Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th April 1807.
Reference Number: 18070408
Reference Number: f18070408-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 8th of APRIL, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY , FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1807.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Honourable EDWARD LORD ELLENBOROUGH , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; SIR GILES ROOKE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knt, One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Curtis , Bart. Sir Harvey Christian Combe , Bart. John Perring , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Rowcroft , Esq. Claudius Stephen Hunter , Esq. John Peter Hankey , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

John Nottingham ,

John Smith ,

Edward Brandon ,

David Kippen ,

John Hopkins ,

James Hoppey ,

Timothy Stanfield ,

John Roberts ,

James Mills ,

Joseph Allwinkle ,

Edward Gardner ,

Edward Brander .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

Thomas Hollis ,

Joseph March ,

Joseph Antell ,

Wiliam Roberts ,

Edward Roberts ,

Robert West ,

Thomas Maycock ,

William Lapworth ,

John Speare ,

James Gomm ,

William Pater ,

Joseph Fawcett .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Daniel Mullet ,

Allen Newman ,

Thomas White ,

William Davies ,

Richard Howell ,

Richard Speare ,

John Harris ,

William Faulkener ,

John Wright ,

Nathaniel Cofton ,

John Saunders ,

Nathan Smith .

Reference Number: t18070408-1

254. RICHARD EVE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , a coat, value 1 l. a key, value 1 d. and a dollar, value 5 s. the property of William Ryan .

WILLIAM RYAN . I am a labouring man .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He lodged in the same house where I did, at John Marley 's, No. 2, Short's-lane, St. Giles's ; the prisoner and I laid in the same bed; I went to bed at ten o'clock on the 15th of March.

Q. Was the prisoner in bed when you went to bed. - A. Yes. When I went to bed I laid my coat on the chair by the bed; at twelve o'clock I awoke, and found the prisoner gone, and my coat; I saw him again on the Friday following early in the morning; I called out catch him, and he ran into a necessary and shut the door after him. I gave him in charge of a constable; the prisoner said he had sold the coat to a jew.

Q. Are you sure the crown piece was in the coat pocket and the key. - A. I am sure it was.

Q. Did you ever find the crown piece. - A. No.

- DONALDSON. I took the prisoner into custody out of a necessary in Pipe-maker's alley; I took him to the watchhouse; I searched him, and found two duplicates and a key; immediately I put the key down the prosecutor said it is my key; on looking over the duplicates I saw they did not answer to this robbery; I said what have you done with this poor fellow's things; he answered I have sold them to a jew for fifteen shillings.

Q. You did not find the dollar. - A. No; the prosecutor has brought the lock to prove that the key found on the prisoner fits the lock.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-2

255. THOMAS THORPE and ZACHARIAH FISHER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Devitt , esq. about the hour of five in the afternoon on the 9th of March , William Dutch and William Pile , and others, in the dwelling house then and there being, and feloniously did steal ten silver spoons, value 5 l. ten silver desert spoons, value 5 l. four silver sauce spoons, value 3 l. and eleven silver forks, value 3 l. the property of Edward Devitt , esquire .

WILLIAM DUTCH . I live in Landsdowne-place, in the parish of St. Pancras , I am servant to Mr. Devitt. On the 9th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the kitchen on the left hand side of the passage in the front of the street.

Q. Did you hear any thing. - A. Yes. I thought I heard a step in the passage; I said to my fellow servant there is somebody in the passage; I ran across the kitchen, I saw the chimney-sweeper Thomas Thorpe was going out of the area door.

Q. Had he the appearance of a chimney-sweeper. A. Yes, he had the plate in his hat at that time.

Q. Where had that plate been. - A. In the butler's pantry on the right hand side of the passage; I told him to stop, he did not; I followed him to the area steps; then he put down the hat on the first step of the area at the bottom; he looked me in the face. When he got on the fourth step I took up the plate, and I took him and the plate into the kitchen, and I sent my fellow servant for the beadle.

Q. Then you did not see any thing of the other boy. - A. No; I know no other of him than what Thorpe said about him. I gave the plate to the beadle.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether he saw me with the property. - A. I did.

WILLIAM PILE . Q. You are servant to Mr. Devitt. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the witness Dutch bring the prisoner into the kitchen - A. Yes.

Q. And bring the hat with the plate. - A. Yes, Thorpe's hat.

Q. How long before had you seen the plate. - A. About six minutes before, at the farthest.

Q. Where had you seen it. - A. It was in the cupboard in the butler's pantry.

RICHARD LILLYWHITE . I am the beadle. I was sent for to Mr. Devitt's house; I took Thorpe in custody.

Q. Was the plate delivered into your charge. - A. Yes; I produce the plate. There is ten table spoons, eleven forks, and four sauce spoons.

Q. (to Pile) You had the care of this plate. - A. Yes.

Q. Are they Mr. Devitt's property. - A. Yes.

Mr. Devitt. They are all marked with my crest.

Q. (to Pile) Who were in the house besides you and Dutch. - A. There were three maid servants.

Q. This boy had not been employed about the house. - A. No.

Thorpe's Defence. I always worked very heard for my living.

Fisher was not put on his defence.

THORPE - GUILTY, DEATH , aged 12.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

FISHER, NOT GUILTY .

[ The prisoner Thorpe was recommended to His Majesty's mercy on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-3

256. JOHN TODD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Hollister , about the hour of eight on the night of the 12th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, two silver table spoons, value 30 s. four silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a gold broach, value 2 s. a gold pin, value 2 s. and a gold ring, value 3 s. the property of Charles Hollister .

MARY HOLLISTER . I live at No. 21, Charlotte-street, Old-street road , my husband's name is Charles Hollister . On Thursday the 12th of March I left my house at eight o'clock; I double locked the door when I went out; I returned at half past eight the

same evening.

Q. Was it dark when you went out. - A. It was dark, but a fine night.

Q. How did you find the door when you came home. - A. I found it open; immediately when I got inside of the door, a man rushed out of the parlour. I heard another at the handles of my drawers, which were in the parlour; I heard the drawers open and shut; I only heard the noise; I did not then see the men. I immediately took hold of the man that rushed out of the parlour. I struggled with the man a little; by the time I was got to the cill of the door, I asked him what business he had in my house, he said it is me to be sure, and he ran from me through a court that is facing my house. I had fallen down. Immediately another man rushed out of my parlour, and stepped upon me in getting out; that is all I know of the man; at that time when I went into the parlour, I missed a pair of silver table spoons, which were in the corner of the drawer.

Q. Have you them here. - A. No, I have not recovered any part of the property; I gave the discription of the prisoner to Mr. Clitherow; he asked me if I should know him again, he told me that a little after the time a man came that answered the description I gave him, came into the public house where he was.

Q. Did you see that man afterwards. - A. Yes.

Q. That man that you saw afterwards is he the prisoner at the bar. - A. He is very much altered, he is not as he was then; he is like him; I should be very sorry to swear to him. I believe him to be the man.

Q. You are sure that these things were left in the drawer when you went out. - A. They were; I had seen the spoons in the drawer before I went out; when I was looking for my gloves, the other things I had not seen for many days, they were in he same drawer.

JOHN WATSON . Q. What do you know of this. - A. On Thursday the 12th of March, a little after six in the evening, I went to the Two Brewers in Shoreditch; I stopped there till about half after nine in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar go out a little after eight, and he returned about half after nine.

Q. How far is this public house from Mrs. Hollister's. - A. Pretty nigh a quarter of a mile.

Q. When did you see the man afterwards. - A. On the Saturday night following, when he was taken.

CHARLES CLITHEROW . On Thursday evening the 12th of March, I was at supper in my own house. About twenty minutes after eight o'clock, I heard the alarm of stop thief; I went out, I saw Mrs. Hollister, she said she had been robbed; she gave me the description of the person; I gave the description to John Watson , as it was given to me. I found him on Saturday evening at the Two Brewers, Shoreditch.

- KENNEDY. I am an officer.

Q. You took the prisoner. - A. Yes; I and the prosecutrix went to the Two Brewers public house in Shoreditch; there were about fourteen persons in the tap room. The prosecutrix pointed out the prisoner at the bar, and said he was very much like the man that she had hold off in her house.

Mr. Knapp. She did not say he was the man, but he was like the man. - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-4

257. DANIEL NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a coat, value 4 s. a pair of leather breeches. value 12 s. a waiscoat, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. and a hat, value 2 s. the property of John Quirk .

JOHN QUIRK . I am a labouring man . I lodge at No. 8, Spread-Eagle court, Gray's-Inn lane ; the prisoner lodged in the house with me. I went to the Marybone infirmary; I was informed that he came to the same room that I slept in the night that I left it. I left my box in the room, it was locked; and while I was in the infirmary, he stole the articles mentioned in the indictment, out of my box. I missed the property the same night I came home from the hospital. The prisoner gave me the duplicate of the coat; he said he took my coat and handkerchief and wore it one day, and put them in the box again; he cried and said, the Devil tempted him to do it.

Q. Have you got any more of your things besides your coat. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-5

258. JOHN SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , five bibles, value 50 s. and two books, value 2 s. the property of John Stockdale , in his dwelling house .

JOHN STOCKDALE . Q. Where is your shop. - A. In Piccadilly, in the parish of St. James' . The goods that were stolen were in an auction room, adjoining my shop, where I dwell; it is the next door to my dwelling house; I have a son that sleeps in that house in the garret, he is my servant. On the 13th of March, the prisoner was detected between three and four in the afternoon, just at the close of the sale; a gentleman tapped me on the leg, and pointed to the prisoner who was sitting at the table. I went to where he was, I saw he was in the act of tying some books up.

Q. What was he tying up. - A. He was tying up a bible with a handkerchief; I went to the clerk that takes the money and delivers the books, and sent him to him; when he returned I kept a watch over him. The prisoner finding he was detected, untied the bundle, which contained a large quarto bible, and put it on the table; as soon as the sale had closed, I called out to the auctioneer Mr. Walker, and said, I had detected a person stealing a bible. I then took him to Bow street, where he was searched, and a number of duplicates were found on him; which duplicates led to a discovery of a great number of books of mine.

Q. Those books were not taken at this time. - A.

No.

Court. Confine yourself to the bible.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Mr. Walker sold for you; therefore whether he sold books to the prisoner, or he bought them at another time, you cannot possibly know. - A. I rather believe he never did.

Q. That you cannot know, you are only to speak to what you know; I would ask you whether this bible was not one of the prior lots that Mr. Walker put up, for which the prisoner bid twenty-four shillings. - A. I am positive that it was bought by another person who bid twenty-five shillings.

WILLIAM HURL . Q. What are you. - A. On that occasion I officiated as clerk to Mr. Stockdale's sale.

Q. Do you remember his selling any bible. - A. I do.

Q. Were there not more than one bible sold that day. - A. Not of that size, that is a demy quarto.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at that sale. - A. I did.

Q. Do you know whether he bid for that bible. - A. I cannot say. It was knocked down to Mr. Taffey for one pound five.

Q. You had not received the money for this book. - A. No. In consequence of Mr. Stockdale speaking to me, I asked the prisoner how he came in possession of the book; he told me he had bought it, and paid one pound four for it, to a person at the top of the room. I examined my book, and found that lot had been knocked down to Mr. Taffey, for one pound five; as soon as I was going back again to the prisoner, I observed him take the bible out of the handkerchief and lay it on the table.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-6

259. ELIZABETH HOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a yard and three quarters of a yard of thread lace, value 4 s. the property of James Maycock .

JAMES MAYCOCK . On the 6th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner in company with another woman came into my shop; the other woman purchased three yards of flannel and a yard of cotton lace; she paid for them, and they went away; after they were gone, we missed a remnant of thread lace; I desired my young man to pursue them and bring them back, he did so; we searched the prisoner, she untied her apron and laid it on the counter, my young man found it in her apron. When she was brought back her apron was folded up on her left arm.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman put the lace and the flannel into my apron; I knew nothing of it till the young man tapped me on the shoulder, he said I had got something in my apron; I says, I have not; I untied my apron and gave it into his hands; I knew nothing about it, nor never saw it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-7

260. JOHN SUTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , a watch, value 12 s. a chain, value 6 d. two gold seals, value 18 s. and a key, value 2 d. the property of John Edney and Philip Thomas Isaacson .

JOHN EDNEY. I am an auctioner and appraiser in Holborn . My partner's name is Philip Thomas Isaacson , the prisoner was our porter .

Q. Did you miss any watch or seals on Monday the 9th of February. - A. Yes, it was a metal watch and two gold seals. The watch was sent to us by a silversmith of the name of Emanuel; it was not sold in the sale; after the sale we generally returned to that gentleman some lots that were unsold immediately; and we thought it was returned to him, so that we did not miss it for three or four days afterwards. This gentleman made application to me, that I did not put it in my account; he suggested to me that it was at a pawnbrokers in Drury-lane.

Q. Did you go there. - A. I saw the watch there about three weeks afterwards.

Q. How came you not to go immediately. - A. I had no suspicion of the prisoner; I did not suppose he had taken it.

JOHN WINFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, 178, Drury-lane. I bought the watch of the prisoner, I gave him two guineas for it, he said he was a hatter, and was going to Bristol; that he found business very slack in London; he said it was is own watch. In a few days after I had bought it, Mr. Emanuel called in, he said it was his watch. I produce the watch.

MOSES EMANUEL . Mr. Winfield sent for me to purchase some goods. I saw the watch, I knew it to be my property. I told Mr. Edney of it; he would not go when I wanted him.

Q. (to Edney) Do you know the watch. - A. Generally I should know it, particularly by the chain; it is more like a jack chain than a watch chain. I should not be able to swear to it.

Q. (to Emanuel). Do you know the watch. - A. I could not swear to the watch, I can swear to the chain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. Can you swear that this is the watch you sent to Mr. Edney's. - A. I do not wish to swear it, if I had my book here I could produce the number upon the watch. I never buy a watch without entering it in my book.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Of stealing the chain only.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-8

261. THOMAS GUN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , three barrels, value 45 s. and a hundred gallons of beer, value 6 l. the property of John Trueman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury , and WILLIAM BOWSER for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

The indictment was opened by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GEORGE EWINGS . - Mr. Andrews. What are you. - A. I am a watchman of Mile End New-town. On the 24th of February I was on the watch; after three o'clock it was my turn to go into the watch-house; I continued there till four, and then I went my round. I came up to the George ale house, in Pelham-street , there stood a dray with seven barrels on it, fronting the George ale house door.

Q. Was any body standing with the dray at this time. - A. No, the whip laid on the curb, between the dray and the public house; in the course of a minute or two the prisoner Gun came out of the house with a bottle in his hand; he took up his whip, and drove off down to the store house with the seven barrels; where they were starting at the end of my beat. The store house belongs to Messrs. Hanbury and Co. In about twenty minutes afterwards I was sitting in my box. Gun came up to me with the empty dray; he says, what do you set there for, why did not you come and have something to drink. I said I did not know whether I might or no; he took hold of my hand, and shook hands with me. With that I found there was a finger wanting on his right hand. He drove off, in a direction to the brew-house; just before five o'clock I saw a dray coming from the brewhouse to go the store house, it stopped at the same public house; I stood up in my box, I saw a barrel go off the dray into the public house.

Q. Did you see who took the barrel. - A. No, I was on the offside, I came out of my box and took my lanthorn, from which I took out a bit of chalk to mark the dray. When I came up to the dray, there was nobody then with the dray, the same as before; they were in the house; I marked the dray on the right hand of the horse, on the shafts of the dray.

Q. What mark did you put upon it. - A. I went to make two crosses, I made one cross and a stroke, and then the chalk fell.

Court. How many barrels were there on the dray. - A. Seven remained on the dray, and one I saw carried in. I heard somebody coming out of the house, then I walked away from the door. Gun quickly came out of the house, he came up to me, and said, why do not you come and have something to drink.

Mr. Andrews. About what time was this. - A. It was just before five when this happened. Gun said I shall be there in about ten minutes, come and have something to drink.

Q. What did he mean by there. - A. Where they were starting. I looked at my watch, it was just about five o'clock, then he drove off; I went my round, and then I went down to the store house, I staid there about two or three minutes; there were several brewer s men there pumping, but I knew none of them. When Gun saw me, he handed me some beer; after I had drank and was coming away, Gun was serving out some gin, he said you shall have a dram. I had a dram, and then I came away. I never saw Bowser at all.

THOMAS BUTTS AVELING . - Mr. Bolland. I believe you are the principal clerk in the house of Messrs. Trueman. - A. I am. The partners are John Trueman Villebois , and Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury .

Q. Did you on the 24th of February, in consequence of any information from Ewings the watchman, make a minute investigation of the drays that had gone out that morning. - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any marks on any of those drays, and state to the court those marks. - A. I found on the off-shaft of a dray two crosses in chalk.

