Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st July 1807.
Reference Number: 18070701
Reference Number: f18070701-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 1st of JULY, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1807

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the right-honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. Lord-Mayor the City of London: Sir Soulden Lawrence , Knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir Alan Chambre , Knt, one of His Majesty's Justice of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , Knt. Sir John William Anderson , Bart. Sir John Eamer , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Charles Flower , Esq. Richard Lea , Esq. Josiah Boydell , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

John Jepson ,

James Greenland ,

Robert Goodall ,

James Hewson ,

Thomas Lowe ,

Robert Ashby ,

Samuel Glover ,

Richard Reeves ,

Henry Sloper ,

Samuel Bellingham ,

John Conner ,

David Bligh .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Bembridge ,

John Wardell ,

John Dixon ,

John Rusby ,

Henry Coates ,

William Page ,

John Cole ,

Peter Palmer ,

Philip Salter ,

William Scott ,

James Wotton ,

Jacob Bailey .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Joseph Parr ,

Nicholas Byerly ,

William Bland ,

John James ,

Thomas Powell ,

Charles Cradock ,

Joseph Tringham ,

Joseph Paste ,

Thomas Wheeler ,

John Hemblem ,

James Savage ,

William Mowbray .

Reference Number: t18070701-1

427. WILLIAM SINGLETON, alias DENCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a silver tankard, value 5 l. a silver stand, value 2 l. eight silver table spoons, value 4 l. five silver desert spoons, value 4 l. 10 s. sixteen silver tea spoons, value 2 l. 18 s. a silver sauce ladle, value 14 s. a silver soup ladle, value 1 l. a silver strainer, value 18 s. six silver forks, value 3 l. a silver fish slice, value 3 s. two silver sauce spoons, value 3 s. a silver skewer, value 5 s. one silver cup, value 10 s. and one linen cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Rawlinson , esq . in his dwelling house ; and RICHARD THOMPSON for feloniously receiving on the same day, five silver tea spoons, value 1 l. and one linen cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. part of the same goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN RAWLINSON . - Mr. Pooley. Where is your house. - A. No. 66, Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner came into my service as a footman , on the 13th of May last.

Q. How long did he live with you. - A I went out of town on the 27th of May; on the 29th I was called to town, upon intimation that he had left my service.

Q. When he came into your service was any part of your plate under his care. - A. It was particularly under his care, all the articles in the indictment; so much so that a few days after he came into my service he desired to have a list given him of the plate.

Q. Was there any silver spoons delivered to him. - A. Yes, about a dozen.

Q. Any desert spoons. - A. Yes, about a dozen or eleven.

Q. Any silver sauce ladle. - A. Yes, and a soup ladle; the tankard was not delivered to him.

Q. A silver wine strainer, - A. Yes, and he had six silver forks in his custody, and a silver fish slice, and four silver sauce spoons, a silver skewer, and a small silver cup.

Q. How lately before you went out of town had you seen them. - A. I had seen them all on the Monday, and part of them I saw on the Tuesday; I went out of town on the Wednesday morning. The silver tankard I had seen on the Monday in the stand.

Q. When you returned to town, upon information that you received, was this plate or any part of it gone. - A. It was all gone that is in the indictment, and the prisoner had left my service.

Q. Where was the plate kept by him. - A. It was kept in a cupboard which belonged to him exclusively, in the back kitchen.

Q. When you went out of town did you leave the prisoner in your service. - A. I did; when I returned he was gone, and the plate was gone. I returned on Saturday the 29th of May.

Q. How soon after the 29th of May were you informed of the prisoner. - A. On the Tuesday following, I saw him at Horsemonger-lane; in consequence of a letter I received, I went and saw him.

Q. Did you have any conversation with him about this transaction. - A. I had a good deal of conversation with him there about this transaction.

Q. Before he said any thing to you relative to this did you tell him it would be better for him to confess. - A. No; he told me if I would not hurt him he would make my loss good; I told him whether he made my loss good or not, I should prosecute him most severely; I said that over and over again to the prisoner in the jail. He told me that he had been instigated to rob me by Richard Thompson , a hair dresser in Great Barlow-street, Marybone ; that he had no particular reason for robbing me, that Thompson told him that gentleman's service was too bad for any body to live in now-a-days. He then told me that he had taken the plate to Thompson's house, and that Thompson had got two jews to purchase it.

Q. Did he tell you what plate he took from your house. - A. When he made his confession before the magistrate, he particularised every thing. At the time I had the conversation with him, he said only generally the plate. In consequence of that information I went to Union Hall, and got an officer, and went to Thompson's house on Tuesday morning after I had been with the prisoner. I found Thompson's house, he appeared to be a hair dresser.

Q. Was his name over the door. - A. I believe his name was over the door.

Q. When you went there for whom did you enquire. - A. I met with the prisoner Richard Thompson in the house, I asked him if his name was Thompson, he said yes. After some conversation about a horse, that has nothing to do with this prosecution, I asked him if he had any transaction with a gentleman's servant with regard to plate; he said that a hundred gentlemen's servants came to his house, but that he had no transaction of that kind. I then asked him if he knew of any gentleman's servant of the name of Dench; he said he knew no such person.

Q. Did you ask him so distinctly that he knew the name of the person you mentioned. - A. He answered distinctly that he knew no such person. The officers then proceeded to search him; in one of his coat pockets they found five tea spoons, which I have no doubt are mine. I then told him that we had been directed to his house by Singleton; he then broke out in a passion, and said, as the rascal has betrayed poor Thompson, I will now tell the whole truth of it.

Q. Was that after the spoons were taken out of his pocket. - A. Yes, after taking the spoons out of his pocket.

Court. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess. - A. Oh no, certainly not. He then said that Singleton brought the plate to him, and that he advised him to take it back.

Q. Did he mention the name of Singleton or Dench. - A. I cannot say, I used the name of Dench first, but I used both the names after; the officers then proceeded to search his wife and the house; I do not think that we went into any further particulars.

Q. Was there a crest on the plate that you lost. - A. There was a shell-drake with a shell in his mouth.

Q. Was there any crest on the plate that was taken out of his pocket - A. Yes; on one or two of the spoons (the spoons produced).

Q. Are these the spoons that were found in his pocket. - A. They are.

Q. Have you got the fellow to them. - A. I have.

Q. Is there any mark, independent of your crest, by which you know them. - A. There is the mark of the broad arrow, which I understand is the polisher's mark, which is upon all the five that were found upon him.

Q. Can you observe any of the crest upon all of them. - A. Upon two the shell-drake is quite distinct.

Q. Have you any doubt of their being your property. - A. Not the smallest.

Q. About what is the value of this plate that was taken from you to sell. - A. Between twenty and thirty pounds.

Q. Do you know the cloth - A. I have since seen the rest of the cloths, which correspond with it; my servant knows it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How long did this person live with you. - A. From the 13th of May till the 27th, I went out of town.

Q. He came to you with a good character, I presume. - A. I took him with a good character from major - , as to honesty and sobriety.

Q. He had the complete controul of the plate. - A. Yes, of all that is in the list.

Q. Therefore he might take it at different times, as he had the controul of it; it is impossible for you to say whether they were taken at one time or no. - A. I know that they were there on the Monday.

Q. But whether some part of the plate was taken at one part of the day, and some at the other, it is impossible for you to say. - A. Certainly; I cannot say, I was out of town.

Q. Was there any thing observed respecting this man's conduct and behaviour while he was with you. - A. No, he seemed very desirous to do his duty, I must confess.

Q. Any appearance of derangement in him. - A. No, he was rather a stupid man, and a heavy appearance.

Q. Had it occurred to you at any time to suppose him at all deranged. - A. O no, clearly not deranged; I thought him a stupid fellow.

Mr. Pooley. What is the value of the tankard. - A. Five pounds; I think it is worth that to sell for old silver.

Q. Have you any doubt of its being worth forty shillings. - A. I have no doubt of it.

CHARITY COMMON . - Mr. Pooley. Do you live with Mr. Rawlinson. - A. I did, and I do know.

Q. Was the prisoner Singleton servant to Mr. Rawlinson. - A. Yes.

Q. On Thursday the 28th of May last, what time did he go out on that morning. - A. At half past eleven o'clock, and returned about ten minutes before four.

Q. Where is the plate kept. - A. In a closet in the back kitchen.

Q. Had he the care of it. - A. Yes, my mistress gave him a list of it in my presence.

Q. Had you in the course of that morning seen any of the plate. - A. Yes, I saw a quantity of plate in the tin tray, and the silver tankard lay before it on the table; I saw it several times in the day, because he left the door open.

Q. When was the latest time that you saw it. - A. At three o'clock the tin tray appeared to be as full of plate as ever it was.

Q. When he came in about ten minutes before four, where did he go to. - A. When he came I opened the door and let him in; he asked me if he had been wanted during his absence; I told him he had been wanted, he said he could not help it. I left him in the back kitchen, where the plate was; I went to the front kitchen; I had not been many minutes there before I heard a loud noise, as if it was the sound of glass; there was a great quantity of glass in the cupboard where the plate stood; I went into the kitchen to him, he was standing before the cupboard, with the door open where the plate and the glass were kept. I asked him what he had been smashing, he said nothing; I then returned into the front kitchen, I was there two or three minutes, I went into the back kitchen again; he was standing in the same situation wish his arm projected out. I went into the front kitchen, and in two or three minutes he followed me; he took a mahogany knife tray out of the closet in the kitchen, and went up stairs into the parlour; he put his knife tray down in the parlour, very loud; I heard it. I heard him walking over the passage; he went out and slammed the street door to very loud. I saw the top of his head and shoulders as he was crossing the street.

Court. What time of the day was this. - A. Just after four o'clock. About six in the evening I went to the cupboard where the plate was kept, to006. for my mistress, the other servant being out; I missed the whole of the plate; I went there to get the tea spoons.

Mr. Pooley. From three o'clock to the time that you missed it, was any other person there but the prisoner. A. No one; I was there the whole time.

Q. Have you seen any cloth that was found. - A. Yes. (the cloth produced).

Q. Was there any cloth missing. - A. Yes, on the 28th of May when the plate was missing; it is a linen cloth, there was a dozen glass clothes, half a dozen of one sort and half a dozen of another, put into the drawer a little before he came in; they were perfectly clean when I missed the plate. It is dirty now.

Q. Look at Thompson, did you see him about the house at that time. - A. No.

Court What servants were in the house besides you and the prisoner. - A. Two nursery maids and the house maid; they were all up stairs at that time.

Q. Nobody had come in the street door in the mean time had they. - A. No person but our own family.

RICHARD BETHEL LLOYD . - Mr. Pooley. You are an officer belonging to Union hall in the Borough. - A. I am.

Q. Have you got any confession of the prisoner. - A. I have, it is signed by the prisoner; I did not see him sign it, I know it to be the signature of the magistrate.

(The confession read in court, signed William Singleton ; written before us, T. Evance, and W. Holland.)

The examinant saith that his real name is William Singleton, but he having deserted from the ninth regiment of light dragoons, he has since gone by the name of Dench; that about five or six weeks ago he went into the service of Mr. Rawlinson, with whom he continued till Thursday evening last, the 28th of May, when he left the service without giving any intimation of so doing; and took away the several articles of plate, a silver tankard, a silver stand, eight silver table spoons, a silver skewer, six silver forks, nine silver tea spoons,

two silver salt spoons, all of which he wrapped up in a cloth, now produced by the constable, and after leaving his master's house, he went to Thompson an hair dresser, with whom he had been acquainted for some time; that he asked Thompson what he should do with the plate, and whether he should not take it back again; Thompson said by no means take it back, if you do it will hang you; that he put the whole of the plate in a basket, and went out with it, and returned and said that he had seen a jew, and directed him, the examinant, to go with him to a clothes shop, where the examinant saw the jew, who looked at the plate, said it was worth two guineas; examinant said he would not take two guineas, he would have eight; the jew gave two guineas and a half, which he took. When Thompson brought the plate back the examinant looked at the plate to see if it was all there; that there was another jew present who did not take any part in the business, except lending the money; that Thompson returned from the jew, and told him he had sold the plate for two guineas and a half; that having his master's clothes on, he said I can put you in a way to get other clothes, you must go on the road; that same evening he bought a pistol, and on Sunday afternoon Thompson hired a horse for the examinant; he rid over Kew bridge, he met a man, examinant stopped him, and robbed him of his watch.

Q. (to Lloyd) Did you go to the house of Thompson. - A I did, I saw him in his house in Barlow-street, Marybone; he keeps a hair dresser's shop. Mr. Rawlinson went in first and we followed; Mr. Rawlinson asked him if he knew a gentleman's servant; he described the clothes that he wore, he said he did not; he asked him if he knew a person of the name of Dench, he denied any knowledge at all of that name.

Q. Had you any search warrant. - A. Collingburn had the search warrant. I asked Thompson myself generally whether he had any transaction with any gentleman's servant about any plate, he said he had not; I desired my brother officer to shew the search warrant, then I proceeded to search Thompson, in his left hand coat pocket I found wrapped up in paper these five tea spoons (producing them); I observed the crest rubbed out; I asked him how that came, and what he would say to having these in his pocket; he said as the damned villain has betrayed poor Thompson, I will tell all I know about it. I then asked him how the crest became obliterated, he said they were in the same manner then as when the young fellow had left them with him; he said he had left the spoons with him for five shillings that he owed him for dressing and shaving him. He begged to tell all he knew. I told him it was useless, the young man was in custody; upon a duplicate being found by my brother officer in his wife's pocket, he said that he had no more transaction with the young man; he had lent him a basket; that he had no transaction with the plate; the spoons and the duplicate of the ladle were all that he had, they were left him for five shillings. (The spoons produced)

Q. What are these spoons worth, are they worth three or four shillings. - A. They are worth a great deal more than that, there are five of them. On that day we took Thompson and his wife in custody, his wife directed us to go back to the house, and we should find the cloth; we found it on the ground in the middle of the room; she said that was the cloth that he brought the plate to their house in.

WILLIAM COLLINGBURN . - Mr. Pooley. You are one of the officers of Union-street. - A. I am; I went with the last witness to Thompson's house; I was present, and heard every thing that was said by Thompson. I know no more than what Lloyd has stated. I produce the duplicate I found in Thompson's wife's pocket.

NICHOLAS MORRITT . - Mr. Pooley. Look at that duplicate, does it refer to that soup ladle you have in your hand. - A. Yes, it was pledged by Thompson's wife. I produce the ladle.

Q. What are these spoons and the ladle worth. - A. About a guinea.

Q. (to prosecutor) Look at that ladle, is that yours. - A. I have lost two ladles precisely like this, but the crest is obliterated.

Court. Was the crest obliterated while it was in your possession. - A. No. I have great reason to believe it is mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. But you do not mean to swear positively that it is yours. - A. I certainly cannot swear positively.

Court. What is the mark that is left. - A. The work that the crest stands upon, that is so upon all my plate.

ANN HARDEST . - Mr. Pooley. You I believe live cook with major Harriot. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner Singleton at any time live there while you was there. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the other prisoner, do you know him. - A. Yes, he came to visit Dench while he was living with major Harriot, he stopped there about a quarter of an hour and cut my hair; I am sure he is the man.

Singleton left his defence to his counsel called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Thompson's Defence. I will speak the truth and nothing but the truth. He came to my shop on Friday the 29th of May, between twelve and one at noon; I had not seen him then for better than five weeks; I have cut his hair but four times; when he came in the shop, I sat the chair for him, he said he did not want any thing, he only wanted to speak to me; I went out with him; going along he asked me if I had any money in my pocket, I said, I have six-pence, that will do he says; we went into a public house, he said he had some plate, he opened it, I would not look at it; when I went out of the public house, he followed me into my shop. I was sent for to a gentleman, when I returned I found he had opened the plate to my wife, and Mrs. Mesbin; I saw the plate was broke and disfigured: he wanted me to go to a jew and sell the plate; I would not go, nor would I pawn it; I told him the pawnbroker knew me very well, and would not take it in. After that I met a jew passing my shop, I told him there was a gentleman's servant had got some plate, he said he would buy it. Then he wanted me to go to speak to the jew or my wife; my wife would not, nor would I; then he took it himself. These five tea spoons in the flurry he was in were put on the bureau; the plate he took out in my basket, and sold to a jew for two guineas, and he left the spoons.

SINGLETON, alias DENCH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-2

428. MARY ANN SELMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , a coat, value 4 s. four cups, value 4 d. two saucers, value 1 d. and one am jug, value 1 d. the property of William Elder .

WILLIAM ELDER . I live in Long alley , I am a watchman . On Monday the 25th of May, about a quarter before nine at night, I was going up stairs to get my great coat to go upon the watch with; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs, and part of a half peck loaf tumbled down stairs before her; I asked her what business she had upon them stairs, she said that she lodged there; then I went and fetched the landlord to know whether she rented the room or me; the land lord came, he asked her when she paid any rent; she said she did not pay her last week's rent, but she knew what she owed. She had lived in the room, but she had left it in January. I found my coat laying by the side of her on the stairs, she said it belonged to her. I went up to Mr. Ray, and had her taken in custody. The prisoner was drunk. The cups and saucers are broken, they are of no value at all.

Q. Where had you left the coat. - A. In my room; the prisoner was stupid, and insisted that she lived there.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-3

420. RICHARD ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , a box, value 3 s. a silver tea pot, value 7 l. a silver bason, value 4 l. a silver milk pot, value 1 l. two pair of silver salts, value 4 l. four silver table spoons, value 2 l. two gravy spoons, value 1 l. six silver tea spoons, value 1 l. the property of James Harris , in his dwelling house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be the property of James Stonehouse Harris .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

JAMES HARRIS . - Mr. Gleed. What are you by profession. - A. I am a surgeon ; I have resided at the corner of Harpur-street, near Red-lion square .

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar lodge with you. - A. He did, he lodged with me in the years 1800 and 1801. His family consisted of his wife and three sons, two servant maids, and a servant man.

Q. The house that he lodged in belonged to you. - A. It did.

Q. Your daughter was married to Mr. James Stonehouse Harris . - A. Yes, he bore a commission in the army .

Q. Was any thing deposited in your custody by him. A. A box of plate in the year 1800; that was in my custody during the time the prisoner lived in my house. There was a silver tea-pot and other silver articles in the box; my daughter had the key, and I had the box. About nine o'clock one morning in April or May 1802, the prisoner came down; I was in the act of shaving myself, he looked about the room, the cupboard door happened to be open, he saw the box of plate, he asked what it was, he took it down and shook it; I told him to put it back again, and I might tell him it was Mr. Harris's plate. that he had left it under my care while he was gone to the West Indies; I then was sent for into the shop by my young man: it might be ten minutes before I returned again. The prisoner had then taken the box of plate up stairs into his own room. I went up stairs immediately to him, I asked him what he meaned by taking the box; I saw the box in his apartment, it was open, and the plate was on the table. He told me he would put the plate in the box again directly and bring me the box down stairs. I was sent for again into my shop, a person wanted to see me in a hurry; I returned in about five or ten minutes up stairs. The prisoner and the box of plate was gone. After diner I saw the prisoner; I asked him about the plate, he said, my good man, you shall have it in the evening, I was very much distressed about it, he tried to pacify me, but he never brought it; I made frequent applications to him about it; he always refused to communicate where it was. The prisoner at this time kept a carriage. I was not in a very good state of health at the time he lived in my house.

Q. What became of you after this - A. One morning after this he asked me to go with him in his carriage; I went with him to a Mr. Hill, that lives in a lane in Fenchurch-street; the prisoner went into Mr. Hill's; I remained in the carriage alone; he returned to me, he ordered the man to drive to Westminster; when we came to Westminster the coach stopped, he got out of the carriage; I thought he went into the hall, it was some time before he returned; when he returned a man came with him; I asked the man who he was, he told me he was a tipstaff, and that I was his prisoner; I said, your prisoner, for what? I never did any body wrong in my life; says he, that does not signify, be quiet. I said I did not know how to be quiet; Andrews said, my good man be quiet, every thing shall be settled in a little time; well then, says I, I will go with you. I did not know where I was going to. I was left in the King's bench, distressed enough, nobody then knew where I was but Andrews himself and the tipstaff; I was very ill a long while in the King's bench, which brought on me an epilepsy. During the time I was in the King's bench Mrs. Andrews called on me once. I was discharged from the King's bench in 1804, under the insolvent act. About a year after I was discharged I met Mr. Andrews near the Buffalo tavern, Bloomsbury-square; he was talking to a gentleman whom I did not know. I waited till he had done with the gentleman, and then I said how have you done this long while; he asked me to walk into a public-house, I refused. I lived then in Middle Row place.

Q. You did not return to the same house that you had left. - A. No, I did not return to Harpur-street, that house was let, and all the goods were gone. I walked with the prisoner after I had met him at the Buffalo's head, down Gray's Inn lane; I called at Mr. Best's, my butter shop, for him to assist me in taking the prisoner; I wanted him to send to Mr. Harris; the prisoner tried to get away. I laid hold of his coat, I begged the butterman to assist me in keeping the prisoner, I said he had robbed me. The master of the shop did not give me the least assistance, I was in a weak state, there were several people about the door, no one would give me any assistance; the prisoner got away, and I hallooed out stop thief; the prisoner got away, and I did not see him for some time. The next time I saw him I had a letter from a gentleman in the Bank; I went to the public office, there I saw him, and gave in every particular.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Then you mean to say that between the time of your being in the King's bench, and the time you saw the prisoner at the police

office, Queen's square, you never saw him only once. - A. Yes; only once in the bench; then I went to see Mr. Lessoo.

Q. Did you go before any magistrate at that time. - A. No, I was informed it would be of no use.

Q. Do you remember your being arrested at the suit of Mr. Baron, a druggist, before you went to the King's bench. - A. I do; I was surprised at it.

Q. That was before the transaction of the box of plate. - A. Yes, but no great while.

Q. Bail was given to the sheriff for your arrest. - A. I do not know, I was released.

Q. Then you did not at all understand at the time the tipstaff took you to the bench, that that was a surrender of your bail. - A. No.

Q. That we shall hear hereafter. - Then from the time of the box of plate being taken, down to your going to the King's bench, you were daily importuning Mr. Andrews for the box of plate. - A. I was, I wanted to get it myself.

Q. You thought him a most wicked and guilty man. A. I did.

Q. You told him you would not forgive him for that wicked act. - A. Yes, I told him so.

Q. Between the time of his taking the plate, and the time of his putting you in the bench, as you call it, how many times have you dined with him. - A. A few times. I was in hopes of getting the plate.

Q. What with dining and threatening, you were in hopes of getting the plate. - A. I was.

Q. You were so angry with him that you could never write to him that you loved him as a son. - A. No.

Q. Look at that letter, is that your hand writing. - A. It is. (The letter read.)

Addressed to MR. ANDREWS.

MAY 27, 1802

"Dear friend.

"I am positively assured part of the goods are sold, but without your knowledge; I love you as my son, and I believe you have affection for me as a father. Out of the notes accepted by me I had thirty pounds; that will not qualify this business, nor any other. If the goods are sold, it is but right I should know it - and it appears some are sold - if with your sanction, I hope I shall be out by Saturday.

"Yours, sincerely, J. HARRIS."

Q. Now sir, upon your being arrested about the time this plate was taken, you were not short of cash. - A. I was

Q. Being short of cash, I dare say it never occurred to you of pawning this plate to make a little money. - A. No, I never did do such a thing.

Q. To be sure it was your daughter's, it would be an awkward thing; have not you never told any body that you was sorry that you pawned the plate. - A. No, I never did.

Q. Just now that was true, that you never wrote that letter - did you never say that you was sorry for it, and that you consented to it - A. Do not ask me them questions, because I speak the truth.

JAMES STONEHOUSE HARRIS . - Mr. Gleed. You are the son in-law of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of your going abroad to the West Indies, was any thing deposited with your father-in-law. - A. Yes, a box containing plate, a silver tea pot and other articles.

Q. At what time did you leave England. - A. On the 20th of February 1802; I returned in June 1803.

Q. Have you seen the plate. - A. It is at home; I did not think it necessary to bring the plate, as Mrs. Harris is detained at home; she is not able to come to identify it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-4

430. CHARLES BARNARD was indicted for that he on the 25th of March was servant to Edward Fawkes , junior, and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of eighty four pounds for his master, and that he afterwards did embezzle six pounds six shillings, being part of the said sum .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

EDWARD FAWKES , junior. Q. I believe the prisoner has been in your service. - A. Yes, he came into my service on the 21st of January last, I hired him for a few weeks; he had sold horses for me before. In the month of March, I told him to sell me a horse, the price of the horse was eighty guineas; he came to me two days after, he told me that he could not get eighty guineas for it, but that lord Craven's groom would give seventy-four. I told him that I had so many horses that I must get rid of them, he must take the seventy four guineas; he came to me in the evening and said he had sold the horse, and gave me the seventy four guineas in bank notes and cash.

Court. Had you authorised him to take the money. - A. Yes, I had authorised him to sell the horse, and likewise to receive the money. I spoke to him on account of his bringing the money in that way; I said to him where is the check; he then said that lord Craven's groom had some other drafts, and he had changed the money; I then said to him there must be some rascality in this business, and I would let lord Craven know. He then said if I did, I should ruin him and lord Craven's groom to; he also said, in an impertinent way, I will never sell a horse for you again; he said all servants must live. I immediately said have not you wages, he replied a man must get something for selling a horse, these things are always happening, we must live in this sort of way, a man cannot live upon his wages, it is a regular way.

JAMES PENTFORD . Q. You are groom to lord Craven. - A. I was in March last.

Q. The prisoner brought a horse to sell. - A. He did.

Q. Whose horse did he tell you it was. - A. Mr Fawkes's.

Q. At what price did he offer you that horse for lord Craven. - A. Eighty guineas. I informed my lord Craven of it, he agreed to give eighty guineas for it I paid the prisoner eighty four pounds for the house; he gave me a receipt for it.

Q. Is that the receipt. - A. It is (read in court). I received two checks of my lord Craven; I received the money at the bankers, and out of that money I paid the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You say that you paid eighty four pounds. - A. I did.

Q. Had you no money from him. - A. Yes, I had three guineas and a half, he made me a present of it.

Q. Did not you refuse to give him eighty guineas for

the horse. - A. I asked him to take seventy five guineas, and he refused it.

Q. Do you mean to say that you had no part out of that eighty four pounds. - A. I had no part of the eighty four pounds; he gave it me as a present out of his pocket.

Q. Upon your oath was it not your bargain to pay seventy four pounds for the horse, and to divide the sum of six guineas between each of you. - A. No.

LORD CRAVEN - Mr. Gurney. I believe the last witness was your groom. - A. He was.

Q. Did your lordship give him a check for eighty guineas for the price of this horse. - A. I did.

Q. Did your lordship receive that receipt for the money. - A. I did, afterwards.

CHARLES LETLY . Q. I believe you are valet to lord Craven. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember shortly after his lordship having purchased this horse, the prisoner called at lord Craven's house. - A. Yes; the prisoner rode up to me one morning, just after I had let his lordship out; he asked me if his lordship was at home, I said no, sir, he is just gone out; he said he wished to speak to him concerning a horse he had sold to his groom Pentford; I suppose, says he, you have heard the story; no, I said, I know nothing at all about it; says he it is concerning a horse that I sold to his groom Pentford, and I find the man is like to lose his situation; he said, I certainly sold the horse for more than what I might have taken for him, but Pentford is not to blame, he had nothing to do in it, and I should be very sorry if the man lost his situation through it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-5

431. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the time for which he was ordered to be transported .

RICHARD BETHEL LLOYD . I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction at the Surrey assizes; I received it of Mr. Knapp, clerk of the Surrey assizes. (The certificate read.)

Q. Were you at the last assizes at Kingston. - A. I was; I was present at the trial when he was convicted at Kingston; I apprehended him and prosecuted him; the prisoner is the same person. On the 4th of April last, at the request of the goaler, I delivered him with others on board the hulk Retribution, captain Read, at Woolwich, for which I took a receipt for him.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am a constable of the police office, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel. On Sunday the 14th of June last, in company with my brother officer that is here, I went to No. 19, Roberts's-place, near the Commercial Road, Mile End Old Town, Middlesex . In consequence of a man being up the chimney when we took a prisoner the day before, I searched the front room in the first pair of stairs; I could not find him there. I then went into the back room, and underneath the bedstead I found him crawled up, under the head of the bedstead on the boards. I then called to my brother officer, I said here he is. I turned up the bedstead, and asked him what he came there for; he said he came to dine with a gentleman in the front room. What! I said, you come to dine with Finch; he said he did.

Q. Had you known him before. - A. No.

EDWARD SMITH . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I was in company with Griffiths; I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoner.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-6

432. GEORGE FINCH was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN SUTER . I am servant to Mr. Newman. When this man was ordered to be transported, I delivered him on board the hulk at Woolwich; I delivered him among some others on the 17th of June 1805.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . On the 14th of last June I received information where the prisoner was. I found the prisoner, in company with my brother officers, at No. 19, Robert's-place, Commercial Road ; we fixed one man at the back of the house, and one in the front. Smith and I agreed to go up stairs to him; we got up a few steps on the stairs, the prisoner opened the door, and fired on me immediately.

Q. That has nothing to do with this business - did you take him. - A. We took him there, he jumped out of the window, I knocked him down, and we secured him.

Q. Do you know any thing of him being tried for any offence. - A. No.

EDWARD SMITH . I produce the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner. I got it of Mr. Shelton. I saw him sign it. (The certificate read.)

Q. (to Suter) Were you present at the trial of the prisoner. - A. I was not

Q. Do you know who were. - A. The clerk of the papers is here; I do not know whether he was present at the time or not.

Q. Do you remember when he first came to Newgate. - A. I cannot recollect from my own knowledge, without I look over the books.

Q. On the 17th of June you put him on board the hulks. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was he in Newgate. - A. He was some time under sentence of death; he was respited.

Q. Did he go by the same name as he does now, at the time he was in Newgate. - A Yes, the same name.

Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner say any thing about a former conviction. - A. No, I cannot say that I did.

Q. (to Smith) Did you ever hear him say any thing about a former conviction. - A. In bringing him to the goal, he said he knew he should be hung, and that made him so desperate. I asked him how he came to fire at us; he said that was the reason.

Q. He did not say what he was convicted for. - A. No, he did not.

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY . Q. Do you know any thing of this man being brought here. - A. I do; I do not recollect the day, it was for a burglary.

Q. Do you know where it was. - A. It was somewhere down in the country, at Chelsea, I believe; I was here while he received sentence at the bar.

Q. Do you remember when he was brought into your custody. - A. Sometime previous to April sessions 1805; he received sentence of death, in April sessions 1805.

Q. Was these any other man received sentence of death that sessions of the name of George Finch . - A. No, he had a brother tried of the name of William or Thomas Finch .

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-7

432. JOHN LOCK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Keene , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 6th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, seventy pounds weight of lead, value 1 l. his property ; and WILLIAM LAWLER for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

GEORGE KEENE . I live in the Horse and Groom-yard, Westminister .

Q. Do you keep a house there. - A. Yes, I am a hay and straw salesman .

Q. Do you know the prisoner John Lock . - A. Yes, I took him in my service in the beginning of June; after that I missed about a hundred and a half weight of lead from the washhouse, in the premises in the Horse and Groom-yard. I had been building a house there.

Q. You did not reside there at the time. - A. I did not; we found the prisoner at the Union public house; we charged him with stealing the lead, he said he knew nothing about it. He went about a quarter of a mile with us, towards Tothill Fields bridewell; he said he had stolen the lead, and if I would try to mitigate his punishment, he would tell me where he had sold the lead. I told him I would.

Q. Then you must not tell me - did you find your lead. - A. I found it in the possession of Lawler.

Q. You did not know of any possession in the prisoner, except what the prisoner said himself. - A. No.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-8

433. JUDITH LAWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , twenty six yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of Joseph Craig , in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

ROBERT ROBERTS . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am employed by Mr. Joseph Craig , 316, Holborn . On the 24th of June in the evening, I saw the prisoner come into the shop.

Q. Are you the person she spoke to when she came in the shop. - A. No, when I saw her come in the shop, I went into the passage, where I had an opportunity of seeing her; she took this piece of printed cotton from off the counter; she looked round, and then slipped it under her apron; she then said to the young man she would call on the following day, and she walked out of the shop. I told William Roberts what I saw; he followed her, and brought her back; when she came into the shop she made a turn sideways, and dropped the cotton from her; she moved her foot, and said there it is.

Q. Are you sure that you saw it drop from her. - A. Yes, I did.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . - Mr. Alley. In consequence of something that boy said to you did you pursue the prisoner. - A. I did, I stopped her and asked her what she had got, she answered I have got nothing of yours; I took her by the right arm into the shop; she disengaged herself, turned her side to the counter, and dropped the print. I saw her drop it from under her apron.

JAMES HODGES . I am a constable. On the 24th of June, between six and seven in the evening I went to Mr. Craig's; the prisoner and the print was deliver-to me.

(The property produced and identified).

Q. (to William Roberts ) What may be the value of that print. - A. About forty-five shillings; that is the prime cost.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was a coming out of the shop door, there was a good deal of cotton about the door, I kicked it out of my way with my foot; I never laid my hand upon it.

Q. (to Robert Roberts) Was that cotton out at the door. - A. No.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-9

434. MARY KNOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 26 s. the property of Facon Bullen Bland , privately in his shop .

FACON BULLEN BLAND . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury square , I am a linen draper . I can only speak to the property.

- . I live in Crown-street, I am servant to Mr. Taylor, a linen draper. On the 19th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, and bought half a shawl; a woman came in and said that she had a piece of cotton in her apron, that she supposed was stolen; I took the prisoner to Mr. Bland's, and there I delivered the prisoner to Ray the officer, and the cotton also.

GEORGE ATKINSON . I live with Mr. Bland. On Friday evening the 19th of June, about six o'clock, the prisoner came in and asked the price of some handkerchiefs that were at the door, I told her; she went away without buying any thing; about a quarter of an hour after we missed this print. It was placed in the shop by the door.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this cotton in Sun-street, of a woman as I was going along.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-10

435. HANNAH GORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , two pair of boots, value 6 s. two pair of shoes, value 12 s. five napkins, value 5 s. two pillow cases, value 5 s. six handkerchiefs, value 6 s. and one key, value 2 s. the property of Richard Willis .

The case was stated by Mr. Myers.

RICHARD WILLIS . I am a boot maker , I live in Fish-street Hill . The prisoner was a wet nurse in the family. In consequence of some suspicions, I told the prisoner her box must be searched, she answered she was very willing for her box to be searched, she had nothing in it but her own; the prisoner opened the box in the presence of the constable and myself; the box was at the top of the house in the nursery. In her box was found all the articles in the indictment.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence, This key they found in my possession; I accidently lost the key of my box, my mistress gave me two keys off a bunch of keys, to see if they would fit the lock of my box; one of them opened the box, and the other I threw in my box; these napkins were for the use of the child, I frequently put them in the box. The half boots his eldest child brought me up in her hands. I believe she is about two years old. The women's shoes I know nothing of, they were not there when the constable opened the box. I was taken to the counter. On the next morning I heard they had found some women's shoes; I said I know nothing of shoes, nor were they found at the time when they opened my box.

Q. (to prosecutor) Is that so. - A. The constable found the shoes when he searched her box; they were wrapped up in a flannel petticoat.

HENRY GILL . I am a constable. The shoes were in her box, and they were taken out in her presence, with the other articles.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-11

436. JAMES HARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , fifty pieces of muslin, value 40 l. and three shawls, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of William Littler , and ELIZABETH SIDEBOTHAM , for feloniously receiving on the same day, three shawls, value 3 l. 3 s. and one piece of muslin, value 1 l. being part of the same goods, she knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM LITTLER . I am a calico printer , I live at Waltham-abbey, Essex ; my calico ground is there, and my shop for printing. On the 16th of May, about five in the morning I went to my shop, I found my shop door and my loft door had been forced open; we leave off work at six, I go round all the premises at night. At eight o'clock in the evening of the 15th I saw them safe.

Q. On account of this discovery, how much of your property did you miss. - A. I could not tell that morning, they had pulled the pieces about in every place. When I came to calculate I found there were fifty pieces missing; I had four or five hundred pieces. The fifty pieces that I missed were all shawls, or for shawls; some of them were white, but they were chiefly printed. I knew that the quantity of goods that I had been robbed of must have been taken away in a cart. I sent my workmen about the neighbourhood to make enquiries, and on the evening of the 16th I saw part of my goods at Worship-street. I saw six seven quarter-shawls, and a single six-quarter square of muslin, that I know to be mine by the pattern, and one piece that had not been printed; twelve yards with the excise officers marks tore off; it was brought with it to the office.

Q. Have you ever found any other part of the goods that have been missing. - A. Not any.

THOMAS LITTLER . Q. Are you partner with your brother. - A. No, I live at Waltham Abbey. After we found that the pieces were stolen, I went to the office in town; Ray and Mason went with us to the house of Mrs. Bovine in Bethnall Green; we there found a cart that had been to Waltham Abbey, that had been hired by a person of the name of Welch; in consequence of what Welch said, we went to the prisoner Sidebotham's house, No. 3, New-street, St. Andrew's-hill ; we saw her and the goods that my brother has mentioned, was on a table in her house. Mrs. Sidebotham was in the back room, and there we took the prisoner Harman from under the bed.

Q. Did you tell her what you came for. - A. The officers said they came after Harman for a bastard child.

Q. Was Mrs. Harman in sight then. - A. No, they said it to the people of the house; when we saw Mrs. Sidebotham, she wanted us to go out of the room. Ray the officer objected to that, he said he thought that somebody else was there; after some little time the prisoner Harman came from under the bed; we took him to a coach, and took her in custody too. Then we went to No. 2, Ireland-yard, to Harman's lodging, where we found these implements.

