gentleman he passed my door; I saw the prisoner and two more follow him, the prisoner drew the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket; I followed him and took him; a carman took the handkerchief from the prisoner.

Q. Do you know the gentleman's name. - A. I believe it was Clarke; I cannot recollect his christian name.

JOHN COLLIS . I was coming along Whitechapel, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket.

Q. Do you know his name. - A. I only heard him called Mr. Clarke.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-59

321. JAMES BARTLETT was indicted for that he on the 12th of February , was servant to William Harris , and employed and intrusted, and employed by him to receive money for him; that he being such servant so employed and intrusted, did receive and take into his possession for and on account of his said master the sum of elevenpence halfpenny and that he feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a baker , the prisoner was my journeyman .

Q. Was he employed by you to receive money for you. - A. Yes, during the time he lived with me; all those who chose to pay ready money, he had power to receive money from them upon bread being delivered.

Q. Had you a customer of the name of Edward Bramwell. - A. Yes, he lived in Oxford street; the prisoner had a book to set down the bread he delivered, and the money he received; in that book he states 11th of February one half quartern loaf, and on the 12th a half quartern loaf, that is elevenpence halfpenny.

Mr. Bolland. Whether in the hurry of business he may not have made a mistake of not marking it paid. - A. I do not think it is likely.

MR. BRAMWELL. Q. Do you purchase bread of Mr. Harris. - A. Yes. On the 12th of February, I paid the prisoner elevenpence halfpenny for a half quarter loaf I had that day, and one I had on the preceding day.

Q. to prosecutor. Did the prisoner ever pay you the elevenpence halfpenny for these two half quartern loaves delivered on the 11th and 12th. - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Did he always account with you. - A. He always accounted to me or my sister.

Q. Can you tell whether he accounted to her for them. - A. I cannot.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the money with any felonious intent; my master did not pay me my wages every week, I kept that money till he paid me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080406-60

322. ELIZABETH SOMMERS , alias ALDRIDGE , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , sixty-six yards of canvas, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of William Freeman the elder .

Second count for like offence, charging it to be the property of David Cook and Alexander Cook .

ANN FREEMAN . Q. You employed this woman to make sand bags. - A. Yes. On the 19th of September, I gave her canvas to make three dozen bags; she was to bring them back on the Monday morning at nine o'clock; she never brought them; on the 20th the next day, I gave her the same quantity she had before to make three dozen bags, she was to bring them on Monday morning, making in the whole six dozen; she never brought them; on the Monday I went to her she said they were all done but stringing; I then waited till the evening, they did not come forward; I went again to her, she was absent.

Prisoner. Did you not receive it of me on the Monday morning by your own son, on your own premises. - A. No, I did not; they were never brought back to me at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18080406-61

323 MARY AYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a wooden till, value 6 d. a wooden bowl, value 1 d. and 12 s. 10 d. the property of Luke Hetherington .

MATILDA HETHERINGTON . I live at No. 40, Christopher's alley, in the parish of Shoreditch . On the 16th of March I lost six shillings, four sixpences, and five shillings in copper, a till, and a wooden bowl that I keep the farthings in; the bowl and the money were in the till; the prisoner had lived in the upper part of the house for about three months;

On the day I lost my property the prisoner removed her goods away by one o'clock in the day.

Q. Did you see her afterwards. - A. Yes, between the hours of one and two o'clock she returned again; she went up stairs to the person in the first floor; the woman in the first floor goes out to work, which gave me suspicion that she was after no good; she remained on the person's premises the best part of the afternoon, on the one pair of stairs; then I saw the prisoner go out of the house with a bundle in her apron; she returned about dusk, she came into my shop and asked for a half pennyworth of small beer; after she had the beer she went up stairs; in about an hour afterwards she went down and enquired if her little girl bad been. About ten minutes the child came in with two white cloths in her hand; the child went up stairs. There is a passage between the shop and the back room. When I set in the back room I cannot see any body that goes into the shop. Some little time after I heard a noise on the stairs, I came into the shop, I saw nothing of Mary Ayres and the child but on the stairs; when she saw me she removed up another pair of stairs higher. In a little time after I heard the same noise again. When I came out again and saw her, she then removed higher up the stairs. In about a quarter of an hour after a person came in the shop for a quarter loaf, she gave me a shilling for the loaf; I went to the till to give her a penny, I missed the till; I gave an alarm and sent for a neighbour; when I gave the alarm I heard something fall out of the window into the yard, which I thought was the till; this was about eight o'clock.

Q. Did you afterwards see the till. - A. Yes, it was found.

Q. Who was in the house besides the prisoner. - A. One woman lodger on the first floor.

Q. What window was the till thrown out of. - A. The two pair of stairs, the room that the prisoner had occupied.

THOMAS MEAD . About eight o'clock on the 16th of March I was called out of my house; I went to Mrs. Hetherington upon being informed a person had taken her till. While Mrs. Hetherington was relating her story to me, there was a noise of something dropping in the yard, I went up stairs, I saw the prisoner and her child picking up five or six pennyworth of halfpence on the landing place of the two pair of stairs; I took her down stairs. Mr. Hetherington came home and sent for an officer; an officer was gone for. I took a candle and looked over the yard, and over a shed that leaned to the back part of the house I discovered the till laying about the middle of it on the tiles; it must have come from the prisoner's window, the other window of the one pair was below it. The officer searched the prisoner, he found on her four shillings and nine pence three farthings, one shilling, and two sixpences. A small bowl was found on the stairs. We got the key of the shed, as the tiles were broke, to see whether she had throwed out any of the money in a hurry with the till; we only found two farthings in the shed.

JOHN PRYOR . I am an officer. I was brought to the prisoner, whom I found in the apartment which she had lately occupied; on her denying having had the till I proceeded to search her - on her I found in copper four shillings and nine pence three farthings - silver, one shilling and two sixpences.

Q. to prosecutor. Could the till have been thrown out of the other lodger's room. - A. No, it was of the other side of the house; the till is mine and the bowl; I can speak to two of the halfpence that was found on the prisoner, I had taken them the same day, there is a mark across the middle of them.

Prisoner's Defence. My master that I work for is in the habit of lending us money twice a week, which is Tuesday and Thursday; he lent me two shillings on Tuesday and five shillings on the Thursday; this good lady said she lost her till and money; she swore at the justices of losing eight shillings in silver, which was six shillings and four sixpences, and the rest of the money she said was in halfpence; when I was searched all that was found on me was one shilling and two sixpences in silver; I never was out of the place; there were other lodgers in the house besides me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080406-62

324. JOSEPH ARGENT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , a wrapper, value 1 s. and fifty pound weight of tea, value 16 l. the property of Thomas Hanson and Benjamin Hanson .

JOHN OILY . I am a servant to Messrs. Freerson and Sawry, haberdashers, Lad lane.

Q. Do you know any thing of the person of the prisoner. - A. Yes; on the 29th of March, between seven o'clock and the half hour after, I saw him at the hind part of a cart in Bull and Mouth street, he was in the act of getting out; I am sure of his person.

Q. Did you see him take any thing from the cart. - A. I did not; I went in about my business; I passed him and went on about two hundred yards, when he passed me with the truss on his shoulder, just at the end of St. Ann's lane.

Q. Are you sure that he was the same man that you had seen in the cart. - A. I was quite sure he was the same man by his dress, he had a brown coat on; when he passed me some person called out Joe do not run; there is no person calling to you; that gave me suspicion; he went on a little further, he put the truss down at a door, I passed him and looked at him; I turned back almost immediately, I run back to the Bull and Mouth to enquire if he had stole the truss; I found the carman enquiring after it; I told the carman if he would follow me I would shew him where it was.

Q. What is his name. - A. Thomas Hartman . The carman followed me into St. Ann's lane, where he found the truss moved from where I left it, about five or six yards across the street.

Q. Where was the prisoner. - A. He was gone; I saw no more of him till he was brought back by the patrol in about eight or ten minutes; I set a person to watch the prisoner, which he did; this man is a stranger to me, he is not here.

Q. Are you sure that when you saw the prisoner in the custody of the patrol he was the same man that you saw in possession of this truss. - A. At that time I was quite sure, I had taken notice of him.

Q. Did you say in his hearing that he was the man that was in the cart. - A. I did.

Prisoner. He said at the hall that he saw me in the cart, but he could not see my face, it was dark.

Witness. I did not.

THOMAS HARTMAN . I was carman to Messrs. Hanson at that time.

Q. On the 29th of March had you any quantity of tea in their cart. - A. I had this truss and another; and a small chest; they were going to the Red Lion inn, Aldersgate street.

Q. Were you walking by the side of the cart. - A. No, I had drawed up my cart close to the side of the Bull and Mouth gate.

Q. About what time was it. - A. Between seven o'clock and the half hour; I went down the yard to deliver a small parcel; I left nobody with the cart; I was gone down the yard about ten minutes to deliver a small parcel.

Q. Are you quite sure that when you went down the Bull and Mouth yard every thing was safe in the cart. - A. Yes, I covered them safe with a sail cloth in the front of the cart; on my return I found the tailboard of my cart down and I missed the truss of tea; I made every enquiry immediately. Oily came and informed me where the truss was gone; I found the truss again in St. Ann's lane by Oily's directions; I took it home; I did not see the prisoner till he was brought back to the cart; he was in custody of the patrol.

Q. When you saw the truss did you know it to be the truss belonging to your master. - A. Yes, it had a direction on it; it is here.

WILLIAM BURTON . I am the officer that took the man in custody; I was coming up St. Ann's lane, I saw the prisoner and a number of people assembled together; I found the prisoner in the custody of Michael Carter , he gave me charge of him; John Oily said that is the man, take him to the Bull and Mouth; he told me he had taken a truss out of a cart in Bull and Mouth street; the prisoner said he was innocent of it.

MICHAEL CARTER . I am a bricklayer; - on the 29th of March, as I was coming up Foster lane I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running in a direction toward me, he turned as if he was going into Wood street, then he altered his course on seeing me come towards him; I followed him and took him in Little Love lane; I asked him what made him run, he said he did not run; he did run, because I run pretty sharp after him; I asked him whole coat it was he had under his arm, he said his own, he put it on; immediately a person came up and told me he had stole a parcel out of a cart in Bull and Mouth street; the prisoner denied it. I asked him to go along with me, then I should see whether he was guilty or not; he refused going with me and struck me. I catched hold of him by the collar and told him I should use him very rough if he served me so any more; I brought him back to the Bull and Mouth, they said they knew him. Oily charged him with being the man that robbed the cart.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - the crime that is alledged against me I am totally ignorant of, and I have no doubt but the discernment of this honourable court and jury will acquit me of this charge; I never saw the witness Oily before I was brought to Bull and Mouth street; the witness Oily admitted that he saw a man in the cart before the magistrate, but he could not identify me to be the person. On the evening laid in the indictment I was coming along Wood street, there were several people quickened their paces; a man before me turned round and seized hold of me and gave me in charge immediately; I did not know why that man stopped me, I have never seen him since, and when I was brought into Bull and Mouth street I was astonished at what they charged me with. I am a watch gilder by trade; - there were many turnings in the street - and if such a thing as conviction should take place it would be dangerous for a man to walk in the street; - is it possible that I can be convicted, as the man who first stopped me never appeared against me; therefore I make no doubt of a verdict of acquittal, as he never appeared against me before the justice where I was examined.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-63

325. AMOS TRIPP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , two sheets; value 5 s. the property of Thomas Talbot , in a lodging room .

Second count for like offence, and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Bligh , a shirt, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Fountain .

MARY TALBOT . Q. Are you the wife of Thomas Talbot . - A. Yes, his house is at No. 28, College hill ; on Thursday evening the prisoner came to lodge at my house, he told me he was a carpenter . In the morning he took away two shirts, two sheets, and a silk handkerchief; he stopped so long in the room before he went out I suspected him; I went up to his door and peeped through the key hole, I saw him trying the other man's hat upon his head; when he unlocked the door I went into the room, he came out immediately; I went round the room and threw down the blankets, I missed the sheets immediately; I pursued him, he got out of the house before I overtook him; I gave the alarm of stop thief, he was stopped at the corner of Budge row, I saw him stopped, he had the sheets wrapped round him, and the shirts were concealed about him; they belonged to two men that slept in the same room.

Q. When the sheets were taken from about his person did you know them to be yours. - A. Yes, I can swear to them; I have washed them, one is marked, the other is not. When I came up to him, he said he would give me any thing to satisfy me; I said I did not want any thing of him but my own property.

Q. Did you lose sight of him from the time he got out of the door till the time he was stopped. - A. I did not.

- ELDRIDGE I am a journeyman cooper, I work in Bread street; I was going to my work about a quarter after seven in the morning, I heard the cry of stop thief, I was about two hundred yards from Talbot's house; I saw the prisoner running very much fatigued, he fell and hurted his face; I stopped him; Mrs. Talbot was running and people

with her, crying stop thief; she come up to him in about a minute.

Q. Did Mrs. Talbot make any charge against him. - A. He had given me the two sheets and a shirt before she came up, and he begged I would let him go; he pulled two sheets and a shirt out of his small clothes. I told him I would not let him go; I took him back to Mrs. Talbot's house; Mr. Emmily searched him. The other shirt was found in his coat pocket, and the handkerchief in his breeches pocket.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-64

326. RICHARD FLAVEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , fifteen pound weight of indigo, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Wilson , Thomas Preston , and Francis John Smith Wilson .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES EVANS . Q. You are one of the officers of the Thames police. - A. I am. On the 4th of April, about half after four in the afternoon, I was passing by Leadenhall street in company with my brother officer; the prisoner was in the act of shutting a gate, No. 98; Dalby and I suspected him; we followed him till he came to Bell lane, Spital fields; when he got there we asked him where he came from, and what he was going to do with this parcel; I said I know where you came from, and I shall make your master acquainted with it; he said he should not give us any account. We found indigo in the bag; we took him custody; he went in the custody of Dalby, and I went to Messrs. Wilsons and acquainted them of the circumstance. I have had the indigo ever since it was in the bag, as it now is.

- DALBY. Q. I suppose you know no more than the last witness. - A. I saw him come out of the same gateway; I know no more than him.

THOMAS WILSON . Q. The prisoner was a servant of yours, we understand. - A. He was, he had been with us near three years.

Q. What is the name of your partnership. - A. Thomas Wilson , Thomas Preston , and Francis John Smith Wilson.

Q. Is your house No. 98. - A. Yes, in Leadenhall street.

Q. Of course I suppose you did not miss this property until you received intelligence about it. - A. I had not; the indigo is of the same quality as the indigo we had then; it is impossible to swear exactly to indigo.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Are there other warehouses in the same gateway. - A. No, not in the same gateway. The indigo at that time was worth about three shillings and sixpence to four shillings per pound.

JOSHUA WELCH . Q. Did you see the prisoner go from the warehouse this day. - A. No, I saw him come in the accompting house about five minutes before four o'clock, he had no bag in his hand; I did not see him after that; he had returned from dinner, he had no business to go out; his time to leave work was about seven o'clock.

Q. Whereabouts did the prisoner lodge. - A. I think in Somerset street, Hackney road.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-65

327. ELIZABETH FITZGERALD and ELIZABETH DALTON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , fifteen shillings and sixpence , the property of Thomas Terry .

JAMES GOULD . I am a waiter to Mr. Terry, John's coffee house, Cornhill.

Q. What do you know of these women. - A. On the 1st of April, about a quarter past seven o'clock, Dalton came in for a bottle of wine, accompanied by Fitzgerald; they asked for a bottle of wine; I did not like the appearance of them, and it being not the practice of the house to send wine out of the house I refused serving them. Dalton said she had had it frequently for the same gentleman that she came from; I told her she could not have it for that gentleman unless he was a subscriber and a friend; she then said he frequented the house, his name was Mr. Dalton, of Cheapside. I did not know the name, but in all probability I thought he being a respectable gentleman, and not knowing but he used the house, I went into the bar and tendered her a bottle of wine; she tendered me a guinea; I gave her half a guinea, five shillings, and two pence, which made the wine and bottles five shillings and fourpence; she disputed the price of the bottle of wine, and said she never gave more than four shillings and ninepence for a bottle of wine in her life there before; this was Dalton, the other said nothing. I told Dalton she could not get it for less; she refused having it except I would let her have it for four shillings and nine pence; I took the wine into the bar; she said give me my guinea and I'll give you the change; I held out my left hand to receive the change and tendered her the guinea with my right hand; Dalton had got the guinea; they both walked towards the door; I opened my hand, I found I had get only two pence.