Q. Who had drove that dray. - A. Thomas Gunn had driven it in the morning; I applied to the magistrates of Worship street office, who sent two officers with me, Armstrong and Vickery.

Court. I wish to know how you can say it was Gunn who drove that morning. - A. Thomas Gunn was at work that morning, I saw his two horses and his dray that was allotted to him, I saw Gunn with the horses and the dray at the brewhouse or the storehouse.

Q. All that you can say is, that you saw the horses that Gunn drove, and that chalked dray that morning. - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. - Where did you first proceed with Vickery and Armstrong - A. To the lodgings of Thomas Gunn , I found him there and gave charge of him to the officers. We next proceeded to the George public-house, kept by the prisoner William Bowser ; when we first went into the house he was not at home, he came in in about a quarter of an hour; upon his return I asked him whether our drays were not there very early that morning, he answered they were; I then asked him if the men left any thing, he hesitated for an instant and said no; I then asked him a second time, he answered they had left two barrels of beer; I asked him where the beer was, he answered in the cellar; I then asked him where the casks where, he said in the yard; he went with me into the yard and shewed me one barrel; I asked him for the other cask, he answered it was in the back place, broke up; he went with me into a back kitchen, he shewed me a number of staves and hoops, which he said were the staves and the hoops of the other cask; I then went with him into the cellar, where he shewed me a but full of beer; I asked him whether the but was empty when he first put the beer in, he answered that it was empty; I asked him from where he got the third barrel, he answered, that the drayman brought it with the others; I then asked him for the third cask, he answered that the staves which he had shewed me where the staves belonging to the two barrels; he afterwards told me that he had bought the beer of the drayman Gunn, and that he had given him three one pound notes for three barrels.

Q. What was that three barrels of beer worth. - A. Six pounds fifteen shillings.

Q. What was the value of each cask. - A. One guinea.

Q. One cask was not broke up, whose property was that. - A. Messrs. Trueman, Hanbury and Co.

Q. Was this beer of the quality which you usually furnish the publicans. - A. Certainly not, it was store beer not of age for selling.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - The prisoner Bowser has been in the public line but a little time. - A. A few months.

Q. Had he been quite six weeks. - A. I cannot answer to a month.

Q. When you charged him upon this subject, he took and shewed you this I believe, he told you that

he had been induced to buy it by the drayman telling him it was a perquisite of his. - A He did.

DANIEL BISHOP . - Mr. Knapp. You are an officer of Worship street. - A. I am.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Moser the magistrate. - A. I am.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner Gunn signed any paper. - A. I was at the time of his examination.

Q. Take that in your hand and tell me whether that is the mark that the prisoner Gunn made at the examination. - A. It is.

Q. Is that the hand-writing of Mr. Moser. - A. It is, I saw him write it. The (examination read in court.)

Q. (to Mr. Aveling.) Did the prisoner Bowser deal with you. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you to have sent him at this time any beer. - A. We had no orders.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . - Mr. Alley. You are a police officer of Worship street. - A. I am. On Tuesday the 24th of February I apprehended Gunn, and then we went to the George public house, kept by Bowser, we found the cask and staves there; after I had seen them and found the beer in the cellar, I asked him how he came by them, he said he had paid three pounds for them; and he thought they were perquisites. I brought them to the public office, and they are here now.

ADAM TINSLEY . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am a cooper by trade.

Q. Did the last witness shew you a cask and some staves. - A. He did, a cask with one head in it and some staves, the cask was marked with Trueman and Hanbury's name upon it. I picked out the staves, and made two complete barrels.

Gunn said nothing in his defence.

Bowser's Defence. When Gunn called on me the night before and had a pot of ale, he shook me by the hand and said, that he had heard say that I was a good civil fellow, and was well liked in the neighbourhhood, he should come and have his beer of me, and several more of his acquaintance; he ordered a pot of beer to be taken home to his house, which I took home myself. He afterwards wanted to say something to me in secret, we went into the kitchen together, he told me he could let me have a barrel of stout, he said they were perquisites. I asked him how much it was to be, he said a one pound note was the same as they had of others, he should not charge me any more. I asked him what I was to do with it, he said put it into the waste but, it would help the waste but very much; he asked me what time I would be up in the morning, for they were going to start beer, and they should give me a call in the morning. I understood that there was a good many of them, and it was worth my attention to be up early in the morning. I told him I would be up at any hour, he said he would bring the cask in the morning in his way to the store-house; accordingly he did, and ordered me to have a bottle of gin, which I gave him according to his orders; then they put the barrel down into the cellar, he said be could let me have two more, which he brought, one at each turn. When he went and put up his horses, he said he would come and empty them, which he did, and brought tools with him for that purpose; he knocked up the hoops so as he might be able to knock in the head; when he was knocking in the head the beer flew about; I left him and went into the tap-room for a considerable time, I went to see how he was getting on. he ordered a glass of gin, which I took him; he skimmed some of the froth off with his hand, and said it was very strong, and they ought to brew it all like that; he asked me how much I gave for a but of other beer, I could not say exactly, I told him near six pounds; he said that they sold that for nine pounds in about three months time; that was nearly all that passed at that time. We went into the bar, I asked him how much I was to pay him, he said four pounds; I told him that I understood that one barrel was to be only one pound, why was I to give him four for the three, he said I must give him a seven shilling piece then, or else he should be out of pocket. After I had gave him the three pound and the seven shilling piece, he asked me to give him change of a one pound note, which I did, supposing that he wanted change to divide it; I asked him how many there was, he said only three. He went away for some time, and then called again for half a pint of gin, and then he asked me to change him a one pound note, which I did. There were two came first in the morning, which I forgot to mention.

Gunn called no witnesses to character.

Bowser called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUNN, GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

BOWSER, GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-9

262. WILLIAM SWASH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st February , three bird cages, value 3 s. and three birds, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Samuel Hagger .

SAMUEL HAGGER . - I am a victualler , I keep the sign of the Blakeney's head, Norton falgate . On Saturday the 21st of February, I missed three birds and the cages out of my tap room; these are the three cages and the three birds, (witness producing them). I know they are my cages and my birds, one is a goldfinch, a linnet, and a chaffinch; I missed them on or about ten or eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you miss them all at one time. - A. I did not; I missed the goldfinch first, about twelve I missed my linnet, and then looked round and missed my chaffinch. From information I received, I went in pursuit of them, I met the prisoner in Finsbury square, he had two handkerchiefs tied up with the cages, and the birds in them; I got the handkerchiefs off, and I saw they were my three birds and my three cages, each bird was in its own cage; I am sure they are my birds and my cages.

Q. What is the value of the cages. - A. Three shillings.

RICHARD FISHER . - Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes. On a Saturday, I cannot recollect the day of the month, the prisoner called upon me with a chaffinch and a linnet in cages, they were tied up in a handkerchief, he told me he had

given fifteen shillings for them; he told me that he had got a very good goldfinch, he would fetch it for me to look at, and he had given a guinea for that; he went and fetched it, and asked me what I thought they were worth; I told him I could not tell him. He left the birds in my room about ten minutes, and then he came and took them away; I had a suspicion that the chaffice belonged to Mr. Hagger, I went to him, and asked him if he had sold it, he told me no; I told him I had that bird and a linnet, and a goldfinch brought to my house by the prisoner; we pursued the prisoner, and overtook him in Finsbury square with three birds, and three cages that I had seen before.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing the three cages only .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-10

263. JAMES CLARKSON was indicted for that he' on the 31st of January , unlawfully, knowingly, and wittingly had in his custody and possession divers forged and counterfeited bank notes; that is to say, four bank notes for the payment of two pounds each, he knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

Second count for having in his possession another bank note for the payment of two pounds, he knowing it to be forged.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-11

264. JAMES CLARKSON was indicted for feloniously forging on the 31st of January , a bank note for the payment of two pounds, with intent to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

Second count for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention.

And two other counts for like offence, only stating it to be a promissory note for the payment of two pounds.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-12

265. ROBERT BENNS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , eighty bushels of beans, value 20 l. and nine sacks, value 13 s. 6 d. the property of Nathaniel Brickwood .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL PIKE . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are carman to Mr. Brickwood. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner foreman to Mr. Brickwood. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 12th of January did he give you any order. - A. It was on a Monday; I cannot say as to the time.

Q. How long was it before he was taken up. - A. I believe it was nine or ten days before he was taken up. He gave me an order to draw ten quarters of beans to Mr. Keeps; in consequence of that order I put them into sacks into Mr. Brickwood's storehouse; then we loaded them in the cart.

Q. How many sacks were there. - A. Twenty sacks. I drew them to the New Cut windmill, Blackfriar's-road , to Mr. Keep.

Q. Is that the paper that the prisoner gave you. - A. I believe he folded it up; I put it in my pocket, I never looked at it, I gave it to Mr. Keep.

Q. Did you deliver the beans to Mr. Keep. - A. Yes, I left the beans and the sacks there.

Q. Had you any money. - A. I had the shooting money, a shilling.

NATHANIEL BRICKWOOD . Q. What are you, sir. A. I am a cornfactor and corn-merchant living at Broken wharf; the prisoner was my foreman.

Q. In the month of January last you had a considerable quantity of beans in your granary. - A. I had.

Q. After you had made this discovery, did you endeavour to ascertain what quantity was deficient. - A. I did; the whole of my deficiency I cannot speak to; I am certain of above forty quarters.

Q. What is the value of a quarter. - A. Forty shillings a quarter.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner and Keep were examined at the office. - A. I was. I can swear that this was the paper that was given by Keep himself to the magistrate; I have no doubt of its being the prisoner's hand-writing; I have seen him write several times.

Q. When the corn is delivered out of your granary, is it usual to give written bills. - A. I have met with instances where there have not been any printed bills ready at hand; but the foreman never fills up notes. They are filled up by the clerk or myself. (The note read.)

Q. Was it the business of the prisoner as your foreman, to send out any corn without your knowledge, or the clerk's. - A. Certainly not.

Q. Whenever he sends out any corn, is it the custom to make any entry in the book. - A. It is his duty to enter it in the delivery book; the clerk usually fills up the notes, and enters it in another book, and that is a check to the other.

Q. Have you any entry on the 12th of January, of beans sent to Mr. Keep, New Cut windmill. - A. There is no such entry in the whole book; I never knew any thing of him till after the discovery of this transaction.

Q. I do not know whether you are able to ascertain any loss of your sacks. - A. Not particularly; I saw nine sacks produced at the office with my name on them; there were twenty brought, in which the beans went in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Have you any partners. - A. I have not.

Q. I understood you to state to my friend, that these bills of sale are usually printed. - A. The tickets that are sent by the carman are usually printed

Q. And sometimes I understand that they are not. - A. There may have been twice in seven years, if the clerk had not any bills at hand, that he has wrote them. I had but one clerk then, and he was at the Corn-exchange with me; it was impossible for him to have wrote it, and every foreman is positively ordered not to deliver any goods without an order from me or the clerk.

JAMES LOCKEY . I am a police officer.

Mr. Gurney. Did you search the New Cut, Keep's mill. - A. I did; I found these nine sacks there, they

have Mr. Brickwood's name on them in full length.

JOHN WOODCOCK . Q. I believe you lived at the New Cut mill on the 12th of January last. - A. Yes. I saw twenty sacks of whole beans come in on that day.

Q. What was done with them. - A. They were split; they came in Mr. Brickwood's sacks.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-13

267. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , seven trusses of hay, value 17 s. 6 d. the property of William Gosling , and JOHN LATTER for feloniously receiving four trusses of hay, value 10 s. knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM GOSLING . I live in Church-street, Edmonton, I have been in the building line, I have not long retired. On the 14th of March I ordered a load of hay to be cut; the man cut a load and three trusses; half a load was to be taken to my son and Mr. Arnold, they are partners together, and the remainder was to be brought to my house at Edmonton.

Q. How far is that from where your stack of hay was. - A. Not three quarters of a mile.

Q. Who was to carry your hay for you. - A. Thomas Ward . At nine o'clock, or thereabouts, he brought me nine trusses of hay, and said he would bring me the rest home at noon.

Q. Is he your servant. - A. No, he is Mr. Arnold's servant; he was to bring me twelve trusses at noon. I met him in the road between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I asked him how many trusses of hay he had got, he said there is twelve trusses; I said I do not think there is twelve, there seems a small quantity of it; I turned back with him, I intended to have seen him turned it out of the cart, but somebody came and prevented me; afterwards I counted them twice over in the loft, I counted only eighteen instead of twenty-one; I went to the field, and they were loading the hay to take to town; the haybinder said there was twenty-one on the cart. Ward was by at the time; Ward asked me if he should leave the three trusses at my house. I told him to take the twenty-one trusses to London; he set off about half after four in the afternoon.

WILLIAM ARNOLD . I live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street, Ward was my carter . On the 13th of March I sent him down to do some work for Mr. Gosling. On his return home he was to bring hay; he returned on the 14th about half past nine; he said he had been at work in the field for Mr. Gosling till past six, and that made him so late home; I asked him how many trusses he had brought; he told me eighteen trusses, and he had left it in the cart; he was to come at eight o'clock in the morning to put it in the loft; at eight o'clock the next morning I found the cart there and the hay, but there was not the quantity that I expected; when he came I told him there was but thirteen trusses; he told me there was eighteen, he said the horses had eat some in the night; I said they could not eat five trusses; there might be with what the horses had eat, and what was loose, another truss; reckoning that there might be fourteen trusses in all. I asked him what he had done with the other, he said he had not done nothing with it. I sent for an officer; during the time the officer came, the foreman told him he had better tell me what he had done with the hay, and I might be a friend to him. I told him if he would tell me who he had sold the hay to, I would be a friend to him. In consequence he was put in the custody of an officer; and we went and found the hay at the Leg of Mutton and Trimmings public house, Kingsland-road.

Q. How much did you find there. - A. Six trusses altogether and four of them were like mine; the other two might be outside trusses.

Q. Four is what you missed. - A. We missed seven.

Q. You did not know of the twenty-one at that time. - A. No.

Q. You missed four, that made up eighteen. - A. Yes. I saw the ostler; the other prisoner there (Latter) told the officer that Ward had left some hay with him, but he had paid him no money.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On Sunday the 15th of March, Ward was brought to my house about this hay; I sent for Mr. Mason, another officer, and left Ward at my house; I went and took Latter, and brought him to my house; he there said in the presence of Ward that Ward had left some hay for some money that he owed him; I think he mentioned six or seven shillings. I found six trusses, four of which Mr. Arnold believed to be his, which he took away.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

WARD, GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

LATTER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-14

268. JOHN MANNING was indicted for that he, on the 16th of June was clerk to William Hasletine Pepys and Edward Pepys , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and valuable securities for them, that he being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, an order for the payment of six pounds thirteen shillings for his said masters, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

WILLIAM HASLETINE PEPYS . - Mr. Comyn. Who are you in partnership with. - A. My brother Edward Pepys , we live at 24, in the Poultry , we are surgeons' instrument makers ; the prisoner was collecting clerk and bookkeeper .

Q. Was it his business to receive payments due to you from your different customers. - A. It was; it was his duty to account daily to the shopman, who made an entry in a receipt book for that purpose, of the money he received from the prisoner.

Q. Did you in the course of your business use to make up your accounts with your shopman weekly. - A. Weekly.

Q. Was the prisoner in that situation in the month of June 1806. - A. He was.

Q. Have you any paper of names in your possession of the prisoner's hand writing. - A. William Williams has that.

Q. When did you discover that any money had not been accounted to you. - A. On the 13th of March, 1807.

Court. This man was to go about to collect your debts. - A. He was; and to account always to the

shopman, because I would not take the responsibility on me.

Prisoner. These sums were put down in pencil.

Mr. Pepys. No, they were not; they were put down in red ink in the regular receipt book in the shop.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . - Mr. Comyn. Are you shopman to Messrs. Pepys. - A. I am.

Q. It was the duty of the prisoner at the bar to account to you daily for the money he had received. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you from time to time make an entry in the book of the money that you received from him. - A. I did.

Q. It was your business to account for the money that you received from him to the master. - A. It was.

Q. In the month of March last had you any direction to call on any person for money. - A. I received instructions on the 2nd of March, to go on the 3d of March by William Hasledine Pepys ; the prisoner was not present when this order was given, but I mentioned to him afterwards on the same day; he said nothing to me on that day. The next morning, as I was in the shop, making preparations to go out, he wished me not to go for a few days; I told him I should go, and Mr. Pepys was coming to attend business while I went, and I must go; he wished me to step up stairs, as he wanted to speak to me; I told him he might as well speak to me there; if it was any secret relative to the business I did not wish to know it. He then presented me with a paper; that is the paper (producing it); it is the hand writing of the prisoner; he requested that I would not call upon those people whose names were in that list. I told him he was placing me in an unpleasant situation; he said it was in my power to make him happy for ever. I went out.