Q. When you saw these goods upon the table, did you know them to be your brother's goods. - A. Yes.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship-street. In consequence of the prosecutor applying to our office that he had been robbed, we went in search of a cart, upon which name, number, and the street were inserted. I found that cart in Castle-street, Bethnall Green, at one Mrs. Bovine's; from information that we received there, we went to Mrs. Sidebotham's, No. 3, New-street, St. Andrew's-hill; I found her there, she said it was her house. The front door of the house was open, I asked a girl that was there if Mrs. Sidebotham was at home, she said yes; I found Mrs. Sidebotham in the back parlour, which is made a bed room; the door was locked; I went into the back yard, leaving Mr. Clark the marshalman, and Mr. Nicholls at that door; the back window sash was up, the curtains were down; I moved the curtains and searched the bed furniture; I observed Mrs. Sidebottham dressing herself; in about three or four minutes she had put on her clothes; she then opened the room door; the moment she came out, I asked her if she had got any man in the house, a girl that was standing by said she did not know; she seemed to be very much flurried; I then immediately says to Mrs. Sidebotham, have you got any man or men in your room, she said yes; there was one, that was the prisoner at the bar; the was then laying upon the boards under the bed, dressed in his boots and every thing. I asked Mrs. Sidebotham if she had any bundle left at her house by any person that day; she said she had, and it was left by the prisoner Harman.

Q. Was the prisoner present. - A. He was not then; she opened her drawer, it was taken out in the presence of Mr. Clark; that was in the front room. She unlocked the drawer and took them out, and produced two or three shawls, which Clark has got in his possession. I had secured the prisoner Harman.

Q. Where was Harman when she shewed this. - A.

We had put him in the coach just by the door; immediately I received information where the prisoner's lodgings was; I went to No. 2, Ireland-yard, at the bottom of St. Andrew's-hill, I found the door locked on the ground floor; I went to Harman, and asked him for the key of his door; I told him where I had been, he delivered this key to me and it opened the door; there I found six pistols, three of them were loaded; there is an hanger; this is a center bit, this center bit will make a hole big enough for any man to put his arm through to unlock any door or draw a bolt; I found two dark lanthorns, about an hundred keys, a phorsphorus bottle; there were several matches laying in the room. I found three crows, they are of different sizes, and a black bag.

Q. Did you find any goods that were stolen in that house. - A. No; all the goods that were found was in Mrs. Sidebotham's house. I went down to Waltham-Abbey, I took these crows and the keys with me; I tried that pick-lock to the shop door where these good were taken from; I opened the lock with this key. I found a mark of this iron crow where they had attempted to break open a place, nearly adjoining to where the goods were taken from; there seemed to be two or three marks where they had tried to wrench the door open.

PETER MASON . I am an officer of Worship-street.

Q. In consequence of information, did you go to Mrs. Sidebotham's with Ray and Clark. - A. I did. The prisoner Harman was brought to me and I took care of him in the coach at the bottom of Creed-lane, with Mrs. Bovine and a man of the name of Welch, whom I had brought from Bethnal-green; I was waiting at the bottom of Creed-lane close to New-street, where they lived Ray brought the prisoner Harman to the coach to me, bid me to take care of him, and delivered him into my custody. I sat with Welch on the fore part of the coach, and Bovine and Harman sat on the hind part of the coach. After Ray had left Harman with me, he went away; in a few minutes he returned back again; he says to Harman, have you got the key of No. 2, Ireland-yard; he said he did not know. Ray said, search him Mason; then he pulled out the key and delivered it. Shortly after that Ray brought the pistols, and these things, and put them into the coach. While Ray was absent I saw something in Harman's hand, which he wanted to conceal under his thigh; after he got out of the coach I found it was two stripes of fag ends of muslin; I produce them; I have kept them ever since. At the public house at the office, he said these thing were his; that was on the Monday following him and Mrs. Sidebotham were together at the public house; she said that he brought them there, and desired her to take care of them. He did not contradict it.

JOHN CLARK . Q. You are a marshal-man. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you get the things from. - A. From Mrs. Sidebotham's house in the front room; she unlocked the drawer from whence I had them. I have kept the things ever since.

SARAH BOVINE . My husband's name is Edward, he is a dyer, he keeps a chaise cart and horse to let out for hire.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Harman. - A. Yes, by coming to our house No. 29. Austin-street, Bethnal-green; I have known him about three weeks before he was taken up; I am quite sure he is the man that had my horse and chaise cart, on the 15th of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; he said he wanted a cart to go for pleasure into the country: he was alone when he had the cart.

Q. What time did he return with your cart. - A. Between nine and ten of the Saturday morning. I did not know where Harman lived; Mr. Welch knew him and recommended him to me.

JOHN MORRIS . I am a publican, I keep the sign of the Green Man. On the 15th of May, about half after eight o'clock, Harman, in company with another man, came to my house; he had a little chaise cart, it was a moon light night; they went away about half past ten.

Q. Do you know who that other man was. - A. I do not. I saw Harman again in Worship-street. I am sure he is the man.

Q. How far is your public house from this shop of Mr. Littler's that was broken open. - A. About three quarters of a mile. When they went away from my house they said they were going to Low Layton.

ELIZABETH GABLE , I live at No. 13, Ireland-yard. On the 16th of May, a little before eight o'clock in the morning, I saw Mrs. Sidebotham and Mr. Harman in her front parlour. No. 2, Ireland-yard; that is the room that Harman lives in, and two other men with him; they were looking over pieces of linen or cotton, there appeared to be a great many; I saw them empty them some from a black bag, such a one as I saw in the officer's hands. Harman and another man was engaged in holding up the pieces. Mrs. Sidebotham and the other men was looking on. Mrs. Sidebotham turned round and observed that I was looking at them; she said something which caused them so move the goods to the furthest part of the parlour; they moved them from my sight; my window was directly opposite to their parlour. I saw Harman go in and out repeatedly that morning. About a quarter before two in the afternoon I saw the goods removed; I saw Harman and one of the other men that were with him in the parlour.

Q. Should you know him if you were to see him. - A. Yes, I have frequently seen him come in and out of that parlour; I saw Mr. Harman come to the street door and look at each way before he came out; he had done so frequently that morning. The other man stood behind him at the parlour door with a large parcel on his shoulder, wrapped in a green baize, and skewered up. Harman went into the parlour and pulled off a pair of old drawers; he took a pair of small pistols, something like these now produced; he put one into each pocket. He then said to the man with the parcel, it is clear, now, now come; the man came out first, and Harman followed him. In the evening I told the officers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You was not examined before the magistrate. - A. I was; I then gave the same account as I gave now.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a married woman, my husband is a lamp lighther.

Q. You were upon very good terms with Mrs. Sidebotham. - A. I never associated with her.

Q. You did not owe her any money. - A. No more than you do; that I will swear positively.

Q. Perhaps you will swear that, according to the law, that you did not owe her any money, but your husband might. - A. He did not.

Q. But there was some money due from your husband to her; although unjustly, I dare say. - A. Yes, a

claim there was; I had paid the money that she called for before to a man that she lived with, on the same day, I borrowed it; and I paid it again into a court of justice.

Court. How much was it. - A. One pound.

Mr. Gurney. And therefore I dare say you owed her a great deal of good will. - A. I owed her no good will.

(The property produced and identified.)

Harman left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

Sidebotham's Defence. Please your worship, I never saw any thing of this gentleman's but the handkerchief; he asked me to let him leave it with me; when the officers asked me if any left a parcel with me, I told him there was this small parcel.

Sidebotham called seven witnesses, who gave her a good character.

HARMAN, GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIDEBOTHAM. GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-12

437. SAMUEL SANDFORD STILL and WILLIAM HITCHEN , were indicted for feloniously forging on the 3d of May , two promissory notes for the payment of five pounds each, with intention to defraud James Page the elder ; and

Second Count, for feloniously forging two other like notes with the same intention; and

Four other Counts for disposing of and putting away like forged notes with the same intention; and

Several other Counts for like offence, to defraud James Page the younger .

The indictment read by Mr. Bolland, and the Case stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES PAGE , junior. - Mr. Bolland Where do you live. - A. No 105, Fenchurch-street, I am at school there.

Q. On the 28th of April did you receive any bill from your father. - A. Yes, about the 28th of April, I took it to Baker's coffee house; I did not see Mr. Still there, and so I took a letter from my father, and left it at No. 6, St. Michael's-alley, Cornhill.

Q. Whose house was it. - A. On the side of the door there was Vaughan, and on the front of the door was Winkley, Brothers, and company; I saw a lady there, and I left the letter with her.

Q. Did you at any other time receive any other bill from your father. - A. Yes; I took the last bill on the 4th or on the 5th of May, to the same house No. 6, St. Michael's-alley; then I saw Mr. Still; he said, is it you that brought this letter up, I said yes; he said he was going to meet one of the partners of the country bank at the Edinburgh Castle, and then he would give me the notes for the bill.

Court. What kind of a bill was it you had from your father - was it a bank of England bill. - A. No, it was a bill drawn upon a person in town.

Mr. Bolland. Did you go to the Edinburgh Castle. - A. Yes, I got there about a quarter past six o'clock; I met Mr. Still there, and a person that called himself Mr. Hitchen. Hitchen told me that he knew my father, and if I mentioned his name to him he would recollect him; he had been to his house. He gave me the bills, and bid me good by; he gave me five pound notes to the amount of one hundred pounds.

Q. Look at these two bills, are these two of the bills so given you on that day. - A. Yes, I know it by this mark on this one, and I tried to imitate it on this.

Q. What is the mark. - A. Crossing the 5. After I had done this, I was afraid I might spoil the bill; I put my finger on it to get the ink off; I sent the bills to my father by the post in a letter, and in about four or five days I received part of them back from my father, and part of them my father brought up to town himself.

Q. What did you do with the bills after you received them from your father the second time. - A. I kept them and looked them up. After I had found the house of Winkley, Brothers, and Co. had stopped payment, I wrote to them to give up my father's bill. I saw neither Mr. Still or Mr. Hitchen afterwards.

Q. How soon after you received the bills from your father, did you learn that they had stopped payment. - A. The next day; in consequence of that I informed my father, and I kept these two bills; and the other bills I delivered to Mr. Humphries.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you received that of Mr. Still - A. Mr. Still wrote that in my presence. I wrote Baker's coffee-house on the back of it, that I might remember where Mr. Still wrote that note. (The note read.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have been speaking of the marks on the note, did you give the account of them marks before the lord mayor. - A. No, I did not recollect them then; but looking over them some time afterwards, I saw the marks I had made. These notes were not produced before the lord mayor; I have kept them in my desk: I brought them here this morning, and gave them to Mr. Humphries.

Court. Were the two marked notes part of those your father sent or which he brought up with him. - A. I do not know; the notes that I received from Hitchen were wafered most of them, and those I received from Still were not wafered; and these two notes form a part of the notes I received from Hitchen. I remember perfectly the one that is marked; I made the mark on or about the 4th of May.

Mr. Knapp. Was that the day that you received them. A. Yes.

Q. Then you mean to say that these two are a part of those you received from Hitchen. - A. Yes.

Q. Will you venture to swear that out of the number that was delivered to you by one and by the other, that these notes might not be part of those you received from Still, as well as part of those you received from Hitchen. A. Yes, I will.

Mr. Alley. I understand you to answer my friend this way - that Mr. Humphries desired you to select the notes that you thought you had received from Hitchen - had you previous to that taken notice of one note from the other. - A. No.

Q. Then why should Mr. Humphries desire you to select those you thought you received from Hitchen. - A. Those that I knew I received from Mr. Hitchen, were all wafered; and these I received from Mr. Still were not.

Q. Had not you said before to Mr. Humphries that you did not distinguish one from the other. - A. I believe I did

Court. When did you recollect that Hitchen's were wafered. - A. I have recollected it all along.

Mr. Alley. Notwithstanding that you said you could not distinguish one from the other. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been able to pitch upon these notes that you received from Hitchen. - A. I believe two days ago; I saw the mark on the notes.

Q. You have told the court that the notes you received from Hitchen were wafered. - A. Not all of them; this note is not wafered. I delivered seventy-five or eighty to Mr. Humphries that were wafered.

JAMES PAGE , Senior. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are the father of the young lad we have examined. - A. I am.

Q. You are a brewer , residing at Swaffham, in Norfolk. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of May did you receive any notes by post in a package. - A. Yes, five-pound bills, to the amount of one hundred pound, purporting to be of the Ipswich and Suffolk bank; on that day I received a letter in the packet; on the next day another letter came from my son. There is one thing necessary for me to correct; though I applied for these bills, I did not apply for any discount; I received the full amount. I did not know at that time whether there was any discount, nor is it considered; the circulation of the bills is looked upon the same of one side as the other.

Q. You had received a prior hundred pound of these bills a few days before from your son. - A. I think on the 30th of April.

Q. Had you done any thing with that second remittance, before you received any letter from your son. - A. I had; on the day I received them, I paid a great many of them bills away.

Q. Look at them two bills, are you able to say whether either of the bills were included in the second remittance. - A. Yes, these that I hold in my hand; I was enabled to know the note the moment I received it in my hand, by the name of Joseph Seaman , a man whom I know very well, being on the back of the bill; I said, why does this man write Mr. Joseph Seaman , when he writes it himself; I noticed the writing at the time, judging whether he wrote it himself. I can positively swear that this is the bill that came in the second remittance.

Q. In consequence of information that you received from your son, did you send back part of the bills that you had received. - A. Yes, I believe to the amount of one hundred pounds about two days afterwards; I afterwards brought up the remainder on the 14th of May, and delivered them to him on the 15th of May.

Mr. Gurney (to jury). Gentleman, the bill that he speaks to, is the bill that the son made the imitation upon.

Q. (to witness) Did you know the prisoner at the bar, Hitchen, was he ever at your house. - A. I know neither of the prisoners at the bar; I never saw them before to the best of my knowledge; Hitchen never was at my house in his life; I have never transacted any business with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. You say you are not acquainted with either of the partners. - A. I am not.

Q. How came you to apply to that house in town. - A. Because of the papers now produced; I have frequently taken their bills in the country, there were a great many about.

Q. Then you had as good opinion of this bank as any other, and you wished your paper to be converted into their paper - A. I had a good opinion of their bank of course.

WILLIAM INNIS . - Mr. Bolland. You are an engraver, living in Little Bell-alley, Coleman-street - do you know the prisoner Mr. Still. - A. I do; about October last I executed four plates for him - a ten pound, a five pound, a one pound, and a day check plate.

Q. What did these plates purport to be. - A. Promissory notes.

Q. Look at these two bills, did you engrave the plate from which this was struck. - A. I originally engraved it, it has been altered since; there is a tree introduced it was originally the Ipswich bank; it is now Ipswich, and Suffolk bank; the five is done in a different manner to what the note was originally done; the alterations are done by another engraver. Mr. Still paid me for engraving that work; he desired me to make a bill out in the name of Ralph, Holden, and Co I suppose I printed off two hundred from each plate altogether.

JOHN KIDGELL . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are an engraver, living in Gracechurch street. - A. I am.

Q. Look at these notes, is any part of the engraving of the plates from which these notes were struck, done by you. - A. Yes, the tree was put in by me; I altered the five, and put it in Suffolk bank by Mr. Still's order. On December 30th was the first alteration that I made; there were several alterations, and I worked off nearly in the whole twelve thousand bills; one's two's and five's. They were delivered at No. 6, Michael's-alley.

Q. Was there any name on the door. - A. Yes, Winkley, Brothers, and Co. were upon the door. I did not deliver the bills myself, I sent them; I have seen Mr. Still there two or three times, and Mr. Vaughan likewise. I waited upon Mr. Still for payment, he paid me part of the bill for the work I have mentioned.

MISS LOUISA SMITH . - Mr. Bolland. Where do you live. - A. In the butter market, Ipswich.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know Mr. Hitchen; the first time I ever saw him was on the 30th of last September; he called at my house respecting hiring a house in Queen-street, St. Nicholas parish, Ipswich.

Q. Was any agreement made between Hitchen and you about that house. - A. Not the first time; he called again in the evening, and then an agreement was made.

Q. What passed between you and Hitchen when he first called - A. He wished to hire the house unfurnished; I did not chose to let the house unfurnished, upon account that we did not agree; he stated that he wanted to hire the house to open a bank.

Q. Did he tell you who were to be the bankers. - A. He did not; he wrote in a memorandum the name of Mr. Haydon and Co.

Mr. Knapp. Have you got that memorandum here. - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Where is that memorandum. - A. I returned it to Mr. Hitchen.

Mr. Bolland. We gave them a notice to produce that memorandum.

MR. CHARLES HUMPHRIES. Q. Did you serve a copy of notice on the prisoners. - A. I served a copy of it yesterday morning to Mr. Hitchen, and another to Mr. Still.

Q. (to Miss Smith) When did Mr. Hitchen call upon you again. - A. I called upon him, in consequence of seeing an advertisement in the Ipswich paper; that was near a month afterwards.

Court. You did not hear any more of him not till a month. - A. No. I agreed for the letting the house on the 30th of September.

Mr. Knapp. That agreement will speak for itself.

Mr. Bolland (to witness). You are not to tell me any thing of that first agreement - did he enter into any further agreement about the house on the 30th of September. - A. No; he entered into that agreement. I let him the house on the 30th of September.

Court. There was no other letting him the house on the 30th of September but by that written paper which you have not got. - A. No other.

Q. Have not you his writing in your pocket of an agreement of letting Hitchen the house. - A. I have (producing it). When I called, I told Mr. Hitchen I called in consequence of seeing different names to the house; he said it was part of the same firm, and he had this agreement ready for me, to take place instead of the other. I gave him possession of the house on the 30th of September; I let him the house at one hundred pounds a-year.

Q. What business did Hitchen carry on in that house. - A. Banking business; there was BANK on the door; I never see any name on the door; I received the rent of Mr. Hitchen sometimes myself; I was very ill the chief of the winter; I did not always go myself. When I have been there I have seen Young and another; he styled himself Tyler. I did not see him transact any business.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Holden. A. I do not.

Q. Do you know of any person living in that house of the name of Saunders. - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I take it for granted that you never went to the banking house except to receive your rent. - A. No.

Q. And the three persons you have described to have seen there, were Young, Tyler, and Hitchen. - A. Yes, I saw no others.

Q. Then for any thing you know to the contrary, there might be other persons carrying on that trade. - A. There might.

Q. You used to give the receipts. - A. I did; the receipts were sometimes written by me and sometimes by my sister.

Q. Of course you can tell your own hand writing, and that of your sister's - whose hand writing is that. A. This is my sister's; Sophia Smith signed by me. (The receipt read.)

THOMAS YOUNG . - Mr. Gurney. Prior to the month of October last what was you. - A. I was servant to a lady; before that I had been eight years in the vote office of the house of commons; I had been servant to the lady for near two years.

Q. About the month of September or October last were you engaged in any employment by either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. No, I believe it was about the 20th of January Mr. Still engaged me for the firm of Holden and company, to go to Ipswich, to pay cash for their notes as they came in; Mr. Still engaged me in London to go to Ipswich.

Q. Did he tell you what business was carried on by Ralph Holden and company. - A. I understood it was a bank from him.

Q. Did he at the time he engaged you tell you the names of the partners in that bank. - A. I do not know that he did.

Q. When did he send you down to Ipswich. - A. A few days after he engaged me; he told me I should find a gentleman there. He directed me to go to the bank.

Q. Did he give you the name of that gentleman. - A. He did not; when I went down to the bank, I found Mr. Hitchen conducting the business of the bank; I delivered to him the letter that I had received from Mr. Still. I commenced business there as clerk on the next day after I arrived, under the directions of Mr. Hitchen.

Q. By what name did you know him at that time. - A. I supposed it was Holden. After I had been there two days, he told me I was under a mistake, his name was not Holden but Hitchen.

Q. How long did you remain there. - A. Between three and four months.

Q. Did you ever receive any directions as clerk in that house to do any thing but from Hitchen while you was there. - A. No.

Q. Were any bills or notes issued while you was there. - A. Yes.

Q. By whom were they signed. - A. I think some were signed by Hitchen.

Q. In what name. - A. Ralph Holden .

Q. Were any issued which were signed by him - first of all look at these two notes - were you daily and hourly seeing Hitchen write. - A. Yes, generally every day.

Q. Were you daily seeing him sign banker's notes. A. No, not daily; I have seen him several times.

Q. Look at these two notes; first of all look at the left hand corner - is there any thing signed by yourself upon it, T. Young. - A. Yes, upon both.

Q. Did you mark any bills as entered before they were signed by any body else. - A. Yes sir, I have.

Q. Upon looking at them notes tell me whether you do or do not believe them to be signed by Hitchen. - A. Certainly sir, the hand writing is very much like it.

Q. Do you believe it is his hand writing. - A. That I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. Now I ask you, and mind what you say, the question is whether you do or do not believe them to be his signature. - A. I believe it be be exactly like Hitchen's signature.

Court. That is not the question.

Mr. Gurney. That is the ground of your belief - I ask you again, whether you do or do not believe them to be his signature. - A. I believe the hand writing to be exactly like it.

Court. You must form a belief one way or the other. A. If your lordship will give me leave I will explain it to you; - since my coming to London, I have been introduced to a person of the name of Ralph Holden ; I saw him sign his name Ralph Holden ; it appeared to be like those signed by Hitchen, so much so that it was impossible for me to describe the difference.

Mr. Gurney. Had you ever seen that person before in your life, before that time. - A. I believe I had.

Q. Where. - A. I believe it was at Ipswich; I believe I had seen him frequently; his face was familiar to me, but I believe I never saw him act in any official capacity.

Q. How long had you been in town before that person was introduced to you as Ralph Holden. - A. I suppose it might be a week or more.

Q. When was it that you come to town. - A. I belive on the 6th of May.

Q. How many examinations before the lord mayor had you attended before that person was introduced to you. - A. I think I had attended two.

Q. Hitchen was in custody part of that time, and Still was in custody all the time. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it that this person was introduced to you. - A. At a public house; I believe they call it the Gentleman and Porter, at the back of Fleet market.

Q. By whom was he introduced to you. - A. By Mr. Arle, a cheesemonger in Fleet market.

Q. Was any other person in company besides you and Arle, and this person calling himself Holden. - A. Yes, Mr. Brant.

Q. Any other person. - A. I do not know of any other person.

Q. How long were you in company with that person when you were at the Gentleman and Porter. - A. About half an hour or more.

Q. Did you expect to see such a person when you was at the Gentleman and Porter. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you expect to meet a person who would sign his name Ralph Holden . - A. No, I did not expect he would sign his name Ralph Holden .

Q. Were these persons, Mr. Brant and Mr. Arle, friends of Mr. Still or Mr. Hitchen. - A. Brant was not a friend of Mr. Still as I know of, nor do I know that he was a friend of Mr. Hitchen. I suppose Arle was a friend of their's, I have heard him mention their names.

Q. Was it an accidental meeting of them and you at this house. - A. I do not think it was.

Q. Did you invite them to meet you or they invite you. - A. I applied to Mr. Humphries for money; he would not give me any, and by Mr. Humphries desire I applied to Mr. Hitchen.

Q. Is that the Mr. Arle that wrote that letter to you. - A. I should suppose it is, I do not know.

Q. Did you receive that letter. - A. Yes.

Q. Now sir, this is another letter; be so good as to tell me whether you received that letter by the post. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. That letter is marked No. 1.

Q. Now, sir, look at that letter No. 2, and tell me whether you received that by post. - A. Yes, the post mark is on it.

Q. Whose hand writing is that, to the best of your knowledge. - A. Mr. Still's, I should suppose.

Q. Look at that No. 3. and tell me is that Mr. Still's hand writing. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. That is not by the post.

Q. Look at that letter No. 4, and tell me whose hand writing you believe that to be. - A. I believe that to be Mr. Holden's.

Court. What, the man that you met with Arle. - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot swear to the hand writing of Hitchen because Holden writes like it; why cannot you swear to the writing of one as well as the other. - A. The hand writing is very different, though the signatures are very similar.

Mr. Gurney. Suppose I had shewed you that letter without the signature, whose hand writing should you have supposed that to be. - A. I should not have supposed it to be Mr. Hitchen's.

Q. Did you ever see that person calling himself Ralph Holden write any thing besides signatures. - A. No.

Q. Do you mean that the body of that letter is unlike Mr. Hitchen's hand writing. - A. I think it is very much unlike it.

Q. Do you believe the body of the letter, No. 4, and the signature, to be done by different persons. - A. By the same person.

Q. You received that letter. - A. I did.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whose hand writing you believe that to be. - A. This is Mr. Hitchen's sir.

Q. This I will put the letter A upon - here is another letter, whose hand writing do you believe that to be. - A. Mr. Hitchen's.

Q. That is No. 5 - take these two bills into your hand again; now attend - supposing these two bills should be presented to your bank, should you or should you not have taken them. - A. No, they are only payable in London. I should have said they were genuine ones, and should have referred them to St. Michael's alley.

Q. Had you ever seen any person write Ralph Holden , besides the prisoner, at the time you were at Ipswich. - A. Never.

Q. While you were there did you seen any other person sign bills but Hitchen. - A. No, sir.

Q. Then if I had presented these bills to you before you had arrived in London, and asked you whose hand writing you believed them to be - whose hand writing should you have said you believed them to be. - A. Mr. Hitchen's.

Q. Did you ever see a Mr. Saunders, a partner of that bank, while you were at Ipswich. - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Did you during the time you was there know of any person that conducted the management of the business besides Hitchen. - A. No, I have heard of them.

Q. I do not ask you what you have heard - have you ever heard it from any body but him. - A. No.

Q. What was the last day that you issued notes on the Ipswich and Suffolk bank. - A. The last day that we paid any was Saturday the 2nd of May; there were none issued after that I know.

Q. Did you do any thing besides issuing of notes. - A. I paid the notes as they came in.

Q. Did you keep the books. - A. Yes, I kept three - a day book, ledger, and cash book.

Q. Did any other person keep the books. - A. Yes, Mr. Hitchen kept the books till he instructed me in keeping them; there were other books, as memorandum books, and a letter book for copying of letters.

Q. Had you any such thing in your banking house as a bill book. - A. There was. I entered into that book such notes as came in, such as Bank of England and country banks; I entered the numbers and the names of of the persons that drew them.

Q. Did you enter the notes as they went out. - A. Yes,

I entered our own notes as they went out in the day book.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is what you call a day book. - A. No.

Q. Did you make any memorandums any other way than on this paper. - A. Certainly, always in the day book; these are my memorandums, I entered them on paper first before I entered them in the book.

Q. Did you know any thing about conducting banking business before you went there. - A. Not the least in the world.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You were not acquainted with the banking business when you went out, but Mr. Hitchen instructed you. - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the clerk previous to your going down. - A. I never saw one.

Q. You were employed by these defendants some months - A. I was.

Q. In the course of the time you was employed, untill two or three days before Mr. Still was taken into custody, was any bill refused payment till within that time. - A. None that were payable at that house. I have paid bills to the amount of several thousands.

Q. Now I ask you, sir, were you ever directed to practise any deceit, or to refuse payment to any bills that were tendered. - A. No, I never saw any thing of the kind; I never saw any thing but what was honourable and fair.

Q. After this stoppage took place in London, had you any small sum in the bank. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Mr. Still or Mr. Hitchen direct you to pay even to the last guinea. - A. Mr. Hitchen did.

Q. Now, sir, Mr. Hitchen was always acting as the manager of the business in the country. - A. When he was there.

Q. Was not he there a great portion of time. - A. Certainly he was.

Q. Do you know Mr. Page. - A. I did not know him till I saw him there.

Q. Do you know whether you have paid any notes of his - A. I do not know.

Q. Have you ever given any bills in exchange to a man of the name of Seaman. - A. I know the name, but the man I do not know. I do not recollect that.

Q. In point of fact, you continued to pay on till the last guinea was expended. - A. Yes.

Q. When was it that Mr. Hitchen left the country, was it before Mr. Still was taken in custody. - A. Yes, a considerable time before that; and during that time I conducted the business as usual; I received remittances to carry on the business.

Q. It frequently happened that he went into the country for receiving of money to assist you in paying the bills when they came in. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. When you first went down to Ipswich, you went with a letter to Messrs Holden and Co. - A. Yes, I enquired at the coach office and they went with me.

Q. You say you was the person that was called upon for entering the notes. - A. Yes.

Q. That was done before they were signed. - A. Sometimes, and sometimes not.

Q. Where not you in the practice of receiving large packages of notes, signed Ralph Holden . - A. Yes.

Q. And since you have been in town, you have seen a person calling himself Ralph Holden . - A. Yes.

Q. You saw that person write Ralph Holden . - A. Yes.

Q. And the name he wrote exactly corresponded with the signature of Ralph Holden on the notes you received from town. - A. Yes.

Q. Is Ralph Holden that you saw at Ipswich, the same person that you saw in town. - A. I believe so; I have seen him frequently somewhere.

Mr. Gurney. Did you ever know him by that name any where before. - A. No.

Q. Have you any other reason to know that is his name than you were told so that night. - A. No.

Q. Before you came from Ipswich, did you know that was his name. - A. No.

Q. Had you ever any reason to know that person' name was Ralph Holden , until Mr. Still was in custody. - A. No.

Q. You were in the habit of receiving notes from London, with the signature of Ralph Holden - A. Yes.

Q. Were they or not notes which had been before issued from Ipswich. - A. No; they had not been entered; sometimes I have received some which had been issued before from our bank.

Q. Bills which you issue and you pay in London were sent down from London to be re-issued. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Hitchen came occasionally, did he. - A. Yes, once or twice.

Q. What time did he stay in London each time. - A. Not more than two or three days.

Q. When he was in London he used to send a good number of notes. - A. Yes.

Q. How long before you stopped payment was it that he came to London. - A. I do not know; he left Ipswich I suppose a month before the notes stopped payment. I do not know that he came to town, he told me where to direct my letters; the first place was Bury, then St. Noets; I directed to him in London, a few day before we stopped payment, at Winkley's and Co.

Q. How long before you stopped payment did you find any difficulty. - A. Several days.

Q. Were you in any difficulty before he left you - A. No; when I saw the difficulty I was fearful; I had always a sufficiency of cash before that to pay.

Q. You say you received directions to pay to the last farthing; how much cash had you then. - A. I had in bank, thirty or forty pounds; there might be more I do not know exactly.

Q. When you found yourself in difficulty, did any of the partners come to the house to support you. - A. No, I wrote to Mr. Hitchen after we stopped payment; I came to London that same evening.

Q. I believe Mr. Newmarsh, an attorney, came for you, and brought you to town. - A. I came to London before that.

Q. And then Mr. Newmarsh brought you to town in custody. - A. Yes.

Q. You was examined before the lord mayor. - A. Yes.

Court. Do you know the place of residence of the person of the name of Ralph Holden . - A. No.

Q. Do you know what name he goes by. - A. Ralph Holden , I suppose.

Q. Do you know it. - A. No.

Q. Do you know it by any other circumstance than being in company with him with Arle, and he signing Ralph Holding . - A. No.

Q. When was the last time you saw him. - A. About a few days ago, I met him in the street; we went to the Cock public house in Cock alley; I did not ask him where he lived, nor did he give any information; this was a long time after I was introduced to him by Arle.

GEORGE GREYSON . - Mr. Bolland. Where do you reside. - A. At Woodbridge.

Q. Do you know the town of Ipswich. - A. I do.

Q. Do you know any thing about a new bank that was set up there a little while ago. - A. I do, to my sorrow.

Q. Who were the partners in that concern. - A. I cannot say, I never saw any of them; I have been to the bank about three times, I only saw Young there, I have never seen Ralph Holden or Saunders at Ipswich. I have made particular enquiries, there is no such persons residing at Ipswich. I have had bills from that bank, and paid them away, and they have returned to me since the stoppage.

MRS. VAUGHAN. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you reside at No. 6, St. Michael's-alley, Cornhill. - A. Yes.

Q. At about Michaelmas last did any person apply to you to take the lower part of the house. - A. Yes, Mr. Still; he said he should want the lower part of the house for a country banking house. He took it of me.

Q. Did he tell you what was the firm of the country bank. - A. No; I gave him possession; he put a brass plate on the door of Winkley, Brothers, and co.

Q. Have you a nephew. - A. Yes; he was a portrait painter.

Q. Did Mr. Still engage him as clerk. - A. Yes, and he acted in that capacity.

Q. Do you ever see any person of the name of Winkley, Brothers, and company. - A. I never did, I saw no one conducting the business but Mr. Still. I always looked upon him as partner to Winkley, Brothers, and company.

THOMAS VAUGHAN . - Mr. Bolland. Where do you live. - A. At No. 9, Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know them both; Mr. Still engaged me as a clerk.

Q. Where was the concern carried on in which he engaged you. - A. No. 6, St Michael's alley, Cornhill.

Q. What concern was it. - A. A kind of agency office for the payment of country notes; to give bank of England notes for Ipswich notes.

Q. Was there any name upon the door of the firm of the house. - A. Yes, upon a large brass plate, there was Winkley, Brothers, and co.

Q. How long did you continue there. - A. I was engaged at the latter end of October last year, and continued there till the 28th of April.

Q. Had any thing happened to that house at the latter end of April. - A. Not that I know of; I had left the house, but I had not left the service. The first that I heard of it was at Oxford.

Q. Did Mr. Still tell you any thing about the difficulty of that house. - A. No.

Q. Have you any idea what quantity of notes there might be in circulation, of your own knowledge, or from Mr. Still. - A. I never had any idea of more than two or three thousand pounds.

Court. During the whole time no more than two or three thousand pounds. - A. Oh, yes, I have paid more than twelve thousand; not more than three thousand in circulation at a time.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me under whose direction you wrote that letter. - A. Mr. Still directed me; all that relates to business was under Mr. Still's direction.

Mr. Gurney. That is No. 1. (the letter read).

Q. Did you leave London on the latter end of April. A. Yes, or the beginning of May.

Q. Look at these notes, I see there is an oak tree. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that originally there. - A. No, it was inserted afterwards; I received the order from Mr. Still. I only considered it done by way of ornament; my instructions were only to get it engraved, I had no drawing for it. There was to be another alteration, but that did not take place.

Q. Upon what business did you go out of town on the latter end of April. - A. Mr. Still had been in expectation of remittances out of the country; being disappointed, he was in want of a sum of money for present use; he asked me if I had any objection to go into the country for the purpose of producing ready money to answer the demands. I went out of town on Tuesday the 28th of April, accompanied by Mary Elizabeth Primrose and Sarah Osborn . Mr. Still told me to go to different shops and to purchase small articles, to lay out as little as I could, and to remit to him the produce of the notes (the money) that I received in change for the notes, and to be home by Saturday or Sunday, and what I bought I was to bring home; he would either keep them himself, or he would dispose of them.

Q. Did he direct you what places to go to. - A. Yes. I was first to go to Cheltenham, then Worcester, and then to Birmingham.

Q. Where did he order you to send the remittance to. - A. Baker's coffee house, to Mr. S. Still. He gave me a parcel of five pound notes, tied up; he told me there was eight hundred pounds. I went to Cheltenham, I did not change many notes there, nor did I change many notes in the whole.

Q. Did the young woman change any notes. - A. Yes.

Q. How much were there distributed among them. - A. I think about an hundred pounds.

Q. From Cheltenham where did you go to. - A. To Tewkesbury, and then to Worcester, and then to Birmingham.

Q. And when you got to Oxford, in consequence of the notes not being paid, you were taken in custody. A. Yes, and there were some notes taken from me at Oxford that I received from Mr. Still.

Q. Did you ever see in this banking affair any body concerned but Hitchen and Still. - A. I never saw Mr Hitchen acting; he gave me orders as an artist, I was not his servant.

Q. Did you keep any account of the money Osborn, you, and Primrose laid out. - A. I kept the bills at the inn, but they were taken from me at Cheltenham.

Mr. Knapp. With respect to Mr. Hitchen, you never saw him act in the business of Winkley and co. - A. No.

Mr. Alley. How long was it altogether they had the house - A. About six months, under the direction of Mr. Still.

Q. I think that you said you paid away more money than twelve thousand pounds. - A. Yes, it must be more than twelve thousand pounds

Q. When you said there might be three thousand pounds out, had not Mr. Still told you that the average circulation was to the amount of three thousand pounds. A. One day Mr. Still stated to me that there might be three thousand pounds out, which he considered as a large sum.

Q. Did he ever say any thing about a clerk of the name of Hayes. - A. I knew a person of the name of Hayes, but I did not know that he was his clerk.

Q. At the time that he sent you into the country, was it not in consequence of Hayes having disposed of two thousand pounds, and not given him any account of it. - A. He was very uneasy.

Mr. Gurney. The question is, whether at the time he sent you into the country, he told you the necessity of it was because Hayes had gone off with the money. - A. Yes.

Q. How long before that had the bank stopped. - A. Three or four days before that it was embarrassed.

Mr. Bolland. What were the article that you were to purchase. - A. I myself purchased but two articles, a quire of paper and a road book, for which I gave five pound notes.

SARAH OSBORNE HESTER . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you had two or three years ago lived as nursery maid with Mrs. Still. - A. Yes.

Q. In month of April last did you go out of town for the purpose of disposing of some notes. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Still give you any directions as to the method of disposing of them. - A. Yes, I was to change them at the shops, and to buy such things as would be suitable for his family. We were with Mr. Vaughan, and we returned to Oxford, where he was stopped.

Q. What sort of shops did you go to. - A. Drapers.

Q. Did he tell you what sort of purchases you were to make as to quantity. - A. As small as possible.

CHARLES NEWMARSH . - Mr. Bolland. I believe, in consequence of some information, you pursued Vaughan and Primrose. - A. Yes, on the 2nd of May I pursued and took them; I found upon them notes to the amount of seven or eight hundred pounds; these are the notes; they are as they delivered them up. (The note read.)

Still's Defence. My lord - I shall trouble you with as few observations as possible, and which I trust will be more than sufficient to explain my conduct to the satisfaction of the court and the jury, with respect to the charge of which I am accused. I have been long in the most respectable connections, my payments having been from 100,000 l. to above 320,000 l. a-year in the mercantile and commission business.

