Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1808.
Reference Number: 18080217
Reference Number: f18080217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 17th of FEBRUARY, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. One of the Justice's of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Thomas Wood , knt. One of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Nathaniel Newnham , esq. Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. James Shaw , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. John Prinsep , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Henry Sheppard ,

Richard Hodgson ,

John Galton ,

Richard Clapton ,

Joseph Warrell ,

Joseph Abbot ,

Joseph Hanway ,

John Darlton ,

Robert Brown ,

Thomas Wilkinson ,

Edward Proser ,

William Rolfe .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Hammock ,

William Harwood ,

Isaac Hodgson ,

Edward Kent ,

John Skirven ,

Robert Leader ,

John Felton ,

John Bergoir ,

John Cove ,

Thomas Holder ,

John Printer ,

William Bundock .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

William Butterfield ,

William Colberg ,

Andrew Todd ,

William Higginbottom ,

John Jeakes ,

Thomas Salter ,

Thomas White ,

Richard Green ,

William Waring ,

Thomas Barker ,

Robert Burne ,

Thomas Moore .

Reference Number: t18080217-1

168 WILLIAM LOWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , four pound and a half of indigo, value 25 s. the property of the united merchants trading to the East Indies.

Second count for like offence, the property of persons unknown.

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM LADBURY. Q. You are a servant to the East India company. - A. Yes.

Q.They have a private warehouse. - A. Yes.

Q. Where is it situated. - A In Gravel-lane in St. George's in the East .

Q. Is there indigo in that warehouse. - A. Yes.

Q. What salary had the prisoner. - A. Sometimes eighteen shilling a week, and sometimes fifteen shillings a week.

Q. They do not work all day. - A. No, from seven to two, or from eight to one. I was in the warehouse, I saw him take the indigo out of the chest in the warehouse and put it in his pocket. On the 27th of January, about half past twelve we were going out, in about half an hour after, I directly went down to the elder and informed him of it.

Q. Were you present when he was searched. - A. Yes; we found upon him in his breeches and waistcoat round him, about four pound and a half of indigo.

Q. What is indigo a pound. - A. Eight and twelve shillings, and different prices.

Q. What did he say for himself. - A. He said he was guilty.

- STIRLING. - Mr. Gleed. You are an elder in the East India company's service. - A. Yes; in consequence of information I received from Ladbury, I searched the prisoner, I found four pound and a half of indigo in a skirt pocket in his waistcoat, that went down into his breeches; part of the indigo was in his breeches and in the body of his waistcoat besides; he begged for forgiveness, I said it was not in my power; I produce the indigo; it is the same sort of indigo that was in the warehouse; there is about four pound and a half. It is worth five shillings and sixpence or six shillings a pound.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped One Hundred Yards near the East India Company's Warehouse, in the Parish of St George's in the East .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-2

169. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's highway in a certain field in the parish of St. Mary, Islington , on the 12th of January , upon Thomas Oldfield , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a sixpence and two halfpence, his property .

THOMAS OLDFIELD . Q. What are you. - A. I am a cow keeper at Islington.

Q. Were you robbed last month. - A. Yes, on the 13th of January, just about eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Where were you going. - A. I was going home from town.

Q. Had you been drinking. - A. I drank part of three pints of wine.

Q. Were you intoxicated with liquor. - A. I was quite sober.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. Very moon light.

Q. Tell your story how you was accosted. - A. About half way from Pentonville and my house, I had turned out of the foot path into a grass field, it being the cleaner way to walk; I saw a man step over the rail just before me, and he says rather politely, have you got any money.

Q. What do you mean by rather politely. - A. He spoke so pleasant; I was surprised at the question, and I said, money! He said give me your money; I said give you my money; he said, yes, give me your money; I put both my hands in my breeches pockets and pulled out a penny from one pocket and sixpence from the other; I rather fumbled with the other, I took them out and held them to him, and he took them; we looked one another full in the face some little time, and he said how much is it; I was terrified at the question, and I saw his eyes recline downwards to the money that he held in his hand; when I perceived his eyes rather bent downwards I struck him on the side of his head, he had like to have fell, but did not; he staggered very much, he was very near falling; I then rushed on him and we grappled a great while, and at last he came down under me; I perceived his face as he lay under me unguarded; I struck him a very large blow on the nose. I struck him once or twice more but it had no effect, and I believe when his face was most unguarded he was pulling a bayonet from before him, I saw the bayonet and he was making towards me; I catched it in my hand; he had got the bayonet in his right hand and I catched it with my left; when I saw the bayonet I cried out very loudly murder, many times; and I held him down; he struggled very hard; I held him down a great while; he then got with his back upwards, each of us holding the bayonet; I was on his back, and when he offered to rise with his hands off the ground I tipped him down again; he immediately gets on his belly, and rose up in spite of me, and we had a long struggle; he was on his back, and when he offered to rise I tipped him down again; we laid looking at one another, and I said, have you met with your match; he says, will you let me up, I have not hurt you; I said you could not deliver your bayonet; he says I will, if you will let me up; I answered I will not; we were pretty still a bit longer; I said deliver your bayonet, he said again, I will if you will let me up; no, I wont, I said again, why do you not deliver your bayonet; he says, will you give it me again; I says I will - upon your honuor - upon my honour - you will give it me again upon your honour; I will give it you again upon my honour; he laid his hands down and was rather flat on his back; he says I have let go, and instantly I saw his hands unclasped; I then went to get up and he laid quite still; I got up and said, you are a dead man if you come near me, I thought he would

come and rush on me; he says give me the bayonet, it will betray me; I walked backwards some yards, I thought I heard a noise behind me; I looked and my son was coming as hard as he could; I said seize him, he has robbed me; I turned my head the other way, he was gone off, running very fast. I believe my son would have catched him but he fell down and so he got away; he ran one hundred yards after him, he did not get him.

Q. What was the reason of your delivering your money. - A. He demanded it.

Q. Did he shew his bayonet at that time. - A. No, I saw the round of the bayonet; I thought it was a pistol.

Q. So then under that apprehension you delivered your money. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, is that the same man. - A That is the same man.

Q. How long might this take up. - A. Near a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. He was very agreeable at first I understood you. - A. The first question was very pleasant, the next question was very rough.

Q. At first you were not alarmed. - A. I knew what he meant, I was alarmed and frightend sadly, I thought I saw a pistol about him.

Q. You knocked him about pretty much. - A. I knocked him when he was down one blow.

Q. That was rather cowardly. - A. I think if you were down with a man, and a drawn bayonet, you would have done the best you could.

Q. Have you always been of opinion that he is the man. - A. I know that he is the man.

Q. I believe at the magistrate's you said you thought he was the man. - A. You are wrong sir.

THOMAS OLDFIELD . JUNIOR Your are the son of the last witness. - A Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the evening we have been speaking of. - A. I had a slight view of the man.

Q. Look at him, do you think it is the same man. - A. I cannot say; I pursued him and fell down, I pursued him after that about an hundred yards, he ran faster than I did.

THOMAS BELL . I am corporal in the royal West London Militia, the prisoner was a private in the same regiment; this Walker was a recruit, he had only been in the regiment three weeks upon the drill, he came on Wednesday morning the 13th of January, after the gentleman was robbed; and when he came to drill, I being drill corporal, I asked him how he came by those bruises we kept him at drill two hours and then the Bow-street officer came with the head corporal; and Mr. Oldfield with the bayonet; he said he had been robbed, and he wanted to know who the bayonet belonged to; the drill serjeant directed him to the City of Chester in Bunhill-row.

Q.(To Prosecutor). Did you detain the bayonet. Yes, it is here; I delivered it to Cox the officer.

Bell. When I saw the bayonet and the letters on it that signified the company, it was number 38, the same company the prisoner belonged to, I told them I could not tell where to find the prisoner; I know a man of the name of Lane, that knows the prisoner; I would go with him to that man, I went along with the officer, and Mr. Oldfield to this Lanes house. The prisoner was in Lanes house; he saw me coming Lane said.

Q. You must not say that Lane will say it. - A. I into Lane's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. The bayonet had 38 on it, that is the company's mark; that would be the mark of all the company. - A. No, they go on from one regular to 38.

Q. Does 38 belong to Walker. - A. I have the fire-lock to prove it.

JOHN LANE . I belong to the West London militia. I am a private.

Q. Where you present when Bell came. - A Yes; the prisoner was standing in my room when Bell came, he took him from my house; he had cohabited in my place during six or eight weeks; he worked with me about nine or ten weeks; when Bell came he was at my place cleaning his things.

Q. What did he say when Bell came. - A. I said stand your ground, whatever may be the consequence.

Q. Why did you say stand your ground. - A. He went towards my back door when Bell was coming in at the fore door.

Q. Who does the bayonet belong to. - A. The second company.

Q. Does it belong to the prisoner. - A. I have seen it and the piece that belonged to it at my house.

Q. Then you were afraid that he was apprehensive of Bell for something or other. - A. I thought that he might have made away with some of his linen; when I said stand your ground, he came back again and went with Bell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. During the nine or ten weeks he worked with you did not he behave exceeding well. - A. Yes, he worked hard along with me.

MARK COX . I am an officer of Bow-street; I produce the bayonet, I got this the next morning of Mr. Oldfield; it has been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday evening I was going down the City road about a quarter before eight o'clock; I was intoxicated with liquor, I met three men; as I was coming up the City road one of them pushed me down and bruised my face; the bayonet fell out of the sheath, and one of them picked it up and ran away with it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court to Jury. William Walker stands charged of a capital felony, that of committing a robbery upon Thomas Oldfield in the King's highway, by putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a sixpence and two halfpence his property. As to a robbery having been committed upon Thomas Oldfield , there can be very little doubt of, after you have heard what the witnesses have said; and I think there can be little doubt of the person, of the prisoner; there can be no mistake in that. He tells you it was a clear moon light night, there was a tussel between the prisoner and him; that he got possession of the bayonet, and that his son came up to his assistance. It appears by the evidence on the next day, the prisoner appeared on the drill with his face bruised, as if he had been struck in fighting; the prosecutor has told you he gave him some strokes upon his face when he was down and he can swear to his person; this continued about a quarter of an hour, here further by the bayonei that i

proved to be a bayonet belonging to a private of the same company, No. 38; the firelock is produced belonging to it, and when Bell went with the prosecutor to Lane, the prisoner saw him; he was going out on seeing Lane coming in; his comrade advised him to stand his ground. There seems to me very little doubt of the prisoner's guilt. The prisoner has called several witnesses, who has said that he was a hard working man till the time of his committing the robbery; that ought not to operate upon your verdict. We can only lament that a person who bore a good character, up to the time of committing such an offence as this, by doing this he had forfeited that good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-3

170 THOMAS WHISTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , twelve ounce and four penny weights of silver, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Robins in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

JAMES DOBSON . Q. You are high constable of Finsbury division. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of some information from Mr. Robins did you search the prisoner's box. - A. I did; on Friday the 8th of January, at Mr. Robins house, I searched a box.

Q. Who shewed you that box. - A. The prosecutor; Mr. Robin's; in his box I found a small piece of silver, which is in this little box I have now in my hand; I found this box in the prisoners box; the prosecutor and the prisoner were both present, they both said it was the prisoners box. I then took Whiston to Hatton Garden office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Was any thing said to the prisoner by the prosecutor. - A. I did not hear it; at the time I searched his box, he shewed me these two seals; he said he had them of Roberts. I apprehended Roberts the next morning; upon him I found this silver.

MR. ROBBINS. Q. Before the prisoner said any thing on the subject had you said any thing to him. - A. No.

Q. At any before did you. - A. In July, when I had my house robbed, I told him if he would confess, I would forgive him; at this time, I never mentioned a word to him till he was going to Newgate; then he asked for half a crown, I would not give it him.

ROBERT FORD . - Mr. Walford. Was the prisoner brought to Hatton Garden office for examination. - A. He was. I am clerk there.

Q. Before you tell us what he said, can you recollect what the magistrate said. - A. The magistrate told the prisoner that what he was about to say, he must consider that it would most likely be made evidence against him.

Q. Is that your hand writing. - A. Yes.

Q. You reduced what the prisoner said to writing, and that is it. - A.Yes, this is it; it is not signed by the magistrate nor the prisoner.

Court. You cannot read it, you may look at it to refresh your memory. - A. He said, that the several pieces of silver that are now produced, he took at different times, from his master's work shop, and gave them to Roberts to sell for him.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only.

[The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy, and said he would take him again into his employ believing he was drawn into it.]

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-4

171. SAMUEL HORTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Thomas Robert Halstead , in the King's highway, on the 2nd of February , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a cloth coat, value 30 s. his property .

Second count for like offence stating it to be the property of John Ridley .

THOMAS ROBERT HALSTEAD. Q. Were you robbed at any time. - A. Yes, on the evening of Tuesday the 2nd of February in High Holborn , at the corner of Southampton street, Bloomsbury; the prisoner laid hold of the bundle I had under my left arm, and pulled it away, and ran up Southampton-street; I followed him, and got within about two yards of him; he turned down a gateway towards Bloomsbury-market; when he came to the corner of Bloomsbury-court he threw the bundle on the steps of a chandler's shop at the corner of the court; I came up to him about the middle of the court, and gave charge of him to the watchman; a butcher's boy brought me the bundle; it was left at the watchhouse till Wednesday morning, when it was brought up to Marlborough-street; the magistrate ordered it to be delivered to me; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. Was there in the bundle a mixture cloth coat. - A. Yes.

Q. Whose property was it. - A. The property of John Ridley , No. 1, Sidney-court Gray's Inn-lane-road.

Q. How came you to have John Ridley 's coat in your care. - A. It was sent to my master he is a taylor, to be repaired. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM WALLIS . On Tuesday night the 2nd of February last, I was watchman in Southampton-street. At half past eight I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner run up Southampton-street, and the boy after him; the prisoner had a bundle under his arm; he got into Silver-street - leading into Bloomsbury-market. I ran after him; just as the prisoner got into Bloomsbury-market, I saw the prisoner throw the bundle away; he was stopped by the boy, just as he got into Bloomsbury-market; I laid hold of him, and the butcher's boy brought the bundle up and gave it to the young lad; I took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM STREET . I was standing by my master's door, I heard the alarm of stop thief.

Q. When was it. - A It was of a Tuesday, about a fortnight ago; I ran with intent to stop him; I saw the bundle on the step of a door, the corner of Bloomsbury-court. I picked it up and gave it to the young lad that owned it; he was standing with the watchman, and the prisoner.

Q.Was it the prisoner that you saw with the watchman. - A. Yes; I am sure of that.

Prisoner's Defence. I am blacksmith by trade; my mother keeps a public house, the Bricklayer's Arms, Kingsgate-street, Holborn; I work hard for my living;

he night this happened I was in the White Horse, Holborn, drinking; I came out, and going up Holborn there was a mob; I went up Southampton-street, there were three or four young fellows went the same way; I happened to go up Bloomsbury-court, and the others went up Southampton-street; the young fellow saw me at the left hand corner; I heard somebody call out stop thief; the watchman called out, where is the thief; the young fellow came up, and said this is the thief; I said let him take me, if I am a thief; I told him if he challenged me with being a thief; I would knock his eye out.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

COURT TO JURY. This is charged as a highway robbery; it does not appear to me as a highway robbery; with respect to the larceny, you have three witnesses who speak to the indentity of the prisoner's person; the first witness speaks to the pulling it away from his arm; the prisoner in his defence says he is quite innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Of simple larceny.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-5

172. SARAH DARTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jacob Williams , about the hour of one in the afternoon, on the 29th of January , no person being therein, with intent to steal and feloniously stealing therein three shirts, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Stratton .

Second count for like offence, the property of Jacob Williams .

ANN WILLIAMS . Q. Are you a washer-woman. - A. Yes; my husband's name is Jacob Williams , I live in High-street, Hampstead .

Q. Did you take in any linen to wash belonging to William Stratton . - A. Yes, I have it once a fortnight from town; he lives at No. 203, Piccadilly.

Q. Did you lose it out of your house. - A. Yes, on Friday the 29th of January; I left the house about noon to buy some dinner; I left nobody in the house.

Q. How was your door secured. - A. Only on the latch; I did not lock it.

Q. In what part of the house did you leave the linen when you went out. - A. I left it in a basket upon a mangle; I was absent about half an hour.

Q. While you were out did you see the prisoner. - A Yes, I saw her of the opposite side of the way; she nodded at me, and I at her.

Q. When was the first time that you missed this linen or any part of it. - A. On Friday night; I was going to wash it, I missed the handkerchiefs; on the next morning I missed the three shirts.

Q. Are you sure that all this linen was in the basket at the time you left your house. - A. Yes.

Q. When had you seen and looked over this linen the last time before you left the house. - A. I received it on Tuesday morning of the carrier; I looked it over then, when I took it out of the trunk; it was all right.

Q. On Friday evening you missed some, and Saturday morning some more. - A. Yes.

JOHN HINCKESMAN . I am a pawnbroker; a shirt and a muslin handkerchief was pledged at my house, on the 30th of January, by a woman for seven shillings. I live in Broad-street Bloomsbury. I do not know the woman.

WILLIAM SMALLBONES . I am a pawnbroker, in High-street, Bloomsbury; a shirt and a handkerchief were pledged at my house, on the 30th of January, in the name of Mary Stevens ; I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JEREMIAH CORDY. I am a pawnbroker; a shirt was pledged with me, on the 30th of January, by the prisoner, I believe, but I am not certain.

WILLIAM READ . The prisoner told me she had pawned the things; she took me to the different pawnbrokers, and they produced the articles; she acknowledged in my presence, and in the presence of the pawnbrokers, these were the things she had pawned.

ROBERT BOULTER . I am constable of St. John's parish, Hampstead; I took this woman on another charge.

Q. Did she say any to you about these things. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her if she confessed. - A. Yes.

Court. Then I cannot hear it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have not been to the prosecutrix's house for upwards of two months; I was taken up wrong for a bit of fish; she offered me money if I would own to this; I said, I had found some duplicates; I saw her about half past two o'clock in the day; she had a piece bread and two plates, with her sons dinner; after that she came to me very much intoxicated with liquor; I saw her home.

COURT. The capital part of the charge you may dismiss; that in this case the prosecutrix says she received the shirts and handkerchiefs on Tuesday; she missed some of them on Friday night and some on Saturday morning; so that they may have been stolen in the intermediate time for any thing the prosecutrix knows, when some person may have been at home, she not having seen them since the Tuesday. The prisoner confessed to the constable that she had pawned the property. It is proved they were lost; she has confessed that she pawned them herself, and has given no account how she came by them.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-6

173. BENJAMIN THORNHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of February , three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 1 l. seven shirts, value 30 s. a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. three waistcoats, value 15 s. two pair of breeches, value 2 l. three sheets, value 30 s. three table cloths, value 3 l. the property of George Adam Ross , in the dwelling house of Henry Burton .

GEORGE ADAM ROSS . I am in the navy .

Q. Did you at any time lose any articles of wearing apparel and linen. - A. I lost them at different times. I lodge in Blenheim-street , in Henry Burton 's house; he lives on the ground floor.

Q. Do you know what parish that house is in. - A. St. George 's Hanover-square.

Q. Did the prisoner live with you as servant. - A. As groom and valet .

Q. Did you at any time charge him with taking any of these things that you missed. - A. Not till I had taken him up. On Tuesday the second of February, there were things missed in the house, which gave me suspicion.

I got a search warrant, Foy searched him; he was first searched at the stable; I went with the officer and searched a trunk there in the ostler's room; I had a horse stood at Mr. Newport's livery stable in Oxford Road. The prisoner produced a key out of his pocket, and opened the trunk.

Q. Did you see any thing found in the trunk. - A. Yes, several articles - shirts, sheets, and stockings; the officer has them. We searched his lodgings, in the same house where I lodge myself; in a trunk that was opened by a key, which he likewise produced, there were several things found belonging to me.

Q. You cannot tell at what time you missed any of these articles. - A. No; I did not miss them at any particular time.

JOHN FOY . Q. You are an officer of the police. - A. I am, of Marlborough-street office. I took the prisoner in custody, and then I went with him to the Golden Horse livery stables in Oxford-street; the prisoner went with us to the ostler's room, and pointed out the trunk, he said it was his; the prisoner opened the trunk with this key; this is the trunk. These things were in the trunk at the time it was opened, and at the trunk at his master's we found the other articles.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things have been in my box ever since last May, just as they were removed from the cottage. They were in the same room with my master's property.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you removed your place of abode from a cottage. - A. I had a place at a cottage, a few miles from town, from which I arrived last May; I kept them locked up while I was in possession of a cottage; I gave him the key of the place where the things were, for him to put them in trunks to be brought to town. At that time I suppose the linen must have been stolen.

Q. Did you order him to put the linen into his trunks. A. No; that trunk he bought a little time before he was taken up; some of the articles I have worn since I came to town; such as shirts and stockings; but the table linen I had not used.

Q. I take it for granted you had not ordered them to be removed to the livery stables. - A. Certainly not.

Prisoner. Not having room in the box to put it in, I put it in the trunk; I have had the care of it ever since last May. I was charged by Mr. Burton of stealing a pair of boots; on which he informed me I should be discharged without my wages; I never parted with any thing, I was going to take them back; Mr. Ross knows the gentleman I lived with before; he had a good character with me.

Prosecutor. The gentleman gave him a good character.

Q. Do you know the gentleman. - A. No, I never saw him before or since, except the day I went and enquired his character; he was a gentleman in the Custom house.

Q. to Foy. At the time you apprehended the prisoner, and on your asking him to shew you where the box was, he took you to the livery stables - did he go willingly with you. - A. Yes; he gave us the key of the box, and said, as his master took the things out, his master had given him them; his master said he had not. After that he said he hoped his master would forgive him, and not go any further in it.

COURT. - The prisoner is charged with stealing the articles in the indictment in the dwelling house of Henry Burton . - I a person, while things are under the protection of a dwelling house, is found guilty of stealing to the value of forty shillings and upwards, the law makes it a capital felony. It is necessary to make particular enquiry, to know the value of the articles stolen, where the value of the articles are above forty shillings, and the articles are not proved to be taken at one time; in that case it is necessary to have the value of each article separate, especially when they are not taken at one time. You will have to determine, from the evidence, whether the prisoner did steal these articles or not; if you are satisfied he did - the next question will be, whether he took them in the dwelling house, and whether you can fix your mind so as to say that he took away any quantity at one time, because many articles taken at different times will not constitute a capital felony. Mr. Ross cannot fix upon any of the articles, so as to be positive that they were taken at once, neither can he ascertain that any one article is of the value of forty shillings. It is not likely any one article is worth that value; therefore in favour of the prisoner it is reasonable to suppose that he stole not any article at one time of the value of forty shillings, so as to make it a capital offence.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-7

173. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , twelve pair of cotton stockings, value 50 s. the property of James White , in his dwelling house .

JAMES WHITE. I am a silk mercer in High-street, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel .

Q. Did you see the prisoner at your shop at any time. A. On the 19th of January she came in my shop about two o'clock. When she came in I was engaged with a customer in the back shop; I supposed she was in a hurry, she went out; there was no person in the shop at that time.

Q. Did she speak to you. - A. She did not.

Q. How long did she stay. - A. I suppose not more than a minute, and then went away; I did not speak to her, she did not come into the back shop.

Q. When she was gone, did you miss any thing. - A. About a minute and a half after she was gone, I went forward to the counter, and missed a dozen of stockings I had on the counter; they were gone.

Q. What sort of cotton stockings were they. - A. White cotton stockings.

Q. Where did you put them. - A. They were laying on the counter when she came in; upon missing them I put on my hat and went after her, I observed her to turn to the left of the door; I perfectly recollected the colour of the gown; I turned down Brick-lane, I saw her walking as fast as she could; when I came up to her I observed her looking into her apron; I did not say any thing to her at the time, but let her go on till I saw some person that I thought would be a witness; she turned down Church-street towards Spital fields church; I saw a gentlemen of the name of Austin coming along; I observed to him that she had robbed me of a dozen pair of stockings, and had them in her apron, we let her walk on till she came into Crispin street; I observed that we had better lay hold of her, I then went up to her and asked her what she had got in her apron; she said, nothing; I asked her how she could say such a falsity, and pulled down the apron; there was the stooking then in her apron; we

took her to Worship-street office and gave her in charge to Kennedy.

Q. What is the value of these stockings. - A. They are invoiced at fifty shillings; the net value is forty-seven and sixpence, taking off the five per cent.

Q. You did not see her take them. - A. No, I did not see her take them. I was certain she had taken them because no other person could; they were on the counter two minutes before.

Q. Is the shop part of your dwelling house. - A. It is.

Q. You are the occupier of the house. - A. Yes; no other person occupies the house, nor have I any partner.

JOHN AUSTIN . Q. What are you. - A. I am a silk dyer.

Q. Did you see the prisoner. - A. I did, on the 19th of January last; when I saw her she was just turned the corner of Church-street, Brick-lane; I saw the prosecutor there; he asked me if I saw that woman before us; I said, yes; he said, she has stolen a dozen stockings from me; he desired me to follow her with him; I did, it was all in my way home; when we came up to the woman Mr. White asked her what she had got and likewise myself; she said she had nothing. Mr. White said how could she assert such a falsehood, and took a dozen pair of cotton stockings from her apron; we took her to the office in Worship street.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a constable belonging to Worship street office. I received a dozen pair of cotton stockings of Mr. White on the 19th of January; I took charge of the prisoner at the same time; I searched the prisoner. I found a few halfpence in her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this gentleman's shop to buy a yard of ribbon; I went out again to see if my eyes deceived me; a woman came up in a black gown; she says carry this parcel for me. I am going after my child; I walked on softly, I went to the corner of the street; I then stopped, I looked into my apron; the gentlemen said that is my property; I said, it is not your property; it is property of the woman that gave it me; I have not stolen it. if I had been guilty of stealing it; I should have concealed it. I stood still, thinking the woman would come up. I did not thieve it.

COURT. The fact of the woman taking the goods seems pretty well established; it is a capital offence in law to steal in a dwelling house to the value of forty shillings; you are to be fully satisfied that they are worth forty shillings; you find the prosecutor says they are of the value of forty seven shillings, that is running pretty nigh the value; you will have to say whether you find the woman guilty of the capital offence, or guilty of simple larceny.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-8

175. MARY FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , twenty-one yards of silk, value 2 l. 15 s. the property of Thomas South , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL DOWNES . Q. You are in the service of Mr. South. - A. Yes, I am shopman.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming into your master's shop. - A. Yes, perfectly well. On the 11th of February she came in, and asked for half a yard of cotton velvet; she bought it and paid for it.

Q. Did she go out again. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe that the silk had been lost. - A. No, about half an hour before that I had taken it out of the window.

Q. How many yards were there. - A. Twenty-one.

Q. Do you know the price. - A. It is marked with the prime cost; three shillings and three pence a yard.

Q. Where did you put it. - A. I cannot say on what part of the counter; when I took it out of the window I placed it on the counter.

Q. How soon did you miss it. - A. I did not miss it at all till I was applied to by another witness before the prisoner came in; I had seen it half an hour before.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a porter in Newgate-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar on the 11th of this month by the prosecutor's shop. - A. I did; I observed her drop down a roll of silk on the ground, she was about two yards from the proscutor's shop; I saw her drop it from some part of her clothes; I stopped and picked it up; I then asked her how she came by it; (not seeing it in paper I thought it was stolen;) she said, what is that to you; then I came towards the prosecutor's shop; I said, you have been robbed; she was taken in a moment's time by somebody in Mr. South's house. I gave the silk into the hands of Mr. South.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I produce the silk; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner.

Q. From whom did you receive that silk. - A. From Mr. South; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your property. - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Did you receive it from Harris. - A. Yes, I delivered it to Gregory; there is my private mark on it. The prime cost is marked about three pound.

Q. to Downes. Is that the silk that you removed from one part of the shop to another. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. South's shop to buy half a yard of velvet; I was never nigh the counter at all; coming out of the shop something hit against my feet; when the gentlemen asked me how I came by it, I said what is that to you; I thought he spoke of the velvet. I did not run away; I came back with them; I made no resistance.

COURT. The prisoner stands charged with a capital offence - of privately stealing twenty one yards of silk, value two pounds, fifteen shillings, in the shop of Thomas South . Samuel Downs tells you, about half an hour before the prisoner came into the shop; he had removed this piece of silk out of the window and put it on the counter; he did not know it was taken till the alarm was given by Thomas Harris ; Thomas Harris said when he came near the prosecutor's shop, he saw the prisoner drop the silk on the ground; it came from some part of her clothes; that created a suspicion in his mind; he took it up and asked her how she came by it; she said what is that to you; upon which he very properly gave the alarm to the prosecutor, and immediately she was taken. Mr. South tells you it is his property, it was stolen

out of his shop. In order to constitute it a capital offence it must be of the value of five shillings; according to the evidence the prime cost was much more. If you have any doubt about it, you will give the prisoner the benefit of that doubt.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 57.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-9

176. MARTHA FLEMING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , three yards of cotton velvet, value 14 s. and four yards of cambric muslin, value 10 s. the property of John Newberry .

JOHN NEWBERRY . Q. Does your wife carry on any business. - A. Yes, she is a lady's dress maker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mary Fleming . - A. Yes, she was employed by her about six months; she resided in the house as a work woman in my wife's business. We took the prisoner up on suspicion about three week ago; I had lost several things; I told her I wished to look into her box; she told me she had nothing; she opened the box herself.

Q. Did she say any thing when you wished to search her box. - A. She was very ready for me to search her box.

Q. Where was that box. - A. In the garret where she slept.

Q. Did you examine the box. - A. I did not; the officer and Mrs. Newberry examined it.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer.

Q. You were present at the searching of this woman's box in the garret in the house. - A. I was; she unlocked the box herself; in the box at Mr. Newberry's house were two pieces of cambric muslin.

Q. Were there a great quantity of articles in the box belonging to the prisoner. - A. Yes, it was full of clothes.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time these things were found. - A. Yes; and the time Mrs. Newberry claimed it, she said they were her own property, that she had bought them five or six years before. I had a search warrant to search a room No. 96, Charlotte place, Rathbone place, Mr. Sutton keeps the house; the prisoner had a box there. I found in that box two pieces of cotton velvet; Mrs. Newberry was with me, she claimed these; the prisoner was present, she said she had these about two years, she bought them for a bonnet or a spencer; they were taken to Mr. Newberry's house to match with the piece he had at his house; it is a fawn colour, it seemed to match in colour, and as near as possible it could do where it was cut off the piece.

Q. That is, it appeared so when put together; the two pieces formed one piece. - A. Yes, as near as I could tell.

Q.to prosecutor. First look at these two pieces of velvet - what is the quantity of them. - A. About three yards and a quarter the two pieces.

Q. Can you say whether it is yours or not. - A. I compared it with what I have in my pocket, they are exactly alike in colour, I have the piece here; I laid them strait; it matched as to form or shape to that it had been cut off.

