Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th January 1808.
Reference Number: 18080113
Reference Number: f18080113-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 13th of JANUARY, 1808, and following Days,

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN ANSLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS; No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOHN ANSLEY , Lord-Mayor of the City of London; Sir Archibald Macdonald , knt. Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Soulden Lawrence, knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. One of his Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Sir Richard Carr Glyn knt. John Perring esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Rowcroft , esq. Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq. William Domville , esq. Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Thomas Perkins ,

Joseph Hundlebee ,

James Lavington ,

James Phillips ,

William Poiner ,

John Judd ,

William Russel ,

William Rickpath ,

James Bell ,

James Stead ,

William Savory ,

John Field .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

Felton Matthews,

William Wybert ,

Timothy Fletcher ,

William Dempsey ,

John Parker ,

Thomas Hughes ,

William Holmes ,

John Sewell ,

George Silk ,

Thomas Bray ,

George Miller ,

John George Olney .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Buller ,

Francis Wingrove ,

Thomas Alexander ,

Thomas Brown ,

John Taylor ,

Thomas Nokes ,

John Biggs ,

Valentine Saunders ,

Thomas Ghrimes ,

George Thorp ,

Samuel Roberts ,

William Watson .

Reference Number: t18080113-1

71. MARY PUCKRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of October , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Bates , privily from his person .

THOMAS BATES . I am a porter to Mr. John Pollard , No. 12, Coleman street.

Q. Had you occasion to go to Islington on the 16th of October. - A. Yes. I cannot say what day it was; it was about the beginning of October; between eleven and twelve o'clock I came down Goswell street, I turned down Fann street into Bridgwater Gardens , just by the Bridgwater Arms, a gin shop; I met two girls, they asked me to give them something to drink. I went with them into the gin shop, and gave them something to drink.

Q. Did you retire with them to any private apartment. - A. No.

Q. Did you take any liberty or any familiarity with them when they were there. - A. No; we did not stop there two or three minutes; when we came out in the street I had a conversation with them about three or four minutes. I stopped about three or four minutes, and one of them left me.

Q. Did you observe their persons at that time, so as to distinguish one from the other. - A. I cannot say I did, I was a little in liquor; after the other woman left me I stopped about three minutes with the prisoner.

Q. Did she leave you or you her. - A. She left me. I went home.

Q. Did you take any liberties with her. - A. No, I did not touch her; I have no recollection of either of their persons, I never saw them before. When I was going to bed I missed my watch. I went to bed about half an hour after I went home; it was a silver watch.

Q. Are you sure that you had your watch before you saw the prisoner. - A. I had my watch when I was in the gin shop.

Q. When did you see the watch again. - A. I saw it again at Worship street. I knew it to be mine.

MR. ALGER. I am a pawnbroker, No. 9, Chiswell street, I have known the prisoner some years. On the 16th of October last she pledged the watch with me for twenty four shillings, in the name of Mary Puckeridge .

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Whitechapel I kicked my foot against the watch; it laid on a cellar window between White Cross street and Golden lane. I went to Mr. Alger on the next morning and pledged it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-2

72. ANDREW DUNSTAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , a carpenter's plow, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Garness .

THOMAS GARNESS . I am a carpenter , I work in Haberdasher row, Hoxton , I live on the other side of the way. On Tuesday week, when I came home, I left the tools in the building. Between one and two I was called from my dinner by the person that took the prisoner; he asked me if the property was mine. I said it was.

WILLIAM KING . I am a carpenter, I worked in the same street where this young man worked. At twelve o'clock the prisoner came and asked for a job; I told him it was a wrong time to come and ask for a job between twelve and one, when the men were gone to dinner; I told him he looked more like a thief than a man that wanted a job; he left me and went to where this young man worked; he could not open the door, he put his arm in the window and took the plow out; he crossed over the street and went of the other side of the terrace; I went after him and asked him what he had got. I laid hold of him; and then he said it was his partner's plow. I said I would take him to the owner, if that was his partner; I called this young man out, and he owned the plow directly.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, almost seventy years of age. I hope you will shew me lenity, as it was done through want.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-3

73. SARAH ATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , a gown, value 12 s. the property of William Ward , privately in his shop .

ANN WARD . I live in White's row, Fashion street, Spital Fields , my husband is a labouring man , I keep a clothes shop. On the 18th of December, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner came in my shop, she said she wanted a gown; I showed her what I had. She fixed on one; after hesitating a little while, she blew out the candle and ran out of the shop with the gown.

Q. Did you get the gown again. - A. Yes; that very evening, about half past nine, I found her in a public house with my gown upon her back. She was taken to the watchhouse with my gown on her.

THOMAS HART . I went with the last witness' husband on the 18th of December in the evening, to the sign of the Angel, opposite Whitechapel church; there we found Mrs. Ward and the prisoner in a strong dispute; Mrs. Ward told me that the gown that the prisoner had got on was her gown. I took her in custody and put her in the watchhouse; I insisted of her taking the gown off and putting her own gown on.

Q. Had she her own gown about her at that time. - A. No, she sent for it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I must ask her pardon for what I have done; I had a little drop in my head; I had another woman with me; she persuaded me to put the gown on. I hope you will have mercy.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-4

74. JOHN GUARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , in the dwelling house of William Bowen , a bank note, value 10 l. his property

WILLIAM BOWEN . I live at No. 29, Jermyn-street, St. James's .

Q. Did you miss any of your property from your house on the 30th of December last. - A. Yes, I lost a ten pound note, from my tea chest; I had seen it there the day before; I remember turning the key of the lock, but I did not try to see if it was locked; I left it in the parlour.

Q. Had you any other notes in the chest. - A. I had two tens, besides the one I speak of; a five and some other small notes.

Q. When did you perceive that one of your notes were missing. - A. On Wednesday the 30th, about four or five o'clock; I found my tea chest open.

Q. Did you count all the notes that were in the tea chest when you opened it between four and five o'clock on the Tuesday. - A. I did.

Q. Are you sure that one out of the number of the ten pound notes was missing. - A. I am sure that one of the ten pound notes were missing, and likewise a one, I believe but I will not swear to that.

Q. Was it a ten pounds bank of England note. - A. It was; the prisoner was my errand boy , he had been with me not quite a fortnight.

Q. When did he leave you. - A. He left me about the time that I missed the note, within half an hour of the time.

Q. Whether before or after you do not recollect. - A I do not recollect.

Q. Did you understand before that that he was to leave your service. - A. He did not tell me that he was going to quit my service, nor did I suspect him till the following morning; he went away about four o'clock instead of eight in the evening; his usual hour to come in the morning was eight, he did not come, and at ten o'clock the next morning I went to his father's house; I asked his father where his son was, he told me he went out as usual to go to my place; on the following day the father brought him to me; I found no notes in his possession; only eighteen pence was in his pocket.

Q. Was the tea chest ever taken out of the house before you missed the note. - A. No, it remained in the house.

Q. What age is the boy. - A.(Prisoner.) I am fourteen.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street office; I and Warner took the prisoner in his master's shop, on the 1st of January; we found no notes upon him; he was searched by Warren, he found nothing but eighteen pence on him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him. - A. Yes, in his master's shop.

Q. Was the master present. - A. I do not remember that he was.

Q.Was any body present but you and Warren. - A.None else, as I know of. We accused him of the robbery.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to tell if he did the act. - A. No, we just asked him if he knew any thing of the robbery; he said, that he had taken the ten pound note, that a helper belonging to Mr. Verney's yard gave him the keys to open the chest, and he gave him the ten pound note; at the second examination before the magistrate, he said he changed the ten pound note with Mr. Strachn, in Swallow-street; Mr. Strachn was sent for, he swore before Mr. Brodie that he never saw the boy; the next time he was examined, he said he had tore it to pieces.

Q. Did you send to the helper. - A. The helper was taken up and discharged on the second examination; there was nothing found on him.

Prisoner. The man told me if I would tell him that he had the note, he would acquit me directly.

Q. Who told you so. - A. Warren.

Q. to Kennedy. Did you hear that. - A. No, I did not.

JOHN WARREN . I took the boy backwards into the palour; the boy confessed to me that he had the ten pound note.

Q. He says that you told him if he would produce the ten pound note you would acquit him. - A. No such a thing, I never promised nor threatened him; he said, that he had certainly robbed his master of a ten pound note and a one pound note; he shewed me the tea chest; he said out of that, I took out the ten pound note and the one pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. He told me that if I would say I had the ten pound note he would acquit me; and being frightened, I said I had the note; I did not know who to bring in that had it of me. On the night I left my master they were all merry making; I left the shop before my usual time; I was afraid of coming to the shop in the morning; I went down to Mr. Porter. My father told me to go back to my master; I went back along with my father to my masters shop.

Court. Gentlemen, the prisoner had an opportunity of taking the note, if he had been so disposed; and instead of staying at his master's shop till eight o'clock on that evening, his usual hour, he went away about four o'clock, and did not return till his father brought him back to his master's shop; that is the part of the evidence which presses mostly upon him; he has varied in the account he gave before the magistrate; you have heard his defence. If you are of opinion that he stole the note you will find him guilty; on the other other hand, the note not being found upon him, nor traced to the hands of any person; if you are not sufficiently satisfied that he stole the note you will then acquit him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-5

75. JAMES DAVEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Sibley , about the hour of seven at night, on the 16th of December with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a pair of silver table spoons, value 30 s. a pair of silver salts, value 24 s. a silver mustard pot. value 40 s. a silver pepper caster, value 18 s. a silver watch, value 1 l. 19 s. and three silver salt spoons, value 7 s. and two silver seals, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Sibley.

ELIZABETH SIBLEY . On the 16th of December last I went out about four o'clock; I left my place shut up; I live at No. 12 White Horse-yard, East Smithfield .

Q. Are you the wife of John Sibley. - A. Yes, he is a cooper in an Indiaman.

Q. When you went out did you fasten the door and windows. - A. Yes.

Q. How was the lower window fastened. - A. The prisoner was a lodger in the lower room; I lived in the one pair of stairs room; I fastened my one pair of stairs door when I went out, and the key of my padlock I took with me; I am sure I locked my door; there are only two rooms in the house; I came home about eight

o'clock, I went into the Cock and Neptune opposite of my house; the prisoner came to me; he says, you have left your door open; I said no, I am sure I have not; it is a thing that I never do.

Q. Do you mean to say that you are certain that you had locked the door, because it was your custom, or are you sure that you did lock it at that time. A. I am certain that I did. I asked the servant of the public house to go to my room and see if it was; fastened, she did, and returned and said it was; when I went home, I observed the padlock had not been picked, it was locked; I observed that the staple had been pulled out; I went into my room, I found my drawers open and the corner of this pillow case was out of the corner of the drawer.

Q. The drawer was partly open was it. - A. Yes, it was broken open; I cried out, I am robbed; I went down stairs to call for assistance, Mrs. O'Hara, my neighbour, told me I could do nothing at that time of night, to make myself as comfortable as I could and tomorrow to go and see after my property I went immediately to my drawer; I missed a silver watch, two silver seals, a pair of silver salts.

Q. What was the value of the silver salt cellars. - A. I gave thirty five shillings for them; the silver pepper box I gave one pound eighteen shillings for it; I missed that and a pair of silver table spoons, they are worth about thirty shillings, and a silver mustard pot two pound, a pair of silver salt spoons I gave fourteen shillings for them; the two silver seals were marked with E. P.

Q. When had you last seen these things before you went out. - A. I put the watch in the draw from off the mantle piece, and then I saw all the other articles there just before I went out.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged with you. - A. A month and three days.

Q. Had he ever been in your room where you left the things. - A. On the Sunday morning his wife was very ill, he came in the room and asked me to lend him a spoon for some company that he had; I looked for a pewter spoon, I could not find it; I went to the drawer; I gave him one of the silver spoons, I said Mr. Davey, I will beg of you to take care of this spoon till you return it.

Q. Where was he standing at that time, when you opened your draw. - A. At my room door.

Q. Could he see where you took it from. - A. Yes, my drawer fronts the door.

Q. Was he so situated that he could see what was in the drawer. - A. Yes, it was the middle drawer he could see.

Q. This you say was on Sunday morning - on what day did you miss the goods. - A. On Wednesday.

Q. Who was in the house besides the prisoner on the Wednesday. - A. Nobody but him.

Q. He is a married man, I suppose his wife lived with him. - A. Yes, they lived together, she was with him.

Q. Your husband was out was he. - A. My husband is at sea, and there was no person left in my room when I went out.

Q. What trade does the prisoner carry on. - A. He is a journeyman carpenter.

Q. When did you see your things again. - A. The next morning Mr. Grindel brought all the things forward that I lost; they are here. The prisoner took the two seals off the watch, and had them up his coat sleeve; I saw them the same day they were found, with the duplicates. I saw the officer search him in my house.

Q. You went out at four o'clock on the 17th of December. - A. Yes.

Q. How was it, light or dark. - A. Darkish; I could distinguish any body.

Q. You cannot tell what time the property was stolen. - A They were pawned between six and seven o'clock.

Court. That you cannot know yourself.

Prisoner. On Monday night did not you set my wife's gown and petticoat on fire. - A. No, I never set any thing on fire.

Q. Did not you send me to pledge the goods to make up the affair between us. - A. No, I never clapped my eyes on you that day; the night before that if I had not gone down stairs just as I did, my place would have been on fire; you and your wife were both in liquor; she sate her own gown alight by smoking; I said to her, ma'am, your gown is on fire; I put it out myself, I came down by accident to get a pitcher of water.

Q. Was not you drinking all that evening till you was so drunk I was obliged to put you out of the room. - A. I never was in the room to drink any thing.

Q. Did not I go to the magistrate to get a warrant and the magistrate would not grant a warrant - did you not take me to the Cock and Neptune and make me drunk, and you was drunk yourself. - A. No, I never saw you.

Q. Did not you tie up the things in your handkerchief, and tell me to pawn them for three pound; you told me they had been often there before, you told me not to tell any soul. - A. No.

Q. You called me up in the room in the morning, you asked me if I would be any thing towards making up your loss; I said I did not care if it cost me five pounds, so as you lost nothing.

Court. Is there any truth in that. - A. No truth whatever; I never set sight of the man all the evening.

Q. Had you ever pledged any of these things. - A. No.

Prisoner. Do not you keep an house of ill fame. I was deluded to go and live with a woman that was not my wife; by this woman's persuading her she let me have the room. - A. I have not a creature in my house.

Prisoner. By being down at that house I have made all my friends my foes.

MR. GRINDEL. I am a pawnbroker. On Monday the 16th James Davey pledged a silver watch for one pound, a milk pot, pepper caster, two salts and five spoons, all silver, a pair of silver table spoons, and a pair of silver salt spoons, and a silver mustard pot.

Q. Were there any seals to that watch. - A. No; I advanced him three pounds on the goods; they were pledged in his own name; I have seen him before. I understood from him that they were his own. He said he would redeem them the next day; that

they were pledged through spite.

Q. Did he explain that at all, did he say that somebody had spited him, or that he would spite them. - A. I understood that he was obliged to pawn the goods.

Q. Do you know Elizabeth Sibley . - A. Yes, I do not live far from her place.

Q. Are you acquainted with her house. - A. I do not know the house.

Q. Have you heard any thing amiss about the house. - A. I have heard that girls lived there.

Q. Did the prisoner when he pledged the things give you to understand that there had been any quarrel. - A. I understood that there had been some words between him and another person, and that was the occasion of it; he did not tell me who he quarrelled with.

Jury. Were these things ever pledged with you before. - A. I believe the watch was, by Mrs. Sibley.

GEORGE PERKINS . I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office. On Thursday morning the 17th of December, Mrs. Sibley came down to our office and told us she had been robbed; I went with a brother officer; the prisoner was at home; he was some time before he would open the door, but he did open it at last; we told him he was the person that we suspected had robbed Mrs. Sibley. We asked him if he would give us leave to search him, he did. I found two duplicates upon him, which exactly answered to the property that was lost. We took him down to Shadwell office; my brother officer found the seals. I was not present.

WILLIAM HEWIT . Q. You was with the other officer when this man was apprehended. - A. I was. I searched him. In his right hand breeches pocket I found these two silver seals.

Prisoner. It was in my waistcoat pocket. - A.(Hewit) It was in his right hand breeches pocket.

ANN WALKER . I live servant at the Cock and Neptune public house, opposite of the prosecutrix. When Mrs. Sibley came in James Davey told her she had left her door open.

Q. What time in the evening was it. - A. About eight o'clock; she said she was quite sure it was not, she had got the key in her pocket; she asked me if I would go and see; I said I was going out with my eight o'clock beer, I would look. I did go. I found the street door open; I tried the room door that Mrs. Sibley lives in, it was fast; I put my hand against it. I had no candle, I did not examine the lock.

Prisoner's Defence. All that I have got to say in my own defence is, that this woman sent me to pawn the things; that we were drinking together on Monday night, and the greater part of Tuesday till the evening; she wanted some supper, I told her I had got no more money; she said if I would go and pawn the things she would have a good supper. I pawned the things for her; I told the pawnbroker my name and where I lived. We went to a house, we had a goose and half a pig, but where it was I do not know. The next morning she called me up, and said she was robbed; I thought she was in joke, as the things were pawned, because she told me I was not to say any thing to any body about it.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN - You must be satisfied in the first place of the prisoner having broken open the apartment of this woman, and that it was so dark that the face of a man could not be distinguished. By her own account she went out at four o'clock. We have no means of knowing the precise time when these goods were taken, if they were taken; - it might be two or three minutes after she went out, or it might be two hours after she went out. The best way is to take it the most favourable to the prisoner, and that this was not done when the face of a man was easily mistaken. Then the main point to consider is this - whether he stole the goods or not; - that these goods were pledged by this man is quite clear, and he does not deny it. - On the part of Mrs. Sibley she would have you believe that this man must have taken the goods, because he pledged them; - on the other hand the prisoner would have you to believe that is not the case, but that they were given to him by her to pledge; that this woman gets drunk, and that it is a house of ill fame. That it is a disorderly house the pawnbroker has proved it. - He further stated, that she set his wife's gown and petticoat on fire, after having been drinking together; they had a quarrel, and they were to have a supper to make it up; that is the account he gave. - It is remarkable that the watch was found at the pawnbroker's, accompanied with all the other things; the seals to be sure were found in his pocket; that is a circumstance which appears as if he was acting for himself, and that he was doing business for himself, and not for another, because he put the seals in his pocket; he did not go to a pawnbroker at a considerable distance, but one that is near, and where in fact he is known; that is a circumstance in his favour; add to this he gave the pawnbroker his name and where he lived. The pawnbroker said that he did understand there had been words, and that was the occasion of his pawning the articles. - The officer found these two seals in his pocket, which is a symptom that he had taken them; these he converted to his own use. - If you think there is sufficient said upon the testimony of the prosecutrix to be satisfied that he was the person who did break this door, enter the room, and take the goods against her inclination and pawned them, then you will find him guilty of stealing in the dwelling house to the value of more than forty shillings. The prisoner so far from concealing his name, he pawned them in his own name, and to a pawnbroker in the neighbourhood. Another circumstance in his favour - she has told you she had never parted with any part of these goods; whereas it does appear by the pawnbroker that she had pawned the watch. - If you are of opinion there was a matter of dispute to be settled between him and her, she wishing to make it up, and at her desire a sum of money was to be raised on these goods, and that he pledged them for that purpose - if you are satisfied that you are upon good grounds that he did not actually steal the goods, you will upon that acquit him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-6

76. MARY CARROL , alias MITCHEL , was indicted for that she at the general quarter sessions holden at Maidstone in the county of Kent, on the 16th of January in the 46th year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was sentenced to be confined in goal one year, and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; that she afterwards on the 23d of November last, a piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, feloniously did utter to William Smith , she at the time of uttering it well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

The Case stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I believe Mr. Powell you are the assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. A. I am.

Q. You produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner, from whom did you get it. - A. From the clerk of the peace for the county of Kent in Maidstone; I have compared it with the original, it is correct (the copy of the record read.)

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. Are you a servant to Mr. Masterman. - A. Yes.

Q. What is Mr. Masterman. - A. He is a furnishing ironmonger, living at the corner of Hatton-garden, Holborn.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you know of her coming to your master's house. - A. Yes, on Friday the 20th of November, about five in the afternoon.

Q. What did she come for. - A. A half pint tin pot; I believe it came to three pence, she gave me a shilling, I gave her change; then she went away.

Q. Did you observe any thing about the shilling before you put it into the till. - A. I did, there was a black kind of grease upon it, I put it into the till; in the course of that evening Mr. Masterman shewed me that shilling, and said it was a bad one; I recollected it was the shilling that I took of the prisoner; there were but three shillings that I had in the till besides.

Q. They had not that black and greasy appearance, had they. - A. There were three or four shillings in the till but none of them having that appearance.

Q. What did you do with that shilling. - A. I put it in the ink-stand in the accompting-house. This is the shilling (producing it.)

Q. Do you remember her coming to your house again on Monday the 23d of November. - A. Yes, then she asked for a metal spoon, that came to three pence; then she tendered me a bad shilling, (I produce it.) I detained her and told Mr. Masterman.

Q. Are you sure that she was the same person that came on the Friday before. - A. Yes, I had seen her several times before that in our shop.

Q. These shillings you have had in your custody ever since. - A. Yes; then Trott the officer was sent for; he searched her.

Q. Did the prisoner at the time in your presence, or before the officer, say any thing. - A. Not a word.

JONATHAN TROTT . - Mr. Knapp. You are an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. - A. Yes. On the 23d of November I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody; I searched her and found upon her four shillings and eleven pence halfpenny in copper money, halfpence and penny-pieces, and twelve good sixpences; I found a small quantity of silk, thread, tobacco, two twopenny loaves, three or four quantitys of meat, and down her bosom I found that metal spoon.

Q. to Smith. Look at that spoon, is that the spoon you sold the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Trott. Likewise a plated tea spoon, and this whity brown paper; she said he had not passed bad money. I then asked her her name, she said her name was Ann Mitchell ; she said there was another woman with her, she gave me her name; I have forgot it. I found it to be a falsity; I have seen the woman since.

Q. Do you know the woman before. - A. Yes, but I do not recollect where rightly.

MR. JOHN NICHOLS . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint. - A. I am.

Q. Look at this shilling and tell me whether it is a good one or a bad one, this is the first shilling tendered to Smith. - A. That is a bad one.

Q. Now look at the other shilling tendered to him the second time. - A. This also is a bad shilling, they are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before the Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-7

77. ELIZA CROSSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December , twelve guineas, fourteen half guineas, and a shilling, the property of Susannah Potter , in her dwelling house .

SUSANNAH POTTER . Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at Old Brentford , in the parish of Hanwell; I keep a public house there; I am a widow .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes. On the 15th of December, she came in and asked for a lodging; I refused her three times, she told me she was a relation of Mr. Hanson's a publican that I knew; I took her in.

Q. Did you see her the next morning. - A. Yes, she came down stairs about nine o'clock, she breakfasted in the bar with my family.

Q. Who did your family consist of that she breakfasted with. - A. We breakfasted before she came down; there were the maid and two of the children in the bar when she came down.

Q. Did they continue the whole time the prisoner was at breakfast. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did she set after breakfast. - A. Till about eleven o'clock.

Q. Where was you between nine and eleven o'clock. - A. I was in the bar almost the whole of the time, except going into the tap room to take a pint or a pot of beer, and the children and the maid they were in and out of the bar.

Q. Where was you when the prisoner left the house. - A. I was just gone into the tap room with a pint of beer; I did not stay there five minutes.

Q. When you went from the bar into the tap room who did you leave in the bar. - A. I left the prisoner alone in the bar.

Q. Before that had she been left alone to your knowledge. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Had your any money in this bar. - A. Yes, I fetched it down to pay the brewer; I expected the brewer in every minute; I brought down four score pounds.

Q. Did any of it consist of gold. - A. I took out nineteen guineas in gold, for my distiller; sixty pounds I left in one bag, that was for the brewer.

Q. What money had you placed in the bar. - A. I had placed it in a cupboard in the bar; twenty pounds in one bag and sixty pounds in another; it was all in the cupboard at the time when I left the prisoner alone; the brewer had not called.

Q. After you had been in the tap room did you go

into the bar again. - A. Yes. I was not gone five minutes; when I returned she was gone. I found nobody there.

Q. Had she before signified her intention of going. - A. She said before, she wondered a gentleman had not called upon business, she was an independent gentlewoman at Richmond; she had not paid her reckoning, that made me distrust that she had taken my money. When I missed her I looked into my cupboard directly; I found twenty pounds was gone, and the bag with it.

Q. You have not described the gold that was in the bag. - A. Twelve guineas in gold, and fourteen half guineas and one shilling; I am sure that was the contents of the bag. When I perceived this money was gone I was very much alarmed, I called my daughter down stairs; some people at the door heard me, they came in, and she was pursued; my maid and some of my neighbours went after her.

Q. You did not go after her. - A. No, I did not; she was taken in less than an hour by Mr. Newman's servant; they took her to the magistrate, I saw her there. When I went into the room at the magistrate's I sat down, she came to me and went down upon her knees; she said, oh, my dear Mrs. Potter here is your money that I robbed you of, I ask forgiveness.

Q. Had you said any thing to her before that. - A. I never spoke to her before that; she gave me the bag and the money; I took it out and told it, it was right, and the bag contained the twelve guineas; I cannot be positive as to say that there was the exact quantity of half guineas; I was flurried; they told it out, and they told me it was right.

Q. What became of the bag that the money was in. - A. In their giving me the money I put it in my pocket, and I was going home; I dropped the bag, I did not think the bag was of any consequence as I had got the money. I begged forgiveness for her; Dr. Glasse would not let her go, he asked for the money; I gave it him. I should have taken care of the bag if I had known it had been of any consequence; but as she gave me the money I took no notice of the bag.

GEORGE FRANKLIN . I am a servant to Mr. Newman, a butcher at Brentford. From information I went in pursuit of the prisoner; her person was described to me by Mrs. Potter. When I came up to the prisoner, I asked her whether she had slept at Brentford last night, she said no; I told her I thought she had, and she must be the person that robbed the widow woman at the public house, and she must go back with me; I took her back a little way to meet Mrs. Potter's servant maid, to know whether it was the right person or not; she said she was. I sent for the constable and took her to Dr. Glasse.

Q. When you took her to Dr. Glasse did you stay there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make her any promise of forgiveness if she would confess. - A. No, nor any body else that I heard, no more than Mrs. Potter wished Dr. Glasse to forgive her.

Q. Tell us what passed. - A. Directly Mrs. Potter came into the room she was very ill, the prisoner immediately came to Mrs. Potter and downed upon her knees, and put the money into her hand in a bag, then the money was taken out of the bag; Mrs. Potter first told it; I believe she said it consisted of the same money that she had lost; the prisoner said nothing but begged for mercy of Mrs. Potter.

Q. Did she say whose money it was when she put it into Mrs. Potter's hands. - A. He said it was Mrs. Potter's money.

Q. to prosecutrix. Are you sure that the prisoner at the bar is the same person. - A. Yes.

HENRY PEARCH BUTLEN. I produce the money; I saw it in the office in Marlborough-street, of which I am chief clerk; I received it in the presence of Dr. Glasse and Mr. Brodie; it was laid down on the table in a piece of paper; I was directed by Dr. Glasse to take it up and put it in the paper. I did and Dr. Glasse wrote his name upon it; I put this office seal upon it directly.

Prosecutrix. I was present when the money was delivered to Mr. Butler.

Q. Mr. Butler open it and see what it consists of. A. Twelve guineas, fourteen half guineas and one shilling; there was one guinea which Mrs. Potter thought she could swear to particularly.

Q. Mrs. Potter look at that money, do you know any particular piece of money among it. - A. Yes, I can swear to this guinea, only by the crook.

Q. Another guinea might be the same. - A. Another might be the same.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Jury. Mrs. Potter when you received the money in the bag, did you know that bag to be yours. - A. Yes, it was the same bag; I should not have dropped the bag but I did not know any thing would occur further.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-8

78. GEORGE HUMPHRY , and CHARLES BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25d of November twenty four yards of velveteen, value 4 l. the property of Nicholas Brooke , in his dwelling house .

NICHOLAS BROOKE . I live at No. 23, Frith street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster . I am a shoemaker .

Q. Are you a house keeper. - A. I am a house keeper.

Q. On the 22d of November last, had you any velveteen in your house. - A. Yes, black velveteen, what we use for shoes, there were forty three yards in the whole; in the morning it was in one piece, I had divided it, there was twenty four yards in one piece and nineteen yards in the other, it was in the shop; I had seen it at one o'clock. About twenty minutes, or half past one o'clock, two men came to me and asked me if I had lost anything; their names were Broad and Poole; I looked in the shop and found the twenty four yards of velveteen was gone; the other piece remained.

Q. Were they in the shop laying near together. - A. They were upon two boards, they lay three or four foot from each other.

Q. What was the value of the piece that was taken. A. Four pounds.

Q. What, for the twenty four yards. - A. Yes; the twenty four yards cost me four pounds one shilling and eight pence.

DAVID BROAD . Q. Were you near the house of Mr. Brooke on the 22nd of November last. - A. Yes. I am a smith, I work twelve doors from it.

Q. Did you at any time in November last see the prisoners at the bar near his shop. - A. It was in December.

Q. to Brooke. What month was it, December or November. - A. It was December.

Broad. It was the 22nd of December, between the hours of one and two; I was going to my dinner, I saw both the prisoners lurking from one shop to the other, they were going into the different shops and asking the price of things and not purchasing.

Q. That you could hardly tell, you were in the street. A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you only saw the prisoners go in and out of the shops. - A. Yes, exactly so; they went into one shop within a door of my master's shop; they tried on gloves, they stopped there what time I cannot say; I saw them come out and go to the prosecutor's house, and they looked through the shop window.

Q. Did they go to any other shop. - A. They went to several shops, I saw them go in, but I saw them in the glover's; I saw the prisoner Humphry look through the window, and Brown went in; I saw nothing in his possession when he went in, but when he came out I saw a bundle of black velveteen under his arm, without any covering or paper at all; he touched me in passing. Humphry remained at the window till Brown had passed the corner of Compton-street, opposite to where the prosecutor's house is; then Humphry followed Brown, after he had passed Compton-street, and looked upon all sides of the way, as if he did not know which way to go; I saw no more of him for some hours, he went down to St. Giles'.

Q. Did he go the same way as Brown. - A. I cannot say, he went in the same direction as Brown did.

Q. Then he followed Brown down the street he had gone. - A. Yes, in a direction down St. Giles's. I went to Mr. Brookes and told him what I had seen. James Poole was with me all the time; we went in search of the prisoners.

Q. Where was it you saw the prisoners afterwards. A. At the bottom of Dyot-street; that might be six hours afterwards, it was quite dark, they were both together; I had been in pursuit of them the whole afternoon, I could not find them till this time. When I came to the bottom of Dyot-street the prisoner Humphry ran against me with a bundle in his hand, he met me full but, he was coming from St. Giles's into Dyot-street; I perceived a bundle in his hand in a blue handkerchief with white spots. I followed him to the Turk's Head, Dyot-street, they went in and stopped at the Turk's Head about a minute and a half; I did not go in. After they came out of there I watched them through the different streets, I cannot say the names of the streets. Humphry had the bundle in his hand; I watched them to the sign of the Horshoe in Bainbridge-street, it lies out to the bottom of Tottenham Court road as you go from Dyot-street. I immediately went and told a constable what the proceedings were. Poole was with me, Fusman the constable, and Poole and I went to the sign of the Horshoe in Bainbridge-street, we took two watchmen with us; we went in, I looked round the room, the room was full of people, they were dancing and fidling, that I could hardly perceive the prisoners. I came out again, I told Mr. Fusman I could not see him, the room was so full; James Poole went in and came out again, and told us he saw him; then we went in, I catched hold of the prisoner Brown. I saw Humphry and pointed him out to Mr. Fusman; we took them both to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you see any bundle there. - A. We told the watchman there was a bundle near to where they were sitting. I saw the prisoner take the bundle in the room. I had not seen the bundle after he got in the room.

Q. Did you see the watchman afterwards with the bundle. - A. Yes, at the watchhouse: it was the same handkerchief, and it had the same appearance, it was a bundle in a blue and white handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. The bundle that you at first saw was velveteen. - A. Yes, black velveteen.

Q. The bundle that was afterwards seen in Humphry's possession was in a blue handkerchief. - A. Yes, a blue handkerchief.

Q. How long was it after Brown went out of the shop that Humphry went to join him. - A. About three minutes.

Q. You do not know how far the boy got before the other got up to him. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Humphry never went into the shop at all. - A. No, not at all.

JAMES POOL . I am a smith.

Q. Was you with the last witness on the 22nd of December. - A. Yes, between the hours of one and two o'clock.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners or both of them. - A. Both of them. In Compton-street was the first place that I saw them at; they went into a hosier's shop and tried on some worsted gloves; they came out of that shop, and they looked into other shops as they passed up the street. When they came to Mr. Brookes's, Brown opened the door and went in, without any thing under his arm.

Q. Had they looked into Mr. Brookes's shop before they went in. - A. Yes, both of them.

Q. Upon Brown opening the door what did Humphry do. - A. He stood looking through the window.

Q. How long did Brown remain in the shop. - A. About three minutes, or hardly so much; then he returned out with a bundle of black velveteen under his arm, without paper or any cover over it. I was on the opposite side of the way. On his coming out of the shop with it he went along the street with it as if he was going with a message.

Q. How near did he pass by you. - A. About five or six yards, as near as I can judge; he went down the street on the other side of the way; I cannot recollect the name of it, although I know it so well.

Q. What became of Humphry. - A. He ran after him as hard as he could.

Q. How long did Humphry remain at the shop window before he followed. - A. About a minute and a half, and he was quite confused to know which way Brown went.

Q. You afterwards went in search with Broad of the two prisoners. - A. Yes, It was about six hours before we discovered them; the first place that I saw them was at the bottom of Dyot street, that end which comes

into St. Giles's, they were both together; Humphy had a bundle in a blue handkerchief with white spots in his hand; I followed them up Dyot-street; they went into the Turk's Head in Dyot-street, they staid there about a minute and a half; from there they went into the Horshoe in Bainbridge street, both together; Humphry had the same bundle then.

Q. Then you got assistance of the constable and watchman. - A. Yes; I went into the public house before the constable and watchman; I saw the prisoners, there were about fifty or sixty people drinking and dancing, men and women. Brown was sitting down and Humphry was standing up about a yard and a halt near to him; I pointed out the two prisoners to the constable, Broad took the prisoner Brown. I and Fusman took Humphry. The two watchmen were left to look for the bundle; they brought it to the watch-house.

Q. What is the man's name that brought the bundle to the watchhouse. - A. Timothy Foley .

Q. Was the bundle that Timothy Foley brought of the same appearance of that which Humphry had. - A. Yes; a bundle in a blue handkerchief with white spots.

TIMOTHY FOLEY . I am a watchman.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Broad and Mr. Poole on the 22nd of December to the Horshoe in Bainbridge-street. - A. I did, I went along with Mr. Fusman, Broad and Poole; they took Brown and Humphry out of the house.

Q. Did you after they were taken out of the house find any bundle. - A. The constable desired me to look after the bundle. I went and took the bundle away and brought it to the watchhouse; that bundle was upon a form; it was wrapped in a blue handkerchief with white spots.

Q. How near was this form where the handkerchief was, to where Humphry's was sitting. - A. He was sitting close to it when I came down.

Q. Then supposing you to have said when you came in Humphry was sitting down by the bundle or close by it. - A. Close by it; I took it to the watchhouse and delivered it to Mr. Fusman, as soon as I came to the watchhouse.

- FUSMAN. You are a constable of St. Giles's. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 22nd of December go with Broad and Pool to the Horshoe in Bainbridge-street. - A. Yes.

Q. There the two prisoners were apprehended, I understand. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Humphry when you went in. - A. I believe about two yards from where the bundle was found, he was standing in the room when I first saw him; there were about fifty or sixty people in the room.

Q. After you got in the room did he set down. - A. No. I did not see him sitting at all. This is the bundle that was brought to me by Foley. (produced it.)

Q. to Foley. You said Humphry was sitting when you first went in, which do you call Humphry. - A. The tall one.

Q. Was he sitting or standing. - A. I cannot tell; I was the last that went in, he was the nearest person to the form where the bundle was, he was sitting, as nigh as I remember.

Mr. Knapp. But whether he was sitting or standing you do not know.

Q. to prosecutor. Open the bundle and see whether there is any thing that you can speak to as being your own, or whether you have any reason for believing it to be your own - what is there in that bundle. - A. A remnant of velveteen, I believe it is two yards. There is no mark upon it by which I can certainly say it is my own; I produce part of it that was not stolen. On comparing them together they appear to me one piece, the breadth is exactly the same, and the substance and shade is the same; the dye is the same, and the quality appears to me to be the same.

Q. In your judgment do you think they are parts of the same piece or not. - A. I do think so.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of the two yards. - A. A yard is three shillings and fourpence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Are there any marks upon the piece that you have now brought that you would know it to be your particular property.

Court. He has brought it from his own house, he must know it to be his own property.

Mr. Knapp. Yes; but are there any marks upon it that you should know it if it was out of your possession. - A. Yes, there is a cut to it.

Q. With respect to the two yards there is no mark to it for you to know it by, how long have you had it. - A. I had it in my possession the evening before at seven o'clock; I bought it the day before.

Q. Have you any partner. - A. No.

Humphry's Defence. I went to Mr. Thomas, pastry cook, in Princes-street, about half after one; he asked me if I would go of a errand for him to the Seven Dials; I said I would. As I was going I met this lad in Compton-street, he went in and looked at a pair of gloves, he came out, and I left him at the corner of Frith-street; I never saw him no more till night.

Brown's Defence. As I was standing at a shoe makers shop a man came up to me, he asked me if I would carry a parcel, he said he would give me a shilling; I said I would; I was to carry it to Covent Garden, and he would be after me at a public house; he came after me, I took it to the public house; he asked me if I knew the Horshoe in Bainbridge street, I told him no; he said if I would come there he would give me a shilling more, and when I went there at night an officer came and took me and this man.

Humphry called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Brown called no witness to his character.

HUMPHRY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-9

79. MARY PEARCE and MARY SOMERS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Cheslyn Pearson , about the hour of five at night on the 4th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty nine yards of gingham, value 2 l. 11 s. his property.

SOPHIA PEARSON . Q. You are a married woman. - A. Yes; my husband's name is William Cheslyn Pearson, he is a clerk in Long Acre; we keep a haberdasher's shop in Theobald's road , we have the house and sleep there; I manage the shop. On the 4th of

this month, about half past four, or hardly so late, I had occasion to go up stairs to warm my hands, and my young woman went with me.

Q. Did you leave any body in the shop while you went out. - A. No; I returned down, and the young woman that I had at work with me; as we came to the bottom of the stairs to go into the shop, we heard a clutter of the glass of the window; I ran to the window, I looked and missed a piece of gingham; the window was cracked a few days before; I had put a large cabinet against it; the glass was drawed out, it laid about a yard distant from the place. I shut up the shop directly and went to the pawnbrokers and I found three pieces of the gingham. It was whole when I lost it; the piece contained twenty nine yards. I bought it on the 2nd of January; I lost it on the 4th, I meant to return it, as it was dirty before I had it; I knew the pattern and the quality. I am positive it is the same. I found one piece in half an hour after it was taken; between eight and nine o'clock I found the next; the third piece was not found till the next day.

Q. How long after was it before you saw the prisoners. - A. The next evening.

MARY ENGLISH . I live with Mrs. Pearson.

Q. You are the person that came down stairs with her. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any more than she has already told us. - A. No; just the same.

Q. When had you seen it last. - A. About half an hour before, I took a candle and brought it down to the shop.

Q. Did you see the gingham that was found. - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know whether it was part of that which was brought down. - A. Yes.

JAMES BRAGG . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Lane, High Holborn. On the 4th of January, between five and six o'clock, I took in this gingham of Mary Pearce , I lent her five shillings on it. In about half an hour afterwards, Mrs. Pearson came and enquired if we had taken in a gingham.

FREDERICK AUSTIN . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Barker, High Holborn. The two prisoners on the 4th of January, between five and six o'clock, came and pledged seven yards of gingham; I advanced them six shillings on it, they pledged it in the name of Mary Williams .

JEREMIAH CORDY . I live with Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, 65, High-street St. Giles's. I took in this piece of gingham of Mary Pearce , there was another with her, I do not know her person; I advanced them six shillings on it.

THOMAS HOWIS . I am a constable. I apprehended Mary Pearce at Mr. Lane's; I desired the sister of Mary Pearce to look after Somers; she brought her into Bow-street; I went out and took her into the office.

(The property produced and identified.)

Pearce's Defence. Last Monday was a week I went out to get a bit of supper; between five and six o'clock; we met four girls, they asked us to have something to drink, we refused at first; afterwards they asked us to pledge some cotton for them; they gave us a piece each. I went to Mr. Lane's, and pledged it for five shillings; and afterwards we pledged the other; they gave us a shilling a piece for pledging it; I afterwards went to Mr. Lane's, they stopped me. I sent my sister after Mary Somers , she came and resigned herself up.

Somers's Defence. Last Monday night was a week, this young woman and I were going to get something for supper; we met four girls, they asked us to have something to drink, we scrupled at first, at last we did; they asked us to pledge some cotton for them, we did; she went into Mr. Lane's, I went in with her, I went to Mr. Dobree's and pledged a piece for six shillings. I brought the money to them, and they gave us a shilling a piece. The next day this young woman had occasion to go to the pawnbrokers, they took her in custody. I delivered myself up.