Q. Did you call upon Messrs. Green of Leadenhall street. - A. I did. I demanded the money.

Q. Look at that receipt, is that the hand-writing of the prisoner. - A. It is. I got it from Messrs. Green, of Leadenhall street.

MR. CHARLES GREEN. - Mr. Comyn. You are a merchant in Leadenhall street. - I am.

Q. Do you deal with Messrs. Pepys in the Poultry. - A I do.

Q. Did you owe them any sum of money in June 1806. - A. We did, six pound thirteen, that receipt was given for the draft on our bankers, and the draft was returned cancelled by our bankers. (The draft and the receipt read in court.)

Q. (to Williams). Look at that receipt and tell me whether that is the hand writing of the prisoner. - A. It is.

Q. Did the prisoner account to you for this six pound thirteen. - A. He did not

Q. (to Mr. W. H. Pepys). Did the prisoner at the bar account to you for this money. - A. No he did not.

Q. (to Mr. E. Pepys). Did the prisoner account to you for the six pound thirteen shillings. - A. No, there was no money transaction at all passed with me.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 11th of June I had the misfortune to lose a watch and a sum of money. I recovered this money till such times I had a friend to come forward. I never intended to defraud my master.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-15

269. ROSEY LOVETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , two tippets, value 3 l. the property of Charles Frederick Giesler , privately his shop .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES ANDREWS . - Mr. Knapp. You live in St. Paul's church yard . - A. Yes. I am a linen draper . On the 27th February last, about a quarter before seven in the evening, the prisoner and another person with her came into my shop and enquired for some French cambrics.

Q. In consequence of what passed, did you think it necessary to follow them - A. Yes, and before they got out of St. Paul's church yard, they were joined by a woman who was standing outside, I followed them as far as a dozen doors down Cheapside, they then stopped and held a parley. I passed them and went on the opposite side of the way to see what they would be after; just as I got across they parted, and the two that was in my shop went into Mr. Giesler's the furrier. I crossed over and passed the shop, and the third person was looking in the shop door. I immediately ran home, put on my great coat and a silk handkerchief round my neck, because they should not know me; when I returned to Mr. Giesler's shop, I found the third person was still standing there; the prisoner and another woman was in the shop, and just as I crossed over the third person opened the door and went in. I immediately crossed again and took her station and looked in the shop, I saw the prisoner at the bar sitting on a stool, the others were standing up. I immediately saw her stoop down and pull up her petticoats as high as her knee, and apparently put something up her petticoats, but I could not see what; she then pulled off her patten and put it on the counter, and attempted to tie it; I thought I see her put something up again; she then stood up and they came out of the shop.

Q. All three. - A. No; the prisoner and another woman; when they came out of the shop, I fell back towards St. Paul's church yard, I followed them but a few steps before I saw the end of the tippet hanging down between her legs, I ran after her and caught hold of it and pulled it down, and down came another along with it. I immediately got hold of her arm, I said you have stole the tippets. I called to several gentlemen going past to stop the other person, they did not, I took her into Mr. Giesler's shop. I shewed them the tippets, I marked them and delivered them to the constable.

FRANCES ROBSON . - Mr. Knapp. Did you serve these women - A. I did.

Q. Is the prisoner one of the women that came into the shop. - A. She is.

Q. Did you know any thing at all of this property being gone till after the prisoner was brought back. - A. I did not see it taken; there was another young man serving in the shop.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, it was a very wet night. I had my pattens on as I was passing this door, I thought my patten felt very heavy. I thought it was full of dirt of the street, I went to stoop down to knock the dirt out of my pattens, that gentleman laid hold of me and dragged me into the shop. I know no more of it than a child unborn.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-16

270. THOMAS PURDON and THOMAS TAYLOR were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Welldon about the hour of one at night on the 25th of February , and burglariously stealing therein five pair of shoes, value 1 l. and a half boot, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Welldon .

ANN WELLDON . My husband's name is Thomas Welldon , he is a shoemaker by trade but he does not follow it, he is just come home from sea, and at this time he entered as a marine .

Q. Do you sell shoes. - A. Yes. I live at No. 57. Goswell street , I have kept that house fourteen years. On the 25th of February, I went to bed, between ten and eleven o'clock; the door was fast and the shutters were up, but I cannot recollect whether I secured them or not.

Q. Whereabouts had you left any shoes. - A. In the windows, they were placed in rows, and some on hooks.

Q. Was the window glass all whole. - A. I have a number of windows cracked but no glass was out.

Q. Who lives in the house with you. - A. I have three lodgers up stairs, they were all of them in and the door was fast; the lodgers have a back door to come in at.

Q. In the course of the night did you hear any alarm. - A. I heard something in the shop, I had no apprehension it was any body at the window, I heard a ratling of glass, I imagined at the time it was the cat, for we use glass in our business, and I thought the cat had got upon the man's seat in the shop. I sleep in the back room adjoining the shop; about one o'clock the watchman knocked at my door; I got up, the watchman said I had been robbed, he told me I must come to the watchhouse; when I had got a light I saw I had lost five pair and one shoe, and an odd child's boot.

Q. Did you perceive what state the windows was in at that time. - A. The shutter was down, I perceived a pane of glass out. The shoes were all lost from the spot where the window was broken. I went to the watchhouse, I saw the the two prisoners at the watchhouse.

Q. When did you see any shoes that were lost. - A. I saw them at Worship street. On the next morning a young man came to my house and said he had found some shoes. I went up to his house and saw the shoes.

Q. How many pair of shoes did you see. - A. Four pair with the half boot, I saw them again at the office, I know they are mine, I cut them out. I lost six pair in the whole with the half boot, I have the fellow to that at home, there was but four pair found.

WILLIAM HEARNE . I am a watchman; my box is in Goswell street.

Q. Do you know where the prosecutrix lives. - A. Yes, my box is between thirty and forty yards from her shop. On the 25th of February, about twenty minutes to one o'clock, I perceived two men at Mrs. Welldon's window, the moon shone very bright at the time, I perceived one of these men stoop; in the course of a minute afterwards I heard some glass crack. I got out of my box, and when I got within ten or a dozen yards of the men they run away, I ran after them, they separated, I catched hold of Purdon, he stopped suddenly, and when I laid hold of him he asked me what was the matter, I told him nothing particular. I led him to the watchhouse; bringing him along I perceived Taylor come out of the willow walk. I am sure he was one of the men that I saw at the window, he had gaiters on.

Q. I suppose you had lost sight of him. - A. I had, but I had not lost sight of Purdon. Taylor came to me while I was taking Purdon round Old street corner, he shammed very drunk; we perceived him sober when he came to the watchhouse.

Q. What symptoms did he show to you that he was drunk. - A. He staggered and run against me and asked me what I was going to do with that man. I called the other watchman to lay hold of him. I told him he must go to the watchhouse; when I came back I see one of the shutters down, and the pane of glass was broke large enough to put a man's head in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. How long have you been a watchman. - A. Six years.

Q. Have you ever been a witness here before. - A. I have.

Q. In a case of burglary. - A. Yes, I was here once in a case of burglary.

Q. If these men are convicted you know there is a reward. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath do you mean to swear that you did not know there is a forty pound reward upon the conviction of these men. - A I know it now.

Q. Do y them twto swear that you have not heard it before you come into court. - A. I have heard there is such a thing.

THOMAS HEADBERRY . Q. You are a watchman. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was you when you saw or heard any thing of this kind. - A. I was at the Pitt's head, the corner of Old street; the watchman called to me to take hold of Taylor, I took hold of him; Hearne had hold of the prisoner, Taylor seemed rather fuddled, he was pretty solid afterwards.

SAMUEL BOYLE . I am a rope maker, I live at No. 61, Noble street, Goswell street. On Thursday morning the 26th of February, I was going to work about a quarter past six.

Q. Which way did your road lay. - A. Down the willow walk.

Q. That is somewhere about Goswell street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you meet with any thing as you went through this place. - A. Yes. I saw some shoes as I went along on a dunghill. I picked them up.

Q. How many were there. - A. Three pair and one odd child's half boot. I took them home till I heard this good woman was robbed, and then I went and asked her if she had lost any thing.

Q. Did she come and see the shoes. - A. Yes, I delivered them to Mr. Ray.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship street. I received the shoes of Boyle, I have had them ever since.

(The property produced and identified.)

Purdon's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery alledged against me.

Taylor's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery alledged against me. I was always brought up under my father, I work with my father to help to support my mother that is blind.

Purdon called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Taylor called one witness, who gave him a good character.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-17

271. LYDIA LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of March , a blanket, value 5 s. two sheets, value 4 s. the property of William Fisher , in a lodging room .

Second count for like offence, not stating them to be in a lodging room.

MARY FISHER . My husband's name is William Fisher , I live at No. 4, Philips court, Grub street .

Q. What apartments did you let the prisoner. - A. A back room one pair of stairs to Mrs. Lewis.

Q. When did she come in. - A. On the 24th of February.

Q. What rent did she pay. - A. Four shillings a week.

Q. Did you let them blankets with your room. - A. Yes Three, and a pair of sheets. My husband happening to see Mrs. Lewis take out some bundles he followed her to a pawnbroker's in Long-lane. I went immediately there and found a blanket; a person brought me the sheets.

Q. All you know is, that you found a blanket of yours at the pawnbroker's in Long-lane. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Did you see any thing dishonest about me.

Prosecutrix. I never saw her but very industrious.

THOMAS PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Long-lane. On the 30th of March, the prisoner at the bar pledged a blanket with me.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I pledged the blanket, I owed Mrs. Fisher one weeks rent, I told her I should pay her on the Thursday, I said to her I hoped it made no odds to her, she did not seem to say to the contrary. I carried out a bundle to pledge, I had to make up some money for a child out to nurse; when I came to the pawnbroker's they were shut up. When I returned, Mrs. Fisher had got two constables, she came up with the constable, she said you have pawned the blanket, I said I have. The sheets were out to wash, I sent them home to her, she found them secure, and since that I sent her the money for the rent; here is her hand writing for the rent (producing a paper.)

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-18

272. GEORGE OLAFF, alias OLIFFE, alias PATCHELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a black gelding, value 10 l. the property of Charles Cox .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS COX . - Mr. Alley. What is your bother's name. - A. Charles Cox , he is a farmer , he resides at Wickham, he has a farm at Totteridge, in Buckinghamshire.

Q. Do you know whether on the 19th of March, your brother had a black gelding. - A. Yes, it was at my house, at the Swan inn, Wickham ; the horse was in my yard with some corn which it brought for me; I am a dealer in corn.

Q. He was at your house in the morning. - A. Yes.

Q. And he was sent home by the servant John Johnson to Totteridge. - A. Yes.

Q. You have seen the horse since. - A. Yes, I saw him at the King's arms, in Oxford street, on the Tuesday following the 20th.

JOHN JOHNSON . - Mr. Alley. You are servant to the prosecutor Charles Cox . - A. Yes

Q. Do you remember bringing your master's black gelding from the last witnesses' house, home to Totteridge. - A. Yes.

Q. On what day of the month was that. - A. I do not know; it was in March, on a Thursday night.

Q. How soon after the Thursday night did you see him. - A. We missed him about four o'clock the next morning.

Q. What day did you see him after it was missed. - A. I saw him on the Tuesday following.

Q. On the night that you brought him from Wickham, did you put him in the stable at Totteridge. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the night or evening was it. - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. You left him in the stable, did you shut the door. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the next morning did you come to the stable again. - A. About a quarter past four.

Q. Was the door open or shut. - A. The door was open.

Q. The door was fast the night you put the horse in. - A. It was.

Q. Did you find the gelding in the stable. - A. No, the gelding was gone.

Q. This was communicated to your master. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence Mr. Joseph Moxon was applied to. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you last see the horse. - A. I saw him to day, and yesterday.

Q. The horse you have seen to day and yesterday, is that the horse that that was taken from your master's stable. - A. It is.

Q. In whose custody is he to day. - A. At the Bull in Holborn.

Court. Where was it you saw him on the Tuesday after he was lost. - A. I did not see him on the Tuesday after he was lost.

Court. You said that you saw him on the Tuesday following, do you mean to say now that you did not see the horse from the time that he was taken from the stable, till yesterday or to day. - A. Yes, I have seen him, but when I cannot say.

Q. However the horse that you saw yesterday, was the same horse that Mr. Moxon sold your master. - A. Yes

Q. And that horse that Mr. Moxon sold to your master you saw in Holborn. - A. Yes, at the Bull in

Holborn.

JOSEPH MOXON . Q. Where do you live. - A. At the Coach and Horses, High Wickham.

Q. Do you recollect in the month of December last, having sold a black gelding to the prosecutor. - A. Yes, to Charles Cox .

Q. Were you applied to on the 20th of March, to go to London to find the gelding. - A. I was, by Thomas Cox . In consequence of that I put the saddle on my horse and came to Smithfield directly.

Q. When you came to Smithfield, did you see the prisoner at the bar there. - A. Yes; I asked him what brought him there; he told me he had brought a horse and sold it. I knew him before; he said he had not taken the money for it. I asked him whether he could stand a pint, he told me that he had not got above two-pence.

Q. In point of fact you proposed to drink, and went into a public house together. - A. Yes.

Q. During the time that you was there did you say any thing about the prosecutor's horse. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you speak afterwards to Varney about the horse. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of what Varney said to you, did you afterwards speak to the prisoner about the horse. - A. Yes; the prisoner asked me whether I had suited myself with a horse; I replied very well, you have got the horse I want. He told me if it was my horse I might go and take it.

Q. Did you at that time learn where the horse was. - A. Yes, Varney and the prisoner went with me to Paddington, and shewed me the horse.

Q. That horse that you saw at Paddington, whose horse was it. - A. Mr. Cox's, he purchased it of me in the month of December.

Q. Are you sure it was the horse that you sold to him. - A. I am sure it was, and I will swear to it.

BENJAMIN VARNEY . - Mr. Alley. I understand you are a horse-dealer, and live at Paddington. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 20th of March last did the prisoner at the bar call upon you with any horse. - A. Yes, he called upon me at Paddington, about ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. What day of the week was that. - A. Friday.

Q. What sort of a horse was that. - A. A black gelding with a long tail.

Q. For what purpose did he bring the horse to you. - A. To sell him to me.

Q. What price did he ask you for it. - A. Two pound. He told me he brought it from Cowley, by Uxbridge; he said his master was coming to Smithfield to buy another. I agreed to give thirty-three shillings for him. I told him I would meet his master at Smithfield, and there I would pay his master.

Q. In consequence of that you came to Smithfield, and left the horse behind you at Paddington. - A. Yes, in my stable.

Q. When you came to Smithfield do you recollect meeting Mr. Moxon. - A. Yes, Moxon and the prisoner accompanied me to Paddington: I shewed him the horse, they brought him to the Green Man in Oxford street.

Court. Who was it took the prisoner in custody. - A. Mr. Moxon and me; we detained him in Smithfield, and sent for an officer at Paddington.

Q. What did you suppose the horse to be worth. - A. About six pound, I believe.

Q. And you really made a bargin for the horse at thirty three shillings, and you would have bought him at that price. - A. Yes, if he came honestly by him.

Q. Could you expect he came honestly by him at that price. - A. That made me doubt, and I detained the horse.

MICHAEL DUNN . - Mr. Alley. I am an officer.

Q. You was sent for to apprehend this man at Paddington. - A. Yes, I took him in custody, and I took the horse to my own premises; the horse was afterwards sent into the conntry.

Court. It is not proved that that is the horse the prisoner agreed to sell for thirty three shillings.

Dunn. I had the care of the horse from the Friday night to the Tuesday, then it was delivered to Mr. Cox.

Mr. Alley. (to Moxon) You saw the horse that the prisoner agreed to sell to Varney in his stables in Paddindton. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the horse that belonged to the prosecutor in the country. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards see the horse in the master's or the servant's possession in the country. - A. Yes.

Court. (to Johnson) You had brought him back again from Cox's, was that the last time he was brought to Cox's for corn. - A. Yes.

Q. When you brought him back again that was the day before he was missing from the stable. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the stable door locked. - A. No, it was not fastened; in the morning I found the back door undone.

Q. What do you mean by the back door being undone. - A. It was barred when I put the horse in the stable, and in the morning I found it undone.

Q. Was the back door more private. - A. Yes, they went in at the front door that was unfastened, and come out at the back door that I found unbarred.

Q. How far is Totteridge from Wickham. - A. About a mile.

Q. (to Moxon) What had you sold this horse to Mr. Cox for in December. - A. Seven guineas. - The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-19

273. WILLIAM STANLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Morris , about the hour of eight, on the 31st of March , and burglariously stealing therein, six yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of William Morris .