Q. That is as you suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the cambric muslin. - A. I believe they are mine, I cannot swear to them.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-10

177. JOHN BOTFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , three glass mirrors, value 1 l. 4 s. and a broken glass mirror, value 7 s. the property of James Petter and James Oakey , in their dwelling house .

The case stated by Mr. Andrews.

JAMES OAKEY . Q. Was Botfield in your service on the 13th of January last. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it customary with you in your business to purchase articles of him. - A. Yes. These glasses we purchased of him were his own property; sometimes he had our goods to manufacture and sometimes he found them; but on the 13th of January he brought in two glasses of eighteen inches, one was damaged, which he requested me to cut for him; I cut it, and made the most of it I could; I cut it to fourteen inches and a quarter; the usual size of them glasses are fifteen inches.

Q. What glasses were they. - A. They were convex mirror glasses, cut in a round circle; the other glass was an eighteen inch glass. After I cut it he took it from the front shop to the back shop, where we silver them.

Q. Had you purchased these two glasses of him. - A. He brought them in; I did not purchase them. He went away as if he was going to put them by.

JAMES PEDDER . Q. Do you remember the prisoner bringing any glasses in the warehouse on the 13th of January last. - A. Yes.

Q. Was he employed in the warehouse that day. - A. Yes. On the 13th of January I bought of the prisoner two glasses; I paid him for them; one was an eighteen and the other a fifteen; that glass only run fourteen and a quarter, there was a star in the middle of it; it had been an eighteen inch glass, it was cut down. I paid him twenty six shillings for the fourteen, and one pound sixteen for the eighteen inches. After I paid him for them I missed the glasses, he ought to have brought them into my shop to have them silvered, to make them fit for sale. On the 18th we made a purchase. On the next day I found the eighteen inch glass; I could not find the fourteen and a quarter. I went to Mr. Drings on the Monday following; I found two other glasses that I knew to be ours. My partner found the fourteen inch glass.

Q. Did you find on the Monday, when you went to Mr. Dring's, any of the glasses that are now in the indictment. - A. Two of them that are in the indictment. This fifteen inch glass I know to be my property.

Q. Were either of these glasses purchased of the prisoner, or were they other glasses that you knew to be your property. - A. These were two others that we know to be our property. This glass I found at Mr. Drings; I know it to be mine by a private mark.

Court. These are the two. - A. Yes, there are two private marks on each, having a stone in the middle, and a figure of 2.

Mr. Andrews. Are the glasses now produced, the glass that was bought of the prisoner Botfield. - A. The first two that I produced is not; the other one is the glass that was bought of Botfield.

Q. Are you certain that these glasses were your property. - A. I am sure as to one: I leave my partner to speak to the other two.

Q. to Mr. Oakey. Is that the plate that you bargained with the prisoner. - A. This is the plate he brought me to cut, this is the glass that I cut away; it was an eighteen; I was present when it was found at Mr. Dring's; the prisoner owned to the magistrate that he took this one and that was all.

THOMAS DRING . Q. What are you. - A. I am a mirror maker.

Q. Look at these plates and tell me whether you have seen them before. - A Yes.

Q. From whom did you receive them. - A. From the prisoner Botfield, about the 12th or 13th of January; he brought me a twelve inch; he asked me if I would silver it for him.

Q. Was that either of these. - A. No.

Q. Confine yourself to these. - A. I do not know that I could go on with my story without mentioning that; I silvered it for him; he took that away on the 14th; Botfield's wife brought me an eighteen inch, and two of them there; I think that was about the 15th of January. I was to silver them. On Thursday afterwards I met Botfield in Fleet-street, he wanted to know if he could not have the eighteen inch on Friday; I told him he had better let it be till Saturday, the silver would be dry and more fit to take away. I went to Mr. Oakey and told him, knowing he worked there. In consequence of that, they came, they found those two glasses in my possession; they owned them.

Q. Do you mean all the three. - A. No, the two fifteens in my possession; Botfield came on the Saturday and fetched the eighteen inch glass that was silvered; he was apprehended on the 19th, he then seemed terrified, it was in Mr. Oakey's house; he said he had done nothing that he was afraid of; he denied it.

Mr. Bolland. How long have you known Botfield. - A. Two years; I never heard any thing against him.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COURT. This is laid as a capital offence, stealing in the dwelling house to the value of four pounds and upwards. The first thing for you to consider, is, whether these glasses were all taken away alone and at the same time, for if they were all taken away at one time, certainly it would be a capital crime; but supposing they were taken away at different times, then it does not appear that either of them are worth forty shillings; if you think they were taken at different times, the capital part of the indictment is done away; the next question will be whether you conceive that this man took them with a view to convert them to his own use. In a case that is doubtful, character ought to have great weight; on the other hand where the case is so clear that you cannot have a doubt then character cannot have any weight.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-11

178. REBECCA FALSGATE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of February , a sheet, value 15 s. six pieces of soap, value 5 s. eighteen pieces of candles, value 3 s. and four ounces of stone blue, value 9 d. the property of Richard John Millington .

JOHN MILLINGTON . I live at the Queen's Head, Holborn ; the prisoner was in my service as laundry maid ; I lost a sheet, she denied that she had the sheet, I saw her taking part of the sheet out of her pocket and conveying it to her box; I detected her doing so; she immediately gave it to me out of her box.

Q. Was it your sheet. - A. I believe it was; the prisoner cut it in pieces to make shifts of; she owned it to be my property.

HARRIET WADE . Q. Is that the prosecutor's sheet. - A. Yes, I know it by the hem, it was in the cupboard the over night; I saw it there when the prisoner came home; I said, I wanted a fine sheet with a broad hem, she said, may be it would be found in the morning; after she was gone to bed I saw it in the cupboard still; in the morning when I got up I asked her if it was not in the cupboard where the mangling things were; she said no, do you suppose that me or the other laundry maid has it; I said I do not suppose the other maid has, but I saw it in your possession last night, if you do not deliver it up I will inform Mrs. Millington of it. The sheet was whole when I saw it in the cupboard; she acknowledged that she had cut it up, and she would buy me one in the place of it.

Prisoner's Defence. The property is mine.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-12

179. WILLIAM GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , a pair of gaiters, value 15 d. the property of George Ash .

CHARLES MORRIS . Q. Do you recollect at any time seeing the prisoner at the bar at Mr. Ash's shop. - A. Yes, on Friday the 5th of this month, between one and two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner standing by Mr. Ash's window; I saw him cut down a pair of gaiters that was hanging outside of the window, he cut them off with a knife, put them inside of his jacket and walked off; I informed Mr. Ash, he went to him, took the gaiters away from him, and sent him about his business.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man - A. I am clear of it.

GEORGE ASH . I keep a clothes shop in Shoreditch . I had four pair of gaiters hanging out on a line; from information of the last witness, I went to the prisoner, I pulled his jacket of one side, and I took these gaiters from him; they are mine; I hung them out in the morning myself.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined One Month in Newgate and Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-13

180. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for that he on the 25th of January , six pound weight of lead, value 18 d. the property of Jonathan Turner , affixed to his dwelling house, did rip and cut, with intent feloniously to steal the same .

JONATHAN TURNER . I live at No. 62, Wardour-street, Soho . On the 25th of January the lead fixed on the dwelling house over the parlour window was ripped off about two feet, but not taken away; they were detected.

JOSEPH BERRY . I was standing at my master's door opposite of Mr. Turner's, about a quarter past seven in the evening of the 25th of January.

Q. Who is your master. - A. Mr. Stephenson. I saw the prisoner and another man ripping the lead from over Mr. Turner's parlour window; one stood by the iron rails close by the parlour door, and the other was standing by the step, and every person that came along he told the other to stop; then he left off. I ran over the way and catched him pulling the lead; I asked him what he was doing, he said he was lying his stocking up.

Q. What became of the other. - A. He ran away as soon as I took this.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is alledged against me. I met with a lad, who was a labourer along with me, we went up Wardour-street; I stopped at Turner's door to tie up my stocking; I saw the other lad looking at something, I asked him what he was looking at; he said a piece of lead: I looked at it, and that gentleman came and seized me.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-14

181. SARAH MARY ANN TOWNSHEND , alias ELLIS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February half a pound weight of tobacco, value 2 s. a quarter of a pound weight of snuff, value 1 s. a dollar value 5 s. ten shillings, three sixpences and three halfpence , the property of Thomas Benningfield .

MARTHA BENNINGFIELD . I am the wife of Thomas Benningfield , he keeps a tobacconist's shop , Whitechapel ; on the 9th of the present month, between twelve and one o'clock at noon, the prisoner came to our shop, she asked for half a pound of shag tobacco; I served her; while I was serving her she asked me if I could give her change of a pound note, I told her yes; I laid the tobacco on the counter, I went to get the change ready, expecting she would get the note ready; while I was getting the change she asked for a quarter of a pound of snuff; I served her the snuff, I put the change on the counter, among the change was a half guinea; she wished me to change the half guinea, and give her silver for it; I took the half guinea and put it in the till; I had not got silver enough in the till; I had to go into the back room; I thought it odd that she did not give me the note; she looked a decent person she counted the money over and said it was not right, I said it was right; she counted it over again, and said there is a shilling I would thank you to change, she thought it was not good; I changed it, then she said the change was wrong again. I counted it over again, I said it was right; then she wished me to make a bill, I said what a bill for half a pound of tobacco and a quarter of a pound of snuff; my little boy made a bill, she said it is right enough, she took the tobacco and snuff under her arm and was going out of the shop; I observed to her when I came out of the parlour with the silver, and said madam you know you have not given me the note, when she was going out with the tobacco and snuff; she said she had; I told her she must be mistaken, she said she was not; I said feel in your pocket, she did not; I asked her what she saw me do with it when I had taken it, she said that I had taken it into the parlour when I went for the change; says I that cannot be, because when I come out of the parlour, I told her she had not given me the note; she said, I have given you the note; I went and looked and she followed me; I took out the bowl where I put my change; I said look, you see your note is not here, you see there is only two notes and they lay considerably under the silver; she would insist on my taking the notes out of the silver; I did it to gratify her; she said there were spots of ink on the note she gave me; when she saw the notes, I observed to her where is the spots of ink, here is no spots of ink upon these; she said no; we walked into the shop, she then said she should know her note if she was to see it, her note was torn at the corner; I went and looked again and there was one of the two torn at the corner; I said you took more notice than I did. I did not observe it was torn, she said she was sure that was her note, she had taken it of Mr. Townsend; she asked me to let my little boy go along with her to Mr. Townsend with the note; to gratify her I let him go; after my little boy was gone out with her, I then thought she was not an honest woman; my husband come up, I desired him to run after her; I was confident she would not come back with the tobacco and snuff and the change; the change was sixteen shillings and sevenpence halfpenny.

Prisoner. There was not one person in the shop but that woman.

Prosecutrix. She told the magistrate there were four or five customers in the shop.

THOMAS BENNINGFIELD . JUNIOR. Q. How old are you. - A. I am fourteen. I took the note in my hand that she said was hers, it was a one pound note; on going out, the prisoner said she would fetch her husband out of a slaughterhouse to box my ears.

Q. How far from the house were you then. - A. I was about the middle of the Butcher row.

Q. Were you going to Mr. Townshend. - A. Yes, as I thought; we went along till we came to Mr. Jones's facing of Houndsditch, she went in there, she asked Mr. Jones if he had not given her a note on the Saturday, he said there were so many notes he could not tell; then she came out, I asked her if she was not going to Mr. Townshend; she said her name was Townshend; I asked her for the change, she said she had not got the change; then we went down Houndsditch; as we were going along I kept asking her for the change, she said she had not got it, and if she was not in the state she was, she would thump my head against the wall; I asked her again for the change, she said she had not got the change; then I went home.

WILLIAM STARNELL . On the 9th of this month I had occasion to come out of Mr. Benningfield's premises into the shop; I saw the prisoner but took little notice of her; I went about my business.

Q. Did you see enough of her so as to know her again or not. - A. I saw her in the parlour adjoining the shop, with Mrs. Benningfield; I know her person that she was there. About ten minutes after one o'clock, I observed Thomas Benningfield came into the shop; in consequence of what I heard I went after the woman and took her; I found her in Mr. Jackson's a straw bonnet shop; I charged with having been in Whitechapel, and there obtaining change of a one pound note; she said she had not been in Whitechapel that day; she came from Hackney where she lived; I wished her to come back.

Prisoner. He offered me a shilling and eighteen-pence

if I would go back with him.

Witness. I told her if she was not the person, I would give her eighteenpence for her trouble if she would go back. I then conveyed her to Worship-street.

MARGARET JACKSON . I live in Houndsditch; the prisoner came into our shop to enquire for a bonnet of the name of Clark, we had no bonnet of that name; shortly after Starnell came in and said to her have you not been to a house in Whitechapel, a tobacconist's; she denied having been in Whitechapel.

JAMES JONES . I am a linen draper. When she came into my shop she said she had taken a note of me the Tuesday before. I knew nothing of her, she had not taken a note of me; the boy asked her for the change; she said she had not got it, she had left it with the lady of the shop

Prosecutrix. Daniel Bishop searched her and found the change; he is not here; I subpoenaed him last night.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the prosecutor's shop to buy half a pound of tobacco, and a quarter of a pound of snuff. I put the note down and the lady gave the change, with a half guinea; she said she would rather give me silver; she took the half guinea; then I lost sight of the note; I never had the tobacco and snuff.

Court to Jury. You are to consider the conduct and demeanour of the prisoner. In the course of this transaction, when she got this change, she quarrelled with it a long time, not having given the note. When she is asked for the note, then she said that she had given the note, when in fact and truth she knew she had not. How does her innocence and demeanour consist with her conduct; when she is asked for the change, she said Mrs. Benningfield had not given her the change, when in truth she had.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-15

182. HERBERT CRYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February three pounds weight of type metal, value 3 s . the property of John Nicholls , and John Bowyer Nicholls .

MR. FIGGINS. I am a letter founder, I live at No. 17 Chick-lane, Smithfield, the prisoner at the bar was my porter and melter ; on Monday the 15th of February, I received a quantity of type metal from the ruins of Mr. Nicholls's fire; my men fetched it in carts; this man was employed to clean it from the rubbish to ascertain the net weight of the metal. In the evening from information I sent for an officer and had him searched; the officer found some metal in an inside pocket of his coat.

Q. Was it type metal. - A. Yes; the same that we received from Mr. Nicholls; his apron was tied over his coat, and before the metal.

Q. When it was produced had it the appearance of metal that was taken from the fire. - A. Yes, burned paper was attached to it.

Q. How much was found on him. - A. About three pounds; it was worth about three shillings.

JOHN BOWYER NICHOLS. Q. Are you in partnernership with your father. - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, some time back you had the misfortune to have your premisses burned by a fire. - A. On Monday the 8th instant; all that was dug out of the ruins was intended to be sent to Mr. Figgins.

Q. Have you seen the metal that was taken from this man. - A. Yes. I have not the least doubt that it came from our premises, by its appearance.

Q. At the time it was taken, it was the property of Messrs. Nichols. - A. It was.

JAMES WARREN . I live with Mr. Figgins; I was standing by the metal pot; Mr. Nichols's metal was melting, and some of it being damp, it splashed over his coat; I was picking it off, I saw something hang out of his coat; I went to the foreman first, and the foreman went to my master.

JOHN HAZLEWOOD WOKRAL. I am a constable. Last Monday I was sent for to take charge of this man, by his master; Mr. Figgins told him he was a very bad man, that he had robbed him; the prisoner made no reply; I found the metal in his left hand side coat pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped in Goal and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-16

183. EDWARD WESTBROOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , three hundred dozen of printed cotton handkerchiefs, value 40 l. and a wrapper, value 6 d. the property of James Hartwell and William Behman , in the dwelling house of James Hartwell .

JAMES HARTWELL . My partner's name is William Behman ; we are warehousemen ; I have no other partner.

Q. In what parish is the house in which you carry on your business. - A. In St. Stephens, Walbrook ; I inhabit the house, and sleep there; Mr. Behman lives in Hackney-road.

Q. He only comes in the house for the purpose of business. - A.Just so.

Q Did you at any time lose a truss containing three hundred dozen of printed cotton handkerchiefs. - A. Yes, on Friday the 5th of February, between six and seven in the evening, from the house in Walbrook; they were enclosed in a canvas wrapper.

Q.Do you know from what circumstance they were lost. - A. Yes; this truss was delivered at my house, after the warehouse was closed; our warehouse is at this time of the year closed at dusk; this truss was deivered about six o'clock; it was delivered into my dwelling house, but not in the warehouse.

Q. Did you see it in your dwelling house before it was taken away. - A. I did not. About twenty minutes or half after six o'clock, my servant was called to the house door in consequence of a knock; the prisoner at the bar said, I hear that your master wants a porter; in consequence of this my servant came up into the dining room to me and said a man wanted me; he said he heard I wanted a porter; I said it is a mistake, I do not want any porter. When she had got half way down stairs she screamed out, observing the man absent and the truss missing; that moment I run out of the dining room.

Q. Did you catch sight of the prisoner. - A. No; the moment I got out of the street door, I called out stop thief; I ran to the corner of Cannon-street, but did not see any thing particular; finding things quiet, I

returned and found a terrible scuffle at that end of Walbrook that comes into Bucklersbury, and as I came gently up I found a man a running very fast indeed, coming towards me, with several others following of him.

Q. Had that man any bundle with him. - A. No. In Walbrook, opposite the end of a court, I secured the prisoner at the bar; he said what do you want with me; I replied you have stolen a truss of mine; and I requested some one or two who were near me to assist me to take him up to my own door; they assisted me in taking him up.

Q. By that means you secured him in your house. - A. Yes. When I got within three yards of my own door, I met my servant whom he asked the question of; she said I will swear that is the man.

Q. That was in his hearing. - A. Yes. The prisoner made no reply; when I got him into the passage of my house, he acknowledged that he was the person that came to enquire about a porter's place. The moment he was in the passage I desired they would be kind enough to secure the prisoner; I went and found a man coming with the truss at the corner of Buckler'sbury, he said he found the truss on a post; I said where are you going with that truss; he replied, sir, I am going to bring it to you. He delivered it to me. I requested they would keep the prisoner in custody till I got a constable.

Q. You had never seen the truss before. - A. No.

SUSANNAH ABBOTT . Q. Were you servant to Mr. Hartwell on the 5th of February. - A. I was.

Q. Do you know whether he had any truss delivered. - A. On the 5th of February, a little after seven, there came a rap at the door, and the truss was delivered.

Q. Is the man here that delivered the truss. - A. No; the truss was delivered to me; it was left in the passage, and the man went away.

Q. How long after that did you see any other person. A. About a quarter of an hour afterwards there came another knock at the door; the prisoner came in and asked for Mr. Hartwell.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the man. - A. I am quite sure, my lord, he is the man; he asked for Mr. Hartwell by name, he said he was informed he wanted a porter; I told him I did not know, but if he would come in I would enquire of my master, he was in the sitting room.

Q. Where was your master's sitting room. - A. Above stairs. I went up to my master, and delivered the message that the man sent me with.

Q. At the time that you left the prisoner with the street door in his hand, whereabouts was this truss. - A. It was very near the prisoner.

Q. Was it a large truss. - A. Yes, I delivered the prisoner's message to my master, and returned down stairs almost immediately, I was not a minute with my master; my master said, he did not want one, he must be misinformed; as I went down I saw the prisoner was gone and the truss, I saw that before I got down stairs by the light of the candle, and the door was left open; I called out for my master before I got to the bottom; I ran into the street calling out stop thief.

Q. Did you get sight of the prisoner. - A. I did not at that moment, a man in the street told me he had gone down the street; another man told me he had told me wrong, he had gone up the street; I returned again towards the Mansion house; I met the prisoner by the church going down the street; he had got rid of the truss and was running down the street; I called out that was the man.

Q. Did you lay hold of him. - A. No, I catched at him but I could not hold him, I followed him; I did not lose sight of him till my master stopped him.

Q. Did you see the truss of goods again. - A. I did, they came into the house again, a strange man brought it in from the corner.

Q. Did that man give you any account how he came by it. - A. No; I have not seen him since.

Q. Do you know it to be the same truss as was there when you went up stairs. - A. I did: my master's name was on it in large letters.

Q. I suppose that is all you know of it. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the man. - A. I am confident that he is the man that came and asked for the porter's place.

DANIEL LEADBEATER . Q. You are a constable. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know any thing more than taking charge of this man. - A. No farther; I was sent for to take charge of him in company with Cartwright; I searched him and fond nothing about him but a knife; he had an apron about him near in the same way he has got that now.

CARTWRIGHT. I produce the truss; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Jury. What do you suppose it to weigh. - A. Between eighty and ninety pound.

Q. to prosecutor. Is your name upon that truss. - A. Yes, it is the same truss, it contains the same articles as the invoice, and before the lord mayor I had it cut open; I saw the contents, it was such a truss as I expected.

Q. Had you given any intimation that you wanted a porter. - A. No, we have a man that suited us exceeding well; I had no thought of changing.

Q. Who had sent you these goods. - A. Ashton and Shipley, at Manchester.

Q. They are persons that supply you with goods. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the contents of that truss. - A. Forty-pounds; the invoice is forty eight.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Newgate street, I met with a young fellow, he told me that if I was to apply to Mr. Hartwell he believed that they wanted a porter; I went to Mr. Hartwell's, to know if they wanted one; the servant went to her master; I stood at the corner of the stairs for an answer and just as the time the maid went up stairs a young fellow took the bale and handed it to another; they ran away, I ran after them calling out stop thief; Mr. Hartwell when he came up to me he knocked me down; he said, that I was the man that was in the entry, while the maid went up stairs to ask if he wanted a porter.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor on account of his youth.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-17

184. ISAAC MULLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of January , fourteen ounces weight of tea, value 5 s. the property of the united company of merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

Second Count for the like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN REYNOLDS . - Mr. Gleed. You are a labourer I believe in the service of the East India company. - A. Yes. The prisoner was a labourer also.

Q. On the 20th of January were you employed in their warehouse in Crutched Friars . - A. Yes: the prisoner was working in the same warehouse.

Q. What sort of goods were deposited in this warehouse. - A. A great number of chests of congou tea; it is a tea warehouse.

Q. Did you see him do any thing - A. I did; between nine and ten in the morning I saw him pulling away the paper that covered the tea, under the lid; that was the first I saw. Afterwards he dipped his hand in three times; he kept shuffling it under his apron, under his great coat; that is what I saw him do. I was not positive whether he put it in his small clothes pocket or no; that was after ten o'clock. I told the commodore what I had seen.

Q. Did you look at the chest of tea. - A I did; it was fell of tea; I looked after the tea was taken away; I saw the toutenage cut sufficient to admit a man's hand.

JAMES POCOCK . - Mr. Gleed. I believe you are a commodore. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 20th of January, from any information, did you pay any attention to the prisoner. - A. I told the prisoner to do his duty, and reported it to the elder. I saw him out a chest open. About a quarter before eleven I saw the prisoner at a chest, he was at work with a knife, he cut the tutenage; he spilt the tea down on the floor; he stooped down, took a handful of it, and put it in his pocket; I informed the elder of it.

THOMAS GLASSE . - Mr. Knapp. You are the elder. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of information did you search the prisoner. - A. Immediately Pocock told me he saw him take some tea, I told him he was wanted in the accounting house; he was searched in my presence; there were fourteen ounces of black tea found upon him, loose in his left hand coat pocket; he said he was very sorry, and I believe he said he did not know what induced him to do it.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of this fourteen ounces. - A. About five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been lately troubled with the rheumatic gout, three months at a time; I have been laid up in bed. I was allowed a salary, but now the estates are all throw'd in chancery. I have nothing to say. This gout afflicted me so the week before, I was blind; I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Publicly whipped One Hundred Yards near the East India Warehouse .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-18

185. DAVID CATHERALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , ten shirts, value 11 l. the property of James Finch .

The case stated by Mr. Knapp.

- ARROWSMITH. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Finch. - A. I am; he keeps a ready made linen warehouse in Cornhill ; the prisoner was porter to Mr. Finch; I hired him in the absence of Mr. Finch in October last. Armstrong and Vickery brought some shirts to our house.

Q. How many. - A. I believe they brought six.

Q. Were these shirts which were brought by the officer to your house your master's property. - A. Yes, they were.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of these shirts. - A. About thirty shilling each we sell them for; I cannot ascertain the exact cost; they were new shirts, they had never been sold.

JAMES HALL - Mr . Knapp. You are a pawnbroker. - A. Yes, living in Old-street Road.

Q. Did you receive any shirts. - A. Yes, on the 27th of January I received three; the same woman offered to pawn a linen shirt on the 10th of February; I suspected it was not her property. I sent for an officer.

Q. Upon the officer coming did you deliver over the shirts to him. - A. Yes, these are the shirts; the woman's name was Hall.

Court. On the 10th of February you did not advance any money. - A. No, I stopped them.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You are an officer belonging to Worship street. - A. I am. I was sent for by the gentleman that has been just examined; I saw the shirts that was produced by the pawnbroker. In consequence of what the woman told me, I went home to the woman's apartments in White Hart court, Hoxton; there I found these six shirts and two silk handkerchiefs; from the information that she gave me, I went to Mr. Finch's house in Cornhill in company with Armstrong.

Q. Did you take these shirts with you. - A. I did; I shewed them to Mr. Finch and Mr. Arrowsmith, they claimed them; one I think has been washed and wore, the others are new. I went with Mr. Arrowsmith to Hackney; we saw the prisoner, he was told by Mr. Arrowsmith that he must go before the magistrate on suspicion of stealing six shirts. I took him to the office in Worship street. I took him into a room where Ann Hall was sitting, that had been to pledge some shirts with Mr. Hall; I asked Ann Hall if that was the man that brought the shirts to her, she cried and said he was; he made no reply. I took him into the front parlour of the public office; the shirts were shewed him; they were taken out one by one. Armstrong asked him who these shirts belonged to, he said to his master, Mr. Finch.

Q. These are the shirts in the paper. - A. Yes; he said he got them from his master Mr. Finch; he was asked whether he got them with Mr. Finch's knowledge. No, he said Mr. Finch knew nothing about it; he seemed to be very sorry for it; and made apology.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You went with Vickrey. A. I had possession of the goods and waited while Vickrey brought him into the public office; I shew-him these goods one by one. I said who does these shirts belong to; the prisoner said my master, Mr Finch; and I have taken them. When we went to his master, he said he had a good character with him, he could not believe it till he saw it.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

[The jury recommeded the prisoner to the mercy of the court on account of his youth and good character.]

Whipped in Goal and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-19

186. MARTHA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , eleven shawls, value 12 s. the property of - Harvey and James Lemming , privately in their shop .

JAMES SMITH . I am shopman to Messrs. Harvey and Lamming, No. 30, Ludgate Hill .

Q. to Mr. Shelton. How is the name in the indictment. - A. Lemming.

Q. to Smith. Then Lamming is the name. - A. Yes.

COURT. The property appears to have been stolen from Messrs. Harvey and Lamming; in the indictment it is Lemming; the prisoner will not escape justice because of this mistake, a fresh bill shall be presented before the grand jury.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-20

187. SUSANNAH CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of January , three shirts, value 9 s. a gown, value 3 s. a table cloth, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a pair of breeches, value 2 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Arthur Owen .

SARAH OWEN . Q. Are you the wife of Arthur Owen. - A. Yes, he is a clerk in Doctors Commons.

Q. Did you lose any shirts, gowns, and a table cloth on the 20th of January or thereabouts. - A. I did.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. Where is your house. - A. No. 24, Shoemaker-row, Blackfriers ; I rent the whole of the house. About one o'clock I was below stairs, I heard a noise at the door; I went to the door, I saw the prisoner, I asked her who she wanted and whether she wanted a lodger; she said, yes; I had one lady in the house; the prisoner had been up stairs.

Q. Had you seen her in the house before. - A. No, I never saw her before; she said she wanted a lodger; I had some suspicion she did not; I called the lady down and asked her if she knew the person; she said, no, in the prisoner's hearing. I saw something tied up in her apron; she said, they were her own things.

Q. Did you look at them to see if that account was true. - A. At last I got a view of them.

Q. What things were there. - A. Three shirts, a table cloth, two handkerchiefs, a pillow case, an apron, a pair of breeches, and a morning gown.

Q. When you saw these things did you know whose they were. - A. Yes, they belonged to my husband, I had seen the things about five minutes before, they were in the garret: I went for a constable; she begged of me to let her go.

Q. You did not see her in the house yourself did you. - A. I saw her in the passage, she must have come in when the door was left open; she thought it might be so again.

SARAH HAINES . Q. Do you lodge in Mrs. Owen's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you acquainted with her. - A. Not at all. Mrs. Owen called me down stairs and asked me if this person had been to me; I immediately said, no, in the prisoner's hearing; Mrs. Owen insisted upon seeing what she had got in her lap; she said, she had nothing but her own; they afterwards found them things in her lap; she begged to go away; she said she was in the family way; when Mrs. Owen was gone for the constable, I said the things did not belong to me, I could not let her go.

THOMAS VINCE . Q. Are you a constable. - A. Yes. I was sent for to take charge of this woman.

Q. Were these things delivered in charge with her. - A. These things when I went in were laying on the floor; I asked the prisoner if she did take them, she said she did. These are the same things that were delivered to me.

(The property produced and identified.)

Q. to prosecutrix. How did the prisoner get in the house. - A. The door was of a jar when she came in.

Mrs. Haines. The door was left open; on account I had stepped out for about two minutes for my porter.

Q. to prosecutrix. Did she give you any account how she came by them. - A. No, on the contrary she was trying to be let go; they did not chuse to let her do it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-21

188. MARY BAILEY and ANN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 5 s. and eighteen yards of other ribbon, value 5 s. the property of William Jenks .

MATILDA JENKS. Q. Are you the wife of William Jenks. - A. Yes, he is a haberdasher , No. 32, Sun-street, Bishopgate-street . On the 19th of January the two prisoners came into the shop, between the hours of six and seven in the evening; they asked me to shew them some ribbons; I took a drawer from the counter and shewed them, they did not like them. I took a second drawer and Williams choosed one.

Q. Were they standing together. - A. They were standing close together.

Q. Did you cut her off any ribbon. - A. I did not; she pitched upon the ribbon and desired I would measure it, I did; it was six yards and a half; Bailey said there were seven and a half, I told her I would measure it over again to convince her I was right; while I was measuring it over again, I observed a hand in the box, I told her I was right, it was but six and a half; I cannot say whose hand I saw in the drawer, but I am certain it was one of the two; there was no person near enough to put a hand in but one of them two. They told me they wanted more, it was for three sister's bonnets; there

must be ten yards, and they wanted it all of one piece; I offered to get it for them by ten o'clock in the morning, that would not do. they wished to go; I told them to stay, I thought I had lost some ribbons, I wished to look them over to see what was missing; they were agreeable to stay, and did stay.

