Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th September 1807.
Reference Number: 18070916
Reference Number: f18070916-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 16th of SEPTEMBER, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Lord Mayor, of the City of London; John Heath , esq. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Soulden Lawrence, knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Simon Le-Blanc , knt. One of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Nathaniel Newnham , esq. Sir Richard Carr Glynn, bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , esq. Recorder of the said City, Thomas Smith , esq. Sir Matthew Bloxand , knt. George Scholey , esq. Aldermen of the said City, and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City, his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Robert Beeby ,

Thomas Buzzard ,

James Low ,

James Lambert ,

William Mullins ,

Edward Utting ,

Richard King ,

William Bolden ,

Christopher Lethbridge ,

Thomas Somers ,

John Meadows ,

Francis Brown .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Maine ,

Richard Smith ,

Richard Berrow ,

John Oliver ,

Clement Chaple ,

James Wardle ,

John Aquilla Brown,

Bennet Odell ,

Richard Franks ,

Richard Johnson ,

Richard Clark,

William Kendall .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Ivey Aires ,

John Pennington ,

Thomas Holland ,

Charles Smith ,

Thomas Mann ,

Richard Peirce ,

William Golding ,

Samuel Cuthurst ,

William Holt ,

Thomas Page ,

Alexander Tullett ,

George Webster .

Reference Number: t18070916-1

523. THOMAS ROSE indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July , a cotton gown, value 6 s. a black silk cloak, value 1 l. 12 s. the property of Mary Skegil .

MARY SKEGIL. I lodge with Mrs. Cross, at Spring-gardens, under Spring-garden-chapel . On the 8th of July, about a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming up Spring-garden, I saw the prisoner coming up the steps of my apartments.

Q. Had you left any body in your apartment. - A. No.

Q. Had he any thing with him. - A. He had the things under his coat, I pulled his coat of one side, I only saw he had something; I asked him what he had got there and what business he had there; he began to give me abusive language and ran away he turned the corner; he threw the things against a Greenwich-coach.

Q. Did you see him do that. - A. No, I only saw part of my things drop; he went of the other side of the coach.

Q. Then you could not see what dropt. - A. No. They were carried into the coach-office; I went with Treadway the officer into the coach office and had my things.

Q. Did you leave the door of your room locked. - A. No; I only pulled the door after me, and so I found it partly.

EDWARD TREADWAY . I was in Scotland-yard; I saw the prisoner at the bar running up Scotland-yard towards the Strand; we took him in Northumberland-street; I had another constable with me. The people said that the woman that was robbed was in the coach-office; we took the prisoner there, the woman was there; she said that he was the man that had robbed her, and this bundle was given to me by one of the servants in the coach office in the presence of the prosecutrix; she said it was her gown and cloak.

ALEXANDER DALLAS . I am a constable. When I heard the cry of stop thief, I was at the corner of Northumberland-street, Scotland-yard. I observed a man stop and talk to a publican. I went up to him and took him; there were a number of people following him calling stop thief; I charged him with what he had done; he said he had only broke a window, and could not pay, for it; I told him he was my prisoner. I took him to the coach office; Treadway had the things, and I took the prisoner to St. Martin's watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I work at Chiswick; I am a plasterer . I came to town to see my cousin in Tothil-street; I had been to see him. Coming into Spring-gardens, I went up a passage that goes into Cockspur-street; I turned round to go into the Strand; I went past Charing-cross and turned round Northumberland-street; I heard a cry of stop thief; I stopped and asked a publican whether he knew the Fox in Hungerford-market; he said he kept the house; then I was taken in custody.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-2

524. THOMAS ROSE was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July two black silk cloaks, value 18 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. two shawls, value 3 s. and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of Ann Cross .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-3

525. JOSEPH ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a hundred wine glasses, value 50 s. twenty wine glass decanters, value 1 l. a deal box, value 1 s. a pair of snuffers, value 6 d. and two copper boilers, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Hall .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS HALL . Q. You reside at Stoke Newington . - A. Yes; I keep a tavern .

Q. On the day mentioned in this indictment did you lose any property. - A. Yes, I lost glasses and decanters, and boilers, on Thursday, either on the over night or early in the morning; they had been deposited in my kitchen adjoining the bowling-green; I saw them again the same day; they were brought home to my own house by my own servant Haley.

MATHEW REDWOOD . I am an ostler. On the 18th of June, at half after nine in the morning, I saw two boilers in a ditch, about four hundred yards from the bowling-green; I gave information to Mr. Hall,

SAMUEL HALEY . I am gardener to Mr. Hall. About half after nine in the morning on the 18th of June, I went towards the ditch.

Q. Did you see any one approach towards the ditch. - A. Yes; at a quarter before twelve I saw the prisoner at the bar; he had a flag basket; there appeared to be something in the basket, which turned out to be a sack; he went to the hedge about twenty yards from where those boilers were concealed; he hid the basket and took out the sack, and went to the place where the boilers were; he put them in the sack and put them on his shoulder and made off with them.

Court. Where was you all that time. - A. I was hid behind the bank, opposite where the boilers were concealed, in another field.

Mr. Alley. Upon his going away what did you do. - A. I pursued him; he turned round and saw me coming after him; he threw the boilers immediately from his shoulders and made off; I picked up the boilers, and took them to the prosecutors.

PETER MASON . Q. What are you. - A. I am an officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner at Hammersmith on the 24th of July, when he came in he asked for the letter that was left there; Haley was in the room behind the door; I called to Haley and asked him if that was the man, he said yes; I pushed him in the door, I told him I apprehended him on charge of robbing Mr. Hall; he then said what he had done his wife was the cause of it. At the public house, next to the office in Worship-street, he acknowledged in the presence of the prosecutor, having the sack and the boilers on his shoulders; he said he found them, and the gardener told him, they did not belong to him he then put them down and went away.

Q.(to Haley) Are they the things that you brought to your master. - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. The boilers are mine; they are worth about a guinea and a half; I cannot speak to the glasses.

Q. When was it you first missed these things from the kitchen of your bowling green. - A. I first missed them on the 18th of June.

Prisoner. When the robbery was committed, I was in bed before ten o'clock, and I was not out of the house before the usual hour, which is five o'clock.

ELIZABETH BROWN . Q. What are you. - A. I am the wife of William Brown , I keep a house at Stoke Newington. On the night that Mr. Hall said he had been robbed, the prisoner came home by half after nine at night, and was in bed by ten.

Q. What day was it that Mr. Hall was robbed. - A. On the 16th of June. Mr. Hall came and searched my lodgings, on the next day; he said he had been robbed the night before.

Q. And then you recollect that he had been at home between nine and ten, and a-bed by ten. - A. Yes; I perfectly recollected it; he came home by himself and sat in the room while we had our supper.

Q.(to prosecutor) When had you last seen these boilers on your premises. - A. I saw them on the day before, about seven o'clock in the evening; they were not affixed in brickwork.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a bricklayer ; I was going over the fields to go to Homerton going along I saw them lay in the edge I took them out, a man called to me and said they are not yours, lay them down; I immediately laid them down. I never ran away; I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined one Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-4

526 MARY DUFFY alias BRALEY , was indicted, and the indictment stated, that at the general quarter sessions of the peace holden at Maidstone, for the county of Kent, on the 28th of January, in the 46th year of his Majesty's reign; she was convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned in the goal of the said county for the space of one year, and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for her good behaviour for two year more; and the indictment further stated that she, on the 23d of May last, a piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of a good shilling; unlawfully and feloniously did utter to William Heath , she at the time knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

Second count the same as the former, only stating that she unlawfully and feloniously did utter a counterfeited shilling to Elizabeth Smith .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You produce a copy of the record of the conviction, from the office of the clerk; of the county of Kent. - A. I do, I examined it, it is a true copy (read in court).

EDWARD NICHOLAS MASTER . Q. Were you present at the quarter sessions at Maidstone, January 28th, at the conviction of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; I was there during the whole of the trial, I was a witness upon that occasion; I am quite sure she is the same person, and I heard the sentence pronounced upon her.

Prisoner. I am not the same person.

ELIZABETH HEATH . Q. Are you the wife of Mr. William Heath . - A. Yes, he is a butcher, at Islington.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner. - A. Perfectly; she came to our house on Saturday the 23d of May last; to purchase a piece of veal, she bargained with me and in consideration of her poor appearance, I sold it her worth her money; it came to a shilling; after she went out of the shop, I sounded it on the board, I said to my servant, Thomas, this is a bad shilling, seek for the woman; the man took up the shilling, went out and returned, and said the woman was gone; he gave me back the shilling.

Q. Was that the same shilling that the woman gave you. - A. I have not a doubt of it; I laid it by itself on the ledge of the window, and it laid there till the woman returned again; that might be an hour and a half.

Q. Was Mr. Heath there then. - A. Yes, he was in the shop; she purchased a lamb's heart of him, it came to four pence; she tendered another shilling to my husband; upon this being tendered to him it was discovered it was a bad one: we sent for the officer Franklin; before the officer came, I said, I think you are the person that was here a good while ago, she said indeed madam I have never been here before; I said you cannot look me in the face, and say you have never been here before, she said she had not; I said you have got the article that you purchased, I dare say, in your basket; then she said Oh, yes, I believe it is the shop.

Q. Did you look into the basket to see if the articles was in the basket. - A. Yes; I found it in the basket. We gave both the shillings to the officer.

Q. You are sure that the first shilling that she gave you, which you gave to the man, and he brought it back again, and you put it on the ledge of the window, is the same shilling. - A. I have no doubt of it.

Court. You said that you had no doubt that the shilling that you put on the ledge of the window to be the same shilling that you had given to the man; did you happen to see any mark on the shilling. - A. No; I have no doubt of my servant changing it.

Q. That is your reason for saying it is the same shilling; you do not believe your man would change it. - A. I do not.

THOMAS WORREL . - Mr. Knapp. Are you the servant of the prosecutor Mr. Heath. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember upon this occasion Mrs. Heath giving you a shilling to go after the woman. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever part with the possession of that shilling that she gave you before you returned home to the shop. - A. No, I kept it by itself.

WILLIAM HEATH - Mr. Knapp. You are the husband of the lady that has been examined. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the day laid in the indictment the woman prisoner coming to you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did she pay you any money for a lamb's heart. - A. Yes, a shilling; I had a doubt of its being a good one; I tried it on the steel and cut it, and found it to be a bad one, in her presence; I said to Mrs. Heath, in the presence of the prisoner, is not this the woman that gave you the bad shilling just now; then she said yes, here it is; I took it and tried it upon the steel, I found that to be bad too; I sent for Franklin directly.

Q. Before Franklin came did any conversation take place between you and the prisoner, or your wife. - A. My wife said she thought she had got the veal that she purchased; she denied it, and afterwards she said she believed it was the shop, and that was the veal in the basket that she had purchased in the shop. When Franklin came, I told him we had got what I believed they called a smasher. When he searched her he told her to open her mouth, she would not; he took hold of her chin and she swallowed something; then he searched

her pockets and found some halfpence; he searched her basket, there he found sugar, potatoes, spinage, and the bit of veal that she bought of Mrs. Heath; they were all in 'the basket in small quantities; I delivered both the shillings to Franklin, and he took her away.

THOMAS FRANKLIN - Mr. Knapp. You are the constable that was sent for on this occasion. - A. I was. When I came there Mr. Heath said he had got a woman he believed they called a smasher: he gave me the two shillings that he said he and his wife had taken; I produce the two shillings; I have kept them separate ever since. I opened the basket, I found some spinage, I put my hand to the bottom of the basket and found the veal; Mrs. Heath said that is the veal she bought of me. I found in her pocket ten pennyworth of halfpence, all good. Mr. Heath said, never mind, send her about her business; I said I did not think that is right, I shall take her to Worship-street, and told him he must be after me directly. I desired her to open her mouth, I was apprehensive that she might have something in her mouth; she said why; she swallowed very hard; I heard something nick against her teeth. Going over the fields she said why should you wish to hurt me, the man does not wish to hurt me, what would be the use of you sending me to goal for a twelvemonth; I shall see you another day and make you amends.

Prisoner. I had not any more in my mouth than any of you gentlemen have.

MR. JOHN NICOLLS - Mr . Knapp. You are the monier of his majesty's mint. - A. I am.

Q. You have got the two shillings that have been produced in court, tell us whether they are good or counterfeited. - A. They are both counterfeits.

Court. Are they of the same sort. - A. They appear different.

Prisoner's Defence. He had more bad shillings that he wanted to bring against me; the people of the shop said it was not right. I knew no more of them than a child unborn. I beg for mercy of the court; I have been sixteen weeks in goal and fed upon bread and water.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-5

527. THOMAS BOWERS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Sizer and George Sizer , about the hour of two in the afternoon of the 24th of July , the said Thomas Sizer and others being therein, and feloniously stealing four silk handkerchiefs, value 24 s. the property of Thomas Sizer and George Sizer .

Second count the same offence as the former, only stating it to be in the dwelling house of Thomas Sizer only.

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM GOODSON . On the 24th of July I was going along Coventry street , about two o'clock in the afternoon; I saw two young men close to Mr. Sizer's window; I saw the prisoner in the act of drawing something out.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing what it was. - A. Yes, it was silk handkerchiefs; I said to him what are you at there; he ran away, and I followed him. The prisoner dropped the handkerchiefs on the pavement, about ten yards from where I catched him; I never lost sight of him; I am sure the prisoner is the person that drawed the handkerchiefs out of the window:

EDWARD EDWARDS . Q. I believe you are servant to the prosecutors. - A. Yes; they live in Coventry-street.

Q. In consequence of any alarm did you go into the street and pick up any thing. - A. Yes, I went into the street and picked up this handkerchief.

Court. Was that before the witness came into the shop. - A. Yes. The moment I heard the alarm I ran out, and about ten yards from the shop I picked up this handkerchief.

Q. Had you any such handkerchief in your master's window. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was you at the time this robbery was committed. - A. I was in the back parlour at dinner, it was about two o'clock; the window was all safe when I left the shop.

Mr. Alley. How was the window when you returned with the handkerchief. - A. There was a hole then in one of the panes of glass in the window, but there was no glass found near the spot at all.

Q. Did it appear cut or broke by violence. - A. There was a hole big enough to put two hands in.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-6

528. JOHN BLACKMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , in the dwelling house of Richard Griffiths , a pocket book, value 6 d. two waistcoats, value 5 s. three shirts, value 7 s. a silver watch, value 3 l. a guinea, and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Robert Hilliard .

ROBERT HILLIARD . I live in Green's-lane, Westminster ; I rent a room of Edward Griffiths, he lives in the house, it belongs to him; I cannot be positive when the box was broken open, it was on a Wednesday morning I found the lock broke; I missed a pocket book, with a five pound bank note and one guinea, my silver watch, three shirts, and two waistcoats.

Q. When did you see any of these things before you missed them. - A. I had seen them on the Sunday when I shifted myself, they were all safe then. On Wednesday morning, when I came out of bed, I looked down by my bed, I saw my handkerchief on the ground; it should have been in my box.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. Yes, he lodged in the house; I told the people of the house that my box was broken open; they said the soldier had not slept in the house that night. We went into the prisoner's room, we saw a bit of an old handkerchief and a bit of tape that I tied my pocket book with; I kept the bit of handkerchief at the bottom of my box, I used to wipe my razor with it.

Q. Did you ever see your things again - A. Yes; I went along with one of the soldiers to some jew at Knightsbridge, and there were the shirts and waistcoats.

JAMES GILLMORE. On the 24th of July I was sent for, and the landlord or landlady gave me this turn-screw, which I found in the prisoner's room; I tried it to the box to see if this was the instrument made use

of; I found it exactly corresponded with the marks on the box; the box was lined with blue paper. On the end of this turn screw was this piece of blue paper, as if it came off the box; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the prosecutor's watch; he said he had slept with a girl the very night he had taken it, and the girl had taken it from him. This is the bit of handkerchief and red tape; I have three pounds eighteen shillings that was delivered to me as part of the change of the five pound note; it was delivered to me.

WILLIAM RENNY. I am an officer. I received these three shirts and two waistcoats of corporal Bates.

NATHANIEL NATHAN . I am a salesman at Knights-bridge. On Wednesday morning the 22nd of July the prisoner came into my shop, he brought me three shirts, and two waistcoats; he asked me to buy them, I said I should not like to buy them of a private unless he brought his serjeant; he said he could not bring the serjeant before night; he put the things on the counter. I lent him four shillings; I delivered the things to the serjeant: the corporal was with him.

THOMAS BATES. I am a corporal in the third regiment of guards; I received the things from Nathan; they were put in serjeant Ball's apartment; the officer has them.

- CORBITT. I am a private in the third regiment. On the 21st of July, about half after four in the evening, I met the prisoner at the Bull's Head, Queen-street, Westminster; he told me he was going to desert the regiment, a sea officer had offered him an hundred pounds to go with him; I parted with him and went to the recruit house. About an hour after, as I was going down Tothil-street, I met him again, he shewed me a silver watch, a five pound note, and a guinea; he told me he had that in part of payment of the hundred pounds. We went to a public house, he called for a shillingsworth of gin and rasberry, he said we should drink together before we parted; he changed a guinea, I got the five pound note changed at Thomas West 's public house, Princes-street. Afterwards I was advised to report him to the regiment. I did not give him the change, I gave it to corporal Lovey.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS. My name is Edward Griffiths .

Q. It is Richard in the indictment - do you keep the house where Hilliard lodges. - A. Yes. The prisoner at the bar quartered upon us in the next room to Hilliard's room. I was in the house when Hilliard complained he was robbed; I know nothing more.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-7

529. ANN BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of August , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Craig privately in his shop .

ROBERT ROBERTS. I live with Mr. Joseph Craig , linen draper , 516, Holborn ; the prisoner came in my master's shop, I believe on the 5th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I saw her walk down the shop, go out and come in again; she then asked to look at some calicoes, the young man was busy, she went to the counter where there was a great deal of goods, she stood there a quarter of an hour; I watched her occasionally, I saw her make motions with her petticoats, I thought she had got something under her petticoats; she went down the shop as if her legs were tied close together; she said she would call tomorrow, as they had no time to serve her; I informed the young man, he went out and brought her into the shop, I told her she had got something; Mr. Craig said one word to me; when I turned round I saw the print on the ground by her; I picked it up.

THOMAS OWEN. I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Craig .

Q. Do you recollect the lad who has been examined telling you his suspicions of the prisoner taking something. - A. Yes; I was behind the counter, I saw her in the shop, but I did not see her take it; I went out and brought her back into the shop; I saw the print actually drop from her, the lad picked it up, it was quite warm. There were a good many young men in the shop, they were all engaged.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took nothing.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-8

530. PETER BURKE was indicted for feloniously entering the dwelling house of Mary Macarty , widow, on the 28th of July , and feloniously stealing twenty-four guineas, a bank note, value 20 l. a bank note, value 10 l. two bank notes, value 2 l. each, and one bank note, value 1 l. the property of Simon Walsh .

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

SIMON WALSH . Q. What are you. - A. I am a publican , I reside at the Rose and Crown, Ratcliffe Highway. On the day of this indictment I had occasion to go to Mrs. Macarty's, she keeps the Bell public house, Ratcliffe-street ; I went there about seven o'clock, I remained there till seven o'clock the next morning.

Q. When you went into the house had you any property in your possession. - A. I had fifty-two guineas in gold in my left hand side coat pocket, and I had sixty pounds in bank notes.

Q. Was there a twenty pound, a ten pound, two two pounds, and a one pound bank note. - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose had you that money in your pocket. - A. I was to pay my brewer the next day; the notes were in my left hand breeches pocket, and there was a letter from Boyle, a seaman, that lodged with the prisoner. As soon as I came into the house, Bell came into the house directly, and said the room would be vacant just now, and he would settle between him and me; there were some money accounts between him and me. We went into the private room and called for a pot of ale. Me and Boyle and another man were together then.

Court. Not the prisoner. - A. No, he came in shortly after.

Q. How long did you continue in that room. - A. The best part of the night; I was going to come away at twelve o'clock at night; Boyle stopped me at the parlour door and said he would toss me for a bottle of

wine; we tossed, there was a dispute in tossing, and Boyle called for two bottles of wine. When we had finished one bottle the prisoner came in the kitchen, and there were other persons there at the time; the prisoner remained a quarter of an hour, and had a glass or two with us.

Q. How long did they remain with you. - A. The prisoner called Boyle out between one and two o'clock in the morning (as I understood) to speak to him about some business; when they went away I had no one to keep me in conversation, I laid my hand to my head and went to sleep; I was alone during the time I slept.

Mr. Alley. Q. While the prisoner was there, and the other men remained with you, did you take your money out. - A. Yes.

Q. Had he an opportunity of seeing where you put it. - A. Yes. I awoke between six and seven in the morning, I put my hand in my pocket, and found I had lost twenty four guineas and thirty-five pounds in notes.

Q. Who was then in the place at the time you awoke. - A. Nobody but myself, only the maid servant sweeping the room.

Q. On the evening of the next day had the prisoner been drinking at your house. - A. He and Boyle had two pots of porter; the prisoner gave me a one pound note, I gave him change, and put the note in my pocket; as soon as the prisoner went out, Boyle said, be particular of that note, I know the prisoner had no money (the prisoner did not hear him say it.) I looked at the note I said I cannot swear to the number, I should soon recollect the indorsement; it was endorsed RAB; then it came to my recollection that it was one of the notes I had lost the night before. On the second day after I received the one pound note from the prisoner, I went to the prisoner's apartment; the landlady and Burke shewed me his box, I asked him to let me search his box, he replied that he had got none of my money; I told him if he would not let me search, I would send for an officer; in consequence of that he let me search it, and underneath the new clothes there was taken out a purse; I told him if there was not a Queen Ann's guinea, 1713, with a dent on the edge of it, I would lay no claim to the money. The landlady examined the purse and found the guinea in it, in the presence of the prisoner in the purse there was twenty three pounds, chiefly in guineas, and all in gold. I found no notes.

Q. When you discovered these new clothes and money did you ask the prisoner how he came in possession of them - A. I did; he gave no answer. This is the one pound note, it is marked A R B; that is the note he gave me in payment for his porter. On the day of the second examination, before the examination, he said he would make restitution for the rest of the money. I have got a watch and a handkerchief.

Court. You did not find them upon the prisoner. - A. I found the handkerchief in his pocket; this pocket book and that card I found in the prisoner's hat, he confessed that he bought the watch with my money; I went to the shop, and here is the gentleman's hand writing that he changed a ten pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I am a Spaniard by birth; I served in his Majesty's navy thirteen years; I was discharged from the Superb. Since then I served in the Invincible of Deptford. The prosecutor alledges the money to be lost at a public house where I lodged; I was with him on the Tuesday evening, where he gave me change of a one pound note; he did not assert that it was the one that he lost untill three days after, when he could have found me on any day or hour at that house. It is not probable that I robbed him, and called at his house and changed the money that he lost; I had money of my own also, I had seventeen pounds prize money, and nine doubloons I brought home with me, which I saved up during the time I was abroad. Under all these circumstances, I trust you will acquit me; and at the time he charged me with the robbery, the prosecutor said if I would give him all my clothes and watch, he would not prosecute me, or else he would hang me. I am innocent of the charge; here is a letter that will shew where I received the money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-9

531. LOUISA BRIAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of September a silver watch, value 5 l. the property of John Lawson , privily from his person .

JOHN LAWSON . On the 6th of September, between ten and eleven at night, I was returning home to John's Court, Upper East Smithfield; the prisoner came up to me, she wanted me to go along with her; I told her to go about her business, I was going home to my wife and family; she came up the second time and clasped her hand round my waist, and drew my watch; I threw her from me and she walked off; I immediately pursued her and made fast hold of her, I asked her for my watch, she told me she had no such thing about her; then I dragged her along to the watchhouse. John Bowler came up and asked the reason why I was dragging the woman; I told him she had robbed me of my watch I was certain she had it about her; he called the watch, and after being searched at the watchhouse the watch was found in her hand.

Q. That was your watch was it. - A. Yes.

Q. You said she clasped her hand round your waist, did you feel her take it. - A. I felt her put her hand down my thigh; I put my hand down immediately, I found my watch was gone.

Q. What you felt caused you to put your hand down directly. - A. Yes.

JOHN BOWLER . Q. You were in the street this night, and saw the last witness dragging the woman along towards the watchhouse. - A. I did; I went with her to the watchhouse. When the officer of the night took her, I took hold of one hand and he the other; when she came in the watchhouse her hands were liberated; she put her hand into her right hand pocket and took out the watch, but would not deliver it up; upon which I took hold of her hand, and Samuel Sanders , the watchhouse keeper took it out of her hand.

SAMUEL SANDERS . I am watchhouse keeper. On the 6th of September, about ten at night, the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse. I saw the watch in her hand and took it from her; she would not give it up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going home that man accosted me, he asked me to go home with him, he said he lived close by; I said you are a married man; he said he was not, he said I will give you one guinea if you will go home with me, I have no money, but if you are afraid of the money take my watch, he gave me the

watch and behaved very brutal to me, I did not like it; he thought to have dragged me to his house; when I found where he lived I would not go with him.

Q.to prosecutor. Did you give her the watch. - A. I did not.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-10

532. SOPHIA HUBBARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a leather purse value 1 d. a guinea, two half guineas, three seven shilling pieces, the property of James Did , in the dwelling house of George Lawson .

JAMES DID . I live at No. 9, Saffron-place, Saffron-hill , I lodge with George Lawson .

Q. Does he live in the house. - A.He lets the house out in tenements, he lives in one adjoining house. On the 25th of July last, Sophia Hubbard came into my apartment with Mrs. Day, she came as a slight acquaintance, her excuse was to ask me how I did, it was on a Sunday; Mrs. Day staid a short time, she said her dinner was ready, and went home; the prisoner staid, I asked the prisoner if she would stop and have a bit of victuals; she did, and we had a pot or two of porter.

Q. Was she a stranger. - A. I am a watchman: I had seen her once or twice before. I had been up two nights and two days, I was very drowsy, I had a little liquor, not much; I laid myself down and fell asleep, leaving the prisoner in the room and nobody else; I slept till the dusk of the evening before I awoke, and then I found the prisoner was gone. I went to the place where I hung my key, I opened my box, I missed my purse and the money altogether; the box was locked, and the key hung in its usual place.

Q. What was in the purse. - A. One guinea, two half guineas, three seven shilling pieces, and nine shillings in silver. From information of Mrs. Day she and I went to a house in Little Saffron-street; the prisoner was up stairs, Mrs. Day fetched her down to me; I charged her with robbing me, she denied it; I got a constable, he took her to the watchhouse; she denied it there some time, till the constable said he must strip her to see-whether she had any money about her; on that she put her hand into her pocket, and counted out one guinea, two half guineas, three seven shilling pieces, and four shillings in silver, she said that was all she got from me; the purse was not found.

Q. There was no mark on the money, I suppose. - A. They were all new money except one seven shilling piece, and that was an old bent one.

THOMAS BAYLIS . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; she frequently denied having the money. After several times threatening to search her she pulled a pocket book out of her pocket with the money in it, she counted it into my hand; I told her that was not all the money she was charged with; she said there was all that she had, and all that she had seen of it.

JOHN HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. Are you the person to whom the constable delivered the money. - A. Yes; I produce the money; one guinea, two half guineas, three seven shillings, and some silver.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday morning me and Mrs. Day went to see the prosecutor, he was on the bed asleep, very much intoxicated in liquor; he said, Sophia I am very glad to see you; he sent me out for some gin, we had some together; when Mrs. Day went out I wanted to go too; he asked me to stay to dinner with him; after dinner he asked me to lay down, I said I would not; he went to his box, and took out some money and gave it me, how much it was I do not know; I went to bed with him till between five and six o'clock, and then I went home. Between eight and nine o'clock he and Mrs. Day came; Mrs. Day came up to me and brought me down stairs, he was there, he said he had lost his money, and that I had robbed him; I said I had not robbed him, before they searched me at the watchhouse: I put my hand into my pocket and took out the money; I said that was all the money I had got.

Q. to Hancock. When she was brought to the office did she say the money was given her - A. No.

Q. to Baylis. Did she say the money was given to her for any purpose. - A.No.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-11

533. WILLIAM GARLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , a piece of linen cloth, value 2 l. 8 s. the property of Charles Kinder , in his dwelling house .

CHARLES KINDER . I am a linen draper ; I can only prove the property.

JAMES DUNN . I am a porter to Mr. Kinder. On Monday morning, about twenty minutes after six o'clock, I was opening the shop, I had the door open, I was taking the iron bar of the shutters down; I went into the shop and missed the piece of linen from a pile of goods that stood right opposite the door; he went from the door very quick, I followed him and stopped him a few yards from the door; I took the piece of linen from under his arm, it was covered with his coat; I brought him back and the linen into the shop, and sent for an officer.

Q. Did you know the man before. - A. No; a morning or two before he had his foot on the step of the door, I reprimanded him and desired him not to be there no more.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 64.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-12

534. MICHAEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of July , a piece of foreign coin, value 1 s. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Richards .

The Case stated by Mr. Gleed.

THOMAS RICHARDS . Q. You are a watch manufacturer . - A. I am, I live in Bridgwater-square.

Q. The prisoner at the bar was in your employ. - A. He was; I employed him principally to melt silver, and to work at his leisure hours at his trade; he was a watch case maker .

Q. How many years had he lived with you. - A. He served his time with my father, and has been with me about twelve years. On the 29th of July last, from a

knowledge that I had been robbed a few days before, I took the numbers of the notes that I had in my pocket book; that was in a tin box underneath the desk in the accounting house.

Court. You took the dates of the bank notes, number, and value. - A. I did: I have the book here. Having taken down the dates and number of the notes, I put them in the pocket book, and the pocket book I put in the tin box which was underneath the desk. On the 29th of July I was absent after two o'clock in the afternoon; I returned about eight in the evening.

Mr. Gleed. In consequence of some information that you received did you examine your pocket book. - A. I went up immediately on my return and examined it; I found all the notes there, wanting one. I missed a one pound note The next morning I went into the neighbourhood where the prisoner lived, and enquired at the public house nearest his dwelling, Mrs. Milley keeps it; she produced to me the second note, which corresponded to the date, number, and amount of that note I lost; the officer has the note (note produced), it is dated the 12th of June, 35,100.

Mr. Gurney. What year. - A. I did not take the date of the year.

Court. How came you not to take the date of the year. - A. I have not taken the date; I only swear to the 12th of June, 35,100; I have no doubt of its being my note. The prisoner's lodgings were searched, I was present at the time; we found sixteen guineas, and a small piece of coin, which I have every reason to believe is mine; it is a particular coin, I do not pretend to swear to it. The prisoner was entrusted to melt two quantities of that coin.

EDWARD BENBY . - Mr. Gleed. You are an apprentice of Mr. Richards. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 29th of July last do you recollect Mr. Richards being absent after two o'clock. - A. Yes. Between two and three o'clock I saw him go into the accompting house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Did you keep watching the accompting house. - A. No.

Q. Therefore who went into the accompting house between two and eight you do not know. - A. No.

Q. You was not by the accompting house the whole of the six hours. - A. I was; but I did not keep watching.

ELIZABETH MILLEY . - Mr. Gleed. Where do you live. - A. I keep the Hare at Hoxton, my husband is a publican.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect on the 29th of July last his coming to your house. - A. Yes, I received a one pound note of him; I put it into my book among other notes.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Richards coming to you on the morning after. - A. Yes, I delivered him the note.

Q. Was that the note that you received from the prisoner. - A. I do not know that, I had nine or ten.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that the note that you received from the prisoner on that day, was one of the nine or ten. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. But which of the nine or ten you do not know. - A. No.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . - Mr. Gleed. You are one of the officers' belonging to Worship-street. - A. Yes. I apprehended the prisoner; the one pound note I received of Mrs. Milley.

Prisoner's Defence. The note I deny ever taking it.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-13

555. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , a silver spoon, value 11 s. the property of Firmin de Taster .

FERMIN DE TASTER . I live in - Bishopsgate-street, I am a merchant . The prisoner was my footman , he had lived with me between two and three months.

MARY COOPER . I am servant to Mr. de Taster. I know that the inventory that I gave him when he counted the plate, it was all right, and he agreed to it. I have got the inventory here.

Q. Was any thing missing from that inventory. - A. Yes, a cream jug, and eight silver table spoons: I counted all the plate to him when he came, myself, and gave him the inventory.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. You are a city constable. - A. Yes. I was sent for to Mr. de Taster's on Thursday morning last; he called the prisoner into his parlour, and then he went into the prisoner's room; I searched him. I found nothing upon his person, but searching a cupboard in his apartment, there were two hats, one on the top of the other, and the undermost hat had the duplicates; I then took him in custody. I went to the pawnbrokers, and they produced the property. We found among the rest, one duplicate 5th of September 1807, one spoon for eleven shillings, in his own name, pledged at Barker's, 91 Houndsditch; the prisoner was very much agitated when I found the duplicate, and wanted to speak to his master.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Where were these hats situated. - A. In his pantry, where he sleeps and keeps his clothes.

THOMAS TOTTERY . I live with Mr. Barker, No. 91, Houndsditch.

Q. Look at that duplicate produced by Cartwright, is that your duplicate. - A. Yes, it is my hand writing. The prisoner pledged the spoon on the 5th of September last.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-14

556. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of July , a carpet, value 4 l. the property of Herbert Broom and John Broom .

The Case stated by Mr. Gurney.

HERBERT BROOM . Q. Have you any partners. - A. Yes, John Broom , we are carpet manufacturers , our warehouse is in Leicester Fields.

Q. Was a carpet produced to you by Crabb the officer - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, he was in the service of John Cooper , whom I believe is a dealer in carpets.

Q. Has Mr. Cooper any transactions at your house. - A. Yes; and the prisoner was frequently at our house.

Q. Had you seen him on the day proceeding the day he was taken up. - A. He called on the 7th in the morning, and requested permission to speak to our porter.

Q. What was your porter's name. - A. John Daniels ; he was taken up and sent on board the the tender.

ELISHA CRAB . Q. You are an officer of the city of London. - A. Yes. On the 7th of July, I apprehended the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock at night, in Cutler's-street, Houndsditch; he was sitting on a carpet; I asked him what he had there, he said it was nothing to me, it was his own property; I told him he must go along with me to the Counter; he said he would go along with me any where, and he would not tell where he had it from; I had two officers with me; I took him in charge, and gave the carpet to one of the officers. I had hold of him; we walked five hundred yards from the place where we first stopped him, he made a sudden spring and got away from me, I held his jacket, the jacket tore all the way up; I then catched hold of him by the collar and the jacket gave way again; he ran away from me into Cammomile-street into a mews, where there was no thoroughfare; there I got hold of him I never lost sight of him; I asked him why he run away from his property: when I went up to him he hit me down when; I got up he hit me down again. I had got a stick, I was obliged to make the best of it I could till I secured him.

Q. Was that carpet you found upon him that night the same carpet you shewed to Mr. Broom the next day. - A. It was; I saw him coming along with the carpet before he sat upon it I was watching for him two hours before. I knew at eleven o'clock that he was to bring it there.

WILLIAM HART . Q. You are also an officer of the city. - A. I am. I searched the prisoner at the Counter, I found upon him a bit of paper belonging to a carpet.

Prosecutor. That paper is our clerk's writing, it certifies the length of the carpet.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witness to character.

GUILTY aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-15

557. RICHARD WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of August , twenty two yards of flannel, value 20 s. the property of John Stirtevant .

JOHN STIRTEVANT . I am a hosier in Bishopsgate-street. On the evening of the 14th of August, the watchman came to me between ten and eleven o'clock, he said there was a man at the watchhouse with a piece of flannel; I went to the watchhouse, I saw the flannel, I knew it to be mine; it had my mark on it.

JOHN MEAD . I am a victualler; I live in Angel-alley, Bishopgate-street, at the sign of the George. On the 14th of July, about nine at night, I met the prisoner coming down Angel-passage, Angel-alley, with this piece of flannel; I stopped him and asked what he had got there; he said for God sake let me pass; I was never guilty of such a thing before; I took him to Mr. Shephard at the watchhouse.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . The prisoner was delivered to me and the flannel at the watchhouse.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along I picked it up in the street.

GUILTY aged 30.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined a Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-16

558. JOHN PETHER was indicted for feloniously stealing a coat, value 10 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

THOMAS BRERETON. I live with Mr. Downes, Fetter-lane. On the 25th of July, between nine and ten o'clock, as I was passing through Fleet-street, there was a post chaise past me; I saw the prisoner at the bar and another person, now and then alternately look into the chaise; they followed it till it came to St. Clement's church in the Strand , then the tallest man of the two jumped up and hung on the window of the chaise by one hand, and with the other took out a coat.

Q. There was no body in the chaise, perhaps. - A. I suppose not; when he had taken the coat he returned a few yards, called some name; upon which the prisoner at the bar come and received the coat. They came through Temple Bar into Fleet-street, where a patrol stood; they went of the opposite side of the way when they saw me, I informed the patrol; we went after the two men and we took the prisoner with the coat in Chancery-lane under his arm; the man that stole the coat ran away. We asked the prisoner where he got the coat, he said he found it in Fleet-street. The patrol took him to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. What part of Chancery-lane was it you overtook the prisoner. - A. Towards Fleet-street.

Q. Was it dark at this time. - A. It was duskish.

Q. You could not see whether there was any body in the chaise or not. - A. No.

Q. Therefore you could not tell whether any body might not hand it out; the coat belonged to the driver. - A. Yes, it appeared to be an empty chaise, but I do not know.

Q. Why did not you call out to the driver. - A. Because the men went the contrary way; if I had done so they would have got off.

ANTHONY M'DONALD. On the 25th of July last I ran up Chancery-lane after the two men, they turned up a dark court; as soon as they saw me come up the court they both came out into Chancery-lane; I followed him that had the coat; when I caught him, I asked where he had got that coat, he said in Fleet-street, it was laying in the dirt, he kicked his foot against it; I produce the coat.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-17

559. ROBERT SMITH , alias ROBERT UTTING SMITH , was indicted for that he at the general quarter sessions of the peace holden for the county of Middlesex on the 14th of April in the forty sixth year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, he knowing at the time it to be false and counterfeited,

and that he at that time had about him in his possession, one other piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of and for a good shilling, whereupon he was sentenced and adjudged by the court to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year, and to find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more; that he afterwards on the 30th of June last, one false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of and for a good shilling, feloniously and unlawfully did utter to John Holt , he knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

Second Count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

The Case stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Do you produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner at the bar at Clerkenwell. - A. Yes: I examined it with the original, it is a true copy.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; I was present at his conviction. (Copy of record read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of New Prison. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in court at the time the prisoner was convicted at Clerkenwell, at the time that has been mentioned. - A. Yes, I heard him receive sentence; I took him afterwards to New Prison; he remained there for one year.

JOHN HOLT . Q. You keep the Three Sweedish Crowns in Old Gravel-lane. - A. I do. On Tuesday the 30th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and called for a glass of gin; he tendered me a shilling, the gin came to two pence. About ten minutes before that a man came to my house, he had a glass of porter, he gave me a shilling, I refused that, he gave me another, and I gave him ten pence halfpenny; I found that to be be a bad shilling. This man came soon after, he gave a shilling, I thought that to be a bad shilling, I came from behind the counter; he thought I was coming to take him in custody, he said he could give me copper enough; I fastened the door, I told him I was an officer of the parish, I insisted upon taking him in custody; I told him there had been another just come in before him, I had taken a bad shilling of him, and as I had every reason to believe they were in colleague together, I would take him in custody. I sent for Charlton the headborough; the prisoner wished me very much to let him go, he said he was not the man that I supposed him to be; he shook very much and was in great agitation; I told him I should not let him go. Mr Charlton came in, then I left him for the purpose of getting the other man; I returned in about ten minutes unsuccessful; When I came back we searched him. I found three other shillings that were like the same that he tendered me, and there was a good sixpence and ten pence halfpenny; I said to Mr. Charlton you had better step with him to the magistrate. On the road he offered me any thing to let him go; I told him I could not think of that; we then took him before the magistrate.

Q. What became of the shilling that he gave you - A. I have it in my pocket, I have kept it separate, I I am sure it is the shilling that was tendered by him; I have kept it separate locked up in my desk ever since. I produce it.

Q. Who has got the other shilling that was tendered by the other person - A. Here is the other that I had just before taken of the other man; and the three shillings that was found on him. I took them out of his pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. When this man came into your shop, there was no other person in the shop but you and him. - A. There was my sister in law.

Q. Then you left him when you went out of the shop with the constable and your sister in law. - A. Yes; when I went in search of the other man I left the shilling on the counter, and when I came back I found it there, and the other three with it.

Q. While you were gone did not he put that shilling with the other three. - A. No. The magistrate asked me if I knew it; I had mixed them; I told the magistrate that I knew it by the marks of my teeth.

Q. Then in point of fact you had got the four shillings in your pocket altogether. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not feel a difficulty at this time. - A. No. I told the magistrate I could discover that one by the head and by the marks of my teeth.

Q. I see there is a B put upon this. - A. Yes, the magistrate desired me to mark it afterwards.

Q. Is it usual for you to try them with your teeth. - A. Yes, if I suppose it to be a bad one. I can swear to the shilling.

Mr. Knapp. Look at that shilling, and see whether you know it. - A. That is the same shilling.

MR. JOHN NICOLL . - Mr. Knapp. Look at that piece he uttered to him. - Q. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at that one that was offered by the other man. - A. It is a counterfeited one.

Court. That has nothing to do with this, do not put that before the jury.

Mr. Knapp. Look at the three that were found upon his person. - A. The three are all counterfeits.

Q. Are they all alike, or do they vary. - A. They vary, for one of them is crooked.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather intoxicated in liquor; I had been with a few friends; they thought it was requisite to take a coach. I changed a one pound note, and took that money of the coachman: that is all the way I can account for it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-18

560. HANNAH HAYWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June , a bottle of wine, value 2 s. the property of Mary Ore .

The Case stated by Mr. Gurney.

MARY ORE. - Mr. Myers. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, she was my servant .

Q. Where do you live. - A. Church-row, Islington.

Q. I believe you had occasion to leave Islington and go to Brighton. - A. Yes, for my health.

Court. When was that. - A. In the early part of last June, and I returned at the latter end.

Mr. Myers. Who did you leave in your house during your absence. - A. Hannah Hayward .

Q. Upon your return did you perceive any wine missing from your cellar. - A. Before that, I repeatedly mentioned the circumstance to the prisoner; she said it must be my own drinking.

Q. When you went to Brighton did you leave the key of your cellar. - A. No, I never entrusted it to the prisoner at the bar; I locked it up with my other things, and took it with me.

Q. Did you discover after your return, that the key of your garden gate would open your wine cellar. - A.

Afterwards I tried it, and it and it did unlock it; I left the key of the garden door with the prisoner.

SARAH DOBSON . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a servant to a friend of Mrs. Ore. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. During Mrs. Ore's absence at Brighton, did you visit the prisoner. - A. On Monday the 15th of June I was there a very short time; she asked me to take wine. I refused; she immediately took a key from her right hand pocket, she told me to follow her; I did, to the wine cellar door, she unlocked the door, I was very much surprized, I asked her if Mrs. Ore left the key of the wine cellar door with her; she said no it was the key of the garden, she said she had access to it in that manner whenever she pleased; the took out a bottle of wine, she told me to look in at the stock; I did, it was large; she said there was wine and spirits of every sort. I refused to drink the wine with her that day; I came away, and informed my mistress the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You had been an intimate acquaintance of the prisoner. - A. No further than going backwards and forwards for my mistress.