RICHARD MORRIS . I live in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell . I am a carpenter .

Q. Who keeps the linen drapery shop. - A. My wife.

Q. Do you remember the condition of your windows. - A. I was robbed three nights out of five. I was robbed the night I detected this boy on the 31st of March; the window was cut the night before I

put up a board before the cut window, with a box to secure it; the box was behind the board to keep it tight.

Q. What other precautions did you take. - A. I put a piece of cotton in the window, and tied a piece of tape to the end of it, that piece of tape went over a chair into the back parlour were my wife sat.

Q. What time was it you was alarmed. - A. A little after eight o'clock at night on the 31st of March. Thomas Williams , a witness, came and informed me that this boy was lurking about the window, I came out of the house, and went across the street, and there I watched the boy.

Q. Do you know the boy. - A. That is him at the bar. He came up to the window, shoved the board away, and put his hand through where the glass was cut before, and catched hold of the cotton with his hand.

Q. How far was the cotton from the window. - A. Close inside, about five or six inches from the hole; he laid hold of the cotton, and dragged it out of the hole of the window; my wife was inside, I heard her screech out, the boy directly run off.

Q. Did you loose sight of him. - A. Not at all.

Q. Were there any other persons waiting about there to protect the boy. - A. I saw no one, I saw part of the cotton hauled out on the pavement. I did not stop to take it up, I run after the boy.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . Q. What are you. - A. I am a cooper. I live facing of Mr. Morris.

Q. Did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, about eight o'clock on the 31st of March, I saw him lurking about the window, I had suspicion, I gave notice to Mr. Morris, I stood in the passage, I saw the boy take the cotton that was tied to a tape out of the hole in the window, Mrs. Morris cried out. I immediately run after the boy, when he ran away, and Mr. Morris catched him.

HENRY BLIGH . I produce the cotton.

ELIZABETH MORRIS . You keep this shop. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the piece of cotton that was taken out of your window. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your cotton. - A. Yes.

Q. There is a string tied to it I see. - A. Yes; that string was in my hand when I was in the parlour; the witness Williams came and told me, and then I was aware of the boy, I came into the room and put the light out, there was a young woman with me; I went behind the counter, and saw him pull the cotton out of the hole of the window. I saw his hand and arm put in so far in the window (witness describing it).

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of White-horse-alley about a quarter before eight o'clock, I saw two boys come by; they said to me, will you take a walk as far as Northampton street, I said yes; they said come along, they pulled this piece of cotton first, the woman called out, and before I could get off they laid hold of me.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Was there light enough without the lamps, or was there twilight or sun light enough at eight o'clock at night. - A. No, it was dark, it was a star light night.

GUILTY, DEATH , aged 16.

The prisoner was recommended by the jury to his majesty's mercy, on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-20

274. THOMAS HANDSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a gold chronometer watch, value 45 l. the property of Nathaniel Chandler and George Benton , in their dwelling house .

ROBERT SPARROW . I am servant to Messrs. Chandler and Benton, they they are silversmiths and pawnbrokers , 244, High Holborn

Q. Is it the dwelling house of both of them. - A. No. George Benton lives in the house. On the 1st of April, about a quarter before four in the evening, the prisoner came into the sale shop and asked to look at a watch that was in the window; having several watches in the window I asked him what kind of a one, he said one with a going fusee; knowing that we had but one of that kind in the shop, which was a gold chronometer, with a label fixed to it price forty-six pound, I took it out of the window, took the label off and put it on the counter. He pulled out of his fob pocket a little metal watch, &c. then took up the gold chronometer, saying, I shall try this for a few days; he put it into his side pocket of his great coat. I thought he meaned to leave it with us to try it; he immediately went off with it.

Q. Did not he give you his directions. - A. No, not knowing the prisoner I followed him, and within ten or twelve yards I came up to him; I then brought him back with the watch in his possession.

Q. What said he to you when you came up to him. - A. I said it is a strange thing taking away a watch of this value. He repeated the words that he should try it for a few days and then return it.

Q. Did he tell you who he was. - A. No.

Q. Did he produce the watch to you. - A. Yes, directly I brought him back to the shop he took it out of his pocket.

Q. What was the value of the metal watch - A. About a pound or thirty-shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Did not you think from the manner of him, that he was more of a madman than a thief. - A. Upon my word by the manner of his going on I think he was.

GEORGE BENTON . I know nothing of the robbery. I was called out of the parlour. I saw the two watches lay on the counter; the boy informed me that he asked for the sight of the chronometer, and he had taken it way. I asked him how he came to take a watch of that value, he said he had a right to take it away as the boy gave it him. I asked him his name, he said it was Thomas Handsworth , that he worked for Mr. Hansard a printer. I asked him again what he meant by taking such a watch; he was very sullen, he said what is that to you; I told him for his impertinence I should make an example of him, otherwise I did not wish to punish him. I sent the boy for a constable, he returned and said there was no one could be found; upon hearing that he walked to the door, he said he should go out, he should not be detained. I said he should not go out, he knocked down some books and a glass worth five guineas, at last we secured him and took him to Hatton-garden; he behaved in the same riotous manner fighting and quarreling there.

Q. Did he explain how he came to take this watch.

- A. No, I could get very little out of him. I thought from his conduct he was out of his senses. I have taken some pains to enquire since, I understand from his master he is something of that kind.

LUKE HANSARD . - Mr. Curwood. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar has worked for me and my father four or five years; he always bore the character of a very sober and honest man; for the last six or eight years he has been very strange.

Q. Are you of opinion that he is lately deranged. - A. I am fully persuaded of it. I have lately been obliged to get him out of the office by stratagem, and twice by force.

Court. What sort of derangement had you observed. - A. In his manner of doing his work, and particularly in his manner of talking. A week or two ago he got in some uproar and was put in the compter; when he came out he said he should enter an action against them and get twenty or thirty pounds, and he would purchase a watch and become a gentleman.

NOT GUILTY.

On account of insanity at the time of committing the offence .

Confined in Newgate till his Majesty's pleasure be known .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-21

275. RICHARD POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March ; a pocket book, value 6 d. a tin box, value 1 d. six pawnbroker's duplicates, 3 d. and 3 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Dyke , privily from the person of Elizabeth his wife .

ELIZABETH DYKE . Q. You are a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is Henry Dyke , we live in Crown street, at the Cooper's arms; he is a sawyer .

Q. When was it you lost this. - A. On the 17th of March, near six o'clock at night. I was at the top of the Minories, in Rosemary-lane .

Q. Did you see the prisoner there. - A. I am not sure whether I saw him or not.

Q. What was you doing there. - A. I was buying a pair of breeches which I gave eighteen pence for, I took out a tin box which I had five shillings in to pay for it.

Q. You do not know of the prisoner being by and saw you. - A. No, not at the fair to know him. I was in the fair, I agreed to buy a waistcoat. I put my hand in my pocket to take out my box, then I missed my box.

Q. What was in the box. - A. There was six duplicates and three and sixpence in money. I went to Mr. Dobson's the same evening, I told him I had lost the duplicates and desired him to stop them. The next day about eleven o'clock I went to Mr. Dobson's in Chiswell street, there I saw Richard Powell .

Q. Do you recollect seeing him before. - A. No, I cannot be sure, I would not say such a thing for the world; when I saw him, I said to him give me my box, my money, and my duplicates that were in it; he told me I should have it. I told him they were picked out of my pocket.

Q. How did you know the man was there with your property. - A. The pawnbroker sent for me. The prisoner offered me the pocket book, but the box he said he had not got with him. Mr. Dobson said I must not take it, he said I had nothing to do but to give charge of him.

Q. Did you perceive the box or the book taken from you. - A. No, I did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Did not the prisoner say in the pawnbroker's shop that he had found the pocket book. - A. He did.

Q. He told you that he was a watchman, have not you found out that he was a man of good character. - A. Yes.

JOSEPH LUMLEY . I am a constable.

Q. You went to Mr. Dobson's and had the prisoner given in charge to you. - A. Yes. I found in his possession a pocket book with some duplicates, a a guinea, half guinea, a shilling, and twelve pennyworth of halfpence; the woman asked him to give her her book, her box, her money and her duplicates; he said he found this in the channel at nine o'clock at night; he said here is your book and your duplicates, I have no more; I found it in the channel of an alley at the top of the Minories.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-22

276. MARY MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , privily from the person of Henry Butler , three half guineas, and a bank note, value 1 l, his property .

HENRY BUTLER . On the 29th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, as I was passing along Duke street, Manchester square , the prisoner accosted me and asked me for some money. I gave her a shilling and she gave to me a sixpence.

Q. Did you express that you meant to give her sixpence. - A. Yes; having no sixpence in my pocket, I told her I would give her a shilling if she could give me a sixpence, and in putting the sixpence into my pocket which she gave me, I found the rest of my money was missing. I charged her with stealing it.

Q. You had felt your money there some time before. - A. Yes, I felt it when I put my hand in for the shilling.

Q. What was the rest of your money. - A. Three half guineas, and a one pound note.

Q. You missed all of them. - A. Yes.

Q. When you put the sixpence in your pocket you charged her with it. - A. Yes, and she denied it. I told her if she would give me up the money I would not charge the watch with her.

Q. Did you give it her by way of charity. - A. Yes. She begged that I would not charge the watch with her. I told her I must if she did not give it me.

Q. Did you charge the watch with her. - A. I did. We took her to the watchhouse; she was stripped and her clothes looked over, but nothing was found in her clothes. I saw her hand clenched, I laid hold of it, I gave it into the constable's hands that keeps the watchhouse; and before he opened her hand I described the money to him, that two of the half guineas were of the old coin and one of the new die; and upon his opening of her hand he found it correct, as I had stated.

Q. Did you afterwards make any search for the note. - Q. Yes, I went back, and with the assistance

of two watchmen's lights. I picked up the one pound note, near about the place where we had been standing.

VALENTINE HOWEL . Q. You are the constable that was charged with this woman. - A. Yes, I was at the watchhouse when she was brought in.

Q. You searched her did you. - A. Yes, we found nothing about her clothes; I had her there so often, I was sure I should not find any thing about her clothes; before I opened her hand the prosecutor told me that two of the half guineas were of the old coin, and one of the new die; she had it in her left hand clenched; she swore solemnly she had nothing in her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. This man picked me up in the street, he took me down a gateway, and gave me sixpence; I pulled out my handkerchief, I heard something fall, I stooped and picked up something, not knowing whether it came out of my pocket on his; a little while afterwards he told me I had robbed him. In taking me to the watchhouse he said he would forgive me, and say nothing about it if I would give it him. I did not, I was taken to the watchhouse, they searched me in a very indecent manner; and when I found it did not belong to me, I gave it up every farthing to the constable.

Howell. She denied having it. I had hard work to break her hand open.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-23

277. THOMAS STATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , a shirt, value 8 s. a pair of stocking, value 1 s. and a jigger, value 1 s. the property of James Hulton .

JAMES HULTON . I live at Stanmore . I am a shoemaker , Statham and I both worked together, and slept together at our master's house. On Sunday the 8th of March, I went out about eight o'clock to take a walk; I returned back about eleven, and at two I went up stairs to clean myself. I found my things out of the box; I missed a new shirt, a pair of stockings, and a tool called a jigger. I turned round and looked over Statham's seat, I found his tools were gone, and his seat was covered over with a coat. I went down stairs and told Mr. Wiggins, my master; he and I went in pursuit after him, we met him at the Bell near Barnett-gate; he had a bundle in his possession. I challenged him with stealing my shirt and stockings, he said he was sorry that he had taken them, but they were safe in his bundle. I was not satisfied, he shewed me them; we brought him back and delivered him to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. During the time that I was working for Mr. Wiggins, I had a long sit of illness that induced me to do this.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-24

278. THOMAS SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John William Braasch , privily from his person .

JOHN WILLIAM BRAASCH . On the 16th of March, about seven o'clock, I was talking to a Clapton stage coachman, in Bishopgate-street ; and just as the man was opening the coach, I found myself run against the arm; I looked round, I saw the prisoner whom I thought was a little intoxicated, he went on in a hurry; I stepped a little back and let him pass. I saw him after he passed me, he mended his pace; I overtook him at the London assurance company. I stepped forward, I said you have robbed me, laying my hand upon him, I saw at that time a handkerchief in his right hand. He knocked or pushed me down, I came to the ground, and my hat fell off; the moment he knocked me down I saw my handkerchief go away; and the man run off. I said immediately stop thief, I got up and ran after him; he was taken in Threadneedle-street. When I came up to him, I said you are the man that robbed me; he cried he knew nothing about it, that he was not capable of robbing. We took him back to the place where I had talked to the coachman. We sent for an officer and took him to the Compter.

Q. What became of the handkerchief. - A. It is in the hands of the officer. I am certain that he is the man that passed me at the coach, because he ran against me.

Q. The moment you charged him with it you saw the handkerchief in his hand. - A. Yes, I saw him throw it away, and I saw the handkerchief on the ground; I lost some time in getting up, and picking my hat up; I thought I had better go after the man.

JAMES CALENDER . I am fire-lighter to the East India House, Leadenhall-street. On Monday the 16th of March, about seven in the evening, I saw two men scuffling, I saw one fall, the other ran down Threadneedle street, and threw a handkerchief from him, I saw it plain enough; I picked the handkerchief up, and carried it into the Flower-pot, Bishopgate street; I looked at the handkerchief, it was marked W. B. No. 18, I gave it to the young man that belongs to the parcels there and left my address. I could not swear to either of the parties, it was so dark, and the contest was short.

PATRICK MULLINS . I am constable of Bishopgate ward. I was sent for, the prisoner was pointed out to me; I took him in custody, and the handkerchief was given to me. I have had it ever since; it is marked W. B. 18.

PETER LEONARD . I am an haberdasher, I live in Bishopsgate-street Without. I was a going down Threadneedle-street, hearing a cry of stop thief, I turned to stop the first man that came; just as I turned round the prisoner fell down upon the pavement; I went and took hold of him. Mr. Braasch came up; we took him to the Flower-pot.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. Ask my prosecutor whether I am the person that took the handkerchief from him.

Court. That is for the jury to say.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of living in good families, I was groom to general Abercombie, I have been out of place in all about six weeks.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-25

279. THOMAS BLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a bag, value one penny. Thirty nine pound fifteen shillings in monies numbered, two bank notes, value two pounds each, and ten bank notes, value one pound each , the property of George Piety .

GEORGE PIETY . Q. What are you. - A. I am a coal porter , I live in Wood street, Westminster.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a costermonger, he sells greens .

Q. What time did you lose this money, on the 12th of March. - A. About five o'clock in the evening at the Coach and Horses public house close to Smithfield .

Q. Were you sober. - A I had been drinking, I was sober enough to know who took my bag away. I have known the prisoner this twelve years. He wanted to buy a cart, he wanted to borrow three guineas of me, I pulled out my bag and laid it on the table, I promised him he should have three pound or three guineas; he looked at the bag, took it up and went away. I staid there some time and then I went after him, I did not think he was going to rob me of it.

Q. How long might you remain in the public-house. A. I suppose the best part of an hour.

Q. Then you got out and looked right and left, and could not find him. - A. Yes.

Q. You knew where his wife lived. - A. Yes; I made the best of my way to where his wife lived, in Pye-street, Westminster.

Q. Was his wife at home. - A. I did not go to his lodgings; I went to a public house that he used, and enquired for him; I staid there some time, and when he came home I asked him for it; he denied it, and said he had not got it.

Q. Did you ever find your money again. - A. No; there was some part of it found.

Q. Did you find the two pound notes and the one pound notes. - A. No, none of the notes; there was fourteen pounds in notes; there was fifty-three pounds fifteen shillings in all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You are a coal porter; they tell me you are the best natured man at the waterside; you knew this man a long time, you and he have drank together a great many times. - A. Yes.

Q. And you have done a kind act one for the other. A. Yes.

Q. You had been drinking a great deal together. - A. We had both of us been drinking there.

Q. He was going to purchase a cart; you threw your bag on the table, and said, do not want money. - A. No, I meaned to give him three guineas; I put the bag on the table by myself.

Q. Had you more than three or four guineas in the bag. - A. I had; I cannot tell how many guineas I had.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I have got the purse and some part of the money here. On the 20th of March in the evening I was sent for to a public house in Pye-street, Westminster, where I found the prisoner Bland and Piety, and a man of the name of Evans. Piety told me of his loss, and gave charge both of Evans and Bland. I conveyed them both to the watchhouse; I searched Bland; I found a half crown and a few halfpence; he told me that was all the money he had in the world; he refused to tell me where his lodgings were when I asked him, and said his stable was in Tothil fields. I went and found them both within an hundred yards. I searched them both and found nothing there. On the Monday following, at the office, I saw Mr. Cope's man give the prisoner half a guinea; I learned that some money was left at Mr. Cope's, a liquor shop, just by Newgate market. I went there and found thirteen guineas and a half.