Q.Did you find there were any ribbons gone from your stock. - A. I could not say positively what ribbons I had missed; I sent for an officer, during the time the officer was gone for, I heard a ribbon drop on the floor where they were; I heard the second piece drop, I could not say it was ribbon; I saw Bailey put her hand into her gown or apron that was pinned up; I told her that she had throwed it either out of her gown or apron, she positively denied it, and said it came out of neither; then the constable came. I told him that I heard the sound of two pieces of ribbon falling on the ground; the constable has had them ever since. I am positive they are my husband's property.

SARAH HOWELL . Q. Were you in the shop at this time. - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live. - A. In Bell-square, Broker-row. Mrs. Jenks shewed the prisoners a drawer of ribbons, they did not like any of them; Mrs. Jenks shewed them another drawer, they pitched on one, they said they wanted ten yards; Mrs. Jenks said when they were going she wished to speak to them, she had lost some ribbon; she sent for a constable; we heard something fall, it turned out to be two pieces of ribbon, it dropped down between them.

(The property produced and identified.)

Bailey's Defence. I would wish Williams to be cleared, she is quite innocent of it.

Williams' Defence. I went into the shop along with Bailey. I did not see her take any thing, nor did I see her drop any thing, and if she did take any thing it is more than I know

BAILEY, GUILTY , aged 19.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080217-22

189. JOHN PEAKE was indicted for that he on the 4th of February , had in his custody and possession, a forged and counterfeited note, purporting to be a promissory note of the governor and company of the Bank of England, for the payment of one pound, and that he at the same time had in his custody and possession one other like forged and counterfeited note, for the payment of one pound, he well knowing them to be false and forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-23

190. JOHN PEAKE was indicted for feloniously forging on the 4th of February , a Bank note for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the Bank of England .

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-24

191 JOHN PEAKE was again indicted for feloniously forging a counterfeited Bank note, for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the Bank of England .

Several other counts for like offence, with like intention, and also to defraud William Elliott and William Morland .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-25

192. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , a box, value 5 s. twelve tablecloths, value 12 l. 17 s. twelve towels, value 10 s. 28 napkins, value 35 s. three dusters, value 1 s. 6 d. two pair of sheets, value 2 l. 10 s. four pillow cases, value 3 s. a bolster case, value 1 s seven cravats, value 21 s. eight handkerchiefs, value 16 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. two night caps, value 1 s. and two binders, value 1 s. the property of Sir John Nichol , Knight ; four pair of stockings, value 6 s. four pocket handkerchiefs, value 6 s. half a handkerchief, value 1 s. a flannel coat, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of Susannah Valentine .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES PARKINS . Q. You are a carter belonging to Sir John Nichol . - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in town loading your cart on the day the box was lost. - A. Yes.

Q. Where is Sir John's house in London - A. No. 55, Lincoln's-Inn Fields .

Q. How long is it ago. - A. A fortnight last Saturday; I came there with my cart to take the linen down into the country, to Sadgrove Aldenham in Hertfordshire, I took a large box and put it into the cart afterwards I went back to get another box. I was loading the cart in Lincoln's-Inn Fields at the front of the house.

Q. How long did you stay. - A. About three or four minutes; when I returned I found the first box gone; upon which several of the servants went out. I went myself; the coachman found the box, the same box that was lost was brought back again. I am sure it is the same box, it is here.

JOSHUA PERCEVAL . I am a coachman to Sir John Nichol ; in consequence of being informed the box was gone, I went out of the house in pursuit after it. I went through Lincoln's-Inn Fields and turned into Clare market; before I went into the market, I saw the box going down the market upon a man's shoulder; I crossed over and stopped the prisoner with the box on his shoulder, he wanted me to be easy, he said I was taring his coat; I said if he stood still I should not tear his coat; there was a butcher's stall just by, he dropped the box immediately, I called out for assistance; he told me to let him go, he would find out the man that gave it to him; I told him no, he must stop there, he was trying to get away; I found the coat giving way, I

immediately laid hold of his waistcoat, some people came to my assistance, and he was taken. That box is the box that was in the prisoner's possession; I knew the box before, it is sir John Nichol 's box. I took the prisoner in about two minutes after the alarm,

SUSANNAH VALENTINE . - Mr. Knapp. You are housekeeper to sir John Nichol , were your things in the box. - A. Yes, every thing that is stated in the indictment,

Court. Nothing depends upon the value here.

Valentine. This pair of pockets are mine, and here is a cravat of my master's; they were in the box.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stopping at the top of Clare market, and a genteel young man called out, porter; he said he had got a box to carry to Temple bar; he asked me what he should give me to carry it, I said a shilling; he lifted it up on my shoulder, and that young man stopped me with the box.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-26

193. JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , five pound weight of brass, value 3 s. 4 d. and five pound weight of mixed metal, value 3 s. 4 d. the property of John Goding and Benjamin Goding .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-27

194. CATHERINE JENNINGS was indicted for that she at a general quarter session of the peace, holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 2nd of July, in the forty-fourth year of his majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeit money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned one year, and to find sureties for two years more; and the indictment stated that she afterwards, on the 2nd of February instant, feloniously did utter one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, did utter to Mary, the wife of George Miller , she knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you assist the solicitor of the mint. - A. Yes.

Q. You produce' a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner in July sessions 1804 at Clerkenwell. - A. Yes, I examined it with the original record of the clerk of the peace. It is a true copy.

Q. Did you happen to be present at the time she was convicted. - A. Yes, she is the same person; and she was cautioned at that time to be cautious of committing a second offence. (The copy of conviction read).

WILLIAM BEEBY . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are assistant to Mr. Newport, the keeper of the New prison. - A. Yes, I am his clerk; this woman was convicted in July session 1804, and was sentenced to be one year in the House of Correction. I took her to the House of Correction myself.

MARY MILLER. - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are the wife of George Miller , he is a tallow chandler in Leather-lane . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house. - A. Yes; on the 28th of last January, between six and seven in the evening, she asked for a single candle, which I gave her, for which she tendered me one shilling; after she was gone I saw it was a bad one; I shewed it to my husband the next morning. I kept it by itself; he requested if she came again, to let him see her; she came again on the 2nd of February in the evening, about the same time, and asked for another candle, for which she gave me a shilling; I then called my husband, I told him that was the woman that gave me the shilling; he said she must be taken in custody; he sent for an officer.

Q. Before you sent for the officer, did you compare the first shilling and the second together. - A. We did, we found they were exactly alike.

Court. Have you got them here. - A. Yes.

Q. Then the jury will look at them. - A. During the time the officer was gone for, she dropped a parcel of good halfpence on the floor; when the officer came he searched her, but no more was found upon her; the officer has the shillings.

- DAY. - Mr. Knapp. You are the constable that was sent for. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time the prisoner was delivered to you, were these shillings delivered to you. - A. They were; these are the shillings; I searched her and found nothing.

MR. JOHN NICOLL . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at them shillings, and tell me whether they are counterfeits. - A. They are both very bad.

Court. You cannot tell whether they were made at the same time, - A. That is impossible.

Prisoner's Defence. The shilling she said I gave her she picked it out of a parcel of money, there was not a shilling found on me.

Court to prosecutrix. Did you pick that shilling out of a parcel of money. - A. I did not.

Prisoner. You had it wrapped up in a bit of paper in the parcel of money, you picked it out.

COURT TO JURY. In order to put a stop to this practice of uttering counterfeit money the legislature thought it was necessary to punish capitally, any such practice after the first conviction. It is well known that it is owing to these people uttering this counterfeit money, that coiners are employed; if there were no utterers of bad money, there would be no coiners. The question for your consideration is, whether the prisoner uttered it with a guilty knowledge; to ascertain that, you must be satisfied with circumstantial proof: it is impossible to have positive proof. When she was convicted at the quarter sessions, the chairman told her the consequence of committing a second offence, with the greatest humanity. It is for your consideration whether you are of opinion, under all these circumstances, that she knew this shilling was a bad one.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-28

195. FRANCIS ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , twenty pound weight of lead, value 6 s. the property of Edward Cook , esq. affixed to a certain building of his called a house .

Second Count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Harris.

MARTIN DAVIS . Q. You live with Mr. Cook. - A. Yes, as servant; I have lived with him fifteen years. His house is the corner of North row, Park lane , in the parish of St. George, Hanover square.

Q. What is Mr. Cook's christian name. - A. Edward.

Q. Do you remember on the 30th of January any thing happening. - A. Yes, on the 30th of January I was sitting in the kitchen, I heard some noise on the leads.

Court. Is that lead over the kitchen. - A. Yes, it was ten minutes before twelve; I heard the noise over my head; I did not get up directly; the noise was as if a person was cutting; I sat about two seconds; then I heard the noise repeated again, as if a person was ripping.

Q. What part of the kitchen did the noise seem to come from. - A. The first time I heard it, it came from the first window to the right; when I heard it the second time, the noise appeared more closer to me in the centre. I waited till my fellow servant came down stairs; I spoke to him; I went out of our hall door into North row; that is the side of the house. I went round the corner facing of the parlour.

Q. Is that where the iron rails are. - A. Yes, it is facing of the kitchen windows. When I came there, my fellow servant lifted me up on the railing; it was so dark I could not see; at first I thought I saw something, but it was so dark and rainy I could not; I stopped where I was; my fellow servant turned the corner, he saw a watchman coming across the road, he had a light with him; he stopped the watchman. In consequence of what he said I went to him, and we took the light from him; I helped my fellow servant up, and the light was held up; directly he saw the prisoner; I saw the prisoner come over the wall; he come down on the ground, he had a very great fall.

Q. You saw a person fall. - A. I did not see him; directly he fell he got up again, he turned round and ran away; I pursued him; he never was out of my sight, we stepped step for step; I struck him three or four times, I knocked him down and then took him; I brought him back to my master before I took him to the watchhouse. After I went to the watchhouse with the prisoner I went upon the leads; there was four feet and a half of lead gone from the first window on the right.

Q. That is the window where you described that you heard the noise first. - A. Yes.

Court. How did the lead lay. - A. It lay by the sky light, it was fixed over the window, and that lead was gone, and the lead of the second window ripped ready to carry away; there are three windows; the whole of the area is covered with lead.

Court There is no mention made in the indictment of ripping, only of stealing; confine yourself to stealing of lead.

Mr. Harris. How much lead was gone entirely. - A. About four feet and a half in length and two feet in width; the other laid at the other window; it was loose, it was not rolled up.

Q. Did you find the other lead. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing the lead in the course of the day. - A. Yes, they were perfect in the course of the day; it was perfect when I saw it; I was on the leads, and the other servants were out upon it in the course of the day.

Q. As the prisoner was running away did you hear any thing fall. - A. Just as I seized the prisoner I perceived him searching his pocket, I thought he was going to use some violence to me; directly afterwards I saw him throw something away; I marked the spot where I took the prisoner; I searched the place in about half an hour afterwards; I found a knife, this is the knife (producing it). I found it just at the place where I took the prisoner.

Court. Could you observe whether the lead was cut or torn. - A. It was cut, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You spoke of some other lead, was that cut. - A. The nails were picked out, it was not cut.

Prisoner. At Marlborough street, he said that he had not, nor any of the servants, been on the leads that day.

Court. Do you recollect on the 30th of January, whether you had been on the leads or not - A. I had business to do there; the door opens level with the parlour to go out upon the leads.

Q. Had you been out upon the leads that morning. A. Yes, I was there seeing the soldiers go by; if there had been any lead taken away I must have seen it. I never said any such thing at Marlborough street.

THOMAS JONES . Q. You live with Mr. Cook. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember something being said by Martin Davis , and going out of doors. - A. Yes, I lifted him up on the rails, I called the watchman and had his light; I saw the prisoner go up over Mr. Cook's water closet; I did not see his face, but I saw the size of the man; he got from thence to the wall into North row.

Q. Were you present when Davis overtook him. - A. Davis and I were together.

Q. Was the person whom Davis had taken brought to your master's house. - A. He was brought to the door, there was a light in the hall.

Q. Was the prisoner that person. - A. Yes. I took hold of him, and never let him go till he was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. In the course of the day had you been on the leads. - A. I cannot say that I had; I had been in the parlour, but I cannot be positive that I had looked at the windows; as soon as we had been to the watch-house I went out upon the leads to examine it; I found the lead from one frame gone, that looks in North row. It was about four feet in length.

Q. What was the state of the other window. - A. The lead was loose.

Q. Did you see any one person there. - A. We met a person at the corner; as we went round he went towards Oxford road.

Court. You said that when you got up on the rails you saw the prisoner; do you mean to say you saw a man like the prisoner - should you have known him again if he had not been taken. - A. Yes, I should; I took particular notice of his hat and size; I should have known him again.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from pay table at night, I was just coming up Park lane, when I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran by the side of them gentlemen. At last one of them catched hold of me, and said I was one of the lads; they were before me first, and running; I got before them.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-29

196. JAMES CHEASLEY , alias CHISLEY, alias CHEERSLY , was indicted for that he on the 29th of October, 1804, by the name of James Cheersley , did marry and take to wife one Rebecca Randell , spinster , that he afterwards on the 22nd day of December 1807 , by the name of James Cheasley , did marry and take to wife one Sarah Martin , spinster , his former wife being alive .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

BENJAMIN - . Q. I believe you are parish clerk of St. John, Hackney. - A. Yes; I produce the register book of marriages.

"29th of October 1804, James Cheersley of this parish, bachelor, and Rebecca Randell of this parish, spinster, were married by banns."

ANN BLANE . Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him. - A. Yes, I was present at his marriage on the 29th of October, he was married to Rebecca Randell .

Q. Is she alive. - A. I saw her yesterday.

SARAH MARTIN . Q. Do you know the man at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever married to him. - A. Yes, on the 22nd of December 1807; he told me he was a single man; I was a servant at Edmonton.

Q. He was working at your master's premises. - A. Yes,

Prisoner. She knew perfectly well that I was a married man; my wife went to her and told her I was a married man.

Court, to Martin. Did you know he was a married man. - A. I did not; he told me he was a single man.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . Q. You are parish clerk of St. Mary, Newington, in the county of Surry. - A. Yes. I produce the register book of the marriages.

ANN MARTIN . Q. I believe you are the sister of Sarah Martin . - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at her marriage at the parish of St. Mary, Newington, Surry. - A. I was. When he came to my place I asked him if he was an honest man; I hoped there was nothing to prevent him from lawfully marrying my sister; he assured me there was not.

Prisoner's Defence. She knew me to be a married man before I was married to her; she begged me not to mention it to her sister. She promised me never to come against me if I was taken up. I told her it would be a great chance if I was not taken up.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-30

197. DANIEL ALLEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Brown , between the hours of twelve and one at night on the 19th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a copper, value 10 s. 6 d. and six pound weight of iron, value 4 s. his property .

WILLIAM BROWN . Q. Where did you live in April last. - A. No. 46, Plomer's row, Mile End New Town .

Q. How did you lose the property. - A. I lost the copper and I lost the iron; I am not sure I lost the iron the same night the copper was lost; the copper was not affixed.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. About eleven o'clock; the iron work was taken out of my dwelling house; the copper was taken out of a little coal hole in the yard, about six feet from the dwelling house.

Q. When did you see it the last time before it was taken. - A. I saw it about eleven o'clock, when I locked the door at night; on Monday morning at six o'clock it was gone.

Q. Was any part of the house broke open. - A. The window was broke open where the iron was, and the door of the coal house where the copper was, that was broke open; that door was locked.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This is near a twelvemonth ago. - A. Yes.

Q. You have known this man a long while. - A. He has worked for me.

Q. You know he was employed at Chatham. - A. I saw him there; he jumped out of the window when he saw me, and I saw him the day after.

Court. At that time had you received any notice that this man took the copper. - A. I never could say that he took the copper.

Mr. Alley. You do not know that he took the copper. - A. No.

Q. You know this is forty pounds reward. - A. No. I do not know it.

MARY TAYLOR . I live at No. 3, Union-row.

Q. Did any of the prisoner's acquaintances lodge with you, - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner come to see them. - A. Yes, often times; the copper was left in the possession of a woman that lodged with me, it was such a copper as that; I cannot swear to the copper; she would have left the copper in my house, but I would not let her.

Q. Did you see the prisoner bring it. - A. No.

- ALLEN. I live at No. 64 Old Gravel lane.

Q. Did you see this copper removed. - A. Yes, Elizabeth Medwin and another woman removed the copper from Mrs. Taylor's place into a court that leads to Blue Anchor court, it was such a copper as that. I went to Shadwell office and gave information.

EDWARD ROGERS . I am a police officer. A woman came to me and gave me information; I went and took the copper out of Allen's out house and took it to the office; the prisoner absconded; I could not find him. I heard he had been at Chatham working there. I apprehended him.

COURT. There is no evidence whatever to affect the prisoner; there seems to be some slight suspicion, but no evidence to affect him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-31

198. LUCY KENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , in the dwelling house of Timothy Herley , four bank notes, value 1 l. each, and one bank note, value 2 l. the property of John Collins .

JOHN COLLINS . I live at No. 21, Oxford-buildings, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . I lodge in Timothy Herley 's house.

Q. Does Timothy Herley live in that same house himself. - A. Yes; I live in the one pair front room; I lodge with Mrs. Lehey, she let me part of a bed in that room.

Q. How many lodged in that same room. - A. Six

lodged in the same room.

Q. Had you any box or trunk in that room. - A. Yes, a box; there was a lock upon it.

Q. Had you any money in that box. - Q. Yes, four one pound notes, and a two pound note.

Q. Were they in a little box or a case. - A. They were in a wooden case.

Q. Your notes were taken from you. - A. Yes; on the 1st of February, I went up into the room at one o'clock at noon, I wanted some tools out of my box; I left my key in the lock of my box, I forgot to take them out.

Q. How long was it since you had seen your notes in the case. - A. I had seen them all there that morning.

Q. How long had you had the notes. - A. I had taken one of them the Saturday before; it was paid me by the man I work for.

Q. Were they bank notes. - A. Yes.

Q. After you went out at one, what time did you come back. - A. At half past five; I went to my box and missed the notes; they were taken out of the case all of them.

Q. Had you clothes and linen in the box. - A. Yes, they were not taken.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner Kennis. A. Yes, she lodged in the same room for three or four nights, about three weeks before; when I went out at one o'clock at noon, I left Mrs. Lehey and James Harper in the room; they were gone when I came back.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner there that day. - A. No.

Q. Was your box in that room while she lodged in that room. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you notes in your box while she lodged there. A. Yes.

Q. You never saw any of the notes after you missed them. - A. No.

Q. You said there were six people lodged in the room, were they men or women. - A. There were four men and two woman.

JAMES HARPER . Q. Did you lodge in this room. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time the other five people lodged there. A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect when Collins came back at half after five. - A. He went out at one, he left me and the landlady in the room; I went out about a quarter after two, the prisoner came up about ten minutes to two; before I went out; she enquired for the landlady, the landlady was out, I left her in the room by herself.

Q.Had you taken any notice of Collins's box. - A. I saw it in the room.

Q. Did you see whether his key was in the box. - A. No, I did not take notice.

Q. When you went out you left nobody else in the room but Kennis. - A. Yes, and a child of about four years old, that belonged to one of the men in the same room.

Q. What time did you come back again. - A. I was gone about half an hour; then I found nobody in the room; the child was down in the court at play.

Q. How long did you then stay in the room. - A.Till the landlady came home, till between four and five o'clock, then I went out; I saw the box in the room, but I saw nothing particular about it.

MARY LEHEY. Q. You are the landlady of this house. A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the day Collins lost his money. A. Yes; he went out about one o'clock, he left Harper and me in the room.

Q. How long did you stop in the room. - A. Just about two minutes. I went out and left Harper in the room; I came back about half past four, then I found Harper in the room; he went out; I staid till Collins came home.

Q. You did not see Kennis. - A. No.

Q. Had you seen any thing of the money in the box. A. No; I never saw the inside of his box; Collins went to the box, just as he came home; he missed the key; then he broke the box open, and missed the money.

WILLIAM PETHERIC . I am an officer of Marlborough street. On the 2nd of February, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 5, Cross-street; at her lodgings I found this bundle, and a umbrella; in her pocket I found half a crown, two pence, and a duplicate, but no notes.

Q. What did the bundle contain. - A. New stockings, new handkerchiefs, caps, and other articles, all new; when I took the duplicate out of her pocket, I asked her how she got these new articles, when she was obliged to go to the pawnbrokers in the morning; she hesitated on the road going to the office, she said there was another girl concerned with her; she took only three of the notes.

Q. Had you told her what you took her for. - A. Yes, for taking the notes out of Collins's box; she said she had slept at the Portland Arms, in Portland-street, she had bought a new bonnet, and there it was left; I went there, I found she had been there in company with a coachman; she had left the bonnet there, and a pair of gloves; she said she was agreeable to give all the things up to Collins, and he would write to her friend to make him satisfaction; James Budgell was present at the office, and heard all that past before the magistrate; I was not present.

JAMES BUDGELL. I am a supernumerary at Marlborough street office; I was present when the prisoner was before the magistrate; the chief clerk read her deposition over to her she told all she knew, I believe, about the notes in the presence of the magistrate; the chief clerk took it down; after it was read over to her, she put her mark. (the deposition read.)

" Louisa Kennis , voluntarily confesses, and saith that on the 1st of February, she took out of a tin box, in the drawer of John Collins , in the dwelling house of Timothy Herley , some bank notes; how many she does not recollect, with which she bought all the articles produced by Petherick."

Q. to Lehey. What part of the house does Timothy Herley live in. - A. In the shop, and a little room in the shop; there he lives, and he lets out the other part of the house.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

COURT TO JURY. The prisoner is charged with a capital felony; you will have to say with this evidence, whether you can have any reason to doubt that the prisoner at the bar has been guilty of stealing this property; if you find there is no doubt, then you must find her guilty of stealing the whole if you find her guilty of stealing, a part, you will say so; I do not know how to state to you, that she took less than forty

shillings; she said to the officer she took three notes, and all the notes that were taken were three ones, and one two pound note; I do not see how you can separate it, so as to make it any thing less than that she is guilty of the whole charge; you will consider the evidence, and find your verdict.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-32

199. HENRY ATTERBURY , and THOMAS HENRY BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of February , two gold seals, value 5 l. the property of Arthur Hammond , privately from his person ,

ARTHUR HAMMOND . I am a serjeant of the fourteenth light dragoons. On the night of the 10th instant, between the hours of eleven and twelve, I met the prisoners in Covent-garden; I knew them about three years ago in the Borough; I went into Mrs. Belshaw's wine vaults with them; Atterbury asked me to go in to have something to drink.

Q. How long did you stay there. - A. About three or four minutes.

Q. Had you had any thing to drink there. - A. No; there was a girl at Mrs. Belshaw's blackguarded me for taking up a deserter; I went away from there and went to Mr. Norris's wine vault in Great Russel-street , I went along with them; there was a young woman that I met, she asked me to go there, she said she would treat me; these men came along with me; at the time I was there I had two gold seals and a watch, the seals were fastened to a ribbon and the ribbon to my watch; I had the watch in my fob and the seals were hanging out.

Q. Do you know whether you had the seals to the watch hanging out when you went into the house. - A. On entering the door I took the watch out and wound the ribbon shorter, they hung very low, that makes me sure I had the seals; after we had a glass of gin Brown came near me, I was standing up, he put his hand down my thigh, I felt it come near me; upon suspicion I stepped back; I said, I had missed my seals, you are playing tricks with me; I said to Brown you have got my seals; he said, how can you think so, I have not; I said, I am certain you have; I got my back against the door, and called for assistance; I kept in that situation till the watchman came and took them in custody; I wished to have them searched; the watchman would not do it. Atterbury says I will strip, I have not got them. They were taken to Covent Garden watchhouse by the watchmen; I stopped a bit behind to see if they had throwed them about; I followed them; the watchhouse keeper used me very ill; at length he made a search but not in a proper manner; nothing was found upon either of them.

Q. How near was Atterbury at the time you felt the other man's hand. - A. About two yards distance from me and him both.

Q. Your watch was not taken. - A. No, the watch remained.

Q. How did it appear that the seals were gone. - A. The ribbon was cut across; I did not see any knife or scissors.

Q. Had you had much liquor. - A. I had been drinking, but not so much but what I knew what I was doing of.

Q. How much had you been drinking. - A. A glass of wine, two glasses of negus, a glass of gin, and a pot of beer in the day with the recruits; it had not taken any effect of me.

Q. At the watchhouse the next morning did either of the prisoners say any thing to you. - A. Yes, Atterbury told me if I would not say any thing about him he would get me all my expences, the watchhouse keeper's wife says, if you have got any friends send to them; he gave Sheane, the watchman, two shillings to go to Gray's Inn-lane, to get some money of a woman that he lodged with to pay me; the watchman came back, and said to him, I see how it is, there is no person there that will give you any thing; he said, there was only a poor woman there where Atterbury lodged, she had no money for herself. The constable said it was getting late, they should go to Bow-street; Atterbury said if you will take a five pound note of hand, he would send for a friend, he would pay me; he said, I should ruin him for ever if they were both put in goal; if he was let out he could work for them both; he sent Sheane the watchman to a man to be answerable for the five pound to me; the watchman staid so long they were taken to Bow-street office; Atterbury came to me and says, d - n it, I'll give you seven pound if you will let me free. I should have taken the money if it had not been for the constable.

Q. You did not take it. - A. No. Brown never made any offer at all.

Q. Who was in the public house besides. - A. A young woman; she was at the front of the bar, not near me; no other person was in the house besides the person serving.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You have said it was between eleven and twelve o'clock when you lost your seals. - A. I did.

Q. You are a recruiting serjeant . - A. I am.

Q. Common observations of life makes me know you are under the necessity of drinking more than any other man. - A. I might have been drinking more, but not so as to be incapable of knowing what I was about.

Q. Am I to understand you that you was perfectly sober. - A. I was not perfectly sober, I knew what I was doing; I cannot say I was drunk.

Q. If you cannot say you was either drunk or sober; you were neither drunk nor sober. - A. I might be between both.

Q. You met with these men just by Belshaw's. - A. Yes.

Q. Who was this woman. - A. I am not acquainted with her.

Q. I suppose she is an unfortunate woman. - A. I do not know.

Q. Did she toy with you. - A. No.

Q. It is a strange thing that a girl should take a liking to you all at once and she was to treat you. - A. I cannot account for that.

Q. After they were taken to the watchhouse they were searched. - A. There was not a proper search made.

Q. That is for the watchmen to explain, do you mean to say that there was no other woman in company with you but the woman that gave you the glass of gin. - A. No, there was not.

Q. How many women was there in the gin shop. - I do not think there were any.

Q. How long might it be between the time you lost

the seals and the time the prisoner was searched. - A. Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Who took him to the watchhouse. - A. Two watchmen.

Q. Then they were under the observation of the two watchmen all the time they went from the house. - A. Yes, but they crossed the street to go to the watchhouse.

Q. From that time to this you have not seen any thing about the seals. - A. I have not.

Brown. I should wish to know whether he did not strike a woman three or four times at Mrs. Belshaw's.

Mr. Alley. Had you any quarrel in the public house. - A. I cannot say I had any quarrel: the woman abused me at Mr. Belshaw's, and the landlord said he would have no row here; I went out.

Brown. He was under nine or ten people in the house; the serjeant would have been beat well had it not been for me.

EDMUND SHEANE . I am a watchman in Covent Garden. I saw both the prisoners go into Covent Garden watchhouse; I was at the watchhouse door at the time they both went in; it was another watchman that apprehended them. In about five minutes after they had been in, a rattle sprung for another watchman to come in; I knocked at the door and Brown wanted to make his escape; I pushed him back. Atterbury sent me the next morning to his lodgings to get some money of his landlady he lodged with; after I came back he sent me to Holborn. He promised to give the serjeant a note of hand for five pounds; I went, and the gentleman was not at home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Did you hear the serjeant say he would forgive them if he had a five pound note. - A. I heard him say give me a five pound note and I will not prosecute.

Atterbury's Defence. I never sent for five pound, I was destitute, I could not; I said I would treat him, as he had treated me; we went to Mr. Belshaw's; immediately we came in the wine vaults he was knocked down, and he had twenty people on him; he did not say that he had lost his seals till he came into Mr. Norris's wine vaults; he said give me my property; I said I cannot, I had not got the seals; he says; I know you are not the man, if you will give me five pound I will not prosecute you. Immediately he accused us the young woman walked off. I had two glasses of gin there; whether they had one or two I cannot tell.

Brown left his defence to his counsel.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-33

200. JOHN EVANS , alias COLEMAN , and GEORGE DOVE , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Alexander , about the hour of five at night on the 7th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein; twenty four yards of cotton lace, value 2 l. 8 s. thirty six yards of thread edging, value 1 l. 16 s. and five yards of lace, value 20 d his property .

JOHN ALEXANDER . I live in Brick lane, Bethnal green . On the 7th of January, about five in the afternoon, the glass of my window was cut. I was in the shop at the time.

Q. Were you alarmed by the noise. - A. I was told by a girl that lived at a neighbour's two doors off that my window was cut; I immediately went out; I discovered that I had lost lace to the amount of between four and five pounds.

Q. When had you seen the lace before. - A. About a quarter of an hour before, they were laying close to the glass that was cut.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a patrol. On the 7th of January I saw the two prisoners in Norton Falgate. In Downes's pocket I found a knife; we took them to the office that night, and they were examined; the next morning I heard that Mr. Alexander's shop had been robbed; I went to his shop and examined the window that was cut; the hole that was made in the putty in the window frame fitted the knife; there was putty on the knife at the time. I fitted it; I told Mr. Alexander; he sent me to a girl that saw them do it.

Q We cannot hear that, the girl must tell that. - A. The girl is gone out of the way ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you see the knife fitted to the hole in the putty. - A. Yes, it fitted the hole in the putty.

COURT. These men were found cutting a window at another shop, half a mile distant; they say it fitted the hole in the putty at Mr. Alexander's shop window; a great many knives would fit the hole.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-34

201. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , in the dwelling house of Morgan Dixon , a silver watch, value 40 s. two gold keys, value 6 s. nine seven shilling pieces, and nineteen shillings, his property .

MORGAN DIXON. I am a watchman in the London dock , I live at No. 8, Grace's buildings. in Whitechapel parish. On the 14th of January I met with the prisoner as I was coming out of the country, between Mile End and Bow.

Q. Had you ever seen him before. - A. Never in my life; I asked him, as he was coming on, which way he was going, he said he was coming to town; I told him I was coming there too; we discoursed upon the road together in talking of America. I understood by his tongue he was an American; I told him that I had been to America, and I was sixteen months a prisoner there. We went as far as the Black Horse, I offered him a pint of beer; I then asked him where he lodged; he told me he had no lodging nor any thing to get a lodging with; I said, if you come along with me I shall give you something to eat and drink, and very likely a lodging; he went with me to my house.

Q. Did you give him something to eat and drink. A. I did; I gave him some mutton chops and bread, and sent for a pint of beer for him.