Q. You seem very comely and well made - you are not a friar - it is very singular she made this free confession to you - she knew you were a servant. - A. Yes.

Q. You are a very sober young woman, you are not fond of drinking at all, it is a character you deserve - did not you drink tea with her. - A. No, I only called in to know how she was; she met me and took me to the house.

Q. Although you are a sober woman, she would take you to the wine cellar and show you how she opened it - you never tasted it. - A. No.

Q. How can you undertake to say it was wine. - A Because I saw it in the glass. She did not make use of it then; I saw her put it in the copper hole.

Mr. Gurney. Mrs. Ore, did you receive the information from this servant. - A. I did.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-19

561. HANNAH HAYWARD was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of December , three bottles of wine, value 6 s. a bottle of brandy, value 2 s. 6 d. a bottle of rum, value 2 s. 6 d. and a bottle of white wine, value 2 s. the property of Mary Ore .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-20

562. RICHARD HYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a chaise harness, value 3 l. the property of Benjamin Westall , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH WESTALL . I am the wife of Benjamin Westall , 144 Long Acre . On Saturday the 24th of August at one o'clock in the day, I was coming down stairs, I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the harness; he had part of them on his arm, he had got two parts on his arm, and the other part hung on the peg; upon my calling to him he dropped part of the harness down.

Q. What became of the third part of the harness. - A. That was on the peg; the bridle of the harness was on the peg.

Q. The harness was not complete without the bridle. - A. No

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070916-21

563 MARGARET HOLMES and ELIZABETH GILL , alias FRAINE , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , seven yards of linen cloth, value 14 s. and sixty yards of ribbon, value 20 s. the property of John Alexander , privately in his shop .

JOHN ALEXANDER . I keep a shop , 128 Brick-lane, in the parish of St. Matthew Bethnal Green : On the 11th of August, about six o'clock in the evening. Elizabeth Gill , with two other women, came into my shop and asked to look at some printed cottons; I shewed her some. She went out of the shop and the other women with her.

Q. Was the other prisoner one of them. - A. No. I received information that a piece of cloth was given to a person outside of the door, which is the prisoner Holmes. I pursued them; they were gone about fifty yards. I overtook them in Church-street.

Q. How many of them were there together. - A. There were the two prisoners, and the other two women; in Shoreditch I come up to Margaret Holmes ; they separated. I looked into her apron and found a piece of Irish cloth, which is my property; I took her and the cloth to Worship-street office, and there were four pieces of ribbon the officer found upon Holmes at the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. How many persons belonging to you were in the shop. - A. Three; a brother, and two girls that are not here.

Q. Nothing was found upon Gill. - A. No.

Q. And when Holmes was stopped in Shoreditch Gill was not with her. - A. No.

Q. If any thing was given to Holmes outside of your door, any of the other women might have given it as well as Gill. - A. Yes.

MARIA FRITH. Q. Were you near the shop of Mr. Alexander on the day he has been speaking of. - A. Yes, I was in the street, close to his shop; I observed there was a woman stood by the shop with a baby in her arms.

Q. Look at the prisoners, was it either of them. - A. Yes, that one in the blue gown, Margaret Holmes ; I saw a woman come out of the shop with some cloth in her hand.

Q. Was it either of these two women. - A.No, neither of them; I did not see no women go into the shop, nor did I see who was in the shop.

Q. You do not know who the woman was that gave the piece of cloth to Holmes. - A. No. I told Mr. Alexander of it.

ALEXANDER LAMLY . I live opposite of Mr. Alexander. About seven o'clock in the evening Mr. Alexander came to me and told me he had been robbed: we both of us turned down Church-street, we saw the three women that had been in the shop; I saw Holmes walking about ten yards before them on the same side of the way; I asked Mr. Alexander if that woman had been in the shop, he said no; I walked before Holmes, she was holding her apron up by the two corners, as if she had something in it. I let her go on till she came into Shoreditch; I then went up to her and said you have got something that is not your own. At that instant Mr. Alexander came up and took it out of her lap.

Q. You did not see the three women and Margaret

Holmes together. - A. They did not seem to speak at all to Holmes.

JOHN VICKREY. I am an officer of Worship-street. I produce a piece of Irish linen, and four pieces of ribbon. The Irish linen was taken out of her cap at the office, and the four pieces of ribbon I took out of her pocket; I asked her where she got these things, she said they were given her by a woman in the street whom she did not know. The other woman was brought to the office afterwards by Hancock.

JAMES HANCOCK. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I had information that Gill was in New Prison; I have duplicates in her name and Margaret Holmes together.

Q. to prosecutor. You received information from Frith what she had seen. - A. Yes.

Q. Had there been any person in the shop before these women came in, or about the time they were in the shop. - A. None, only the three women that came in together: there had been no one in the shop for about a quarter of an hour before; the three women talked together in the shop, Gill introduced the other women as customers, and they looked at ribbands.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

HOLMES, GUILTY , aged 27.

GILL, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-22

564. WILLIAM O'BRIAN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 25th of July , upon Hannah Davey , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, three pound weight of beef, value 6 d and a cotton handkerchief, value 10 d. her property .

HANNAH DAVEY . Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar before. - A. On Saturday the 25th of July, at twelve o'clock at night, I saw him at just before I came to Starch-green. I was going with the rest of my friends, William Dance a blacksmith, John Sparks , a man that works in the gardens; (I work in the gardens;) and William Sparks a carpenter; as I was going home that man insulted me, and two others followed me from Hammersmith.

Q. Had you seen him at any house at Hammersmith. - A.Not as I know of.

Q. You say he insulted you, I want to know what you mean. - A. Why he pulled me about you know.

Q. I do not know any thing but what you tell me - how far had you got from Hammersmith before he began to pull you about. - A. About a quarter of a mile; it was in a lane before we came to Starch-green ; he wanted me to go with him; I told him I would not; the Irishman followed me all the way till I came at Starch-green. My three friends stopped, thinking there was danger, they would not go any further; I being tired I said I wished to go home. I left my friends upon Starch-green and went towards home; as I was going home I heard somebody run behind me; I turned round, I said to the prisoner for God's sake do not meddle with me, a poor old woman like me; he said blast your eyes I will; he knocked me down with his fist, or stick, I cannot tell in the fright I was in which; it struck on my head. I think he wrestled the bundle from me, out of my hand as I laid down; then he ran away immediately, knowing the witnesses were after him.

Q. What was in the bundle. - A. Beef, in a cotton handkerchief. The witnesses called to me after they catched him, and asked me if that was my property.

Q. Did you call out for assistance. - A. I did; he was stopped by Dance and John Sparks , they were not twenty yards from me at the time.

Q. How long had he been walking with you. - A. I did not see him but once from Hammersmith; he and the Irishman; they would not go from me at all; they were with me about half an hour.

Q. Before this happened had you spoke to any of your company. - A. I do not know that I had.

Q. Upon their stopping him what was done. - A. They put him in the cage at Hammersmith.

Q. What become of the other men. - A. They went away.

Q. Did they go when he knocked you down. - A. No they were altogether.

Q. Them that were with him remained with your companions and he ran after you. - A. Yes.

Q. Having knocked you down and taken your bundle from you, he ran towards your companions. - A. No, he ran like a hedge hog past me and ran forwards; they run after him and took him.

THOMAS DANCE . We were altogether at the Salutation public house at Hammersmith; we left it about two minutes before twelve o'clock. O'Brian and two Irishmen followed us to Starch-green; they were standing at the Salutation door when we came out.

Q. Did they say any thing to you. - A. We would not have any thing to say to them; they wanted to have something to say to Hannah Davey , she would not have any thing to say to O'Brian; we went as far as the seven Stars just by the Green; we said we would call them up at the Stars; we were in danger of our lifes.

Q. What was the danger, - A.O'Brian said he would knock our brains out, and he pulled old Hannah Davey about before we got there; then we asked them why they followed us; they told us they would follow us go where we would.

Q. Where did this pass. - A. Against 'squire Dorville's wall, just before we came to the Seven Stars. When we came back to the Seven Stars Hannah Davey said she would go home.

Q. Had you passed the Seven Stars. - A. Yes; when we came back to the Seven Stars, Hannah Davey said I shall go home; it is very late, nobody will hurt me. Accordingly Hannah Davey went on, O'Brian and the other two men followed her; we said to each other them men are at no good; it is not fit that the old woman should go alone; we went on, we saw they began to run, and we ran.

Q. Did they all three run. - A. Yes, they all went together; before we got in sight of her we heard her, cry murder several times; when we got in sight of her we saw her lying on her back, with his legs astride her, he was wrestling the bundle out of her hand, and the other men stood of the side of her; he wrested the bundle out of her hand.

Q. Did you see that. - A. Yes, it was moon light; she said, oh my bundle, he has got my property, and off he ran; we ran after him as fast as we could and overtook him about three hundred yards of.

Q. What became of the two other men. - A. We left them; they did not interfere; we catched him trying to get over a hedge. O'Brian made a good deal to do,

crying murder, and said he had not got the bundle; he said if we would let him go he would show us where the bundle was; we told him we would; he took us to the side of a hedge and shewed us where it was; that was about two hundred yards from where the woman lay. We called Hannah Davey to receive the bundle; she came and said it was her property.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before. - A. No.

JOHN SPARKS . We happened to meet promiscuously at the Salutation, Hammersmith.

Q. Who were you to meet. - A. Hannah Davey , William Dance , and William Sparks .

Q. What time did you go away. - A. A few minutes before twelve. Being late we agreed to go home together. When we came out O'Brian and his two companions were standing at the door; we had been but a little way before O'Brian and his two companions over-took us; O'Brian began to pull Hannah Davey about and to insult her; she told him she wished him to let her alone and go home about her business; we still kept on, and they followed us till we got to the Seven Stars. We thought ourselves not safe in going any farther.

Q. You stopped. - A. Yes, and Hannah Davey stopped a little while with us; I said we were in danger of our lives. O'Brian said if we said so again he would knock our brains out, and run his fist up against my face; Hannah Davey said I am not far from home, I will not stay any longer, being a poor old woman I am not afraid of any body hurting me; she left our company. These three men stood a little while arguing with us; they left us and followed her; we thought they were upon no good; we set off after them. Just before we got in sight we heard Hannah Davey cry out murder, and just as we got in sight of her we saw her lying on her back and O'Brian astride of her, and his two companions just by; she said he has got my bundle. We ran after him; we left her and the two Irishmen; there she was lying on the ground; we ran about three hundred yards and catched him as he was getting over a hedge; he cried murder, and said if we would let him go he would shew us where the bundle was; we said we would; he shewed us where the bundle was.

Q. How far was the bundle from where she was laying. - A. About an hundred yards.

WILLIAM SPARKS . Q. Were you with these two witnesses and the old woman at the Salutation at Hammersmith on the 25th of July. - A. Yes. After we went out of the house O'Brien and the other two men followed us; O'Brien and the other two men began to pull Hannah Davey about, she begged of them to leave her alone; they kept pulling her about till they came to Starch Green; we went forward, she called us back to her assistance; we begged of them to let her alone, they would not; we told them to go home, they said they would go with us go where we would; they said they would knock our brains out; we said it was not safe to go on, we would go back to the Stars. As they stood quarrelling with us, Hannah Davey said she would go home, she had but a little way to go, being a poor old woman no body would meddle with her; we went away, and we said it was not safe for the woman to go by herself. We followed her, we saw them run and we run after them; we heard the old woman crying murder just as we got in sight of her; we saw her lying on her back, O'Brien astride of her, and the other two, men of the side of her; she cried, oh! he has robbed me, he has got my property; just before we got to him he run from her; his companions stood about twenty yards off. He ran away, and we followed him about three hundred yards; then we stopped him; he began crying murder, and said we were robbing him. We secured him then; he said if we would let him go he would shew us where the woman's bundle was; he run back to the dunghill and shewed us the bundle.

Q. How far from where you took him - A. About two hundred yards, and about an hundred yards from the woman.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a constable of Hammersmith. The prisoner was delivered into my custody by the three witnesses on the 25th of July; it was one o'clock when they brought him in.

Q. Then it was the 26th of July. - A. Yes. This handkerchief and three pound of beef was delivered to me. I kept the handkerchief and Davey had the beef.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence (read in court). My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - on Saturday night the 25th of July, between twelve and one o'clock; after leaving the pay table and drinking pretty freely, I drank with two women and two men; the prosecutrix was drinking with us; we passed some jokes together. When we came out I took the prosecutrix by the arm, thinking by the liberties she let me take I might. She left her companions, I gave her a shilling; when she was out of sight of her companions she consented to let me have connexion with her; she was very much intoxicated in liquor, and when she saw her companions coming she cried out. At the time she took my shilling she threw the bundle behind the dunghill; her companions came up and swore I had taken the bundle; they found the bundle behind the dunghill, where the prosecutrix throwed it. I hope you will take my case into your humane consideration, as my prosecutrix intends taking my life if she can by false swearing, for the sake of the reward. I had no intention of taking the bundle from her.

Q. to prosecutrix. Are you are a married woman. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-23

565. WILLIAM WALMSLEY and CHARLES WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Winter , about the hour of five o'clock on the 11th of July , the said James Winter and others of his family being therein, and stealing two quarts of rum, value 6 s. and five halfpence , his property.

JAMES WINTER. I am a publican , at the sign of the Cross Keys, Long Acre . The prisoners are soldiers , they were quartered at my house, they lodged at the top of the house both in the same room; they had been quartered upon me for three months.

Q. Did you at any time watch or use any means for finding out the persons that robbed you. - A. Never before that morning; I found them out on Saturday morning the 4th of July; my wife sat up till three o'clock in the morning, she came to bed then. I concealed myself in the parlour below stairs; about four o'clock the two young men came down stairs it was day light; they began dusting their clothes. One of them put his hand into the window where there was a

pane of glass broke; he said there is a double curtain here; that was the parlour where I was. The other came back through the passage to the bottom of the stair case, where there was another broken; he put his hand and said here is another curtain there is two windows to that parlour. I was concealed in that room under that window; there are two windows in that room, one in the yard and one in the passage. I saw them, but neither of them could see me. He then went to the tap-room; I drew the curtain of one side, I saw him through the window, it was the same man; the other man was walking backwards and forwards in the passage at the time; he went through the tap-room to the bar door, he took this file and put it between the bar-door and forced it open.

Q. You did not see at that time where the instrument was. - A. No, he took it from the fire place and forced the door in the wrong way: it was locked when I went to bed; he was in the bar about a minute and a half; I heard the halfpence jingle: the other went up stairs.

Q. Did they speak to each other at the time. - A. Not till they went up stairs. As soon as he came out of the bar he fastened the bar door again, he put this file on the mantle piece and went up stairs to his comrade and said all is well. I went for an officer, he came and took them in the room; I pointed out the man that went into the bar; the officer found five halfpence which my wife had marked the night before, and a bottle of rum under the bed head; we took them to Bow-street. When we came back we found another bottle in a hole in the floor by the bed's head; they had drawed it off the cask. I had gauged my cask the night before, I guaged it again in the morning; there was a deficiency of a pint and a half. I had lost rum frequently before, and halfpence.

Q. These two bottles must contain more than you missed out of your cask. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of your rum. - A. I valued it at three shillings a bottle.

Q. Which was the prisoner that went into the bar. - A. William Walmsley .

ANN WINTER . I am the wife of the last witness. On the proceeding night to the morning my husband has been speaking of, I marked twenty old halfpence and nine new ones; I put them in the till; there were other halfpence that were not marked. I sat up till three o'clock, I went to bed and my husband got up. The officer shewed me the halfpence; they were the same that I had marked the night before.

- SMITH, I am an officer of Bow-street. I searched the prisoners, I found nothing upon them; under the head of the bed on the floor I found a bottle of rum; there was no cork in it, it was full. On the bed I found a waistcoat; Williams owned it, with five halfpence in it; he said they were his halfpence what he had got in change the over night. I shewed the halfpence to the landlady at the time I took them down to Bow-street. I came back again; I found another bottle under the floor; that was corked.

(The property produced and identified.)

Walmsley's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is laid to my charge; I do not know any thing of the rum; the room is left to the mercy of the lodgers of the house. The halfpence I had the over night in change.

William's Defence. The door is left open to the mercy of every one.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character.

WALMSLEY, GUILTY, aged 22.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing two pence halfpenny only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-24

566. JAMES GERRARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 40 s. the property of George Ansley , William Pearce , and Thomas Ansley , in their dwelling house .

SARAH TINKER . I am a servant to Mr. Pearce. On the 2nd of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I found a piece of printed cotton furniture in the pantry below, stairs facing the kitchen; there was a flag stone put upon it, it was in a corner and I saw it by one of the corners of the furniture sticking out. I left it there.

Q. Did you at any time afterwards, see any thing done with it. - A. I was watching in the kitchen facing it; in about three quarters of an hour afterwards, I heard a noise in the pantry; I saw the prisoner at the bar come and take the cotton into a long passage adjoining the pantry; I went into the shop and informed John Webb ; he came from the shop instantly, and took the cotton from him.

Q. How came the prisoner in the house. - A. He was employed in the house; the house was repairing; he was a plaisterer .

JOHN WEBB . I am shopman to William Pearce , and George Ansley and Thomas Ansley .

Q. Do they all live in the house where the shop is - A. William Pearce does. George Ansley resides at Watford, in the summer season. Thomas Ansley lives at 143, in the Strand, that is his dwelling house, they are all partners.

Q. In consequence of any information, that you received from the last witness, did you go down into the passage leading into the pantry. - A. I did; I went to the further end of the passage to the privy; on opening the door, the prisoner endeavoured to rush out; I stopped him and asked him what he had got in his apron; he answered nothing. I then endeavoured to take it from him, he made some resistance. I took a piece of printed cotton from his apron it belongs to Messrs. Ansley and Pearce; it is worth about three guineas.

Q. When did you see it last. - A. I cannot, say having many; it must have been taken from the shop.

THOMAS FOY . I am goaler to the office at Marlbrough street. I apprehended the prisoner in Baldwyn's-gardens Gray's Inn-lane he made his escape from the house I apprehended him the same evening at eleven o'clock.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence (read in court) My lord in the situation I now stand has brought distress upon me and my family, I can assure you lordship it never was my intention to commit any theft. Unfortunate for me I happened to be the person who found the printed cotton; when I found it I did not know what it was nor had I the least thought of taking it off the premises. I hope you will shew me that lenity that the nature of the case requires, if I am found guilty it will be the total ruin of

me and my family.

GUILTY, aged 46.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070916-25

567. THOMAS WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of William Lingard on the 19th of August , a box, value 1 d. five pounds in monies numbered, a promissory note of the Bristol bank, value 5 l. four bank notes, value 10 l. each, and two bank notes, value 5 l. each , the property of William Lingard .

The Case stated by Mr. Const.

WILLIAM LINGARD . Q. You are the master of the Roebuck at Hammersmith . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give your wife any bank notes or money on the 19th of August. - A. Yes; I delivered to her all the bank notes I was in possession of; there were four ten pound notes, two five pound notes (all of them bank of England notes), and a country note of five pounds; and there were some small notes, but I could not ascertain what quantity there was. The prisoner was the only person present when I delivered them to her; I gave them to her in the small bar; he saw me give them to her.

Q. You have got a sum of money that was returned to you. - A. Yes.

Court. The notes were not sent to you by the prisoner. - A. Not that I know of; they were sent by somebody, I do not know who sent them.

Mr. Const. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I have known the prisoner some time; he is the proprietor of the Brentford coach as well as the driver.

Q. I would ask you whether he has not bore a respectable character. - A. I never found otherwise.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. On this Wednesday when you gave your wife the notes, I believe you went out upon some foot race. - A. That is quite irrelevant to the question.

Q.On that Wednesday you left home. - A. Yes. I returned the next day, Thursday.

Q. The race was on the Wednesday evening, where was that race. - A.On the road to Bath.

Q. I believe on your return you met the prisoner. - A. I must have met him, but I did not see him. The moment I went home, I learned from my wife of the loss.

Q. You saw the prisoner that evening. - A. I did. I went to Kew bridge; I spoke to him on the subject.

Q. He took out all the money he had in notes and offered them you. - A. He pulled out some, but whether he pulled out all I cannot say.

Q. You did not claim them as yours. - A. No, I had a higher opinion of the man.

Q. The prisoner came to your house that evening. - A. So. I heard from my wife after I had seen him at the bridge.

Q. I believe he was announced to attend at Bow-street. - A. He was, the first time.

Q. He was discharged them, and he came the second time voluntarily. - A.He was discharged through my interference.

Q. But he kept his word and came again. - A. He did.

Court. You say you gave your notes to your wife in a small bar, and he was with you. - A. He was. She put them in a box, which was her custom prior to my being married to her, for many years.

Q. Do you mean to say that she put them into a box immediately. - A. I do, while the prisoner at the bar was with me; he saw it, I am sure, or else I would not say it.

HARRIET LINGARD . - Mr. Const You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 19th of last month Mr. Lingard delivering to you any bank notes. - A. Yes, four ten's, and two five pound bank notes, and a Bristol note for five pound; and the prisoner stood close by the drawer in which I put them in, and I put them immediately in the drawer and locked them up, and in the evening I put in four or five pounds in silver; there was nobody there but my husband, myself, and Mr. Weston.

Q. When had you occasion to open that drawer. - A. About four o'clock the same day. I was going to put some silver in the box, the coach came up to the door, I put the drawer too, with the key in it; I went to serve a glass of liquor to a man that came in with Thomas Weston .

Q. Did you go out of the bar. - A. No, the man wanted a glass of gin; he came to the door of the bar, he did not come in the bar. Weston came to the spot where the drawers were.

Q. Was there any part of the time that you lost sight of the man. - A. I went to the corner of the bar to give the man change for a shilling that had the gin; when he had got the change he went away immediately. While I was giving change I heard a rustling; I said to Weston, what are you about; the table linen and books fell down, they were placed on the top of the drawers; Mr. Weston went out immediately; on his going out he clapped his hand to his coat. I said why do you come in to knock my things down; I picked up my books, I went to put the silver in the box in the drawer; I found the property gone. It was all done in about four or five minutes.

Court. How was the drawer, open or shut when you went to put your money in. - A. It was shut, but the key was in it.

Q. When you found it out did you call to him. - A. No, I found he was gone; I sent to an opposite neighbour, Mr. Fletcher.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This was the day after the race from London to Bath. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to be positive that there was no other person in the bar on the afternoon of that day besides the prisoner. - A. Not at the time he was there; he was only there a few minutes while the gentleman had a glass of gin, and I gave him change for a shilling.

Q. You say you did not put your silver in during the time that he was there. - A. No.

Q. Were there not some persons in the bar who had been seeing the race at the time he was there. - A. Not exactly at the time he was there; there was no other person there while he was there but another man at the bar; there were two or three men came in from the coach, but not in the bar.

Q.Did not the prisoner come in the presence of some other persons and speak to you about the loss of the money. - A. He came to me and said he wanted to speak to Mrs. Lingard herself; he said it three or four

times over; he said I hear you have lost so and so, says I, so I have; he said and you accuse me of it, says I nobody was there but you and me. That was all I said to him.

Q. Did not you further say to him, No. Tom Weston , I am sure it could not be you, but you must know some of the people that were in the bar. - A. No, indeed I did not say that; I said nobody knew it was there but him.

WILLIAM FLETCHER . - Mr. Const. Q. What are you. - A. I am out of business at present, I live opposite Mrs. Lingard; she sent her servant who said she wanted to speak to me, I went over, she informed me that she had been robbed; I went to Kew-bridge to endeavour if I could learn any thing of the robbery, and in consequence of information from Mr. Smith I went down to the water side; I met the prisoner his carriage stood at the bridge with the horses heads towards the water; he was returning from the water. I said Weston how do you do, nodded to me and immediately went into Mr. Dunn's stable yard and set upon a place that is erected upon a dunghill. When he came out of there, Mr. Lingard came down and accused him of robbing him; Weston said he had not, and he was very willing that Mr. Lingard might search him; Mr. Lingard did not search him - Mr. Lingard and I went down to the water-side to see if we could find any of the property; we could not. I advised him to apply to a Bow-street officer; we went up to the turnpike-gate, and afterwards Bacon the officer came in about three quarters of an hour.

Q. Did you after that at any time go to the water side. - A. I went with the officer to the water side where I saw Weston come from; we went into a market garden this side of the water, there I found the bottom of a paper box. We there discovered two more pieces: I took them to Mrs. Lingard, she said it was part of the box that the property was in. The pieces of box were afterward given to Bacon the officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The coach had stopped at Kew bridge some short time before you got there. - A. Yes.

Q. The passengers had left the coach. - A. I saw no passengers.

Q. Which way they went, or whether they went into the market-garden, you cannot tell. - A. No.

Court. Where was this market garden that you speak of; I understood it to be of the left hand side of Kew-bridge from London. - A. Yes before you get to Kew-bridge you turn round to the left hand.

Q. When you first went to Kew-bridge you saw the prisoner coming from the water side - was that on the right hand side. - A. No, on the left; the same side as the market garden is.

Q. In what part of that garden did you pick up these pieces. - A. About two yards from the wall in the garden; the wall parts the garden ground from the road.

Mr. Gurney. There is a path-way by the side of it.

Court. Yes it is the side of the road.

JOHN SMITH . - Mr. Const. Q. Do you remember meeting Mr. Fletcher. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come down to Kew bridge with the coach. - A. Yes. about ten minutes before Mr. Fletcher met me, the prisoner came down driving his coach. When he came there he let his passengers out. I stopped there a few minutes; I said to Weston there is Mr. Lingard gone along in the stage; Weston says is he; Weston was running. Mr. Lingard came up, he says where is Weston. I turned my head I saw Weston going to the water side. I said to Weston are you going to drown yourself.

Q. You was joking. - A Yes.

Court. How many passengers had he. - A. I only saw one; there might be three or four; I did not see where that one went to.

WILLIAM BACON . - Mr. Const. Q. What are you. - A. I am a patrol of Bow street. I received information of this robbery; I went down to Kew-bridge with Mr. Fletcher, on Friday to search the garden. The pieces of box were picked up in the garden, in my presence. I produce them.

Q.(to Mrs. Lingard.) You have seen these pieces of the box; look at them, and tell me whether they are part of your box. - A. They are part of my box; I have a set of them they are all paste board boxes. I have had them twenty-three or twenty four years.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of these things that is laid against me; Mr. Lingard has known me many years; we generally drank together, if I did not go in the bar, he generally called me in; he has trusted me in the bar, when he has not trusted other people; I believe Mrs. Lingard knows the same.

THOMAS RICE . - Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I am a hatter; I live at 42 Gravel-lane, Southwark. On Thursday the 20th of August, I went in the Brentford coach.

Q. Do you remember any thing occuring about the race from Bath to London. - A. In the coach that I was going there was a man, he said Lingard is one. When the coach got to the Roebuck at Turnham-green it was four o'clock; we stopped there, I was outside passenger, but when a storm of rain came, one got out, and I went in; the inside was full; that was this side of Turnham-green; two the coach stopped at the Roebuck Turnham-green; two of the passengers went out; I knew one of them, his name is Parker, we went in the bar, and Parker wrote a note; the third passenger went in the bar; Weston the coachman went into the bar first, he was standing by the side of the fire place when I went in; and there was a thin elderly man. Mrs. Lingard doing of. - A. She was talking about the race; and serving her customers; she mixed a glass of brandy and water, and gave it to the coachman. I perceived that she never measured it; she put it into the glass, I said to Parker, that the landlady gave more for sixpence, then I could get for a shilling; she was all of a tremble; she drawed a glass of ale for the other passenger, and a glass of gin for me; I was in the bar about eight or ten minutes, and there were four or five coming in and out. The coachmen set on the right side of the fire, and the thin man on the left hand; the thin man was not a passenger. Parker sat in the left hand corner of the bar; the coachman asked the landlady of the house, if she knew the thin elderly man that she was talking to about the wager; she gave him four-pence out of his sixpence he said they will not do, he put them back; the coachman I think, came out first; we all nearly came out together.

Q. Did you observe any thing falling in the bar. - A. There was not a thing of the kind.

Q. Then if any person has talked that there was only the coachman in the bar, that is a mistake, because you are certain that there were four in the bar altogether. -

A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. What day are you speaking of. - A. The wager was decided, Thursday, the 20th of August.

Q. Any particular reasoning for recollecting the day of the month. - A. I was going with Mr. Snowden a grocer, he had a little bill.

Q. You never saw the man before. - A. I did not know the man at all.

Q. You went away from the coach, how came you to hear any thing of the coachman. - A. I heard of him at night; I was at Kew bridge; I went so far home that night; I heard he was accused.

Q. How did you know it was your coachman. - A. They told me it was the coachman that I come down with; the landlady of the Star and Garter told us so; she saw me come out of the coach, the coach was about twenty yards from her door; she was out talking to a young woman.

Court. What did you hear about the coachman. - A. They accused him of taking the money, I said I stopped there; I think it was impossible for it to be done; they said they had been after him they were suspicious that he had done it.

Mr. Const. Why did you say it could not be done. - A. Because I think it impossible, when so many people were there; there were four or five people there.

Q. What size bar is it. - A. A largish bar; it is on the right hand side, as you go into the house; the bar would hold a dozen people, according to what I see of it.

Q. How soon did Mr. Weston find you out to be a witness. - A. The day before yesterday, by Mr. Parker mentioning of it.

SAMUEL PARKER. - Mr. Alley. You have seen Mr. Rice the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect accompanying him to Kew-bridge on the coach that was driven by the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. What are you. - A. I am constable, beadle, and a shoemaker.

Q. Do you recollect going on to the prosecutor's house. - A. I recollect it very well; I went into the house, there were two or three there; there was another gentlemen besides Mr. Rice; the coachman went in first, I wrote a few lines there in the bar. I went there yesterday, for the purpose of enquiring whether it was the bar or not. As soon as I had done my writing they were all ready; the coach went off.

JAMES BENFIELD . - Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I am a fruiterer, I live at Covent-garden.

Q. Do you remember coming up to town on the evening after this wager was won on the Bath road. - A. Yes; on Thursday the 20th of August.

Q. Did you stop that evening at Mr. Lingard's. - A. I did; I was in the bar, I saw Mr. Weston there; he was conversing with Mrs. Lingard; when I went in, he says to her, do you suppose I have your property. No, Tom Weston , she replied, I do not accuse you of having my property; but you know the men who were in the bar. I mentioned the circumstance to several people.

WILLIAM BROWN . - Mr. Alley. Q. What are you. - A. I am stable-keeper; I live at the Bull and Gate, Holborn.

Q. Do you remember the race on the Bath road, on the 20th of August last. - A. I do; I was at the race. I called at Mr. Lingard's on my return from the race, I dare say I was there three quarters of an hour.

Q. Do you know Mr. Benfield. - A. I do; I saw him the day after the race, at Mr. Lingard's house; I called for a chaise, and took him with me, to know how the race was decided.

Q. When you was at the house with him did you see Weston there. - A. I did; Benfield and I were at the bar; there was a great dispute; the prisoner at the bar, said, god bless me, Mrs. Lingard, do you think that I have got the money; no says she, I do not think you have my money but you know them that have got it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc:

Reference Number: t18070916-26

568. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , a metal watch, value 5 l. the property of Henry Burton , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH BURTON . Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is Henry Burton ; we live at No. 8, Blenheim-street, New Bond-street, in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square .

Q. Is he a house-keeper. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember at any time the prisoner at the bar coming to your house to take lodgings - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 28th of July.

Q. Are you sure it was the 28th of July. - A. It was either the 28th or 27th of last July; it was about twelve o'clock in the day; he asked me it I had got any apartment to let, I told him I had the first floor; he went up and looked at it, he asked me if I could let him have the use of the parlour, I told him I would; the prisoner looked round the parlour, and said he wanted a book-case, I told him I would get him a book-case; at last as he was going out into the passage, he looked very poorly, he asked for a glass of spring water.

Q. How hid he appear to be poorly. - A. He pretended to be faint; I ran down stairs to get the water, when I came up, the prisoner was gone. I missed the watch from the mantle piece before I put the water out of my hand; it hung in the back parlour.

Q. Had he been in that room. - A. Yes, that was the room in which he wanted the book case.

Q. Had you seen the watch in the back parlour while he was there. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. How long was he in your apartments. - A. He was in the house about a quarter of an hour; he went up stairs, in the second floor, I did not want him to go up; he did go up, he said he wanted a room for two servants; and he found his own plate, and linen, and he wanted the use of the kitchen; he went down to see it.

Q. You never saw him before had you. - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man. - A. I am.

Q. What sort of a watch was this. - A. A metal watch capped and jewelled.

Q. What was the name of the maker. - A. Tuck, No. 10766.

Q. Have you ever seen the watch since. - A. No. It was a gilt case, just coming home from being gilt, with gold hands; it opened at the back.

Q. How soon after your loss did you see the prisoner. - A. About three weeks after. I saw him in Clerkenwell prison.

GEORGE WEGGULIN . Q. What is you business. - A. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Chandos-street. On Tuesday the 28th of July, about half after one, to the best of my recollection, the prisoner brought a metal watch to pledge made by John Tuck of Cockspur-street; it is a remarkable watch dome, capped by a spring; you open the back and by another spring you open the cap; it does not open by the glass.

Q. Did you observe the number. - A. I did not; they were plain gold hands. To the best of my recollection it was a gilt case; he wanted seven pound upon it; I asked him how it was possible he could ask seven pound for a watch like this; which had it been made by a watchmaker he would not charge more than that, much more when it was made by a silversmith; I asked him what he gave for it, he said fifteen pound; I no ways credited the story; still the genteel appearance of the prisoner made at that time, I thought though he told that plain story it might be that he thought my judgment might be such that I might go by what he said, rather than my own judgment. I offered him three guineas and a half; with which he was not satisfied; he took it away and I saw no more of him.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the person. - A. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Q. You offered him three guineas and a half for it, of course you thought it was worth that. - A. The value of it according to my judgement was about four guineas.

Prisoner's Defence (read in court). My lord, supported with confidence that the serious charge that is alledged against me will meet with a just discrimination of mercy and justice, that is always exemplary distributed to every unhappy prisoner, and I trust that my case will be considered with humanity and attention from the honourable jury; I having served his Majesty's army most of my life. By a succession of distress I have been obliged to sell my commission to support my wife and family; the difficulty of procuring for them lodgings, I was under the necessity of looking at a great many; for while I was continuing in London I was under some considerable expectation. My lord, many cases collected together to implicate a criminal must without any other effect reduce his character to a great question of integrity, and is a great state of disparagement to him. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, in such case I stand before you. I happened to be apprehended in one case under suspicion of stealing a watch; a vast number of people that kept lodging houses appeared at my examination, in order to see if they might identify my person to lay their charge against me; the present prosecutrix appeared; she deposed that she missed her watch about ten minutes after I left her house, that her husband was making enquiries after the watch at the pawnbrokers, get no watch has ever been produced.

Q.(to prosecutor). While the prisoner was in your house and you saw your watch to the time you missed it, had there ever been any other person there. - A. No.

Q.(to pawnbroker). Did the watch appear to be lately gilt. - A. It had not the appearance of being lately gilt; it had the appearance of a new watch; it wound up in the back. I am sure it was on a Tuesday he came to me; my young man was out on the Monday.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-27

569. EDWARD COOK and JOHN SQUEERS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May a silver wine taster, value 10 s. an order for the payment of money, value 120 l. and a bill of exchange , value 20 l. the property of Thomas Barry , and William Wilkinson . junior.

THOMAS BARRY . I am a wine merchant , I live at Stratford in Essex; my accompting house is in Mincing-lane . On the 11th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, as I was coming to the accompting house I met Mr. Levit, who is a gentlemen in my accompting house, who informed me that my accompting house had been broken open. When I reached my accompting house I saw that the door and the desk in my accompting house, were open; I observed on the face of the desk several bills which had been taken out of my desk on examining my bill book I found that a check of a hundred and twenty pound, and a bill of exchange for twenty pound, were missing. I sent the clerk to the bankers to stop payment of the check; he presently returned and told me the check had been presented and paid; the bill of exchange had never been presented; the check was upon Messrs. Were, Bruce and Co.

HENRY LEVIT . Q. Are you in the accompting house of Messrs. Barry and Wilkinson. - A. I am. On Sunday night the 20th of May, about eleven o'clock, I was returning home to my lodgings I went down Mincing-lane to the accompting house door, I tried the accompting house door; I found the staple of the door had been forced; the door opened to my pushing. I immediately called the watchman and went into the accompting house; I found Mr. Barry's desk broken open; a black leather case on the desk and several bills were strewed on the desk. I opened the case, took out the bill book, examined it, and found there was a twenty pound bill missing. I made the entry myself when I received the bill; I gave the bill to Mr. Barry and it was put into the desk that was broken open; I did not know of the hundred and twenty pound check, we do not put the cash into the bill book. On Monday morning I went to the banker to stop payment and there I found it had been paid.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am porter to Messrs Skipper and Bull, Great Tower-street. On the 10th of May I was standing at the gate, just before six o'clock. I saw the prisoner Cook standing at No, 9. Mincing-lane facing the house of Barry and Wilkinson; I saw no other person in the lane at the time. I was looking at him for the course of a minute; I cast my eyes on the other side of the way, I saw a man standing with his back towards Mr Barry's door; they were both coming down Mincing-lane I went down St. Dunstan's-hill into St. Dunstan's-alley into Idol-lane; when I came to the top I was stopped by Cook, he asked me who I was looking after; I made him no answer he said d - n your eyes are you looking after us. I told him I lived in the neighbourhood, I had a right to walk where I liked: then Squeers came up, he says this is the bl - y b - r that is looking after us, do not stay let us go; they went a few yards distance, I was going to follow them towards my home; Squeers turned round and said you bl - y b - r if you follow me I will stick a knife in your bl - y guts and let them out, and tie them round your neck. With that I slopped; the prisoners went up Mincing lane. I then went to our own gate again The prisoner Cook saw me, he turned round and turned the tail of his coat over his back, signifying I might

kiss his backside.

Q. Are you sure that Cook was the man that you saw on one side of the street, opposite to Mr. Barry and Wilkinson's door. - A. Yes, I am sure he is the man.

Q. Are you sure that Squeers is the man that stood with his back against Mr. Barry's door. - A. Yes. I gave over watching them and went in doors.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. This was on a Sunday afternoon. - A. It was Sunday morning, just before six o'clock.

Q. You had never seen this man before. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Nor you never saw him from that time till you saw him at the House of Correction. - A. No.

Q. When was it that you saw him at the House of Correction. - A. I do not know; it might be a month or six weeks. I went with Mr. Nalder.

Q. Was it not in the month of August. - A. I do not know.

Q. When you went there you saw several people. - A. I saw three men.

Q. At that time you could not tell which of the three men were the prisoners. - A. I was not positive at the first sight; I stood at one end of them; I did not see their faces. I knew them in the course of a minute.

Q. You never having seen them before you saw them in Mincing-lane, and not being certain of their persons when you first saw them in the prison, will you venture to say they are the men. - A. Yes.

Court. When you first saw them you did not see their faces. - A. No.

Q. And when you saw their faces you knew them. - A. There were three brought out; I looked at them; I stood at one end of them, I did not see their faces. Mr. Aris took two away; I said the one that was left, Squeers, was one of them, and then they brought the other two, I said Cook was the other; when they first brought in the three men I said no, when they asked me if I knew the three men; when they were separated I was asked if I knew them, I said yes; I am certain they are the men.

JOHN WALKER . I am a porter at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate. On Monday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, after the robbery, I was coming up Whitechapel, I saw Cook; he asked me if I was busy, I said no; he said he had got a job for me, if I would do it, I said I would; I asked him if I should take my knot, he said no, it was only to go and see a gentleman upon Cornhill; we walked together till we came to Cornhill; he went into Bartholomow-lane, when he gave to me a hundred and twenty pound check; he asked me to go into Were, Bruce, and co. bankers in Bartholomow-lane. I looked at the check and read it, I did not like to go in; he said I had no occasion to be afraid, the check was good; he had got it to discount for some gentleman in the country; he was to have twenty guineas, and if I went in I was to have ten guineas; I said I did not like to go in with it; he said I had no occasion to be afraid, the check was good, and the parties would not be in town before eleven o'clock. I gave him the check and wished him good morning; he went away; I did not see any more of him. I knew the man before. I am sure he is the man.

Jury. Should you know the check. - A. I should if I was to see it.

Q. When he offered you the check, was any body i company with him. - A. Squeers was in company with him when I returned the check: I knew both of them.

Court. Young man, you have described that Cook asked you to go to Cornhill, did not you see Squeers in Petticoat-lane. - A. He was in the public house at the corner; I saw Cook at the door, he came out of the public house to me. I had seen them together in the Saracen's Head tap; that is the way I became acquainted with them.

MR. ABERNETHY. I am a merchant. All that I know, that check which I had issued was returned to me paid, by the bankers, Messrs. Were, Bruce, and co. I produce it; I paid it to Mr. Barry; it is my hand writing.

Q. to Barry. Look at that check, do you know it. - A. I do, it is the same check I lost out of my desk.

- LEVITT. I saw Mr. Abernethy write it; the moment I saw it at the bankers I knew it to be the same. I have no doubt whatever but that is the check that was taken out of my master's desk.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 15th of July, about half after eleven o'clock at night, in company with James Kennedy , I met the two prisoners and another man, that is not here, he is in custody; I laid hold of Cook and the other man in each hand; that moment I got hold of them two men Kennedy got fast hold of Squeers; I observed a handkerchief drop from Cook, it fell on my toes; this is the handkerchief. In this handkerchief is a crow (producing it); Kennedy said hold tight, here is something else. That moment we were no great distance from a watch box, I called the watch, being rather dark, it was close to a gentleman's house; that gentleman came out with a light; I had no opportunity of searching them. I saw things go out of Cook's hands, and the other man's hand that I had got hold of, over in a field; I begged of the gentleman to be careful and look in that field, to see if he could find something that I suspected had been thrown away. The gentleman is in court, and I have been ill since. This is the crow that fell from Cook's hand.

JAMES KENNEDY . On the 15th of July Ray and I were in company together at half past eleven at night near the two mile stone on the Bow road, we were coming to town; we met the prisoners at the bar, and another in their company. I came up to Squeers, I asked him who he was, he told me he was a master and worked at Bow; I then said we were officers, and we must see what they had got about them. I proceeded to search Squeers; in his right hand coat pocket I found this bag, and in his left hand inside coat pocket I found this iron crow; I then called out to Ray who was standing with the other two, to hold them fast, for I had found something not right. I then seized fast hold of Squeers, and I joined Ray with the other two; we brought them to a watch box, and secured them all three together. I saw the handkerchief drop from Cook between his legs as Ray was securing him, and a man who is now in the house of correction. When the handkerchief was picked up this small crow was in the handkerchief at the time. He gave his name to me John Smith . I likewise saw him drop two small paper parcels at the same time. One appears to be a bundle of matches, and the other a candle. There was a gentleman of the name of Adams that lived next door to the watchhouse; he assisted in giving me a light; he gave me a bundle of picklock keys that he picked up where

they stood in the presence of the prisoners. Here is a bottle of phosphorus he found, or was likewise found, just upon the spot; we brought them to town and put them in the watchhouse for that night. The next day we took them before the magistrate. Vickrey took the crow to Mincing-lane; it fitted the marks on the desk.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You went with that crow with Kennedy. - A. I did, in company with Mr. Nalder, to the house No. 30, Mincing-lane, on the 6th of August last. I saw Mr. Barry there. I fitted the crow to the marks on the desk that was broken open; it corresponded exactly.