Q. Who gave you that purse. - A. Mr. Cope, in the presence of Thomas Hodsoll .

THOMAS HODSOLL . I am servant to Mr. Cope, he keeps a liquor shop in Newgate-market. On the 20th of March the prisoner came into my master's shop between the hours of six and seven in the evening; he asked if Mr. Cope was at home, I told him no; he said he wanted to leave a little money with him, I told him he might leave it with me, I would take care of it. He left with me thirteen guineas and a half; that is the bag and the same money.

Q. (to prosecutor) Is that your bag. - A. I believe it is, there was a string in then; this is what the gold was in; there was another bag larger than this, that had the notes in, and this bag was inside of that.

Prisoner's Defence. That is my bag what I put my silver and what I took in, I have had it two years. I left thirteen guineas and a half at Mr. Cope's, because I was drunk; I left it for safety. I went round with that man, he said he would lend me some money; I said I had money, I wanted none, but I had none about me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-26

280. LYDIA LEWIS, alias LYDIA LICESTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a testament, value 1 s. two sheets of paper, value 2 d. and two books, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Walker .

THOMAS WALKER . I am a stationer , 55, Watling-street , Lydia Lewis worked for me, she was a folder and sewer . On the 1st of April I went to Mrs. Fisher's house in a court in Grub-street; I saw these books and paper; the officer shewed them to me.

Q. Did you know that you had lost any books. - A. I did not; nor did I expect such a thing of the prisoner.

MARY FISHER . I live at No. 4, Philip's-court. Grub-street; these books were offered me by Mrs. Lewis, but I did not accept of them. On the night the prisoner was taken into custody they brought her down stairs to me; she had lodged in my house; the woman offered them as a satisfaction for something I claimed; but I would not.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these books of a jew-broker in a lot of imperfect books; I paid him seven shillings and six-pence for them; some of them were in sheets; and that marble paper is to be matched any where. I had it by me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-27

281. STEPHEN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , a coat, value 7 s. the property of Louisa Manners .

THOMAS PEARMAN . I am servant to lady Louisa Manners ; she is a widow lady.

Q. When did you lose this coat or how. - A. On the 1st of March it hung behind the stable door in Mason's-yard, Duke-street, St. James's .

Q. Are you coachman. - A. Yes; I left the coat

there when I went out at three o'clock in the afternoon, and when I came in at half past six I found the coat gone. The prisoner at the bar was the first man that came into the stable after I came; I asked him if he had seen my surtout coat, he said he saw it there at four o'clock in the afternoon; he said he saw nobody take it away; he is a servant to Mr. Dean, the hackneyman, in the yard. The next morning I found him in the stable, cleaning one of my horses; I said to Mr. Dean it is very odd who took my coat, the prisoner looked very much confused, I taxed him and another about it; I asked him where he lodged, he said at first in Pall-mall, but he did not know the name nor the number, and then he said he lodged in Titchfield-street. I told them I would take them to Marlborough-street and put them upon their oaths, and make them swear whether they knew any thing or not of the coat; then I went to breakfast. I left word with two men in the yard not to let him go to breakfast without watching him; a man that is here watched him and brought him back with the coat. He came up to me and said, coachman, I did take your coat, but I hope you will not hurt me; I told him no, I would not, I would give him what the law would allow him.

JOHN AYRES . I am groom to Mr. Stepney. I watched the prisoner from Mason's yard to the Lemon-tree the corner of the Hay-market; he stopped there about twenty minutes; I watched him from there; when he came out to Buckingham-court, Charing Cross. He went into a public house, he waited there ten minutes, and then he came out with the coat on his arm; I laid hold of him and told him it was the coachman's coat; he said he knew it was; he was going towards Westminster with the coat.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-28

282. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for burglarously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Stevens , about the hour of nine at night, on the 30th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, four cotton gowns, value 40 s. a bonnet, value 12 s. a tablecloth, value 12 s. three napkins, value 18 d. two bed quilts, value 10 s. 6 d. five petticoats, value 7 s. a child's frock, value 1 s. a blanket, value 5 s. and four aprons, value 5 s. the property of Sarah Scraggs .

SARAH SCRAGGS . I live in New Inn yard, Shoreditch . I have a ground floor front room, the house belongs to Henry Stevens .

Q. Are there any other lodgers in the house besides you. - A. Only one. On the 30th of March, I went out about half past three in the afternoon, I left my door locked, and my shutters bolted; I returned home about half past twelve; I found my door on the latch. I alarmed my landlord, and the first thing I missed was a basket, containing two bed quilts, and a blanket was taken away, and a straw bonnet, four gowns, four aprons, five petticoats, several napkins, and several towels; my landlord and me looked about the door, we found a child's spencer of mine in the saw-pit, opposite my door. We found a few piece of muslin, which is my property. The next day there was a child's petticoat produced at the office Worship-street, which I prove to be mine; it belonged to one of the children. They got in at the window and went out at the door; they had drawn the nails from the bolts of the window.

JOHN COWDEN . Q. You lodge in the one pair of stairs room over Mrs. Scraggs. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the evening of the 30th of March, and at what what time, hear any noise. - A. Being an ailing man, I went to bed about eight o'clock; between eight and nine I heard a rumbling below stairs, like a drawing of boxes; I had been in the house all the afternoon, I heard no noise before; I can hear the mangle go in that room; I heard the street door shut as I laid in bed, after the rumbling noise was over, which was about ten minutes. About one o'clock my landlord came up and asked me if I had heard any noise; I told him I had heard a noise; I at the time supposed the woman was about her ordinary business.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer of Worship-street, Harding was brought to the office in Worship-street. On Tuesday morning the 31st of March, by Armstrong, Bishop, and Kennedy, I understood he had been in Shoreditch watchhouse, and he had secreted a child's skirt in the privy; I went with Bishop, and Bishop took the child's skirt out of the privy. The prosecutrix swore to it before the magistrate.

DANIEL BISHOP . On Monday night the 30th of March, I went out in company with Armstrong and Kennedy. About half after twelve o'clock we met the prisoner in company with two other men; knowing him, we secured him and took him to Shoreditch watch-house. I searched the prisoner Harding; in his hat I found a small child's black skirt; he said it was his own; he put it in his hat; the hat having no lining to keep it from coming over his eyes, believing his story, I returned it to him.

Q. Did you know him by name and person. - A. I did; I heard of this robbery about four o'clock in the morning; we kept Harding in the cage all night. In the morning we took him before the magistrate, and among other articles that were lost, this black petticoat was mentioned; I then asked Harding what he had done with the black petticoat that he had in his hat the night before; he said he had thrown it down the watch-house privy.

Q. Did he assign any reason why he had done so. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home about half after twelve o'clock; I was stopped by three of the officers and taken to the watchhouse. Bishop searched me, and left the petticoat in my hat; I was put in the cage, it was very wet and dirty; in the cage a man had been sick there. In the course of the night I fell asleep on the bench, my hat felt off, I would not put it in my hat again, it was very wet. The next day, when I was taken to the office, they asked me where the black petticoat was that I had in my hat; I directly told him where it was. I have two of the same yellow strings, and two or three of the same black pieces of stuff; my sister is here that made the petticoat.

- HARDING. Q. Are you the prisoner's sister. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make this petticoat. - A. Yes.

Q. Describe the petticoat before you see it. - A. It is bombazeen, with a narrow hem at the bottom.

Q. You have seen it since your brother has been taken up. - A. No, I have not; it has yellow strings to

it. I made it nine weeks ago.

Prosecutrix. I have examined it before; I am sure it is my property.

Jury. The stuff which the prisoner has produced and the skirt appear to be very similar, and there is no doubt but the strings he has produced are of the same piece of goods as the strings on the petticoat.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-29

283. FRANCES CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , a gown, value 3 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of Ann Newman .

ANN NEWMAN . I am a pauper in the poor house of St. Mary, Woolnoth . On the 29th of March, I lost my gown from the dwelling house of Mrs. Ford, an acquaintance of mine in Chick-lane , whom I went to see at that time. I found myself unwell, I went and laid on the bed, this woman came into the bedroom.

Q. Did you know her. - A. I had never seen her before nor do I know how she came into the room. When I awoke I found my clothes gone, there was nothing left me but my shift.

Q. What had she to do in that house. - A. She lodged there.

Q. What kind of a house is this. - A. A lodging house in Chick-lane, and they sell clothes; I know the mistress of the house, I went there to dine. I was informed where the prisoner was, I went to her, I said to her this is my property that you have on your back, how could you rob me; the landlady told me to take her out of the house, then I might do what I pleased with her. The prisoner went out, I followed her and called stop thief; when I came up to her she bit me on the arm, she was secured. I said my gown was on her and my shawl.

- . I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to me on the 31st of March, charged with theft.

Q. Had she the prosecutrix's gown on. - A. She had a gown, shawl, and cap of the prosecutrix's. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. The cap I will not swear to; it is my gown and shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. This good woman lodged at Mrs. Ford's, she is a woman that keeps a great many young women and lends them clothes and sends them out to bring in money. On Sunday evening she lent me the clothes; I could not get any money, I was afraid to return home. Mrs. Newman has lodged at Mrs. Ford's a long time. On Tuesday evening I went into Long-lane with some friends; she came into the house and accused me of robbing her.

Prosecutrix. I never lent her the cloaths nor do I lodge at Mrs. Ford's, I had not seen Mrs. Ford for six weeks.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-30

284. PETER RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , eighty-four pound weight of lead, the property of James Mullett , fixed to a certain building called a house .

Second Count for a like offence, fixed to a certain building.

JAMES MULLET . I am a broker and auctioneer , I live in Moorfields . On the 26th of March, early in the morning, three of our watchmen called upon me to inform me that some lead belonging to my premises were stripped, and that they had got one of the men in custody; I went to the place where the lead was taken from and there I saw it.

THOMAS WINTER . I am a watchman in Moorfields. On the 26th of March, about two o'clock in the morning, my brother watchman, Pippin, called out to me stop thief. I saw two men run by my box, I followed them across the quarters, he run round the quarters into the Broker-row and into Wilson-street; I called out stop thief, he was stopped by two gentlemen, I was close behind, I took hold of him by the collar. I am sure it is the same man, I never had him out of my sight.

Q. Had he any thing with him. - A. No, we put him in the watchhouse, and we went to Sash court, where we saw him run out; there we saw this quantity of lead laying on the dunghill.

JOHN PIPPIN . I am a watchman; at two o'clock in the morning I heard a noise of something scratching against the bricks, I walked towards where the sound was, and coming towards the corner of the alley the prisoner walked out, as I believe him to be the man, I did not see his face, with his hands in his pockets. he walked towards the quarters. I asked the other man that came out what they were doing there, he made answer that they were making water. I had suspicion that they were after no good; I went to shift the lanthorn into my other hand to catch him, in the mean time they made their escape; he run across the street to the quarters and went towards Bedlam wall. I lost sight of this man and the other both.

Q. When they came out of the alley did they both go together. - A. This lad walked out first; my brother watchman went after this lad.

Q. Now as to this man, how came he to be pursued. - A. This lad came towards us from Bedlam wall; there were three watchmen after the two thieves that ran away.

Q. Then you do not know that this is the man that came out with his hands in his pocket. - A. It is to the best of my knowledge.

Q. When he came out he called stop thief. - A. Yes, and my brother watchman Winter and White pursued him. I lost sight of them both, and and this prisoner sprung out against me out of a dark place, he took to his heels and run into the same street and there he was stopped by some gentleman; after we had secured him we went back to the alley; we found the lead upon a dunghill.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a watchman, I heard the alarm of stop thief at two o'clock in the morning. I went out of my box; in a little time I saw a man running back again, he made a turn towards Ropemaker's street. I called out to two watchmen at the corner of Ropemaker's street, with that the prisoner turned back again; he was stopped in Wilson-street.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, on the day I was taken in custody I was coming from the Minories to go home in Old street; going along I met three watchmen, one of them on seeing me said there is one, the others made answer it is not him he had, got a brown jacket on; as I was going into Wilson street, the watchmen took me into custody;

it was my nearest way across Moorfields. I am innocent of the crime alledged against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-31

285. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Billingay , about the hour of twelve at night on the 3d of March , and burglariously stealing therein, a copper coal scuttle, value 12 s. a pewter wash-hand bason, value 2 s. a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. four towels, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 1 s. thirty-two pound weight of lead, value 2 s. a copper, being a fixture, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Billingay .

SAMUEL BILLINGAY . I live at White-horse-gate, Ratcliff . On the 4th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs and found the kitchen door of my house open; to the best of my knowledge it was shut with a spring lock the night preceding, but the bar was not put up. I missed the copper with the lead round it, that was a fixture to the house. I missed a copper coal scuttle, and all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Were these things found any where. - A. They were found the next morning; I have seen them since, they are mine, they were taken from the kitchen.

- MATHEWS. I am a watchman. On the 4th of March, at three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in London-street Ratcliff, with the copper on his shoulder; the other articles I saw were in the copper when he throwed it down. I took him in custody.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the copper, I was going by the sugar-house-yard, I went in to ease myself; the gate was open, the copper was standing there with something in it. I took it away and the watchman stopped me with it.

GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing to the value of Thirty-nine Shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-32

286. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of March , a silver fork, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Bell .

THOMAS BEALE . Q. How is your name spelt. - A. Beale.

Court. It is Bell in the indictment .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-33

287. THOMAS MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a silver saltcellar, value 5 s. the property of George Blakeway .

THOMAS COGGER . I am a servant to Mr. Blakeway, No. 37, in the Strand ; he keeps a glass shop . On the 20th of March the prisoner came into the shop, under pretence of buying some articles; he asked for some glass cups with handles, they were shewed to him, he bargained for six, for which he was to pay four shillings and three pence; he pulled out his money which he had in a bag, he put the bag on a salt that was papered up.

Q. Could he see it was silver. - A. Yes, the legs appeared through the paper, and they were uppermost.

Q. Where was that salt. - A. On the outside of a glass case, which stood on the counter.

Q. Did he take his money out of the bag. - A. I saw the money in the bag, I believe, or I heard it; he said he would send his wife to pay for them with halfpence, he said he supposed it would make no difference, I told him no; I returned to my book, he put up the silver, and I supposed at that moment put the salt up with it; but I did not see him do it, and he went away. When he shut the shop door I was writing at the time; I turned round and saw the salt was gone from the situation in which it had been. I told George Ridley that the man had stole the salt, he followed him immediately; I was with him, we brought him back together.

Q. Did either of you take any thing from him. - A. No, we sent for an officer; the moment he came he searched him, we did not find our property on him.

Q. Did you ever see your salt again. - A. Yes, it was brought over by Ridley, I sent him to search the way the prisoner had gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. This person came in the shop to purchase some articles. - A. Yes.

Q. Which were put up for him. - A. Yes.

Q. He appeared to have money with him, to what amount you cannot say. - A. There might be five or six shillings.

Q. He said he would send his wife, and she should come with some halfpence to pay for them; the property was not found upon him. - A. No.

Court. Did he take the bag and money with him. - A. Yes, the constable found it on him.

GEORGE RIDLEY . Q. You live with Mr. Blakeway in the Strand. - A. Yes, I am porter to him. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in and asked for some handle glasses. I went up stairs into the ware-room, and brought some down; he asked Mr. Cogger the price of them, he said nine-pence each; he took the list from under the counter, he told him he should have them for eight-pence halfpenny each; he desired me to match six, I did, I asked him if I should do them up in a parcel for him, he said yes; I heard him ask Mr. Cogger if it made any difference if he paid him in halfpence, Mr. Cogger said no; then he went away from the shop.

Q. Had you seen him produce any bag. - A. I saw a bag, I did not see what was in it. I observed his hands over the counter where the salts was.

Q. Had you observed the salts at this time. - A. No, I did in the morning when I dusted the counter. When he went away, Cogger desired me to run after him; nearly as soon as he had shut the door I opened the door, I saw him he was crossing the road as fast as he could. I run after him, he is lame I believe, he hopped a little. I laid my hands upon him on the pavement, the other side of the way; he turned himself round close to the area rails of Mr. Bankes house; our shop is directly opposite Round court, in the Strand; Mr. Bankes is six or seven doors from Round-court.