Q. to prosecutrix. What was the price of the whole piece. - A. I paid one shilling and ninepence a yard.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN. - The two prisoners are indicted for a burglary, but with respect to the capital part of the charge, namely the burglary, it is an essential circumstance to constitute a burglary that the offence should be committed in the night. You find this offence, whoever it was committed by, was committed at half after four, or rather before that. At the time the robbery was committed the sun did not set till five minutes before four. It is not night, within the meaning of the law, till after twilight: as long as the light of the sun is remaining it is not night. It is a capital felony for any one to be found stealing in a dwelling house to the value of forty shillings; the value of the article stolen has not been valued at a great deal more than that; your enquiry is whether the case is brought home to either of the two prisoners, and whether you do not think it sufficient if you find them guilty at all, to find them guilty of stealing to the amount of thirty nine shillings only. That they are found in possession of part of the property is beyond a doubt and also of pledging it. One of them went to the pawnbrokers the next day, where she was apprehended, and the other prisoner coming to Bow-street, where she was apprehended, which is a circumstance for your consideration. It is for you to decide how far you think the prisoners were either or both of them innocent or guilty.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-10

80. WILLIAM HOARD was indicted for that he on the 5th of December in the dwelling house of Arthur Windus , without breaking the same, did enter and one time piece, value 30 s. the property of Arthur Windus , Edward William Windus and Thomas Windus , he did steal and take away, and afterwards burglariously about nine o'clock of the said night, the said dwelling house did break to get out of the same .

The case stated by Mr. Knapp.

ARTHUR WINDUS . Q. You live in Bishopgate-street , you are a coach maker , who are your partners. - A. My two sons, Edward William Windus and Thomas Windus , I have no other partners. The time piece was the property of us all; the house is my own freehold. The partners contribute to the part that is used in the trade, this accounting house for one, it is all under the same roof, the external walls enclosing that and the dwelling house. I am the only person that inhabits the house.

Q. The accompting house from where the time piece was stolen, was it nigh the carriage place. - A. Yes, under my dwelling house. You come to the accompting house by a pair of stairs, where there is a door that goes into the accompting house.

Q. In that accompting house had you a time piece.

- A. Yes. I missed it on the Monday morning, not before; I made enquiry about it; it was taken away on the Saturday night.

Q. Who was the person that fastened the house of a night. - A.Douglass. The prisoner had been my apprentice, he left his apprenticeship near a twelve month ago, he had been my apprentice five years; he worked at another place at the time he took this time piece.

ROBERT DOUGLASS . Q. You are apprentice to Messrs. Windus. - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday the 5th of December last did you shut up the carriage way. - A. Yes; we call it the front shop. I only fastened the wicket gate that we come out of, it fastens with a spring lock; I pulled it to after me, I tried it, the lock catched, there is no key hole outside. It could not be opened without some force had been used; this front shop communicates with the street.

Q. What time did you leave Mr. Windus's premises. - A. Between six and seven o'clock; it was dark.

WILLIAM STOKER . Q. You are a watchman. - A. I am. On this Saturday a little after nine o'clock in the evening I looked at Mr. Windus's wicket, I felt one of the holdfasts outside, I found the wicket was open. I knocked at the door, the servant girl came; I found no violence on the door; then I informed Mr. Saffell.

Douglass. I was the last person that left the shop; there are two wickets, only one in the front.

Q. Were they both secured. - A. One was; the other I cannot answer to. I secured the one in the front of the street; that is the one the men goes out of.

THOMAS SAFFELL . I am an officer. On Monday I was sent for by Mr. Windus. On the 11th of December I apprehended the prisoner with his two brothers, about seven o'clock in the evening, I took them to Mr. Windus; I fetched Mr. Peto the pawnbroker, he pointed out the prisoner at the bar as being the person that pawned the time piece. The prisoner begged for mercy; he said he was sorry for what he had done.

ROBERT PETO . I am servant to Mr. Sadler, pawnbroker, 13, Bishopgate-street. On the 5th of December, between the hours of nine and ten, the prisoner pledged the time piece, we lent him sixteen shillings on it; he said it was his father's, it cost fifty shillings; he pledged it in the name of William Smith . I am sure of his person.

EDWARD WILLIAM WINDUS . Q. You are one of the partners; is that piece the property of the partners. - A. Yes, I saw it on the mantle piece in the accompting house about half after six o'clock on the Saturday night.

Q. You have none of your servants here. - A. None but Douglass; my father has a coachman and footman, who live on the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that took the time piece. It was given to me. I took it right facing of Mr. Windus and pledged it.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-11

81. THOMAS WRIGHT and SAMUEL HUGGER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , one quart of oats, beans, and chaff, mixed together, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Deacon .

DANIEL DEACON . I am a carrier, I keep the York waggon , it goes from the Red Lion inn, Aldersgate-street; the prisoners were my farrier's men . From suspicion, on the 22nd of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I took an opportunity of watching them; I posted myself outside of the stable; I heard Hugger say to Wright, look out. Wright took his station at the door; Hugger went to the corn bin, and was filling his pocket; one of my servants was coming into the stable where they were; Wright gave Hugger a signal by a nod of his head; Hugger left off and pretended to be looking for a bottle. My servant left the stable, he only came for his whip; Hugger began filling his pocket again at the same place; then on two of my servants coming into the stable to finish the horsis, Wright gave Hugger the signal as before; I sent for a constable, he searched Hugger in my presence, he found upon him the chaff, oats, and beans in question, about a quart. They both acknowledged themselves guilty; said it was their first offence.

JAMES COLLY . I am a constable. I searched Hugger. I found the chaff, oats, and beans upon him. I produce it.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel; called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

WRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

HUGGER, GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

[The jury recommended the prisoners to mercy on account of their good character.]

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-12

82. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December a gold watch, value 7 l. the property of Septimus Miles .

SEPTIMUS MILES . I am a watchmaker , 32, Ludgate-street . On the 16th of December about seven o'clock in the evening the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at a watch; being engaged myself I directed my shopman to shew him one; the prisoner made an objection to a watch, and requested to see another, and while my man was gone to the window, he went out of the shop and took a watch with him; my man gave me the alarm; my man and Mr. Lydiard pursued after the prisoner, and they took him to Mr. Hillier's shop; I went over and saw my watch, I knew it to be mine.

MR. HILLIER. I am a linen draper in Ludgate-street; I was in Mr. Miles's shop at the time this happened; the young was shewing him some watches, he made an objection to them; he went out of the shop as I thought to point to one, he did not; I pursued him, he ran into Union-street, where he was taken.

Q. Did you see any thing found upon him. - A. The patrol searched him in my house, where he was taken to; the watch was found close to him.

Q. Did he say any thing at the time. - A. He implored for mercy, and wished to see Mr. Miles alone; they went into my back shop together.

CHARLES HALL . I am a watchmaker, I work for Mr. Miles. The prisoner came into the shop to look at a watch; I shewed him a gold hunting watch, he objected to its winding up on the dial plate, he desired to have one that did not. While I was gone to look for one, he went out of the shop, he said he would shew me one in the window; I asked directly did the gentleman

leave a watch on the counter, the reply was no; then I gave the alarm and pursued him; I saw him after he was taken in Mr. Hillier's shop; I was present when the watch was found; I knew it to be the watch that I had shewed him; it is worth seven pounds.

THOMAS TOMACK . I am a patrol, I heard the alarm of stop thief; I followed the prisoner down Union-street, and took him into Mr. Hillier's shop; while I was searching him Mr. Hillier said, here is the watch; it was close by the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney, to Miles. I believe this poor boy shewed a great deal of contrition. - A. He did; if any recommendation of mine will induce the court to be merciful towards him it will be a great satisfaction to me.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his good character.]

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-13

83. THOMAS RYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of January , a wrapper, value 4 d. and five pieces of calimanco, value 5 l. the property of Richard Bailey .

RICHARD BAILEY . I am a carrier from Bedford to the Red Lion inn, in Aldersgate-street. On the 2nd of January, the parcel laid by the side of the waggon at the Red Lion inn yard .

Q. Who was this parcel to be carried to. - A. To Mr. Langley at Bedford; I am sure it was safe in the yard, when I left the yard to go into St. John-street; I was absent about half an hour; on my return it was gone; I did not miss it till Bignell asked me whether I had lost a truss; I looked then, and it was gone.

Q. Did you ever see your truss again. - A. Yes, the same day, I saw it before the magistrate, when the prisoner was in custody.

WILLIAM FORRESTER . Q. You are book-keeper to this waggon. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any parcel being brought for the Bedford waggon. - A. Yes, I took it in that morning; I put it by the side of the waggon, to be loaded with the rest of the goods; I saw the prisoner in the yard while the goods were laying by the side of the waggon; I did not see him do any thing; in consequence of information, I went to the Castle and Falcon, there I saw the prisoner with the truss in custody of Hawkins the officer; I asked the prisoner how he came by the truss, he said he was coming down Carthusian-street, some man asked him if he would carry the parcel, he would give him a shilling to carry it to Wood-street; I am positive the parcel belonged to the Bedford waggon; I recollect booking it.

SAMUEL BIGNELL . I am a carman to Messrs. Rainsdon in Red Lion yard. On the 2nd of January, when this parcel was taken, I was coming up the yard to fetch a truss of straw, to pack a gentleman's furniture in my cart; I saw the prisoner coming down the yard with the truss on his shoulder, running from where the waggon stood.

Q. How far was he from the waggon, when you saw him with this truss. - A. About twenty yards from the waggon when I first saw him; and when I first saw him he was running; as soon as he saw me, he stopped running, and walked the rest part of the yard till he come to the gate; then he turned round to see if I followed him, and ran down Long-lane into Cloth-fair; I followed him; when I first met him in the Red Lion yard, the direction on the parcel was outermost; in Cloth-fair he shifted it next to his shoulder, so as nobody could see it; he came into Aldersgate-street, I followed him; when the prisoner came to Little Britain he made a bit of a stop, looked to see if there were any body after him, and then run as fast as he could, till he come into St. Ann's-lane; I collared him in St. Ann's-lane; I said you are a pretty rascal are not you, this property is not yours; he throwed the truss off his shoulder, said let me go, my master does not live far off; I said you shall not go from me; I took him and the truss into the Castle and Falcon, and had him secured; the truss has been in the constable's hands ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have been drinking a little to night. - A. No, I have not been drinking to night; I have had only one pint since dinner.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before. - A. No, not till I saw him in Red Lion yard, and then my eyes were never off him till I took him.

Q. I take it for granted all the time you saw him his back was towards you. - A. No, he turned round and went on again; I saw his face at the Red Lion yard, when he passed me, and I saw his face in St. Ann's-lane; I can swear that is the lad.

Jury. What was the weight of the truss.

Mr. Forster. Better than a quarter of a hundred.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a constable, I heard an uproar; I came up to the prisoner at the Castle and Falcon gate; I took him into the tap room.

Q. Was Bignel there. - A. He was, he charged the prisoner with stealing the truss from the Red Lion gateway; I asked the prisoner how he came by it, he told me directly that a man had given it him to carry; he was to carry it to the corner of Wood-street, he said he thought he should know the man again; he was a decent man, he was to have a shilling for carrying it; I had a knowledge of the lad, not in any bad way; he is an apprentice to a silversmith in St. Ann's-lane; I sent to his master and for the book-keeper; he came down with the waggoner; we proceeded then to Guildhall; that is all I know.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I am porter to Messrs. Hotham's and Co. 28, Clements-lane.

Q. Did you take that parcel to go by the Bedford waggon. - A. Yes, I delivered it to the book-keeper. I directed it myself.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. Five pounds.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-14

84. JOHN BERRINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , a waiscoat, value 6 s. the property of John Fearn .

JOHN FEARN. I am a salesman , I live at 154, Hounsditch .

Q. Did you lose a waistcoat at any time. - A. Yes it was on my shew board, I was out at the time. I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM KING . I am servant to Mr. Fearn. On the 23d of December, about half past five o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop window, two other persons were with him; they said go in and take the waistcoat.

Q. Where was you at that time, could you see. - A. No. I was sitting behind the counter; I could see all over the place; he came some way into the shop and took the waistcoat out; there was a pair of gaiters on the waistcoat; when he took the waistcoat the gaiters fell. I halloaed out, and the constable was on the other side of the way looking at him. The prisoner ran down Gun-square, and threw the waistcoat down; the constable caught him, it being no thoroughfare. I am sure he is the same person, he had a Belcher handkerchief on.

THOMAS KING THOMPSON . I was in Houndsditch at the time this happened.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, and the two others that were with him. I did not actually see him go in, I saw him come from the door, with the waistcoat in his hand. The two others that were with him held their coats out to shade the light, that no one should see what was done; the lad came out and cried give me my waistcoat; the prisoner made a turn, and threw the waistcoat down in Gun-square; I was quite close to him when he threw the waistcoat down. I watched his coming out of Gun-square; I knew it was no thoroughfare. I apprehended him; I have had the waistcoat ever since. The prisoner when I took him said he was the wrong person.

Q. Do you know whether he had any handkerchief about his neck. - A. He had a Belcher handkerchief on and a brown great coat.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Houndsditch. I saw four or five lads about my height, they had soldier's great coats on; I saw two of them run up the archway, and the other two towards the church; I heard some people running, I thought they were coming after me; I ran about two yards, that gentleman took me I said I was the wrong person; I had not a Belcher handkerchief on.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-15

85. FRANCIS MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of January , a watch, value 5 l. and two watch cases, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Dodds .

JOSEPH DODDS . I am a ship and insurance broker .

Q. Did you lose a watch and two watch cases on the 10th of January last. - A. I did; it was near one o'clock, I was coming down Fleet-street ; near to Salisbury-court the prisoner at the bar came up and snatched the watch out of my pocket; I immediately seized him by the collar and held him fast, at the same time he handed the watch to some of his accomplices; they received it in their hands and ran up the street; there was one or two. I see him receive the watch. I called the watchman and the prisoner was secured.

Q. Have you ever been able to find your watch again. - A. No.

Q. What was the value of your watch. - A. Four or five pounds; it was a metal watch jewelled.

Q. Were you sober at this time, had you been drinking with any friend. - A. No, not any thing. I live in Lambeth-street, Goodman's Fields; I had been into St. Martin's-lane, I supped there.

Jury. Were you near to a lamp at the time. - A. I was not directly under a lamp; I could discern and see about me very well.

GABRIEL CONNER . I was constable. I took the prisoner in custody; Mr. Dodds charged him with snatching his watch out of his pocket; the prisoner denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the other side of the water to my home in Fleet Market; there was a mob made by that gentleman, he got hold of me, he said I had got his watch; there were two or three people that pushed him, I did not know them; they took me to the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-16

86. JOHN LITTLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Pavey , about the hour of eight at night on the 11th of December , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein two gowns, value 10 s. five silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a bed gown, value 5 s. and one pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of the said Mary Pavey ; - a hat, value 4 s. two pair of trowsers, value 5 s. three waistcoats, value 5 s. two shirts, value 4 s. a coat, value 10 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of John Gronan .

MARY PAVEY . I live in Elbow-lane, Shadwell .

Q. Did you lose any thing on the 11th of December last. - A. Yes, all the articles in the indictment, my property and my lodger's; my lodger had left the property with me, I was answerable for them if any lost. I left my house on the 10th of last month; on the 11th it was broken open; I returned on the 17th and applied to the office; I went down with the lodger that part of the property belongs to to Gravesend on business, and was absent a week.

Q. Who did you leave in your house. - A. No person at all. I double locked my door, and fastened my windows with a pin and key. I found two trunks broken open; one contained my property and the others my lodger's; I had seen my things on the day I went away. On coming back on the 17th I found the door in the same situation as I left it; the front and back windows were both broken open; the window shutter was wrenched open, and part of the board was broke where the bolt is in; the front window pane of glass was taken out, apparently with a penknife; the point of the penknife was found in the window.

Q. When did you see your things again. - A. On the following day; they were produced by the pawnbrokers.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office. On the 17th of December I was applied to by Mrs. Pavey to apprehend the prisoner at the bar; I went down to the house with her, I found the front shutter was broken open, and the back shutter, I found two trunks and a desk that were in the house had been broken open. The prisoner was brought to me the next morning by Mr. Strong the headborough for rioting;

I took him in custody, he told me where the property was. I took the prosecutrix with me to the different pawnbrokers, stopped the property, and told them to attend at the office and produce the goods.

Prisoner. The prosecutrix said, provided I would tell her where the property was she would forgive me. I told her where the rest of the party where that were concerned with me.

Brown. There was no such thing mentioned; when he was brought, I said I am very glad to see you; she told me immediately.

MR. BELL. I am a pawnbroker; these goods were pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of December; a pair of trowsers, waistcoat and shirt, for fourteen shillings; on the same day a hat for four shillings; on the 14th of December, a pair of trowsers for two shillings, and a coat for one pound; on the 15th, two gowns for ten shillings; on the 16th, four handkerchiefs for ten shillings; the 17th, a bed gown, and a pair of shoes for three shillings. I am positive the prisoner is the person; they were pawned in the name of John Pavey .

MARGARET SMITH. I live in Elbow-lane. On the 11th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was coming up the lane, I saw him getting out of the window; when I got up to him he had get on the ground, he had a bundle under his left arm, he was fastening the window shutter with his right hand; I knew it was him by the light of the chandler's shop window, I had known him a great while.

Q. What business is he. - A. I never knew him to be any thing. I did not know Mrs. Pavey was not in her house; I walked on.

Prisoner. I and the other boy gave her five shillings not to say, any thing, and we were to treat her with going to the play.

Q. You convict yourself - is that true witness. - A. No.

Prisoner. Fitzgerald was a party concerned in it; I told Mr. Brown and Mrs. Pavey of it; they would not go after him.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a pawnbroker's servant.

Q. Was any thing pawned at your shop by the prisoner. - A. Yes; I am sure it was him; one coloured shirt, a waistcoat, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief, for nine shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only, not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-17

87. SARAH DOUGLASS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , two table cloths, value 5 s. the property of Peter Thompson .

PETER THOMPSON . I am a victualler , I live at the Crown and Anchor, New-street Hill, Shoe-lane , the prisoner was my servant for three weeks; I discharged her. On the 13th of December, I missed three table cloths; upon enquiring where she was, I found her next door to where I live, I went and taxed her with the theft, she denied it; I told her I was sure that she had got my property, so I took her in custody.

CHRISTOPHER STANLEY . I am an officer. On the 15th of December last I took the prisoner in custody; she denied the charge I asked her where the table cloths were, I told her probably it might be the better for her if she told me. I found the table cloths at Mrs. Scotts, No. 19, in the Old Change; the prisoner shewed me the house.

ANN SCOTT . I live in the Old Change.

Q. What are you. - A. My husband is a warehouse-man.

Q. These table cloths were found at your house, who had you them of. - A. On the 15th of December I met Sarah Douglass in St. Paul's church yard, she came home with me and she asked me if she might leave the table cloths for about an hour. In about an hour she returned with Mr. Thompson and the constable; she gave to them Mr. Thompson herself.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place I was not hired to Mr. Thompson as a servant; he asked me to assist him till he got a servant; he agreed to give me a shilling a day, instead of that he only gave me twelve shillings. On Monday night after I was discharged, he came and said he had missed two or three table cloths; if I would tell him where the table cloths were, I should go about my business.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-18

88. JANE PATTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on 5th of December , two pound weight of tobacco, value 5 s. the property of James Taddy , James Tomlin and Alexander Hatfield .

ALEXANDER HATFIELD . I am a tobacconist .

Q. Have you any partners. - A. Yes, Jame's Taddy, and James Tomlin . I saw the property taken from her.

GEORGE SNITH . I am apprentice to James Tomlin . Having had suspicion of this woman, on Saturday the 5th of December, between the hours of one and two, I saw the prisoner put something into her apron; I let her go out of the door and called her back again, and I found this roll of tobacco in her apron.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had it in my pocket; I was going to give it to an acquaintance who was going to sea; I did not think any harm of it. I never did such a thing before.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Month in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-19

89. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of December fifty two gross of buttons, value 8 l. the property of James Deykin .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

EDWARD CLARK . Are you employed by Mr. James Deykin, who keeps the Bell inn, Wood-street . - A. Yes.

Q. What is Mr. Deykin. - A. He is a carrier from London to Birmingham.

Q. In the day stated in the indictment had you a variety of parcels in your master's cart to take to different persons. - A. I had.

Q. Among others had you a parcel No. 40. - A. Yes.

It was directed to Mr. Welford, Lad-lane; I set out with the different parcels a little before nine, and when I arrived at Mr. Welford's house the clock had gone nine; the parcel was gone.

ANTHONY HARRISON . Q. You are an officer of police. - A. Yes; on Saturday the 19th of December I was going up Noble-street, near Wood-street in the city, about ten minutes after nine; I met the prisoner and two others with him, he had this bundle on his shoulder I crossed over, followed him, and catched hold of his collar, I asked him what he had got there; he instantly threw it off his shoulder; I laid hold of him, he attempted to run; in struggling to get away he tore his shirt. I secured him with my right hand, a scuffle ensued, I pulled of one side and he of the other; he tried to put his hand in his pocket, and when I found that I struck him once or twice with my fist; I afterwards examined his pocket, I found this knife; the other two escaped. I took him to the Bell public house and secured him; he told me he came honestly by it. This is the bill of parcels, and this is the carman's note.

Q. Upon what account did you take him. - A. I knew the persons that were with him; I never saw the prisoner before that morning.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going down the street a man came up to me and asked me if I would carry the parcel for him; he gave me half a crown. I carry things for any body.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-20

90. WILLIAM ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , a bottle, value 3 d. and a pint and a half of wine, value 5 s. 9 d. the property of Nicholas Temple .

NICHOLAS TEMPLE. I am a dealer in wine and spirits , I live in Fleet-street, the prisoner was my cellar-man . On the 24th of December he went into the cellar to fetch up some wine; from suspicion I went into my cellar to fetch a bottle of out; my cellar is of great length, there is five vaults in it; it is the corner of Fleet Market . I went in the dark; he was at the farther vault but one.

Q. Had he a candle. - A. Yes; I was about six or seven yards from him, I saw him with his hands under his apron, fumbling with something, I could not tell what; he took his hands out and pulled his apron down to make it appear as if there was no bulk there. He then began to proceed toward the stairs; I walked backwards in the dark, he could not perceive me nor hear me; I asked him for the candle to reach down a bottle of stout. When I came to the foot of the stairs he was standing, he offered me to go first, I told him to walk up first; as soon as he was up stairs he asked me for the change that he was to take to the gentleman where he was going with the wine.

Q. He was going to carry some wine out. - A. Yes, a single bottle; I told him the change was ready, but I wanted something with him first; I laid hold of his leather apron, I said what have you got in your small clothes, you have got a bottle of wine here; I told him to pull it out, he resisted and shook his apron over it again. I went for the constable, and while I was absent he took it out, my wife saw him, she is here; when I came back I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said if I must tell the truth, he meant to have a bottle of wine for his Christmas day's dinner.

Prisoner. I did not intend to take it away, I only brought it up to save me the trouble of going down again.

Q. Why did you bring the bottle of wine up in your breeches. - A. It was in my coat pocket.

MARGARET TEMPLE . Q. When your husband was absent what happened. - A. I stood over the prisoner, I saw him pull the bottle of wine out of his small clothes, he endeavoured to put it in a little cupboard behind him. I put my foot against the cupboard door, and he put it down.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of taking it out of the house, nor did I mean to take it out of the house.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped on the Day of his discharge .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-21

91. ISAAC CASTLE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon Mary Little , on the 8th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a silk shawl, value 5 s. her property.

Second count the same as the former, only charging it to be the property of John Thornborough .

MARY LITTLE . Q. On the 8th of December last were you going towards Chelsea. - A. I was going to Hans-place, Sloane-street, about half past five.

Q. It was dark then was it not. - A. No, it was moon light.

Q. Did you observe any body following of you as you was going there. - A. Yes, a man with a long rough great coat.

Q. Where was you when you first observed him. - A. At the top of Sloane-street.

Q. How far did he follow you. - A. He followed me quite down to Hans-street

Q. Did he turn into Hans-street. - A. Yes, into Hans street.

Q. What happened upon your turning into Hans-street . - A. He caught me by the leg and throwed me down; he took the shawl out of my hand when I was down and ran off with it.

Q.Having taken the shawl from out of your hand, what was then done. - A. He ran off with it. I got up and went into a green grocer's shop, and told the man that I had been throwed down; I asked him to go with me to Hans-place. When the boy was going to take me to Hans place, I said the man had taken a crimson shawl from me; a milkman heard me, he pursued him and took him.

Q. Did you know the milkman. - A. No.

Q. When you were going with the green grocer's lad to Hans-street you met a milkman. - A. Yes, the milkman said he saw the man run round the corner.

Q. You mentioned it to the milkman and he pursued him. - A. Yes, the milkman pursued him after I left the green grocer's shop.

Q. Did you see the man afterwards that evening that throwed you down. - A. No.

Q. Did you see the man's face before he throwed you down. - A. I saw him just before we got out of Sloane-street to go into Hans-street; he turned round and I saw his face, I saw the man turn round.

Q. Did you see his face. - A. He had his coat buttoned up round his neck, I could not see his face.

Q. What was the colour of his coat. - A. Rather a dark olive colour.

Q. Did you take any notice whether he was a short or tall man. - A. He was shorter than me, I observed, when he turned round.

Q. Did you ever see the shawl again. - A. Yes, I saw it that night when the man was confined; the milkman shewed me the shawl again at the watch-house.

Q. Did you see the man at the watchhouse. - A. No.

Q. What became of the handkerchief, was it left with the milkman. - A. Yes.

Q. Whose shawl was it. - A. Mrs. Thornborough's of Hans-place.

Q. What is her husband's name. - A. John.

Q. What sort of a shawl was it. - A. A large crimson plain shawl.

Q. No name upon it. - A. Not any.

Q. What was it made of. - A. Silk.

Q. Was it only silk, was there no other material in it. - A. I do not think there was any other material in it.

Prisoner. She says she came to see her shawl at the watchhouse.

Court. She says the shawl was shewn to her at the watchhouse by the milkman.

Prisoner. She said very wrong.

Witness. I do not know whether it was the watch-house or no; it was the place where he was confined all night till the next morning.

EDWARD COLTEN. Q. Were you in Hans-street any time on the 8th of December last. - A. Yes.

Q. What time. - A. About half past five; I was coming out of Sloane-street to go into Hans-street; I saw the man run round the corner to go into Sloane-street again, towards Sloane-square; then I went round to go into Hans-place to serve two families; I saw this young lady, she said she had been robbed; I told her I would go after the man and catch him.

Q. You mean by the lady, the last witness. - A. Yes. I went after the man, I caught him.

Q. Was it the same man you saw run round the corner. - A. Yes; I caught him almost down to Sloane terrace.

Q. How far was it from where you met him. - A. Almost a quarter of a mile.

Q. Where was the shawl. - A. It was stuffed in his coat at his bosom; I took it from him; that was in Sloane-street where I took the shawl from him.

Q. I want to know whether you took the shawl away immediately upon laying hold of him. - A. Yes, I took it immediately away when I took him over the way.

Q. Then where did you carry him to. - A. I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the man whom you saw run round the corner. - A. Yes, he looks like the man.

Q. Look at him and see whether he is the man that you took to the watchhouse. - A. He looks a great deal like the man.

Q. Have you any doubt about it. - A. I have no doubt at all.

Q. Then why did not you say so. - A.After I took him to the watchhouse I took the shawl home, I have kept it ever since.

Q. How was the man dressed. - A. In a dark rough coat, apparently a dark brown. I produce the shawl.

Q. Did you shew the lady it that night at the watch-house. - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the prisoner. - A. The next day he was carried before Mr. Dudley and committed to prison.

Prisoner. Did not you say the lady came to see the shawl at the watchhouse. - A. Yes.

Q. I did not see her. - A. No, you was locked up, and she was in the room.

Court. Did any body follow after you in pursuit of the prisoner. - A. Yes, John Hicks .

Q. Did he come up when the man was laid hold of. A. A little while afterwards he came up.

Q. Did he come up before you took the shawl from him. - A. I do not think he did; I did not see him for some time afterward that I had the shawl from him.

Q. You are not sure, perhaps. - A. No.

Jury. Did he make any resistance when you first seized him. - A. Very little; there were a great many people came round; then he struggled a little, we had a little bit of a rumble; then we went down to the watchhouse together.

JOHN HICKS . My master's name is Walker, he is a green grocer.

Q. Did miss Little come to your house and complain that she was robbed. - A. Yes; I went with her from my master's house.

Q. Going away from your master's house to her house what happened - did you pursue after any person that robbed her. - A. Yes, I followed the milkman; he pursued a man in a rough great coat.

Q. Where was that man in a rough great coat when you pursued him. - A. Almost down to Sloane Terrace. We saw him tumble down by the paling.

Q. Did you see him fall down. - A. Mr. Colten did.

Q. My question is, did you see him fall. - A. I did, before I pursued him.

Q. What made him fall. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. However, he fell down. - A. Yes.

Q. How long after Colten had got hold of him did you come up to him. - A. He was at the place where Mr. Colten first laid hold of him; I saw Mr. Colten take a shawl out of his bosom.

Q. Did you go to the watchhouse with Colten. - A. No, I went to fetch the lady; I went with him, but I did not go in.

Q. How long was he at the watchhouse when you went to fetch the lady. - A. About five minutes.

Q. Did you take any notice of his face so as to swear to him. - A. No.

Q. However, he was a man in a rough great coat. - A. Yes.

Q. What colour. - A.Dark brown.

Jury. Was the person running when you saw him tumble down. - A. I do not know.

Colten. I saw him running, he was running when he tumbled down.

Q. When you run after the prisoner did he seem to

stoop down or did he fall down. - A. He fell down; I have asked a man in Sloane-street that knew him; he says he is a hard working man.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at the shawl, is that the shawl. - A. That is the shawl, I know it by the grease that is in it.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN. - A highway robbery consists in taking away goods in a violent manner on the King's highway; and the fact of this young woman being robbed by somebody there is no doubt. She has told you some man caught her by the leg just as she got into Hans-street, threw her down, and took the shawl away from her; that in law is enough to constitute a highway robbery. - The next question is, whether the prisoner is the man; she says it was a man in a dark rough great coat; a man in a dark brown rough great coat is seen turning round the corner of Hans-street into Sloane-street by the milkman. Upon her telling the milkman that she was robbed, he pursued after the man and caught him; that man turned out to be the prisoner; and from under his breast is the shawl found which was taken from her by a man in a rough great coat. Likewise Hicks as he was going home with the lady, upon his meeting the milkman, he likewise pursued after him; - he has told you when he came up to him, from out of the bosom of the prisoner at the bar was taken that shawl. There is no accounting how he got this shawl in any other way than he being the man that laid hold of her leg, throwed her down, and took it from her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

[The prosecutrix recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-22

92. SUSANNAH CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , two blankets, value 7 s. two sheets, value 4 s. and two pieces of carpet, value 7 s. the property of Ann Fisher , widow.

ANN FISHER . I live at No. 12, Nicholas-lane, Cannon-street . I used to let the ground floor out as an accounting house. On the 12th of December, about half past three in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my house and walked up the three pair of stairs; the street door is generally open. She stripped my son's bed of two blankets, two sheets, and two pieces of carpet; I I saw her coming down the second pair of stairs with a bundle in the front of her gown; I asked her who she wanted. she said one Mrs. Parsons that lodged there; I told her I had no woman lodger in my house; I was suspicious, as she had such a great bundle before her, that she had robbed my son's bed; I asked her what she had got, she said she had some things for Mrs. Parsons; I told her to come down and let me see what she had got for Mrs. Parsons; she came down with the things, she said you may see if you like what I have got; I looked in her lap, I perceived she had got my blankets, sheets, and carpeting; I put my fist up, I said you wretch, you have been up three pair of stairs and robbed me of my bedding. I took hold of the things and in vexation I tossed them into the room and she ran down stairs. Mr. William Walton that rented the accounting house of me pursued her and brought her back.

Q. How soon was it that she was brought back. - A. In about five minutes. I am sure it was the same person that robbed me that was brought back.

Prisoner. Will you take your oath that I was the person that you met on the stairs. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime; when I was brought back, the prosecutrix said she only knew me by my coat.

Q. to prosecutrix. Did you see her face. - A. Yes.

Jury. Mr. Fisher is not your passage very dark. - A. It is, there is a light on the stairs that comes from the side of the stairs; I am sure she is the same person.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-23

93. SARAH BOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. two pewter pint pots, value 3 s. and two pewter half pint pots, value 3 s. the property of Margaret Andrews , widow .

MARY CLEMENTS . I live at the Crown, Stationers-court , I am a servant to Mrs. Andrews, she is a widow, she keeps the house. On the 12th of December, I missed the pots out of the kitchen, between eight and half after eight in the morning; the prisoner chaired at our house; directly she was gone, I went down stairs, and looked at the pots that I had left there; I missed a quart pot, a pint pot, and two half pints; I told my fellow servant; he and the constable went together to Mrs. Bott.

Q. Did you know where she lived. - A. I did not. my fellow servant did.

GEORGE REYNOLDS . Q. You live at the Crown too. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do in consequence of information from the last witness. - A. I fetched Kimber the constable, and we proceeded to her apartment, No. 61, Golden-lane; there I found the prisoner, I told her we had come for the pots that she had taken away from our house; she said, she was sorry for what she had done, she would give up the pots that she had taken away; she begged for mercy.

Q. How many did she give you. - A. Two pint pots and two half pint pots out of the cupboard, and one quart pot the officer took out of her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. All the time I chaired for Mrs. Andrews, I never did such a thing before; what could possess me I do not know; the prosecutrix gave me some brandy; I did not know what I was about.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-24

94. ELIZABETH MERWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , two coats, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Sapwell .

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am constable of the ward of Bishopgate; I can only speak to the property.

SARAH WILSON . On Friday the 9th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I went out and left the street door upon the latch.

Q. Do you live in Sapwell's house. - A. Yes, in the one pair; I returned about one o'clock, I found the door on the latch the same as I left it. About three o'clock I heard some person come from the three pair of stairs; my room door being open, I saw the appearance of a woman going down stairs; I followed her down into the street, she turned up White Hind-court; there I saw a woman of the name of Tindal, I asked her to stop the prisoner till I informed Mr. Sapwell;

I followed the prisoner, I had strong suspicion of her; I did not see what she had about her.

Q. Is this the person you saw come down stairs. - A. Yes.

SUSANNAH TINDAL . I met the woman in White Hind-court; Mrs. Wilson told me to stop her, till she fetched Mr. Sapwell; the prisoner is the same person, she had two coats, a black and a blue coat; I took her into the White Hind public house till Mr. Sapwell came and took her.

Prosecutor. I went to the White Hind, I found the prisoner there; and the two coats laying by the table by the side of her: here is a blue coat and a black coat; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped the Day of her discharge .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-25

95. ANN BRUNCHER , alias BRUNKER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , a hempen sack, value 1 s. and twenty two pounds weight of cotton, value 1 l. 3 s. the property of Mark Taylor .

DAVID EVANS . I am Mark Taylor's warehouse-man; he is a cotton merchant , No. 4, College-hill , I catched the prisoner with the cotton coming out of the warehouse up one pair of stairs, on the 8th of December, about half after two o'clock.

Q. Was she a work woman there. - A. I am informed she had worked before I was warehouseman; I never saw he before, I catched her as a thief; I saw the cotton in her arms; when she saw me she let the cotton fall down; going out of the door she fell down, I picked he: up, and brought her into into the accompting house, till my master came home; then he sent for a constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, me and my husband had worked for Mr. Taylor many times; I asked Mr. Taylor in the morning, if he could get me employ; I went to the west end of the town, and drank with two of my shopmates: then I went again to Mr. Taylor; after I had been in the accompting house and could not see him, I went up into the warehouse; that bag of cotton stood by me; thinks I, I will not be caught with this; I took it in my arms and threw it in doors. My husband is a wicked man; he has made Mr. Taylor believe I wanted to rob him; I have two children, and a bad husband that would do me all the harm in his power, though I have done him no harm, God forgive him; Mr. Taylor is a worthy man, he would not have done what he has, if it had not been for my husband; my husband was an Irish fortune hunter. I had a few hundreds a few years ago, when he had me; I believe him to be an honest man to his master, but I may say he is the worst of his country; he was in a little business of his own, when he got acquainted with the woman he now lives with, and him and her eloped away together; for months I have not received a farthing from him; I believe him to be an honest man in many respects, but he is an unworthy man to go to Mr. Taylor and get him to do what he has to me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-26

62. BENJAMIN SLOP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , a coat, value 2 s. 6 d. a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pocket book, value 6 d. the property of James Lloyd , jun.

Second count for like offence, the property of James Lloyd , sen.

HANNAH LLOYD . I live at No. 65, Old-street . On the 5th of January, about half past one, the prisoner came into the further part of my shop, and took the coat; I was in the back room, I saw him take the coat and run out of the shop with it; I cried stop thief, and followed him to a considerable distance; he dropped the coat and was taken by the neighbours. I am sure the prisoner is the man that took the coat, and that was stopped.

RICHARD TERRY . I am a shoemaker; as I was sitting at work I heard the cry of stop thief, and people running by my door.

Q. Where do you live. - A. In White Swan-gardens, Hoxton; I pursued the prisoner and took him in a garden opposite of my own house he; had got over the garden and laid himself down in a arbour.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three children, they are brought into great distress; if I get my pardon, I will never come here any more.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-27

96. JOHN MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , thirteen silver table spoons, value 10 l. six silver forks, value 5 l. and a silver ladle, value 1 l. the property of Ann Shum , in her dwelling house .

The case stated by Mr. Arabin.

PETER READ . Q. You are butler, I believe, to Mrs Shum. - A. Yes, she lives in Bedford-square .

Q. On the morning of the 30th of December, did you miss any plate from your pantry. - A. Yes, six silver table spoons, five desert forks, seven desert spoons, one table fork and one sauce ladle.

Q. From what place did you miss them. - A. From the closet in the pantry; they were in a tin tray, standing on a shelf in the pantry, close to the passage, just inside of the door.

Q. Has this passage a door to the area. - A. Yes, that is usually on the latch when the servants are out, and the area door generally stood open.

Q. What time had elapsed since you had seen these things. - A. I had seen these things at seven o'clock the same morning and I missed them before ten.

Court. When did you miss them. - A. About half after nine on Wednesday morning. I went and counted the rest of them and found what I have mentioned mising.

Q. You have seen them since. - A. Part of them.

BARNARD HALE . Q. You are coachman to sir Charles Price , who lives next door to Mrs. Shum in Bedford-square. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you waiting at your master's door with the carriage on the morning that we have been speaking of. - A. Yes, about half past nine.

Q. I do not know whether you saw any body go down the area - did you see any body come up. - A. I did not see any body go down, I saw the prisoner at

the bar come up, he had a dark brown coat and a linen apron on, he appeared very much like a carpenter; I did not see any thing that he had when he came up from the area.

Court. Look at the prisoner once more, and see whether you are certain he is the person. - A. He is; I have no doubt at all. I saw the prisoner again the day after at the office, I knew him again directly.

DAVID GORDON . Q. You are a pawnbroker. - A. I am, I live at 134, St. Martin's-lane. On Wednesday the 30th of December the prisoner came to my house between eleven and twelve; he brought three silver desert spoons, on one of the spoons was the letter S, he had a decent appearance then; he asked me to lend him one pound; I weighed them and offered him fifteen shillings; he said that his mother gave them to him, and that he was going to be married. When he gave me the name of Matthews, I told him that was not the name on the spoons; he said his mother gave them to him, I need not be the least apprehensive but that they were his own.

Q. What was the real value of them. - A. They are worth twenty shillings; I gave him a duplicate. I went to the office from the information of my son; I did not see the prisoner then, he was sent to Tothill Fields. On the Thursday following I went up to the office again, finding the prisoner there; I knew him directly. The officer had some more plate of the same description and the same letter.

THOMAS NELSON . Q. You are servant to Mr. Winfield. - A. Yes, 178, Drury-lane, he is a pawnbroker.

Q. Did you at any time see the prisoner at the bar. A. On the morning of the 30th of December, between the hours of twelve and one, he came to Mr. Winfield's shop, and offered these two table spoons to pledge; they are marked with a crest corresponding to some of the others.

Q. Did he pawn them. - A. No, I did not take them in; I asked him if they were his own, he said yes; I asked him a second time if they were his own, he said no, they were his mother's; I then asked him what they cost, he did not know; I asked him if his mother could come herself, he said yes, she should come; upon that he went out of the shop, leaving the spoons.

Q. Did he after that return. - A. Never.

Q. Are you certain that the prisoner at the bar was the lad that brought them. - A. I am certain of it.

Q. What is the value of these spoons. - A. Twenty-six shillings. I saw him on the Saturday following, then I knew him to be the same lad, and I said so there.

WILLIAM GORDON . Q. You are a pawnbroker, No. 92, St. Martin's-lane. - A. I am. On the morning of the 30th of December, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner offered me a silver sauce ladle, he asked me twelve shillings on it. From his appearance, and the questions I asked him, I immediately suspected they were stolen; I went round to the place he was in and took him into the inner part of the shop and detained him. I sent one of my lads to Bow-street for an officer; the officer found five desert forks on his person, a table fork broken in two, besides the sauce ladle he had offered to me; the sauce ladle is worth about fifteen shillings.

JOHN PERKS: Q. You are an officer of Bow-street. A. I am; I found the prisoner at Mr. Gordon's house. I searched him, he reluctantly let me search him; on his person I found five desert forks and a four-pronged fork, broken in two pieces.

Q. Did you see the ladle. - A. I did, I have had it in my possession. Mr. Gordon wrote his name in the bowl of it.

Q. What is the value of this plate, Mr. Gordon. - A. Two pounds ten shillings.

Q. to Read. Look at the desert spoon - first, whose property are they. - A. Mrs. Shum's.

Q. Are there initials or crest upon them. - A. There is; I am certain they are her property. The others have the initials; these two spoons have the crest; the sauce ladle is Mrs. Shum's. I have not the least doubt of the whole being Mrs. Shum's property.

Q. You missed them all at the same time. - A. Yes.

Q. Bedford-square is in the parish of St. Ann. - A. It is.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-28

97. JOHN COATES and ROBERT BADGER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Deward , about the hour of seven at night on the 5th of January , with intent to steal. and burglariously stealing therein, twenty-six yards of Irish cloth, value 4 l. and three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. his property.

JOHN DOWARD . I live at No. 5, New-street, Brompton, in the parish of Kensington .

Q. You are a housekeeper. - A. Yes, me and my family live there; I rent the whole of the house, I am a hosier and haberdasher .

Q. On the 5th of January had you your shop window broken by any body. - A. Yes, between seven and eight at night. I was in the parlour adjoining.