Q. to Walker. Look at that note. - A. It is the same date, the same sum, and the same bankers.

Cook's Defence. I am entirely ignorant of what I am charged with.

Squeers' Defence. I am quite innocent of the offence I am charged with.

COOK, GUILTY , aged 30.

SQUEERS, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-28

564. WILLIAM POTENHAM TITBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July , thirty pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Edward Terry , John Henry Peacock , and Thomas Terry .

THOMAS TERRY . I live at the London tavern. On the 8th of July, in consequence of information from one of my servants, I stopped the prisoner going out of the passage; I found in his right hand waistcoat pocket a piece of lead; he told me it was lead he was going to take to his master's premises; the prisoner is a plumber ; he was working at my house; I told him to go about his business. I received further information; in consequence of which I searched him, and found a large quantity of lead.

- ADAMS. I am a waiter at the London tavern. On the 8th of July I was up stairs. I heard a knocking at the window on the leads; I saw this prisoner with a piece of lead of about three or four pounds; he concealed it under his jacket. I went down stairs and told my fellow servant to go up stairs into the Small (that is the name of the room) to see the fellow sacking the lead. I informed Mr. Terry of it.

CHARLES BENWELL . I am a waiter at the London tavern; I went up stairs in one of the tavern rooms between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the leads, he was collecting his tools together apparently; after that he removed his jacket, and under his jacket lay a piece of lead; he took the piece of lead up and put it into his breeches.

Q. Was there any other man besides him on the leads. (The lead produced.)

- TEMSEAD. I am an officer, I took the man in custody; these two pieces he took out of his pocket, and the large quantity was in the front of his breeches; it weighs somewhat more than a quarter of a hundred: he said he was going to get some nails for his work, he said he had measured more lead than the measurement of the place; he was going to take it to his master's and put it in the melting pot, in order that there might be no words about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to measure this lead; I went to the shop to cut it out, I was called away. When I came down again I cut out the remainder, as I thought, and rolled it up together; I took it to the premises, and when I opened it I found I had made a mistake in some of the pieces; and I could do nothing to it till I got some nails; so I doubled up the piece that was to spare, and went in order to get the nails. As it was not booked I made a memorandum, I knew Mr. Chapman was very severe, he would not like to see me take the cuttings home. I thought to take it home, I doubled it up and put it in my waistcoat to carry it to my master's shop, unknown to my master and the surveyor, or any body else.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 44.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined a Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-29

565. JOHN PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July , three bottles of port wine, value 12 s. a bottle of brandy, value 2 s. and three bottles of cyder, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Chitty .

CHARLES CHITTY . I live with my mother, Sarah Chitty , in Gower-street , the prisoner was footman to my mother; he came into my mother's service on the 4th of May last. On the 8th of July my mother was out of town; between eleven and twelve o'clock I went into the cellar to get a bottle of rum: it appeared to me that a considerable quantity of spirits were missing. I counted five bottles of brandy that were missing, two bottles of rum, and a considerable quantity of port wine. From information of the cook, my suspicion fell upon the man. The following morning I procured an officer. We examined his trunk; there we found a bottle of brandy, two bottles of port wine, and an empty bottle; the corks were cut off the bottles, as they are now; the top of the corks were marked with a B for the brandy, and the top of the corks are cut off.

ANN MORGAN . Q. You are cook to Mrs. Chitty. - A. Yes. I only know about the wine and cyder; he asked me to have a bottle of wine, I told him he had better not do it, for they were too good a judge of what was in the cellar. I saw him take three bottles of cyder while the man was bottling of it.

Q. Did he say where he was to get this bottle of wine. - A. He got it out of the cellar, and gave it to me.

MRS. HOWARD. I am a chairwoman. I was at Mrs. Chitty's on the 4th of July; the prisoner came where I was ironing; he took a bottle of wine from under his apron. I did not see where he took it from.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer of Marlborough street; I apprehended the prisoner; I searched his box. I found these three bottles, a pint, and two quarts; there was another bottle with a small quantity of brandy in it, which the prisoner drank coming along.

Prisoner. I am innocent of the charge; I was unwell; the wine was given me by a person in the city to take with my bark.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-30

566. ELIZABETH DUDLEY was indicted for that she on the 21st of August , feloniously and knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her possession and

custody, a forged bank note, for the payment of one pound, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-31

567. ELIZABETH DUDLEY was indicted for feloniously forging on the 21st of August , a bank note for the payment of one pound, with intent to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

Second count for disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention, and

Two other counts for feloniously forging and uttering, and publishing as true, knowing it to be forged, a promissory note, with the same intention; and

Four other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud Stephen Lawrence .

Mr. Fielding, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-32

568. JOHN MAHONY was indicted for the willful murder of Dennis Bryant .

JEREMIAH HANAGAN. Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He sold saw dust ; he lived in Blue Anchor-yard, near Rosemary-lane.

Q. Did you know the deceased, Dennis Bryant . - A. I did, he was a labouring man .

Q. He is dead now, is not he. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how he came by his death. - A. He and Mahony went out into Stepney fields to fight, on a Sunday morning. They fought in Stepney fields with their fists; Mahony gave Bryant the last blow, and he gave out.

Q. Where had he the last blow. - A. On the right side.

Q. A bad blow. - A. Yes. When he went out of the field he could not walk; they sent for a coach; he died in the coach; I was present, it was about half a mile out of Stepney.

Q. What occasioned his death. - A. I do not know, he was hearty and well when he went to the fields, and he died afterwards.

Q. Do you know why they went out to fight. - A. No.

Q. Were they in liquor. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Were not you a member of the smoaking club. - A. No.

Q. You know they were members of the smoaking club. - A. Yes.

Q. You went to the fight. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the deceased get there first. - A. To be sure he did.

SAMUEL COWNE . I am a surgeon.

Q. Did you examine the body of the deceased. - A. I was with Mr. Curtis, surgeon of Whitechapel, at the examination of the body. After strict examination of the body, we found he had broken a blood vessel.

Q. What was the occasion of his death, in your opinion. - A. Rupture of a blood vessel, just above the kidneys.

Q. If the deceased endeavoured to throw the prisoner, that might occasion a rupture of the blood vessel, might it not. - A. Yes, there were no external bruises.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-33

569. GEORGE HURT was indicted (together with ENOCH ROBERTS , not in custody), for feloniously making an assault upon Charles Locke , on the 22nd of July , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a gold watch, value 21 l. a gold key, value 10 s. and a seal, value 2 l. and seven pounds seven shillings, his property .

CHARLES LOCKE . Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know any thing of him. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him and upon what occasion. - A. Upon the 27th of July last, at about half past nine in the evening, I was walking near Coney hatch.

Q. Where is that. - A. At Fryern Barnet .

Q. That is in Middlesex, is it not - A. Yes; I was walking in the road by myself. The prisoner, in company with another man, stopped me, and demanded my money; and the prisoner held a bludgeon to me; the other man held out his hand, as if to take my watch, he did not say any thing; I said do not take my watch, be satisfied with my purse, there is about seven guineas in it; he continued to hold out his hand, and I gave him my watch. The prisoner said, when he presented the bludgeon, I do not wish to take any man's life. One of them told me then not to stop, but to go about my business; I cannot recollect which.

Q. They took your watch and you purse. - A. Yes, the other man did; the prisoner took nothing.

Q. Neither of them touched you. - A. One of them struck me at the first, not the prisoner. They left me and went towards Finchley Common. I ran home to my father's house, at Coney hatch; I got the assistance of my brother and servant, and pursued them across the common, towards the Bald-faced Stag.

Q. You did not overtake them. - A. No; on returning from the Bald-faced Stag, we saw two men in the opposite side of the road; we went up to them: I said these are the fellows that robbed me; I seized the prisoner, and when we got him down, I searched him. I found my watch upon him, and the bludgeon which he held up to me.

Q. Where did you find the bludgeon. - A. It was inside of his coat.

Q. Was that the same sort of bludgeon that he held up to you. - A. Yes, about the same size. We took him to a public house close to my father's house. The other man got away.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. No, I had never seen him to my knowledge.

Q. What sort of a night was it, a light night, or a dark night - A. It was dark; there were some high trees that were on the road, it was not dark on the common.

Q. Was it so dark that you could not distinguish the figure of the person, or the countenances of the persons that stopped you. - A. By the figure.

Q. You said it was the prisoner that stopped you - can you speak to their persons, or their countenances. - A. Not to their countenances; they were in dark dresses, both of them, nearly alike.

Q. You told me that at the time the prisoner held up the bludgeon to you, he was the person that spoke to you; the other was the person that held out his hand,

and who took from you your purse and your watch - how do you know it was the prisoner that spoke to you. - A. I heard him speak to me when we took him, then I knew his voice directly.

Q. If any body else had taken him, could you have told by his voice whether he was the man that stopped you. - A. No.

Q. Who has the watch. - A. I have had it ever since.

Q. How long have you had that watch. - A. About four or five years.

Q. You say it is your watch, what do you know it by, do you know it by either number or mark, or what is it you know it by. - A. I can swear to it; it is a singular face, I never saw a face like it.

Q. You cannot swear to it by the number. - A. No. I can by the maker's name.

Q. Had it a chain, or ribbon, or what. - A When I found the watch upon him it was in the state it is in now, so that I only found the watch, not the ribbon. We went to the place where I was robbed; there I found the ribbon, seal, and ring, which is mine; the ring is torn off.

Q. You have no doubt but that watch is yours. - A. Not a doubt. I said to the prisoner, after I had taken him, this is a bad evening's work for you, my friend; he said, indeed it is sir. That is all that passed.

ROBERT LOCKE . Q. You are the brother of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of his coming home and giving you information of the robbery, did you go with him in pursuit of the robbers. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go towards the Bald-faced Stag. - A. Yes, we could not find them. Coming back we saw two people on the opposite side of the road; we went across the road to them; my brother said these are the men that robbed me. We laid hold of the prisoner and threw him down; we found my brother's watch upon him. I saw my brother take it from him; we found a stick that was under his coat.

WILLIAM MANN . Q. You have heard the account that these witnesses have given. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe what they have stated now in court. - A. Yes.

Q. You went with them. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PICKERING . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. The prisoner was given into my charge; on the Tuesday following he confessed to me that he did the robbery.

Q. Did you promise him any thing or threaten him. A. No; he mentioned it in the goal before he told me. He informed me that Enoch Roberts was the person that took him out and led him into it, and that he had never been guilty of the like before.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I stopped the gentleman and took the money away. I was led into it very innocently by a man that was here before. I found him since to be a very bad man.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the metal of that watch. - A. It is a gold watch.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-34

570. JAMES ARNAUT was indicted for the wilful murder of Eugene Mahoney .

The Case stated by Mr. Knapp.

CATHERINE FAINE . Q. Did you know either the deceased or the prisoner. - A. I only know them since the child was killed.

Q. On what day was the child killed. - A. On the Wednesday before Whitsuntide. On that day I was coming from Mr. Lewis's with a pint of beer, facing Cartwright-square, Rosemary-lane; I saw some children about four hogsheads; I saw a man come across the square out of Crown-court , he said he would kill some of them if they did not go away; he then took the hogshead at the top and bottom with his two hands, and throwed it upon them; he did it almost immediately; he did not throw it at one in particular, he throwed it at them. The hogshead struck the child on the back; then sir this child was killed.

Q. What was the name of the child . - A. Eugene Mahoney .

Q. On what part of his back. - A. About the small of the back. The blow of the hogshead knocked the boy down as he stood scraping the sugar on the side of the hogshead, and when the man threw the hogshead the boy fell. There were several children there.

Q. Who is the man. - A. The prisoner. He took the child in his arms and asked for the owner of it; a man came and said it was Mahoney's child.

MARY BRIANT . Q. Did you take the child from any body. - A. I was coming along with the mother of the child, I received the child out of another woman's arms; after the child was dead I washed it and laid it out; the child had a small spot upon the small of his back, about the breadth of half a crown.

FRANCIS MAHONEY . Q. You are the father of the child. - A. I am the father of the child. I took the child to the surgeon, he bled it, and told me it was dead; the child was well at one o'clock.

THOMAS STONE . Q. Were you one of the boys that were playing with the deceased. - A. I was about the sugar casks before the man came.

Q. Did you see all that happened. - A. Yes. I was picking one of the sugar casks; and when I saw the man come I run away, and some more, and then there was a child on one side of the cask that the man could see; he drove it away with his hat. Then the man shoved the cask, but he could not see the child of the other side, for it was quite the other side of the tub; then I cried out, Mr. Arnaut there is a child, but the tub was too much gone, he could not save it; it hit the child, the tub rolled off the child; the man and me run to take the tub further from the child; the man took the child in his arms, and his wife took it; there was some women took the child into Wellcose-square to the surgeon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Then the poor man did what he could, he had his wife to his assistance. - A. Yes.

Q. The child was of the other side of the cask, it was quite impossible for him to see it. - A. Yes.

Q. The moment you called out he endeavoured to stop it from going on the child. - A. He could not save it, it was too far gone.

Q. Therefore it was against his will. - A. Yes. I had often seen the man there, he used to bring tubs there, and after that they were put in the yard a little way from the square.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 18th of May I bought

four hogsheads of a grocer in Broad-street, St. Giles; he sent them me in Cartwright-square. The man laid them two by two, the tierce he laid in one of the hogsheads, which came higher up than the hogshead; I came to take them into a yard that I had; there was a number of children about the hogsheads; I warned them to get out of the way. I laid hold of the bottom of the hogshead to bring it towards me, unfortunately it went, and unfortunately the child came out of the yard right facing, and the hogshead rolled upon it; I took the child up in my arms, and enquired who it belonged to; I gave it to my wife, and desired her to take care of the child; I went to Dr. Warner, and told him of the accident; I entreated him to come to the child, and any thing it come to I would give to him; he told me it was of no use; before I came back, the child was taken by the parents (I was told) to the hospital; I went to the hospital, I met the father of the child, he told me the child was dead; I said I was very sorry for the accident.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-35

571. HENRY PRICE was indicated for the willful murder of Sarah Price .

The Case stated by Mr. Pooley.

MR. SKILLET. - Mr. Pooley. You are an apothecary. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner's wife before she died. - A. I did; I was first of all sent for on Friday the 17th of July, between two and three o'clock, I found her very ill, and rather convulsed; I first of all examined the child that she was delivered of, a female child; I found it very well; after that I found a black mark on her right eye. I sent her some medicine, and told them to let me know how she was at eleven o'clock; they sent me word that she was something better; I went the next morning, and found her something better; she complained then of a very sore throat, and a compression across her breast; on Saturday I called again, and found her worse, and very much convulsed; on Sunday morning I found her dead. I believe she died with an inflammation of the chest, and convulsions.

Q. Was it possible that the blow she received under her eye, could be the occasion of her death. - A. No, it could not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-36

572. THOMAS DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , four pound weight of nails, value 4 s. two dozen of files, value 5 s. and a quarter of a pound weight of brass, value 2 d. the property of Charles Farmer and William Harford .

CHARLES FARMER . I am an ironmonger ; my partner's name is William Harford , we live in St. John-street ; the prisoner had been employed in our business for two months. On the 28th of August, about two o'clock, in consequence of information, we asked the prisoner what he had got in his pocket, he was in our shop; he took the old brass out of his pocket; he said he never saw any of the men save old brass; we deal in old iron; it was bits of brass that we were collecting from the old iron. He was employed in taking the bits of brass off. My partner afterwards took some nails out of his pocket, three papers, about four pound weight; and when the constable came he took two dozen of files out of his pocket; he said he picked the nails up off the ground, they were new nails. I believe these nails and files to be my property; he first said the nails did not belong to us. I cannot swear the nails and files to be my property; the brass I can swear to.

JOHN BEAL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Farmer. On the 28th of August the prisoner was breaking up some old iron; there was a ring of brass on the old iron which belonged to my master; when he took them off he put them into his pocket.

Q. What quantity might that be. - A. I only saw him put two pieces in; I did not see him take any thing else. I saw the old brass and one parcel of nails taken out of his pocket; he said the nails did not belong to Mr. Farmer.

Q. What might be the value of the brass. - A. Two pence or threepence.

Jury. Were the nails tied up in paper. - A. They were just put in a piece of paper.

THOMAS MILLS . I am a constable. These two parcels of files I took out of his breeches pocket; the nails and the brass I received from Mr. Farmer.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY aged 42.

Of stealing to the value of ten pence .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling . First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-37

573. JOHN BRYANT , alias BIRKETT , and THOMAS HOLMES , alias BENJAMIN CRADDOCK , alias CADDICK , were indicted for that they on the 25th of May upon John Watkinson , feloniously and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously did strike, cut, stab, and wound the said John Watkinson in and upon his back, with intent in so doing with malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

The indictment read by Mr. Andrews, and case stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN PARKINSON . Q. What are you. - A. I am a salesman, I live at Mr. Gower's in Holborn, my own residence is 26 Compton-street. On the night of the 25th of May I was at my benefit club; I came through Holborn, near to Middle-row, I came up to the waggon. After I got through the row I saw a man in a mixture coat, he came up to the waggoner, asked him where the waggon came from, and who the waggon belonged to, he answered; the man in the mixture coat said he knew the owner exceeding well. I got a-head of the waggon, and I stopped at Chancery-lane, and the waggon got before me again; I heard him ask the waggoner to have something to drink; the waggoner drawed up to the George and Blue Boar; I told him to go about his business for they wanted to rob the waggon; the waggoner went on. The man that was in the mixture coat flew round the back of the waggon, went over the road, and went into the Red Lion public house; I went on a head of the waggon as far as Turnstile; there I told the waggoner to keep his course and not stop for any one. I saw no more of the waggon till I came to Smart's-buildings; there I saw the man in the mixture coat.

Q. Did the waggon stop there. - A. No. I did not see the face of the man in the mixture coat; I saw him come round the waggon. As soon as I saw this man in the mixture coat he struck him in the face and knocked him down with his fist between the wheels, with intention to knock him under, but he did not do it. The man retreated, from that I retreated, and went to the watchman at Smart's-buildings. After the watchman came up I went round of the other side and took the waggoner away, and went up St. Giles's. At the time the waggoner was knocked down I saw no man but the man in the mixture coat.

Q. After he knocked the man down what became of him. - A. I cannot say; the watchman sprang his rattle; in two or three minutes afterwards the spring of the rattle at the corner of Smart's buildings brought other watchman, and the inhabitants out. I told the waggoner to come out of the narrow part of Holborn, I told him he was in a dangerous place.

Q. You saw several people assemble. - A. Yes; I do not know how many.

Q. What sort of a night was this. - A. It was about half past eleven. it was a fine night.

Q. Was it light enough for you to describe the men. - A. No, I should not know them by the face at all; he had a dark mixture lapelled coat on.

Q. Look to the men at the bar, and tell me whether you can speak to either of them. - A. I cannot speak to either of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. It was dark. - A. Yes, I could not take any observation at all.

THOMAS TOPPING . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you drive the Watford waggon, do not you. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 5th of May were you going up Holborn at half past eleven. - A. Yes.

Q. When you got near to the top of Holborn were you knocked down in Holborn. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any person go to any part of your waggon before you were knocked down at the spot where you were knocked down. - A. No.

Q. You was knocked down. - A. Yes. I do not know who knocked me down.

Q. How many persons did you find when you got up again. - A. There were two or three.

Q. Was any assistance called. - A. There were persons that came up to assist.

Q. Before you were so knocked down had you struck any body or given any provocation. - A. No, I never struck any one, nor affronted them.

JOHN KETTLE . - Mr. Andrews. What are you. - A. I am a bookseller in Holborn. On the night of the 25th of May I was standing at my desk in my shop, I heard a waggoner apparently stop his horses; the man was crying out why do you use me ill, or why do you knock me down. I went out of the side door, I came round the corner (my house is the corner of a court), and at the next door there stood two men by the shutters, and opposite that there stood the waggoner and Mr. Watkinson, and the next door was an alamode beef shop with a patent lamp each side the window, and a patent lamp in the shop. I saw the persons of the two men.

Q. What did the waggoner say or do to these two men. - A. The waggoner seemed to describe the assault that these two men had been making to him; the waggoner was very bloody in the face, he said that one of these men had knocked him down.

Q. Look at the two men at the bar, and tell me whether you recollect the persons of the two men that were present. - A. I will tell you as it has struck me all along; I imagine I stood next to Caddick.

Q. Do you believe him to be one of the men you have described. - A. Yes, to the best of my belief.

Court. Will you swear positively. - A. I could not take upon me to swear positively to a man whom I had seen but once. The waggoner said he had knocked him down, and he would swear to it; the men were both impertinent. I seeing the waggoner bloody, and they impertinent, I said, my friend, there is a watch-box, you had better charge the watch with him. At that time the watchman was coming with his lanthorn; young Mr. Watkinson said, here is a watchman; I said now you charge him with the watch. As soon as I advanced a step or two to the watchmen these two men run off; the shorter man stood near me, he had a kind of a speckled frock coat on, and they both had the resemblance of gentlemen's grooms; I perfectly recollect the dress they had on. I stood still myself; I had no apprehension of the danger that took place. The watchmen pursued them, and young Mr. Watkinson pursued, and in a very few minutes Mr. Watkinson came back; he said he was struck; I thought he said he was stuck. He took his hands off, and I perceived he was wounded.

Q. Did you see either of the two men you have described after they run off. - A. No.

Q. Can you at all describe the tall man. - A. Why. the tall man had a dark dress, I cannot say the colour of the coat. I only think they are the men; when I saw them at Lambeth-street it struck me they were the men, they were dressed different to what they are now; I believe Caddick is in the same dress, I cannot say positively. Briant was dressed in a suit of black there.

Q. Can you speak to the tall man Briant. - A. I cannot speak to the countenance only. From the general appearance they were like grooms. It has struck me all along that they are the same men. I cannot say more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You had but little time to observe these men - how much time had you. - A. About two or three minutes.

Q. That person that you describe to be Caddick was next to you; had you the opportunity of observing him better than the other who was farther from you. - A. Most likely.

Q. You were alarmed. - A. I had no alarm then.

Q. These persons you had never seen before. - A. No.

Q. These persons are now trying for their lives - do you mean to have it understood that you mean positively to swear to the persons of these men that you saw only two or three minutes. - A. I cannot say; I think they are the men, and it has struck me all along so.

Q. Where next did you see them after this night. - A. At Lambeth-street. I saw them before the magistrate.

Q. Were not their persons pointed out to you as the persons against whom you were to appear. - A. Yes. I saw another man, but I could not point him out; I believe they resemble the men that I saw that night.

JOHN WATKINSON . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you live in High Holborn. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of May the 25th was your attention attracted by any thing. - A. Yes, I was coming down Broad St. Giles's at about half past eleven at night; in

the narrow part of Holborn; I perceived four or five people standing together, by the alamode beef shop. When I went to see what was the matter, I saw two persons, and one of them stood by Mr. Cawthorn's shutters; they appeared to me to be suspicious characters; the alamode beef shop was open; the waggon was stopped, and the waggoner was standing off the curb; when he came near the short man, he said you are the man that knocked me down, I will swear to it; Mr. Kettle who was standing by, said you have been ill used, you had better call the watchman; a watchman came from the corner of Smart's-buildings; I said to the waggoner, there is the watchman; the waggoner turned round, he said watchman take charge of this man; that was the short one. The tall man took hold of the short one, turned him round, and gave him a push up Holborn, the opposite way from where the watchman was.

Q. Did the light of the alamode beef shop give you any light so as to speak to their persons. - A. Yes, the short one; the tall one was standing towards St. Giles, he was rather out of the light.

Q. Now look, and tell me whether either of them are the persons. - A. If either of them are the persons I have lost my recollection; the prisoner at the bar answers to the two men in height; I do not recollect their faces.

Court Are they unlike the men. - A. They are like the men; I cannot recollect enough to say they are the the men; I think the tallest of the two prisoners is not so lusty as the tall man was. The short man appears to be of the same size.

Q. Now pursue the story. - A. The watchman came up, and the waggoner gave charge of him; the tall man gave him a shove, the short man ran off; I pursued him; when he got the distance of four or five houses, I laid hold of him by the left side of his collar; the instant I laid hold of him, some man came up and struck me in the back; it appeared to be the same man that stood behind the shutter; that man went away from me; upon that I left hold of the short man. I was stabbed in the back, and was under the care of the surgeon some time.

MARIA - . - Mr. Andrews. Where do you live. - A. I live at the Windsor Castle, I am servant to Mrs. Atkins.

Q. Is that near the alamode beef shop. - A. It is almost opposite of it.

Q. Do you remember a waggon stopping there on one evening in May last. - A. Yes, about twenty minutes past eleven; I saw the waggon stop, I saw the waggoner and a man talking; the waggoner pointed to him, and said he could swear to that man, that he knocked him down; he said that he had been used very ill; he took up his smock frock and shewed the blood upon it; there were several people told him to charge the watch with him; as soon as the watchman came the man ran away; then young Mr. Watkinson came up, and he said he was hurt.

Q. Now look at these two men at the bar, will you swear to either of them; was the light of the night sufficient to enable you to observe the persons of these men - A. I cannot positively say it was.

Q. Did you observe the dress of the men. - A. He had a light coloured drab coat on; I cannot recollect any more.

Q. Turn round and see if you see any men that resemble the persons you have described; have you looked at these men at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe they are the men you have described. - A. No, I cannot say

MICHAEL COLEMAN . - Mr. Gurney. You are a watchman, I believe. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you called by the alarm of this waggoner, the night of the 25th of May. - A. I was called by two men; when I came up I saw the waggoner standing by the waggon, by the alamode shop, High Holborn; he appeared to have some blood about his face; as soon as I came up, they told me to take charge of that man; as I was coming up they said

'bone him'; there were three men walking behind him, and two before him; one of the men turned round, and whipped his knife into me here, [witness putting his hand to the lower part of his stomach]; with that I turned round and struck one of them.

Q. Look round and see if you see any one that you can speak to. to be that man. - A. As I have said before, I cannot clearly swear to any of them.

Q. Can you speak to belief; do you see any person that you believe to be the man. - A. No, I told you I cannot swear to them.

SAMUEL MARSH . - Mr. Andrews. You live in the neighbourhood of Holborn. - A. I live in Soho-square.

Q. Do you remember this affray in Holborn, on the night of the 25th of May. - A. Yes, I was coming past at the time, in Holborn, towards St. Giles'. I saw the waggoner being ill used.

Q. Where you present at the alamode beef shop. - A. I was.

Q. How many persons might there be assembled there. - A. I should imagine about four at first; I can swear to one of them. I did not see Mr. Watkinson.

Q. Should you know them if you saw them. - A. I should know one of them if I was to see him.

Q. Have you seen that person since the night this affair happened. - A. Yes, I saw him at the office.

Q. Did you then speak positively to him. - A. I did; his name is Briant; that is the man (witness pointing to Briant); he ran past me in Holborn, and almost knocked me down; I am sensible that is the gentleman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Where were you in Holborn, at the time that you supposed he was running by you. - A. This side of the alamode beef shop; about two or three yards to the farthest; there was no one run but him.

Q. Had you ever seen that person, whom you supposed to be Briant, before in your life. - A. No, but he came with his face right towards me, that made me observe him; I only saw him as he rushed by me. I afterwards saw him at Worship-street.

Q. Were you told before you went that you should see the person who assaulted the waggoner. - A. By all means.

Q. When you came there, was the persons who are present now, then at the bar. - A By all means; there were four there; I looked round to be sure, and then I recollected Briant; he was the person that run by me.

MARY ATKINS . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you live near the alamode beef shop. - A. Nearly opposite.

Q. Were you standing at the door about the time the waggon was stopped at your house. - A. Before the

waggon came up I stood in the middle of the street, I saw the waggoner with a tallish man, I saw two or three others about the waggon; there was two of this side of the waggon. As the waggon passed that short man Caddick was at the tail of the waggon; the waggon passed me. I stood still at the alamode beef shop door and Caddick passed me; there was a good light at the alamode beef shop, and the lamp at my own house (I keep a public house), and it was a moon light night; I saw him, I was as close to him as I am to this gentleman; I have no doubt of his being the man. I returned to my own house and stood on the steps; in two or three minutes I saw Mr. Watkinson walk into the alamode beef shop.

Q. Did you see any thing of the scuffle. - A. I did not.

Q. You did not see the waggoner knocked down. A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. At the time that you first saw the man that you now speak of (Caddick) you had not seen any thing improper take place. - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Was he standing still or walking along. - A. Walking along.

Q. You had no other opportunity of seeing him than as he was walking along. - A. No other.

Q. I want to know how you came to take such particular notice, you had no particular attention drawn to him. - A. No. There were four men scattered about the waggon.

Q. Then in consequence if they were scattered about the waggon, your attention must have been divided. - A. If you was to come to see the situation that I stood in the street, there is a parting in the houses between the potatoe warehouse and the pawnbroker's; the reflection of the light came down so that I could see him; had the waggon came the other way I could not have seen him; but the moon glared.

Q. You are sure it was a moon light night. - A. It was a moon light night.

Q. You may be positive, and you may be mistaken, it has positively been proved by the witnesses that it was a dark night, how long was it after this that you saw the man in custody. - A. About a fortnight or three weeks afterwards.

Q. Give me leave to ask you whether at that time you did not say you could not venture so swear to him. A. I said Briant appeared to be the man. I was asked by the attorney of the prisoners whether I could swear to the man.

Q. Then you said that although Caddick bore the appearance of the man, yet you could not venture to swear to the man. - A. It was Briant; I did not say so of Caddick. I always said Caddick was the man that passed me; I did not know whether or no he was the man that did it.

THOMAS SAPWELL . - Mr. Andrews. What are you. A. I am an officer of the ward of Bishopgate. On the 31st of May I apprehended the prisoner Briant at the White Hind, Bishopgate Without. I apprehended Caddick at Dr. Taylor's, Bishopgate-street, he was having his wounds dressed. On searching Briant I found this pistol and this knife; the pistol was loaded. On Caddick I found this gimlet and this little knife.

WILLIAM BLAIR . - Mr. Gurney. You are a surgeon. A. Yes.

Q.Was this unfortunate man Mr. Watkinson under your care. - A. He came to me on the 25th of May about half after eleven o'clock at night; he was wounded in the back, about half an inch in breadth, the wound passing into the loins about three inches in depth.

Q. I will ask you, sir, whether it was such a wound- as a knife would make. - A. It was made by a sharp instrument, perhaps a knife; it bled violently.

Briant's Defence. I am innocent; that is all I have got to say. I have got witnesses to prove where I was at the time this affair happened.

Caddick's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with.

WILLIAM COX . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a hackney coachman.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Briant. - A. I do; I have known him nearly a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you remember being in company with him on Monday the 25th of May last. - A. I do, I was in company with him at the Crown and Anchor public house, Moor-fields; I went into his company between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and remained in his company till near twelve o'clock; he was not out of my company during that time.

Q. You know the distance between Moorfields and High Holborn, St. Giles'. - Q. Pretty near; it is about a mile and a half and half a quarter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Where do you live. A. I live at No. 17, Union-street, Hatton Wall.

Q. Master or servant. - A. I am a servant.

Q. Were you there as a coachman that night. - A. I was, the coach was on the stand.

Q. Do you keep a book with an account of every day where you are. - A. No.

Q. You cannot tell me where you was any other day as well as the 25th. - A. No, I cannot.

Q. How long is it ago that you was desired to attend as a witness. - A. About two months.

Q. Was there any other coachman there. - A. There was a man there they call Strawback; I do not know his name. There was another man that came in afterwards.

Q. Were you supping. - A. No, I had nothing to eat; I drank and smoked a pipe; the prisoner drank with another coachman; his name is Fisk.

Q. Can you give any reason why this was the 25th of May rather than the 24th. - A. I was to have taken Mr. Yates and his family to Sydenham fair; they keep the George on Little Saffron Hill; the 25th of May was the first day of Sydenham fair, that is the reason of my remembering it.

Q. What time in the evening were you to have taken him. - A. About five or six in the evening. When I came the wife thought it was too late to go, I did not go, and the reason of my remembering it so particular, I was baulked of going to the fair. I have no other reason.

Q. Did you on that night taken any particular notice of him. - A. No.

Q. You could not tell me his dress. - A. I could not.

WILLIAM WENTWORTH . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a coachman; I drive for Mrs. Child in Old-street Road.

Q. Do you know William Cox , the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the Crown and Anchor public

house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Briant. - A. I have seen him once or twice.

Q. Do you remember being in company with Cox and Briant, at the Crown and Anchor public house. - A. Yes. On the first Monday after Bow-fair; but the day of the month, I cannot say; Briant was in the house first, Cox was there with him; I did not sit at the same table.

Q. What time did you go into the public house. - A. It might be near half past ten o'clock, or near eleven; I staid in their company about twenty minutes; my wife was with me; as we were going in, Gosling was at the door; I left Mr. Cox, Briant, and Gosling together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. Do you know a man of the name of Strawback. - A. No, I do not.

Q. I suppose there was smoking, as well as drinking. - A. I did not take particular notice.

Q. How happened you to know that it would be useful to Briant for you to prove where he was on the 25th of May. - A. Some person came to my wife and asked her if she could recollect it; that might be three weeks, from the time he was in trouble. I will not be positive.

LYDIA WENTWORTH . - Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being with him at the Crown and Anchor public-house in Moorfields. - A. Yes. On the Monday evening after Bow-fair I saw Briant and Cox there, Gosling went in with me and my husband, I cannot say whether it was eleven or no when I went in; when I came out the watchman was going half past eleven; we left Briant, Cox and Gosling there. I never saw Briant till the Sunday morning before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. What was the company doing. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. None of them drinking together. - A. Mr. Cox was drinking with Mr. Briant.

Q. Then you know more than he, he did not. - A. They were drinking together.

Q. What should impress you so much that it was the Monday after Bow-fair. - A. Because a gentlemen came to me. At first I could not recollect; that same evening he called; I did recollect in the course of the night.

Q. By what wonderful chance they found you out you cannot tell. - A. That I cannot tell.

JOSEPH GOSLING . - Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you. - A. I am a hackney coachman.

Q. Do you know the Crown and Anchor public house on the Pavement, Moorfields. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Briant, Cox and Wentworth. - A. Yes. I remember being with them at the Crown and Anchor public house, on the 25th of May, because I had been after a situation at Greenwich; I went into the public house between half after ten o'clock and eleven, and staid there till twelve o'clock; Briant was in the house the whole time.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-38

574. CHARLES HOBSON was indicted for that he on the 13th of July , upon Catherine Randall spinster , feloniously, wilfully maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and that he with a certain sharp instrument then and there did strike, cut, penetrate and wound the said Chatherine Randall in and upon her right arm, with intent in so doing to kill and murder her .

CATHERINE RANDALL , I lodge at Mrs. Roach's, Peartree Alley, St. George's in the East . The prisoner came to me on Thursday the 9th of July, he slept with me three or four nights there. On Sunday after he had eat his dinner he took hold of the table cloth and wiped his knife he said that knife should either end his life or mine; after that he laid himself on the bed, and I came out. I did not return till eleven o'clock on the Monday morning, and then he had a pint of beer before him; he asked me if I would shake hands with him; I did; he asked me if I would drink with him, I told him I would, he said I should not have beer, he would go to Mr. Murphy, and get some cherry brandy; he went out and returned, and said he could not get a bottle; he turned back into the passage and sharpened his case knife; he returned, into the room and said he would have my life, Hannah-Black was in the room. She went to take the knife out of his hand; he cut her knuckles with it; she went out to call assistance; he laid hold of me with his left hand by my head he had the knife in his right hand, he went to put the knife across my throat; I put up my arm, it cut my arm in two places; as soon as I could run away I did; there is the mark of one of the cuts; the other you cannot see.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. You have said the prisoner cut you on the arm - was not all this done in play. - A. That I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-39

575. CATHERINE FORRESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August ; a cheese value 10 s. the property of William Tipple , privately in his shop .

MARY TIPPLE . I am the wife of William Tipple ; we keep a chandler's shop .

Q. You lost a cheese. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming into your shop. - A. Yes, I was coming out of the adjoining room; I went as far as the shop door, I saw the prisoner in the shop.

Q. Do you know what errand she came in upon. - A. Yes, a halfpenny worth of beer, she was served with the table-beer; she drank it and was going out.

Q. Did you observe any thing as she was going out. - A. There was some cheese in the shop that stood at the shop window; when I turned round, I missed one cheese, and I suspected her to be the person that had taken it; she had a long cloak on, I went and put my hand outside of her cloak there I found the cheese, it was under her long cloak, she had it under her arm. I took it from her; she denied taking it, and she said I did not take it from her.

Q. What is the value of the cheese. - A. Ten shillings; it is my cheese.

JOHN SPINKS . I am a coal dealer; I happened to be in the shop, I saw the cheese taken from the prisoner; she said and swore that it was not taken from her and that she knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a drop in my head; I knew nothing of it till the next morning, when the officer told me of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-40

576. DANIEL COLLINS was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 24th of August , a jacket, value 10 s. a pair of trowsers, value 10 s. four silk hankerchiefs value 16 s. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. three shirts, value 15 s. a hat, value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Stevens , in the dwelling house of Joseph Munen .

THOMAS STEVENS . Q. Where did you lodge at the time you lost your clothes. - A. In Old Gravel-lane, at Joseph Munen's ; the prisoner slept in the same room with me, but in a different bed.

Q. How many beds were there in the room. - A. Three; the prisoner was in the room when I went to bed. I awoke between three and four in the morning; Collins was not in the room. The landlord called to me, I immediately looked for my clothes; when I awoke they were all gone. There was a jacket, a pair of trowsers, a hat, four silk handkerchiefs, three shirts, and a pair of shoes, the handkerchiefs, stockings. and the shirts were laying loose in the room; the jacket, trowsers, and the shoes were what I pulled off when I went to bed.

Q. Do you know the worth of them. - A. About three pound ten.

Q. Did you see the man afterwards. - A. I did not see him for two or three days afterwards; my landlord caught him selling other property.

Q. Did you see any of your things again. - A. None at all.

JOSEPH MUNEN . Q. Did the last witness Stevens lodge at your house. - A. Yes; and the prisoner lodged there; I kept the house, it is in the parish of St. George's.

Q. Do you recollect this night when Stevens lost his clothes. - A. Yes; they both slept in one room; the prisoner was the first that was up. At four o'clock I heard my house door open, I got up and found it open; I shut my door, and went to the room where he had lodged; I missed him out of the room, and no one but him; all was at home a-bed, and Stevens was fast asleep.

Q. Had he paid you for the lodgings. - A. He had paid me on the night before.

Q. When did you take him up afterwards. - A. Three days afterwards; I catched him in a public house in Spital fields.

Q. You did not find any of Stevens' clothes. - A. Not any of them. I asked the prisoner what he had done with them; he would not make me any answer.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard him when I was coming down stairs, I spoke to him; I said Joe, you are sick, and his wife said he was drunk the over night. There was five slept in the room where I lay; there were two that went out before me; I told one of the men to give me a call; he called me. I have subpoenaed this man; he sent me word he was indebted to the landlord, and he would not come forward, for fear the landlord would turn him out.

Munen. When I came down and found my door open, I went up stairs; I found the lodgers in bed; Stevens was asleep, and Collins had absconded. I was as sober that night as I am now.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-41

577. ANN LLOYD , alias BOND , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a chaise, value 18 l. 18 s. and a chaise harness, value 2 l. the property of William Brownnutt .

WILLIAM BROWNUTT . I am a coachmaker , I live in Blackfriars Road. On the 5th of August last the prisoner came and hired a chaise for the afternoon, to go to Hampstead, and to return at eight o'clock in the evening. I never saw no more of the girl, till I saw her in possession of the officer at Hatton Garden, She brought a horse with her; she said she was going to drive the chaise herself.

Q. Did not you enquire who she was, or what she was - A. The labourer in general does, or me; I omitted it that day, else I generally make the enquiry. I left the prisoner to go to a gentleman at the other part of the shop I ordered the man to deliver a chaise to her, which he did.

Q. What is the woman. - A. When I enquired about the horse, she said that the horse was her mother's, she gave twenty pound for it; I said to her the horse has a bad eye, you had better have some advice, or else the horse will loose the eye. It was by the mark of the horse over the eye that she was apprehended.

Q. Then you do not know the woman at all. - A. Yes I do; she was drest like a person in business; as if she was used to cows, or horses. I am sure it was her.

- HOARDER. I am a wheelwright, I live in Upper Thames-street. On the 10th of August the prisoner drove herself a chaise into my yard, and left it there; and took away a cart which she had previously agreed to give ten pounds for.

WILLIAM MAYHEW. I am a collar maker. I live in Upper Thames-street. On the 10th of August the prisoner came to our shop, and bespoke a new harness to be made; she left the harness that was on her horse at that time, till she called for the new; I lent her a harness to use in the mean time: the harness that she had was not fit for use, for the cart that she then had. I did not see her for a week afterwards; then she was in the custody of the officer. The officer took the harness that she had left, saying that the harness had been stolen.

JOHN WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the evening of the 27th of August, I received information of the prisoner. There was an advertisement of two guineas reward, for apprehending the prisoner for running away with a one horse chaise of Mr. Brownnutt, in Blackfriars Road. I went to the White Hart public house, Leather-lane, Holborn; where I found the prisoner standing at the bar; I laid hold of her by the arm, and told her I wanted to speak to her, I asked her what she had done with Mr. Brownnutt's chaise and harness; she told me that she had left the chaise at Mr. Horder's, a wheeler, in Thames-street, and she had left the harness at a collar makers in Thames Street. I went there and found the harness, all but the bridle and the collar.

Q.(to prosecutor) Have you ever seen the chaise and the harness. - A. I have. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not the least thought o defrauding Mr. Brownnutt of the chaise; when Mrs Wood came to take me, I was going to Mr. Brownnutt that night.

Q.(to Wood) What is this young woman. - A. She is the daughter of a very honest woman, with five children.

I am sorry to say the mother gave her the worst of characters.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-42

578. MARY GILLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of July , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s 4 d. the property of Joseph Christopher .

JOSEPH CHRISTOPHER. I am a publican , I live at the Black Horse, Petticoat-late ; I lost the pot out of the tap room; on the 13th of July the prisoner came in for half a pint of beer; the two men had just drank a quart of beer, they went out when she came in; I missed my pot, I asked her if she had not got something belonging to me; I took her basket from her, I could then see the pot from under her apron; I took it from her; this is the pot, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It was a light transgression; I was never guilty of the like before. I humbly entreat for mercy.

GUILTY aged 53.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-43

579. THOMAS JEFFERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July , an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and three quarters of a yard of cotton, value 6 d. the property of John Morris .