Shortly previous to Christmas 1805, Mr. Hitchen took a counting house of mine for himself and partner, Mr. Roche, where they conducted business as merchants to a very considerable amount; and after they had been some time there, Mr. Hitchen solicited me to take some of their consignments, as they had a greater quantity of goods on hand than their finances would permit them to hold with convenience; to which I consented, and made them the necessary advances, to the amount of 2 or 3000 l.

About the middle of the year 1806, Mr. Hitchen informed me that some differences had arisen between him and his partner, and that he had made up his mind to discontinue his connection with him, and having overtures from a gentleman of the name of Holden, whom he had long known in Liverpool, to join him in the corn and provision trade, and that if they could settle their plan, he would shortly dissolve his copartnership with Roche.

Soon after, I learnt that Mr. Hitchen and Roche had agreed to dissolve their copartnership, and that Mr. Hitchen had joined with Mr. Holden and others in a mercantile concern, which they were about to establish in the country, and I was requested to take their consignments in addition to my other concerns in the same line. I agreed to take them, without thinking it at all necessary to make those enquiries as to Mr. Holden or Saunders that I should have done had it been to trust them.

I received several large lots of cheese into my warehouse in October last, which I sold on their account. I afterwards received heavy consignments of cargoes of oats and other goods; so that I was obliged to transfer some to cornfactors, and which generally left a profit. They afterwards consigned direct to houses on the corn exchange.

After they got established at Ipswich, I received an intimation from Mr. Hitchen that they had it in contemplation to issue their own notes payable on demand in London, similar to country banks, as they found it would materially tend to the advantage of their mercantile concerns; and they at the same time stated that they found a difficulty in prevailing on the London bankers to pay them, as they were to be issued for so small an amount as one pound; and they requested me to take a house for them, which I did in the first instance, and I supposed at that time that one of their own partners would superintend it; but afterwards, for various reasons, I was prevailed upon to become the payer, they promising that I should always have sufficient assets to answer any demand that should be made upon me. I disliked becoming the payer, principally from its being out of my usual business, and materially so, as it would appear to the world that I had two accompting-houses, being obliged to keep my mercantile one in the Borough, and they thought it indispensable that their notes should be paid in the city. This appearance was obviated by my getting my friend Winkley and his brother to allow me to make use of their names before mine in the firm of Winkley, Brothers, and company - determining in all cases and events, and which determination I always abided by, never to raise, or suffer to be raised, any money or credit directly or indirectly by that firm, and never to do any business there but pay the notes of Holden and company - never to accept any bill in that firm, or use any deception or disguise whatever. And on all occasions I directed every one to consider me the principal in it; and in my own mind and conduct, the firm was nothing else than the usual point of note where the holders might apply for their money, and which I considered myself no longer bound to pay than as I received remittances for the purpose. I always acted to the best of my judgment and abilities as the agent of Holden and company, and I exerted myself as much as possible for their interest, which they honourably acknowledge.

knowledge. I received the minutest instructions from their letters in my possession to get their plates engraved; I communicated those instructions to my clerk, Mr. Vaughan, who gave them to the engraver. With respect to Mr. Page's son, it is not true, that I gave him any of Holden and Co's. notes, on or at all near so recent as the 28th of April; nor did he have any of these notes from me which he has sworn to have had. With respect to the last parcel; and his last application, I thought it imprudent at that particular period of Holden and Co's. difficulty to give Page's son of myself notes for his bill; and more so as Mr. Hitchen was himself in town, who knew his own resources best, and who was more confident in raising money for the bank to go on, than I was or could be. - I therefore told the lad, that as one of the partners was in London, he had better meet him with me at the Edinburgh coffee house, at three o'clock that day, Monday the 4th of May, which he did; and Mr. Hitchen gave him notes for his bill, assuring me after the boy was gone, that the bank of Ipswich was paying regularly, which it was; and that he was promised the loan of a thousand pounds the next morning, to enable me to continue their concern in town. However, it was of no avail; because I was taken up the same day, on the idea that I had circulated notes, knowing that Mr. Hitchen had forged Mr. Holden's name to them; and the lord mayor was so impressed with the criminality, that he would not listen to any defence; though Mr. Holden and Mr. Hitchen came into court on my first and second examination, expecting to be called.

In the month of January or February last, Mr. Hayes, who was a very able man to get connections for Messrs Holden and Co. in the West of England, was introduced to me by Mr. Hitchen; and was I requested to send him the notes from London, which I regularly did, till about the 28th of April; when he was more eager for me to send him notes than ever, and less liberal in his remittances in return. I kept paying as far as the 28th of April, he sent me only twenty pounds, and not any since, when I presume the ballance of notes he had obtained exceeded two thousand pound. It unfortunately happened that my remittances were very deficient from other quarters, at the same time. I therefore wrote to Mr. Hitchen to come to London immediately, and meet me on the 30th, and used every exertion I was empowered with, to raise money on their notes and goods in my possession. On the 28th I concluded some accident had happened to Mr. Hayes; I sent my clerk, Vaughan, in the country, with his companions, with notes he had before paid, perhaps four or five times over, and which I never saw, either them or any other signed; conceiving every exertion to be my duty in supporting Holden and Co. I was particularly careful so mark all the notes which were thus given to negotiate, that they in particular should at all events be paid, and even most sanguinely expected every other also would be taken up.

The witness must acknowledge that no representation, much more any misrepresentation was made by me. I particularly desired that if, at any time, any questions were asked them, to tell the truth, and to refer immediately to me, as the principal in the firm of Winkley and Co. I had no motive or inducement whatever, to act with deception or disguise; I had no idea but Holden and Co. were honorably correct in all their transactions. I never saw, nor had I any cause for any suspicion to the contrary; the worst I knew was, they often bought more corn than I thought prudent with safety, to the due payment of their notes; so that I was sometimes obliged to write to their friends for particular exertions in sending me money; though I never did, or had occasion to use extraordinary measures myself, till I saw my empty letter on the 28th; though I had their authority to circulate as occasion required.

I will not tresspass longer on your patience, but beg leave to assure you that my intentions in every thing I have done were perfectly honest, and with the best of motives. Therefore I must rely on your justice; first in believing there was no fraud, and therefore there cannot be any forgery. And secondly, if Mr. Hitchen signed Mr. Holden's name on emergency, he was fully authorised so to do, by a regular power of attorney for that purpose.

Hitchen's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the the jury, I have but little to add after what has been said by Mr. Still. In the month of June in the last year, I agreed to enter into partnership with Mr. Holden and Mr. Sanders, in the corn and provision trade; in which I have been brought up to from my youth, and with the concurrence of my partners I went to Ipswich, and took premises suitable for our business; and having left workmen to do what I considered necessary, I came to London untill they should be completed; Previous to my going down to commence business, my partner and myself waited upon Mr. Still, and requested him to take our consignments, to which he consented. provided the quantity did not exceed his finances for the usual advance. I then returned into the country; and as Mr. Holden who was the senior partner, was only occasionally at Ipswich, I requested to have his letter of attorney, to authorise me to sign his name in his absence, which he accordingly gave me.

After some short time, we considered it would be beneficial to our interests to have small notes payable in London, in the same manner as country merchants and bankers do; and we accordingly applied, as Mr. Still has stated, to several London bankers, to request them to pay our notes, but they declined paying so small notes as one pound. We then requested Mr. Still to pay them; he at first declined, but he afterwards aceeded to our solicitations, upon understanding that he was in no shape to be responsible, and upon condition that his name was not inserted upon the face of the notes. Every thing being thus far settled, we sent Mr. Still's directions to get the plates engraved, sending him at the same time the form; and upon this being completed, we commenced issuing notes on the 5th of November 1806; and from that time untill the begining of May in the present year every note issued by us was duly honored. A great many of the notes thus issued were signed by Mr. Holden; and I have no hesitation in acknowledging that a great many were signed by me, and which I considered I was authorised to do by virtue of the letter of attorney.

It has been asserted, that some fraud must have been intended from my name not appearing upon the face of the notes. This I most solemnly assure you is not the case; the only reason for its suppression, was that between three and four years ago, in consequence of sustaining very heavy losses, I failed in business, and it was apprehended that if my name appeared it would come to

the knowledge of some persons who were acquainted with my former failure, and who might, by mentioning the circumstance, injure the credit of the establishment at Ipswich; but to all those with whom I transacted business, I ingenuously avowed that I was a principal in the firm. This is well known to my clerks, and to every one at Ipswich.

During the time we were in business in Suffolk our dealings were extensive and regular; we had always one or two ships in our employ, and our consignments being very considerable, and requiring larger advances than could be made by Mr. Still, they were made by other gentlemen, who are in attendance, and will prove the regularity of our mercantile transactions with them. - Gentlemen, Mr. Still has truly told you that our failure originated with Hayes; had he acted honestly, not a note of ours would have been unpaid. It was with the utmost astonishment and concern that on my arrival in London on or about the 30th of April, that I for the first time learnt from Mr. Still the conduct of Hayes. Notwithstanding which, we determined if possible to withstand the blow. I sent to Ipswich instructions to pay as far as the last shilling would admit, and used every exertion to raise money to answer the emergency. I had determined to go in the country in search of Hayes, when the apprehension of Mr. Still put an end to all further exertions, as no hopes could be then entertained of retrieving our credit.

Gentlemen, both myself and partners attended before the lord mayor upon Mr. Still's first examination, in order to give evidence on his behalf, which circumstance his lordship perfectly well recollected upon my being afterwards taken into custody. We also attended in the neighbourhood during several subsequent examinations, for the same purpose; I was conscious that I had done nothing intentionally wrong, and I was not therefore anxious to shrink from investigation. I visited Mr. Still several times in prison, but at last, upon one of these occasional visits, I was detained, and examined with Mr. Still before the lord mayor, who committed us for trial. - Gentlemen, I am perfectly aware of the situation I stand in, and the prejudice entertained against me in the minds of the public. - Here I am, gentlemen, on a commitment, standing before you, confident that no prejudice prevails in this honourable court, but that it will do me the honour to give me an impartial hearing. I have done my utmost endeavour to shew you and the court the simple transaction under the agreement of partnership of myself, Holden, and company; and clear am I, had we not met with the losses before stated by Hayes, together with the unfortunate apprehension of Still, we might have carried on the business with honour and advantage to ourselves and families, with accommodation and benefit to individuals, as well as the public at large, to the general good of trade and commerce.

Having said thus much - allow me just to shew the misfortunes that has since attended us, from the losses sustained aforesaid - first, by stating briefly the charges alleged against us, with our simple and candid defence thereto, for the clearer comprehension of you, gentlemen, as to the facts, previous to your verdict, where our lives, and all that is dear to us, is pending.

I stand here indicted for a forgery; perhaps it may have been proved I did utter such notes; and perhaps it may have been partly proved I have written, signed, or endorsed the name of Ralph Holden to such Ipswich bank notes; - should that appear to be so, my lord and gentlemen - is it a forgery for one of the firm of any house to sign bills for the whole - if so, but few mercantile houses are without committing forgeries hourly, as one man usually signs for himself and company.

The next thing - I hold a letter of attorney, authorising me in the name of Ralph Holden , to sign any bill, note, &c. which power, I trust, has been duly stamped in the usual form of such instruments, just and legal. - If this act constitutes a forgery, I have committed it innocently. If it was our misfortune to meet with losses so heavy, as to deprive us of the means of honouring our bills, after so many months establishment, we ought to have been called upon in the usual way at Guild-hall, when we became insolvent, to yield all our property fairly for the benefit of the whole of our bona fide creditors.

Gentlemen, is it not unprecedented to attempt a criminal charge; - under such circumstances I feel myself justified in conceiving it originated in the jealousy of other bankers, and the extravagance of the public prints - and I trust from the evidence this day given on the part of the prosecution, your lordship, and the gentlemen of the jury, will coincide with me in this opinion and that nothing has appeared to constitute forgery or fraud, but what may be completely done away by the evidence hereafter to be produced in my defence. - I therefore crave the indulgence of the court, by no means to form their judgment until the whole of such evidence on my behalf is finished and gone through - leaving my fate to your lordship, the court, and jury, and to my defence hereafter to follow, I bow with submission, waiting most anxiously for the decision, which I doubt not will be an acquittal.

WILLIAM BIRD . - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live. A. No. 1, York-street, Borough.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ralph Holden . - A. Yes; to the best of my recollection I have known him nine months.

Q. Were you present at executing any letter or deed - look at this - were you present at the execution of this. - A. Yes. I was present at the time he signed it in York-street in the Borough.

Q. Was that where the prisoner Hitchen lived. - A. Yes.

Q. Is your hand writing there. - A. Yes.

Q. When was it executed. - A. Somewhere about nine months ago.

Q. Were you present at the execution of any other deed by him at any other time. - A. No.

Q. Have you seen him many times. - A. I have seen him a number of times.

Q. Have you seen him in the presence of Young. A. Yes.

Q. That is the same person that signed the letter of attorney that Young saw. - A. Yes.

Q. When did Young see him. - A. A few days ago.

Q. You are sure that was the same person that signed that instrument. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. What are you - have you a father living. - A. Yes, he is a master carpenter, he lives in York-street in the Borough, just by London bridge, on the right hand side, opposite St. Thomas's hospital.

Q. That place formerly was called Dirty-lane. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it you saw Ralph Holden sign it. -

A. In York-street, in Mr. Still's house.

Q. Has a Mr. Still a house there. - A. He has a sort of a warehouse.

Q. Mr. Hitchen has a house there. - A. Yes, Mr. Still let it to Mr. Hitchen.

Q. It was a bacon warehouse. - A. It was about two years ago.

Q. Mr. Still was a provision merchant. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen Mr. Ralph Holden before you saw him sign that paper. - A. Yes, a great many times.

Q. You told the gentleman who examined you before that you had not known him above nine months. - A. Nine months or a year.

Q. Where had you seen him before. - A. In the house of Mr. Roche; he was a friend of Mr. Gregson.

Q. Who is a man under Mr. Roche, who had an accompting house there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Holden any where besides at Mr. Roche's. - A. Yes, at public houses in St. Saviour's church yard, the Globe, and in the Borough market.

Q. And no where else. - A. No, except meeting him in the streets.

Q. Do you walk the streets a good deal. - A. Yes.

Q. You often met him in the streets. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen him in any other houses besides those you have mentioned. - A. No. I have seen him in company with Mr. Brandt and Mr. Arle.

Q. When did you first know his name was Ralph Holden . - A. About a year or more ago.

Q. Who first told you his name was Ralph Holden . A. Mr. Hitchen called him Mr. Ralph Holden.

Q. They also called him Mr. Ralph Holden when they spoke to him. - A. Yes.

Q. They laid particular stress upon his Christian name, Ralph. - A. No, they did not always call him Ralph but sometimes Mr. Holden.

Q. Do you go to school. - A. I go to school at night.

Q. What time of the day did you see him sign that. A. Between twelve and three o'clock.

Q. Were you called in, or did you go in. - A. I was servant there, I was attending in the accompting house in York-street.

Q. What business was done there. - A. There was no particular business done.

Q. But there was an accompting house. - A. Yes.

Q. And you was to attend there and go of messages. A. Yes.

Q. And so Mr. Ralph Holden and Mr. Hitchen desired you to sign that paper. - A. Mr. Holden signed it first and Mr. Hitchen, and then he desired me to sign it.

Q. Where did Mr. Ralph Holden live. - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you ever hear what business he was in. - A. No, never.

Q. Did you never hear from Mr. Still what business he was in. - A. No.

Q. Was he an old man or a young man. - A. I suppose him about thirty five or forty.

Q. Was he very frequently there. - A. Yes.

Q. He was there almost every day. - A. Sometimes; and sometimes he would be a week or two before he came; he used to stand outside in the yard, and sometimes he would come in, but generally stood on the outside.

Q. How long did he stay outside. - A. Sometimes half an hour, talking to Mr. Gregson, at other times he would not stay above a quarter of an hour, and sometimes he would come and sit in the accompting house. (Warrant of attorney read.)

MARIA TYLER . - Mr. Gleed. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband was clerk to Mr. Hitchen at Ipswich, somewhere about last September.

Q. Is that the banking house you are speaking of, of Ralph Holden and company. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ralph Holden. - A. Yes, I have seen him three or four times at the bank. Queen-street, Ipswich; I saw him writing in the parlour opposite of the bank, on the left hand side going into the house.

Q. You saw him in the act of writing, you mean opposite the room where the banking business was transacted. - A. Yes, in the same house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. At what time did your husband go to live at Ipswich. - A. He went, I think, on the 23d of September; I followed him a month or five weeks afterwards, and when I got down I found him at the bank acting as clerk there.

Q. That would carry you to the end of October nearly. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Young. - A. I never saw him before I came to London; my husband left Mr. Hitchen at Ipswich some time after Christmas. I do not recollect exactly.

Q. When your husband was at Ipswich, did you reside with him at the bank. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Holden live at Ipswich. - A. I believe at London, I never asked him; I never heard him say where, nor did I ask him the question.

Q. Do you know a gentleman of the name of Saunders. - A. I understood from my husband that he was travelling for the concern.

Q. Where did you go to live after you went from Ipswich. - A. I went to Norwich.

Q. At what period did your husband come into Broad-street. - A. a never knew that he lived in Broad street; since I have been his wife he never did.

Q. Was there never a house opened in Broad-street under the firm of Tyler and company, which your husband professed to be the master of. - A. No.

Q. That you will swear. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you understand Mr. Holden to be. - A. I understood him to be a banker; I saw him there three or four times; the first time he was there four days; that was a short time after I was down there, I cannot recollect the day of the month, I think I left London in the beginning of September.

Q. You told me that it was five weeks after your husband went that you left London, and we both agreed that it was late in October; now I shall ask you no more questions.

HENRY DALE . - Mr. Knapp. I travel for the house of Hawkins and co. for orders.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ralph Holden . - A. I do; my first knowledge of him was about four years since. I saw him first in Liverpool; he was occasionally coming into the different hotels where I was in the habit of going.

Q. Did you ever see him at Ipswich. - A. I did; I

I left London on the 4th of September; on my arrival in Ipswich, having occasion to disburse a dividend there, I changed a five pound bank note; I received a two pound bank of England note, and a two pound note in change, with the name of Holden upon it; I knowing the name of Holden, I went down to the bank to see him; the first day I waited upon Mr. Holden, I saw him twice; I received from his hands small notes, ones and fives, and in return I gave him a forty pound bank note.

Q. Look at these notes, and tell me whether they are the sort of notes that you received for the forty pound bank note. - A. I do not think they are; there seems to be an addition; I received three notes drawn upon Winkley and Co. Michael's alley, Cornhill; I knew Mr. Holden as soon as I saw him, I saw him twice or three times there; on the ensung day I saw him at the Griffin inn, and twice before dinner in the bank transacting business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. What house do you travel for. - A. Hawkins, Law, and Co. in the Borough.

Q. You knew Ralph Holden three or four years ago in Liverpool - what was he then. - A. He was then a glass manufacturer; I understood him so.

Q. How long is that ago. - A. I cannot say exactly, nearly four years since; I had not seen him from that time till I pursued this journey.

Q. Then at your arrival at Ipswich, you found your friend Holden, whom you had seen at Liverpool nearly four years ago, quite across the country, at Ipswich. - A. Yes.

Q. As soon as you saw the note, you knew it to be the same man, and you went to pay your respects to him. - A. I went to see whether it was him or no.

Q. You took him to be a respectable banker, living at Ipswich. - A. No, I think he told me he lived in London.

Q. What trade did he carry on in London. - A. I did not ask him.

Q. Nor did he tell you - have you seen him lately. - A. I saw him on Monday last.

Q. Were you subpoenaed here. - A. No, nor did I know this trial would come on.

Q. Did you know Hitchen. - A. Yes, three or four years ago I saw him at Liverpool. I never was acquainted with him; and Mr. Still I never was at all acquainted with him; I knew there was such a person, but I never had any transaction with him.

SOPHIA LOWMAN . - Mr. Alley. You lived servant with Mr. Hitchen. - A. Yes, at York-street, in the Borough; I lived with him nine months.

Q. During the time that you lived with him, did you know a person of the name of Ralph Holden . - A. I knew Mr. Holden; when my master was in town; I have heard him called Ralph Holden .

Q. By whom have you heard him called Ralph Holden . - A. I understood from Mr. Hitchen that his name was Ralph Holden . I have heard Mr. Hitchen in conversation with him about business, but not hear particularly what they said.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. When did you first go to live with Hitchen. - A. Last October the 15th. I left him the 23d of last month.

Q. How many times did you see Mr. Holden there. - A. I have seen him several times; I cannot name the times.

Q. You can give a guess. - A. I may have seen him half a dozen times.

Q. Did he dine with your master. - A. I do not remember his dining there; I remember his coming after he had dined, and during that time they have been conversing about business.

Q. Where did Mr. Holden live. - A. I cannot say, I never heard where he lived.

JAMES ELLIS . - Mr. Curwood. Where do you live. - A. I live in Hunston, in Suffolk, some miles off Ipswich.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hitchen. - A. I do, I saw him frequently at Ipswich.

Q. Did you understand from him that he was one of the principals in the firm of Holden and Co. bankers. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he state to you at any time, under what authority he signed bills there. - A. Yes, by letter of attorney, he shewed it me.

Q. Look at that one, and tell me whether that was the one that he shewed you. - A. It is.

Court. When was that conversation that he shewed it you. - A. About the 28th of February.

Q. What are you. - A. A corn and seed merchant.

Mr. Gurney. Did you ever know from any other person that he was a partner in that firm. - A. I did not.

THOMAS LIVELING LAWRENCE . I live at Stanground, near Peterborough.

Q. Did you at any time live in Ipswich. - A. Yes, I lived there as clerk to Mr. Ralph Holden and Co's. bank till the 17th of February; I was in the employ of Ralph Holden from the 17th of February till the stoppage of the bank. I saw Mr. Ralph Holden at St. Noets, in Huntingdon, on the 23d of April; I was his clerk there; they had a branch of their bank there; I have seen Mr. Hitchen and Mr. Holden there, transacting business together, and signing cash notes. I have seen Mr. Holden sign as many notes as to the amount of twenty five hundred pounds.

Still called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hitchen called no witnesses to character.

BOTH NOT - GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-13

438. SAMUEL STILL , and WILLIAM HITCHEN , were indicted for feloniously forging on the 24th of April , two promissory notes, for the payment of 5 l. each, with intention to defraud Thomas Vaughan .

Second count for like offence, with like intention, and

Two other counts for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, two like forged notes, knowing them to be forged, with like intention, and

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, they were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-14

439. MARTHA BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 23d of May , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. the property of George Martin .

GEORGE MARTIN . I keep the sign of the Sun and Sportsman, High-street, Marybone ; I sent the pots out to general Johnson, Beaumont-street ; on the next morning I saw these two quart pots and a pint pot on the rails of general Johnson's house, close to the door; I desired the man to go for them. I saw them on the 26th at Hatton Garden, and the prisoner was in custody.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am one of the officers of Hatton Garden. On the 23d of May I was in Mrs. Hill's old iron shop, Golden-lane. White, Trott, and I was searching the house for some glass; the prisoner came into the shop, I took her into the back room, I found a quart pot in her apron, and Trott took the other quart pot out of her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-15

440. SARAH SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , two coats, value 14 s. the property of Robert Stone .

ROBERT STONE . I live at No. 5, Garden-row, Old street road , I am a plaisterer . The prisoner and her husband lodged in my house; I missed the articles out of a box that was in my sleeping room.

JOHN RAY . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I searched the prisoner, but found nothing leading to the property that was stolen; I told her I should take her to the pawnbrokers where the articles were in pledge; she immediately seemed to be sorry for what she had done; she said she only took them for a little while, she meant to bring them back again, and her husband knew nothing at all about it; she said she had burnt the ticket.

THOMAS SOUTHWORTH . I am servant to Mr. Francis, pawnbroker in Shoreditch. On June the 14th the prisoner pawned two coats with me for fourteen shillings.

(The property produced and identified).

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to defraud him of his property; I meant to replace them.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-16

441. MARY SCARROT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of June , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Bacon .

SAMUEL BACON . I live in Wheeler-street, Spital Fields , I keep the sign of the Jolly Weavers . From information of a young woman, that the prisoner had taken a pot of mine, I took her to the other end of the tap room, where there were some men drinking. I asked them to feel outside of her clothes; they did, they said it was a quart pot. I went and fetched an officer.

JOHN JACKSON . I was drinking along with two or three of my friends; Bacon brought the prisoner to me. I put my hand against her pocket; I found the bulk of a quart pot in her pocket. While Bacon was gone for the officer she pulled it out of her pocket; I asked her how she came to put the pot in her pocket; she said she believed the devil put it her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-17

442. JOHN PITTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , privily from the person of William Braizer , a tobacco box, value 1 d. thirteen-shillings and three sixpences, his property .

WILLIAM BRAZIER . Q. Did you meet with the prisoner any time in the course of last month. - A. Yes, last Thursday I was sitting at the door of the sign of the Windmill at Turnham Green; John Pitts and two other young men came up together; the prisoner asked me to give him some beer, and one of the other young men asked me to give him some beer, they both told me they had no money; Pitts said when they got to Brentford, they should have some money, and they would return me the beer again; knowing the prisoner I called for half a gallon of beer; I said I was going on to Brentford, they might ride if they would along with me; we then went on as far as the Castle Inn, in Brentford; I called for a pot of beer, we sat in the cart and drank it. We went on to Richard Cockson 's, the Half Moon and Seven Stars, he was sitting at the door, I owed him a trifle, I told him to bring out the bottle of gin, we would have a glass of gin a-piece, and I would pay him; we had a glass of gin a-piece; I changed a two pound note, he gave me a one pound note, eighteen shillings and some halfpence; we went over Bentford bridge, and Pitts that I was acquainted with, I did not know the other men, he said he was going to a house to get some money, I do not know the sign of the house; I drove up to that public house, they all three went out there and called for a pot beer, we drank the beer and came away; I asked them if they had got any money there, they said no; the person was not there; they said if they went as far as Ealing, they should get some; we then went to the Horse and Groom at Ealing ; I went in and called for a pot of beer, they drank with me; I look upon it was seven o'clock in the evening then; after that we had a pot of ale, I paid for it; and told them if they had not got any money, I could not stand it any longer; two of them went out, and Pitts staid; he sat by the side of me; after a while I laid my head on the table and fell asleep.

Q. Did not you drink any more liquor afterwards. - A. Not with Pitts; I drank with some others after I awaked.

Q. By this time you had pretty near liquor enough. - A. No, not so much for four people, I might be fresh, but not any ways disguised.

Q. What time was it when you fell asleep. - A. It might be between eleven and twelve when I awoke; there were some people there, I said I would go home; they said they would go home with me; they said you must drink something, I said I would pay for some gin; I went to take my money out of my pocket to pay for it, and my money was gone.

Q. Now recollect yourself, and tell me whether you was not intoxicated when you went to sleep. - A. I was a little in liquor, not intoxicated very much.

Q. You were intoxicated then. - A. Yes.

Q. You are swearing against a man's life; say at once you were drunk and fell asleep - what state were you in when you came into the Horse and Groom public house, were you not drunk then. - A. Yes, I must be in liquor.

Q. How near the time of your awaking and finding your money gone, had you felt or seen your money. - A. When I paid for the last beer that we had, I took a shilling out of the purse, I know it was all there then; my purse was in my right hand breeches pocket, and my tobacco box was in my jacket pocket.

Q. Upon losing this what was done, was the prisoner in the house. - A. No, a young man found Pitts at the other door of the public house, paying for a pot of ale with a shilling; we took him directly to the constable.

- COCHRANE. Q. Were you at this public house at Ealing. - A. Yes.

Q. About eleven or twelve o'clock at night did you see the prisoner there and the last witness. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner put his hand into Brazier's breeches pocket when he was asleep; then he put it into his own pocket; he got up and went out of the door; he came in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, and sat at a distance from him.

JAMES CORBIT . I saw the prisoner and Brazier at the Horse and Groom; Brazier was asleep with his head on the table.

Q. What time of night was this. - A. Near twelve o'clock; I saw the prisoner put his hand into Brazier's right-hand breeches pocket; as soon as he took it out he put it into his left-hand pocket and walked out of door; he came in again, and sat at a distance from him.

GEORGE HEATON . I am constable of Ealing. I searched the prisoner; I found on him this tobacco box, a one pound note, thirteen shillings, and three sixpences.

Prosecutor. That tobacco box is mine; I cannot swear to the money nor the note.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the tobacco box in the room.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-18

443. MARY TRASH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , two silver watches, value 3 l. 15 s. the property of Eleanor Briant , spinster , in her dwelling house .

ELEANOR BRIANT . I live in Popplewell-alley, St. John's, Wapping .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she had lived with me, but did not live with me when she took this property; she was in my house on that day when I went out.

Q. What day was that. - A. It was the 12th of May last; I went out about half after four o'clock I left Howard, Thompson, and Betsey Murphy in the house; when I came home I missed two silver watches.

Q. What part of the house were these watches in. A. In my chamber in a large chest. I have seen the watches since.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I live at 169, Shadwell High-street, I am shopman to Mr. Rolfe, pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged a watch with me in the name of Mary Coleman on the 13th of May; she said it was her husband's.

- HALL. I am servant to Nicholls and Latter, they are pawnbrokers, No. 80, Broad-street, Ratcliff Cross. On the 13th of May in the evening, the prisoner brought a silver watch to pledge; Mr. Latter lent her one pound ten shillings on it.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-19

444. MARGARET BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a shawl, value 5 s. the property of William Godden , privately in his shop .

The case was stated by Mr. Pollock.

WILLIAM GODDEN . - Q. Where do you live. - A. At No. 10, Leicester-square , I am a linen draper . On the 9th of June in the evening, in consequence of hearing some altercation in the shop between the young man and the prisoner, I came out of my back shop and went into the front shop; the young man told me that he had missed a shawl; I asked him if he was certain the shawl was on the counter, he said he was quite positive it was on the counter; I then told the prisoner if she had the shawl she had better give it up; she said she had not got it; at the same time she put her hand under her clothes, and seemed as if she was throwing something down.

Q. You said she put her hand under her clothes - what do you mean. - A. She put her hand under her apron, through her pocket hole, and turned her child round on the ground; I saw the shawl drop from under the prisoner's clothes, I picked it up, sent for an officer, and I delivered her and the shawl into Limerick's hands.

JOHN NAYLOR . Q. Are you shopman to Mr. Godden. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect on the 9th of June the prisoner coming into Mr. Godden's shop. - A. I do; she asked to look at some shawls, I put some on the counter; she said they would not do, she wished to look at some which were rather better; I turned my back to her to take some more down, I throwed her down a light coloured shawl, which she said would not do. I told her I thought she had taken a shawl from off the counter, she said she had not; I told her then the child had got it if she had not; I desired her to take the child from her breast, and I dare say the shawl would fall; she did take the child from her breast, but the shawl did not fall down. I came out from behind the counter, and told her she must be searched. I put the door to; at that time Mr. Godden came in; the prisoner wanted to get out, she walked backwards and forwards some time.

Court. Did you see the shawl drop from her. - A.

I did not.

Q. Did you see her take the shawl. - A. I did not.

Q. Were there any other persons in the shop belonging to Mr. Godden. - A. Not in the shop; there was another in the back shop.

Q. What was it induced you to think she had taken the shawl. - A. I had taken two quantities of shawls down of the same colour; I missed one of them, I did not know how many there were at the time; it proved only to be one of each colour, and one was taken.

Q. Had you any suspicion of her taking this one until you missed it. - A. No, I had not.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a child in my arms when I went into this shop; the young man took down a parcel of shawls, as much as his hands could contain, he turned his back to reach some more down; if I had a mind to take them I could have taken a great many; when he turned round he said he missed a shawl, I said he was welcome to search me, I did not pretend to get out. When he came out from behind the counter, he brought out the shawl on his foot, and then he said that I had it.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings and nine-pence only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-20

445. MARGARET BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a shawl, value 10 s. the property of George Hammond , privately in his shop .

GEORGE HAMMOND . I am a linen draper , No. 7, Leicester-square . On the 9th of June, between five and six in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, she asked to look at some shawls, which I shewed her; she said she did not like any, and went - out of the shop. Within half an hour she returned again, and looked at them the second time, and went out again without purchasing any. I saw nothing more of the prisoner till I was informed by Mr. Godden that she had a shawl belonging to me; in consequence of that I went to Mr. Godden's.

Q. Had you missed your shawl before you had this information from Mr. Godden. - A. No, I had not.

Q. How long was that after she had been in your shop the last time. - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Who was in the shop at the time she was there. A. A young man, and a friend of his; they are neither of them here.

WILLIAM GODDEN . When I discovered my own shawl, the prisoner endeavoured to go out of the shop; in pulling her back again, her apron flew of one side; I then saw a shawl stick out of her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming up Bear-street I picked up a small piece of paper parcel, it was wrapped up at both ends; I put it in my pocket, I did not look to see what it was till they took it from me.

Jury, to Godden. When you saw it in her pocket was it rolled up in paper, or without paper. - A. It was in a loose state without any paper.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-21

446. JOHN CONWAY, alias CONNOWAY , was indicted for that he on the 14th of June upon Martin Carrol , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and lawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike, cut, penetrate, and wound the said Martin Carrol in and upon his left hand, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

Second Count for like offence, with intention to disable him.

Third Count - to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MARTIN CARROL . I live in Charlotte-buildings, Gray's Inn-lane , I am a paviour .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. What complaint do you make against the prisoner. - A. I was in my own place on the 14th of June last; one of my own lodgers came home and knocked at the door, I got up to let him in, it was about one o'clock at night, and Conway knocked him down; I said, Mr. Conway go home to your own place, he lives opposite to me; I laid hold of him by the arm and led him to his own door; Conway run up stairs and brought down a sword with him. My lodger Davis was at the door, Conway and Slater both laid hold of him by the bosom and the collar, one pulled him along, and the other shoved him into a passage; Davies hallooed out murder; I ran to assist him; Conway says, here he comes, I'll run him through; Davis got out of the passage all, cut; by that he made a stab at me; I got hold of the blade of the sword.

Q. And by that means your hand got out. - A. Yes, he made a cut at me, and I laid hold of the sword; my hand was cut by his thrusting the sword at me; Slater took hold of me by the collar, and held a stick over my head; there was assistance came up to me, and we took the sword from Conway.

Q. Did the prisoner Conway and your lodger Davis come up together to the door. - A. No, not as I know of.

Q. Did you hear before the prisoner struck him any words pass between them. - A. No, not a word.

Q. Are you sure that you did nothing more than lay your hand on the prisoner to lead him across. - A. No more.

Q. Did you accompany it with no further violence than that. - A. No more, indeed.

Q. How was your hand cut, deep or slightly. - A. Very deep, he knocked a piece out of it.

Q. Was the prisoner sober at the time. - A. Quite sober.

Q. Was there any connection between Davis and him. - A. None, as I know of.

Q. What is Davis. - A. He is a pavior.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a crimp serjeant .

Prisoner. My lord, I hope you will take notice of that, that is not a proper expression.

Q. How long was it before your wound was healed up. - A. It is not well yet.

Q. Did you apply to any surgeon. - A. No.

MARY CARROL . Q. Are you the wife of Martin Carrol . - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know of this transaction. - A. I got up to let Davis in; after I heard him knock at the door I saw Conway strike him twice, and knock him down, they neither of them said a word at the

time.

Q. Where was your husband at the time. - A. He was in doors; I called him out; my husband went to him and told him to go to bed, he said that was the only best way for him; Conway went up to his own apartment and brought down a sword.

Q. Did you see your husband go with him to his own door. - A. I saw my husband telling him to go into his own door.

Q. Was there any force used, did he lay hold of his hand or arm. - A. No, not at that time; then Conway came down stairs with his sword, and stood outside of the door some time; Davis come out again; my husband was in doors; Conway and Slater pulled Davis into Slater's passage; Davis cried out murder, my husband went out to try to save him, I saw Davis come out of the passage all of a gore of blood; I went to the passage, I saw Slater, he had hold of Carrol by the collar, holding a large stick over his head, and Conway had the sword across Carrol's body, and Slater's wife had a candle; I took the candle from her; I went to Conway and pulled down his two arms, and Carrol took the sword from him; Conway turned into Slater's apartment; I took the stick from Slater, and gave it to the night constable.

MARY WELCH . I live in Charlotte-buildings; I saw Conway striking Davis first.

Q. What was the first between them before that blow was struck. - A. Nothing at all; I was standing at my own door at the time, I lodge in Carrol's house. Davis knocked at the door to get in, Conway came up and knocked him down; upon that Carrol came out and took Davis in; Conway went up stairs and brought down his sword. Carrol after he brought Davis in doors, he forced Conway into his passage, he took hold of him by his arms; when Conway came down with the sword he swore bitterly that he would kill one before he would part with his sword; I begged of him to go up stairs with his sword; he went to Slater's passage, and stood with the sword at his back; I begged him to drop the sword, he said he would not; Davis came out of Carrol's house to make water, Conway drew his sword, and raised his hand to strike Davis; Davis cried out murder, Carrol came out at the time Conway and Davis were in the passage; when Carrol came out Conway said, here he comes, and I will run him through; then I went to call the watchmen, and when I came with them Carrol had Conway's sword, and his hand was bloody. I saw the blow given to Davis, but I did not to Carrol.

WILLIAM DAY . I was officer of the night; Carrol delivered the sword to me, and this stick was taken from the prisoner in his own room, he used it as a defence against me.

Q. (to Carrol) Look at that sword, is that the sword that you were describing - A. Yes.

Q. How came it bent in that way. - A. In forcing it from him.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - on Sunday morning the 14th of June last, between two and three o'clock, I saw a man whom I supposed to be a deserter; I followed him sharply, he took to his heels and threw himself under a gateway; when I came up to him; I asked him what he was doing there, he replied what is that to you; I called the watchman, and charged him with being a deserter. My lord, there is a set of people that live opposite of me, that would deprive me of my life and liberty, by false swearing; they are eternally calling me a crimp. After securing the man in the watchhouse, coming home I stopped to speak to a woman who lived next door to me, these people rushed out of the house, knocked me down in the passage, and secured the sword from me, and broke the blade; and in their securing the sword from me, I have every reason to believe the parties were cut; I got away from them, went up stairs to a neighbour, I staid in her room, and when I thought every thing was quiet I got over the yard, and went to my own room; these people came and broke my room door open. I declare I am an innocent man.