Q. Did you give him a lodging. - A. I told him there was a bed if he chose to accept it; if he did not, there was a shilling for him to get a lodging for himself.

Q. Why, you had never seen him before. - A.

No.

Q. You took a great partiality to him, never having seen him before - was this your own bed. - A. Yes; he went to bed in my own bed before I did; I locked and bolted the window and door afterwards; I laid down, I hung my watch up at the bed's head, I fell asleep; when I awoke in the morning I missed the prisoner.

Q. You were not surprised at that. - A. I was surprised.

Q. It is a very probable thing to have happened - did you miss nothing but the prisoner. - A. I then laid awhile; I listened to hear if my watch beat, it did not; I put my hand up to find if my watch was there; it was gone. I then got up and went into the yard, thinking he might have gone to the privy. I found he was not there; I searched my pockets, I missed a guinea, two two-pound notes, nine seven shilling pieces, nineteen shillings in silver, and two gold watch keys.

Q. Have you ever seen your property again. - A. My watch was found in the Minories.

Q. Have you been long in this town. - A.Yes, I have been watchman to the London dock three years.

Prisoner. I wish to bring him to his oath where he me me: me first.

Court. He says between Mile End and Bow.

Prisoner. He is wrong in that.

Prosecutor. I cannot say exactly the place, but it was between Mile End and Bow.

Prisoner. I want to know what time you met with me. - A. Between five and six in the evening.

Q. Where did you take me to. - A. To the Black Horse.

Q. Where did you take me after that. - A. Up to my own house in Whitechapel.

Q. What did you give me to eat after that.

Court. He said mutton chops.

Prisoner. What had I to drink before I went to his own house. - A. A pint of beer, and nothing else.

Q. Did not you change a guinea, and I offered to pay half the reckoning for a quartern of rum. - A. You did not offer that, nor did I change a guinea; we had no rum.

Q. Were you in liquor yourself. - A. No, not in the least.

Court. Was the prisoner in liquor. - A. No, I did not take him to be in liquor.

PETER MAY . I am a patrol. On the 16th of last month I met the prosecutor; he told me this man had robbed him, he described his having one arm; I went with him to No. 22, Sun yard, I found the prisoner in bed along with Jane Beautyman , it was about half past twelve at night when I took him to the watchhouse; I found nothing on him but a few halfpence, a duplicate and two knives. On Sunday morning I took the girl; she told me the watch was pawned.

JANE BEAUTYMAN . Q. Do you recollect the time when the last witness apprehended the prisoner. A. Yes, I was with the prisoner at the time.

Q. When had you first met the prisoner. - A. On the Friday night; this happened on the Saturday. I never saw him before Friday night; I met him at the Crown in Mortimer's rents, Aldgate parish.

Q. Did you go with him that night. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any money he had. - A. No; he had no money, he had a watch; he asked me to go home and sleep with him; he gave me the watch for the expences of myself and the lodging. I gave the watch to the woman of the house to pay for the expences of the bed and myself; I gave the watch to her. She gave me the watch back again on Saturday morning.

Q. Did you take notice of the watch. - A. No, I did not.

Q. What watch was it. - A. A silver watch.

Q. Did she give the same watch to you again in the morning. - A. To the best of my knowledge it was the same watch she gave me in the morning; there was a chain to it, but no seals to it nor nothing.

Q. What did you do with the watch when the woman gave it you back - A. William Hunt told me to pledge it.

Q. Did he see the woman give it you in the morning. - A. Yes, and he saw me give it to her in the evening. I went and pledged it; he told me to get as much as I could upon it. I met Elizabeth Collier in the Minories, I gave it to her to pledge. Elizabeth Collier brought me back twenty five shillings.

Q. Was he with you. - A. No, he was at home; I took out a waistcoat and a handkerchief, as he told me, and I gave him the money.

Q. This was on Saturday. - A. Yes.

Q. He continued with you all the Saturday. - A. Yes, till the patrol came and took him.

Q. Did he say he had no money. - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH COLLIER . Q. Do you know the last witness, Jane Beautyman . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect her employing you to pledge any thing. - A. Yes, a watch on a Saturday evening, about a month ago. I was in the Minories, she asked me to pawn the watch, she did not like to pawn the watch herself, as she had no bonnet on; I pledged the same watch that she gave me for twenty five shillings. I pawned the watch at the first shop in the Minories.

CHRISTIAN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker in the Minories.

Q. Have you a watch. - A. Yes, I took this watch in pledge of Elizabeth Collier . I lent her twenty five shillings on it on the 16th of January.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place, I was in the Crown in Morling's rents. I met that man there; my prosecutor came up to me very much in liquor; he says why do you not give the watchman a glass to drink, I said with all my heart; we went over the way to another public house, we had a quartern of rum, he went to change a guinea; I said I will pay half. When he came out of doors he fell down in the street; we had not then above five or six yards to go. When he got up he gave me a shilling to get a pot of beer; he had got some mutton chops raw; I toasted one of them; he spilt the beer and broke six plates; he gave me five penny worth of halfpence to get another pot of beer; I never saw the man before in my life. I think the man must be a lunatic. I am an innocent man standing here.

COURT. You have not said any thing about the watch.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-35

202. ANN PRICE and CATHERINE BEASLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Westmoreland , privily from his person ; and JOHN BRANCH for feloniously receiving the same, he knowing it to be stolen .

THOMAS WESTMORELAND . I am a soldier belonging to the 1st regiment of guards. On the morning of the 3d of February I went to the public house at the corner of Hemming's row ; while I was drinking a pint of porter the prisoners Price and Beasley came in.

Q. What time was that. - A. Between two and three o'clock in the morning.

Q. Were you in company together. - A. No.

Q. Did they drink with you. - A. No, nor I with them; I went out of the door about half past four in the morning to make water; Beasley and Price came out immediately after me, Beasley came up to me and asked me if I would go home with her; I refused it; I had my watch in my fob when I unbuttoned my smallclothes, I am positive I had it then; when I buttoned them up I missed it; I laid hold of Beasley immediately and told her she had got my watch; the prisoner Price was at her back; she went away; I took Beasley into the public house; I told the landlord of the house she had got my watch; the prisoner Beasley undressed herself, I did not see any thing of my watch; I did not search her at all, I took her to St. Martin's watch-house and gave her up to the constable of the night; the constable of the night, I believe, got directions from Beasley where to find Price; we went to No. 6, New Exchange-court, in the Strand; we met the Price and Branch coming arm in arm together; the constable took Branch and the watchman took Price; they conveyed them to the watchhouse.

Q. How near were the prisoners to you when you went out of the public house. - A. Beasley came up close to me and Price was in the rear of me.

Q. Did either of them touch you. - A. Yes, the prisoner Beasley laid her hand upon my breast; I did not feel her hand go to my fob.

Q. Was she near you when you discovered you had lost your watch. - A. She was close to me.

Q. Was your fob turned down so that your watch might fall out. - A. No, the fob was fastened at the bottom so that it could not fall out.

Q. The watch was not fastened, might not that fall out when you unbuttoned. - A No, it could not.

Q. Why, you did not feel it go. - A. No, I did not.

Q.Had you had much liquor. - A. No.

Q.What made you out at that time. - A. I attended the Opera House as a soldier; I went to this house to get refreshment before I went to my quarters.

Q. You did not go with these women any where. - A. I did not; that I will swear.

VALENTINE CRAWFORD. I am a watchman. I took Price in New Exchange-court, in the Strand. Branch was with her, the constable took him.

ROBERT STOTON . I am a constable; I went with the last witness to New Exchange-court; I took Branch into custody; going along to the watch-house. I said to Branch, I believe you are the person that has got the watch, I think you had better give it me; he said he could tell me all about it; Beasley had informed me before that Price and Branch lived together, that made me suspect that he had got it; he gave me the watch, he told me Price gave it him to keep till the morning.

Beasley's Defence. I know nothing of the man. I work in Tavistock-street and round the neighourhood; going out in the morning I met with this woman; she said, she was going out to work at the upholstery work at Mr. Trotter's; I said, I am going to the same place; it was rather cold, she and I went into this house to get a pint of beer; Price went out while I was warming the beer, I thought she was gone long; I went to the door, I met this man right at the door; he told me his watch was gone; he seemed very much in liquor; he took me into the tap room, and made me undress myself all to my linen before every one.

Price's Defence. This woman and I were sitting together at the public house drinking a pint of beer; the soldier beckoned me out; I went out after him, not knowing what he wanted; I walked a little way with him, he asked me to have something to drink; when I got to the corner he wanted to be indecent with me; I stood a while with him; I perceived him pulling his small clothes down; he asked me to hold his watch while he eased himself, he asked my pardon, he told me not to go away. When he stooped I walked away, as I thought it not very decent; I met a young woman at the Sun, she was going into that house; there I met this man. I asked her to hold this watch while I took out the money to get something to drink. On going to my lodgings to clean myself, we met the constable. I meaned to take the watch back again to the public house. This woman is innocent.

Branch's Defence. I am a watchman of St. James's parish. Coming off duty after six o'clock I met with a man; we went into a public house; I was warming myself by the fire. Price came in, she asked me if I would have something to drink; I said, I did not care if I did. We went to the Man in the Moon the corner of Vine-street; she gave me a handkerchief, with the watch in it, to hold while she got the halfpence out to pay for the gin; I did not know then what was in the handkerchief. Coming out I looked in the handkerchief; I said to her in the name of God which way came you by this; she said, a man in Hemmings's-row gave her the watch to hold while he did something. I do not know what he was about, I was not nigh there by three quarters of a mile. I said if you mean any good to yourself go and give the property up to the owner, and I insist upon it you shall before I part with it. I thought it my duty to do so.

Q. Were you on duty that night as watchman. - A. I was; she begged of me to go home with her to her apartments to get her a clean apron. When I came to the door the constable took me and the

watchman took the woman.

Branch called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

PRICE, GUILTY aged 33.

BEASLEY, GUILTY aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

BRANCH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-36

203. SARAH CHILDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , a feather bed, value 5 l. two sheets, value 11 s. two blankets, value 7 s. a quilt, value 3 s. a bolster, value 2 s. two pillows, value 10 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. two flat irons, value 1 s. and a tea kettle, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Read , in a lodging room .

ANN READ. Q. You are the wife of Thomas Read . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you let any lodgings to the prisoner on the 21st of November. - A. Yes, it was a furnished one pair of stairs back room in Ironmonger-row ; she was to give me three shillings and eight pence a week; she took the room on the Saturday and came on the Wednesday following; she was with us nine weeks.

Q. At the end of nine weeks, when she was gone, what did you lose. - A. We missed her coming backwards and forwards for about a week; my husband made a hole in the wainscoat; we missed the bed, the sheets, blankets, quilt, two pillows, two pillow cases, two flat irons, and a tea kettle.

Q. All that was let with the lodging. - A. Yes, it was all gone.

Q. Had she paid you regularly. - A. No, she owes us eleven shillings, rent.

THOMAS READ. Q. Did you go in pursuit of the prisoner. - A. I did; I found out her husband; I went and met her at her husband's place; I charged her with the robbery; she at first denied it and afterwards owned it; she told the officer where they were pawned.

Q. Did you go with the officer to the place. - A. I did.

GEORGE WOOD . Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with the prisoner to any pawnbrokers. - A. I went with the prisoner to a woman of the name of Connelly, where she had left the duplicates for one shilling and sixpence; the prisoner paid the woman one shilling and sixpence. Mrs. Connelly gave me sixteen duplicates; I went to the pawnbrokers, the prisoner was not with me at the time.

MR. CROUCH. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a bolster, the prisoner pawned it on the 19th of December last, for one shilling.

MR. ROBERTS. I produce a flat iron; the prisoner pawned it.

MR. GILLET. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pillow, quilt, and flat iron; I do not know who pawned them; the prisoner did not pawn them, to the best of my knowledge.

(The property produced and identified.)

Q. to prosecutrix. Did she represent herself to be a married woman. - A. Yes, she was parted from her husband; he allows her seven shillings a week; she sold all the feathers that were in the bed, to an iron shop in Golden-lane, for a groat a pound.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-37

204. HENRY FROST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , thirty pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Richard Hergest , affixed to a building called a stable .

Second count for like offence, stating it to be affixed to a building generally.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . Q. You are a patrol. - A. Yes; I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of January, when I was on Bethnal Green-road; I asked him what he was carrying off; he said, lead and threw it down; he said he worked for Mr. Hergest at Bow, he had found the lead in a field in the basket; I took him to the office on Thursday morning; I took it down to Mr. Hergest; we found that piece, and there were some cuttings on the place, it seemed fresh cut, I fitted it on the gutter of the stable.

Q. Was there any lead remaining on the stable. - A. Yes, three time this length, but this was at the other end; there was only one nail hole in the board, and there is only one nail hole in the lead when it was fitted on; it fitted exactly.

JOHN RAY . Q. Did you go to Mr. Hergest with the last witness. - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any place where the lead fitted. - A. I did, on Mr. Hergest's stable at Bow, it fitted a gutter; I found it exactly corresponded.

RICHARD HERGEST . I live at the White Horse at Bow ; I am a collar maker as well as a publican ; the prisoner had worked for me five weeks; on Monday evening he went away about dark.

Q. How long after that was it that the patrol came down. - A. It was on the Thursday Valentine came down; he asked me if I had lost any lead; I said not as I knew of; he went in search and found this place; it was taken off the stable.

Q. How long before had you seen this lead on the gutter. - A. Not for a great while; I should not have found it out I dare say if the officer had not come down. I am pretty positive that is the lead that was taken from the gutter; it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. It is very easy to put down a piece of lead like that to fit any gutter; there were bricklayers at work there at the time.

COURT. The question for you to consider, is, whether the prisoner did or did not steal this lead. You must be satisfied whether the evidence of Valentine, Ray, and Hergest, who applied the lead to the gutter and were satisfied in their minds, that that lead belonged to that gutter - you must try how far they are correct. - Your next enquiry will be about the guilt of the prisoner; you find the prisoner was a man working there; on Monday evening he left off work there, on the same day he was stopped by the patrol carrying a basket; in that basket is found the lead which was carried down and applied to the gutter; he was asked by the patrol what it was, he told him it was lead; that so far goes in favour of the prisoner, and then he told him he found it in a field hard by; if you believe that account, if you are satisfied that he found it, to be sure he is not the person that stole it; if you are not satisfied then as they say this lead was found upon him about eight o'clock; his behaviour at the time he is stopped, has nothing improper in it; he told them he worked at Bow; these are the circumstances of the case. If from the evidence you are satisfied that the man took the

lead from the stable, he is guilty of the charge; if you do not think so you will acquit him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-38

205. FREDERICK POLMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , in the dwelling house of William Williams , a bank note, value 100 l. the property of James Wood .

JAMES WOOD . I am an officer in the East India service . On the 15th of January I was looking into my papers.

Q. Where was you. - A. I had lodgings at the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane ; I had put my papers into a drawer in my bed room where I slept on the 15th of January; on the following day I discovered I had lost a hundred pound note.

Q. What time of the day was it put there. - A. On the evening of the 15th about four o'clock; the next day in the afternoon I discovered that the hundred pound note was taken from me; it was taken out of the purse from the drawer.

Q. Did you lock the drawer. - A. No, there was no key to it; it was not locked. After getting the number of the note and applying to the bank, I traced it to the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner a waiter at the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes.

MR. ALSBROOKE. I am a boot maker; I live at No. 123, in the Strand; the prisoner came to my house on the 18th of January and purchased a pair of boots, in the morning about nine o'clock, he paid me one pound sixteen shillings for them; he presented me a hundred pound note to change; not having sufficient change in my house, I got it of a neighbour, Mr. Burnell, in the Strand.

Q. Did you give Mr. Burnell the same note you received of the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man. - A. I am certain of it.

MR. BURNELL. I am a grocer, No. 368 in the Strand. On the 18th of January last in the morning, the last witness came to me for change of a hundred pound note; I had not change in my house, I sent my apprentice to my bankers, which is just by, Messrs. Hodsoll and Stirling.

Q. The same note that you received from Mr. Alsbrooke you gave to your apprentice. - A. Yes.

Q. It was a hundred pound note. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HOW . Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Burnell. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with that note you received on the 18th of January. - A. Mr. Alsbrooke came to my master to get change for the hundred pound note; the note was given to me to go to the bankers to get change, Mr. Burnell not having sufficient change in the house; I got change there; one fifty, two twenty's, and a ten, and by the request of one of the gentlemen at the banking house, I put my name on the back of the note.

Q. The note that you got changed that you put your name on the back, was it the same note you received from Mr. Burnell. - A. Yes.

THOMAS KEMP . On the 31st of December last I received a hundred pound note, at No 11, Mansion House-street. I paid it to Mr. Wood the same day.

Q. Did you put any mark on it. - A. No; I should not know it again.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I keep the Swan and Two Necks inn, Lad-lane; the prisoner at the bar was an under waiter of mine at the time this hundred pound note was lost; in consequence of Mr. Wood saying he had lost an hundred pound note from his drawer in room 38, I made every enquiry I could among the servants in the house to discover who had taken it.

Q. You do not know any thing of it of your own knowledge. - A. Only what I have found out from the witnesses.

AMELIA WOODLEY . I am house-maid to Mr. Williams the Swan and Two Necks. On the 15th of January, I saw the prisoner coming from the room, No. 38, where captain Wood lodged; I asked him what he wanted in that room, he replied he had been for some water for a gentleman that lodged in No. 42.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. Between four and five o'clock.

Q. He had no business in that room had he. - A. No.

Q. Had he any business in any of the rooms. - A. No.

Q. His business was to keep below stairs. - A. Yes.

CHARLES HENRY GASCOIGNE. I am clerk to Messrs. Hodsol and Stirling, bankers. On the 18th of January, a person came from Mr. Burnell, a grocer in the Strand, with a hundred pound note to be changed; I gave him change myself for the hundred pound note; I gave him a fifty, two twenties, and a ten pound note, making together an hundred pound; I wrote the name of Burnell myself upon the note, to identify the note; the note was put in our drawer and paid away in our house by some other person.

JOHN GIBBONS. Q. You belong to the bank of England. - A. Yes.

Q. You produce the note, I suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know who paid it in. - A. The entry is Smith, Payne and co. on the 18th of January.

Q. Now Mr. Gascoigne look at that note. - A. This is the note I gave change for.

JOHN UNDERWOOD . I am clerk to Messrs. Forster and Lubbock, No. 11, Mansion-house-street. On the 31st of December, I paid a draft for one hundred and twenty six pounds, six shillings and five-pence; among the other notes, I paid a hundred pound note, No. 2524

Q. Is that the note you paid to Mr. Kemp. - A. The note I paid away corresponds with the number and date of this.

Q. to Kemp. The same one hundred pound note that you received from Mr. Underwood you paid to Mr. Wood. - A. I did; I cannot swear to the note, I never looked at the note.

SAMUEL - . I am one of the officers belonging to Bow-street. On the 22nd of January, I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings in Market-street, Bloomsbury; I informed him I apprehended him in consequence of his stealing a hundred pound note, at the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane; he acknowledged he had taken it, and a great part of the change was in a pocket book in the drawer in the room; I then took the pocket book out of the drawer, it contained a fifty pound note, No. 961, dated 12th January, 1808, a ten pound note, No. 1572, dated 19th of December, 1807, a five pound note, and four ones; there was a

gold watch, gold chain, and gold seals.

Q. Had you made him any promise to make him say all this. - A. None in the least; he cried and seemed very sorry for what he had done.

Q. to Wood. From whom did you receive the bank note that you lost. - A. The same note I lost, I received from Mr. Kemp.

Q. to How. Should you know the hundred pound note again. - A. No; my name is on the back of the hundred pound note. W. M. How.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot read nor write English, I am sorry for my misfortune; I went up stairs to clean myself; the gentleman in 42, asked me for some water; I went into this gentlemans room, and took the water out, I took the note; I found the note at the back of the place, I could not read, I could not tell what it was.

Q. to Williams. You keep the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes.

Q. Nobody else lives in the house besides you and your family. - A. No.

Q. What countrymen is the prisoner. - A. He is an Hanoverian; he had lived with me between four and five months.

Q. Had you any character with him. - A. Yes, a person in Goodman's Fields, who was a jobbing tailor, in the house, recommended him. I had a good character with him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-39

206. CHALES PICKEVER was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hickley , on the 27th of January ; in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch chain, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 3 l. and a watch key, value 6 d. his property .

WILLIAM HICKLEY . On Wednesday the 27th of January, about a quarter past seven in the evening, in Castle-street, Holborn , I was assaulted by the prisoner; he struck me in the face, at the same instant he snatched the chain and seal; on feeling which I put my hand to my pocket to feel if he had drawed out the watch, but the chain being stronger than the pendant, the pendant of the watch broke off; a scuffle ensued between us, I collared him; in the interim two more men came up, one of whom knocked me down the second time.

Q. Were you knocked down before. - A. Yes, by the blow in my face; they all made their escape; I immediately called the watch, and the man who was in company with me and some others pursued them.

Q. Was there a man in company with you. - A. Yes; I withdrew into a public house, the sign of the Castle in Castle-street; they brought the prisoner back into the public house, the Castle; then I identified his person.

Q. Did you find your chain upon him. - A. No, it was not found upon his person after he was brought in; it was never found afterwards not to my knowledge.

Q. How many were you in company. - A. Two; myself and Robert Sheppard .

Q. Were you walking together when this man struck one of you. - A. Yes.

Q. When the prisoner struck you was he before you or behind you. - A. He was on my right side; he came up to me, and struck me on my face, by which I fell in consequence of that blow.

Jury. What kind of a night was it, a light or dark night. - A. I discovered his features by the lamps; it was a little past seven.

Court. Was it a moon light night. - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Was it light enough for you to observe his features. - A. Yes; he had dark clothes on.

Q. If I understand you, he came up to you, struck you a blow in the face, you fell down, at the same instant he laid hold of your chain. - A. I held him till another man knocked me down.

Q. Had you time enough to observe his face. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at him now, was the man that was brought into the public house the same man that struck you in the face. - A. Yes, that man (witness pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Your chain and seal were gone. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Was you drunk or sober. - A. I had been drinking a little; I was sober.

Q. Do you recollect the time I was brought into the public house, you stood with your back towards the fire place; I was placed in front of you, you were asked whether you knew the person that knocked you down, you said, no; you were asked whether I was the person that knocked you down, you said, no.

Court. Did you say he was not the man when he was brought to the public house. - A. No; when the gentleman asked the question I did not see the prisoner.

Prisoner. Do not you recollect the night being very dark. - A. No, it was not dark; I do not recollect whether it was moon light, but the light of the street was sufficient for me to distinguish features.

ROBERT SHEPPARD . Q. What are you. - A. I am a bricklayer.

Q. What is Hickley. - A. I believe he is something in the 15th light dragoons. I met him; he asked me whether I could inform him where Castle-street was. On going up Fetter-lane the right hand side of the way a person followed very close.

Q. What time was it. - A. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, this gentleman was going with his coat buttoned; I looked to see if he had his watch, some person following very close; it appeared that he had a watch chain and one seal to it, it was a kind of a barrel chain; I observed that we got half way up Norwich-court when the prisoner and another person past us; the prosecutor was asking me if I knew Mr. Keith who keeps the Castle; I said, I knew the house perfectly well; we went up to the house, the gentleman was a little elevated in liquor, no great deal as I could perceive; I took him round to the front door instead of the back door, there being a step more, and as he was going in the steps of the front door, there were two people on the steps before us; a scuffle took place.

Q. Was any thing said. - A. I did not hear that any thing was said, there was collaring one another, that was the chief of the scuffle, there might be some blows; we found ourselves at the corner of Castle yard, which is the place where the house is situated. I saw a person's hand upon Mr. Hickley's

watch chain when the scuffle took place; I cannot pretend to say whether it was the prisoner's, or whose hand it was; to the best of my knowledge, another person came up, which made three; in the scuffle two of them got away, while the prisoner and Mr. Hickley were scuffling together; then I ran after the other two; they run down Norwich court. I met the prisoner about half way down the court; he was following the others.

Q. You left the prisoner scuffling with Mr. Hickley. - A. I did; I ran after the other two, and before I got half way down the court I met the prisoner.

Q. That was not meeting, he came past you. - A. Yes, he came past me; he asked me what was the matter, I believe the words I made use of were - the gentleman was robbed of his watch. I did not see his face at the time; he said let us go after him; he ran away, I was not able to run so fast as him; I lost sight of him; he is the same man, I saw him by the light in the Castle window; I am sure he is the same man; there was a light in the window that projected out about two feet; he was brought back by Mr. Norden.

Prisoner. At the time I was at my examination Sheppard said he was not sure I was the person or not.

Sheppard. I said no such thing; I could not say so, because I was certain of his person. The prisoner asked me whether I met him or not; I said I did, and I believe he mentioned it before that at the magistrate's.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I live at Mrs. Keith's, the Castle, in Castle street, Holborn. On Wednesday the 27th of January, in the evening, I heard a great noise, I came out of doors and see them all hustling together, I thought they were fighting together; presently they made a push; I saw the prisoner make a snatch at the seal and chain, and then they all ran away.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person that made the snatch. - A Yes. There were three of them; they all ran away and the people after them. The prosecutor went a little way up Norwich court, there came one back and knocked him down, he struck him three times and cut his mouth open; then he picked up his hat and ran away. I took the prosecutor to our house, because his mouth was bleeding. Master sent me to Hatton Garden to get two officers; then the prisoner was brought back to our house.

Q. Are you certain that you saw the prisoner make a snatch at the watch. - A. Yes; he had a pen stuck in his hat and a white apron on; at the time when he was brought back to our house he had a pen and apron just the same.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer at Hatton Garden office. On the 27th of January I was sent for in a great hurry from the office, saying there was a person in Castle street stopped on suspicion of robbing a gentleman. I went as fast as I could in company with William Read ; when I got to the public house in Castle street, some people had been persuading the parties to let the prisoner go. I immediately said, ah! Charles, is that you.

Q. You knew him before. - A. I knew him perfectly well before; he had a white apron on, which I produce; two handkerchiefs were produced to me by Mr. Norden, they were taken out of his hat; the other silk handkerchief I found in his pocket, and the key of a room; the watch of the prosecutor was then delivered to me; this is the watch, the pendant is broken off. I asked the prisoner where he then resided, he refused telling; he said this key that I took from him was the key of a box.

Q. At the time that you took him did you observe the pen in his hat. - A. I did.

EDWARD NORDEN . I am a cabinet maker, I live in Charles street, Hatton Garden. On the evening of the 27th of January, coming out of my own street into King's Head yard, hearing the cry of stop thief I made haste; this prisoner was about thirty yards before the rest; I stepped over the way; I did not see any body before him, that was the reason I took account of him; he calling out stop thief, I thought he was the thief. When he came near he halloaed out stop thief the loudest; I knocked him down; he said he was not the thief; I said, stop a little, we can soon know whether you are the thief or no. A mob came up, and Mr. Sheppard he said that is the man that robbed the man in Castle street. I believe he had a white apron tied round him.

Q. Was there any thing in his hat. - A. There were two handkerchiefs in his hat; I observed a pen in his hat, I asked him what he wore that pen for, he said he was a broker. Mr. Trott came, I gave him up. The boy said that is the man when he brought Trott in, and Mr. Hickley's mouth was bleeding.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you observe the apron round him. - A. I did not observe it.

Trott. The apron was tucked up.

Prosecutor. The prisoner struck me first when he was taking the chain and seal; afterwards the person knocked me down, by which it occasioned such bleeding in my mouth; he cut my lips.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from St. Bartholomew's hospital from my wife; I received these two silk handkerchiefs from her; I was going down Fetter lane to buy something for supper; I stopped at the pork shop, Mr. Sheppard came up to me, he said there was a man who had been knocked down and robbed; I asked him which way they went, he said they went that way, up towards Holborn; I ran directly, there was a cry of stop thief, I halloaed stop thief too; one of the witnesses knocked me down and brought me into the tap room as a prisoner. I was placed before the prosecutor who had lost the chain and seal; there were two gentlemen who were present asked him if he knew the person that robbed him, he made answer and said no; he was very much in liquor at the time; I told him I would give him every satisfaction, I told him to send for an officer; an officer was sent for; Trott came, he searched me, and found nothing about me but my own property; I was taken into the parlour, Trott went into the tap room and got the watch belonging to the prosecutor; the prosecutor then said he would not come forward. Mr. Trott swore he would be d - d if he did not come forward the watch should be his.

COURT. If it is true that the prisoner was the man who

struck the prosecutor, and took away his chain and seal; the robbery is compleat, because taking it away in the open street, by force and violence, that is a highway robbery, because the man assaults the prosecutor first of all, by striking him, and then by violence taking the watch chain from his person; if you believe the prisoner is the man, in point of law it does not amount to a highway robbery; whether he is or not, it does not depend only upon the evidence of the prosecutor, because the boy, who was no ways concerned, he observed the prisoner; he says he is the man, he observed the apron round him, and the pen in his hat, at the time and when he was brought back he observed that; in confirmation of that Sheppard says he is the man; Nordon said he heard the cry of stop thief, no person running near him but the prisoner, he was calling out stop thief, upon which he stopped him; taking all these circumstances into your consideration, you are to say whether he is or is not the person that committed this robbery; he has called no person; therefore the evidence rests on the part of the prosecution.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-40

207. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , two ounces of tea, value 6 d. the property of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.

ANDREW PASMORE . Q. You are a labourer in the service of the East India company. - A. I am. On the 6th of February last, I was employed in Fenchurch-street warehouse , in the City of London; the prisoner was employed in the same warehouse; between the hours of one and two, I saw the prisoner come into the room, where I was ordered to watch; he came about half way into the room, faced himself to the right, he looked about and moved two paces forward; I saw him put his hand into the chest, and take out a handful of tea; the prisoner then turned round rather to the left, and then put his hand towards his breeches; I gave information to the elder.

JOHN PHILLIPSON . I am assistant elder.

Q. On what time of the day did you stop the prisoner. - A.About five minutes after three; I found something in his pocket, which I suspected to be tea; when I rubbed him down, he guarded the place where it was secreted; I put my hand there, I was satisfied it was tea; I saw it taken from him, out of his left hand breeches pocket.

Q. Did you observe whether it was a double or single pocket. - A. It was an additional pocket to his breeches pocket.

JOSEPH ELVIN . I am a King's officer; the prisoner was delivered into my custody; I searched him; in his left hand beeches pocket, I took out this leather pocket, with the tea in it. This is the bag and the tea I took from him.

Q. How much is there of it. - A. Two ounces of congou tea; I took him over to the office; before Mr. Saunders he said he was exceeding sorry; Mr. Saunders said so am I too, to see a man who has been twenty two years in the service, guilty of doing this.