ANN MORRIS. I am the wife of John Morris , we live at No. 10, King-street, Cloth Fair . On the 2nd of July, between the hours of three and four o'clock, I went out, I was out about half an hour; I heard an alarm that there was somebody in my room; when I went up stairs my landlord had got the knob of the door in his hand; he asked me if I had not got the key. I gave him the key. he opened the door; when I went in the prisoner at the bar was standing behind the door, there was nothing taken out of the room; they were taken out of the drawer and tied upon the table; there was an apron, a pair of stockings, and a piece of red cotton check.

Q. You are sure that you had not left them on the table. - A. No, I had left them in the left hand drawer.

Q. Did you know the man. - A. No, I never saw him before I saw him in my room.

Prisoner. She has given her evidence in the name of Ann Morris ; I am informed she is not his wife, she lives in adultery.

Mrs. Morris. I am his wife, I was married at St. Sepulchre's.

THOMAS PAGE . One of my lodgers, Margaret Coe , came down to me and said there was somebody in Mrs. Morris's room, and she knew Mrs. Morris was out. When I came up stairs I catched hold of the door and peeped through the key hole; I saw him in the room packing up as fast as he could, I saw these things in his hand, and I saw that property on him. When I got in the premises he had them in his hand; when I laid hold of him.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-44

580. JOHN BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September a pocket book, value 1 s. and a bill of exchange for the payment of 15 l. 15 s. the property of William Holmes .

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am a cheesemonger , No. 50, Newgate-street.

Q. When did you lose this pocket book. - A. On the 2nd of September, about five o'clock in the afternoon in Cornhill . I knew nothing of it till the constable tapped me on the shoulder and told me of it.

JOHN FORRESTER I am a constable. On the 2nd of this month, near five o'clock, I was walking in Leadenhall-street, towards Aldgate. At the corner of St. Mary Axe I met the prisoner and two of his accomplices; I made a full stop, and looked at them; I could see by their manner that their intention was to rob Mr. Holmes. I turned about and kept company with them.

Q. Did you speak to them. - A. No.

Q. Did they see you. - A. Yes, but they did not happen to know me. Between that and Cornhill they made two or three attempts; when they came to Corn-hill Mr. Holmes stopped at No. 73, a picture shop; the prisoner stood close to Mr. Holmes, and the two accomplices stood on each side of him; I saw the prisoner at the bar with his right hand in Mr. Holmes's pocket; he made off then; I knew they had done the business. He walked off pretty sharp towards the Exchange, I walked after him and passed him, then I turned round and laid hold of him by the collar, he asked me what I meant by that; I told him that I suspected that he had something about him that did not belong to him; says he, you are mistaken in me, I am an officer of Union-hall, and there is my authority.

Q. Did he produce his authority. - A. Yes, here it is in my hand. I told him he might be an officer, but I believed I should prove him to be a thief. I shoved him against a window; he said you will not expose me in the street, I said it will be of no consequence to you; I went to search him, he took something out of his pocket, and let it fall on the grating of the window; I picked it up, I said that is all I want. Mr. Holmes still kept looking at the picture shop, and I held him till he made his way towards the Exchange. I asked Mr. Holmes if he had lost any thing, he said he had not; I told him to be satisfied, and shewed him the pocket book; he said that is my pocket book, and to convince you it is mine, there is a bill of exchange in it for fifteen guineas. I opened it and found it corresponded; then I took him to the counter.

Q. What became of the other men. - A. They went off, I had no time to look after them, if I had gone after them I should have lost the property.

Q. Are you a city constable - A. I am.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. That pocket book I never saw; a boy found it; directly he laid hold of me, he searched me, he found nothing on me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-45

581. SARAH HAINES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of september , three gowns, value 15 s. a pair of sheet, value 5 s. a tablecloth, value 1 s. a shift value 1 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. two pair of stockens, value 2 s. a shawl, 1 s. a veil, value 2 s. and two night caps, value 2 s. the property of Sophia Lloyd , spinster .

SOPHIA LLOYD, I lived at No. 52, Holborn-hill. I am a hatter , and I am a single woman. She was a servant of mine, she lived with me six days On Monday last Sarah Haines said she must leave me at a minutes warning; I told her that I had agreed for a months wages, or a month's warning; I therefore requested a months wages; in consequence of that she brought me eleven shillings, I told her to bring her box to me, I thought she seemed rather agitated; I told her to uncord it; she stooped down to uncord it, I saw her throwing some things of one side; my witness is here who saw the property found in her box; she took the things from me, as I took them out of the box; I found all the property that is mentioned in the indictment. After the constable took her to the counter, I found a lace cloak, and two silk handkerchiefs, that were pledged that day.

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I am a pawnbroker I produce a lace cloak; and two silk handkerchiefs, pawned by the prisoner, on the 14th of September.

MRS. Cross. I saw the things taken out out of the box.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 18,

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-46

582. MARY CASSEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 7 s. the property of Samuel Taylor and James Newbery , privately in their shop .

JAMES SMITH . I am shopman to Messrs. Samuel Taylor , and James Newbery , 88, Aldgate . the prisoner at the bar, and another, came into the shop to buy some gingham; one of of them bought two yard and a quarter, and another of them bought two yards and a quarter, after they had paid for it the prisoner at the bar went out of the shop, and left the other in the shop; as she passed the window, she had something as I supposed under her arm.

Q. Who was in the shop besides the prisoner and the other person. - A. The porter; I pursued the prisoner. As soon as she saw me she quickened her pace and ran into Golden Fleece-court in the Minories, went into No. 1 and there I took her by the side of the door, and the print was laying down by the side of her; she said she did not take it, her friend gave it her.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the cotton. If I was to die this minute there is no one can say they saw me take a thing in my possession.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined a Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-47

583. ALEXANDER MUNRO was indicted for that he on the 18th of June , with a certain pistol, loaded with gun powder, and a leaden bullet, unlawfully and feloniously did shoot, Emily Wyatt Dobbs , spinster , she being in a certain highway, called Fleet-street .

The Case stated by Mr. Curwood.

EMILY WYATT DOOBS. - Mr. Curwood Were you on the morning of the 18th of June, walking up Fleet-street. - A. I was.

Q. Tell his lordship what happened. - A. I only know I was wounded.

Q. Did you hear any report of a pistol close to you. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the person that fired. - A. I did not.

Q. Where was you wounded. - A. Here, [witness pointing to the front part under the left ear.]

RICHARD MUNNS . Mr. Curwood. Where do you live - A. I reside at 159, Fleet-street.

Q. On the morning of the 18th of June, did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. I did, I saw him pull a pistol out of his pocket; I saw him fire.

Q. Did you see against whom he levelled the pistol. - A. It did not appear to me that he levelled the pistol against any one.

Q. Did he fire at random. - A. It appeared to me so. I saw the lady go into the shop; I did not know she was wounded then.

Q. Was there any person between him and you. - A. No.

Q. Did you know that she was wounded. - A. I knew it afterwards; I am certain that the prisoner is the person that fired; and the last witness is the lady.

WILLIAM MARCH . - Mr. Curwood. I belive you are the constable of St. Dunstan's. - A. Yes; I heard the report, and saw the prisoner draw back his hand, and put the pistol in his right hand pocket; I ran after him, and apprehended him near the church. On searching his pockets, I found the pistol and a couple of balls loose in his pocket, and some powder in paper.

Q. Did you find only that one pistol. - A. Only that one; he had no more.

Q. Was the pistol in the state it is now when you found it. - A. No, not the barrel off. I went after him and brought him back; and afterwards I found the lady was wounded.

Q. Did he say any thing to you. - A. No, he gave no reason; I asked him he told me he knew nothing at all about it.

MR. DAVIS. - Mr. Curwood. This accident happened opposite to your house. - A. A little distance from my house.

Q. Have you the ball. - A. Yes, I have the ball; I picked it up from behind the counter; it penetrated through the shop window the moment the pistol was fired.

Q. What parish is this in. - A. St. Dunstan's.

MR. CARTWRIGHT. - Mr. Curwood. You are a surgeon. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you examine the wound. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it made by a ball or some such thing. - A. It certainly was.

Prisoner's Defence. It was in my own defence, some how or other; I was troubled. I cannot say which way; I was troubled in body.

Court. What do you mean by saying you was troubled in body, how was you troubled. in body. - A. I could not say, my body was not right.

Q. In what respect. - A. I cannot say properly.

Q. Have you no friends. - A. I have a sister.

Q. Is your sister here. - A. Yes; she is the other side of the water. I saw her yesterday.

Q. Where did you live before this. - A. I lived in Scotland, in Lokirk-street, Glasgow.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-48

584. JAMES BULLOCK was indicted for that he on the 14th of May in the forty seventh year of his Majesties reign, and for six months before, was and had been a wine and spirit merchant, dealer and chapman, that he being such trader became indebted to John Cowell and George Cowell in the sum of 189 l. 19 s. 2 d. that he afterwards being such trader and so indebted did become a bankrupt within the intent and meaning of the several statutes made and then in force concerning bankrupts, That is to say, he the said James Bullock did on the 1st of May depart from his dwelling house to injure his just creditors, whereupon a commission of bankruptcy under the great seal was instituted again him, and he was declared a bankrupt; and that he upon his examination before the major part of the commissioners, on the 8th of June, or at any other time, before the said commissioners duly authorised, or the major part of them, after he became a bankrupt, and after the time of issuing the said commission, did not fully and truly discover all his effects and personal estate of which he was possessed, before or after, or at the time of his becoming a bankrupt, except such part of his effects as had been sold in the ordinary way of his dealing, and except such sums as had been laid out in ordinary expences; neither did he deliver up to the said commissioners, to wit on the 8th of June, or at any other time all such parts of his goods, wares, merchandize, money, estates and effects, as at the time of such examination was in his custody, his necessary wearing apparel and his wife's and children only excepted, but that after he became a bankrupt and after the issuing of the said commission against him, to wit, on the 8th of June , unlawfully and feloniously did conceal part of his said personal estate, to more than the value of 20 l. of which he was possessed, and which was in his custody and possession at the time of his examination before the commissioners - a promissory note for the payment of 300 l. a bank of England note for the payment of 500. sixteen silver table spoons, value 8 l. twelve silver desert spoons, value 5 l. a silver soup ladle, value 2 l. two silver gravy spoons, value 2 l. a book-case, value 5 l. a feather bed, value 6 l. four pillows, value 1 l. 21 s 6 d. eight blankets, value 4 l. and a tea urn, value 18 s. with intention to defraud his creditors.

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be removing and embezzling with like intention.

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN HUBBARD . - Mr. Bolland. Q. You are clerk and cellar man to Mr. John and George Cowell . - A. I am a clerk to them.

Q. What are they. - A.Rum and brandy merchants .

Q. Do you know Mr. Bullock. - A. Yes, perfectly well.

Q. Did he at any time do business with that house. - A. Yes, several times.

Q. Do you know whether he was indebted to them. - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know him to be so indebted. - A. By having access to the books, and by having delivered goods at different time.

Q. What quantity of goods, and of what nature, have you ever delivered to Mr. Bullock. - A.On the 28th of January, two puncheons of rum, at the West India Docks.

Q. What is the value of the two puncheons. - A.1891. 19 s. 2 d.

Q. Do you keep Messrs. Cowell's books. - A. I do not.

Q. What other goods have you ever delivered to Mr. Bullock. - A. I cannot say as to what date; I have delivered four puncheons of rum after the 28th of January last, and brandy at different times.

Q. To what amount. - A. I should imagine it amounted at different times from my own account, to a thousand pounds

Court. Since January. - A. From the 28th of January, to about the beginning of May.

Mr. Bolland. In what manner did Mr. Bullock pay for these goods. - A. By bills of three months.

Q. Have you any of these bills - A. I have not.

Court. That was the course of their dealing. - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. Now look at the bills, and tell me whether these are the bills that he gave to Messrs. Cowell. - A. Yes. They are drawn by Mr. Cowell, and accepted by Mr. Bullock; they are the same bills that I left for acceptance, and that I afterwards called for the acceptance, they were never paid to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. You are not the bookkeeper. - A. I am not.

Q. You are the person that receives the money. - A. I never received any money of Mr. Bullock.

Q. Whether he paid any body else you do not know, how do you know these are the bills for the goods that you delivered. - A. After I took the bill of parcel, I took the bill to be accepted.

Q. Then each of these bill were taken by you, and the bills of parcels were taken by you, and you left them together. - A. Generally so; I cannot say every time.

Q. Now fix upon any one time, and upon any one of them that you delivered. - A. The first, that is for one hundred and eighty-nine pound, nineteen shillings and two-pence; that I am certain I did.

Q. Did you go to receive the money afterwards. - A. I went after it was returned from the bankers; I asked if Mr. Bullock was at home. I was answered he was not.

Q. Is that bill noted. - A. Yes.

Q. It was noted before you had it, at the back of it. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Q. I think you say you delivered me goods. - A. I said I delivered them into the carts at the dock, into Joseph Miles cart.

Mr. Bolland. You delivered into Joseph Miles cart two puncheons. - A. Yes.

Q. And you afterwards delivered the bill of parcel, and the bill to Mr. Bullock. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you after the bill was returned from the bankers, go to Mr. Bullock's accompting house, to see why the bill was not paid. - A. I did; the answer was, not at home.

Prisoner. After you had presented the bill for payment, did it not go back to your bankers again. - A.Not as I know of.

THOMAS HOLLY. - Mr. Gurney. Are you a carman. - A. Yes.

Q. In the service of Joseph Miles . - A. Yes.

Q. On the 28th of January last, did you receive from the last witness, Hubbard, two puncheons of rum. - A. I did, I delivered them in Suffolk-lane, at Mr. Bullock's wharf.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Prescot, Grote; and co.

Q. Look at these bills, did you ever see Mr. Bullock write. - A. Several times.

Q. Did he keep cash at your house. A. Yes.

Q. Look at these bills, and tell me whose writing that acceptance is. - A. The whole of them are the hand writing of Mr. Bullock; the acceptance is.

Q. When did the bill first become due. - A. It is marked on the first of May.

Q. Had you any effects in your house to pay that bill on that day. - A. We had not, our transactions ceased on that day.

Prisoner. Is there not an account of mine not settled. A. There are some bills.

Q. I ask you whether there is not an unsettled account of mine open at the house of Prescot and co. - A. There is some unsettled transaction with Mr. Bullock at present; bills which he had discounted, which he had not paid.

Mr. Bolland. You are the creditor, I suppose. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. At the time these bills were drawn, there was an account open. - A. There was.

Q. He had at that time credit with you. - A. He had.

Court. Had he any credit when the bill became due. A. No, he had none; on the first of May our transactions ceased; in the middle of April they discontinued paying, because we had no money in our hands.

GEORGE SHEATH . - Mr. Gurney. You are clerk to Mr. - notary-public. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you present that on the day it became due at messrs. Prescott, Grote, and co. - A. I did; the answer was

"no effects."

WILLIAM BRIANT. Mr. Bolland. I believe you travelled for Mr. Bullock. - A. I did

Q. Did you go a journey for him in the beginning of the year 1807. - A. I did.

Q. Did you on your return, make any application at Mr. Bullock's accompting house, to see him. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Are you a creditor, or were you at the time of the bankruptcy. - A. I was at that time.

Q. Are you a creditor now. - A. No. I was the person that proved the bankruptcy by being brought forward; I was at that time; I am not now.

Mr. Bolland. What business did Mr. Bullock carry on for which you travelled for him. - A. The wine and spirit trade.

Q. He had an accompting house in Scot's yard. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any dwelling house there. - A. I understood so.

Q. Did Mr. Bullock reside there, or had he any other house. - A. I understood he had a house at Dulwich; I was never there, nor in the house in Scot's yard.

Q. Who lived in the house. - A. His porter of the name of Lang I understood lived there.

Q. Did Willis live there. - A. I believe not.

Q. Is Lang a married man. - A. He went for a married man; there was a woman I understood living there.

Q. Did you attend more than once at that accompting house to see Mr. Bullock after your return from your southward journey, the first journey. - A. Yes.

Q. What month was that. - A. I think it was the latter end of March.

Q. Did you at that time see him. - A. I did.

Q. Did you go another journey for him. - A.Yes.

Q. In what period of the year was that. - A. That was the middle of April; I returned on the latter end of April.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Bullock's accompting house to see him. - A. I did; I did not see him there then. I attended more than once; I attended him day after day.

Q. What answer did you receive from his servant. - A. That Mr. Bullock was out.

Q. During the time that you were there, was Mr. Bullock refused to any other person besides yourself. - A. There were people came in with bills of payment; they were told that he was out likewise.

Q. Were there bills paid by his servants. - A. I never heard of such a thing.

Q. Then you mean to say that persons came with bills and their payment remained. - A. I understood it was.

Q. Did you at any other time see Mr. Bullock. - A. I did at Gerrard's hall inn, Basing-lane.

Q. Did you to claim any money of him. - A. Not at that time. Mr. Willis, who was the clerk, he went with me to Mr. Bullock at Gerrard's hall inn; Mr. Bullock and his wife was there; and after we asked each other how we did, he related to me that he supposed I thought something or other was the matter by my not seeing him at the accompting house; I told him I thought it was very odd I had not seen him; I had called upon him several times. He said that it was on an aukward business that he had up the Baltic; some payment of money; I could not rightly understand him. I understood that was the case. I believe he had forwarded some rum to a man up the Baltic; he said there were bills coming due, that was the reason he was there, and did not attend the accompting house.

Q. How far is Basing-lane from Scot's-yard. - A. it may be a quarter of a mile.

Q. How long did he remain at Gerrard's hall inn. - A. I do not know; I was there about an hour. I only saw him there once.

Q. You told me just now that you did not ask him for money - had you at any time applied to him for money. - A. I had; he said in a few days he would give me what I wanted.

Mr. Alley. How long did you live with him. - A. It was the 2nd of last March when I commenced with him.

Q. At the time when you proved the act of bankruptcy you was a creditor. - A. I was.

JOHN TRACEY . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you were carman to the prisoner Bullock. - A. I was.

Q. How long had you been in his service. - A. Between nine and ten months.

Q. In the month of April last did he cease to attend his house in Scott's yard. - A. He did not come quite so regular as he used to come.

Q. When was the last time you saw him there. - A. I cannot say exactly the day of the month.

Q. At the latter end of April was he there. - A. Yes, he used to come once a-week.

Q. In the beginning of May was he there. - A. Yes.

Q. How long in May was it before he caused to

come. - A. I cannot say.

Q. When was the name of Bullock taken off the door. - A. I cannot say; it was on the door; it was taken off, and the name of Lang was put on the door.

Q. What was Lang. - A. He was a kind of cellarman and porter when I went there; I assisted him and he went out collecting.

Q. When the name of Bullock was taken off, did Mr. Bullock come there. - A. Yes.

Q. He came and transacted business as usual. - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you know during the time he was absent, of any creditors coming and applying for their debts. - A. I do not.

JAMES MABBS . - Mr. Bolland. Q. You lived gardener with Mr. Bullock at Dulwich. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect when he left his house at Dulwich. - A. Between the 11th and 14th of May.

Q. At about what time. - A. He went away about eight o'clock in the morning I believe.

Q. Do you know where he went to from Dulwich. - A. He came to town; I did not know where he went afterwards.

Q. Do you mean that at the time you did not know where he went to, or that he went away. - A. I knew afterwards where he went to, but I did not know for some time. I saw him again at the coffee house the corner of Lincoln's Inn.

Q. Do you know where he went to live when he left. London - A. At Chelsea; I saw him there.

Q. Did you remove any goods for him to Chelsea. - A. No, I saw none removed there.

Q. Did you see any goods removed from Dulwich that you understood went to Chelsea. - A. Yes, one cart load.

Q. Who went with that cart. - A The carman, John Tracey , took it to town; I went with him.

Q. Before you went away with the cart what instructions did he give you. - A. He gave me no instructions.

Q. What did he say about his leaving Dulwich. - A. He said he was going to leave Dulwich; he said there was a little something, things were not altogether right. In the course of time he should come back again; he told me that at another time.

Q. When you went with the cart did he give you any directions about Blackfrier's-bridge. - A. No.

Q. Where did you see Bullock that morning after having left Dulwich. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you not see him in Fleet-street. - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you again when you left Dulwich, whether he did not tell you something about Blackfrier's-bridge. - A. No, he gave no directions to me nor in my hearing; I do not know that he gave any directions, he might to the carman.

Q. Did you hear these directions. - A. No.

Q. You swear that you did not hear them. - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body meet you on Blackfrier's-bridge. - A. Yes; I cannot say who it was, I understood it was Mr. Cowell's clerk the gentlemen was a stranger to me, I never saw him before, to my recollection. In Fleet-street I saw Mr. Bullock.

Q. Did Mr. Bullock accompany you to the place where the goods were deposited. - A. I do not recollect that he did.

Q. Do you recollect that he did not. - A. Yes he did; we went to Hungerford-market, at the inn, just by the water-side; the goods were packed in trunks.

Q.Do you know whether there were any directions on the trunks. - A. I cannot say.

Q. How many trunks were there. - A. I cannot tell exactly.

Q. How many horses had you. - A. One horse.

Q. Were there half a dozen or more trunks. - A. Half a dozen I think.

Q. You saw a man you said, now what that man said to you I must not know; did you in consequence of what that man said, apply to Mr. Bullock to know where to carry the goods to. - A. The man did not speak to me, he spoke to Tracey, I believe. I did not hear him speak to him I was with the carman; when he saw Mr. Bullock, he said to him, I do not know where to take the goods; he had seen a man, and I cannot say what Mr. Bullock said to that, I did not hear.

Q. I ask you what directions Bullock gave, when the goods left Dulwich - A. They were to go in Fleet-street, where the other goods were taken, a good way up the street; I cannot say where it was.

Q. And the reason that the goods went to Hungerford market, was on account of what the man said. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. (to Tracey). Did you bring any goods from Dulwich. - A. I did; two cart loads, by Mr. and Mrs. Bullock's directing. One load went to Bouverie-street, and the other to Hungerford market.

Q. Did you see Mr. Bullock at Dulwich when you went away. - A. No, I saw him on the over night; he did not say what time we should come off, but I thought the sooner we came away the better it would be for us.

Q. Did you take the cart there the over night. - A. Yes, Mr. Bullock ordered me me to come to sleep at Dulwich.

Q. What time did you come off. - A Sunday morning four o'clock, or from four to five; that was the first time.

Q. Did you bring the second cart load the same day. A. No; another day, we came there about an hour later; I saw him with the first load.

Q. Who was it you saw. - A. One Atkinson, a clerk; and after we had unloaded the goods, I saw Mr. Bullock, he told me to get something to eat and drink. I saw Mr. Cowell's man when I brought the goods to Hungerford-market; on Blackfrier's-bridge he spoke to me; after that I sent Mabbs to see for Mr. Bullock, or somebody to give us directions where to take the goods to; I saw Mr. Bullock about Temple-bars; he gave me directions to take them to Hungerford-market; before I saw Mr. Cowell's man, I was going to take them to Bouverie-street.

Q. How many packages did you take. - A. The first time the cart was full; the second time it was not; the cart was about level.

Q. How many packages. - A. I cannot say.

Q. You can tell me wether there was one or twenty. - A. There were six or seven.

Q. Did Mr. Bullock go with you to Hungerford-market. - A. He did, we delivered them at a public house, by the water side.

Q. Did you afterwards remove the goods from Bouverie-street. - A. I afterwards was told to hire a town cart, and to remove them from Bouverie-street to Dulwich; that might be about two months after.

Q. Did you remove all the goods back you took. - A.

I cannot say exactly all.

Q.After your master had gone from Dulwich did you see him and where; after that time did you see him in any house - A I saw him twice in Willis's coffee-house; I met him in the street afterward, and I saw him once at Chelsea; at a house facing the water side.

Q. Did he tell you whether it was his own furniture, or whether he had taken it furnished. - A. He did not mention any thing of the kind to me, I being a servant.

Q. Did you receive any papers, after your master left Dulwich. - A. Yes, some from a young man in black, that I understood came from Mr. Garth.

Q. Did you have any conversation with Mr. Bullock on any papers that you had received. - A. Yes; I asked him what I had better do with these papers, I showed them him; he returned them me, one I lost, and some where left at Mr. Low's; they were papers saying that I was to meet the commissioners at such a place.

Q. When you gave them to Mr. Bullock, how many had you received. - A. Two or three at the latter end; he told me I had better apply to Mr. Low; if I was dubious any harm would come to me.

Q. Had you told him you was afraid of any harm coming. - A. I told him, I did not know what might be the consequence.

Q. You say that was at last. - A. Yes.

Q. When you shewed him the papers at first, what did he say. - A. He said they did not signify any thing, no harm would come to me from these papers.

Q. Did he tell you whether to attend them or not to attend them. - A. He told me to apply to Mr. Low; he told me it did not signify; we were busy and I went about my work. I never attended any one of them summons's.

Q. Did you go before the commissioners in consequence of these summons. - A. I did not go at all.

Q.(to Mabbs.) Now we understand from Tracey, that Mr. Bullock was living at Chelsea, I ask you whether it was his own house, or whether it was lodgings. - A. Lodgings.

Q. Were they his own goods. - A. I do not know; from Mrs. Bullock I understood that they had ready furnished lodgings.

Prisoner. Do you recollect after you had moved these goods, that you have given that gentleman the history of, that a bailiff came into the house. - A. I do.

Mr. Bolland. You do not know who the bailiff was do you. - A. No.

Q. Mr. Bullock never told you who sent him. - A. No, he did not.

JOSEPH SPENCER. Q. You are the messenger, servant to Mr. Page. - A. I am.

Q. Did you go on the 5th of June last to Scot's yard - A. I went to Scot's yard; on the 5th of June last, this notice was presented to Mr. Atkinson.

Q. Did you carry it to Scot's yard. - A. I went to Scot's yard, I saw another person carry it.

Q. Was that notice taken to Bullock's house in Scot's yard first. - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you find there. - A. Mr. Atkinson.

Q.Was it left there - A. At that time Mr. Atkinson would not take it. I took it down to the house at Dulwich; I took possession of the house at Dulwich, I took this notice there; there I found Mr. Wallis, I shewed it to Mabbs, Mr. Bullock's servant, who was down there. I then put it upon a shelf; it remained there till the 10th of this month, and then I brought it away. (The notice shewn to the commissioners, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Winter, Mr. Garth, and Mr. Ainsworth.)

Q. to Winter. Is that your name and hand writing. - A It is.

Q. to Wilson. Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is.

Q. to Ainsworth. Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is.

Q. to Garth. It that your name and hand writing. - A. It is.

Did you see the commissioners sign it. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. This is a memorandum that the commissioners were duly qualified, and then here is a declaration. (The notice and declaration read).

MR. NEWMAN - Mr. Bolland. Will you produce lord Ellenborough's warrant; (the warrant produced) what is that. - A. Lord Ellenborough's warrant.

Mr. Bolland. This is an order from the commissioners for to take him up. (A paper handed to the commissioners).

Q.(to Winter) Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is my name and hand writing.

Q.(to Wilson) Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is my name and hand writing.

Q.(to Ainsworth) Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is my name and hand writing.

Q.(to Newman) This is your authority for receiving him. - A. Yes, for receiving him and delivering him. (The warrant read).

JOSHUA GARTH . - Mr. Gurney. You were the solicitor under this commission of bankruptcy. - A. I was.

Q. Were you present Mr. Garth at the meeting of the commissioners on the 18th of June. - A. I was; it was held at the Baptist coffee-house, Chancery lane.

Q. Was the bankrupt before the commissioners, pursuant to that warrant. - A. I saw him there, and I believe in the custody of Mr. Newman's servant.

Q. Had you a surrender to the commission. - A. I had; I saw it signed by Mr. Bullock.

Q. Which surrender was signed by him after he had gone through the examination. - A. It was; (the surrender read).

Q. Was the prisoner that day examined by the commissioners. - A. He was.

Q. Was the questions and answers taken in writing. - A. I believe they were all of them.

Q. In the first place was he sworn. - A. He was sworn.

Q. Have the goodness to read the questions and answers (the questions and answers read.)

Signed G. Wilson, A. E. Winter, and F. Ainsworth, 18th of June, 1807, at the Baptist coffee house. James Bullock , of Scot's-yard, wine and brandy merchant; against whom a commission of bankruptcy is instituted, being sworn and examined before us, the major part of the commissioners, answers the several questions put to him, as follows: -

Q. Who is your bankers. - A. Messrs. Prescot, Grote, and co.

Q. Had you a banking house besides this. - A. The bank of England, and no other.

Q. When did you remove your books and papers from your accompting house. - A. Some time about the 6th of May, or possibly later.

Q. Why did you take them away. - A.Because I had transferred my business to Wallis, Lang, and Co. and because I had no more business in Scot's yard.

Q. Have you delivered up all your books and papers. - A. To the best of my knowledge I delivered to Mr. - all my books and papers.

Q. Does the book marked A contain a regular account of receipts and papers. - A. It does, but there may be accident and omission in it.

Q. Do you recollect any payment made in the month of May last, not entered in your cash book. - A. There have been such payments, but I cannot recollect now.

Q. To what amount in the whole had such payments been made. - A. I think between five hundred and one thousand pounds. I am sure it is not two thousand pounds.

Q. How do you account for the deficiency. - A. At present I can give no further answer to this question; that what is concluded in my former answer, as there was a great confusion in my accompting house.

Q. Have any payments been made subsequent to the removal of your books, and to what amount in the whole. - A. There has been payments made subsequent to the removal of my books; the amount I cannot tell.

Q. State such payments as have been made in the month of May not in the cash book, and to whom. - A. I remember five hundred pounds to Griffin Jones , and another payment of two hundred and fifty pounds to Elizabeth Jones ; I remember no other payments but rent and servants wages, which might amount to an hundred pounds.

Q. Have you in the month of May assigned over or transferred any thing except sales in the ordinary course of your dealing. - A. I sold and transferred to Wallis, Lang, and company, all my stock and trade; to Mr. Ralph, a dock warrant for ten puncheons of brandy and rum; and nothing else has been signed or transferred by me in any other manner.

Q. Have you any other consignment coming forward. - A. None. The property delivered to Messrs. Ralph, the dock order, was on the 6th of April, and the dock order of brandy was on the 6th of May. Mr. Low in law expences and money advanced by him in law proceedings.

Q. Had you any other effects besides Scot's yard, and at Dulwich. - A. None, except a trunk and a pair of drawers. containing bed linen, wearing apparel, and some little plate, of which I cannot give an account.

Mr. Gurney. Here is a warrant that is not signed in the London docks. - A. That was given me the next day, or the day after, I am not sure.

Q. Have you the book there in that examination marked A.- A. This is it. (Producing it).

Q. Have you examined that book carefully. - A. I have.

Q. Does it appear to be a regular kept book. - A. Yes, and the balance is carried forward to the next month.

Q. What is the balance that is brought forward to the 1st of May. - A.1701.

Q. The same balance of course is carried forward from the latter end of April to the beginning of May. - A. Yes.

Q. What appears to be the difference in the month of June. - A. Eleven hundred, forty-eight pounds and eleven pence halfpenny; but the balance at the time of examination was different, because there has been some addition since.

Q. What was the balance then. - A. Twelve hundred pounds and a fraction. The entries appear to be the same hand writing, which is Wallis, who used to keep his books.

Q. Were you present at the second meeting of the commissioners on the 23d of June - did he attend then. A. I believe not, I did not see him. Indeed he told me that he did not attend; he did not think it requisite. I cannot say his exact words, but I have an impression on my mind.

Q. Who were the assignees. - A. John George Medley, John Cowel , and Richard Pettit .

Q. On any day after they were chosen were you present at any meeting between them and the bankrupt - A. Several days; one meeting was the next day; and I saw him several times afterwards in their company at the accompting house in Scot's-yard.

Q. At either of these times was he charged respecting the money that he had paid to Griffin Jones and Elizabeth Jones . - A. He was, I believe; it was on the 24th or on the 25th but it was on the day after the choice of the assignees; he stated then that the two hundred and fifty pounds, which upon his former examination he stated to have paid to Elizabeth Jones, was paid to Griffin Jones ; he stated also that he had paid to Griffin Jones since that examination two hundred and fifty pounds; he said he had paid to Griffin Jones so much money that would make in the whole one thousand and fifty pound, because he had borrowed of him at different times money to that amount, and that Mr Jones was a particular friend of his, and he considered it a matter of honour to repay it.

Q. Was any thing said respecting the assignees applying to Mr. Jones for the payment of that money - A. I believe there was.

Q. What did he say upon that subject. - A. The exact language I cannot recollect; but he wished not for the application to be made by the assignees to Mr. Jones, but that he himself would apply for it.

Q. What did the assignees request him to do with respect to his affairs in general. - A. I have a minute in writing of the proceedings on the 24th of January (the memorandum read) that Mr. Bullock do bring the cash book and adjust the bills, and make out the debts in town separate, and the different bills owing in the country.

Q. Did he do any such thing. - A. Not to my knowledge. I believe Mr. Wallis made out the list of the town and country debts. The bankers checks were not made up; the cash book was never brought up, and the deficiency at present is eleven hundred odd pounds.

Q. Have you as solicitor ever received from the bankrupt that eleven hundred, odd pounds. - A.Certainly not, nor any part.

Q. Nor has any person received it on the part of the estate. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you attend the last meeting of the commissioners upon the 18th of July. - A. I did.

Q. Did the bankrupt appear then. - A. He did not, or else I should have seen him (this is the certificate of the commissioners.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. When these questions and answers were taken down, I ask you whether he did not state that he did not wish to prejudice the commission. - A. No; I think not.

Q. Do not you remember his saying something of that sort. - A. No, he showed a reluctance of being examined.

Q. I ask you whether he did not state - I give these answers to the best of my judgment at the moment, but I must have power afterwards to rectify them, and then the next day he gave you that memorandum, the next day as something that mistook his recollection. - A. I do not think he did; but it is very probable.

Q. Did he at any time do any more than bankrupts do ask for time. - A. No more I believe it was explained to him that without that surrender he could not obtain his commission (the memorandum read.)

Mr. Gurney. Did you afterwards search for them things. - A. Oh no.

Q. Have you been able to recover these things. - A. Mr. Bullock gave me, that has being an advance; Mr. Bullock has not secreted this.

Q. Did he ever tell you what become of the money, except the account of this payment to Griffin Jones you have given. - A. Never.

Mr. Const. Did he never say (I will give it you in words that will perhaps bring it to your memory) he said he was not insolvent. - A. I have rather an imperfect recollection of his declaring himself not in a state of insolvency, I have still a mere imperfect recollection; I cannot say one way or the other.

Q.(to the commissioners.) Do you remember any such declaration. - A. I do not; every thing that he stated is certainly taken down in writing; I recollect he objected being examined at all. (a paper shewn to the commissioners.

Q. to the commissioners. Is that your name and hand writing. - A. It is. (the certificate read.)

- SPENCER. Q. You are the messenger's man, you attended at Guildhall on the 18th of July, the day the bankrupt was warned to surrender. - A. I did all but one hour, from one o'clock till twelve at night.

Q. Who was the person that attended that hour - A. Lewis.

Q. Did the prisoner attend all that part of the time you was there - A.He did not nor did the commissioner see him.

Q. At twelve at night they made the proclamation. - A. They did.

- LEWIS. Are you a messenger man. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you attend on the eighteenth of July during the time the former witness was absent. - A. I did, the bankrupt did not appear.

- ANTHONY. Q. I believe you are an officer. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you applied to, and when, to search after Mr. Bullock. - A. On the 20th of July.

Q. Who applied to you. - A. Mr. Garth; I went down to Leith, in Scotland, after him; I arrived there on the 23d of July. On getting to Leith, I applied to Pith and Co's. wharf about some packages arriving in the name of Brown; the packages were landed, and lying on the wharf.

Q. Were there any directions on the packages. - A. I think merely the name of Brown; there were sixteen packages on the wharf; these are two of the directions they are similar to this.

Q. You can speak to these being two of the cards. - A. Yes, they are all similar, they were all unloaded.

Q. Did you at any time see Mr. Bullock. - A. I saw him that evening; I waited for his coming for them; when he came he went on board the packet, I went on board too, he claimed the goods, and brought some men to take the goods away. I took him in custody, he said, he had got a protection, he shewed it me; this is it; (the paper read) signed G. Wilson, A. E. Winter, and F. Ainsworth. Whereas a commission of bankruptcy, is issued against you James Bullock, of Scots-yard; we the said commissioners, or the major part of them, do order and direct you to appear before us, on the 13th of June instant; and the 23d of the said month, in the said year, at one o'clock in the afternoon; herein sail not at your peril, dated the 4th of June, 1807; addressed to James Bullock , endorsed with the commissioners names, Baptist coffee-house. Be it remembered that James Bullock has surrendered himself upon a prosecution against him, he has been examined touching a discovery of his effects, but not being now prepared to make a full discovery, he has asked for more time, which we have granted him accordingly.

Q. Now look at that paper; did you find that upon Mr. Bullock. - A. I did.

Q. Was he passing in the name of Bullock, - A. No, in the name of Brown. (the paper read.) Millers wharf, 17th of July, 1807. Received on board the Shipping Company's, smack, James Cumming 's packet, (Leith marked in the margin;) which I promise to deliver at Leith, in the margin it is put Mr. Brown. This receipt to be in force for three months, and no longer. Received wharfage, five shillings and sixpence; signed Robbins for the master.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's lodging. - A. I did.

Q. Did you know in what name he was passing there. - A. Yes, Brown. I saw the landlord, I asked for Mr. Brown, he was not at home; Mrs. Brown, I was informed she was, and in bed. I desired her to be called up; which she was; she said she was Mr. Bullock's wife.

Q. You put a seal on the packages. - A. I did, I lodged the prisoner in prison; I left him at Leith, afterwards I brought him to London. When I was at Leith, he told me that he left town on Saturday the 18th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and arrived at Edinborough on the Wednesday following to dinner.

Q. Did he say any thing about the packages. - A. He said they were things of no great value; not above fifty pounds, he thought.

Q. Did you interrogate him at all about any bank notes. - A. No, I only mentioned to him about some bank notes; he said that he mistook the letter, or something he thought Mr. Garth had received them in town. When arrived in town, he told me that he had received some money from a bankers, the day he left town, he said it was in a tin case in one of the packages at Leith.

Q. Did he say how much. - A. I do not think the full sum was mentioned; I have a faint recollection of four hundred pounds.

Q. Did you bring the packages from Leith with you. - A. No; I saw them afterwards; I saw them opened when they came up with the Leith packet.

GRIFFIN JONES. Q. I believe you are an officer in the army. - A. I am a reduced officer.

Q. Have you been acquainted with Mr. Bullock. - A. I have.

Q. Did you ever lend him a thousand and fifty pounds - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you ever lend him any money whatever. - A. Not to the best of my knowledge except it might be a

trifling thing at a coffee-house.

Q. As you never lent him a thousand and fifty pounds did he in the month of April, May, or June, pay you a thousand and fifty pounds - Did he ever pay you any. - A. Not to the best of my recollection, except the trifles that passes amongst friends in coffee-houses.

Q. In the month of May or June last where did you live. - A. I lived in Dartmouth-street, Westminster, or else in Stafford place.

Q. In May or June last did you see the prisoner. - A.Very frequent.

Q. Did you see him in your own lodgings. - A. Yes in Dartmouth-street.

Q. Did he at any time in May or June make any proposal to you on the subject of money (witness paused), did he say any thing respecting money - A. I cannot charge my memory with it, as I never had any concern with Mr. Bullock.

Q. Do you remember the last time you saw him. - Yes.

Q. State the substance of the conversation the last time you saw him (witness paused).

Court. State any proposals he made to you. - A. He came to see me as a friend, at my house; I was very happy to see him. In walking along he mentioned something about his affairs; I did not wish to hurt his feelings because I thought he was rather in an unpleasant situation.

Mr. Gurney. Was any thing said to you respecting a thousand pounds. - A. There was something said, sir. He signified as much that he owed me a thousand pounds and he honourably paid me. I passed it over.

Q. What was it that he wished you to do or say respecting a thousand pounds - A. I supposed he wished me to say if any body asked me, if he owed me a thousand pounds.

Mr. Alley. Do not tell what you suppose; the thing is what he said.

Mr. Gurney Give us as near as you can the substance of what past between him and you. - A. He expressed this walking along that he owed me a thousand pounds, and he had honourably repaid me; he just mentioned it in a kind of discourse. There was no further words passed.

Q. Was that true he had borrowed a thousand pound and paid you. - A. No, sir.

Q. Did you ever live in Church-street - A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Elizabeth Jones in Bond-street, Westminster. - A. I do not.

Q. You have told me generally that you did not receive of the prisoner a thousand and fifty pounds, did he ever make you a payment of a thousand pounds, of five hundred pounds, or of two hundred and fifty pounds. - A. He never did.

THOMAS WILD . Q. I believe you are in partnership with your brother in St. Martin's lane, Cannon-street. - A. I am, with John Wild .

Q. Do you know Mr. Bullock. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Did he apply to you at any time to advance any money on some cyder which arrived on the 6th of April. - A. Yes.

Q. What security did he give you. - A. One of these dock orders.

Q. And ten puncheons of brandy. - A. That was in April 1807; I lent him four hundred pounds on that security. On the 6th of May he deposited bills of lading for thirty puncheons of brandy; I advanced him four hundred pounds more on these bills of lading.

Q. Did he apply himself. - A. He did not; he had applied, but afterwards I gave it to George Wallis. I gave a draft on Prescot and co. bankers; his clerk wrote Prescot and co. across the face of the draft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner. - A. About four or five years.

Q. At that time you were acquainted with his affairs. - A. At that time I was more acquainted with him than ever.

Q. Do you know whether he went out of the way of his creditors. - A. That was July 1807. I had an opportunity of knowing he was out of the way. I was requested to meet him at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate, by one or two of the creditors.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing whether at that time, or previous to that time, he had been arrested or in custody. - A. No. He produced the state of his affairs; there appeared to be upon the balance of his accounts in his favour 4 or 5000 l.

Q. Had you or not an opportunity of knowing that he had been out of the way for the purpose of avoiding meeting the creditors. - A. Not antecedent to July.

Mr. Gurney. What day was this. - A. I cannot say, I did not notice.

Court. This ends in nothing.

RICHARD MARDEN . Q I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Wild. - A. I am.

Q. On the 6th of May last did you see any check on which Mr. Wallis wrote Prescott and co. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Wallis bring that check back - A. No.

Q. Were you present when John Wild gave a second check - do you recollect that second check being given instead of the first. - A. This is my writing.

Q. Was that given in lieu of the check which Wallis had indorsed. - A. I do not know the cause of this check being given that was given to Mr. Wallis.

ANDREW SMITH . Q. You have been clerk to Martin and co. bankers, look at that check, and tell me whether it was paid by you, in what manner, and when it was paid. - A. On the 6th of May by a bank note, No. 1698, 21st April 1807, 300 l, the other was 6749, 18th April 1807, 100 l. George Wallis on the check.

MR. KELLY. Q. I believe you are a clerk in the bank of England. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of May last, and prior to that time in the year 1807, had the prisoner kept an account with the bank of England. - A. He had, for a considerable time; the last transaction was on the 8th of May.

Q. Have you the check drawn on the 8th of May. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the check drawn by Mr. Bullock. - A. I believe it is; I have seen his drafts upon which he has taken his accounts. I believe that to be his hand writing. I paid that draft to the bearer for five hundred and four pounds.