PATRICK BARRY . I was sitting in my own room No. 7, Charlotte-buildings; I heard a noise in the court, I opened the window and looked out; I saw the prisoner standing in the court with Davis, Carrol and his wife, and Welch; they were arguing with the prisoner, the prisoner turned round and went into Slater's house; they all followed him, even Carrol's wife did; I do not know what they did there, I saw Carrol come out of the house with a naked sword in his hand; calling out bloody Conway, bloody Slater; Carrol struck the window shutter and broke the glass, I did not see Conway after that. One morning as I was coming from my work, I heard Carrol cry out bloody Conway, I will send you to Pimlico, to get another silver plate in your head; Carrol's wife said she should be very well satisfied if she saw him hung in the Old Bailey. Davis, Slater, Carrol, and me, we all work for the same master, and this morning I saw Slater in my master's yard.

ANN BOTTOMLY . I live at No. 7, Charlotte-buildings. On the 14th of June I happened to be up that night, being very busy; Carrol and Conway had some words before this happened.

Q. About what time did this happen. - A. To the best of my knowledge about half after two in the morning. About a week before this happened Mr. Carrol came out in the middle of the day, he pulled his shirt sleeves up and called Conway, Conway looked out of the window and asked him what he wanted, he said I want no more of you than to come down stairs; the prisoner said he would not come down; I told Carrol to go in doors, I thought he wanted him to fight with him. The next time I saw him was when the fight was; the prisoner's room is opposite of mine, Carrol lives in the next house to me; I saw a little short man, he wanted to take the sword out of the prisoner's hand. I fancy his hand was cut.

Q. You know Carrol. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Davis. - A. That was the name of the little man; his hand bled very much, Carrol went to his assistance, Conway went into Slater's house to save himself; they both pursued the prisoner to get the sword out of his hands.

ESTHER FISHER . I live at No. 2, Charlotte-buildings. On the 14th of June I was in bed when the prisoner came up to me and asked me to let him in to save his life.

Q. What time was that. - A. Between two and three in the morning; he said Carrol and his wife and Davis had been ill using him, and they had taken his sword from him; I told Mr. Conway if he would stay in the house I would go down. I went down stairs and opened the door, I saw Carrol with Conway's sword in his

hand, breaking the lower part of the parlour window; Carrol came to me, he asked me if Conway was in my room, I told him no; he said he had better not let him lay hold of him, if he did he would murder him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-22

446. JOHN CONWAY, alias CONNOWAY , was indicted for that he on the 14th of June , upon John Davis , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, willfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain instrument, which he then and there held in his hand, did strike, penetrate, cut and wound, the said John Davis, in and upon the right side of his face, and his right hand, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

Second count for like offence, with intention to disable him.

Third count to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN DAVIS . I was coming home to my lodgings on a Sunday morning three weeks ago, between one and two o'clock in the morning; I knocked at the door of my landlady to let me in; Conway came up to me and knocked me down, and after getting up he knocked me down a second time without any provocation; I never mentioned a word to him; my landlord came to the door, he desired me to come in, he opened the door and took me in; after being in doors some time, I went out of door to water. Conway and Slater catched hold of me and pulled me into Slater's passage; Conway brought his sword and cut me on the cheek.

Q. Where did he bring the sword from. - A. Out of his own room; I cried out for assistance, my landlord came to assist me, Conway struck him with the sword, and Slater laid hold of Carrol by the shoulder; the prisoner said, here comes the long b - r, and I'll run him through; he hit Carrol in the middle of his left hand; the night constable came and saw him all of a gore of blood; Conway and Slater run away after he had cut me and Carrol, when the watchman came into the court.

Q. What became of his sword. - A. Carrol took it away from him.

Q. Did any body assist in taking it away from him. - A. No, no one; my hand was bad, I was not able to assist, the sword was taken from Conway before Carrol's wife came; he took it by meer strength. Carrol's wife took the stick from Slater.

Q. She did nothing in taking the sword from Conway. - A. Not as I saw.

Q. You said that Carrol had taken the sword from Conway before his wife came. - A. I think he did.

Q. What did you do when Conway struck you with the sword. - A. I was down when he struck me with the sword, and I catched the sword in my hand.

Q. What was Slater about at the time that Conway struck you with the sword. - A. He laid hold of me in his passage.

Q. Where is Slater now. - A. I saw him last Saturday.

Q. You are the prosecutor of this indictment - how happened it you did not take Slater up, you say he held you when you was struck with the sword. - A. We could not take him up when we could not find him; we tried to find him on Monday, we could not.

Q. Is he not at work at his business. - A. I believe he is.

Q. Did nothing pass between you and the prisoner before he knocked you down. - A. Not a word.

Q. Had you no dispute with him before. - A. Never at any time, he did it without any provocation at all. I did not see him when he struck me first.

MARY CARROL . Q. Now tell us what was the dispute between the prisoner Conway and your husband, and when was it. - A. On the 14th of June, about one o'clock in the morning, Davis was coming home to his lodgings; I was up, he knocked at the door for me to let him in; with that Conway came and knocked him down, when I opened the door to him.

Q. I want to know whether he was knocked down before you opened the door to him. - A. I cannot say, he was knocked down twice after I opened the door to him; my husband came out and took him in, Carrol went and put his hand to Conway's arm, and said go home good man; I think he went with him as far as the step of the door, after Davis went in. He was in a considerable time and then he went out again; with that Conway and Slater pushed him into the passage; I went out of the door when I heard the noise, I saw Slater and Conway pulling him into Slater's passage; I did not go nigh them till I saw Davis coming out all of a gore of blood. He cried out murder.

Q. Where was your husband at that time. - A. He was in his own apartment; he went to his assistance to bring him in.

Q. Where was Davis when you saw him of a gore of blood. - A. He was coming out of Slater's passage, he came into my place.

Q. Where was he when your husband went out to his assistance. - A. He was in Slater's passage.

Q. Had your husband gone out to him before you saw him on a gore of blood. - A. Yes, upon Davis coming out, I asked him where Carrol was, he said he believed he was killed; I went into Slater's passage, I saw my husband held by Slater, and Slater's wife had a candle in her hand; and held him with the other hand; I did not see him strike him; Conway had the sword across Carrol's body; I went inside of them, I laid hold of Conway's arm, till Carrol took the sword out of his hands.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-23

447. RICHARD WOODHATCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , a cow, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Bliss .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS BLISS . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you live at Chertsey . - A. I do, I am a baker .

Q. On Friday the 22nd of May were you in possession of a cow. - A. I was, I saw her about nine o'clock in the evening in the meadow.

Q. Was your gate secured. - A. It was locked. On the next morning about five o'clock I missed her; the gate was lifted off the hinges, and the cow was gone. It was a little black cow.

Q. In consequence of information on the Monday morning following, did you come to Smithfield. - A. I did, with a person of the name of Fleming, and Garment joined us soon after; I came to Smithfield on Monday morning a little after three o'clock.

Q. Did you find your cow in Smithfield. - A. About four, or a little after four, I found my cow tied to a rail in Smithfield market.

did, a tall man in a blue coat; it was the prisoner at the bar, he had on a red handkerchief, and there were white spots in it; the prisoner was so dressed at the time.

Q. How near to the cow was he standing. - A. About three yards, I suppose.

Q. What did you do upon seeing that man and seeing the cow. - A. About an hour and a half after that I saw a friend of mine, Mr. Garment; I kept watching the cow and the man during that time.

Q. Did the man keep near the cow or leave her. - A. I believe during that time the man put the cow in some other person's hand and left the cow.

Q. When Garment joined you, did you desire him to do any thing. - A. I did.

Q. In consequence of what you desired him to do, did you see him go towards the cow. - A. I did, I observed him to be conversing with Curtis a salesman; I saw the prisoner again in about ten minutes, I pointed him out to Garment; he went up to the prisoner, I believe he conversed with him about half an hour, I stood near him watching him; at last I went up to him, and at that time Garment was buying the cow of the prisoner; I charged the constable with the prisoner for selling the cow to Garment.

Court. You charged him with stealing it. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that your cow. - A. Yes, I am very certain it was; the prisoner said what do you charge me for, I replied for the cow; I asked Garment if he had not sold him that cow, he said yes, that black cow for seven guineas; I said that is my cow; then I charged the constable with him.

Mr. Gurney. What is the value of the cow. - A. Ten guineas.

Q. Have you since shewn that cow to Hunt. - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Did you point out that cow to Hunt, or did he select it himself. - A. He selected it himself, it was with two others in the field.

Q. Have you shewn that cow to Mrs. Ryning. - A. I have.

Q. Are there any marks about the cow. - A. Yes, some grey hairs over the right eye.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Then the only mark that I understand you to know her by, the cow has some grey hairs over her right eye - is that the only mark. - A. She has a full staring eye.

Q. I suppose you never see a cow with a full staring eye. - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Now, with respect to a few grey gairs, I suppose you have seen a cow with that before. - A. I cannot say that I have exactly like that.

Q. How long have you had the cow. - A. About four or five months.

Q. Are you a married man. - A. I am.

Q. Have you any partner with you in your business. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. You are quite sure it is your cow. - A. I am quite certain of it.

JOHN GARMENT . - Mr. Gurney. On the morning of the 26th May were you in company with Mr. Bliss. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of what the prosecutor said to you, did you accost the prisoner. - A. I went to the prisoner, about pigs; after that we got into conversation about the price of beasts; I told him I had been cheapening a little cow in the market for a friend of mine; he told me that he had got one in the market; I asked him what part of the market it was, he told me it was at the further part of the market; I made answer that I had been cheapening one at the further part of the market, a small cow; I asked him if he would like to take a walk with me to the further part of the market, as I had been cheapening this cow; he took a walk with me to the cow; then I asked him if it was his property, he said it was his cow. I asked the price of the cow, the salesman said the price of the cow was eight guineas.

Q. Was that Mr. Curtis. - A. I do not know his name; I told the prisoner that price was too much, it was more than I could afford to give, I would give him seven guineas; the prisoner soon after made answer you shall have it; he was taken up immediately; I looked round immediately to Mr. Bliss.

Q. On your looking round to Mr. Bliss he came up, and the constable took him into custody. - A. Yes, and the cow was taken away.

Q. Was that the cow which Mr. Bliss claimed. - A. Yes, the same cow which Mr. Bliss claimed to be his property.

Q. Had Mr. Bliss pointed out the cow to you before you spoke to the prisoner. - A. He had.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Was this the open market. - A. Yes, on a market-day.

Q. Were there many people there. - A. Yes, there were a great many people there.

Q. There was nothing in this transaction that was secret in it. - A. Not to my knowledge.

JOHN TURNER . - Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I am a carpenter.

Q. On Friday evening the 22nd of May were you at Chertsey. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar there. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known him before. - A. Yes, ever since I can remember.

Q. Is he a Chertsey man. - A. No, he was brought up two miles and a half from there.

Q. What time in the evening did you see him. - A. I met him about nine o'clock in the street; we went into a public house together, he said he was going to Staines.

Q. How was he drest at that time. - A. I believe he had on a blue coat, and a red handkerchief with white spots in it round his neck; I parted with him about eleven o'clock.

GEORGE HUNT . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a labourer, living near Chertsey. - A. Yes.

Q. At about half past two o'clock on Saturday the 23rd of May were you at Shepperton. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any person coming through Shepperton towards London. - A. Yes, a man, he had a blue coat on, a red handkerchief with white spots in it, and a pair of buckles in his shoes; he was driving a black cow along; it was a moon shiney night.

Q. How long was it before the day broke. - A. Very near an hour.

Q. Have you ever since seen a cow like it or the same cow. - A. Yes, at Chertsey; I knew the cow again.

Q. You selected that cow from among others. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever known the prisoner. - A. I had not.

Q. Are you able to say whether he is or is not the man that you saw driving the cow. - A. No.

Q. How far is Shepperton from Chertsey. - A. Two miles.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Shepperton is the other side of the water. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. There is a bridge, it is the road to London. - A. Yes.

ANN RYNING . Mr. Gurney. I believe you keep a public house at Chelsea. - A. Yes, called the World's-end.

Q. On Saturday May the 23d did the prisoner come to your house. - A. He did, about half past nine.

Q. On that morning did he bring any thing with him. - A. He brought a black cow with him; her horn was tied by a cord to her foot, she was put into my yard; he asked me to let my servant milk the cow; in consequence of his request she did.

Q. After she had milked the cow, did she say any thing. - A. I have a little black cow, very much like that cow; she said though that cow was like mine, it did not give so much milk; he replied, she had been brought nineteen miles that accounted for her not giving so much milk. I asked him if he had bought the cow at the fair; he told me he had.

Court. Did he say what fair. - A. He did not; he told me to take care of the cow, and he would call in the evening; the cow remained there till the evening; he called again, and requested the servant to milk her again in the evening, and the morning. He told me he should take her away on Monday morning to Smithfield; accordingly she was taken on the Monday morning to Smithfield, I was in bed, I heard the cow go out. I saw the cow at Mr. Bliss's. That is the cow that was at my house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understand you to say that this cow the prisoner had was like your cow. - A. Yes, if I saw them together I should know my own cow, there is a difference in the heads of the two cows.

Mr. Knapp. I propose to read this examination.

Court. I do not know how that can be evidence to you.

Mr. Gurney. I have no objection to it.

(The examination read). The prisoner being asked what he had to say, saith, that on the 23d of September, about half past nine in the morning, he was at the World's-end, public house, King's-road, Chelsea, in company with two or three other persons; that on leaving that house, they went into the road, and met a man with the cow, that he returned with the man and the cow to the World's-end; and that the man offered him the cow for seven guineas, and he took six guineas and a half for the cow.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , DEATH aged 29.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-24

448. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for that he on the 18th of April , was servant to John French and was employed and entrusted by him to receive monies for and on his account, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive, and take into his possession, five bank notes value 1 l. each, for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same .

JOHN FRENCH . I was a publican when this man was my servant, in Founder's-court Lothbury. On the 18th of April the prisoner was my pot boy . I was in the habit of sending the prisoner to my customers with change for notes; my wife sent him to Mr. Stewards', I was present; I heard my wife request the prisoner to give her compliments to Mr. Lyons, and to ask him for five pound in bank; accordingly he went; I never saw him till last Wednesday was a fortnight, he never returned.

Q. What day was this. - A. The 18th of April. The prisoner served me before this time truly and honest.

Q. You never received the money of Mr. Lyons. - A. No.

WILLIAM LYONS . I am a taylor, I am employed by Mr. Steward, it is my duty to pay the men on Saturday night their wages; it used to be my custom to go to Mr. French's for small change to pay the men; I received five pound in small change of Mrs. French; after I had received it, I went to the shop to make out the different sums of money to give the men their wages while I was so doing, the prisoner at the bar came up to me in the accompting house with Mrs. French's compliments, would be thankful for the five pound in lieu of the change I had of her; I then asked him if he was certain that his mistress; sent him for the five pounds he answered me yes; or he should have known nothing about it. I gave him five one pound notes; he counted them over, folded them up, and put them carefully into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the notes; as I was coming along I missed them out of my pocket, and not being able to make it good I was afraid to return.

GUILTY, aged 28.

[ The jury and prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy .]

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-25

449. JOSEPH ARGENT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June a silver watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 1 s, and three seals, value 3 s. the property of James Fisher .

JAMES FISHER . I live at No. 56, Red-Cross-street, in the city of London, I am a journeyman stationer .

Q. On the 15th of June did you lose a watch. - A. Yes, a silver watch.

Q. Did you lose it from your person. - A. On the 15th of June, about half past eleven at night, I was in Well-street coming home, with my wife.

Q. Were you sober. - A. Yes, I am never otherwise. The prisoner at the bar was the person that drawed the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Are you sure of his person. - A. I never left him from the minute he took it; my wife and I was going down Well-street; he came up against me; I said at the moment, that man has got my watch; when he shoved up against me I felt the watch drawn out of my pocket.

Q. Did you see the watch in his hand. - A. I only felt it go from me; I pursued after him in a minute.

Q. Were there many people in the street at that time. - A. Not a soul was in the street but him, he was alone; I cried stop thief, and pursued him immediately; I never lost sight of him.

Q. How far did he get before he was stopped. - A. I believe the space that he ran before he was obliged to turn back again was twenty or thirty yards; my crying stop thief alarmed the people; he run down Red Cross-square, and turned back to avoid the people; he returned back because of the quantity of people that were coming up Red Cross-square; I laid hold of him by the collar and had him on the ground; some other person came up and he was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you see the watch found upon him. - A. When we took him to the watchhouse he was searched, and no watch found upon him; Mr. Brock went back to the same place where the scuffle was; there he picked up the watch, and brought it to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. You say it was half past eleven at night. - A. Yes.

Q. You were passing through Well-street, Cripplegate - is that in the road to Barbican. - A. It is the strait road to Red-Cross-street.

Q. You say the prisoner came to you and attempted to take the watch from your pocket - had you been drinking - A. No, not at all.

Q. Were you quite sober. - A. I am always sober.

Q. So I heard you say before. - A. I defy any man to say otherwise.

Q. When you say that he returned back because of a mob coming, will you say that you never lost sight of him. - A. I never lost sight of him.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see him. - A. It was light enough for me to see him, because I was never farther from him than I am to you.

Q. The moon was nine days old - do you mean to say it was light enough for you to see the face of a man, so that you could identify the person that took the watch from you. - A. If I were not positive I would not appear in this place.

Q. I want to know the probability of your story, not your reason - what dress had the prisoner got on. - A. A brown coat.

Q. Was not any other man in a brown coat. - A. I had hold of the man before there was another man to be seen.

Q. How far from the place where your watch was lost was it from where it was picked up. - A. Not above forty yards.

Q. Do you remember any person being present when the prisoner was brought up to you. - A. None at all.

Q. You never said that you could not identify the person that robbed you. - A. No, I never quitted him till the constable took him from me.

Q. Did you tell the constable or any other person that you could not identify the person that robbed you. A. I never did.

JOSEPH BROCK . I am a china enameller and gilder. I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watchhouse; the prisoner was searched, there was nothing found on him, I saw where the prisoner fell, I went back to the very spot, I found the case within five yards of where he fell, in the gutter; I found the watch a little further against the wall, with the chain and seal to it; I took it to the watchhouse.

Q. Was it claimed by the prosecutor. - A. Yes, and the prosecutor identified the prisoner in the watch-house.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-26

450. JACOB ANTILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June , a stone gorge, value 2 s. an earthen ware figure, value 6 d. five wine glasses, value 3 s. on butter cup and cover, value 2 s. one glass cruet, value 9 d. two tea pots, value 2 s. two glass salts, value 1 s. and one smelling bottle, value 1 s. the property of William North and Frances North .

Second Count the property of William North and Richard Johnson .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM NORTH . Q. Where do you live - A. No. 104, Bishopsgate without, in the city of London ; I am a potter and glass-seller .

Q. Who was your partner at the time you lost this property. - A. My sister Frances Johnson .

Q. In consequence of information that you received about a gorge, did you go to a public house called the City of Canterbury. - A. I did, on Monday afternoon the 15th of June, it is situated the corner of Primrose-street; I went with my neighbour, we found the stone gorge inside of the pantry door; we took it into the parlour of the public house, and waited there a few minutes, till Sapwell the constable brought the prisoner into the parlour; then I charged the prisoner with stealing it. He began telling a long story about my stopping half a day's wages on the Saturday; he did not deny doing it, but he said how could he live if he did not do something of that kind.

Q. Had you stopped half a day's wages. - A. I had, in consequence of his stopping away half a day; his wages were eighteen shillings a week. After Sapwell delivered him into the care of another officer, I and Sapwell went to his lodgings, he had told me where he lived; we went to No. 9, Read's place, Hoxton; we found the door fast and no person at home; I waited till eleven o'clock, and then we found his wife at home. We searched and found all the articles in the indictment, and a great many more.

THOMAS CROW . Q. What are you. - A. I am a butcher, I live next door to the prosecutor. In the day mentioned in the indictment I saw the prisoner bring a gorge up the gateway, he brought it from the back door apparently; he then went towards the Canterbury with the gorge; I did not see him go into the City of Canterbury, but I saw him come out of the front door without the gorge; I went and spoke to my next door neighbour; he and I run into the Canterbury and saw a jug, which I supposed to be the same.

MR. CRAIG. I went with Mr. Crow to the City of Canterbury.

Q. Did you see a jug that was in the pantry. - A. I did; afterwards I told the prosecutor, and went with him to the City of Canterbury; the prisoner was brought there, I heard him acknowledge taking it.

(The property produced and identified).

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called

four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-27

451. MARY ANN M'COY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Jackson .

WILLIAM JACKSON . I live at 116, in the Minories , I am a linen draper . On Friday the 29th of May I was in my back parlour, a gentleman told me there was a woman gone out of my shop; I immediately ran to the door; seeing no woman whatever right or left, I turned myself round and missed a shawl from off the horse, that stood about three yards from the door, within the shop; when I missed the shawl I ran into a pawnbroker's shop that was three doors from me; I saw the prisoner there, having previously seen this woman about the door, not suspecting at the time she was stealing any thing; I asked the pawnbroker if a shawl had been brought to pawn; she went out of the shop; I communicated my suspicions to the pawnbroker, he sent his man out and brought the woman back; I saw him take the shawl out of her pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought two shawls on Thursday the 28th of May; my husband is a sailor, I did not know one shop from another, having been in London only two days; I pawned one of them for eighteen pence, as my husband has gone to sea and left me; and I pawned some silver spoons, I lost the ticket. On the next day I was coming past this gentleman's shop, I went in to see if I had pawned them there; he took that shawl out of my pocket; I never was in his shop.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-28

452. RICHARD POWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of William Fowler .

WILLIAM FOWLER . I am an independent man, I live in St. George's in the East. On Tuesday the 26th of May last, about a quarter after nine o'clock, I was at the end of Barbican, the corner of Golden-lane; I stopped there, resting my hand upon the post, my wife was looking at a haberdasher's shop, I was looking towards Long-lane, that she might not pass me; it was getting dark, there were several men standing behind the post in Golden-lane; I did not take notice of them, my eye being fixed along Barbican; several men rushed upon me and took me bodily away from the post, several yards down Barbican ; I felt a sudden twitch of my pocket and when I felt the switch I saw the motion of the prisoner's hand as soon as they had quitted me; I clapped my hand to my pocket and exclaimed that I had been robbed of my watch; the prisoner and several others went down Red Cross-street as hard as they could run; I pursued him, calling stop thief, still keeping him in sight; the prisoner was stopt; I laid hold of him; at the time he had his coat off; he gave his coat to a man that was standing on his left hand; I had hold of the prisoner with my left hand, I seized the man with my right hand; a scuffle ensued, they both got from me; I hurt my hand, it has been so bad this three weeks I do not know what to do with it hardly; the prisoner was taken in a few minutes afterwards, he was taken to a public house and there searched; there was nothing found on him.

Q. What became of the other man. - A. The other man got off; he dropped the coat and another person picked it up.

Q. Was he one of those that drove you from the post. - A. I cannot say positively that I saw him where they stood; I was not more than three yards from them, I saw them standing in Golden-lane; I never saw their faces, I was standing outside of the post by a pawnbrokers, not to hinder the foot passengers.

Q. Was the prisoner one of the party. - A. Yes, I fixed my eye upon him, he was one of the party that rushed on me; he was the man; when I felt the snatch I saw his motion, I am sure he was one of the party.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. This was past nine o'clock. - A. Yes, the clock struck nine when I was in Charterhouse-square.

Q. It was dusk. - A. Yes, but it was a remarkable clear day.

Q. You say there were several men - how many do you think there might be. - A. I dare say there was half a dozen.

Q. When you was hurried along in that manner, I should imagine you could not take much notice - when a man is in that situation he cannot make much observation - they rushed you down Barbican. - A. No, about six yards.

Q. You say the prisoner was the shortest man, were you in the confusion competent to ascertain which was the shortest man among them. - A. He was the shortest man, I took notice of the colour of his coat, it was a light great coat; I catched my eyes upon him.

Q. What was the colour of any body else's coat that was there. - A. There were two others with dark great coats, and some with short coats.

Q. This a little astonished you. - A. Yes, and I dare say if you had been in my situation, it would have astonished you.

Q. I know it would; so much so that I should not be able to say who was the shortest man - you getting among a parcel of riotous men, and losing your wife, must be very much flurried. - A. No, not at all.

Q. Then you were not flurried. - A. No, I was in a frustration.

Q. How long before this had you known that your watch was in your pocket. - A. When I left my friend's house, No. 58, St. John-street, just by Hicks'-hall.

Q. You had your eye upon the prisoner all the time. - A. Yes, he was before me.

Q. All the others were behind you. - A. No, some were before me.

Q. Then you might have seen them; have you always given the same account - A. Exactly. When a man states the truth, he cannot deviate from it.

Q. Have you always given the same story. - A. Yes, I think I have.

Q. Never made the least deviation. - A. I do not say; I may have made a deviation in a word, the facts are the same.

Q. You lost you watch at the corner of Golden-lane. - A. Yes.

Q. You never said you lost it at the corner of Barbican by Long-lane. - A. I said that end of Barbican, the corner of Golden-lane; that was correct. In an instant

I mentioned Long-lane instead of Golden-lane, and the alderman corrected me in an instant.

Q. Then you have not always told the same story. - A. I said not in a word.

Q. Will you take upon yourself positively to swear, that you saw this person, whom you never saw before in your life; that the prisoner was one of the party. - A. I will swear to the prisoner, that he was one of the party that hustled me.

Q. What became of the coat - A. He put it on again, it was searched, there was nothing in it.

WILLIAM DOWLING . I was coming along by Cripplegate church; I saw a parcel of men running, and a man crying stop thief; I saw the prisoner throw his coat over his head, and he got away; I collared him.

Q. What coat was it. - A. A white drab long coat; his coat was brought to him again.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Mr. Wood, an enameller, the same as I am, to ask for work; I met a friend who told me my sister in Moor-lane was taken ill; I made the best of my way home, when some gentlemen took hold of me and pursued me; I took off all my clothes for them to search them; he charged another man with robbing him; he proved to be a respectable housekeeper, he let him go.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-29

453. ARTHUR ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , nine pound weight of pewter, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of James Edward Yates .

JAMES EDWARD YATES . I am a pewterer , I live at No. 20, Shoreditch .

Q. Did the prisoner work for you. - A He did, for two or three days this last time, he is a soldier , he belongs to the Tower Hamlets. On the 17th of June from information I followed the prisoner, and brought him back again to my house; Ray the officer searched him, and took from him ten pound three quarters weight of old pewter; it was my property, he had it concealed in his breeches.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. On the 17th of June I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; in his breeches and waistcoat I found the pewter he fell down upon his knees and begged for mercy of his master.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of the crime alleged against me; the property was my own, I had been two years saving it up, they were broken spoons and soldiers buttons; I took them to the shop and melted them in two pieces. Previous to the officer taking charge of me, I gave up the property to the prosecutor, although it was my own.

Q. (to Ray) I understood you that you took the property from him. - A. I took one piece of the property out of his breeches, and the other piece was under his waistcoat.

Prosecutor. As he was coming back he attempted to throw it up a court; the officer took it out of his small clothes in my presence.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-30

454. EDWARD RIDLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , a wooden washing stand, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a pair of plated spurs value 2 s. the property of Lewis, Defontaine .

LEWIS DEFONTAINE . I am riding master, and stable keeper , I live in Duke-street, Finsbury ; all I know is that the things found in the prisoner's apartment were my property.

JOHN RAY . I went with a search warrant to the prisoners lodgings, I found these things; I produce the property.

Q. (to prosecutor.) Look at the these spurs, are they yours. - A. They are like them, and the stool is like one I had; I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-31

455. THOMAS FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 31st of May , upon George Black , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a metal watch, value 6 l. four ducats, value 36 s. two guineas and two shillings, his property .

GEORGE BLACK . Q. On the 31st of May last were you in the road from Hampstead to London. - A. I was, sometime between half past ten and eleven o'clock on Sunday night, I was near the lane leading up to Chalk farm ; I met two men, they were coming up the road slowly I was on the foot path, and they were on the foot path; I was in the act of passing them; one was a tall man in a soldier's jacket, taller than myself, as well as I could judge by an inch and a half; and the other was a short man; as I was in the act of passing them, the tall man, who was the nearest me, he put his left hand to my collar, he seized me by the neck handkerchief, held up his stick and desired me to stop. I rather think I was going to speak; he said be silent, give me your watch, sir; I took out my watch and gave it him; I think I said to him, it is a metal watch, you had better not take it; he repeated be silent, your money; I took out my money and gave it to him, it was loose in my pocket.

Q. What did you give him. - A. I gave him two guineas, to the best of my recollection, and one or two shillings I said at the time, the money you are welcome to, but you had better give me my watch, it is a metal watch; he still repeated be silent, and held up his stick. The other man who kept close to me, put his hand upon the outside of my left hand breeches pocket, I told him there was nothing there but trinkets of no value, he had better not take them; I had forgot at the time that I had these ducats in the pocket, but they were packed up with some trinkets; he put his hand into the pocket and took them out.

Q. What were the value of these ducats. - A. I understand about nine shillings a piece, they are Dutch coin. He then asked me for my pocket book, I told him that I had no pocket book; he repeated his demand, I told him I had none; he then quitted his hold of me, and said be off, sir; accordingly I stepped on two or three steps on the road, they urged me still to go on.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. It was a fine night, but no moon.

Q. Was there light enough to distinguish; and to see

the persons of the men that robbed you. - A. There might have been; if I had not been a good deal agitated, and the transaction took place a very short time, not above a minute or two. I can only speak to the impression it made in my mind.

Q. Had you an opportunity during the time this transaction happened, during the flurry you were in, of seeing the features of the men. - A. No, his features appeared to me small, and rather pale-faced.

Q. What size in bulk. - A. He was not large made.

Q. On looking at the prisoner, can you say with certainty that he is or is not the man. - A. I cannot say with certainty that he is the man.

HENRY OVERTON . Q. You are servant to Mr. F. Salkeld, 202, Fleet-street, a pawnbroker - have you any watch with you. - A. Yes. On Monday the 1st of June, about two o'clock, the prisoner pawned it; on the 1st of June he came again, and said he had lost the ticket. From information I had from Bow-street office I had him taken in custody; when the constable came I told him what I had taken him for, that the watch had been stolen; he said he bought the watch; he did not tell me when nor where he bought the watch.

Q. What name did he pawn the watch in. - A. Robert Fletcher ; I told the prisoner he must go to the Compter; I went to the door for a coach to take him; the constable and he followed me. While I was opening the coach door the prisoner shot off and run through Temple Bar; the constable run after him and called stop thief; he was stopped and brought back; we took him to the Compter. When the prisoner pledged the watch he had a bricklayer's jacket on; I cannot recollect the colour. When he was taken up he had that coat on.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You say it was on the 1st of June he came to pledge it. - A. Yes.

Q. And on Tuesday week he came, not to redeem the watch, but to tell you he had lost the ticket. - A. Yes.

Q. There had been an information given to you that this man had lost his watch. - A. Yes.

Q. And the poor fellow when you charged him with a felony and took him in custody, he attempted to slide away. - A. He did slide away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a different place at the time.

JAMES COOPER . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am a bricklayer ; the prisoner is in the same line, I have been in company with him several times in the houses of call; I saw him on the first of June in the Crown public house, Oxford road; I recollect it very well, being a wet morning.

Q. What time of the day did you see him there. - A. Between eight and nine in the morning; I called in the house and had a pint of beer, I saw the prisoner sit there, and another person was sitting with him; they had got a watch looking at; the other man said to me, I have got a watch to sell, do you want such a thing; no, said I, I do not, I have got one.

Q. Was that openly said, or in secret. - A. It was said in the tap room. The prisoner said I want such a thing myself, but I do not think I have got money enough to purchase it; the prisoner said how much do you ask for the watch, he said about four guineas, he said he had not got money enough to purchase it now; perhaps he might pledge it and make up the money. I saw him pull out two pounds myself, I saw the watch opened, I had it not in my hand, to the best of my recollection; I saw Cornhill inside of it; that is the watch, to the best of my recollection.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-32

456. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of June , a trunk, value 11 s. the property of John Mitchell Furnell and Joseph Bagnall .

WILLIAM ADELL . I am servant to Messrs. Furnell and Bagnell, trunkmaker s, Cornhill . On the 22nd of June, about half past ten in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the bar at our shop window; I then had suspicion that he was a tradesman like myself, waiting for my employer coming in, for a situation; I kept my eye on him for a few minutes, but not knowing his face, I took no further notice of him; I missed him from the window a minute or two, I saw him return to the window again, and I saw him lift a trunk off the top of the window; I then ran up into the street, and saw the prisoner at the bar with the trunk going towards Leadenhall-street; I pursued him and laid hold of him by St. Peter's-alley, Cornhill; I asked him how he came by that property, he said a gentleman told him to bring it with him and he would give him a shilling; I looked round, saw no gentleman, I brought him back to the shop; I then asked him who he was, he said his name was White, he was a fishmonger, residing in Holborn; I detained him till my master came in; I believe he had been drinking.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated at the time; I know nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-33

457. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a pocket book, value 2 s. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of James Dye .

JAMES DYE . I am a traveller . On Wednesday morning the 10th of June, about the hour of eleven o'clock, I came out of a house called the Blue-last, Cock-court, Ludgate-hill , at which time I was in possession of a five pound bank note; it was in a red morocco pocket book, I had not got out of the house, and proceeded ten yards down the court, when the prisoner at the bar, who was standing on the left hand side of the way, I was walking on the right hand side, the moment she espied me she ran across the way, and seized me round the waist, but putting her left arm round my coat; she put her body very close to me in a very amourous disposition, inclined her head to my left shoulder, and with her right hand she took my pocket book out of my pocket.

Q. Which pocket was it. - A. My left hand side pocket; I felt her take it out of my pocket, and the moment that I disengaged myself from her, I charged her with the robbery; I called the watch; I observed just as she had attacked me the watchman was standing within two or three yards of her, of the name of Bennet; he did not take charge of her, but another watchman

came up of the name of Cromack, he took charge of her, she was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. What became of your pocket book - A. That I did not see; after she took my pocket book she put her hand behind, she passed it behind her I believe to the watchman Bennet; her head was situated so on my left shoulder so as I could not see her.

Q. Where were your hands at that time. - A. My hands she artfully kept down.

Q. How - A. By the method she used she clasped me round my body.

Q. If she kept your arms down with both her hands, I do not know how she had one hand to spare to take your pocket book. - A. She got her left arm around my waist, and placed her body so close to the right arm, that both my arms were kept down; she laid hold of my left arm by her left arm, her arm was round me; she was taken to the watch house and searched by Cromack; nothing was found. Bennet has since absconded.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How long had you been at this public house. - A. I might be there doing a little business with a friend, about a quarter of an hour.

Q. You had been drinking had not you. - A. I had not.

Q. Do you mean to say you were perfectly sober. - A. Most assuredly.

Q. What line of life are you in. - A. I am a traveller; I deal in silk.

Q. What house do you travel for. - A. I am now collecting for a friend in Fenchurch-street.

Q. What time of the night was this. - A. About eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you know the woman before. - A. No.

Q. Have you ever found your pocket book. - A. I have not; I had seen the note five minutes previous to my coming out of the house.

WALTER M'DOWELL . I am constable of the night for St. Bride's parish. On the evening mentioned, Ann Jones was brought into the watchhouse, accompanied by Bennet, the watchman, and Cromack, and Mr. Dye was there, he related the circumstance the same then as he has now. The prisoner was searched, and nothing was found on her.

Q. What is become of Bennet. - A. From what I have observed, he I believe has absconded.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-34

432. CHARLES WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of William Lee .

WILLIAM LEE . I am a shoemaker , living in Field-lane ; I can only speak to the property.

ELIZABETH GREEN . I am a servant to Mr. Forsyth in Field-lane. I had been of an errand; coming home between eleven and twelve in the forenoon I stopped at Mr. Lee's door, seeing no one in the shop; I saw the prisoner take the shoes from the nail at the window, and he ran away with them; I called to Mrs Lee's little girl, I ran after the prisoner I catched him about half a dozen doors up Holborn; I asked him for the shoes, he gave them me. Mr. Lee came up; I gave him he shoes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress; I left my wife at Chatham to seek for work; I could get no work, I had nothing to eat.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-35

444. WILLIAM CABBADY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Delves Collier .

WILLIAM DELVES COLLIER . I live at the White Horse, Bethnal-green . On Saturday the 30th of May, about half past six in the evening, I was in the the club room attending a benefit society; hearing a noise below at the foot of the stairs I came down, I found the prisoner scuffling with my wife, he was endeavouring to get out of the house; I laid hold of the prisoner, my wife informed me that he had stole a quart pot; in the scuffle the quart pot fell from under his coat; we scuffled and he got outside of the door; he had a bag, I insisted upon examining it; I found two pint pots which belonged to other publicans.

JOHN ROBERT HARRIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody and the pot; the prisoner's, bag contained two pint pots, and a pair of boots. There is no person that owned the boots.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I must totally leave it to the mercy of the court; I have a wife and two small children.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-36

446. MARY MOULDER and ANN KENDALL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of June , a pint of brandy, value 1 s, a pint of rum, value 1 s, four glass bottles, value 1 s, a hundred and sixty halfpence, and eighteen farthings , the property of Richard Manwaring .