Prisoner's Defence. It was poverty that made me do it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-41

208. WILLIAM MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , a gown, value 2 l. a petticoat, value 12 s. 6 d. a pair of shoes, value 8 s. 6 d. nine handkerchiefs, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 5 s. 6 d. a night gown, value 1 s. 6 d. two caps, value, 1 s. 3 d. a pair of gloves, value 3 d. and a shawl, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Hopkins , widow .

ELIZABETH HOPKINS . I am a widow woman, I live in Turk's Head-court, Orchard-street, Westminster.

Q.When did you lose these things. - A. On the 8th of February; I was coming from Gravesend; in landing at Billingsgate , I delivered my things to the mate of the boat.

Q. Were they all in one bundle. - A. Yes; there were a great many passengers, the mate was helping the woman on shore, and this man took the bundle out of the mate's hand; I gave my bundle to the mate.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take the bundle out of the mates hand. - A. No, I was coming on shore.

EDWARD LUMLEY . I am the mate of the Gravesend-boat; Mrs. Hopkins and her two pieces came with me from Graveshend to Billingsgate; about half after eleven o'clock in the evening, it being a late hour I thought proper to help the ladies over the craft; I took a small box and bundle out of the lady's hand; I assisted these two young ladies over the vessel; Morgan was standing there at the time.

Q. Did you know him - A. No, he asked me if he should assist me with them; I thanked him for his kindness; I told him I did not want his assistance; I assisted the two ladies on shore, then I returned back to the old lady, taking her bundle and pattens out of her hand; when I came to the shore again Morgan was there, the second-time; he asked me the second time if he should assist me; I told him no; he took the bundle out of my hand, having the lady in my hand; if I had let her go as she was stepping up, she must have fell back in the boat, which lay upon the vessel's deck; at the same time he took the bundle, he gave it to somebody else; after the lady enquired for the bundle, I asked Morgan what he had done with the bundle; he told me he knew not, he gave it to somebody that stood by; I told him he knew what he had done with it; I insisted upon knowing; he said he did not know, he gave it to somebody that stood by; I left Morgan with some people while I called my master; I then gave Morgan in charge and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Was the bundle ever found. - A. No.

CHARLOTTE HOPKINS . I am niece to Elizabeth Hopkins ; I saw Morgan take the bundle out of Lumley's hands, he threw it over his shoulder to another man.

Q. What became of the other man. - A. I did not see.

GEORGE WHITE . I am an officer; I took the

prisoner in custody; I searched him at the watchhouse, I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

Q. What business had you at Billingsgate. - A. I went to Darkhouse-lane to get a pint of beer; I live in Whitechapel; I had a man by the collar; when he called his master five sailors rescued him away.

Court. What business had you to ask for the bundle.

Lumley. He asked me twice for the bundle the first time I came on shore, and the second time he asked me again.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-42

209. THOMAS CATON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , sixteen pound weight of sugar, value 8 s. the property of John Cookson , James Friend and John Lambert .

JOHN LAMBERT. I live in Upper Thames street ; I am a grocer ; my partners names are John Cookson and James Friend ; the prisoner is porter to our cooper . On the 15th instant, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was serving a customer in the warehouse; when our porter brought the prisoner up to me, he had the sugar in his apron; he denied having the sugar, and said the had not been in the warehouse. I asked him if the apron was his; he said it was; he said he met a man in the street whom he did not know who gave him the sugar; he had been to some other grocer he said.

GEORGE POWERS . I am a porter to the prosecutor; the prisoner came in first and asked for a hogshead; I told him there was one outside of the house; then he went away; in about five minutes afterwards he came again, I was up stairs and at the time, I heard somebody come in the warehouse, I went down stairs to see who it was, I saw the prisoner standing at the hogshead.

Q. Was any thing in the hogshead. - A. Yes, it was full of sugar. He held up his apron with one hand, and with the other he took the sugar and put it into his apron; I called to him and asked him what he was doing there, he made no answer, and went out of the warehouse; I followed him and collared him, he would not stop; I put my hand in his apron, I found a large lump of sugar; I asked him to bring the sugar back again to where he took it from, he said, no, I wont; I asked him three or four times, he would not; I went to see for one of my masters, then he got away; I went round the other way to meet him. When I came to the Red Lion coal wharf, I saw him go in the coal wharf with the sugar, then I stepped back a little and saw what he was doing, he untied his apron and hid the sugar in his apron in a dark corner of the coal wharf; I stopped till he came back, then I laid hold of him; I asked him where he put the sugar that he took out of the hogshead; he said he had no sugar; I said, came back with me, I will show you where you put it; I took him with me, and showed him the sugar, and then I brought him up to the warehouse.

THOMAS BLUNT. I am a constable; I produce the sugar; it is moist sugar.

Mr. Lambert. That sugar is the same as we have in our warehouse; I compared it with the hogshead, it corresponded; there was the hole in the hogshead where it was taken from.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not get the sugar there, I got it from the hogsheads that I took from the sugar houses; the master where I live allows us the sugar for our perquisite.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-43

210. JOHN M'DANIEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of January , two pair of skates, value 2 l. 8 s. the property of John Royton .

JOHN ROYTON . I live at No. 25, Sackville-street, Piccadilly ; I am a cutler . On Saturday the 16th of January, about a quarter to five in the evening, I heard a noise by the door, somebody was pulling away two pair of skates; I pursued the prisoner down Sackville-street, I run up to him and collared him; before I collared him he said it is not me; he threw them against the railing; I brought him into the shop; the skates were picked up at the door and in the street. His wife came to the private door and asked forgiveness; and he asked forgiveness; I said, I would forgive him provided he was not an old offender; I sent for an officer, he thought he knew him; he was taken to Bow-street office.

MARY FORD . I was forcing through Sackvile-street between the hours of five and six, I heard something drop; I turned round and looked, and on the steps of Mr. Royton's door, I saw the skates lay; some man ran off the step of the door, he was pursued by Mr. Royton and brought back, I did not see his face; I saw Mr. Royton pursue him and bring him back.

Q. Was it the same man that ran off the steps that he pursued and brought back. - A. Yes.

MICHAEL LEE . I am shopman to Mr. Royton; I picked up the skates that were fastened to the door, they were fastened to the pin that secures the shutters; three of the skates were picked up in Sackville-street, and one was picked up at the door.

Q. to Mary Ford . How many did you see fall at the door. - A. I do not know how many; there were some, one lay I believe at the shop door and three were picked up about thirty or forty yards down Sackville-street.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-44

211. WILLIAM MILES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , a pair of leather gaiters, value 2 s. the property of Peter Shrouder .

PETER SHROUDER. I am a gentleman's servant . On the 1st of February, about four o'clock, I was in the pantry; I live servant at No. 11, Devonshire place , at Mr. Scott's house; Martha Major , the servant, said there was a strange man in the hall; we both ran up the area steps, she pointed out the man to me, I pursued him and found upon him a pair of leather gaiters; they were hanging up over the servant's hall; these are

the gaiters, they are mine; there is a particular mark of the spur on the gaiters.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the gaiters ten minutes before of a jew.

MARTHA MAJOR . I saw the prisoner in the servant's hall. I am sure it is the same man.

Court to prisoner. Do you choose to give any account how you came in the servant's hall. - A. I never was in the servant's hall in my life.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-45

212. JOHN AMES was indicted for felonious stealing on the 30th of January , a bedstead, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Chamberlain .

SARAH CHAMBERLAIN . My husband's name is William Chamberlain .

Q. Where did you live in January. - A. No. 8, Princes-street, Westminster .

Q. Was there any fire in your neighbourhood last January, between eight and nine at night on the 30th of January. - A. It began three doors off our house.

Q. During the fire did you remove any of your furniture. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see John Ames , the prisoner, there. - A. I think I did, I cannot swear it.

Q. Did you see any body take any of your goods. - A. I cannot positively swear to the person of any one; I saw a great many people take some part of my furniture.

Q. Where were your goods taken to. - A. To a smith's shop, in the same street.

ANN MARTIN . I am sister to the last witness.

Q. Were you at her house in Princes-street on the night of the fire. - A. No, I was there on the next day at noon, I was in her house, I saw the prisoner there; I saw him first at the parlour door, he was standing looking on, but doing nothing; the fire was partly extinguished; the goods were chiefly removed. I afterwards heard a noise, I went up the garret stairs, there I saw the prisoner and another man loaded with things; I ordered them to take them to the room where they took them from, they did; when I came there there was my brother and another person assisting of him. I asked him where the prisoner was taking the things to, the other person said he had ordered the prisoner to take the things to the smith's shop; the prisoner was by and heard him say that; the prisoner then went away with the beadstead; I saw the prisoner afterwards, and hearing it was not delivered, I asked him what he had done with it; in the course of ten minutes I saw him near the ruins, his answer was, that he had taken it to a brokers just by; on asking him what broker's, he said he had not taken it away, two other soldiers had done it; when I found him denying that he had taken it, I insisted upon him being taken to Queen-square. The constable took him.

Q. Was he in his soldier's dress. - A. When he was in the apartment he had a soldier's great coat on; when he returned he had taken it off, and he had a leather apron on.

RICHARD JOZEL . Q. You were in this house of the prosecutor Chamberlain, were you, on the day after the fire. - A. Yes,

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner there. - A. Yes, I was up in the garret; I saw him and another soldier there; the prisoner was lying a bedstead. I told him to make haste, and take them things to the smith's shop, where the other things were; I asked him if he knew where the smith's was, he said he did, he had taken other things out of the house before to there. Mrs. Martin told me the bedstead was missing; I saw the prisoner afterwards, I asked him what he did with the bedstead; he said he did not take it away, it was the other soldier.

Q. There was another man when you saw him. - A. Yes; the other man had a bag, he still persisted it was not him, it was the other soldier.

Jury. You gave your order to the other soldier as well a shim. - A. Yes.

JAMES RENNEY . On Saturday the 30th of January, the prisoner was brought to our office; when he was ordered to go to Tothill-fields bridewell, he asked me to go with him to get his great coat, I indulged him; I went with him into a room in Pye-street, there I saw a bedstead.

Q. Do you know whose room it was. - A. I saw his wite there; the bedstead was pulled to pieces, not tied up at all; his wife bursted out crying as soon as she saw me. I brought the bedstead away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the bottom part of the house. Mr. Jozel and me and two soldiers went up stairs, he told us the house was condemned; in the first floor were some pots, he said we might take them and what there was; I took away the bedstead, my comrade took a bag of hair; he returned it when I was taken.

Q. to Jozel. Do you recollect saying to the man there, that the house was condemned, he might take that away. - A. There were two or three garden pots Mr. Chamberlain said they might take away; when I asked him where the bedstead was, he denied it.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate ; and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-46

213. WILLIAM CHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , a great coat, value 20 s. The property of Adam Noke .

JOHN NEWLAND . I am an officer. I apprehend the the prisoner on the 4th of February, at Butcher-row, East Smithfied, at Mr. King's, a carrier's, where he was at work.

Q. Did you find any thing upon him. - A. Yes, a duplicate, he had it in his pocket. I asked him about the coat, he told me he had pawned it in St. Martin's lane for fourteen shillings; he said that he pawned it himself, and another man in company with him took it.

GEORGE STONE. I lived then with Mr. Gordon in St. Martin's-lane.

Q. Look at that ticket, is it a ticket of your house. - A. Yes, it is; it is a coat for fourteen shillings, I took it in; I do not know the person that pawned it.

ADAM NOKE . It is my great coat, I cut it out and and made it myself. I left it at a public house facing of my house, on the 12th of January; I laid it on the parlour table, and came away without it. When I came away I left nobody in the parlour but the prisoner

and his comrade.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. How long before you went away from the parlour had you seen your coat. - A. About five or six minutes before; I am sure it was in the place when I went out of the parlour.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in Goal and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-47

214. JOHN WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , sixty pound weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of John Blackburn , Edward Gale Boldero , and Edward Biley .

THOMAS COWARD . I am in the employ of Messrs. Blackburn, Boldero and Biley; I am a cooper.

Q. Do you know the sign of the Green Man, Bethnal Green , what parish is it. - A. I believe it is St. Matthew, Bethnal Green.

Q. Who does the house belong to. - A. John Blackburn , Edward Gale Boldero , and Edward Biley ; they have a lease upon it; it is at present shut up and uninhabited.

JOHN MOLTON . I keep the Salmon and Ball, Bethnal Green.

Q. Do you remember on Tuesday night the 12th of January Mary Randell coming up to you. - A. Yes, near seven o'clock in the evening. In consequence of what she said I went out with two young men who were in my tap room; I went through the passage of the next door into the Green Man yard. At the time I was standing in the yard with the two young men, we consulted which would be the best way to secure the men we supposed to be in the house stealing of the lead. While I was consulting with them, two men rushed out of the door of the Green Man; we instantly pursued them, they ran towards Whitechapel, and jumped over some high paling into a field; I pursued them, and took the prisoner in the middle of a field; the other got off.

Q. Had you seen him all the while you were pursuing him. - A. Yes, only momentarily; we passed no other person. I am sure the prisoner is one of them that came out of the house. I took hold of the prisoner and brought him to my house; I delivered him to the watchman; he was taken to the watch-house.

MARY RANDELL . I live at Bethnal Green, I am apprentice to Mrs. Farrer. On the 12th of this month I was sent to the Salmon and Ball for a pint of beer.

Q. That is near the Green Man, is it. - A. Yes. I saw two men, they were on the top of the balcony of the Green Man, lifting up the lead.

Q. Was the lead affixed to that part of the house. A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure they were employed in lifting up the lead. - A. Yes. I went to the green stall first, and asked them if any body lived in the Green Man, they said no; he came out and halloaed to them, what business they had there.

Q. Did they make any answer. - A. No.

Q. What did the men do when he halloaed to them. - A. They went into the little door of the balcony; then I went to the Salmon and Ball. I told Mr. Molten what I had seen; he came out, and two men with him; they went into the green stall, and went into the Green Man back yard. I did not go with them.

Q. Did you see them go there. - A. No, I did not.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a police constable belonging to Worship street. On hearing there had been some lead stolen from the Green Man, I and Ray, my brother officer, went to the Salmon and Ball, it was near eight o'clock in the evening; we went to the watchhouse and looked at the prisoner, and then we proceeded to the Green Man. We went up to the second floor, there is a large passage that leads out to the balcony; in this passage we found the lead cut in pieces and rolled up; there is a sack full of it, above a hundred weight, I dare say. We took the lead to the balcony, Ray and I matched it to the balcony, it completely fitted.

Q. Are you sure that it must be taken from that place. - A I am confident of it; it was fresh cut from the part that was left behind. I have no doubt but it come from that place.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. It was valued at ten shillings before the magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about it at all; I enlisted for a soldier at the Star and Garter, Whitechapel; I was very tipsy, I did not know what I was doing; they have said the lead was cut; they searched my pockets; they did not find any knife about me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-48

215. JOHN BLUNDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , a great coat, value 30 s. the property of William Goodman .

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am a coachman in the service of James Brown , a coachmaster at Tottenham.

Q. You lost a great coat. - A. Yes, on the 12th of January, out of the tap room of my master's public house. I went to bed and left it there. On the next morning, when I came to take my coat and whip, I missed my coat; I found my coat in the possession of the pawnbroker. I saw it again on the Thursday.

LAWRENCE PEARSON . I am the son of Mr. Pearson, a pawnbroker, 161, Shoreditch. On the 12th of January the prisoner pledged the coat for one pound. I am sure he is the man.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. There is never a one can say I stole the coat; I never saw the pawnbroker; in the pawnbroker's house I never was

JOHN HILL . On Thursday the 14th I went to the Swan at Tottenham to get a pint of beer; I was told I was wanted. I went into the parlour, Mr. Brown had Blunden in custody; he gave me charge of him.

Q. What did Blunden say. - A. Nothing.

Q. What is he. - A. A farming man . I never knew that he was guilty of any thing of the kind.

COURT. You are to determine upon the business. If the pawnbroker is right, there is no doubt but that it was him that stole the coat; because stolen goods found in the possession

it is incumbent upon him to give an account how he came by them; the prisoner says he is not the person; the pawnbroker has sworn positively to him. It is possible he may be mistaken, and one man may be like another; I have known mistakes of that sort in a highway robbery; you will consider your verdict.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-49

216. SARAH BACHE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , two shirts, value 1 l. one frock, value 2 s. the property of Robert Roberts , and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Ann Seymour Damer , widow .

Second count for like offence, laying it to be the property of Robert Roberts .

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am constable of the parish of St. Ann.

Q. Did you go at any time with a search warrant to the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I did, on the 9th of this month; I went first to Mrs. Damer's house, where I saw the prisoner; I told her I had business rather of an unpleasant nature to impart to her; but it would be the means of removing the suspicion from her, if she was innocent, by her going and having her box and person examined; she went with me with a great deal of willingness, to her lodgings, No. 5, Paddington-street.

Q. Did you tell her what it was about. - A. Yes; I told her to search for some things that had been missing from Mrs. Damer's house in her apartments; I searched her pockets, I found nothing there; I then proceeded to search the room, and found nothing; I took her muff and gave it a shake; inside of the muff I drew out these four duplicates; I said to Mr. Roberts we have got the very thing we have been looking for so long; the prisoner began crying, and dropped on her knees and begged forgiveness; I went to the different pawnbrokers; the property was produced. Mr. Roberts claimed them.

JOHN PRICE . I live with Mr. Dring, pawnbroker; I produce a shirt, pledged for seven shillings; I took it in of the prisoner.

ADAM CHRISTIAN . I live at No. 72, High-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 30th of January, the prisoner pawned a frock, napkin and pillow case for three shillings; the napkin and pillow case were proved to be the prisoners.

JEREMIAH LIGHTFOOT . I am a pawnbroker, No. 8, Bulstrode-street. On the 25th of January, the prisoner pawned a sheet at my shop for six shillings.

ROBERT ROBERTS. Q. Do you live with Mrs. Damer. - A. Yes, as house steward and butler .

Q. What is Mrs. Damer's name. - A. Ann Seymour Damer; she is a widow.

Q. Do you know Bache the prisoner. - A. Yes, she was engaged as sempstress , on the 15th of January, and she continued till the day she was taken up; she lived in the house; the first thing that was missing was a sheet, on the Friday week after she came.

Q. You had not the care of them things. - A. No, my wife, she is housekeeper; in a day or two afterwards there were two pair of silk stockings, and some of my child's things missing.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left her defence to to her counsel, called three witnesses, who gave her good a character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-50

217. RACHAEL BALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , a habit shirt, value 12 s. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a cravat, value 3 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of James Wicks .

ANN WICKS . Q. You are the wife of James Wicks are you. - A. Yes; my husband is a gardener by day, and a watchman by night.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she washed for me.

Q. Did you miss any linen on the 8th of January. - A. Yes; I missed them on the 9th of of January, I had that linen to wash; the last day the prisoner worked for me was on the 8th of January; then she went home to her lodgings on Golder's Green.

Q. How far is Golder's Green from your house. - A. I do not think it is a mile; I live at North End, in the parish of St. John, Hampstead .

Q. Did she live with her husband during this time, A. No, they had separate lodgings at that time; he lodged at the Black Lion at Kilburn, in the same parish.

Q. How long did they continue to lodge separate. A. I believe all the time of her working for me; they went to live together a few days after she left me; she came on the 6th of January, and staid till the 8th.

Q. Did the husband come to her between the 6th and the 9th. - A. No, he came on the 6th at night, but she was gone; he did not come in the house, he staid in the yard.

Q. Where did you keep the linen. - A. In the house.

Q. When had you last seen this linen before you missed it. - A. I last saw it on the 6th of January; it came into her hand to wash; I did not miss it till the night after she was gone, when I went to get these things to put upon the roller to mange, then I missed them; I saw the habit shirt, the cravat, and handkerchief, on the 11th, they were in the prisoner's possession at Kilburn; Charles Polter and John Adams went with me; we had a search warrant; the prisoner was brought into a little parlour, she denied having my property; they were found in a trunk in the prisoner's bed room.

CHARLES POLTER . I am constable of St. John's, Hampstead.

Q. Did you go and search the lodgings of the prisoner and her husband. - A. Yes, I went with John Adams ; the prisoner and her husband were both together in the tap room, at the Black Lion at Kilburn; I called the husband out first, I told him what I had come about; I told the prisoner when she came in the parlour I was come to search her lodgings; she said that her box and clothes were not there, it was at Golder's Green; I told her I should be satisfied by seeing her room; the servant of the house shewed me the room; I went in her room, I found these articles in her box, a habit shirt, three pocket handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings and a cravat; the next morning I searched her lodgings at Golder's Green. I found a napkin.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My things were washed there in her place, they were brought home in mistake; sometimes I brought them home, and sometimes they were sent home.

Jury. How long have you known the prisoner. - A.Between four and five months.

Q. Did you ever send home any article to her in your life. - A. No.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-51

218. THOMAS BOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , two pound weight of composition nails, value 1 s. 9 d. and two pound weight of composition heads of ridges, value 1 s. 9 d. the property of John Boldero , George Faith and Robert Brown .

JOHN BOLDERO. I am a copper and brass founder , my partners names are George Faith and Robert Brown .

Q.Was the prisoner in your service. - A. Yes, he stole the composition nails and the ridges on the 15th of February.

- LOCKE. I am the foreman to the prosecutor; in consequence of information I went to Shadwell office, on Monday last.

Q. Did you search his lodgings. - A. We found in his lodgings part of the metal the constable produces; he was taken in custody before and some of the property found on his person.

Q. How came you to suspect the prisoner. - A. By information of the other workmen.

EDWARD ROGERS . At six o'clock in the evening this man and I appointed to meet the men coming out of the warehouse; I stopped him and found the things upon him; part in his trowsers, and the other things we found in his fob and in his boot.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-52

219. SAMUEL COSTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , six yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Nokes , privately in his shop .

THOMAS NOKES . I am a linen draper , I live at No. 13, Shoreditch .

Q. Did you miss any piece of printed cotton out of your shop on the 27th of January last. - A. Yes, about half past five in the afternoon, two officers, Vickrey and Gleed, came into my shop and asked me if I had lost any printed cotton; on looking round I found I had lost two pieces.

Q. When had you seen the two pieces before. - A. About an hour before I had seen them in my shop.

Q. Are you sure that you had not sold them to somebody. - A. Yes, I am quite certain of it. I had a piece of each pattern left in my shop; when I went to Worship street office I took a pattern of each, and laid it before the magistrate.

Q. Then when you went to Worship-street you saw these two pieces. - A. I did; it was in the possession of Vickrey the officer.

Q. What is the value of the pieces. - A. Twelve shillings.

JOHN VICKREY . I am a police constable of Worship-street. On the 27th of January last, I, Gleed, Valentine, and Croswell, were going out on duty; I saw the prisoner and two other men at a little distance from the prosecutor's shop; they were all three together; when we first saw them they were about ten or fifteen yards from the prosecutor's shop; we were of one side of the way, the prisoner was on the side of the way as Mr. Nokes's shop was; I saw the prisoner go towards Mr. Nokes's door; the other men stood behind; he passed by the door and before we could cross the road he came back again; we could see very clear from the light of a window; I saw him with a bundle under his right arm, he run across the road, Gleed seized him; that moment he threw the bundle behind him; Crosswell picked up the bundle.

BARNARD GLEED . Q. You were with the last witness. - A I was. On Wednesday evening, the 27th, I saw the prisoner with two other men in Shoreditch; the prisoner past the shop door of Mr. Nokes and returned again; I saw him go into the shop door and take something out; he came into the road, I ran and caught hold of his collar; he then threw something on the ground, Crosswell picked it up; I afterwards saw it was a piece of printed cotton.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had just come along Shoreditch from Greenwich; this gentleman took hold of my collar; the officers said I had taken a piece of print, and they said I had been robbing a shop; I told them I had not, I was going home; I had nobody with me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

COURT. You find one of the officers saw this man take it away. - It is not privately stealing, therefore you must acquit him of the capital part of the charge - then the question is whether you are not satisfied that he is guilty of the larceny; the property is found upon him. If you have any doubt about it, character in a doubtful case is very material; if you are of opinion he is guilty of the larceny, you will say so.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-53

220. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Lillia , on the 14th of February putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, seven duplicates, value seven halfpence, his property .

JAMES LILLIA . On the 14th of February, I was going home to my lodgings; coming up Holborn, past Gray's Inn gate , the prisoner stopped me in the high road in a strange manner; she stopped me in the middle of the street, she wanted me to go with her; I said, you have no business to stop me; I denied having any connection with her; at the very same time she put her hand in at once into my watch pocket and took out these tickets and ran away; I felt they were gone, I catched hold of her; the watchman called out one o'clock; I called for assistance, he came; then I insisted

upon her going to the watchhouse.

COURT. - There is no pretence for calling it a highway robbery; I am sorry I cannot call it a larceny.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-54

221. LAZARUS JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , four pound weight of feathers, value 4 s. the property of John Dixon .

JOHN DIXON . Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking your property. - A. Yes; I keep a public house , Essex street, Whitechapel . On the 4th of this month, coming down stairs in the morning to open the street door, I saw the prisoner sitting in the tap room; I opened the door and took down the shutters, then he walked out; I looked after him, having a suspicion that he had robbed me; I saw a large bundle concealed under his coat behind him; he turned up a court, and attempted to make water; he came out, there was another court, he went into that court and tried to make water; I said my friend come back and pay for your lodging; he said I will pay you before twelve o'clock; I insisted upon his coming back; he came back and sat down in the tap room; my servant said the man has got a bundle behind him; I said I know he has, I will search him; I went to him, I said what have you got here; he says a small bundle, it is my own; he would not produce it; I took it away, I found it to be feathers; he said he bought them. I got him secured while I went for an officer; the officer came and went up stairs and examined the bed; we found the corner of the bed had been cut open and partly sewed up again; before he came to lodge in the room the room was perfectly clean, and after this was done the room was covered with feathers; the officer and I examined the feathers, the feathers proved to be the same in his bag as was in my bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. You do not mean to swear to the feathers. - A. To the quality.

Q. There are ten thousand feathers alike. - A. The feathers in the bed were exactly like the feathers in the bundle.

Court. What business was the prisoner. - A. I never asked him.

Q. What time in the morning was it that you came down and saw him coming out. - A. A little before seven in the morning; the bundle was concealed under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. He saw no feathers at all, it is all spite against me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-55

222. PHILIP RIAN , alias RAILES , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , a silk umbrella, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Clark .

ELIZABETH CLARK . Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is Joseph Clark . On the 30th of January, when the fire was, I lodged in Mrs. Chamberlain's house.

Q. In consequence of the fire were you obliged to move all the things out of the house. - A. Yes. It broke out between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I moved all my things four doors off, to Mr. Hollier's. I left the umbrella in Mrs. Chamberlain's parlour window. When I came back it was gone.

Q. Did you leave the door open. - A. I locked the door and left the key in the door in my hurry, as the firemen said I must make haste, they thought the house would tumble down.

Q. You do not know the prisoner, do you. - A. No, I never saw him before that night.

Q. Are you sure that you did not leave the umbrella in the other house. - A. I did not. The umbrella was produced at the office in Queen's square. I claimed it.

THOMAS RENNEY . I am a police officer of Queen square office. From private information I searched the prisoner's lodgings in a one pair of stairs back room, New Tothill street; there upon a high shelf I found this umbrella.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. A publican by that place asked me to move some goods; as we were coming up a court on the left hand side of Princes street I found that umbrella; it was laying at the corner of a watering place.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-56

223. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , two gowns, value 10 s. two yards of cotton, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 6 d. the property of Ann Boyd .

MARY SLATER . Q. Do you remember the prisoner being in Mrs. Boyd's house. - A. Yes, she was servant there, No. 11, Cecil's court, St. Martin's lane .

Q. Did you pursue her and take her. - A. Yes, I overtook her at Charing Cross, just by the King's mews, she had the bundle with her; I stopped her and demanded the property; she refused to give it me, she said she would go back with me, she did not; just as I got to the corner of Suffolk street I sent for an officer, the officer took her in custody; when the officer brought her to the house I examined the bundle, I found it to be the property of Ann Boyd . She gave me no account why she took it, nor what she was going to do with it.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS. I am a constable. After I took her and the bundle she attempted to run away from me; I was forced to drop the bundle and pursue her. I brought her back.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the girl in the street; I gave her the things myself; there were some of my things in the bundle, she would not let me have them out.

Q. How came you to take the things. - A. She gave them me.

Q. to Boyd. Did you give her the things. - A. No, I did not.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-57

224. EDWARD HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , eight pair of shoes, value 1 l. and a pair of boots, value 1 l. the property

of Edward Pitman , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH HAMLET . I live at No. 12, Cranbourn street, in the parish of St. Ann ; I have the management of Mr. Edward Pitman 's shop; he is a shoemaker .

Q. Does Mr. Pitman live there. - A. No he lives at No. 12, Charlotte street, Rathbone place; a relation of his lives at No. 12, Cranbourn street; his name is John Pitman .

Q. Did you observe the prisoner at the bar coming to that house. - A. Yes, very frequent; he was in the habit of coming to dine with the man who keeps the house; I watched last Sunday and the Sunday before that.

Q. Did you observe him go from your house. - A. Yes, about half past nine at night he came through the door of the shop to go out; I followed him to a wine vault the corner of New street, Covent Garden; I saw him come out again; I followed him down St. Martin's lane, down Bedfordbury; I had a person with me; I sent the person up one of the courts, and I met the prisoner in a dark passage; I touched his pockets, I was sure he had the property; I took him by his coat and took him into the wine vaults in Chandos street; there were two young men present; I took five pair of shoes from behind his waistcoat, about his body, and one pair of soles. The watchman came, I sent the person that was watching with me to Bow street for an officer; the officer took from him three pair of shoes and one pair of boots; he was taken to the watchhouse.

JOHN PERKS . I am a Bow street officer. I took these three pair of shoes and a pair of boots from the inside of the prisoner's small clothes.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling house.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc

Reference Number: t18080217-58

225. MARY TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , a bolster, value 5 s. a blanket, value 5 s. a pair of sheets, value 8 s. two pillows, value 5 s. the property of John Jones in a lodging room .

LYDIA JONES . Q. Are you the wife of John Jones . - A. Yes; we live at No. 31, Noble-street, Queen Ann-street, East .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I have known lier about sixteen months; I let her a furnished lodging myself; she was to pay me five shillings a week for it.

Q.Was she a single woman. - A. There was a husband as she told me that was to come with her; I did not see him when I let her the room; since she has confessed that it was not her husband. I searched the room the 1st of February, I found all the articles gone mentioned in the indictment.

JOSEPH CRAIG . I am constable of the parish of St. Ann's. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of this month; I searched her, I found six duplicates of the property; the articles were pawned at two pawnbrokers.

JOSEPH AVORY . I am servant to Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned two sheets, one on the 4th of January and one on the 11th.