Q. Is that the balance of that account. - A. I believe not; there is some small account left.

Mr. BRIANT. Q. Do you believe that to be Mr. Bullock's hand writing. - A. I believe it is; I gave a ticket on the bank note pay office to the amount.

Q. That is the course of your office. - A. Exactly. [the tickes read] 6148, London 8th of May 1807, to the cashier, 163, pay to myself or bearer the sum of 504 l. J. Bullock.

Q. Did you receive the check from the last witness.

A. Yes, this is the check, I posted it, and Mr. Salter paid it.

MR. SALTER. Did you pay this check. - A. I paid for this check that Mr. Kelley wrote, a five hundred pound note, No. 1363, 8th of May, 1807; and four pound notes.

THOMAS FARQUHAR, ESQ. Q. You are a partner with sir Robert Herries . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner, Mr. Bullock. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect on what day. - A. On the 14th of July I saw him in the bank room in our shop; he said he was come out of the country, and he wanted to open an account in our house; I asked him his name, he wrote J. Brown, 11, Chapple-street, Park-lane; I saw him write it. He left eight hundred pound, a bank note, No. 1363, five hundred pound, May 8th, 1807, and a bank note for three hundred pound, No. 1698, dated 21st of April, 1807; I gave him a receipt, and he went away. I never saw him afterwards.

MR. SMITH. You are clerk in the house of Messrs. Herries and co. - do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. He opened an account at your house. - A. Yes.

Q Did he at any time draw upon that account. - A. He drew three checks, one of one hundred and seventy five pound, on the 15th of July; one hundred and fifty pound on the 16th; and four hundred and five pound on the 18th; to the best of my knowledge the prisoner at the bar came to claim these payments in the name of Brown; the four hundred and five pound closed the accounts.

Q. You at that time thought his name was Brown. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 18th did he state any thing to you respecting his accounts. - A. He said he was going out of town, and he was sorry that the account was so short; he was sorry that he had opened so bad all account, but when he returned he would give us a lift; the draft of one hundred and fifty pounds was paid in two fifty's, two twenty's, and a ten pound bank notes; the draft of one hundred and seventy five pounds was paid in three fifty pound bank notes, a twenty and five small notes, and the four hundred and five pound, two of a hundred, four fiftys, and a five pound bank note.

HUGO - . - Mr. Bolland, Did you pay a draft of Mr. Bullocks. - A. Yes, of seventy pound.

Q. You do not know to whom you paid it. - A No.

- COBURN. - Mr. Gurney. You were present when the packages were opened. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the spoons that are charged in the indictment. - A. Yes, sixteen table spoons, twelve desert spoons, and a soup ladle.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. I really do not know the value of them, they were weighed; Mr. Garth has the weight, fifty six ounces.

Q. Is it worth at least five shillings an ounce. - A Yes.

Q. Is that the inventory of all the things. - A. Yes, it is.

Q. What is the value of all the articles. - A They were never valued. They are worth more than forty or fifty pound.

Court. Do you know the value of them. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Did you take these directions off the boxes. - A I did.

Q.(to Briant.) Do you believe them to be the hand writing of Mr. Bullock. - A. I cannot swear to that hand writing; it is a very different B to what he usually writes.

Q.(to Cowell, Medley, and Pettit) Are you the assignees. - A. Yes.

Q. to Pettit. Did the bankrupt ever surrender any of this money spoken of to day. - A. No, never.

Q. to Cowell. Did Mr. Bullock ever surrender this money we have been speaking of. - A. No.

Q. to Medley. Did Mr. Bullock make the surrender of the five hundred or the three hundred pound to you. - A. Never.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury. It seems to appear that the law does not allow my counsel to urge what I might have to say in my defence, perhaps for me very unfortunately. Gentlemen, you have heard the evidence that has been adduced in support of the prosecution; you have also heard the objections that have been stated; you must be aware that men like me, unaccustomed to speak in public, must feel greatly at a loss; and the state of my mind, which is not most at ease, I trust will have some weight, and no undue consideration with you, when you consider what I have got to say. I flatter myself, while I am addressing a tribunal like this, all of them Englishmen, that if I state any thing that is not correct, in point of form, or any thing that I may have omitted for my defence, will not be forgotten by you.

Gentlemen, it is not unworthy your notice, one thing I shall state to you. It is for the breach of an act of parliament, for which I am accused I will say that law is severe, it is partial. You, gentlemen, are like myself, men that get your living by buying and selling. There is every man, even the greatest bulk of society, may buy as many goods of you and me, and other tradesmen, they may pledge them, keep them, embezzle them in any way they may think fit; there is no criminal attachment to them, they may go to prison, and live upon our property. It seems to me very hard, when we, who are subject to so many misfortunes, should be liable to loose our lives, when they may go at large; I trust that will have some consideration with you; I am coming now to speak to you of the motive under which I I have acted; and you will surely while I am doing that fully and freely excuse me of going into general matters. In the first place, I did not consider myself insolvent; for that reason I did not wish to be a bankrupt. This I think you have heard in evidence; I am not aware that any act of bankruptcy I ever committed; I did not in this go on by my own judgment, it was upon the repeated opinion of my solicitors, and whom I believe there is none in the profession more respectable than these gentlemen I am quoting, Messrs. Cooper and Low in Chancery-lane.

Gentlemen, this refers with more peculiarity to my situation after I had been declared a bankrupt, and it may be worth my while to make an observation upon the evidence upon which I was declared a bankrupt. It struck me in this way; the law has expressed on that subject, as I have since heard, that a creditor cannot be an acting man to establish a bankruptcy; that gentleman who did give that evidence, on which that declaration was founded, has since been found to be a

creditor to the amount of one hundred and fifty pounds, and in this court he has averred that he was a creditor; then, perhaps, it does not become me to reason on the subject I am bound to give an historical account of facts I reasoned in this way, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury that if a commission of bankruptcy, issued against me, upon evidence that was not legal; that every proceeding upon that declaration must in itself be illegal also. Under that evation did I refuse to attend the summons of the commissioners, and when compelled by force, I made them terms. Gentlemen, I am not insolent; I have committed no act of bankruptcy, I will not submit to be examined; the answer was, you have no alternative, but to submit, or to be committed to Newgate; for that is our duty; my answer was, gentlemen is is immaterial to me whether you do or not; and when I submitted to be examined, it was with this condition, that whatever I might say with regard to the state of my affairs, in answer to any of those questions that were put to me, that I should at any future time be at liberty to revise and correct. I confess that when I made these conditions I did intend to revise the examination; I at the said time, when I entered into the said examination, was not aware it had so much consequence, as I see it has to day; I considered myself at liberty, to revise and to correct them; I hope you will take this with what I before said, not considering myself insolvent, I avoided any further examination.

Gentlemen I think I may with some propriety state by way of refuting the allegation, that I have acted with no intention to defraud my creditors; I may state to you that it never was my intention to defraud my creditors; and this, I shall not state without calling evidence to prove it. When I met the gentlemen, who are now my petitioning creditors, I told them I was not insolvent, I was applied to by Mr. Thomas Wild , to give in the state of of my affairs; I told them I was averse, and never had been of committing an act of bankruptcy; but if nothing else would do, I would give up my whole estate, without being insolvent After this declaration of bankruptcy was made against me, day after day, was I hunted to attend upon the assignees; two or three times did I attend upon them; every time I met them, they and their solicitor, imposed new difficulties, and new hardships. In short it was carried on in that way, that the intent was not to get a full and fair disclosure of my estate, as to drive me into some corner, as would drive me into the prosecution I am now in. I therefore discontinued attending their meetings, I disregarded their summons's; still under the notion, that I was illegally declared a bankrupt, and that I was not an insolvent man, I still kept in my mind that I would resist. This was the ground and motive upon which I acted which will be satisfactorily proved to you, and when I have done that, I trust and hope that the breach of the vindictive part of the act of parliament, will appear to you to be done without manifesting any intention of defrauding my creditors; I trust that will have its due weight with you. Gentlemen, it may not be altogether foreign to the purpose; when I state to you that so far from showing a total disinclination to account to the creditors; that when the officer apprehended me, he having no warrant against me, I made no resistance; he said he was come to take me; well, I said take me; in this he will not contradict me.

Gentlemen, it may be asked why I went to Scotland; I will state my reasons, and my motive. Having as alledged against me, refused to attend the meeting of the assignees, they threatened me all manner of things; and particularly one of the assignees, threatened me in these words; that on the 18th, he should take care that I should not be to look after. I thought it a hard case, acting as I did, I was doing no wrong, not submitting as I thought to a hard case; considering myself innocent, I was unwilling to submit to so long imprisonment, with this idea I went to Scotland, with a firm and determined purpose of returning in December, and to stand while the commission was disputed; which I was conscious would be the case.

There was another view, gentlemen, which by no means appear unnatural; had I surrendered on the 18th, I must have given up every thing, or have perjured myself; it was not unnatural, to reason in this way; here is a great many months, I must be stripped of ever thing for no purpose; for when the courts of law again meet, it will be disputed, and it will be upset and while that is going forward, I and my family must be starving; I do not mean to urge this in point of law, because I am no lawyer. I considered an aged parent a tender offspring, that when there is no provision for them, I trust you will not think unreasonable in me for to think myself fairly entitled to be the guardian, of whatever little property is left rather than to squander, it away in law; I wish you understand me in the way I mean it, and the way in which I understood the act of bankruptcy, as declared against me. It occured to me the furious proceedings of the gentlemen who conducts this prosecution of the invalidity of the commission that was one reason more why I was induced to resist it prowers. Gentlemen I apprehend it would be idle to occupy much more of your time; I have stated to you, the spirit in which I was guided; I therefore believe I had better call the evidence to justify what I have said, and then to leave myself in your hands; I have no doubt but that I shall meet with all the justice that my case can meet with.

JOHN SHERWOOD - Mr. Cous. You are under secretary in the public office Chancery-lane. - A. I am.

Q. Have you any documents against the person of James Bullock . - A. Yes, on the 39th of July 1806.

Mr. Gurney. That is the affidavit on the bond that constitutes the docket [docket read]; Newcastle upon Tyne. John Hudson Atkinson makes oath that James Bullock is justly indebted in the sum of one hundred pounds and upwards, for money lent to him by the said John Hudson Atkinson , and this said James Bullock is become a bankrupt under the statutes now in force. Signed John Hudson Atkinson ; sworn at the public office, Chancery-lane.

Q. Now, Mr. Sherwood, was that docket struck by Messrs. Cooper and Low. - A. By one of his clerks.

Q. You have two sorts of dockets, one for the purpose of entering a commission, and dockets for the purpose of preventing a commission, which was this. - A. It is impossible for me to tell with what view they did it at the time.

Q. You can tell provided it is a dockt for issuing a commission, how soon did they issue it. - A. Within four or five days, the remaining fees were paid in as much as there was no other application we received the fees.

Q. When was the docket withdrawn. - A. On the 15th of October by Mr. Low, by a young man from his

office; they said they did not mean to proceed upon it; the remaining fees we returned.

Q. The docket was struck on the 30th of July, and no instructions whatever were given to take out a commission: was any commission ever prepared. - A.No, never.

GEORGE WALLIS. Mr. Const. I understand you lived servant with Mr. Bullock. - A. I did, from the 20th of January, 1806.

Q. Then you remember the state of his affairs from that time till July, 1806. - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Have you a claim against Mr. Bullock. - A. I have. I have entered an action in the Mayor's Court.

Mr. Const. Do you remember the time in which the docket was struck in July, 1806, that his affairs were deranged at that time, he was out of the way. - A. He certainly was out of the way to avoid being arrested, he retired to Lordship Lane, near Dulwich.

Q. There you had frequent communication with him. - A. I had.

Q. Did you at the time that he was so retired, happen to know whether people pressed him for money. - A. Yes, and the answer to the people that enquired was that he was in the country.

Q. Do you remember his being in Thames Street when he came to town, which he did frequently. - A. Every day almost he came to the Bell public house in Thames Street: there I saw him also.

Cross examined by Mr. Bolland. How old are you. - A. I was twenty the 5th of this present September. I have lived with Mr. Bullock since the 20th of January 1806.

Q. Now I ask you whether you had any claim upon Mr. Bullock. - A. One hundred and twenty pounds. I have entered an attachment in the Mayor's office.

Q. Which attachment cannot succeed except this commission is set aside. Do not you know that you cannot get your money unless this commission is set aside. - A. I was let to understand that I should not.

Q. Now what are you, Mr. Wallis, to whom Mr. Bullock transferred his stock. - A. I was his clerk.

Q. Who is Mr. Lang. - A. He lived collecting clerk and cellarman to Mr. Bullock.

Q. Who is Co. - A. The Co. was his son, George James Frederick Bullock .

Q. What is the age of that junior partner. - A. He is about six years old.

Q. What salary did you live with him at. - A. Two hundred a year.

Q. What consideration did you give him for the stock and business. - A. We gave him accepted bills to the amount of the stock in general; it exceeded two thousand pounds.

Q. What is this claim of one hundred and twenty pounds for. - A. For wages.

Q. So that although you advanced these bills for the stock, he had not paid it. - A. No.

Q. Nor had he deducted it. - A. No.

Q. Where was Mr. Bullock in 1806. - A. In Lordship Lane, Dulwich.

Q. That is the house where he lived latterly. - A. No, it is not; he lived in Dulwich Common lately.

Q. You had some summons to attend upon the commissioners. - A. I had one summons, I did not attend, because I was told I was not obliged to attend; I was told so by Mr. Bullock.

Q. Had you any other summons. - A. I had another afterwards; the second was served upon me late in the evening, I could not attend, I had other business to attend to: I had a third, and I attended.

Q. And all the good you did then was to pull Mr. Gill away who was a witness. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not you induce Mr. Gill who was subpoened to go away. -

Mr. Alley. I object to that.

Jury. Do not answer that question.

Mr. Bolland. Do you know Mr. Bullock's family. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Hudson Atkinson . - A. Yes; he lived with his uncle previous to my going to him; he lived with him in Lawrence Pultney Lane; he lived with him while I was there. He went to Newcastle, I think about last Christmas.

Q. How long did he stay at Newcastle. - A. I cannot state the minute.

A. I did not ask to a minute: did he stay a week. - A. I cannot tell whether he staid a week, a fortnight, or a month.

Q. He managed the cellar for his uncle, and went out. - A. He was a servant.

Y. Do you know what wages his uncle paid him. - A. I do not.

Q. Was there no entry of money advanced to Atkinson. - A. I believe there was under house expences.

Q. Did you ever understand that Atkinson ever received any wages of his uncle. - A. He told me he expected them.

Q. What wages did he receive. - A. There appears six pounds which he received previous to my going.

Q. Did you know him ever receive any wages from his uncle while you was with him. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Now look at that docket: do you know Atkinson's hand-writing. - A. I think this is Hudson Atkinson 's hand-writing.

Q. You kept Mr. Bullock's cash-book. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any credit to Atkinson of one hundred pound. - A. I never saw that entry.

Q. Do you upon your oath believe that ever Atkinson had such a claim.

Mr. Alley. I object to that.

Mr. Bolland. Do you know whether Atkinson had a debt of an hundred pound. - A. I cannot tell; I saw the affidavit; that is for money lent to his uncle.

Q. Is there any such entry that Atkinson lent his uncle one hundred pound. - A. I do not know that there is.

Q. How old do you believe Atkinson to be. - A. I may believe he is thirty; he is taller than I am.

Q. Never mind how tall he is: how old do you believe Atkinson to be, upon your oath. - A. I cannot tell.

Court. Is he a man. - A. He appears so.

Mr. Bolland. Will you swear that he is twenty-one. - A. I will not swear that he is twenty-one, or that he is not.

Q. Do you believe that he is twenty-one. - A. I

have no reason to believe that he is twenty-one, or that he is not. I never heard his age.

Mr. Const. Your wages was two hundred pound a year. - A. Yes.

Q. The wages of Atkinson you do not know. - A. No.

Q. You have been asked about making over this business, do you know whether before you took it, it was offered to somebody else. - A. I believe there was a treaty to some other party: I heard him say it was his intention of selling the business.

Mr. LE COHEN. Mr. Alley. Your name is John Martin Le Cohen . - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known the prisoner at the bar any time. - A. Yes: I was applied to for the particulars of his stock and business that he wished to dispose of. I applied to him for the particulars for the purpose of a friend of mine who wanted to know them.

Q. You mean the quantity of stock, and the terms that he would dispose of them. - A. Yes; it was in the latter end of August or the beginning of September last year, when he went to Scott's Yard.

Mr. JAMES LOW. Mr. Gurney. You are an attorney. - A. Yes, in partnership with Mr. Cooper.

Q. Look at that docket; did you strike that docket. - A. It was struck by one of my clerks; I was out of town at that time.

Q. Did you see the person in whose name that docket was struck. - A. Not till April last: I had no recollection of him till that time.

Q. Before you received that docket did you receive any information that you expected a person to come to strike that docket. - A. Prior to my going to Honiton, Mr. Bullock called.

Q. Were you attorney to Mr. Bullock. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. I object to that: it is impossible that any thing committed to him by Mr. Bullock should be disclosed.

Mr. Gurney. When was you paid for that docket. - A. On the beginning of May last.

Q. That was just about the time this commission was sued out. You did not till then discover who the petitioning creditor was. - A. No.

Mr. Alley. He paid you. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Bullock was not present. - A. No, I thought it came from Mr. Bullock by the appearance of the young man.

FRANCES POWELL . Mr. Bolland. I believe that you are aunt to Hudson Atkinson . - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the age of Hudson Atkinson ; is he fifteen. - A. I cannot say; I am not intimate with his mother now.

Q.Is he the oldest child. - A. No.

Q. How long has the mother been married. - A. That I cannot precisely say.

Q. What do you mean by precisely. - A. I cannot tell precisely: you are to consider I am not in the habit of intimacy. I claim the indulgence of the Court not to answer such questions as are relative to the present subject.

Q. You used the term precisely; I want to know what you mean. - A. I might speak incorrect; I do not know his age exactly.

Q. Do you not know that he is not one and twenty. - A. I do not know it.

Q.(To Mr. Garth) Did you find this paper in the package as it came from Leith. - A. Yes, in one of the books I found it.

One of the Assignees. I took out that paper from one of the packages that came from Leith.

Mr. Bolland. The paper purports to be a copy of a register.

Mr. Const. It must be authenticated before you can give it in evidence.

Court. I do not see how that is evidence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-49

535. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted upon the Coroner's inquisition, for that he, on the 16th of August , upon James Warwick feloniously did make an assault, and with both his hands did strike and beat the said James Warwick in and upon his head and face, and did force and throw him to and against the ground, and by means of such striking and beating, he did then and thereby give him divers mortal bruises in and upon his head and face, whereupon he languished till the 17th of August and then died .

- MEARS. Q. Were you at a public house at Islington. - Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner and a man of the name of Warwick there. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About six o'clock in the evening.

Q. What was the name of the public-house. - A. The Clown, opposite Sadler's Wells .

Q. Was there any quarrel between the prisoner Field and Warwick. - A. Not at first. On Sunday evening the prisoner and I were at the Clown public house; we were sitting there some time, and the deceased and an old man got to words; the deceased had chucked some ale over the old man, that was sitting there. The prisoner, on seeing the old man ill used, got up, and wished the old man to sit down, and the deceased to sit down, and not to have any words: the prisoner then came to me and sat down again. After that the deceased and the old man got to words again. The prisoner said to the old man, you had better go out of the company. The old man went in a very few minutes afterwards: after that the prisoner and I went away. In about an hour we returned with a young man. We took seats nearly opposite to the deceased. The deceased got in conversation with him concerning interrupting him with the old man. The prisoner told the deceased to keep his own company. The deceased said, why not you keep your own company this afternoon? The prisoner replied, I did not like to see an old man used ill. The deceased said, I'll serve you the same, and I will split your nose. The deceased arose to strike the prisoner, I got between them to prevent them from fighting. The deceased said he would fight him for five or ten pound, or one pound: the prisoner said he did not wish to fight, he had no money. The deceased then ill used the prisoner and his company; he said we were beggars; he insisted upon fighting him for one pound. I put the money down, and they went out to fight. They continued to fight for an hour, or an hour and a quarter, then the second said he would not fight any more. I went with the prisoner.

Q.What became of the deceased. - A. I do not know; I did not see him when I took the prisoner away.

JEFFERY MORGAN. Q. Were you in this company at the Clown. - A. I was; I saw all that passed, as the witness has related, except the beginning of using the old man ill. I heard the prisoner at the bar say it was cruel of him using the old man ill. The deceased said, I will serve you ten times worse, I will split your nose. The prisoner said, I do not think you can do that. With that the deceased got up, and tried to strike the prisoner; the people stopped them.

Q. Did you see them afterwards fight. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the deceased when his friends said he would not fight any more. - A. I did.

Q. Was there any more blows struck after that. - A. No.

JOHN LEVER. I was standing at the Clown public-house door with a friend. He said there was a fight in the field: I went into the field and they were just done. I saw the prisoner there. The deceased was standing on the ground, held up by two or three men of his acquaintance; he seemed to be quite senseless. I am an officer: the prisoner surrendered himself to me the next morning after I heard he was dead.

WILLIAM CROFT. Q. Was you at the Clown public-house. - A. I was there when they fought.

Q. Did you hear the deceased give in. - A. I heard the words said, that he could fight no more. I went immediately and fetched a doctor. The doctor ordered him to the hospital. I went with the deceased to the hospital, and stopped with him till the doctor ordered me away. I saw him no more. The next morning I went there, I heard he was dead.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-50

586. ELIEZER WHITE was indicted for that he on the 7th of September with force and arms upon John Green feloniously did make an assault in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, he then and there being on a coach did drive the pole of the said coach against the said John Green, and that he did thereby beat him to and against the ground, and did also drive the near horse and the near wheel of the coach over the head of the said John Green, thereby giving him one mortal wound on the left side of the head, of the length of three inches, and the depth of one inch and a half; of which said mortal wound he languished from the 7th of September, and languishing did live until the 13th of the said month, and then he died of the said mortal wound and bruise .

Mr. PHIPPS. I live in Westmoreland Buildings.

Q. You did not know John Green. - A. No, I never saw him till I saw the accident. On Monday the 7th of September, I was walking up Aldersgate Street . I heard a coach coming violently up the street: the driver was violently whipping the horses; as he drove by me the horses were upon the gallop, and he whipping them.

Q. Who was the man that was whipping them. - A. The coachman there at the bar. After he had passed me a few yards, I saw two men coming across the street, and the coach was so near them, that in my apprehension at the time it appeared that he must run over them both. One of the men stepped on one side, and the old man, the deceased was knocked down by the coach and horses; the near horse and the near small wheel went over his head. The coach was instantly stopped.

Q. Who stopped it. - A. I believe the prisoner stopped it as soon as he could; and as soon as the man got up we perceived two wounds, one large wound on the left side of the upper part of his head, and the lesser wound on the right side the lower part.

Q. He did not die on the spot. - A. No. After the accident the coachman turned the people out of the coach, and put the deceased in; the prisoner then drove him to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. After the accident the prisoner did every thing that a man could do.

EDWARD WATTS . I was with the deceased crossing Aldersgate Street on Monday last week, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. I ran as quick as possible, and by some means or other this man was run over; before I could turn and recover myself he was picked up.

Q. You are a young man and you ran; he was an old man and he could not. - A. No.

Mr. SQUIRE. Q. You are the surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. - A. Yes. The deceased was brought to the hospital; he died of an inflammation arising from the wounds he received on the left side of the head, and the other on the right side of the head.

Prisoner's Defence. There was neither of the horses a galloping; facing Bull and Mouth street my, off horse made a slip, and I gave him a whip or two, that gentleman has swore as false as God is true.

Q.(To Watts) Did the horses gallop. - A. I could not see.

JOHN VICKRY . I am an officer. I was coming past at the same time this accident happened; the horses were trotting a middling pace; I saw the wheel go over the man, it certainly appeared to be accidental. The company that were in the coach got out by his orders, the man was put in the coach and taken to the hospital.

DANIEL BISHOP . I was in company with Vickry I observed the coach coming along, it was a fair trot or else we should have taken him in custody.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-51

587. JOHN RAWLINS was indicted, for that he on the 10th of August , feloniously and violently did make an assault upon Sally Leversidge Matravers , and against her will, he the said John Rawlins carnally did ravish and know her .

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-52

588. MARY SPIRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , two chaise cushions, value 20 s. the property of William Griffith , and William Petit .

WILLIAM GRIFFITH . I am in partnership with William Petit , we keep the Ram Inn Smithfield . On the morning of the 23d of July, I missed two chaise cushions.

- I am the constable of St. Martins, the

prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house by John Craig , and these two cushions. I told her it would save a deal of trouble if she would confess.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I swear that the cushions are Mr. Griffiths's.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-53

589. GEORGE STEVENS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Elliot , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 21st of June , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing therein, two silver table spoons value 20 s. three silver tea spoons, value 3 s. a gold pin, value 2 s. a gold watch key, value 2 s. a pair of trowsers, value 12 s. two pair of breeches, value 32 s. one shirt, value 5 s. six neck handkerchiefs, value 15 s. two gowns, value 3 l. a spencer, value 3 s. three petticoats, value 10 s. a shift, value 5 s. a table cloth, value 10 s. two breakfast cloths, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 24 s. a shawl, value 5 s. a hat, value 20 s. two habit shirts, value 5 s. and a silk umbrella, value 10 s. the property of William Elliot .

The Case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

MRS. ELLIOT. Q. Are you the wife of William Elliot . - A. Yes. I live at No. 10, Wood street, Spa Fields ; on Sunday the 21st of June, about a quarter before 12 at noon, I went out, I left all my things safe; I locked my parlour door. I left Mrs. Jackson in the first floor.

Q. At what time was you fetched home upon an alarm that your house had been robbed. - A. About four or five in the afternoon, when I came home I found a police officer in my house, and some of my neighbours; I found the door open, and all the property gone that is in the indictment, they were all left in the drawer in the second floor.

ANN JACKSON . I lodge at Mrs. Elliot's, in the first floor. On Sunday the 21st of June I left the house at 12 o'clock and my servant girl along with me, I saw her double lock the door when she went out, and then I tried it and found it was right, I left nobody in the house, I double locked both my back and my front room door. When I came home in the evening I found my back room door had been opened, my servant's things were taken out of the box, but nothing was taken away.

ELIZABETH SPUNGE . Q. I believe you are servant to Mr. Nicholson nearly opposite. - A. Yes. On Sunday, June the 21st, about three o'clock I saw two men go into Mrs. Elliot's house, and they came out in about half an hour, the prisoner was one of them; he had a shabby hat on when he went in, and a good one when he came out, and each of them when they came out had a bundle and an umbrella; I saw their faces distinctly, they passed our house with their faces towards me; I supposed they were lodgers. In about half an hour some people assembled about the door, and then I related what I had seen.

Q. How soon was it afterwards that you saw the prisoner. - A. On the Wednesday following, I saw him at Tothil Fields prison, he was standing with others: I selected him out. I am sure he is the person I saw come out of Mrs. Elliot's, I knew him as soon as I saw him.

JONATHAN TROT . I am a police officer. I went with the last witness to Tothill Fields prison, she selected the prisoner from among the persons who were there. On the Sunday afternoon the robbery was committed, I was near the spot in consequence of information. I went to the house, the house was open, and two or three people in it; I found the drawers had been broken open violently; I remained there till Mrs. Elliot came home.

Prisoner's Defence. I am informed that Mrs. Cherry saw the men about the place, she saw them go in and come out, and I am informed the same men were drinking at the Vineyard public house. I have witnesses to prove that I was at Shadwell from a quarter before three till a quarter before five. The Rev. Dr. Hawker preached a charity sermon there.

RICHARD READ . I belong to the Thames Police office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him on the 21st of June. - A. I do; I saw him on that Sunday opposite Shadwell Church about three o'clock in the afternoon, at the time the Rev. Dr. Hawker preached a funeral sermon; there I saw him just about the time the clergyman came into the church, I took notice of him; Mr. Brown, a Shadwell officer, went round to several houses, and we could not see him, he and his companion ran up a street, we meant to take him in custody if we could see him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Were you ever an officer before to the City of London. - A. Yes, for five years.

Q. You were dismissed from that. - A. I was.

Q. When was it you was first of all applied to come here. - A. Last Saturday.

Q. Have you not said within these two days you wonder'd you was subpoened, for you did not know the time when you saw him. - A. No. I said I could not prove whether it was after two or three. I could not speak positively. I never said I could not speak to the time.

Q. Have you not said so to Trott. - A. No, I said it was between two and three o'clock.

Q. What was the person's name that was in company with the prisoner. - A. I did not know his name, he was a short man. I should have taken them if I could have found them again.

Q.(To Trott.) You have been attending two days upon this trial. - A. I have.

Q. The day before yesterday did you see Read. - A. Yes he called me out of the gate. He asked me if I was not against Long Stevy, he generally goes by that name. I said I was, he then said he was subpoened on behalf of the prisoner Stevens, he then said in a low voice, I cannot tell what I was subpoened for, I cannot say any thing at all about the time; I thought I did not want any conversation about it, I left him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-54

590. ROBERT BANTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , in the dwelling house of Joseph Smith, a leather purse, value one penny, and five one pound bank notes , the property of James Harvey .

MARY HARVEY. Q. What is your husband's

name. - A. James Harvey , he is a Chelsea pensioner , and so is the prisoner. My husband and Robert Banton , with one Stedman, went to Chelsea to receive their pension; on the 21st of July my husband received six one-pound notes, four shillings, and ten pence; my husband gave me the six notes, I put them in a leather purse; the prisoner gave me four pound notes, his new instructions, and some duplicates, as a public house near Chelsea bridge, and his pocket book; I was to take care of them; we walked as far as Buckingham Gate, and then we all four took a coach; we came to Green's-court, St. James's , where I lodge, at Joseph Smith 's house.

Q. Does he live in the house. - A. No, he lives over the way. When I got home I took out his money and mine together, from my bosom; I took a one pound note out of my six, and then I put my own purse and his pocket book upon a shelf in a cupboard.

Q. Was the prisoner and your husband in that room. A. Yes. I went out for some tea and sugar; I left my husband and the prisoner in the room when I went out.

Q. Was the cupboard locked. - A. No, there is no door to it. I staid about three quarters of an hour; when I came back I found them both on the bed, and directly I went into the room I missed his money and mine. I said I am ruined, and run down stairs directly to my landlady; I awoke my husband and told him somebody had taken the money out of the room. The prisoner was on the bed.

Q. Did you tell him. - A. No, not then. I fetched my landlady, we searched the room, we could not find it; she made the prisoner get up out of the bed for us to search the bed; we told him the money was gone; he said I had ruined him, I had lost all his money and all his property. The prisoner walked out of the room, and never spoke another word; he seemed very unconcerned.

Q. He expressed some concern, he said you had ruined him, and you had lost all his property, but however then he went out of the room. - A. Yes; in about half an hour he came back and asked for his pocket book and his money; I told him I could not give it him, somebody had robbed me of his money and mine and all.

Q. Did you ever see the pocket book notes, or purse afterwards. - A. No.

JAMES HARVEY. I am a Chelsea pensioner. I received six one pound notes; I gave them to my wife, and the change I kept. When we got home my wife put it on a shelf, she told me; I did not see it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner's pocket book. - A. No. After I was upon the bed my wife went out.

Q. Did the prisoner lay on the bed when you did. - A Yes, he came to me and laid by me on the bed; I went to sleep while she was gone.

Q. At the time of her absence, did you take the purse or the pocket book from the shelf. - A. No.

Q. Do you remember your wife awaking you, and telling you she had lost the pocket book. - A. I do not recollect her coming into the room, but as soon as I saw her in the room, she cast her eyes towards the shelf, and said the money was gone; the prisoner said it was a pretty job if all the money was gone, he was ruined.

JAMES SLADE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22nd of July, in the prosecutor's house. I asked him if he had any money or notes, he denied it; there was a soldier in the room that insisted that he had notes about him; he still persisted that he had not, I searched him, and found upon him three one pound notes, two seven shilling pieces, and three shillings and sixpence in silver. I produce the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 21st of July I went to Chelsea; I received a pension of four pound six shillings and eleven pence; I put it in my pocket. I parted with Harvey, and went into a cook's shop, from that into a public house; I drank pretty freely. Going home I met Harvey and his wife very much in liquor. We went into a coach, and ordered it to drive to the Fox, Wardour-street, where I live; we stopped there, drank half a pint of gin, then they went round to Green's court; they alighted, and went up that court; several of my friends took me away; she could not walk she was conducted up the court; I went to the Fox. After that I went and asked her for my pocketbook. I gave her my pocket-book to take care off; there were twenty duplicates in it, there was no other property in it. When I asked for the pocketbook, she said she put it and her husband's money on a shelf; it was all gone; I asked her who had been in the place, she said a woman up stairs; I went home to my own place and treated a friend; I never mentioned the word money to her; I had my notes in my pocket when I was at my home. I asked a tailor to buy my boy some things that night; I pulled out my notes to change at the Fox; the landlord would not change them that night.

THOMAS BROOKS . Q. Do you remember the evening when Bantin had been to Chelsea. - A. Yes, I remember his coming to the sign of the Fox the corner of Wardour-street, Peter-street, Soho, it was about three or four o'clock in the afternoon; they came in a coach, Mr. Harvey, his wife, Bantin, and his boy and another man; they had half a pint of gin in the coach, the coachman led the horses round to Green's-court to Harvey's habitation; the prisoner at the bar did not go into the house with them, he returned with me to the Fox; I was with him there upwards of three hours.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-55

591. BRIDGET BUSH and MARY MOORE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , five yards of printed gingham, value 9 s. and a yard and a half of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of Evan Thomas Davis , privately in his shop .

MICHAEL TODD . I am shopman to Mr. Davis, linen draper , in Great Warner-street, Cold Bath fields . The prisoners came in the shop together; Bush asked to look at a print.

Q. Did you shew her any print. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see this gingham any time before they came in the shop. - A. Yes, it was on the counter before they came in; we served Bush with the article they wanted, and they waited for change; I went into Mr. Cook's, a linen draper in the same street for change. After I came back I detected the prisoner Bush with the gingham; after I stopped her I looked down, and the gingham had fell down close to her feet; I looked about, I saw the gingham lying on the ground.

Q. You did not know how it came on the ground. -

A. No, it was close to Bush's feet; after that Bush went down upon her knees and begged pardon, requested us to let her go, and she would never do so any more. She confessed that she took it. After the constable came, I saw Mr. Cook take a remnant of printed cotton from Bush.

MR. COOK. Q. You were called in. - A. Yes; I saw the gingham drop on the ground, but I did not see it drop from her; I searched Bush, she endeavoured to take some things out of her pocket; I took the remnant of printed cotton from her, as she was taking it out of her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Bush's Defence. When I was going away the young man told me I had got something that was not my own; I opened the handkerchief and begged his pardon, I said it was a mistake, I took it up with what I had paid for, as they laid together on the counter. One of the gentlemen came and took me, he said I was going to thieve it. This woman is innocent of it.

Moore was not put on her defence.

BUSH - GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of three shillings .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-56

592. JOSEPH STANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of James Cronen , in his dwelling house , and JOHN STANLEY for receiving the said watch, he knowing it to have been stolen .

JAMES CRONEN . I live in Lombard-court, Seven Dials , I rent the house, I am a fishmonger . On the 13th of August the watch was taken out of my back parlour. I had seen it at two o'clock; I missed it at eleven.

Mrs. CRONEN. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 13th of August Joseph Stanley came into my place; I had been out between seven and eight o'clock. When I came in I saw him coming out of my parlour.

Q. Was he at all intimate with you. - A. Yes; when I was busy he used to come and string the fish.

Q. Was your husband in the shop when you saw Joseph Stanley coming out of the parlour. - A. Yes. I had not left the shop above five minutes. When I saw him coming out of the parlour, I said what are you doing there Joseph; he said Mr. Cronen sent me in for a pipe of tobaoco; I said there is no light there, do not you see Cronen smoking over the boards; I never missed the watch till eleven at night, when I was going to bed.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you see this boy come in between seven and eight o'clock. - A. I had not seen him that night.

JAMES DONALDSON. I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. On the 24th of August I found Joseph Stanley in Tichfield street, at a saddle-tree makers; I said to him where is the fishmonger's watch; he said he had not got it, his father had the watch; he told me he believed his father was at a public house in the street; I went to the public house, called the father out, and I saw the ribbon hanging out; I said to the father let me look at that watch; he pulled the watch out, and I think put it into my hand; I then turned round to Cronen, I said is this your watch; he looked at it and said it is my watch; I said to the father where is the chain and the seal, he said it is at home. When I had them both in the coach I corrected the father, Stanley, for encouraging the son to do this. The father said no, my son gave it me, and I am very angry that he should place me in this situation; he told me he found it. I went to his lodgings in West-street, at a bird cage makers; Mrs. Stanley gave me the chain and seal. The father said he had been looking every morning in the papers to see if it was advertised.

Joseph Stanley said nothing in his defence.

John Stanley 's Defence. My lord, I declare my innocency. I never had any reason to suspect his dishonesty.

John Stanley called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOSEPH STANLEY , GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Judgment respited .

JOHN STANLEY , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-57

593. JOSEPH ELLISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 4 l. the property of John Poole , Robert Lilystock , and Joseph Gibbs Barker ; and RICHARD STEINBACK for feloniously receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

The Case stated by Mr. Stork.

JOSEPH GIBBS BARKER . Q. What are your partner's names. - A. John Poole and Robert Lilystock .

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know them both; Ellison lived with us four years, and Steinback about two years, as porter ; Steinback left us about a year and a half ago.

Q. Did you at any time discover a piece of Irish in a particular situation in your warehouse. - A. Yes, it was put behind the boxes in which the cloth is usually put; I let it remain there to see what would become of it; I saw it every evening, it was there about the time we first discovered the cloth; Ellison was taken ill and was confined up stairs about ten days; he resumed his calling last Monday week. On this day week in the afternoon I discovered the piece of cloth was gone.

Q. Were you present at any time when Ellison was accused of having taken this piece of Irish. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Did you tell him if he would discover who the receiver was, you would let him off. - A. No, he acknowledged having taken it, and that he had given it to Steinback.

Mr. Stork. What has been the character of Ellison during these four years. - A. A very industrious useful man.

Mr. Alley. You had an opportunity after this man was taken ill, to discover that this piece of Irish linen was in a very unusual situation, you choosed that it should remain there; you left it there expecting that it would be stolen. - A. Yes.

Court. In point of fact it was stolen; because if it was taken out of the box it was stolen.

Mr. Alley. Ellison did not confess at first what he had done, but the terror of a prison, and your kindness towards him, he told you. - A. I suppose it was his contrition, and seeing we had the goods, and we were in possession of some of the facts.

Q. You could prove that he was the person that stole it, but your object was not so much to punish him as the receiver. - A. There was no such remark by me nor

any body else.

JOSEPH READER . Q. I believe you are the man who manages the business. - A. Yes.

Q Did you see this piece of goods as described by Mr. Barker. - A I did; the porter under Ellison discovered it by accident; I marked it. I believe it was taken from a box, No. 3. I found a piece deficient in the box.

Q. Is it usual for you to mark off the goods that are sold. - A. Yes; this was marked off. I had not marked it off.

Q. When did you first miss it from the place where it was concealed behind the box. - A. This day week I found it missing about nine in the morning; he was accused of it, at first he denied it; he was told if he told the truth it would be the better for him; he then said that he had taken it, and had given it to Steinback.

Court. Who told him he had better tell the truth. - A. I did for one

Q. In the hearing of your masters. - A. I did.

Q. Did they say any thing to the contrary. - A. No.

Court. Then I must not hear it.

Mr. Barker. These goods were in the house on Saturday morning. The prisoner had the charge of the house on that morning, from seven till nine o'clock.

FRANCIS NALDER. Q. Did you at any time go to the lodging of the prisoner Steinback. - A. I did, this day week, he lived in Ironmonger-lane, he came home about four o'clock in the afternoon. I and some officers, and Mr. Poole the partner went up after him; I secured him, and then I pulled out the warrant. I said I must search the place for a piece of goods; I searched, and in a dirty sheet was concealed this piece of linen. Mr. Poole looked at it, and said this was the piece of goods that he had lost.

Q. to Reader. Can you say whether that is the piece that you marked. - A.It is the piece that I marked, after it was found in the place.

Q. to Nalder. When did you see Steinback again. - A. On Monday, when he was brought before the lord mayor.

Q. What was said was taken down in writing. - A. I cannot say, Mr. Hobler warned the porter to be particular cautious in what he said in his confession, that there was no fair hopes of any favour, and as such he should speak unbiassed.

Q. Then this confession, whatever it was, was read over in the presence of Steinback. - A. It was.

MR. CHARLES HUMPHRIES . Q. Was this taken down in writing by the officer. - A. It was not.

Court. All that I admit. A paper was read in the hearing of Steinback, not as proof of the facts, only they say that the answers apply to Steinback. (read): - The voluntary confession of Joseph Ellison ; the informant saith, that he has been in the employ of Messrs. Pool and co. as a porter, living in their house about four years; that he has been acquainted with Richard Steinback, from the time that he lived in the same service, to the present time; that Richard Steinback left the service about a year and a half ago; that the said Richard Steinback told him he wished he would get him a piece of Irish; that the informant did take a piece of Irish linen, marked 23, which he put behind the box, in the said warehouse. The informant met the said prisoner, and told him he had got a piece of Irish for him, and the prisoner Steinback told him he would call on the Saturday morning for it; and as the informant was sweeping out the warehouse he delivered to him the piece of linen he had so concealed. Taken before me, Samuel Birch. Signed Charles Wilson.

Q.Was that paper read over in the hearing of Steinback - A. Yes, and the answer that he gave was, that he received it from Ellison to take care of it for him.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q.Did you accompany Mr. Nalder to the lodgings of Steinback. - A I did; nothing passed at that time; I took him to the compter; returned to Mr. Nalder at his lodgings; I saw Mr. Nalder find this piece of linen, it was covered over with a sheet.

Q. When did you next see him. - A. On Monday morning; he was then before Mr. Alderman Birch; I took him to Newgate from there. As we were coming along in the coach, in company with Leadbetter, Sherrin, Ellison, and Steinback, Steinback said to Ellison, what a fool you must be, to say any thing about it; Ellison replied, how much would you have given me out of it, or what could you have sold it for; he said he should have sold it for about three shillings a yard, and they had made a mistake at the Mansion-house, they had called it twenty-five yards, and it was twenty-six yards; Leadbetter said he should be very glad if he could get such a piece at three shillings a yard, he thought it a very good one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This conversation began by Steinback asking the other why did he say any thing about it - then you tell us Ellison replied, what would you have given to me if you had sold it. - A. Ellison said to Steinback, I suppose you would have given to me about two pounds; Steinback made a laugh and no answer.

Q. Do you wish the jury to believe that these men introduced this discourse before you and the other officers what bargain they would have made - A. That is what passed.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. Has this man given a correct account of what passed. - A Yes, all but the two pounds, that I do not recollect; I recollect Steinback saying at three shillings a-yard it would come to two pounds eighteen shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. These men knew you were officers. - A Surely.

Q. And they said all that you have stated. - A. They did.

(The property produced and identified.)

Ellison's Defence. I signed my confession; I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

Court. There is no confession here.