Q. You saw him close to the railings, did you see him do any thing. - A. His back was close to the

railings; Cogger came up directly, and he was taken back to the shop. The constable searched him, the salt was not found on him. Mr Cogger desired me to search in the direction he had gone; I did so, I found nothing. I knocked at Mr. Banke's door, I went in the kitchen, I opened the window. Mrs. Bankes lent me a candle, I found the salt at the bottom of the arae where he stood with his back. I brought the salt back and gave it to Mr. Cogger.

BENJAMIN HINCKS . I am a constable of St. Martin's. I was sent for to Mr. Blakeway's shop; I searched the prisoner, I found a bag that had six shillings in it.

Q. Were you present when the last witness Ridley returned, after having went out. - A. Yes, he brought in the silver salt with him; that was given to Mr. Cogger the shopman, and it was given to me.

Q. Have you had it ever since. - A. No, I returned it to Ridley. Mr. Cogger gave it to me the first day of the session.

Cogger. The salt cellar has been in the custody of Mr. Blakeway in a drawer, no one goes to it but himself; that is the same salt cellar, we had it to put a glass lining to it.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 30th of March I was coming home from my work, I went into this shop, to buy some glasses; I said I would send my wife to pay for them with some halfpence; there were some more people that were in the shop that went out before me. The porter came over and said I must go back, and Mr. Cogger said I had stole something out of the shop; they took me into the shop and searched me, and could not find any thing on me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-34

288. JOHN BREWSTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Prior , about the hour of eight at night, on the 25th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, a glass tumbler, value 1 s. the property of Edward Palmer .

ELIZABETH PALMER . I live at No. 17, Clipstone-street, near Fitzroy-square. William Prior belongs to the house.

Q. Who is Edward Palmer . - A. My son, he is two years and a half old, he lives with me. Edward Palmer was my husband, I am a widow; I was not at home at the time of this transaction. I went out on the evening of the 25th of February, a few minutes before six; Mr. Prior sent for me; I returned about half past nine; I missed a glass tumbler out of the closet, in the sitting room on the first floor. That tumbler I had in my hand that afternoon, I put some cakes in it and put it in the closet.

Q. Was that tumbler your own. - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to call it in the indictment, the property of Edward Palmer . - A. They asked me my husband's name, I told them, and I told them I was a widow.

Q. Had you left your room door locked. - A. No.

WILLIAM PRIOR . I am a carpenter , I live at No. 12, Clipstone-street, St. Mary-le-bone , Elizabeth Palmer has the first floor in my house. On the 25th of Februray, between seven and eight in the evening, I was alarmed by my servant, as I was sitting in my parlour. On the prosecutrix going out, she requested my servant to attend her fire, and on my servant going into the room, she came down and told me that she saw a man in the room. I proceeded to the lodger's apartment, I found nobody in the room; on returning down stairs again a person knocked at the door, and informed me that some body had escaped from the window; and by the directions I pursued him, and took him by Portland chapel; he was then standing by the side of a house, he was pointed to me, he had no coat on; I gave him in charge of a watchman. When I returned home, I found a glass tumbler outside of the door broken, and several small cakes laying by the side of it.

Q. It was a considerable way from your house where you laid hold of him. - A. Yes, near a quarter of a mile.

Q. How long had you been in the parlour before you received the alarm. - A. An hour at the least.

MARY MATTHEWS . You are servant to Mrs. Prior. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Palmer going out on this day. - A. Yes, I went up stairs between seven and eight o'clock; I saw a man standing at the closet door in her room. I had a candle in my hand, I saw he had no coat on, the closet door was open; I went down and alarmed my master.

Q. Did you speak to the man first. - A. No.

Q. Did you see him come down stairs. - A. No.

Q. Did you see him go up stairs. - A. No, I should not know him again.

HENRY GASKIN . What are you. - A. I am an apprentice to Mr. Clark, brush maker in Charlton-street. On the 25th of February, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, I saw a man without a coat on, coming out of the first floor window of Mr. Prior's house; he got from the first floor window to the lid of the door, and then he dropped into the street; he ran down the next turning, and I after him; he came back again to the house, within a few doors, he leaned on a post, I went and informed Mr. Prior; I knocked at the door and called out, and then the man ran away; I went first after him, and Mr. Prior followed; he ran into George-street, Portland chapel; and then he stood at the corner of a public house. Mr. Prior charged the watch with him.

Q. Can you undertake to say that the person Mr. Prior laid hold of, was the same man that you had seen come out of the window. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you observed any thing of any glass at any time. - A. When I came back from the watch-house not before.

Q. Then when the man came out of the window you did not see him throw any thing down. - A. I did not.

Q. Nor hear any glass break. - A. No, Mr. Prior picked up the bits of glass from the step of the door when we came back.

Q. (to Prior) This lad has told us that you picked

up some broken glass. - A. I did, when I returned from the watchhouse I produce it.

Q. (to prosecutrix) You cannot speak to the glass. - A. I cannot; only my tumbler had a foot to it, and this has a foot.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent man. Before the magistrate the prosecutrix only valued the tumbler at sixpence, so I was to be tried at Hicks'-hall. They made a burglary of it yesterday and brought me here.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-35

289. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , a sheet, value 7 s. and a brass candlestick, value 1 s. the property of Mary Ann Franks .

MARY ANN FRANKS . I live at No. 29, Huper-square, Whitechapel ; I keep the house.

Q. You had a message from Mr. Hill the pawnbroker, and you sent an answer by Ann Holroyd . - A. Yes.

ANN HOLROYD . I am a servant to Mrs. Franks.

Q. She sent you on a message to Mr. Hill the pawnbroker. - A. Yes; my mistress desired me to see who was the person at the pawnbrokers, and when I went there I saw the prisoner at the bar.

Q. When was this. - A. On Monday the 2nd of March. When I entered the shop I said, Mary is it you; she said yes; she was my fellow servant. I asked her how she came there; she said I sent her with the sheet to pledge.

Q. Had you sent her to pledge the sheet. - A. I knew nothing about it, I told her so; she knew I had been out three hours. I went home and acquainted my mistress; she told me to get an officer; I did, and she was taken in custody.

Prisoner. Did not you give me the sheet. - A. I did not.

Prisoner. You told me to take the sheet, and pledge it.

EDWARD SMITH . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr Hill's the pawnbroker, by the last witness; when I went in, the prisoner said I suppose you want me. I asked her how she came to pledge the sheet; she said the last witness gave it her to pledge. I searched her; in her pocket I found this candlestick.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to live in this house on Friday; I did not know what kind of a house it was. Mrs. Franks told me this woman was to be housekeeper, she was to be mistress of every thing in the house, I was to be under her. Accordingly on the Monday this woman gave me the sheet, to pledge it for two shillings; the candlestick I let fall on the hearth and broke it as I was cleaning it; I put it in my pocket to get it mended; as I might not have a noise.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-36

290. GEORGE GROOM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , fourteen pieces of mahogany, value 16 s. the property of John Ayres .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to belong to James Potts .

PETER MASON . I am a constable of Worship-street.

Q. Who was it that called upon you, and desired you to call at North-green. - A. A person of the name of Burridge.

Q. On the 28th of March did you find the prisoner there. - A. Yes. Mr. Burridge charged the prisoner with stealing three pieces of some mahogany belonging to Mr. Ayres. The prisoner denied it at first, but afterwards he owned to taking one piece; the prisoner said if I would go with him to a baker's just by, he would shew me that piece, which he did; it was under the baker's dough through. I took it back to his master's. I then asked him where the other two pieces were; he said he had taken them to No. 10, Caroline-court, Saffron-hill; I went there and found fourteen pieces.

Q. Did the prisoner acknowledge that he had taken them there. - A. Yes; and the man in whose place it was found said he had brought that wood there. The prisoner said he took it out of his master's yard.

DANIEL CULLUM . I am a cabinet maker, I live in Caroline-court. The first time I met with the prisoner was at a public house; he asked me what business I was, I told him I was a cabinet maker; he asked me to make him a table; he said he would find his own stuff. He brought this stuff to make him a dining table.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-37

291. JOHN DIMOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of August , a silver watch, value 3 l. a half guinea, two bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a seven shilling piece , the property of Thomas Medes .

THOMAS MEDES . Q. When did you lose your watch. A. On the 14th of August last; it was a very stormy day; me and my fellow servant had been to Uxbridge with a chaise and four horses; it was about one o'clock when we returned; being late we could not get into our lodgings, and we being very wet went to the watering house in Cockspur-street; from there went into the stable, Nag's head yard, Whitcomb-street . I said to my fellow servant I will put my watch and money out of my pocket for fear of losing it.

Q. What money had you. - A. Two one pound notes, a half guinea, and a seven shilling piece. I wound my silver watch up, and put it and the money in a silk handkerchief together. I left it under the bin of a four-stall stable in Nag's-head yard.

Q. Did you cover it over under this bin. - A. No further than pushing it under the bin; there were three horses in this stable that I had put in when I came home.

Q. Did you lock this stable door. - A. No, there was no lock to the door; I left the watch and money there a little before two o'clock; I returned to the stable about five o'clock, it was gone; I asked Cave if he had been in the stable, he said no.

Q. How long was it before you heard any thing of it. - A. Nearly two months; I saw it first at Dunstable in Bedfordshire; Cave was down there. He wrote to me he had suspicion my watch was there in the prisoner's custody.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before. - A. Yes;

he had been accustomed to sleep in the stables, or in the lofts in the yard.

Q. On this information of Cave's you went down to Dunstable. - A. Yes; I heard the watch had been to a watchmaker at Dunstable, and by the description the watchmaker gave me, I got a constable and took up the prisoner.

Q. The prisoner was at Dunstable. - A. Yes. I sent Cave first to the prisoner; he came; I told him I had lost my watch and money, I told him I thought he had got it; he said he had not, but he knew who had got it, it was not far off, he would shew me where it was; he took me to the landlady of the Saracen's-head, Dunstable; it was in her possession; he asked the landlady for his watch, she gave it into his hand, and he delivered it to me; he told me it was mine, I might take it, he had bought it of a girl for fifteen shillings.

Q. Upon looking at it did you find it to be your property. - A. Yes.

(The watch produced and identified.)

JOSEPH CAVE . Q. You drove with this lad on the 14th of August. - A. Yes, we returned about one o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect his putting by his money and watch in the way he has stated. - A. Yes, he wrapped it up in a handkerchief, and put it under the bin; the next morning he came into my stable and asked me if I had been in his stable; I said no. The next morning he made it known to his master; and he laid it to my charge; my master had us all searched, and nothing was found on any body.

Q. How long did you stay with your master after that. - A. Very near two months; then I went to Dunstable. I heard the prisoner was there; I asked a friend of his if he had ever seen him with a watch; I learned the watch had been to a watchmaker's there.

Q. How came you to ask that question. - A. Because a person had said he came into the country with a good watch; it struck me it might be this watch, as he had worked in the yard, and after that he had liberty from the master to sleep in the yard. I wrote to Medes, and he came down and claimed the watch

Prisoner's Defence. That place where he laid his watch was public; I have lost several things there myself. I bought this watch of a girl that lived in Pye-street, Westminster.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-38

292. JOHN BIRCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a sheet, value 7 s. the property of Margaret Martin , in a lodging room .

MARGARET MARTIN . I am a widow , I live at No. 5, Prince's-court, Drury-lane .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes; he took lodgings of me a few days after Shrove Tuesday, a furnished back room up one pair of stairs, at four shillings a week; he staid with me rather better than four weeks. He owed me nothing. To the Monday he was taken up, he had not left my house.

Q. Had you discovered there was any thing missing. - A. No; he was taken up in the city on Saturday the 21st of March, and two officers came with him to my house; they called me up stairs, and asked me if any thing was missing from the bed. I went up in the room and missed a sheet from the bed where the prisoner had slept. The officer ordered me to attend on Wednesday at the mansion house.

Q. Did you see the sheet. - A. Yes, the pawnbroker's servant produced it; I knew it was my sheet.

THOMAS HODGES . I am a servant to Mr. Lane, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. I took a sheet in pledge of the prisoner on Friday the 20th of March; he asked me to lend him eight shillings on it in the name of John Harris ; he said he belonged to the opera-house, and he lived in Little Wild-passage. I lent him seven shillings on it. On the Saturday two officers came; they told me to bring the sheet to the mansion house on the Wednesday following.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am a city officer. I had the prisoner in custody upon another charge; on Saturday the 21st of March he was examined before the lord-mayor, and I was ordered to take him to the other end of the town to see if I could find the property.

Q. You do not mean the property of this woman. - A. No; before I took him to the other end of the town I searched him; I found this duplicate in his breeches fob; I asked him what sheet it was, he told me it was the sheet of the bed where he lodged, at No. 5, Prince's-court, Drury-lane. He had a key in his pocket which he said was the key of his room; I took the key from him. Sherry and I and the prisoner went up to the lodging; after we were in his room I sent for Mrs. Martin to come up; when she came up, I desired her to look round the room to see if she had lost any thing; she missed the sheet from the bed. I told her the prisoner was remanded for examination on the next Wednesday at the mansion house, and requested her to attend. We came from there and went to the pawnbroker's; I asked the young man in the shop if he knew the prisoner; he said he did. I produced the duplicate, I desired him to produce the sheet at the mansion house on the Wednesday following. He appeared there with the sheet, and the prosecutrix identified it.

Prisoner. Mrs. Martin observed to you if you would give her the ticket, she did not want to go to the mansion house, she did not think I was the person to wrong her of the sheet.

Leadbetter. The prisoner said he had some crockery in the room that would satisfy Mrs. Martin for the sheet; Mrs. Martin seemed inclined to be favourable to the prisoner; she did not wish to go to further trouble.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - With submission to the honourable court. I most humbly beg leave to observe, I am a native of the Isle of Man; my father was a lieutenant on board a man of war, and my uncle held a respectable situation in Castle Town in the Isle of Man. I have lived in London three years, and kept myself with honesty. I am a tailor by trade. I leave it to this honourable court.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-39

293. ELIZABETH BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , a cotton gown,

value 7 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 3 d. and a silk cloak, value 2 s. the property of Austin Tyer .

ELIZABETH TYER . Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she lodged with me one week. On Saturday the 14th of March I went out at nine o'clock.

Q Did you leave the prisoner in the house. - A. No, she went out to the White Swan, in Shoreditch. I told her I was going to work at Mr. Milwards, at Hackney. I returned about seven o'clock in the evening; I called up the prisoner at the White Swan; I told her I was come home. When I went home I missed my gown, shawl and cloak; I went back to the Swan directly, and the prisoner was gone; I met with her at the Swan the next morning; she said she had not robbed me; she ran out of the house, I followed her into Shoreditch; then she struck at me, I said, Oh! Mrs. Barnes, do not be so cruel; she crossed over the way into Kingsland-road, and ran through Saunder's gardens; I met Mr. Mason, and he took her in custody. When he searched her she gave the duplicate to me, she had it in her hand; I gave it to Mr. Mason.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a pawnbroker's servant. On the 14th of March the prisoner brought a cotton gown and a shawl to pledge; I lent her eight shillings on them.

(The property produced and identified.)

PETER MASON . Q. You took this woman up. - A. Yes, on Sunday the 15th of March; I took her to the watchhouse and searched her. I found this handkerchief and duplicate; she owned she took these things, but not the cloak.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with Mrs. Tyer, I am a widow woman and three children. Mrs. Tyer promised me when I went out to see my children, I should have her gown and shawl to put on. On that Saturday Mrs. Tyer went out, I thought of having a day's work but was disappointed; I turned back and took the liberty of taking them, as she had promised to lend them me.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18070408-40

294. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , in the dwelling house of George Humphries , four shirts, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 1 l. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. a coat, value 3 l. a seven shilling piece, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Lawrence Lewis .

LAWRENCE LEWIS . I am a farrier , I live in Red-lion-court, Charterhouse-lane .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a farrier . On the 30th of August the prisoner had lived with me three weeks; he left me on that day; he said he would mend a chair while I was gone to market. He came out with me at eight o'clock, to buy a screw to mend the chair, I saw him return into the house, he unlocked the door and went up stairs; I returned in about half an hour, when I came back the property was gone. I did not see him for six months afterwards.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property. - A. No.

Q. Did you know this person before you took him in the house to lodge. - A. No, he said he had just come out of the country; I found he knew London as well as I did.

Q. What did he take out of your house. - A. A suit of clothes, four shirts, and a one pound note, and a seven-shilling piece. He saw me put the money in the caddie when he and I came home from work.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I am a farrier, I worked at the time with John Green and Lewis.

Q. You are certain it is the same man. - A. Yes, I used to go home of a night with them together; I saw him go into the house with Mr. Lewis.