DAVID FARRER. I am shopman to Mr. Dobree. On the 3rd of December the prisoner pledged a blanket, I took it in myself; I produce also two pillows and a bolster; I did not take them in.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I pledged them I was very much distressed indeed; my husband knew I had pledged them when he was with me; he went on board a ship, I went after him, as he said he would give me three pound eighteen shillings, I could not find him, when I returned I was taken prisoner, before I could redeem them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-59

226. CATHERINE WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of February , a shift, value 3 s. a pair of men's shoes, value 5 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Scriggins .

FRANCES CRIGGINS. I am the wife of Thomas Scriggens .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, she was left in charge of my room on the morning of the 3d of February; I went out between seven and eight, I did not leave her in the room; I left my child in her care and the key of my apartment, we both lodged in the house; I returned again in the evening between nine and ten.

Q. When did you miss any property. - A. I went up stairs to fetch the child from her apartment, when I came home; on going to bed, I went to my drawer for my shift, I missed the shift, a shawl, a towel, and a pair of men's shoes; I went to the prisoner and asked her if she knew any thing of it; in the morning I went into the area of the coal celler, I found two duplicates of a shift, shawl and shoes, of the property I lost.

Q. You gave it to the constable did not you. - A. Yes.

Q. There were other lodgers in the house were not there. - A. Yes, six lodgers; the things are here.

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am a pawnbroker; this property was pawned with me on the 3rd of February in the morning about eleven o'clock; to the best of my knowledge it was the prisoner, but I would not swear positively.

The property produced and identified.

COURT. - There is no evidence against the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-60

227. ROBERT BURGESS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , a Kidderminster carpet, value 18 s. the property of James Shearman .

ELIZABETH SHEARMAN . I am the wife of James Shearman , he is a broker , Church-street, Bethnal Green .

Q. Did you miss any thing. - A. I believe I lost a carpet: I was fetched by the officer to the office; they shewed me a carpet.

PETER MASON . On Saturday the 6th of February, about half after six in the evening, I was going up Church-street in company with Gleed, I saw the prisoner

coming down Church street with a large bundle under his great coat, buttoned over. I looked hard at him, and he crossed immediately to go the other side of the way; I went after him and stopped him in the middle of the road; I laid hold of him by the collar, and Gleed took the carpet from under his coat; I asked him where he was going with that carpet, he said to his master, he lived at Mile End New Town. I told him he was coming directly from that way. I took him to the office. When I was going to lock him up, he said he would tell me the whole truth; he said another man took it out of the shop and gave it to him; he was to meet the man in Shoreditch.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I sold a carpet of that size and pattern to Mr. Shearman. I cannot positively say it is that carpet.

Q. There is no mark by which you can say that particular carpet was sold to Mr. Shearman. - A. There is not.

JAMES SHEARMAN , junior. Q. Do you live with your father. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of any carpet which he had in the shop being lost. - A. I know that he had several of the same pattern as this; there is a ticket of Mr. Bartlett's to it.

Q. Do you know how many your father had of that pattern. - A. No.

Q. Therefore you do not know whether there was any one missing. - A. No. I saw the prisoner between five and six in the evening on the 6th of February, in Church street, Bethnal Green, he was standing. and a mob of people around him.

Q. Your father had several of that pattern. - A. Yes. We went to Worship street and saw it; we cannot find that it was sold. On Monday we found there was one missing.

Q. to prosecutrix. Do you know how many you had. - A. No. I do not believe the prisoner did steal it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-61

228. ANN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a wooden tub, value 3 s. a flannel waistcoat, value 1 s. and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of Robert Burke .

ELIZABETH BURKE . Robert Burke , my husband, is a glass cutter . The prisoner came into my house on the 25th of January; she asked me to buy a bunch of turnips; I refused to buy them; she went out and sold them to my next door neighbour. In about half an hour afterwards I met this same woman with a washing tub, a pair of stockings, and a waistcoat under her arm; she came up to me and asked me if I would buy the washing tub; I rather refused buying it at first, knowing I had one of the same size at home; she said if I would buy it, it should be worth my money. She asked me three shillings; thinking she would not take my money, I bid her two shillings for the tub. I brought it home. When I came in door I saw some splashes of whiting, the same as mine had; I looked and missed my tub. Seeing this woman with the stockings and waistcoat under her arm, I went down stairs, and missed the stockings and the waistcoat; I went out and overtook her by Smithfield bars talking to two women. I took hold of her, I told her it was my property that she had on her arm. She gave them up directly; I brought her home with me.

HENRY BLIGH. I was sent for on the 25th of January. Mrs. Burke gave me charge of the prisoner; the prisoner said she had not taken the stockings and waistcoat.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along St. John street, a woman met me, she gave me the tub, stockings, and waistcoat; I met the prosecutrix, I asked her to buy the tub; she gave me two shillings for it; she came after me, and said they were her stockings and waistcoat; I gave them to her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-62

229. PAUL COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , fourteen pound weight of hay, value 6 d. the property of John Maitland , Henry Sterry , John Nettleship , and Thomas Strutton .

JAMES STEVENS . I am porter to John Maitland , Henry Sterry , John Nettleship , and Thomas Strutton , they are factor s. On the 26th of January, my master sent to me by the carman to go to the stable to watch for some person coming to rob the stable of hay, which we had lost several times. I and the carman concealed ourselves About half past five the prisoner came to a rail that is put across; from there he went up to the manger and took the hay out, and put about half of it into the bag; some person coming along the yard, he stooped down for about a quarter of a minute, then he put the remainder in the bag. I gave a signal to my fellow servant to open the door; he pushed the door open, and the prisoner threw the bag down and ran away; he followed him about an hundred yards and took him. We took him and the bag together to our master; he did not come in the stable, he came into a shed and took the hay out; there was a board down, I could have laid hold of his nose if I chosed, and pulled it through.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am carter to these gentlemen. About half after four o'clock in the afternoon, my fellow servant concealed himself at one end of the stable, and I stopped out at the door; about half after five, I heard the prisoner go over the dunghill; he proceeded to the end of the old manger, where my horses feed; I heard him rustling of the hay; my fellow servant gave me a signal, I threw open the door, I saw the prisoner, he had then got the sack in one hand and the gate in another; he turned his head, saw me, and threw the sack off his shoulder, within two yards of my feet; he ran away; as soon as I catched him he said he would not run away from me; I told him to come back to the stable, where he had throwed the bag down. I took him and the bag up to my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming that way in the evening, I was ill of the bowel complaint; I asked a man if I might go on the dunghill, he said yes; I went up. As I was coming out, they called out that is him, knock him down; they overtook me and accused me of taking some hay; there was a bag on the dunghill; I did not throw it there.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-63

230. ROBERT KIAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of February , three yards and a half of calico, value 6 s. 3 d. a handkerchief, value 3 d. a pair of gaiters, value 6 d. a comb, value 3 d. and sixpence in monies, numbered , the property of Robert Hollis .

ROBERT HOLLIS. I am a gentleman's coachman ; I live with William Hunt , Esqr. On Tuesday the 2nd of February, between twelve and one at noon, my master's stable was robbed of my property; there were three yards and a half of calico taken, five pennyworth of halfpence, and a penny piece; and a knife and comb were taken out of my waistcoat pocket, while I was on the premises; on Wednesday, February the 3d, between the hours of eleven and five in the day, I lost an old silk handkerchief and a pair of old gaiters.

Q.Did the boy live in the yard. - A. No, he lived just by; he has robbed the stable six times; the silk handkerchief was found upon him, the calico he sold to a Jew in Petticoat-lane.

EDWARD JAMES . I am Mr. Gosling's groom; my stable was robbed of a great coat.

Q. That is not in this indictment. - A. The prisoner was found in my loft; he had an old silk handkerchief and a comb.

Q. Is your loft near Hollis's stables. - A. These are two stables between his and mine. When he was taken he owned that he took the piece of calico and sold it to a Jew in Petticoat-lane.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I laid the things there but not with intent to take them; I slept there all night, my father and mother said I should not go home.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-64

231. HENRY SELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , thirty four pound weight of mutton, value 19 s. the property of George Ballard .

GEORGE BALLARD . I am porter to the butchers at Westminster. On the 4th of February. I had in my care seven pieces of mutton in Warwick-lane , three pair of hind quarters, three chines, and one leg and and chine together; that made up the seven pieces; I put them in the cart; the cart stood in Warwick-lane, I went up in the market to fetch three sheep, they being big ones, I could bring no more than one at a time. I brought down one and put it in the cart; while I was gone for that one I lost one pair of hind quarters from the cart; I made a hue and cry, if any body had seen them taken out of the cart; a man of the name of Tatum told me Parker saw the prisoner take it out of the cart, I went in pursuit of the prisoner, I could not find him.

JONATHAN PARKER. I am servant to Mr. Griffin, a butcher in Little James-street, Bedford row. On the morning of the 4th, a little before nine o'clock, I was in Warwick-lane minding my cart where my master's property was; while I was standing there I saw the prisoner and another man pass by; I saw them go to the other part of Warwick-lane, and the prisoner took a hind quarter of mutton out of the cart; the person who was with him was standing against the post; when he took it of the opposite side of the way, I saw it as plain as I see you where you are, sir.

Q. What distance off where you. - A. I suppose about fifty yards off. He took it out of the cart, put it on his shoulder, and walked away with it.

Q. What became of the other man. - A. He went with him; what became of them I know not I told Mr. Tatum of it.

Q. Did you know the prisoner. - A. I had seen him once, I believe; Ballard came out of the market, he enquired for the property; Tatum told him I saw it taken out of the cart; and by the description I gave him of the person he knew him by name.

Q. How soon after did you see him. - A. Not till the Monday following, I saw him at the office.

Q. When you saw him before the magistrate were you sure he was the man. - A. I was upon my oath then about it; I am perfectly satisfied that he was the man that took the mutton.

Prisoner. If that man saw me take away the property that time, why did not he give information and have me taken up.

Court. So he did.

Ballard. I have seen the prisoner before; I have heard him called by name, and by the description I knew him; I have seen him in our market before about the carts.

JONATHAN TROTT . On Thursday the 4th of February an information was received at the office that there was a bull bait at Highgate Common; and that some people were going to fighting; we had instructions to go up and try to stop them. On my return back I saw the prisoner, and from having an information of the robbery in the morning I took him in custody; he had been to the bull bating.

Q. You did not find the mutton. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the charge that is alledged against me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-65

232. ELIZABETH HOLLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , a pewter pot, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Butler .

THOMAS BUTLER . I am a publican ; I live at the King's Arms, Little Moorfields . On the 14th of February the prisoner came into my house for half a pint of porter with her own mug, as she used to do, three or four times a day sometimes. She took a quart pot away from off the sink at the side of the bar, while my back was turned; I was in another room; I turned round, I saw she was putting something in her cloak; I ran to the bar directly, I says to my wife, Holley has got one of my quart pots; I went after her and turned her cloak back, and saw the quart pot under her arm; she said she hoped I would forgive her, it was the first that ever she had taken.

Q. What is she. - A. I have know her and her husband a great while; I never heard a bad character of her before this happened.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor; I did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-66

233. EDWARD TOBIN and EDMUND HICKEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of January , two bags, value 1 s. sixty pound weight of vermilion, value 13 l. two sticks of distilled verdigrease, value 2 l. eleven pound weight of bronze, value 7 l. 10 s. the property of Lewis Berger , John Berger , Samuel Berger , and Daniel Watson Berger , in their dwelling house .

Second count for like offence, charging it to be the dwelling house of Samuel Berger only.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

SAMUEL BERGER . Q. Tell us the names of your partners, sir. - A. Lewis Berger , John Berger , Samuel Berger , and Daniel Watson Berger . We have no other partners, we carry on the business in Bow lane, in the parish of St. Mary Le Bow .

Q. Is there a dwelling house there. - A. Yes; I reside there myself the property was taken in the warehouse, which is part of the dwelling house.

Court. The warehouse is under the same roof. - A. It is; the warehouse is on the ground floor, and the kitchen and dwelling house above it.

Mr. Gurney. I believe sir, the prisoner Tobin had been some time before in your service. - A. Yes, he had been discharged about a fortnight previous to this,

Q. What was he. - A. He was a porter .

Q. You are merchants dealing in oils and colours . - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of this transaction, I believe Hickey was in your employ as porter. - A. He was porter in the warehouse ; he had been so about twelve or fourteen months; Tobin had not been any length of time, hardly a fortnight, I believe.

Q. On the morning of the 16th of January, in consequence of any suspicion, did you and Mr. Nevitt, your clerk, conceal yourselves in your warehouse. - A Yes, we got up about half past six in the morning, the bell rung at seven o'clock; we concealed ourselves in the warehouse before any person entered in the warehouse; after the bell rung, I heard two men stop as I conceived, they came close to me in the warehouse, there were two men stood by me for sometime, I did not see them; they said in a sow tono of voice, do not make a noise, fetch or get a light were the words added to that; I do not know which of them proceeded to the counter, at no great distance I heard the reel distinctly, and they cut some twine; from thence they went from me some considerable distance back wards; I perceived Hickey our servant going first, coming back.

Q. Had any person entered but these two before mentioned. - A. No soul; and on their returning I observed Hickey first, Tobin followed him with the bags on his shoulder, they came nigh the door; I then remained sometime thinking to let them go out of the door; I heard the key put in the lock, and when the lock was sprung, I imagined then it would be time; I came from the place where I was concealed, towards the door; I saw Hickey as it were with the door in his hand.

Q. Did you see Tobin. - A. I cannot say, I saw Tobin directly; on my running forward, Hickey, the short man. ran into the street; I followed him and ran I think better than a mile after him; he ran down Watling street, turned up Queen street, then into Pancrass lane; at last in the Old Jewry, there he was stopped by Mr. Bradshaw I was close to him; he was then taken to the Poultery Compter. I found Tobin in custody of our other servant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Have you no other partners but those you have mentioned. - A. None.

Mr. Gurney. You say Tobin had been in your service before. - A. Yes, about a fortnight before; I saw Tobin the day before he asked for Hickey, he had about three hats on his head, and about half a dozen pair of small clothes on his arm; he enquired for Hickey; I asked him what he wanted with Hickey; he said he wished to see him; I asked him what it was for; he said that he knew; I told him I presumed he knew where he lived, to go there; no, he said he did not; I then told him he might find it out; he then said I was a d - d impudent fellow; I said it was of little consequence he might go; I did not recollect him then. I knew him the next morning.

Mr. Alley. You live in this dwelling house yourself. - A. I do; the warehouse is under it.

Q. Is there any internal communication to the warehouse. - A. There is an internal communication to the warehouse; you may come in the warehouse two ways from the house, and from the street.

Q. Do you pay the rent yourself for the warehouse or only the house. - A. I pay the rent of the house and the warehouse as it were together, they are under one lease; the firm pay the taxes jointly, and I pay the rent; the premises are easy rented.

GEORGE NEVITT . - Mr. Gurney. You are clerk to Messrs. Berger. - A. I am.

Q. Did you conceal yourself in the warehouse of Mr. Bergers. - A. Yes, I concealed myself in one part of the warehouse, and Mr. Berger in another; after the bell rang, I immediately took my station in the warehouse; I was not in a part to see any one; I heard two men come into the warehouse to that part where I was; I heard them talk in a low tone, I heard the voice of Hickey distinctly, which I knew; when they came to that part of the warehouse where I was, they unlocked the accompting house door, and proceeded to unlock an inner door, which they had not the key of; unless the key was given to them by the servant, it was impossible they could get the key out of the iron safe; they must have another key.

Q.The proper key was locked up in the iron safe. A. Yes. After they got in at the inner door, something heavy I heard drop in a bag; I knew vermilion was deposited in that place, I thought it to be vermilion; I heard something else rustling, I could not tell what it was; it was as though they were taking something else away; after which they came out of the inner door, turned the key of that and were proceeding out of the warehouse by Well court; there are two entrances to our warehouse, they got the door open.

Q. As they went by you could not you see them. - A. No, but I heard them open the door to go out; after the door was open, I heard the prisoner Hickey

say to the other, stop, we must not go there, there is something a stirring; the door was then shut to. They then proceeded towards the door going out into Bow lane. When they got a short distance from me, as I thought they would not perceive me, I followed, and I perceived the prisoner Hickey at the door, with the door partly open. I spoke to Mr. Berger; I supposed the other was gone off. We both rushed to the door; in our haste we passed the prisoner Tobin, and left him behind the door.

Q. Did Hickey escape out of the door. - A. Yes; and Mr. Berger and myself followed him out into the lane.

Q. Did you turn back. - A. Not till I got to the Crown tavern in our lane, then I turned back; I heard a noise behind me, I turned my head round, and Tobin was in the act of coming out of the warehouse. I pursued him down Bow lane, crying stop thief; he was secured by Mr. Christopher Dodson in Chapside. I took him back to our warehouse. Mr. Berger secured the other man; we took him to the compter.

Q. Where did you find that which had been brought out of the accounting house. - A. Behind the door, out of which Hickey ran, was the vermilion and the other articles; the vermilion is here. (producing it.)

Q. What is that. - A. Two bags of vermilion, weighing thirty pounds each.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. From fifteen to ten pounds; the two sticks of verdigrease about forty nine shillings; eleven pound weight of bronze, seven pounds; they are the property of Messrs. Berger and sons.

Q. The bag is not their property. - A. The small bag is Mr. Berger's property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. At the time you apprehended the prisoner there was nothing found on him. - A. No, he had dropped the bag, which noise I had heard.

Q. Nothing was taken out of the house. - A. No, it had been removed from out of the accompting house; was on his shoulder, and he throwed it behind the door.

Court. You never lost sight of him when you pursued him. - A. No.

Tobin's Defence. My lord - on this morning, as I was out of employment, I went to look after employment, any where, where I could get work; I had lived with Mr. Berger three weeks; I went as far as Watling street, I met a porter, he told me I might get a porter's place in Barge yard; I talked to him a great time; I came into Bow lane, and had turned up to Bow church, when the alarm was given. I was stopped. The day before I called at the warehouse to speak to Hickey; Mr. Berger asked me what I wanted with him; I told him I wanted to speak with him; he said, you rascal, go about your business, or else I will kick your a - e. I had two hats in my hand at the time, and two or three coats. I knew that Hickey was at dinner at that time.

Hickey's Defence. On the 6th of January I came to this warehouse door to work as usual; the servant came down stairs and gave me the key of the accompting house and the warehouse. After going into the warehouse I unlocked the accompting house door to light the fire there; coming back again to get some wood I thought some of the men came and knocked at the door; I went down to the warehouse door, Mr. Berger run down the warehouse as if he was mad; I ran out of the door, he ran after me; upon which I was stopped and brought back.

Tobin called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hickey called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

TOBIN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

HICKEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-67

324. JOHN PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , two trunks, value 27 s. the property of Samuel Ash .

SAMUEL ASH . I am a trunkmaker , 44, Leadenhall street . On the 4th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner at the bar took two trunks, a larger and a smaller one; when I saw him with them he was by the next person's house, standing still with them; the large one was on his shoulder, and the small one he had in his hand.

Q. What did he say for himself when you went out to him. - A. He seemed silly; I said what are you going to do with these trunks; he said if you were to cut my head off you would serve me right; he was not going on with them, he was standing with his face towards me.

SAMUEL MONDAY . I am master of the ship John. The prisoner was cook of the ship during the voyage; I had a very good character with him from the owners; he behaved as such during the whole of the voyage; he appeared simple during the latter part of the voyage.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-68

235. JOHN LOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , a great coat, value 9 s. the property of Henry Hatton .

HENRY HATTON. I am a coachman to Mr. Burridge; I lost my great coat on the 30th of January last, from out of the stable in Crooked Billet walk, Millbank street, Westminster ; the prisoner was on the premises when I lost it; he had no business there. I left the coat in the stable at four o'clock in the afternoon; when I returned at five it was gone, and him along with it.

Q. You did not find your great coat upon him. - A. I did not.

WILLIAM SALT . I am a coachman. I bought the coat of that man on the 30th of January, very late in the evening; I bought it at the King's Head, Broad St. Giles's, in the open tap room; I gave a seven shilling piece and two shillings for it.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH. I am a constable. On the 31st of January I received an information from Richard Maggs that a great coat was lost from Mr. Burridge's wharf. I found the prisoner on Monday, about twelve o'clock, at the Roebuck public house, Millbank. I took him in custody. He wanted to know what for; I told him I would take him up to Richard Maggs and his uncle, and then he would hear all about it; he at last told Maggs that he had sold it for nine shillings. I found five shillings on him, which he said was part of the nine; he gave information where he had sold the coat. I found the coat in about a week.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I do not know any thing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-69

236. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , a copper boiler value 10 s. the property of James Parsons .

JAMES PARSONS . I am a broker ; I live in Norris street, St. James's ; I lost the copper on the 19th of January, at five o'clock in the evening. I put it out in the morning on the second step of the door, tied with a rope; as I was sitting in my shop about five o'clock I heard the rattle of the pot, on turning my head to see, it was gone; on my running to the corner of the street, I saw the prisoner with it on his arm; I brought him back and sent for an officer. The rope I fastened the pot to the door was cut.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was coming home from work, a man came by St. James's market and gave me that copper to carry; he said he would give me sixpence; that man went on before a little way when he took me.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-70

237. JOHN DENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of January , a box, value 2 s. two gowns, value 12 s. three petticoats, value 14 s. two aprons, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. a pinnafore, value 1 s. three shifts, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a shawl, value 6 d. a habit shirt, value 6 d. and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Isaac Baker .

Second count for like offence, laying them to be the property of Thomas Straker .

MARY BAKER . Q. Do you recollect the time you lost a bandbox. - A. Yes; I came from Oakenham in Berkshire on the 22nd of January, in Mr. Straker's waggon. I had my bandbox with me.

Q. What time was it you missed the box. - A. About half past seven; I went to the Bell at Bedfont .

Q. Did you see the prisoner on any part of your journey. - A. The waggoner took the prisoner up at Staines, before we came to Bedfont. At Bedfont we got out of the waggon and went to a private house; he took his bundle and went to the Bell, and I walked with him: I left my band box in the waggon; I staid at the Bell till the waggon called for me; he told me that he should wait till the waggon came; he went out with a lighted pipe in his mouth and left his bundle at the Bell; I had a suspicion that he was gone for my bundle; he came in again a little before eight o'clock, he brought in nothing with him; offered to lend me a coat to wrap up myself in the waggon; he took his bundle and went off; the waggon called at nine o'clock; they went after him and took him on suspicion of stealing my box.

TAOMAS ATKINS. I am the waggoner.

Q. Do you recollect stopping at a private house at Bedfont. - A. Yes; the prisoner and the woman got out of the waggon at Bedfont at the same time.

Q. Did you afterwards follow the prisoner and take him. - A. Yes; we took him about a hundred yards from the Bell.

Q. What did you see him do. - A. He stopped; we went to him and asked him about it.

Q. You did not see the box any where did you. - A. No. He said he had not seen the box; I took him back to the public house; Taylor went back and found the box just by where the man stopped.

Q. Did you see the box in the waggon when the woman got out. - A. Yes; I covered it with a bit of straw.

JAMES TAYLOR . Q. Do you live at Bedfont. - A. I live at a private house, where the waggon stopped.

Q. When did you hear any alarm about the box being lost. - A. I was going to the Bell to get a pint of beer for my supper; I met the prisoner coming from the Bell towards the waggon; I said, good night, sir; the Bell is nearer London than where the waggon stopped, at out three quarters of a mile.

Q. Did you see him go to the waggon. - A. No; I went to the public house, and stopping there a little bit, I heard that this box was lost out of the waggon; I set off after the man, towards Hounslow expecting this was the man.

Q. Was it light or dark. - A. Dark, he kept right on the road for Hounslow till we stopped him.

Q. How far had he got before you stopped him. A About a hundred yards, I believe.

Q. Did you see any box. - A. No; I went up to him, I asked him whether he had not seen any box that had been taken out of the waggon; he said no; I told him we suspected he had, he must go along with us back to the public house; we took him back.

Q. Did you find the box any where. - A. Yes; we found the box fifteen or twenty yards from the place we took the man from; close to the road upon the ground.

Q. What was the reason for charging the prison with taking the box. - A. I know nothing no farther than all suspicion; he owned nothing, nor nothing we could swear to, in regard of that.

Q. Is there any body here who saw him with the box. - A. No.

COURT. - It is unnecessary to go farther there was a ground for suspicion; nobody saw him near the waggon nor with the box; it is a case of suspicion, but the people were too hasty in taking him up; they should have waited till he took the box up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-71

238. SARAH CRAWFORD and CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , two counterpanes, value 1 l. 13 s. two table cloths, value 9 s. a shift, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of Sarah Perkins , widow .

SARAH PERKINS . Q. Are you a widow. - A. I am; I live at No. 42, Bread-street, Cheapside .

Q. Were there any counterpanes lost any time belonging to you. - A. There was; I missed them on the 23rd of January.

Q. Did you miss any table cloths. - A. I missed six, four shifts, four petticoats, four silver tea spoons, four table spoons and a pair of pockets; I had the spoons in common use, I missed them before the other articles; I missed them on the 23rd of December; Sarah Crawford had lived servant with me about seven weeks.

Q. Had both the prisoners lived servants with

you. - A. No. Crawford came to me on the 29th of October, and left me on the 23d of December; she left me before I came down in the morning. Leaving me in this way, I thought she had done something that was not proper. I went into her bed chamber, I found I missed out of my trunk in her room two counterpanes; from that I looked in the buffet, where I missed four table spoons and four tea spoons, one salt spoon, and a pair of tea tongs; from that I went up stairs. I missed six table cloths, a sheet, four shifts, one shirt of my son's, one night waistcoat, four petticoats, a head cloth of a bed furniture, and five pair of stockings. - I missed two flat irons a day or two afterwards, and one pair of pockets that was found on the prisoner. I was present when she was taken from a house of ill fame in Whitcombe street, by my brother in law. When she was in the coach she mentioned that she had pledged the spoon herself in Chandos street, and the other prisoner Salmon had pawned the counterpane there likewise. We went into the pawnbroker's shop, the pawnbroker found the counterpane and the tea spoon; I stopped there with the prisoner while my brother in law got an officer; the officer came; we then went to Salmon's apartment in Bull's Inn court, where the officer searched her, and found the pockets on her, and in the apartments of Mrs. Salmon he found a number of pawnbroker's duplicates; some of these led to the discovery of other articles belonging to me, which were pledged at another shop.

Q. Did the prisoner Crawford lodge with Salmon. A. I am certain she did not. We went to Mr. Ackland's in the Strand; we found a counterpane, a shift, two table cloths, and a petticoat; that is all I can recollect.

Q. These were your property. - A. Yes.

Q. Had Mrs. Salmon lived with you. - A. I never saw her to my knowledge at my house.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Wegulan, pawnbroker, Chandos street, Covent Garden. On the 23d of December the two prisoners came together. Crawford pledged the tea spoon for two shillings, and Salmon the counterpane for twelve shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAM CARTER . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Salkeld and Ackland, I am journeyman to them. I produce a counterpane, two petticoats, and a shift; I took in the counterpane myself on the 23d of December. I did not take in the shift myself. I am not certain who I took the petticoats of.

(The property produced and identified.)

THOMAS LOVELL . I am a profile painter, 32, Bread street, Cheapside. On the 18th of January I took Crawford at a house in Whitcomb street; I put her in a coach and took her to the public office. I asked her how she could be so ungrateful to rob her mistress; I told her she had taken the silver spoons; she said she did not take the spoons, she had only taken the counterpane, and a shift of her mistresses's. In consequence of that we went to Mr. Wegulan; there we found the counterpane. Mr. Chapman acted in a manner that does him credit, he brought forward the spoon.

Crawford's Defence. When he took me in the coach, he told me that if I would confess he would set me at liberty directly; consider, he said, you are almost at the office. Mrs. Salmon is clear of the offence she stands here for; I told her it was my property, I asked her to pawn it for me.

Salmon left her defence to her counsel.

CRAWFORD, GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years

SALMON, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-72

239. JOSEPH PETTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , four quartern loaves of bread, value 3 s. 4 d. and a half peck loaf, value 20 d. the property of David Todd .

JOHN BALL . Q. Are you a journeyman to the prosecutor Todd. - A. Yes. On the 3d of this month I left my bread in a barrow in the street in Cold Bath fields . I was away from the barrow three quarters of an hour.

Q. What time in the day was it. - A. About three o'clock; when I returned I missed a half peck loaf and four quarterns. I saw the loaves again, and the prisoner I saw at the office in Hatton Garden; when I saw the loaves I knew them to be mine.

JOHN TEDDES . Q. Do you remember seeing this barrow. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner take this bread out of the barrow; he put it into two bags; I pursued him and took him across Spa fields.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in Goal and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-73

240. RICHARD STATE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , a bridle, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Bigby and David Murray .

JOHN BURN . I am in the service of the prosecutors; they are brewer s.

Q. Did you lose the bridle off your horse's head. - A. Yes. I was at the Gun and Tent in Fort street, Spital Fields ; I was putting the beer down the cellar; when I returned again to the dray I lost the bridle off the horse's head. I met with the prisoner in Crispin street; I found the bridle under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it laying on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-74

241. ROBERT COLE was indicted for that he on the 15th of August was servant to Edward Brown , and was intrusted by him to receive money for him, that he being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of five shillings, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Second count for like offence, only stating that he received the money from Daniel Fielding .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

EDWARD BROWN . Q. You are a brewer . - A. Yes, in St. James's walk, Clerkenwell .

Q. The prisoner was employed by you to carry out beer and to receive money . - A. Yes.

Q. On the 15th of August did he account to you

for five shillings that he was to receive of Mr. Fielding. - A. No, not to me.

Court. What are the names of your clerks that receive money for you. - A. James Elliott and Thomas Windsor .

DANIEL FIELDING . Q. What are you. - A. I am a butcher .

Q. On the 15th of August did you receive any beer from Mr. Brown. - A. Yes, a nine gallon barrel; me or Mrs. Fielding paid him for it; this is a receipt the prisoner gave.

Q. Who saw him sign it. - A. Me, or Mrs. Fielding.

Court. That will not do.

Mr. Alley. Do you remember whether he delivered any beer for you or not. - A. I cannot say.

JAMES ELLIOTT . - Mr. Alley. Were you a clerk to Mr. Brown on the 15th of August. - A. I was.

Q. It was the duty of the prisoner to account to you for any money he received. - A. It was.

Q. Is that his hand writing. - A. Yes, that is his receipt; (read) Received 15th August 1807, of Mr. Fielder five shillings, for one cask of beer, for Edward Brown , R. Cole.

A. Have you a customer of the name of Fielder. - A. No, we have not, his name his Fielding; the whole of that is the drayman's writing.

Q. Did he account to you for the five shillings he had received of Mr. Fielding. - A. He did not.

Prisoner. Mr. Elliott knows very well that he is liable to make mistakes, and that we rectify it at other times.

Court. Do you know of your own knowledge that any beer was taken out to Mr. Fielding on that day. - A. The dray takes a regular round; I do not know of any being sent at that time.