Q. Did you hear it break. - A. I did not; my little boy, between nine and ten years of age, was looking through the glass door, he heard a noise; I immediately rose and went into the shop. I observed the window broken.

Q. How near the time that you was alarmed had you observed that window before. - A. I had not observed it for some time; I think it was about an hour before. I think if it had been broken before my people would have told me.

Q. Had you observed that window in the course of the afternoon, to see whether it was broke yourself or not - A. Not particularly, I had not; I do not know that I had taken notice of it in the day.

Q. Upon your going into the shop and observing a window broke, what then. - A. I observed a piece of Irish linen and three handkerchiefs were taken away.

Q. Where were they taken from. - A. They were taken from near that part where the window was broken; they were laying against the piece of glass that was taken out, and the three handkerchiefs were upon it; they were laying on the frame, which is a kind of thing made on purpose for putting these things on; they were not leaning against the window, but almost close to it.

Q. How near the time of your alarm had you observed the handkerchiefs. - A. I cannot exactly tell; I had observed them there before.

Q. Having found that your window war broke, and some of your stock was gone, what did you do. - A. I went out immediately and went towards Hyde Park corner; not seeing any person that I suspected I was returning; in a few yards from Knightsbridge barracks I observed the prisoner Coates on my left side, with something under his great coat; upon that I seized him, and putting my hand within his coat I felt the cloth, I asked him where he got it from, he said he did not take it, but he got it from two boys; at that instant I observed two boys close to him; a person passing by I desired him that he would seize these boys, he seized Badger; the other prisoner and the other boy made his escape. We took them to Knightsbridge watchhouse; I asked Coates what he had done with the handkerchiefs he took out of the window; he took them out of his pocket and they were delivered to me. Badger denied any knowledge of the transaction. Coates said he received the goods from Badger, and a boy of the name of Lacey, that made his escape; Badger was by at the time; Coates was afterwards searched, and various other articles were found in his possession.

Q. They were not yours. - A. No. In the first instance I observed blood upon the hand of Badger, it was cut down on the back part of it, and bled very fresh, as if it was fresh cut, and the blood was quite wet upon the back of his hand. I did not examine the window till the next morning; I found a piece of glass taken out, it appeared to be done with a sharp instrument; it was taken out nearly whole, and the piece laid by the side; I should suppose a knife had been put in between the putty, and there was some blood upon the window frame.

Q. Have you the handkerchiefs and the piece of Irish cloth. - A. I have not; I left them at the watchhouse; they were brought to Bow-street the next morning and delivered it into the care of Adkins the officer.

Q. Was that piece of cloth and the handkerchiefs that were delivered to Adkins at Bow-street office the same as were taken from your house. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ADKINS . Q. You are an officer of Bow-street. - A. Yes. I produce the linen and the handkerchiefs, that were brought by the constable or the watchhouse keeper.

Q. Mr. Doward, look at them again and see whether that linen and handkerchiefs are the same that were taken out of the shop window. - A. It is the same, I know it by the number upon it; it is the same piece of linen, and they are the handkerchiefs that I took from the boy.

Q. What is the value of the piece of cloth. - A. It cost me above five pounds; I valued it at four pounds, it cost me four shillings and two pence a yard; the handkerchiefs are of the same pattern, and of the same quality; I have no particular marks upon them.

Q. What are the materials of which they are made. - A. Two of them are muslin, and one of them silk.

Q. Were two of the handkerchiefs that you lost made of muslin, and one of silk. - A. Yes; the boy gave them me out of his pocket, and they were of that pattern; the three cost me about half a guinea.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. They are common handkerchiefs, they are common in town. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your mark to the linen, or the wholesale dealer's mark. - A. The wholesale dealer's.

Q.Then you do not know, but what he sends out other linen of the same quality, with the same mark. - A. I do not know it.

Q. It is not your own mark. - A. It is not my own mark.

Q. You said you took no particular notice of this window during the day. - A. I did.

Q. Though Coates made this confession, Badger he denied it. - A. He did before.

Court. What do you mean by denying it before; when he was first taken to the watchhouse you said that Badger denied any knowledge of the transaction; Coates said he received them from Badger, and the boy that was not taken; you have introduced a confusion in the business, by using the expression, he denied before. - A. Coates said he received them from two boys; Badger denied it.

Q. When he said he received them of Badger, and Lacey on a subsequent day, what did Badger say. - A. Nothing; he afterwards said so at the watchhouse.

WILLIAM DOWARD . Q. You are son of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in your father's house on the 5th of January. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the window being broken. - A. I was in the parlour at the time; my brother first heard the noise.

Q. Did you hear it. - A. Yes, I heard something as if peas had been thrown against the window.

Q. What time was that. - A. Between seven and eight when my brother gave the alarm, I got up with the rest.

Q. How near to the time of hearing this noise that you was describing the peas being thrown against the window, had you seen the window. - A. When I hung up the slate that was between two and three in the afternoon, then I discovered the window was not broken, I had not observed it after that time. I saw the blood in the morning on the window frame, just under the place where it was broken.

WILLIAM COPOUS . I was in Mr. Doward's parlour at the time the alarm was given; I heard a window break, I did not know it was in the shop; in the course of a minute afterwards the little boy saw somebody take the things out of the window; I run out directly. I observed the window was broken and some blood was on the frame.

Q. Did you observe it at that time. - A. I did; I ran after them, I did not take them; on our returning to the watchhouse, I found these things; they do not belong to Mr. Doward.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Who was in the parlour with you. - A. There were Mrs. Doward, the three sons, and Mr. Doward.

Q. How came you to be so much quicker of hearing than them - were they all deaf. - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. I shall not ask you any more questions.

Court. You asked him if they were all deaf - he answered you no.

Q. You were asked if all the other people were deaf - did any body else hear the window break. - A. The little boy heard it, and I think Mrs. Doward heard it.

WILLIAM HILL . Q. You I believe were required by Mr. Doward to lay hold of Badger. - A. Yes.

Q. You was the person he spoke to at Knightsbridge. A. Yes. I laid hold of Badger immediately, and the

other made his escape.

Q. What did you hear them say. - A. I heard Coates say that he had got the property from Badger, and the other boy Badger said he did not know any thing about it; going along I felt his hand, and his hand was all wet with blood; then we took him to the watchhouse, and then Badger owned that he was a confederate with Coates; Badger said that he had been with him all the afternoon.

Q. Repeat the words that Badger said, as near as you can. - A. He said, they had been with him all that evening; Coates and Lacey that run away, had been with him all that evening.

Q. How came Badger to say that he had been with them all the evening. - A. Coates said he had the things from Badger and Lacey, Badger said he had nothing to do in it; after he was searched, he said he had been with them all the evening.

Q. How came Badger to say that. - A. Badger said he come down to see his aunt; I asked him where his aunt lived; he said, he could not tell me; I said that is a queer piece of business, you come to see your aunt, and do not know where she lives; then we were going on towards the watchhouse, then he owned he had been along with them.

Q. Then if I understand you right, as you were going to the watchhouse, he said he was going to see his aunt, you asked where she lived, he said he could not tell where she lived. - A. Yes,

Q. You said it was a queer piece of business, and he could not tell where she lived. - A. Yes.

Q. Then afterwards he said he had been with them all the evening. - A. Yes.

Coates's Defence. I was going up to Brompton; I was looking for work there; in returning home, I met two lads, they said they would give me two half crowns to carry these things; thinking no harm I carried them.

Badger left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN - The circumstances against the two prisoners are first, that on Badger being apprehended, his hand was bleeding, and the widow frame having blood upon it; that when Coates was taken by the prosecutor with the goods in his possession, Badger and the other boy were seen near in company with Coates, and the assertion of Coates, uncontradicted by Badger, who acknowledged that they were in company all the evening together; there appears to me to be very strong circumstance against the two prisoners; however, it is for you to decide, how far in you opinion the prisoners are either or both of them innocent or guilty.

COATES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

BADGER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-29

98. SARAH WARD was indicted for that she about the hour of twelve at night, on the 10th of December , being in the dwelling house of Alexander Bruce , esq. feloniously did steal twenty four silver forks, value 15 l. fifteen silver desert spoons, value 5 l. seventeen silver handled desert knifes, value 1 l. eighteen silver handled desert forks, value 1 l. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 3 s. a window curtain, value 3 s. and part of the furniture of a bed, value 2 s. the property of Alexander Bruce , esq. that she afterwards did burglariously break to get out of the same .

ALEXANDER BRUCE , ESQR. I live at No. 5, Pall Mall-court .

Q. You are the occupier of the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar Sarah Ward . - A. Yes, she was in my service.

Q. When did she come in your service. - A. Only that day week that she left it: it must be the 2nd or 3rd of December last.

Q. When did she leave you. - A. Between twelve o'clock on Thursday evening, and eight o'clock on Friday morning on the 10th of December.

Q. Had you given her any notice or had she given you any notice of quitting your place. - A. She signified to Mrs. Bruce of her not staying in the place.

Q. Had you any previous intention of her going that night. - A. She was to go on Friday the 11th at any rate when another servant came.

Q. Had she received any notice of going on that day. A. I do not know that she had. On the evening of the 11th the other servant arrived, she was to have gone on the Friday when the other servant came, but she went on the night preceding she was to go on the arrival of another servant, but the other servant had not come before she went.

Q. Do you know what time she went whether it was in the night or in the morning of the next day. - A. I do not.

Q. What time did you get up on the Friday. - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. Before that time some of the other servants were up. - A. It happened at that time some part of my family were in the country; there was no other servant in the house at that time.

Q. Was Mrs. Bruce in the house at that time. - A. Yes, and two of my children; one is ten and the other about nine; my daughter about nine years old was up first, I presume I was up the next; Mrs. Bruce was unwell.

Q. Did you examine the fastenings of the house. - A. I did not take any observation whatever.

Q. Who was left to fasten the house the night before. A. The prisoner probably.

Q. You did not see in what manner she made the fastenings. - A. I did not.

Q. Your daughter is not here. - A. She is not.

Q. Did you miss the prisoner at the bar, upon your getting up. - A. She was missed immediately, my daughter went down; finding that she did not answer the bell then she was missed; my daughter found the street door open.

Q. That you do not know of your own knowledge. A. No.

Q. Upon the door being found open did you look about to see if there were any articles missing. - A. Mrs. Bruce did.

Q. Is she here. - A. She is not able to come, she is confined.

Q. Do you know the place where that property was usually kept. - A. Yes, I examined it myself and found twenty four silver forks missing, fifteen silver desert spoons, about a dozen and a half of silver handled knifes and forks, some bed furniture, a pillow and several other small articles that I do not recollect.

JAMES KIMBER . I live at Knightsbridge, I am a pawnbroker. On Friday the 11th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house and brought the twenty four silver forks, seventeen silver handled knifes, and eighteen

silver handled forks; she asked me to lend her eight guineas on them, she said they were her own property; she had a genteel appearance at the time, I told her I did not think they were her own; if she had brought them for some other person, I would send one of my servants with her, to see if they were the person property; she replied, that she brought them from Mrs. Bruce in Bromptom, and that my servant could not be admitted to see her, she was very ill; at last she consented to let him go with her; from her behaviour, I did not give credit to her; I sent two of my servants with her; they returned in a few minutes, and said that she had confessed that she had taken them from the same person; she refused to tell me at first, I told her I must take her in custody if she did not tell me who she took them from, but if she told me they might shew her the lenity that her case admitted of; then she said she had taken them from the same person.

Q. Repeat what you last said. - A. I told her that I must take her in custody if she did not acknowledge who she took them from, and if she would go quietly with me probably the person that she took them from would shew her that lenity that the nature of her case admitted of; I took one of my servants with me and her in a hackney coach to Mr. Bruce, and the articles along with me. I staid there till she was taken in custody. I produce the articles.

MARTHA HOLLIS . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I saw her about two years ago, she was then living in a respectable family in Chelsea parish. I live at No. 4, in the King's private road.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to you any time last month. - A. The prisoner came to me on the 11th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, she saw a bill in the window, it was to let a gentleman's house, she supposed it was lodgings to let; she came in a hackney coach, it stopped at my door, she asked me if I could let her have a bed, I told her no; she then asked me if I would let her sleep there for one night; I told her no; she asked me to let her sit up in my room all night, which I refused her; she then asked me if I would let her leave her things, while she seeked a lodging; I told her yes, she might leave them while she seeked a lodging; she said she was come out of the country off a long journey; she went out from me, taking first a small parcel from the basket which she had in her hand; a little before seven she returned and said she had got a lodging; she then asked me if I thought she could go to the top of Sloane street by nine o'clock, I told her she might; I did not see her any more that night; the small parcel she took out of the basket with her, but the bundle in the basket she left in my care till eleven o'clock the same evening, then Mr. Jones came down to my house in a hackney coach, and fetched them from my house.

Q. Was the bundle that she delivered to you the same that you delivered to Mr. Jones. - A. Yes, the same; I never altered it or meddled with it at all.

THOMAS JONES . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street.

Q. Were you sent to Mrs. Hollis. - A. Yes, I was. The prisoner told me it was in the King's-road, near Chelsea; she did not know the name, nor whereabout the house was.

Q. You found Mrs. Hollis there, did you receive from her what was in the basket. - A. I received from Mrs. Hollis a bundle in a basket; I have had it in my custody ever since. I produce them. She told me in Mr. Bruce's house; then I took Baker with me and her, and she shewed me the house.

- BAKER. Q. Did you accompany Jones when these articles were received from Mrs. Hollis. - A. Yes. I was in the coach with the prisoner.

Q. You have heard what he has told, do you agree with him. - A. Yes, they are facts that he has told.

Q. Now Mr. Bruce look at the things produced, first of all look at the silver forks - A. They are mine.

Q. When had you seen them before in your house. A. I had seen some of them a few days before in my house, perhaps two or three days; there is a crest upon them and the motto.

Q. Your own crest. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of these being your own. - A. Not the least doubt.

Q. You never parted with these. - A. Never.

Q. Whereabouts may be the value of these forks. - They are certainly worth fifteen pounds.

Q. You speak of that with certainty. - A. Yes; they cost me upwards of twenty pounds. I have looked at the desert spoons, they are marked with my crest and motto both; I have not the smallest doubt but they are mine; they are part of the articles lost from my house.

Q. The desert knives and forks with silver handles, have they the same mark. - A. No, but they have a mark; these are mine also.

Q. What is the mark upon them. - A. It is a spread eagle; those I missed were marked in the same way.

Q. The articles of furniture of the house, can you speak to. - A. Yes, the bed furniture is mine; I merely judge from the appearance.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner directing the officer to go to Mrs. Hollis. - A. I do not.

Q. When the prisoner was brought to your house was any thing said by you to induce her to confess. - A. She fell down upon her knees; I said nothing to her what I should do.

Q. Have you any house at Brompton. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg and pray for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Of stealing the goods in the dwelling house to the value of above forty shillings, but not of breaking out of the house.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor on account of her contrition.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-30

99. MARTHA DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Charles Titswell , in the King's highway on the 11th of January , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a hat, value 10 s. a silver band, value 8 s. and a half crown piece , the property of Charles Titswell.

Second count for like offence, a hat value 10 s. and a silver band, value 8 s. the property of William Thomas Lewis .

CHARLES TITSWELL . Q. How old are you. - A. I am fifteen years old. I live at No. 19, Hart-street, Bloomsbury-square.

Q. Were you employed to go on any errand on the 11th of this month. - A. Yes My mistress, about half after six in the evening, sent me into Gower-street, Bedford-square; from Bedford-square I was to go into

Broad-court, Bow-street, before I went home.

Q. What way did you go from thence. - A. I was to go down Plumtree-street, and to go down Drury-lane; instead of that I missed my turning and went down Dyot-street instead of Plumtree-street.

Q. What happened when you were going down Dyot-street. - A. As I was going down Dyot-street the prisoner took hold of my arm, and pulled me through a passage into a room.

Q. What time of the evening might it be then. - A. It was about seven o'clock then.

Q. Where was the prisoner standing. - A. Inside of a passage door.

Q. You did not go in the passage, did you, before she laid hold of you. - A. No; as I was going by the door she laid hold of my arm and dragged me in.

Q. Did you resist. - A. I could not get out, she laid hold of my arm, and when she got me in she locked the door.

Q. Did you go willingly in. - A. No, I pulled back as much as I could.

Q.When she got you in the room what then. - A. She called to her daughter to lock the room door outside.

Q. How do you know she was her daughter. - A. She called her her daughter.

Q. Do you mean the door of the house or the door of the room. - A. The door of the room.

Q. When she locked the room door on the outside what followed. - A. Then after that she searched my coat pocket, the prisoner did.

Q. Did you consent to her searching your pockets. - A. No, she would search me; she knocked me down several times with her flats.

Q. Where did you receive the blows. - A. On my breast. Then after she bent me, she said if I made a noise she would murder me; she searched my coat pocket, then my waistcoat pocket; she could find nothing there; then she unbuttoned my left hand breeches pocket, and took out half a crown; after that she took my hat away.

Q. Was it the hat that you have in your hand. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the band on them as it is now. - A. Yes.

Q. What did she do with the hat when she had taken it. - A. She throwed it under the bed; after that she called to her daughter to unlock the door, when she found I had no more.

Q. Her daughter did unlock the door did she. - A. Yes. She said if I made any noise when I went out she would murder me. She told me I might go when she had got my money; while she was calling the daughter to open the room door I got my hat.

Q. Where was the prisoner at that time. - A. She was at the room door, she locked it inside too.

Q. Did she see you when you got your hat, or was her back towards you. - A. She did not see me take it; while she was opening the door I put it behind my back; when the door was opened I come away with it; then afterwards she went into the room and missed the hat; she followed me again after that.

Q. How soon after that. - A. Just as soon as she missed it.

Q. That is what you suppose; I want to know how short a time after you came out of the room was it that she came after you. - A. She came directly after me

Q.When she came out of the door did she take the same course as you had done. - A. Yes. I was almost at the bottom of the street; she ran after me and laid hold of my hat; as soon as she laid hold of my hat these was a man come up to me that knew her, that belonged to her, he took me up in his arms, he said he would take me to the watchhouse.

Q. You do not know that he belonged to her. - A. I suspected that he belonged to her.

Q. But you do not know it. - A. No. When he said he would take me to the watchhouse some people came up, knocked the man down, and then he run away. When the man knocked the man down there was a mob, and the watchman came, he told me to go up the other side of the way, and he would follow me to the house to take the woman; he put his coat over the lanthorn, and when we came up we see her in the passage, she was talking to a man; as soon as we went in the man ran out.

Q. Do you know the person of the man she was talking with. - A. No, I should not know him again. When the watchman went in she said she never saw me; when she got to the watchhouse then she said she would give me the half crown.

Q. Did she take out the money to give to you. - A. She took two shillings, and wanted her daughter to lend her sixpence.

Q. What became of the half crown that she took from you. - A. She gave it to her daughter in the house before I came away.

Q. Before you first come away. - A. Yes. When she got to the watchhouse she struck at me, and said she would murder me; that was when she was going to be locked up.

Q. You refused to take the money, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that you did not go of your own accord into this house. - A. Yes; I should not have gone down the street if I had known it at all.

Q. Had you been taking any liquor that afternoon. - A. I never drink any kind of liquor.

Prisoner. I can contradict him in his saying I knocked him down.

TIMOTHY DONNOVAN . Q. You are the watchman that came up to this party. - A. Yes; there was a woman that went up the street as I stood opposite my box, she told me there was a boy crying up the street; with that I went up, there was a mob about the boy, he was crying, he told me he had been robbed; I asked him if he should know the person that robbed him if he saw them; he told me yes; I dispersed the mob, and told him to go before me to the house where he was robbed; I clapped my lanthorn under my coat; he went before me and I followed him; as we came up to the door the prisoner stood at the door in the entry, he gave charge of her; I went in and took the prisoner, and took her to the watchhouse. She wanted to make it up with him at the watchhouse; she had no half crown to give him, only two shillings, she wanted to give him the half crown.

Q. You heard her. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any violence used by her towards the boy at the watchhouse. - A. Yes, she made an offer to strike him.

Q. Was that after she offered the half crown or before. - A. I do not know positively whether it was after or before.

Q. Did you observe any marks of violence on the boy. - A. No.

JAMES PERRY . I am watchhouse keeper.

Q. Were you at the watchhouse when the prisoner was brought down that evening. - A. I was.

Q. Did you see and hear what past on the occasion. A. I did; I took the charge of her, and locked her up; previous to that she wanted to make it up with the prosecutor, she offered him two shillings, and called to her girl, who she stiled her daughter, to lend her sixpence, that was to make up the half crown; I would not suffer it, she was very violent against him when I would not suffer the boy to make it up; she swore and damned his eyes, if she would not murder him; she offered to strike him, and the watchman got in between them.

Q. When she offered the half crown, did she say what it was for. - A. No, only in general, that it was to make it up with him; he had charged her with taking a half crown from him, and using him ill, and endeavouring to take his hat from him; the next morning we took her to Marlborough-street; there before Mr. Conant she set up a plea, that he wanted to take liberties with her.

Q. Did she say any thing of that sort the night before. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my lord, yesterday was a week in the morning, I went out with twelfth-cakes, I got more liquor than did me good; in returning home a parcel of boys throwed mud at me, that lad came after me, he took the liberty of pulling me about; when I got in he charged the watch with me; I never saw him in my life before that night.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN. The circumstances are proved by the witness necessary make it a stealing; all this is done by force in the manner the boy has described; the case rests solely upon the evidence of the boy. If you see any improbability in his relation, I must confess I do not, if you believe what he has told you, you will find her guilty; if you do not believe the story he has told you, you will then acquit her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-31

100. ANN THOMPSON was indicted for the wilful murder of Joseph Walker .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

BARTHOLOMEW JEWEL . Q. What are you. - A. I am surgeon's beadle to the London hospital.

Q. Tell me what that is, - A. I am always attending on the surgeons, I am always with them.

Q. On the 26th of December last, was the deceased Joseph Walker brought into the hospital. - A. He was, between ten and eleven at night.

Q. Did you at the time he was brought in examine his person. - A. I saw the wound, it was on the left side.

Court. Describe what part of the side. - A. The lower part of the side, by the two lower ribs; a portion of the caul or omentum come through the wound. He died on the Monday following, he was afterwards opened.

Q. Do you know from the inspection of his body, that the wound was the cause of his death. - A. I have no doubt it was, I am certain it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You were present at the time the deceased was brought in. - A. I was; he was accompanied by the prisoner, she attended upon him, up to the time of his death; I believe the deceased died in her arms.

Q. Did she during the whole time he was there, from the time he came in the hospital, untill the time he die in her arms, appear to conduct herself in an affectionate way to the man. - A. Very much so indeed.

Court. Did he appear to apprehend that the wound would be the cause of his death. - A. I do not think he did.

MATTHEW ANTHONY . Q. You are a sea-faring man. - A. Yes; I reside in Denmark-street, East Smithfield.

Q. Did you know Joseph Walker the deceased. - A. I did, I had known him upwards of two months; I know the prisoner, they lived together at No. 9, and I lived at No. 10, the next door. On Saturday night the 26th of December, an alarm was given by a seafaring young man; I ran to the house where the deceased lodged; I went to the door, I found the door fast; it was then nearer nine than ten o'clock; with assistance I raised myself up, and looked through a hole in the window; I observed the woman nearly naked, she was hanging her head down; the deceased was laying on the floor, upon his left side. I saw Sophia Murray with a candle, I understood she just went in, and the prisoner's child was in the room.

Q. Had the prisoner at this time any thing in her hand. - A. She had then a clasped knife in her hand, it was open. I gave it to the officer (the knife produced.)

Q. At the time the deceased was laying on the floor did you hear him say any thing - A. He was groaning and holding his side.

Q. Did you hear her say any thing. - A. She appeared to be making him, she was endeavouring to make light of it to him, she was swearing him out of his notion; in my opinion he did not think he was wounded so much as he was; I went from the window, and a black man who is not here, William Dandige , got up took a look; after that little Bill Mackdonald , a publicans son came; I sent him down to the watchman; when the watchman came, they said who is that, he answered; they knew his voice and let him in; then I and Dandige went in; the watchman asked what was the matter, the prisoner answered nothing; the man was then laying on his left side; I said Old Thing, what is the matter; they called me Old Thing, and I called her old thing in a friendly way; she said, oh Jonas, and shook her head. (Jonas is a nick name they gave me in the street.) William Dandige took the candle and leaned over the deceased, and said there is blood, or something like blood; there must be something the matter more than common; immediately the prisoner at the bar said to Dandige, Mr. Man I will thank you to walk out, you have nothing to do with it; he did not go out immediately, she asked the watchman to turn him out, the watchman then turned round and asked him to go out, he went out and I remained in the room. The deceased was groaning; I said Nancy, I should like to see the wound; I had heard that he was stabbed; she touched me on the arm and desired me to wait till the watchman went out; the watchman went out, he saw the man laying and groaning, but he did not go near him; there was some conversation between the watchman and the prisoner; it was not particularly loud, nor was it private, but what it was I cannot tell; when the watchman was gone, I helped the deceased up, I spoke to him, he gave me no answer; I said Joe, what is the matter; she wished me to put him in a chair, he continued groaning; I put him in a chair and stood by him; his shirt was torn open,

there was blood upon the collar; he had a canvas frock on. I held the jacket of one side and saw the wound; not being able to see the wound fully, I asked the deceased to tear the Guernsey frock open; I asked for a knife to do it. This is the knife she had in her hand; she just held the knife up, she said no, I will not give you the knife, this is the h - y knife I did it with, I wish my b - y hand had been off before I had taken it in my hand; after a while she gave me the knife; I went towards the deceased, I said Joseph, let me open your frock; he seemed afraid of the knife, I did not cut it open; she went towards him and tore the Guernsey frock open; then I saw the wound fully, I saw a piece of flesh hang out about the length of my thumb, out of the wound; good God, I says, Nancy, he is very bad; she then said what had better be done; I told her she could do nothing more then send for a doctor; she was then crying over him, holding him, kissing him frequently, saying, oh Joseph, forgive me; he then says, Nancy, I forgive you; Sophia Murray was called, and she was sent for the doctor; while she was gone, the prisoner said what must she say to the doctor; I told her all that she must say was, that she knew nothing about it; if you do you will certainly die for it; I told her she must say he had been drinking, there was a jar then broken on the floor; I said perhaps the doctor may think he has cut himself by his falling about the floor, or that in his coming from Blackwall he has fell down; I told her so. The doctor came, he pulled the deceased's shirt of one side and looked at the wound, he tried to put the bit of flesh in, he could not; he touched her arm; they went to the door of the bed room together, he spoke to her two or three words, I could not hear what it was; then he said the man must be sent to the hospital immediately; she was crying freely; the doctor went away; there was a coach got; after a black man came in, he began scolding the woman, I said it is of no use you saying any thing more about it; she sent for some vinegar and washed his face and gave him some vinegar and water to drink. Price, the black man, fetched the coach, he is a fidler; he and the prisoner went in the coach with the deceased to the hospital.

Q. Did any conversation pass between the doctor and the deceased. - A. He did not speak to the deceased at all.

SOPHIA MURRAY . - Mr. Pooley. Where do you live. - A. I lived in the same house with the prisoner at the time. On the Saturday night this accident happened, I was at the public house, the sign of the Kettle Drum in the neighbourhood, I was asleep there; a man awaked me, he said there was murder done at home; this was between eight and nine o'clock at night. I went home with him, I saw the deceased in the front room, I went for the doctor; when I returned he was in the back room; the doctor ordered the man to be sent to the hospital. The prisoner told me he had been ill using of her, which he frequently used to do; she told me he had been beating her. I had seen him beat her many times.

Q. Did she tell you that he had been beating her in the hearing of the deceased. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understand you have been witness of his ill treatment to her. - A. I have, but not at that time.

JOHN GRIFFITH. - Mr. Pooley. You are a police officer. - A. I am. I know nothing of this transaction but what the prisoner told me. I apprehended her on Monday the 28th; I was informed that a man lay dead at the hospital that had been murdered; I went to the hospital to make enquiry, I found that the man lay dead there. When I went to Denmark-street I found that it was a black man that lived at No. 9, that was murdered; I went to the prisoner's house, her room was fast; I went up one pair of stairs, there I found the last witness with another girl, she said she expected her home every minute; she did not come; then I desired her to go with me to shew me where she was; she was at a neighbour's house a few doors off. I took her in custody and took her to her own house; she opened the door, and the window shutters; I searched the house, I could not find the knife; I asked how this man came by his death, she said they had been quarelling, he had beat her, she got him out of the house into the street, she then bolted the door and the shutter to keep him out; then he got round the house, over some paling; he pulled a pane of glass out of the back window and came into the bed room, then he began beating her cruelly, and no person was there but themselves; in the scuffle she said it was done. I asked her if she recollected taking up a knife, she said she could not recollect whether she did or not; she then shewed me her knee, she was very black on one side of her knee and bruised, she said he had given it her by beating her; she was likewise bruised across the eyes and nose. I took her to the office. I received the knife before the coroner at the London hospital, it was produced by the young man who gave evidence here; it was swore to then; that knife I have kept ever since.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

ELIZABETH JACQUES. - Mr. Gurney. Did you lodge in the same house with the prisoner and the deceased. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night the accident happened did you come home. - A. Yes, between seven and eight o'clock. I knocked at the door, the deceased came then to the door, she would not open it, she said she would not open it even for her mother; the deceased went right down the street and I went away; that was an hour before the accident happened, as nigh as I can tell.

Q. Why would not she open the door. - A. I cannot say; the deceased was outside of the door as well as me. I was there first.

CATHERINE BLUNT . - Mr. Knapp. Where you at the prisoner's house on the 26th of December. - A. I was going down the street, as near as I can recollect, about seven o'clock; I heard a great noise and swearing as if a man was out of his mind; when I came to the house of Ann Thompson I saw the deceased outside of the door, he was swearing and asking admittance, I heard a voice (which I supposed to be Ann Thompson , I did not see her) say, you shall not come in, you have no business here, go about your business; I then went on. I returned in about half an hour; as I entered the street I heard the same person.

Q. That is the deceased. - A. Yes. When I came up to him he kicked or knocked at Ann Thompson 's door; he came from the door exclaiming, with a dreadful expression, that he would be the death of her if he laid hold of her that night; I hurried past him as fast as I could; when I had got three or four doors farther I stopped and looked round, I heard a person come to

the door and ask for admittance, and by the voice I believe it to be Betsey Jacques, she was refused admittance; I then went home.

JOSEPH BLUNT . - Mr. Gurney. Are you the son of Catherine Blunt . - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in Denmark-street at any time on the night of the 26th of December. - A. Yes. I saw the deceased in the street, I knew him well; between six and seven o'clock he went down the street muttering and grating his teeth. On my return I saw him come down an alley, two or three doors beyond Mrs. Thompson's house.

Q. What time was that. - A. Between seven and eight o'clock; he went to the door and peeped through the key hole, he said he would be the death of her if he could get in, and the black b - r that took her part.

ANN MURRAY . - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live. - A. I live at 71, Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. Were you near the house of the prisoner on the 26th of December in the evening. - A. I was passing by, between eight and nine o'clock; I heard a heavy noise, it was a lumbering noise, as if something heavy was thrown; I heard Ann Thompson cry out murder several times; after that Joseph Walker , the deceased man, flew out of the door; I heard the door and windows fastened and nailed up by this woman; he said you may nail up your doors and windows, but I will break them open; he went on a little way, and then returned back, he said to himself, you bitch I will mark you this night for burning my face with a candle.

Court. Where was he when he said this. - A. He was in the street going back to the prisoner's house, about four or five doors off. In about ten minutes afterwards I heard the murder was done.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You live in Ratcliffe Highway. - A. Yes, No. 71.

Q. Have you known the prisoner long. - A. I know both parties; I have known the prisoner near two years; I never visited her only when I washed for her. I have heard quarrels repeatedly between them when I have been in the house.

Q. Was it a light or was it a dark night. - A. It was a very dark and wet night.

Q. There are a good many black sailors at that part of the town. - A. Yes.

Q. Can you in consequence of its being a dark night say that it was the deceased. - A. Yes, it was the deceased, I believe so, I saw nobody but him as I was passing by.

MARY GORDON . - Mr. Gurney. How near do you live to Ann Thompson 's house. - A. At the next door. A little past seven o'clock I was going down the street to get some candles, I saw Joseph Walker at the cellar window of Ann Thompson ; as I returned he stood at our door; I was rather frightened at seeing him stand there.

Q. Did you know him. - A. Perfectly well; he passed me and went down the alley; then I went in doors directly.

Court. Where does that alley go to. - A. Mrs. Thompson's yard and our yard goes into that alley.

Mr. Gurney. Could a person go into Mrs. Thompson's yard in that alley. - A. There are only palings; one part a man may get over. I did not see him get over the palings, nor did I hear him say a word.

JANE BARLOW. - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live. A.No. 4, Denmark-street.

Q. Do you remember the night this accident happened. - A. Yes; I was coming down the street, between the hours of seven and eight, the deceased said, Mrs. Barlow is that you, he was standing by Ann Thompson 's window; I answered him yes; says he, she has turned me out, I replied, that is no business of mine, as you fall out so fall in; the deceased said, never mind, I will come down to your house in five minutes and tell you something, and you shall be sent for; I went in, shut my door, and saw him no more.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you keep a public house in that neighbourhood. - A. I do, I have known the prisoner five years and a half; I never saw any thing amiss by the woman.

Q. I believe she and the deceased had both been in your house in the evening. - A. He had been in my house two or three times in the course of the evening; I think she was there about nine o'clock.

Q. Was the deceased sober that night. - A. He was not sober.

Q. Had any thing passed at your house in the evening. - A. Yes, for a few minutes; when she was there I saw the prisoner very much agitated; the deceased exclaimed against her, says he, I will be with you presently; she left the house, he followed; he appeared to be in anger.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. You say that the prisoner seemed to be agitated, and the deceased seemed to be in anger, he said he would soon follow her. - A. Yes.

Q. This was about nine o'clock. - A. It may be a few minutes over or under; he had been in my house three hours, backward and forward; I live about an hundred yards from the prisoner's house.

Q. At the time that she and Walker were in the house were they drinking together. - A. I do not think they were drinking together; there were two or three neighbours with this man; he had been singing and hooting, I called him to order once or twice; when she came in he sat at one end of the box and she at the other; he was in and out in the course of the evening; when he went out he might be gone ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. How soon after he left your house was it that you heard there was murder done. - A. I believe it was twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. What had she been saying to him when he said that he would be after her. - A. I did not hear what passed.

Q. Do you recollect whether she asked him to come home. - A. She exclaimed against his coming home, she said to him I have kept you long enough; you shall not come any longer. In about twenty minutes after they went out I heard of the accident.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

COURT. - GENTLEMEN. In this case you are to consider whether you are satisfied that the account the prisoner gave of the matter, and the witnesses severally and respectively give, who as they happened to have business, did meet this man in a very angry and intemperate state of mind, one of them hearing a rumbling as if something had been thrown, and some of them hearing the prisoner cry out murder - if you should be of opinion any such scuffle happened between them, and in fact that there was enmity between him and this

woman, and the story to be true, that he had been beating her before - if you believe that to be the case, and that this woman under these circumstances committed this act of violence, although perhaps she might have gone further than she ought to have gone; - in consideration of human infirmities, persons under these circumstances not having their recollection and reason and government of their passions, as in cooler moments they would have it. The law in that case extends the crime to manslaughter only. That they had been engaged in a dispute and a scuffle is manifestly proved by the witnesses; I must own that they do not say enough for you to be sure it was of that nature that called upon her, as a human being, to protect herself in that way which she has done. - If you see there is malice plain and clear in this case, you will find her guilty. I own it does not appear to me to have been done with that malice which the law requires to constitute murder; - if you should be of that opinion it reduces the crime to manslaughter.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of Manslaughter, not of the Murder .

Confined Three Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-32

101. MARY LINAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 50 s. the property of George Hammond , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE HAMMOND . I live at No. 7, Leicester-square, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster ; I am a linen draper .

Q. Did you lose any thing on the 15th of December. A. Yes, twenty eight yards of cotton.

Q. What is the value of that. - A. Fifty shillings; I had seen it a few minutes before we missed it, it stood on the counter a few yards from the door. In the evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I was standing in the shop; the prisoner came in the shop and made an attempt to steal this piece of print; she laid hold of it, and when she saw me observe it she let the print go and went out of the shop; upon which I took my hat and went out to watch her, thinking she might come back again. As I went from my own door the prisoner passed me; I then went nearly in the middle of the square, opposite of the door; I found her go to the shop again; not seing any person in the shop she went in and took the print.

Q. Was there any person in the shop. - A. There was a person in the shop, I had observed to him not to notice the door; I was opposite of the door, I saw her take the print, she came out with it; I let her go from the door a few yards, I took her in custody and brought her into the shop; I found the print under her cloak; I saw her take it off the counter.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to lose a frock; I came to this shop to look out a bit of cotton to make a frock; I did not take it out of the house; I wanted to buy a piece of cotton to make a frock, to return it to the owner.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18080113-33

102. ELIZABETH MINSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of December , ten yards of muslin, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Morhall and Price James Evans .

THOMAS MORHALL . I live in Russel-court, Covent Garden, in the parish of St. Martin .

Q. Have you any partner. - A. I have, Price James Evans .

Q. Has he a father living. - A. He has an uncle living of the same name.

Q. Is the warehouse part of your dwelling house. - A. It is; I built a warehouse in the yard from the shop, between the two buildings; I have a plan of the premises here. (The plan produced).

Q. Is the warehouse built in one, or part in one and part in the other. - A. It is built in one.

Q. Can you go into the warehouse from either of them. - A. Yes; you must go into the wareroom, which was once a yard, to go from one house to the other.

Q. You say that they were two houses, and that you built a wareroom in the yard; are both the houses that you speak of in Russell-court. - A. No, one in Russel-court and the other house comes into White Hart-yard, Drury-lane; there is a door comes out of each house.

Q. Does this warehouse that you speak of being built in the yard, lie between the two houses. - A. It does.

Q. Does it join both the houses. - A. It does.

Q. A door opening from either, it comes into the warehouse. - A. Yes.

Q. Which of these houses do you and your family live in. - A. Occasionally in both, but our chief residence is in White-Hard-yard; we have a better sitting room in Russel-court where on particular occasions we go.

Q. Mr. Evans's family, where do they reside. - A. We eat together and sleep in the same house; Mr. Evans's room adjoins mine.

Q. Then if I understand you, both the houses are connected by this warehouse, and are entirely used as one house. - A. I would observe to your lordship, that our young women sleep in Russel-court house, and the other part of my family in White-Hart-yard house.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in your service. - A. She was; but I hope your lordship will let me give testimony of her good character.

Q. Let that be till by-and-by; in what situation was she. - A. She was forewoman .

Q. How long had she been in that situation. - A. About three years and a half.

Q. At the end of that period you thought fit to dismiss her for some reason or other. - A. I did; on Saturday the 25th of December.

Q. Did Elizabeth Hutton on the 26th of December bring any muslin. - A. Upon the 27th on the Sunday, she brought me a parcel; the 26th was Saturday.

Q. Who was Elizabeth Hutton . - A. She is my warehouse woman, she manages my business, and has lived some years with me.

Q. What time was it that she brought it to you. - A. It was in the evening, about six o'clock I believe, it was candle light.

Q. What did the parcel contain. - A. These articles.

Q. What are the articles. - A. Certain pieces of muslin and leno, which is a species of muslin, only distinguished by the name. (The muslin produced.) It is pieces of muslin of different sorts.

Q. How many parcels are there in all. - A. Four yards and a half of sprig leno, No. 971, and five yards of lace work, No. 943, there are three yards of satin

work spot, and seven sixteenths, we call it bird's eye, spot; that is the whole.

Q. What is the value of the four yards and a half of leno. - A. My lord, am I to give the value it cost me - I hope not, I would wish to allow them of less value, if your lordship would permit me.

Q. You are sworn to speak upon your oath. - A. I am.

Q. You now exercise your judgment of the moderate value of the articles. - A. I would value the leno at three shillings a yard, admitting for the change of the fashion; the lace cost me ten shillings a yard, I would value it at five shillings a yard, one pound five shillings; the three yards of satin work I would wish to consider it not more than six shillings now; seven sixteenths of bird's eye pattern, I cannot reckon of any value, they are cut in such a sort of a way.

Q. These things being brought to you by Elizabeth Hutton , what did you do with it. - A. I marked them in my own name on gum paper, then I directed her to take and put them where she found it.

Q. Can you say with certainty whether these several pieces of muslin are the property of you and your partner. - Q. Certainly.

Q. What reason have you for saying certainly they are your property. - A. Here is a bill of parcels of 971 and 943.

Q. There are no marks on these pieces by which you can swear to them; I do not speak of the marks that you put on the time they were brought down by Elizabeth Hutton - had they any mark by which you knew them. - A. Here is two of them which have the mark on, it is a private mark that correspond with the bills of parcel, and the number corresponds with the bill of parcels.

Q. Which are those. - A. No. 971 and 943. This small piece has no mark but what I put on, at the time Elizabeth Hutton brought it me; I only know it by the pattern, and having been a length of time in the house.

Q. Is there any mark on the bird's eye pattern that you know it by. - A. No, except the mark I put on at the time it was brought me.

Q. I see your premises are described as a silk warehouse, a millinery warehouse, and a packing warehouse in the plan; what part of your shop or warehouse was these things kept. - A. In that part of the warehouse where you see the chimney; that was the proper place, and were our muslins are kept.

Q. In consequence of this, how long did the prisoner remain in your house after having discharged her. - A. It was late on Saturday night the 26th, when I discharged her; she requested to sleep in the house.

Q. On the 27th, did she attempt to go away. - A. That I cannot say with certainty; other witnesses will tell you that.

Q. Did she stay in your house on Sunday night. - A. She came back to sleep on Sunday night, I saw her go up to bed.

Q. On Monday morning did she go any where. - A. I desired her to be called up early on Monday morning, for reasons that I had; she was brought over to me at eight o'clock by Elizabeth Hutton and Esther Hutton .

Q. What do you mean by being brought over to you. - A. I was in my sitting room in White Hart yard, and they were in Russell-court, having slept there.

Q. When she was brought to you by Elizabeth Hutton and Esther Hutton , had she any parcel with her - A. She had a bundle, and this parcel.