Q. (to prosecutor) Who rents the house. - A. George Humphries ; I pay my rent to him.

Prisoner's Defence. (read in court) My lord, having an impediment in my speech, which makes it out of my power to address the court, I hope your lordship will excuse these few lines; my case is as follows: - On or about August last, I went to Mr. Loader to work, my shopmate asked me to lodge with him; I did so, at eighteen pence a week. On Saturday night following my master paid me my wages, and discharged me. My prosecutor and I went home together, from whence the prosecutor, his wife and I, went out to take a walk together, as far as Smithfield; I met a shopmate of mine, who told me where I might get work: I told him I should not stay with him, and that I would leave my shirt and stockings, which would be a security to him for what I owed him. I went with my shopmate to Hertfordshire, and got work there. In January last I got work in Little Moorfields, where I was apprehended. The prosecutor came to Newgate and told me the bill was thrown out; he treated me; I sent all my friends away yesterday.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18070408-41

295. ELIZABETH MADDOX , and ISABELLA LAMB , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , fourty-pound weight of potatoes, value 1 s. 6 d. and half a bushel of coals, value 1 s. the property of John Higgins .

JOHN HIGGINS . I live at No. 8, Grub-street , I am a dealer in potatoes and coals . The prisoners were my lodgers; Maddox is the mother, and Isabella Lamb is her daughter, they are lint maker s. Last Thursday week I suspected the prisoners, I laid wait for them, I placed my boy below in the cellar; I then went up stairs as though I intended to go out, but I placed myself in the shop; I saw the mother and the daughter come down with a candle; they opened the cellar door and went down into the cellar; about five minutes afterwards I see the daughter come up with a bag full of potatoes; I followed her, and had just time to touch the mother as she emptied out a lap full of large coals; I called the lad out of his hiding place, and sent him for a constable. The mother was filling her apron with the coals that were in the cellar; I found her emptying them out when she heard me. The officer went up stairs and found a large bag of potatoes and coals, I could not swear to them; I am partly sure they are mine. These are the potatoes I took from her in the passage

FREDERIC LOW. Q. You are servant to Mr. Low, are you. - A. Yes; I hid myself in the corner of the cellar; directly after almost, the mother and daughter came down; both of them filled a bag with potatoes; they said, I dare say Mr. Higgins will have some more potatoes in to-day. The mother began to fill her apron with large coals; Mr. Higgins came down stairs, and when she saw him, she chucked the coals out of her apron.

EDWARD TRING . I was called upon to take charge of the prisoners. I went up into their apartment, I found fifty pound weight of potatoes in a basket under the bed, and a closet nearly full of large coals.

Maddox's Defence. I never touched the coals and the potatoes.

Lamb's Defence. I am sorry to say the privy was in the cellar; I found the door open, I went down, and seeing the potatoes, it tempted me to take them, as I was out of employ.

MADDOX, GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

LAMB, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-42

296. ELIZABETH HYAT was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of John Houghton , on the 4th of March , a silver watch, value 3 l. a pocket book, value 6 d. ten guineas, two half guineas, two dollars, value 5 s. each, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of William Owen .

WILLIAM OWEN . I work at Mr. Butt's powder-mills; I lodge at John Houghton 's, Twickenham common, in the parish of Twickenham .

Q. Is it a public house or a private house. - A. A private house.

Q. He keeps the house and lives in it himself. - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any more lodgers. - A. Yes, another.

Q. He, himself, slept in the house, did he. - A. Yes.

Q. You rented your apartment of him. - A. Yes, the other man and me had one room, and the prisoner had the other.

Q. How long had you lodged there. - A. A twelvemonth.

Q. Had the prisoner any thing to do about the house. - A. She was occasionally employed by my landlady to make the beds.

Q. On what day did this happen. - A. On the 4th of March; I left my lodgings about six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did the man the slept in the room with you leave it at the same time. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any box in that room. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you keep it locked. - A. Yes.

Q. How lately had you been to the box before Wednesday the 4th of March. - A. On the Monday night I was putting my money and my things in the box.

Q. You keep your money and clothes in that box, had you the watch there. - A. Yes, I put the watch there at the same time. There was ten guineas, two half guineas, two dollars, and a one pound note.

Q. Was there any pocket book. - A. Yes, I kept my money in the pocket book.

Q. You had seen them in the box on the Monday night. - A. Yes.

Q. You had besides clothes in the box. - A. Yes.

Q. What had you done with the key, had you it about you. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you return to the house. - A. I returned on Wednesday at six o'clock at night.

Q. Did you receive any alarm before you came. A. As soon as I came into the house.

Q. That is, when you returned, you had some information. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner the morning before you went out. - A. No.

Q. You do not know whether she made the beds that day. - A. My landlord told my landlady she did.

Q. When you went home and received this information, you went into your room. - A. Yes.

Q. In what state did you find the box. - A. I found my hinges tore off my box.

Q. You found it locked, I suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. In what state did you find your clothes. - A. Two of my coats that were in the box were laying in the room.

Q. Did you miss your pocket book and the watch. A. Yes.

Q. The pocket book containing the money was taken out of the box was it. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of losing your money and property what did you do. - A. I went the next day to Hounslow.

Q. That was on the Thursday. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did the prisoner live. - A. She lived up stairs in the same house that I did.

Q. Did you get any warrant. - A. Yes, a search-warrant.

Q. Who attended you in the execution of that warrant. - A. Mr. Clayton the constable.

Q. Where did you go with that warrant. - A. I took it home to the house.

Q. Did you search the room that she was in. - A. Yes.

Q. Was she at home at the time. - A. Yes.

Q. About what time of the day was this. - A. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did she live with her husband in that room. - A Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing in that room. - A. No.

Q. Was the husband at home at that time. - A. No.

Q. Did you search her person or her apartment first. - A. We first searched her.

Q. Did you tell her what you searched her for. - A. Yes; the constable told her we had got a search-warrant to search the room; she said we was welcome to do it, she had not got the money.

Q. You found nothing about the room. - A. No.

Q. You searched her pockets and her person, you found nothing there. - A. No; we searched her in the room.

Q. Did you make any further search. - A. Yes; we searched the hair of her head.

Q. Had she a cap on then. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find. - A. Eight guineas, two half guineas.

Q. I think you said you missed ten guineas. - A. Yes; in all, I missed thirteen pounds one shilling.

Q. You said that you had ten guineas in the box. A. Yes.

Q. Then you found eight guineas. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there no half guineas among them. - A. No; eight whole guineas, a one pound note, and two five shilling dollars, was found in her hair, and the watch and pocket book.

Q. The note and money was in the pocket-book. A. Yes.

Q. The watch was not. - A. No.

Q. Then there were two half guineas and two guineas that you did not find. - A. Not till afterwards.

Q. You knew your pocket book, I suppose. - A. Yes.

Q. I do not suppose that you knew your money again. - A. No, I cannot say that I did.

Q. You knew your pocket book and your watch. A. Yes.

Q. Did you secure her. - A. The constable took her to the Bell at Hounslow. After he had taken her to the magistrate, I found one guinea and two half guineas in her pocket, when she was going to bed.

Q. When you had searched her before you could not find any thing in her pocket. - A. No.

Q. Where was she going to be put to bed. - A. At the Bell at Hounslow.

Q. Were you present when it was found. - A. Yes, I found the guinea and the two half guineas in the finger of a glove.

Q. How do you know this was your money. - A. I cannot say it was.

Q. How came you to find it there. - A. We saw her take a pair of pockets off.

Q. Were these the pockets that you before had searched. - A. No.

Q. Had she more than one pair of pockets then. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing more any where. - A. No, there is a guinea missing now.

Q. Was there nothing about the fire place. - A. No.

Q. Had she given you any account about the fire place. - A. When we were going to the magistrate she said there were two guineas and two half guineas in the fire place; we searched the fire place, and found nothing there.

Q. Upon her you found one guinea and two half guineas in that pocket, you could not tell whether that was your money or not. - A. No.

ISAAC CLAYTON . Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes.

Q. Being applied to by Owen, did you go to the house where he lodged. - A. I did; it is in the parish of Twickenham.

Q. Did you search her pockets. - A. I did; I found six shillings, which she declared was her husband's.

Q. You did not find any gold nor a pocket book. A. No; I searched the room, and found nothing at all. I saw her put her hand to her head; I thought there was something in it; I took her bonnet off, I searched the back part of her head, and in her hair I found the pocket book with the money and watch. The magistrate sealed it up; it has been in my possession ever since. When the prisoner went to bed the husband searched his wife along with Owen, he searched all her clothes.

Q. Did you see any thing taken out of her pocket. - A. I saw a glove in his hand, I saw one guinea and two half guineas taken out of it; this money was found after she had been to the magistrate. I produce the property.

Q. (to prosecutor) Is that your pocket book. - A. Yes, it contained the note and my money.

Q. Look at, the note can you at all tell whether that was your note. - A. I cannot, I can only say I had a one pound note.

Q. The money you cannot tell. - A. No, there is eight guineas and two dollars; the watch is mine; I know it by the the inside case not fastening too; I have had it a twelve month. I know the chain and seals. It is a silver watch.

Q Where is the money that was found in the glove. - A. In my pocket, all but half a guinea; I was out of money.

Q. What watchmaker's hands had your watch been in before this time. - A. Mr. Howard of Brentford, about three months before.

Q. Did it come back with the case not fastening as it is now. - A. Yes, it was so when I took it him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out that day, when I came home I picked the money up on the stairs. I beg of William Owen to be as favourable to me as he can, for the sake of my baby.

The prisoner called one witness, who give her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-43

297. MARY BULL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , a sheet, value 7 s, a shirt, value 3 s. and 40 farthings , the property of Edward Abbot .

EDWARD ABBOT . I live at No. 14, Worship-street . I am a porter .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house. - A. Yes, she lived in another apartment. On the 14th of March about two o'clock in the afternoon, I went out to work I saw the shirt before I went out in the bed room.

Q. What part of the house do you occupy. - A. Two rooms on the ground floor. The farthings were on the dresser in a pot; there was forty three.

Q. Did you leave your wife at home when you went out. - A. No.

Q. Did you lock your door. - A. I do not think that I did. I returned about five, and I missed the key from the door; I went across my room, I saw my chest lid was open; my wife came home, she missed a sheet from the chest; I missed the shirt from the bed-room. I examined the pot, I found all the farthings were gone. On Tuesday morning after the sheet and shirt were found at the pawnbroker's, I charged the prisoner with it; I took her to the pawnbroker's he said she was the person that pledged them.

MRS. ABBOT. Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home on Saturday the 14th of March, when these things were lost. - A. I was not; when I came home I looked in the chest, and there was a sheet taken out of it; the chest was not locked, I had put the sheet in the chest on the Sunday before. My husband counted the farthings the night before, there were forty three; when I came home there were none left in the pot.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mrs. Abbot told me she had lost these things, I said, do not be too sure; Mrs Abbot said she had lost her husband's silk handkerchief and he knows no other to this day; she told me she had got the money for it.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-44

298. JOHN POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , in the dwelling house of Ellen Maria O'Callaghan , an antiquel seal, value 20 s, and a bank note, value 10 l. her property .

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

ELLEN MARIA O'CALLAGHAN . Q. We understand that this boy in your family was a servant . - A. Yes.

Q. What was his situation. - A. Cleaning knives and running of errands.

Q. I do not know whether any thing attracted your notice of this boy. - A. I perceived him have a watch and a broach.

Court. What age is the prisoner. - A. About fourteen.

Mr. Const. When you first observed them things, did you ask him any questions. - A. Yes, I asked him how he got his watch; he said his father gave it him.

Q. What was his father. - A. A soldier in the guards.

Q. Was the father employed by you. - A. Now and then occasionally; when he said his father gave it him it struck me not very likely that his father should give him the watch, as he had complained to me that his father always used him very ill.

Q. Where had you placed this ten pound note. - A. In a desk in a back room about three weeks ago; I always kept it locked.

Q. When you first discovered that you had lost your bank note, was it locked. - A. Yes, the lock was injured.

Q. Are you inattentive to your keys and leave them about - A. Yes, I often do.

Q. Had you lost also a seal. - A. Yes, which I prized very much. I had left it on the mantle piece.

Q. You have never seen it again. - A. No.

Q. And you have never seen your bank note again. - A. No.

ELIZABETH FORREST . - Mr. Const. You keep the Exeter-arms, do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever apply to you for change of a note. - A. Yes; I cannot say the day, I believe it was about a month ago; the prisoner came and asked me to give him change of a note, I believe it was a ten pound note; he said it was for a lady, No. 7, Cadogan-place.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Did you ever send him for change of any note of value. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant

Reference Number: t18070408-45

299. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for the wilfull murder of William Curtis .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS PARKER . - Mr. Knapp What are you. - A. I am a watchman in Leman-street, Goodman's-fields.

Q. On the 6th of February were you in company with any person. - A. I was, about one o'clock in the morning, in company with the prisoner, he is a patrol ; while we were discoursing together we heard a noise.

Q. Where did the noise come from. - A. From Leman-street, the corner of Prescott-street; I says to the prisoner, let us go and see what is the matter; we both went up and endeavoured to make peace, if we could.

Q. When you came up how many persons did you find, and who was there. - A. I found six, and the deceased made seven; the deceased was then fighting. We told them to disperse As soon as we said that the deceased fell on the patrol, and struck him.

Q. What sort of a blow was it. - A. I do not know; the deceased fell down upon the prisoner. I laid hold of the deceased by the coat, and pulled him from the patrol. I said to the prisoner, we will take him to the watchhouse.

Q. That is take the deceased. - A. Yes, he struggled and said he would not go to the watchhouse; we came together so far as the middle of Little Ayliffe-street , some of the deceased's companions told him not to go to the watchhouse; another said if he did not go to the watchhouse he would give him a good hiding; the deceased turned round and said, who is it to give me a beating; in consequence of that he turned round again, and gave the patrol a stroke on his head.

Q. The deceased then struck the patrol. - A. Yes, with that the patrol made a blow, and struck the deceased over the head; then we took the deceased to the watchhouse.

Q. What did he strike him with. - A. The hilt of his sword; the sword had the scabbard on, and the blade part was in his hand.

Q. Do you know where it struck him. - A. On the side of his head.

Q. Was it a violent blow. - A. Not so violent as I saw; upon the deceased receiving the blow he fell on the ground, we took him up and set him on the step of the door.

Q. Could the man get up without you had picked him up. - A. No.

Q. How did he appear. - A. He was in liquor, and with the stun of the blow he appeared very much affected, he was conducted to the watchhouse, and afterwards to the hospital the same night, shortly after.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge how long he lived. - A. I believe about nine days.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The deceased struck the prisoner a blow on the side of the head, then momentary, he having a sword in his hand, struck the

deceased. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any threats of using force. - A. The deceased's friends insisted upon his not going to the watchhouse.

Q. Did it appear to you as if the prisoner had not used force, the deceased would have been rescued. - A. I make no doubt of it.

Q. Now with respect to the blow, the sword had a nob on the handle, which part unfortunately gave the blow and was the cause of his death. - A. Yes.

Q. What was the effect of the blow the prisoner received, was not his head cut. - A. It was; there was some blood came from the blow he received.

Q. Did the deceased and his companions know what you were. - A. They knew I was a watchman, I had the parish watch coat on; and the prisoner had a patrol's blue coat on.

Court. And you both desired them to disperse. - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-46

301. HANNAH SWINNEY and MARY LOWE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Johnson , about the hour of nine at night, on the 28th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, four curtains, value 15 s. the property of John Johnson .

MARGARET JOHNSON . I am the wife of John Johnson , we keep a lodging house for seamen , in New Gravel-lane . Hannah Swinney had been a servant of mine; I saw the back door open between eight and nine o'clock at night, on the last day of February, and I found the things missing the next morning.

WILLIAM CORDING . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Ratcliff Highway. On Saturday evening about half past ten o'clock, the prisoner Swinney brought some curtains to pledge; I lent her seven shillings on them. On Monday Mrs. Johnson came and described them, they were brought down to her, she owned them, paid me the money and took them; in the evening the prisoner Swinney was examined at Shadwell office; the two curtains were produced at the office, which I believe to be the same Mrs. Johnson redeemed; I put a mark on them at the office.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office. On the 1st of March Mrs. Johnson informed me that she had been robbed, she gave me three curtains that she said she had been robbed off; I immediately went and apprehended the prisoner Swinney, I took her to Mr. Cording's shop; he immediately said that was the person that pawned the three curtains.

HENRY MAXWELL . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Shadwell. On the 2nd of March the prisoner Lowe came to my house and brought this curtain to pledge, she told me she found it, I stopped it; I gave charge of her to an officer.

(The property produced and identified.)

Swinney's Defence. On the 28th of February I picked up these three curtains in the Highway, I took them to Mr. Cording. I asked him to lend me the money upon them. That gentlewoman swears they are her things. I believe she keeps a very bad house.

Lowe's Defence. I picked up the curtains in New Gravel-lane.