Steinback left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

ELLISON, GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

STEINBACK, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-58

594. JOHN SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of July , three silver tea spoons, value 6 s. the property of John Hatchett .

JOHN HILL . I am a waiter at Mr. Hatchett's hotel in Piccadilly . The prisoner has been in the hotel a great many times; we missed tea spoons from the coffee room in the hotel; I cannot speak to the time, I believe

about a fortnight before the prisoner was taken up. I saw the spoons at Bow-street, I know them to be my master's. The prisoner was in the habit of coming into the coffee room; he had brandy and water, and a spoon with it.

Q. Had you acquainted your master that any tea spoons were missing. - A. Yes.

JOHN MILLER. I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 7th of July the prisoner was brought in custody of Mr. Lane's shopman to the Brown Bear , opposite the office. I searched the prisoner's lodgings in Marchmont-street, Great Coram-street; there I found two silver tea spoons. I saw his wife at the lodgings.

Q. Was there any appearance of business at the lodgings. - A. No.

JAMES HULME . I am servant to Mr. Lane, 135, Drury-lane. On Tuesday afternoon the 7th of July the prisoner came to sell two tea spoons; I told him there was Hatchett's hotel on them; he said was there. He desired me to let him look at them; no, said I. I turned round to get my hat, and the prisoner went out of the shop. I pursued him as far as Brydges-street, Covent Garden, and then I laid hold of him; he said do not say any thing. I then took him to Bow-street.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-59

595. RICHARD HYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a chaise saddle, value 30 s. a horse collar, value 5 s. and a pair of traces and haims, value 25 s. the property of Benjamin Westall , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH WESTALL . I am the wife of Benjamin Westall , No. 4, Long Acre , my husband is a light carriage maker . On Saturday August the 22nd at one o'clock I was coming from the first floor to the shop; I discovered the prisoner with some part of the harness on the bend of his left arm; he was in the act of taking down the bridle and the reins when I called to him; part of the reins was on his arm, and part on the ground. I had passed it two minutes before, and then it was hanging on the pegs. I called halloa, then he dropped it; I ran to the door and gave an alarm to my neighbours. He set off running, and my neighbours took him; he was brought back in two or three minutes. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. Was there any thing removed out of the place except the bridle and the reins. - A. The bridle and reins hung on the place; he took the saddle and the collar, the traces and haims; he left the bridle and reins hung on the peg when I called out to him.

Q. I thought you said he took the bridle and reins off the peg. - A. No. I am confident he is the man.

Q Was this saddle a chaise saddle. - A. I believe it is.

PETER BUSHNAN . I am a carver and gilder, I live opposite Mr. Westall. On the 22nd of August I was standing at my door; hearing Mrs. Westall calling particularly loud I looked towards the door, I saw the prisoner drop part of the reins, I ran after him, he took up Angel-court, I brought him back immediately. I lost sight of him for a minute and a half, when he turned the corner.

Q. How long was it after he first began to run, was it before you took him back to the shop. - A. Not more than six minutes. I am positive he is the man that dropt these things upon Mrs. Westalls alarm and run away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Situated as I am and impeached with so serious a crime as this, and being the first time I ever was before a court, I am obliged to trouble the court with a written defence. I am a painter by trade. On the day afternoon of the mentioned in the indictment went to Mr. Quin, Angel-court, to borrow a brush which I wanted to use that day; as I went through the court I heard a cry of stop thief; there was a man past me in full speed; at the moment I had not the idea to stop him, if I had it would have been prevented me from being tried, and had I thought I should have been tried for this offence, I would have taken him. I went to the top of the court to see what was the matter; I saw several people, but I saw nothing of the man; therefore I returned to my acquaintances abode. On my return I was met by two men and charged with the theft. This is a simple state of the fact, and I hope your enlightened minds will be cautious if in this great populous city one person is to be mistaken, or to be taken in custody for another. I solemnly declare I never saw my prosecutrix till I was brought to her; nor I never was in her house. Therefore I hope for my acquital, to be restored to my family.

Q. to Bushnan. At the time that you were pursuing this man, did you find any man running before him, upon the cry of Stop thief. - A. No, that you may rely on. There was another person that went round another way to meet him, as he was coming out of the court.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-60

596. JOHN PHILLIPS COLLINS was indicted for feloniously forging on the 22nd of August , an order for the payment of 40 l. with intention to defraud George Grote and William Willoughby Prescott .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true a like forged order for payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention; and

Two other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud George Griffiths .

The indictment read by Mr. Knapp, and case stated by Mr. Const.

WILLIAM FLEMING GRAYSON . Q. Are you a clerk to Messrs. Prescott and co. bankers , Threadneedle-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Who are the partners. - A. George Grote and William Willoughby Prescott ; these are the only partners.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, on Saturday the 22nd of August, about a quarter before five in the afternoon, he presented a check upon Messrs. Prescott and co. to me; I produce it; I have had it ever since. I suspected that it was not the hand writing of Mr. Griffiths, I shewed it to another clerk; then I was satisfied that it was not a good one. I took him into the back office and asked him from whom he had it; he said he had it from Mr. Soames, a hatter in St. John-street; I asked him if he lived with Mr. Soames, he said he did.

Q. What did you do with the prisoner. - A. It was desired that he might be detained; I went to Mr. Griffiths in Houndsditch and made some discovery; I then asked the prisoner the number of Mr. Soames house in St. John-street; he hesitated, he said he did not know. He then said that he did not live with Mr. Soames, but that he had the check of a gentleman in Bartholomew-lane, whom he did not know and that this gentleman desired him to say that he came from Mr. Soames. I asked him how he was to meet the gentleman, and how he was to give him the money; he said he was to take the money to an eating house in Bartholomew-lane and there meet the gentleman. I went with him to the eating house; there were several persons sitting there, he looked about, but he did not fix upon any person; one person sitting asked him who he was looking for, he answered Mr. Soames. Upon leaving the house I asked him if he lived with any person in the neighbourhood; he answered that he lived with Mr. Simpson in Coleman-street; I told him he must go with me there. In passing the bank he said he did not work for Mr Simpson, but that he lodged with him, he worked with Mr. Dutton in Bartholomew-lane; we were in sight of Mr. Dutton, he was standing at his shop door. I then desired the prisoner to write his name, he wrote John Phillips ; I shewed it to Mr. Dutton, the prisoner was not present; he was given into the charge of a constable after I took him to the banking house.

Q. Did you make enquiries after such a person as Soames. - A. Yes, I made a diligent search for him, and a person of the name of Simpson; I could find neither of them.

Q. Do you know Mr Griffiths. - A. Yes, he is a customer at our house; I have seen his hand writing, but I have not seen him write.

JOHN DUTTON . - Mr. Const. I am an oilman, I live in Bartholomew lane; the prisoner lived with me as a porter upwards of seventeen months.

Q. Where do you keep your banking house. - A. At Messrs. Prescott and co.

Q. Did you ever employ the prisoner to go to the banking house. - A. I think I have sent him there twice to pay cash, never to receive any.

Q. Do you keep checks by you. - A. I have none by me now; I usually have; I keep them where I keep my money, locked up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you had sent him that very morning. - A. Yes, to pay money.

Q. Therefore he would be likely to be known. - A. Most likely. He has behaved extremely well; if he was at liberty I should be inclined to take him again.

JOHN BARNET. - Mr. Knapp. You are a constable of the city of London. - A. I am; I apprehended the prisoner at Messrs. Prescotts. I searched the prisoner's trunks; there were some trifling things that belonged to Mr. Dutton, and there were two bankers checks.

ANDREW ROBERTSON . - Mr. Const. Are you particularly acquainted with Mr. Griffiths's hand-writing. - A. I know it.

Q. Is that is hand writing - A. I do not think it is.

WILLIAM PASHER . I am acquainted with Mr. Griffiths's hand writing; that is not his hand writing; he lives in Houndsditch.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-61

597. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , a box, value 1 d. a guinea, and five shillings and six pence, the property of Isaac Parsley , privily from the person of Hannah his wife .

HANNAH PARSLEY . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Isaac Parsley .

Q. You had your pocket picked. - A.Yes. On the 1st of August I was standing at Mr. Miller's shop, Spital fields market ; I felt something in my left hand pocket where the box was; I turned round and looked at the prisoner, but before I turned round I put my hand into my pocket, I missed my box; I asked the prisoner what she had been doing, she said nothing; I pushed her into Mrs. Miller's shop; I lost my box, it contained one guinea and five shillings and sixpence; I saw Mrs. Miller take the box out of her hand, and then it contained my money.

Mrs. MILLER. Mrs. Parsley put this woman inside of my shop, I pulled her cloak of one side; in her left hand I took out a box, which contained the money; I gave the box to Mrs. Parsley. The prisoner begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I say I did not take it, nor I did not think of it; I picked it up in the straw, in the middle of the market.

Prosecutrix. It is my box and my money; I am sure she picked my pocket of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who have her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined one Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-62

598. HUGH DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a coat, value 10 s. the property of John Groves .

The prosecutor not appearing in court his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-63

599. ELIZABETH TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , a pair of leather shoes, value 5 s. the property of David Byrn .

WILLIAM WESLEY . I am a shoemaker, I live in Pelham-street. I saw David Byrn 's child crying, I looked out in the street, I saw the prisoner and two other women stopping her; I went out and asked what she had done to the child, she said nothing. I brought her back, and the child said she had stole her father's shoes; I felt something between her knees; she then pulled the shoes from under her clothes and said they were her property. I took them from her, and took her to the watchhouse. I produce the shoes.

DAVID BYRN . Q. You are a poulterer . - A. Yes, I live in Pelham-street, Spital fields; I knew the shoes to be mine, I left them in the window; there was no person in the house but the child.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along I picked these shoes up.

Q. How came you to put them under your petticoat. A. I did not, I put them under my gown.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Six Months In the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-64

600. ELIZA KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a black lead pencil, value 1 d. two guineas, a shilling, two sixpences, and ten halfpence, the property of John Vincent privily from his person .

JOHN VINCENT . I live at No. 9. Charles-street, Hampstead road. I lived there when the affair happened.

Q. You had your pocket picked I suppose. - A. Yes, it was on the 4th of July, I was coming from St. Ann's parish, across Fox-street , to the end of Crown-street. I was going then to the corner of Tottenham-court-road ; as I was a crossing a lady crossed.

Q. Had you been drinking. - A. I had one pint of beer, no more.

Q. How came you to be out so late at night. - A. I had been out upon business, and a friend of mine detained me some time. The prisoner at the bar accosted me; she spoke to me, or I to her, I am not certain; I believe she spoke first. We walked on together; when she told me she had been seduced by a gentleman who brought her from the country. We walked on a bit till we came to a yard, we walked down there, I there gave her a shilling, she saw me take the money out of my pocket, out of a small bit of newspaper. I put the remainder into my pocket and hearing a noise in the house, we stopped to hear what it was about, and during that time she took my money out of my pocket.

Q. You felt her hand in your pocket. - A. I did not. I never saw my money after I put it in my pocket.

Q. How soon after did you miss it. - A. A very few minutes after; the watchman came up; and as soon as the watchman came up she said it was her uncle, and if he saw her with any body he would not speak to her again, and her aunt would turn her out of doors, and she a poor girl out of the country what could she do; she begged me to leave her; it was Hanover-yard we were in. I considered with myself what was the best to do; I was determined to go with her. I was for turning to the right hand, where I saw a watchman at the corner of Rathbone-place; she saw him as well as me, and refused to go. I immediately accused her of the crime; she said she knew nothing of it. I told her she had picked my pocket and insisted upon her returning it immediately, or I would give her into the charge of the watchman; she walked on about the midway to the box, at the corner of Rathbone-place, Tottenham-court-road, when a woman came towards her; she held her hand out towards her to give her something; I held her hand and would not let her. We were going on a little way farther, then she said she insisted upon going home; this I refused, and immediately called the watchman. The watchman came, and the sergeant of the night; when she saw them coming she dropt the two guineas behind her; the watchman was just soon enough to see her drop the two guineas.

Q. Did you hear them fall. - A. No. she stooped very low; the ground was dirty, you could not very well hear; the sergeant of the night picked it up; said he, it is two guineas. I said to the watchman it is my money. He asked her what property she had of mine; she gave up a shilling, two sixpences, and five pennyworth of halfpence from her hand; he then took her to the watchouse. There she denied any knowledge of the two guineas. The constable of the night told her to turn out her pockets, which she did; on her pockets being turned out there was a hazel nut, which I had in my pocket for a year and a half, and likewise the splinter of a pencil; the pencil had come undone in my pocket. The constable of the night asked me if it was mine, and when I turned out my pocket, I found the splinter that matched it, and likewise the pencil. This is the pencil, and the constable has the two remaining pieces; one that came out of my pocket and that which came out of her pocket.

Q. What made you suppose that she throwed the two guineas away. - A. I had hold of her, because she should not make her escape, and I saw her stoop.

Q. What money did you lose. - A. I lost two guineas, a shilling, two sixpences, and five pennyworth of halfpence.

ALEXANDER M'DONALD. I am sergeant of the night in Marylebone. I saw her stoop down, and I picked up the two guineas.

Prosecutor. The splinters of the pencil matches; I have no doubt of it being mine.

HENRY HOWARD . Q. Did you search the prisoner. - A. Yes. I found six shillings in her pocket, a splinter of a pencil, and a large hazel nut. I produce them.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me would I take any thing, I said no; then he asked me if I would have something to eat. I declined his offer; he put his hand in his pocket and gave me a shilling and two sixpences and some halfpence, and some nuts came with it; I did not wish to accept the money, I was wishing him a good night; he stopped me, he said if I would go with him he would get a bed for him and me for half a crown or three shillings; he insisted upon my going with him. I would not he took very indecent liberty with me in the street, I begged him not to behave so rude to me; he made use of very improper expressions and asked me for what purpose did I think he gave me the money.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-65

601. FRANCIS TURNER was indicted for fe- for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , twenty-six yards, and three quarters of a yard of gingham, value 1 l. 12 s. the property of Thomas Sharp and William Risen .

FRANCIS BLAKE. I have the management of Mr. Sharp's business, he is a partner to William Risen , they are linen drapers , they live at the corner of Milk-street, Cheapside . On the 27th of August, between seven and eight in the evening, I was told that the prisoner took a piece of gingham that was hanging inside of the door; the boy ran after her and took it from her at the bottom of Wood-street. I overtook him and took it from the boy.

Q. Did you see him overtake her. - A. I did not.

ELIZABETH HACK . I was standing at the door, I saw the prisoner take the gingham from Mr. Sharp's door.

Q. Do you live in the neighboured. - A. I did then.

Q. Where was the linen hanging. - A It was on a pile within side the door, it was fastened with two strings; I directly told John King , a lad that lived with Mr. Blake; he went after her. I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

JOHN KING . I am a servant to Mr. Sharp, I was in his shop at the time it was stole. On my coming to the door I was told that the woman had taken it; I ran after her directly and took it away from her. Mr. Blake came up and I gave it to him. She had the gingham in her hand.

- JOHNSON. I am an hosier. I was standing at the door when the young man announced to me there was a robbery at Mr. Sharp's. Upon my approaching the prisoner, I took the gingham from the young man, for him to secure the prisoner; I then took the gingham to my own warehouse and deliver- it to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Cheapside, I picked that cotton up, it was twenty yards from that shop; the lad came up to me, he said my good mistress that piece of gingham belongs to our shop; I said if it is yours take it. That young man came up and said I should not go, he would charge an officer with me. I had the cloth in my hand; I did not cover it with any thing.

Q.(to Elizabeth Hack.) You said you saw her take it. - A. I saw her take it; I will be upon my oath that she took it from the side of the door.

GUILTY aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-66

602. JAMES HART was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , a coat, value 15 s. the property of William Stanborough .

JOHN CHAPPLE . I am a waiter at the Old Bell, Holborn . On Monday the 5th of July I took this great coat out of Mr. Standborough's chaise, I hung it in the coffee room upon the curtain. In about an hour afterwards the prisoner came into the coffee room and set himself by the coat; he removed from where the coat was hanging, and presently I saw him take the coat down, tie it up in a handkerchief, and walked out of the room. I followed him with the great coat upon him. Then I gave him in charge of the street keeper.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into the coffee room I supposed it to be my own coat; I was in the habit of wearing one.

Jury. (to Chapple.) Did the prisoner come in the room with a great coat on. - A. No.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-67

603. JAMES ADAMSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of July , a quarter of a yard of printed calico, value 2 d. and forty other pieces of printed calico, each of them containing in ength half a quarter of a yard, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Williams ,

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a calender and packer ; the prisoner was a servant of mine, he was a finisher of goods that were entrusted to his care.

Q. What do you accuse him of. - A. Of cutting the ends from the pieces of goods that was entrusted to his care.

Q. When was it. - A. On the 27 of July. From information I and the officer caught him with the goods upon him. They were going abroad. It is the custom to take off one end for the merchant as a sample; he cut off each end.

Q. What use could be made of the eighth part of a yard. - A. They sell them; it is but of small value, but an immense quantity is of great value; it is an unfortunate circumstance that in all the markets they are publicly sold as remnants to make patchwork.

WILLIAM SHERRIN . I am an officer. On Monday the 27th of July Mr. Williams gave me in charge of the prisoner. On searching him I took out twenty one pieces from his coat pocket. Tipper has some, that he found in his lodgings; one of the pieces corresponds with the piece he was working.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never denied to Mr. Williams that I had taken the matter in question; I asked him if he did not allow it, he told me he did not; I then told him if I had known his refusal of it, I should not have took it, for journeymen generally do it. I have been a master, and my partners as well as myself never disanulled the custom; I asked Mr. Williams if he meant to send me to prison, he told me yes; I told him I hoped he would think of my family, a pregnant wife and six children. I had a strong recommendation of character to Mr. Williams; I had been only in his service six weeks.

Q. to prosecutor. I am bound to ask you whether it is a custom in the trade for such perquisites. - A. Never since I have been in the trade.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined six Months in Newgate and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-68

604. JAMES STOCK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Huntington , about the hour of twelve at night on the 31st of July , and burglariously stealing therein a caddlestick, value 2 s. an extinguisher, value 6 d. a bowl, value 6 d. two silver tea spoons, value 2 s.; two pound eleven shillings and sixpence, and a bank note, value 1 l. his property .

MARTHA ELLIOT . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a chairwoman employed at the chapel Titchfield street . - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of the 31st of July were you employed in cleaning the chapel. - A. I was. I left Mr. Huntington's chapel a quarter before seven; it is called Providence chapel.

Q. Are there any rooms in that chapel. - A. Yes, two; they are even with the first gallery over the door; one is the vestry and the other the study.

Q. Does Mr. Huntington occasionally sleep there. A. Yes.

Q. At the time you went did you observe whether there was a candlestick on the mantle shelf. - A

Yes, in the vestry; the vestry adjoins the study, and there was a brass bowl in the sink; I returned on Saturday morning at about half past five; I found somebody there; I went in, I found the drawers had been broken open on the side of the vestry; the top of the drawers were split off. I saw the tongs lying by the side of the drawers very much bent; the shutters of the lower window of the chapel were open, the bolt was very much bent, it appeared that the shutter had been forced. I had fastened them shutters when I left it.

Q. Is there any way to get to that study but by getting in the chapel. - A. No.

Q. Did you miss any thing in the morning when you came. - A. Yes, a candlestick and a bowl; nothing else was in my care.

DENNIS CRONE. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a watchman. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of August the 1st were you calling the hour of two behind this chapel. - A. Yes; it was break of day, I observed the shutter of the chapel to be open; I tried the door, that was not fastened. I acquainted the woman that is in care of the chapel, the pew opener; then I got a light and went into the vestry, and found the drawers forced open, and the top quite broken off, and the fender was bent.

MR. WILLIAM HUNTINGTON . - Mr. Gurney. We understand sir, you are the minister of this chapel. - A. I am.

Q. Do you sleep occasionally in that study. - A. I live there on the sabbath day, my residence is five miles from the chapel; I have a bed in the study, in this chapel that I may sleep there on Saturday or Sunday evening, in case of bad weather. There is two galleries to the chapel; the vestry and the study are on a level with the first gallery; I built it for the convenience of going into the vestry, without going into the body of the congregation.

Q. Did you leave any bank notes there. - A. There was about three guineas and a half there in the drawer.

Court. When had you seen this money there. - A. There was always a little money left in the drawer in the vestry, to defray the expences of coals, or any thing that might be wanted; I cannot speak to the money; it was very much under the management of one of the gentlemen of the chapel.

Q. Whose candlestick is that. - A. It is mine; there were three tea spoons and a sugar spoon, one of them belongs to me, the others are his mothers.

WILLIAM ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Monday the 3d of August, I apprehended the prisoner; I sent a man into public house where he was, to identify him; when the man came out, he immediately followed, and tried to get away. From the description I had of him, I told him that I suspected he had robbed Mr. Huntington's chapel; he said he had not; I took him to the office. In his fob pocket I found the duplicate of the candlestick; I went to the pawnbrokers, and there I found the candlestick; when I came back, I told him I had seen the candlestic, that a person who was in the habit of going to the chapel bad identified it, therefore he must be the person who took them. I asked who was with him, he said it was the lame fidler that was in the public house with him; I asked him what he had done with the bowl, he said he had sold it to a person that kept an ironshop, a few doors from the pawnbroker's; I asked him what he had done with the spoons, he said he knew nothing more than of two spoons and if there were more taken the fidler that was with him had not made him acquainted with it. One of the spoons he said he had given to a girl, who went to pawn it; she immediately came back and said the pawnbroker would not take it in, and a man who was sitting in the same box with him and several others, took the spoon from the girl it was given from one to another he never saw it afterwards, and the other spoon he gave to another woman. He said it was between eleven and twelve o'clock when he went with the fidler, and he broke the drawers open with the poker.

- . I am shopman to Mr. William Briant , George-street, Bloomsbury. On Saturday the 1st of August, the prisoner pledged this candlestick; I lent him a shilling on it; he asked two shillings and sixpence, and two shillings, and one shilling and sixpence for it; that made me take such notice of him.

MARTHA ELLIOTT. That is the candlestick, to the best of my belief, that was left in the vestry.

Prisoner's Defence. That man swears false to say I pawned it.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing, but not breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-69

605. WILLIAM KAY was indicted for that he being in the house of William Walker , on the 2nd of August , about the hour of one at night, burglariously did steal a cotton gown, value 10 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a shift, value 1 s. two guineas, and eight shillings, the property of Henry Wilkins , and afterwards, about the same hour of the night, did break to get out of the same .

SARAH WILKINS . Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husbands's name is Henry Wilkins . On the 2nd of August I slept at Mr. Walker's house, No. 2, Lawrence-lane, St. Giles's .

Q. Did you lose any thing there. - A. Yes; I got up about six o'clock; I missed my pocket apron, a gown, two silk handkerchief's, a shift, and the money, two guineas and eight shillings; the prisoner is a brother in law of mine; I slept in his room; the prisoner and his wife laid on the bed; to the best of my knowledge he only took off his coat, because about a little after one he asked for his coat.

Q. Were you awake at that time. - A. No, I only heard so. About four o'clock I heard him on the stairs, my sister fastened the door after him, and came to bed again.

RICHARD BURTON . On the 5th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening I was going up Dean-street, Soho, with my brother officer; I heard a noise in the street; when I came up, I heard the prosecutrix charging the prisoner that he had robbed her; she gave me charge of him. I took him to St. Ann's watchhouse; the prosecutrix said he had got her handkerchief on his neck; I took it off. The prisoner said I believe it was his own; here is the shift that was taken out of the crown of his hat, by my brother officer.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, this charge is totally false, I went to my room, I found it distressed of all the things; I took this old handkerchief and the shift, or rather a shift without a tail. If Mrs. Walker was here she could contradict her; if I would have married her sister this prosecution would have never been.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-70

606. THOMAS DENNIS WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , at the parish of Finchley, two-hundred pound weight of lead, value 40 s. affixed to the said parish church , the property of the Rev. Ralph Worsley , clerk, rector , and

Three other counts for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS VERRALLS . I am a farmer, living in the parish of Finchley . I am clerk of the church. On the 1st of August, in the afternoon, I went to a field adjoining the church; there I saw the church had been stripped of a quantity of lead: a soldier took me to a ditch; I found the lead lay there. I and several of the inhabitants watched from half past nine at night till half past eleven. While I was watching with William Wood , I heard a cart come into a bye-lane, opposite of where the lead lay. About ten minutes after I heard the cart, I saw a man come into the ditch; he took a piece, and threw it on the bank; he threw out another, and then he put it on his shoulder, and was going across the field with it. Then I sprang the rattle, and all came that were on the watch, and Wood took him. The lead was compared with the lead on the roof; it tallied; I have no doubt but it was the lead. There was about four hundred pound weight in the whole.

Q. Do you know him. - A. He said about five years ago he worked with me a hay-making; I believe he did; my men knew him.

WILLIAM WOOD . Mr. Alley. You were watching, did you see the man carry the lead. - A. Yes. About ten minutes before twelve o'clock, on the 1st of August, I saw him with the lead. I took him. I saw the lead compared the next day; it corresponded exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 1st of August, Robert Ratley , a bricklayer, came to my house for me to go to Finchley to bring some apples that he had there. When I came to the White Lion, he told me to wait there; I thinking the delay too long, went on to meet him. He told me that he had not got the apples, but he had got something in a field there. I went with him, imagining it was his own, and that he was responsible for the act. I went for it. The people sprang a rattle, and fired a pistol. Robert Ratley went off, and left me a prisoner. I gave every information of him, but without any effect.

Q. to Verrall. Did the other man come to the ditch. - A. There were two men came with the cart; he was seen by the other people; only the prisoner came to the ditch.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-71

607. WILLIAM HIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , a goose, value 4 s. the property of George Mash .

WILLIAM PAGE . I am a patrol of Hackney. On the 15th of August last, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner passed by me in Grove Street, with the goose under his arm; it was tied up in a handkerchief. I asked him what he had got there; he replied a goose. I asked him where he got it; he replied he would be d - d if he could tell; he told me it was gave by a woman; afterwards he said he gave a woman half a crown for it. I took him to the watch-house.

GEORGE MASH . I live at Homerton . I am a farmer . I saw the goose in the cow-shed on the 15th of August, about five o'clock. It was found on the 16th by William Page .

Q. Did you see the goose. - A. Yes. I think it is my goose. My servant found the head in the marsh. The head was wrung off. We match'd it; it match'd as nigh as it could.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the goose of a woman as I was coming home: who the woman was I cannot say. She asked four shillings for it; I told her I had but half a crown; she said, take it; I tied it up in my handkerchief.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-72

608. WALTER SHUT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , two cotton curtains, value 42 s. the property of the Rev. Charles Thomas Heathcote .

ROBERT BAILEY . I am gardener to the Rev. Dr. Heathcote, at Lower Clapton . On the 21st of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard an alarm that the prisoner had stole some bed-furniture out of the drying-ground. I went into the fields. I saw the prisoner running across the fields, with a bundle under his arm. He got out of the fields into a lane. He was not half a minute out of my sight.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man. - A. I am positive.

Q. What did he do with the bundle. - A. He threw it over that field, and then he ran back again into the field that he came out of, and ran about half a mile before I took him: then I gave him in charge of another man. I went over the field and picked up the bundle.

Q. Does your drying-ground join the road. - A. No, it is at the back of the house; there is a thoroughfare in the field adjoining it.

WILLIAM BAILEY . - I am a carpenter. I was at work by the side of Captain Dobree's field. I perceived them both running as fast as they could; the witness cried out stop thief, I joined in the pursuit; he then did not run above an hundred and fifty yards before we took him by the collar; he said do not collar me, I will go without. As we were coming home, the last witness asked the prisoner where the wet linen was; he said, I am not the man. We went out of the field into the road, till we came to Pound Lane, we went about an hundred yards down; the witness said, I think it is somewhere here where you throwed the linen; he answered, upon my word I am not telling you a word of a story, I saw a man throw the linen over between two trees. The witness left him in my care, and he found the linen exactly where he described it to be.

ELIZA WHITE . I am a servant to Mr. Heathcote. I looked through a window into the drying-ground. I found the furniture gone. I had seen it about

half an hour before I assisted in hanging the furniture up. I ran to the gardener for him to pursue after the man.

Q. Did you see the man. - A. I never saw the man.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I had been down to Layton; coming up the lane I saw a person running down pretty sharp; the gentleman overtook me; he told me to stop, I stopped immediately; he said, what is become of the bundle you had under your arm, I said I met a person running, he throwed it under the hedge.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-73

609. ANN COVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , a counterpane, value 10 s. the property of Ambrose Roles .

AMBROSE ROLES . I am a labourer in the East India Company's Warehouse; my wife take in washing. I live in Mare Street, Hackney . About four o'clock, five weeks ago, I brought home a basket of linen, with a counterpane loose in it. I sat it on a table by the front window; the window was thrown up. My wife took the bundle out of the basket, and took it into another room, leaving the counterpane and basket on the table. I was in the other room in conversation with her; I heard the table move; I went into the room, and saw it was taken out of the basket; I immediately opened the front door, and I saw my next door neighbour run up to a woman and stop her: I opened her apron, and found the counterpane in it.

JOHN HARRIOTT . I am a fishmonger: I live at Hackney. From information, I ran after a woman that I thought had robbed me. I found nothing upon her that belonged to me: my next door neighbour came up and found the counterpane in her apron.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-74

610. JOHN POYNTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a silver bowl, value 4 l. the property of Lion Levy , in his dwelling house .

SOPHIA LEVY . I live in Goodman's Yard, in the Minories . My husband's name is Lion Levy; my husband does not live there. On the 27th of July, at two o'clock in the day, I was by myself, I was ill, the prisoner came in and took the bowl from the sideboard.

Q. Do you follow any business. - A. No, I live upon the spoil.

Prisoner. Her husband is transported at Woolwich.

Q. Did you know this man before. - A. I have known him a good bit; he used to be an acquaintance of my husband's.

Q. What did you when he took this bowl away. - A. I was ill in bed; I could not cry out. On the Saturday following, he came to me with a bit of rhubarb; I said sit down, and mean while I sent for Mr. Griffiths.

Q. Did you ever find the bowl. - A. No, he owned he sold it for three guineas.

Q. What is this man. - A. A soldier .

Q.(to Prisoner) What regiment do you belong to. - A. The Coldstream guards.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. On Saturday the 1st of August, I was sent for to Mrs. Levy's house; I went up one pair of stairs. In the room I saw the prisoner, with another soldier, sitting in Levy's room; he had got a small quantity of rhubarb before him; I believe it was in the scale: she gave charge of him for stealing this bowl; I took them both to the office. The prisoner said in the clerk's office to Mrs. Levy, that he knew the man that stole it.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the jury, never was a case before a rational jury more to be pitied than mine. My prosecutrix knows well I am not guilty of the crime. I went to her house on the 1st of August, a very unlikely thing for me to do if I was guilty. Mrs. Levy asked me where the tall soldier was, that came to her house; I told her I did not know; she told me if I did not tell her she would have me taken into custody. I told the officer, that William Saltey and Black Wainwright, of the first guards told me of the robbery; they told me, that while they were drinking in Thames Street, they went to her house, they found her in bed, and they took the bowl. If Mrs. Levy thought that I took the bowl, she knew where I was before the 1st of August.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-75

611. EVAN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , two gold seals, value 9 l. the property of Mr. Rogers .

JOHN HANCOCK . I am a servant to Mr. Rogers. On Tuesday the 18th of August, the prisoner came into the shop between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning. He wished to look at some seals; I shewed him some; he selected some of them; he said his name was Evans, he was a messenger of the Secretary of State's office; the seals were not for him, they were for a gentleman at the Secretary of State's office; he said the two that he selected out he must take to the office, and he would return with the seals or the money. I sent the seals with Charles Fuel , who went with the prisoner to the Secretary of State's office.

Q. Did you ever see the seals again. - A. Yes, when the prisoner was taken up on the Friday following.

CHARLES FUEL . - Q. You are servant to Mr. Rogers, are you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with the prisoner with a couple of gold seals. - A. Yes, by the direction of Hancock, to the Secretary of State's office. As soon as I got into the landing place of the Secretary of State's office, the prisoner took the two seals, and bid me to wait outside while he went in and shewed them to the gentleman in the office. I waited about two minutes, he returned, he said the gentleman was not there, but if I would call at twelve o'clock I should

have an answer; then he would either return the seals or the money. I went to the office at twelve o'clock; I could not see the prisoner, nor could I hear any thing of him at the office.

Q. Did you part with these seals to this man believing that he wanted to shew them to another. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again. - A. On the Friday following at Bow Street.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. You say you did not see the prisoner afterwards till you saw him at Bow Street; do not you know that the prisoner called at your house with the seals. - A. Yes, but I did not see him.

Q.(to Hancock) Did you see him. - A. He called at the other house in the Strand; I was not present. We have two shops, one 63, Charing Cross, and one 127, in the Strand. My master lives there. I heard Mr. Rogers say he did call there.

Mr. ROGERS. Q. Did the prisoner call at 127, in the Strand. - A. Yes; that was the next day after he had the seals. Then he came mounted upon a very fine horse; I went to the door; he began by explaining himself very politely, that his name was Evans, that he had a couple of seals from my shop at Charing Cross the day previous, that he had procured them by the order of Mr. Nepan, that he had accompanied my servant for the purpose of shewing them to Mr. Nepan at the Secretary of State's office, that when he came there he was gone, and he had not had an opportunity of seeing him since; he described himself as a messenger at the office, that I need not be under any alarm for the safety of the seals, that he should certainly see Mr. Nepan that evening or early in the morning, and that one or both of the seals would be returned or the money. I considered him to be in the situation as he represented himself to be, and upon that I gave him credit for the seals.

- WOODLAND. I am a porter to the Secretary of State's office.

Q. Was this man messenger in the Secretary of State's office. - A. Not since I have been there.

Mr. NEPAN. I never gave him any order, nor ever received them.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-76

612. JAMES DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a pair of trowsers, value 8 s. the property of Joseph Richardson .

JOSEPH RICHARDSON . I live at No. 1, the corner of Middle Row, St. Giles's . I keep a cloath's shop . On Tuesday, about six o'clock in the evening, a person came into the shop and said, there is a man has taken something from the door; I overtook the prisoner at a pawnbroker's in Short's Gardens; he was going to pawn them.

Q. Did you know the trowsers to be yours. - A. I did: I produce them; they are mine.

WILLIAM SELLERS . On the 1st of September, about 6 o'clock, I saw the prisoner unpinning something outside of Mr. Richardson's shop, he put it under his coat and went off. I told him he had got something that did not belong to him; he told me no, did I want to hobble him? I told him, if he would carry the property back to the man I would say nothing, if he did not I would have him taken; he said he would not return. I went and told Mr. Richardson; I followed after the prosecutor to the pawnbroker's; I did not go in.

WILLIAM WILD . I am servant to Mr. Pritchard, Short's Gardens. The prisoner brought the trowsers into the shop about six o'clock on the 1st of September, he laid them on the counter, and before he had time to speak Mr. Richardson came into the shop and took him in custody.

Q. What did the prisoner say when he was taken in custody. - A. He said Sellers had given them to him.

Prisoner's defence. I was in liquor; I saw the trowsers laying on the ground; no person owning them, I took them away: being short of money, I went to pledge them.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Whipped in goal and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-77

613. JOHN HOPCRAFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of James Nicholls .

JAMES NICHOLLS. I am a waiter at the White Lion at Paddington . On the 24th of August, a little after eight in the morning, I left my watch in the privy, and in less than half an hour I recollected I had left my watch there, I went to the privy, it was gone. The privy is in the yard; there are two gates that open to the road. The prisoner was in the public house that day. I missed my watch about eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a carpenter . He was a customer to the house. I asked the prisoner if he had seen any thing of my watch, he said he had not, if he had he would give it me; immediately he left the house. In consequence of information, I pursued the prisoner, brought him back; he was searched, and the watch was found upon him. I have known this man eight years, I never heard any thing against him before.

The watch produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I saw the watch lay in the privy; I put it in my pocket: I meant to return it at dinner-time: it is a house I use.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-78

614. JOSEPH JEPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , two saws, value 5 s. and a rule, value 1 s. the property of John Cowles .

JOHN COWLES . I am a cabinet-maker . The prisoner was working in the same shop with me. On the 9th of July I lost two saws and a rule from Mr. Loader's, Broker Row, Moorfields . I left them on my bench when I left work on the night before. The prisoner was not at work on the day I lost them. In consequence of suspicion, I looked after him: I found him on the tenth, and the tools were produced by the officer.

MARY STONE . I lived servant with Mr. Loader at that time. It was my place to let the men in in the morning. At the same time this prisoner was a workman there; he came on the morning he was suspected

of taking these things; between five and six, he went up into the workshop, and afterwards he asked me to let him out. It was dark, I could not see whether he had any thing or not.

A. How long did he stay before you let him out. - A.About ten minutes. He used to come last in the morning; that morning he came first. He never returned to work that day.

PETER MASON . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner; I found him asleep in Long's Buildings, St. Giles's. Cowles was with me; he charged him with stealing some saws and a rule, the prisoner said he knew nothing about it; I searched his breeches pockets; I found the duplicates of the property.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. On the day mentioned in the indictment, having no money, I unfortunately fell into this error, not to defraud my fellow workman, I intended to take them out and restore them to him.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-79

615. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , eighteen pound weight of cheese, value 10 s. the property of William Moores .

SOPHIA MOORES . I live at 211, High Street, Shoreditch : my husband is a cheesemonger , his name is William Moores . On the 24th of August, between seven and eight o'clock, I lost a double Gloucester cheese; a person came in, which took my attention from the window, it is an open window; a child informed me that a boy had taken it. I went out to the door; I could not see him. In about a quarter of an hour I was sent for to Worship Street; there I saw the boy and the cheese.

BARNARD GLEED. I am a patrol. I was going to Worship Street. I saw the prisoner by the window of Mrs. Moores, and another boy standing in the road; he said to the prisoner Now is your time; they did not see me: the prisoner then went up to the window, and took this cheese; he crossed the road with the cheese to where I was standing, I took him and the cheese to the office, and then I sent for the lady.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. (read) By the advice of my parents, who are now in court, I implore the forgiveness of my prosecutor and the court, hoping they will have mercy on my youth, and it shall be my study through life to beware of bad advice.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-80

616. ABRAHAM BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a jacket, value 2 s. a neck-handkerchief, value 6 d. and a tobacco box, value 4 d. the property of Joseph Hughes .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-81

617. THOMAS WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , a deal plank, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Lett , sen. Thomas Lett , jun. and John Lett .

CHARLES MOORE . I am a servant to Messrs. Letts. They are timber-merchants , Narrow Wall, Lambeth, in Surrey. I know nothing of the plank being taken till I saw it at the office; I shall not be able to swear to the plank. On the 12th of August, the prisoner came with a cart to our yard for a load of deals for Mr. Waterman; he was employed by the purchaser.

Q. Do you know how many deals were delivered in his cart. - A. Thirty-four.

THOMAS HARWOOD . I am a cabinet-maker; I work for Parrarer, Hatton Wall. I was standing looking at a print in a broker's shop, Cow Cross; the prisoner asked me if I belonged to the shop, he said he had got a deal for sale on his cart; he shewed me the plank, he said it was his own; this was near eleven o'clock in the day on the 12th of August; afterwards he said it was not his own, he was hired to sell it. I gave information to an officer, and then I bought the plank. I asked him what he asked for it, he said half a crown, I told him I would give him 2 s. I cautioned him not to sell the deal unless he came honestly by it, he must face the deal again, for I should be stopped by an officer; he took the 2 s. the officer came up and stopped the deal, and took the man.

THOMAS EKELSO . Q. In consequence of this man's information you stopped the deal. - A. Yes, I produce it. He acknowledged to me it was Mr. Lett's deal, and if I would let him go he would take it back again, he said he had got it out of the yard.

Q.(to Moore) I suppose the quantity of deals that you have in your yard, you cannot miss one piece. - A. Impossible; it is not of the same description as he had in the cart; but we have many hundreds of the same sort in our yard; he had no right to take a deal of that description, it is worth 5 s.

Prisoner's defence. On the day laid in the indictment I went with a load of deals to Mr. Waterman. Coming up Narrow Wall, I saw that deal lay in the road, I supposed it had been dropped by some timber carriage, I took it up and was going to sell it at Cow Cross.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-82

618. ANN LLOYD , alias BOND , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a cart, value 9 l. the property of James Horder .

JAMES HORDER. I am a wheelwright . On the 5th of August the prisoner called and left a chaise for security of my cart, she agreed to give me 10 l. for it; she took away the cart; I am sure the prisoner is the person; the chaise was claimed by the officer. I never saw the cart again till I saw it in possession of Wood the officer.

WILLIAM HOWELL . I bought the cart for 3 l. of the prisoner.

Q. That cart is worth 10 l. - A. She asked me only 3 l. 10 s.

THOMAS WATERS . On the 10th of August she brought the cart to my yard; the cart was left in my yard, and she took one of mine.

JOHN WOOD . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner after she was locked up, I asked her what she had done with the cart; she said it was at Hendon, in the course of half an hour, I found the cart.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-83

619. ANN BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , four yards, and three quarters of a yard, of striped holland, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Willmott .

THOMAS WILLMOTT . I live at 16, John-street, Oxford-street, I am an upholsterer . The things in this indictment were pledged on the 25th of July, four yards and three quarters of striped holland bolonging to me; she was my forewoman . As I was coming home I met the prisoner a little after one o'clock on the 10th of August; I met the prisoner as she was going dinner. Observing her to have her gown in this way, (witness describing it) and her pockets to stick out, I thought it somewhat singular; I watched her where she was going; I followed her to Mr. Hill's, pawnbroker, Newman's passage, Upper Rathbone place, where I found her in the act of offering this to pledge (producing another article.)

Q. You found her in the act of pledging some of your property. - A. Yes; I took her in custody and gave her to the officer; he searched the woman and found forty eight duplicates upon her; some of which were for my property

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. I examined this woman; I found forty eight duplicates on her her; three of them are Mr. Willmott's.

Q. Did you find any one of them on the 25th of July. - A. Not one.

Mr. CLEARSON. I am a pawnbroker in Castle-street, Oxford-road. I took in pledges of the prisoner at different times; this striped holland was pledged on the 25th of July for two shillings; I am sure the prisoner pawned it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My trouble is great; I fall on your mercy. I am the wife of an officer that has served his Majesty for years; I have a son now in the service. After having a child that has lost a leg, I was obliged to solicit for work; I in an unguarded moment was tempted to take the articles till I received my money from my husband, which was due in a few days; I entreat you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-84

620. STEPHEN ADAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Wright on the 31st of July , no person being therein, and stealing therein the furniture of a bed, value 15 s. and a sophy cover, value 5 s. his property.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am an upholsterer in Oxford street. This is a small house in Marybone fields , where I and my family live in the summer. On Saturday the 31st of July, about one o'clock in the day, I went up stairs, and found the prisoner had taken down the bed furniture. On looking about I found the bed furniture and the sophy cover packed up in a box, and brought down stairs.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. No; he is a soldier .