Q. I understood you that this was the parcel which Elizabeth Hutton brought to you, and you marked it and desired her to put it where she took it from. - A. It was, and it was wrapped up in the same way as when I gave it her.

Q. Did you take it from her. - A. I did; I asked her how she came to take this, after the warning I had given her; she said, she could not tell, her confusion was considerable; that was the conversation that passed between me and her. I sealed up the parcel immediately.

Q. You began with stating something favourable of her conduct. - A. Throughout the time she lived with me, from the time of her first coming up to this time, which is about three years and a half, her conduct and character were praise-worthy, I put implicit confidence in her; her friends and relations are highly respectable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I believe at a prior time this poor woman was in business for herself. - A. She was, as I understood; I have no reason to doubt it.

Q. I should not think that any one piece of that is worth forty shillings. - A. I should hope not.

ELIZABETH HUTTON . Q. You are warehouse woman to Messrs. Morhall and Evans. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 27th of December discover a parcel under a sophy in any of Mr. Morhall's rooms. - A. I did, in the front room up two pair of stairs in a drawing room, about six o'clock in the evening; it was under the sophy.

Q. Was it concealed under the sophy. - A. The flounce of the sophy concealed it, the cover of the sopha hung down, and till the cover of the sophy was removed it could not be seen; upon discovering it I brought it down stairs directly to Mr. Morhall, he opened it directly, and put his marks on it, then he gave it me and desired me to put it where I found it.

Q. Was it made up in a parcel again. - A. Yes, just as it was before.

Q. Did you do so, and put it where you found it. - A. I did, almost directly as soon as it was done up.

Q. The next morning the prisoner was going away, I understand. - A. Yes, between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Did you prevent her going away. - A. I did.

Q. How far had she got towards the door before you prevented her from going out. - A. About a yard from the door in Russel-court.

Q. Was she then going to leave the house entirely. - A. No, she would have been coming again because her clothes were not gone.

Q. However she was going out with it. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe whether she had this bundle with her or not. - A She had that bundle with her and a parcel of muslin besides.

Q. I am asking to this particular bundle - had she this bundle. - A. Yes, she had it under her arm.

Q. Had she any cloak on or any thing by which it is was covered. - A. No, it was not covered at all.

Q. Upon her attempting to go out with these things what did you say to her. - A. I said, that Mr. Morhall desired me not to let her take any thing out without

letting him see it; she said very well, and turned up the stairs; as she came down she went up Russell-court house stairs; she said she had got something to shew Mrs. Morhall, I said if she had any thing to shew Mrs. Morhall, she was in the dining room.

Q. At which house is that. - A. In White-Hart-yard. She came down stairs again directly, and went to Mrs. Morhall in the dining room, with the parcels.

Q. What became of the parcel, did Mr. Morhall take it from her. - A. Yes. Mr. Morhall took it from her himself; he asked her how she came to take it, she said she did not know.

Q. Was that all she said. - A, Yes.

ESTHER HUTTON . Q. What do you know about this matter. - A. I met the prisoner on the stairs, on Monday morning the 28th of December, before eight o'clock in the morning, she had a parcel under her arm.

Q. What parcel do you mean, the parcel that was afterwards taken by Mr. Morhall. - A. Yes; I followed her up into the dining room, where Mr. Morhall was.

Q. You met her coming up stairs did you. - A. Mr. Morhall asked her how she came to take them; she said she did not know how she came to take them.

Q. Did he take the parcel from her. - A. Yes.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called eight witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

The jury and the prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of her good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-34

103. JOHN BUTLER and CORNELIUS FOGGERTY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , privily from the person of John Gadsby , a handkerchief, value 6 d. a half guinea, three seven shilling pieces, three promissory notes, for the payment of five pound each, value 5 l. each, three bank notes, value 1 l. each, a bank note, value 2 l. and one bank note, value 10 l. the property of John Gadsby .

JOHN GADSBY . I am a soldier in the Huntingdon militia. On Thursday week, about seven o'clock in the evening, I and my comrades had been up Saffron-hill; coming through Field-lane we stopped there to buy some oysters, we went into the Thatched House, Field-lane , to have our oysters; we had two pots of beer with the oysters in the parlour; coming back to the door to pay for it my comrade changed a five pound note; when he had changed the five pound note he gave me a ten pound note and two ones to take care of for him; John Briggs gave me three five pound Portsmouth notes, a two pound bank note, a one pound note, half a guinea, and a seven shilling piece; I tied it up carefully and put it in my handkerchief at different corners, and the mistress of the house said there was rum people behind me, I had a deal of money, I had better take care of it, I had better put it in my smallclothes; I said I am very well able to take care of it.

Q. Were you quite sober. - A. Yes, as sober as I am at this time; these men came in and seeing me tie up the money, Moore, Butler and Foggerty, they stood at my back while I was talking to the mistress at the bar; Butler touched me by the side, he said do not make any noise to the mistress at the bar; I said my friend, I do not want any concern with you; I stood talking to the mistress a minute or two, I put my hand in my pocket, my handkerchief was gone and the men had all quitted the house; I found I had lost all the money; a woman came up to me, she said you may depend upon it they are the men that have got the money. I did not feel them take it out.

Q. What is Butler. - A. I do not know, I never saw him nor Foggerty before in my life.

Q. Did they all three come in together. - A. Yes. This woman went with us to Butler's house, we could not find him, the place is somewhere about Field-lane; we went again the next morning, he had not been home all night; in the course of the day I went up to the office and gave a description of the men; they went and found Butler; they searched him and found but six shillings on him.

JAMES WHITE . I am a soldier in the Huntingdonshire militia. I had a pass, I came to London. On Thursday week I was going to take some money to Holborn, to have it booked to go to my friends in the country; we went up Saffron Hill to see Peter Flemming ; when we came down we came to an oyster shop opposite of the Thatched House, Field-lane; we had some oysters, which we took into the Thatched House, the kitchen being full of people, we went into the parlour; we eat the oysters and had two or three pots of beer; we went to the bar, I got change for a five pound note, I gave Gadsby a ten pound note, two ones, and two pounds in silver; I believe he did not put the silver in his handkerchief, he put it in his pocket, for fear I should want some silver in the evening; I went back to drink part of the beer, we were going, he went to the bar to pay for the beer, I was waiting for him; the landlady told him to take care of the property he had, she advised him to put it in his small clothes by way of taking care of it, he said he had been to London before, he was used to the town, he was not afraid; there were William Thomas , he stood against the bar; one of the lasses came out of the kitchen, she came to look at Thomas; Gadsby desired her to go away; Butler came in and stood behind Gadsby, he stooped down most of the time; he was talking to the landlady about the property, and as I was passing by Butler laid his hand on Gadsby's right side, and told him not to make any piece of work in the woman's house; Foggerty was at the door, and Moore was walking past; he came up to Gadsby and asked him if he would list him for a soldier; he said no, my friend, I have no authority, nor do I want to enlist you; I went into the kitchen, I left them there; I know no more than Gadsby put his hand in his pocket as he was going, he said he had lost all my money; we were searched; as soon as we got up stairs Gadsby pulled off his shirt and every thing; when we come down stairs we were enquiring after the men, Charlotte Chapman , a woman that was there, said she thought that Foggerty, Butler, and Moore must be the men that had got the money; they were not present to hear it, they were gone the moment they knew he had lost the money.

Butler. Was there any woman in your company at the time that you lay this charge to me. - A. There was no woman in my company at that time.

JOHN BRIGGS . I am a soldier in the Huntingdon militia; I saw Butler, Foggerty, and Moore (I believe his name is) by the hall, in the door of Mrs. Murphy's house in Field-lane.

Q. What house does she keep. - A. The Thatched House. Moore and Butler stood by my comrade; Foggerty stood nearer the door, walking backwards and forwards, he was at a distance from him, and I was passing by myself, not taking any notice; when my comrade paid for the beer he stood a little while; on feeling in his pocket he found that he had lost the money; these three men went off directly. As soon as the money was lost every person was taken up stairs and searched. It was not found on any of them.

Butler. You had four women with you. - A. No; you were the nearest to my comrade.

WILLIAM THOMAS . Q. You belong to the Huntindon militia. - A. Yes; when we were at the Thatched House in Field-lane, I saw Butler, Foggerty, and Thomas Moore , standing at the bar behind Gadsby; Butler and Thomas Moore were the closet to him; Foggerty stood against the tap door.

Butler. I want to know whether he was in company of any of the women.

Court. Had you any women in company. - A. This one; I never saw her before.

RACHAEL MURPHY . Q. Do you keep the Thatched House. - A. Yes, in Field-lane. On the 7th of January the three soldiers walked in together with a dish of oysters, and called for a pot of beer; they hesitated walking into the tap room; I ordered the servant to take a light into the parlour; they had other oysters and more beer, they came to the bar and White changed a five pound note; I introduced him into the parlour to give him his regular change, taking for the two pots of beer; I gave him two one pound notes, a seven shilling piece, a half guinea, and the rest in silver; he took the two one-pounds; one of the soldiers did, and seemed to keep them loose; I desired him to take care of them; he told me that he was sufficient to take care of them, he had been often enough in London; I told him there was some rum people there, and I wished him to take care of his property; he said he had got a deal more money than that, he pulled out a handkerchief, tied in different parts with knots, the contents I know not; he said he had to the amount of between thirty and forty pounds; I advised him to take care of the handkerchief that contained that sum of money and to put it in his small clothes; he made a laugh at me, I said no more about it; there were then outside of the door three men, disputing what they would have, one said they would have something short; they concluded to have a pot of hot.

Q. Did you see him give any thing to Gadsby. - A. No, I did not. There was a man came out of the tap room, he ridiculed the soldier; I saw John Butler stand close by the man that lost his property.

Court to Gadsby. Stand up.

Q. Is that the man. - A. That is the man that had the money, the other changed the note; these two men together said they had forty pounds. At the time they were standing at the bar Butler was as close to Gadsby as I am now; Butler said do not make a noise in the woman's house.

Q. What was Butler doing. - A. I could not tell; I knew Butler, he had resorted to my house. Before Gadsby left the bar he missed the money, that moment Jack Butler made off; Jack Butler was not seen there no more from that moment. Moore made off at the same time, he has never been seen since. Foggerty he was in my tap room, he made off, and was not seen in my house till Saturday; he lodged in my house at the time. This happened in my house yesterday week. On Thursday, about seven o'clock in the evening, he left my house and was not seen till Saturday eleven o'clock at night.

CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN . I live in George-alley. Fleet-market; I was in the soldier's company at Mrs. Murphy's the Thatched House, Field-lane; we went in the parlour and had oysters, after that they came out and had a glass of something at the bar; I saw John Moore very much about one of these young men when he was at the bar; I saw him put his hand into the right hand pocket of the young man who lost his money, he pulled his hand out, he did not bring any thing out then; in less than a minute he put his hand in again, and pulled out a white cloth there; seemed to be something in it about the compass of half a crownsworth of halfpence; he gave it to John Butler , they both went out immediately, and went up Shoe-lane as fast as they could go.

Q. Did you see Foggerty. - A. I did not. I knew Butler and Moore they used Mrs. Murphy's house.

Butler. This woman has been at the bar before ever I have, she has been here for robbing a gentleman of a watch; she has been in divers prisons, although she had the good luck to get off; I find myself aggrieved that she should give her evidence.

Court. If you want to impeach her evidence, you must prove it from the record of the trial.

JOHN HANCOCK. I am an officer. On the night the robbery was committed, me and my brother officers were looking in at the different houses round St. Giles's. At the Black Dog St. Giles', we saw Butler, and two men answering the description of the two other men, they were drinking mixed liquor; when I went in I heard the prisoner Butler say, do you want me, or something to that purpose the expression he used was to Price; I did not know any thing about the robbery at that time, or else I should have proceed to have searched him, and the two other men; this was the very same night of the robbery a little before eight o'clock.

Q. to Mrs. Murphy. What time of night was this robbery committed on. - A. About seven.

Q. to Hancock. You are sure they were all together. A. Not Foggerty; there were two men in company with Butler, they answered the description of the other men that the soldiers gave me; Butler I knew was there the other two I cannot say, I did not see Foggerty.

THOMAS EKELSOE. I am an officer. On Friday the 8th of January, Wood and I were in St. Giles's; we apprehended Butler in Dyot-street, I took Foggerty on Sunday morning in Field-lane. I found none of the property.

Butler's Defence. My defence is as this; on the 7th of January, which was my birth day, I was then thirty one years of age, I had some money in my pocket, which I chused to spend upon the spot where I was born, which is Plumtree-street Broad-street, St. Giles's. I went from the Thatched House, Field-lane, to that part, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock at night; I drank freely as many other persons might do Mr. Hancock might see me undoubtedly, I asked him to drink, but with regard to my asking if I was wanted it is wrong.

Foggerty's Defence. If I was dying this moment,

the last word should be that I am innocent.

Q. to Price. Q. You are beadle of St. Andrew's parish. - A. Yes. I have known Butler for a length of time: when I went into the Black Dog with Hancock, Butler said, Price I shall not drink with you, for you will not let me get a shilling since you have walked Holborn; d - n me, says he, if you want me here I am.

BUTLER, GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

FOGGERTY, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-35

104. JEREMIAH ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , a wooden shelf, value 2 s. three other shelves, value 1 s. a lanthorn, value 1 s. a hanging iron, value 2 d. six crutches, value 1 s. two books, value 1 s. a curtain rod, value 1 s. a tin grater, value 6 d. and five linen rollers, value 6 d. the property of the mayor and commonalty and citizens of London, governors of the house of the poor, commonly called St. Bartholomew's hospital , near West Smithfield, London, of the foundation of King Henry VIII .

Second count for like offence, the property of Mary Foote .

Third count the property of persons unknown.

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . Q. You are an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information did you go to any house in Featherbed-lane, Fetter-lane. - A. Yes, No. 31, on the 30th of last month; I found every thing there contained in this indictment.

Q. Did you ascertain whose apartments they were. - A. They were the apartments of Robert Panton ,

ROBERT PANTON . Q. Where do you live. - A. I live in Featherbed-lane, Fetter-lane.

Q. Do you remember Chapman the officer coming and taking away any property. - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought that property to your apartment. - A. The man at the bar brought a part of that property in a cart, on the 17th of December, between six and seven in the evening; all that I observed was a chest of drawers. I helped him up stairs, they were put in the garret. These are the things that the officer brought away; I cannot recollect the articles that he brought.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Hutchinson. - A. Yes.

Q. They were brought by Mrs. Hutchinson's desire. A. I do not know that Mrs. Hutchinson was there; the hamper was brought up in the garret.

Q. Do not you know that they were brought there not as the prisoner's goods. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. How came he to bring them there. - A. He told me that sister Hutchinson was leaving the hospital, and she begged them to be there two or three days; I understood they were her goods, but I did not know.

ANN GROVES . Q. Did you happen to be a patient at St. Bartholomew's hospital in the ward in which Ann Hutchinson resided. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the man at the bar coming to visit Mrs. Hutchinson when you were in that ward. - A. I do.

Q. Did you assist in removing any of the property from the ward. - A. A fortnight before she left it, she tied up two beds.

Q. Did you observe any thing done with some shelves and crutches. - A. The shelf she took down by daylight, and in the night she took it away.

JAMES BRAY. Q. You are box carrier, do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he was watchman.

Q. Do you remember any time seeing him assisting in loading a cart from the hospital. - A. I do it was on Thursday night the 17th of December, between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing what he put in the cart. - A. No; I gave information to a woman who came to me.

JANE HAINES . Q. Did you happen to be a patient. - A. I was seven weeks under Sir James Earle ; Mrs. Hutchinson was sister of the ward. I saw the prisoner coming several times there, the prisoner helped to move the things to the cart, and I assisted him myself in taking the drawers and a great many flower pots; the shelves did not go away till afterwards; the crutches she took away her own self, they were taken to the cart; the prisoner helped them in the cart, the carter drove the cart.

Q. Did not the cart contain the crutches as well as the chairs. - A. It did. The prisoner followed the cart; the things were all put in the cart, and the sister loaded some of the things

(The property produced and identified.)

RICHARD PAYTER. Q. Is Mrs. Foote the matron of the hospital. - A. Yes.

Q. What is her christian name. - A. Mary, I believe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. When a sister goes away she takes her own furniture. - A. Yes.

Q. She may employ a man to take her furniture, she may smuggle other people's furniture. - A. I understand so now.

Mr. Alley to Chapman. When did you apprehend the prisoner at the bar. - A. On the 30th of December, I apprehended him in Gee-street, Goswell-street, concealed under the stairs.

Q. Had he an opportunity of knowing what you was come for. - A. I have no doubt of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by Ann Hutchinson to hire a cart, and move her goods; I agreed to give three shilling for the cart to move the goods; and I was to have two shillings: and the five shillings she gave me paid the cart hire and me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-36

105. MICHAEL THEWAY and SARAH FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , eighty yards of ribbon, value 2 l. and twelve yards of black ribbon, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Burford , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL BURFORD . I live at No. 91, Oxford-street, St. Marylebone ; I am a haberdasher .

Q. Do you keep a shop there. - A. I do, for the sale of ribbons and other things of that sort. On the 13th of January last, between the hours of three and four o'clock, the two prisoners came into my shop, they asked to look at some ribbons and were shewn some; Mrs. Burford

served them, and likewise one of my young men.

Q. Who asked for them. - A. I do not know, they came in for that purpose.

Q. Is Mrs. Burford here. - A. No, nor the young man; I was called from the back shop in to the front shop; upon my coming into the front shop I observed the man run out. I saw them in the shop together.

Q. You said they came in together before. - A. I saw them together; they came in to look at some ribbons.

Q. How do you know that. - A. I was informed that.

Q. Do you know whether they both looked at the ribbons. - A. I saw the drawer before the woman when I came into the shop, I was then informed that there were some ribbons gone, and the prisoner was suspected, I then laid hold of the woman prisoner, I asked her what she had; the said she had got nothing; upon that I searched her, I found a piece of ribbon; I have it in my pocket. By that time the other was brought back again.

Q. How much ribbon was it. - A.About eighteen or nineteen yards.

Q. Whereabouts is the price of it. - A. About twelve shillings; it cost me more than that. I know it to be mine; I saw it in the morning; there is the cost price on it in my own hand writing; I then took the prisoners, the woman and the man, myself to Marlborough-street; the other prisoner was brought back; I desired a person to watch her, that she throwed nothing away; I suspected she had more. She was searched at the office, I saw three pieces more taken from her by the officer; the officer has got them.

ROBERT MINNIS. I am an apprentice to Mr. Burford. On the 13th of this month, between the hours of three and four, I saw the two prisoners come into Mr. Burford's shop; Mrs. Burford served them; after they had been in some time I heard Mrs. Burford call Mr. Burford forward, I ran forward, I saw the prisoner Theway run out of the shop; I suspected him and ran after him, and at a little distance I saw him throw away a piece of ribbon; I got up to him and caught hold of him. I picked up the ribbon afterwards, I brought him back and helped to take him to Marlborough-street. I produce the ribbon, it is marked with our private marks; half the marks are torn off; there is enough left that I can speak to its being Mr. Burford's property.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough-street, I searched the woman prisoner, I found three pieces of ribbon on her which I have here; one piece under each of her arm pits, and one in her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Fitzgerald's Defence. I bought the three rolls of ribbon, the officer took from me, before I went into the prosecutor's shop; I came from on board a ship on Tuesday morning, from my husband, with two of his shipmates, to buy things for him, as the ship expected to sail in a fortnight; the three rolls of ribbon I bought to sell on board the ship to any of the women that might like to bye them; the next day I took one of his shipmates with me, he wanted to purchase a pair of shoes for himself; the gentleman told him he did not sell men's shoes; not liking the ribbon I had purchased, I wanted to buy a ribbon for my own wear; the gentlewoman shewed me some ribbons, I took up the ribbon in my hand, she snatched my hands together till she called the master; she told him I wanted to steal it; I declare it was not my intention.

Prosecutor. There is no truth in what she has said Mrs. Burford had got hold of both her hands when I came into the shop; I took the piece of ribbon from under her apron, it was tucked up under some tucks.

Theway's Defence. I came from on board a ship on Monday night, this young woman came with me; I went with her to buy a pair of shoes, then I went with her to the shop were she said she wanted to buy a ribbon; I saw the gentlewoman lay hold of this young woman, she said she had stole this ribbon; I thought I saw one of my shipmates coming past, I went cut to him, I dropped the piece of black ribbon out of my pocket in Oxford Market; I bought that ribbon to tie my hair with.

THEWAY, GUILTY .

FITZGERALD, GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-37

106. MICHAEL THEWAY and SARAH FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Hale , privately in his shop .

JOHN HALE I live at No. 87, Oxford-street ; I am a shoemaker ; I keep a shop there for the sale of ladies, shoes. Last Wednesday I think about three o'clock, the prisoners both came in my shop together; the woman took a seat near a glass case that was open, and sat down; they said nothing when they came in, I was busy at the time with other customers; as soon as it was convenient I went to Sarah Fitzgerald and asked her what she wanted; the other prisoner spoke up immediately and said he wanted a pair of men's pumps; I told him we sold nothing but ladies shoes; they immediately went out of the shop.

Q. Had you any reason to suspect that they had taken any thing. - A. I had no suspicion at all.

THOMAS FOY . Q. You searched this woman at Marlborough-street. - A. Yes, on Wednesday the 13th of this month about four o'clock she was brought there; I found the pair of shoes in her pocket.

Prosecutor. They are of my manufactory; there are my initials on them, we mark all with an iron; they were never sold by me.

Q. They might be sold by some of your servants. - A. I will not take upon me to say they were not, but it is clear to me they were not.

Q. You did not miss them out of your shop. - A. I did not till I heard of it. The whole of the glass cases in the shop were shut, but the glass case where she came and sat down by, that was open; she came and sat down the by glass case where we always keep these shoes.

Q. Did you know the number of shoes you had on that day in that glass case. - A. No, I do not count them; I value them at five shillings; they cost me more than that.

Theway's Defence. I went into that gentleman's shop to see if he had got any men's pumps; he told me he had none.

Fitzgerald's Defence. When I went out I asked this young man where he was going, he said to buy a pair of shoes; I said to him, I had bought a pair the day before at this gentlemen's shop; we went in, he said he did not sell men's pumps, and we went away; I bought that pair of shoes the day before.

Court. There can be no charge against the prisoners about privately stealing in this case; it is a case of strong suspicion.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-38

107. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Potier , about the hour of three at night on the 4th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, ten fowls, value 25 s. his property .

The Case stated by Mr. Andrews.

JOSEPH POTIER . Q. What parish is your house situated in. - A. In the parish of Feltham .

Q. Did you sleep at home on the 4th of December last. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you before you had gone to bed seen your poultry house. - A. I had; I secured it just after dark, about five o'clock; I fastened it with a nail, top and bottom.

Q. Did you see that the fowls were all in it. - A. Yes; at four o'clock, when I fed them, there were just four dozen and six, they were all in the coop; I do not breed any fowls, I only fatten them; I was disturbed about half past three in the morning by the fowls, I was rather suspicious, I got up, I had a rush light in my room; I lighted a candle and saw what o'clock it was, it was half past three; I went down stairs into the kitchen at the back of my house.

Q. Describe how the poultry house is situated with respect to the dwelling house. - A. The poultry house is attached to the house, so far as it is a bit of a shed built against the house; the beams of it run against the walls of the house.

Q. Is that in an enclosed yard. - A. Yes; the house is enclosed all round, with paling, and one side a ditch. When I got down stairs I heard the noise more and more in the poultry shed; I went to the shed, I found the door of the shed was wide open; I had a candle in my hand, I observed Mr. Baker come out of the shed, he advanced rapidly with his face towards me; there is the person [pointing to the prisoner]; he knew me and I knew him very well, the prisoner is the person, he is the man, the very man; he had a sack on his shoulder, the sack had some loading in it; he kept it on his shoulder.

Q. Did you observe how he was dressed. - A. He had a coloured handkerchief and a dark waistcoat on; he came out of the shed, and gave me a blow on the side of my face, and said, God d - n your eyes, what do you want; the blow knocked me down, the blood ran out of my nose; I halloaed murder, Baker ran away, I could see no more of him; I was a good deal hurt. Several of the neighbours came to my assistance.

Q. How soon after did you see Betts the constable. - A. In about a quarter of an hour I saw him, I sent for him; I sent Mr. Betts to go after the prisoner when I found out who it was; I went with him as far as the prisoner's house, he lives about a quarter of a mile from my house. They brought the prisoner to me about half after five, he was in the custody of Betts; I said that is the man that knocked me down and robbed me of the fowls; his waistcoat and his handkerchief were the same; the coat I cannot say, because he had a sack over it.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you there. - A. He said I was a very false man, it was not him.

Q. How soon after the prisoner Baker knocked you down and absconded, did you examine the poultry house. - A. About two minutes after Baker had ran away. I had put a cloth of one side to keep them warm, that was removed, and the door was wide open.

Q. What had become of the fowls. - A. That I cannot say; there were ten missing, I have never found any of them since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. There is no internal communication from your house into the shed. - A. No.

Q. What time did you fasten it. - A.About five; my servant went in the shed in the course of the afternoon to feed them; she is not here.

Q. When you went down stairs you went with a candle. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you found the door wide open. - A. Yes.

Q. And a man whom you say was the prisoner came running upon you. - A. Yes.

Q. He came running rapidly upon you, as fast as he could, therefore you could not see him only momentarily. - A. So I could; and when he was brought back he had a coloured handkerchief, and a dark waistcoat on.

Q. The prisoner told you you was a false man for charging of him. - A. Yes.

Q. There was no moon that night. - A. It was a dark night. I had a candle in my hand.

EDMUND BETTS . Q. You are a constable at Feltham - A. Yes. On the 5th of December last Mr. Pottier sent for me to apprehend Baker. I went to Mr. Pottier's house about four in the morning. I and Pottier went to the prisoner's house.

Q. Did you find Baker. - A. No, not directly; there was a light in a room, which I took to be a bed room; we waited near three quarters of an hour, and then we saw Baker get up from his bed side, we were about twenty yards off; he was swinging his clothes over his head, and then he came down stairs and went into his stable to his horse; we did not go in directly; he made a little fire and called his people up; then I went and rapped at the door, he opened it; I went in and catched fast hold of him and said he was my prisoner; he seemed very much surprised what it was for; I told him it was for robbing Pottier of his fowls and knocking him down; he said, I knock him down! he is a very false man for so saying, he wished he had the knocking of his bl - y French head off for laying such lies to him; he said he never robbed him nor knocked him down, nor never went into his house at all. We took him to Mr. Pottier's, and then to the Red Lion.

Q. Did Mr. Pottier, when he first saw Baker when he was first brought back to the house, did he say he was the same man that robbed him. - A.He said he was the same man and no other.

THOMAS HOLSHIP . Q. Where was you on the morning of the 5th of December. - A. A little after six o'clock I was going to my labour; I found a chicken coop in Smitcham-lane, about threescore yards from Mr. Pottier's house; I also found a gander in a bag close to it, in a gateway; a prong was put in the mouth of the bag to keep the gander in; the prong was marked J. B.

Court. What is the inference from that. - A. The

prisoner acknowledged the bag and the coop belonged to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime. I leave it to my counsel.

ANN FOOTE . - Mr. Gurney. I believe your mother lives with the prisoner. - A. She does; I live in the same house.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being taken up on the morning of the 5th of December. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night before he was at home all the evening. - A. Yes, he never went out from five o'clock till my mother came home from London; she returned between eleven and twelve o'clock; then he went out and unloaded the cart, and came in. My brother put the horse in the stable.

Q. What business does your mother carry on. - A. She is in the poultry business, and attending markets; my mother and him both went to bed at one o'clock; I and the servant sat up to clean the house; we were up till between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Q. During the time from one o'clock, to the time which you and the servant went to bed, had the prisoner got up. - A. No, he could not, for the stairs that we had cleaned after they went to bed, came down into the room that we were cleaning.

Q. Therefore he could not have got up and come down without your knowledge. - A. He could not.

Q. How far is the house of Mr. Pottier from your house. - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Was your poultry house robbed. - A. Yes, of a bag of feathers, and I believe a chicken coop.

JOHN FOOTE. Q. Are you the son of Mrs. Foote. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your mother coming home on the night, previous to the morning that Baker was taken up. - A. Yes, I came home with her, about eleven or a little after eleven.

Q. Did you find Baker at home. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A.About one o'clock; Mr. Baker went up stairs first, I followed him, my chamber adjoins his; I did not hear him go out at all in the course of that night,

Q. Do you know the circumstance of your poultry house being robbed that night. - A. Yes; we lost a coop and a sack of wing feathers. The feathers were thrown into a field, and the sack was found with a gander in it with the coop.

MRS. FOOTE. Q. You live at Feltham. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner and you live together. - A. We do.

Q. Do you remember on the night before he was taken up coming home. - A. I do, I had been to town with poultry; I came home about eleven o'clock, I went to bed; after the horse had been done up, it was near upon one o'clock, when I went to bed; Baker went up to bed before me, and I followed him up stairs; I sleep in the same bed with him. He never went out of the bed till near five o'clock, I looked at the watch, I called him up myself; we were to go to Kingston market. I swear solemnly, and declare to God, it is the truth, that he never went out of his bed and never went out of the house till near five o'clock.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-39

108. WILLIAM EDIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , a silver watch, value 2 l. a key, value 1 d. and a seal value 6 d. the property of Joseph Randall .

JOSEPH RANDALL . I am a tallow-chandler , apprentice to my father; my father's name is John Randall .

Q. What age are you. - A. I am sixteen. Last Tuesday night at half, past twelve o'clock, I was at the corner of Bush-lane, Cannon-street ; I had been with some young men to spend the evening, there was my brother and a few friends in company.

Q. Had you been drinking to excess at all. - A.No, I was quite sober.

Q. Were you alone when you lost the watch. - A. Yes; the prisoner, with two or three more with him, hussled me; the prisoner shoved against me, and took my watch out of my pocket; I catched hold of his coat, I said you have got my watch; he said no I have not I saw him take it out of my pocket.

Q. Was it done too quick for you to lay hold of his hand to get possession of the watch again. - A. Yes, he put his hand behind him and gave the watch away to them.

Q. You did not see the watch in his hand at that time, you were not sure that he had the watch in his hand. - A. No, it was his right hand he put behind him.

Q. Did the others leave him. - A. Yes, they went off.

Q. Did you charge him loud enough with having your watch, do you think, for his companions to have heard you. - A. I said it in the same tone of voice, and as loud as I do now.

Q. Then they must have heard you; when the other men went away did you call the watch. - A. No. I said you have got my watch; I had hold of him, he said he had not; I replied you have, give me my watch; he said he would not; then I said I will put you where you ought to be. I called the watchman directly, and when the watchman came, I gave charge of him for stealing my watch.

Q. What sort of a watch was it. - A. A silver watch. I bought it myself, and worked hard for it. I gave two guineas and a half for it; I valued it at forty shillings.

Q. Had it a key and seal. - A. Yes; I have never recovered it again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. This was between twelve and one o'clock - what time did you go to your friend's house. - A. About eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Had you been drinking any thing. - A. A little wine and water.

Q. Where do you live. - A. With my father, 139, Tooley-street.

Q. How far is that from the place where you lost the watch. - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Did you know the watchman before. - A. No.

Q. Did you ask the watchman to drink. - A. Coming past the watchman, I ran against him I begged his pardon; I said will you have something to drink, he said no; then I says, here is sixpence to get you something to drink.

Q. How far were you when you gave the watchman sixpence from the place where you lost the watch. - A. About four yards; they met me as I was going along.

Q. They met you, you said to the prisoner you have got my watch, you said it loud enough for the other men to have heard, and watchman he was about four yards off; how many watchman were there. - A. I

cannot say, there was this old man that I ran against, and another on the other side of the way.

Q. How far were they from him and you when the watch was taken. - A. About four or five yards.

Q. Then they that took your watch could see them as well as you. - A. Yes.

Q. When you called out watch these four men could have easily rescued him if they had thought fit to have done it. - A. Yes; he put his hand behind him and gave the watch away; he was searched at the watchhouse, nothing was found; I will take my oath that he took my watch.

Q. Yes, you believe it. - A. I do not believe it, I am sure of it he took it.

Q. How came you to be running along the street at this time of the night. - A. I had been spending my evening in Clare-street, Clare Market; I was running as fast as I could to get home, because my brother was sitting up for me.

Q. When he was searched it was found that he had some money of his own. - A. I do not know that it was his own; there was a pocket book and six pounds, I believe, in it.

JAMES PATRICK . Q. You are a watchman - where is your beat. - A. Cannon-street, Turnwheel-lane, up to Bush-lane to Dowgate Hill.

Q. Do you remember last Tuesday night the 12th of this month seeing the lad that has been examined. - A. I saw him; he rather pushed against me, he asked my pardon, he asked me if I would have something to drink; he was going rather fast, he gave me sixpence; I stopped and put my lanthorn down at the corner of Turnwheel-lane; he called watch, I went directly to him, he had hold of the prisoner, and I laid hold of him, he charged the prisoner with taking his watch from him; I took charge of him. The prisoner said he would go quietly to the watchhouse; the young lad said he saw him take it; I took him to the watchhouse. I was not above five yards from him when it happened.

Court. Did he at all appear the worse for liquor. - A. No, I cannot say he did; some people will carry it off. He did not appear to me to be in liquor.

Mr. Pooley. Whereabouts did he run against you. - A.At the cheesemonger's, just by Turnwheel-lane, he rather run against me; I took no notice of it.

Q. What name did he call you. - A. Old Brusher.

Q. Is that the name you go by. - A. No, without I am new baptised.

ROBERT GOSLING . I live at No. 19, Hollis-street, Clare Market. I know that the prosecutor was not in liquor when he left the company; I continued in company with him till he went. I went to the door and saw him out; he had only drank a little wine and water.

Q. What time was it when he went away. - A. As near twelve o'clock as could be.

ROBERT GOODALL . I was constable of the night, I was in the watchhouse when the prisoner was brought in; the prosecutor brought the prisoner in, with Patrick the watchman; he said he had robbed him of his watch; the prisoner said he had not the watch, what did he mean by saying he had robbed him; I searched him, I found a pocket book containing four one pound notes and a two pound note; a letter, and a certificate of his discharge from a man of war.

Q. Did the prosecutor appear to be the least disguised in liquor. - A. He was not disguised; he appeared very much irritated at the act that had been done to him.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord - I had been to my sister at Whitechapel. Going home I went down Thames-street, I met this boy, he stopped me, he said you have got my watch; he collared me, I said let go of me; I called watch, I said, watchman, this rascal says I have got his watch; I went with them quietly to the watch-house; they searched me and found my watch; I asked him if that was his, he said no; I took out my pocket book, I asked him if that was his; the constable of the night took my watch and money. I am as innocent of the crime as a child unborn.

GUILTY . aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-40

109. GEORGE RUDD and THOMAS DONNOVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , twenty five sheep, value 40 l. the property of James Bunnell and Robert Swain .

JAMES BUNNELL . I am a butcher .

Q. Do you remember last month buying any sheep at Smithfield market, part of which you afterwards lost. - A. On the 28th of December I bought seventy four sheep between me and Mr. Swain.

Q. What is your partner's name - A. Robert Swain .

Q. After these sheep were brought, where did you put them. - A. They were brought to my house about half after three o'clock, or four to the outside, No. 5, Sharp's-alley, Cow Cross. After they came to my house, I eat a cold dinner; it might be four o'clock when I took them from my house to a field which I rent of Mr. Bennet, at Battle Bridge ; they call it the Reservoir field. I took seventy three to that field; there was one tired, we were obliged to kill it. I left them in the field and fastened the gate; it fastens with a catch staple; I put a bit of stick into the staple.

Q.Were any of the sheep marked - A. There were twenty marked across the nose with dark ochre; the were bought of Mr. Ebb, a salesman; they had no other mark.

Q. Were they wethers or ewes. - A. There were about three wethers in the twenty.

Q. How were the others marked, the other fifty three that were in the field. - A. There were twenty five of them marked double across the loin with ochre; they were all ewes; there were twenty three marked on the shoulders with ochre; they were bought in two lots, thirteen in one lot, and ten in the other. The other lot were G branded on the near hip, I believe; there were six of them; I believe they were ewes.

Q. What time did you leave them in this field. - A.Just before five o'clock, I could just see to put them in. I went on Tuesday, the next morning, about nine o'clock, to the field.

Q. Did you find them all there. - A. No, I did not; the gate was open.

Q. How many sheep were gone. - A.Twenty five; I found forty eight in the field; we missed ten of the twenty that were marked over the nose, seven of them that were marked double on the loin, one with G branded; the others were them that were marked on the shoulder.

Q. That is seven that were marked on the shoulder.

A. Yes. I found the sheep on the same night, about half after eight o'clock, on the Tuesday night; I found them at the prisoner Rudd's house at Pimlico; I believe it is in Chelsea parish, close by the Union Tea Gardens. I found five of them dressed in his shop.

Q.Is he a butcher. - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know these five in the shop were your sheep. - A. The first I took hold of, I was sure by the mark on the nose; they had not took the skin off clean; the head is here now. The other four that were hanging in the shop were not marked in the same way; we found the skins and the sheep we found eight dead in all; we found five in the shop, there were seven of them killed with the mark across the nose; when I went in I asked how many he had got of them ewes; he said that he had got nine. I asked him where the remainder of them were; he went into the back place, where he was working, there were two dressed there, and one not quite finished, about half dressed; that made eight dead ones.

Q. How do you know that the two that were dressed were yours. - A By the skins, all the skins were in the place.

Q. Had these skins any mark over the nose. - A. Seven out of the eight had.

Q.I thought that you told me in the shop were five sheep, one you knew by the mark on the nose, the skin not being taken off clean from the head. - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know whether the skins of the four sheep that you saw afterwards, were in the shop. - A.They were in the shop.

Q. You saw two dressed in the back place, where were the skins. - A. They were in the back place, where he was at work, and five skins were in the shop.

Q. The one that was half dressed, how was that marked. - A. On the nose, the skin was upon the sheep in all the four quarter, that I finished myself, he could not finish it. I asked him where the other one was; he said he had nine at first; he answered he had got no more; upon that I lifted up a bit of cloth, that was hung before them on a rail, and there were three live ones. One of them were marked G, brand, and the other two were marked over the nose.

Q. Did you find any more any where else. - A. I was left in possession of the things; the officer took him to prison; after the officer came back they asked the woman and the boy for the key of a stable he had got; the wife and the boy said they had no stable.

Q. Did they get into the stable. - A. They did, I believe, by force; they broke it open. I went afterwards to the stable to help take the sheep out; there were there fourteen sheep.

Q. Can you describe what they were. - A. It was so dark, I did not take any particular notice; Mr. Swain did.

Q. That makes twenty five. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The sheep were found on the Tuesday; they might have been some time in the house, because you found some of them killed. - A. They might.

Court. When you went in the house what did you say. - A. I went up to the door, I asked him for a pound of mutton chops; when I went in he held the candle in his hand, and dropped back, he seemed suprized; I laid hold of this sheep; I asked him how many he had got of them; he said nine, I asked him where he had bought them; he said at Smithfield on the Monday; I asked him of whom, he said he had bought them of Mr. Ireson; I told him he could not, Mr. Ireson was not up that day, which he was not. That was the whole of the conversation that I had with him before the officer came in.

Q.Did he say he had bought them on the Monday or the day before. - A. The day before, I understood him.

Q.What time was the market over at Smithfield. - A. Some people will stay at this time of the year till almost dark; I believe Mr. Ebb was the last that was there. I believe it might be near five o'clock when he went; I was not there, I went to the field with the sheep.

ROBERT SWAIN . Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Bunnell. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at Smithfield market on the 28th of December last. - A. I was.

Q. Do you know what time the market finished that day. - A. No.

Q. What did you buy that day. - A. I bought seventy four sheep that day.

Q. How were these sheep marked. - A. There were twenty I bought of Mr. Ebb marked across the nose; the other fifty four I bought of Mr. Billing; there were twenty three marked red shoulder, thirteen and ten, they were in two lots; there were twenty five marked twice over the loins, and there were six G branded between the hip, they were not particularly nearer one hip than the other; that makes fifty four of Mr. Billing, and twenty of Mr. Ebb, is seventy four.

Q. Did you go to the field at Battle-bridge. - A. I went part of the way; I was going out to spend the evening with my mother.

Q.What time did you go to the field. - A. Near four o'clock.

Q. Did you go the next morning to the field first. - A. No, my partner went first.

Q. Did you go to Rudd's. - A. Yes. I went there between seven and eight, on the next evening; I was called in, and the officer and Mr. Smith the butcher then went in; Mr. Bunnell went in first, then I was called in, he said he had found the sheep.

Q. Upon going in what did you see. - A. I saw the five sheep hanging in the shop.

Q. Did you know they were some of them which you had bought - were there any marks upon them. - A. Yes, there was one left with the mark on, about the nose; there were four more with the marks almost left on, but the marks were not so much to be seen as they were on the other one; the skins were not quite taken off; there were two more hung backwards.

Q. Did you find the skins in the shop. - A. I did not take particular notice, but when I looked over all the skins, they were all nearly together, close to the door that goes to the back place.

Q. There were two more in this back place. - A. Yes; they were finished dressing; they had marks on the nose, he had not skinned them clean. There was one more half finished dressing; the mark was on the skin.

Q. Was the skin separated from the sheep. - A. No, it was on, half way down the back; the last sheep I am not positive whether it was one of Mr. Ebb's sheep or not, they had ochred them afresh to disfigure them, but I am positive that he killed seven out of Mr. Ebb's.

Q. Having found these three, at you described them, did you find any more afterward. - A. Yes, three more live ones.

Q. How was that part separated from the others that they were dressing. - A. There was a cloth hung down before the rails that went across; these three had been disfigured, two of them were Mr. Ebb's and one Mr. Billing's.

Q. Was that of Mr. Billing's a red shoulder. - A. Yes; but they had been ruddling it down the back to take the mark out.

Q. Any of these three with a G brand. - A. No, neither of them; there was but one G brand lost.

Q. Where did you find any more. - A. In a stable, about an hundred yards up the town, we found fourteen there; some of them were marked twice over the loins, and some red shoulders, and there was one of Mr. Ebb's marked all down the back to disfigure it, and one G brand; that I took particular notice was in stable.