Q. Then they put something in your hand. - A. Yes, which I thought was the whole change; I called out to them to stop, they had not given me the right change; Dalton cried out she had. They both returned; Dalton insisted upon it she had given me the change, I insisted upon it I never received it; Dalton was riotous, Fitzgerald desired her to be quiet. I went for my master, he found Dalton in a riotous situation, he sent for a constable; she was taken to the counter.

Q. Are you quite certain that she played this trick upon you, and gave you no more than two pence. - A. I am certain of that.

THOMAS TERRY . Q. You was sent for by your servant. - A. Yes, on Friday the 1st of April; I was in the bar of the City tavern; about seven o'clock Dalton came into the City tavern for a bottle of

wine, (I am master of that); the prisoner Dalton tendered a guinea for the wine, she said she should not pay five shillings and four pence for the wine; the bar keeper was giving her change, she disputed the silver, said there were Irish shillings in the change; and she as he supposed gave him the change about an hour after that I was fetched to John's coffee house, and told of the circumstance; in consequence of which I sent for a constable

- SHIRVIN. I am an officer. I searched Dalton first at the counter; in her right hand pocket I found a new guinea and a penny piece. Fitzgerald had nothing about her except a farthing or a halfpenny.

Dalton's Defence. This young woman came to see me on the 1st of April, she lived in Ratcliffe highway. I told her I would go and see her home; my mother was very ill, I thought I might as well go in that place and get the wine.

Fitzgerald's Defence. I went to see Mrs. Dalton, she came to see me part of the way home; she said her mother was very poorly; she went in to buy a bottle of wine for her; I went in with her; what past after I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-66

328. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31 of March , six silver tea spoons, value 18 s. the property of Mary Ward , widow .

MARY WARD. Q. Are you a widow lady. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 31st of March, did you lose half a dozen tea spoons. - A. Yes, on that day I missed them towards the evening; I had seen them on the night of the 30th. I live at the Saracen's head, Snow-hill. The prisoner was kitchen maid .

Q. She was sufficiently within the reach of taking these things if she was dishonestly disposed. - A. Yes; the waiter took them into the kitchen where she attended about her business; after missing of them I told the servants they must all take their oath, they all said they would,; I sent a servant to the pawnbrokers; she went to Mr. Hillier's and they were produced.

MR. HILLIER. I am a pawnbroker, No. 12, Smithfield bars. On the 31st of March, between four and five, in the afternoon; I took in half a dozen silver spoons of the prisoner. I am sure as to her person; I advanced her eight shillings on them, she said they were her own she lived in Gray's Inn home: she pledged them in the name of Stewart. Mrs. Ward has the spoons.

MRS. WARD. These are the spoons; I valued them at eighteen shillings; she confessed to me that she had taken them; when I asked her first if she know any thing of the spoons she said she did not, she would take her oath of it. I said I can tell you this, I have the spoons in my possession, it is in vain for you to deny it; she then told me that she did it to buy a gown; she lived with me about a fortnight last Tuesday.

Prisoner's Defence. I have got nothing to say, I leave it all with you.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-67

329. ANN VESSEY and MARGARET SHIPLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , six handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a shirt, value 5 s. and one yard of dimity, value 1 s. the property George Stephen Stibbs .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ANN STIBBS. Q. Do you superintend the London Penitentiary , for the purpose of reform. - A. Yes.

Q. Had the prisoners at the bar been received into that house. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of Tuesday the 29th of March, was the prisoners and Elizabeth Law , to get up at an early hour to wash. - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you rise. - A. I believe it was between six and seven o'clock; I found that they were all three gone, and the door of the laundry was locked on the inside, and the window was open; so that it appeared they had gone out of the window.

Q. Had they taken any thing with them. - A. Yes, a great quantity of clothes were gone.

Q. Were any handkerchiefs gone of Mr. Stibb's. - A. Yes, and one shirt, and one yard of dimity.

Q. Besides which a great number of things that we do not enquire into. - A. Yes.

Q. On the same day were you in Whitechapel. - A. Yes, about eleven in the morning; I there saw Margaret Shipley , I followed her at some distance; I saw her go into Sugar loaf court, in Whitechapel. I got an officer; we met Law and Shipley; the officer took them in custody; we went into Sugar loaf court, there we found the prisoner Vessey in a house, and all the property, except those things which had been pawned.

Court. You have recovered those things likewise. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Did the prisoner Law take you to the pawnbrokers. - A. Yes, I found a shirt at Mr. Burton's, and a sheet and two gown's at Mr. Windsors.

Q. How long had these persons been in the house of reformation. - A. I believe about three or four months; they had behaved very well while they were there.

EDWARD SMITH . I am an officer of Lambeth Street office.

Q. We understand that you, in company with Mrs. Stibbs, met the prisoner Shipley and Law, and took them to the office. - A. Yes. I afterwards went to Sugar loaf court, and apprehended Vessey; I found these four bundles which I have here, in the room under the bed, in which the articles mentioned in the indictment are contained; I delivered them to a servant of Mr. Emmerton's. Vessey claimed two of the bundles, Shipley claimed one, and Law claimed one.

ELIZABETH LAW . Q. I believe you had been received into the Penipotentiary house - A. Yes, I had been there three months.

Q. On the morning of Tuesday the 29th of March, did you and the prisoners get up early to wash. - A. Yes, we got up between two and three o'clock,

we made a fire and had a cup of tea; we had agreed to go on the over night, we brought away four bundles; I brought away the things that were given me to wear in the house, and my own things in the same bundle, we had tied them up on the overnight. Shipley locked the door; we all got out of the laundry window and got over the garden wall, and went to Shipley's sister in Sugar loaf court, Whitechapel Shipley's sister was not at home at first; we we found her out and took the bundles into her room; the shirts were taken out of one of the bundles; Vessey picked the initials out and it was washed; Shipley and her sister went out to pawn it, and there was a sheet taken out; they went into the pawnbrokers, I stood at the step of the door while Shipley went in; the handkerchief was taken out of the bundle afterwards.

Q. You were apprehended in the course of that afternoon with Shipley. - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Vessey's Defence. I left the Penitentiary on the 29th of March, the day before I had been washing. I mangled this piece of dimity, I had been damping some things; I intended to iron them, on Monday night. In the morning I had a couple of Mrs. Stibb's half handkerchiefs, and in my hurry I put them things in the dimity with my own things and the handkerchief, being damp in the bundle; and as I brought them away so I found them.

Shipley's Defence. I was very happy in the Penitentiary house, till Law asked me if I would leave the house; and after asking me several times I agreed to go. I took nothing but my own.

VESSEY, GUILTY , aged 21.

SHIPLEY, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-68

330. HENRY MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Morris Solomon .

MORRIS SOLOMON . I live at No. 24, East Smithfield , I am a slopseller , and I am in the habit of shipping men.

Q. Do you know any thing of this coat, waistcoat, and shirt. - A. On the 23d of March, the prisoner at the bar came to my house and said he wanted a ship; I asked him if ever he had been to sea, he said no; I told him I could do nothing with him; he said he was in great distress; seeing him a decent young man, I said to him you shall be in my house, I will give you victtuals and drink until you can get a situation; on the Friday following I was informed we had been robbed; I asked the prisoner, and he acknowledged he had stole the things. I promised him forgiveness, and do not wish to hurt him now.

Q. Then you must not tell me any thing he said, after you had this conversation with the lad; did you go with him any where. - A. Yes, he pointed out the place where he took them; I found every thing. I think he did it through necessity.

Q. Had you permitted him to wear them. - A. I told him he might put any thing on.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-69

331. JOHN TATNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , a piece of Russia sheeting, value 6 l. twenty eight yards of Russia sheeting, value 4 l. thirty yards of Russia duck, value 4 l. 10 s. five pound weight of packthread. value 6 s. and six hand brushes, value 4 s. the property of John Butts .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

WILLIAM STUDWICK . Q. I believe you superintend Mr. Butts's business. - A. I do.

Q. Had you the care of the accompting house. - A. I had, I left it locked, and the windows were all safe. I was the last person that was in it.

Q. Did it contain property in it. - A. Yes.

Q. State to the court what property was in it. - A. One piece of Russia sheeting, and one piece that something was cut-off, and thirty yards of Russia duck, about half an hundred weight of sailing twine, and eleven balls of packthread.

Q. You left this property there on the evening of the 20th. - A. Yes. When I came between seven and eight in the morning, there were four squares of the window frame broken in, so that a man could get in; I found on going in several things displaced. I found both the desks broken open, but nothing in the desk was taken, but all the things I have mentioned were gone. On the 3d of March, eleven balls of packthread, and nine balls of twine.

Q. Had the prisoner ever worked for Mr. Butts. - A. Yes, he drove one of Mr. Butts's teams, from the 4th of May, till the 11th of July.

Q. Did he use to come to the accompting house to be paid. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know in whose service he was at the time of the robbery was committed. - A. He worked at Mr. Moorin's.

Q. In consequence of the property that was brought to you, what did you proceed to do. - A. I procured a search warrant; I searched the prisoner's house on the 8th of March, accompanied with the constable Evans, John Willan , and my son; the constable and Evans entered his room first; they found these pieces of Russia shetting, some of them in pieces, as if a woman was at work at them. I found a piece of Russia duck, some of which was made into a bed tick.

Q. How much of the Russia duck was there in all - A. Thirty yards; one sheet was made of it, and the piece that was left corresponded with that made up in sheeting and the bed tick; he also had a smock frock and trowsers made of the Russia duck.

Q. Did the smock frock, sheet, bed tick, trowsers, and the piece that was left, make up about thirty yards. - A. I should suppose so. We also found a brush in his room.

Q. When did you see the prisoner. - A. The next morning. I was not present when he was taken up.

Q. Has Mr. Butts any partner. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Do you know

that house in which you found these things to be the house of the prisoner's. - A. I was directed to it as his house by the person that let it him.

Q. Then you do not know excepting what that person told you, that it was his house. - A. No.

JOSEPH MOORIN . - Mr. Bolland. You are a farmer living at Hatton. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. He worked for me near a month, till the 28th of November; for the last fortnight he worked in the old barn.

Q. What did that old barn contain. - A. Barley.

Q. Of course it was locked. - A. Yes, and the prisoner had the custody of the key most nights but Saturday night, and then he hung it up in the kitchen.

Q. You must not tell me under what circumstances, but did he leave the country, was he discharged by you. - A. No, he went without being discharged by me.

Q. After the prisoner went away did you employ a man of the name of Newton to thrash in the barn. - A. No, I had allowed Mr. Dawes to use the opposite side of that barn, he employed Newton.

Q. During the time the prisoner was with you on the 20th of November was any body employed in that barn but the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. How far is that barn from the prosecutor's accompting house. - A. I should suppose about two miles and a quarter.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lived. - A. he lived at Hounslow.

JOHN NEWTON. Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at Feltham.

Q. Were you employed by Mr. Dawes to thrash in Mr. Moorin's old barn. - A. Yes. There I found under the roof of the barn, between the boards and the barley, nine balls of twine, and eleven balls of packthread; as soon as I found it I took it to the public house and mentioned what I had found; in consequence of which it was afterwards claimed by Mr. Strudwicke. This is the twine, I can swear to it; here is a hole where a mouse crept in, he hung in there, he was as dry as a bone.

JOHN WILLIAM BROOKS . I live at Tamworth, I was present at the time the prisoner was apprehended. I am a farmer; when we saw the prisoner the constable said come in, here he is; we saw him in a field; they had just apprehended his wife. I gave chase after him; he ran a considerable way.

Q. Before he ran was any thing said to him. - A. Not a word. This was the 9th of March; he ran for about a mile and a quarter; there was a man a hedging; I cried stop him, he attempted to stop him, he could not; I asked the hedger for his bill, he gave it to me, we ran about a mile and a half farther, then I got up to him, when he got over a hedge. I said surrender; he stopped and held up his fist, I said I will strike you with the bill if you do not surrender. He knocked me down and put his knees on my throat and attempted to choak me; I gave him several cuts with the bill; he bled and got weak; I throwed him off, I said come surrender; he walked on and we took him.

Q. Do you know that the house that was searched was the prisoner's house. - A. His wife told me so afterwards.

Q. Did he at any time claim any of the property that was seized there. - A. She claimed it, but not in his presence; he did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. This was at Epsom, a great many miles across the country. - A. I knew he lived in that country.

Q. Was any body else present when this struggle took place. - A. No.

Q. You know that you cut that man's nose in two. A. Yes, it was.

Q. And you also know that he had so many grievous wounds that his life was despaired of. - A. It may be so; I only gave him blows in my own defence.

COURT. Did he ever make any complaints before the magistrate. - A. No, he did not.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing about it till I went home; I heard my wife was taken. I went away, they ran after me, and I ran away.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-70

332. JOHN HARTCUP , THOMAS BUCKLEY , DANIEL BUCKLEY , and JOHN HOMER , were indicted for that they on the 26th of March, one piece of false and counterfeited coin, not the proper coin of this realm, nor permitted to be current within the same, but made to the likeness and similitude of a certain foreign prince's coin, to wit, the King of Prussia's coin, called a gulden ,

And other counts for like offence, with intention to pass as a piece of silver coin in the kingdom of Prussia.

Four other counts in like manner, calling the coin that they counterfeited an eight grosschen piece.

The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case stated by Mr. Fielding.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are an officer of Worship street office. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of a warrant that you had from the magistrate, did you go on the 26th of March to a house No. 12, King street, St. James's, Clerkenwell . - A. Yes, in company with Vickery and Bishop, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I sent Vickery to ring the bell, I was standing outside of the door, young Buckley opened the door to us. I told him I had a warrant to search; we all three of us went in, we shut the outer door; we went through a passage where the door opened, that presented a washhouse or a back kitchen. On the side of that washhouse was a place which I thought was an accompting house adjoined to it; we went into it; I returned out of that; went into a yard; it crossed that washhouse to a privy; and in a shed (I went along with Vickery there), there were two stamps then fixed.

Q. What sort of stamps. - A. A pair of dies in one, and only one die in the other, the bottom die. We had Buckley with us at the time. We came back into this accompting house; there upon a counter was a scale fixed to a beam; at the further

end of that counter was a writing desk; I lifted up the top of that desk I found a paper, which when I opened, was a quantity of this coin, which I now produce, it appeared very fresh. In a drawer under the counter were some blanks in a paper which were not struck, but were edged; there was adjoining to that a stone place (it formerly had been used in a silver manufactory) and a cutter, which stood in the corner, with a quantity of this sissel of copper; in that place there was a a pan with some pickle then standing in it; in a box in the accompting house, close by the side where this money was found, I found this pan and another box, with a composition of something which will produce the colour of silver. In the same place was a quantity of saw dust, some clean and some dirty, and on the counter was a card of shirt buttons. We went down into the kitchen below stairs, there was a quantity of watch seals in paper; then we returned up to a shop which has two stair cases for the workmen to go out of the shop without going through the house; that is over the back kitchen and the accompting house; there was what is called an edging tool fixed there, with two lathes, but nobody at work; in the accompting house there was a great quantity of other money that we have in bags; this was on the box, stuffed with saw dust. There was two bags full of small money in the same accompting house; the apparatus was all brought away by the officers. I and Vickrey took young Buckley in Spital fields; I left Mason and Bishop behind me; we took these things on the Saturday. On the Sunday we went there to take the apparatus down.

Q. All this apparatus, the composition and the pickles, are they such things as coiners make use of. - A. Yes.

Q. And they were all complete for work. - A. Yes, the large dies were then set.

COURT. What do you call sissell. - A. It is the waste copper out of which the blanks are cut; pickle will produce on the surface the silver out of the metal; it is made of aqua fortis and cream of tartar. The composition I believe is silver dissolved.

Q. Then every thing seems to be complete. - A. Yes.

JOHN FREEMAN. Q. You are acquainted with Prussia. - A. Yes, I am a Prussian.

Q. Is there any coin in Prussia similar to these. - A. There is; the large piece is called a golden, and the smaller piece a groschen.

Q. Do they appear to be made as the foreign Prussian coin. - A. Yes.

Q. These are not the coin of Prussia, but counterfeits. - A. They do resemble it, but not so as to be deceived.

Mr. Gurney. Do they resemble so as one would be taken for the other. - A. The large coin, if it came to my inspection, I certainly should not take it for the real coin.

Q. That is not because it is worn out, as some of our shillings are. - A. No, the real Prussian coin has a remarkable likeness of the king; this face is not like the king's face at all.