RICHARD MANWARING . I am a publican , I live at the Green Man, Featherstone-street, St. Luke's . Moulder and Kendall were employed to wash for my family. On the 1st of June they came on the over night to work at twelve o'clock, when our family go to bed, leaving them up to work. Some little time after five in the morning my wife and I thought we heard our bar window open; we both got up, and my wife saw the prisoner Kendall get out of the bar upon her hands and knees; my wife asked her what she wanted there, she said that she had been into the bar for a bit of cheese; I dressed myself and came down and opened the bar, to see if I could find any thing missing; I found by the print of the saw dust that somebody had been in my bar I next examined my till, I found there were more more halfpence taken out of the till than there were left in the till. There was sixteen or seventeen shillings left in the till.

Q. How much do you suppose there were taken out. - A. About fourteen or fifteen shillings, I cannot

exactly say.

Q. Were there any silver. - A. There was no silver; we took that up the overnight with us; I desired my wife not to take any notice of it to the prisoner, but to let them finish their work. I sent for Ray the officer, and he searched the prisoners; there were nine or ten shillings found upon Kendall, and about three or four shillings upon Moulder; she said she received them from Kendall, she never was in the bar in her life. Ray the officer asked her how much money they had when they came into the house; they said they had only two or three halfpence; they said they had sent some liquor home to their lodgings. We searched their different lodgings.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. On Monday the 1st of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went to Mr. Manwaring's house, where I found both the prisoners; I took them both into custody; I searched Kendall first; in her pocket was nighteen shillings of half pence and penny pieces and farthings; there was one paper done up; she seemed very much alarmed, downed upon her knees, and begged for mercy. On the other prisoner Moulder I found about three shillings in penny pieces and farthings; she said she was very sorry, and begged that Mr. Manwaring would not hurt her. I went to Moulder's lodgings, where I found a bottle of vinegar, and a bottle of rum and brandy, it seems to be mixed; she said that it belonged to Mr. Manwaring, they had taken it out of the bar. Then I went to Kendal; there seemed to be just the same quantity found there.

Kendall left her defence to her counsel.

Moulder's Defence. I am very innocent.

MOULDER, GUILTY , aged 31.

KENDALL, GUILTY , aged 59.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-37

461. JOHN BRISCOE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of April , two quarters of malt, value 7 l. the property of William Northcote and Susannah Northcote ; and

Other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them; and

JOHN CHERRY for receiving the same goods knowing them to be stolen .

The indictment read by Mr. Bolland; and case stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM BAKER . - Mr. Bolland. Where do you live. - A. I live at West Ham, I am a coal dealer and bargeman.

Q. Have you any partners. - A. Yes, Susannah Ingleton .

Q. Have you any barges - A. Yes, four; the prisoner Briscoe was my servant, he was captain of the barge .

Q. Had Mark Hodson of Bow employed you to bring any thing for him. - A. Yes, one hundred quarters of malt from Rotherhithe, from Mr. Northcote's; and forty-five quarters two bushels, from Messrs. Sawyer and Williams; I gave Briscoe the order to fetch it, and to hire sacks for it. On the 23d of April, in consequence of information, I told Briscoe that he had sold Mr. Cherry two quarters of malt; he replied, I know I have; he said he had it over at Northcote's; I asked him if he had hired the sacks on my account; he said no; he gave me the sack ticket for two hundred and ninety sacks.

Q. Is that the sack hire ticket that was delivered to you. - A. It is; he told me the sacks were in the barge's hold. I went and brought four sacks marked R W out of the barge.

Q. Did you understand from Briscoe they were the sacks that delivered the malt to Cherry. - A. I did; he said he supposed Ward's men had by mistake put four sacks too many; he said he threw the sacks down at Northcote's, and he supposed they filled them.

Q. So then you understood from him that he threw down four sacks too many, and Northcote filled them four sacks by mistake. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any more sacks in the barge. - A. No, not when I took them out. I saw Mr. Cherry about two or three days after I had his conversation with Briscoe; as soon as I accosted Cherry I said to him, I wish you would not buy malt of my man; he said he knew he bought it and they had a right to it, as it was over, as they had put up four sacks more than the quantity. I sent the four sacks home to Mr. Ward, and I had a return ticket for two hundred and ninety-four sacks. I saw Briscoe the next day, I told him that I should acquaint the parties with it; he said I had better let it drop. When I spoke to Cherry, he said he bought it fair enough in Halliday's tap room, they had a right to all that was over, as they paid for all that was lost; he said we wanted it ourselves, or else we should not make that stir about it.

Q. How long have you been in the trade of barge master. - A. About three years; I never heard of any such practice.

Q. Did you want that corn, or should you have brought it home if you had seen it. - A. No.

Q. Was Mrs. Ingleton by at the time you had these conversations. - A. Yes, she said if there were no receivers there would be no thieves; he replied that he wanted it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You are the owner of this barge. - A. No, Mr. Hearn is the owner, I am not a free lighterman.

Q. You did not go to Rotherhithe. - A No.

Q. You know nothing of what was delivered there. - A. No.

Q. Did you see any thing that was passing at the time the barge arrived. - A. I did not.

Q. How long have you known the two prisoners. A. Briscoe has worked for me about twelve months.

Q. He was about leaving you at this time. - A. He was.

Q. He was leaving you to go to a person of the name of Kettlewell, in whose service he was when he surrendered to meet this case. - A. I understood he was going there.

Q. Did not you know he was there. - A. No.

Q. He was a very good servant. - A. He certainly was.

Q. Where does Mr. Northcote live. - A. In Rotherhithe, Surry.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Cherry. - A. I have known him nine or ten years, he is a corn

chandler and coal dealer , he lives near the river Lea, on the Middlesex side.

Q. You learned this on the 23d of April, how soon did you communicate that which had been told you by both the prisoners. - A. I told several people of it, Mr. Bradley and Mr. Phillips, some few days after the 23d; I never communicated it to Mr. Carry nor Mr. Hodson.

Q. How soon after this was the prisoner apprehended and taken before a magistrate. - A. Either a fortnight or three weeks after.

Q. How soon was the first time that you made any application to a magistrate. - A. As soon as ever Mr. Hodson heard of it; about a fortnight after it happened; it had been talked of in the neighbourhood, and Mr. Hodson heard it, he communicated it to Mr. Northcote; we went before sir D. Williams to get a warrant, he heard our story and refused it. Then we went to Worship-street office, we had a warrant granted us there.

Q. Do you know Cook the porter. - A. Yes.

Q. You have denied to my learned friend, that you said he might as well let you have the malt. - A. I never said such a word.

WILLIAM NORTHCOTE . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a malster , residing at Rotherithe. - A. Yes, I am in partnership with my mother, Susannah Northcote .

Q. On the 20th of April last, did you deliver any malt to the prisoner Briscoe for Mr. Hodson. - A. I delivered one hundred quarters in sacks; he came in a barge, and brought the sacks to receive it, a hundred quarters of malt would fill two hundred sacks, I was present at the delivery, I did not count the sacks; I wrote a note for the delivery of one hundred quarters, that is the note; I gave it to Briscoe to carry to Mr. Hodson, (the note read), it was pale malt of a very good quality. I afterwards went to Cherry's, she brought me a handful of malt, which I really believe to be of the same quality of that malt I sent to Mr. Hodson.

Q. What was the price of it. - A. Seventy seven shillings a quarter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Be so good as to tell us the mode that is pursued at your malt house, to prevent more malt from being delivered than is ordered. - A. When the barge comes to the wharf; when the people are at leisure they go into the barge and fetch the empty sacks, which are in bundles of twenty sacks each bundle; these are carried into the malt room, and there told over, then they are doubled up in one fold; and the twenty sacks is laid open and reversed, to denote that is for ten quarters; when they have told out two hundred sacks, then they tell out two hundred strings to tie them; they are told out the same as the sacks, and laid twenty strings in a bundle; then the delivery note of an hundred quarters is given to the bargeman, to take to Mr. Hodson; Briscoe goes from my malt house down to the barge; the sacks are filled and delivered to him.

Q. This was directed by you for the purpose of preventing any mistake or fraud. - A. Yes.

Q. If this had been pursued, is it possible for more than two hundred sacks to be delivered. - A. It is highly improbable; I was present at the whole of the delivery, my being present if there had been any more than the regular quantity, I believe I should have seen it.

Q. Did you count the sacks yourself, or stand over your servants while they counted them. - A. I believe the sacks were counted previous to my going into the malt house.

Q. Therefore whether they had been counted correct or incorrect, you had not any opportunity of knowing. - A. I should distinguish that while the malt was filling in the sacks.

Q. Did you count them. - A. I did not.

Q. Therefore you cannot be able of your own knowledge to say whether they filled two hundred or two hundred and four without counting. - A. I think I should without counting.

Q. How soon after the delivery of these sacks, did you receive any information. - A. The first information I received was from Mr. Mark Hodson ; it was about three weeks after the corn had been delivered.

WILLIAM WOODLING . - Mr. Bolland. You are miller to Mr. Hodson. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you assist in April last in unloading a barge bearing three hundred sacks of malt, on what day was that barge unloaded. - A. I cannot say.

Q. How many sacks did you unload from that barge. - A. One hundred and forty five quarters and half a sack; that is two hundred and ninety sacks and a half, we found we had the full quantity, we measured them and weighed them.

JOHN HAYES . - Mr. Gurney. You are a porter. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of April last were you employed by Briscoe to carry any thing for him. - A. Yes, I carried one sack of grain out of Sion-hill barge, lying at Meason's lower wharf; on the Essex side of the river Lea; Briscoe told me to carry it to John Cherry 's, on the Middlesex side of the river Lea, I carried the third sack, Cook and Spicer carried one sack each before me.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. To the best of my knowledge it was between five and six in the evening.

Q. When you got to Cherry's house, did you see him. - A. No, he was not at home, I saw his wife; I carried it backwards into the washhouse; Briscoe paid me for carrying the sack.

JONATHAN COOK . - Mr. Bolland. What are you. - A. I am a porter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Briscoe. - A. Perfectly well; I carried one sack of grain for him, from the Sion barge; I cannot say whether it was malt or wheat; I carried one sack to Cherry's house, and pitched it where I was ordered.

Q. I believe you work for Mr. Baker. - A. Sometimes, the same as I may do for another gentleman.

Q. What time of the day did you carry these sacks to Mr. Cherry's. - A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it day light. - A. God bless you, yes.

Q. Where did you take the sacks from. - A. Out of a barge from Mr. Meason's wharf.

Q. Did you at the time see Mr. Baker. - A. Yes, and Mr. Baker saw me; I walked by his door with

it. About a week afterwards Baker told me he might as well let him have it as any body else; he said he might let him have the first refusal; the answer that I made to him was this, you would be glad to have it if you could have it for nothing.

THOMAS SPICER . - Mr. Gurney. You are a porter. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of April were you employed by Briscoe to carry any thing. - A. Yes, I carried to Mr. Cherry's by Briscoe's order, a sack of grain out of the barge, and Briscoe paid me.

Q. Was it the same time that Cook and Hayes went. - A. Yes.

NATHANIEL STONARD . - Mr. Bolland. Had you sir, at any time, any conversation with Cherry respecting this malt. - A. Yes, in the month of May he came to me in consequence of having been charged with buying this malt; he said he had not purchased the malt; he observed, that if he had purchased the malt, he should not have thought it a crime, as the sweepings of the barge were the perquisites of the men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Did not he tell you that he had not bought stolen malt. - A. He said that he had not bought the malt.

Q. Do you mean to say whether he said he had not purchased the malt, or that he had not purchased stolen malt. - A. I cannot say; he said he was accused of having purchased stolen malt, of whom he did not say; he said if he had purchased it, he should not have thought it wrong, as the malt was the sweepings of the barge.

MR. BRADLEY. Q. You are a baker living at Bromley. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation in the month of May last with Mr. Cherry. - A. I had, Mr. Billings was present; I told Mr. Cherry that I heard that he had bought two quarters of malt of Mr. Baker's bargeman; I said I thought it was wrong of a man like him to buy malt of a bargeman; he said he had a right to buy it, as the man had got it over; I asked him what he gave for it, he did not tell me; I asked him if he gave as much as three pound a quarter for it; he said he gave more, he would not tell me how much; he said that Mr. Baker only was angry that he had not the malt himself, and the reason why the man did not let Baker have the malt was, because he knew he never should have any thing for it.

JAMES BILLING . - Mr. Bolland. You are a carpenter in Bromley. - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at any conversation that took place between Mr. Bradley and Mr. Cherry. - A. I was; Mr. Bradley told Mr. Cherry that he had been buying some malt of Mr. Baker's man, very improperly; Mr. Cherry did not deny but what he had done so; Mr. Bradley asked him what he gave for it; he did not say; he asked him if he had given three pound a quarter for it; he said he gave more, but he did not say what he gave; he said the man had a right to sell it, because if he had any short he must make it good; it was the regular run of the business.

JOHN GILLMAM . I am an officer of the Thames police; I went to Cherry's house and got the malt. I produce three sacks.

Briscoe left his defence to his counsel.

Cherry's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - I rejoice at the day having arrived that I hope to be restored to peace and honour by your acquital. On the 22nd of April Briscoe was on shore at the Dog and Partridge; I called in the public house to look at the paper, when he informed me that he was going to leave Mr. Baker's lighter and that he had also some malt to sell I asked him if it was his own; he said yes, and he would sell it to whom he pleased; I then said let me have a sample if I like it I will give you a fair price for it I found the malt was tolerably good but mixed; I told him I could not give him more than seventy shillings a quarter for it. On Friday the first of May I paid him seven pound for it and took a stamp receipt for it; a few days afterwards Mr. Baker told me I had bought some malt of his man; I most readily told him yes I had. My servant will prove that it was done most publickly, it was brought along the public road into my shop-door, no concealment being made nor requested by me; and my personal surrender before the magistrate to give evidence to prove my innocence, and shewing a sample of the malt to Mr. Northcote, and offering to give it up before the magistrate; my keeping the malt seven weeks, when I might have removed it, must also afford a demonstration of my innocence. Gentlemen, some of you may censure me of being guilty of imprudence, and that you would have acted otherwise; but, gentlemen imprudence is not guilt; and for my imprudence already my punishment is more than I can bear; already to become the companions of felons in guilt, and to expect the taunts of my enemies, which your acquittal cannot prevent. As to my own fate I have suffered more than death. I have a tender wife and two infant daughters, which I love; it is for them I am anxious; it is for them you must decide.

Briscoe called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Cherry called sixteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BRISCOE, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

CHERRY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070701-38

462. MARY ANN FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June , a tin box, value 2 d. a seven shilling piece, a half crown, and one shilling, the property of Johanna Ford , spinster, privily from her person .

JOHANNA FORD . Q. Are you a single woman. - A. I am a widow woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-39

463. JOHN MEAKINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May , in the dwelling house of Thomas Johnson , a pocket book, value 6 d. two bills of exchange, for the payment of 10 l. each, and eight bank notes, value 10 l. each, the property of Thomas Johnson .

SARAH JOHNSON . My husband's name is Thomas Johnson , we live in White Lion-street, Seven Dials , my husband is a lapidary ; the prisoner was

apprentice to my husband. On Sunday the 10th of May, between nine and ten in the morning, I put the pocket book in the looking glass drawer, in the two pair back room where we sleep.

Q. What was there in the pocket book. - A. Three ten pound note, two ten pound drafts, and two indentures of the apprentices; one of them was the indenture of the prisoner.

Q. Did you lock the drawer. - A. No, I believe the prisoner was out at the time I put it there; he returned about eleven o'clock, I was below stairs; he went into the shop up stairs.

Q. Did he pass the room where you slept to go to the shop. - A. Yes.

Q. Was your bed room door locked. - A. No.

Q. Where was your husband during this time. - A. My husband went out just as the prisoner came in; my husband returned at two o'clock, and a few minutes after that the prisoner went out; about three or four o'clock my husband went up for the pocket book; he missed it.

Q. Did you at any time find any bank notes upon the floor of your room. - A. I did, in the parlour; that was two or three weeks following; I found five one pound bank notes, at the time I picked them up the prisoner was in custody

Q. Had he been in that room before he was taken in custody. - A. Just before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. There was some other lad taken up, charged with this offence. - A. Yes.

THOMAS JOHNSON . Q. Do you remember on Sunday the 10th of May - do you remember your wife putting any pocket book of yours in the drawer. - A. No; on Saturday night I received the ten pound notes; I told my wife to put them in my pocket book, and to take care of them. On Sunday the 10th of May I had occasion for some money; I asked her where the pocket book was; she told me it was in the looking glass drawer, in the bed room. I went and looked for it and it was missing.

Q. You apprehended the prisoner on suspicion that he had done this. - A. Yes, I apprehended him on Tuesday the 19th of May; upon searching him the officer found a watch, a one pound note, and a seven shilling piece; on Monday he stopped out all night, and on the Tuesday I apprehended him on suspicion.

Q. Had he any watch before that time. - A. Not to my knowledge; and there was another watch found in the lath and plaster in the room where the prisoner slept.

Q. Was there any thing found in the room near where the prisoner was, when the officer took hold of him. - A. Not on the same day, that was the day after; there were five one pound notes found much about the same spot as he stood when the officer searched him, and found a watch, a one pound note, and a seven shilling piece.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You found on his person a watch, a one pound note, and a seven shilling piece. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you allow your apprentices over money if they work. - A. Yes, he can get from five to seven shillings a week for himself; he has lived with me eight years, I always found him honest.

ROBERT GILBERT . I am an apprentice to Mr. Johnson.

Q. Do you remember at any time your master having left his pocket book on the desk in the shop. - A. Yes, about two months before; Meaking saw it, he opened it, he said his indentures were in it; he took them out and put them in again; one night afterwards he stopped out rather late, and master scolded him for it; he told me if he could get his indentures he would not stop; he told me if I should see them to give them to him.

Q. Do you remember the time when your master's pocket book was missing. - A. Yes, it was on a Sunday; the next day Meakings told me if I would keep a secret he would give me a watch; I told him I would; he said he had got a pocket book, and he brought the watch home at night; he did not say whose pocket book it was, nor what he had done with it; afterwards he told me that he had burned the two papers that were in the pocket book, that was two drafts I suppose. On Monday night he brought me a watch, he put it in the wall in the bed room in the back parlour; he said I might take it, after it had been there some time; and in the course of a week I saw him put two guineas in the window frame of the shop.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. You are this man's apprentice - did you happen to be taken in custody for this yourself. - A. Yes, on Wednesday week after the pocket book was lost.

Q. I take it for granted, you had access to all parts of the house the same as the prisoner had. - A. Yes.

Q. It was shortly after the robbery was committed that he told you this secret. - A. Yes.

Q. You remained in the house and never gave any account till you were apprehended. - A. No.

JAMES LIMERICK . I am an officer. On Tuesday the 19th of May I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner at the bar, I asked him what money he had got about him, he told me two or three halfpence; I searched him, I found a five pound note, a seven shilling piece, a halfpenny, in his pocket, and a silver hunting watch; it appears to be a new one.

Q. Did you afterwards search the back parlour of the prosecutor's house. - A. That was the next day; there I found a watch between the lath and plaster, that parts the two parlours near the head of the bed; the person produces that watch that took it out of the wall; I produce the hunting watch, the note and the money. I then went up into the shop, I found two guineas in the window frame, where the window slides up and down.

BENJAMIN WARD . I found this watch between the lath and plaster, between Mr. Johnson's apartment and the back room, on Wednesday the 20th of May.

DAVID JONES , I live at No. 30, Broad-street, St. Giles'. I am a silversmith and salesman.

Q. Look at that watch - do you remember selling that watch to any body. - A. I sold it on Saturday evening, the 16th of May, for five guineas, to two young men, they appeared like blacksmiths; I am not certain as to the identity of the prisoner; the other watch was sold out of my shop, but I cannot recollect when; I have some recollection of the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch that Gilbert says I gave him, is not my property; what he has said is false; the hunting watch, the one pound, and the seven shilling piece, is my property.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-40

464. JOHN SPARKS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , a gold watch, value 8 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. and a gold seal, value 1 l. the property of Robert Newton , in the dwelling house of William Stonnard .

ROBERT NEWTON . Q. Where did you sleep on the 23d of June last. - A. At the York hotel, Charles-street, Covent Garden .

Q. Had you any watch with you there. - A. I believe I had, I cannot swear that I had then.

Q. Had you a watch in the course of the day. - A. I had, it was a gold watch, it had gold chain and seals to it.

Q. You went to bed, and did not know where you put it. - A. Yes, I missed it in the morning afterwards when I got up, that was about nine o'clock.

Q. Was there any other person that slept in the room in any other bed. - A. No.

WILLIAM STONNARD . Q Do you keep the York hotel in Charles-street, Covent Garden. - A. Yes, it is in the parish of St. Pauls, Covent Garden.

Q. You are the keeper of the house, are you. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Newton sleeping at your house. - A. Yes, he came to town on the 23rd of June.

Q. Do you know what time he went up stairs. - A. It was between one and two o'clock when Mr. Newton went to bed; he went to the theatre that night and the theatre was very late.

Q. Did the prisoner Sparks lodge at your house that night. - A. Yes, he came between ten and eleven o'clock, he asked if he could have a bed. I looked at him, and after some hesitation I told him he might, as he was drest genteel and respectable; he ordered a glass of brandy and water, and sat down in the coffee room, he sat there till near two o'clock, till the coffee room was quite clear. I desired the waiter to give him a bed pair of slippers, and a bed candle, and to shew him his room, which he did; and he went to bed directly.

Q. Was his room near that in which Mr. Newton slept. - A. The adjoining room. After he had gone up stairs I went up to bed in nearly a quarter of an hour; I went to my own room, which is in the next floor above to where the prisoner, lay; I shut my door to, and had partly undressed myself, I heard some little noise, as if some person was opening a door or moving about the passage; it was a very trifling noise; knowing there was a stranger in the house, I opened my door to see what it was, I saw a light, and by my opening the door it made some little noise, and the light vanished away, it was gone; I stopped outside of the door a minute or two till the light came again; I then went down two stairs, in doing that the stairs made some little noise, and the light went away again; I was then sufficiently got enough down the stairs to see the door of the prisoner's room stood at that time a-jar, and the light was in his room; I concluded that it was not right for him to have the door open; I stopped where I was for the space of ten minutes, then I saw him come out with the candle in his hand, he was undressed, he slept in the room No. 5, he came across the passage and went into the room No. 3.

Q. Was that Mr. Newton's. - A. No, no person slept in that room that night. He then went to the drawers, which he opened one by one; I stood on the stairs and heard him open the drawers one by one; there were just five drawers, he opened four, one was locked. I was then fully satisfied what his intention was. I went into the room to inform Mrs. Stonnard, and when I was comming down the stairs again, the stairs made further noise; the prisoner ran into his room again, and locked the door; when the prisoner had locked his door he could not unlock it again. In the same room where he slept, in the cupboard, were some trunks of a gentleman; I was afraid he was trying to open them, I found them safe afterwards. I called one of my waiters up to get an officer, that I might give the prisoner in charge; one of the waiters went out and got an officer, I went down stairs myself just after the waiter was gone; and while I was down stairs I heard the prisoner come out of his room with a candle in his hand, he was naked; one of the maid servants at that time was on the stairs, she called to him; I was at the bottom of the stairs below; I heard her call to him. I ran up stairs and went into his room, the prisoner pretended to be much frightened; I insisted upon his going out of the house directly; I told him I knew what his intention was. I looked in the cupboard and found every thing was safe.

Q. You having no reason to suppose that he had taken any thing let him go. - A. Yes, I told the officer to let him go, and he went away. The next morning Mr. Newton asked me if I had seen his watch, if he had left it in the coffee room on the over night; I told him no. In consequence of that I went to the office, got an officer; we went to No. 4, Leather-lane, where the prisoner had stated he lived; we there learned that he was at a house, No. 7, Earl-street, Seven Dials; we went there, and there we saw the prisoner coming from a house No. 7, Earl-street, Seven Dials. We searched him and took the watch out of his pocket.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . On the 24th of last month I apprehended the prisoner in Earl street, I searched him and found a gold watch upon him, chain and seal; I took the watch out of his fob pocket. I produce it.

Q. (to prosecutor) Is that your watch, chain and seal. - A. It is the same, it is worth ten pounds; it is a gold watch, capped and jewelled.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I think you said you did not know whether you lost it coming out of the theatre. - A. When I came out of the theatre I remember putting the chain into my pocket, in order to guard it from being taken; but at the same time, I do not recollect any thing more about it.

Prisoner's Defence. After I left the house, I went towards the Seven Dials; in passing there I found the watch which has been produced here.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

[ The Jury recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, upon account of his being an unfortunate man, having failed in trade .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-41

465. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously

breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann March , no person being therein, about the hour of eight in the afternoon, on the 14th of June , and feloniously stealing therein, a coat, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 s. and a sheet, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Brunton .

THOMAS BRUNTON . I live at No. 14, England-buildings. Oxford Road , I lodge with Ann March , she is the house keeper, I occupy the attic floor. The clothes were left in my care, I had to answer for them; the owner was in the country, he sleeps there some nights, and when he is absent the room is under my care.

Q. What time on the 14th of January did you go out. A. I believe between five and six; I locked the door when I left it; I returned between eight and nine in the evening; I went up stairs to the attic, I found the lock of the door had been forced, and the clothes and the sheet were missing.

ENEAS MARCH . My mother's name is Ann March .

Q. Does she occupy the house where Williams lodges. A. Yes.

Q. On the 14th of June what time you leave the house. - A. Between eight and nine in the evening; I left nobody in the house; my mother was out.

Q. How did you leave your house when you went out. - A. I shut the door when I went out and left it on the latch; I was out about half an hour, and when I returned I found it fast as I had left it; I opened the door, I found a man in the passage.

Q. Are you sure the latch catched when you went out. - A. I did not try to see whether it caught; when I opened the door and found a man in the passage, I asked him who he was, he had a bundle under his arm; he said he wanted a person of the name of Wilson; I told him there was no such a person lived in the house; then he walked out of the house, taking the bundle with him. Mr. Kemp was standing at the end of the court, I desired him to lay hold of him; Mr. Kemp laid hold of him and took him to the round house.

Q. Do you know that man again. - A. The prisoner is the man.

Q. What was in the bundle. - A. A suit of clothes.

WILLIAM KEMP . Q. Were you in this court called England's-buildings. - A. Yes. In consequence of Eneas March calling to me I stopped the prisoner in Charles-street, Oxford-road; he had a bundle in his left hand, he pushed forward just as I got close to him; I brought him and the bundle back to the court, and delivered him to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to make water in this court; I saw a bundle lying at a door; a child was coming out of the court, I asked her whether the bundle belonged to her, she said it belonged to a person that lived in the house of the name of Wilson; I went to the door, opened it, and went into the passage; as I stood in this passage this gentlewoman came behind me; I asked her if one of the name of Wilson lived there; I told her I was informed the bundle belonged to her. Immediately the girl went out of the court I run out in the road after the girl, who informed me that the bundle belonged to that house; I could not find her.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings .

Confined One Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070701-42

466. MARY WILLIAMS , MARY HARRIS , and JANE MARTIN , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , privily from the person of Margaret Winter , a pocket book, value 6 d. and a one pound note, her property .

MARGARET WINTER . I am a widow , I live at No. 11, Robinson's-row, Kingsland.

Q Did you lose your pocket book and a one pound bank note. - A. Yes; on the 28th of May, about twelve o'clock at noon, when the charity children went to St. Paul's school I was in St. Paul's church yard , going from the city to Ludgate-hill.

Q. When you set off from Kingsland had you a pocket book. - A. Yes, and a one pound note in it.

Q. Had you any occasion to feel in your pocket between Kingsland and St. Paul's church yard. - A. Yes.

Q. When was the last time that you felt in your pocket book, and perceived your pocket book safe in it. A. When I was rather beyond the church door in St. Paul's church yard I felt in my pocket, it was safe then. When I got rather beyond the print shop, the two elder ones of the prisoners they were very troublesome to me indeed; the tallest one was as close to me as she could; I had a young woman with me, she separated me from her; I do not say that they robbed me.

Q. How near was the shorter of the two elderly women. - A. She was before me; the taller of the two was very troublesome indeed with pushing me about.

Q. There were a great many people very near to you. - A. Yes, but they were not troublesome, they appeared to be in company together, the tall one and the shorter. When I first went into St. Paul's church yard they seemed to select me out to push me about; they were one before me and the other behind me, and both of them were near enough to touch me.

Q. Did you see the tall woman then. - A. I cannot say I did.

Q. Was the pushing at all violent. - A. Particularly the tall one; I pushed her off from me as the crowd were about; I was a good deal pushed about; when I came to Ludgate Hill I went into a friend's; then I found I had lost my pocket book and the note. On the next day I saw my book before the lord mayor; the book and the note were together, and they all three were in custody.

JOHN TURNER . I am a city constable.

Q. Were you in St. Paul's church yard the day the charity children were. - A. I was on duty at the north door. After I had information I followed the three women, I saw them hustle several people; I saw the three prisoners in company together, they were going in a direction from Cheapside to Ludgate Hill; Hart and I watched them till they got to a good many people, at Newberry's corner of Ludgate Hill; we could see them hustling about for six or seven minutes, but we could not see their hands for the quantity of people that were about.

Q. Did you at all catch sight of Mrs. Winter at this time. - A. I did not; all at once they all three took a start, and went through London House yard into Pater-noster-row; I told Hart to come along, they had got something; in Pater-noster-row I laid hold of Mary

Williams , she had crossed Pater-noster-row, going into a passage that leads into Newgate market; I desired Hart to lay hold of the other two; I and Hart went up Pater-noster-row with the three prisoners into a public house and searched them; we found nothing upon them.

WILLIAM HART . I am a constable; from information we followed the three prisoners.

Q. Did they appear to be in company together. - A. Not exactly so; the tallest was at some distance when we first saw them, her name is Jane Martin ; the other two were very near together, they seemed to be walking very sharp between the people near to Ludgate Hill, by Newberry's; they all joined together and went down London House yard towards Pater-noster-row; there I apprehended Jane Martin and Mary Harris . I was afraid Harris had some intention of throwing something from her; her right hand was at liberty; I watched her; but I did not perceive her do any thing. We took the women into the Hope public house, Ivey-lane; there was a person came to inform us that there was a pocket book thrown into a house; I received the pocket book of a man of the name of Watkins. He is not here; he never came to the mansion house.

(The property produced and identified).

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-43

467. JOHN STEPHENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , eight pieces of shawls, value 30 l. one hundred and forty nine shawls, value 30 l. a piece of printed calico, value 3 l. twenty-four yards of printed calico, value 3 l. two shawls, value 8 s. the property of Jonathan Peel , Lawrence Peel , Joseph Peel , John Peel , Robert Peel , Edmund Peel , Richard Yates , John Peel , junior , Robert Peel , junior , and James Thompson , in their dwelling house .

Second Count for like offence, stating it to be in the dwelling house of Joseph Peel and Edmund Peel .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH PEEL . Q. Where is your house. - A No 19, Lawrence-lane, London

Q. Who are the partner s in that business. - A. Jonathan Peel , Lawrence Peel , Joseph Peel , myself, John Peel , Thomas Peel , Robert Peel , Edmund Peel , Richard Yates , John Peel , junior, and Robert Peel , junior.

Q. Who resides in your house in Lawrence-lane. - A. Joseph Peel and Edmund Peel ; it is a general home for us both. The property of this house belongs to all the partners.

Q. The prisoner at the bar has been your servant . - A. Yes, upwards of three years.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Watson, and did you see some of your property there. - A. I went to Mr. Watson's. and I afterward went to Mr. Purse, a pawnbroker in London Wall, and there Mr. Mill, the clerk, shewed me eight pieces of shawl belonging to our firm; I had no doubt of their being our property; the names were on the shawls in full length; he had not taken the precaution of taking the names off.

Q. Did you see after that any piece of British calico. A. I saw one piece; the officer brought it down stairs from the room in which he lodged, and two single shawls. In consequence of selling the goods at Mr. Purse's, I went to the mansion house; the officer took the prisoner in our counting house.

Q. Do you happen to know what parish this house is in. - A. I believe it is in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry; I do not positively know.

WILLIAM MILL . Q. I understand you are a shopman to Mr. Purse, who is a pawnbroker in London Wall. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do; I have known him ten months, by his bringing goods to me, shawls and a few cottons. I went to Mr. Peel myself, and shewed him eight pieces of shawls, which I got of the prisoner; he brought them at four different times.

Q. How lately had any been brought to you. - A. On the 17th or 18th of May; he then brought two pieces.

Q. Did you shew to Mr. Peel these two pieces that were brought on the 17th or the 18th. - A. Yes, they are part of the eight pieces that were shewn to Mr. Peel; Mr. Peel claimed them as his own; I have got them here, but they are so much alike I cannot distinguish them, they are of two patterns; I produce the eight pieces; I took in six of them myself.

Q. You say only two pieces were brought on the 17th or 18th of May - were you present when they were brought, and did you take in the goods on that day. - A. I did not; we did not see the shawls then.

Q. Do you advance money on goods without looking at them. - A. No; he said he would leave the goods and call again.

WILLIAM WICHELLO . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take in any shawls of him. - A. I believe I have, once or twice.

Q. Did you take in any of him on the 17th or 18th of May. - A. I cannot say; I do not know whether I took in any myself.

Court. Were you present when he brought in any goods. - A. Yes.

Q. When was the latest time that you see him bring in any goods. - A. I cannot say.

Q. How did you receive these goods. - A. They were packed up in paper; I never bought any.

Q. Who bought them. - A. This young man and another young man that lived with us.

Q. to Mill. Did you pay him any money for them A. Yes, I did.

Q. Which shawls did you pay him for. - A. Those that have been sold some time ago.

Q. Were these a sample of any thing that you did buy. - A. They were samples of what I were to buy.

Q. When did you open any of these shawls that are now here in the presence of the prisoner. - A. Some of these pieces of shawls which I can point out.

Q. You say they were brought on the 17th or 18th of May did you see the prisoner after that. - A. I saw him on the 19th

Q. Was Mr. Purse present. - A. No

Mr. Knapp. Upon what occasion did you see him on the 19th of May. - A. He called in to let me know that he had a quantity of goods for me to look at in Lawrence lane; we conversed about the goods that were brought on the 18th; I offered him one pound ten shilling, a dozen for the shawls; after some hesitation he agreed to take it; I was to pay him for them when he brought the thirty dozen. On the 19th of May, about

seven o'clock in the evening I went to Mr. Peel's, Lawrence-lane; I rung at the bell, and the prisoner opened the door, and told me that he had looked out the goods for me; he took me into the warehouse, and shewed me about ten pieces of them; I asked him then if he was a partner in the house, he told me he was not, he was only a warehouseman; I then asked him whose goods they were, he told me that they were Mr. Peel's; I asked him whether Mr. Peel knew I was buying these goods, or of his selling them; he said he did not know it; I told him he was doing very wrong in selling Mr. Peel's goods without his knowledge; he then told me I might have any goods I saw in the warehouse, to the amount of several thousands worth; I might pick them out, and he would sell them me; I told him I would have nothing to do with the shawls, as they were not his own. I gave information to Mr. Watson, who formerly belonged to Mr. Peel's house.

WILLIAM SHERRIN . Q. You are a constable of the city of London. - A. Yes; on the 20th of May I took the prisoner in custody, in Mr. Peel's accompting house; I went to No 58, White Lion-street, to the prisoner's lodgings, he directed me; there we found two shawls in his chest of drawers, in the one pair of stairs room; and in his bed room in Mr. Peele's house, I found this piece of printed cotton.

(The property produced and identified.)

Q. (to Mr. Peel) Since you have made this charge, have you taken stock, and do you find a diminution of that stock since the apprehension of the prisoner. - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character,

GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-44

468. MARY SHEARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Jones Ellison .

MRS. ELLISON. I am the wife of Thomas Jones Ellison , I live at No. 8, Water-lane, Black Friers ; I missed the watch on the 22nd of May, between four and five in the afternoon, it was hanging up in the room; I knew the prisoner, I asked her to come and see my apartment; she came about four o'clock that afternoon, and staid about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Had you seen the watch while she was in the room. - A. I cannot say, I saw it at two o'clock; I missed it about a quarter of an hour after she was gone. I saw the watch about a week afterwards at the mansion house.

ROBERT STARKE . I am shopman to Mr. Fleming. On the 22nd of May. about twelve at noon, I took this watch in of a woman. I rent her twenty shillings on it. I have no recollection of the prisoner.

GEORGE DAWSON . I am a constable. From information I searched the prisoner, she was very much intoxicated; I found the duplicate of this watch upon her.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London on jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-45

497. SARAH SUMMERFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , fifteen yards of silk ribbon, value 5 s. the property of Mary Ann Homan , and Elizabeth Homan .

ANN HOMAN . I live at 269, Shoreditch , we are haberdasher s; Elizabeth Homan is my partner. On the 29th of May, the prisoner came in the shop to look at a pasteboard bonnet shape; I asked her six-pence for it, she said it was too much; she would look at some ribbons, I shewed her some ribbons, and she fixed upon a primrose ribbon, and said she should like a mazarine blue of the same width; I shewed her that, and then I missed the primrose ribbon. I took hold of her hand, and the ribbon fell from under her left arm. She begged for mercy.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of four and sixpence only .

[The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of her good character].

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-46

469. JOHN COOPER , JOSEPH DALTON , and STEPHEN PAPPS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , in the dwelling house of Thomas Daws , a pocket book, value 6 d. two bank notes, value 50 l. each, a bill of exchange, value 11 d. and a warrant for the payment of money, value 12 l. 17 s, the property of Edward Barr Duddington , and Thomas Nelson .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

CHARLES FENN - Mr. Alley. Do you recollect on the 25th of May, being employed by your master in going out to get money. - A. Yes.