Q. Did you hear him say anything about them. - A. I went with him to prison, I asked him where the remainder of the sheep were, we only found eleven at the house; he said he had no more I asked him to tell me how he came by them; he told me that he got them of a person that sent him them to kill. I asked him if he could not inform me his name, he said he could not; then I asked him whether the person sent him them or brought them himself; he said that a drover brought them. I asked him the drover's name, he said he could not tell; that is all that past.

Q. Are you clear that they were part of the sheep you had bought, and that these were the sheep you had lost. - A. I bought the sheep myself; Mr. Bunnell was with me at the time I bought them, and I am very clear to these being part of the sheep that I lost.

Q. Have you the skins and the head here. - A. Yes. She skins stink very much; I have both the skins and the heads.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Are you at all able to six the time when the sheep were lost. - A. I cannot be positive, I cannot say the time; this is one of the heads bought of Mr Ebb, there is red a cross the nose.

Jury. It is very plain to be seen.

Mr. Swain. Here are four heads marked the same. This is another, he has disfigured the appearance of the skin; this head was marked across the nose, it was one of Mr. Ebb's, he has marked this skin down the back to disfigure it. This is another skin, he has been putting the mark on the back; this had the reddle on the shoulder, that is one of Mr. Billing's; they have put the additional mark on the nose to make them all look alike.

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. I understand you are a butcher by business. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Swain and his partner, Mr. Bunnell, to the house of the prisoner Rudd. - A. Yes, I went first with Mr. Bunnell, then I came back to my house; Mr. Bunnell went away and got his partner, Mr. Swain, then we all went to Rudd's house with the officer; that might be eight o'clock. When we went there Mr. Bunnell went in the shop; upon his going in he halloed out, Smith; we went in instantly, he said here is the sheep; Rudd was in the shop at that time with Mr. Bunnell, there were five sheep in the shop; we went backwards and found two dressed and one not finished; close by it there was a small shed, where some sacking was hanging down, there we found three live sheep; I asked a person close by whether Rudd had not another place; they said yes, about an hundred yards off.

Q. Did you discover any marks on the nose of any of them which had reddle put on them to disfigure them. - A. No.

Q. Did you hear him give any account how he came by them. - A. No, I was in the street outside of the shop at that time.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer of the public office Hatton Garden, I apprehended Donovan in White Bear-yard, near Hatton Garden; I think on the Thursday was taken to the office.

Q. Were any promises or threats made to him when he came to the office. - A. Most of the questions that were put to him were by the keeper of the house of correction; he was asked whether he knew any thing of the sheep belonging to Mr. Bunnell and Mr. Swain; he several times declared that he knew nothing of it; the governor then said as that is the case lock him up again; one of the turnkeys was going to take him away; when he was going out of the office, he acknowledged that he was one of the men that did drive the sheep.

Q. Tell us the very words he said. - A. He said, I did drive the sheep, I was one of them; that Moore and himself were engaged to drive them for the other prisoner, he said, for the butcher; he did not mention the name of Rudd; and Moore was engaged to pay him, and he thought he had done no hurt. After that he mentioned which way he drove them, that was up the New-road to Hyde Park corner, through the turnpike, and there he enquired which was the way; he drove them to the butchers; he had seen Rudd then at Queen-square.

Q. Was not the conversation all at one time. - A. No, it was not. When he said Moore was engaged to pay him, he drove them to the butcher's, he thought he had done do harm, that was at Queen-square; Rudd was taken there and I took Donnovan there. It was after he had seen Rudd he said he was the person.

Q. Did he say why he enquired the way. - A. No, he did not.

Q. You understood that he and Moore drove them. - A. I did. He saw Moore the next morning; he asked him if he had lost any of the sheep, as it was a dark night; he said he believed he had not. I believe the publican will testify them words.

MR. CARPENTER. Q. You keep a public house. - A. Yes, at Pimlico. It is called the Chelsea Water Works.

Q. Do you know any thing respecting the sheep. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the two prisoners together. - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you saw them in company together. - A.It was the 29th of December between eleven and twelve in the morning.

Q. How long did they stay in your house. - A.About an hour.

Q. Had you any conversation with them. - A. Not a word.

Q. Did you see the prisoner Rudd at his own house on the Monday. - A. I saw him at my house about three o'clock, or a little after; I saw him again about six o'clock, or something before; he was at my house.

Q. How long did he continue at your house. - A.

He stopped something more than an hour.

Q. Do you recollect whether he went away of his own accord, or whether any messenger came for him. - A. I was not in the way at the time; I believe his wife came for him.

JAMES BLIGH . Q. Do you know any thing about this business. - A. Nothing but the questions I put to him when Mr. Swain and Bunnell were looking at the back part of the premises; I questioned him how he came by the sheep, he said he bought them at Smithfield yesterday, of Mr. Ireson; I broke the stable door open and found the fourteen sheep; he afterwards told me that two men sent them to him to be slaughtered, just as I was carrying him to prison.

Rudd's Defence. John Donnovan brought me them sheep to kill; I did not know they were stolen.

Donnovan's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury - the crime I am indicted for I know no more than what I informed the magistrates at Queen-square office, which I thought it my duty to do. On Monday the 28th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, John Moore of Islington brought me the twenty five sheep, in the road near Bagnigge wells, to deliver to Mr. Rudd at Chelsea; I drove them there, and Rudd received them of me; he asked me where Moore was, I told him; he told me he was gone to Smithfield to settle his books. The next day I went to Rudd's to see the sheep were safe delivered. Moore paid me, and I knew not that the sheep were stolen, or else I would not have drove the sheep; I was in no ways concerned in this transaction no more than being willing to earn a few shillings. On the next day I saw Moore, he is a master drover; he gave me part of a pint of beer and some beef steaks; he parted with me; I did not know they were stolen. I trust you will restore me to my family of infant children; I am their only support.

WILLIAM RUDD - Mr . Alley. Had your master any servant but you. - A. No.

Q. How old are you. - A. Turned of nine last birthday, about two months ago.

Q. Have you learned your catechism and to go to church. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with the defendant. - A. Almost a fortnight.

Q. Used you to say your prayers when you went to bed. - A. Yes.

Q. What becomes of people after they are dead who tell tales. - A. They go to the naughty man.

Q. Do you mean to go to the Devil. - A. Yes.

Q. You said you lived a fortnight with the prisoner Rudd. - A. Yes, and I slept at my father's house.

Q. Do you know the day on which your master was taken from his home and taken to Queen-square, you was there you know. - A. Yes, on Tuesday night, I believe.

Q. On the Monday night, the day before Tuesday, did you carry any message from your mistress to your master. - A. Yes, my mistress sent me to the Water Works public house.

Q. Did you find your master there. - A. Yes.

Q.What time in the evening was it. - A. Between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Did your master accompany you home. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any sheep being brought. - A. No.

Q. Where did he keep his sheep. - A. At a place a distance from his house.

Q. Turn round and see if you see your master. - A. Yes.

Q. You see another man there, Donnovan. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see that man at your master's house before you went with the message to the public house, the Water Works. - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing under his care. - A. I did not see any thing, I saw him at the place where my master kills the sheep.

Court. Are you sure it was the other man that you saw. - A. Yes, I am quite sure of that.

Rudd called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

[The COURT, after recapitulating the whole of the evidence, added] -

How RUDD could suppose that a man like Donnovan could have come possessed of these sheep to bring them to him to slaughter, we must judge from his conduct. When asked by the witness where he got them, he first said he bought them in Smithfield market of Mr. Ireson; he might have called him to prove it. He is afterwards asked how he came by them, then he says he got them of some other person to kill; who that person was, he could not tell. He is asked if the person brought them himself - he said a drover brought them; who that drover is he cannot tell. He is asked whether he had any other sheep besides these seen by the witnesses - he said he had no other sheep. - When these fourteen sheep were found in his stable, being called on for his defence, he tolls you he did not know they were stolen, they were brought to him by Donnovan; therefore he would have you suppose that Donnovan stole them.

DONNOVAN's case stands upon his own confession. He is asked, after he was apprehended, if he knew any thing about the sheep - he said, over and over, he knew nothing about the sheep. He would have said, if he had been an innocent man - yes, I know who employed me. When he is ordered to be locked up, he then said he drove the sheep, and he had them of Moore to take them to the butcher. That there was a connexion between these two men Mr. Carpenter has proved. On the Monday Rudd was at his house in the evening, and the boy told you he was sent for him between seven and eight o'clock, and he saw Donnovan at the place where his master kills the sheep. On the 29th Mr. Carpenter has told you these two persons were in his house for about an hour, they were together; there it a connecting proof of these two prisoners being together about the time the offence was committed.

The case against RUDD is - he is found in possession of the sheep, and the false and contradictory account how he came came by them.

Against DONNOVAN is - he drove them there, and his denying he drove them. His defence is - he thought the person who brought them came by them honestly. - Donnovan's confession can have no weight but against himself. - You will consider the evidence against one prisoner distinct with respect to the other, and judge how far either of them, or both, are innocent or guilty.

RUDD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

DONNOVAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-41

110. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 19th of June , in and upon William Barret , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously and unlawfully did make an assault, and that he then and there with a certain sharp instrument, which he held in his right hand, did strike, cut, and wound the said William Barret in and upon the head, with intent in so doing him feloniously and with malice aforethought to kill and murder .

Second count for like offence, with intention to disable him.

Third count to do him some greivous bodily harm.

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

WILLIAM BARRET . Q. I believe you are constable of the hamlet of Poplar. - A. I am.

Q. Were you on duty on the 19th of June last. - A. I was.

Q. Did you in consequence of any information you had received, go to quell a riot. - A. I did.

Q. At what hour of the night. - A. It was nigh twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Did any body accompany you. - A. Mr. Lee, the headborough. We went from the watchhouse to Noble-street, and when we came to Noble-street we heard there had been a riot there; we went up to the top of Noble-street to see if all was quiet there; coming back again we saw a woman at the corner of Paradise-row with a child in her arms; I said to her, good woman, why do you not go home, she replied, I have no home; I says if you have not got a home I will find you one, meaning the watchhouse; I had hardly spoke that word but this man came running out of a house, saying, d - n your eyes, I will learn you to come this way; he took and gave the headborough a blow; he struck him with an iron bar, I believe, that was lodged at his side.

Q. Where did he strike him. - A. He struck him on the head.

A. Who struck him. - A. This Adams struck Lee on the head.

Q. You do not know it was that man, a man came running out of the house. - A. Yes.

Q. That man that came running out of the house struck Mr. Lee. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him. - A. Yes, he gave him two blows, I think; it was with an iron instrument; after he struck Mr. Lee, Mr. Lee fell.

Q. You say he lodged it at his side. - A. He drawed the instrument from his side, and struck Mr. Lee.

Q. Was the weapon in his hand. - A. Yes.

Q. What do you mean by lodging it on his side. - A. He hauled his hand from his side.

Q. Then he listed up his hand with a weapon, and struck Mr. Lee, is that what you mean. - A. Yes; he struck Mr. Lee and he fell.

Q. Now describe the weapon as well as you can. - A. It was a square weapon, a square bar about three feet long.

Q. Was it square the whole way up, the whole length. - A. All the way up.

Q. If it was square the whole way up, it was the same thickness the whole way up, what was the colour of it. - A. It appeared to be black.

Q. After he brought Lee to the ground what did this person do. - A. Then he began upon me and struck me upon several places upon the head; there is the dent upon my hat; he struck me upon my head several times.

Q. Did he bring you to the ground. - A. I ran, and he ran after me, beating me about my back, about three hundred yards, till I was so hurt by the beating in my loins, I was obliged to drop from the blows I received.

Q. Can you at all judge what this weapon was made of. A. Iron.

Q. You say he struck you upon the head, what effect did it produce upon your head. - A. One cut, of about two inches long.

Q. I believe you were confined by reason of the blows some time. - A. About a couple of months; Mr. Tatem attended me, Mr. Maxfield's assistant.

Q. Were you cut on any other part of your body besides your head. - A. I was bruised, not cut; this is the hat I had on, it is cut in two or three places by the blows I received from the man (The hat shown to the court and jury.)

Court. You said there were more cuts than one, I do not see more than one. - A. There is one cut just below of the same side where the other cut is; one cut is near to the crown, it is cut right through, and the other cut is near the band.

Mr. Bolland. Did these blows render you senseless. A Yes, for a day or two.

Q. What parish is it in where his happened. - A.In the parish of Stepney in the hamlet of Poplar

Court. I understood from you that this appeared to you to be done by a square bar of iron. - A. Yes. This is the handkerchief I had on and this is the shirt.

Q. What part of your head was cut. - A. The right side of my head.

Mr. Bolland. Did the person say any thing to you at the time. - A. Not a word; only repeating them words, d - your eyes I will learn you to come this way.

Court. Was the cut in your head occasioned by the blow that made that hole through your hat. - A. Yes, it was the upper blow in the hat that occasioned it.

Mr. Bolland. Do you know who that woman was. A. I never saw the woman before.

Prisoner. I want to know whether he is the man that can swear I did it or not.

Court. He has not said it, that depends upon other evidence.

JOHN LEE. Q. You are headborough of Poplar. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on duty on the 19th of June last in company with Mr. Barret. - A. Yes, I went with him on that night to Noble-street, about the hour of twelve; we met a woman.

Q. What happened when you got there. - A.We went up Noble-street; the second time I was at the left hand of Mr. Barret; there was a woman standing facing of Mr. Barret and me, on the other side of the way; Mr. Barret said, good woman what business have you in the street at this time of night, I desire you will dispatch and go to your lodgings; she said she had none; then instantly this Adams rushed out from the side of her, ran by her, and crossed over to him and me.

Q. Did you know Adams. - A. He came and rushed from the side of the woman; then he struck me with some weapon that he had in his hand, I cannot justly say what it was, although it was moonlight; he carried it by the side of him.

Court. You say it was moon light. - A. Yes, but not perfectly clear.

Q. That I understand you to say it was moon light. A. Yes.

Q. But not very clear. - A. Not perfectly clear.

Q. Now was there light enough for you to distinguish his person and to be sure of it. - A. It was.

Q. He struck you you say. - A. He struck me twice the second blow I fell.

Q. What was the weapon he struck you with. - A. I cannot justly say, it was something that was very heavy and sharp; with all he cut my head on the side. I was under the surgeon's care for two months and three weeks of the two wounds I received.

Q. Did it appear to be an iron bar. - A. It was something very heavy, it cut so; it was about the length of two foot and a half.

Q. Did you observe what shape it was. - A. I cannot say I did.

Mr. Bolland. You say the second blow brought you to the ground. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he strike you any more. - A. I do not remember he did.

Q. Did he do any thing to Mr. Barrett. - A. Yes, after I recoverd myself from the ground, I made into the street, I heard Mr. Barrett cry for mercy repeatedly, several times. I was at the distance of twenty yards from them; I said to Adams are you murdering this man; he looked over his shoulder and said if I have not it was my intention.

Court. At what time were you at the distance of twenty yards from him. - A. When I came to them; when I first heard Mr. Barrett I was more than a hundred yards from him.

Q. Upon hearing Mr. Barrett crying for mercy did you go towards Mr. Barrett. - A. I did.

Q. How near did you get to him. - A. I was at the distance of twenty yards.

Q. Did you say any thing to him. - Q. I did, I said you scoundrel are you murdering the man; he said, if he had not done it, it was his intention.

Q. After he had said that what did he do. - A. Then he ran strait down Poplar.

Q. Then if I understood you, you never got nearer to him than twenty yards after he knocked you down. A.No, I do not think I was, I was about the distance of twenty yards.

Mr. Bolland. When he first came out of the alley towards the woman, was his face towards you or his back. - A. His face was not towards me, in a strait and proper direction, he turned and spoke to the woman.

Q. When Adams spoke to the woman, was his face towards you. - A. Exactly then.

Q. How far were you from the alley out of which he came. - A. About nine yards.

Court. Did he come out of an alley. - A. Yes, the house was facing of us up an alley.

Q. Answer my question - I asked about the alley not about any house in the alley - how far was the woman from the alley. - A. She stood in an alley and Adams rushed by her.

Q. How far where you from the place where the woman stood at the time he rushed by her. - A. I was more than nine yards, I have measured it since.

Q. How long had you an opportunity of observing him, before he struck you. - A. Not half a minute, we will say, he dashed across and struck me.

Q. Then the whole opportunity of your observing his face was at the time of rushing from the alley and striking, was that the half minute. - A. Yes.

Q. During that time, was the only time you had of observing his face. - A. Yes.

Q. Could you see him so as to distinguish who he was when you called to him, when he was twenty yards off. - A. Yes, perfectly, because the moon light was clear, then I could see more perfectly.

Q. If you had seen him without Mr. Barrett being there should you have known him at the distance of twenty yards. - A. Yes, perfectly well, because he is bare of hair upon his crown.

Q. At the time he was beating of Barrett you were twenty yards from him there was light enough for you to know him. - A. I am very sure of that, I am very clear that he is the man.

Mr. Bolland. Do you know the woman, have you ever seen her since. - A. I cannot say; did I ever see her afterwards, did you say.

Q. Have you seen that woman since. - A. Yes, it is a woman that goes for his wife.

Q. You mean the woman that lives with him. - A. Yes.

Q. What opportunity before had you of seeing him, you said you saw him before in the watchhouse, how many times had you seen him before. - A.Several different times; if I was to say ten or fifteen times I should not speak out of compass.

Q. Do you know where he lived. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Where did you make search for him. - A. At his house at the time Mr. Barrett was dressing.

Q. Where is his house. - A. Noble-street.

Court. It is in this alley. - A. It is at the corner of this alley, it opens in the alley, from where he come out of.

Mr. Bolland. In what state did you find Mr. Barrett when you came up to him, was he standing, sitting or laying. - A. Laying. I thought absolutely he was dead; I lifted him up, he tell with his head doubled, he had no life at all, as I thought; we took him to a neighbour and rested him against a door, we could not call them up at last we took him to Mr. Greaves; when we got a light we saw he had a cut on his head, there was a cut on his head about two inches and a half.

Q. The surgeon is the best judge of that - when did you afterwards see Adams. - A. I saw him at Hicks's Hall, Clerkenwell; I knew him directly, in a moment, as soon as ever I saw him. I was perfectly sure he was the man.

Q. When was it you saw him at Hicks's Hall. - A. Last sessions, on the Friday in the sessions week.

Q. What did you do in consequence of seeing him there. - A. I had got a warrant with me at the time, that I took out in June last; I desired Thomas Robertson to execute that warrant upon Adams.

Q. Did you accompany Robertson to execute it. - A. He did not stand his trial that day, it was Monday he took his trial, he was acquitted; I was with Robertson to execute that warrant, I stood upon the steps.

Q. Did you see Adams. - A. I did not; when he went out they said Adams was out. Robertson went after him; after he had taken him. I met them in the street.

Prisoner. I want to know whether he know whether I am the man that struck him or not. On the 19th of June last there were two men came to my wife, she had occasion to be up, having a sick child.

Court. That is your defence.

Q. Had you been to his house that same night. - A. Never at all, I was not in the house that night not till

some days after.

Prisoner. I want to know whether he can swear I am the man that struck him positively. - A. I have sworn it.

Q. How can you swear to me when you never saw me nor spoke to me - A. I have seen you in the watch-house; I saw you on that night.

Q. He cannot swear that it was me that struck him. - A. I can with propriety.

Q. You never saw me with your eyes before. - A. You are the man, and the man only.

Court. Did you ever see him before. - A. Several times; I have seen him in custody several times.

Q. Was he in custody at the watchhouse more than once. - A. I cannot say that he was; he has been there for misdemeanors; he was there all night once at the watchhouse he was brought in about eight o'clock in the evening and remained there till eleven o'clock the next day, till he went to the magistrate.

Q. Did you take him to the magistrate the next day. - A. No.

Q. How long was he in the same part of the watch-house with you, so as to give you an opportunity of knowing his face. - A. I suppose for the course of an hour; they were talking to him, they let him out of the lock-up place for an hour, to know how he could be guilty of such a thing.

Q. Then he was in the same room with you. - A. Nearly.

Q. Had you any conversation with him that night. - A. Not any thing particular.

Q. Had you any conversation with him. - A. None in the least. Mr. Greaves conversed with him; he will be a witness against him by-and-by upon this very thing.

Q. Did you hear any conversation between him and Greaves. - A. I cannot say I did; I was on particular business; I observed his hair was gone from the top of his head; I many times have been called up to turn him out of public houses for rioting.

Q. You say that he was in the watchhouse in the same room as you was. - A. Yes.

Q. Who was he conversing with. - A. The headborough; I did not give any head to what he was talking of, because Adams was in liquor; he ran out of one thing into another; I dare say he was more than an hour, rather more than less.

MARMADUKE TATEM . Q. You are a surgeon, I believe. - A. I am assistant to Mr. Maxfield, surgeon and apothecary.

Q. Were you on the 19th of June called to Mr. Barret. - A. I was; about three o'clock in the morning; he was in bed at his own house, I found him nearly in an insensible state; he had been partly dressed by another surgeon; upon taking it off I discovered that some plaisters had been applied over the wound; they had been separated by bleeding.

Q. Where was this wound. - A. It was on the back part of the head; it might be two inches in length.

Q. How far had it penetrated. - A. I penetrated the integumen through the scull, but there was no fracture.

Q. In what state was he in as to danger. - A. In this case it is not possible to discover immediately; he appeared insensible; when he was moved he did not seem sensible.

Q. What was this wound occasioned by. - A. By some weapon; there was a great contusion, it was what we call a contused lacerated wound.

Court. Not what is called inscised wound. - A. No, it was not.

Q. It was not what we call a cut, but rather a bruise; this wound had been made by a blunt instrument. - A. This wound had been made by a piece of wood or iron.

Q. Do not you understand by a cut, a wound made by a sharp instrument. - A. No, sir.

Q. How then, I ask you this; when we speak of a cut, or when a thing is said to be cut that wound is made by a sharp instrument. - A. Not in general; it may be cut with a blunt instrument, not particularly sharp.

Q. A wound being made by an edged instrument, is called a cut; you may have a cut with a hatchet - does not the cut of a wound imply it being done with an edged instrument. - A. My lord, I have seen cuts from a stick, not particularly sharp; I have seen a cut with the knuckle or falling on a piece of timber; that is the distinction we make; a cut with a knife, that is called an incised wound, and a cut with a stick it is called lacerated.

Q. I take it that the separation of the flesh by a sharp instrument is called a cut; in common language it is called a cut; when a person has fallen on a piece of timber and hurt their hand, they say I have torn my hand or bruised it; lacerated is a harder word. Suppose you pound a piece of flesh with a pestle, would you say you cut it. - A. I should say it was bruised.

Court. So I should think.

JOHN PRESTON . Q. You live at Poplar. - A.I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, he was a tenant of mine.

Q. Was he during the time this accident happened. - A. Yes, in a little house near Noble-street; the house is in an alley close to the street.

Q. Did you in common with others hear the affray on the 19th of June. - A. Yes, on the next morning.

Q. Did you in consequence of hearing it, say any thing to Adams about it. - A. Yes on the Sunday morning after, as this happened an the Friday night, I told him there was a fine piece of work; that I understood he was the man that hurt the officers; he said he knew nothing of the matter, and so did his wife.

Q. Did he say any thing else to you. - A. He added that he knew something about it; that somebody had done it. On the Tuesday following I was standing at the butcher's shop; I collect rents about that neighbourhood. He came by me, I said, here is a fine piece work, you dressed pretty well most of our officers that night; he said d - n me, I did, and I would do so again, if they come to my house, he said; but I did not know they were officers; then he went away directly.

Q. Did you at any time go with Mr. Lee, in search after him. - A. I went with Lee about half an hour afterwards to the house, and the house was locked up; I never saw him in Poplar afterwards.

THOMAS ROBINSON . Q. You are a constable of the police office, Shadwell. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Lee, that has been examined to day. - A. I do.

Q. Did Lee apply to you at any time and where, to take Adams in custody. - A. On the 4th of December last he applied to me to apprehend him.

Q. Where was Adams at that time. - A. He was at the bar in the sessions house, Clerkenwell.

Q. He was acquitted of the charge. - A. He was; I

found it was going in his favour. I then went to the door, I desired one of the constables to assist me if there was occasion; when Adams came out he turned his coat up under his arm, and ran as fast as he could about a mile from the sessions house; I came up to him, I said to him, I have got you; he said you have. I said, suppose you know for what, yes, he replied, I suppose it is for that business at Poplar, it is said I. I then secured him, and brought him down to Shadwell office.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, with the greatest respect, I most humbly solicit your goodness to condescend to hear this my defence. The prosecutors on the 19th of June came to my house, between twelve and one o'clock, my wife having a sick child was the cause of her being up at that late hour; I was a bed and asleep with my other children, my wife went out to fasten the window shutters; when the prosecutors asked my wife to give them a lodging; she desired them to go about their business; they began to use her ill. she got in doors, they followed her, and when they got in they put the candle out and began to behave indecent; she called me to give her assistance. When I got up I thought the house was on fire, she called to me and said, dear husband, here is two men ill using me; upon which one of them run out of the door; I expected them to be thieves. I caught hold of a broomstick and struck one of them; one of them says d - n your eyes, whip it into him; they then ran down the lane, one run against the post and fell backwards, which I suppose to be the shortest of the two; I did not go out of the door, as I had nothing on but my shirt. On the next day I told my wife to go and get a warrant; the magistrate would not, they being parish constables, when they got a warrant against me, the magistrate told the clerk to make it a common assault, and desired me to get bail; when I was brought up for the next examination they brought a shirt stained with blood, upon which I was committed. I am a poor labouring man; I never was in any trouble in my life.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-42

111. JOHN JOUEL FOSTER ROPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December , in the dwelling house of Robert Dunbar , an order for payment of 33 l. 9 d. the property of Robert Dunbar .

Second count, the property of different other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

ALEXANDER ALLEN . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Dunbar. - A. I am; he is a ship and insurance broker , No. 16, Old London-street, Fenchurch-street .

Q. Had you any order for the payment of thirty three pound and nine pence bought into your house on the 5th of December. - A. Yes, it came from Mr. Johnson; I believe it was delivered to Mr. Begbie by Mr. Johnson's clerk; Mr. Begbie, one of our clerks gave it me; I put it on the tin box on the desk and locked it up.

Q. Did you leave the key in that box or take it out. - A. I left it in.

Q. During the time that you was there, did you see the prisoner at the bar there. - A. It was after I went away that he came in.

Q. After you had put it there was it taken out by any person in your presence. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. About what time of the day did you receive that order. - A. I got it a quarter after three, and it wanted about twenty minutes to four when I left the accompting house.

Q. Who did you leave in the accompting house when you went out. - A. A young man of the name of Osborne, a clerk in our house; I am not quite sure whether Mr. Sowel had come back or not I did not look particularly at the order. I knew the amount and the drawer.

JOHN BEGBIE. Q. You are clerk at Mr. Dunbar's. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of December last did you receive a draft of thirty three pound and nine pence. - A. Yes, I think Mr. Johnson's clerk gave it me; I gave it to Mr. Allen. I left the accompting house at half after three or twenty minutes to four.

Q. Are you sure the paper you received from Mr. Johnson's clerk you gave it to Mr. Allen. - A. Yes.

SAMUEL SOWELL . Q. You are a clerk to Mr. Dunbar. - A. I am. I did not see the order brought; I saw the prisoner there, he came in about half after four. Mr. Thomas Osborne came in with him, he is brother to one of our clerks. Mr. Thomas Osborne , when he came in with the prisoner, he asked if his father was within; I said yes, he was up at dinner with Mr. Dunbar; he begged leave to leave the prisoner while he went up to speak to his father.

Q. Did you see the tin box upon the desk. - A. I took it off the desk and and put it into the iron chest in the inward accompting house, adjoining to that accompting house.

Q. Did the prisoner see you take it from that desk and carry it to that accompting house. - A. I did not watch his eye, he might see it. I believe I left the accompting house just after five. I left the prisoner only there.

Q. During the time that you was there before you put the box into the chest in the adjoining room had any body taken any thing out of the tin box. - A. There could be no person that took any thing out; I did not know of thing being there, only six registers; I did not turn the key, I only put it into the other accompting house.

Q. From the time that the other clerks went who were in the accompting house. - A. No one.

Q. Were you there the whole time. - A. Yes.

THOMAS OSBORNE . Q. You are an officer in the marines. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 5th of December go to Mr. Dunbars. - A. Yes, I left Mr. Roper down stairs; I went up stair's and when I came down I found the prisoner sitting in the accompting-house alone; my brother came down first and shewed us both out.

Q. After you came down did either of you go into the accompting-house. - A. No, I passed through the accompting-house and went into where the prisoner was; we were going to the theatre; going along we went into Mr. Stunt's the shoemakers. Mr. Roper presented a draft of thirty three pounds and ninepence, he went in there to purchase a pair of boots the prisoner I believe said to Mr. Stunts's foreman that he got that draft from his guardian; he gave the draft and bought a pair of boot, left his others, and took three or four pounds I believe, and left the draft there.

Q. Had any thing passed between you and the prisoner about a draft. - A. He said, as he was going down Fenchurch-street, that he had a draft of thirty pounds.

WILLIAM BARRETT . Q. You are foreman to Mr. Stunt the shoemaker. - A. Yes, he lives at No. 57, in the Strand. On the 5th of December, the prisoner came

in company with Mr. Osborne; he told me he wanted a pair of boots, he pulled out a draft; he said you must give me change for this, I looked at it, it was for thirty three pounds and ninepence; I cannot be positive of the note again, I only know it was drawn upon Messrs. Lee and Satterthwaite; he did not tell me where he got the draft. When he produced the draft I hesitated, I said, I did not know that I had so much money; I went up stairs; when I came down, I told him I had not so much money, but he should have a few pounds, and the boots, and on Monday he should have the remainder. On the Monday I sent the draft to the bankers by Peter Crump ; I told the prisoner if he would give me a direction I would send the money; I sent the money according to the directions. The draft for thirty three pounds and ninepence that I had of the prisoner I gave to Peter Crump .

PETER CRUMP . Q. You are servant to Mr. Stunt the shoemaker. - A. I am.

Q Did you receive a draft from Mr. Barrett. - A. I did; I took it to 71, Lombard-street to the bankers, I gave it to a lusty gentleman there; they paid the amount of the draft thirty three pounds and ninepence. I cannot answer to the draft.

JOHN MARSHALL . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Lee and Co. 71, Lombard-street. - A. Yes, I cancelled that draft, and paid it; I believe the last witness to be the same person I paid it to.

JOHN LOMAS JOHNSON. Q. Look at that draft, did you draw that draft. - A. I did.

Q. Did you draw any other draft on that day to the same amount. - A. No.

Court. Mr. Johnson where was it drawn. - A. In my accompting-house Baker-street, Old Bethlem in London

Q. to Barrett. Who was it delivered the draft to you, the prisoner or Mr. Osborne. - A. I am sure to the best of my recollection that it was delivered by the prisoner.

Q. to Osborne. Did you give that check to the shoemaker. - A. No, Mr. Roper. (the draft read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with Thomas Osborne at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street; the master of the Cross Keys informed Mr. Osborne that his father had been there and wanted to see him; he asked me to go with him; he said, if I said I belonged to the same ship as he did, he should get some money of his father; I did go. I saw a tin case with a key in it; it was there when I came, in and when I went out, I never touched it; when Mr. Osborne came down stairs, we went out; we walked along to the corner of Gracechurch-street, where we left Mr. Osborne's brother, who came down stairs with us; we went into the Strand; when we came there Mr. Osborne said he had got a check, he wanted cash for it; I said, I could get it cashed at Mr. Stunt's; I was to say this check belonged to me; we went into Mr. Stunt's shop, I ask- for a pair of boots; Mr. Thomas Osborne presented the check, and asked the foreman if he could cash it. Mr. Stunt's foreman went up stairs, he said when he came down he had not got enough money; I had a pair of boots and three pound one, and we went to the play.

COURT. - The prisoner's counsel has made an objection about the word London on the draft; you shall see it. At the same time it is my duty to declare what the law is; if the word London had not appeared on the face of it, the prisoner would have taken the benefit of it; but as it is, both law and ets are mixed together, the word London being expressed, and it actually was drawn in London and therefore you are to say whether you are satisfied in point of fact that he stole the note if you are, then the prisoner has committed the larcency; however, you are to judge of that; you have heard the evidence of persons both in the house of Mr. Dunbar and Mr. Stunt; Mr. Stunt's foreman has told you upon his oath the prisoner at the bar was the person who presented that draft, there can no imputation at all to Mr. Osborne.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-43

112. WILLIAM GEORGE WALFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a promissory note, value 5 l. 5 s. and four other promissory notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Watkin Crowder .

WATKIN CROWDER . I live at High Wickham , I keep the sign of the Red Lion . On the 12th of December, the prisoner, in a one horse chaise, came to my house, he drank tea there; he told me his horse was tired, and he was afraid that he would not be able to take him to town that night; he asked me if his horse could be taken care of till the Tuesday following, and then he should return to the Red Lion; he said, he was acquainted with Mr. Watson in Messrs. Esdaile's house, bankers, and asked me to give him change of a fifteen pound note; I gave him fifteen pounds in paper and cash; he ordered a chaise; he left his horse and whiskey at my house, and went off with the chaise, and his two sons with him; about four hours after he was gone there was a hue and cry after him.

Q. You heard something. - A. Yes. I gave him three notes payable at the house of Messrs. Watson and Co.

Q. Are there any body here from Messrs. Watson and Co. - A. No.

Q. Have you ever presented this draft. - A. I never did.

JOHN FOY . I produce a five pound note, and four other notes; of the Chipping bank, and a bank of England one pound note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-44

113. WILLIAM CANSLEY , alias CAUSLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , four pound weight of soap, value 2 s. the property of William Whitworth .

BENJAMIN NORRIS. I am clerk to William Whitworth , soapmaker , Bethnal Green ; the prisoner was a labourer there. About the 8th or 9th of December, I am not positive of the date, in the morning, I missed some soap in the cutting room; I searched and found it concealled under the cutting room steps; I left it there. and just before the men left work in the evening, I placed myself in a situation that I could see any person take the soap; I then ordered the bell to be rung for the men to leave the premises; I went to the gate, the prisoner came first, I charged him with having taken the soap; he denied it. I sent for a constable, during which time he produced the soap.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This soap was in an improper place; I thought it my duty to take it to Mr. Norris; he never asked me for it, I said, I had got it; he said he knew I had got it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-45

114 JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , fifty three pounds a weight of Indigo, value 20 l. the property of George Coles , Charles Coles , and William Coles .

The Indictment was read by Mr. Gurney and the case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

CHARLES COLE, Mr. (Gurney,) What is the name of your partners. - A. William and George Coles ; I live in Scot's Yard, the warehouse is in St. Dunstan's Hill .

Q. I believe you are brokers as well as indigo merchants . - A. Yes. The prisoner was our warehouseman , he had been with us better than two years; he had the entire care of the warehouse; at all times there was Indigo in the warehouse.

Q. Was the prisoner authorised to sell any indigo on your account. - A. On no occasion whatever.

Q. What quantity were you in the habit of selling. - A. seventy or eighty pound was the smallest quantity.

Q. You would not be in the habit of selling it in a box of 25 lb. - A. No, he was not authorised to sell any quantity.

Q. Have you missed a considerable quantity of indigo. - A. We have.

Q. When did the Prisoner cease to be in your employ. - A. About the latter end of November.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp, I understood from my learned friend, in his opening the case, he stated to the jury that the prisoner was arrested by you. -

A. He was.

Q. Did not the subject for action form the subject for debt. - A. No, I discharged the debt and pursued the other object.

Q. What salary was it the prisoner had. - A. The salary was depending upon his merits we took him in a as distressed man.

Q. Has he received any Salary from you. - A. There is an open account, he has not disbursed the amount he received.

THOMAS SKINNER , (Mr. Pooley.) Q. You are a porter belonging to Messrs Coles. - A. yes, the prisoner was warehouseman there.

Q. On the 21st of November last was there any indigo packed up by you by his order. - A. The prisoner packed it in the warehouse, it was on Saturday. I do not know what day it was weigh'd after it was pack'd, the prisoner packed it in two deal boxes, I weighed them by his order; one of them weighed about 27 pounds and the other 24 or 25 pounds, this indigo was packed in Messrs Coles warehouse, St. Dunstan's Hill, they were hasped down and sent from the warehouse the same day. I carried them to Mr. Read the Vauxhall errand carter by Turner's order.

JAMES READ (Mr. Gurney,) I believe you drive the errand cart of Lambeth and Vauxhall. - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember taking any box on the latter end of November from Messrs Coles warehouse. - A. I remember taking some boxes I received from Skinner's hands; I took them to No. 10, Paradise Row, Lambeth; I received an order at the booking house. I called for them, Mr. Turner gave me a list of the articles I put in the cart to give to the person to whom I delivered them for the person to see they were right. I was to deliver the paper at Paradise Row.

Q What Number of boxes did you take. - A. I think there were two boxes and two or three little articles in paper, I left them at No. 10, Paradise Row.

Court. Can you by any accident tell us the day. - A. No I cannot.

Mr. Gurney, was that the house that you had taken any parcels to by the Prisoners directions before. - A. Yes, one or two articles two or three months before, the same as I do for any other Gentleman.

Q. Were you directed afterwards to call for these articles and to take them any where else. A. I was directed to take them to the other end of the town, whether it was a week or a month afterwards I have not the recollection.

Q. Did you say you was directed to go to the same house in Paradise Row to receive the same boxes. - A. yes, I received three boxes and three parcels in a bag to bring to No. 23, in the Old Change.

Q. Did two of these boxes seem to be the same boxes you had taken before. A. I do not know, they seemed to be the same size, my wife was with me part of the way. I have seen Mr. Turner, of St. Dunstan's hill, at the house in Paradise Row and two women.

Court. You mean the Prisoner. - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH READ , (Mr. Pooley) Q. you are the wife of James Read . A. Yes, I accompany my husband with the Cart. Q. Do you recollect, in November, going to St. Dunstan's hill. - A. Yes, we went to Mr. Cole's warehouse there; two boxes were delivered to my husband I was not present then, I was gone of an errand, I was present when they were delivered in Paradise Row, No. 10; Beazley is on the door.

Q. Do you recollect calling any time at Paradise row to take any boxes. A. Yes, but I cannot say how long after, we took them in the Cart at Paradise row, we took three boxes, a bag, and two small parcels, two of them seemed to be of the same size as we carried to St. Dunstan's hill to Paradise row. We took them to No. 23, Old Change; the direction No. 23, Old Change was on the same paper as the number of the articles were.

Cross Examined by Mr. Gleed, you were not present when the boxes were delivered at St. Dunstan's Hill. - A. No I was not.

Q. There were some boxes delivered at Mrs. Beazley's house. - A. Yes.

Q. The Prisoner at the bar you never saw upon the occasion. - A. I did not.

Q. Therefore when some boxes, at some time after were delivered to you of which you cannot ascertain the time they were delivered, the prisoner at the bar was not there, he could not deliver the boxes to you. - A. No, Sir, nor do I know that I should know Mr. Turner if I was to see him.

BROOK ROBINS, (Mr. Gurney,) do you live at No. 23, in the Old Change. - A. I do, I am a dealer in damaged Cottons.

Q. Have you for some time past known the prisoner, Turner - A. About two years and a quarter.

Q. In the latter end of the month of November, did you receive any boxes containing Indigo. - A.Yes three.

Q. Did they contain Indigo, or one of them Indigo-dust. - A. One Indigo dust and two Indigo.

Q. What else came with them. - A. About eighteen

pounds of East India Indigo, about 18 pounds of Gum, and twenty one pounds of Cotton; I received these on the 27th of November,

Q. Did you receive any letter with them. - A. I received a letter previous to that.

Q. In whose hand writing is that letter. - A. Mr. Turners, I have seen him write, I know his hand writing.

Q. Is that letter destroyed, - A. Turner destroyed that letter himself, I saw him destroy it.

O. What was the contents of that letter, - A. It mentioned the particulars of the goods, and that I was to dispose of them in the best way I could and he would give me a commission for selling them; this was on Friday the 27th of November.

O. On the Monday following did you receive another letter from him. - A. Yes.

O. Is that letter dated the 30th, Yes, It is Turner's hand writing, read), Dear Sir, I particularly request to see you as soon as possible at No. 5, Edward Street Black Friars, I am yours sincerely, J. Turner, directed Mr. T. Robins, No. 23, Old Change.

O. Did you go to that house described in that letter. - A. I did it was a lock up house, he was then under an arrest, he said nothing that day respecting these goods. I received another letter on the next day, I think it was Tuesday night, the conversation past respecting this Indigo. I told him I had weighed the things, I took out the letter I received from him specifying of the things; I told him they weighed more than that letter expressed by two or three pounds or more, I said then that I had sent two of the boxes off to Mr. Woodward, he said he was very glad that I thought of it, he told me to send them all off.

Q. What became of that letter that you shewed him that specified about it. - A. He put it into the fire and burnt it, saying, it was of no use now.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the Prisoner again - A. I think he sent for me again the next day. I do not recollect any thing more that past about the Indigo.

Q. You tell me that you sent two of these boxes to Mr. Woodward, how long did they remain there. - A. About two days. On the Thursday I was taken in custody, the boxes were fetched back again by my wife after I was in custody.

Cross examined, by Mr. Knapp. You carry on a new trade in the City of London, a dealer in damaged Cottons and occasionally any thing that comes to your hand. - A. If I understand the articles.

Q. You are a general dealer, and take any thing that is brought - A. No, if I am not disposed to buy it I do not, if I am disposed to buy it I buy it.

Q. Without making any inquiries. - A. I buy every thing in the regular market.

Q Yes, and buy them as cheap as you can. Did you ever say a word about this before you was taken up, put in custody, and likely to be tried yourself for this offence. - A. I do not know that I mentioned it to any body before I was apprehended

MARY WARREN . (Mr Pooley), You are servant to Mr. Robins - A. Yes.

Q.(To Read) Do you know her. - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mary Warren). Did you receive any box from him. - A. I did on a Friday the latter end of November, the day of the month I cannot say, he brought them with his errand cart. I received of him two boxes, two small parcels, and a small long bag, at Mr. Robins's house in the old change.