Q. Is it a coin of silver mixed with copper. - A. I cannot tell; no coin in Prussia is considered as silver but the rix dollar; I suppose they are mixed.

Q. Now the grosschen, the proper name of that is gute grosschen. - A. Yes; but in the provinces where these are done, it goes by the name of grosschen; in the kingdom it goes by the name of gute grosschen.

Q. Do you know whether this coin is struck at Berlin or at Brandenburgh. - A. I cannot answer it.

Q. How many different mints are there in the Prussian state. - A. The mints in the different provinces are for the smaller money; I know only of one, at Koeningsberg.

Q. You are not employed in the mint of Prussia. A. No; it is four years ago since I was in Prussia.

Q. Do not the coins change. - A. About four years ago, when I went home, I did not find any difference in the coin.

JOHN JOHNSON . Q. Are you an assayer. - A. Yes, I assayed two of these pieces brought to my office last Saturday; the counterfeit one contains eighteen grains of silver and a pound weight of copper; the good one contains seven ounces seventeen penny weights of silver, and four ounces three penny-weights of copper.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You are an officer. - A. I am; I went in with the other officers; the house is situated, in the way Mr. Armstrong has described. I passed through the washhouse into the yard; at the further end of the yard was a shed; within that shed was fixed two stamping engines, the dies were both set in the engine for the large piece of coin; in the small stamping engine was one die fixed in the bottom; the reverse die was out; - in a box close to the left hand of the large engine, I found several pieces of large coin, that exactly matched with the large die; I read the inscription on the die and on one of the pieces, and they were exactly alike, letter for letter; there was a little wooden box, which is now out of doors in the cart with the other heavy and large instruments; the press was worked by means of the foot; there was a hole dug in the ground two feet and a half deep, and when the bed of the die was fixed it came to their hands; it was worked by the foot in this manner [witness describing it], the dies being close to their middle; they could work without stopping to it. In this box was another die, it appears to be the top die in the small press; to this little shed was a small window; the stamps were between the men that worked and the light, it threw a light down upon the bed of the work; they stood with their faces to the press, and the light was on the opposite side of them; there was a curtain to prevent any body from looking in; in this same drawer there were several pieces of coin which I have here, with the dies; these were found in this box, where the die out of the small press was found.

Court. What is that. - A. Pieces of coin resembling these large and small; the principal part is large - that there was found in the drawer; some of them are perfect and some appear to have been struck twice to see whether the dye would take the effect. These are the dies that were in the large stamping engine; this die was fixed in the bed of the small stamping engine; these dies were left in this box; these three were left to all that was there, the officers all saw it; we then went to the accompting

house, there was a counter fixed in the accompting house with several dies on it; there were some dies on it; there were some drawers standing on the top of it, and there were two or three cards of sleeve buttons on it, as if for the purpose of shewing to gentlemen that they dealt in buttons. At the further part of this accompting house was a desk; I saw Armstrong take out a large paper of this coin; I produce the edging tool; I saw a cutting engine standing at the right hand corner coming in; I saw the pickle and the silvery composition; there were two laths up stairs, there were several other working tools that did not appear to this business, therefore they were not brought away; the dies and small articles were taken away on Saturday night; on Sunday we went again for the purpose of taking away the stamping engine; after we had taken away the top part there was a large iron bed which weighs near three hundred pounds weight; it was fixed in a block; in doing that I found coming out of the ground this piece of coin, it is completely fresh; in moving the small die we found two or three pieces of coin. Old Buckley and Hartcup was taken in custody, while we were gone to search Hartcup's house at Kilburn; when we came back a taylor came and said he had two suits of clothes; he was asked if he would leave them; be said no, he took them away afterwards Homer came, he was taken in custody.

Q. He did not come in the house. - A. I believe Bishop went out and took him in the yard.

Mr. Alley. Homer merely came to the door and you took him in custody. - A. I do not think he was in the house till he was brought in.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes; I went there.

Q. Before you were left in the house by Armstrong what did you find. - A. On searching an iron safe in the kitchen below stairs, I found thirteen dies for small coin.

Q. Of the grosschen. - A. Yes, likewise a box of small coin all completed. I was left in the care of the house, and about dusk I heard the key put in the street door on the outside. I placed myself behind the door, when the prisoner Hartcup came in, and under his arms he had some bags similar to these, and some brown paper, one large bag and two small ones; the larger bag corresponded with the bag which holds the small coin; immediately he came in, I asked him if his name was Hartcup; he said it was; I took him into custody. I asked him if the premises belonged to him; he said they did, and that he paid seventy five pounds a year for it to a Mr. Carpenter; I saw the agreement of the lease in his pocket; these are two bills for blanks bought of Messrs. Bett's and sons; in a few minutes the bell rung, I placed myself behind the door and opened the door, when the elder Mr. Buckley came in; he said he wanted to see a Mr. Nixon; I let him into the parlour, I told him what we were there for. I took him in custody; about nine o'clock the bell rung again, I opened the door and stood behind it; no person coming in I went across the yard to the iron gate, when Homer was standing at the gate with a bundle under his arm, which turned out afterwards to be a shoulder of mutton; the moment he saw me he turned away; I said walk in; he said he knew nothing about it; I told him we had not said any thing about it what it was; we took him in custody. In the shed where this press was found, I found this small coin, which corresponds with a pair of dies that I have here.

Q. How many dies did you find altogether. - A. Thirteen.

MR. MARSH. Q. You are a publican in the neighbourhood - look at the prisoners and see if you know them. - A. I know the three shortest, the other I do not remember seeing him.

Q. You speak to all but Hartcup. - A. Yes, them three I saw.

Q. How far did they live from your house. - A. About a hundred and fifty yards; I have seen them more than once or twice, each of them; they have been to my house to order beer to be carried to that place; I have frequently called for the pots, and each of them have given me the pots; they have just opened the door and the pot was handed out to me; I think for more than three months I served them, during which time I had an opportunity of seeing them.

PETER MASON. Q. You are an officer - tell me my good fellow what you found. - A. Here is an aqua fortis bottle I found there, and here is another with oil of vitriol, and a curtain that was hanging at the shop door, a couple of cloths that have been whitening of them; there was a large pan with pickle. I took this vial full out; this pickle came from the same pan that Mr. Armstrong has described.

JOHN HODINOT . Q. Do you know No. 12, King street, the house inhabited by these men. - A. Yes; in consequence of information that I received I went to a neighbour's in King street, I went to the top of the leads over Mr. Fernough's workshop, I heard a noise of something like a stamp going; I immediately went to Worship street office and gave information of it to Mr. Armstrong; I work in the iron business; I saw two stamps; after the officers made the entry I went in.

Q. Would these stamps make the noise you heard. A. Exactly so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Although you had an opportunity of going upon the top of the house, you could not see these men doing any thing. - A. I could not see the men, I could only hear.

Q. You do not know that they inhabited the house. - A. I saw one man in the house, and another man came in while I was there.

MR. FURNOUGH. Q. You live next door to No. 12, King street - could you from your house command a view of the shed in the yard. - A. Yes, we can.

Q. Do you know by whom this house was occupied. - A. No.

Q. During the time the persons inhabited the house - be they who they will - had you ever heard any particular noise that has been stated. - A. Yes; I have frequently heard the noise of stamping, from the first time they came.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners. - A. One, Mr. Buckley; I have seen him go by the door and go into his own house as I conceived.

Q. Have you seen either of the others. - A. I have

seen men about; I do not know that I can swear to either of the other prisoners; the tall man I can say nothing about.

Q. Have you seen persons go backwards and forwards to the shed. - A. I have.

Q. Do you know either of the persons that went into the shed. - A. No.

Q. What were they carrying. - A. One time when one come out another went in with him, he carried something in a box.

Q. Do you know the accompting house. - A. Yes; one morning I saw things like coin in the scale; I saw them weighing a great number, as much as those bags would contain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How often have you seen Buckley go in. - A. The last two months, I have seen him go out five or six times.

OLIVER RAINE . Q. You live with Mr. Furnough. A. Yes; I have heard a noise go like a stamping engine several times on the premises; I do not know either of the prisoners. One time I saw a man in the accompting house weighing some pieces of coin in a paper, about that bag full.

SARAH WALLIN. Q. We understand you go out a chairing - did you chair at No. 12, King street, Clerkenwell. - A. Yes, twice; the first time was a little after Christmas, and the second time about five weeks before I heard of this disturbance; I have seen Mr. Hartcup once, and I seen Mr. Buckley and his son at the house.

Q. Do you know the other. - A. I have seen him, he told me he was a lodger in the house; I never saw any woman in the house but myself; I believe both the Buckleys slept in the house, there was a bed in the one pair of stairs and in the two pair of stairs; Daniel Buckley was about the house all the day I was there; and Mr. Buckley and son dined with me in the kitchen; Hartcup came in the evening, and Buckley paid me.

MR. CARPENTER. Q. I believe you are the landlord of this house. - A. I am. Hartcup was my tenant. Hartcup and another person was with him when he took my house; they said that they intended to manufacture thimbles and coffin nails upon a new principle, they thought they should get a good deal of money by so doing; I have been twice in the shop since they took it.

Hartcup's Defence. I had taken that house of Mr. Carpenter, I paid him five pounds earnest; after that I repented what I had done, and one Mr. Nixon who was with me, he told me he would take the house, and it must go as it was; I kept the writings, as I did not get back my money, and I kept the key; I called on Saturday night, being the first Saturday after quarter day; there were some people in the house that shut me in, whom I never saw before.

Thomas Buckley 's Defence. I lodged in the house; I frequently got up about eight o'clock in the morning, and before ten o'clock I left it, as I had commission business; I was very seldom at home till late in the evening. I know nothing of this business.

Daniel Buckley 's Defence. I lodged in the house; I know nothing, and I am innocent of the kind.

Homer's Defence. I lodged in the house, and I worked for Mr. Bushby, St. Martin's lane. I came home on Saturday, I saw several men in the house, and they detained me.

MR. BUSHBY. Q. What are you sir. - A. I am a gilt and plated button manufacturer. Homer worked for me four weeks and one day; he was in my employ down to the evening he was taken up; he quitted my house about seven o'clock that evening.

Mr. Fielding. Do you know yourself where he lodged. A. I did not; he was employed by me in burnishing of buttons and occasionally in the stamps; he was an industrious man the time I have known him.

Homer called one other witness, who said he was in Mr. Bushby's employ.

Hartcup called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Thomas and Daniel Buckley called one witness, who gave them a good character.

HARTCUP, GUILTY aged 50.

THOMAS BUCKLEY , GUILTY aged 57.

DANIEL BUCKLEY, GUILTY aged 19.

HOMER, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-71

333. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for that he on the 9th of January, in the the 46th year of his Majestys reign , did falsely make, forge and counterfeit, and willingly acted and assisted in making a certain acquittance and receipt, that is to say, for the sum of one pound twelve and sixpence, with intention to defraud our sovereign lord the King .

Second Count for uttering and publishing as true a like forged acquittance or receipt with like intention, he knowing it to be forged.

And several other counts for like offence, only stating it to be done with different intentions.

The case was stated by Mr. Fielding.

MATTHEW BEECHER . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. A. I am a painter and glazier.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in your business by him in in the year 1805. - A. Yes.

Court. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a serjeant in the guards , I believe.

Mr. Knapp. In the Coldstream, is not be. - A. I do not know.

Q. Were you employed by him in the duke of York's chapel, Jeffry's buildings, Tothill street, Westminster. A. Yes.

Q. What business did you do for him there. - A. I mended some windows.

Q. When you had performed that work which you were employed to do, did you deliver him the bill. - A. When I mended the windows.

Q. Did you deliver him the bill. - A. I do not know that I delivered it.

Q. Did you make out that bill. - A. Yes.

Court. Was it delivered to him. - A. It was delivered to him, when the work was done.

Mr. Knapp. When was that work done. - A. When it mentions there, November 6th, 1805.

Q. Is that a receipt on it. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your hand writing. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the bill and receipt in the same state now as it was when it was delivered. - A. It appears to me not to be so.

Q. Have the goodness to state what is the alteration - A. It appears to me to be an alteration in the twelve.

Q. That is twelve sash squares, sixteen shillings. - A. Yes.

Q. Twenty six squares, what alteration does there appear to be in that. - A. The alteration appears to be in the twelve sash squares.

Q. What is the alteration in the twelve, is there more figures there than it was originally. - A. Yes.

Court. What is the alteration. In the one's, which makes it twelve, and which makes it sixteen shillings.

Q. By adding a one it makes twelve, it was before a two. - A. It appears so, and here is a one before the six, which appears to be in my figures; it cannot be.

Q. You believe that two ones are added to it. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. What other alteration do you observe. A. I do not see any other.

Q. Is there any alteration in the sum total. - A. There appears to be a one before the twelve in the sum total.

Q. It was twelve shillings and sixpence, and by putting a one before the twelve - it is now one pound twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. Yes.

Court. Twenty six lead squares, that has not been altered. - A. No.

Q. The sum total appears to have been altered by the one being put before the twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp Then the number of squares have not been altered but in the sum total. - A. No.

Court. What do you charge for the twenty-six squares in lead. - A. According to my account it is three pence a square.

Mr. Fielding. Look at that and recollect whether these figures are yours or his. - A. I do not think it is mine, I said so before.

Q. You say, you do not think it is yours so that there is an alteration in the number of the figures. - A. Yes.

Court. In the first article there is twelve square, you think there is an addition of one to the article and to the price. - A. Yes.

Q. And with regard to the twenty six squares in lead there is an addition of one to the price, is that right. A. Yes.

Q. What should that be. - A. Three pence a square.

Mr. Knapp. That would be six shillings and sixpence. A. Yes.

Q. Then there is one pound added. - A. Yes, it appears so.

Q. Now recollect what sum it was you received. - A. No, I cannot recollect no more than I suppose.

Q. Are you quite sure that you did not receive the one pound twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. I never recollect any thing at all about it; I never think of them things; when I receive it I mark it off and do not mind it.

Court. Do not you keep a book. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Have you got your book here. - A. No.

Court. Then you do not recollect whether you received the one pound more than you ought to have done. A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Do you recollect at this moment whether you ought to have received twelve shillings and sixpence or one pound twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. I have not kept it in my memory.

Q. Your book is not here. - A. No.

Q. Without your book have you any recollection upon the subject at all. - A. No.

Q. Without your book do you know whether it would be six shillings for the sash squares, or sixteen shillings for the sash squares. - A. Not without my book.

Q. Do you know whether it should be twelve or two, from your own recollection do you recollect it. - A. No.

Q. Or whether it should be six shillings or sixteen shillings you do not recollect. - A. No.

Q. No more can you tell me whether the sum this receipt was uttered for, was twelve shillings and sixpence, or one pound twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. No.

Q. Now the twenty six squares of lead, are not these figures yours. - A. Yes.

Q. They are both yours. - A. Yes.

Court The twenty six lead squares should be six shilling and sixpence. - A. Yes,

Mr. Gurney. Can you swear that the one before the figure is not yours. - A. Yes, I can; you mean in the first article, that is not my figure.

Q. Can you be sure of it. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the one before the two - now can you recollect positively that that is not your hand writing. - It appears very much like my writing.

Q. Now, Mr. Beecher, you say that the one before the two is very much like one of your figures - does not the one before the six look very much like one of your figures. - A. Yes; both these one's look very much like my figures.

Q. Could you venture to swear positively that they are not your figures. - A. No, I would not positively swear that.

Q. No, you would not - I dare say you would not - could you venture to swear that either the one before the two and the one before the six is not your hand writing - you told me the first one looked very much like your hand writing - can you venture to swear that either of these ones is not your hand writing. - A. Both the ones look like my figures.

Q. And the one in the sum total does that look very much like it. - A. Yes, both of them do.

Q. And you would not venture to swear positively considering the life of a fellow creature is at stake upon your evidence that they are not your figures. A. I would not.

Q. And you have already told me that you do not know from your own recollection whether the sum you received was twelve shillings and sixpence, or one pound twelve shillings and sixpence. - A. I do not recollect any thing about it.

Mr. Knapp. Does the one to the sum one pound twelve shillings and sixpence appear to have been an alteration since or not. - A. I do not know, it is like the other ones, and they are very much like my hand writing.

Q. What would be the price of the twenty six squares of lead. - A. It entirely depends upon the size.

Mr. Gurney. Do you recollect the size. - A. No, there are several different sizes in the chapel; my man brings the size home to me, and I put it on the slate. I take it from that short, I have hardly any recollection about it.