CHARLES HALL . On the 31st of July, about one o'clock, I was standing at my own door; I saw the prisoner in Mr. Wright's garden, taking the key, or putting it into Mr. Wright's back door; I came opposite the house, I heard him going up stairs, and looking over the fence I saw the tiling taken off the kitchen. I went to the Jew's Harp and got assistance; the witness placed himself at the front of the house; I went into the garden to the back door, I called out to him, he attempted to come out of the front door; I went in and he was standing inside of the chimney.

Q. You found him in the house. - A. Yes; Mr. Wright came in and found the bed furniture; and the sophy cover was removed from up stairs down into the kitchen.

WILLIAM GAY . I am a labouring man. On the 31st of July I was at the Jew's Harp; Hall called upon me to go to the house; he brought the prisoner to the door, and I took charge of him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking all the day; I was drunk, I did not know what I was doing of.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-85

621. MARIA COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , a metal watch, value 50 s and half a crown, the property of Stephen Seaman , in the dwelling house of Mary Rice , widow .

STEPHEN SEAMAN . Q. Are you a soldier . - A. Yes, in the second regiment of life guards. On the 11th of this month, about eleven o'clock in the evening, I went with the prisoner to her lodgings in Dyot-street; when I went to bed I put my watch upon the bed's head. In the morning the prisoner got up first, put nothing on but her gown, and went down stairs; she said she would come back in a minute, but she never returned. When I got up I missed my money and my watch.

Q. Did you find your watch. - A No. Blackman found the half crown upon her; it had a particular mark on it.

Blackman and Jones not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not see him have any watch. The half crown he gave me as a present.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-86

622. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , two bank notes, value 20 l. each, and two bank notes, value 10 l. each , the property of William Edmunds .

WILLIAM EDMUNDS . I am clerk of the London district to pay the recruiting officers. On the evening of the 3d of September I called at the Coach and Horses, King-street, Westminster; there I drank gin and water with three or four friends; from there we went to Charles-street, Westminster; there we had punch; we waited till half past eleven.

Q. Did you get drunk there. - A. No. Then I proceeded home to Pimlico. I met with the prisoner, I went home with her to Perkin's Rents, Westminster , I went to bed with her and went to sleep; when I awoke in the morning I found I was alone; I began to look at my pantaloons; I had laid them under my head. I found them on the bed, and all the notes were gone;

I had sixty pounds in my pocket.

Q. Did you find any of your property. - A. The officer found some part of it.

Q. Are you sure she is the woman - A. Yes.

Q. Why you must be pretty forwards. - A. No; I did not drink pretty rapidly

- SKINNER. I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner in Parker's Rents; I understood afterwards it was not her room. I searched in her pockets, I found a one pound note, two seven shilling pieces, twenty-four shillings and a sixpence in silver; I stripped her, and two twenty pound bank of England notes dropped on the floor, and a ten pound note. I asked her what she had done with the other ten pound note, she said she knew nothing about it, nor did she know how she came by these notes.

ROBERT MARSHALL . These are the notes that I gave in change for a two hundred pound note. I am clerk at Messrs. Drummonds; I have seen the prosecutor; I do not know he is the person I changed the note for.

JAMES GILMORE . When the woman was apprehended she said she had fetched her things out of pawn out of part of the serjeant's notes. I found a quantity of wearing apparel in her apartment, bundled up; she said she brought them from Mr. Sherrinan's, a pawnbroker in Stretton Ground.

- BINGHAM. I am shopman to Mr. Sherrlnan. I received a two pound note of the prisoner on the 4th of September, to redeem these things that were in pledge.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor betwixt twelve and one o'clock, he was very much intoxicated. When we came home he gave me a shilling to get something to drink; it was too late then to get something; in the morning, as soon as I could, I went out, about half past four, and when I returned the prosecutor was gone; he gave me a two pound note for being with me.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you give her a two pound note. A. No; I do not believe I had one; I received all the money at Messrs. Drummonds.

GUILTY aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-87

623. ELIZABETH MERRIFIELD and MARY GREEN , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August a leather pocket book, value 2 d. and a gold pin, value 7 s. the property of John Benjamin Cole , privily from his persons

JOHN BENJAMIN COLE . On the 25th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, I met the two prisoners at the corner of Golden-lane; I gave them something to drink; then they asked me to go home with them and to go to bed with them; I did, I was very much in liquor.

Q. Did you go to bed with them both. - A. Yes. Then they asked me to give them something to drink again; I laid half a crown on the table and some halfpence, they took it up; they each of them took hold of my arm and walked with me to the Crown and Sceptre Ball Yard, Golden-lane, there I changed half a guinea; I did not know how much I took up; they walked with me to the corner of Long-lane ; the mob gathered round me there, upon which I felt one of their hands in my right hand coat pocket. Soon after the left me I missed my pocket book; they were both together, I do not know which of them took it; there was a gold pin in the pocket book.

Q. Are you sure that these are the two women. - A. I am almost, I am not quite sure of it.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-88

624. HANNAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , two earthen dishes value 1 s. a pint glass decanter, value 1 s. four ale glasses, value 1 s. 6 d. two glass goblets, value 1 s. two wine glasses, value 1 s. and two green glass bottles, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Newman .

THOMAS NEWMAN . I keep a china and glass warehouse 137, Leather-lane, Holborn ; Hannah Brown was a lodger of ours. On the 25th of August suspecting that she was a robbing of us; we watched her; when she was gone out my wife and me entered the room, and in the drawers we found these things specified in the indictment.

Q.What is the prisoner. - A. A bead maker by trade. When she came home she went up stairs, and went out with a bundle; I followed her as far as Hatton Wall; she saw me and shunned me. I immediately came back and asked my wife to go up stairs to see if she had taken the things away; my wife did, and she said she had taken them away.

Q. Why did not you stop her with the things. - A. I was not positive; I did not like to stop her In the course of half an hour she returned back again; we immediately went up stairs and charged her with these things; she acknowledged they were our property.

CHARLOTTE NEWMAN . Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. I am; I went up and found the things in the indictment in the drawer; I saw the prisoner go out of the house, my husband followed her. When he returned I went up and found the things were gone out of the drawer; when the prisoner came home I went up to her, and she confessed they were my husband's property.

ANN BANKS . I am servant to Mr. Newman; when I was in the garret the prisoner came up and took five decanters, four ale glasses, and four rummers; she carried them down stairs. I confess I did wrong.

Mrs. WELDON. Hannah Brown left a parcel at my house; Mr. Hancock took it away.

JAMES HANCOCK . Q. You are an officer, you found at Mr. Weldon's the property. - A. Yes; in the handkerchief tied up as it is now; and these two bottles I found in the drawers at the lodgings. At one time she confessed she took them; at another time she said the servant girl gave them to her; she told me the property was at Mr. Weldon's.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-89

625. RICHARD ATKINS, alias BAKER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a bank note, value 40 l. the property of John Spanton .

JOHN SPANTON . I am a gardener , I live in New Peter-street, Westminster. On Monday morning the 10th of August the prisoner came and asked me to lend him ten pounds, I told him I had nothing less than a forty pound note, I would let him have that, as I had known him some years; I trusted him with this note to get it changed; and to return me the change that evening, and I was to lend him ten pounds. I saw him no more from the Monday morning till the Wednesday following. I went to his lodgings; the landlady told me he was gone to Tothil fields to a green stall, a house where he used; when I saw him I asked him the reason he did not return me the change on the Monday evening; he told me he could not let me have it before Thursday morning, he had not changed the note, he had it in his chest; I asked him to return the note, he refused; while I was talking to the prisoner I received information from Ashton that Mr. Hylet had the note.

WILLIAM HYLET . I am a victualler in Tothil-street, Westminster. The prisoner came to my house on the 12th of August, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock, and told me that he was going down to Leiscester to settle; he shewed me the corner of a forty pound note, I saw it was a forty pound note; he said that little score I owe you I will send you up a little present from Leicester and that will satisfy you; I told him I would rather he would pay me, it was five shillings and two pence farthing; he then went out of the door into Tothil-street; he returned again, gave me the forty pound note, said give me the change for it, and take your score; I told him he should call again when he was sober, being so large a note I did not like to change it for him. He was very angry that I would not give him change; he says here is a seven shilling piece, take your score, and give me the forty pound; I said I will not till by and bye. The prisoner left me. In the course of half an hour in comes Ashton and the prosecutor; he asked me if the prisoner had left a forty pound note in my hand. The young man explained to me how he came to have the forty pound note; I believed his story. I went into the parlour to come round to the front door; we found either in the tap room or in the passage the prisoner; the prosecutor came round, and the prisoner and he had a pint of porter together. I said to the prisoner, now if it is agreeable I will give you the change; the prisoner gave me a wink, got up, and went towards my parlour; I followed him; he put his fingers upon the parlour table and said, now, give me the change here; I says, there is something very singular in this, I shall call the young man in the tap room; the young man came; I says is there any money matters between you and Atkins; the prosecutor said I trusted him with a forty pound note to get it changed. I was to lend him ten pounds; he never returned it. I said to the prisoner now is this true; he replied No. I never had a forty pound note of him, and what is more than that, I do not know him. Then I thought it most prudent to take him to Queen-square to have the magistrate's opinion of the note. The prisoner was very unwilling to go; when he was at the office I told the magistrate the same as I have now, he denied receiving the note before the magistrate from the prosecutor; the stock broker came forward to prove that he had paid the forty pound note to Spanton. I produce the note.

MR. WATSON. Q. Are you a stock broker. - A. Yes. I know the number of the note I gave to Spanton on the 4th of August, it is 4716, it is a forty pound note, I believe that to be the note.

Spanton. It is that number; I received that note from Mr. Watson; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Spanton lent me the forty pound, on condition of paying him six per cent interest.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-90

626. WILLIAM CHALLENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August four books, value 4 s. 6 d. a brush, value 4 d. and a tin box, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Pearson .

THOMAS PEARSON . I live at Hoxton , I am a wholesale upholsterer . On the evening of the 6th of August I had the misfortune to have my house and warehouse burned; and during the time I lost these articles that are in the indictment; they were in the house before the fire happened.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking them. - A. During the time of the fire the volunteers guarded the court yard before my house; I saw the prisoner there, I asked him what he had got there, he had a white chip box in his hand, he said nothing, it had wafers in it; I took it from him and threw it on the ground. I saw something still in his bosom, I forced my hand into his bosom, and out of thence I drew a japaned tin box. I then drove him away, and Mr. Simpson gave him in charge of the officer.

PETER MASON . I am an officer; the prisoner was given into my charge by Samuel Marr , who put some box in my hand that he said he had taken out of the prisoner's pocket. I put my hand in his breast and pulled out this brush from his breeches; I pulled out this cannister a top of a jug and a shell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Did not the prisoner say he was picking up all these things to restore them to the owner. - A. He did, but I could not believe him; he concealed it in his breeches.

Court, to Mason. Were there any books taken from him. - A. Yes; they were given to me in the crowd by some person, I could not tell who it was.

SAMUEL MARR . I am a cheesemonger No. 72, Old-street. I am a volunteer.

Q. Did you attend to guard this house from plunder. - A. I did. As we were bidding the prisoner to fall back some person called out to see if he had any thing about him; I put my hand on his left side and felt something; I took out of his pocket a tobacco cannister, the top of a china jar, and a prayer book, and a small enamelled box; he was asked why he did it, he said he might as well pick them up as to have them burnt.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never at a fire before. I went to see it as a curiosity; I was willing to assist.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-91

627. ISABELLA CLARKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July , a silver table spoon, value 14 s. four silver tea spoons, value 10 s. a

cotton gown, value 7 s. a pair of sheets, value 6 s. a lace habit shirt, value 5 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 10 s. a muslin gown, value 10 s. a muslin petticoat, value 10 s. two habit shirts, value 4 s. a lace cap, value 4 s. a pair of silk gloves, value 2 s. a shift, value 6 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. and a cap, value 1 s. the property of Edward Watkins in his dwelling house .

EDWARD WATKINS . I live at 47, Upper Marylebone-street . On the 22d of July the prisoner came to my house and asked me if I could inform her of a place.

Q.What is your business. - A. Haberdasher and sell women's wearing apparel . We wanted a young woman at that time; we were obliged to go out of town the next week; we engaged her as a servant at three shilling per week; she came on the 22d and left us on the 23d, without any notice. On the 23d, my wife and I were obliged to be in the city; in our absence we left her in the house, with our little girl. On our return she was gone, and we missed all the property that is mentioned in the indictment. On the next day we apprehended her in a garret in Theobald's Road, cohabiting with a man of the name of Brown. Croker the officer searched her; he found some part of the things, and some part was pledged.

HENRY CROKER . I am an officer. I went with the last witness to the Hole in the Wall, Theobald's Road. I found the prisoner in the garret behind the bedstead.

Q. Was there any alarm before you went up stairs. - A. I spoke to the landlord, and I suppose some per- might tell her; I searched her. The lady came up, she said the stockings she had on was hers, and every thing that was taken from her; the lady owned a habit shirt and a shift that was not taken off till she was examined; a pair of of gloves, and several articles were found in the room. Afterwards the other things were found at the pawnbrokers.

JAMES LAVER . Q. Do you live with a pawnbroker. - A. I do, the corner of Dean-street Holborn; I have two parcels pledged by the prisoner I lent her thirty five shillings on them; a gown, a sheet, a silver table spoon, a lace handkerchief, that is one parcel; I took them both at one time, two sheets and a pair of silk stockings.

Q. What time did you take them in. - A. On the 23d of July in the afternoon between three and four o'clock.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner. - A. Yes, I have seen her before.

Q. What are they all worth. - A. They may be worth two pounds.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesess to character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-92

628. GEORGE ELLIOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of July , a wooden till, value 1 s. two seven shilling pieces, a dollar, a half crown, and 17 s. 6 d. seventy three halfpence, and seven farthings, the property of William Hawkins , in the dwelling house of James Bird .

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a pork butcher , No. 8, Beech-street , I rent the shop, the second and attic floor of James Bird ; he occupies the first floor himself. On Wednesday evening about two months ago, after ten at night, I went into the yard, when I returned I missed the till; it had two pound in it, I am sure.

Q. Had you counted it. - A. No, I saw the till at Worship-street, and a note that was in it.

GEORGE WILD . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. On Wednesday night, I was going my round in Red Lion-market, I saw the prisoner with the till under his arm, when he saw me he ran away, and I ran after him. I caught him about fifty yards distance; when I caught him he dropped the till. I found two seven shilling pieces in it, and a note. I gave it to the officer of the night.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-93

629. MARY HEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of September twenty three yards of gingham, value 22 s. the property of Joseph Craig , privately in his shop .

ROBERT ROBERTSON . I live with Mr. Joseph Craig , linen draper 360, Holborn . On Tuesday last about twenty minutes before four in the afternoon the prisoner came into our shop to look at some flannels, about a shilling, or fifteen pence a yard; I showed her some at a shilling, she said it was too coarse, she would look at some at fifteen pence; I could not find any of that price. I told her to wait till the young men were disengaged; she waited about a qarter of an hour, I saw her continually watching the young men, I saw her moving a piece of gingham about, but I did not see her take it; I went to the door where there were several customers; I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the gingham under her arm; I saw it through a hole in her cloak. I informed one of our young men; she went towards Southampton Buildings, she looked at our shop; I believe she saw us; I and the young man followed her into the Grotto pulic-house, Southampton Buildings; she went against the table in the tap room. I picked the gingham up from under the table.

Q. Do you know whether that gingham was you master's. - A. I know it was the same that was on the counter; I looked on the counter before I went after her, and it was gone.

THOMAS OWEN. Q. You are shopman in Mr. Craig's house. - A. Yes. He has no partner. I followed the prisoner with the boy to the public house; directly she entered the tap room she fixed her back against the table; I said to her I think you have got something that belongs to us; she said she thought that she had something of great bulk, but she was afraid to bring it back again; I gave her a push of one side, I saw it drop on the ground; I think it came from under her cloak. The boy picked it up.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called three witnesses who gave her good character.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House Of Correction and find One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070916-94

630. EDWARD GILSON was indicted for that he on the 5th of August , feloniously, wickedly, and unlawfully did set fire to a certain house then being in his possession with intention to defraud the London Assurance company for houses and the loss of goods from fire .

Second count for like offence, with intention to defraud the said corporation.

Third count with intention to defraud Mathew Wilson , Major Rose , and Charles Hamlyn Turner .

Fourth count to defraud William Richards , and

Fifth count to defraud John Langfield .

The indictment read by Mr. Pooley and case stated by Mr. Fielding.

WILLIAM BUCKLOW - Mr Pooley. Q. You keep a public house in Boswell-court . - A. Yes, next door to the prisoner.

Q. The prisoner I believe keeps an eating house there. - A. Yes. On the 5th of August, about a quarter before four o'clock, I heard a woman of the name of Evans say to the watchman that there was a fire at the cook's-shop; I opened the window, I asked Mrs Evans if she said there was a fire, she said yes, the cook's-shop was on fire, I immediately alarmed the lodgers and servants that the cook's shop was on fire; I then ran down Clements-lane and tried to rush open the door.

Q. You say you went to the door in Clement's-lane, is that the front or the back door of the prisoner's house. A. It is the back door, I believe; he has an entrance in Clement's-lane and in Boswell court; I tried to force the door, I could not; I returned to Boswell court, crying at the same time Fire and Watch; I went to the front door and got admittance; I then saw at the door in Boswell-court that the stairs were on fire. About this time a watchman came running up Boswell-court, he sprang his rattle, that brought the neighbours around us in a moment; neighbour Stentiford came down with two children; he fetched two pails of water; he forced the door open; I assisted him; he knocked in the pannels of the door with his staff, he went in, and Stentiford and I jumped over the door; he asked for an axe to chop down the stairs.

Q. Who provided an axe. - A. Some person, I believe his name is Coombes; he began to chop down the burning stairs, they were burning behind; the moment the door opened the flames burst through the stairs. As soon as the stairs were taken down, I desired somebody to go down and examine where the fire began; Crawford and Stentiford went down; they called Bucklow; then I went down.

Court. Was there another part of the house on fire. A. Yes; after we got the stairs out we went down stairs.

Q. Did you observe another part of the house in flames. - A. Yes, in the coal cellar I observed a candle burning in the joists, there were three candles placed, but two of them were gone out, under the floor; I have got the things that the candles were standing on (producing them); this is a piece of coal, and a potatoe standing on it; there is a hole in the potatoe in which the candle might be placed; these candles were gone out, the tallow was running over the coals, and the floor over it was scorched very much, but not burnt through. The candle that we found alight had burnt through the floor; we have got the piece of the floor here.

Mr. Pooley. How soon after you broke in the house did you see the prisoner. - A. In about a quarter of an hour; we had put out that fire on the stair case when the prisoner came down. From the time of our bursting open the door till we had extinguished the fire on the stairs, I think it was a quarter of an hour.

Q. Had you during that time made a great noise. - A. Yes; I called the prisoner and his wife, supposing she was there, and I called his lodgers; I made as great noise as I could.

Q. And he did not make his appearance till you had put out the fire in the stair case. - A. No; when he came he seemed desirous of going into the cellar; I took hold of his arm, and asked him how this could happen; he could not speak, but seemed desirous of going down stairs.

Q. Had you described to him what was in the cellar - A. No, I had not been down.

Q. Did you let him go down stairs. - A. No, Mr. Crawford went down stairs, and I followed him and Stentiford.

Q. When he was attempting to go down did you prevent him. - A. No, I do not know that any body prevented him; he did not go down.

Jury. You say you took hold of his arm and asked him how this could happen, did this prevent him from going down. - A. I do not know that prevented him; he was so he could not speak; he seemed to want to go down; Crawford went down, and pointed out these three candles, and he called out Bucklow.

Q. How soon did Gilson come down in the cellar. - A. I never saw him in the cellar, I never saw him but in the shop near the stair case, where the fire was put out.

Q. You saw these candles in the cellar, what other place besides the stairs was on fire. - A. None as I saw.

Q. Was there any other marks of fire in any other place. - A. Yes, in a little place from the stairs, on a plank; it seemed to be a separate fire from the stairs; the firemen tore the board up; the end of the plank is burnt.

Q. Could you see from what part that fire communicated. - A. It appeared to me that some laths which were hanging down from the plaster, there was tallow on them.

Q. Were these laths hanging down when you saw the search on the boards. - A. Yes, between that and the stairs.

Q. Could you tell whether one fire had communicated with the other. - A. By appearance I do not think it could.

Q. Was it in your judgment a separate fire. - A. I think so.

Q. Where was the candles alight in the cellar. - A. In the coal cellar, rather higher than I could reach; I got on a stool that was standing in the cellar, and took down the candles and the coals; the coal was standing on a beam.

Q. How far was the coal from the floor. - A. About six or seven inches; the stool was in the coal cellar, just under the place where the candles were placed.

Q. Did it require a stool to get all the candles. - A. They were all of one height, and near together.

Q. Did you see any thing that laid near where the candles were. - A. I did not; there was about a bushel of coals in the cellar.

Mr. Fielding: Now, gentlemen, it will be more satisfactory to have the immediate pot pointed out where the candles were found (a model of the premises produced.)

Mr. Pooley. How long have you lived where you reside. - A.(Bucklow.) About five years and one month.

Q. How long has Gilson inhabited the house that was on fire. - A. I think in September last.

Q.What did his family consist of. - A. His family consisted of a son, a wife, and two servants.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. When you came into the house you observed the house was on fire. - A. I saw it before I saw the flames then.

Q. And you say the prisoner came down towards the cellar, and appeared agitated. - A. Yes, very much indeed.

Q. Did it occur to you as any thing exceeding extraordinary that a man should be agitated when his house was on fire. - A. No, it was most likely.

Mr. Fielding. Have you seen the model before. - A. Yes, I think it is exactly like it.

Q. Who made the model. - A. John Harrison .

JOHN HARRISON . - Mr. Fielding. Take this model in your hand, give the jury the specific description of all the parts - first of all the ground floor, hold the Boswell-court front to the jury. - A. This is the Boswell-court front; this is a sash over the door, that was broke.

Mr. Bucklow. That is the door that Mr. Stentiford and I got in by, we got over the bottom part of the door.

Mr. Harrison. These stairs that are represented black here, are all down; some of the bottom steps were part burnt, and one of them burned through.

Q. How many stairs Mr. Harrison does there appear altogether burnt. - A. There were six of them down; I cannot say how many were burnt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Mr. Harrison, when was it when you first saw it, how soon after the fire. - A. On the 5th of September.

Mr. Gurney. The model was not made till then, that is just a month.

Mr. Fielding. Q.(to Bucklow.) You understand the description of this model likewise; these stairs were burnt. - A. Yes.

Q. Now be so good as to look at the place where the laths were broken down below with the tallow upon them. - A.(Witness pointing to the place).

Q. How far was that from the other fire. - A. A very few inches, two inches.

Q. From the second fire. - A. No more.

Q. Now Mr. Bucklow describe the spot exactly where you saw the candle burning, when you got down into the coal cellar. - A. The three candles were placed here, upon the top of that partition; the vacancy between the wall was the height of these rafters, about the heighth of six or seven inches, as I said before, there were three of them burning here, in the coal cellar, about twelve seat from the fire on the stairs; two of them were burnt out, and one was burning; I took it down.

WILLIAM CRAWPORD . Mr. Pooley. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 4, Boswell-court, about twenty yards from Gilson's door.

Q. On the morning of the 5th of August was you alarmed. - A. Yes, by a terrible noise, I heard the alarm of fire in the street; I came down into the court; I fetched some water to Gilson's house, when I first went down into the court, I saw the smoke come through the two pair of stairs window of the prisoner's house, that is the first I saw; the windows were shut; after I assisted in carrying water, I got into the prisoners house, the door was broke, as it is in the model, by the assistance of Mr. Stentiford and another man; they broke the other part of the door. Mr. Stentiford went in first, and I went in.

Q. In what state did you find the stairs. - A. In flames These stairs that are marked black were in flames; then Mr. Bucklow's lad was coming across the shop with a lighted candle in his hand, Stentiford said somebody go down and see whether there is another fire; I took the candle out of his hand and went into the cellar. That is the cellar (pointing to the model), this part is lath and plaister that, is not. I went into this part and saw a candle burning, that is where the candle was burning where my finger is; there are two pieces here where there apparently had been two candles more burnt; there were three pieces of potatoes with coal under them; the coal stood here (pointing to the model,) with a potatoe and a candle burning; I thought it was burnt an inch and a half, but when the board was taken up I saw it was burnt through, and three or four other places were burnt on that spot; it was burnt with a candle, and I saw the fire at the stair case.

Q. Did you see a third place, did you observe any laths broken down. - A. Yes.

Q. What was upon the laths. - A. That I cannot say, till I saw them with the fireman afterwards; then I saw a piece of tallow grease sticking on one end of the laths. The fire in the cellar was four yards from the stairs.

Q. How far was the fire from where the laths were burnt - A. I saw no laths burnt, the beam was burnt where the laths were hanging down; I suppose that was about a quarter of a yard.

Q. As far as you can judge from the appearance of that fire, where the laths were, and the beam was burnt; was there any apparent communication with that on the stairs. - A. I cannot say; there was a light fixed here, where the stairs was burnt.

Q. How soon was it that saw the prisoner after you first went to the house - A. I saw Gilson in about ten minutes, as near as I can guess. The fire was got under before ever I saw Gilson; I saw him after I had been in the cellar.

Court. Did you hear any person call out for Mr. Gilson, before the fire was put out. - A. That I cannot say.

JOHN SPRATLEY STENTIFORD . - Mr. Fielding. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 14. Old Boswell-court, next door to Mr. Gilson. On the 5th of August last, a little before four o'clock, I was alarmed by the cry of fire and a knocking at the door, saying Stentiford get up or you will be burnt; I immediately went up and fetched two of my children down four pair of stairs. I brought them cut into the street and returned into my own cellar and got two pails of water.

Q. Is there any pump in the court. - A. There is about two yards from his house I went to the door which the watchman was forcing, he forced the glass and the shutters of the prisoner's door in; I threw in the two pails of water on the fire, seeing it on a blaze; I directly called for a hatchet and cut down the stairs which had a communication to my house; formerly it was one house I stood throwing water on to extinguish the fire. Mr. Crawford that brought me water, said he would go into the cellar and see what is there; hearing him call Bucklow, I ran down and perceived a light burning. This

is the light that was burning (producing it); it is a candle stuck upon a potatoe, upon a piece of coal, just as you see it now.

Q. Show us where you saw that candle burning. - A. I saw the potatoe with the candle between this joist (pointing to the model) that hole was burnt the wood was quite red at that place, the other was only burnt. The other two candles were both gone out and had run down what it rested on. There were two laths hung down, they found some grease upon them, seemingly as if a candle had been stuck there and above it, it was burnt to a round hole, seemingly through the board.

Q. Where that round hole was burnt how far was it from the stairs. - A. Ten or twelve inches, as well as I can say.

Q. Was there any communication between that fire and the fire on the stairs. - A. There was no communication whatever, it was clear and distinct from that.

Q. Was that fire in your judgment where the laths were compleat and distinct from the stairs. - A. It was, to the best of my judgment, from the appearance that I saw. I saw the prisoner coming through the door of the shop from Clement's-lane as I was descending into the cellar, I saw him come about half way in the shop, he did not go into the cellar, as I understood; he was upon the top of the cellar stairs when I came up.

Q. When you saw him, when he came up from the cellar, what did he do. - A. He was standing looking at it, I said, I should take him in custody on suspicion of setting fire to his house. He had his clothes on, I think he had his apron in his hand, but I cannot say whether he had or not; he was compleately dressed in other respects only without his hat. From what I saw I immediately gave him in charge of the watchman on suspicion of setting fire to his house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe that after the alarm was given first, the prisoner at the bar came as soon as he could from the situation he was in. - A. I do not believe it; there were several people there before he came.

Q. That may be, he but came. - A. Yes.

Q. At the moment you saw him you said you would take him in custody. - A. No, never till I saw the candle burning.

Q.He was in the house then. - A. He was in the house, and he went half way along from the back door to the cellar stairs.

Q. You have described that there were two other candles burning. - A. There were

Q. Can you take upon you to swear that they had been burning that night. - A. I can swear it, the grease was running down, and the boards were hot at the time, the place was hot; at the time where the two other candles were, it was extinguished, and the boards over it were warm.

Mr. Fielding. When you first saw him you did not say you would take him in custody. - A. No, I was sorry for the man, it was on suspicion of seeing the candle burning and nothing else.

Jury. How high is the house. - A. Four story high; he came down from off his own leads, through a back door.

Court. He cannot tell how he came dow stairs.

THOMAS FRENCH . - Mr. Pooley. Q. Where do you live. - A. I lived then at that time in Boswell-court, No. 1.

Q. On the 5th of August were you alarmed by fire. - A. Yes, about four o'clock, I went down to Gilson's house, I found the door forced open, I staid there for two hours, or an hour and a half.

Q. Before you got there, was the fire on the stairs extinguished. - A. Not quite.

Q. Did you see Mr. Stentiford and Bucklow there. - A. Yes; after it was extingiushed.

Q. After it was extinguished did you go down stairs. - A. No, not till we returned from the watchhouse; then I went down into the coal cellar, I got up upon a bench and saw were the candle was burning, but there had been candles placed in four or five places, the candles had been placed between the second and third joist. I found a bundle of chips and paper, there were several potatoes cut in two, but one with a hole in it which I produce. It was exactly over the dust hole, which is under the cellar stairs, and the cellar stairs are under the stairs that were on fire; it was a little black, it appeared to come from a candle, but there was no grease there.

Q. How soon did you see Gilson. - A. I saw him as soon as some gentlemen and Mr. Bucklow come out of the cellar and called for him to be secured; I turned round Clement's-lane and met them and went to the watchhouse.

Q. How was Gilson dressed. - A. He had all his cloaths on; I believe his apron was across his arm.

Q. Was his waiscoat buttoned. - A I think it was.

ELEANOR SHEPPERD . - Mr. Fielding. Were you servant to the man at the bar. - A. I was, I had been there very near three months.

Q. He was a married man was not he. - A. He was.

Q. Was the wife in the house on the night when the fire broke out. - A. She was not at home that night.

Q. Had she during the three months you lived with them laid out of the house before that night. - A. No.

Q. Did you know of her going away from the house that day. - A. No, not till after she went my master told a gentleman that she was going to Bow and would not return till the next day; I saw her back go out of the door; I did not see what she had in her hand.

Q. Your fellow servant is Martha Davies . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember when your master told you to go to bed, on that night at about what time. - A. Past eleven o'clock.

Q. Before that time did you happen to go into the coal cellar. - A. Yes, to carry a red dish down; it appeared the same as usual, I did not stop a minute.

Q. Was there any light burning. - A. I did not see it.

Q. How high do you sleep. - A. Up two pair of stairs; I went up stairs to bed first, my fellow servant next, and my master with the till under his arm; he seemed to go into his own room, and I bid him good night. In the morning my master knocked at my door, and said for god's sake get up, we are all on fire, and you will be burnt. I got out directly; opened the door and saw my master; and was going the right way down; but he stopped me, he said the place was all in flames, we must get on the leads as fast as we could: we must go the other way down in another house.

Q. When you saw him at the door how was he dressed. - A. He was dressed as he does his work with, his apron on, a drab jacket, and worsted stockings; he was dressed the same as he was all day; my fellow servant and me got upon the leads and dressed ourselves.

Q. When you was upon the leads putting on your clothes, where was your master. - A. I missed him all at once; he went down and got my box and my fellow servants, and returned to me on the leads with the boxes almost directly.

Q. When he had come upon the leads to you did he give any alarm to the neighbourhood. - A. He hallowed out as loud as he could, and told the watchman to spring his rattle, or we should all be burned. Then I was very much alarmed, I set down and put my things on. I do not know what became of him then.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. At the time you were putting on your clothes he went down the other house. - A. Yes, and I lost him, I did not see him any more. I went down that way.

MARTHA DAVIS . - Mr. Pooley. Were you a servant to the prisoner. - A. Yes, on the 5th of August I had been with him between six or seven months.

Q. Had your master a wife. - A. Yes.

Q. Any children. - A. No.

Q. On the night before the fire happened, what time did you go to bed. - A. About half past eleven.

Q. Did your master go up to bed the same time as you did - A. Yes, he had his till under his arm.

Q. During the time that you had lived at your master's house, had your mistress ever slept out. - A. No.

Q. Did she sleep at home on the night of the fire. - A. She did not, she came home in the morning after the fire.

Q. Were you alarmed by any knocking at your door. - A. My master knocked, Eleanor Shepperd opened the door; I saw my master, I got up out of bed, and went up sairs; my master was dressed in the same dress exactly as he was the over night; my fellow servant went down stairs, but my master sent her up again. I was frightened and went to the top of the house.

Q. How long was it before your master come to the top of the house. - A. About ten minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You are sure it was ten minutes. - A. Yes.

Q. He did not say any thing on the leads, I dare say. - A. He called out fire to alarm the neighbourhood

ELIZABETH ROLFE . - Mr. Fielding. You are an inhabitant of this neighbourhood. - A. I live at No. 5. opposite the prisoner's house; I saw the the prisoner stand upon the leads, about a quarter before four. On the 5th of August, as I looked out of the window, the watchman sprang his rattle, I saw a smoke and a man upon the leads, at the top of the house; he was going by the side of the chimney; we begged of Gilson to come down and open the door, he said he could not come down, the stair case was on fire; he had a night cap on his head, and his jacket on. I saw him come out of his own door, that comes into Clement's-lane, with a sack on his left shoulder, and a box under his arm, he staggered very much, as if he had got something of great weight; he pitched the sack and the box on the ground next door to Mr. Bucklow's and I saw no more of him

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you mean to say you saw him come out of his own house or the next door. - A. It was the house that comes into Clement's-lane.

Court. It was his own house adjoining. - A. Yes.

GEORGE HEATH . - Mr. Pooley. You are a fireman. - A. I belong to the Phoenix fire office; these are the pieces of wood that I took from the house, where the prisoner resided (producing them.)

Q. Did you take them down. - A. No, they were laying on the ground before I came there.

Q. to Stentiford. Did either of you knock down that wood. - A. I did, with the axe; these are the bearings of the stairs; this is the plank that was taken up from the vacancy, it lay across the kitchen stairs; that plank went over the place where the candle was, with the laths. This end was close against the joist, over against where the laths were broke; this place was on fire; that candle had been alight, there is the scorch of it where the candle candle went out; the hole that was burned was quite warm. These are the laths that I took down, where this board had been taken off, there was a great deal more grease upon them at that time. I noticed the things that were in the house, and I made an inventory of then. I attended the churchwardens on the 5th of August. This is the copy of the inventory of all the goods in the house at the time, except a jack.

Q. What do you think they were worth. - A. Under forty pounds.

Q. Had any of these things been taken of the premises before your examination. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Bucklow. I was at the house; none of the things were taken away to the best of my knowledge.

WILLIAM FORD . - Mr. Fielding. You know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know where he lived. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive any box from the prisoner's wife at any time. - A. Yes, I am not in possession of the day of the month, it was the next day after the fire in Clement's-lane I believe; she delivered the box to me in the house; where the fire was, it was brought there from another house; while I was there a friend of hers had the key, Mr. Hobert, he produced it; the box was opened in my presence. The box contained some money and various papers. The box is at my house.

Q. Why did not you bring the box. - A. I did not know it was necessary.

Q. Look at these papers, they have your mark on them have they not. - A. Them two papers have both my mark, they came out of the box.

JOHN BICKERSTAFFE. - Mr. Pooley. You are clerk in the London Assurance office. - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at that piece of paper, look at the number, can you tell whether that you now hold in your hand is a receipt of a premium, to the London assurance office. - A. The number corresponds, it is doted the 11th of June. 1807.

JAMES ALEXANDER . Q. Look at that receipt. - A. This was taken out of the box, it was produced by Mr. Ford; this is the paper the last witness spoke to.

Mr. Martin. I produce the books of the fire office, I produce the charter of the London Assurance company.

Q. to Mr. Ford. How long have you know the prisoner. - A. About two years.

Q. Where did he live before he came into Boswell-court. - A. At the Golden shears public house, wood-street, Cheapside; it is a year since he came into Boswell court this day.

EDMUND EDWARD AUSTIM . I am acomptant to the London Assurance office.

Q. Is that the corporation seal. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that duly executed. - A. Yes.

Q. There is the name of Edward Austin there. - A. Yes, that is my name, I am the attesting witness; there are two directors names on it. (The removal of the policy read.)

WILLIAM RICHARDS. I live in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell.

Q. Have you any houses in Boswell-court. - A. Yes, two in Boswell-court, each of them run back into Clement's-lane.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar rent either of these houses of you. - A. They were leased to Mr. Langfield, they are my houses; I receive my rent of him; he paid me in Mr. Langford's name. I received rent twice of him. Gilson was in possession of them.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Langfield is your tenant. - A. I always considered him so.

JOHN LANGFIELD . I live in Rose-street, Covent Garden.

Q. Do you occupy any houses that belong to Mr. Richards. - A. I did, the house that Gilson lived in; when I quitted the premises Gilson succeeded me.

Q. Did you insure the houses. - A. No; I insured my property for two hundred pound.

Prisoner's Defence. In taking these houses I was informed the houses were not insured; I went to my landlord, he told me he never insured the walls of the premises, if any accident happened he should expect me to rebuild them; I took my friend Mr. Bucklow to the Phoenix insurance office, Charing Cross; there I insured the houses for four hundred and fifty pounds each; that was the instigation of my insuring them.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH, aged 48.

On the first and second Counts.

Not Guilty of the third, fourth, and fifth Counts.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-95

631. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st. of August , ten pound weight of lead pipe, value, 2 s. and a brass cock, value 1 s. the property of Ralph Harris .

RALPH HARRIS . I am a picture frame maker , I live at 43, Marylebone-lane . On Friday August the 31st, about six o'clock in the morning, I went down to my back kitchen to turn my water off, it was on flush, and about half past eight I heard the water running in a very peculiar manner; I went down and saw a piece of the pipe with the cock was twisted off; in about half an hour, from information of my neighbour, I saw the man in custody at the watch-house; the pipe was found upon him.

Q. Did you match it afterwards. - A. Yes, it matched it exactly.

JOHN DAVIS . I was going along Marylebone-lane. On the 31st of August, about half after eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner with something under his coat, I told Mr. Love; we followed him and found out his residence. We procured an officer, and the officer went up stairs into his own apartment; the said brass cock and pipe was found. I saw the prisoner brought down.

Q. Did you see what he had when he ran along. - A. Yes, he had the pipe as he was going along.

MR. LOVE. I was at my own door; Mr. Davis said the prisoner was gone along with something under his coat; we followed him and the property was found on him.

SAMUEL CRANK . I am an officer; I went to his apartment and found the property; the moment he saw me he used a great deal of violence; had it not been for Mr. Love he would have got from me. I matched the the pipe, it corresponded exactly.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-96

632. WILLIAM WALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of July , a saw, value 7 s. the property of John Code .

JOHN CODE. I am a carpenter . On the 6th of July I was at work in St. Alban's-street; I went to beer at four o'clock; I had not been there long before a witness brought in this man with the saw; I looked at it, I found it to be my property.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am a painter. I was working at No. 29, St. Alban's-street ; the prisoner was loitering about the house, I knew him. I saw him come across the way to the building during the time the men were gone to their beer; he came up the step of the door; I saw him come out. I ran down stairs after him, I asked him what business he had there, he said he come to the painter to get a bit of colour; I asked him what painter he knew, he said no particular one; I pulled his coat of one side, I saw this saw. I took him in charge and took the saw from him.

Prisoner's Defence. He said I stole a gallon of turpentine; he followed me out of the house after that.

Q. He says he took this saw from you - A. Yes. - I am sixty one years of age and never was in such a perdicament in my life.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-97

633. MARY MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , half a sieve of apples, value 1 s. 6 d. half a sieve of plums, value 1 s. 6 d. half a sieve of French beans, value 2 s. forty five pound weight of potatoes, value 3 s. twenty four cucumbers, value 8 d. a blue woollen apron, value 1 s. 9 d. a towel, value 3 d. and two bunches of herbs, value 4 d. the property of Patrick Cunningham .

SARAH CUNNINGHAM . I am a green grocer in Wardour-street.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A market woman . On the 20th of August I went to Covent Garden market; I got rather more goods than one woman could carry; the prisoner stood by, she agreed to take part, I was to give them eight pence between them, one load was more than the other; they agreed to change loads at Newport-market pitch; after they had rested there they set off again; when I got to my shop I turned to assist them down with their load; the prisoner was missing. The other basket woman and me looked for her and could not find her; from information I found her at a public house in St. Giles's intoxicated; I asked her what she had done with my things, she said she had lost them; I never found what she had done with them. I went with her to Newport-market pitch; she asked me to treat her, I would not; she said she knew my

way; I went on and thought she was following.

Q. Was she sober when you hired her. - A. Yes.

MARY LION . Q. Are you a basket woman. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She is the same; I followed Mrs. Cunningham, I did not see what became of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-98

634. WILLIAM BENFORD, alias BENFIELD , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , a pair of boots, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Monk .

WILLIAM MONK , I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 9, Leman-street ; from information, on the 12th of August, I took the prisoner with the boots upon him; they are my father's.

THOMAS SMITH . I saw the prisoner take the boots off the hook at Mr. Monk's window; I informed Mr. Monk of it; he took the prisoner with the boots upon him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I did not know what I was about.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-99

635. THOMAS LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , a cart harness, value 40 s. the property of sir John Lade .

JAMES ROBINSON . I am a farmer, I live at Totteridge. On the 3d of September I saw the harness lay at Perry's door, Islington Road; I knew part of the harness, I informed sir John Lade of it; he came and claimed the harness. We took the prisoner at the vinegar yard in St. John-street.

WILLIAM PERRY . I am a collar and harness maker, Islington Road. On Wednesday the latter end of August I had the harness to sell for the prisoner, he asked two pounds for it; on the Thursday the prosecutor claimed it. The harness is worth about thirty-six shillings.

CHARLES BROWN . I am a constable; I took the prisoner in custody on the 3th of September; he said he bought the harness in Smithfield.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Did sir John Lade ever put that question to him. - A. I do not know that he did.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I can say a great deal; I leave it to my counsel. It it is very well known that I have kept a horse, that I had occasion for the harness.

JOHN EVANS . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I work at the vinegar yard, Messrs. Newberry and Wells, St. John-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at any time when he purchased any harness. - A. Yes, about eight or ten weeks ago in Smithfield; he gave a two pound note for it, and the man gave him a shilling.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-100

636. SARAH KETTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of July , one gown, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. three aprons, value 3 s, a silk shawl, value 6 d. two neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a pair of stockings value 1 s. and two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Eliza Freberry .

ELIZA FREBERRY . I am a widow , I live in Fitzroy market ; I missed all the property in the indictment on the 7th of July, my trunk was in the room the prisoner slept in; the prisoner did not come home for three days; when she returned I charged her with taking them, she denied it, she was at another place in a day; some of the things were found there, I recovered the petticoat, a shift, two aprons, and shawl, the other things are lost.

- BAKER. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at a public house in Tottenham-court-road, I charged her with this offence, she denied it; I searched a room No. 9, Tottenham-place; I found five duplicates; I told the prisoner; she did not deny the duplicates were there, and she admitted that the place where the duplicates were found belonged to her. The articles were all pawned in her name; I found a shift, petticoat, three aprons, and a shawl.