Q.(To Read), Is that the person you delivered them to. - A.- It is, to the best of my knowledge.

RICHARD WOODWARD . (Mr. Gurney.) Where do you live. - A. No. 53, Watling Street.

Q. On Tuesday, the first of December, did you receive any boxes of Indigo from Mr. Robins. - A. Yes, I received the boxes, I did not know what they contained. Wright, his Porter, brought them me, afterwards they were taken back by Wright.

JAMES WRIGHT (Mr. Gurney), were you Porter to Mr. Robins, - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take two boxes to Woodwards's house. - A. I did, and in two days afterwards I brought them back, I left them in the Warehouse.

Q. Did you afterwards open them. - A. Yes, by my mistresses order. They contained indigo, there was a box of Indigo dust besides. I put the Indigo into a small bag by my mistresses order, I buried it in the cellar, and the Indigo dust I put among the ashes. My mistress ordered me to split up the boxes and give them her to burn, I did.

Q. Do you know where these boxes came from. - A. No. I was not in the warehouse when they were brought in; the boxes that I delivered to Mr. Woodward were the same that I broke up.

Q.(To Mary Warren ), Were these the boxes that were taken from the errand cart that were broken up. - A. Yes.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT (Mr Pooley), You are a city constable. - A. Yes, I produce the Indigo. I found the bag in Mr. Robins's cellar about four feet under ground under some rubbish in a hole dug, Mr. Robins's Porters hewed me where it was.

Q (To Prosecutor), Is that such indigo as you had in your warehouse. - A. It is such Indigo as we lost - it is worth nine or ten shillings a pound, we never gave him any authority to sell any Indigo.

Prisoners Defence, My lord understanding that, although I have a Solicitor and Counsel, who are fully informed of the subject, yet it will be expected that I should make my defence. Feeling a consciousness of the falsehood of the allegation might over power me, I have determined to commit to writing this my solemn declaration. Although Messrs. Coles's business was regulated by method, yet it was in a great measure left to my discretion, I acted the best I could for them, but having entered into no specific agreement with them, I certainly considered, I had a right to reimbursement by every emolument. Under these circumstances, for near two years and a half, I had the uncontrouled management of their concern, wherein I had from seventy thousand to an hundred pound's worth of goods under my care. Surely then it could not be imagined that I could deem it worth while to commit the offence which I am charged and to which there could be no temptation. I was asked for an account, I rendered one, I wished the prosecutors to fill up the blanks with the sums which I considered my due; however, as far as it was I considered it

acquiescent. I continued to pay and receive as usual, I was not charged with any omission or I should have answered any question that might have been stated. I was proceeding to wind up every transaction when I was apprehended in my chamber by a writ for 500 and the same day and following I could obtain no satisfaction for their extraordinary conduct, nor could I discover there was any criminal action against me. They made use of an engine to extort confession when I was under arrest, to which I was a stranger: their evidence has been obtained through terror. I utterly disclaim the charge and proclaim my innocence. I rely on the liberality of this court to save me from the power of wealth and the violence of wrong.

The prisoner called two witnsses who gave him a good character.

COURT, Every man found in possession of stolen goods, it becomes him to say where he got them from, the possession of stolen property, in law the presumption is that his hand is the hand that has stolen it. You have heard a long defence, and not a word in answer to the charge.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

London, jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-46

115. WILLIAM WELLS , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Cox , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 10th of December , and burglariously stealing therein a Pier Glass, value six pounds , the property of William Basket .

The case was. stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM BASKET, Mr. Gurney, Had you in December last, a lodging at Mr. Cox's Kensington . - A. Yes.

Q. On what day before the robbery did you come there. - A. I think the Thursday week prior to that. I was in the habit of coming there once or twice a week.

Q. Did you go on there on Sunday the 13th of December. - A. I did, on the 13th, Mr. Cox, and me both, went in the room; we found the room had been robbed; we imagined they came in the room by what we discovered by the window, there seemed a pane of glass broken sufficient for a person to have introduced a hand by which means they might have opened the shutters; we saw the drawers had been broken open we observed the Pier Glass was gone.

Q. What is the value of that glass. - A. about six pounds. There were several articles taken from the drawers, they were all found in the house; there was a violin, two coats, and a waistcoat, some towels, a table cloth or two, and a few linen things. I cannot speak to exactly, they were my wife's, she was in the country; I was in the habit of going to my room once or twice a week. I left the key with Mrs. Cox.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same house. - A. Yes. On the next day we searched his room, the officer found the glass under the bed clothes, we found a small bit of India Ink, which I was well satisfied was mine, and we found a hammer in his room. I went with the officer to the fleet prison, he was apprehended there, and was taken to Bow street and examined.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing upon his examination. - A. Yes.

MR. STAFFORD Mr. Gurney, You are the principal Clerk in Bow Street office, were you present at the examination of the prisoner. - A. I was.

Q. was it taken down - A. It was not.

Court, How came you not to take it down. - A. We do not in general take it down unless the prisoner makes a formal confession. I rather think it was a conversation of the parties

Mr. Gurney, Did you make any promises or threats, or did any person say any thing to induce him to make the acknowledgement. - A. No. He acknowledged to Mr. Read that he had taken the pier glass from the window, the glass that was stolen; he acknowledged he had taken it.

ELIZABETH COX . Mr. Gurney, Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Samuel Cox , we live in Kensington.

Q. On what time of the day used you to lock Mr. Basket's room. - A. Of a night, he always left his key in the house.

Q. On what day did you discover the room had been robbed. - A. On the 11th of December, at 12 o'clock in the forenoon my little girl discovered the window had been broken open. I was in the room and saw it, the shutters were both wide open. I had shut the shutters about half after five the day before after dark, the room door was locked, I had the key in my pocket before I entered the room; I found it locked the same as I left it.

Q. In what condition did you find the room. - A. the sashes were shut down, the shutters open, and the things scattered about; the first thing I missed was a pair of Callico sheets, I missed a pier glass and the drawers I found open.

Q. The Prisoner I understand lodged at your house. - A. He lodged with his grandmother, she had seven rooms in the house, he lodged in the back garrett.

Q. Had you seen him the night preceeding the discovery of the robbery. - A. I think he slept at home that night, I saw him between three and four o'clock in the morning, he came down to breakfast.

Q. Were you present when the glass was found under the bed. - A. I was.

JOHN LINGUARD Mr. Gurney, You are a watchman I believe. - A. Yes.

Q. Is this house in your beat. - A. Yes.

Q. In going your rounds on Friday the 11th of December, did you find any thing the matter with Mr. Cox's house. - A. Yes, I found two sashes up in the front parlour, I shut them down not knowing the house had been robbed.

Q. You did not alarm the family at all. - A. I did not.

WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH Mr. Gurney, I believe you are one of the Bow Street Patrols. - A. I am.

Q. On Monday the 14th of December, did you make search in the prisoners room for the discovery of Mr. Basket's property. - A. I did.

Q. did you find a glass concealed in the manner he has related. - A. I did in the back garrett. I found a piece of India Ink and a small brush; I found a hammer which corresponded with the marks on the drawers, I found two picklock keys in the back garrett, on the floor,

I afterwards apprehended the Prisoner and took him to Bow-Street. (The Property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had that hammer out of the closet on the sunday morning following to which the robbery was done. I know nothing of the glass, nor did I know any thing about it 'till Friday morning. I went out on Thursday morning very early to an acquaintance in the Fleet prison and came home about half past eleven very tipsey with wine. The next morning I got up about eleven; I had not been down stairs above an hour before the landlady came in and said what had happened - I said I was very sorry for it. I went out and staid my usual time on Saturday, and on Sunday I was out all day. On Monday at the Fleet prison Mr. Basket come down to me with the officer. - They took me to a house in Fleet Street, and searched me. He asked me how I came to be so foolish as to take the glass. I said I did not take it; he said at Bow Street you say you found it, and that you took it in to take care of it, he said he would not appear against me, if sufficient was made up to him for his time and trouble. I told him I could not settle it, he must go to my grandmother; the Street door generally was left open all the day to a late hour at night. The parlour windows were left one night open the whole of the night, I have two witnesses to prove it.

DOROTHY STEBBING . Mr. Pooley, do you know this young man. - A. I have known him a year and a half, I never heard any thing disrespectful of him before.

Q. Do you recollect the parlour windows being left open the whole of the night. - A. I believe it was once mentioned of Mr. Basket's getting in the window himself. - A. I never saw it open.

Q. To Mr. Baskett, do you recollect at any time the door being shut, and you getting in at the window. - A. I think I did, it is seven or eight months ago.

ANN STEBBING, Mr. Pooley, do you recollect one night the parlour window being left open. - A. I remember once it being mentioned that Mr. Basket got in at the window. On the 13th of December, Wm. Well 's came into the parlour, and asked his grandmother to give him a hammer, I gave him the hammer by his grandmother's desire, he could not have had it on the morning of the robbery it was locked up in the closet.

Q. Was the street door in the habit of being left open. - A. Very often, the Street door was left open in the evening till eight o'clock.

Prisoner, Q. Was my room door ever locked. - A. Never locked, any body could go in.

Court, who lives in the house besides Mr. Cox and his wife. - A. Mrs. Basket's Children, Mrs. Stebbing, Mrs. Harrison, and I live in the house.

Q. Are there any men who live in the house besides Mr. Cox, Mr. Basket and the Prisoner. - A. No.

Prisoner, Q To Mrs. Cox, was not William Cox in and out of the house several times in a day, and even his workmen of an evening. - A. Yes, his workshop was backward; he was oblidged to come there, his paint was kept in a vault under the area, they had no business in the garret. Wm. Cox once went up stairs to speak to his father, but the men never go up.

Court, If you should be of opinion that the prisoner in the night time, between the 10th and the 11th of December, took the opportunity of getting in this room, by lifting up these sashes, and got into the room and stole the glass, he is guilty of the whole charge. If the sashes had been left open, and he took the opportunity of getting in and stealing the glass, then he will be guilty of stealing the glass, and not the burglary. In the first place you are to consider, whether he is guilty of stealing it at all. The evidence that effects him principally is, that the glass stole out of this room was found under his bed. How it got under his bed without his putting it there, I cannot say. You will judge what probability there is in the defence he has set up, that this glass was stolen by somebody or other, and carried up there; I do not find by the evidence that Mr. Coxs's men were found going to his room, you have the evidence of Elizabeth Cox that she fastened the door and the shutters of this room at dark the night before, about three o'clock in the morning the windows were found open and they were shut down by the watchman, and part of the goods stolen were found in this room, put under the bed of the prisoner, he not accounting how he came in possession of them. If you see any reason to suppose that somebody else threw up the windows and he stole the glass you will find him guilty of stealing under 40 s. if you have no reason to suppose that any body throwed up the window than the person who stole the glass, you must find him guilty of the whole charge.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings, but not of the burglary .

Confined two years in the house of Correction and fined 1 s

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-47

116. HENRY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , three sheep, value 3 3 s. the property of Wm. Tooley .

WILLIAM TOOLEY , I am a day labouring man , I live at Finchley.

Q. Did you loose three sheep at any time. A. They were stolen from Finchley Common .

Q. When was the last time you saw them. - A. I saw them safe on the Common some time in May. I did not go every day to look at them. I had seen them between three and four days before I missed them. They were Southdown tags, a tag is between a sheep and a lamb, they were wethers about a year old.

Q. Do you know the Prisoner, Henry Smith . - A. Yes, he lives at Sandrich in Hertfordshire.

Q. When did you see them again. - A. I missed them about fourteen or fifteen days; I found them on Muswell hill Common, I took them home.

Q. Did any body come to claim them after you took them home. A. Yes, Richard Freind , I am sure they were my sheep, they were marked with a W. and a T. upon the last stroke of the W. the mark was almost worn out - it was visible.

Q. When was the prisoner taken upon this charge. A. In June, after they had taken him to the Magistrate at St. Alban's, they brought him to Hendon; there he broke out of the cage, and made his escape.

RICHARD FREIND. I'm a gardener, I live at Hortsey. I bought these three sheep of Mr. Billings, on the 23d

of May in Smithfield, I gave him a guinea each; I put them on the common. On Saturday I lost them; on the Sunday I found them in Tottenham parish, they strayed there; I brought them back, and washed them; I marked one of them on the near hip. I lost them again the same afternoon; on the Monday afterwards I found them at Tooley's: I told Tooley they were my sheep, he said they were his; I saw the prisoner at Hendon, he broke out of the cage at night; I did not see him again till I saw him at Hatton Garden.

MR. BILLING. I am a shepherd. I buy and sell sheep at most fairs and markets.

Q. Do you know any thing of these three sheep that Tooley has got. - A. I bought them of James Osman in Smithfield; I have never seen the sheep since the day I parted with them; they were Southdown taggs. I took the prisoner up about the latter end of May for taking away these three sheep from Finchley-common; he owned that he took these sheep, and he wished to make us any recompence. He made his escape out of the cage at Hendon; I did not see him after till the 10th of December at Hatton Garden office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. When you are giving us what the prisoner said, you should give us exactly what he said - was it not said by him that some sheep joined his drove as he was going over Finchley-common, it was dark, he did not see them. - A. No, he said, he had them off Finchley-common, but whether he took them or they joined the drove, that I cannot tell.

Court. Did he say at the time he was going over Finchley-common, it was dark, he was driving a drove of sheep some joined his drove, he did not observe these sheep till he got to Holloway.

Mr. Gurney. Did he say that, sir. - A. He did say that, and he wished to make us any recompence.

Q. You stick to that like a parrot - he wished to make any recompence - did not he say when he came over the common, it was dark, he did not see them till he got to Holloway. - A. When he had his hearing, he said he come over the common in the dark, he did not see them till he got to Holloway.

Court. What did he say when you first took him. - A. He owned that he had taken the sheep, and he would return the money back again; he said I will make you any recompence.

Q. Did he say that he took the sheep from Finchley-common. - A. He did not say where he took them; when I took him at Sandrich he said, I know what you come after, I will return you the money back and make you any recompence; before the magistrate at St. Alban's, he said it was dark, he did not see the sheep till he got to Holloway.

Q. You bought these sheep of Osman. - A. Yes, I am sure that they are the sheep I sold to Friend.

JAMES OSMAN . I am a salesman in Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he was in the habit of bringing up different sheep from farmers at Sandrich, to me to sell for and to other salesmen.

Q. Do you know any thing of these three sheep that were purchased by Mr. Billing. - A. On the 15th of May, he brought several lots of sheep and lambs for sale to me; he told me these three sheep were his own, he would be glad if I would sell them for him; I sold for him these three sheep to Mr. Billing, they were Southdown tags. I sold them on the 15th of May, for sixteen shillings and sixpence each; he never said how he came by them. We took him in his garden at Sandrich; he said, Mr. Osman, I know what you are come after, it is about them three sheep I brought to you to sell; Mr. Billing laid hold of him. I said Smith how do you you do, he immediately said what I have related; we did not tell him for what purpose we came. I told him he must go along with us; he said, he meaned to give the man the money for the sheep, if he come after it.

Q. Are you quite sure that before you took him to the magistrate that he did not say that they had not joined his sheep, that it was dark, and he had not seen them till he came to Holloway. - A. He never mentioned a word of that till he came before the magistrate.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden; I apprehended the prisoner at Woodbridge. I took him to the office; I asked him how he came by the sheep; he told they had joined his flock, he did not know of it till he got a good way off.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-48

117. RICHARD WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , thirteen engraved copper plates, value 10 l. the property of John Girtin .

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN GIRTIN . Q. What are you. - A. I am an engaver and printer .

Q. On the day of the indictment, did you employ your boy to bring some copper plates from the City to your house. - A. Yes, to No. 8, Charles-street, Middlesex hospital; it was on the 8th of December.

JOHN BANYARD . Q. Are you errand boy to the prosecutor. - A. I am. On the 8th of December, I went in the city to get some plates to carry to my master's house; I got thirteen plates in the City, about six o'clock in the evening; when I got into Holborn, just by Red Lion-street, the prisoner asked me which was Oxford-road; I told him I was going to Oxford-road, I would shew him; he asked me to let him carry the plates; I delivered them to him; as soon as we got a little way up Holborn, I asked him where the plates were; he said he had got them under his coat; I asked him to give them to me, he said he would not, he would carry them a little farther for me; when I came to Southampton-street, I told him I was going up that way; he said, so am I; as soon as we got up a few doors in Southampton-street , he said, there are your plates, he fell down then he got up and ran away.

Q. Were your plates on the ground. - A. No; I cried stop thief, he was pursued and taken by Mr. Carpmeal; I never lost sight of him from the time he stumbled till the time he was taken; I was close to his heels. There was no plates found on him. There was a man walking close by the side of the prisoner as we were going up Holborn; I lost sight of that man.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing whether the prisoner gave the plates to any body. - A. No, the plates have never been found.

Court. When you gave him the plates how did he carry them. - A. Under his arm. I missed them from under his arm; then he said he had got them under his coat.

Q. Have you any doubt the prisoner at the bar is

the man. - A. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES CARPMEAL. Q. In consequence of hearing the cry of Stop Thief, did you apprehend the prisoner. A. I assisted; he was running; I apprehended him two doors from Little Queen-street, Holborn; the boy was close to his heels. There was nothing found upon him but three pair of upper leathers, belonging to some shoemaker.

THOMAS FOSSIT . Q. Did you assist in stopping the prisoner. - A. I stopped him; the boy was close to his heels.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-49

118. EMMIA ADAMS was indicted for that she on the 5th of December , feloniously and unlawfully did receive and buy a copper, value 15 s. the property of William Thomas , the said copper being lately before affixed to his dwelling house, and by some evil-disposed person had been stolen away, she well knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a smith , I live in Chandos-street . On the 6th of December I missed the copper from my back kitchen in my dwelling house; it was fixed in brick work. I went to Mr. Lane's that night, I could not find it; he is a dealer in old iron, &c. I found it on the 7th of December at Mr. Lane's door, it stood there for sale; I know the copper to be mine.

ISAAC WATSON . I saw the copper at Mr. Lane's door; I told Mr. Lane that Mr. Thomas claimed the copper; I wished it to be kept back for the present; Mr. Lane put it into the shop. I tried the copper to the place; it fitted.

WILLIAM RODMAN . I bought the copper of Mrs. Adams, North-street, Marybone, I gave her eleven pence halfpenny a-pound for it. I sold it to Mr. Lane in Chandler-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. The prisoner is a married woman, I believe. - A. Yes, her husband keeps a broker's shop.

Court. Who had you your dealings with. - A. Mrs. Adams.

Q. Did you see Mr. Adams at all. - A. He was in the shop; he weighed the copper, and she took the money.

MR. LANE. I bought the copper of Rodman, I gave him a shilling a-pound for it, it weighed eighteen pounds.

(The property produced and identified.)

COURT. This woman stands indicted for a felony, she buying this copper, knowing it to be stolen. If you believe the evidence it was done in the presence of the husband. It is not a strict felony because her husband was present; he is supposed to have a controul over her. Why they did not indict the husband, or both husband and wife, I know not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-50

119. JOSEPH BENJAMIN and BARNET BENJAMIN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November , four shirts, value 3 l. three shifts, value 1 l. six petticoats, value 1 l. 5 s. two frocks, value 6 s. three pair of trowsers, value 9 s. a child's frock, value 6 s. a pair of pockets, value 2 s. 6 d. a waistcoat, value 1 l. 5 s. two pair of drawers, value 18 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. three sheets, value 1 l. 6 s. two table cloths, value 1 l. twenty-seven pieces of cloth, value 15 s. and one apron, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of George Graham .

The Case stated by Mr. Gurney.

MRS. GRAHAM. Q. You are the wife of George Graham . - A. Yes, we live in New Bridge-street, Blackfriars.

Q. On Thursday the 26th of November had you a large parcel of linen put up in your bag to send to your laundress. - A. We had; all the articles in the indictment were put in the bag.

Q. I believe your servant took the bag, containing the various articles of linen, to the errand cart. - A. She did.

ESTHER GREEN . Q. Are you Mrs. Graham's servant. - A. Yes; I received from my mistress a bag of linen; I took it out of my mistress' chamber; I delivered it to William How , the driver of the errand cart.

WILLIAM HOW . Q. I believe your mother is a laundress. - A. Yes, we live at Hackney.

Q. On Thursday the 26th of November, did you receive from the last witness a bag of linen to take to your mother to wash. - A. I did, about four o'clock in the afternoon. After I went from Mrs. Graham's, I went to different parts of the town. About six o'clock I discovered that this bag of linen was taken out of the cart; it was a large bag, as much as I could heave.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are a police officer. - A. I am.

Q. Did you, in company with Vickrey and Mason, go to the house of Barnet and Joseph Benjamin on the 27th of November. - A. I had apprehended Barnet Benjamin in the morning between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. How soon after you had apprehended him, did you go to search his house. - A. About four o'clock, I went to No. 82, Golden-lane, a clothes shop.

Q, Do you know that was the house of Barnet Benjamin. - A. Not of my own knowledge.

JOHN ODDINOT . Q. What are you. - A. I am a chairmaker, I live in Gee-street, Goswell-street.

Q. Do you know whether Barnet Benjamin lives at No. 82, Golden-lane. - A. I cannot tell whether he rents the house; I believe he does; I have seen him frequently in that house as his own; he apparently lived there as the master of the house.

THOMAS WHITTINGTON . Q. Do you know whether Barnet Benjamin lives at No. 82, Golden-lane. - A. He keeps the shop, and rents the lower part.

Q. to Armstrong. You went to this house in Golden-lane, it is a clothes shop you say. - A. Yes. There I found Mrs. Benjamin; in searching the lower part of the house, I found two frocks, a shirt, a petticoat, three pair of stocking, a sheet, and a table cloth; these I brought away to the office; we advertised them; that is how we come to find Mr. Graham.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You say this was the house of Barnet Benjamin. - A. I believe it was.

Q. You knew Barnet Benjamin, he was in custody at the time you searched the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the wife carry on business in his absence. - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore whether she bought these things while

he was in custody you do not know. - A. No.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. On the 27th of November you went to Joseph's house. - A. I did, in company with Mason, between three and four o'clock; Joseph Benjamin came in, and then we proceeded to search. I found these two sheets in a back room, a bed room, on the ground floor, in a basket; Joseph was standing by; his wife was sitting upon the bed; I asked him who these sheets belonged to, he said he did not know; the wife said they were her sheets and belonged to her bed, they were marked in her name; Joseph Benjamin then said he bought them; of whom he could not tell; he might have had them a fortnight or a twelvemonth. I brought Joseph Benjamin to the office.

(The property produced and identified.)

Joseph Benjamin 's Defence. I was not at home when the things were brought to my house.

Barnet Benjamin's Defence. I keep a clothes shop; I was sent for to look at some things; Mr. Armstrong seized me looking at these things. After that Mr. Armstrong searched my house, and whether my wife bought them I do not know; I never had a sight of them.

Joseph Benjamin called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Barnet Benjamin called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOSEPH BENJAMIN , GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

BARNET BENJAMIN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-51

120. BARNET BENJAMIN , JOHN METCALF , and MARY SHEARING , alias METCALF , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November a box, value 1 s. six shirts, value 3 l. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. two towels, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a night cap, value 6 d. and a table cloth, value 6 d. the property of Jeffrey Hart Bent ; - five shirts, value 2 l. 10 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. and a table cloth, value 7 s. the property of Ellis Bent .

Second count the property of James Swain .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

JONATHAN MILLER . Q. You are the butler belonging to Lincoln's-inn. - A. I am.

Q. On the 26th of November did you pack up any linen belonging to Mr. Ellis Bent . - A. I did; which linen I took to Mr. Jeffrey Hart Bent, about eight o'clock in the evening; Mr. Jeffrey Bent packed up some linen in the same box, and locked the box. I took the box to the Spotted Dog in the Strand; there I delivered it, and it was booked.

GEORGE LEDDIS. Q. You keep the Spotted Dog in the Strand. - A. I do.

Q. On the 26th of November did you receive a box from the last witness. - A. I did; I delivered it to Littlefield, he drives the Chertsey cart, about nine o'clock in the morning of the 27th.

RICHARD LITTLEFIELD . Q. You are a carter, you drive the Chertsey cart. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 27th of November did you receive a box from the last witness. - A. Yes; I put it in the cart, and drove the cart to the White Horse cellar. When I got there I took the box out of the cart to make room for a cask of liquor, and left it on the pavement; I went down the White Horse cellar for the cask; when I came up again the box was gone.

Q. What time did you get to the White Horse cellar. - A. About ten o'clock. I had taken the box frequently before; it was directed to 'squire Mosely.

PETER MASON. Q. You are an officer - on the 27th of November last, did you in company with Armstrong and Bishop, go to the house of Metcalfe. - A. I did; between eleven and twelve o'clock. We went to a house in Red Lion market, leading out of Whitecross-street into Golden-lane; Metcalfe acknowledged it was his house. Mr. Armstrong went in first; we went through the first room into the back room, and there Metcalfe, the woman, and Benjamin, the three prisoners, were all standing in that back room, and a quantity of linen was laying in the middle of the floor. Armstrong asked who the linen belonged to; they all denied it belonged to them. Mr. Armstrong said as there were none of them that owned it, he would take and see if he could find an owner. Bishop, I believe, found something in the bed; we took them and the linen to the office.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are an officer - you have heard what Mason said. - A. Yes; I shewed every article to each of the prisoners; they all denied it being theirs. Benjamin said he had not bought them. I found a shirt in the bedding.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes; I went with Mason and Armstrong. On searching the back room where the prisoners stood, I found these two shirts hanging over a chair by the fire; I found a shirt and neck handkerchief; I then held them up, and asked the prisoners separate if they belonged to them; they all denied it.

(The property produced and identified.)

John Metcalfe's Defence. On Friday morning, when I went out, my wife was out on an errand; when I returned I found these things had been left by two men, the girl told me, for Mr. Benjamin.

Shearing's Defence. I went out to pledge a watch on Friday; I was out two hours. When I came home the girl told me there had been two men, and they had left the linen for Mr. Benjamin; she said she did not know them.

Court. Some of them were left in the bed, you know's the men would not have left them in the bed.

Benjamin's Defence. The girl fetched me to look at the things; I was looking at them when Mr. Armstrong came in. I was sent for to go and look at them, and it any body sends for me I am to go.

METCALFE, GUILTY , aged 55.

SHEARING, GUILTY , aged 25.

BENJAMIN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-52

121. JOHN MAYNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , four shirts, value 16 s. and two shifts, value 2 s. the property of Charles Cliff .

LUCY CLIFF. I am the wife of Charles Cliff , he keeps the Half Way House on the Commercial-road . On the 30th of September, I had a quantity of shirts hanging out on the ground opposite of the house; I saw them in the ground at four o'clock from my window; about a quarter past four the prisoner was brought into my house with a bag of linen; I examined the bag, it contained

four shirts of Mr. Cliff's, one shift of mine, and one a young lady's that I had to assist me. I know the things.

BENJAMIN STERN . I am a servant to Mr. Cliff; I saw a man go into the ground where the fence is broken down; he went to the linen and unpinned the things.

Q. Are you quite sure it was the man at the bar. - A. I am. I asked the servant whether she had sent any body to take them down; she said no. I made the best of my way to the ground, he was coming out; I asked him what he had been doing, he said nothing; I told him it was of no use of him saying nothing, I had seen what he had been doing as well as himself; I laid hold of him and shoved him against the paling till I got assistance; then he was secured. My mistress saw what was in the bag and claimed them.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask him whether he saw the linen in my hand. - A. I saw you with the linen in your hand; when you came nigh me you threw it away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past the Half Way House, a heavy hail storm came on, as I was standing under a shed the lad came and asked me what I had been doing; he searched me, and found nothing on me. I went up to the house with him and staid till the constable came.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-53

122. MARGARET BATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of December , a silk cloak, value 15 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. and two cotton gowns, value 12 s. the property of James Carley .

MARY CARLEY . My husband's name is James Carley , we live in Houghton-street, Clare Market . The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 3rd of November, and she took these things on the 6th; they were in my chest. She is a servant and out of place, I fancy.

Q. Then she went away on the 6th. - A. Yes; the things were found at three different pawnbrokers; the petticoat she had on.

ROBERT BOONE . I am one of the Bow-street patrols. On the 4th of December I apprehended the prisoner at the sign of the Apple Tree in White-Hart-yard, Drury-lane; upon her I found this petticoat and these three duplicates, that alludes to the property.

EDWARD EWER . I am a pawnbroker in Oxford-street; on the 11th of November the prisoner pledged a gown with me for seven shillings.

EDWARD CALVER . I am servant to Mr. Dry, St. Martin's-lane. On the 6th of November the prisoner pledged a silk cloak with me for fifteen shillings.

MR. PAYNE. I am a pawnbroker, Bow-street, Bloomsbury; the prisoner on the 5th of November pawned a gown for three shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. This lady lent me these things to pawn to get my own out of pawn.

Mrs. Carley. I did not, it was the least of my thoughts.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-54

123. SARAH BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , twenty six yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Evan Thomas Davies .

EVAN THOMAS DAVIES . I am a linen draper ; I live in Great Warner-street, Cold Bath Fields . On the 24th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop; my shopman served her with what she wanted; when she went out of the shop, he informed me she had taken something.

RICHARD SILVERS . I am shopman to Mr. Davies; the prisoner came into the shop about five in the afternoon on the 24th of December; while I was shewing her pieces of printed cottons, I saw her put a piece of printed cotton under her gown, which she had taken from off the counter; when she had paid for the goods she bought, she went out. I directly followed her and brought her back, when I had got her in the shop I charged her with having the piece of print, she denied it; while I was talking to her I saw it drop from her on the ground; I picked it up and gave it to Mr. Davies.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the cotton nor did it drop from me. I return the gentleman thanks for relieving my distressed family. When he came up into my room my husband went down to him, he gave them sixpence each, I was in great distress; they had seized upon my goods three or four days before.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-55

124. MARY CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , a table cloth, value 4 s. the property of Joshua Davenport .

ELIZABETH DAVENPORT . I am the wife of Joshua Davenport , he is a printer .

Q. When did you lose the table cloth. - A. On the 15th of December; it was taken off a table in my room.

Q. Why do you charge that woman with taking it. - A. There was no other person in the house at the time I lost it.

GEORGE PAINTER . I am a pawnbroker; I took the table cloth in pawn of the prisoner, I gave her two shillings and sixpence on it.

THOMAS EKELSOR. I am an officer. On the 20th of December, I apprehended the prisoner; she said she was very sorry for what she had done; I had not told her what I had taken her for; she said she had pawned Mrs. Davenport's table cloth in Purple-lane, for half a crown, and there I found it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling some fish. As I was coming out of the door I picked up that cloth by her door in the channel. I pawned it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-56

125. ANN ORAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a table cloth, value

14 s. a sheet, value 7 s. and a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of William Sumner .

WILLIAM SUMNER. I am a weaver , 22, Bacon-street. Bethnall Green . The prisoner was a weekly servant to me. I missed the table cloth on the 6th of December, the sheet on the 30th of December, and the tea spoon on the 30th of December; I was out when she took it; she left me that evening, and did not return any more. I apprehended her in about two days; I asked her about the sheet and the spoon; I told her she had better tell me.

Q. Then I must not hear her answer. - A. My wife went to the pawnbroker by the prisoner's directions, and found the spoon; I can swear to the spoon.

THOMAS LAMPARD . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, Brick-lane. To the best of my knowledge I took in the spoon of the prisoner on the 30th of December. I advanced her eighteen pence on it.

THOMAS FRENCH . I am shopman to Mr. Winsor, Whitechapel. On the 30th of December I received the table cloth of a woman in the name of Ann Oram . I do not know the woman.

ELIZABETH WHITE . I am servant to Mr. Smith, Shoreditch. I took in this sheet; I advanced four shillings on it; I cannot say the prisoner is the person.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing the spoon only .

Imprisoned Fourteen Days in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-57

126. STEPHEN TANNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , thirty-four onions, value 3 s. the property of John Millet , junior, and JOHN TANNER for feloniously receiving on the same day, twenty-five onions, value 2 s. he knowing them to be stolen .

JOAN MILLETT . - Mr. Gleed. What are you. - A. I am a gardner and farmer , I live at Fulham ; Stephen Tanner was my thresher . I lost a quantity of onions from time to time; in consequence of that I stuck a pin in the root of the onions, and some in the eye of the onions, and threw them in the loft; some of them I picked the peel off; they were close to the barn where Stephen was threshing.

DANIEL WIELAND . Q. What are you. - A. I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 3d of January last I met John Tanner , between six and seven o'clock at night, I asked what he had got; he said onions, he had got them from his brother, a gardener. I took him back, with the onions, to the house of Stephen Tanner ; I asked him if he had given these onions to his brother; he said yes.

Q. Did he look at the onions. - A. He did not; they were in the handkerchief; as they are now. I asked him where he got the onions, he told me he bought them at Putney, he gave eighteen pence a sieve for them; he said he worked for Mr. Millett; I said Mr. Millett complained he had lost a great many onions. I asked him if he had any more, he said yes; he went up stairs, opened a drawer, and there were a dozen. I took them to Mr. Millett; he said they were his property.

COURT. The man never saw the onions; and here the jury are to say upon their oaths they are the property of the prosecutor before the prisoners can be convicted. How are they to say those onions, which Stephen Tanner never saw when they were brought back, were the property of the prosecutor.

Gentlemen of the Jury - This creates a great suspicion; - Mr. Millett tells you he has lost a great quantity of onions; the onions are taken back to one of the prisoners in a handkerchief; they are never shewn to him; he said he bought them and gave them to his brother. He is asked who he worked for, he told the officer Mr. Millett. - It is upon his confession, and not upon any evidence, that you can convict them, he not having seen them.

The prisoners were both charged with like offence.

Mr. Gleed, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, they were both found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-58

127. CHARLOTEE BROWN and ELIZABETH HINCKS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a silver watch, value 50 s. the property of Thomas Barry , in the dwelling house of James Charol .

THOMAS BARRY . Q. When did you lose this watch. A. On the 13th of December, about six o'clock, we were sat the Spotted Dog, Broad St. Giles's ; I went in to have a pint of beer with my shopmates, and I went to sleep.

Q. I suppose you had been up all night - A. Yes. I am a shoemaker ; I was locked out of my lodgings, I had been walking about the streets all night; I went in and went to sleep.

Q. Did you pick up these women in the street. - A. No, I never saw them before; they were never in my company; they came into the house; one laid hold of me, and the other took the watch out of my fob.

Q. How could you tell, when you were asleep. - A. This man saw them - Dolby Jackson, a black man.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. No; when I awoke I found my watch was gone; there was a woman standing by the side of me, but she was neither of the prisoners. The prisoners went out of the house as soon as they took the watch away. I laid hold of the woman; the black man said if she had not got the watch he would shew me who had. I went and found the prisoners in the street, drinking saloop; they were taken to the watchhouse, and nothing found upon them. The watchhouse keeper told me to go back for the saloop woman; I did, she was gone away; she has not been out for weeks afterwards.

Q.Were you sober. - A. No, I was drunk.

DOLBY JACKSON. I am a shoeblack. I was sitting in the Black Dog; these two men came in and called for a pint of beer, they both drank once; he fell asleep; these two women came in and finished the pint of beer the men called for. One of them sat down and the other leaned over him; Charlotte Brown put his head in her lap, and the other unbuttoned his flap and took out his watch. I called out they were going to rob the man; the landlord said, what is that to you; then I said no more. I waked him soon after, and he went and took them in the street. Hinckes searched him first; she says I can perceive nothing. Brown said, you come and set over him, I will search him; the biggest prisoner drawed the watch out, I halloaed out; the landlord said I had nothing to do with it; as they said so, I said no more. As soon as I came to town I gave twelve shillings for a hat; some of them in that public

house stole my hat.

Q. You are sure it the same persons. - A. Yes, there were other girls in the house; they were not nigh this man, none but the prisoners; when they took the watch out, I saw them; I spoke; they told me to hush, I told them they were robbing the man; they told me to go away, I would not.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, or called any witnesses to character.

BROWN, GUILTY, aged 19.

HINCKS, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-59

128. JOHN IVES and JOHN HOUNDLE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , two deal boards, value 1 s. and a sir plank, value 3 s the property of James Weston .

JAMES WESTON . Q. You are a timber merchant , and have a yard in Bethnal Green . - A. I have.

Q. The prisoners at the bar, I understand, live in your neighbourhood. - A. Ives has a timber yard about a quarter of a mile distance from mine. Before I lost the boards in question, I put marks upon them, I marked nineteen deals, called twelve feet deals; one of these are only eleven feet. Mr. Wright marked them in my presence; after hearing they were at Ives's yard, I caused him to be apprehended.

Q. Were you present when the deals were found. - A. Yes, it was on the 4th of January they were found, one at the back of the saw pit in Ives's premises; the other was found on Mr. Ridley, a carpenter; I saw it after it was found, they both were my deals, and both were marked in my presence; I saw them both in my yard on the 2nd, I missed them on the 4th; I also saw a five feet plank, which I knew to be mine, in the possession of Mr. Lawrence; I lost that five or six weeks previous with a great many others.

JOHN GEE . Q. You are an apprentice to the prisoner Ives. - A Yes, he is a sawyer.

Q. What is Houndle. - A. I know him by sight.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 4th of January. - A. Yes, he came to Mr. Ives, and there was money passed between my mistress and him.

Q. Did you see any deal. - A. No, it was as soon as I got up he, told me the deal was at the window; he said are not you up yet; then he went away; he said, he did not want any body; then he come again soon after that, and said you must take this deal in the pin; I put it in the saw pit, he sent me of an errand; when I came back there was another of them on the saw pit; then we went to breakfast. Mr. Ridley came in, he wanted to buy a deal, there was none would suit him but that which was on the pit; master said he would sell it him.

Q. Was that the same that Houndle had brought. - A. Yes, he told me so, Mr. Ridley said he would have one cut put in the deal; master said, it should be done directly; Mr. Ridley said, he was going up to Shoreditch he would call for it as he came back; he came and had it, he gave him him six and ninepence for the deal.

Q. Did Houndle tell you any thing else that you can recollect. - A. No, but several times in the morning, when I have gone in the yard, I have seen deals that have been thrown in the yard. Houndle told me had been up three or four hours that night.

JOHN RIDLEY . Q. You are a carpenter. - A. Yes. On the 4th of January, I went to Ives's yard, I bought a deal of him; I gave him six and sixpence for the deal, and threepence for cutting it.

Q. In the course of your journey were you stopped by the prosecutor with the deal. - A. Yes, he claimed it.

Q. Is that the deal. - A. Yes.

ROBERT WRIGHT . Q. You are a carriage maker. A. Yes; I marked nineteen deals with this hammer, by the prosecutor's desire; I have fitted the hammer to the marks in the deals, they correspond.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 4th of this month, going up Bethnal Greenroad I met Ives near his own house; I took charge of him, and took him to his house; I asked him if he had any deals brought him within these two or three days; his answer was that he had none. He has got two small yards, I looked over the first yard; there was none there that Mr. Weston knew; we went a little further from his dwelling house, looking over there there was one Mr. Weston knew was his property; I asked him how he got that, he said it was brought him to be sawed by a person, he could not tell where that person lived; I then asked him if he had not sold a deal that morning: he hesitated for sometime, he then said he had sold one; he told me it was brought by a person that he thought he could make free with to sell it for him. I put my mark on them; this is the deal I received from Ridley, and the other is just here.

The property produced and identified

Houndle's Defence. On the 4th of January, as I was going to work, between seven and eight o'clock, I met a man with two deals; he asked me if I knew any body that could cut him a deal; I shewed him this yard, he pitched them there; I went down and spoke to the boy, I said is your master going to cut these deals for the man; I did not know where the man got the deals; I did not bring them.

Ives's Defence. I was in bed when these deals were delivered in my yard; the boy did not say they were brought by Houndle.

HOUNDLE, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

IVES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-60

129. THOMAS WELLS and THOMAS WHEELER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a sack, value 1 s. and a hundred pounds weight of potatoes, value 7 s. the property of John Holding .

JOHN HOLDING . I am a potatoe dealer in Clare-market . On the 13th of December, I lost the sack with the potatoes from my stand.

Q. What time of night were they stolen. - A. I cannot tell; I saw them there at eleven o'clock at night.

ROBERT UWIN . I am a watchman on Saffron-hill. On the 13th of December, about a quarter to one, I stopped the prisoner Wells, he had this sack and the potatoes in it; I asked him what he had got, he said hog potatoes; I told him I must stop him, unless he gave me a satisfactory account to pass; Wheeler said they were his property, he had bought them; he lived at No. 1, Black Boy-alley, Chick-lane; I asked them to

go to the watchhouse with me, and if the constable of the night was satisfied, then I should be satisfied they both seemed willing to go to the watchhouse. Turning out of Saffron Hill into turnstile that leads into Hatton Garden, Wells threw the sack off his back, he swore d - n his eyes, for my giving him that trouble, I should carry the sack; I sprung the rattle, one of the watchmen came; Wells was conducted to the watch-house with the potatoes; Wheeler got away. I told the constable where Wheeler lived; he sent the watchman and a patrol after him; he was brought to the watchhouse.

ROBERT COATES . I was officer of the night of Saffron Hill liberty. On the 13th of December, about one o'clock in the morning, Wells was brought to me with the sack of potatoes on his back; I asked Wells where he had brought it from, he said Clare Market; he said it belonged to Wheeler, and he was employed by Wheeler to carry it to Wheeler's house, No. 1. Black-boy-alley; he said they had stayed rather late drinking after they had purchased them. I sent for Wheeler, he said he had not purchased any potatoes that evening; he did not know Wells, he had not employed him.

The property produced and identified.

Wells's Defence. I met a man at Chancery-lane, he said he had slipt down and hurt himself, and he wished some one to carry the sack to Saffron Hill; I told him I was going as far as Saffron Hill; he said if I would carry the sack he would give me a shilling. The watchman stopped me, he asked me what I had got; I said, potatoes, I believe, by the appearance; he said, I must go to the watchhouse; I asked him to look after the man that owned them. I was detained. This man was not with me at the time I undertook the job.

Uwin. I am convinced that Wheeler was along with Wells at the time I stopped him.

Wheeler's Defence. I was not there at all; I know nothing about it.