Q. You did not know on that day of any money being received or beer left at Mr. Fieldings. - A. Not on that day I did not, he did not account for any.

Q. As you receive money of the draymen, were there any mistakes made by them and afterwards rectified by them. - A. Never by me.

Q. I want to know whether is does happen that there are mistakes made by sitting down wrong sums and rectifying it afterwards. - A. If the drayman makes a mistake we rectify it in the morning.

THOMAS WINDSOR . - Mr. Alley. You are also a clerk entrusted to receive money. - A. I am collecting clerk; I have nothing to do with the draymen; Mr. Elliott receives of the draymen and he alone.

Prisoner's Defence. I never made a mistake wilfully nor knowingly.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-75

242. ROBERT COLE was indicted for that he on the 3d of September was servant to Edward Brown , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him; that he being such servant so employed, did receive 2 l. 5 s. on account of his said master, that he afterwards feloniously did steal embezzle and secrete the sum of 9 s. part of the said sum of 2 l. 5 s.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

EDWARD BROWN . - Mr. Alley. You are a brewer , sir living in St. James's walk, Clerkenwell . - A. Yes, the prisoner was my servant .

Q. On the 3d of September did he account to you for the sum of two pound, five shillings, which he received of Mr. Clark. - A. He did not.

JAMES ELLIOTT . - Mr. Alley. On the 3d of September did the prisoner account to you for any money he received of Mr. Clark. - A. On the 3d of September I received one pound, sixteen shillings, of the prisoner on account of Mr. Clark.

THOMAS CLARK. - Mr. Alley. Where do you live. - A. I live on Clerkenwell-green. I keep an eating house; this is a receipt for two pound, five shillings, for beer, I paid the prisoner the money and took the receipt; the two pound, five shillings, I paid. I saw him write that receipt.

THOMAS WINDSOR . - Mr. Alley. Did he ever account to you for any money. - A. At no time.

Prisoner's Defence. I never made a mistake knowingly.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-76

243 HANNAH CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a bolster, value 4 s. a pillow, value 1 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. a blanket, value 1 s. a counterpane, value 3 s. two flat irons, value 1 s. and five pictures, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Jury , in a lodging room .

MARY JURY. Q. You are the wife of Joseph Jury . - A. Yes, we live at No. 20, Baldwin's gardens . On the 28th of November last, I let the prisoner a three pair of stairs furnished room.

Q. Did you search the lodging at any time to see if any thing was missing. - A. I did; on the 26th of January I missed a pair of sheets, a bolster, a pillow case, a blanket, a quilt, five pictures, and two irons.

THOMAS COTTERILL . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Shoe lane; on the 8th of January, a sheet was pawned by the prisoner; I am certain of her person, I took it in myself; I lent her six shillings on it.

- BARD. I am shopman to Mr. Armstrong; on the 21st of December I lent the prisoner one shilling on two pictures; here is a pillow case that was pawned by the prisoner, on the 9th of January, in the name of Mary Scott ; and there was a sheet pawned with me on the 8th of January.

GEORGE WOOD. I tok the prisoner in custody on the 26th of January; I found all the duplicates of the property upon her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I made away with these things my husband was out of work; I was not well, I did not leave the lodgings. I meant to replace the property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-77

244. WILLIAM DUKES and BENJAMIN FOGGETT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February fifty seven pound weight of king wood, value 2 l. 16 s. twelve pound and a half weight of tulip wood, value 7 s. 6 d. and three pound weight of ebony wood, value 2 s. the property of George Oakley and Benjamin Oakley .

The indictment was read by Mr. Walford, and the case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

WILLIAM GOW . Q. What are you. - A. I am a chair maker, I live at No. 2, Bowling Green lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Dukes. - A. Yes, he came to my house with some goods of Mr. Oakley's; I assisted in taking the wood out of the caravan; when I had got the quantity out, Dukes asked me whether I used any rose wood; I said no; he then got up in the caravan and shewed me a piece of tulip wood; I took it for granted he did not know what kind of wood he was selling of, it appeared so to me; I said the only hard wood I used was ebony; he said he dare say he could serve me with some ebony in a short time; I said very well; in consequence of which I informed Mr. Atkinson, who is Mr. Oakley's foreman.

ALEXANDER BURKE . - Mr. Bolland I believe you are a cabinet maker in Mercer's street, Long acre. A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Dukes. - A. The prisoner Dukes came to me about a fortnight ago, he asked me if I wanted any rose wood; I told him no, not at present; he asked me if I knew any cabinet maker in the neighbourhood; I told him yes, Mr. Lawson in Maiden lane; he immediately said I will fetch it and let you see it; he brought it up to the door in Mr. Oakley's cart, he told me it was round the corner in Long acre; he said there were two men with him in the public house drinking he fetched it in the cart; I got up to the top of the cart and looked into the cart to see what wood there was, I saw two large pieces, which the prisoner called rose wood, which turned out to be king wood, and four pieces of tulip wood; I asked him what he wanted for the wood; he told me two guineas for the whole; I said, I did not want any thing of the kind; then he offered me the whole of it for one guinea and a half; I told him no, and declined having any thing to do with it.

Q. Should you know the wood again. - A. I could not swear to it by any particular mark; I think I should know the wood again.

CHARLES LAWSON . - Mr. Walford. Where do you live. - A. I live in Maiden lane, Covent-garden; I am a cabinet maker.

Q. Do you remember any time in this month some wood being left at your house. - A. Yes, on the 10th of this month; two pieces of king wood, and three pieces of tulip wood.

Q. Did you examine them pieces of wood. - A. Dukes called on me the day after it was left, or the second day after, he asked me whether I meaned to purchase the wood that was standing there; I had never moved it from where he left it; he said he frequently dealt in such sort of wood as that; he said Mr. Gouge ordered him to get it, but it was not convenient for him to have it; he asked me nwepence a pound for the king wood, he put no price on the other; I informed him I would not have it if he would give it me, I did not want the king wood; I asked him for his address, if he had a stock of wood I would look at it; he gave me a reference to Mr. Gouge; he came on the Saturday after and took the wood away, as my wife informed me.

JOHN BAKER . - Mr. Bolland, What are you. - A. I am a sawyer, I live in Swallow street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Foggett. - A. Yes, he is a sawyer ; I know Dukes he lived with Mr. Oakley.

Q. Do you remember any application made to you by the prisoner Dukes. - A. I do, Foggett and me were together; he said, I am going out with the caravan, and if so be you have any thing that I can put in, I can get a customer for it. Foggett took two pieces of king wood to the cart, and three pieces of tulip wood; he delivered it to Dukes.

Q. What became of the caravan after that. - A. Foggett and I went away; he said he would overtake us in Piccadilly.

Q. Where did you see Dukes again. - A. In Picadilly; we kept strait on till we came to Long acre, we went into a public house and had a pot of porter; Dukes went out, he said he would go to the man, where he was going to; he went and came back again, and said the man did not want any, he said that man had recommended him to another man in Maiden lane, just the other side of Covent garden; he went there; we went with him both of us.

Q. To whose house did he go there. - A. I cannot tell, we stopped at the end of Maiden lane; when he came back he said the man was not at home, but he would be at home in about half an hour, or an hours time; he had the wood in the caravan all the time.

Q. Did you wait till the man returned. - A. We went just by the end of Drury lane, and there we had a pot of porter; he went away and said he would take Mr. Oakley's wood where he was going to; then Foggett and I left him, we did not see him till the evening; he said then that he saw the man, the man did not want it, he might leave it there till such time as he called for it.

Court. Did the prisoner Foggett ever say any thing to you about this wood. - A. I know no more about it; Foggett did not know where the house was, not to my knowledge; Dukes talked of fetching it away, but he did not know where to take it to.

Q. Did he tell you where he took it to. - A. Last Saturday night Dukes told me then that he and Foggett went after it; I stopped at a public house, they said they had left the wood at Foggett's house. On Sunday morning I saw the wood at Foggett's house.

Q. Was the wood that you saw at Foggett's house the same that he put in the caravan. - A. It was the wood; that is the truth and nothing but the truth.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You never saw the wood in the caravan. - A. No, but I knew it was out of the caravan.

Q. Whatever was in the caravan you knew was not out. - A. No.

Q. Now my good fellow, when did you tell the prosecutor this story that you have been telling my lord to day. - A. After I was taken up; after he chastized me in that sort of way I told him.

Q. Not one word before. - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Alley. I understood you to say that you and Foggett stole the wood; Dukes was not nigh when you stole the wood. - A. Yes, he was in the cart and received it.

JAMES KENNEDY. - Mr. Walford. Did you apprehend the prisoners. - A. I apprehended Foggett in Mr. Oakley's warehouse; he told me where his lodgings was. I found the timber that I gave got here in his lodging; he had only a back garret. I asked him where he got the two large pieces of king wood,

he said he bought it at the river side; I told him it would be very proper to bring the person where he bought it; he said he did not know where to find him.

Q. to Gow. Is that the wood they shewed you at your house. - A. It has all the appearance of it; it is just the same size and shape.

Mr. Lawson. I can tell the marks of it without looking at it. I looked it over when he offered it for sale; they are the pieces of wood he offered to me.

Baker. That is the king wood that Fogget put in Duke's, cart.

THOMAS ATKINSON . Q. Look at that wood. - A. I have seen the wood before; I believe it is George and Benjamin Oakley 's property.

Dukes left his defence to his counsel; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Fogget left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

DUKES, GUILTY , aged 34.

FOGGET, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-78

245. WILLIAM DUKES and THOMAS RICHARDS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , two packing mats, value 2 s. the property of George Oakley and Benjamin Oakley .

The indictment was read by Mr. Walford, and the case stated by Mr. Bolland.

ALEXANDER BALL . - Mr. Walford. What are you. A. I am a constable; I live in Shepherd's Market.

Q. In consequence of any directions of Mr. Oakley, did you follow his caravan. - A. Last Monday night I followed it from Bond street to Piccadilly; Richards and another man got in the cart; Dukes was driving the cart; they went from there to Lisle street, and then to Holborn, to a public house door.

Q. What time in the evening was that. - A. I believe about seven o'clock; one of them said. d - n it, it is too light; they went from there, and went down the hill to another public house; I saw the carter go up in the cart and take a mat out, and after that they took another mat out; after they had some thing to drink Richards walked off with the mats; Richards went on towards Hatton Garden, and the cart went on to Fleet market; I stopped Richards; he had two mats under his arm; I told him he had some goods that did not belong to him, they belonged to Mr. Oakley; he said he was very innocent, he was sorry they were stolen property.

Court. Did you see the cart go from the door. - A. Yes. Richards was not with the cart then.

THOMAS ATKINSON . - Mr. Bolland. You live with Mr. Oakley. - A. I do; I believe the mats belong to Mr. Oakley.

Q. What is your reason for believing that. - A. A bundle of ten mats were fetched up from Mr. Oakley's cellar by Dukes, for packing up some furniture; they laid in Mr. Oakley's gateway, where our caravan stands. They corresponded with the other mats in the bundle.

COURT. There is nothing in this charge against the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-79

246. WILLIAM HEATHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , a piece of elm wood, value 4 s. the property of the company and proprietors of the Grand Junction canal ;

And other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

HENRY SAUNDERS . Q. You are a millwright, and live at Cowley, that is in Middlesex . - A. Yes. In the month of February there was a bit of timber laying by the canal; on the 4th of February it was brought down the river by the canal by a man, and left on my premises. I live at the distance of four hundred yards from the canal.

Q. After the man left it on your premises, did you at any time see the prisoner at the bar. - A. On the 3d of February Mr. Bowser sent for me to do some repairs to his mill; I went up there and taw Heather; he asked me seven shillings for it. I agreed to give Heather six for it; it was brought to me the next day by Clayton.

Q. Did Mr. Herbert, a servant of the company, see that timber on your premises. - A. Yes, he fetched it away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. You went down to Mr. Bowser - did the prisoner work for Mr. Bowser. - A. Yes; he shewed me the timber laying in the foot path, very near to the towing path.

Q. What magistrate was he carried before. - A. Dr. Perry.

Q. Do you know whether Dr. Perry ordered any examination. - A. I believe not.

GEORGE CLAYTON . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am a sawyer.

Q. Were you employed by the prisoner to carry a piece of timber down to the last witnesses's house. - A. Yes, I did so on the 4th of February.

JOHN HERBERT. Q. Are you a clerk to the navigation company. - A. Yes. Their timber is in my care.

Q. Did you in the month of February go to Mr. Saunders's house to look after a piece of timber. - A. I found there a piece of timber that I had a perfect knowledge of; I brought it back.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. I believe you went before Dr. Perry. - A. Yes. (producing two letters.)

Q. Tell me what then passed. - A. The person that towed the timber in the canal said that Heather told him to come and fetch it from his master's house; then Dr. Perry granted a warrant against Heather.

Q. Was not Heather discharged. - A. The magistrate told him he might go about his business.

Q. Did not you ask Mr. Bowser to pay the expences of the man, or else he would be prosecuted. - A. No.

Q. Did you receive any directions from Mr. Greville not to prosecute this man. - A. No other way than you see in the letters.

MR. BOWSER. - Mr. Bolland. I believe, sir, you live at Uxbridge. - A. I do, I keep iron mills there; the prisoner has worked for me eight years. His character, from the time of his first employment up to this hour is universally honest; him and his wife has free access to my house.

Q. Did you attend Dr. Perry. - A. I did. When the prisoner was taken one of the men came into the accompting house and told me that Heather was taken up. When I went to Dr. Perry the commitment was not signed.

Q. Was he committed. - A. He was.

Q. Did the prosecutor institute any other examination about the timber. - A. None whatever while I was

there; through permission. I was desired to go to Mr. Hilliard to know whether any thing could be done to the prisoner. In consequence of that the prisoner was discharged.

Q. Did any body make any application, and by whom was the application made to pay the expences. A. Herbert came to me on Friday before the man was committed on the Monday; Herbert said I want to know who is to pay for the prosecution; I said I always understood the prosecutor paid the expenses; I said let it be taken to Heather or Mr. Saunders; he said if you do not pay it bad will come on it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18080217-80

247. EDWARD JORDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January a sack, value 3 s. and five bushels of flour, value 3 l. the property of Augustin King George .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

ISAAC BROOKES . - Mr. Bolland. You are a servant to Mr. Augustin King George , what is he. - A. A mealman .

Q. In January at any time did you give the man at the bar any sacks of flour to deliver to Mr. Chipperfield. - A. On Tuesday the 26th of January, I delivered to the best of my knowledge and belief twenty sacks to him, he was waggoner to Mr. George; he took the directions from the house; he was to carry them to Mr. Chipperfield, a baker in Whitechapel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. Are you not disposed to think there were twenty-one. - A. I am not disposed to think there were more than twenty; I had not a shadow of doubt to think but what they were right.

HENRY BECKWORTH. I am servant to Mr. Chipperfield; the prisoner came on the 26th of January, he asked me whether I had room for twenty sacks of flour, I told him no, in a minute or two I would make him room; I did so, I ordered him to pitch the flour at the further part of the lost.

Q. Were there any more sacks in the lost. - A. None nigh the place where I told him to pitch them, if he had pitched the flour there.

Q. Did you examine how many sacks of flour there were. - A. I did not trouble my head any more about him.

Q. When you looked how many did you find. - A. He said were they all right; I said if you have got six behind as in the front of course they will all be right; he went away and I went into the bakehouse again; about a quarter of an hour afterwards I went into the lost, I found a sack of flour missing, I had left seven sacks of brown flour in the loft. I found one of the sacks of brown flour between the sacks that this man brought.

Q. How many sacks of white flour did you find on the same spot. - A. Only eighteen; we found a sack of white flour among the brown flour, that made only nineteen sacks of white flour.

Mr. Reynolds. You do not know how many he brought. - A. No.

JONATHAN TROTT . I saw that note produced by Mr. Chipperfield at the office; Mr. Chipperfield told the prisoner he had followed him to the White Hart at Newington; after missing a sack of flour. He asked the prisoner whether he did not offer him the money for the sack of flour.

Q. What answer did the prisoner make. - A. He was checked by a person standing by, he did not make any answer.

AUGUSTIN KING GEORGE . - Mr. Bolland. Where did you get that note. - A. It is the note I wrote to be delivered to Mr. Chipperfield for twenty sacks of flour; it was delivered to my man.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you see it delivered to him. - A. No, I believe the maid servant delivered it.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury, there is no evidence to affect the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-81

248. EDWARD JORDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January a sack, value 3 s. and five bushels of flour, value 3 l. the property of Augustin King George .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

ISAAC BROOKES . - Mr. Bolland. Do you remember delivering some sacks of flour to the prisoner, and how many sacks of flour did you deliver to him to go to Mr. Stock's at Islington . - A. I delivered twenty sacks of flour to the prisoner to go to Mr. Stock's at Islington; I counted the sacks, there were just twenty, neither more or less.

JOHN STOCKS. - Mr. Bolland. You are a baker living in Camden street, Islington. - A. Yes, I ordered twenty sacks of flour of Mr. George, Jordan's waggon was standing at the door after he delivered the sacks; upon searching the waggon, I found a sack laid across down on the waggon it was covered with the tarpaulin, it could not have fell down, so it must have been laid down in that manner; the hay that he had brought for his horses was throwed up and the tail of the waggon was fastened up ready to go away; after he came back. I asked him to point out the twenty sacks of flour he had pitched, but he could not do it, he had intermixed them with some other sacks that were there, that had been brought in about a fortnight before.

Q. Were you able to point out to him that there was not twenty sacks. - A. I was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. Was it not possible on a certain number of sacks being moved away from the waggon it might have fell down there. - A. No, it was impossible to fall down against the front of the waggon, the taupaulin was tucked under the sides.

JONATHAN TROTT . I and my brother officer received an information, we went to where he was to deliver a load of flour; I was some distance at a public house watching him; when I saw him fasten up the tail of the waggon, I went over and asked him if Sir George was come to town, he said no; I asked him his name, he said Edward Jordan ; I said then you are my prisoner for stealing a sack of flour.

Q. Did you examine the waggon. - A. No, Mrs. Stock understanding what it was, she said to the prisoner; I hope you have not done just the same to us; he said no madam there is your twenty sacks of flour there; he pointed out to the twenty sacks; then I took him to the public house; soon after Mr. Stock's man came; he said therewas a sack of flour in the waggon. I went over and saw the sack of flour in the waggon, it lay quite flat and the taupaulin over it fastened at two corners.

Court. Had it the appearance of being thrown down. A. It appeared to me nothing more than thrown down and the tarpaulin over it.

COURT. - Gentlemen of the Jury, we are all of opinion that it does not amount to a larceny; the offence was not compleated, if the waggon had been driven away it might be then.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-82

249. ELIZABETH PENDRED was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Robert Armstrong .

ROBERT ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker , I live in Baldwin's gardens, Leather lane . On the 6th of February the prisoner came in to pledge a silk handkerchief. I lent her two shillings on it, I gave her the money and took the handkerchief she brought; immediately she went out I missed a silk handkerchief for sale in the shop; I sent my young man to the neighbouring pawnbrokers, that if she should come to pledge it to stop it; in about ten minutes George Page , a neighbouring pawnbroker, brought the prisoner to my shop, with the handkerchief; believing the handkerchief to be mine, I sent for an officer; I spoke to her about the impropriety of stealing; she said, she had not stole it, it was given to her by a woman in the workhouse the day before.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman in Gray's Inn lane, she was very big with child, she gave me the handkerchief to pawn for her; they detained me at the pawnbrokers, where I was going to pawn the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18080217-83

250. JOHN GATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , two ducks, value 4 s. the property of Edward Arrowsmith , esq .

Second count for like offence; the property of Philadelphia Lee , spinster .

RICHARD THORN . - Mr. Gurney. You are gardener to Edward Arrowsmith. - A. Yes.

Q. At about twelve o'clock at night did you hear any noise in the poultry yard. - A. Yes; a little after twelve I heard a noise; I had a little dog in the place, he was ready to tear the place down. I was afraid to go out.

Q. In the morning when you went out did you find the poultry house robbed. - A. Yes, I found two ducks gone, they were the only two that we had left; I saw them again the 8th of February at Mr. Wilson's at Darts in Hertfordshire, they were dead; I am sure they were the two that were stolen from our poultry house, one had a white ring round the neck, and the other a little spot of white under the throat; I had been particular in saving them, I meaned to keep them to breed.

THOMAS CHILD . Q. I believe you are carman to Mr. Wilson of Darts in Hertfordshire. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 30th were you coming to town with a load of hay. - A. Yes; when I come to Whetstone it was four o'clock; on my coming on I saw the prisoner walking along the path; we walked a good way, he said good morning to me, he said he would thank me to put his parcel on my cart; he had two bags on his shoulder, one hanging behind, and one before; he said they were not five pound weight; when the horses stopped at the bottom of the hill, I objected to it, I would not let him; I went to the Dirt House on the side of Finchley Common to have some bread and cheese, I never saw him at all there; going up Highgate he came to me again, and asked me if I had a parcel of his in my cart; I told him no. I asked him what it was; he said it was a parcel of clothes he was going to carry to his daughter, he said thanky, and I never saw him any more; when I came to market and got to the Bear yard, Smithfield, when I took my bottle hay off, I found the two bags laying on the hay in Smithfield.

Q. Did they appear to be the same bags that you had seen on his shoulder. - A. Yes, I am certain they were the same bags; I took them to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad lane, I there shewed the bags to Thomas How ; I went there for a bag of hops; How and me found four fowls in one bag, in the other two ducks, and a towel; I left them with How.

ISAAC SIBLEY . Q. You are the mate of the last witness. - A. Yes. On Saturday morning as I was coming over Finchley Common with my cart, I saw the prisoner.

Q. Had he any load with him. - A. Yes, he had two bags on his shoulder, one hanging before him and the other behind him; I had one cart and the other witness another; when I came to Smithfield, he asked me if I had got any thing upon the top of my cart; I told him no; then he said he had lost a bundle.

Q. Did you afterwards see the bags that Child found. A. Yes; I saw them when he came down to our master's

Q. Did they appear to be the bags he was carrying on his shoulders. - A. Yes.

THOMAS HOW . Q. I believe you are employed at the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 3d of January last did Child produce to you two bags. - A. Yes, one bag contained two ducks, a game cock, a dun hen, and a towel, and the other four fowls; all in their feathers and apparently quite warm; they were both small bags, they were tied up tight; I sent them down to Mr. Wilson's by the coach. I went the next day.

Q. Did you see the two ducks you had seen the day, before. - A. Yes; they were left there till Thorn came for them.

Q. Did you remark the ring on the neck of one and the spot on the other as described. - A. Yes, I am sure they are the same.

ROBERT STANTON . Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner. - A. I did, in Bell alley, Goswell street.

Thorn. I produce the heads of the ducks, there is the ring on the neck.

Prisoner's Defence. I never put any thing on the top of the cart; I had no fowls with me, I had only two or three things that I brought up for my daughter.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and during that time to be Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-84

251. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 28th of January , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. the property of Robert Fitch , in a lodging room .

Second count for stealing them generally, not stating it to be in a lodging room.

ROBERT FITCH . I keep a lodging house in Whitechapel .

Q. Did the prisoner come to lodge with you. - A. Yes, on the 28th of last month he came for one night only, and he agreed and paid me for one night.

Q. Did any body lodge in the same room. - A. Yes, there was another man in a bed in the same room. On the next morning, from information of my girl. I searched the prisoner; I found upon him a pair of sheets, one round his waist and the other in his small clothes, they are my sheets, there are my marks on them, R F.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18080217-85

252. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , two blankets, value 3 s. two sheets, value 2 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. a bolster, value 1 s. 6 d. a counterpane, value 1 s. 6 d. and a flat iron. value 6 d the property of John Botellar , in a lodging room .

JOHN BOTELLAR . I live at No. 9. St. John's lane , I let the lodgings to the prisoner, and gave my consent for her to have another young woman with her at the time.

Q. Was the other young woman with her at the time she took the room. - A. No.

Q. She and you agreed for her to have the room. - A. Yes, she agreed with me till the 15th of February; on Tuesday I went up and searched the bed; I found missing two blankets, two sheets, two pillow cases, a counterpane, and a flat iron.

Q. Did you find the prisoner. - A. Yes, I brought her home; I went for an officer to search her; he found some duplicates on her.

HENRY BLIGH . I searched the prisoner; I found seven duplicates in her pocket.

JOHN BURGIS . I live with Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, Turnmill street.

Q. Have you any articles which agree with what the constable produced. - A. Yes; two pillow cases, counterpane, an iron, blanket, bolster, and two sheets The prisoner pawned them; I am sure of her person.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I meaned to take them out again.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc

Reference Number: t18080217-86

253. ANN HOLTON , alias PLAYFAIR . was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , in the dwelling house of Edward Schirm , four guineas, twelve half guineas, two seven shilling pieces, three half crowns, seventy shillings, sixty eight sixpences, one piece of foreign silver coin, called a quarter dollar, value 20 d. two bank notes, value 20 l. each, a bank note, value 2 l. and four other bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

MRS. SCHIRM , Q. I believe your husband keeps the Cock and Crown in Little Britain . - A. Yes, it is in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, without the Bars.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar, with Daniel Holton , lodge in the upper part of your house. - A. Yes, she lodged with Holton.

Q. As his wife. - A. Yes, in the two pair of stairs front room.

Q. Did you used to keep money and notes in the two pair of stairs back room in a drawer. - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday the 23d of January, at three o'clock in the afternoon, did you go up to that room to have resort to that drawer. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was the key of the room kept. - A. In the bar, laying on a shelf.

Q. You took the key, and opened the door. - A. Yes.

Q. Did it open the door as usual. - A. Yes. When I went to the drawer I found it all was gone but a two pound note and two sixpences. I had seen it all safe the night before.

Q. When you went to bed the night before. - A.Yes.

Q. Were there five guineas there on the night before. - A. I cannot say how many guineas there were; there were several guineas, half guineas, and seven shilling pieces, and half crowns, a great many shillings and sixpences, and a quarter of a dollar.

Q. Was there two twenty pound bank notes, one two pound bank note, and four one pound bank notes. - A. Yes.

Q. Besides this was there any five pound notes. - A. There were two.

Q. There was also, besides what is mentioned in the indictment, two five pound notes. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know from whom you received them two twenty pound notes. - A. I received one of my husband, and the other of John Walter .

Q. You discovered this loss on a Saturday afternoon about three o'clock. - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of that morning had the prisoner said any thing to you about rent. - A. I was in the kitchen in the morning about eleven o'clock, she came into the kitchen to me and said she was behind, with her rent.

Q. That was the fact, she was. - A. Yes; she said Daniel would bring home a two pound note, she would pay me.

Q. How much was she behind. - A. Three weeks.

Q. In the course of that morning, while you were in the bar, did you observe her in the bar or near it. - A. I was in the kitchen, the bar was left in care of my niece.

Q. In the course of the day did you observe any thing about her dress. - A. I did; she had about a week or ten days before that borrowed my servant's shawl; on that day I saw her with her own shawl on; her shawl she told me was in pledge.

Q. Did you observe in the morning whether she staid in or went out. - A. I cannot say. I was in the kitchen; when my husband came home between five and six o'clock in the evening I caused her to be taken up.

Q. Was Holton also apprehended that evening. - A. Yes.

Q.So that there was nobody left in their room. - A. Nobody; the next morning I went to her room, I

observed an old gown hanging on the back of the chair, that she had worn that Saturday; the same day she was apprehended I took it in my hand, I observed a small key tied withinside of the waist of the gown, with a string only; the key and gown are both here, this gown she took off while the officer waited for her; this is the gown, and the key is hanging to it.

Q. Was any of the money that you lost wrapped up in pieces of old newspaper. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Now we know ladies do not wear pockets, and the key is tied to the gown in the modern fashion. It is a common key, it is not a picklock key. - A. To be sure it is not.

Q. Was your drawer locked. - A. My own key was left in the drawer.

Q. Your husband keeps the house that the property belongs to. - A. Yes.

Q. I am sorry for your loss. How many lodgers did you keep. - A. Two, when the prisoner was there.

Q. Did they all come in at one common door. - A. Yes.

Q. You have some servants perhaps. - A. Yes, two; a boy and a female servant.

Q.This woman was a lodger in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. In the upper part of it, not on the same floor. - A. No.

Q. Who made the bed. - A. Myself; I never entrust the servant with the key; I always make the bed myself and keep the key, because I never trust the servant to go into it; it is where I keep my property.

Q. I only wish to know whether you did not let your servant occasionally go into this little bed room to do little purposes. - A. I never do, because we keep loose halfpence about it.

Q. You do not know the exact accompt of your money. - A. No; there were above ninety pounds; I believe so.

Q. I am sure so if you say so; you do not know the number of the notes. - A. No.

Q. Therefore if I ask you the number of one pound, two pound or twenty pound, you cannot tell me. - A. No.

Q How long did this woman lodge with you. - A. About eight weeks.

SARAH SCHIRM . - Mr. Gurney. How old are you. - A. Twelve.

Q. You are the niece of Mrs. Schirm. A.- Yes.

Q. On the day your aunt was robbed, your aunt was in the kitchen. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take care of the bar while she was in the kitchen. - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of the forenoon did the prisoner come down in the bar while you were in it. - A. Yes; she came into the tap room and stood by the fire and asked me if my uncle was gone out.

Q. I do not know that we need to have the conversation. In the course of the time was she near the bar where the key was placed. - A. Yes.

Q. Did she come in. - A. No; she could reach the key without going into the bar if she liked.

Q. Was she close enough to get the key if she chose. - A. Yes.

Q. While she was in that position were you with your face towards her or your back. - A. My back to her.

Q. Did she then go up stairs. - A. No.

Q. Did she go up stairs soon after. - A. Yes; to fetch a glass down.

Q. After she had been up some time did she come down again. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you notice how long she was up stairs. - A. No.

Q. When she come down did she come near the bar again. - A. She come in the bar.

Q. Had you your face to her or your back to her. - A. My back to her.

Q. Then if she had been so disposed was she able without your seeing her to put the key down. - A. I did not see her.

Q. I did not ask you whether you saw her; was she behind you enough to put the key down without your seeing her. - A. Yes.

Q. You said she went to fetch a glass down. - A. Yes.

Q. Was she long gone or not longer than she might be to fetch a glass - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. What time of the day was it. - A. Between nine and ten in the morning.

Q. That is the time of day people come to breakfast. - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose the people in the tap room came to the bar to pay their reckoning. - A. No; the servants have their breakfast in the tap room; I washed up the tea things.

Q. A most extraordinary circumstance, your aunt keeps servants, your aunt sweeps the room and makes the bed, and you wash up the tea things; I suppose they might come to the bar as well this woman. - A. They went into the kitchen.

Q. I suppose you do not recollect whether they came nigh the bar or not. - A. Only Mrs. Holton.

SUSANNAH HOW . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a servant to Mr. Charles Spilsbury , in Angel-court, Snow Hill. - A. Yes.