Court. These two sash squares, what would be

the price of them. - A. I do not know the size of them.

Mr. Fielding. You know the size of them at the chapel. - A. No.

COURT. Are they as big as these (pointing to the windows behind the bench.) - A. Some is and some not.

Q. Then you cannot tell me what the price of these two sash squares should be. - A. No more than I can tell you when I am going to die. I cannot.

Q. Now the twenty six squares of lead, what would be the price of that. - A. They vary much in size.

Q. You have no recollection what the real value of them is. - A. Some of them would be nine pence, some sixpence, and some fourpence.

Q. Then if I understand you right the twenty six squares in lead might come to sixteen shilling and sixpence. - A. They might come to more.

Q. And the one's you believe them to be yours. - A. I believe them to be mine.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-72

334. WILLIAM SHEPHERD , alias KNIGHT , was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon George Goddard , on the 25th of February , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 1 s. a seal, value 1 s. a great coat, value 1 l. and 2 l. 2 s. his property.

GEORGE GODDARD . Q. Where do you live. - A. At Feltham in Middlesex. I am a farmer .

Q. When was you robbed. - A. On the 25th of February, in a lane called Dawley, in the parish of Harlington .

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About half after six o'clock in the evening. I was by myself in a chaise cart.

Q. How was you stopped. - A. I was met by four men. One man ran up to the horse's head and cut the reins; then that same man that cut the reins came up to the right hand of me, to the step of the chaise cart; the prisoner at the bar came to the left side of me. One man was at the horse's head, and the other stood at the right hand of the shafts on the ground. The prisoner at the bar then unbuttoned my left hand breeches pocket, and the other my right hand breeches pocket; the right hand man took forty shillings from me.

Q. What did they say to you. - A. They told me to stop, they must have my money; I do not know which of them it was; they surrounded me so momently, I could not distinguish who told me to stop. The man on the right hand took out of my breeches pocket, forty shillings in silver, besides a dollar, one of the old dollars, with this king's head upon it; he took every thing out of my right waistcoat pocket; a pencil case, and a few halfpence that were in it. I had two great coats over this; they unbuttoned all my coats, then they saw my watch-chain; the prisoner at the bar says what have you got here, I must have it in a moment; he took hold of the chain, snatched it out; it was a silver watch, there was a chain, seal, and key to it; the seal had my initials on it; from this coat pocket the prisoner took a handkerchief, the fellow to this, and a snuff box; then he asked me what I had got there. I had a silk handkerchief round my neck, I wear it when I am about home, he took it off my neck; one of them said we must have your coat, they pulled my great coat off. Then the prisoner says if he has money it is in the seat, they desired him to search the seat; there was a bundle of empty sacks on the left hand of me, the prisoner says d - n them, let us have them out, he pulled them out on the ground; then he said sir, you must come out. I said be easy I will get out; so I jumped out; the man on the right hand opened the lid of the seat and took a hand basket up, wherein there was a pound of sausages, and half a pound of tea; they took all the things contained in the basket; the same right hand man searched about the straw, he found no money, then he said I am satisfied, and away they went.

Q. Had any of these men any arms. - A. The one on the right hand side of the cart he had a pistol.

Q. You never saw any more of them. - A. No, when I was down I asked them if they would help me with the sacks up, they said I might put them up myself. I went to the horse's head, I found the bearing reins, and the long reins all four cut in two. I fastened them up and got on as well as I could.

Q. Did you find any thing again. - A. Yes, there was something found but not immediately.

Q. You said one man stood on your right hand and the prisoner stood on your left hand; what makes you say it was the prisoner. - A. I could see him while he was robbing of me; I looked under his hat two or three times, he lived with me about eight year and a half ago; he told me he had lived with me at Bow street. I have got a name of Shepherd in my book, I did not know that he had lived with me then.

Q. Could you take such observations of him as to know the man. - A. I did. I was as recollected as I am now, I never was more recollected.

Q. Are you positive clear in your own mind. - A. Yes, I am that he is the man, as I am of my own existence.

Q. Then it is not from any circumstance that has happened since, that you believe he is the man. - A. No, when I came down Harlington, I said three of the men I should know again if I saw them, I took such observation of them so as to know three out of the four.

Q. How soon after was it that you saw this man. - A. About a fortnight afterwards I was sent for by Mr. Read, the chief magistrate of Bow street, to see if I knew him.

Q. Are you sure that he was the man. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sure he was the man when you saw him about a fortnight afterwards. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. That gentleman said that he did not know that I lived with him.

Prosecutor. I did not know that he had lived with we then; when I was at Bow street he told me he had lived with me, and when I went home I saw the name of William Shepherd in the book; my recollection is not from his living with me, but from my recollection of him when I was robbed.

WILLIAM WALTERS. I am a soldier, I belong

to the life guards, Hyde park barracks. On the 25th of February, about the middle of the day, these men came by me.

Q. Where. - A. At the Vine inn in Hillingdon, near Uxbridge; they came in the Vine and called for a pot of beer, and Hooper and this prisoner went to Uxbridge.

Q. Are you sure Shepherd is one of them. - A. Yes, and they stopped there about a couple of hours and a half, and the other men stopped there during the day, while they were gone to Uxbridge, except a few minutes that they went to a gentleman's house in Hillingdon; they told me if I saw any one come after them, I was to say they were to come back in about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes to the farthest; Hooper and Shepherd came back, and went out again; I asked them if they wanted them gentlemen that were with them, they said yes; I said they would be back almost directly; they all four came back, and went away about five o'clock in the evening.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is one of those four. - A. Yes; that is the same man that went to Uxbridge.

Q. How far is that from Dawley lane, Harlington. A. About a mile and a half from where the gentleman was robbed to Hillingdon. One of the men had a pistol in his pocket, I saw the muzzle hang out of his pocket; the others had not any thing that I saw; I am sure he is the same man; I was with him in the whole about three hours in day light.

Prosecutor. I was coming from Uxbridge market the same day.

WILLIAM ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow street office. I and Lavender apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of March in St. Giles's; I produce a handkerchief which I found upon one of the four men that were with him; his name is Sadler, I took it from his neck.

Q. I see he is indicted. - A. Yes.

Q. Was Sadler. when you took the prisoner, in company with him. - A. No, we apprehended Sadler in Marybone, the same morning when we took the prisoner Shepherd.

Q. to Walters. Did you see Sadler. - A. Yes, Sadler and Hooper was of the party, and Samuel Bone . I am sure Sadler was in company at the Vine.

Q. to Adkins. You found that handkerchief on Sadler's neck. - A. Yes, I took it off Sadler's neck.

STEPHEN LAVENDER. I know no more than Adkins; I was present with him on the 11th of March; when we took Hooper we found a pencil case, which was identified by Mr. Goddard.

Q. Mr. Goddard look at that handkerchief. - A. This is my handkerchief, I had four of them; there is the fellow of it, it is faded in the double by wearing it; it is faded with the fun, and wearing round my neck with the perspiration; I always wear them round my neck at home.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the property or of the robbery; there was no property found on me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-73

335. JOSEPH DALTON was indicted for that he on the 7th of March , about the hour of eight at night, being in the dwelling house of John Robins and John Coggerill Gladston , feloniously did steal a bed, value 2 l. twenty pound weight of load, value 2 s. affixed to the dwelling house; and one copper boiler, value 20 s. affixed to the dwelling house, their property; then after having done the said felony, he burglariously did break to get out of the same .

Second count for like offence, only stating the house to belong to Samuel Newth .

SAMUEL NEWTH . I am clerk to Mr. John Robins , auctioneer , Covent garden; John Robins and John Coggerill Gladston are executors to Mr. Moffet .

Q. How long has Mr. Moffet been dead. - A. I do not know; I have been in care of the house three months, he was dead before I went there; the house is in Leicester fields ; I was the only person in the house, I slept there continually, Mr. Robins and Mr. Gladston never slept there. On the 17th of March Mr. Robins sent me to the bankers; about a quarter after five o'clock, coming from the bankers, I called into the house, which I did when I came near the house to see if it was safe; when I left the house that day I double locked it; when I called to see if it was safe it was only on the spring lock, somebody must have picked the lock. Upon going in I did not find any thing particular, I did not look about; I staid in the parlour about ten minutes, I neither heard nor saw any body at all, I double locked the door and went away; I returned about ten minutes past eight o'clock.

Q. You are quite sure the second time you double locked it again. - A. Yes; and when I came there at a quarter after eight I found it on the single lock again; that struck my mind somebody must be there again; on my opening the door, and going into the house to get a light, I run against a copper in the passage that had been affixed in the back kitchen below; I halloaed out who is there, I heard somebody run up stairs, I pulled the door to and locked it again, and went to the next house but one, a public house, to get a light, and gave an alarm; coming back I saw the prisoner getting out of the parlour window, the sash was up, he was getting over the rails; I laid hold of the prisoner, he ran away, he broke from me, dropped his hat, and crossed the street; I ran after him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him. - A. No, I was near him all the way, he only ran to Sidney's alley; I called out Stop, he was stopped, and I was close to him when he was stopped by three or four people; it was in the court.

Q. When he was stopped was he without his hat. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure that he was the same man that came out of the window. - A. Yes, I hit him two or three times, I hit his nose, or he hit himself against the rails because his nose was bleeding on the top of it. I secured him, and brought him back, when I got into the house I found the copper was removed from the back kitchen into the passage; the lead was inside of it, and going into the parlour, I found the bed which had been removed from the front kitchen, it was in a bureau bedstead; when I left it the bed was worth forty

shillings, the copper and the lead about two guineas.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I found the copper and a quantity of lead in it in the passage; the bed was in the parlour tied up in a bundle. In the back kitchen where this copper stood, I found this iron crow, on the rubbish, it appeared as if the copper had been fresh removed.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a job on the 17th of March; coming back a gentlemen asked me if I could stop and help to move a few things; I went in the house with him; he said stop a bit, I will go and get a light; he went out and locked me in, and while he was gone somebody came and and unlocked the door. I jumped out of the window.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only, not of breaking to get out of the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-74

335. MATILDA SNOWSWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of March , a black silk cloak, value 10 s. a gown, value 8 s. a frock, value 2 s. two lace frills, value 5 s. and a pellise, value 5 s. the property of Charles Townsend .

ELIZA TOWNSEND . I am the wife of Charles Townsend ; he is a porter .

Q. Did you lose a black silk cloak and other articles - A. Yes; I lost them from my lodgings on the 23rd of March, about a quarter before seven o'clock; I had seen them safe about a quarter past three.

Q. Do you know whether you left the prisoner at home or not. - A. I did. She was with me in the front parlour; when I came back, she was gone. On the 26th, I had an officer with me, I found her in Royal Tent Court, in the Borough; I charged her with having robbed me; she acknowledged it, and begged for mercy.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to tell you. - A. I did: and she did tell me.

Q. Then we must not hear it. - A. I found the pellise on the bed where I found her; the other things were down stairs in the lower apartment, all but the cloak. She was a lodger to Mrs. Green; she directed us up stairs.

GEORGE SMITH . I live at No. 12, Long Acre. On the 24th of March, a woman pledged a black silk cloak in the name of Jones; I advanced three shillings upon it.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am a constable. On the 26th of March, I took the prisoner in Royal Tent court, Kent-street, in the Borough. In the two pair of stairs room where I apprehended her, I found a pellise on the bed; the remainder of the articles I found below by the prisoner's direction.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lent me these things on the 23rd of March, I promised to bring them home on Friday; I parted with the cloak on Thursday night. On Monday night she told me if I would give her a two pound note, she would not take me before a justice.

Q. to prosecutrix. Did ever you lend her these things on the promise for her to bring them back on the Friday night. - A. No; nor she never asked me the question.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-75

336. CORNELIUS MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a brass boiler, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Wheeler .

JOSEPH WHEELER . I am a carpenter ; I live in George Yard, Whitechapel .

Q. Did you lose a brass boiler from your house at any time. - A. Yes; on the 31st of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

MARY WHEELER . Q. How old are you. - A. I am between fourteen and fifteen.

Q. Do you know of your father having lost a brass boiler from the back kitchen. - A. Yes. On Sunday the 31st of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming out of George Yard with the kettle; I told him it was my mother's, he made me no answer but walked off; I ran in doors and told my mother; my father went out one way and I the other. He was stopped in about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was the boiler stopped with him. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the boiler to be your father's. - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prosecutor. He had worked with me; he was out of work at the time. I believe he did it through want.

Prisoner's Defence. There is nothing more to be said about the subject at present.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-76

337. PETER HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. a pair of boots, value 4 s. and a neck handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of William Vaughn .

WILLIAM VAUGHN . I lodged in Suffolk-street ; I missed them about the 9th or 10th of March; the prisoner used to come in the morning to brush my clothes and clean my boots. The pantaloons were found at the pawnbrokers; I had given him them a few days before to give to my taylor to be altered, instead of taking them to the taylors he took them to the pawnbrokers. The boots were at the bootmakers for the purpose of getting a pair made by them.

Q. Had you sent them with him to the boot makers. - A. Yes. The handkerchief was in my room. On the 9th I desired him to produce the things he had of me that I might discharge him; instead of bringing them he offered me a great deal of abuse; he told me that if I paid him his wages I should have my things; if I did not I should have none of them; this was on the eleventh; I owed him for five weeks wages at five shillings a week; I told him he should have his wages as soon as he brought my things, and I was ready to discharge him; the next morning he came with the same abuse as he did before; in consequence of his telling me that the pantaloons were at the taylors, I sent there and found they had not got them; I then caused him to be taken up.

Prisoner. Mr. Vaughn, did not I ask you for a pound note to pay my lodgings. - A. No, you asked me no

such question.

JOHN OGLE . I am shopman to Mr. Payne, pawnbroker, 95, Wardour-street. On the 8th of March the prisoner pledged a pair of pantaloons for half a guinea in his own name.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the fields. On the 12th of March I was sent to take the prisoner in custody; the prisoner wanted me to let him go; he said he had got nothing of Mr. Vaughn's. I took him to the watchhouse; I found the pantaloons at the pawnbroker's; he said he had sold the boots, as I was taking him to Bow-street.

The property produced and identified.

Q. to prosecutor. You said you owed him five weeks wages; at the time of this discovery had he made any application to you for wages. - A. Yes, about a week or ten days before.

Q. Then three weeks must be due to him, that is fifteen shillings; how came you not to pay him. - A. I declined paying his wages till he brought them home; I told him so at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, this is a most cruel prosecution that ever was instituted against any man; I am indicted for robbing the prosecutor of a pair of boots and a pair of pantaloons; at the same time he has been owing me a sum of money which he means to deprive me of. I have had the honour of living with his royal highness the duke of Kent, and never was in custody upon the smallest matter before this unfortunate transaction; I have always endeavoured through life to live by my industry; and should have continued so, had not I entered into this house of Mr. Vaughn's, who had nothing to recommend him but poverty and want; I have been his greatest benefactor, and that he well knows; he could not have made the gentleman like appearance he did unless I had made influence with the tradesmen whom I knew, to serve him; and what he has done is to destroy me and deprive me of my wages; I will first of all explain to you how I came in possession of these articles; first of all he gave me a pair of boots which were fitted with clogs for himself. In a few days afterwards I found myself in want of money; I asked him for money; he answered, he had none, he was going to the pay office to get some, he then offered me the pantaloons, I offered to sell them in the house, the servants not buying them and I being in want of money, I pledged them for ten shillings and sixpence; with part of this money I bought breakfast for himself for four days afterwards; I told the prosecutor it was impossible for me to live unless he paid me my wages; he put himself in a passion and swore he would kick me down stairs; I informed him I would no longer remain in his service; finding me determined of quitting his service, he swore he would get me a situation himself if I did not bring him back the pantaloons; he immediately called for a servant, sent him for an officer and he swore at the public office that I had robbed him of a pair of boots and a pair of pantaloons; unfortunately I had no witness to prove that he had given them me; but God is my witness, he did; this matter is only brought on to ruin me for ever.

Q. to prosecutor. What are you. - A. I am a lieutenant in the 28th regiment of foot.

Q. Was he in the habit of buying any small articles of you. - A. No. Some boot top liquid he bought which is one shilling; I paid him for it.

Prisoner. My lord, if you will please to look at that, you will see that he had not a halfpenny in the world. (The prisoner handed a paper to the court.)