Wheeler called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Wells called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WELLS, GUILTY , aged 24.

WHEELER, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-61

130. SARAH PECK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , twelve pound weight of beef, value 3 s. the property of Jonas Adams .

JANE ADAMS . I am the wife of Jonas Adams , he is a butcher , No. 102, Shoreditch . On the 8th of December, between four and five in the afternoon, a young woman informed me I had lost a piece of meat; she took me to a court adjoining my house; there I saw the prisoner. I said, give me my meat that you have taken; she endeavoured to drop it; I caught it, it was part of a rump of beef.

Q. Did the prisoner get away from you. - A. I took the beef and came home; the prisoner came to the door and remained there a long time, an hour almost, demanding the meat. An officer came by; I told him what had passed; he took her to the office in Worship-street.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer of Worship-street. When I came up to the shop I observed the prisoner at the bar there and about forty or fifty people round the door; she wanted Mrs. Adams to give her some meat which she said belonged to her; Mrs. Adams told me she had detected her with two pieces of beef, one part of a rump and the other part of a mouse buttock; Mrs. Adams claimed the rump; the prisoner said she had bought the mouse buttock in Leadenhall-market; she did not claim the rump; while she was telling me that a man of the name of Patch, right opposite of Mrs. Adam's, said the piece of mouse buttock was stolen from his shop, he knew it to be his; I took the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The mouse buttock I bought in Leadenhall-market, it cost me two shillings; they took the meat from me and knocked it about my head. I never took the bit of meat.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-62

131. LYDIA MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , a silver table spoon, value 10 s. a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. three table cloths, value 10 s. a tea board, value 5 s. and a pair of gaiters, value 2 s. the property of William Anthony ; and one shirt, value 3 s , the property of John Poole .

WILLIAM ANTHONY . I am a watchmaker , I live in Red Lion street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes. she was my servant , she came in December 1806, and remained till August 1807, then I discharged her; I had missed the articles, but I had no idea she had taken them. On Tuesday the 31st of December, from information, I took out a warrant against the prisoner, I executed it at her sister's lodgings in Bennet-street in the Borough. On looking over my plate I found some spoons were gone.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that she had been at your house after you had discharged her in August. - A. Not of my own knowledge. I accompanied the officer with the search warrant to No. 6, Bennet-street; on the first floor there I found the duplicates that relates this property, except the gaiters; them we found in the bed.

Q. Was the sister there. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the sister in the habit of coming and seeing the prisoner while she was in your service. - A. Yes; the prisoner said her sister took the gaiters in mistake along with some things of hers.

JOHN POOLE . I am an appprentice to Mr. Anthony.

Q. Do you recollect the time when Lydia Martin left the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lose a shirt at any time. - A. Yes, I was first informed that I had lost one by herself.

Q. When did she tell you that. - A. About two months before she left Mr. Anthony's service, after she was gone, I found that I had lost a shirt.

Q. Did you know it to be your own when you saw it. - A. I have one great reason why I do not like to swear to it; when it was produced there was another very much like it and marked J. P. as well as mine.

JAMES POWELL . I am servant to Mr. Richardson, Duke-street in the Borough, I have some silver tea spoons, a tea board, three table cloths, and a shirt; I do not know the prisoner was the person that pawned

them.

JAMES KIRKHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Smith, St. Margaret's-hill. On the 14th of March a table spoon was pledged with me and a tea-spoon; I cannot recollect who pawned them.

JOHN FITZGERALD . I am servant to Mr. Rossitor, George-street, Black-friars-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Perfectly well. I produce two silver tea spoons; the person that took them in is gone away. They are pledged in the name of Ann Martin .

(The property produced and identified.)

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer. I executed a search warrant; I went up stairs; I searched about and under the bed the prisoner was lying; the sister soon after come up stairs; I found the gaiters, Mr. Anthony said they were his; there were a number of duplicates found. I asked them who they belonged to; the sister said they were her mother's before she died, the pri- prisoner fainted away.

Prisoner's Defence. The sister of Mr. Anthony gave me the duplicates of the spoon on the 13th of May, down in the kitchen in his house.

Q. to pawnbroker. When does the spoons appear to be pawned. - A. The table spoon on the 14th of March, and the tea spoon on the 28th of March last.

Prisoner. She gave me the ticket of a table spoon and a shirt at the same time; I had repaired two gowns for her; she said she had no money; if I liked to accept of these two duplicates she would give them to me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-63

132. JOHN HYDE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , two japanned tea trays, value 18 s. the property of John Turner .

JOHN TURNER. I am a broker , I live at No. 46, Church-street, Bethnal Green . I was not at home when the robbery was done; I saw the trays on the same evening at Worship-street; I knew them to be mine.

PETER KAY. I am a shoemaker, I live opposite of Mr. Turner's. On the 21st of December, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner and a man come up to Mr. Turner's door, and the man that was with him lifted up the latch and looked in, he lifted up the latch again, and went in; the prisoner staid at the door.

Q. How long was it before the other man came out. - A. Between ten minutes and a quarter of an hour; he handed these two trays to the prisoner at the door; I went out and asked the prisoner what he was going to do with these two trays, he made me no answer, but put the two trays just at the entrance of New-court in Church-street; I took them up and put them in a neighbour's house and followed the prisoner. In about two minutes I came up to him. I am perfectly sure he is the same man.

Q. What become of the other man. - A. I do not know, he went the other way; I and a neighbour secured the prisoner and took him to the office. I delivered the trays up at the office.

JOHN VICKREY . The prisoner and the trays were delivered over to me at the office by the last witness.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man that went in the shop asked me to carry the trays, he said he would give me sixpence; I had not broke my fast that day, I thought it would buy me a bit of victuals to eat. I never saw the man before to my knowledge.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-64

133. MARY GAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , a great coat, value 12 s. and a waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of Michael Johnston .

MICHAEL JOHNSTON . I am a weaver ; I live in Quaker-street, Spital-fields .

Q. Did you lose a great coat at any time. - A. Yes, on the 18th of December, between twelve and two o'clock; it was taken out of the kitchen; I was up at work; I heard Mr. Andrews coming in, I heard some woman speak to him in the entry, enquiring after the name of Elizabeth Smith ; I came down stairs, hearing Mr. Andrews voice; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs just by the entry; I saw a bundle under her cloak, I went into the kitchen to see whether my coat and waistcoat was hanging there; she seeing me, dropped on her knees, she said, she knowing me a poor hard working man, she could not find it in her heart to rob me. I examined the bundle, it contained my coat and waistcoat.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I knowing Mr. Johnson, by working for Mr. Remington of Milk-street, and knowing that he kept looms for workmen, I went to ask for a loom; while I was there a gentleman came in the entry. I asked if a person of the name of Smith was there; he said are you going to take this coat and waistcoat, they were on the bannisters; I said, do you suppose I would take it away knowing of you.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-65

134. MARY ANN WALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , three gowns, value 1 l. one bed gown, value 6 d. two petticoats, value 4 s. a shirt, value 2 s. five caps, value 1 s. two pair of pockets, value 6 d. two aprons, value 1 s, four neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a cloak, value 3 s. a bonnet, value 3 s. a silk band, value 3 d. and one pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of Ann Mallen , widow .

ANN MALLEN . I live in Crown-street, Soho , I am a widow woman.

Q. Did you lose a quantity of wearing apparel at any time. - A. Yes, on the 5th of last month. I lodge backwards in the yard; the prisoner lodged with me for a week, in the same room; I go out washing. I did not miss the articles till I came home; I kept these things in my drawer and in my box; there were no locks to them. I went out to work on that morning about half

after six, I returned home about half past ten at night; I found all these things; gone they were all safe in the morning.

Q. Did the prisoner return to her lodging. - A. No. I saw my things on Wednesday the 6th of January; I saw the prisoner the next day where she had lodged that night in Chick-lane; she had part of the things with her. I gave her in charge of the constable, he took the things and the duplicates.

THOMAS BAYLIS . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner at a lodging house No. 11, Chick-lane. I searched her and found some duplicates relating to the property, and these articles are what I found in her possession; I asked her what induced her to rob the woman; she said she could not tell what possessed her to do it, she did it in an unwary moment.

WILLIAM SENIOR. I am a pawnbroker in Field-lane; I took in this gown of the prisoner about eight o'clock in the evening on the 5th of June; I advanced her four shillings on it.

JEREMIAH CORDY . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 5th of January I took in this gown and shirt of the prisoner. I advanced her seven shillings on it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy of the court.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-66

135. THOMAS BOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , twenty four whisk brooms, value 16 s. fourteen broom sticks, value 1 s. seven leather bands, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Chandler .

SAMUEL CHANDLER . I live at 195, High Holborn , I am a brush maker ; the prisoner at the bar was in my employ, he was a journeyman to make carpet brooms, he worked in the premises that is at the back of my dwelling house; I was going to this warehouse on the 7th of December, about ten minutes before eight, for a piece of mat; I heard a noise against the fence, which separates our premises from a court in Holborn; I heard the prisoner jump from an eminence, and run hastily to the place where he was at work; I enquired of him what the noise was, he answered he had been out to make water; I immediately returned to the shop, and went to the court that leads up to the premises, there I found a bundle of broomsticks thrown over the fence and suspended by a cord, hanging about three feet from the ground; the cord was fastened inside of the fence. I spoke to my brother about it, and said Bowles is a thief. In about five minutes afterwards there were two dozen of whisk brooms thrown out; I let them all hang just as they were till eight o'clock in the evening. When he left work, he bid us good night as usual and went away; then my brother and I followed him. We found him in the court behind the water tub; we found this mat and the other things. I asked him how he could think of robbing me in this way, and what he could say for himself; he said; what can I say. I said you must go with me to the watchhouse; he begged me to let him go and he would call the next morning and settle it with me. I gave him in charge; and he without any promise or threats said he was tempted by the devil to do it. The bands I found in his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. With respect to the carpet bands they are my own.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-67

136. WILLIAM RAWLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , a silver watch, value 42 s. a great coat, value 16 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. a waistcoat, value 6 s. a neck handkerchief, value 2 s a pair of leather gloves, value 1 s. a cloth coat, value 9 s. and a tobacco stopper, value 1 d. the property, of Thomas Goodhall in the dwelling house of Thomas Sowthey .

THOMAS GOODHALL . I am a servant to Mr. Stanley, a cheesemonger in High Holborn; I live at Mr. Sowthey's, the Coach and Horses, Fann-street, Goswell-street .

Q. When did you lose these things. - A. I missed my watch on the 29th of December last. When I went to bed at night I put it under my pillow; the prisoner lodged in the same room.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. At twelve o'clock. The next morning when I awoke I put my hand under my head, the watch was gone; I got up and took all the clothes off the bed, and could not find it.

Q. Did he sleep in the same bed with you. - A. No. I looked about the room; I could not find it; I went to work. When I came home at night I told the people of the house what had happened, there was another man that slept along with him; I accused him of it, he said he did not know any thing about it; I did not say any more about it. On the Saturday I came home wet, I went up stairs to put my things on, I could not find them.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. This was about half past ten at night. I lost a great coat, an under coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, a neck handkerchief, a pair of gloves, and a tobacco stopper.

Q. Where were all these things. - A. In the room where I sleep. The prisoner left his lodgings on Thursday the 31st.

Q. Had you seen your things between the Tuesday and the Thursday. - A. Yes, I think they were taken on the Thursday; I had suspicion of the prisoner by his not coming home to his lodging; I told my father of it, he got an officer to search him, and about him they found the tobacco stopper and gloves; the tobacco stopper I left in my waistcoat pocket, and the gloves in my great coat pocket. I have never found my watch nor my clothes.

THOMAS - I am assistant teacher for the asylum of deaf and dumb; the prisoner was one of my pupils under my instruction. I can make him understand.

Q. What trade is he. - A. He was put apprentice to a shoemaker; [the witness by motions and by writing related the evidence.] - Witness. He says the gloves and the tobacco stopper he found in his bed room.

JOHN GEARY. I am an officer. On Monday the 4th

of January I searched the prisoner, I found a pair of gloves and a tobacco stopper, and about nine and sixpence in money; when I got him to the office in Worship-street, I wrote to him with chalk, and he wrote to me; I asked him what he had done with the clothes, he informed me that he had changed them for a dark brown coat that he had on, and fifteen shillings besides. After he was examined I took him into the public house, I asked him where; he said Wapping, but where he would not tell. The watch, he said he knew nothing about that. I have never been able to trace the watch nor the clothes.

The prisoner wrote for his defence - I did not steal watch - I did not steal clothes.

The gloves produced and identified.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-68

137. EDWARD OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , a gold watch, value 8 l. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Jane Croucher .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JANE CROUCHER. Q. I believe you reside at Brompton. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 3d of December did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, a little of this side of Hyde Park corner; I do not know where he came from; I was going into the city; he accosted me, he said he was surprised at the improvements in town, or the buildings, I cannot say which, but it was one of them; he said he had not been in town for seven years, that he had a son lived in Broad-street, No. 15, he kept a grocer's shop; as for his part he would not live in the city if any body would give him a house to live in. He walked on one side of me till we came opposite of a house (we were in Piccadilly); he asked me whose that was, I said I believed it belonged to the Ranger of the park; he then stooped down and took up a parcel; I immediately said I wish the right owner had it; he replied, so do I; he said, if I had not picked it up somebody else would. He was going to put it in his pocket; I said I should like to know what it contained, as I thought it might be the means of the right owner coming to the property; he said he would go to a private place and examine it; then he said we may as well go into the Green Park; we were standing on that side. He went in, and went to the third bench; he opened the parcel, he took off the brown paper, and there was a red morocco pocket book; he opened the pocket book, it contained a diamond cross. At this time there was a stranger going by; the prisoner accosted this stranger and desired him to read this paper -

'a diamond cross, one hundred pounds ten shillings' - I then proposed to him to find out the right owner; this stranger said, madam, that would be very wrong, some person or other would own it that it did not belong to, it would be in the paper the next morning. Then the stranger proposed that he should leave some property in my hands, either thirty or forty pounds. I replied whatever you leave in my hands shall be safe. The prisoner at the same time said there was a man in Pall Mall that had fifty pounds of his money, and he would go and get the sum. He took me to a room in a public house, I think in Duke-street, St. James's , and there he left me and the stranger together, saying he was going to Pall Mall for the money; he returned again and hinted that his friend was just gone out; then the stranger proposed that I should take the cross into my possession till the next morning, and they proposed for me to give more money than I had about me, I had only a five pound note; the stranger said, why you have got a watch; I gave the five pound note and my gold watch, and they gave me the cross. The prisoner said your will be sure to deliver up the cross-tomorrow, when I come at ten o'clock.

Q. Did you give them your address. - A. Yes, and they gave me their address; the prisoner wrote his address, 15, Bird-street, and the stranger gave his address, 17, John-street, Westminster. They seemed so fair I had no idea what they were about. The stranger desired I would carry it home and lock it up before I went into the city.

Q. Have you seen the stranger since. - A. No. On the evening of the next day I went to Bow-street office and gave information; the magistrate was kind enough to speak to me although I went after the office hours were over. The officer said if the lady is not afraid of trusting herself with me, he would take me to a public house in Leicester Fields where I might see him. I saw him near the Ship in Leicester Fields; he was walking fast along the street.

Q. Are you sure it is the prisoner. - A. Yes, I have no doubt of his person; I thought he was an honest country farmer; the watch and the five pound note the officer has; it was produced at Bow street.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . Q. You belong to the office in Bow-street. - A. I do. In consequence of information I went with Mrs. Croucher to Leicester-square.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. I never saw him before in my life. I was going through Leicester Fields, he was walking just before me; I saw the lady up with her arms, I catched hold of the prisoner at the bar; he looked round and said, I know what the lady wants is her gold watch again; I said to him I have got what I want at present, you shall go with me; he said, I dare say if the lady gets her gold watch again she will be satisfied; I replied, I do not know that she will, there is a five pound note besides; he said if I would let him go, I will take you to a man who has the duplicate of the watch, it is in pawn; he did not tell where. Going along the prison kept talking to the lady; I told the lady not to talk to him, but to go on before. I took him to the Brown Bear , Bow-street, there I searched him; on him I found a silver watch, two five pound notes, two five pound notes, five one pound notes, nine guineas, six seven shilling pieces, six shillings, and three pence three farthings. I found the watch afterwards at Mr. Benton's, a pawnbroker in Holborn; Mr. Benton denied at first the watch being there. I went the third time before he gave up the watch.

Q. Whereabouts is it in Holborn. - A. It is the corner of a court that goes into Lincoln's Inn Fields; the watch was delivered up at Bow-street, and the five pound note I found upon Owen.

(The property produced and identified.)

JOHN NICHOLSON . Q. I believe, sir, you are a jeweller, living in Cornhill. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the cross, and tell me whereabouts is the value of it. - A. It is common paste; it might cost a guinea, it is gilded up, it is not a fashionable thing; you might have bought it for six or seven shillings.

Prisoner Defence. I have nothing to say in my own defence. I am an old man and very feeble. I hope you will be as lenient as you can.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-69

138. DAVID EVANS and GEORGE COX were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , a half tub, value 6 d. fifty-six pounds weight of raisins, value 30 s. and three sticks of Spanish liquorice, value 1 s. the property of James Wilson .

JAMES WILSON. I am a grocer in Brick-lane . On the 15th of December, between five and six, I was in the parlour, and on hearing something fall I came out, I ran into the street, I found the prisoners in the custody of two officers, they were brought to the shop; I found I had lost a tub of raisins and three sticks of Spanish juice.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street, attached to Worship-street office. On Tuesday evening the 15th of December, Valentine and I were going down Brick-lane, Spitalfields; we saw the two prisoners at the bar, Cox went into Mr. Wilson's shop, he put his hand to a shelf that was at the window; he took something off that shelf, but what I did not know; Cox went in again. Evans and Cox were close together, Evans went in after him; Evans had got an apron on, in that apron he had got that half tub of raisins. Valentine caught hold of him and threw him down in the street in the mud; I took hold of Cox; we took them back into the shop and secured them; we went and picked up the plums in the street.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . Q. You are a patrol likewise. - A. Yes, I was in company with Gleed. On the 15th of December last as we were going down Brick-lane, Spitalfields, I saw Cox go in Mr. Wilson's shop, and snatch something out of the window; he came out to Evans, and they both went into the shop again; I saw them both come out, Evans had something in his apron, they both crossed the road; I took Evans by the collar, I asked him what he was carrying off; he immediately threw down this tub of raisins; I took him and the tub into Mr. Wilson's shop I asked Mr. Wilson if he had lost any thing; he said he had, a half tub of raision; he said this was the tub, and he had lost three sticks of Spanish juice. Just by were I took Evans these three sticks of Spanish liquorice laid in the mud.

(The property produced and identified.)

Evans's Defence. When first we were taken in the shop, they asked Mr. Wilson if he had lost any thing; he said he did not know that he had; then when he searched his shop he said half a tub of raisins and nothing else; they took me in custody, I told them where I belonged to. That gentleman in the white coat said I had been to school with him; I said I had been to sea for three or four years I did not know him.

Cox's Defence. I was going along the street to see for work, and I was going from there home to my father; I had not been out before for above half a year.

Cox called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Evans called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

EVANS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

COX, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-70

139. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , a turkey, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Dixon .

CHARLES DUNN . I am shopman to Mr. Dixon, poulterer , No. 36, Leather lane . On the 23d of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was coming from the parlour into the shop; I observed a man taking down a turkey from out of the window. I did not go immediately, being about something else, thinking he might want to purchase it; when I saw him go out with it I followed him, I took hold of him at the next door with one hand, he dropped the turkey; I picked up the turkey with the other; he went across the road, I put him in a silversmith's shop, there I secured him till an officer came.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past this shop, they charged me with stealing this turkey; I said do not collar me, I will go back with you; I am as innocent as a child unborn. I hope for the sake of my wife and four children you will shew me mercy.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Month in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-71

140. CHRISTIANA PRATT and MARGARET SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , three cotton shawls, value 6 s. the property of George Dorvell privately in his shop .

THOMAS PRICE . I am shopman to Mr. Dorvell, linen draper , 216, High-street . On the 23d of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop; Pratt applied to me for some check, and while I was shewing them some check, I observed Pratt put something up her clothes; Smith leaned over the counter so as to hide Pratt from me: I was looking at Pratt.

GEORGE DORVELL . I took the prisoners from my shopman as customers and served them myself; I sold them goods to the amount of ten shillings. I then said to the prisoner Pratt, I shall be glad to speak to you; she said certainly; when we got to the back shop, I says it is very unpleasant, but my young man informs me that you have shuffled something into your pocket; she said not I indeed, you are very welcome to search me; I immediately took her into the back parlour, she pulled off her cloak and her apron, and I believe pulled up her upper petticoat, and said you see I have nothing about me; I pointed to her pockets and said pray what have you got there; her countenance changed, and she immediately pulled three shawls out of her pockets; she said do not take any notice, I will not do it any more.

(The property produced and identified.)

Pratt left her defence to her counsel.

Smith's Defence. I am quite innocent. I knew nothing of it.

Pratt called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Smith called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

PRATT, GUILTY, aged 44.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence,

Reference Number: t18080113-72

141. SARAH SHAKESHAFT was indicted for feloninously stealing on the 1st of January , a silver watch, value 3 l. 10 s. and three quarters of a yard of lace, value 4 s. the property of William, Straker in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM STRAKER . I am a bookbinder , I live in Helmet-court, Helmet-row, St. Luke's ; the prisoner lodged in my house a fortnight before she committed the robbery; she was to lodge with us till she got a place.

Q. Had you known her before. - A. For a short time. On the 31st of December, between seven and eight in the evening, I missed my watch; I left it under my pillow in my bed chamber.

Q. Who slept there besides you. - A. My wife and me, and the prisoner slept in one corner of the room.

Q. Was the prisoner at home when the watch was missed. - A. No, she went out after dinner she returned at night.

Q. Have you ever seen the watch since. - A. No.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge who made he bed that morning. - A. My wife told me the prisoner made the bed; I never saw my watch after I left it in the morning.

Q. When did you get the prisoner apprehended. - A. On the next morning.

Q. What induced you suspect her. - A. There was nobody else that I could suspect.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Had you any servants at the time. - A. I had a brother in law, an apprentice, he is there in the day, he does not sleep there.

WILLIAM GEARING . I am headborough of St. Luke's; when I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her and a box; I found nothing relating to the watch. Mrs. Straker missed some lace from a habit shirt of hers: I found the lace on the prisoners cap in the box; the prisoner said she took the lace and sewed it on her cap, to make Mrs. Straker a present of it.

MRS. STRAKER. Q. You are the wife of William Straker. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the officer was giving his evidence about searching the box. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know it to be the prisoners box. - A. Yes, it was locked; I saw a cap found with lace on it, the lace is mine, it was upon my habit shirt; I do not recollect seeing it since. The Sunday before it was dirty I believe it was in the foul clothes bag, but I am not certain; the habit shirt was found in the prisoners box with the lace taken off; I knew the lace again, but there were no particular marks on it; I should not like to swear to it, I am sure it is the same pattern.

Q. Did you make her any promise of favour about the watch the night before. - A. I told her nobody should know of it.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of your watch. A. It cost me three pounds ten shillings, second hand, five or six years ago.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord - with most perfect consciousness of my innocence, I throw myself upon the mercy of the court and the jury. The watch which I am accused of taking, was perpetually left about the house, and in rooms through which many persons were passing. It is true I and many persons might have purloined it; but the rectitude of my conscience would not suffer me to do it. I ever protest my innocence with regard to the lace; - could it have been possible for me to commit a theft of the kind, I had frequent opportunities of so doing to a much larger value. The most perfect confidence was placed in me by the prosecutor and his wife. I have hitherto passed through life without a stain on my character. I trust in this instance I have not deviated from the principles of virtue and honesty, by which I have been brought up to from my infancy by my parents.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-73

142. ANN WERRELLEY and DOROTHY CANNON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , a silver watch, value 3 l. and a gilt chain, value 6 d. the property of Robert Fairburn , in the dwelling house of William Cooper .

ROBERT FAIRBURN. I met the prisoner at the top of Bond-street on the 21st of December, between nine and ten in the evening; she wished me to go with her and give her something to drink. I went to her lodgings in John-street , I sat down by the fire and remained there some time; then I arose up and pulled out my watch; the prisoner pulled it out of my hand. I did not at the present moment make any resistance by taking it from her, she told me she took it to look at; I then remained in the room without taking particular notice what she had done with it.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was perfectly sober. While I was looking at a picture that was in a corner of the room, Cannon came into the room; I afterwards asked for my watch; Werrelley denied having seen it, nor had she taken it; I then said if she would not deliver it up to me I would call the watch; I asked Cannon if she had not got it from her, she denied having it. I went down stairs and called the watchman.

Werrelley's Defence. He gave me the watch into my hand, he did not give me any money; I put it in a proper place; as I was in the habits of bringing different company home. The gentleman asked me for the watch several times; I did not return it him, as he had not gave me any money; I put the watch by until such time as he should please to call to give me some money. At the watchhouse I sent this woman to give it him.

Q. to prosecutor. How was this, is it true that you gave her no money. - A. I gave her a shilling to get something to drink, and I gave her a shilling besides.

Cannon's Defence. She did not like to be in the watchhouse; she told me to go home and get the watch.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-74

143. JOSEPH WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , two pieces of bombaset, value 40 s. the property of John Davison , in his dwelling house .

JOHN DAVISON . Q. Where do you live. - A At Brentford . On the 6th of this month I had been out; I returned about five in the evening; as I came to Brentford, I met a man with two pieces of stuff under his arm.

Q. What man was that. - A. I did not know that person, I passed him, I thought he was a tradesman of the town, till I got within sight of my own door, then

I met the prisoner at the bar about fifteen yards from my door, with the two pieces of stuff that are here, he was coming towards me in a direction from my shop; I saw him come direct from my shop door; my shop rather stands out of the main street.

Q. You did not see him come out of the shop door. - A. No, I do not believe he came out of the shop door at that time.

Q. When you first saw him, how near was he to the door. - A. Close by the door.

Q. Was he standing there or walking. - A. Just as I turned round to the main street, he was walking from my door.

Q. Are there any houses or shops in the recess where your house stands. - A. Not linen draper's.

Q. There are other houses that are out of the main street. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come up to you. - A. I met him within fifteen yards from my door; I caught hold of the stuff, and asked him how he came by them; he immediately ran away.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before. - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he is the same. - A. I believe he is the same; I have not much doubt about him.

Q. Do you judge from your recollection and the figure of his person. - A. From the appearance of his person, and from the observations that I made; I described his dress to my wife; when I went in she said the prisoner had been in the shop,

Q. Did you endeavour to pursue him when he run off. - A. No, I took the stuff first; I went out to see if I could find him or his comrade with the other two pieces.

Q. What distance from your shop was it that you had seen the other man. - A. It might be an hundred yards down the street.

Q. What success had you in searching after the prisoner and his comrade. - A. I had been to a pawnbrokers in Old Brentford; in about three quarters of an hour after, as I was returning up the street, the prisoner was standing up against the wall. I stopped and looked at him.

Q. How far was that from your own shop. - A. It is about a quarter of a mile down to Old Brentford.

Q. You stopped and looked at him. - A. Yes; he asked me if I knew him; I told him I thought I did; and I asked him if he would walk up the street with me, which he did; he did not resist. As I walked up the street with him, I asked him if he had not bought a silk handkerchief at a linen draper's up the street, he said, no, he had not, he did not want one; when I took him into my shop, I sent for a constable; and my wife recognized him being in the shop a few minutes before.

Q. Have you got the two pieces that you took from him. - A. Yes. These are the pieces; there is my private mark on them; they are mine.

Q. Are you sure that you had not disposed of these pieces in the way of business. - A. I am certain I had not; the four pieces were there when I went out in the afternoon.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of them. - A. They are put down two pounds in the indictment; one of them cost me forty shillings, discount two and a half; the other twenty five shillings.

MARY DAVISON. Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, I saw him in my shop on the 6th of January about five in the evening; he came into my shop to buy a silk handkerchief. I asked him six shillings for it, he asked me to let him have it for five and six pence; he gave me six shillings; the money I had asked him before.

Q. While he was there was it light. - A. It was; I had candles in the shop, I distinguished his face, and likewise a scar he had on the upper part of his lip; I remarked his dress. I was just gone out of shop a few minutes when Mr. Davison brought in the two pieces of stuff.

Q. What do you call them. - A. Bombazets. He told me he had taken them from a boy in the street; he went out and brought in the boy.

Q. Did you look at these bombazets when they were brought in by Mr. Davison. - A. I did; I had seen them in the shop a short time before the boy came into the shop.

Q. How soon before. - A. A short time; I cannot say; they lay within side of the shop door, close to the door.

Q. Was the door open. - A. It was.

Q. How far from that part of the shop were you when when you sold him the silk handkerchief. - A. Not above two or three yards; our shop is very small.

Q. Did you see the boy go out. - A. Yes, and I went into the back room.

Q. Of course they could not go out with such a thing under his arm at that time. - A. He did not.

Q. So you went out of the shop a very short time before your husband came in with the bombazets. Did you leave no one else in the shop. - A. There was no one else in the shop.

Q. Was the door wide open. - A. The shop door was wide open, and the bombazets were against the door, they kept it open.

Q. Your husband afterward come back with the boy; did you then observe the person of the boy. - A. I did.

Q. Are you sure it is the same. - A. I am.

Q. Was there any alteration when he was brought back by your husband. - A. No.

Q. Did you observe that mark on the lip. - A. Yes, it was by a cold, I believe; I do not observe it now.

Q. Then the mark was not a scar, but something broke out on the lip. - A. It was. He gave me a seven shilling piece for the handkerchief, and I gave him a crooked shilling. When he came back to the shop he had a crooked shilling but I would not swear to it.

Q. Your husband and you occupy the whole house. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the shop a part of the house. - A. Yes, we have no lodgers.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to see my uncle at the next town to that; I was coming back to take the coach at Kew bridge; that gentleman stopped me as I was making water, I asked him if he knew me; he asked me if I would come up the town with him, I said yes; he asked me if I had bought a handkerchief, I said no.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth.

First Middlesex jury, before justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-75

144. THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Gibson , about the hour of seven at night on the 22nd of November , and stealing therein seven gowns, value 3 l. five shifts, value 5 s. a cloak, value 14 s. a petticoat, value 6 s. a shawl, value 3 s. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a night gown, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. two coats, value 4 l. a pair of breeches, value 20 s. three shirts, value 12 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 3 s. two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. three crown pieces, and four shillings, the property of John Gibson , senior; - a coat, value 30 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 20 s. and a shirt, value 4 s. the property of John Gibson , junior.

JOHN GIBSON , senior. I live at No. 24, Anchor-street, Bethnall Green ; I have the whole house, I keep a coal shed . On the 22nd of November I left my house about half after one in the afternoon.

Q. Who did you leave in the house. - A. My eldest son.

Q. What time did you return. - A. A few minutes after nine o'clock. When I came home my front door stood half open.

Q. Did you find any other door open. - A. We have only one room besides the coal shed; the up stairs door was wide open, that is the room where we all sleep. I missed from that room all the things contained in the indictment.

JOHN GIBSON, junior. Q. You are the son of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you leave your father's house on Sunday the 22nd of November. - A. About half past four.

Q. Did you leave any body in the house. - A. No.

Q. How did you fasten the door. - A. I double locked the street door, I tried it, I found I had locked it; I returned home a little after ten o'clock, I found I had lost my coat, shirt, and pantaloons, from out of the chest. I have found nothing but the pantaloons; I gave one pound eighteen shillings for them; they are worth a guinea. I had worn them but two or three times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. It was not dark when you left the house. - A. Yes, it was sun set; the lamps were lighted when I came to Shoreditch; that is not much more than a hundred yards off.

JOHN ALGER . I am a pawnbroker, No. 9, Chiswell-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you ever saw him before. - A. Yes, I have known him some years in the neighbourhood; on the 27th or 28th of December he sold me the pantaloons; I gave him eight shillings for them.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The pantaloons I bought of a hawker in the street, I gave him twelve shillings for them; on account of their not being big enough for me I sold them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-76

145. ELEANOR MACRAE , MARY WOOD , and MARY JENNINGS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , two pair of leather shoes, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Wasp , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HORN . I live with Mr. Wasp, he is a shoemaker in Holborn . On the 18th of December last, about eight o'clock in the evening, Macrae and Wood came into my master's shop; Macrae asked to look at some shoes, I shewed her some women's shoes, she looked at two pair; I had a great number on my arm; I hung them on the bannisters.

Q. When you gave her two pair to look at did she buy any. - A. No, she asked to look at some with heels; I went up stairs to get some, leaving a lad in the shop; I came down, she fitted a pair on and offered me four shillings; I told her we could not take it; some officers brought the prisoners into the shop in about three quarters of an hour afterwards; they produced two pair of shoes; I did not miss the shoes till the officers brought them; they were of the same description with those I had placed on the bannisters.

Q. Is the lad here that was in the shop. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. How many persons were there to serve in your master's shop. - A. There were two; I served Macrae and Wood.

Q. That lad and you that served in the shop, he is not here - what notice he might have taken when you went up stairs you cannot tell. - A. He was busy with another person.

Q. Whether he looked at these two women you cannot tell. - A. No.

Q. It was Macrae that looked at the shoes. - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know that your master lost any from the bannisters. - A. There were two pair missing.

Q. You did not know that till they were brought in, and you did not miss any, nor do you know how many pair of shoes were there. - A. No.

Q. Wood looked at nothing. - A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I am one of the conductors of the patrol of Bow-street. On the 18th of December I was in Holborn; I saw Macrae and Wood in a stocking shop; Jennings was out side of the window; Wood and Macrae came out; they went up Holborn about twenty yards.

Q. How far is that from the shop of Mr. Wasp. - A. About thirty yards; I saw Jennings standing at the corner of Chancery-lane, that is about eleven yards from Mr. Wasp's, on the same side of the way. I went down Holborn, and Jennings passed me running, she had something in her lap; I went up Holborn again; I met Macrae and Wood, they were coming down Holborn, they were between Mr. Wasp's shop and Southampton-buildings, as if coming from Mr. Wasp's shop. Macrae called out Mary three or four times, they crossed over the way and stood against Gray's Inn coffee-house; I saw them all join; I sent Lines and Preston to watch them; I went to Mr. Wasp's shop to know if two women had been there; they told me they had. I suspected they had when I missed them. From information I went over to Warwick-court, there I saw the three prisoners together I went and took hold of Jennings and Wood; Macrae run away. I got hold of Jennings with my right hand I found something drop from her; I had got hold of Wood with my left hand, I was between them; the shoes dropped close to my right foot on the side Jennings was; then we took them to Mr. Wasp's shop; when I heard them fall I stooped down and picked them up immediately; I have had them in my possession ever since; I searched Wood; I

did not find any thing upon her. I took the prisoners to Mr. Wasp's shop, and then to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. It was Macrae that called out Mary; you have no doubt that the shoes that fell at your right hand were dropped by Jennings. A. No doubt at all.

JOHN LINES . Q. Are you one of the patrols. - A. Yes. On the 18th of December, I was following Smith down Holborn; when I came to 317, the stocking shop, I saw Macrae and Wood in the stocking shop; I left them there, in two or three minutes they came out of the shop; we followed them till we came to Chancery-lane; we waited at the corner of Chancery-lane four or five minutes, Macrae walked by me and went down Holborn again alone; I crossed over the way, hearing a person calling out Mary. John Preston , a patrol, was standing at Warwick-court. Smith came up and told me they were all three in the court; I went in the court and caught hold of Mary Jennings ; in her lap I found this waistcoat; I said have you any more; she said no, and dropped her apron down; I immediately felt her pocket, and felt the shoes; I heard them drop on the ground; I rubbed her down, and they felt to be shoes by the heel, apparently; and the moment I put my hand they fell. I picked them up, they fell from her left side; I took one pair and Smith took the other; Macrae ran away, she was pursued and brought back by Preston.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. Smith had hold of Jennings's right hand - you put your hand on her left side, you felt something that appeared by the heels to be a pair of shoes, and immediately after that they dropped. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you certain that they both fell from Jennings. A. I have no doubt but they fell from Jennings.

Q. Had you any reason to suppose that Wood had shoes at all. - A. No.

JOHN PRESTON . Q. You are another patrol. - A. Yes; I was ordered by Mr. Smith to look at these people; when I first saw them, Macrae and Wood were crossing from Mr. Wasp's shop to the other side of the way; I followed them, I heard them call Mary three or four times; I saw Mary Jennings join the other two against Warwick-court; I informed Smith and Lines where the parties were; they came up and took hold of Jennings and Wood. Macrae ran away; I followed her and took her at the bottom of Gray's Inn-passage, and brought her back to Smith and Lines. The shoes were dropped before I came back.

(The property produced and identified.)

Macrae's Defence. I know nothing about the shoes, the lad would not take any money. I left the shop; I immediately went into Warwick-court to go to the inn to get my poultry.

Wood left her defence to her counsel.

Jennings's Defence. That waistcoat is my husband's, I had just taken it out of pawn to take to him at Portsmouth. The officer held me by the hands; he picked up two pair of shoes; I never saw the prisoners before in my life. I know nothing about the shoes.

Macrae called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Jennings called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre .

Reference Number: t18080113-77

146. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for making an assault upon Thomas Morgan , on the 3rd of January in the King's highway, putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a purse, value 4 d. a half guinea, a seven shilling piece, and thirty shillings , the property of the said Thomas Morgan .

THOMAS MORGAN . On the 3rd of January, about ten minutes before nine in the evening, I was in Long Acre enquiring the way to King-street, Soho; the prisoner said if you will come along with me, I will take you the way; she put her arm into mine, and in less than three or four minutes she put her hand into my breeches pocket; missed my purse and my money.

Q. She took out your purse and your money - A.Yes.

Q. How much money was in your purse. - A. A half guinea, a seven shilling piece and thirty shillings in silver.

Q. When she had done this, what did she do. - A. She took some money out of the purse, and I took as much as I could from her, and I halloaed out for assistance; I got my purse back again, a half guinea and nineten shillings in silver; she put the rest in her bosom. With assistance I took her to the watchhouse.

Q. Were you sober at this time. - A. I was.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am constable of St. Martin's.

Q. Do you remember this woman being brought to the watchhouse. - A. Yes, about nine o'clock on the 3rd of January, by Morgan and a number of people besides. I searched her; in her right hand pocket I found three shillings and sixpence, and I found a shilling in her left hand pocket; I then unloosed her clothes and shook her petticoats, and down dropped this five shillings; the watchhouse keeper picked them up and gave them to me. I produce the money.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Monday night, I was standing in Long Acre with a young woman, about half after eight this young man came up to us, and asked me where was Long Acre; I told him he was in Long Acre; he asked me if I lived far from there; I told him I did not; then he asked me if I had a room of own, I told him I had not; he said he would give me a shilling for his pleasure, which he did; after that he very much ill used me, and coming into the street, he took me to the watchhouse; this money I had saved up ever since Christmas last to buy me a gown; he has sworn so false, I must leave it to the jury.

COURT. There is no pretence for making it a highway robbery, if you believe his story she picked his pocket; she took the opportunity as they were walking towards the place to take his purse out of his pocket; there is no doubt but what she stole it, if you believe the prosecutors story; but you will acquit her of the highway robbery. He says he was sober when it happened.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18080113-78

147. ANN CHARLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 34 s. two waistcoats, value 21 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 7 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. and five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. 4 d. the property of James Wilford , in his dwelling ; and MARY ANN THOMPSON for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

The Case stated by Mr. Bolland.

PETER LABAN , Q. Where do you live. - A. At No. 46, Broad-street, Ralcliffe Highway.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor James Wilford . - A. I do; I am his father in law. I was present on the 26th of December when Charlton came in his shop; she told him that she came from her aunt Ramsay for some things; that her uncle John was come from sea, and wanted some things to fit himself out he was afraid to come out himself for fear of the press.

Q. Did you deliver to her any things. - A. I was present when they were delivered, and she took them away with her; she ordered us to send in the bill. We sent in the bill; Mrs. Ramsay said, she did not know nothing of it. In consequence of that we went in search of the girl.

Court. Who ordered the bill to be sent in. - A. Ann Charlton .

Q. You meaned to sell the articles to the aunt and to give her credit for the goods - A. Yes.

COURT. This is obtaining goods under false pretence, and they have indicted her capitally.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18080113-79

148 JANE KEMSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of November , two silver table spoons, value 10 s. a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. and a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Bacon .

JOSEPH BACON . I live in Gray's Inn-square , I am in the profession; the prisoner was my housekeeper ; she had been with me ever since last June last; the table-spoons I missed from my side board, in the middle of November.

Q. Did you find your things. - A. I discovered the whole of them at the pawnbrokers.

MR. LOWTHER. I am a pawnbroker, Fox's-court, Gray's Inn-lane; two articles were pledged with me by the prisoner; two table spoons pledged for one pound one shilling and a penny on the 14th of November; I did not take them in. I took in a suit of cloaths pledged by the prisoner on the 21st of October.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged these things for want of money; I meant to take them out again.

Prosecutor. I firmly believe that it was her intention to restore every thing that she took away.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-80

149. THOMAS PARSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , one firkin of butter, value 3 l. the property of Robert Russel ; and ANN MARTIN for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH OSTERWIN . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am agent to Mr. Russell he is a carrier ; he has a waggon that comes from Bridport in Dorset; he lives at Exeter; the waggon inns at the Bell in Friday-street .

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge the waggoner having any butter consigned to Mr. Todd. - A. Yes. On the 21st of December a certain quantity arrived by the Exeter waggon, it was put into the warehouse, as is usual, till the owner applied for it; it was marked I T and a diamond.

Q. How many firkins, were there. - A. Five firkins and three half firkins, marked 17 to 24; in consequence of Chapman the officer making application to the inn concerning a firkin of butter marked I T 19, with a diamond, we observed one of that number was gone. I attended the office in Hatton Garden when the persons were examined; I knew Parsley very well, he was in the habit of coming from Messrs. Todd and Benson at Pentonville, to our inn.