A. Was Daniel Holton an apprentice to Mr. Spilsbury. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known Mrs. Holton. - A. About seven or eight weeks, as near as I can recollect; she used to come to bring Holton some tea.

Q. In the forenoon of January the 23d did she come to your house. - A. Yes; as nigh as I can guess between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. Did she come to you in the kitchen at your master's. - A. Yes.

Q. Did she bring any thing with her. - A. I did not see any thing. She came up and spoke to me; she said good morning; I said, how are you; she said, I am better than I was before, for I have some good news to tell you; she took me of one side and said, Susan, I want to speak to you; I went into the back kitchen with her and she gave me a little red trunk; she said, Susan I will thank you to take care of this trunk for me there is something in it very precious and a little money, I asked her if she knew what was in it; she said it come from a gentleman abroad; her landlady had received it the night before unbeknown to her husband Daniel; she said she had hid it the night before under the bed; she begged that I would take care of it and not let Daniel know; I asked her if she knew what was in it; she said yes. No, I asked her if she would unlock it to satisfy herself before I took it; she said she

was perfectly satisfied with my honesty, or else she should not have brought it to me; I asked her to come with me to see me lock it up, she refused coming, and I said I would not take it if she did not come.

Q. Then I believe she went away. - A. She did; she said good morning, she should soon come again; she came again in about half an hour.

Q. At that time was Collis Golding with you when she came again. - A. Yes.

Q. Was she a fellow servant of yours. - A. No, she was formerly a mistress of mine; when she came again for the trunk I went and fetched it out of my box; she sat herself down by the side of the fire and unlocked it.

Q. Where did the key come from. - A. I do not know; I saw her unlock it; when I saw her unlock it I saw some money in it and some bank notes.

Q. Did you ask her any questions about the money. - A. No, I asked her if there was as much as she expected, she said yes, and more.

Q. Did you ask any thing about shillings. - A. I asked her if they were all shillings that she was counting; she was counting money in her box; she said no, there was some yellows. She counted the notes; I asked her if they were all ones, she said no, there was one five; she took some money out of the box, I do not know how much.

Q. Was the money wrapped up or loose. - A. There were some wrapped up in paper, two she undid and throwed in the ashes.

Q. What sort of pieces of paper were they. - A.pieces of old newspaper.

Q. After she had done this did she lock the trunk again. - A. She locked it up again and gave it to me; I locked it up in my box as before.

Q. And during this time Mrs. Golding was present. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you keep her box in your possession. - A. On the Sunday night following, I acquainted my master with it, and gave it to my master; I heard Holton was in custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. What day did she give you the money and the box. - A. On the Saturday morning between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. You was pretty inquisitive, can you read. - A. Not distinctly.

Q. Can you tell the difference between a ten pound note and a five pound note. - A. I did not see them.

Q. It was rather strange that you should be so inquisitive to ask what they were; this man cohabits in the house he lives in the house with you. - A. He worked in the house; I had not seen him since dinner, I never heard that he was taken in custody till Sunday afternoon, then one of the apprentices had been to see him; I heard this in the afternoon, and I gave the box to my master.

Q. Are you acquainted with any body in the house where the prisoner lived but this woman. - A. No.

COLLIS GOLDING. - Mr. Gurney. Where do you live. - A. I live in Norton Falgate.

Q. On Saturday the 23d of January, did you call upon Susannah How , the last witness. - A. I did; it might be one o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. While you were there did the prisoner come into the kitchen. - A. She did.

Q. Have the goodness to state what happened when she came in; she came laughing, she said Susannah I am come to see you again; she asked for the trunk; Susannah How brought it to her, the prisoner took it in her lap, she took a key from her right hand side that hung by a small string, and she unlocked it; she looked over some of the bank notes, which I saw; I saw they were bank notes.

Q. Was there a good many of them. - A. Yes, there were several of them; she undid some small money that appeared to be silver; she took it out of the paper.

Q. What sort of paper were they. - A. They appeared to be bits of newspapers that she put in the fire. Mrs. How asked her if the notes were all ones; she made answer there was one five; she asked her if they were all silver; she said no, there was some yellow.

Q. Did she take any of the cash out. - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to be all silver; or silver and gold. - A. It might be silver and gold; I cannot tell; she then locked it up again with the key hanging to her gown, and gave it to Susannah How again; then she went away, she seemed very much flurried.

CHARLES SPILSBURY . - Mr. Gurney. You are a printer, living in Angel-court, Snowhill. - A. I am.

Q. Susannah How lived with you as servant. - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of Sunday the 24th of January, did she deliver you a small trunk. - A. Yes, I took it into my possession; with her consent I gave it to the officer Goddison on Monday morning.

Q. That is the trunk she gave you. - A. Yes. - GODDISON. Q. You have kept that trunk ever since. - A. Yes.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . - Mr. Gurney. You are a city constable. - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. To Goddison. Were you present when she changed her gown. - A. I was, I saw her change it.

Q. to Spilsbury. Take that key which opens the trunk. - A. I opened it with a common key.

Q. See if that key that hangs to the gown opens it, - A. It does.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look over the money, there is a great many shillings and sixpences, is there a quarter of a dollar. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that. - A. I had such a piece of coin as that.

Q. Do you know that to be the piece of coin that you lost. - A. I know I took such a one of a nurse of Bartholomew's hospital.

Q. Are there two twenty pound notes there. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. The number of the notes are 2070, 2d of December 1807, a twenty pound; the other is No, 1748, 2d of December 1807.

ANTHONY WAITSON . - Mr. Gurney. You are clerk to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis. - A. I am.

Q. Did you, sir, on the 11th of December last pay a check of Mrs. Fisher's. - A. I did, in five twenty pound notes and two tens.

Q. Were they all dated 2d of December, 1807. - A. They were; among others were No. 1748, 2d of December, 1807, No. 2070, dated 2d of December, 1807.

Q. Is that your hand writing. - A. Yes it is.

MRS. RIDER. - Mr. Gurney. On the 28th of December last did you receive of Messrs. Robarts and co. change for a cheek of Mrs. Fisher's for one hundred

and twenty pounds. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive among other change five twenty pound notes. - A. I did.

Q. Pray did you pay one to Mrs. Schirm. - A. I did, on the 20th of January last.

Q. Are you quite sure that that note that you paid to Mrs. Schirm on the 20th of January was one that you received of Messrs. Robarts and co. on that day. - A. I am sure.

Q. Did you pay John Walter one. - A. I did; I am sure I received that from Messrs. Robarts and co.

JOHN WALTER . Q. Did you on the 20th of January last receive a twenty pound note from Mrs. Rider. A. I did; I paid it to Mrs. Schirm.

EDMUND SCHIRM . Q. On the 20th of January last, did you receive of Mrs. Rider a twenty pound bank note. - A. I did.

Q. On the same day did you see your wife receive a twenty pound note of Mr. Walter. - A. I did; it was all done within five minutes.

Q. Did you give the one you received of Mrs. Rider to your wife to put in your drawer. - A. I did.

Q. Mrs. Schirm, did you put the two twenty pound notes, the one of Mrs. Rider and the other of Mr. Walter, in your drawer. - A. I did.

Q. And they were the two that you lost. - A. Yes.

Q. Have the goodness to look at some of the papers that the money was wrapt up in. - A. These are my figures.

Q. Do you know that there was money wrapped up in papers that had your figures on it. - A. I did not know, but seeing it I know it is my writing; I think I know this paper, it is part of Lloyd's Evening Post; the prisoner gave it me.

Q. to Spilsbury. I believe you print that paper. - A. Yes. it is; it has the appearance of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not deny that I had it; it is not to screen myself; I know I must go through the punishment, but I did not unlock the drawer and take it out.

Court. You must prove that.

The prisoner called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-87

254. DANIEL WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January twelve yards of cotton, value 15 s. the property of Robert Macklew .

ROBERT MACKLEW . I am a linen draper , I live on the Pavement, Moorfields . On the 26th of January, about five o'clock, a neighbour of ours brought in the prisoner, saying this is he, I saw him come from the other end of the road; I suspected something was gone. I went and looked at the door, I saw a piece of printed cotton was gone; I had seen it not a minute before.

Q. Where had you placed it. - A. Near the door, withinside; I had ordered my young man to take in the things at the door.

JAMES SPENCER . I live at Mr. Chapman's, boot-maker, Moorfields. On Tuesday the 26th of January, about ten minutes past five in the afternoon, the foreman of Mr. Chapman went to tea; he came back after he had been to Short street, he said there were three men standing there, they either intended to do the linen draper or us; I went and shut the door of the ladies' shop; we have two shops, one for ladies and the other for gentlemen; I stood at the other door, I saw the prisoner walking on the pavement, up and down; he crossed the road into Moorfield's quarters; I saw the prisoner behind a tree looking at Mr. Macklew's shop, I observed one of them as he went round the coach stand by the end of Moorgate, I saw him again in the quarters making motions to another; at that time Mr. Macklew's young man was taking the things in; he looked up at the next house at that time. I saw no person passing just at that time; I saw the prisoner about three yards from the door with a piece of printed cotton in his hand; I saw one that was with him meet him about half way in the road; I saw the prisoner give it the other, he put it under his coat and ran off across Moorfields; I immediately run and caught the prisoner by the collar, and brought him into the shop.

Q. Are you sure that this is the man. - A. Yes, I am certain that is the man.

- CARTWRIGHT. I took the prisoner in custody, I searched him, I found nothing upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime alledged against me, as any gentleman here is.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-88

255 WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 8th of February , twelve ounces, four penny weights of silver, value 39 s. the property of Thomas Robbins , whereof Thomas Whiston hath this session been tried and convicted of stealing, he the said William Roberts knowing them to have been so feloniously stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS ROBBINS . Q. I believe you are a working silversmith living in St. John's square . - A. Yes:

Q. Had you an apprentice, sir, of the name of Thomas Whiston . - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been robbed of silver to a considerable amount. - A. Yes; I think on the 8th of January I caused Whiston to be apprehended on a charge of robbing me of silver; the prisoner was apprehended the next morning, on the 9th of January.

JAMES DOBSON . I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of January; this is the silver I found in his coat pocket.

Q. Was that silver produced at the examination of the two prisoners at the office. - A. It was.

ROBERT FORD . Q. I believe you are chief clerk of the police office, Hatton Garden. - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner of the bar, and also of Whiston. - A. I was.

Q. Upon that occasion was the silver produced by Mr. Dobson. - A. It was.

Q. Before any declaration was made by Whiston, was any warning made to Whiston. - A. Before that declaration was made the magistrate cautioned Whiston upon his making the confession, he told him that what he said would be committed to writing, therefore he was to consider whether he would say any thing or no.

Mr. Knapp. What one prisoner says of the other prisoner is not evidence against the other; it may be evidence against himself, and whatever Whiston might say is not evidence against the other.

Court. It is making what another says not upon oath

evidence against the prisoner; the indictment proves the conviction of Whiston. (The conviction read.)

Mr Gurney to Dobson You produced that silver on the trial of Whiston. - A. I did.

The property produced and identified

COURT. Possession is not evidence of the receiver; possession is evidence of the thief. If property is recently stolen and found in possession of another person, he is the thief, and not the receiver. In this case we can have but one opinion, that is, to think that he is a very bad man; but though he is a bad man, we must try him upon the strict rule of law; - possession is not evidence of the receiver but evidence of the thief. I cannot state it to you that mere possession of property is evidence that he received it of another person, knowing it to be stolen; because to make him the receiver, there must be evidence that he knew another person stole it. It is a very fortunate circumstance to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-89

256. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of January , two gold seals, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of John Forrest .

Mr. Gurney declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-90

257. MARTHA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , eleven shawls, value 12 s. the property of John Harvey and James Lamming , privately in their shop .

JAMES SMITH . I am shopman to John Harvey and James Lamming , they are linen draper s, 30, Ludgate hill , they are the only partners. On Thursday the 28th of January the prisoner came up to me for half a shawl; I told her we did not cut any; I pushed her of one side with the yard, telling her to stand off; soon after I saw the prisoner go past the window; I had a suspicion that she had something; I immediately jumped over the counter and went after her; I overtook her in the Old Bailey, brought her back, and took her up stairs; soon after she went up stairs she dropped a piece of shawls.

Q. Did you see her. - A. Yes, I saw her drop it of her right side; I immediately sent for a constable and gave charge of her.

Q. Who was in the shop besides this young woman. A. A number of customers.

Q. Then some of them might see it done for what you know. - A. They might, for what I know; she told the magistrate that two girls gave it her, they were in the shop, and she was to meet them in the Old Bailey, and they would pay her handsomely for it.

Jury. Is yours the shop to which so many people are thronging to purchase goods. - A. Yes.

Q. How many people were in the shop. - A. I suppose fifty.

Q. What made you suspect her. - A. She had a red cloak on; she went round the shop rather quick.

Court. How many serve in the shop. - A. Eight or nine; there is only one person that attends the shawls, he is here.

Jury. I believe your floor is usually strewed with goods. - A. There are some on the counter, but none on the floor.

JAMES WILSON . I am a shopman to Messrs. Harvey and Lamming.

Q. Which department are you in. - A. The shawl department. On Thursday the 28th of January, our shop was very much crowded with customers; and the counter was very much crowded with goods.

Q. Some on the counter and some on the floor. - A. None on the floor as I know of; I was at one end of the counter serving a customer; I observed this woman at the other end crowding upon the people. I do not recollect her speaking or asking one for any thing. I only recollect her face among the crowd. I saw the prisoner brought in by the last witness, she was taken up stairs.

Q. Did you know it was that woman. - A Yes.

Q. I do not know how you could know that if there were fifty or sixty people in the shop; supposing you was serving me, you would not look at the other end of the shop - A. I can speak to you just now, and I can see the jury.

Q. Can you look at one end and the other at the same time. - A. I can.

Q. Then you are a clever fellow. - A. She had a scarlet cloak on; I knew her face very well.

Q. How many customers in scarlet cloaks had you on that day. - A. I cannot say.

Q. What was it that you recollected her face; was there any thing particular. - A. I cannot say any thing particular that I recollected her face by; but taking her face altogether, I recollected her; there was eleven shawls which I saw up stairs were said to be found upon her; I did not see them found upon her.

Jury. I suppose you can tell us within some hundreds how many customers you had on that day. - A. I cannot say.

Q. I do not confine you to two or three hundred; had you a thousand persons in the shop. - A. About six hundred,

Court. And can you remember the face of every one of them. - A. No.

Q. Neither do I know how you can recollect the face of a person, the shop being so thronged; had she a bonnet on. - A. I think as far as I can recollect she had a straw hat on.

Q. Pulled over her face; how long is the counter where you stood. - A. So far as from me to you.

Q. So then the distance that she was from you was as far as from you to me. - A. Yes, thereabouts.

Q. Nothing particular called your attention to her. - A. No more than persons in red cloaks excites suspicion. - Q. I do not know that red cloaks excites any suspicion; they are fashionable; or that a straw hat excites any suspicion. - A. I would rather suspect a person in that way.

Q. I think you should have more reason to suspect a woman in a genteel dress. - A. Perhaps that is the case.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy two yards of cloth; I knocked at the door, there came two women, they asked me if I had knocked at the door, I told them; I had, they knocked at the door and got admittance; I might stay I dare say a quarter of an hour in the shop; I went out; soon after they called to me and asked me whether I would take a parcel into the Old Bailey; I disputed taking it because of taking my husband's tea; they told me they would pay me; I took it and waited in the Old Bailey five minutes, when the gentleman came up to me and asked me what I had got,

I said it did not belong to me; he gave me a violent blow, with that I dropped the parcel down; he took it up.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-91

258. MARY ALLOM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , two blankets, value 10 s. and a sheet, value 8 s. the property of David Alexander , in a lodging room .

JULIA ALEXANDER . We live at No. 9, Cleg alley, Long acre .

Q. Do you let lodgings - A. Yes, furnished lodgings. I let the prisoner a three pair of stairs back room furnished, she was to pay me five shillings a week.

Q. Is she a married woman. - A. I believe she is; her husband came at night; she lodged with me ten weeks; and she left my apartment on the 9th of this month.

Q. Did the husband go away too. - A. Yes, when she went away she owed me ten shillings.

Q. How did she get her bread. - A. She told me her husband was a carpenter; she got her bread by shoe binding. I had a suspicion that she was gone; I took the bed down, I found two blankets and a sheet were gone; and the ticking torn to pieces, and part of the stocks and feathers were taken out; I found them at the pawnbrokers when she was apprehended.

ROBERT BOONE. I belong to the public office, Bow street; on the 11th of this month, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 32 Great Earle street, Seven Dials; on searching her I found three duplicates; I went with Mrs. Alexander, she identified the property.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I pledged the things, it was done with intention of replacing them; my husband had been out of employ eleven weeks; I had nothing but what I earned to keep house; and the lodgings was five shillings a week.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-92

259. JAMES BISHOP and JOHN SAUNDERS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , an oak post, value 2 s. the property of John Thompson .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am an inn keeper ; I live at the Pyed Bull, Islington . I know nothing of the transaction.

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am a watchman in Islington parish; about ten minutes before nine o'clock, I was going on my beat; I saw Saunders coming out of Mr. Thompson's premises, with this post on his shoulder.

Q. Was any body with him. - A. Yes, Bishop, they both came out with a drove of sheep; I asked Saunders where he had the post from; he said from his master's field, his master gave it him, he did not say who was his master; I took the post away from him and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did not you take both. - A. No, I only took Saunders; Bishop is a drover he followed his drove of sheep.

The property produced and identified.

Bishop's Defence. On Thursday the 18th of this month I was at Islington, accompanied by John Saunders , I perceived this piece of wood lay; I said to Saunders take this up, it will do for you to burn; I went on with my sheep to Smithfield market; the prosecutor has known me thirty years, and never knew any thing dishonest of me before this charge, I knew not to whom it belonged; I imagined it might be given to Saunders to burn, I came forward as soon as I was sent for, and was liberated to return as soon as I was wanted; if I have erred it was not through any intention of harm or design.

Saunders Defence. As we were coming out of the gate, this bit of wood, laid down; Bishop called and said take this bit of wood it will serve you to burn.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-93

260. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , one cask, value 18 s. and thirty six gallons of beer, value 7 s. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a brewer , I live in Bermondsey street, in the Borough; the prisoner was one of my draymen .

Q. When did you loose your cask of beer. - A. On the 15th of January last.

- GORE. I am clerk to Mr. Clark; on Friday the 15th of January, I sent this man with five barrels of beer to Saffron hill workhouse; here is the gauge bill that I sent with the beer; I gave it to him to deliver with the beer, and here is the book that the prisoner signed at the workhouse, of the delivery.

JAMES EVANS . I am drayman to Mr. Clark.

Q. Did you go with the dray that day. - A. Yes, we had five barrels on the dray to go to Saffron hill workhouse; we delivered four; the cellarman at the workhouse asked the prisoner if they were all down in the cellar, he made answer yes, there were all; I made answer there was one more to go down; the prisoner said that was to go home again he took it home and struck it along with the empty casks.

JAMES BRADSHAW. I am in the poor house Saffron hill; I am blind. I asked Butler if all the beer was down in the cellar; Butler said yes, Evans said there was one more to come down. I came up stairs and told the maid to give them the book; he delivered the gauge bill, to whom I cannot say.

WILLIAM PEDDER . I am a pauper in the same workhouse; on the Friday the beer came down, the blind man asked me to assist him, there were only four barrels put down.

ELIZABETH JONES . I gave butler the beer book, he put down five barrels of beer in the book.

Q. Did you ask Bradshaw or Pedder what he delivered. - A. No.

MR. CLARK. When the man returned home, and they were taking the casks off the dray, the man that was taking account of the casks, discovered, that there was one with a great deal of beer in it; I was called, in consequence of that I examined the cask; I found it contained beer exactly of the same quality as that which had been carried out; I asked the prisoner which way he came in possession of it, and for what purpose; he said the people at the workhouse had

given it him; from the quality of the beer I knew that must be an untruth; I took him and Evans to the workhouse to see what quantity of beer they had delivered; when we got to the house we went into the cellar and there we found only four; while I was conversing with the men the prisoner slipped up stairs and ran away; I had some difficulty in securing him. I am very sorry to say that draymen make up beer in this way to the injury of the brewer; it was done with intention of converting it to his own use, he would take it out in parts and mix it; his intention was to rob my customers.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had any intention to rob my master I would not have taken the beer to my master's, but in the hurry of business I was mistaken; I took it home. It is the first time I ever was before a justice in my life. I hope you will restore me to my family.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Whipped in Goal and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-94

261. WILLIAM HEARN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , a bag, value 14 d. a leather strap, value 1 d. two pecks of horse beans, clover chaff, and grains, mixed together, value 7 d. and BENJAMIN WEST for feloniously receiving them, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN FRITH . I am foreman to Mr. William Rhodes , he is a cowkeeper at Hoxton ; the prisoner Hearn was his carman . On the 19th of February I delivered a peck of beans at four o'clock in the morning to Hearn, into a basket, which he had to feed his horses; he took them into the stable to feed his horses with part of them; part he mixed up in two nose bags to take with him.

Q. What did he mix the beans with. - A. Clover, chaff and grains; he took the two bags and put them on the shaft of the waggon; I took and cut a bit off the ends of both of the straps; he went off, I followed him up to Bethnal green, I stood at a distance, I saw him deliver one nose bag in a cart; as soon as the bag was put in the cart Hearn drove on; I went for Armstrong; Armstrong, me, and Bishop went up to the cart, there was nobody with the cart at the time it was delivered; it was an empty cart standing on West's premises, with the name of West on the cart; we concealed ourselves backwards, and watched the cart; during that time we saw West come from his house to the cart, he took the bag out of the cart and carried it before him into the stable; Armstrong followed him and seized him; I followed Armstrong, and saw the bag taken out of a tub in West's stable.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes.

Q. On the day mentioned in the indictment you went with the prosecutor. - A. Yes, between six and seven in the morning, Bishop was with me; I accompanied Mr. Frith and Bishop to Bethnal green; I then came to a cart which had the name of West on it, standing very near the stable door; I looked into the cart and saw a bag stand in the corner, just like this; I did not handle the bag; I returned with Bishop and Frith behind some paling. In about five or ten minutes I perceived the prisoner West with this bag before him, going into the stable; I ran after him, and left Mr. Frith and Bishop to follow me into the stable; I catched hold of West; about a yard behind him was a tub, which appeared to have some grains. I looked in that tub; this bag stood upright in it, which I took and shewed to Mr. Frith; I asked West if that was his cart, he said yes, it was, and that was his stable, and he found that bag in his cart; I secured West, and Bishop went after Hearn.

Jury. Had he emptied the bag, or was it in the state it now is. - A. In the state it is in now. I instantly followed him.

The property produced and identified.

Hearn's Defence. I chucked it in the cart; I never saw any body; I thought the horses would not eat it.

West's Defence. I know nothing at all of it; when I got up I went to the cart and unlocked the wheel; it has no where to stand but in the open road; it has stood there twelve years.

Hearn called no witnesses to character.

West called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HEARN, GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

WEST, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-95

262. WILLIAM HEARN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , a bag, value 14 d. a leather strap, value 1 d. and two pecks of horse beans, clover, chaff and grains, mixed together, value 7 d. ; and JOHN BLAND for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen

The Court informed the jury there was not evidence certainly to reach the receiver, because what one prisoner said of another cannot be returned in evidence; evidence in a court of justice must be upon oath, therefore what one man says against another not on oath is not admissible.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-96

263. ANN HALL was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 10th of February , ten shirts, value 11 l. whereof David Catherall , at the present sessions of the city of London, has been tried and convicted for feloniously stealing the said goods .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

MR. HUNT. Q. You produce a copy of the conviction of David Catherall . - A. I do; I have examined with the original, it is a true copy. (The copy of conviction read.)

JAMES HALL . Q. You live in Old Street-road and are a pawnbroker. - A. Yes. On the 10th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop to pledge a linen shirt for five shillings; I looked at the shirt, it was of a very fine quality; she said she had pledged a shirt at my shop before, on the 27th of January, for five shillings, in the name of Ann Hall; I asked her whose they were; she said they were her husband's, Ned Catherall , that he was a brewer's servant, and lived with Mr. Robert's, East Smithfield. I asked her if she made the shirts; she said she did; she bought the cloth in Bishopgate-street, and gave two shillings and sixpence or three shillings a yard for it; I asked her if she was quite sure that she made the shirts herself; she said it was her own work, she made them; she then said that they were not her making, that they were her husband's shirts before she knew him; that they were brought to her

by a young man, her husband's brother; in a few minutes I questioned her again, she then said she was not married at all, she was going to be married to Ned to-morrow.

Q. Had she any thing with her. - A. A small bundle which I have here, containing two shirts of the same quality as the one she offered to pledge; I asked her what was the reason she brought three shirts and she meaned only to pawn one; she said she was going to take the other two to Mr. Francis's in Shoreditch; in consequence of that I sent for the officer and had her apprehended.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. In consequence of being sent for did you go to her lodgings. - A. I did.

Court. What is the young woman. - A. A servant; I believe she left her place to be married to this young man's brother; she told me where she lived and took me to her apartments; I searched it, I found in a chest that she took a key out of her pocket and opened it, these shirts; it contained men's apparel; there might be women's apparel, I do not recollect any, there were a coat or two and breeches in the chest. The account that she gave me was, that they were brought to her place in her absence.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-97

264. SARAH TANCKSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. and a pewter measure, value 6 d. the property of Henry Long .

HENRY LONG. I am a publican ; I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. On the 15th of February I apprehended the prisoner in Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields; I found the pot and measure in her apron; I asked her what she had got; she said, nothing

Q. Where does Mr. Long live. - A. In Northampton Buildings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Lincoln's Inn Fields, at the edge of the pavement these pots lay, I picked them up; the constable took me with them in my aprons.

Prosecutor. They were taken out of a baker's shop in Chancery-lane .

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Privately Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-98

265. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of January , four pound weight of tobacco, value 12 s. the property of Joseph Hodgson , privately in his shop .

MRS. HODGSON. My husband's name is Joseph Hodgson ; he works at a callico glazers; I keep a tobacco shop , No. 144. Anchor and Hope-alley by the new docks, Wapping , St. George's. On the 30th of January the prisoner came to my shop.

Q. Were you in the shop when he came in. - A. No, I was in the back room; when he came in he asked for something, I do not know for what; the moment I entered the shop I missed the two rolls of to bacco from the shop window.

Q. Then it was taken in your absence. - A. Yes; I made use of the expression, my God, somebody has taken my tobacco out of the window; he said have you lost your tobacco, good woman; I said yes, and nobody has been in the shop but you since I served a woman, and I am sure it was in the window after she went out; the prisoner immediately run out, and says there she goes. I desired my son to follow him; he stopped him; I saw him when he was brought back; was found nothing on him.

JOSEPH HODGSON , JUN. Q. You ran after the man. - A. Yes; all the way he ran, he said there she goes; I saw the prisoner throw the roll of tobacco away; I followed him till he was stopped, and when I returned I picked up the tobacco, where he had throwed it; I never lost sight of the prisoner.

Q. Did he throw both of the pieces together. - A. No; I saw him throw the great piece, the other was found in a person's yard.

Prosecutor. I lost two rolls, there is no mark to it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080217-99

266. JOHN HYNDE was indicted for unlawfully, designedly, and by means of false pretences, that he came from Thomas Kiplan , on the 28th of January , did obtain of and from George White , warehouseman to William Ward and Richard Frazer , one dozen pair of black silk stockings, value 7 l. 10 s.

Second count that he on the 1st of February , by means of like false pretences, did obtain from George White , one dozen pair of black worsted hose, value 1 s. 16 s.

Third count that he on the 5th of February did falsely pretend to George White , that he came from Thomas Kiplan for one dozen sorted plain worsted stockings, at 3 s. 6 d. a dozen, the property of William Ward and Richard Frazer , one dozen of ribbed sorted stockings, value 1 l. 16 s. and one dozen plain worsted stockings, value 1 l. 16 s. their property. with intent to cheat and defraud them of the same .

GEORGE WHITE . I am warehouseman to William Ward and Richard Frazer, they are hosiers , and live at No. 35, in Cateaton-street .

Q. Do you know Mr. Kiplan. - A. Yes; his name is Thomas Kiplan, he is an haberdasher and hosier , he lives at No. 23, Ayre-street, Cold Bath Fields.

Q. Is he a customer. - A. Yes; the prisoner came to our house on Thursday the 28th of January, between ten and eleven in the forenoon, he said he wanted one dozen pair of men's black silk stockings, about twelve and sixpence a pair, for Mr. Kiplan; I gave him the dozen with a bill of parcels, made out in Mr. Kiplan's name; he came again on the 1st of February for one dozen pair of men's black worsted stockings, about thirty six shillings a dozen, for Mr. Kiplan; he had some other things at the same time, one dozen of plain sorted ditto, about the same price, and one dozen black silk, the same that he had before at twelve and sixpence a pair; I delivered them to him with a bill, made out to Mr. Kiplan; he came again on the 5th of February, wanting a dozen plain black, worsted stockings, at thirty six shillings and sixpence a dozen, one dozen ribbed ditto, of the same price, and a dozen plain black ditto of the same price; I likewise delivered them to him with a bill of parcels made out in Mr. Kiplan's name.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. I did not.

Q. How came you to let him have them. - A. By making use of Mr. Kiplans name.

Q. How was he drest. - A. In a blue coat, blue pantaloons, with half boots, and a yellow coloured silk handkerchief; he came again on the 6th of February.

Q. There are no other charges than on the 28th of January, 1st of February and 5th of February; are you sure the prisoner is the person. - A. Yes.

Jury. Did he bring no written order. - A. No.

THOMAS KIPLAN . I am a haberdasher and hosier, I live in Ayre-street, Cold Bath Fields; the prisoner was my servant, before the 28th of January he was my shopman.

Q. He knew where you dealt then. - A. Yes; he had lived with me seven week. On the the 27th of January he was drawned for the militia; he asked if he might go out for about an hour; I agreed to it; he said he wanted to go and speak to an uncle of his about the militia; he did not return all the day not till the 28th, stating that he was going to America, as captain's clerk; he demanded his salary, I paid him.

Q. Did you send him on the 28th for these goods. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you on the 1st or 5th of February. - A. I did not; he left me on the 28th of January; I never sent him, he never went to Mr. Frazer's on my account during the time he was with me: the goods never came to my hands.

RICHARD FRAZER. I live in Cateaton-street, I am partner to William Ward ; Mr. Kiplan was a customer of mine: when he came the fourth time I suspected him; I sent my young man to Mr. Kiplan, I found that he had ordered no goods.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 28th of January, when I left Mr. Kiplan, I did not wish to be seen by any body; I did not like to go into the militia, I was afraid of being taken by the officers; I meaned to go abroad as captain's clerk; I went down to a house at Shadwell, called the Old Glass House; with respect to the goods I am indicted for, I know nothing of: I never received any goods of Messrs. Ward and Frazer for Mr. Kiplan.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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