Q. Who are your masters. - A. Mr. Edward Barr Duddington , and Mr. Thomas Nelson , they are calico printer s, 67, Bond-street. I went out with my pocket book, there was a bill of exchange in it for one hundred and eleven pound, a check for twelve pound seventeen shillings, and two fifty pound bank notes, which I received in Bond-street for a hundred pound draft. I went into Mrs. Daw's public house, the sign of the Wheatsheaf, Holywell street . I put my banker's book on the table, called for a glass of ale, I took up the newspaper; I staid in the house about five minutes, put the newspaper down and went out of the house, and left the book behind me; I went a little past Temple Bar before I missed the book, then I went back to Mrs. Daw's, and made enquiry about it.

THOMAS NELSON . - Mr. Alley. What is your partner's name. - A. Edward Barr Duddington . We are calico printers; the last witness is our apprentice.

Q. Do you remember the day we are speaking of, sending him out for some money. - A. Perfectly well; that is the book he carried out that morning (the book produced); this bill of exchange for one hundred and eleven pound, I endorsed it; and a check of twelve pound seventeen shillings, upon Hodsoll, was to be paid when presented; and a draft of one hundred pound upon Birch and Chambers, in Bond-street, for which he got two fifty pound notes. In discovering this loss, I

went immediately to Bow-street.

FREDERICK GATTEY . - Mr. Alley. You are clerk to Messrs. Birch and Chambers, Bond street - A. Yes.

Q. Look at your book and see whether a check was presented to your house for a hundred pounds. - A. Yes, I paid the bill on the 25th of May in two fifty pound bank of England notes; one of the fifty pound notes was No. 7078, and the other 2152, both in the present year; one 30th of April, and the other 14th of May; I delivered them notes to Fenn.

JANE DAWS . Q. You keep the Wheatsheaf public house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day this young man lost the pocket book. - A. Yes.

Q. When he was in your house do you remember seeing either of the prisoners at the bar in your house at the same time - A. Yes, John Cooper was in the house at the time, he sat in the next box to him asleep; there were two tables between them. Fenn was of the farthest side of the box. After Fenn went away Dalton and Papps came in and asked for a pint of beer; they sat in the same box that Fenn went from; they drank their beer, and then they went to the box that Cooper was sitting at; they joined together and went out together. About a minute after they were gone Fenn came in to enquire about the pocket book; after the young man, Fenn, had gone, the three prisoners all returned in company together; I asked them if they saw any thing of the book; Papps said he had it not, did I think they were all thieves; he asked me if I knew where the young man lived that had lost his pocket book; I told them no. he was a perfect stranger, I told him whether they had or not got the book, they could have no objection to give me their address; Papps told me that he lived at the Green Man. Covent Garden, and Dalton told me he lived at No. 20, Charing Cross; I never asked Cooper.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields. I went with Fenn and a gentleman along with him to the Wheatsheaf on the 25th; on the 26th of May I apprehended Papps at the Green Man, New-street, Covent Garden; he was in bed; I said where is the pocket book and the notes; he said he knew nothing about it. I searched his clothes and found nothing; I made a further search in his lodgings; I found the banker's book, containing the banker's check of one hundred and eleven pounds, and the bill of exchange for twelve pounds seventeen shillings; he then says I will tell you all about it. He said that he had the two fifty pounds bank notes in his fob pocket, and that he suspected Dalton had picked his pocket of them; he said the other two prisoners were to meet him at the Crooked Billet. I afterwards found the other prisoners at the Crooked Billet. Papps told me that he was at Merlin's Cave playing at skittles, they were almost drunk, he had lost them there, Dalton had picked his pocket; Dalton seemed offended at Papps accusing him of picking his pocket.

MATTHEW GAWLAND . I live at the Loyal Volunteer, late the Merlin's Cave. I found two fifty pound notes on my premises in the skittle ground on the 26th of May. I delivered them up at the office in Bow-street on the 30th of May.

EDWARD EXTON . I am a waiter at the Loyal Volunteer. On the 25th of May the prisoners were playing at skittles in our ground; they came between four and five in the afternoon; Cooper went away between six and seven, and the other two staid till between ten and eleven at night.

Donaldson. I produce one of the fifty pound notes; I got it at Bow-street office, I saw them delivered up by the landlord of the Merlin's Cave; the other was given up to Mr. Nelson, he has made use of it. The number of this note is 2152, 30th April 1807.

Papps' Defence. When I found this book I did not mean to keep it, but to restore it to the owner; we waited till the next morning to see if we could see the reward. That is the reason that we met at the Crooked Billet.

Cooper and Dalton left their defence to their counsel.

Dalton called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COOPER, NOT GUILTY .

DALTON, NOT GUILTY .

PAPPS, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-47

471. JOHN BUCKLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , two coats, value 2 l. a pair of breeches, value 15 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Catherine Middleton Wynne , in her dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

MARGARET NEWMAN . Q. On the 14th or 16th of June last were you the housekeeper to Mrs. Wynne. A. I was.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in her service at that time as coachman . - A. He was; I was ordered by Mrs. Wynne to discharge him; she said she would have nothing more to do with him, and the next day when he came I desired him to deliver up his box great coat and his rough suit, his stable things, and I would discharge him and pay him his wages, which was one pound sixteen shillings.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge where these things were kept, where did he sleep. - A. He slept at his mistresses's house, but he never kept his box or any of his clothes there; he kept his great coat in the stable.

Q. How is the stable situated to your dwelling house. A. There is no stable belonging to the house, it is a livery stable; he had all his livery on when I called him to discharge him.

JOHN ASH . Q. What are you. - A. I am a dealer in old clothes. On the 20th of June the prisoner brought me a box drab great coat, with livery buttons; I gave him two guineas and a half for it and two twopenny glasses of rum. On Tuesday he brought me a livery coat, waistcoat, and breeches; I gave him ten shillings for that suit; the great coat was nearly new; I asked him how he came by it, he said his mistress was gone to Ireland, and she had given him all the clothes. The officer came and took them away.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it just to support nature; I asked for my wages; she said she would not give me any; she would keep it to help repair the carriage. I told her if she did, I would make away with the

clothes.

Mrs. Newman. What he has alledged is not true; I told him if he would deliver his clothes I would pay him his wages.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-48

471. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , a metal watch value 8 l. two gold seals, value 3 l. a piece of gold coin, value 31 s. 6 d. and a copper coin, value 1 d. the property of Daniel Crisp , in the dwelling house of William Hayward .

DANIEL CRISP . I am engraver , I live in St. Ann's-lane. On the 26th of May, about half after two in the morning, I went home with the prisoner to her apartments, No. 3, Harford's-place, Drury-lane ; I staid there till between eight and nine o'clock in the morning and when I awoke in the morning I missed my watch, and the other things in the indictment; before I went to bed I took the key from the outside of the door and locked the door on the inside; I wound my watch up and laid it upon the table. In the morning when I got up I went to see what o'clock it was; the watch was gone, with some pieces of coin I had in my pocket; I accused the prisoner with taking it; then she denied ever having seen them.

Q. Did you ever find the property again. - A. The watch, seals, and piece of gold coin I have never seen; the piece of copper coin I have.

JOHN DONALDSON . I apprehended the prisoner at No 3, Harford-place. In searching her pockets I pulled out some halfpence and silver, among which was this piece of copper coin; the prosecutor said that is my penny piece I searched the room; I could not find the watch nor the other property.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman before he went to bed he gave me a few halfpence to get something to drink, and among them halfpence he gave that piece of coin.

Prosecutor. I gave her no halfpence; I gave her a pound note. This piece of copper coin is mine; it was doubled in three papers; she took this and the gold coin; it was an angel of Henry the Eighth.

Q. Are you sure you give her a note, or that in the halfpence. - A. I could not give her that.

Prisoner. He gave me a handful of halfpence, and among that was the copper coin; he gave me a one pound note, I returned him fifteen shillings; in the morning he had a great many more notes; if I had a mind to have robbed him I should have taken them.

Jury. You said you gave her a one pound note, you did not say she returned any money to you. - A. She returned me fourteen shillings in the morning; I had no more notes about me; she was in bed when I got up. I do not know that she had been cut.

Court. Have you ever seen your watch - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-49

472. JOSEPH BARKER and MORRIS ENGAN alias ANIGAN, alias HENIGAN , were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon Thomas Stockall , on the 3d of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 1 l. 10 s. four shillings, a sixpence, and twelve halfpence, his property .

THOMAS STOCKALL . Q. Where do you live. - A. In Richard's-buildings, Hatfield-street, Goswell-street. I am a shoemaker .

Q. When did this happen. - A. On the 3d of June at ten o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Ball-yard, Golden-lane ; I was going up Golden-lane, crossing the end of Ball-yard, I met three men; I strove to avoid them; one of them came up to me and knocked me down with his fist, I lay a little time on the ground, I recollected myself in a little bit; I then got up and I missed my watch and my money.

Q. Why do you accuse these men of it. - A. The shorter one, Barker, I believe to be the man that struck me.

Q. Did he say any thing to you - A. No, only come up and knocked me down and robbed me.

Q. Who took your watch out of your pocket. - A. I cannot say, there were three round me.

Q. You say Barker was the man that you supposed knocked you down; what did the others do. - A. I do not know.

Q. Were you insensible when you were down. - A. Rather so at first.

Q. What opportunity had you of knowing that man. - A. I recollected him again when I was taken to the prison to look at him, by the order of the magistrate.

Q. You recollected that he was one of the men that came up to you. - A Yes; when I came to the prison I recollected his person.

Q. Are you sure he is the man. - A. To the best of my recollection.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. No.

Q. What do you say as to the other prisoner Engan. - A. I do not recollect him at all.

Barker. Can you say that I knocked you down. - A. To the best of my recollection you were the first that met me; there were three of you.

RACHAEL RIDLEY . I live at No. 13, Noble-street, Brick-lane, Old-street. On the third of June, about ten o'clock at night, I was standing at the corner of Ball-yard, Golden lane; I saw this gentleman knocked down.

Q. By whom. - A. I cannot tell who it was that knocked him down; there were three or four of them.

Q. Did you know any of them. - A. I only knew them two prisoners.

Q. What did Barker do - A. He did do not any thing; after they knocked the old gentleman down, they run on; they were both in company with the others.

Q. You say you saw him knocked down by three or four people - which of them knocked him down. - A. It was a strange man that knocked him down.

Q. You saw this man in company with two or three others, some of which knocked the old man down, and when they knocked him down, what did they all do. - A. They all ran away.

Q. Did not they take his watch from him. - A. No, I did not see that.

Q How long have you known them. - A. I have known them about twelve months. I know them by living at a public house in Bridgewater gardens, they used to come there, I am sure they were been in company with those that knocked the old man down.

Q. You are sure they were in company with the men who knocked him down. - A. Yes, that I am sure of.

Q. Did you see the old man get up. - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say. - A. I cannot recollect what he said.

Q. How came he to find you out. - A. The next morning I happened to mention it to my master at the Catherine Wheel; he told the gentleman of it.

Q. Did not the old gentleman say he was robbed and his watch was gone. - A. Yes, he said when he got up his watch and money was gone.

Q. Which way did they go after they knocked him down. - A. They went strait up the lane and came round, and begged me not to mention his name.

Q. Who did that. - A. Morris Engan ; he begged me not to mention his name; he said I should get him hanged.

Q. What did Barker say. - A. I did not see him afterwards.

Barker. Can you say that you saw me that night. - A. Yes, I saw you both.

Barker. I was bad in bed.

Engan. When I saw you, says you I can take my oath to Joseph Barker . - A. I said what a shame it is that man was knocked down.

Q. You said there is Joe Barker for one; says I, do not say so, you are not certain, you'll get the man hanged. - A. I saw you both.

Court. How soon after that did Morris Engan come to you. - A. In about a quarter of an hour.

JONATHAN TROTT . On the 9th of June I received information of a burglary committed upon Saffron-hill; myself and Chapman went down Saffron-hill, knowing disorderly persons that lived in White's-yard, Saffron-hill. We then watched there; one of the persons was pointed out as supposed to be one of the persons that committed that burglary. I watched; after that I saw Barker come out in company with a young woman, whom he keeps; I took him in custody on suspicion of that burglary. The consequence was two or three days afterwards the prosecutor made application to the office to know if there was not a person of the name of Barker in custody. I told him there was.

Q. You knew Barker before - A. Yes, perfectly well; in consequence of that, with the magistrate's approbation, I took the prosecutor down; immediately he saw Barker, he said he was one of the men. The prosecutor told me there was a girl that knew more of the robbery than he did; I took a summons, left it with her father, she appeared, she swore to Barker, and told me of the other, Engan.

Barker Mr. Trott is giving that girl presents every day, because she is to have eighty pound to prosecute.

Court. (to Ridley) Have you had any money. - A. No, I have not.

Barker. You told Margeret Engan so. - A. I did not, I have not had one halfpenny given me. I am in danger of my life for speaking the truth.

Barker's Defence. I was in bed at the time this robbery was committed.

Engan's Defence. I am innocent of the fact; I happened to come up, and this girl said there is Joseph Barker , he is one, I said do not take his life away, if you are not sure; she said she could take her oath of it.

BARKER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

ENGAN, GUILTY - DEATH aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18070701-50

473. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of May , a black gelding, value 20 l. the property of William Baxter .

WILLIAM BAXTER . I live at Leicester , I keep the Swan public house .

Q. When did you lose your horse. - A. On the 19th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, it was hired by the prisoner; he was to return it the next day at ten o'clock. I was not in the way when it was hired.

Q. Then all you know it is your property. - A. Yes.

PETER PEARCE . I live partly by graizing, and partly upon a copyhold estate, in the marsh at Hackney. On the 21st of May, the prisoner came to my house at Hackney, he asked me if I had any grass to let, I told him I had plenty, I was going to open a field. On that same day he turned in a black cropped horse.

Q. Did you know him. - A. No, I had never seen him to the best of my knowledge before, I enquired of him where he lived, and as it was in the new neighbourhood at Hackney, the new buildings, I did not think it necessary to enquire. On Thursday he came again, and asked me if I would let him turn in another horse; I told him I could for a guinea a month; being a small horse, and he a name sake, I was rather inclined to favour him. I heard no more of the black horse till the 9th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was leaning over the hatchway of my outward premises; a neighbour coming by said, there is a strange piece of work down in the new neighbourhood; I heard no more of it till Atkins came for the horse; I had suspicion that the horse was not honestly come by; I followed Atkins, Salmon and the prisoner, they were all three together. I saw the prisoner in the act of haltering the black horse, they had got in the field; I said, generally, I addressed myself to neither of the three. I hope you are not going to take this horse out without paying me for keep, if you are it is very unusual; Atkins replied, I do not know that we shall pay you for the keep, for I conceive this horse is stolen, and I shall take it away; I said I thought myself justified in detaining it. They gave me their address; from that time the horse was out of my possession. That horse was in my possession from the 21th of May, till the 9th of June.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 9th of June I in company with Atkins, apprehended the prisoner at the bar in Hackney field; we asked the prisoner what he had done with a little black horse he had at Leicester, and whether he had sold him; he paused a little; he then said he had not sold him, if we would give him leave to walk with us, he would show us where the horse was; accordingly we all three went together; he pointed out the horse in the field; he said that is the horse, if you will give me leave, I will catch him; he accordingly catched the horse, put a halter on him, and delivered him into my hands; he said that was the horse that he had from Leicester. Mr. Baxter has seen it and has sworn to it.

JOHN FOX. I am servant to Mr. Baxter On the 19th of May the prisoner came and asked to hire a horse to go to Hinkley, which is thirteen miles from

Leicester. He said he was going of a very unpleasant errand. he was going money hunting.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. I do not know that I did; I saddled and bridled the poney for him.

Q. When was he to return. - A. The next morning at ten o'clock.

Q. What was he to pay. - A. Ten shillings, he hired it for two days.

Q. Did he return. - A. He did not.

Q. Have you seen the horse since. - A. Yes, I saw him in Lincoln's Inn fields.

Q. Were you shewn the horse by Salmon. - A. Yes, I knew the horse very well.

Q. Whose horse is it. - A. Mr. Baxter's, the black one.

Q. Did the prisoner describe where he lived when he came to you at Leicester. - A. No, he did not say five words to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You say he hired him to take a journey from Leicester to Hinkly. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you agree that if he kept him longer, he was wellcome to do so, provided he paid five shillings a day. - A. No, he said he would come back the next day at ten.

Q. (to prosecutor) You have seen that horse. - A Yes.

Q. Are you sure it is yours. - A. Yes.

Q. What do you call it, a black gelding. - A. Yes, a black gelding.

Q. How long have you had it. - A. I had it on the 26th of March, when I entered on that public house.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

Q. (to Pearce) Did you find out where he lived. - A. No, I did not know any thing of him; he lived in the new buildings, knowing they were all new inhabitants, I made no enquiry.

Prisoner. I told Mr. Pearce my name was William Pearce . - A. No, you said John Pearce.

Q. (to Fox) Did he tell you his name when he hired the horse. - A. No, not a word.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-51

474. ELIZABETH BLADEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Gibbons , no person being therein, about the hour of one on the afternoon of the 15th of June , and feloniously stealing therein, a gown, value 12 s. the property of James Gibbons .

ELEANOR CARROL . I lodge in Mr. Gibbons' house, No. 4, New-street, St. Giles's . Mrs. Gibbons was going out, and I was coming in; she told me if I saw any one come in I was to give an answer; at the same time I was going into the yard I heard the prisoner come down stairs, she lived in the house; she went to Mrs. Gibbons' door and knocked twice; she got no answer; she went out of the street door. She came the second time to Mrs. Gibbons's door, unlatched it, and went in; she staid in the room about twenty minutes; I watched to see what she was doing. This gown laid upon the table behind the parlour door; she took the gown, put it under her apron, and walked up stairs with it.

Q. Are you sure that you saw this woman go behind the door and take the gown. - A. Yes, I came past the door and saw her.

Q. Did not you speak to her. - A. No, I did not.

MRS. GIBBONS. Q. What do you know about this gown. - A The pawnbroker has got it; my lodger found the duplicate on the stairs.

THOMAS RUTLAND . I live in High Holborn; the gown was pawned at our house by a woman of the name of Joon; I lent three shillings upon it; I do not know it was the prisoner.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday she told me she had lost a gown, and that it laid between me and the woman in the two pair of stairs, and that the pawnbroker knew the person; I told her I would go with her to the pawnbroker's or to any magistrate; she turned the woman out of doors, she said she did not think it was me. It was pawned in my sister in law's name; I know nothing of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-52

475. JOHN HARDING was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of John Wilkinson , on the 12th of June , three bank notes, value 5 l. each, fifteen bank notes, value 2 l. each, and fifteen other bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of John Wilkinson .

JOHN WILKINSON . I am a publican ; I keep the Green Man, Bow-street. Covent Garden ; the prisoner is a soldier in the third regiment of guards ; he had been quartered at my house about four months.

Q. When was, it you lost these notes - A. On Friday the 12th of June; I was out at the time the robbery was committed; I did not miss it till the morning about twelve or one o'clock.

Q. Where did you leave your money. - A. In the bed room, locked up in a table drawer.

Q. Why do you accuse him of it. - A. He did not come in his quarters till near ten o'clock, and then he was very drunk indeed; he went to bed. About one o'clock, when I fastened the house up and went to bed myself, I unlocked this table drawer; I found this money deficient; I suspected the prisoner, he being drunk. I went up stairs, I found him on the bed with his clothes on; I awoke his comrade that was with him, and then I awoke him; I asked him what money he had got about him, he said none at all; I searched him. In his fob pocket. I found four one pound notes, a half guinea, two shillings, and two sixpences; in his jacket pocket I found a screw driver, with which he forced the lock; it exactly corresponded with the hole where he had been forcing the lock; I asked him how he came by that money, he said it was not his, nor had he it in his possession; I put him in the watchhouse. On the following morning I found all the remainder of the money except sixteen shillings and sixpence. I told him if he would return me the property I would forgive him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-53

476. THOMAS SIMON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May , a coat, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 3 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two pair of breeches, value 1 l. a pair of pantaloons, value 8 s and a shirt, value 7 s. the property of Edward Quife , in the dwelling house of Daniel Morley .

EDWARD QUIFE . I am a soldier in the third regiment of guards ; the prisoner belongs to the East London militia ; I am quartered at Mr. Morley's, Cockspur street . I came home on a Wednesday, I cannot say what day of the month it was, I got a light, I saw there was a large hole broke from the adjoining room to my room, I lifted up my box, and my things were all gone; I enquired of the ostler, he told me he saw the prisoner jump out of the adjoining room with the property.

JOHN TYLER . I am ostler at Mr. Morley's; the prosecutor sleeps in the stable yard. On the 27th of May, a little before nine at night, I saw the prisoner jump out as the window adjoining where the prosecutor sleeps, with his snuff coloured coat on his back, and a bundle under his arm; I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday the 27th of May I was in company with the man that is quartered along with that soldier; he said he was going to Sadler's Wells; I went to Whitcomb street to a cook's shop, and dined with him; we had two pints of beer, and we parted; I went to Westminster, and there I remained playing at skittles till after the time the robbery was committed.

WILLIAM CONNER . On Wednesday the 27th of April the prisoner was with me playing at skittles from four till nine o'clock.

FRANCES SNAPE . About a quarter aften nine at night on the 27th of May, Thomas Simon came up to my room, and asked me to fry him fifteen flounders; I did; he left our apartment a little before ten; my husband was not at home.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-54

477. JOHN MOSS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Lewis , privily from his person .

JOHN LEWIS . I live at No. 4, St. Vincent's-row, City Road. On the 27th of June, about six o'clock at night, I was at the Holborn corner of Fleet market ; I had come from Blackfrier's bridge; I had seen my handkerchief about five minutes before. As I was standing at the corner of Fleet market, a woman asked me if I had lost any thing, I felt in my pocket, I told her I had lost my handkerchief.

Q. Did you perceive your handkerchief go from you. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you perceive yourself hustled or pushed. - A. I did not. She immediately pointed out the prisoner to me, and in the space of a minute after she gave me the alarm; I saw the prisoner; I went with her directly to him, he was about two or three yards off, and the officer laid hold of him.

Q. What became of the handkerchief. - A. I saw it fall from his person; I picked it off the ground.

Q. Did you know the handkerchief to be yours when you picked it up. - A. Yes, it was worth five shillings.

Prisoner When he first accosted me, I told him I had no handkerchief but what was mine, as I knew of; when I was laid hold of there was a great mob; the handkerchief was found upon the ground.

Prosecutor. I do not recollect any thing of the kind.

JAMES WARD . I am a constable of the city. I only heard the charge made against him; I laid hold of him in consequence of that; I saw the handkerchief on the ground after I got him in custody; there was a great crowd about him when the prosecutor charged him with taking his handkerchief; he made no answer to it.

WILLIAM WARD . I was going up Fleet market, a woman said to me that the prisoner at the bar ought to be taken up, because he had his hand in the man's pocket. I watched the prisoner, he stood behind the prosecutor.

Q. Did you see him do any thing. - A. I did not, he was close to me; the woman asked Mr. Lewis if he had lost any thing, he said his handkerchief.

Q. Did you see any thing drop from him. - A. Yes, the handkerchief.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing when he was laid hold of. - A. No.

Q. How near was the handkerchief to him when you saw it on the ground. - A. As near to him as my hand is to my side.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, from agitation which every man must feel, being in this awful situation, together with the confinement of a prison, so overcomes me that I am not able to give my defence, without the indulgence of this honourable court in permitting this to be read. My lord and gentlemen, in the first place I am a sworn broker and appraiser; I am now in the fifty ninth year of my age; my conduct hitherto has been irreproachable. I have an ailing wife and four children, two of which are solely dependent on me for support. On the afternoon mentioned, I had been to Tottenham Court Road, to destrain goods for some rent for Mr. Dixon in the Old Bailey. After I left Mr. Dixon, I went into Fleet market, and was asking the price of some peas; and before I could turn round, the prosecutor or some person got hold of me, and said I had got their handkerchief; my answer was candid and honest, I said I had never seen him or his handkerchief. The market at this time was crowded, and no doubt with people of various descriptions; I was immediately laid hold of, and was informed the handkerchief was taken from off the ground. The prosecutor before the alderman said that I dropped the handkerchief on the ground, but from the crowd that were about at the time, I think it impossible for him or any man to distinguish from whom it fell. I solemnly declare that I never had the handkerchief in my possession. - Gentlemen, so far from the prosecutor knowing me to be the person that robbed him, he was not even aware that he had lost his property, till a woman pointed out me to him; whether she did it through ill will or malice, I cannot state; I think the latter from the best information; I learned that I did destrain the goods of this very woman, which so pointed me out. This is the manner she has chosen to be revenged of me, for the distress I brought upon her as she thought; whereas I did only the part of a broker. Gentlemen, if ever the case of innocence deserved the protection of a British jury, this does; I was dragged to a prison, and put to a great expence, entirely through a foolish woman, who would sacrifice the miserable life of an old man, to gratify her revenge. I trust you have already received the impressions of truth in my favour; and that by your generous verdict, I shall be restored to my family.

Q. (to prosecutor) I want to know whether you can say you saw the handkerchief drop from the hand of the

prisoner. - A. I saw it drop by the side of him.

Q. Was there any person so near the side of him, that it could have fell from them. - A. There were other people before him; I saw it drop, I supposed it came from him; I did not see it in his hand, it is possible it may fall from one behind.

Q. Can you say with certainty whether it fell from him or any other person. - A. I saw it drop from him.

Q. You do very right to speak what is true, whatever may be the consequence of that truth; you are bound to speak the truth if you are conscious, and if you firmly believe it dropped from him, say so. - A. I am certain it dropped from him.

GUILTY, aged 58.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-55

478. DAVID THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of May , one pound weight of cocoa, value 3 s. the property of Richard Abbey , John Cocks , and John Gullett .

RICHARD ABBEY . The prisoner was our weekly porter .

Q. Do you know any thing of his taking this pound of cocoa of your own knowledge. - A. Upon seeing our goods diminish, I suspected the prisoner. On the 20th of May, as he was going home in the evening from his work, I sent one of my men to call him back again; he was searched in my presence; in one pocket we found two quarters of a pound of cocoa, in separate parcels; we examined his other pocket, and found two other quarters of a pound; I then sent for an officer. He told me the next day, that he took it to give it to two poor women.

Q. What is the value of the cocoa. - A. Three shillings. I have no doubt of it being my property.

GEORGE LINCOLN . I am servant to Mr. Abbey. I stopped the prisoner when he had got about five yards from the gate, at his hour of going home from work; I brought him in and searched him, and found four quarters of cocoa upon him, in separate parcels; the prisoner said he was very sorry, and he hoped to obtain Mr. Abbey's pardon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of this charge, I never robbed my master; that pound of cocoa is not my master's property, nor never was; I bought it of a man at the Blossoms inn, I gave him five shilling for it.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18070701-56

479. HANNAH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , seventeen pair of gloves, value 34 s. and three pair of stockings, value 4 s. the property of James Chapple , privately in his shop .

MARY CHAPPLE . My husband's name is James Chapple , he sells gloves and stockings , our shop is No. 21, Grace's-alley, Well Close-square . On the 10th of June last, about six in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop.

Q. Had you any other customers in the shop. - A. A lady; and there were two boys serving in the shop besides me; the prisoner came in for a pair of stockings at sixteen pence a pair; I was serving the lady, one of the boys served her with the stockings.

Q. How long did she stay in the shop. - A About twenty minutes; she bought the stockings at sixteen pence; I did not miss the stockings, there was a lady in the shop that gave me a jog on the arm. I am sure I saw the gloves and the stockings on the counter while the prisoner was in the shop. In consequence of the lady jogging my arm, I placed myself in such a manner as to watch her going out, she dropped a glove as she was going out in the middle of the shop, I accused her of it; she said the child had taken it up with the stockings that she had bought perhaps; I cast my eye round, I saw all the gloves hanging out of her pocket; I took hold of her and turned her round the shop, and while I was attempting to search her pockets, she threw the gloves and stockings both down.

Q. How many pair of gloves. - A. Seventeen pair of gloves, and three pair of stockings; I saw her pull them from her pocket, the stockings were black worsted, the same as she had bought.

Q. I suppose you did not see her in the act of taking them. - A. I did not.

Q. What did she say about this. - A. She said she had not got them.

Q. What is the value of these gloves and stockings. - A. The seventeen pair of gloves thirty four shillings, and stockings four shillings.

JAMES STERLING . I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner; and the gloves and stockings were delivered to me.

EDWARD BEAN . I was in the shop buying a pair of stockings at the same time. I saw the mistress of the shop stop the prisoner, and she went to feel round her; I took hold of her by one arm, and with the other arm she dropped the stockings and the gloves; I saw her take them out of her right hand pocket; she had two pockets almost as big as sacks.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in the shop to purchase these pair of stockings, there was a lady in the shop, that man came in the shop after; the child picked up a bit of paper with a string to it, I did not know what was in it; as I was going out of the door this lady said I had dropped a glove, I said I had dropped no gloves; she picked up a quantity of gloves off the floor, and put them in the window; she picked out these stockings from three dozen, and said I had robbed her. I had no pockets on.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-57

480. SUSAN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , two sheets, value 14 s. the property of John Ryland , in a lodging room .

JOHN RYLAND . Q. Was the prisoner at the bar your lodger. - A. Yes, she took possession of the lodgings on the 15th of June for herself, two rooms on the first floor, at half a guinea a week. On the 23d,

not approving of her conduct, I gave her a week's warning, that she was to quit on the 29th. On Saturday she went out loaded with two bundles; which gave me reason to suspect that she had got more than her own. I followed her and overtook her.

Q. You did not tell me where your dwelling is. - A. Kingsland-road, near the turnpike. I followed her near a mile, the went to Islington; I observed a bundle that looked like sheets; I then told an officer the circumstance; he stopped her.

Q. Who was to wash the linen. - A. My wife; when the constable stopped her, we found both the sheets and a great many other things. The sheets were not dirty.

Q. How long had she had them. - A. A week.

Q. Then they were not over and above clean. - A. She said she was taking the sheets to be washed

Q. And she had dirty sheets with her. - A. Yes.

Q. She had paid you for her lodgings. - A. Yes

Court. You did not wait to see if me got them washed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-58

481. ANN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May , a cotton gown, value 15 s. the property of Timothy Leper .

HANNAH LEPER . I am the wife of Timothy Leper . I live in Grove-street, St. George's in the East . On the 23d of May, about nine o'clock, my gown was safe in my hands. I missed it between eleven and twelve.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner. - A. I do not charge her with it; I found it at the pawnbroker's in the afternoon.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am servant to a pawnbroker, Wood-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Did you take in a gown in pawn, that was afterwards claimed by Mrs. Leper. - A. Yes, it was pawned by a woman; I should not like to say it was the prisoner.

Q. If she was the woman, and you knew it to be so, you are bound to say so. - A. I could not positively say it was the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-59

482. BENJAMIN HEARN , CHARLES CRADLE , and WILLIAM HUGHES , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , fifteen sacks, value 1 l. 17 s. 6 d. and sixty bushels of malt, value 27 l. the property of William Raymond , in a certain barge, in the navigable river Thames ; and

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

EDMUND WILLIAMS . - Mr. Reynolds. Are you a servant to the prosecutor. - A. Yes, he is a lighter-man and malster , and lives at Richmond.

Q. On the 15th of May had your master a barge in the Thames. - A. Yes, opposite his house at Richmond , on the Middlesex side; she was mo red to a chain; it was about the length of the barge from the shore.

Q. What was it loaded with. - A. There was seventy five qarter of malt in her.

Q. How many sacks would that be. - A. There is two sacks to a quarter; the sacks were marked with my master's name in full length on one side, and Richmond on the other.

Q. When had you seen them there last. - A. On Friday the 15th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. How soon in the following morning did you go to your master's barge. - A. Near eight o'clock; when I got up to the barges stern sheets, I missed fifteen sacks. I went on shore and let my master know it.

WILLIAM RAYMOND . - Mr. Pooley. I believe you are a lighterman and maltster, at Richmond. - A. I am.

Q. Have you a barge of the name of Fly. - A. She is called by the name of Fly, but my bargeman has put the name of the Dart on it. On that day I had been to town; in the evening of the day before I saw seventy five quarters of malt on board of her.

Q. In consequence of any information from Williams, did you go to the place where your vessel was moored. - A. I did not go on board the barge, I saw she was all of one side; they had taken the malt all out of one side of her. I took a boat, I went down the river till I came to a place called Rail's Head Ferry in Isleworth; there are two ferrys, this is the upper ferry, the nearest to Richmond; there I saw Robert Rouse , he was enquiring after a boat that he had lost.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there. - A. I saw some fisherman , I was not near enough to see who they were; Rouse went on shore at Rail's Head, he went in one boat and I in another.

Q. Did Rouse point out any thing to your attention. - A. He did, he shewed me the track of a cart; that had been there that night.

Q. Is that near the creek of the river. - A. There is a creek near where the cart had stood.

Q. How far was it that you saw the track of that cart from where your boat was. - A. About a mile. I discovered the cart by the track of this place where it stood; that it had been secreted in a field; there was the track of the horse's feet in the field.

Q. Do you mean the Shoulder of Mutton field. - A. It is nearly opposite; it is on the right hand side going towards Twickenham, there is a field within twenty yards of this bridge; there I saw where the horse had stood, by the impressions of the horse's feet having stood a long time. I traced the horse and cart from that field to the bridge; on looking at the ground where the tail of the cart had been; I there discovered grains of malt scattered about the field; I will say there was forty grains of malt where the cart had been; I took some of that malt up, it had the flavour and appearance of my malt; I then looked to see which way the cart went from there, and as I imagined, I saw it went over from Isleworth to Brentford; but previous to that I observed where this horse had stood, that on the near foot before the horse had a shoe off; that I observed near where the cart was standing.

Q. Was there much trampling of the horse there. - A. There was, and that horse had scratched a good deal, as if he had gibbed, as if he did not go away

very kindly from the spot. I made enquires of the watchmen, I got some information; in consequence of that I went to the magistrate, he granted me a search warrant against Hearn and others. I searched Hearn's house and found nothing. We searched Cradle's, and their in a room on the ground floor I found fifteen sacks of malt, the quantity lost.

Q. What marks had these sacks that you found. - A. They were marked W. Raymond on one side, and Richmond on the other, with red paint; our sacks are generally marked so. I can swear they are my sacks, and they contained malt.

Q. As near as you can swear to grain of that description, can you say it is the same sort of malt as you lost. - A. As near as a person can swear to it, it is mine; I believe it is the malt that was taken from my vessel; I have some of them both here; I had a sample left in the boat, and I believe it to be the same upon comparison.

Q. What is the value of the sacks. - A. The sacks cost me three shillings a piece, I will put them at two shillings. The malt is worth seventy two shillings a quarter.

Q. Is it worth twenty pounds. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go to a man of the name of Ratcliffe. - A. I did; the horse was not at home, the horse had gone to the farrier's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Is any body interested in your business. - A. No.

Q. How far was the cart stationed in the field, from where your barge was moored. - A. About a mile.

Q. I take it for granted, that the only conveyance of your malt to this cart must be by boats. - A. Yes.

Q. How much would be the value of a sack of malt, including the sack at two shillings. - A. The sack and the malt would be worth about thirty seven shillings.

Q. A small boat would not carry many sack at one time. - A. The boat would carry fifteen sacks at one time, and rather more.

Q. Is there any thing particular in your malt from any other maltster's. - A. We colour your malt different from a great many.

Q. Other people may do it in the same way as you do. - A. Certainly.

Mr. Pooley. You have been asked whether a wherry would carry fifteen sacks - did you afterwards see Rouse's boat. - A. Yes.

Q. Would that carry fifteen sacks. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you go to Hearn's house. - A. The next day; in the afternoon I went to Cradles, and there I found the fifteen sacks.

Q. Have you a sample left. - A. Yes, one part comes from what was lost, and the other from the bulk (a sample of each shown to the jury).

Jury. There is not the least doubt but they are of one sort.

Mr. Knapp (to prosecutor). Had you sold any malt of that flavour. - A. I had.

Court. Had you sold any to Hearne or Cradle. - A. No.

Mr. Pooley. Did you sell the fifteen sacks out of that barge. - A. No, I do not recollect selling fifteen sacks to any individual. That is not the exact quantity.

ROBERT ROUSE . - Mr. Reynolds. Are you a wherryman. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 15th of May, were you going down the river in search of any thing. - A. On the 15th I fastened my boat in the river; on the morning of the 16th, about four o'clock, the boat was gone; about half past eight o'clock I saw Cradle coming up the river.

Q. Did you know Cradle. - A. Yes, he is a fisherman ; I rowed over to him, and asked him if he saw my boat a drift any where; he told me he had not.

Q. Was there any body with him. - A. There were one or two, they were towing up of the horse's side; I did not take notice of them; Mr. Raymond came down just at the time I was calling out to Cradle. Mr. Raymond and I went ashore at Rail's head Ferry place; we observed at the foot of the bridge, that goes over the creek, a cart had been loaded.

Q. Where did the cart stand. - A. Just at the foot of the bridge in Mr. Keare's field; we observed some scattered malt on the ground.

Q. While you were standing there, did you make any observations of the place where the horse had stood - A. Yes, the horse had scratched a good deal, and had been very much loaded; it appeared as if he had struggled with the load; on the near foot before I observed the horse had no shoe on. I traced the cart over the bridge.

Q. Where did you find your boat. - A. She was picked up on the strand, just by Kew bridge; she had been turned adrist.

Q. Was your name upon the boat. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was she brought home. - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning.

Q. How late had you seen her the night before. - A. At ten o'clock.

Q. When she was brought home, did you observe any thing in her at all. - A. I observed some malt scattered in the boat.

Q. When you left you boat the night before at ten o'clock, was any malt in her. - A. No, I only carry passengers.

ESTHER RATCLIFF . - Mr. Pooley. Your husband is a butcher, living at Old Brentford. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoners. - A. I have known Cradle for five or six years; I know Hearn by sight; I know the boy Hughes by playing about; they are all Brentford people. Hughes came on Friday night, the 15th of May, about eight o'clock at night, to borrow a horse and cart.

Q. What time was it taken away. - A. At ten o'clock, or a little after; he said he wanted to go to London with it, to the fish market. I do not know who came to take it away, Mr. Ratcliff delivered it.