Q. Was their mark the same as this, I T. - A. No, T B.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. Q. You are an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. - A. I am. When Ekelsoe, a brother officer, and I entered the prisoner Martin's room on Saffron-hill, she turned her back on the butter and opened the cupboard door; she said we might look there for any thing; I pulled her of oneside, and upon the ground, between her and the foot of the bed, the firkin of butter stood; I told her that was partly what I wanted; a child in the bed about five years old cried out, mammy, Thomas brought it; I said I know your husband deals in a great many comical things, I did not know that he dealt in butter; I took her to the office and the butter; the next morning I saw Parsley and her husband. I introduced them into the office. I went to the Bell in Friday-street, I found the butter belonged to Mr. Todd, of St. Paul's church yard. Parsley said he carried it for Mr. Todd of Pentonville; he was so intoxicated he could not carry it there.

The property produced and identified.

ANTHONY BENSON . I am in partnership with John Todd ; I live at Islington; we receive butter from the Exeter waggon; the mark was T D.

Q. Did you send the prisoner on the 21st to receive any butter. - A. I believe he was, I am not positive.

Parsley's Defence. On Monday the 21st, I was employed by Mr. Todd at Islington, to go to the Bell inn, Friday-street, to get the firkins of butter for him; when Mr. Todd is there he puts them all right, as I am no scholar. I found but three; he told me there were four; I carried these three to him. In about four hours afterwards they had found the one; I went back for it, I was so intoxicated I fell down; I went to Mrs. Martin's with it; I there fell fast asleep against the fire place; when I awoke I told them it was late to go to Islington, and being intoxicated, I asked them the favour of letting me leave it there till the morning, and then I would take it up to Islington; they granted me the favour; I went home to go to bed; sometime after I had got home Martin came to inform me that the firkin of butter I had left at his house I had stolen, his wife was in custody for it. I told him it was wrong I would go to Chapman's house; I went, Mrs Chapman told me he was not at home; the next morning I went to Chapman's house, the boy there told me to go to the Royal Oak and he would be with me; I did, and saw Chapman there. As to this woman she is entirely innocent of it.

Martin said nothing in her defence.

Parsley called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-81

150. PETER STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , a copper can, value 18 s. the property of James Deady and John Henley .

WILLIAM CULLUM . I live with Mr. James Deady and John Henley, distillers , of Tottenham Court road. On the 5th of January I was out with the waggon in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane ; I saw the prisoner take the can out of the waggon myself; it was between five and six o'clock in the evening; I followed him and catched hold of him; he dropped it; I told him I saw him take it out of Mr. Deady's waggon, and insisted on his going back with me to where the wag gon stood in White Hart-yard; he refused; and by a hit of a scuffle with him I brought him back, delivered him into my fellow servant's hands, and we went to Bow-street for an officer.

Q. Are you sure this is the man that you saw take it out of the waggon. - A. Yes.

THOMAS LIMERICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was sent for into White Hart-yard. As soon as I went into the room the prisoner Stokes was delivered to me, and two cans. Cullom said he could not take upon him to say which can it was.

Q. to Cullom. Which can was it. - A. I could not say, after they were put in the waggon; it was one of them, we had them both out; they are both my master's property I am sure he took one out of the two.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, when the first witness laid hold of me and said I had stole the can. - I know nothing of it. There was a man run on before me.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-82

151. JOHN NORRISH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , three kirb stones, value 5 s. the property of the commissioners for paving the estate belonging to the Foundling hospital .

Court. The only persons that could be supposed to be in possession of the property, were certain commissioners under certain acts of parliament. Unfortunately, the clerk who took the instructions mistook the name of one of these gentlemen; it does not belong to a person of that name.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-83

152. JUDITH BREDFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , a gown, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Mary Leary .

MARY LEARY . I am a servant , I live at the Bull's Head, Ratcliff Highway . On the 8th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was in the tap room; my fellow servant saw her go down in the kitchen and take the things; she went out and took them from her. I saw the gown and apron in about three or four minutes afterwards; I know them to be mine, I keep my clothes in the kitchen. I have lost a great many things. I lost a new gown out of the wash some time before.

JANE EDDIN . Q. Are you a servant at the Bull's Head. - A. Yes. I was in the bar, I saw the prisoner go down stairs into the kitchen, and I saw her go out in the street. After she came up I followed her in the street about the distance of an hundred yards from the house. I asked her to come back with me; she said - child, who wants me? and she came back with me. When I got her in the house I asked her what she had got under her gown. I saw my fellow servant's apron in her pocket, I took it out, and the gown fell down; it was tucked under her gown. She then said she would do any thing in her power to make me amends. I knew the gown and the apron to be my fellow servant's.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the house but that time and the week before.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-84

153. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a tea pot, value 1 s. 6 d. a milk jug, value 1 d. four basons, value 3 s. twelve cups, value 2 s. and twelve saucers, value 2 s. the property of George Carr .

GEORGE CARR . I keep an earthen ware shop at Paddington, upon the Grand Junction wharf .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. He was my servant . I can only speak to the property when it is produced.

JOHN NEEDHAM . I am servant to Mr. Carr. On the 6th of January the prisoner was carrying goods backwards and forwards into the warehouse; I saw him go from the warehouse into the necessary, and I observed something in his pockets. I informed Norman, the porter, of it, and told him to watch him. I took the candle and the lanthorn, and there I discovered the articles of earthen ware concealed in the necessary.

Q. Could you see what it was in his pockets. - A. No, I only saw a bulk. After he had left work, he was going home; about the distance of an hundred yards off I met him, and asked him what he had got about him; he said nothing but a cracked bason. I clapped my hand upon his bosom and told him I felt more than that; he immediately pulled out four basons from his bosom and gave them into my hands. We immediately took him to his master's house, and there were taken from him twelve cups and twelve saucers; they were distributed about his person, and some in the crown of his hat.

Q. What were the value of these articles - were they worth four shillings all together. - A. More than that.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-85

154. JAMES CARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of December , six pound weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of Charles Jones .

CHARLES JONES . I live at No. 55, Lemon-street, Goodman's Fields ; I am a cheesemonger . On Saturday the 19th of December, at six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and two others came up to my shop window. They seemed to be viewing what was in the shop window; presently after they came to the door. I had suspicion that they meaned to take something; I went into a dark passage and watched them. I saw them make several attempts; at last the prisoner took a piece of bacon out of the window and delivered it to one of the others. I saw him take it.

Q. Where was the bacon. - A. It lay in the window on the top of a butter tub; when he had delivered it to one of the others, he began running directly. I came out of the passage and passed them that had it. I said I would have him that did take it. I caught him; I am sure he is the man. I never got the bacon, there was about six pound of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been of an errand, I was running by this man's door and many people ran, he halloaed out stop thief. I stopped, and he charged me with stealing it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-86

155. JOHN WALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , five pound weight of brass, value 5 s. the property of Enoch Evans .

ENOCH EVANS . I am an ironmonger, smith, and brass founder , I live at No. 6, Portland-street, St. James's ; the prisoner was my servant . In consequence of suspicion on the 12th of December, between five and six o'clock, I concealed myself in a ware room adjoining my shop; as I went in I met two of the men coming out of the shop going to their tea; the prisoner was then the only person left behind; I then went in my place of concealment, I might be there about five minutes. I observed through a hole in the partition the prisoner coming from an upper shop into a lower one; he left his candle in the upper one, consequently I could not see him in the lower one; I could hear him distinctly in the lower shop, as if he was taking up some loose materials that sounded like brass I could hear them drop as if into a bag or pocket.

Q. How long did he stay in this lower shop. - A. About a minute and a half; he returned from the lower shop into the upper, and put out the candle; then he came down and went into the retail shop; I followed him; when I came in the front shop, he was asking my man to change a bad shilling I had given to him a day or two before. I desired the man to change it, and I walked out of the door and stood upon the pavement; the prisoner came out and passed me; as he was going about half way over the street I hailed him, he came back to me; I took hold of him and told him he had robbed me. He said he had not. I told him in positive terms that I heard him doing that which he ought not, and insisted upon it that he had something upon him. On this the prisoner fell on his kness and begged my pardon, saying he had robbed me and would come in the shop and take the things out himself. He walked into the back shop and took it out of his pocket himself. - These are the pieces of brass, I have no doubt but they are mine.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a servant to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner take the brass out of his pocket himself. He begged to be forgiven.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-87

156. JEREMIAH ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , two beds, value 10 s. five blankets, value 10 s. seven sheets, value 10 s. and one bolster, value 1 s. the property of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of the City of London, Governors of the House of Poor, commonly called St. Bartholomew's Hospital , near West Smithfield, London, of the foundation of King Henry the VIIIth.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received did you go to a house in Gee-street. - A. On the 30th of December I went with a search warrant to a house in Gee-street, Goswell-street, No. 24, kept by a person of the name of Rice; I was accompanied by Richard Payter . I searched the attic story; there I found two beds belonging to the hospital; a bolster, three new blankets and a pair of old ones, and one sheet, they were laying loose in the room on the floor. We found a box, which was fastened, in the same room; I broke it open, containing two pair of new sheets and one pair of old ones. Mr. Rice was with me at that time.

Q. In consequence of what he said did you go down stairs. - A. I did. I found the prisoner concealed in a coal hole; when I got a light he was doubled up all of a heap under the the stair case. I was looking for Ann Hutchinson . I apprehended the prisoner by private information.

JAMES RICE . Q. Do you live at No. 24, Gee-street, Goswell-street. - A. I do.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in the habit of coming to your house. - A. Yes, he did some smith's work for me.

Q.There was some property found by the officer in the attic story of your house; who brought it there. - A. I do not know who brought it there; I did not know that there was any property there till I saw something in the corner of the room.

Court. Can you tell when that property that you saw laid up in the corner came. - A. No. On the 17th Ann Hutchinson was to come to sleep there for a night or two. It was impossible for her to have the room, I could not spare it.

Q. You say you saw something lay in the corner of that room; how long was that before the officer came to search the house. - A. About three days.

Q. Was not this man in the house at the time the officer came. - A. I believe he was. I thought he was come to do his work.

Q. Does he work in the coal hole. - A. No, upon the one pair.

JANE HAINES. - Mr. Alley. On the 30th of December you were head nurse at Jones's ward in St. Bartholomew's hospital; do you know the beds. - A. Yes. One is my own making; I made one part with single thread and the other with double thread. I made it while I was a patient. I am positive it is the same bed; that bed was for the use of the patients if they wanted a bed.

Q. Ann Hutchinson , whom we have not found, belonged to Aldridge's ward. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing her and the prisoner together. - A. Frequently.

Q. How far from your ward was Aldridge's ward. - A. One is on the right hand side and the other is on the left; they are oppossite. I am sure that bed is the property of the hospital.

Q. Do you know whether Ann Hutchinson had any bed there. - A. Not to my knowledge. When the carman came I helped her and the prisoner helped her. The sister had this bed in her room; it was under her bed; she slept on three beds - they were all three the property of the hospital I am sure.

Court. Have you ever seen the sheets and blankets that have been produced. - A. Yes; the sheets and blankets are the hospital property.

Q. When was it she moved. - A. Eight days before Christmas.

JANE ARCHER . - Mr. Alley. On the 17th of December you were a patient in St. Bartholomew's hospital. - A. Yes.

Q. There has been a bed produced worked with yellow silk; have you seen that bed before in the hospital. - A. Yes. I saw it in Mrs. Hutchinson's ward; it a flock bed belonging to the hospital; the other bed worked with brown I saw made in the hospital three weeks after I was in the hospital - it was kept in Mrs. Hutchinson's ward.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Perfectly well; he was a watchman of the hospital. He breakfasted, dined, and had his tea with Mrs. Hutchinson for five weeks, and his supper was sent to the gate every night. I did not know but that he was Mrs. Hutchinson's husband till his wife came to make a piece of work.

Q. Did you see either of these beds taken out of the hospital - A. I did not. I saw sister Hutchinson carrying one of the beds into her own room in Aldridge's ward.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the Tuesday evening as she left the ward on the Thursday. - A. The prisoner was there on the Tuesday evening as she left the ward on the Thursday; and then the ward was put in darkness. - At the time that Mrs, Hutchinson ordered the ward to be in darkness, the prisoner and a young man were in sister Hutchinson's room; sister Hutchinson went out into the lobby, she said now all is safe - come along. - The prisoner and the young man that was there, assisted in carrying two or three bundles.

Q. You cannot tell what it was they carried. - A. No.

MARY EVANS . - Mr. Alley. You were a patient at the time we have been speaking of. - A. Yes, and I am now. I was employed to make a bed in the ward about a month or six weeks before Mrs. Hutchinson went from the hospital.

Court. Look at one of these two beds. - A. To the best of knowledge one of these beds I made by the order of Mrs. Hutchinson, for the hospital. I had seen the prisoner come backwards and forwards to Mrs. Hutchinson several times.

ANN ROSE . - Mr. Alley. Were you a patient in the hospital at the time we have been speaking of. - A. I have been in there ten weeks to-day.

Q. On the day we have been speaking of did you see the prisoner carry any thing away from the hospital. - A. About a fortnight before Mrs. Hutchinson left the hospital, one night, about seven o'clock, sister Hutchinson tied up one bed and two sheets, and about eight or nine o'clock the prisoner took them away; he was in the room and saw her tie them up; he took them out of the ward. Where he took them to I cannot say; I have often seen the prisoner in the ward, day and night; he would come in in the night and put coals on the fire, and come in again and stir the fire.

Mr. Curwood. I believe you saw the goods taken away. - A. No, I heard the cart was at the door; I was not able to get out of bed.

Q. She must know they were hospital beds, the prisoner might not know. - A. No.

Court. Did you ever know any other watchman but him come within side of the building of the hospital. - A. No, I have not, it is a ward for women.

JAMES BRAY . - Mr. Alley. You are a box carrier and watchman to the hospital; the prisoner had also been a watchman some time. - A. Yes, he had been there for two years.

Q. On the night these things were taken from the hospital, did you see the prisoner with the cart. - A. Yes, between six and seven; it was dark.

Q. Did he assist in loading the things in the cart. - A. He did. My duty called me at seven o'clock; I did not follow the cart.

Q. Do the watchman go inside of the ward. - A. Only me. I take care of all casualties from seven o'clock. I have an apartment inside of the hospital, the prisoner had no business in the hospital; his duty did not lay inside of the square where the patients were; he had the care of the apothecary's house, the matron's, the clerk's and Mr. Abernethy's; the prisoner was discharged from his post for being in connection with this woman; he was found in the act. I found him myself in the act.

Q. Ann Hutchinson has not been heard of since. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The reason why I hid myself when I was at work at Mr. Rice's, was, the day before my wife and I had a few words; she is given to drinking, and she struck me and I struck her. She said that she would send the Hatton Garden officers after me. When I heard the Hatton Garden officers was in the house, I was afraid. I was there finishing some wheels. Ann Hutchinson employed me to hire a cart for her,

she was to give me two shillings for assisting her; I hired the cart and, she gave me three shillings to pay the carter.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years . Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-88

157. CHARLES SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of December , a truss of hay, value 3 s. the property of John Moody and Edward Edwards .

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am a servant to the prosecutor, he is a stage master ; the prisoner was also employed in the stables . On Tuesday, December the 1st, about half past seven o'clock at night, I was getting my horses in; Joseph Young that worked at the Powder Mills passed by my gate; he halloaed out Charles: no said he it is Dick; he went on to the stable door, when he found nobody answered him; I looked and saw the prisoner deliver a truss of hay from the loft to Joseph Young ; I said halloa, here are pretty games carried on here. Charles made answer as soon as he saw me, God d - m, and Joseph Young made answer d - n, it is not half a bundle.

Q. What was it in point of fact. - A. It was a truss of hay.

Q. What was the value of a truss of hay, was it worth two shillings. - A. Yes, a good deal more than that. It was my master's property; when I cried out this is a pretty game, Young threw the truss of hay by the stable door; I put the truss in the stable, Young came in the stable with me, I said there is not half a truss, is it not. I halloaed out Charles, he made me no answer. I am sure Simmons is the person who handed the truss out; I acquainted my master of it. Young has not been found since.

Q. When you next saw Charles Simmons , what did you say to him. - A. I did not see him till he was taken, he absconded directly, he did not stop to get his wages; he was taken a fortnight afterwards about three miles this side of Bagshot.

Mr. Alley. Was it not the shortest way for him to put the hay out of the loft that way for the horses. - A. No, the shortest way was to put it from the loft into the stable; besides the horses were racked up for the night, they did not want it.

MR. MOODY. - Mr. Curwood. Whose property was that hay in the loft described by the witnesses. - A. All mine and my partner Edward Edwards .

Prisoner's Defence. I had the care of Mr. Moody's horses, I had occasion to put a truss of hay down the loft. Joseph Young was coming by, I asked him to take it down to keep it out of the dirt. I gave it to the horses, and what they did not eat in the night I gave it them in the morning.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly Whipped One Hundred Yards near the Marquis of Granby .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-89

158. SARAH LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of January , eight pounds weight of cheese, value 4 s. the property of John Layton Ireland .

JOHN LAYTON IRELAND . I am a cheesemonger , 239, High-street, Shoreditch . On Saturday night, the 2nd of January, about ten o'clock at night, I missed a half cheese from out of my shop; it was on a pile of cheese close to the door. I saw it there about half past eight o'clock.

JOHN COLAND . I keep the sign of the Robin Hood , in Webb square, Shoreditch. I went into the tap room about ten o'clock on Saturday night; I saw this woman apparently asleep, I was going to turn her out of the house; some of the people in the tap room told me that there was a cheese belonging to her. I looked at the cheese; I said I was sure she had stole it; she said she had found it. I sent to the watchhouse. The constable of the night came, and took her to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM SWAIN . I am a constable of Shoreditch.

Q. Did you take charge of this woman at the Robin Hood public house. - A. I did; she said she found the cheese upon a post in Brick-lane. On Monday morning I went to some of the neighbours, and asked them if they had lost a cheese. Mr. Ireland came and claimed the cheese.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the cheese on a post in Brick lane, just before you come to the brewhouse. I went down to Webb square, and had half a pint of two penny. I was never near his shop in my life.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-90

159. PETER EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , a gown, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. two pair of half stockings, value 1 s. and a pair of breeches, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Lawler .

MARY CONNER . I am servant to Thomas Lawler , he keeps the York Arms, Carter Street, May Fair . On the 13th of this month, the articles mentioned in the indictment were taken out of a box in the adjoining room to Peter Evans 's room; the prisoner is a soldier , he was billeted in Mr. Lawler's house.

Q. When had you seen these clothes. - A. On the 13th of January, between two and three o'clock; when I went up stairs the prisoner was supporting the lid of the box with one hand and turning over the things with the other hand; the box had been left locked, and strapped over; besides I had seen the box about half an hour before that, it appeared safe then; the prisoner said he had been taking things out two or three times and selling them.

Q. This room did not belong to the prisoner. - A. No, he went through that room to go to his own.

Q. When you saw this, did you alarm the house. - A I did, but he went down stairs and went out; we did not see him for two or three hours; before he got to the foot of the stairs, I called my mistress, she was cleaning herself, she came as soon as she could, he was gone then.

Q. Was there any thing removed from the box. - A. A silk gown and a pair of stockings; they were all found under the prisoner's bed.

Q. What did you find under the prisoner's bed. - A. A silk gown, a pair of stockings, one pair of half stockings, and a pair of breeches; they were under his pillow; they were left in the house under Mr. Lawler's care they belonged to Thomas Clark .

ALEXANDER BALL. I am a constable of St. Geerge's; Hanover-square; I examined the box and the room, the room door was wide open, the staple of the box had been forced and the lock drove back; at nine o'clock the prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house; the prisoner never spoke a word till he got down stairs at the watchhouse; I said it must be him that had sold the three waistcoats, two without sleeves and one with; and I told him he had got other things besides; he immediately said, I suppose you mean those things I have got under my pillow.

Q. When you went to Lawler's house did you see the things that were under the pillow. - A. Yes, I took them out. The next morning he said he had no confederate whatever nor was any person concerned with him; he was drunk or else he should not have done it; that he opened the box with an iron nail. These are the things that were taken out of the prisoner's bed.

Q. to Mary Conner . Do you know that any of the things that are now produced were taken out of that box. - A. No, I do not know any thing that was in it; Mr. Lawler is not here, nor Thomas Clark .

Q. Do you think the gown is worth five shillings. - A. Yes, and the stockings are worth a shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the first regiment of guards. I did not break the box open, it was fastened down with nothing but a strap.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-91

157. THOMAS HALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December one hundred and ninety three pound weight of copper rivets, value 10 l. the property of Francis Morgan and James Morgan ; and THOMAS HENSHAW for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN HARVEY . I am in the employ of Messrs. Tyler and son, tea urn manufacturers and brazers, No. 3, Cripplegate-buildings.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoner at the bar. - A. I know Mr. Henshaw by being a customer of my master's.

Q. On the 23d of December do you recollect his bringing any rivets to your master's house. - A. I saw one; he asked my master, the old gentleman, if such things would suit him my master made answer he could not say, his son was not at home; he said he would send a twopenny post letter the next morning if Mr. Henshaw liked. Mr. Henshaw said he would not give him the trouble as he was coming that way on the next day, he would call; Mr. Henshaw did call the next day about twelve o'clock, I believe.

Q. What past then. - A. I did not see; he went away, having left the rivets on the first day; on the second day the rivets were brought in the evening, by a soldier and Mr. Henshaw's apprentice, they were brought on a truck, I took them in: when I had put them in a back place in the yard, Mr. Griffiths and master came and took possession of them; and the soldier and Mr. Henshaw's apprentice were taken in custody.

Q.What quantity of rivets were there. - A. The bags and all weighed one hundred, three quarters, and nineteen pound.

WILLIAM NEWMAN . - Mr. Alley. Are you an apprentice to Mr. Henshaw. - A. Yes. I was sent with these rivets on the 24th of December, I took them from my master's No. 28, King-street, Tower Hill, to Mr. Tylers house in Cripplegate-building's.

Q. Did your master give you any directions when he gave you these rivets to carry. - A. He only told me to carry them to Mr. Tyler's.

Q. You brought them according to his direction and then you were taken in custody. - A. Yes; I remained in custody from that night till Saturday night.

Q. Who had your master them rivets from. - A. From Haley, the other prisoner; it was in the evening I carried them, and he had them of Haley on the same day between one and two o'clock.

Q. What o'clock was it you took them to Mr. Tyler's. - A. Between four and five o'clock. When the rivets were brought in I was sent for two bags to put them in; they were brought in baskets by Haley at twice; they were weighed in the bags.

WILLIAM HICKNEP. Q. You are a soldier. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Henshaw employ you along with this boy to carry the rivets on that day. - A. Yes; I took them to Mr. Tyler's house, I delivered them there, and there I was taken in custody.

ROBERT KEATES . Q. I believe you manage the business of the prosecutor. - A. I do. They are coppersmiths, their manufactory is in Whitechapel.

Q. What their names. - A. Francis and James Morgan.

Q. In their business do they use rivets. - A.They do; they are all marked W T; formerly the firm was Thwaites and Co. and all the tools that we had in the shop at that time had W T; it is impossible for a man to make a rivet with these tools without W T being stamped upon the rivet. We have lost a vast quantity of rivets and copper; these rivets are all wrought with the hammer; there is W T upon them all; I believe them to be the property of Messrs. Morgan.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. Q. You are an officer of Lambeth street office. - A. I am. On the 24th of December last, from information, I went to the house of Mr. Tyler with Mr. Keate, and about five in the evening I observed Mr. Henshaw's apprentice and the soldier in the warehouse of Mr. Tyler; I took both of them in custody, and put them in the compter. About seven o'clock the same evening I took Mr. Henshaw in custody; I took him into the back parlour, I told him I had taken in custody his apprentice, I had put him in the compter along with the soldier for delivering some copper rivets at Mr. Tylers, Cripplegate Buildings; I asked him if he had sent any with his apprentice and the soldier; he said he had, he wondered they stopped so long, he was going to send after them; I asked him who he bought them of, he said a man brought him a sample of them the day before, and he believed he was an Irish man, he was a dirty looking fellow in a smock frock; he said

that he did not buy them on that day, he would not buy them except he could sell them again, he was to call on the next day for an answer; he went to Mr. Tyler's that evening to see if Mr. Tyler would purchase them; he saw old Mr. Tyler, he could not give him an answer except his son was at home, if he would call the next day he would give him an answer; he said he did call the next day on Mr. Tyler, and they agreed for him to send them in; that he was to give him thirteen pence a pound for them; he then returned home and sent his apprentice and the soldier with them.

Q. What business is Henshaw. - A. He sells allsorts of ironmongery. I asked him where this man lived that brought them, he said some where near Petticoat-lane, he could not justly say where; he said, he had been there at different times before; at first he could not recollect his name, then he said his name was Haley; I said I knew Haley very well; he said, he expected him in every minute for his money, he was to give him ten pence a pound for them; I took him to the magistrate, leaving my brother officer to wait for Haley; soon after I got to the officer my fellow officer brought Haley. Haley was put to the bar and asked where he got the rivets.

Q. Was what was said taken in writing. - A. I believe it was.

Mr. Const. From the information you received, no matter what it was, did not you find every thing he told you true. - A. Exactly so.

JOHN NOWLAND . - Mr. Alley. I believe you do not know any thing further. - A. I do not.

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Henshaw's mother pointed out Haley to you. - A. Yes, she did, she sent him into the room where I was; I told him as soon as he came into the room, I had a charge of felony against him concerning some stolen copper; I asked him if he knew any thing about bringing any copper to Mr. Henshaw's he said, he did; I asked him if he could account how he came by it; he said, he met a countryman driving a team in Whitechapel, he asked him if he wanted a job, he told him he would give him five shillings if he would carry these two parcels to Mr. Henshaw's, King-street, Tower Hill; I asked him if he knew the countryman's name, he said he did not know his name nor where he lived; he said he had come on purpose to receive the money and he meaned to keep the money till he saw the countryman in the street, and then he meant to return the money to him. In taking him along the street to the office he resisted a great deal, and tried to make his escape; I secured him, and conveyed him to the magistrate, and he was committed. (The examinations of the prisoners before the magistrate read.)

(The property produced and identified.)

Haley's Defence. I was employed to bring them from Whitechapel to Mr. Henshaw's. I have a great family.

Henshaw's Defence. I had not the least idea that these articles were stolen, or else I should not have offered them to so respectable a tradesman as Mr. Tyler. I lament that their religious principles prevents them from coming forward. They offered me thirteen pence a pound for the copper.

Haley called no witnesses to his character.

Henshaw called twenty one witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HALEY, GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENSHAW, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-92

158. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , two gowns, value 9 s. three yards of flannel, value 4 s. two table cloths, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. and four caps, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Ellis .

THOMAS ELLIS . I live at No. 3, Market-street, St. James's , I am a taylor ; I keep the lower part of the house to myself. About a quarter past six I was at work on my shop board in the right hand shop, my wife had just come from the left hand shop, in which these things were, to speak to me.

Q. Was your passage door generally open. - A. It was. My wife in going out of my shop saw two men in the further part of the room; she cried out to me and pushed to the passage door to prevent the persons from getting out; I left my shop board and went to her assistance; I saw the prisoner and another man; the first man made his escape, he could not get the door back, it stuck against the mat; however, he squeezed through the door way; the prisoner could not get through so well; I collared him, we scuffled together, and the things dropped from under his great coat; I secured him, and with assistance I took him to the watchhouse; I examined the bundle; it contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I had seen all the articles safe in the room at five o'clock.

MRS. ELLIS: Q. Did you go to your husband's shop to speak to him a little after six o'clock in the evening. - A. Yes, I went from the left hand room into the right hand, and I left no person in the left hand shop; I was speaking to my husband for about five minutes. on my returning into the left hand room, I saw two men at the further end of the room; when they saw me they attempted to run out; I tried to shut to the street door, but the mat prevented my shutting it close; I alarmed my husband; when he came out one had nearly squeezed through and made his escape; the prisoner could not squeeze through; my husband secured him.

Q. Did you see the bundle fall in the scuffle. - A. Yes; it contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

GEORGE HARPER . I live at No. 11, Market-street, St. James's; I was coming out of my house on this evening about six o'clock, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw one man pass very swiftly by me, he came from towards Mr. Ellis't door; I ran to the assistance of Mr. Ellis; the prisoner and he were scuffling together. The linen that is now produced in court was laying under the feet of the prisoner and Mr. Ellis's, near the threshold of the door; they had fallen down in the scuffle.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a public house in Broad-street, I saw this young man setting there; he said he was going my way. We went into Market-street; he said stop here, I am going into this house; he went in and came out, and said step in; I went in and stopped inside of the door a minute; I believe when he came out he had a bundle, I am not quite sure whether he had or not; the lady came out and made an alarm. That is all I have to say.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-93

159. MARY KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of October , twelve shillings, two bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Reddington .

ELIZABETH REDDINGTON. My husband's name is Thomas Reddington , I live in Castle-lane, Westminster , we keep the Stag public house ; the prisoner had been my servant , she had lived with me about three months.

Q. When did she leave your service. - A. About the 5th of October; I sent her to a customer of mine, Mrs. Basnet, with two pints of beer, about a quarter past three, and the lady gave her a five pound note; she sent it to me to give change and to take for a weeks beer out of it; her week's beer was eight shillings and some odd halfpence; I gave her one two pound bank notes, and two one pound bank notes and twelve shilling in silver, to give in change to the lady.

Q. Where does this lady live that sent the five pound note. - A. In Palace-street, Westminster, near Pimlico; she was to take that change to the lady; she left my house for that purpose, and to fetch the empty pots; she left my house about a quarter before five o'clock, and never returned again. In less than an hour afterwards the change was asked for; I never saw the prisoner till she was taken in custody. I was obliged to make the money good to the lady; when the lady came I went up stairs to see if her things were gone. I found them all gone.

HANNAH BASNET . Q. Do you live in Palace-street, Pimlico. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you send a five pound note to receive the change in payment of your beer. - A. Yes, on the 5th of October; I sent it by the prisoner, about a quarter past three, she never brought me the change; between five and six o'clock, I went to Mrs. Reddington, and she informed me that she sent it by the the servant; Mrs. Reddington made good the loss to me; I never saw the prisoner after I gave her the note.

JOHN GAMBLE . I belong to the first regiment of guards; about fortnight ago, as I was upon duty at the savoy; I apprehended the prisoner; I am quartered at Mrs. Reddington's. I sent for a constable, she was searched, and two shillings, a knife and a thimble was found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money out of my pocket; I had the change of my mistress; never such a thing come into my mind of taking it away.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-94

160. ROBERT COLLUM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of December , a cask, value 1 s. two gallons of gin, value 18 s. and one pint of brandy, value 2 s. the property of George Smith Bramwell and John Woodhead .

GEORGE SMITH BRAMWELL . My partner's name is John Woodhead , we are distillers and rectifiers in Drury-lane ; the prisoner was my servant at the time. On the evening of the 11th of December, I wanted to go to that part of the distill house, where my partner was; on returning back to the accompting house I saw some person endeavouring to conceal themselves; I asked who was there, I received no answer; I took a candle to see who was there, and found it to be the prisoner; I asked him what he was about, he replied nothing; I requested to see what that nothing was that he was about; I found that he had filled a two gallon cask of gin; he was in the act of putting it behind an empty pipe; when I took up the cask and took him to the accompting house, I searched him; I found this tin case of foreign brandy, about a pint, I found this key of the vat; we have two keys which open almost all the vats in the house. There was no cork in this cask, it was just filled; he told me he had drawn it out of the foreign cellar.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not conceal the cask, nor did I intend to to take it away.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-95

161. MICHAEL FARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , ten pound weight of mutton, value 4 s. the property of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE . I live in East Smithfield . On the 7th or 8th of December, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, this man came into my shop and took off the hook a leg and loin together.

Q. Did you see him do it. - A. No; I went after him and took it from him, it was under his coat; I took him to the watchhouse; I had seen it two minutes before. I am sure it was my own mutton.

GEORGE FERM . I saw the prisoner unbolt the half hatch, go in the shop; and take the mutton of the hook, he put it under his coat, and walked off; I called out to Mr. Lane; we pursued him and took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the Tower Hamlets; I was going down to the regiment. I was in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-96

162. MARY MADDOX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , a waiscoat, value 2 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Richard Skeele .

RICHARD SKEELE. I live at Wandsworth, I am a millwright .

Q. Do you know the woman. - A. Yes; I lost the handkerchiefs and the waiscoat at the Kings Arms, Old Brentford , on the 4th of January, I was at work at Isleworth mills; I lost my things out of the parlour; this woman went with me to shew me where I could get a lodging.

Q. Where were this waiscoat and two handkerchief. A. The waiscoat and one of the handkerchiefs were on me, and the other handkerchief was in my pocket; they were taken from me. I went to sleep in the parlour by the fire side; the landlady and the women were both there when I went to sleep; I had been at

the night before, that made me so sleepy. I awoke about one or two o'clock, I found somebody getting something off me; I alarmed the house; my coat, hat and shoes I found in the room.

Q. You must be very drunk. - A. I was not sober; I found my waistcoat and my two handkerchiefs, and the women were gone; the landlady of the house said she had got them; I found the woman the next day; I saw my things again; they were brought before the magistrate.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the public house with him; I never saw the things till they were brought to me at the cage.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-97

163. CHARLES JERROMS , and JOHN WATSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , a cask, value 16 s. the property of Sarah Sayer .

SARAH SAYER . I keep a wine vaults in Shoreditch . On Thursday week I lost a cask, it was standing at the front of my house on the foot pavement for the day; I had seen it about seven o'clock in the evening.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am a servant to Mrs. Sayer; I missed the cask between seven and eight o'clock; about seven o'clock I removed it from the pavement to the window; I saw it again about nine o'clock in the evening at Mr. Penny's warehouse in John-street. I am sure it is the same cask.

JOSEPH GIBBS . I am a servant to Mr. Penny; the prisoners brought the cask to me for sale about eight o'clock; the last witness came and claimed it. The cask is worth sixteen shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Jerroms' Defence. As we were going home, this cask laid in the middle of the road; I saw no owner. I thought it tumbled out of a cart.

Watson's Defence. We rolled it down the street seeing it lay there; the shops were all open. We never took it up at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-98

164. THOMAS BRAY was indicted for unlawfully receiving on the 14th of December , a hundred and sixty pounds weight of cochineal, value 200 l. the property of Charles Battie and Thomas Pilgrim , which had lately been feloniously stolen by some evil disposed person or persons he knowing the said goods to have been so stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS PILGRIM . - Mr. Arabin. Who is your partner. - A. Charles Battie , I have no other partner; our warehouse is in Lawrence Poultney-hill, we are brokers . On the morning of the 14th of December our warehouse was broken open; we lost a bag of cochineal containing about a hundred and a half.

Q. What is the value of that. - A. About two hundred pounds; the bag was marked G. M. K. at the bottom No. 68, lot 264. This is a sample of it.

JAMES STEELE . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are an officer of the customs. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of Tuesday the 15th of December, were you in Bartholomew-close. - A. I was, about twenty minutes after eight, soon after it was light, Mr. Ellis was with me another officer; I saw Bray and Potts come out of a public house, called the Baker and Basket, in Cloth-fair; Bray came out first and Potts followed; Bray had a bag twice as large as Pott's, they had each of them a bag; Bray's bag was the largest considerably, there was double the quantity in it; by the bend of the bags on the shoulders both of them appeared to be grain of some sort. When they came out they went down Middle-street, towards Bartholomew-close; they appeared to be in company together: I watched them; Bray and Potts turned into Half Moon-alley, and the moment they turned in Bray mended his pace and ran; Potts was behind him. I lost sight of Bray, when he turned the elbow of the alley. I could not pass Potts the passage was so narrow; Potts went into Aldersgate-street, he appeared to be looking about for Bray, he had lost him by his manner; some man came up to him and asked him to have something to drink; he turned into a public house, I followed him.

Q. Did you examine the contents of the bag on his shoulder. - A. I did, I found it contained forty two pounds of cochineal; I took Potts in company of my brother officer to the custom house. When I got out of the public house into the street, I saw Bray about forty or fifty yards off at the end of Hare-court, he appeared to be looking for Potts. He had no bag then.

WILLIAM ELLIS . - Mr. Arabin. You were with the last witness. - A. I was. I know nothing more than he has related.

RICHARD POTTS . - Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I keep a chandlers shop in White Cross-street, St. Luke's.

Q. On the morning you were taken by the officers, had you seen Bray. - A. I had met him, in consequence of something that passed the day before: on that morning in Aldersgate-street; I went with him into a room in the Baker and Basket public house, Cloth-fair: Mr. Bray brought a bag on his shoulder: he told me to go into the public house and get a pint of purl and gin: he took the bag backwards and asked me to hold one end of the bag, while he emptied part of the contents of the first bag into that bag: I did so, and he emptied part of the contents of the first bag. I did not know at that time what it was: I saw it afterwards when the two gentlemen stopped me.

Q. What became of that first bag. - A. It was emptied all out into two bags, one of which I carried and one Bray carried; I do not know what became of that bag; Bray took the largest bag, and I had the smallest; he went out first, I followed him; I lost him all at once; when I got into Aldersgate-street, I looked all round, I could not see him; when an opposite neighbour of mine, his name was Sadler, asked me to have something to drink; I put the bag down in the public house, and while I was going to have a glass of something to drink, Mr. Ellis and the other gentleman came in and took the bag from me.

LUCY DAWSON . - Mr. Arabin. You lived servant at the Baker and Basket on the 13th of December. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Bray. - A. Yes, I have seen him in the house at different times having a pint of beer, and stopping ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then going away again; I never saw Potts before that morning; Mr. Bray came in between seven and eight o'clock, with a bag on his shoulder, and Potts followed him; when they came in master was not up; I called him down to get a pint of beer; they stopped some time in the back room, I do not know what they did; I was cleaning the kitchen, I never went in the room; they drank the purl and gin; they went out with these two bags.

Q. Do you know what became of the first bag. - A. No, I never saw it afterwards.

THOMAS PETIT . I keep the Baker and Basket, in Middle-street, Cloth-fair.

Q. Do you remember seeing the defendant Bray and Potts together on the morning of the 15th of December. - A. I remember seeing them go out, when they went out they threw a bag in and they took out two full bags.

Q. What did these bags contain. - A. I cannot tell, I never saw any thing it contained; I never went into the back

room; they came into the tap room to drink the purl and gin. I did not go in the room after they went out.

Mr. Alley. That is not the bag belonging to the prosecutor.

Mr. Gurney. Nor would it contain that cochineal.

Court. Did you find any other bag besides that in your house. - A. No.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . - Mr. Arabin. Did you go in search of the defendant Bray. - A. I did; I afterwards went and searched his house with these custom house officers, on the 15th of January: I did not find any cochineal in his house; I did not find him till the 3d of January; I met him accidentally Aldersgate street, I took him in custody.

(The property produced and identified,)

Mr. Knapp addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant.

Prisoner's Defence. The property taken out of the bag is my own.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Two Years in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18080113-99

165. THOMAS DARLEY was indicted for a libel .

Prisoner. I wish to withdraw my plea and confess myself

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-100

166. JOHN NIGHTINGAL and ROBERT GARNER were indicted for a conspiracy .

The plaintiff not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18080113-101

167. MICHAEL FLAHERTY was indicted for that he on the 19th of December , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Mary Mitchell , spinster , he at the time well knowing it to be false and counterfeited; and that he at the time when he so uttered the said piece of money, had about him in his custody and possession one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness as and for a good shilling, he well knowing the said last piece of money to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN PRICE . Q. I believe you are a beadle belonging to St. Andrew's, Holborn. - A. I am. On the 19th of December, I saw the prisoner about half after twelve come up Holborn, and go round the corner of the linen draper's, by Gray's inn-lane; he sorted his money out; I saw him place some in one pocket and some into another; he had a good deal of silver about him; after that I watched him into Mr. Mackey's the ginger bread baker; I saw him take a bun at the widow, then he went into the shop to pay for it; I looked in at the window, he tendered Miss Mackey a shilling, with a mark on it; that I saw very plain; after he came out he went up Holborn; I went in and asked to see the shilling; I desired her to rub it on the stone; she did so, it was a bad one; I left the shilling with Mary Mackey ; I went after the prisoner and brought him back; Mrs. Mackey shewed him the shilling; he said he did not know it was a bad one. I took him into the parlour and searched him; I found on him eleven good shillings, three good sixpences, and ten penny worth of halfpence; in another pocket I found a shilling and a sixpence, counterfeited money; then I took him to Hatton Garden office.

MARY MACKEY . Q. You are sister in law to Mrs. Mackey. Do you remember the prisoner coming to pay you for a bun. - A. Yes, he gave me a shilling.

Q. Look at that shilling, and tell me whether that is the shilling he proffered you in change. - A. Yes; that shilling had a mark on it; whether it is the same I cannot say. I gave the shilling to my sister.

Q. Did you see your sister give it to Price. - A. Yes.

Court. Are you sure that the same shilling that you gave to your sister, she handed it over to Price. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. And he came in and gave you that shilling. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the shilling that he gave you the one that you shewed afterwards and rubbed upon a stone when Price came in. - A. Yes; it was a bad one. I gave that shilling to my sister.

MRS. MACKEY. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Mackey, who keeps this shop. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember having seen that shilling that your sister shewed you. - A. Yes, I gave to Mr. Price the same shilling.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. I believe you assist the solicitor of the mint; you are acquainted with coin, look at that shilling. - A. It is a counterfeit one; the other shilling and the sixpence are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence (read). My lord, and gentlemen of the jury. I am innocent of the charge of uttering in the way alledged to me; I never in my life wilfully passed a bad shilling, or any current coin of this realm. On the day mentioned in this indictment I purchased a ticket of a watch pawned in Holborn. I stood at the shop of my prosecutor, to separate and take out this duplicate from my money. I was rather weak in my person, having been lately discharged from the house of recovery, of the fever. I fancied one of the buns in the window, I asked the price of them, she said one penny; without my having any forethought that I had less change, I threw down one of the shillings that I had in my hand; I went in the shop and got the change; I had got change of a pound note of Mr. Nowland, a victualler, and the change he gave me was found on me when I was taken in custody. I have endeavoured to subpoena Mr. Nowland; therefore I hope you will take my case into consideration, and restore me to my liberty again.

GUILTY .

Confined in Newgate One Year , and find Sureties for Two Years more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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