- LAW. I am servant to Edward Baylis , Adams-row, Hampstead Road. On the 29th of June the prisoner pawned a white apron; on the 1st of July, a jacket and apron; the 3d of July a petticoat, shift, and apron; I am sure she is the woman.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated when I laid on the bed; there came a woman that lodged in the upper part of the house; she asked me six shillings for them.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-101

637. MARY HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , a looking glass, value 2 s. a bolster, value 3 s. two blankets, value 1 s. a frying pan, value 6 d. two sheets, value 10 s. two curtains, value 8 s. the property of John Gadsby , in a lodging room .

MARY GADSBY . My husband's name is John Gadsby , he is a cheesemonger in Gray's-inn-lane ; the prisoner at the bar lodged at our house; her son took it for her, he was to pay the rent, it was a furnished lodging at four shilling and six pence a-week. On the 5th of September I got two officers to search the room, I found all the things were gone that is mentioned in the indictment; I asked the prisoner what was gone with the things, she said she had pawned them; she delivered up the duplicates.

WILLIAM EDMONDSON . I am servant to Mr. Peacham, Holborn; I produce two curtains pledged at our shop. I do not know the prisoner. I advanced four shillings; this is one of the duplicates, and the other duplicate the constable had, they corresponded.

ISAAC PALLISER . I am a pawnbroker in the Borough. The prisoner pledged a pair of sheets with me; I have known her some time.

WILLIAM JOHN HOWITSON . I live with Mr. Armstrong, Baldwyn's Gardens. A looking glass, a frying pan, two blankets, and a bolster, were pledged at different times with me. I believe the prisoner pledged them; by her own confession they are pledged in her name.

THOMAS BAYLIS . I am a constable. I searched this woman; she gave up forty or fifty duplicates, she said she had done wrong. I found these articles by these duplicates.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman knows very well, when I was in the house my son or me always paid the rent; she knew I would not wrong her of them.

Q.(to prosecutor) What was owing at this time. - A. One pound twelve shillings.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-102

638. THOMAS FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of July , a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Look .

SARAH LOOK. I am the wife of Robert Look . On the 26th of July, between one and two o'clock, I gave the spoon to a child of mine to play with in the room; after a bit I missed it. I live in Moor's-yard, St. Martin's-lane . I let my back room to the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room where the child was playing with the spoon. - A. Yes, I asked him if he had seen any thing of the spoon, he said no.

JOHN GREEN . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Corder, Green-street, Leicester square. On the 27th of August, I bought the spoon of the prisoner, he said it was his own. I gave him half a crown for it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the spoon at the bottom of the two pair of stairs.

GUILTY aged 30.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-103

639. ELIZABETH HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , one yard and a half of cloth, value 3 s. the property of Mark Stokes .

MARY STOKES . My husband's name is Mark Stokes , we live at No. 1, Princess-street, Rosemary-lane. On the 1st of July I took my gown to the prisoner to mangle, and after she had mangled it, I missed a breadth of it; I went to her and asked her for the breadth, she said she had none; she took the gown to shew the neighbours, to shew them she would do no wrong.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-104

640. JOHN BROMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , four saws, value 20 s. and a stock and bit, value 5 s. the property of William Wright , and two saws, value 9 s. the property of Edmund Basant .

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I was at work in Marchiment-square on the 11th of September, I went out about twelve, I left the tools in the house. I missed my saws, and stock, and bit.

Q. Did you ever find your tools. - A. No.

CHRISTOPHER FISH . I am a carpenter. I was at work at the adjoining building to where the man was robbed. The prisoner was a plaisterer . I saw him at half after twelve o'clock; I saw him go up the building where the tools were lost.

JOHN HILL. I am a tailor, I keep a little shop in Field-lane. On the 11th of September, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner with six saws under his left arm, as I was standing at the door. I am positive he is the man. The prosecutor came to me, I gave him information; I told him I should know the man again.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the building to case myself.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-105

641. WILLIAM REECE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July , a plane, value 3 s. the property of Walter Hodge ; a guage, value 3 s. and a rule, value 9 d. the property of John Doling .

WALTER HODGE . I was at work at Tavistock-place . The prisoner was there looking at a staircase, I did not know that he took any thing. I lost my plane.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-106

942. WILLIAM REECE was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , a saw, value 3 s. the property of Edmund Basham .

EDMUND BASHAM . I am a carpenter , I work at Osleton-street, Somers Town . The prisoner was at work at the same house. I left the house to go into the next house; when I returned the prisoner was gone and my saw.

- RUMBALD. I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of June the prisoner pledged this saw with me for two shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-107

643. ELIZABETH DAVIS , and CATHERINE DENT , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , a shawl, value 2 s. a half shawl, value 1 s. a child's petticoat, value 1 s. a shift, value 4 s. a child's bed gown, value 1 s. half a guinea, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Sarah Lawrence .

SARAH LAWRENCE . I am a servant , while I am able to get my bread. I am now in Hornsey workhouse. When I was a servant, I lived in Castle-street, Falcon-square, I left my place to go to Hornsey; and left my box in the prisoner's care some time the latter end of June. Being destitute of clothes, I came to town on the 7th of August; not finding my things as I left them, I left my box locked and corded; but I left more clothes that were not locked fast; when I enquired for them, she said she had pledged them; distress had drove her to do it; I

should have them in a week or a fortnights time.

Q. Which of them said that. - A.Elizabeth Davis; the box was left in her care. She sent me them things according to her promise. Being unable to search my box when I fetched it from her house, I did not miss any thing directly. When I missed the things, I sent to her directly.

Q. How long was it after that you missed them. - A.Three days; she said she knew nothing about them; I sent to her; then I came to town in a fortnight before I was able; I had laid in. Afterwards Davis owned she took them out of the box, and that Dent had part of them.

Q. What is Davis, the woman. - A. I do not know, her husband is a glass cutter; they lived in Nelson's-passage, Arthur-street, Goswell-street. I do not know what the other woman is; the things that were pawned the pawnbrokers gave them up. I lost a one pound bank note and a half a guinea out of my box.

ABRAHAM BROAD . I am a pawnbroker's servant in Aldersgate-street. On the 18th of August, Catherine Dent pledged a shawl at our shop.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I live with Mrs. Fothergill, Aldersgate-street. I was present when Davis pawned a shift for three shillings and sixpence, a child's gown, nine pence halfpenny, a patchwork, and a shawl, and a petticoat, for a shilling, They are all pledged in Davis' name; I recollect both these women coming.

Q. Did they come together. - A. No, separate.

WILLIAM READ . On the 12th of August the prosecutrix came to me, and told me that her box had been opened, and some of the things taken out. I went with her to Davis' house; Davis produced the duplicates to me; she told me that Dent pursuaded her to do it. I apprehended Dent, she lived opposite; she said Davis brought her into it.

Davis said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Dent's Defence. I know nothing at all about the box; she brought the shawl down stairs to me, and asked me to pledge it.

DAVIS, GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years

DENT, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-108

644. MARY BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , a feather bolster, value 3 s. the property of William Cater .

WILLIAM CATER. I am a carpenter and broker , in New Compton-street. I pursued the prisoner; when I came up my daughter had taken the bolster from her.

ANN CATER . I am daughter to the last witness. I saw the prisoner take the bolster, it was across the door. I followed her, and stopped her, she would not give me up the bolster quietly. I took it from her. (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. That bolster laid on the curb. I picked it up, and put it on the chair; they brought me into the house and used me ill.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-109

645. HANNAH TAYLOR was indicted for that she on the 5th of September , sixteen pieces of false and counterfeited milled money and coin, made to the likeness and similitude of and for a good shilling, the same not being cut to pieces, unlawfully did put off to Cornelius Richardson , at a lower rate then they were denominated for; that is to say, for eight shillings .

Two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CORNELIUS RICHARDSON . I am a labouring man. On the 5th of this month, I went to the prisoner's house with these three half crowns, which Rogers the officer marked; the day before she had agreed for me to be there by nine o'clock in the morning. She told me her name was Connelly; when I went in she gave me sixteen pieces, which she called shillings. I gave her three half crowns and a sixpence; she took them out of her pocket in paper; I asked her if she would have any thing to drink, and told the old man to fetch a drop of gin: the old man went out I told him to bring bitters; and then I gave a signal to Rogers and Brown. They came in and searched her, and found the money I had given her. I gave Rogers the bad money.

EDWARD ROGERS . I am an officer of Shadwell, I have known the prisoner many years. On the 5th of September I gave three half crowns, as described, to the witness, and marked them. In consequence of a signal I went into the house; the prisoner was sitting by the parlour fire; the moment she saw me, she put her hand in her left hand pocket; I laid hold of her hand and examined the half crowns which she had in her hand; and there were the three half crowns which I had previously given to Richardson; I said to Richardson, let me see what you have in your hand, he handed me sixteen counterfeited shillings in a piece of paper; I said, who did you get them from, he said from Mrs. Taylor; now says I, Mrs. Taylor, you hear what this man says, did you give these shillings to this man; yes, says she, the villain, I did; he came to take me in Now says I, the three half crowns and the sixpence, where did you get them from; she replied, I got them from the villain. I produce the sixteen shillings and the half crowns.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I produce a shilling; I found it on a table in the prisoner's house, it is a counterfeit.

CALEB EDWARD POWEL . Q. You assist the solicitor of the mint - you are acquainted with good and bad money; look at the sixteen shillings, and tell me whether they are counterfeited or not. - A. The sixteen are counterfeit, and exactly of the same manufactory, and have not been in circulation. This shilling found on the table is a counterfeit of the same description.

Prisoner's Defence. This Richardson was sentenced for perjury at Maidstone. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-110

646. WILLIAM OAKSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , nine embossed crests for carriages, value 18 s. two coach handles, value 1 s. a coach spindle, value 2 d. forty feet of plated beading, value 40 s. and twenty feet of brass beading, value 20 s. the property of William Leader .

WILLIAM LEADER . I am a coach-maker in Well Street, Oxford Street . The prisoner had been in my employ about two or three years. In consequence of information, on the 21st of August, I was present when the officers searched his box in the work-shop, there we found the beading; the officer searched his lodgings, and there we found nine silver embossed crests, a door handle, and many other things.

JAMES MANN . I am clerk to the last witness. I had, previous to the prisoner's box being searched, looked into it, there I saw a quantity of plated beading, doubled together in short lengths to convey away; it was concealed in a bag.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer belonging to Marlborough Street. I searched the prisoner's house; after I searched his box, at his lodgings, I found these crests, lock, and coach handle.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-111

647. JOHN YOUNG and WILLIAM MEEK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a gown, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Whittaker .

THOMAS WHITTAKER . I am a basket-maker . I live in Old Gravel Lane . On the 13th of July, I went from my home at three o'clock, I returned at seven, I was informed I was robbed, I went up stairs, and missed the things in the indictment.

Q. Where had you left the things. - A. In the middle of a back one pair of stairs room.

ELEANOR WHITTAKER . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 13th of July I went out between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I returned between six and seven, I left the things safe in the room when I went out, they were gone when I returned; I saw them the next day at the police office.

MARY MILLER . I live at No. 75, Old Gravel Lane. I was standing in my own shop, I saw Meek open the door and go into the back yard where Whittaker lodges, and presently the wind blew the door open, he went and shut the door to. I said to my husband, I will go and see what that man is doing in the yard. I went, and I saw Meek in the one pair of stairs back room. Young said, D - n your eyes, come out; Meek was throwing the things through the window, and Young was outside of the yard; my husband came over and took Meek as he was coming over the pales.

Q. Where was the property. - A. The property was down in the yard.

A. They never were carried out of the yard. - A. No.

THOMAS MILLER . I am the husband of the last witness. On the 13th of July my wife went over to Whittaker's and she beckoned to me come over with her hand; I went over, she told me the man had thrown some things out of the one pair back window; I saw the things on the ground, and an article or two was hanging on the line; Meek was coming over the pales, I took hold of him.

JOHN ALLENDER . I am a carpenter: I was at work opposite. I went over; I saw Mr. Miller take hold of Meek; I, with the assistance of another, took Young, as Mrs. Miller said he was an accomplice; he begged to be let go, we did not let him go; then he begged to go over to the public house to get a character; when we went over the publican knew nothing of him, he went out of the house, we went after him, he saw us coming after him, he ran into a shop, we caught him; he is the same man.

The property produced and identified.

Young. I have a witness to prove my innocency.

Meek's defence. I was in the place, but not designing to rob or wrong any one, but from curiosity I got on the rails to see the bustle; as to Young, I know nothing of him.

- I live in Dean Street. On the 13th of July, I saw this man go by my door; I shewed him a letter from my husband; he went with me to Old Gravel Lane. Coming round at the top of the lane we saw a mob, he went away from me, I saw many people take him, they tore the coat off his back. I immediately went and told his wife.

Q. How much of this is true: he did not go into the public house when they took him. - A. No, not as I know of.

YOUNG, GUILTY , aged 33.

MEEK, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-112

648. FRANCES WEBB and WILLIAM RIGBY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , eight guineas, a half guinea, and seven shillings , the property of John Howard .

JOHN HOWARD . I am a carpenter ; I live at Enfield.

Q. What is Rigby. - A. He is a hay binder . Webb is a bad woman. I got into her company at the Woolpack. I went home and went to bed with her. It was about eleven o'clock at night when I missed the money as we were in bed together; she said somebody was throwing stones at the window, she got out of bed several times. I got up; I saw the rule lay out of my breeches; I pulled the purse out of my pocket, then I missed the eight guineas and a half and the seven shillings; there were two one pound notes, she left them in the purse; I searched her, I could not find any of my property. When I went into the house it was ten o'clock, I saw Rigby there: he kept the house. Going home I met him; I told him I had been robbed, he said he knew nothing about it, he had got none of my money. There was a young man came with me from Waltham Cross.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-113

649. MARK PYKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a chaise harness, value 25 s. the property of John Norris Dagley .

JOHN NORRIS DAGLEY . I am a bricklayer ; I live in Grove Street, Hackney . On the 27th of August, between the hours of six and seven in the morning, I discovered my coach-house door broken open; I found the harness to be gone off the pegs. I ordered my man to go to Mr. Bott's, Worship Street, to borrow a harness; there he received information of the harness.

JOHN BOTTS . I am a harness maker; I live in Worship Street. On the 27th of August, about half past eight in the morning, Mr. Dagley's servant came to me, requesting I would lend his master a harness, he informed me that his master's premises had been broken open; I lent him a harness. About half an hour after he was gone, I saw a person coming down Curtain Road, with a harness on his back, he came to my shop, and asked me if I bought such things; I told him I had suspicion that he had stole it, he said his master gave it him; he told me his master was at the corner of the street, I took him to the corner of the street for him to shew me his master, he could not find him; then he clung hold of the railing, and wanted to get away; I secured him; I took him to the public-house in Worship Street: I searched him, I found this tinder-box with tinder in it; I found a steel upon him, he said he had it to light his pipe with it, and he was a shoemaker, he heated his tools with it. The man that he represented to be his master, is a man of a very bad character.

Prisoner's defence. I then worked with Benjamin Lawrance for victuals and instructions. I had been with him about three weeks to instruct myself in shoemaking. We worked in a stall, therefore it is necessary to have a light, I put the matches and tinder-box into my pocket, and just as I was going to open the stall, he wanted me to go with him to dispose of the said harness; thinking it was his own property, and knowing that he had a horse once, I went with him; he went into a shop in Old Street, he came out and said they could not agree for the price; my master sent me into this shop in Worship Street; there I was stopped; I told Mr. Botts my master was out of doors; when I came out he was gone, and since I have heard he has absconded.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-114

650. THOMAS HENRY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a portmanteau, value 3 l. and a box, value 32 s. the property of John Harrington .

JOHN HARRINGTON . I am a trunk-maker in Leicester Square . I lost this portmanteau about the 25th of August, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; he came and purchased the portmanteau and the box for Captain Crawford .

- READ. I am apprentice to Mr. Harrington. The prisoner came into the shop about the 25th of August, between six and seven o'clock, and ordered two trunks and a box for Captain Crawford ; he had Captain Crawford engraved on a plate and put on one of them; I took it home at ten o'clock the next morning, he was not there, I am sure he is the person. When I returned from Mrs. Crawford's, the prisoner was in our shop; he told me to call at two o'clock, I did not call till four o'clock.

Q. Did you enquire if Captain Crawford lived there. - A. He only lived there when in town.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I was Captain Crawford 's steward. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I sailed with Captain Crawford to Russia; I was in the habit of purchasing what he wanted; knowing he wanted this trunk and box, I purchased them, and sent them to Sheerness; the ship sailing prevented me from sailing with him.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-115

651. THOMAS SEAMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , five pair of shoes, value 23 s. two skins of leather, value 2 s. and a venetian blind, value 1 s. the property of Robert Pearce .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS PEARCE . Q. On the 21st of July, in consequence of any thing that was passing, was the prisoner put into your house. - A. Yes, I put him in care of all the property; he was in possession nearly two days, at 5 s. a day.

Q. When the property came afterwards to be examined, did you find any thing to be missing. - A. I did; twenty-two pair of shoes, a pair of boots, two skins of leather, and a vast number of things; I caused the prisoner's lodgings to be searched.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Your affairs had unfortunately been embarrassed, and you agreed that a sort of assignment should take place. - A. I put this man in possession, and sent to my creditors directly that they might see that all was fair. I authorised this man to sell for all the creditors. Mr. Barker and Mr. Chalmer were my principal creditors.

- HISLOP. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I found two pair of children's shoes, and a pair of men's shoes, they have been worn; two kid skins, and several pieces of leather. I found a duplicate; I went to the pawnbroker's, and there I found three pair of shoes.

THOMAS SUMMERS . I am servant to Mr. Windsor, Whitechapel. I have two pair of shoes, they were pawned by a woman; she appeared to be the wife of the prisoner.

Hislop. That is the woman I found in his lodgings.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-116

652. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , five leather skins, value 15 s. twelve whip thongs, value 5 s. a pair of plated hooks, value 5 s. a razor, value 4 d. three balls of hemp, value 1 s. and a pair of clams, value 1 s. the property of William Mane .

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. On the 7th of this month in the afternoon, in Upper East Smithfield, I went into a public-house, where I saw the prisoner, in

company with a man, offering these skins for sale to some of the people who were in the tap-room. He offered them to me; I told him I should have no objection to buying them, if he could refer me to any honest tradesman that he bought them of; he said he received them in part of payment for his wages; he said his master's name was Jackson, that he lived in Surrey. Not believing him, I took him to the office and searched him, on his person I found a pair of plated spring hooks, three balls of hemp, five skins, and a pair of clams. I received information that he had sold a dozen of thongs to Mr. Judd, in the Strand, I went with the prosecutor, and there I found the thongs. I found another skin and a razor in his lodgings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. Sheane gave me the things to sell; he turned evidence at the magistrate's to save himself.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-117

653. THOMAS VINCENT was indicted for that he, on the 11th of July , was servant to John Maberly , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, did take into his possession a banker's draft for 42 l. 16 s. 6 d. and a banker's draft for 25 l. for and on account of his said master, that he afterwards fraudulently did secrete, embezzle, and steal the same . And

Two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

EDWARD WARD . Q. You are in the employment of Mr. Maberly, Welbeck Street. - A. Yes, he is a coach-maker , I am clerk to him. The prisoner was a porter there. On Saturday, the 11th of July, I received two checks on account of my employer on the bankers. I gave them to the prisoner, one was a draft on the house of Ferrol and Co. for 42 l. 16 s. 6 d. the other on Robarts and Co. for 25 l. I desired him to go to the banking houses and receive the money, and return with it to me. He took the drafts and went, and I saw no more of him till Sunday the 19th of July, then I saw him with the officer at Oxford; the officer who took him gave me to the amount of 32 l. 6 s. On my return to town I discovered that he had a watch, which I took form him.

Q. Had he a watch before. - A. No, I do not know that he had. I have the drafts that I gave him; these are them.

ANTHONY WADE . Q. You are one of the clerks at the house of Roberts and Co. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember, on the 11th of July last, paying a draft of 25 l. - A. I do, I paid this check on that afternoon. I do not know the prisoner. I paid it in a 20 l. note, and a 5 l. note.

LEWIS MILLER . Q. You live with the other bankers. - A. Yes; I paid this draft on the 11th of July, 42 l. 16 s. 6 d. I do not recollect the person I paid it to: I believe I paid it in small notes and money.

CHARLOTTE CROMWELL . I live at No. 5, Union Street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 11th of July, near dusk, me and another young woman stood at the door; she asked him if he would walk in, he came into her apartment; he sent her servant out with a shilling to get something to drink. After that he went into my apartment; he gave me a 20 l. note for myself, he sent it out by my servant to get it changed, she brought in the change, I told her to give them to the gentleman, he told her to give them to me, and told me to lock them up, that I might not lose them; he staid with me that evening. On Sunday morning he and I, and a Miss Row, rid in a one horse chaise to Brentford; he staid with me that evening when he came home.

Q. How soon did you set off for Oxford. - A. On the Tuesday morning. My friends live there. We went in a one horse chaise; we got to Oxford on the Wednesday, he was taken on the Sunday.

Q. Who paid your expences to Oxford. - A. The prisoner. The officer asked me if I had any property, I said yes, it was at my mother's house, and I would fetch it. I went to my mother, she lives at Oxford, I fetched him 15 l. I told him I had laid out 5 l. I told the officer I did not know it was not his own money.

Prisoner's defence. I am friendless: every thing is clear against me.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-118

654. SARAH BLAKELY and ANN BYRON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of John Rolf .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-119

655. JOHN DORNOTO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , one pocketbook, value 3 s. a metal ring, value 2 s. a guinea, two shillings, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Naish .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his reconizance was ordered to be estreated, the prisoner were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-120

656. JOHN COTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling house of John Hill, on the 28th of July , a half guinea, six shillings, and seven half pence, four bank notes, value 10 l. each, and seven bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of William Parsons .

The case was stated by Mr. Barry.

WILLIAM PARSONS . I am a seaman ; I belonged to the Jason frigate; I lost a leg, and part of my thigh, in that ship. When I arrived at Sheerness, I received 47 l. four 10 l. notes and seven ones; they were Bank of England notes; the prisoner was with me, and saw me receive the money.

Q. How much did he receive. - A.Between three and four pounds. We came together in one boat to town, and we lived together at the Dundee Arms; then from there we went to Mrs. Hill's, 123, Wapping .

Q. When you arrived there, had you these four ten pound notes and seven ones in your waistcoat pocket. - A. Yes, I felt them when I was in bed, about two

o'clock I had my dinner, they were all safe, then I fell asleep.

Court. Had you been drinking. - A. No, I had only one pint of porter after my breakfast. Between four and five o'clock I awoke, I observed a letter that was wrapped round my money, and my invaliding ticket, they were laying on the bed; the handkerchiefs that I had in my pocket were both taken out, all my cloaths were scattered about, and my money was taken out of my pocket; the wool was taken out of my wooden leg to see if there was any thing there.

Q.What money had you in your pocket. - A. Five or six shillings, and some half-pence; in short, they left me nothing. When I had found every thing was gone, Mrs. Hill brought me up some tea, I told her of the robbery, she told me not to alarm myself. Presently after I saw the prisoner; he was charged with the robbery; he denied it.

Q. Did you or any body tell him it would be better for him to confess. - A. Not that night; he went out, and stopped out all night; he came the next morning, and was put in the charge of the police officer; then he denied it; he desired Mrs. Hill to give me 30 l. she did not, as it was a robbery done in her house.

MARGARET HILL . I am a victualler. I keep a lodging house in Wapping. My husband's name is John Hill. It is in the parish of St. John's, Wapping.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, and I know the prosecutor. On the 28th of July, the prosecutor went to bed immediately after breakfast, he was very ill. The prisoner and another black man were together; I asked them whether they had any money, the prisoner replied he had but 8 l. and he was capable of taking care of it himself.

Q. Did you at any time receive any sum of money from the prisoner before the prosecutor got up. - A. In the afternoon I received 40 l. in notes, I put my mark on them, I cannot read nor write; I received half a guinea, a Spanish dollar, a shilling, and eight-pence halfpenny in copper; he told me to take care of it, till he called for it. I asked him at the time where he got it from, he said in Scotland; I said, the money grows, you said in the morning you had only got 8 l. He brought me the money shivering and shaking.

Q. Are you a Scotch-woman. - A. No, indeed, my Lord, I am not; yet I am an Irishwoman. When I went up to the prosecutor with his tea he said he had been robbed.

Q. When the prisoner was charged with the offence, did he desire you to give the prosecutor three ten pound notes. - A. He did; he told me to give Billy Parsons 30 l.

Q. Why. - A. For the money that he had taken from him, I guessed that he only said give 30 l. to him for him not to say any thing about it.

Q. How soon afterwards did he desire the prosecutor not to say any thing about it. - Q. A good while; he desired me to give it him at different times.

Prisoner. What time did I give you this money. - A. It was between three and four o'clock.

Prisoner. It was eleven o'clock I gave her that money to keep for me. All that woman says about me is not true.

JOHN BRADLEY . I am a seaman. I was in the house in the morning when the prosecutor and the prisoner came. After breakfast, Mrs. Hill asked them all if they had any money, she would take care of it for them; the prisoner said, he had 8 l. he was capable of taking care of it himself. After that the prisoner went up stairs two or three times. I asked him if he had been asleep, he said he had been abed but he could sleep none. The last time he came down stairs, he fetched this money down, these thirteen bank notes; I saw them reckoned out to Mrs. Hill.

Q. What hour of the day was it. - A. After four o'clock.

Q. You are sure it was not eleven o'clock. - A. No.

RICHARD PERRY . I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police. I took the prisoner in custody at the Fox.

Q. From whom did you get these Bank of England notes. - A. From Mr. Kinnard. I was present when they were delivered to Mr. Kinnard by Mrs. Hill.

Q.(to Mrs. Hill.) Look at that bag. - A. That is the same bag the prisoner gave me, and these are the bank notes he gave me; they have all my mark.

Q.(to prosecutor) Have you any particular mark by which you know the notes. - A. One of the 10 l. bank notes is marked with Sheerness on the back, the number was 7665, the name on it is Gibson.

Q. Is there a note marked 7665. - A. No, I had four 10 l. notes, that is the one that I suppose is missing.

HENRY NUTWELL TOMLINS . Q. You are clerk at the Thames Police Office. - A. Yes. The first account that the prisoner gave, which was voluntary, was, that he received three 10 l. notes of a captain of a vessel at Cork in Ireland for his wages in last December. He was asked by the magistrate, whether the notes then produced were those identical notes that he received of the captain, he said they were; on examining the notes it appeared that one was dated subsequent in April. On another examination, he gave the account to the magistrate of 15 l. he had received of a captain of a ship, and a pig, for his wages; he afterwards said that he received the money in Scotland; this was at three different examinations.

Prisoner's defence. I cannot speak good English, if I could I could speak what I please; well, I was with my captain, sir, three voyages, and I never had a copper of him. This last voyage I came to Scotland, I was going to the West Indies, I scalded my leg, I was sick, the captain turned me on shore in Ireland; what little money I brought on shore, I spent it all. When signal was making for the ship to sail, I wrote a letter to my captain; he came to me; I said, Captain, I want some money, I am very bad with the rheumatism; I said I had been three voyages with him, twenty-one months. Do you know what I am indebted to you? No, I says; he took out ten notes, he said it was 20 l. I told him I did not understand these notes, I wanted change; he said if he gave me all silver I should spend it all, these were better. I took the notes of the captain; he said, I am indebted to you 17 l. and I owe you 3 l. for a pig, and you owe me for blue trowsers, jacket, shoes, and handkerchief; he gave me one single note, that made eleven. I was on board the Trident, guard ship, three months; from

there I went on board another ship; I receive three notes at Sheerness. I do not understand the notes.

JOHN SMITH . Q. Were you present when the prisoner at the bar received his money at Sheerness. - A. Yes, he received three pound four shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[The jury recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy on account of his being a stranger, and not knowing the laws of the country.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070916-121

657. NORAH KELLY , alias TURNEY , was indicted for stealing on the 25th of August , a metal watch, value 1 l. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. and half a guinea , the property of Francis Hardwick .

FRANCIS HARDWICK. I am a taylor , I live in Leicester-street. On the 25th of August I met this woman, I went home with her to Charles street , I staid with her two nights; in the morning I missed my watch and the other property; she told me she knew nothing of them. The officer found the duplicate of the watch on her.

- GARDNER. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I found the duplicate of the watch on her person.

Q. Where is the watch. - A. It is in the hands of my landlord.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-122

658. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the on the 2nd of July , two silver table spoons, value 24 s. the property of Nicholas Scott .

NICHOLAS SCOTT . I have been a publican ; I lost the spoons in July last from my own house.

HENRY MARKS . I live in High-street, St. Giles's. On the 21st of July the prisoner offered me this spoon for sale; I looked at the spoon, I saw Mr. Scott, Bedford terrace. I gave him in charge of an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I found some tickets in Oxford Road; a young man owed me eleven shillings, he took the spoon out of pledge and gave it me for the money he owed me.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-123

659. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of September , a pair of trowsers. value 5 s. a shirt, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Raine .

THOMAS RAINE . I am a sailor ; I lost my trowsers on the 16th of this month from the forecastle; they were hanging on a line to dry; he came on board and stole them. I found the property on him at his room in Pepplewell-alley.

Prisoner's Defence. I took these things from the ship to keep me from the dew, I did not intend to keep them.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-124

660. ANDREW TIFFEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a pair of boots, value 7 s. the property of James Watson .

JAMES WATSON . I live at No. 93, Golden-lane ; I lost the boots on Saturday last, about ten o'clock in the morning. As I was standing in my shop three men came up to the window; I saw one of them taking a pair of boots, he tucked them under his coat; I think it was the other man that was not taken that took them down. When I run down a little way in the lane this man ran away down an alley; I cried out stop thief: he dropped the boots in the alley, the officer picked up the boots; he happened to run by his door. If the prisoner had not run away I should not have thought any thing of him.

- FRENCH. I am a watchman; hearing the cry of stop thief, I stopped the prisoner seeing him running; he said do not stop me, they want to press me I held him while Mr. Spicer came up with the boots in his hand.

WILLIAM SPICER . I am an officer. Last Saturday morning, between the hours of ten and eleven, I heard the cry of stop thief, I followed the sound. I went out of my house and saw Mr. Watson and the prisoner running, the prisoner threw the boots down; Watson ran over them: I picked them up; I pursued him till French stopped him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was just come from Plymouth hearing the cry of stop thief I ran; I thought they wanted to press me.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-125

661. SARAH PURRIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May , a silver watch, value 1 l. and a gold ring, value 5 s. the property of Edward Archer .

EDWARD ARCHER . I am a shoemaker . I lived in John-street when I lost the watch, now I live in Hare street; I lost the watch and the gold ring on the 3d of May, they were both on the table, I lost it about five o'clock in the evening; there was nobody in the house but me. The prisoner lodged next door to me; she and another woman came in my room, the other woman took the ring and she took the watch; the prisoner came to ask me to mend her a pair of shoes. When she went out she put the hasp of the padlock on, I could not get out; it was a month before I could get the prisoner into custody; I have had twice hold of her but she got away. The other we took out of bed on the Tuesday as this happened on the Sunday. That woman was prosecuted, and I had my watch again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. How long have you been acquainted with this girl and Young. - A. I never was acquainted with them; they never came into my house before that day.

Q You have prosecuted Young here, you did not prosecute this prisoner till this sessions. - A. No, she has been at Deptford; and when I found her they took her away before I could get a constable.

Q. Can you read or write. - A. No.

Q. Do you known your own mark. - A. I cannot say I marked it; I know nothing about it.

Q. Do not you believe it. - A. It may be so, I do not contradict it.

Q. Do not you know it is - is it not. - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Then it is your own mark. - A. Well, then it

must be so; I must never be in my senses if I did mark it.

Q. Now I will read it. -

"By receiving twelve shillings, stop proceedings against Sarah Bergier ; - I Edward Archer , do before witness agree not to prosecute her, Sarah Bergier.

Q. Who is that. -

Mr. Alley. It may mean Spurrier.

Q. Did you receive that money. - A. I was promised such a thing, I never touched any of the money.

Court. Did any person persuade you to put a mark to any such thing. - A. I was at a public house, there were ten or eleven women there; I could not put a mark, I was so bad with drinking I was obliged to be carried home.

Q. I ask you now man, did you or did you not, aware of the contents of this instrument, sign it. - A. It must be when I was out of my senses. I was very drunk, I was obliged to be carried home.

Mr. Alley. Did you ever say to any person at any time that this woman was not concerned in the robbery that Young did it. - A. No, they were both together; this woman had the ring on her finger; I never would have done it if she would have sent the ring back or the seven shillings.

Q. Did you ever sign that receipt. - A. I do not know it.

BENJAMIN CHARLTON . I am shopman to Mr. Robertson, Alfred-place, London Road, Surry.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do not. On the 4th of May the prisoner that was convicted pledged a watch with me for fifteen shillings; there was a woman with her; I do not know the prisoner.

Q. Was that the watch that was swore to when Young was tried. - A. Yes, it was returned to the prosecutor.

Q. Was there any gold ring pledged. - A. No there was not.

PETER MASON . I am an officer of Worship-street. In the beginning of May I apprehended Sarah Young , whom Archer charged with this woman of robbing him; this woman I could not find.

Q. Do you know where this woman lived before this man prosecuted Young. - A. They both lived next door to the prosecutor; I took this prisoner just before this sessions commenced; I told her what I took her for, and that these two duplicates I found in her room, which she owned; but it does not concern this. She denied any knowledge of the watch or ring; I was sent for before at Bethnal Green to take this prisoner; when I come she was gone; the prosecutor said he was stoned out of the place.

The property produced and identified.

SOLOMON SPENCER . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am a weaver.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor. - A. I never was in company with him before last Friday sennight. I was sent for to look at an agreement.

Q. Did you see him put his mark there. - A. I did; he was perfectly sober, he would not put his mark till he had twelve shillings for taking out the indictment; I saw him receive twelve shillings; he said he understood Young was guilty, and he thought this girl was innocent, and being all neighbours alike, he said why should he hurt her, he would go out of the way and would not prosecute,

Court. Did you ever witness a thing of this sort be fore. - A. No; the girls father applied to me to witness it.

Q. Did not you know that this girl lived with Young. A. No, I do not know where she lived; her father is a comrade of mine in the East London militia; I knew nothing of it till the father fetched me to make my mark to this paper.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called no witness to character.

GUILTY aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-126

662. ANN BEAUMONT was indicted for feloniously stealing in the month of August, a frock, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Powell .

ELIZABETH POWELL . I am the wife of Edward Powell , No. 7, Phoenix-street, he is a sawyer , near Westminster bridge, in Lambeth; I lost a frock from this baby, the prisoner took it from her, it was about the middle of August; my daughter was nursing the child I now have in my arms, I saw the prisoner with the child I now have in my arms, turning the corner of the street, and little thought that she was going to take the child away; the baby was missing two hours; I found it in Parliament street, and the frock was taken away; the frock has not been found since.

SUSANNAH POWELL. Q. You are the daughter of Elizabeth Powell . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember having your sister to nurse. - A. Yes. That is the woman that took the child out of my arms (pointing to the prisoner); my mother keeps a broker's shop, the prisoner came in to sell a jacket and two pair of old stockings; I came in soon after her; she took the child out of my arms and kissed it; she went with me to the soot of Westminster bridge, she gave me a penny to fetch her a pennyworth of plums; while I was gone she went away towards Westminster. I looked back as I went for the plums; she got up and then safe down; when I came back she was gone. I went home and told my mother; in about two hours the child was found in Parliament-street, stripped of her frock.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable, I took her in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not strip that child.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-127

663. ANN BEAUMONT was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , a frock, value, 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Pennell .

ELIZABETH PENNELL . My husband's name is John Pennell, he is a labourer at the India house, I live in Monmouth-street . On the 27th of August, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I left the child at the door to play.

Q. What age is the child. - A.Three years old; I returned about four, the child was missing; I looked for it two hours; I was informed the child was stripped in Leicester fields, that the child was in the work house, and the woman in the watchhouse. I found my child at the office in Queen square, it had been stripped of its frock.

JOHN GREEN . I am a pawnbroker, servant

Corder, Green-street, Leicester square. On the 27th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop, she had a child at the bottom of the box, but I could only see its head; she offered this frock to pledge; I advanced her a shilling on it. Soon after this child was seen in our passage. it came out, I saw it at the window, I knew the child by the head, it was white; it was stripped of its frock. I got the child to be taken care of. Soon after I saw her at the window; I ran after her and took her against St. Martin's watchhouse; I secured her and sent for Goodenough, he took her to Qeen square; I was ordered to attend with the frock. The child was produced before the magistrate; the mother claimed it.

Q. You are quite sure that is the woman that pawned the frock. - A. Yes.

Q. And that is the child she had with her, so far as you can judge from appearance. - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-128

664. ROBERT LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a composing stick, value 4 s. the property of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a printer . On Saturday morning two o'clock, when I left work, I left my composing stick in the office; on Sunday it was gone.

JOHN WISE . I bought the duplicate of the prisoner on Wednesday night; a publican informed me there were two sticks stolen out of the Morning Post printing office. I went up to the office, Davis claimed one.

Q. You received that stick from a duplicate you bought of the prisoner. - A. Yes.

- I am a pawnbroker; I took in that composing stick of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged them for John Frill ; he gave me the duplicates.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-129

665. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a leg of mutton, value 4 s. the property of James Mucklow .

JAMES MUCKLOW . I am a butcher in Whitecross-street ; about a month ago I weighed a leg of mutton to the prisoner at seven pence per pound, it came to four shillings and a penny; I laid it on the block, he took it out to his wife, she walked away with it; as he stopped a minute I thought he meant to pay for it; he walked away, I called to him and asked him for the money for the leg of mutton; he said he had been in no butcher's shop, he did not know me; he ran away; I pursued him and brought him back.

EDWARD TRING . On Saturday night, about half past nine at night, Mr. Mucklow brought this man to me, charged him with stealing a leg of mutton; I asked him why he did not pay for the mutton, he said because he had no money. I searched him, he had two seven shilling pieces, two half crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence; he was not in liquor.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-130

666. THOMAS HERRING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of Mary Lawrence .

HENRY LATHAM . I am a dealer in Mahogany, Prince's-square, Ratcliff Highway; I was standing just before my gate, the prisoner had a watch in his hand playing with it; I asked him how he came by the watch, he said he was going to somebody in Ratcliff Highway with it, he did not know his name; he told me he lived at No. 42, Rosemary-lane, he was afraid of being beat by his master; I took the watch and gave him my card; I said, tell your master to come to me at eight o'clock; his father came to me, he said the boy had found the watch as he was flying a kite, he hoped I would let him have it, as it was not owned. I afterterwards was informed Mrs. Lawrence had lost a watch and five shillingsworth of halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the street; a boy gave me the watch in the street in my hand.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-131

667. JOHN TOMALIN was indicted for that he being servant to William Palliser , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, did receive 1 s. 7 d. for and on account of his said master, that he afterwards fraudulently did secrete and steal the same .

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM PALLISER . I live at No. 7, Clerkenwell-Green, I carry on the timber and coal trade .

Q. On the 22d of August had the prisoner carried out any coals for you. - A. He had; in the evening he said he had sold a bushel of coals to Mrs. Tuff, and she had not paid him; he has never paid me that sum from that time to this; he gave me an account of what he sold in writing, and sometimes he came home fuddled, and then I got the account as I could.

Court. Have you got any of his slips in writing here. A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-132

668. JOHN TOMALIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , ten bushels of coals, value 13 s. the property of William Palliser .

The case stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM PALLISER On Monday the 24th of August I desired him to take out eighteen bushels of coals, and not to take any more without my knowledge; his man went with the cart, he followed him, they sold the eighteen bushels, and he said the man took the money out of his hat; they came back, broke my warehouse open, and took out a cart load of coals and sold them.

Mr. Gurney. He told you that Jem, his man, broke the place open and took the coals, had he a liberty to take out coals. - A.When I gave him the key; when I was out my daughter gave him the key.

Court. Suppose you were out might not he take the key and get the coals. - A. Yes, I certainly should have let him have the key.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-133

669. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , two elm planks value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Rhodes , Samuel Rhodes and William Rhodes .

JAMES COCKWELL . I am night surveyor to the lights and watch. On the 9th of August, a little before two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner turn out of Dirty-lane, Hoxton; he had two elm planks on his shoulder. I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the road.

The prisoner called two witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-134

670. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case stated by Mr. Knapp.

SOPHIA STRANGE . Q. I belive you are employed by Mr Blundell, haberdasher , 124, Bishopgate-street . - A. I am. On the 8th of July , between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, she said she wanted a quarter of an ounce of four-penny thread, it came to a penny; she tendered me a sixpence, I thought it was a bad one; I gave it to Mr. Blundell, he said it was a bad one

GEORGE BLUNDELL . The last witness called me to look at the sixpence; I told the prisoner it was a bad one; she offered me this sixpence, which is a good one; I suspected she was a common utterer of bad money, because she had several small articles; I asked her if she had no halfpence, she said no; I put my hand by the side of her thigh; I heard a quantity of halfpence rattle, she had never been out of my sight till she was in custody. I have kept the shilling and the sixpence ever since. I produce them; this shilling and a good sixpence, she offered me as a compensation to let her go.

JOHN SAPWELL . On searching the prisoner, she dropped two sixpences from her hand; I opened her right hand, there I found thirteen sixpences and two shillings; they were all bad; in her mouth I found four bad sixpences. Shephard found one shilling and sixpence before me.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Just look at the first sixpence. - A. It is a counterfeit; the thirteen sixpences and the four found in her mouth and the shilling she gave to Mr. Blundell, are all of them counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. On July 18th, I found a handkerchief with some sixpences tied up in it; I offered one to that gentleman.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and to find Sureties for Two Years good Behaviour at the Expiration of that Time .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070916-135

671. THOMAS LIGHTFOOT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am shopman to Messrs Hill and Parkinson. On the 18th of June last, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for two dozen o wax candles; he said he had not got any order; I told him Mr. Wyat requested that he should not have the goods without the order; he said that Mr. Wyat and his clerk were in the warehouse, they desired him to make all the haste they could for the candles for the carriage was waiting at the door for them; under this circumstance, I let him have them. I wrote a bill out in Mr. Wyat's name and gave him the bill.

JOHN FRANCIS WYAT . I live in Fleet-street; I am a tallow chandler

Q. Are you a customer of Mr. Hill and Parkinson. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He was my porter ; he left me in April. I never sent him for these candles, nor did I ever see him.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070916-136

672. HUMPHRY WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

AUGUSTUS FINCH . I am apprentice to Richard and George Knight , ironmongers , Foster-lane . On the 6th of June the prisoner gave me this order. -

"Sir, please to let the bearer have two dozen green handle knives and forks, and two dozen of black ditto, with the small ones with them."

"Signed, W. S."

In consequence of this I gave him the goods. On the 11th he brought another order for two dozen black handle knives and forks, for W. Kent and son, W. S. - I delivered him the goods likewise.

Q. What made him put W. S. - A. For William Swapp , apprentice to Mr. Kent.

WILLIAM SWAPP I am an apprentice to Messrs. Kent.

Q. Is that your hand writing. - A. No, it was never given by any person in our house.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot deny the crime charged against me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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