Q. to prosecutor. How long had he lived with you. - A. Five weeks.

Q. Do you remember having this bill presented to you. - A. No, I never saw this before; he bought milk for me six days at sixpence per day; for which I paid him three shillings; Mr. Robinson has been in the habit of finding me breakfast; Mr. Robinson has an account against me.

Q. Do you not know that this man has made a claim as being furnished by him. - A. I never received a bill or claim from him but what I paid.

Q. Did not you hear it claimed by him till he was taken up. - A. Not a sentence of it. At Bow-street he made a claim for going of messages as well as being a servant, but never before. I agreed to give him five shillings a week, which was adequate to what he did for me; that bill never was presented to me.

Q. Did you ever tell him you would pay him but you must go to the agency office first. - A. I never did assign any reason of that kind.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18080406-77

338. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , a sheet, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Patterson .

MARGARET PATTERSON . I am the wife of Thomas Patterson , hair-dresser , No. 28, Merrick-street . I take in washing; I lost two sheets of my customers on Ash Wednesday, a little after twelve o'clock, it was hanging up to dry at the back part of the house.

Q. Is your street door generally open. - A. It is. The constable brought me the sheet

Q. When the sheet was produced to you did you know it was the one you had to wash. - A. Yes.

JAMES SLADE . I am a constable of St. James's. On Ash Wednesday I was called to the Conduit in Upper Conduit-street; this woman sat in a box with a sheet by her, wet; the prisoner seemed rather stupid with drink, I found the name of Lancaster, St. James's-street, on the sheet; I went and shewed Mrs. Lancaster the sheet; she said it was hers, she marked it herself; she directed me to the washerwoman.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going down Maddox-street a woman tapped me on the shoulder, she offered me this sheet for sale, I told her I did not want to buy any thing of the kind; she said I should have it very cheap; she pleaded her distress, I told her, if she would go into the the public house I would, buy it before the landlady; if I had stole it I would have put it in my pocket. I did not.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-78

339. WILLIAM DAVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , fourteen deal boards, value 6 s. the property of George Marsden .

GEORGE MARSDEN . I am a carpenter , I live in Martha-street, St. George's in the East.

Q. Did you lose fourteen deal boards on the 27th of of February. - A. Yes, from a building in Spencer street , I was finishing the inside of a house. On the 13th of February the prisoner was finishing the last floor, I said, Davey, you have got boards enough to finish this floor, he said he should want one; there was nobody employed in finishing the floor but him. I found boards put away in a private place; I marked four of them, they remained in the place till the 27th; I found them gone in the afternoon.

Q. Then we must only enquire about them - on the afternoon of the 27th you found four boards gone away - what is the worth of the four boards. - A. About three shillings and six pence; I went with the constable to the prisoner's room, there I found the boards which I had put the private mark on, they were in the fire place; the prisoner said he had had the boards a long time before he came to work for me; I saw the private mark on them; he had planed them over, but not so as to take out the private mark.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Publickly Whipped , and Confined One Year in the of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-79

341. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of February , a brass handle, value 6 d. the property of William Littlewood , affixed to his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Arabin.

DANIEL BERRY . - Mr. Arabin. You are servant to a gentleman, I believe in Brunswick square. - A. Yes, to Mr. Bromley, in Brunswick square.

Q. Were you in Lamb's Conduit street, on the 22nd of February last. - A. I was; about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner upon the steps of Mr. Littlewood's door, No. 40, Lamb's Conduit street . I had a suspicion that he was after the handle of the door, as there were a number of handles lost in the neighbourhood; I saw him wrench the handle. and he dropped the handle on the steps; I told the watchman what I saw; when we got into Lansdowne place, I said stop my friend; then he ran; the watchman halloed out stop thief; I took him across the square, he had an apron on, he threw it down, it was full of handles; I saw him throw an iron crow and a turn screw over the irons rails; I saw the person pick it up, it was given me at the watchhouse. I can take my oath to the man at the bar; I only lost sight of him for a moment when he turned the corner.

MR. CANNAN. This is the handle that fits the door of Mr. Littlewood, affixed to the door, it is worth two shillings.

MR. LITTLEWOOD. I saw it fitted, it fitted exactly.

Q. Where is your house situated - A. No. 40, Lamb's Conduit street, in the parish of St. George the martyr.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of your lordship, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-80

342. ELIZABETH KEARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , two sheets , the property of Thomas Harrison .

THOMAS HARRISON . I keep the New Hummums , Covent Garden , the prisoner was in my employ. I missed the sheets on the 8th of March; when the sheets were produced to me, I knew they were mine.

WILLIAM DICKERS . I am a pawnbroker's servant, the corner of Bedford street, in the Strand; the prisoner offered one sheet to pawn on the 8th of March. I stopped it; I asked her whose sheet it was, she said it belonged to Mr. Smith; and the other sheet was brought before by another woman. I saw the name of Harrison on them, I sent to him, Mr. Godfry came; he identified them to be Mr. Harrison's, and she was stopped.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave one of these sheets to the other woman to pawn, she went with the sheet to the pawnbrokers, and that man that stands there, he is a perjured person, he kept that one sheet; I had joined with this woman in the lottery; I never asked that man any thing on the sheet; the other woman when she saw the name on the sheet, she slipped out; I told him I had got them to wash; I said if he would be so kind as to let me have them I would take them home to my master, he said no, I will not let you; they fetched. Mr. Godfry.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of one sheet. - A. Nineteen shillings.

GUILTY, aged 56.

Fined One Shilling . and discharged.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-81

343. JOHN LAXAN and HANNAH LAXAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , twenty earthen plates, value 4 s. eight earthen dishes, value 4 s. two earthen tureens, value 4 s. two china coffee cups, value 1 s. four tea cups, value 1 s. four tea saucers, value 1 s. a sugar bason, value 2 s. a milk pot, value 6 d. a wine glass, value 1 s. two glass tumblers, value 1 s. a stone jar, value 4 d. a copper saucepan, value 4 s. eight forks, value 8 d. seven knives, value 7 d. a blanket, value 3 s. three yards of carpeting, value 12 s. two sheets, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. two pillow cases, value 3 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of John Champion ; - six glass cruets, value 4 s. a leather stand, value 4 s. two cruets, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Champion ; - a pair of shoes, value 2 s. a pair of mits, value 1 s. a habit shirt, value 1 s. and one half handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Ann Champion .

JOHN CHAMPION . I live in Mincing lane, Fenchurch street , the prisoner was in my service; I missed the articles about a fortnight after the prisoner left my service, she left my service on the 16th of March last; we had suspicion of her about five or six weeks ago; we applied to Worship street office for a warrant, and I went in company with the officer and searched the house.

Q. How came you not to apply when you suspected her about the latter end of November. - A. We staid. to get the best evidence we could till we applied for the

warrant; she gave notice to leave, saying she was going to be married.

Q. Is Thomas Champion your brother. - A. Yes; he did not live in the house with me; Ann Champion lived in the house with me, she is a relation.

Q. Where did you find this woman. - A. We found her at a house in Tabernacle walk, the other side of Finsbury square; in the room where she was we found some tea cups; when the officer read over the warrant, she denied every thing of having these things in her possession.

Q. There is twenty earthen plates, did you miss them. - A. We did not miss them; we found a deficiency, we did not know but what they might have been broke; many of the articles were not in use; we missed the three yards of carpet; two sheets we missed. One was found.

Q. What did the prisoner say. - A. She said nothing, she appeared guilty.

Q. Did the husband use to come and visit her at your house. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. The principal part of this indictment comprizes a great deal of crockery ware out of use - do you mean to swear to them. - A. I have not sworn to them.

Q. The man prisoner was not at home when you found the things - he had not been a servant of yours. A. No.

Q. Yet you indicted him - this was missed in November, all of it. - A. I did not say so.

Q. When did you begin to miss these things. - A. About a month after.

Q. That was in December - what is your business. - A. I am a grocer.

Q. Although you suspected this woman, not one word of a warrant was thought of till February. - A. I did not apply for it till then.

ANN CHAMPION . Q. Do you live at Mr. John Champion 's house, Mincing lane. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect this woman being in his service. A. Yes.

Q. During the time that she was in his service did you miss any of the property. - A. Yes; and I missed a pair of mitts and a half handkerchief.

Q. Did she leave your service for the purpose of going to be married. - A. Yes, she came on the 16th of September, and left us on the 17th of November.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer. On Friday the 19th of February I attended with the search warrant; Mr. Champion and Miss Champion were present; I went to No. 6. Tabernacle walk; they had a shop and a little back room. I read the warrant; then I asked if she had any property in her possession belonging to Mr. Champion; she said none at all; there was a piece of carpet mentioned among other things, I saw it lay on the floor of the back room; Miss Champion believed it to be theirs; a copper was standing on the fire in the back room. Miss Champion believed that to be their property, they had lost such a one. Bishop took a blanket and sheet out of the bed. Miss Champion knew that the prisoner seemed confused, I did not think it prudent to ask her any more questions. In the two rooms the prisoner occupied I found all the articles.

(The property produced and identified)

John Laxon was not put on his defence.

Hannah Laxon left her defence to her counsel, and called no witness to her character.

JOHN LAXON , NOT GUILTY ,

HANNAH LAXON , GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Month's in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-82

344. WILLIAM BOOT , and THOMAS CROZIER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , one hundred and twelve pound weight of pepper, value 3 l. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East-Indies .

Second count for like offence, the property to the jurors unknown.

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN RIDER . - Mr. Bolland. You are assistant elder in the East India Company's warehouse. - A. Yes, I had the care of all the pepper belonging to the company at Blackwall.

Q. Had you any pepper that had been brought to you by the Lord Nelson. - A. Yes, I had between two and three thousand bags.

Q. Had any of the pepper that had been brought by the Lord Nelson, been sent to the kiln. - A. Yes, I caused one hundred and twenty damaged bags to be put in parcels of five each.

Mr. Alley. I suppose you know only from your books, you have no recollection of the circumstance. - A. Yes, I know it from my own memory. On the next morning the 23d of February, one of the East-India company's caravans came to be loaded.

Mr. Bolland. How many bags were put into the caravan. - A. Sixty to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Was that pepper to be sent to the kiln to be dryed for the purpose of using it. - A. Yes, the kiln is in Cutler's street, Honnsditch, in Mr. Barnjum's yard.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners. - A. I have seen them often with the East India company's caravans. Mr. Barnjum is a master carman; he employed them. I received a note back signifying that five were lost; when I received information that there had been but fifty five delivered instead of sixty, I went to Spitalfields watchhouse, there I examined a sack of pepper.

COURT. How many sacks did you find there. - A. One; it had been a corn sack, it contained pepper; being out of the company's sack, I could not tell what it weighed.

Q. Can you ascertain who that belonged to. - A. I should suppose the East-India company; because I do not know any other merchants that import pepper.

Q. Was the pepper damaged. - A. Yes, the company do not sell pepper in that state; there were certain things found in the pepper that corresponded with the pepper found in the Lord Nelson. In the first place it was damaged pepper, there was paddy and gram, which is something of the tea kind that grows in India, and there were some small stones and some coals, it appeared to me to be in the same state as the pepper I sent brought by the Lord Nelson.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I take it for granted that you have a variety of pepper that is damaged. - A. Yes.

Q. Now the sack that you found this pepper in was not the company's sack. - A. No, the company's sacks are marked.

Q. If the pepper had been put in the caravan to be taken to the kiln, they were in sacks that belonged to the company - therefore if any pepper was taken away it was taken out of the caravan in the company's bags - A. Of course.

Q. You know the order given to the carman is that he do not stop on the road, the caravan has two locks on it, one is the companys lock and the other is the King's lock - A. Yes.

Q. It is not an open cart it is such a cart in which you may see them carry wild beasts about - A. Exactly so; the carman is not entrusted with the key of these locks.

WILLIAM BROWN . I have the care of the kiln in Cutler's street, Hounsditch.

Q. Do you remember the caravan arriving at the East India warehouse - A. Yes. On the 23rd of February last; this kiln and warehouse is in Mr. Barnjum's yard; it belongs to the East India company.

Q. On the unloading was there any deficiency - A. There were fifty five, there were five deficient; I have seen the pepper that was taken from the prisoners; I knew it immediately, it was damaged pepper, there was paddy and gram amongst it; I have no doubt but it was the property of the East India company. It was in a sack marked I. Matravers and co. I knew the prisoners, they were employed as carmen by Mr. Barnjum.

Court. You know the bags in which the company imports - A. Yes; the pepper bag is larger than the corn sack; the pepper bag contains a hundred pounds neat weight when we send it to the kiln.

Q. What was the quantity of pepper found at the watchhouse - A. I did not see it weighed; I guess it to be about a hundred and twenty five pounds in my own mind.

ROBERT CUTTER . Q. You are locker to the customs are you not - A. Yes. On the 23rd of February I was stationed at the East India companies warehouse, Blackwall; on that day sixty bags were told into the caravan.

Q. As locker to the customs it is your duty to tell the bags as they are put into the caravan - A. I stood there for that purpose; I saw the company's lock and the Kings lock put on.

EDWARD LEFEVRE . Q. What are you - A. I am headborough of the parish of Spitalfields. On the 28th of February, about two o'clock in the morning, I was proceeding from the watchhouse with the patrol, our beadle, and the watchhouse keeper; we came into Wentworth street, which is in the middle of Petticoat lane; we came to the corner of the India warehouse; I heard a whispering noise down Harrow alley, upon which I let go Harts arm; he said I will cross over the way and try if he could hear what is going forward; I waited at the corner of the India warehouse half a minute, when a jew man of the name of Levi, came round the corner and ran against me; I had some knowledge of this man and he of me. Levi keeps a house in Petticoat lane; upon which I observed him have his hat on his head, and a man's hat in his hand; I thought things was not right, I crossed over the way; when I first spoke to him he seemed perfectly sober, but when I went on with him to his house about midway he appeared to be perfectly drunk; we followed him to his own steps, he went in; I desired Mr. Hart to wait with me at the corner; we had not waited one moment before the two prisoners came up with the bag of pepper; Levi's house is situated at the corner of Frying Pan alley, and they had just turned the corner of the front of the house; I ran and seized Crozier. Hart took the other with the bag of pepper; we conveyed them to the watchhouse after a deal of trouble.

Q. What passed at the time of the apprehension - A. They were asked where they got these things; they said somebody asked them to carry it, they did not know who it was nor where they were going to; there were five or six fellows at the moment we took them came with intent as I thought to rescue them; they said d - n your eyes what have you got there, what are you going to do here; the three patrols at that time were about fifty yards off with the two prisoners; Hart fell at that moment with the pepper; with a deal of difficulty I kept them off; in the end I secured the two prisoners and one other man besides, which the magistrate thought fit to let go; the prisoners behaved in an orderly manner themselves.

THOMAS HART . Q. You are beadle and headborough of Christ church parish, Spitalfields - A. Yes; I was with the last witness on duty in Petticoat lane; close by Mr. Levi's house we saw these two men come up; Boot had the pepper on his back, Crozier was close to him; I asked Boot what he had got there; he said he did not know; I catched hold of it, he chucked it off his shoulders; I asked him where he brought it from; he said from Whitechapel end of Petticoat lane; he was carrying it for somebody, he did not know who nor where he was going with it. At the watchhouse I untied the sack and found it was pepper; on the sack was Matravers and co. That is the sack I took from Boot, I have had it ever since.

Mr. Rider. The pepper is changed now being in the sack at the time I saw it at the watchhouse; I had no doubt but what it was the same pepper that came with the Lord Nelson, and belonged to the East India company.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Crozier called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOOT, GUILTY aged 40.

CROZIER, GUILTY aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

Reference Number: t18080406-83

345. HUGH M'QUYENNY , JOSEPH NICHOLS , NATHANIEL SHERIFF , INGRAM WOOD , ROBERT WOOD , and JOSEPH WOOD , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , two bushel of beans, value 9 s. one bushel and a half of horsebeans, value 8 s. one half bushel of kidney beans, value 8 s. four bushel of hats, and a sack, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Edward Hoare .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

BENJAMIN WOOLMER . Q. You are clerk to the prosecutor. - A. I am.

Q. Who is the proprietor of Hoare's wharf - A. Edward Hoare ; the wharf is in Wapping just by Hermitage bridge.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. I do. M'Yuheny and Sheriff, are are porters .

Q. What is Nichols and Groute. - A. They were carmen in Mr. Hoare's employ, also Ingram Wood is a master butcher . Robert and Joseph Wood are butchers , they lived with their brother.