Q. Upon whose account did the boy borrow it. - A. Hearn and Cradle.

Court. Is he a servant to them. - A. He is son-in-law to Hearn.

Q. Is Hearn and Cradle partners - A. They are fishermen; fishermen generally go in partners, but I do not know whether they are.

THOMAS RATCLIFE . - Mr. Reynolds. You are

the husband of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. On Friday the 15th of May, did you let your cart and horse. - A. Yes.

Q. On coming home in consequence of any thing your husband said, did you prepare your cart and horse. - A. Yes, for Hearn and Cradle; I got it ready about ten o'clock; Cradle came and asked me if it was ready.

Q. Did you see Hearn. - A. Yes, at the public house just by my house; Hughes and Hearn got into the cart with Cradle.

Q. Did you take the cart down to the public house where Hearn and the boy was. - A. Cradle did; and I followed him with the whip; they went the Hounslow road.

Q. Is that the way to Isleworth. - A. Yes, they can turn there.

Q. When you put the horse in the cart, the horse gibbed. - A. It did, it run fifty yards back.

Q. Is it in the habit of gibbing. - A. No, it did gib; I do not know the reason of it.

Q. Had that horse one of his shoes off. - A. Yes, the fore near foot, I believe.

Q. What time was the cart and horse brought home. - A. I do not know; I saw the horse in the stable the next morning, and the cart in the yard.

WILLIAM GORE . - Mr. Reynolds. What are you. - A. I am headborough of Brentford, in the parish of Ealing.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes, very well, all three of them; they live next door to one another.

Q. Did you see the horse gib. - A. Yes, close to Ratcliff's house; first of all I heard a great noise, I looked and saw a horse and cart go backwards; I went to see and there was the three prisoners in the cart; I saw them going towards the Hounslow road.

Q. What are the prisoners. - A. Hearn is a barge-man, Cradle has been a fisherman, and Hughes has been in the habit of working in the barge or fishing line.

Court. What time of the night was it you saw this. - A. About half past ten at night, on the 15th of May.

Q. Did you afterwards, before Hearn and Cradle were taken up, meet Hughes. - A. Yes, he asked me if I thought there would be any harm of it; now Mr Raymond had got his property. I met him in New Brentford, near the market place; that was the first he said to me.

Q. Had you been with the warrant before to Cradle's house. - A. Yes, I went with a search warrant, and took away the fifteen sacks of malt; they have been in my custody ever since.

WILLIAM HATHAWAY . - Mr. Pooley. You are a constable. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of receiving any charge against either of the prisoners, did you go in company with Samuel Hughes and others, to a public house at Brentford. - A. I did, to the Plow, in Windmill-lane; I saw Hearn and Cradle there in the tap-room; when we went into the room, I said to them both, you are my prisoners; they asked me for what, I told them for Mr. Raymond's business, for the malt; they then made use of very abusive language, and said they would not be taken; they made towards the door, we persevered in keeping them from the door; the scuffle between us might last for a quarter of an hour, they were defending themselves against us; Cradle and I scuffled, he attempted to hit me, I guarded myself; I did not receive any blows. The greatest scuffle was between Hearn and Mr. Hughes; at last we secured them. We got to the door, and we kept the door shut; and somebody tapped at the door, which proved to be the party that went out with us; they went one way and we another; and there was a good deal of scuffling in the street.

SAMUEL HUGHES . - Mr. Reynolds. We have heard that you accompanied the last witness to apprehend Cradle and Hearn. - A. I did. Cradle at first gave me a violent blow on my right eye, and set me reeling; and Hearn said, you b - r, give it him.

Q. Had you declared what you came for. - A. Yes.

Q. Did they make use of any other particular expression. - A. Hearn swore he would knock my fat guts out, and he began to kick my belly; I was knocked down three times by Cradle, and twice by Hearn; and I knocked them down as much. Cradle went to the fire place to get the poker; he said let me get my staff, and I knocked him down against the settle. They were very violent in the street, they kicked my shins, and bruised me all over, from my ancle to my knees; I have many black marks on my body; we were nearly an hour and a half getting them in the cage. Hearn sat himself down and said, do now what you please; I got hold of his heels, and gave him a complete somerset, and turned him over into the cage. I have now the marks of Hearn's teeth in my hand.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 29th of May, I apprehended the lad at Stoney Stratford, nine miles from Newcastle; I told him what I apprehended him for; he denied at first, I told him I was satisfied he knew Mr. Raymond, and he knew the malt, I dare say; he denied knowing any thing of it. I took him to a public house, I ordered him something to eat, and left him in the care of the constable of the town; after he had something to eat, he had a mug of ale, and half an hour after that he burst out crying; he said he was sent by Hearn and Cradle to get a cart, he went with the cart, he drove it into a field near Islworth; he waited there pretty near an hour and a half; Cradle and Hearn came up with some bags, filled with something, that he did not know; they put a quantity in the cart; as they were driving the horse out of the field, the horse gibbed, and would not carry the load; they took it back again to the boat, and ordered him to take the horse back again, which he did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. It appeared to you from all this boy said, that this boy was employed as a servant, and under their controul. - A. I understood him so.

Hearn's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery I am indicted for; I was not on the water all that night.

Cradle's Defence. I was coming home from my work, I picked this boat up, she was adrift, and when I took her on shore she was sinking; I took the

malt into my house, expecting somebody would own it, as the boat was sinking. I went to work about my business, as I heard nothing of it.

Hughes's Defence. My father and I went to Kingston with the cart, and when we came back I put the horse into the stable and the cart into the yard; my father and I on Friday night went to Mr. Nott's at Kingston, on business,.

Hughes called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Hearn and Cradle called no witnesses to character.

HEARN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

CRADLE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

HUGHES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The jury recommended Hughes to his Majesty's mercy on account of his youth, and being a servant to the other prisoners .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-60

483. JOHN GODDING, alias GODWYN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , seven pine apples, value 6 l. the property of Sackville Stephen Bale .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

SACKVILLE STEPHEN BALE . Q. I believe, sir, you are rector of Wineham in Sussex . - A. Yes.

On the morning of the 25th of June did you go to your pine house. - A. I was informed by my servant. I went to the pinehouse about nine o'clock in the morning; I found the door going into the garden had been broken open, and I saw one of the front lights of the pine house had been taken out, and that some one had entered the pine house; I saw a cavity there.

Q. How many pine apples were gone. - A. About thirty in all; two of them were ripe, and some were nigh ripe, and others were green.

Q. Was there any thing that gave you suspicion that the person who had done this, whoever he was, must have known the premises. - A. I had every reason to believe so.

Q. Had the prisoner been your servant. - A. Yes, four months ago he was my gardener , and had the care of the pine house; he had lived with me about four or five months.

Q. You came or sent to Covent Garden market directly. - A. I came to Covent Garden that same day; I have seen the pine apples at Bow-street; I have no doubt they are mine.

ALEXANDER FRAZER . Q. You are Mr. Bale's gardener. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 24th of June was the pine house all safe. - A. Yes; about ten o'clock at night I saw them safe.

Q. At what hour the next morning did you go to the pine house. - A. About seven o'clock I found the front light of the pine house pulled out, and about thirty two pines were cut from the plant; about eight or nine of them were ripe, the rest were green. On Saturday I came to London; I saw the pines at Covent Garden, and they were produced at Bow-street.

Q. Are you able to speak to any of them being your master's. - A. I can speak to one, it was a singular one; I had never seen the like before.

Q. Is that the pine that you speak of being so singular. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the singularity of that pine apple. - A. They generally swell up here (describing it); about an inch from that it had been hurt in the root, and it came up with a double crown.

Jury. Did you never see one with a double crown before. - A. No, not both connected together, with a double crown, and not to swell at the top.

Mr. Gurney. Now look at the others, and tell me whether they are such as you raised. - A. Yes; I have every reason to believe they are the pine apples that were taken out of my master's pine house.

Q. How many are there. - A. Five.

WILLIAM SHALES . I am servant to Mr. Lloyd, five miles beyond Croydon.

Q. On the morning of Thursday the 25th of June were you near Sanders's workhouse. - A. Yes, I was on horseback; that is three miles beyond Croydon; I overtook the prisoner, he was walking, he had green pine apples in a handkerchief, and ripe ones in a flag basket; he had a handkerchief, with a cabbage leaf inside of it, and some grapes; he was coming from Wineham to Croydon, and so towards town; I carried the basket and the handkerchief for him, they were tied together; he said he had started about one o'clock in the morning; this was about nine I believe when I saw him; he said the grapes were all of his own growing. I came three miles with him of the high road, and just as we came to the pay gate he turned off there; his stockings were torn, he said it was getting over Dubble Hill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Did you know the prisoner before. - A. No; I understood since that he lived at Dubble Hill.

Q. Did you see a great many people in your riding and walking together. - A. We met three men. I unluckily let one of the pine apples fall; one of these men picked it up, and said they found it; they brought it to our house, my mistress bought it.

MR. BENTLEY. I keep a shop in Covent Garden market. On the afternoon of Thursday the 25th of June, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and offered me five pine apples; I told him they were too green, and they were not cut as in general they were to come to market; he told me they were just upon the turn, and if they were put in the window they would ripen in a day or two; he said he came from Croydon, just by Haydon park; I asked him why he cut them so; he said he generally cut them so to set them flat in a plate; we generally have the stalks about three inches long; some will come only an inch long, but none come in this way. He said he was a gardneer; I asked him if they were his perquisites; he said his master was a very good kind of a man, and never said any thing so long as he kept the table well supplied; I asked him if he should have any other kind of fruit to dispose of; he said he should in the course of the season have two or three dozen of peaches.

Q. Did you buy the pine apples. - A. Yes, I gave him fifty-five shillings for them. I told him as I bought the pine apples of him, and they were not ripe, he should give me the refusal of the other fruit when he came to town. I put them in the window; Mr. Carpmeal and Frazer, the gardener, came together; they went into the parlour; I put the pine apples I bought of the prisoner on the table. They desired I would take care of them, which I did.

THOMAS STACKMAN . I was in the shop of the last witness when the prisoner came with the pine apples.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person that sold the pine apples. - A. Yes.

MR. LARKING. I keep a fruiterer's shop in Covent Garden.

Q. On Thursday the 25th of June did the prisoner come to your house. - A. He did; I think it was between two and three o'clock; he brought four pine apples, two ripe and two green; I bought the two ripe ones and refused the two green; I gave thirty shillings for them; I sold them; I am certain he is the man.

ANN BAILEY . Q. On the same Thursday did the prisoner offer to you any pine apples. - A. Yes, four; three of them were ripe, and one green; they were cut without stalks, which I objected to; I told the prisoner they looked as if they had been on table for a desert.

Q. Did not that create suspicion in your mind. - A. No. Sometimes gentlemen's servants will bring a pine after it has been on table; it is their perquisites.

THOMAS CARPMEAL , I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner at his house Dubble Hill; I told him I took him in custody for stealing pine apples at Mr. Bale's, and that on Thursday in the afternoon he had sold them in Covent Garden market; he said he had not been to Covent Garden market for many months.

Q. to Frazer. Would any body trampling among the rough leaves tear their stockings. - A. Yes, provided they went against the edge.

Q. Had you any peaches. - A. We had a peach-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been very bad; on Thursday the 25th of June I was a little better; I came to town, I went to see my brother at Islington. As I was coming over Thornton heath I saw the basket with eleven pines in it; I picked it up; I brought them to Covent Garden market and sold them, as I did not find any body to own them.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-61

484. JAMES CHESLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , one hundred wine glasses, value 50 s. twenty glass decanters, value 10 s. a deal box, value 1 s. a pair of snuffers, value 6 d. and two copper boilers, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL , senior. I live at the Three Crowns tavern and public house . On the 17th of June I lost all the articles in the indictment; the prisoner has been frequently at my house, he was fifer to the volunteer corps that frequented my house to exercise in my bowling green.

Q. All that you know is that you lost the property. - A. Yes. The prisoner was taken up by the Fox in Kings-land Road.

Q. Did you see any of your property. - A Yes; I found the box and nine dozen of glasses in the field; I also saw the boiler; they are my property. At the time he was taken I saw some lemon peel in his pocket; I said that is the lemon peel that laid by my wine glasses in the kitchen.

Mr. Walford. I think there was another man you suspected of the name of Anderson. - A. Yes.

THOMAS HALL , junior. On Thursday morning the 8th of June I unlocked the kitchen door; I missed all the glasses that were on the shelf the evening before, I also missed the two boilers from the range; the ostler found the boilers under the hedge; I saw them there in the hedge in the field, about four hundred yards from our house; I saw the prisoner sitting on a stool two fields distance; I said Chisley, is that you, how are you; he got up and went away about a yard; I came up to town and told my father he must go up directly; he got Peter Mason , and had him taken up.

PETER MASON I apprehended the prisoner; I searched him at the Fox; I found ten shillings, a little knife, and some lemon peel on him; I handcuffed him and took him to the watchhouse; I said to him then, Chelsey you know of this robbery, we have found the boilers in the dry ditch where you have hid them; he burst out crying; I told him I was going to Newington in search after his companions; I asked him whether he chose to tell me their names; he said one was a bricklayer, he did not tell me his name; afterwards he said I will tell you no more, it will not do me any good.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-62

485. JOSEPH LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of June , a silver watch, value 4 l. and a seal, value 6 d. the property of Alexander M'Kenzie , privily from his person .

ALEXANDER M'KENZIE . I am a shoe maker , I live in Eagle court, Swallow-street. On the 29th of June, past three o'clock, I was going along Piccadilly , when sir Francis Burdet was passing; there was a great crowd; the prisoner pressed on me very hard, he was just before me.

Q. Some persons pressed behind. - A. Yes; I cannot say who was behind, but I took particular notice of him; that was before. I heard him call some man's name; then I clapped my hand on my watch pocket. my watch was gone; I took hold of the prisoner, and I immediately stooped down to get hold of his left hand; I suspected the watch was in it; he held it down, and I heard the watch drop; I looked on the ground, and took it up; I still kept hold of the same man and called out for assistance; I was assisted; and he said I confess it, let me go; I would not let him go, I said he was a low mean fellow, that would be guilty of such an action, and so young a man; I kept the watch and him, and I gave him into the custody of one of the Marlborough-street officers. I did not see the watch drop from his hand, I only heard it.

Q. He pressed upon you so much that you had a great suspicion of him. - A. No, I had no suspicion of him till I heard him call a man.

Q. After you heard him call a man, you had a suspicion, you put your hand down, you missed your watch. A. Yes.

DANIEL FLYNN . Last Monday was a week I was in Piccadilly to see sir Francis Burdet chaired; I stood by the crowd; there was a scuffle between the prosecutor and the prisoner, one laid hold of the other, and the

prosecutor said you have robbed me; he said I have not, the prosecutor said you have; one stooped down, and said here is the watch, you threw my watch on the ground. I put my hand against the prisoner, and shoved him out of the mob. I am sure he is the man.

(The property produced and identified.)

Jury. (to Flynn) Did you hear the prisoner say, I confess it, let me go. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was in Picadilly, on the afternoon that sir Francis Burdet was chaired, this man was very much in liquor, he was with four or five of his countrymen; he said he had lost his watch, he said he believed I was the man; I said I am very willing to go with you, he said he thought it was me, but he was not sure, he let me go three times; he said he did not know the number of the watch, and it was tied with a black ribbon.

Q. (to Flynn) Was the prosecutor in liquor. - A. He was very sober.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-63

486. MARY FARRELL was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 15th of May , upon David Humphries , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 30 s. his property .

DAVID HUMPHRIES . The last place I was in, I was book keeper to the Angel inn. I have been in the country since. On the 15th of May, in the morning. between one and two o'clock, I came from my club, the corner of Oxford Road; coming along to Holborn , the prisoner and another woman accosted me, the prisoner laid hold of of my left arm, and the other woman snatched the watch out of my pocket; she would not loose my arm to let me go after the other woman; I called the watch, and gave her in custody; he took her to St. Giles' watchhouse. She owned to the watchman that she knew who it was that took my watch.

Q. She did not strike you at all. - A. No.

THOMAS DAWSON . I am a watchman. On the 15th of May, between one and two in the morning, I heard watch called; me and another watchman went directly, and the prosecutor gave charge of that woman; she said she knew the woman that took the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man in the street; we were talking together a good time; we were going to sleep together, till this girl came up, this girl and he began laughing and talking together; then after that she went away; he asked me if I knew her, and he said she had taken the watch out of his pocket; I said I was sorry for it; he went after the girl, he could not take her; he came back and took me up. That woman I never saw before in my life.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-64

487. ANN SIMONS , and ELIZABETH CLARKE , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of June , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 14 s. the property of Richard Samuel , privately in his shop .

RICHARD SAMUEL . I live at No. 49, New Compton-street, St. Giles' , I am a linen draper . I was not in the shop at the time.

SARAH SAMUEL . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 2nd of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came to buy an apron; I shewed them several and none would suit them; I pulled down a piece of print to shew them, and while I was shewing them the print, one of them said they did not see a print they should like; they did not stop long after that; soon after they were gone, I missed a piece of print that I had shewed them.

Q. Who was in the shop at the time. - A. No one but myself. When my husband came home, I told him; that might be an hour and a half after. The printed cotton was found at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL MORRIS . I am a pawnbroker, I live at Long-acre. On the 2nd of June last, seven yards of cotton was pledged by a woman of the name of Ann Simons . I cannot swear to either of the prisoners.

- . I live with Mr. Lane, pawnbroker, Holborn. On the 7th of June, seven yards of cotton was pledged in the name of Mary Clark .

Q. Who did you take it of. - A. I do not know. I have seen the prisoners, I cannot say when.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I searched the prisoner's apartments. In taking up the boards of the flooring, I found the duplicate of the property.

(The property produced and identified.)

Simon's Defence. I own to that piece of cotton, and no more.

Clark's Defence. I was never inside of the shop, I never saw the cotton.

SIMONS, GUILTY, aged 17.

CLARK, GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-65

488. MARY LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , twelve yards of printed gingham, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of Robert Newman , privately in his shop .

ROBERT NEWMAN , senior. I am a linen draper , I live at 147, Oxford-street . On the 9th of June, about half after six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar, in company with another person, came to my shop to purchase some Irish; there were four pieces of gingham came in that morning, they all lay on the counter, opposite of the counter where I was serving the person who came with the prisoner. The prisoner went to the opposite counter, and brought two of these pieces of gingham to the person that I was serving, that was with her she; asked the price of them, and commended the quality to a person who was with her; I sold three yards and a half of Irish linen to the person that she was with; and immediately upon their leaving the shop, I missed one of these ginghams; I went out of the door to look after them, and my young man was coming, I sent him after them. The prisoner was brought back with the gingham, and a quantity of Irish.

Q. Had you lost the Irish. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified).

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and

fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-66

486. MARY LEWIS was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , seven yards and a half of Irish linen, value 12 s. the property of Wharton Rye .

WHARTON RYE . I am a linen draper , 154, Oxford-street . On the 9th of June, about six in the afternoon, the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into my shop, and asked to look at some Irish linen; I laid down two or three pieces before them; the prisoner at the bar seemed very difficult in her choice, none suited, and they went away. I did not know at that time that I had lost any thing; I heard there were some persons taken up and sent to the office; I went there, and Mr. Newman asked me if it was mine; I looked at it, it had my mark on it.

(The property produced and identified).

Q. You were not conscious that you lost it at the time. - A. No.

Q. Who were in the shop besides you. - A. There were three or four people in the shop at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-67

490. GEORGE PEARSALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , a truss of hay, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Dale .

THOMAS DALE . I am a stable keeper , I live in Chiswell-street . The prisoner was farmer's servant , he drove my team from Wood Green, Hornsey, to Chiswell-street.

- SMITH. I am servant to Mr. Dale. I was in the yard and saw George Pearsal take the hay out of the loft, he put it on the dung cart, and covered it over with dung; my master came down the yard, and I told him of it.

Q. (to prosecutor) Is it customary for the horses to have any hay from town. - A. It is customary for them to have it in London; I do not allow any to be taken, because they are fed in the country, and they are fed in town.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it for my master's horses; the reason I covered it with dung was, because my master did not allow it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-68

491. WILLIAM HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of May , twenty glass bottles, value 2 s. and a piece of iron, value 6 d. the property of the revered John Gamble .

JOHN FALKNER . I am servant to Mr. Beaver, floor cloth manufacturer, Knightsbridge. On the 18th of May, I was going up to work in the manufactory; I saw the prisoner take the glass bottles out of the yard, and put them in the dust cart, and a piece of iron.

Q. What is he. - A. A dustman .

JOHN BROWN . I am servant to the reverend John Gamble , chaplain-general. On Monday the 18th of June, Falkner came to me, between six and seven in the morning, and told me that the prisoner was taking some bottles from the bottle rack, and hiding them in the dust cart; I looked in the cart and saw them, and a piece of iron, which belonged to the telegraph. I can swear to this one bottle, and the piece of iron; it matched the wood of the telegraph.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-69

492. WILLIAM GRANT , and ELIZABETH HOMAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , a cotton gown, value 5 s. the property of John Matthews .

JOHN MATTHWS . I am a pawnbroker , I live at No. 36, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields . On Tuesday the 17th of February, about a quarter after seven in the evening, the prisoner Grant came to my shop, in company with a woman; he had a quill wheel, which is used in the silk manufactory; he put it down on the floor, and told me he wanted half a crown upon it; I told him I did not take them kind of articles in; while I was talking to him, my young man asked me if there was not a gown hanging opposite to him, I said yes; I got over the counter, and opened the door to see if I could see any body, I could see no one; the prisoner was in the shop all the time; I turned round to the prisoner, and desired him to take up his wheel and be off; he replied to me, do you think I have stole your gown; I told him if he had not stole it, those that came with him had. In the course of the evening I received information where the gown was pledged. The woman prisoner was not the woman that came into my shop with him; she was seen to carry something along from my door. The next morning I went to Mr. French, and describing the parties and the property; they produced it me.

Prisoner Why did not you take me in custody immediately; I did not rob him, nor the woman neither; the woman bought the gown, and gave seven shillings for it.

Court. Why did not you take him in custody immediately. - A. I did not conceive myself authorised in doing it till I had found the parties that had pledged it.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a pawnbroker, White-row, Spitalfields. On the evening of the 17th of February, the two prisoners offered this gown and a handkerchief, to pledge; the woman produced them to me for six shillings and sixpence; which I advanced.

JOHN RAY . I received information of Mr. Mathews of the robbery of this gown. I have been a number of times after these prisoners. I took him at his lodgings with the woman that he cohabits with, in Holywell-street; upon her I found the duplicate of the gown and handkerchief.

(The property produced and identified.)

Grant's Defence. The prosecutor states that I robbed him of his gown. On that night he said that he had lost a gown; I said, Mr. Matthews, if you think I have robbed you of a gown, put me in charge of a constable. I told him that I came there, knowing that he took in working tools; he said no, be off about your business; I then said, I will be off. The man that was behind the counter, he said he saw two men come in, and one of them he believed had taken it; he went out to see, when he ordered me out, I said I will not go till your

man comes back. I am innocent of robbing that man, and that he knows.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GRANT, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

HOMAN, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-70

493. THOMAS ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , two coppers, value 5 l. the property of Joseph Cook , esq. affixed to a certain building of his, called a house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be affixed to a certain building.

JAMES HOLMES . I am butler to Mr. Cook, No. 21, Pall Mall ; the coppers were taken from No. 20, it was an empty house at the time.

Q. Do you know what day was these copper staken. - A. On the 22nd of May I had seen them there; three or four days before they were in a fixed state; one was in the back kitchen and the other was in the front kitchen; about seven o'clock on Friday morning I heard a noise in No. 20; it being an empty house I took the keys to go and see that every thing was right; I tried the latch, I heard that unfasten, but the lock would not open; I am certain that four or five days before I fastened the house, and nobody had been in but me; finding I could not get in I went back to No. 21, I went of a short message into St. Alban's street, I got a few yards from the house, I saw the prisoner with the two coppers upon his right shoulder; in the other hand he had got a basket, which contained a crow and a small saw, and some pick lock keys; I turned round and stopped him; I asked him where he was going with these coppers, he said he was going home with them, his master had sent him for them; I told him he must go back with me, I was confident they belonged to our house; he neither told me who was his master, nor where he was going to take them to, nor did I ask him. After I turned him round he put the two coppers on the second step of No. 20, the house they were taken from.

Q. Did he say where he had taken them from. - A. No, nor did I ask him; he kept the basket in his hand. I took him into the passage of No. 21.

Q. Was your master at home then. - A. He was; I told him that I had stopped the prisoner with two coppers belonging to No. 20.

JOSEPH POINTINGTON . I produce the implements that the prisoner had in his basket; and one of the coppers; I have had them ever since.

Q. to Holmes. Are these the implements that were in the basket when you first stopped him. - A. Yes.

JOSEPH COOK , ESQ . Q. On the 22nd of May were you the proprietor of this house, No. 20, Pall Mall. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you give this man at the bar any authority to remove these coppers - was it done by your knowledge or consent. - A. By no means; he acknowledged that he had taken them from that house; he said if I would forgive him he would send for one of the best workmen, and put them up in the tastiest way I could wish; I said nothing more to him, than that if he moved from the place I would shoot him.

MARY HOLMES . I am wife to James Holmes . About half past six in the morning on the 22nd of May, I heard a noise at No. 20, as if he was hammering of brick work; I was alarmed; I communicated it to my husband.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-71

494. MARY ANN JONES and JANE MORRIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a spoon, value 2 s. and a piece of lace, value 2 s. the property of William Lloyd .

WILLIAM LLOYD . I have two rooms up a bricklayer's yard, between Bowling-street and College-street, Westminster ; I lost the spoon and the lace on Friday the 19th of June, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I had seen them about eight o'clock in the morning; the lace was on a drawer in the parlour, and the spoon was in a cup on the shelf. I saw them again at the magistrate's.

MRS. LLOYD. I am the wife of the last witness. Mary Ann Jones came to the washhouse, and asked me to lend her a shilling to go to the Circus.

Q. Was she an acquaintance of yours. - A. I had never seen her but once before, that was at the play house; an acquaintance of mine was with me that knew her; not knowing her I did not lend her the shilling; she had to come through the room where the lace and the spoon were to come to me; about a quarter of an hour after she went away I missed the spoon and the lace; the other prisoner did not stir out in the yard all the time. In consequence of this I went to the Circus to find Jones; I passed her on Westminster bridge, she called after me, and asked me if I was going to the Circus; I told her I was, but I did not mention any thing to her till she got to the house; the other prisoner was with her. I then asked Jones if she had seen any thing of a piece of lace and a silver tea spoon; she said she had not; then I beckoned to the other prisoner and asked her the same question, she burst out in tears, she told me that Mary Ann Jones had taken it, and Jones confessed it afterwards, and told me if I would go to Westminster, she would shew me the person that had the ticket, she had pawned it; I went with both of them to a person of the name of Phipps, she gave me the duplicate by Jones's desire; I then went to my husband and caused them to be taken up; the spoon and lace were produced at Queen-square office.

MARY ANN PHIPPS . On the 19th of June, between four and five in the afternoon, Mary Ann Jones gave me a spoon, some lace, and a cap, to pledge for her, which I pledged with Joseph Avory for half a crown; I gave Jones the money and the duplicate; she returned the duplicate to me; the other prisoner was with her.

Q. Did she afterwards come back to you and desire you, in the presence of Mrs. Lloyd, to return that duplicate to Mrs. Lloyd. - A. Yes, about an hour afterwards.

(The property produced and identified.)

Jones said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Morris was not called on for her defence.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined One Day in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

MORRIS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-72

495. MARY ANN JONES and JANE MORRIS , were again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , a silver spoon, value 2 s. the property of Alexander Ross .

DOROTHY DAVIS. I am housekeeper to Mr. Ross. Seymour-place, Kensington . On the 18th of June after tea I put the spoon in the cupboard; I missed it the next morning.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. I have seen her twice in Mr. Ross's house; I saw Jane Morris at Mr. Ross's house on the 18th of June; I gave her a supper in the kitchen, I thought she was a poor distressed girl; she was an acquaintance of the other servant; I have seen the spoon again in the constable's hands.

- GOODENOUGH. I am a constable. On the 20th of June, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I met Mary Ann Jones just by Chelsea college, I told her she was my prisoner; she shewed me where Morris lived; Morris told me she sold the spoon to Mr. Basnet in Tothil-street; she took me to the shop, and Mr. Basnet produced the spoon that is now in my hand.

(The property produced and identified.)

Morris said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Jones was not put on her defence.

MORRIS, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined One Day in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

JONES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-73

496. SARAH CHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of William Lee .

WILLIAM LEE . I keep the Lord Mansfield's Head, Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 3d of June the prisoner was brought to my house with the property on her.

WILLIAM WANTLEY , I am a pot boy to Mr. Bateman, he keeps the George and Dragon, Buckingham-place, near Fitzroy-square. I saw the prisoner at the bar take two pint pots of Mr. Lee's from No. 11, Buckingham-place; they were hung up on the rails, she held them in her hand, and then took three more that belonged to Mr. Bateman; I stopped and asked her where she was going with them; she said she was going into Tottenham Court Road to collect Mr. Lee's pots; a carpenter took her to Mr. Lee's; I did not go with her.

WILLIAM WILSON WRIGHT . I am a wine cooper. Me and my fellow servant were working a pine of wine at Mr. Lee's; I was going of an errand, I saw the prisoner and the boy Wantley quarreling about pots; she said she was going to gather pots for Mr. Lee, she said she lived there.

Q. That you knew to be false. - A. Yes; I told her she did not live at Mr. Lee's; there was a man present that was paid at Mr. Lee's last Saturday night; he took her to Mr. Lee's; I went on, and when I came back she was at Mr. Lee's.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 3d of June I was going up the New Road to get a pennyworth of new milk; I saw these two pots upon the iron spikes at the door; I took them to get some milk in; the boy said they were not my pots, he wrenched them out of my hands; I told him I was going over to the cow house for some milk, and then I would take the pots to his house.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-74

497. MARY MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June , seventeen pair of shoes, value 17 s. the property of Robert Cooper .

ROBERT COOPER . I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 7, Red-lion court, St. Catherine's-lane. On Thursday evening the 4th of June, about half after eight in the evening, my wife and I went to the Rose and Crown public house, Queen-street, Rosemary-lane ; we took with us seventeen pair of shoes in a basket, and when I came home I found my wife had left them behind. I returned back to the tap room, the shoes and the basket were gone.

Q. Have you seen the shoes since. - A. No, I value them at seventeen shillings.

ANN BARRY Q. Are you servant to the Rose and Crown public house, Rosemary-lane. - A. Yes; on the 4th of June the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutor and his wife were sitting at one table; I saw the basket under the table where they were drinking their beer.

Q. Who left the tap room first. - A. The man and his wife; the prisoner staid about a quarter of an hour after them; when she went away I asked her if the basket belonged to her, she told me it did; then she went away; I did not see what was in the basket. A few minutes afterwards Cooper came in, he looked under the table; I asked him what he wanted, he said a basket; I told him the prisoner had taken it away.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again. - A. On the Monday fortnight I went to the magistrate, I said that was the woman as soon as I saw her; I am sure she is the woman that was sitting with Cooper and his wife, and that took the basket away.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of them.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-75

498. MARY SAVERN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of June , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of William Atkinson

WILLIAM ATKINSON . I am a publican . I keep the sign of the Lord Hood, King street, Greenwich, Kent . John Herbert brought the pot to me; I can only speak to the pot. I have enquired, I find the prisoner bears a good character.

JOHN HERBERT . I am an officer of the Thames police. On the 2nd of June I was on the river on duty at Limehouse Reach; I boarded a boat, in which was the prisoner and another woman.

Q. Were you on the Middlesex side of the river, or the Kent side when you boarded the boat. - A. On the Middlesex side. I observed a bundle in the boat behind the back board: I asked her who that bundle belonged to, the prisoner said it belonged to her; I asked

what was in it, the prisoner said a mop; I told her I must examine it, then she said there were two pots, besides that there was a mop; in looking at the pots, I saw that they belonged to two publicans at Greenwich; one of them to Mr. Atkinson; the prisoner said she had borrowed them to measure fruit with; I took them in custody. I went to Mr. Atkinson, he claimed the pot.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. One of the pots was lent to me, and the other was given me. I had them to measure my goosberries.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-76

499. MARY SAVERN was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of June , a pewter pint pot, the property of persons to the jurors unknown .

JOHN HERBERT . This pot was in the bundle; the man's name is almost burnt out; I found the man; he would not come forward.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-77

500. ELIZABETH SMITH, alias BELCHER, alias MASON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , a guinea, and a shilling, the property of James Carter .

JAMES CARTER . I am a stonemason , I lodge with Elizabeth Atkinson , No. 12, Swallow-street. On the 20th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going with a shopmate of mine near Hyde Park Corner gate, he was a little intoxicated, I was going to see him home; we had been drinking at the Pitt's head, Great Cumberland-street, Portman-square; that is the house where we are paid. It was near eleven o'clock when we left the house. I was a little in liquor too.

Q. Did you see your friend safe into the house. - A. No, I saw him through Hyde Park gate, he had got to go to Sloane-street; I thought he would be safe. I met the prisoner very near Hyde Park Corner gate.

Q. You had got a little tipsy at this house, are you quite sure that you had any money about you when you left that house. - A. I am sure I had one guinea and four shillings; I was perfectly sensible of that, though I was not perfectly sober.

Q. Then you joined in company with the prisoner. - A. Yes, I went with her to Pye-street, Westminster .

Q. That is all out of your way to Swallow-street. - A. I know it it is. I went to her lodgings in Pye-street, into a one pair of stairs back room; there was nobody in the room but she and me, when we went in I stopped some time there; I gave her three shillings as the place had so decent an appearance; then I wanted to come away, she refused to let me; she went out of the room; I heard her talk to a man on the stairs, which very much alarmed me; I was afraid to make any resistance; she came round me, and put her arms about my knees, and coaksed me to stop; she put her hand into my pocket, and took the guinea out; I had suspicion by her putting her hand down my side; I felt her hand, but I was not positive that it was in my pocket, it was in my right hand breeches pocket. I felt so much that excited suspicion.

Q. That is a very different thing, you said she put her hand into your pocket. - A. I felt her hand in my pocket.

Q. You have said both ways, attend to me - did not you say you believed her hand was in your pocket, because you felt it on your side, that gave you suspicion, and you have sworn that you felt her hand in your pocket. - A. I am sure I felt her hand in my pocket. I gave her three shillings; I am sure that I left the guinea and a shilling in my pocket.

Q. Upon feeling her hand in your pocket, did you afterwards put your hand into your pocket to feel if your money was gone. - A. I did.

Q. After you had given her the three shillings - here I must ask you a question - are you sure that you did not lye down on the bed. - A. No, by no means; I had no connection with her at all.

Q. Are you quite sure that you were in no posture, that it would fall from you. - A. I am sure of it; I had not fell down on the road.

Q. After you had suspected that she had taken your money what passed then. - A. I saw it in her hand; she said she would give it me back in the morning if I would stop all night; she would not give it me then; I refused stopping all night, I told her I should be glad if she would give it me then; she still refused and went out of the room and left me there; I waited about an hour and a half, she never returned; at the expiration of that time a man came in the room, he asked me how I came there, and accused me of breaking into his room; I told him no, I had not; I was brought in, I described the woman to him; he said she had broken open the door. This was Saturday night, I saw the prisoner on Sunday evening; and on Monday morning I saw her in her own apartment, then I charged the officer with her.

Q. I suppose you never found your guinea or your shilling. - A. No.

THOMAS RENNY . On Monday, the 22nd of June, I apprehended the prisoner at her lodgings, Duck-lane; I searched her, she had no money about her.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night the prosecutor was very much intoxicated; he and his friend pushed against me. He went home with me, gave me three shillings, and went to bed; about half an hour after he was in bed, he said he could stop no longer, he must go. On Sunday morning he came to me, and asked me for the guinea; he said he would give me half if I would return him half; I told him I had not seen it, or else I would give it him with pleasure. He dropped his watch on the floor, I gave it him.

Prosecutor. I did drop my watch, I catched it in my hand as well as she; it was owing to my own dexterity that I got it, or he would not have given it me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-78

501. JOHN BRIMLEY, alias BRUMBY , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , a cheese, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Ekins .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court, their recognances were ordered to be estreated , and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-79

502. RACHAEL WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of June , a gown value 5 s. the property of Mary Fletcher .

MARY FLETCHER . I keep a shop , No. 5, Parker-street, Drury-lane ; the gown was hanging outside of my parlour window on the 8th of June; I saw it safe there about twelve o'clock; I did not see the prisoner take it. She was brought back and then I saw my gown again.

BENJAMIN RUTTER . I am a smith, I live in Parker's-lane, opposite of Mrs. Fletcher. I saw the prisoner at the bar, and another young woman come up to the door where the clothes were hung up; the other young woman went into the shop to cheapen the stockings; I saw the mistress of the shop reach them down to show them to her; in the mean time the prisoner undid this gown, throwed it into her apron, and went off with it I pursued her, and cried out stop thief; she was stopped in Holborn.

JOHN TOBY . I live in Mrs. Fletcher's house; I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued after the prisoner, she got into Holborn before I overtook her; and then she said the gown was her own. A woman took the gown from her, and gave it to Mrs. Fletcher.

Q. (to prosecutrix) What is the gown worth. - A. Five shillings.

(The property produced and identified).

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Parker's-street, I saw something lay on the ground; I picked it up, there were a great many people round me; I asked them if they owned it, they said no; I thought I had a right to it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-80

503. ROBERT BAILEY , and THOMAS GARDNER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , seventy pound weight of lead, value 21 s. the property of our sovereign Lord the King .

Second count for like offence, the property of Thomas Pope .

Third count, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS POPE . - Mr. Knapp. You are superintendant of his majesty's New Mint, on Tower Hill . - A. I am.