Q. Has Mr. Hoare any stables there. - A. He has, between his dwelling house and the wharf gate; the stables, dwelling house, and accompting house are all under one roof. On the 28th of March, last; about six o'clock in the evening, passing from the accompting house to the wharf I overheard Robert Wood , inform Groute, that the cart would be there directly. I went on to the wharf, I was determined to watch till the cart came. I returned to the accompting house and waited about five minutes, I then saw Ingram Wood drive his cart up to his shop door, he got down and was in discourse with his brother Robert; he returned to the cart again and drove the cart to Mr. Hoare's stable putting the tail of the cart to the stable door. I then passed again to the wharf and returned in about three minutes afterwards; and I observed the tail board of the cart being up. I looked in and saw two sacks.

Q. Had you seen any of the prisoners before you saw the cart. - A. No, I observed M'Quyenny, Nichols, and Groute, at the stable door. Ingram Wood was at the tail of the cart, pulling some straw forward from the hind part of the cart to the forepart; when I returned I saw two sacks, they were full of something. I called M'Yuyenny. I told him he was wanted upon the wharf; he went directly, at this time Joseph Wood came and drove the cart away with two sacks in it. I asked M'Quyenny what grain it was he had been loading, he answered that it was the sweepings which he had bought on board the Duchess of Gordon; he paid nine shillings for it, and sold it for eleven shillings. I told him the sacks belonged to the wharf, which he acknowledged; they were oatmeal sacks belonging to Mr. Preston, they were lodged with us, he said the sacks should be returned directly; I then asked Joseph Nichols who had the care of this stable from which the grain was loaded, what grain it was had been loaded in Wood's cart; for the first two or three minutes he said he knew nothing about it; he afterwards said he believed it was sweepings which Mr. M'Yuyenny had bought; I then went on board the Duchess of Gordon, made some enquiry, in consequence of which I went to M'Quyenny the second time and told him he had given me a wrong account of the grain which he had put into Wood's cart. He said he knew nothing about it, no farther than he saw Richard Groute get it out of the wharf, from where he could not say. On the next day I went to Richard Groute , Nichols was present. Groute said he knew nothing at all of it. I told him what I heard on the 28th, that Robert Wood informed him the cart would be there directly, he must know something of it; he then said he knew no more of it than M'Quyenny. On the 28th wished him to go to Wood and tell him to send his cart with two sacks, and he would give him part of a pot of beer for so doing.

Q. Have you seen the sacks, the oats and the beans since. - A. I have they were in the possession of our wharf.

JOHN GILLAM . Q. You are the mate of the Duchess of Gordon. - A. Yes, she was laying at Hoare's wharf Hermitage.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's. - A. All of them by sight.

Q. Did you out of the Duchess of Gordon ever sell any sweepings. - A. Never, we were loaded with oats, they were all delivered before we came to the wharf, we had no sweepings.

THOMAS MAXWELL . Q. You are a porter in the service of Mr. Hoare. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Sheriff. - A. Yes, he is a porter in Mr. Hoare's service.

Q. How was he employed on the 28th of March - A. He was employed in different parts of the wharf to lower corn down. He was shifting of oats out of the warehouse down on the wharf.

WILLIAM HOARE . Q. You are nephew to the prosecutor. - A. I am.

Q. I believe you have the manage of this wharf. - A. I have.

Q. Do you know the prisoners. - A. The whole of them. On Tuesday the 29th of March, in consequence of a search warrant, I went to Ingram Wood's stable situated on Frier's hill, Great Hermitage street, accompanied with Gillmer the officer; and Ingram Wood was with us. He gave the officer the key of the stable, and Gillmer opened the door. There I saw a sack and part of another standing on the ground, direct in front of the door from the appearance of these sacks I had no doubt they were the sacks that were taken from the wharf. I asked Ingram Wood if they were the sacks he brought away the night before from the stable, on the wharf in the hearing of the officer; he said they were, and in the same state they then stood. I looked into each sack, one of which contained oats, and the other a mixture of beans; on taking a handful of the beans, I knew them to be the property of Mr. Hoare.

JOHN SMITH . Q. You are a Thames police officer. - A. Yes. On Tuesday the 29th of March, in company with Gillmer, I apprehended M'Quyenny and Nichols, on the wharf; we took them to the office; we then proceeded to the house of Ingram Wood, with a search warrant, and apprehended Ingram Wood, Joseph Wood , and Robert Wood . On searching the house in the garret, there were three sacks of different sort of oats, on the floor. Mr. Hoare saw them the next morning, he could not identify them.

Q. At the time of their apprehension did either of the prisoners say any thing to you. - A. Ingram Wood told me that he had bought them for sweepings out of the Duchess of Gordon.

Mr. Gurney. Could any man conduct himself with more propriety. - A. I do not think it it possible a man could.

JOHN GALLMER . Q. You are an officer of the

Thames police; did you go to Ingram Wood's stable. - A I did; I there found two sacks containing oats and beans; Ingram Wood acknowledged buying them, he said he had never looked at them; he understood they were sweepings.

The property produced and identified.

M'Quyenny and Nichols said nothing in their defence.

Sherriff's Defence. I was not there.

Ingram Wood's Defence. I bought this grain, not knowing that it was stolen. The moment they came I said I supposed they had come after the sweepings that I had bought of his men; I immediately went to the stable and pointed them out; what my brother did, was by my order.

Ingram Wood called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

M'QUYENNY, GUILTY , aged 53.

NICHOLS, GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

INGRAM WOOD, GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

SHERRIFF, NOT GUILTY .

ROBERT WOOD , NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH WOOD , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-84

346. ANN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of February , a handkerchief, value 3 d. a decanter, value 2 d. a glass, value 1 d. a copper pepper box, value 2 d. a bottle filled with brandy, value 4 s. a bottle filled with gin, value 2 s. and six shillings and fivepence three farthings , the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I live at No. 23, Puckeridge street, St. Giles' , the prisoner was my servant . On Sunday the 21st of February, about two in the afternoon I received information from Eleanor Gosgin : in consequence of what she told me, I went into the two pair of stairs bed room; I charged her with taking copper money out of the drawer; the drawer was full; she replied she had not taking any copper, and that the child had often told lies of her before; I asked her to shew me her pockets; she turned them inside out, there were between three and four pennyworth of halfpence, nothing like the quantity I expected to find.

Q. Was your little girl in the room at the time. - A. Yes, and my wife; I saw a tin box, I asked her if that belonged to her; she said it did, it laid on the top of the bed. I searched that bed I found nothing there; I searched a turnup bed in the same room there I found the copper on the top of it, in a dirty handkerchief, apparently thrown just thrown in.

Q. How much in copper. - A. Six shillings and fivepence three farthings.

Q. Did the prisoner claim that handkerchief. - A. She did not claim it; she did not deny taking the copper money; after I found it I asked her if she was not ashamed of taking it, and how she could say she had not taken it when the child was looking at her; she made no answer to that; I asked the prisoner to give me leave to search her lodgings; the officer brought some things.

Q. We cannot enter into that business because they were taken at a different time - you said the drawer was full of halfpence, what sized drawer was it. - A. It was a large wide drawer full of halfpence.

Q. You could not tell whether the bulk was less or not. - A. We could not because there were so many in it.

ELEANOR GOSLING . Q. How old are you - A Ten years.

Q. Have you learned the Lord's prayer - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know there is a God in heaven. - A. Yes.

Q. Will he punish bad people. - A. Yes.

Q. Supposing you were to tell a lie here - upon your oath do you think God would punish you for that. - A. Yes, he would put me into everlasting fire.

Q. You are to tell nothing but the truth, and God will love you and every body will love you - do you know that woman standing at the bar. - A. I have known her this twelve months, she was a servant of my mother's.

Q. What relation are you to Mr. Griffith's. - A. His step daughter.

Q. Did you see her at any time that day do any thing. - A. Yes; I saw her take the halfpence out of the drawer, where my father keeps his halfpence; she sent me up stairs to got the cruet stand, I heard the drawer open; I pulled off my shoes, come down stairs and leaned across the the bannisters; I saw her she was trying to take as many new halfpence as she could; she put one handfull in her pocket; I came down stairs directly; when I came into the room where the money was, she had money all along her arms.

Q. Do you mean copper money. - A. Halfpence; she took two plates in her hand to try to shade the money from me; she turned to the stairs and put the plates upon the table; she called the young child to her, she took the child in her left hand and a kettle in her right hand and went up stairs.

Q. Did you see how she disposed of the halfpence she took the second time. - A. No. When she went up stairs she dropped an old tower halfpenny; I picked it up after she went up stairs, she did not see me pick it up; I laid it on the table, and called my mother; I told my mother what I had seen; she went up stairs and told my father.

Q. In consequence of your father being told what you had seen did you all go up stairs to the prisoner. A. Yes; my father told the prisoner what I had seen; she said she had not taken any halfpence, and it was not the first time I had told stories about her; my father looked on the bed; he found a little tin box, he found no halfpence on that bed; the halfpence were found in a little turn up bedstead; I was in the room when they were found; then my father told me to go for a Bow street officer.

Q. Was it a good number of halfpence. - A. Six shillings and fivepence three farthings.

MICHAEL LEA . I was sent for to take charge of this woman.

Q. Was the little girl present. - A. Yes, she came for me; I searched her room; I found these things. I produce them; these are the halfpence that was delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the child in my hand,

and went up stairs; it was not above five or six minutes when they followed me, the mother asked me if I took any thing out of the drawer, and asked to look in my pockets; I said my pockets stand in defence to you or any body else; I had my tin box on the bed, and what I had of my own in my pockets was ten shillings and sixpence; she said I must have hid them; they searched the children's bed; and found the halfpence, then they gave me up in custody.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-85

347. WILLIAM DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , a coat, value 1 l. 5 s. a waistcoat, value 6 s. a handkerchief, value 5 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of Alexander Stewart .

ALEXANDER STEWART . I am a seaman .

Q. Is the prisoner a seamen - A. Yes, by his appearance; I live at No. 4, Harp alley, Buckingham street.

Q. What do you accuse this man of - A. Of taking my coat, waistcoat, handkerchief and shirt on the 15th of March; on the 27th of February he came to my house to lodge, he said he had just come out of Newgate, he was destitute of money and clothes, he had been arrested for debt just as he arrived from the West Indies; my waistcoat, coat, and handkerchief, were hanging on the line to dry in the room; I left the room for any thing he might want in the night; I locked my outer door at half after ten at night; in the morning I sent my boy in to light the fire, he informed me Dunn was not there. I got up and found my things gone. I went to a house in Wapping, I found the prisoner there sitting by the fire side; he had my waistcoat and shirt on, he denied having my coat and handkerchief. The woman of the house said she would tell the truth and shame the devil - she said he came to her house the evening before, and said he came out of Newgate; he had a great coat on, she sent it out that morning to pawn for ten shillings.

Prisoner. Was not you the man that gave me the shirt the first time that I came to your house - A. No, I lent you a flannel shirt, I did not lend you the cotton shirt, the coat, nor the waistcoat.

JOHN SMITH . I belong to the Thames police. In consequence of information from the prosecutor I went to Mrs. Callam's, King street, Wapping; I saw the prisoner sitting by the fire side; the prosecutor told me that was the man he was in search of. I asked him what he had done with the great coat and the other articles belonging to this man; he at first denied all knowledge of the things. Mrs. Callam knowing me, she told me she would tell the truth - she told me she had sent the great coat by Mrs. Hayes to pawn in Anchor and Hope alley, Wapping. I took the prisoner in custody. On searching him at the office I found three shirts on him, a red flannel one and two check cotton shirts, and a waistcoat; one of these shirts and waistcoat the prosecutor said were his; the landlady gave me the duplicate of the coat. The pawnbroker produced the coat at the office.

ELEANOR CALLAM . I live in King street, Wapping; the prisoner lodged with me, he told me had just come out of Newgate; I sent Mary Hayes to pawn the coat; he said he would take it out on the Tuesday following.

MR. BRADLEY. I am a pawnbroker; I took the coat in of Mary Hayes on the 16th of March.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The coat, waistcoat, and shirt they lent me; the coat was on the bed; he said it would keep me warm and comfortable; he said if I went out I might put it round me; he wanted to make my will and power to him, and that was the reason I was put in prison.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined in Newgate Fourteen Days , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-86

348. ABRAHAM FELIX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a quilt, value 10 s. the property of Robert Oldfield .

MARY OLDFIELD . My husband's name is Robert Oldfield , he is a cabinet maker , we keep a broker's shop , No. 100, Whitecross street . On the 11th of February the prisoner brought an old chair for me to buy, he knocked at the door, I answered him, he said, mistress, will you buy an old chair; I was rather in the dark, I went into my kitchen to fetch a light; in the mean time I went to fetch a light he took the quilt off the chair that was in the shop, and left his old chair.

Q. Did you ever see your quilt again. - A. No, I am sure he is the person, I knew him some time before he is in the militia; he was not dressed then as he is now, he had a brown jacket on; I am sure the quilt was on the chair in the shop when he came up to the door with the chair.

THOMAS ARCHER . I am a servant to Mr. Simpson, he keeps a broker's shop, No. 94, Whitecross street; the prisoner brought a chair to my master's house on the 11th of February, between seven and eight o'clock; I told him I could not buy it, my master and mistress was out.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. He looks like the man; he is the man, he had a brown jacket on.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer belonging to Worship street office; I apprehended the prisoner at Blackheath, he was then on duty, he belongs to the West London militia; I told him I took him for stealing a quilt the property of Mr. Oldfield; he said he knew nothing about it.

Q. You never found the quilt - A. No; I searched his quarters.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday evening the 11th of February I was at my quarters Church street, Greenwich; upon account of our being inspected by lord Banbury, I was obliged to go to my quarters to get my things ready; the next morning there were a great many people that would have come forward to prove I was there, but now it is so long afterwards I know nothing of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-87

349. ANN NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , a dollar, value 5 s two guineas, three half guineas, seven seven-shilling pieces, thirty four shillings, and three sixpences , the property of William Whittaker .

WILLIAM WHITTAKER. I am collecting clerk to Mr. Rowley, a brewer , Charles street, Mile End New Town. On my returning home on the 25th of February, about half after eight o'clock at night. I was a little the worse for liquor, I met the prisoner opposite the Red Lion, Whitechapel, she took hold of my arm and asked me to go with her; she took me to a house in George yard, Whitechapel ; I went up stairs to the first floor with her, there was a bed the room, we went in bed together; I was in the room about five minutes; when we came off the bed she asked me to bring the candle down stairs; she went and stood on the stairs and asked me if I was coming. I was not a minute after her; I brought the candle down stairs and found she was gone. I asked the people of the house whether she was there, they said no, she was just gone out of the house. I went towards Whitechapel to see if I could find her, I went about a hundred yards farther, I found my money was all gone, it was in a canvas bag, to the amount of eight guineas in gold and silver of different coins, and amongst it was a crown piece that I had taken for a cask of beer of Mrs. Buzzard. I went back to the people of the house and told them that I had been robbed of my money; they said they were very sorry, but they did not know the person. I took the candle and went up to see if it was on the bed; it was not. I went there in about half an hour afterwards, and asked if the person that I had been with was there, they said no; I went about the streets two hours to see if I could see her any where, but could not see her. I went to Lambeth street office the next morning, I met with Mr. Griffiths, I told him I had been robbed of my money in George yard; he went with me to the house and asked the people if they knew the person I was with last night, they said they did not know; we met with her in Crown court, Wentworth street. In searching her we found to the amount of eight pounds three shillings; and amongst it was the crown piece that I had taken that day.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, is she the woman. A. I am sure she is the woman; I had never seen her before, but I am certain she is the person.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth street office. I went to this house in George yard on on the 26th of February, and from there I went to No. 5, Crown court, Wentworth street; there I found the prisoner and another young woman in the room; I asked the prosecutor which was the woman that he complained had robbed him; he pointed out the prisoner. I asked her if she knew any thing about this man's money, she said no; I searched her, found in her pocket two guineas, three half guineas, seven seven shilling pieces, one dollar, called a crown piece, thirty four shillings and three sixpences. I told her I expected that to be the man's money that she had robbed him of; she said no, it was her own money I searched her room I found some duplicates, eight or nine, and one of the duplicates is on the day the robbery was committed; that day she had pledged a gown for twelve shillings; I told her it was very odd she should pledge a gown for twelve shillings when she had got eight pound odd about her; she made an excuse that she did not like the pattern; I desired the prosecutor to look at the money; he did; he pointed out this dollar to be one he had taken on that day; he told me he could take me to the lady that paid it him in Jewry street; I went with him to the lady and shewed her the dollar; the lady said she had paid him the dollar; he described to me that he had lost two guineas, he could not account for the half guineas or the seven shilling pieces; he said in different gold and silver, but he did not account what the pieces were that were taken on that day; there is in the whole eight pounds three shillings; the prosecutor said he had lost in the whole eight guineas.