Q. Understand there is a great quantity of lead laying about these works. - A. Yes; and I had been missing of lead several times.

Q. The prisoners were plumbers and labourers on the 26th of May last. - A. They were; they were employed on these premises.

Q. Did you see any lead afterwards that was produced by the officer. - A. I did.

Q. Was the lead that was so produced to you by the officer, such lead as you had about the premises. - A. I had great reason to believe it was.

Q. Are you responsible to his majesty for the different property under your superintendence. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You are the superintendent on the building. - A. I am.

Q. Is the building done on contract. - A. No, there is two master plumbers employed. We have a quantity of old lead, and we have erected a casting house there. The old lead is delivered to the two master plumbers, and they melt it.

Q. On the 26th of May the two prisoners were employed there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you yourself weigh the lead to see there was a deficiency. - A. I did not.

Q. What time do the workmen go away. - A. The plumbers at six, and the other workmen at seven; then the gates are shut.

Q. Now the lead that has been produced by the officer, is any mark upon it. - A. There is no private mark upon it.

Q. Is there any mark private or public. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Can you undertake to say that is the lead which was stolen from the Mint. - A. I cannot, I believe it is.

Court. From your inspection of the bulk of lead, could you see that their was any deficiency. - A. No, we cannot; because we have five or six thousand pounds worth of lead.

JOSEPH HARDEN . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the officers belonging to the Thames police. - A. I am. On Tuesday the 26th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw Robert Bailey , in company with Thomas Barber ; I stopped Bailey, I felt something at his breast, I found it was metal; directly I stopped Bailey, Thomas Gardener attempted to make his escape by running away; he threw down about thirty-eight pound of new lead; Thomas went after him and fetched him back; I secured Bailey. I found upon him thirty-two pound weight of old sheet lead, it was concealed under his waistcoat and frock. I asked them where they got it, and where they worked, they gave me no answer.

WILLIAM THOMAS . - Mr. Knapp. You were with the last witness Harden. - A. Yes; when Gardener attempted to make his escape, I ran after him; just before I came up to him, he took a new piece of lead out of his waistcoat, and throwed it down in the street.

Q. How far was he from the new building. - A. About an hundred yards.

Court. (to Pope) Can you say there is a fraudulent diminution of that lead. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the lead afterwards. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. From what time can you swear that there was an improper diminution of the lead, (the lead produced). - A. I cannot swear to the time exactly, I missed it three days after the 26th.

Court. Of course you were acquainted that these people were taken on the 26th. - A. I was acquainted with it the next day.

Q. Did you look at the stock of lead to see whether there was a fraudulent diminishing from that place. - A Yes.

Q. Can you swear that there was a fraudulent diminishing of the lead from that place - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of this lead. - A. Six or seven shillings.

Bailey's Defence. As we turned round the new docks, almost at the bottom of Nightingale-lane, we picked these two pieces of lead up; I put it under my smock frock, I thought it the easiest way of carrying it.

Gardener's Defence. I picked up some of the lead. We picked it up both together.

Bailey called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BAILEY, GUILTY, aged 44.

GARDENER, GUILTY, aged 35.

The jury recommended the prisoners to mercy on account of their good character .

Confined in Newgate One Week .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-81

504. DANIEL ANSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , twenty two brass coach door plates, value 7 s. ten buckles, value 2 s. and a bell, value 4 d. the property of Joseph Ford .

JOSEPH FORD . I am a coachmaker , Bowling Green lane, Clerkenwell . I was from home when the articles were stolen, they were in the warehouse adjoining to where the prisoner was; I was sent for; the prisoner had broke into my warehouse. When I came home, I found the prisoner was in custody; I looked into the warehouse; I perceived the things were gone.

GEORGE WALTON . I am a coach painter, I work for Mr. Comford; my master's shop where I work adjoins Mr. Ford's shop. On Friday the 22nd of May I heard somebody rattle the iron about in the next shop; it being five o'clock in the afternoon I knew it was the time for the men to be all at tea; I looked through the crevice of the boards of Mr. Ford's shop; I saw the prisoner standing against the door of the warehouse; he seemed confused and he was looking as if to see whether any body was coming into the shop; I looked through the party wall, I saw him try to get into the store room; he got part of the way in but could get no further; I got upon a carriage, so as to look over the party wall, I saw him attempting to get into the warehouse; he retreated back, came again, and ripped down another bar of the warehouse; then he went in, he began taking the brass coach door plates, he took some out the first time, and he came a second time; with that I called my master.

Q. Did he take any in the presence of you and your master. - A. Yes, my master came and saw him; he went round and caught him; master asked him what he was after, he said nothing; my master replied you must be after something down there; he said he was looking for a piece of leather.

Prisoner. I did not break the place down, the place was broken down.

JOHN COMFORD . I am a coach painter. When I came out from tea my man told me he saw the prisoner taking the plates from the warehouse; I saw him in the act of taking the plates out of the warehouse; I went into Mr. Ford's shop, I asked him what he was about, he said nothing; there was no one with him at the time. I told him I was sure he was about something, I could see him, and he was in there taking the plates.

Q. Upon looking at the warehouse could you see that it had been forced open. - A. Yes, there were two bars torn down.

Q. Did you see where the plates had been put. - A. They were found in a stage coach.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I was sent for to take this man in custody; I searched him, I found nothing upon him but a few nails. These are the coach door plates, I found them in the body of a stage coach; and these plates I found at Mrs. Hill's, an old iron shop. The next morning the prisoner said he was sorry for what he had done; I told him I thought he had a warning before.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of these plates are they worth five or six shillings. - A. They are.

Q. You had not put these coach plates in the stage coach. - A. No; I lost many before; I put them in that place; I could see my stock was diminished; he left only one out of eleven dozen.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no leather to work with; my mistress told me to look about the warehouse; I put my arm in, and the pale broke in; I pulled out the leather, and two of the plates came out with it.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-82

505. MARY BIRCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a sheet, value 5 s. a saucepan value 4 s. and a looking glass, value 4 s. the property of Mary Knowles .

MARY KNOWLES . I am a widow woman, I live at No. 17, Hatfield street, Goswell street . The prisoner lodged in my garret; I had let the lodging to Stephen Warner , and the prisoner, for their use, and they lived together as man and wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-83

506. WILLIAM CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , eleven pieces of leather, value 20 d. the property of James Barker and Joseph Dumas .

JAMES BARKER . I am in partnership with Joseph Dumas , we are curriers and leather cutters , 25, Bow-street, Covent Garden . On the 13th of June the prisoner came into my shop, I was then in the back warehouse; I came into the shop where he was looking at some leather; he placed one piece on the counter, I told him I thought he had some pieces of leather under his coat; I had suspected him for some time past; he denied it; I said that I was sure that he had; he pulled out one piece; I told him I was sure that he had got more; then he pulled out ten pieces.

Q. Was it your leather. - A. I believe it to be my leather. He said he hoped I would forgive him, he had done it through distress, and his wife was laying-in.

Q. What is the value of the leather. - A. About twenty pence.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a customer of Mr. Barker's nine years; I went into his shop to buy some leather; I looked the leather out of the bin, I put it under my arm, as I thought, to put it on the counter; before I got to the counter Mr. Barker said I had got some under my coat; I did not know but I put it under my arm; in the act of stooping I put it under my coat.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-84

506. JOHN CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June, twelve birch brooms, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Paste .

JOSEPH PASTE . I am a cornchandler , 125, High Holborn . On the 18th of June, between six and seven in the morning, from information of my servant maid I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him at the corner

of Bleeding Hart-yard. He had the bundle of brooms with him.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. Three shillings; the bundle of brooms lay before my door on the channel by the curb.

MARIA BANKS . Q. You are servant to Mr. Paste are you. - A. Yes. On the 18th of June, I saw a man carry a bundle of brooms from my master's door; he went towards Leather lane. I went and informed my master.

SAMUEL BOTTOMLY . On the 18th of June, Mr. Paste came up Leather lane, he asked me if I had seen a man with brooms, I told him yes; he had passed me. I pursued the prisoner and stopped him; I said, my friend that is a dozen of brooms that do not belong to you, he pitched them down at my feet, and ran away; I ran after him and took him; these are the brooms.

Prosecutor. I believe them to be the brooms, I cannot take upon me to swear it.

Prisoner. I acknowledge I had the brooms; I implore for mercy.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-85

507. PHOEBE FARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of May , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Davies .

THOMAS PHIPPS . I am servant to Joseph Davies ; he lives at Shrewsbury .

Q. Did you lose a pair of shoes from your shop at any time. - A. Yes On the 21st of May, about nine in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop to change a pair of shoes that she had not bought at the shop: I at last agreed to change them; she fitted on a pair; I papered them uy for her, and she gave me nine pence, which was the difference; she said her garter was down, she did not mind me, I was a married man; she went on the stairs to tie it up, I missed a pair of shoes from the place where she had sat, she came and sat down again and there seemed to be a riot in the street; she got up and was going out. I then said to her, I think you have got more about you than you should have; I asked her to go into the back room and deliver them up to my wife; she denied it; I sent for a constable; the shoes were found in her pocket. When the shoes were found upon her she said that she did not know she had them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little in liquor, I did not know that I had the shoes; I insisted upon having the constable sent for; he offered to let me go if I would pay for them.

Prosecutor. She was a little in liquor; she denied having them, and insisted upon the constable being sent for.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-86

508. ELIZABETH JARVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , a silver table spoon, value 16 s. the property of George Cole , esq .

JOHN UNDERHILL I am a servant to Mr. Page, pawnbroker, 35, Wardour-street. On Saturday the 16th of May the prisoner offered this spoon to pledge; I asked her whose it was, she said it was her own, she had bought this and another, and four tea-spoons for two pound of Mr. Lightfoot, Bulstrode-street, Marybone; I asked her how long she had them, she said twelve months, and she had pledged the others in High-street, Marybone, but she did not know the name of the person; I then sent for an officer, he took her in custody, I went with him; going along she said if I would let her go she would tell me the particulars about it.

REBECCA WOOTTON . Q. Are you servant to Mr. Cole of Kensington . - A. Yes. On the 16th of May, the prisoner came to our house, she washed for us; she left our house between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day; between nine and ten I saw the spoon safe in the plate closet; the door was locked when I went up stairs; she brought the basket of linen to me, I told her to go down in the kitchen; the postman came with a letter, I went up stairs to get the money to pay for the letter; she opened the door then.

Q. You did not see her. - A. No, when I came up the door was locked, and when I came down the plate closet door was open. The key was in the kitchen but not in the door.

Q. Did you at that time expect any thing amiss. - A. No, I missed the spoon about an hour after she went.

Mr. Alley. The next morning her husband came and asked you if you had lost a spoon. - A. Yes, he said he was very sorry for it.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

[ The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of her good character ].

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-87

509. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of June , two coach cushions, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Faires .

THOMAS FAIRES . I am a coach master ; I can only swear to my property. The coach stands at the Bull and Gate yard Holbron .

THOMAS HEWITT . I drive for Thomas Faires .

Q. What is the number. - A. 480. On the 31st of May, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I left the coach safe in the yard; the cushions were in it at that time; I saw the coach again the next morning and then the cushions were gone; I saw them at twelve o'clock at Marlborough-street; I am sure they are my master's cushions.

JOHN PARR . I am a watchman my box is near the Bull and Gate. On the 1st of June I had just called the hour of the night, when the prisoner at the bar came to me, he said you make a worse noise than a ship's corporal on board a ship but you have a better light; he was taken at the corner of Queen-street. He and I walked to the box close to the Bull and Gate, he asked me how [Text unreadable in original.]t was to the top of Holborn; I told him; and then sat down in my box; he had nothing with him then. About half an hour afterwards I went out, I saw him rolling something up in a cloth, I thought it was a bed quilt as he came out of the gate, the pocket being narrow, I saw what he had got; I asked him where he was going, he said to Gravesend, I took him by the collar and told him he should go to the watchhouse: he took the two cushions from his shoulder, they were covered

up in a great horse rug; he said if I took him to the watchhouse he would cut my guts out, and struck me in the face.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, on the 1st of June last, I received directions from captain Fowler, of his majesty's ship Britannia, to come to London to look after my prize money. On my arriving at Gravesend, I took the boat to London; when I arrived at Billingsgate, I went with a girl of the town to the Bull and Gate, which is a house for the reception of prostitutes, and there at the corner of the gateway I saw a bundle, I took it up and swore I fell in with a prize. The watchman was calling the hour, he says you are half seas over, what prize is this you have got; I opened the bundle, I said they will do for my hammoc; I am an innocent far. I have served his majesty eighteen years, I was with lord Howe on the 1st of June; I have sailed with lord Duncan, and I was in the action of Trasalgar, with the immortal Lord Nelson.

Q. (to Parr). Had he any girl of the town with him when you saw. - A. No, he was alone.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Sentence respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-88

510. WALTER SCAMMELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , five pair of shoes, value 25 s. the property of Henry Marsh .

HENRY MARSH . I am a shoemaker of Old Brentford .

Q. On the 14th of June, did you lose any thing from your shop. - A. The prisoner worked in the house. On the 13th of June, the prisoner brought a pair of shoes down to me that he had made; I was serving some customers at the time; and some more came in, I got him to serve them, and after he had served them, I perceived something in his pocket; another person came in, and while I was serving that person, he went up stairs into the workshop, where he and two others were working; he came down stairs almost immediately, that pocket appeared to be empty. While he was having his supper, I went into the workshop (he was the only lodger that was in the house then); I found five pair of shoes up the chimney. I let him alone till the 14th, which was Sunday; I watched him till about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard him come up stairs, and he went down almost immediately; he came up again and was some little time in the room, and he went down; instantly as he was gone I followed him; he went out of the door; a person that is here stopped him.

Q. Had he the shoes with him then. - A. Yes, they were tied up in a bundle; we examined the bundle and found the shoes. These were the shoes that were in the chimney piece; I looked there before I followed him. They are worth twenty-five shillings. The prisoner is a single man, and bore an honest character.

WILLIAM MARSH . I am the father of the other witness; I stopped this man, he had a bundle with him; I took the bundle from him, and charged the constable with him; when I stopped him, he said, Oh lord! what have I done.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21.

The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account of his good character .

Discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-89

511. ELIZABETH CARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a velvet bonnot, value 7 s. the property of Michael Benjamin .

SARAH BENJAMIN . I am the wife of Michael Benjamin; he keeps a sale shop , 67, Wardour-street, Soho .

Q. Do you know of the loss of a velvet bonnet from your shop. - A. Yes. On the 28th of May, between one and two o'clock, it was taken away; I had seen it five minutes before that time, it hung up by the side of the window for sale. I took the bonnet from the prisoner, as she was going into Little Pulteney-street.

Q. What is the value of the bonnet. - A. Seven shillings.

SARAH HOOPER. I live at the Black Horse, Swallow-street. As I was going by Mrs. Benjamin's shop, I saw the prisoner take the bonnet and go away with it; I called to Mrs. Benjamin, she pursued her, and I saw Mrs. Benjamin take the bonnet from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the door, I picked up the bonnet a little distance from the door, this woman came after me and said I stole it. I gave her the bonnet.

GUILTY , 22.

Confined in Newgate One Week , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-90

512. THOMAS HOUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a glass oil cover, value 7 s. the property of Samuel Parker , and William Perry .

WILLIAM PERRY . My partner's name is Samuel Parker, we are glass manufacturer s in Fleet-street .

Q. Did you lose a glass oil cover at any time. - A. Yes; the last time I saw it was within three months of the present time; it was not sold, because a part of it was defective; it was put in a glass case in the back shop; it is worth about six or seven shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You had not seen this for some time before the 10th of July; you say it is defective, and therefore it being not a complete article it could not be sold; have you not many servants that serve in the shop - A. Yes.

Q. They may have sold it for any thing you know, though it is not usual. - A. All the servants that ever sell are here, they can speak to their own knowledge; the prisoner was a cleaner of glass for us.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. On the 10th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I received information that a parcel of people frequented the lodgings of the prisoner, at his mother's in Lilley-street, Saffron-Hill; they have only one room in the one pair of stairs; there I found the glass article in a box, among some old rags. The prisoner was laying in bed, there was two bed, there was two bedsteads there; I asked him whose glass oil cover that was, he said it was his, and he worked for Mr. Parker and Mr. Perry. I have shewed the glass oil cover to Mr. Perry, he claimed it. The prisoner said he was allowed all the glass that was cracked; I said here is not all cracked glass here.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. This property is mine, that Mr. Perry has sworn to.

Prosecutor. The oil cover is mine.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-91

513. JAMES GUDGER and JOHN COLLEY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , two iron hinges, value 3 s. and an iron steak, value 1 s. the property of Charles Hale .

CHARLES HALE . I am a brick-maker , I live at Stepney. I know the prisoner Colley.

Q. Did you at any time lose two iron hinges and an iron steak. - A. I did; on the 9th of June, they were kept in a house that I was building; I saw them there on the 8th in the after part of the day. On the 9th I saw them in the bag, when they both were stopped together; I knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I work for Mr. Hale. On the 9th of June, about a quarter past six in the morning, I met Gudger with the bag upon his shoulder; I did not see Colley; then Gudger was in the adjoining field to Mr. Hale's house, across the road; I thought I knew the bag; I walked by him and I thought I saw the hinges in the bag, they were hinges that dropt off a five bar gate; we had put them in a bag. I examined the house, I found they were gone, I pursued Gudger to the third field, I came up to Colley, he had them upon his shoulder; Gudger was about thirty yards a head, I put my hand upon the bag I told him to stop, he said for what; I said he had my property, Colley immediately put the bag down, and stood along side of it; I ran up to Gudger, and catched hold of his shoulder, he said what is the matter; I told him he should go along with me, and just as he came up to Colley, he began to cry, and said he hoped I would not hurt him; I told him I would not hurt him no more than the law would allow: I would hang him if I could, for we had been robbed so many times before; he said he had taken them out of the house, between three and four in the morning; I told Colley to take the iron up, and follow me; Colley said Gudger was to give him a pint of beer to carry it; Gudger said he was the only person that took it; he was to give Colley some beer for carrying it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Gudger said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses's to character.

Colley's Defence. I was going to work, he asked me to carry it; he said he would give me a drop of beer.

GUDGER, GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

COLLEY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-92

514. JOHN FLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June , eleven pound weight of nails, value 10 s. and a towel, value 6 d. the property of Edward Houlditch , John Houlditch , and James Houlditch .

JAMES HOULDITCH . My partners names are Edward, and John Houlditch , we are coachmaker s in Long-acre . The prisoner had been our servant.

JAMES COOK . I am a publican, I keep the White Horse, Long-acre; the prisoner lodged with me; we turned him out of his lodgings on the 10th of June, and locked up the room immediately.

Q. From any complaint that Jaques, the foreman to Mr. Houlditch, made did you open the room and search there. - A. I did, on the 15th; I brought down a portmanteau; Mr. Jaques claimed a towel that was in it; I searched the room afterwards, I found three papers of nails in the closet, I took them to Mr. Houlditch; they claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. The towel I know I had, the nails I know nothing of; I used to dust gentlemen's carriages, I was four days from my lodgings, they would not let me have my clothes. That towel was in my coat pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18070701-93

515. BENJAMIN GARREN was indicted for that he on the 6th of May , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder, and a leaden bullet, did shoot at Daniel Leadbetter , he then being in the dwelling house of him the said Benjamin Garren .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be in a certain dwelling house.

The indictment was opened by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Watson.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . - Mr. Reynolds. Are you an officer of the city of London. - A. I am a constable .

Q. Were you so on the 6th of May last. - A. I was.

Q. Whereabouts were you about four or five o'clock in the afternoon of that day. - A. At about five o'clock I was at the Three Crowns, in the Old Jewry; there I received information that a man had shot two men, and they wanted a peace officer to go and take him; I went in company with Sherrin, my brother officer, to Fenchurch-street , nearly the bottom, beyond London-street; I there saw a vast number of people collected about the house where Mr. Garren lived; they were on both sides of the way, and in the middle of the street; there were two or three hundred people, I dare say.

Court. What I want to know is this, was there any alarm in the crowd of what had been done. - A. I do not recollect particular that there might; when I got to the door, I was going to pull my staff out, some person thought it was not adviseable to pull my staff out, and told me to be careful, for he was armed. I looked up the passage, I saw Mr. Garren standing at a passage door, up the passage; there is a door that parts two passages; there are two doors close together, and a passage to each; I saw him at the passage door with a pistol in each hand.

Q. When you first saw him, and saw the crown

about the house, did you then generally understand whether any mischief had been done. - A. I do not recollect whether there was any thing about mischief mentioned; I was anxious to get the man; I did not go up the passage to meet him, I went through a door in the passage, into a hardware shop, and went into the kitchen, at the back of the hardware shop; there I saw Mr. Garren's daughter and Barber the sheriff's officer. The door of the kitchen was fastened on the inside with a cross wooden bar, and I think Barber took the bar down, and the door was opened; and when I first saw him, I was nearly opposite of him.

Mr. Reynolds. How far distant were you from him, when you first saw him. - A. Not more than three yards, if so much; I said what is the matter Mr. Garren, you know me very well.

Q. Did he know you. - A. I think he must, I knew him; I have been in the habit of meeting him in the street frequently; I have conversed with him about a dozen years ago.

Q. When you met him in the street, did he appear to know you. - A. I have sometimes bowed to him when I passed, and he returned it; and sometimes we passed.

Q. When you have bowed to him in the street, have you ever had your staff. - A. Never to shew it to him.

Q. When you told him he knew you, what answer did he make. - A. I do not recollect any thing. I am sure he had both the pistols in his hands I went up close to him; by this he got into the other passage were the stairs (as I understand) led up to his apartments; he got about two yards from where he first stood, we were face to face; I took the opportunity of striking his right hand with my left, to make him drop the pistol. but he did not drop it; he was not pointing the pistol towards me, he was holding it down; when I found that he did not lose his hold I took my right hand and laid hold of him by his left arm, and threw him on the stairs and threw myself upon him.

Q. What did you do that for. - A. Thinking he might shoot me, and to secure him, and to take the pistols from him; when I threw myself upon him he he turned one of the pistols at my head, and I kept it down; he turned the muzzle of the pistol towards my head as I was laying upon him, he was upon his back and I was upon my belly; I kept the pistol down with my left hand, and it went off almost immediately.

Q. Are you quite sure that he pointed it towards you so that the contents might reach you. - A. I believe so I have no doubt of it.

Q. What was the effect of this pistol going off. - A. I had the flash in my face, it was black; I received no injury at all. The contents of that pistol lodged in the skirting board; Sherrin will produce you the piece of wood, he took it out afterwards; both the stairs and the skirting board were penetrated by the firing of the pistol. I then got the pistols from him; after I had got both the pistols from him he reached out his hand to catch the pistol; there were plenty of help then, he was secured. The other pistol I took in company of Bennet to Bartholomew-lane; here is the contents of it, it was loaded with five small pieces of lead and some gunpowder.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. It is a dozen years since you and Mr. Garren spoke together. - A. I do not know that it is as much as that, it is a good many years ago.

Q. When you met him in the street, having known him as a clergyman, you pulled off your hat. - A. I seldom pulled off my hat; I sometimes bowed to him but seldom did that.

Q. When you first of all went to his house, upon seeing him in the passage, you went round and got this door open, and got into the passage; was there a considerable noise in the front of him. - A. In the front, sir.

Q. He was looking towards the street when you first met him. - A. No, he turned round to me.

Q. You chucked him upon the stairs and threw yourself upon him. - A. I did.

Q. Did any other person join with you in laying upon him. - A. I cannot say, my attention was too much upon him.

Q. Therefore whether Sherrin was upon him or not you cannot say. - A. He was not upon him.

Q. Whether he was upon you. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. You say the pistol was turned towards your head, you took hold of it with your left hand and turned it down - A. I turned it down; I cannot say whether it was my right hand or left; I think it was my left.

Q. You had touched it with your left hand before it went off. - A. I think I did, for it went off just at the instant that I touched it.

Q. And the powder of the flash discoloured your face. - A. No doubt of it.

Q. I presume your laying hold of it with your left hand was rather a sudden act. - A. My hand was not near the trigger.

Q. When you saw the pistol turned toward you you gave it a sudden snatch. - A. It was a quick motion.

Q. But finding the muzzle approach you you took hold of it, and it instantly went off - there was some struggling between him and you before this took place. - A. There was not much struggling before the pistol went off, it was done almost as soon as he was down.

Q. Had he or had he not pointed the pistol to you before you laid hold of it. - A. He pointed the pistol to me before I turned it down; I seized the pistol between the lock and the muzzle.

Q. If he had been disposed to have shot at you before you were down he had opportunity enough. - A. He had; I went to him, having full confidence that he knew me, thinking he would not.

Court. If the pistol had gone off in the direction in which it was before you put your left hand to it, do you believe it would have hit you - A. I have every reason to believe if I had not prevented him he would have shot me; there was not time for a great deal of aim, but he put it round towards my head; my putting my left hand to it altered the direction,

WILLIAM SHERRIN . - Mr. Watson. What are you. - A. I am a city constable. On the 6th of May I was at the public house in the Old Jewry, in company with Leadbetter; I went from thence with him to Fenchurch-street to Mr. Garren's house; from

Information of a boy that two men had been shot; I went to the dwelling house of some person, I was given to understand it was his house; I suppose there were two or three hundred people assembled round the house.

Court. First of all let me ask you whether there was any cry in the croud about what had passed. - A. I think I heard the mob say he had fire arms, and to take care of ourselves.

Q. Who had fire arms. - A. Mr. Garren; a man had been shot.

Q. Did you hear that. - A. I cannot pretend to say that; I went into this passage with Leadbetter, I then saw Mr. Garren with a pistol in each hand at the further end of the passage.

Mr. Watson. At this moment had either of you shewn any staff of office. - A. I shewed none at all; not Leadbetter as I know of. Then a door was opened to Leadbetter, which led him through a hardware shop into the kitchen; I remained in the passage, the prisoner was walking about at the further end of the passage; Leadbetter came out of a door, which I judged to be the kitchen door, where the prisoner was standing. I then heard Mr. Leadbetter say to Mr. Garren, you have known me for some years; I did not hear the prisoner make any reply. Leadbetter went up to him; he turned himself round as if he was going out of the passage, with intention of going up stairs; I then observed Leadbetter rush on him; and he throwed him on the stairs quite flat, and throwed himself upon him; and I immediately fell upon him also, before the pistol was fired; I then heard the report of a pistol, I did not see the motion of his hand, I merely heard the sound; and the flash of the pistol came into my face; the confusion was great, I was upon Leadbetter at that time. After we were upon him, there were a large quantity of people rushed in upon him.

Q. Did you afterwards observe the effect that that firing had. - A. I did; I took the bit of the stairs and the skirting board out (producing them); that nail in the stair turned the bullet off; the bullet is in the wood. I now produce them. We secured him and brought him away to the counter; in going I did not hear him say any thing; he hung back and was obstropolous.

JAMES BARBER . I am a serjeant at mace.

Q. Were you in the kitchen of this house when Leadbetter came in. - A. I was; when Leadbetter came the prisoner had shot a man.

Court. Relate under what circumstance the prisoner had shot a man before Leadbetter came. - A. Porcus, a serjeant at mace, had a warrant against a person of the name of Gerrard, I was with him; about thirty yards to our coming to Mr. Garren's house, he saw the prisoner standing at the door; he says there he is; when we got there Porcus went up stairs along with the prisoner, he told the prisoner that he had got an execution against him for one hundred and twenty pounds; the prisoner says to his daughter, these fellows are come to rob the house, to rob me, and murder you. The prisoner at the bar made his escape; he went into the kitchen and went up stairs; Porcus followed him, he called to me, and said, Barber follow me; when Porcus got midway of the stair case, the prisoner chucked down large pieces of wood.

Q. In a direction to hit you and Porcus. - A. Yes, two large pieces; Porcus and I withdrew, and Porcus left me in the passage. Porcus returned with a man of the name of Jones, a fireman and ticket porter; when he returned I pushed my foot against the door and forced it open; the prisoner was on the landing place on the stairs; we advanced on the stairs towards the prisoner, Porcus was in my rear; when Jones had got on the sixth or seventh step on the stairs, I saw the prisoner point the pistol at me, he shot at me, and shot Jones; I took Jones down stairs and I delivered him to Porcus; he took him to the doctor; he was dangerously wounded; he was four or five weeks in Bartholomew's hospital. After I delivered Jones into the care of Porcus, I went up two or three stairs, I came down stairs and said I would not be shot; he had another pistol pointed. When the constable came I told him he had got fire arms, I was in the kitchen; I saw the warrant; Porcus shewed it to the prisoner before Jones was shot.

Q. You have since found that the prisoner was not the real man against whom that warrant was directed. - A. He was not; I found it out the next day (the warrant produced).

THOMAS PORCUS . - Court. Did you go with that warrant to arrest the prisoner. - A. I shewed him that warrant.

Q. Did you explain to him the nature of that warrant. - A. An explanation he would not allow, I saw that from the conduct of the man. That is the warrant which Barber and I went to make the arrest of the man.

Mr. Pooley (to Barber). You had a letter from Mr. Fenwick, while you had been suspended. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me whether that is the letter. - A. That is the letter.

Q. There was a card enclosed in that letter, have you found that card. - A. No, I have not been able to find it.

Q. You had notice to find it. - A. Yes, Porcus had that letter.

Q. Before you went to execute your office, did not you observe the Reverend B. Garren on the door. - A. Yes.

Q. That card was addressed to No. 63, he lives at No. 61. - A. Yes.

Q. Now when you was there, do you recollect Porcus, calling him by name. - A. I was not near enough to hear him.

Q. You told him you were come to take him in execution of a warrant for one hundred and twenty pounds. - A. Porcus did.

Q. Did not he tell you he owed no such thing. - A. I never heard him.

Q. I believe you know very well that Mr. Garren is not the person against whom this writ is. - A. I understood that the day after, or else I should never have taken the trouble to have my friend shot.

Court. Did you believe at the time that you went to make the arrest, that he was the person. - A. I did.

Mr. Gurney (to Porcus). I believe that card was given to you, have you found it. - A. I have endeavoured

to find it among Barber's papers.

Q. Barber says he gave it you. - A. He may say what he likes.

Q. On the card it was to arrest Mr. Garrard, No. 63 - now you had known Fenchurch-street before that time. - A. Many years.

Q. And you had known that the reverend Mr. Garren was living at No 61. - A Not directly.

Q. Then indirectly; did you not know it directly or indirectly. - A. Certainly.

Q. Did not you know Mr. Garren's by the number. - A. With submission to his lordship, I will state the outset.

Q. Did you not know that the reverend Mr. Garron lived at No. 61. - A. No.

Q. Did you not know that the reverend Mr. Garren lived in Fenchurch-street. - A. I certainly did know that his name was on the door.

Court. You knew that Mr. Garren lived in Fenchurch-street, but not at No. 61. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not know that the reverend Mr. Garren's name was on a brass plate on the door. - A. No, it is white paint; you will not allow me to state the outset; there is an outset in every thing.

Q. Then you know that the name of the reverend B. Garren was on the door. - A. Yes.

Court. Did you know that the name of the reverend B. Garren was on the door, when you entered the door. - A. Not correctly, not on that day.

Q. Did you before you entered the door see the the name of the reverend B. Garren on the door. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Pray sir, have not you passed that door many thousand times in your life. - A. Many.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you know that the name of the reverend B. Garren was on the door. - A. I was incorrect upon it.

Mr. Gurney. That is not an answer.

Court. Did you not hear the question, that admits of an answer, aye or no - did you before you went into the door, see the name on the door, aye or no. - A. Not the name when I made the arrest.

Q. When you entered the door, did you see the name on the door. - A. Not that day.

Mr. Gurney. I know you did not see it on that day because you did not look, had you not seen it in former days. - A. Not minutely.

Mr. Gurney. I shall not put up with that answer.

Court. You are either a foolish fellow, or you are keeping back something - at the time you entered that door, were you acquainted with the name of B. Garren being on that door. - A. I knew there was a name, but whether it was Garrard or Garren I did not know; I certainly was not correct whether it was Garrard or Garren.

Mr. Gurney. Now I should like one plain answer - had not you before that day observed the name of the reverend B. Garren on that door, aye or no; now recollect. - A. I do not conceive that I have seen the name on the door.

Q. Before you entered the house did you look to see whether it was 61 or 63. - A. I certainly did not; as we were going along Fenchurch-street I saw him at the door, I thought he was the man.

Court. You saw him at the house, which afterwards turned out to be 61. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. After you had done the mischief, I take it for granted you went to 63. - A. Yes, the next morning.

Q. On the door of 63 did you see W. Garrard painted on a board at the door. - A. Most undoubtedly.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-94

516. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , a table cloth, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. and a brass weight, value 2 d. the property of William Vinsall .

WILLIAM VINSALL . I live in Charles-street, Westminster . On the 1st of July, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner called at our shop for sixpennyworth of salmon; I lent her a plate and she went to the next door; she returned and left the plate, and asked me to let her wait in the parlour till a servant came which she expected would come at three o'clock; I gave her leave; I had occasion to go into the shop; I saw the property I lost on the drawers at the same time as she was in the room; no servant called, she made an excuse to go ten minutes before three, she said she was going into King-street, she would be back in a few minutes, and the servant was to wait for her. About five minutes after she had left the house I missed the apron, I ran after her and catched her in King-street with the apron in her hand; bringing her back to my house I met an officer; she was searched, and the table cloth and weight was found upon her.

JOSEPH GREGORY . The table cloth I took out of her pocket; the brass weight she chucked out herself.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, I did not know what I did, or where I was going to.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-95

517. JOSEPH ELY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of Daniel Miller .

DANIEL MILLER . I live with John Parr , Finchley Common . On the 10th of June the breeches were taken out of the room that I sleep in at the Bald Faced Stag public house; I saw them when I got up in the morning at five o'clock; I returned between seven and eight in the morning, they were gone. The prisoner is a marine , he said; he was out on a furlough, he was quartered that night at my master's; I saw the breeches again at Hatton Garden, about three o'clock on the same day; they are worth ten shillings.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable of Hatton Garden; I heard there was a pair of breeches taken from the Bald Faced Stag; I went up to Hampstead and took the prisoner at ten o'clock in the morning; he had sold the breeches to a waggoner named Bull. I told him what I took him for; first he denied it, and afterwards he said, well, you cannot hang me for it.

GEORGE BULL . I am a waggoner, I drive for Joseph

Wood of Bushy. On the 10th of June the prisoner overtook me going over Hampstead Heath; he said he had a pair of breeches to sell; I gave him eight shillings for them and a pot of beer; the clock struck eight as we were drinking.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Sentence respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070701-96

518. GEORGE GOLDING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , an iron shovel, value 2 s. the property of William Stapleton .

WILLIAM STAPLETON . I am a scavenger ; I only know the property.

THOMAS FISHER . On the 4th of June I was coming across Smithfield , I saw the prisoner take up the shovel in his hand; I heard him say it was a very handy shovel; the cart was about ten yards from it, the men were at work; they had left this shovel with the clothes. I went across the way to get a bason of soup; when I returned the prisoner and the shovel was gone.

SAMUEL TURNER . I work for Mr. Stapleton. On the 13th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Smithfield with the cart; I saw Fisher there.

Court. This is a mistake the other saying the 4th of June. - A. It is; we went to breakfast at eight o'clock; when I returned the shovel was missing. On the 18th of June, from Fisher's information, I went to Golding, I asked him to lend me a shovel, he said he would; he got me one out of the chimney piece; I told him this was Mr. Stapleton's shovel, it is stamped in the blade, it is the same shovel. I was at work with in Smithfield that I lost; it is worth two shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shovel, I gave ninepence for it.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-97

519. JEREMIAH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Roach .

THOMAS ROACH . I am a publican , I keep the Maidenhead in Dyot street, St. Giles's . On the 26th of June, about twelve o'clock in the day, I lost a sheet from the one pair of stairs room; the prisoner was drinking in the tap room from eight in the morning till twelve; then I met him at the bottom of the stairs with something under his coat; he told me it was a sheet he had from another man in the room.

Q. Did he say who the other man was. - A. No; there was another man, he ran away at the time.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Mr. Roach's tap room, there was another man there with a bundle under his arm; he told me he would be thankful if I would take charge of the bundle while he went backwards; I kept the bundle twenty minutes, he did not come; I went out to the yard to see for him, and Mr. Roach took me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-98

520. ELIZABETH GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of June , a bolster, value 3 s. two pillows, value 4 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. 2 d. two sheets, value 8 s. a counterpane, value 2 s. a blanket, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Ann Holwell , in a lodging room .

Second count for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

MARY HOLWELL . I live at No 9, Ironmonger-row, Old street . The prisoner took a ready furnished room on the ground floor of me, at four and nine-pence a week; my mother holds the house, and the property belongs to me. She left the lodgings on the 20th of June, without my notice. On the 27th she knocked at the parlour window shutter, I let her in, and insisted upon going into the room, which I did. I found every thing gone in the indictment.

JAMES GEARY . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the property about her.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left my lodgings, I had things in the room belonging to me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-99

521. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July , a pair of pantaloons, value 12 s. the property of Mary Tyler .

RICHARD HEATHER . I am servant to Mary Tyler , 110, Shoreditch . On the 2nd of July, a quarter past seven in the morning, I hung the pantaloons on the shop door within the shop; I missed them between six and seven in the afternoon. From information I pursued after the prisoner, I found him at Mr. Windsor's shop, Whitechapel; he was offering the pantaloons to pledge, I laid hold of him, I said they were the pantaloons that hung in our shop, and he had just stolen them; he said they were his. I know them to be my mistresses' property, they have our shop mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I am subject to fits, these breeches belong to me, they never belonged to that young man.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070701-100

522. BRIDGET HUGHES was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The indictment was opened by Mr. Alley, and the case was stated by Mr. Const.

MR. FITZPATRICK. - Mr. Alley, I shall call upon you for the record. (The record produced, and read in court.)

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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