HARRIET BUZZARD . Q. All you know is that you paid him a dollar on that day - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord - this gentleman I met with, about seven o'clock in the evening; we went to a house and I went on a bed with him; I knew nor saw any more of his money than three shillings he gave me; he came down with me and shook hands with me, and bid me good night; I had not the least idea that he had any money to lose. The next morning this gentleman came to my apartment, and finding money in my pocket, which I had made a reserve for my children, which I have had by different men; I am an unfortunate woman in the street, I am sorry to say it; the money was taken from me.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080406-88

350. ANN PRICE , and MARGARET WEZER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Elizabeth Norris , widow .

ELIZABETH NORRIS . I am a widow woman, I live in Shadwell High street . I keep a haberdasher's shop .

Q. On the 6th of April did you lose two pair of stockings from your shop - A. Yes; about half past seven o'clock in the evening, both the prisoners came in, they asked for a pair of black stockings at about two shillings, or half a crown; I shewed them the two shilling ones first; they did not approve of them; I then shewed them two pair of half crown ones, they told me they would not do, they could buy cheaper away they went; scarce a second after they were gone I missed two pair of stockings, that I had in paper and that I shewed them, of the finest sort.

Q. Of what value were they - A. Two shillings and sixpence a pair; Mr. Fisher watched them when they were in my shop he came into my shop; he watched them to a pawnbrokers, they offered to pawn them for eighteen pence a pair; I knew the stockings again.

MR. FISHER. I am a linen draper, 87, Shadwell. On the 6th of April, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners were in my shop; in consequence of suspicion I followed them to Mrs. Norris' shop; I saw them come out. I went in and

communicated my suspicion to Mrs. Norris; I saw the prisoner Wezer go into a pawnbroker's shop, about twelve or fourteen doors off; I stood at the pawnbroker's window; I saw Wezer take a pair of black worsted stockings from her right hand pocket and lay them on the counter to pawn; I immediately went to Mrs. Norris, told her the circumstance: she told me she had missed two pair of stockings; I applied to an officer; he and I went together; we detected the prisoners as the pawnbroker was making out the duplicate for the two pair of stockings; Ann Price was standing behind the door; we took them and the stockings from the pawnbroker's to Mrs. Norris's; Margaret Wezer had both the pair of stockings; Mrs. Norris said they were her stockings.

WILLIAM CURLING . I am headborough of Shadwell. I apprehended both the prisoners at the pawnbroker's shop.

Q. Had either of them any black stockings with them - A. Yes; Wezer. I took both the prisoner's back to Mrs. Norris; I showed her the stockings, she said they were her property, and that both the prisoners had been in her shop; Price said she should not have taken the stockings without she had been distressed.

The property produced and identified.

Wezer's Defence. I am innocent of the affair.

Price's Defence. I was in distress; I through myself on the mercy of the court; I will clear her and take all upon myself.

PRICE, GUILTY aged 54.

WEZER, GUILTY aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-89

351. WALTER COOK was indicted for that he on the 26th of April, in the 45th year of his Majesty's reign , was servant to James Paulain , John Levasque and James Paulain , Junior , and was entrusted to receive money for them, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 4 l. 15 s. on their account, and that he fraudulently did embezzle, secrete and steal the same .

The case was stated by M. Gurney.

MR. TIPCAP. - Mr. Gurney. What are you - A. I am a book binder; I live at No. 7, Bull and Mouth-street.

Q. Do you deal with Messers. Paulain and Levasque. - A. Yes, many years; I have known the prisoner many years. These two receipts I found upon my file; I always made the payment to the best of my remembrance it never was made by any other hand.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner write. - A. I have seen him write; I am certain that receipt is the prisoner's hand writing.

JOHN LEVASQUE . Q. What are the names of your partners. - A. James Paulain the elder, and James Paulain the younger, and myself.

Q. In the month of April, 1805, and down till lately was the prisoner your clerk. - A. He was; and before that time.

Q. In that character was he entrusted and empowered to receive money on your account. - A. He was; it was part of his business to go out and receive small bills of our customers.

Q. When he so went out did he carry with him any book. - A. Not generally.

Q. When he came home what was of course his duty. A. To have paid the money and to have it entered in a day book; and when he paid it in, the first letter of his name, C. was always inserted; he generally accounted to me or Mr. Paulain, junior.

Q. Whose hand writing is the bill. - A. The bill and receipt, the whole of the writing part I take to be Mr. Cook's.

"The amount of the bill is four pound fifteen shillings. Received, April the 26th, 1805, four pound fifteen shillings;" the bill delivered up to lady day last in the day receiving book. On that day he accounted with Mr. Paulain, Junior.

Q. Have the goodness, sir, to look at the entry, 26th of April, 1805; do you find that he accounted with you for the sum of four pound fifteen shillings as received from Mr. Tipcap. - A. He did not.

JAMES PAULAIN , JUNIOR. Q. I ask you, sir, whether on the 26th of April the prisoner accounted to you for the sum of four pound fifteen shillings, as received from Mr. Tipcap. - A. He never accounted to me for that sum of money.

Q. Have the goodness, sir, to refer to your ledger, to Mr. Tipcap's account; do you find any entry there of January 12th, cash - two pound five shillings. - A. Yes. and June 1st, cash two pound ten shillings; both 1805.

Q. Are these two entries your hand writing, - A. They are not.

Q. Are they like yours. - A. At first sight; not when I come to look at them; the two first are not mine.

Q. Independent of the two, who are the persons that made the entries in that book. - A. I was one, and Mr. Levasque the other.

Q. Did Cook use to make any entries in that book - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Looking at these two entries, at the hand writing; are you able to form any belief whether they are or are not written by the prisoner - A. I have very little doubt but they are written by the prisoner.

COURT. You are to tell us from the character of the hand writing; from the mode in which you have observed the prisoner to write, not from any suspicion you have, but merely from the characters of the hand writing, abstracted from all other circumstances. Do you believe that is his his hand writing - A. I do.

Mr. Gurney to Lavesque. Look at these two entries, you are not to contract into your consideration any thing of your suspicion from the appearance of the hand writing; whose hand writing do you believe it to be - A. I believe it to be the hand writing of the prisoner.

Q. This book in which these two entries are made is your ledger - A. Yes, and that ledger is copied from the day book; we never make any original entries in the ledger.

Q. Is there any entry in the day book upon which this entry was copied - A. There is none.

Q. How often do you balance your accounts - A. Once a year.

Q. This offence is stated to be three years ago; you must have had three postings of your annual accounts and never brought the charge against him till now - A. No; not till we found it out.

Q. Have not your customers complained that money which they have paid has been again charged to them, and whether on examination Mr. Paulain, junior, has received the money of your servant and has not accounted

it by mistake - A. Such a thing has happened.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, have you not had a complaint made by your customers of a sum of money being charged a second time which has never been accounted for by Mr. Paulain Jun. when it has turned out to be paid to Mr. Paulain - A. I never knew such an instance but once; that was more than two years ago; that was to the best of my belief the sum of three pound.

Q. Have you not found fault with the slovenly manner in which Mr. Paulain Jun. kept his accounts - A. I have done it several times.

Q. Look at that book, is that entry the handwriting of the prisoner - A. I believe it to be.

Q. Do you from that belief upon the handwriting of the figures - A. I form it upon this opinion, that no person with us could have written it but Mr. Cook, except Mr. King, who can write that hand.

Q. That is all I want. Had not Mr. Paulain an opportunity of looking at the book every day and every night, when he settled your accounts - A. He had.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-90

352. WALTER COOK was indicted for that he on the 20th of February , being servant to James Paulain , John Levasque , and James Paulain , Jun. that he did receive and take into his possession the sum of 15 s. on their account, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN LEVASQUE . Q. Was the prisoner clerk to yourself, James Paulain , Sen. and James Paulain , Jun. - A. He was.

Q. Was he empowered to receive sums of monies for you as collecting clerk - A. He was.

JANE HUMPHREYS. Q. On the 29th of February last, did you pay the prisoner the sum of fifteen shillings. - A. I did. I received that receipt from him, I paid him on the Saturday; he called on the following Monday and said did I receive your bill on Saturday, I told him yes; he said I thought I must, when I went home at night I found fifteen shillings in my pocket which was not my own; I thought it an honest action though an omission.

COURT. Where do you live. - A. 73 Snowhill, with Mr. Berridge.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (to Levasque.) Turn to the entering of the 20th of February, in the day receiving book. - A. On the 20th of February, Mr. Cook accounted to me.

Q. Did he account to you for any money received of Mr. Berridge. - A. He did not. On the 22d he accounted with Mr. Paulain Junr.

JAMES PAULAIN , JUN. Q. Turn to the 22d of February, last, in that book did the prisoner account to you for the money he received. - A. He did.

Q. Did he give you an account of the fifteen shillings he received of Mr. Berridge. - A. He did not.

Q. Did he ever render to you at any subsequent payment that fifteen shillings. - A. He did not.

Q. What number of entries are there of monies received by him on the 22d. - A. Two only, 6 l. 10 s. and 1 l. 10 s.

Q. In point of fact has there been any errors in your accounts - A. Sometimes there has.

Q. Are you able to say from receiving two accounts in number on the 22d that you did not receive a third - A. I am, because if I had I should have entered it.

COURT. So you might have said in other cases where there are errors. Have not you been inaccurate to the amount of sixty or one hundred pound A. I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-91

353 JOHN ALLGOOD was indicted for that he being servant to James Paulain , John Levasque , and James Paulain , Jun. on the 29th of October , did receive and take into his possession the sum of ten shillings, on their account. and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROGER OWEN . I live in Bridewell Hospital.

Q. You have your table beer of Mr. Levasque; did you make any payment for beer on the 6th of October last - A. Yes, I paid it to the prisoner, he gave me that receipt for the ten shillings.

MR. LEVASQUE. Q. Was the prisoner in your employ as drayman , in October last - A. He was.

Q. Have the goodness to look at that receipt and tell me whether that is his handwriting - A. I have no doubt of it, (the receipt read.)

Q. The prisoner carried out beer on the dray, when he came home at night he was either to account with you for the beer or bringing the money A. By bringing the account where he left the beer, or by bringing the money; this is the book that we keep for the purpose; in this book there is an entry of beer delivered to Mr. Owen, not paid the book is all in his hand writing; when he comes home at night; that book is the account he renders.

Q. Was that sum of ten shillings ever paid - A. No. On the 15th of March, I informed him of this charge; he at first denied it. I shewed him his book and the receipt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Has it not happened repeatedly in your business, the men have omitted to render the exact account, and on some future day has it not been rectified - A. Such a circumstance has happened.

Q. Has it not happened with the prisoner that he has made a mistake with one customer for another; and on a subsequent day he has rectified that mistake - A. It has not been so in that case.

Q. I ask you again, sir; you must tell me upon your oath - A. He has done so.

Q. If he had accounted with your partner, Mr. Paulin jun. that would have been an answer to your complaint, are your books here which contain the entry's of different payments, to this man that have been accounted - A. I have the books here.

Q. In that book that young gentleman who has been examined he has made entry's of money paid as well as you - A. Yes.

MR. PAULIN, JUN. - Mr. Gurney. You have

looked at the entry in that book - A. Yes, the prisoner's book. He did not account any thing with me for that.

Mr. Alley. All that you can say according to your recollection; the man has not accounted to you - A No.

Prisoner's Defence. They make a great many mistakes I can prove it clearly they have made mistakes in the book and have scratched it out themselves. Mr. Levasque has said he never saw books kept like these, for they was always scratching and altering them; if I did not pay Mr. Levasque, I paid Mr. Paulain, or Mr. Cook. Mr. Thompson in Giltspur street, it was down paid, they sent the bill in again and I could recollect forty places. I never kept a sixpence belonging to them to my knowledge.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-92

354. JOHN ALLGOOD was indicted for that he being servant to James Paulain , John Levasque , and James Paulain Jun. On the 26th of November , did receive and take into his possession on their account the sum of 10 s. that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROGER OWEN . Q. On the 26th of November last, did you pay any sum of money to the prisoner - A. I paid this in the same manner as the last, and received a receipt (the receipt read.)

MR. LEVASQUE. Q. Your firm consists of James Paulin Sen. John Levasque , and James Paulain Jun. - A. Yes.

Q Was the prisoner in your employ as drayman - A. He was.

Q. Was he entrusted to receive money on account of your house - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the book that he kept the account in - A. Yes.

Q. Now you have there the account of beer carried out on the 26th of November, have you the account of half a kilderkin of beer received by Mr. Owen - A. I have.

Q Is there any account of money received - A. No.

Q. Did he ever apply to you on any subsequent period to rectify any mistake on that day - A. No.

Q. Must he either bring back the beer or account to you of the several customers he has delivered beer to - A. He must.

Q. If he takes out thirty barrels and delivers twenty he is to deliver an entery of the persons he has delivered to - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Mr. Cook was authorised to receive money as well as you - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore whether he received it is impossible for you to tell - A. It is not, in that book the book is filled up.

Q. Have you not had that book in your hands ever since it has been filled up - A. Yes.

Q. And the other gentleman that has been examined, he also received money occasionally - A. Yes.

COURT. Have you received of Mr. Cook, or accounted with Mr. Cook, for this ten shillings - A. No, we have never received it from one or the other.

Q. Have you charged this ten shillings to Mr. Cook - A. No.

Jury. Has not Mr. Owen been a ready money customer - A. Yes.

Q. Knowing that Mr. Owen paid you regular, why did not you ask for that money when he had the beer - A. We have many customers that pay regular; omit one and pay two the next time.

Mr. Gurney. Whether the prisoner accounted to you or young Mr. Paulain, or Mr. Cook, it would be entered at the bottom of the book - A. Yes.

Q. And then it would be corrected in that book if any error was made - A. Yes.

Q. The book comes down to almost the end of the year, therefore he had the opportunity of referring back to this entry - A. Yes.

Q. Has any alteration been made in that entry, the entry in question of Mr Owen - A None.

Court. After the book is full and delivered up to you, supposing the man had said, I find I have made a mistake, I ought to have mentioned ten shillings, would it have been entred in that book. - A. No; it would have been entred in a subsequent book.

Q. Did he ever make any application to you. - A. Never in the world; I have the books here.

MR. PAULAIN, JUN. Q. Has the prisoner ever made any application to you respecting his making a mistake of this ten shillings. - A. No.

Mr. Alley. He has applied to you for various other errors for money received. - A. He has sometimes; never to Mr. Owen as I recollect.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-93

355. JOHN MULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of March , three pounds weight of candles, value 3 s. the property of William Rich .

WILLIAM RICH . Q. Are you a tallow chandler A. Yes; No. 59, Charlotte street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner at the bar was working for me at the time.

Q. Did you lose three pound of candles at any time. - A. Yes, on the 26th of March; my house is a corner house; it stands in Glocester street, and in Charlotte street.

Q. What reason have you for charging the prisoner with having taken them - A. I watched that night, and searched a hole under a window in Glocester street; there I found a parcel containing three pound of candles wrapped up as it is now; I stood at the private door, till such times as he returned; he run back the same way as he came, he passed me; I immediately pursued him, I overtook him in Glocester street, brought him back and gave him in charge of the officer; I asked him what he had got there; he said nothing.

Q. Had you known him for any length of time - A. I have known him for these five years.

Q. Had there been any money transactions between you - A. Before he came to me I had a little money of his in my hands; I owe him now nothing but wages, which is seventeen pounds.

Court. He took three pounds of candles; you owing him this seventeen pounds, you know this wipes off from his account.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. This is a return for his friendship - how came you not to pay him his wages - A. He always had what he wanted.

Q. Had not he taken candles and deducted them in his wages. - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-94

356. RICHARD PENDLEBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March , a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Carney .

JOHN CARNEY . I am licensed hawker , I live in Holborn.

Q. On the 17th of March did you lose a one pound note - A. Yes, between the hours of one and two; I went to the Compasses public house, Drury lane ; I went in and called for a pot of beer first, it was not brought me; then I called for half a pint of gin. I pulled out a one pound note; I was reaching it to the waiter that brought me the gin; the prisoner at the bar snatched it out of my hand, and ran away with it.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge; the prisoner was pursued he was not taken till twelve o'clock at night; I am sure he is the same man.

Q. Was your one pound note found again - A. No.

ELIZABETH WHITROW. Q. Are you servant to this public house - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at the public house at the time when the prosecutor lost the note - A. Yes; I know his person, he often used our house; Carney came in between one and two o'clock; he called for a pot of beer, I did not bring it; then he called for half a pint of gin, he offered a one pound note to me for change; I was about a yard from him before I could reach it; the prisoner took it out of his hands and made off; my master pursued him; he was not taken then.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am an officer. From information of the publican, I was all day after him; a soldier put him in the watchhouse and delivered him to me; I searched him, he denied having the note.

Prisoner's Defence. Since I have been in prison the prosecutor has been to the place where I lodge and said if I would pay him two pound he would sling the indictment out.

GUILTY aged 21.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-95

357. RICHARD THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , an iron axletree, value 10 s. the property of William Miller .

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a smith at Clapton.

Q. Did you lose an iron axletree at any time - A. Yes; on the night of the 14th of March, or the morning of the 15th; it was upon a truck at the door.

Q. Do you generally leave the things out all night - A. Yes; it was left out there for seven years almost. I afterwards saw the axletree at Worship-street office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes: some years back he worked for me.

WILLIAM BROWN . I work in the brick fields near Hackney. On the 15th March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with this axletree and a wrench; I asked him where he was going with it; he said what was that to me; he was going to mend it; I clapped my hand against it, I told him I thought it did not want mending. I detained him; I delivered him to Mr. Griffiths.

The property produced and identified

Prisoner's Defence. What that man said is all true.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-96

358. WILLIAM TROWER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , a pound and a half of beef, value 6 d. a pound of butter, value 1 s. and six eggs, value 6 d. the property of Roger Pickering .

GEORGE LOWING . I am servant to Mr. Pickering; he lives at No. 15, Great Coram-street .

Q. Did you see the prisoner at your master's house - A. Yes; about a quarter after two o'clock in the morning on the 5th of April I found him in the pantry, it adjoins the kitchen, under the stone steps of the street door.

Q. How came you in the pantry at that time - A. The housemaid got up at that time to washing, she came and alarmed me. On opening the kitchen door I found him laying fast asleep. I did not wake him; he was searched in my presence.

Q. Did you see any thing taken from his person - A. I saw about a pound and a half of beef laying by the side of him, on the floor. I desired the watchman to come in and take him; the watchman asked him what he came there for; he said he came to take a nap. The watchman locked him up in a room and went to get further assistance, he broke out of the room where he was locked up and made to the hall; I secured him in the hall after a violent scuffle.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This poor fellow broke out after you locked him up in the cupboard - A. Yes; I dare say I should have done the same.

Q. Was not he partly drunk - A. He was partly so. There were some eggs in the pantry, he had them in his pocket, they were broke. He must have got in over the iron rails of the area.

Q. There were no damage done; I believe you have taken pains since to find that this poor creature is of reputable connections - A. Yes.

JOHN CLARK . I am a watchman. Yesterday week I was going my beat, I met this servant at the corner of the street, with a poker in his hand, he told me there was a man in the pantry; I went with him to the house, the servant opened the pantry, there I saw the prisoner; he was just on his feet, hustling about as if he was half asleep; I asked him what he was doing there; he hum'd and ah'd a good while, at last he said he was taking a snooze; by the side of him was about a pound and a half of beef; the flour was scattered about the area; the servant said there were eggs in the flour tub; I found them in one of his pockets and butter in the other; I locked him up in a little room under the kitchen stairs while I went out and got the patrol; he took the butter and eggs into this little room; there was nothing at that time taken from him; at the time I was out he escaped from that little room and got into the hall; the house was searched by the patrol; we did not find any thing

broke; he had a pair of boots that he brought with him; he could give very little account how he got them we found no picklock key nor iron crow upon him.

Q. Did he appear to you as if he was drunk - A. I dare say he was; he was drowsy.

WILLIAM WEBB. I am a shoemaker; I live in Marchment-place, Little Coram-street; I was passing along Great Coram-street; I heard the alarm of thieves being in the house, by the servant maid out of a two pair of stairs window; I knocked at the door, I said if they wanted any assistance there was some at the door. The footman opened the door with the prisoner in one hand; I collared him.

Q. Did he appear to be drunk - A. He did not appear to me to be altogether drunk, he seemed confused; he was bleeding freely from a blow that he received from the footman.

JOHN REASON . I am a patrol.

Q. Was you sent for to Mr. Pickering's house - A. Yes; I took charge of this man; I searched him; I found no implemement for housebreaking on him; in my judgment he was a little in liquor.

WILLIAM READ . I searched the prisoner; I found a duplicate on him; he had a silk handkerchief in his pocket; the boots were left for the prisoner and the handkerchief; he said he bought the boots at Marybone, and the duplicate he bought as he was going along.

Prisoner's Defence. The boots I bought of a man in Marybone and paid for them; I brought them home with me.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-97

359. ROBERT JIFFERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , twenty six yards of blue baize, value 30 s. the property of Griffith Foulkes .

WILLIAM REDDLE . I am a boot maker, I live in Apollo court, Fleet street; I was going by Mr. Foulkes shop on the 24th of March, between two and five o'clock, I saw two men engaged in taking away this baize from the door post,; I did not suspect them taking the property until they got to the corner of the gateway, which gave me me suspicion; then they ran hastily.

Q. How was the piece of baize secured - A. It was under a chain; one end fastened in the shop and the other end at the door post, there was some difficulty in getting it away; he was half a minute in getting it from under the chain. I am certain the prisoner is one of the men that assisted in getting it out, and he was the man that ran away with it, I informed Mr. Foulkes's people of it. I pursued the prisoner; he heard the boy cry stop thief; he dropped the baize in Stewards rents; I passed the baize and caught him before he got to the bottom of the court. I assisted in bringing him back to the shop.

GEORGE BANKES . I am apprentice to Mr. Griffith Foulkes . In consequence of the last witness information I saw the prisoner with the baize under his arm: I gave the alarm of stop thief, he dropped it. I saw Reddle stop him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of it? two men dropped a bundle in Stewart's rent's that person topped me.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Twelve Month's in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-98

360. WILLIAM WEBSTER and SARAH WEBSTER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of February , twenty yards of canvas, value 10 s. two yards of flannel, value 6 d. thirty wooden staves, value 5 s. and one stick, value 6 d. the property of George Perrin .

GEORGE PERRIN . Q. What are you - A. I am a dealer in staves and iron hoops , I live in Old Nichols street, Bethnal green; William Webster rented a house of me, which communicated with my warehouse and yard. On the 26th of February, on my return home at nine in the evening, I was informed by my family that my son, who had returned about a quarter of an hour before, had detected the woman prisoner. In consequence of that I heard he was in the prisoner's house waiting till my return; I went to the prisoner's house and found him there. When I got in the woman prisoner was in the lower room; she asked me what business I had there; I told her I wanted to go up stairs; she violently resisted, she told me she would stab me, I had no business there without a search warrant, if I attempted to go up stairs she would swear a robbery against me. My son, as I suppose, on hearing my voice, called down stairs for me to go up; I went up in the two pair of stairs room, where I found my son; there was a saw and small hatchet, and staves split to pieces, a great quantity of it there.

Q. How many staves do you think there might be - A. About one hundred and fifty; we brought away thirty whole staves; this stick, cloth, and canvas, was laying under a bed in the same room; this stick I have travelled many miles with it; I know it well, and the flannel and the canvas.

Q. What business is the prisoner - A. He works on the road as a labourer.

GEORGE PERRIN . On the 26th of February I had occasion to go up to our back premises; it was dark; on my return back I saw Sarah Webster go away from a stack of staves to her back door; she went in doors. I stood about five minutes watching, I then went and looked at the stack of staves, and missed some; I looked through her back window and saw some staves burning, and at the same time I saw a light in the two pair of stairs room; I heard her breaking of wood, I suspected it was staves; I lifted up the latch of the door, and one of the children opened it; I went up stairs, there I saw William Webster in the act of breaking the staves with the hatchet; I took the candle out of the chimney corner, and found the canvas, flannel, and the stick, under the bed; I shewed the stick to my father.

Q. The staves you could not swear to - A. No more than seeing her go away from the stack, and seeing them burning, and finding others.

Q. Do you know that your warehouse had been robbed of flannel and canvas - A. Yes; the man exclaimed, stamped his foot on the floor, and said through his bitch of a wife he should be transported for them staves; he run down stairs; I saw no more of him till Monday night he was brought to the office; this was on Friday night.

Q. Did both of them go away - A. Only the man.

Q. Have you any doubt of the canvas and flannel being your father's property - A. No.

William Webster 's Defence. I am a poor distressed man with four small children; I have lived in the prosecutor's house five years, he is the only person in the neighbourhood that wishes me not well; he has since I have been here turned my children out of doors; my neighbours have taken them in till they know the event of my trial. My wife told me she bought the canvas of the prosecutor's wife for a bed tick; she told me she bought the staves of a labouring man, and the flannel of the prosecutor's daughter.

Sarah Webster 's Defence. He took the staves off the fire; he gave me a kick across the thigh, and told me he would break my bloody neck; he told me to go down stairs; his sister told him to come down stairs, he said he would not till his father came.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-99

361. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , eleven chimney glasses, value 4 s. the property of Robert Faircloth , and George Payne .

RICHARD FAIRCLOTH . My partners name is George Payne , we are glass manufacturers , I know nothing of the fact; I only saw eleven glasses taken out of his pocket. I knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM FAIRCLOTH . Q. Tell us what you saw of this transaction - A. I saw him putting glasses in his pocket two or three times; in consequence of that I told the foreman; he first said the glass were his own, afterwards he said he was sorry for it; after my brother sent for the constable he said lord have mercy upon me.

Q. How many glasses were taken out of his pocket. - A. Eleven.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-100

362. MARY WEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of April , two shawls, value 17 s. the property of James January .

THOMAS POWELL I am shopman to Mr. James Janeway , Parliament street, Westminster . On the 2d of April, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with another woman. The prisoner with her asked to look at some caps; I shewed her some, she bought one and paid for it, and went out, they returned in a moment asked me to give them a pattern of something on the counter; as they were going out I perceived something concealed under the prisoner's apron.

Q. Are you quite sure your master's name is Janeway - A. Yes.

MR. FITZPATRICK. It is January in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-101

363. ANN PALMER was indicted for that she on the 15th of March , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good seven shilling piece, as and for a good one, unlawfully did utter to Ann, the wife of Thomas Steventon , she at the time well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

ANN STEVENTON. - Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do. I am the wife of Thomas Steventon ; George Steventon is my son.

Q. Do you remember her coming into Mr. George Steventon 's shop. - A. Yes; on the 15th of March she had three two penny cheese cakes; she gave me the seven shilling piece; I gave it my son to change: I brought her the change, then she said she could pay for them without, she only wanted to know if it was a good one; she put the seven shilling piece that I brought back into her pocket; she felt for money, then she said she could not pay without change; she then gave me a seven shilling piece and wanted change; I saw it was not the same seven shilling piece, I gave it to my son; he said it was a bad one, and not the same; he said he would send for a constable. She got it from his hand but he got it from her.

GEORGE STEVENTON . Q. You keep a pastry cook's shop in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street; do you remember your mother bringing the first seven shilling piece to you. - A. Yes; I rung it on the table, it was a good one; she afterwards brought me a different one; it did not ring; the first rung as well as any seven shilling piece could; the second sounded like lead; I then came out and asked the prisoner how she could offer a bad seven shilling piece; she said it was a good one; I told her the changes had been attempted to be rung on me; it would not do now, it was the fourth time; she then said it was a good one to the best of her knowledge, she would go with me to where she took it. I refused going till the constable came; when he came I told her I would go any where with her: she attempted to get it out of my fingers; she got it between her fingers but not so as to get possession of it. I am positive it was not the first seven shilling piece; she said it was.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I have the seven shilling piece; Mr. Steventon delivered it me, I have kept it ever since. I searched her, and while I was searching, a shilling dropped from her hand. I perceived she had something in her mouth. She made two gulps; I put my fingers in her mouth; I could not find any thing.

CALEB POWELL. Q. Look at that seven shilling piece. - A. This seven shilling piece is a bad one; the shilling is a good one.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold six pair of shoes for eight shillings at Rag-fair: I went into this shop to buy the cheese-cakes for my sick child; I said is this a good seven shilling piece. Yes; she makes answer; then I says, I can pay you without change. I thought I had halfpence; I had not; then I gave the same seven shilling piece: I will be upon my oath it was the same; as to swallowing any thing, I had nothing in my mouth.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and find sureties for her good behaviour for Twelve Months at the expiration of that time .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080406-102

364. CHARLOTTE WADE , alias BUMSTEAD . was indicted for a fraud .

THOMAS JONES . I live in Bull Head court, Newgate street, in the parish of Christ church. I am warehouseman, my partner's name is James Weldon .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to you. - A. Yes, on the 15th of February, near two o'clock in the day, she told me she came by the order of Miss Sarah Lisley, of High Wickham, Buckinghamshire; she was to look out some handkerchiefs and lace; about two years since I had seen the prisoner at Miss Lisley's. I had no doubt but what it was right, she said she wanted them on Miss Lisley's account; I shewed her some silk handkerchiefs. I gave full credit to her story.

COURT. Was Miss Lisley a customer of yours. - A. She was, and is now. She looked at eight pieces of bandana silk handkerchiefs, six pair of silk stockings, and some lace.

Q. How many silk handkerchiefs altogether. - A. Seventy five silk handkerchiefs that together with the silk stockings is of the value of twenty three pounds nine shillings.

Q. How many yards of lace. - A. One hundred and nine value thirty five pound, six shillings and one penny. After they was looked out, she told me she must take them with

her, to go down by the coach that runs through High Wickham, as some officers who were customers of Miss Lisley would be disappointed if Miss Lisley had not the handkerchiefs after the parcel was entered and tied up; I went down to the Bull and Mouth, put the parcel into the seat of the coach, and assisted the prisoner to get into the coach, then I parted with her. I made Miss Lisley debtor for it in my books.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see miss Bumstead. - A. She ordered a piece of black silk handkerchief to be sent down to Miss Lisley; that is the way I discovered the fraud.

Q. When afterwards did you see these goods. - A. Not till I saw them at Guildhall.

SARAH LISLEY . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you live at High Wickham , in Buckinghamshire . - A. I do. Two years ago last Christmas the prisoner lived in my service.

Q. Did you on the 15th of February last, give her any order to go to Messrs. Jones and Weldons. - A. No.

COURT. Had you any reason to suppose that she was going there to order goods in your name . - A. No.

Q. Had you seen Miss Wade on the morning of the 15th of February, at High Wickham . - A. No.

Q. You never gave her any written or verbal authority. - A. Never.

Q. (to Mr. Jones.) When did you enter them down debtor to Miss Lisley. - A. The day I parted with them, the 15th of February.

Q. In what name did the prisoner appear to you. - A. In the name of Miss Wade.

Q. (to Miss Lisley .) Did she live with you in the name of Miss Wade . - A. No, Charlotte Bumstead .

JOSEPH THOMPSON . Q. You are a pawnbroker. - A. Yes. This lace and handkerchiefs were pledged on the 16th of February, the 18th the 4th and 17th of March, was the last . and the 23d of February they were pledged by the prisoner.

JOHN HARRISON . I have six pieces of handkerchiefs, I received them of the prisoner on the 15th of February, she said her husband was a linen draper, No. 19 Newgate street, he was deficient in six pound. I advanced her six pound on them.

JOHN KIMBER . I am a pawnbroker , No. 22 Knightsbridge; on the 26th of February, the prisoner pledged sixteen yards of lace on the 8th of March, seven handkerchiefs, and two pair of silk hose.

- SLATER . Q. Were you present at the detection of the prisoner. - A. Yes. At the house of Ingleby and Co. Cheapside; prior to her being apprehended, I was sent for, she was obtaining goods in the same way; I called her Miss Bumpstead, she said her name was Miss Wade, that was the name she obtained the goods at Mr. Jones's. As to her person I had no doubt about it, she said she was the person, she told me where the goods were pawned.

Prisoner's Defence. I was persuaded by a gentleman that I lived with of the name of Hawkins, that knew of the transaction.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant .


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