SWINNEY, GUILTY , aged 26.

LOWE, GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-47

302. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of Edward Theobald .

EDWARD THEOBALD . I am a gentleman's servant . On the 10th of March, about half past ten at night, at the corner of Dover-street, Picadilly , Mary Hamilton pursuaded me to go down a large yard, I was with her about ten minutes, she picked my pocket of a watch; I am sure she took it, because I had it when I went up the yard with her; and when I came down she ran away from me as fast as she could; and then I found my watch was gone.

Q. Did not you feel it go away. - A. No, I did not feel her take it out. I ran after her but could not see her that night. On the 14th of March I came up from Queen-square, Bloomsbury, and waited there at Dover-street two hours before I saw her; I happened with her at ten at night, and then I charged the watch with her.

Q. Are you sure you did not drop the watch out of your fob. - A. It could not drop it out, it was impossible; she pursuaded me to undo my waistband, but I did not.

Q. Did you ever find your watch. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man in my life before he charged the watch with me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-48

303. PETER GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , two epaulets, value 1 l. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pair of breeches, value 1 l. the property of James Delaney , in the dwelling house of Charles Warwick .

CHARLES WARWICK . I keep the White Swan in Bunhill-row .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he is a soldier in the East London militia , and a servant to captain Kirkman.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking this property from James Delaney . - A. On the 3d of April Mr. Delaney came to dress for the parade; he sent for me up in his room, and said he had been robbed of his property, and suspicion fell on the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-49

304. THOMAS HUTCHBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , a stone bottle, value 1 s. and three gallons of brandy, value 15 s. the property of William Bramwell , in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

RICHARD BRAMWELL . - Mr. Pooley. You are the son of the prosecutor. - A. I am.

Q. Where does your father live. - A. In Greek-street, Soho ; he is a wine and brandy merchant .

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar live with you as a

porter . - A. He did, for three years.

Q. Where used you to keep the key of your vaults. - A. In the accompting house desk locked up.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received did you search the kitchen drawers on the premises. - A. I did, by the direction of Robert Mallows ; I found a key there that would open the accompting house desk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have a father and a brother in the business, are you not at all in partnership. - A. No.

Q. The name of Bramwell and sons is over the door. - A. Yes, and the name of Bramley and sons is in our bills and receipts, but we are not in partnership.

Q. Mallows told you to search the kitchen, I have heard an old adage which may be applied to this; that were people hide things they know where to find them. - A. Yes.

Q. You have found him out to be a pretty considerable thief. - A Pretty well for that.

Mr. Alley. Do you not believe him to be as big a rogue as any in England. - A. I do not know.

Court. Have you missed liquor from time to time, down to the time you took up the prisoner. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BRAMWELL . - Mr. Pooley. You are son to the prosecutor, and brother to the last witness. - A. I am.

Q. Your father is a wine and brandy merchant. - A. He is.

Q. I understand there is the name of Branwell and son over the door of the house. - A. There is.

Q. Where do you keep the keys of your vaults. - A. In the desk in the accompting house, where only me and my brother have access to them; each of us have a key to that desk. We never trusted the prisoner or any of the servants with the key of the vaults.

WILLIAM BRAMWELL , senior. - Mr. Pooley. Have any of your sons any share of the business. - A. No more than you have; my sons live in the house. I pay the rent and taxes, they are both my servants.

ROBERT MALLOWS . - Mr. Pooley. Did you live servant with Mr. William Bramwell . - A. I lived with him rather better than three months.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar live there. - A. Yes, he was a carman there.

Q. Was he there when you first went into his service. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of March were you unwell at any time in that month. - A. I was very ill the latter part of last March; I was taken ill the middle of March.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the house. - A. He is a married man, he lodged at the Plough in Crown street, near Soho-square; I lived in the house with my young masters.

Q. Do you recollect when you was ill the prisoner at the bar coming to you about any thing belonging to your master. - A. Yes, it was a Sunday morning we got it.

Q. Got what. - A. A bottle of brandy, I cannot recollect the day of the month; I got up that morning very ill indeed.

Q. What time did he come in the morning. - A. Betwixt six and seven o'clock, he came to my master's house, he said to me he wanted some brandy; accordingly I had a key that would undo this desk in the accompting house.

Q. Did he before that day know that you had a key of that desk. - A. Yes; after he said he wanted some bandy, I unlocked the desk, and took out the key of the brandy cellar; the prisoner took a stone bottle from the warehouse; we opened the brandy cellar and filled the bottle with three gallons of brandy. The prisoner took it up stairs, and went home with it to his lodgings. We put the key in the desk again and locked the desk up.

Q. Where did you get the key from that you opened the desk. - A. That key I found in the bottom drawer in the kitchen.

Court. How long had you found that key. - A. About three weeks after I lived with Mr. Bramwell.

Q. How came he to ask you to get some brandy, how did he know that you had the key. - A. He knew before that I had the key, we had used it before.

Q. Were either of your masters at home that day. - A. Yes, both my young masters, but they were not up.

Q. How do you know that he took it home to his lodgings. - A. He told me so; I received one pound two and six-pence, as my share for the last brandy.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I suppose sir, not one word of the story that you have been telling to day, did you tell your master till you were found out. - A. Sir.

Q. I have the misfortune to speak low; I suppose not one word that you have told to day, did you tell your master till you were found out, and threatened to be prosecuted. - A. No.

Q. You stole a key three weeks after you had been with your master, you found your way to the cellar where you stole frequently; and now you hope to be believed by the jury. - A. I should wish to speak nothing but the truth.

Q. You know by speaking the truth you keep yourself from being tried. - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you think you shall be hanged. - A. No.

Q. Three months you have been in your master's service, and according to your own account you have been robbing him all the time. - A. Not all the time.

Q. You had a house at Cambridge. - A. Me and my wife left it; there was a captain hired me and my wife, and we went and lived with him.

MARY MALLOWS . - Mr. Pooley. You are the wife of Robert Mallows . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lodges. - A. Yes, in Crown-street, Soho.

Q. Did you ever sleep at his lodgings. - A. Yes.

Q. Was he at home when you slept there. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming home any morning when you was there. - A. Yes, on a Sunday morning, something before seven o'clock, he brought home a stone bottle that held about three gallons of brandy.

Q. Where did your husband sleep at that time. - A. At Mr. Bramwell's.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you where he got that bottle from. - A. No, he said he brought the brandy from Mr. Bramwell's cellar himself.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had seen

your husband. - A. He said my husband was very ill.

Q. Did you see the brandy. - A. I saw it bottled off at night into twelve glass bottles, and he told me he was going to carry it to a man of the name of Smith.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You come here to day to try to save your husband from hanging. - A. Yes.

Q. This man is not to suffer for the sake of your saving your husband, upon your oath were not you turned out of the house in which the prisoner lodged, for your improper conduct with the captain. - A. No.

Q. You lived there about a fortnight. - A. Three weeks.

Q. Did not you know the captain at Cambridge. - A. I have seen him there.

Q. Was not you threatened to be punished if you did not leave Cambridge, you and your husband. - A. No.

Q. So you went to that poor man's house to lodge, and now you come to swear that you saw him bring brandy in the house; he told you he had got brandy, you thought he stole it. - A. I supposed it.

Q. I take it for granted you never tasted it. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Stolen waters are sweet, and so is brandy too; you did not tell the master until the master took up your husband, and threatened to hang him. - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-50

305. GEORGE TREE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of February , six-hundred and ninety-four pound weight of lead, value 9 l. belonging to the parish church of Ryslip , the property of Samuel Carter Lewis , clerk, vicar of the said parish, and

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN BRAY . I am a farmer, I live at Ryslip. I am churchwarden to the parish of Ryslip.

Q. Was the parish church of Ryslip at any time robbed of lead. - A. Yes, I cannot justly say the day it was taken off.

Q. When did you miss the lead from the church. - A. On the 24th of February, from the East end of the roof of the church.

Q. Did you go up to the roof of the church to see how much was missing. - A. Yes, there was missing nine feet six inches in length, and nine feet over, was taken from the roof. I was upon the roof of the church in last October, it was safe then. I know no further than we missed it.

Q. Is it called Ryslip parish. - A. Yes, it is in the county of Middlesex.

THOMAS LEE . I am the plumber, I do the parish business at Ryslip.

Q. Did you in October do any repairs to the church of Ryslip. - A. Yes, I was at work there two days in October. I repaired the lead work at the chancel end.

Q. Did you leave the roof entirely covered with lead. - A. On the 24th of February I saw it again, then I went to make some further repairs; as soon as I put the ladder up I saw some of the lead had been taken off the church; it appeared to me as if it had been cut with a knife, and that some had been ripped by a pair of pincers.

Q. Was there any lead that you saw on the church, that you saw and knew elsewhere. - A. Yes; on the 25th of February I went to Notting-hill, and saw the lead that the constable had the custody of.

Q. Upon looking at the lead, was there any mark that you could know it was taken from Ryslip church. - A. Yes, I am certain of it; I should know it if it was in fifty pieces; I knew it by a damaged part, and it was about the quantity of lead that was taken from the church. I told the constable the admeasurement before I saw it.

Q. It had been fixed to the place. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the lead. - A. Nine-pound.

GEORGE CRIB . I am constable of Kensington, near London. On the 21st of February, about four o'clock in the morning, I was called up by two men, they said they had detained a man with some lead at Notting-hill turnpike. I went there and took charge of the prisoner; the lead was in a cart. The prisoner said he had not stole the lead; first he said he had hired a horse and cart at Little Chelsea; he had been fourteen or fifteen miles down in the country, and found the lead on a dunghill. Then he said that he was hired, and that two men were to give him twenty-shillings on a job that was to bring away the lead, and that was the lead in the cart; but when they hired him, they said he was to bring furniture, but he did not know the men's names; one he called Sam and the other Joe. He said they were going to deliver it to a shop in Oxford-street. I asked him what shop, he said he did not know exactly.

Q. How far is Notting-hill from Kensington. - A. About half a mile.

Prisoner. I said it was not my lead, I told the constable that two men had got it planted in the dung; they went and got it and loaded the cart with it.

Crib. He said there were two men, one Sam, and the other Joe; he did not know it was lead; he said if he had he would not have gone, and when he was there the men threatened him with his life if he did not put it in his cart, or something of that sort.

Q. Did he say what place they brought it from. - A. He said he went to Ealing, and went down the road a great many miles, and took it out of a dunghill.

THOMAS MAY . Q. What are you. - A. I am a labouring man.

Q. Did you stop the prisoner. - A. Yes, on the 21st of February, about half past three in the morning, there was nobody with him; I was at Notting-hill along with a man at the turnpike gate, I asked him what he had got in the cart, he said garden stuff; I called the man at the gate and looked in the cart; there was about eight or nine heads of brocolli; I saw the cart was loaded with lead.

Q. Did he ever mention the lead to you before you looked in the cart. - A. No. I asked him how he came by it, he said he had been down in the country for it; but he did not know the place, he said he set off the night before, and Sam was then along with him; he said he was behind, travelling after the

cart; I never saw him.

Q. Then I suppose you got a constable and had him secured. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Ryslip. - A. Yes, I have been there, it is about sixteen miles from London.

Q. How many horses had this cart. - A. One.

THOMAS WATERS . Q. Do you keep the turnpike gate. - A. I was there that night.

Q. Did you stop the prisoner with the other witness. - A. Yes.

Q. You know no more than the other witness. - A. No.

Q. (to Mr. Bray) Who is your vicar. - A. Samuel Carter Lewis .

Q. Who is your fellow church warden. - A. Daniel Pritchard .

Prisoner's Defence. I was with these two men drinking, I was very intoxicated; they took me down to this place; they went and got this lead from where they had planted it. I had no hand in getting it off the church.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-51

306. RICHARD MARKWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , eighteen shovels, value 1 l. the property of Charles Haskins , and JONATHAN BRITTAIN for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

CHARLES HASKINS . I am an iron plate worker and smith , No. 48, Old-Bailey . On Saturday the 21st of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, Tisiker came to my shop with three shovels. I know no more of the transaction than they are my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Did you know Markwell before. - A. He was a lodger of mine.

Q. He was in distressed circumstances. - A. Yes; and especially in mind. He is a man that is ill used by his family; they have taken his wife from him, and she is in the country.

Mr. Alley. When the poor fellow was in a good state of mind, he was a good-natured civil fellow. - A. He was.

WILLIAM TISSIKER . I am a parish officer, I keep a sheep's head shop. On Saturday morning the 21st of March, about half after six, I saw the prisoner Markwell with a dozen of shovels, he had six in each hand; I saw him go into Brittain's old iron shop, No. 6, Peter's-lane, St. John-street, Clerkenwell . I waited a quarter of an hour, I saw him come out without the shovels; I followed him to High Holborn, into a tool shop; when he came out I went in and made enquiry. I found he lodged at a shovel maker's in the Old-Bailey, and coming down Holborn I met Brittain with some shovels on his shoulder; they appeared to me to be the same shovels that I saw Markwell take to his house. I told him he must not sell these shovels, I had every reason to suspect they were stolen; he said, Tissiker if they are stolen, it is unknown to me, I have given a fair price for them, and there is no harm can come to me; he carried the shovels home. Going along, I asked him if he knew the man that he bought the shovels of; he told me he knew nothing of the man, but he had had dealings with him before. I went home with him, and three of the shovels that were marked with chalk I took to Mr. Haskins in the Old-Bailey; Mr. Haskins said they were his property. I then went and took Brittain in custody.

(The property produced and identified.)

Markwell left his defence to his counsel.

Brittain's Defence. I bought these shovels of this man; he said he was out of work, and he was employed to sell them any where he could get a customer; I thought I had a right to buy as well as any other person.

Brittain called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

MARKWELL, GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

BRITTAIN, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-52

307. GABRIEL ELIAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , half a pound weight of shag tobacco, value 2 s. the property of William Boone .

WILLIAM BOONE . I am an oil and colourman , I live at No. 70, White-cross-street . On Friday the 2nd of March, in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked me whether I sold shag tobacco; I replied yes; he wished to look at a sample. I shewed him a sample of return tobacco, he looked at it, and turning about, he took a handful of tobacco out of a jar, and put it in his pocket. I immediately went round the counter and detained him; in my going round the counter he took a handful of tobacco out of his pocket; some he put in the jar, some on the counter, and some he spilt on the ground; I said I would send for an officer; he immediately fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You lost nothing I am very glad to hear; you could not swear that bit of tobacco he took out of his pocket was your property. - A. I compared it with that in the jar, I believe it is my tobacco.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-53

308. ANN BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , an umbrella, value 10 s. the property of James Bowen .

SARAH BOWEN . My husband's name is James Bowen .

Q. What shop do you keep. - A. An umbrella shop, No. 3, Little St. Martin's-lane . I can only speak to the property.

MARY WARDEN . On the 9th of March the prisoner at the bar opened the shop door, came in, and asked me if I would buy any oranges; I told her no, and bid her be gone. As she went out of the door, she put her hand back and took an umbrella; I got up to go after her, I was not able to follow her, having a child. I called my daughter, and she went in pursuit of her.

Q. (to prosecutrix) You went in pursuit of the prisoner, did you find her. - A. Yes, after some time, in the street.

Q. Did you find the umbrella. - A. Yes, at the pawnbroker's

JAMES BATES . I live with Mr. Hinckesman, pawnbroker, Broad-street, St. Giles's. I received the umbrella of the prisoner, I lent her five shillings and sixpence on it.

Q. What day. - A. On the 9th of March; it might be about four o'clock in the afternoon.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not go to pawn it myself, I met a woman in the street that pawned it; she asked me to go with her, I went with her, she put it in that gentleman's hands, and she took the ticket, and she asked me to look at the dollar I went home, the young woman followed me; the constable took her at six o'clock; he took me to Bow-street. The lady that swore to me now did not swear to me at Bow-street.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-54

309. THOMAS SPINKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of Eleanor Roberts , spinster .

ELEANOR ROBERTS . I live with Mr. Forty, Dukes-head, King-street, Westminster . About four o'clock on the 18th of March, my coat was taken from off the bannisters of the stairs; I had seen it there five minutes before I missed it.

Q. When did you see your coat again. - A. In about ten minutes after I had missed it; the prisoner was then in the custody of the officer.

JAMES COURTNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, Tothill-street, Westminster. On Wednesday the 18th of March, between four and five in the afternoon, the girl came to our shop and described the coat, and the prisoner at the bar, and enquired if we had taken in such a coat; I informed her that there had been a coat taken in of such a person.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I recollected his person, he pledged the coat just before the witness came. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave me the coat to pledge it for him. I gave him the money and the duplicate.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-55

310. JOHN CANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of March , two pound weight of soap, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of James Nowland and John Nowland .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES NOWLAND . - Mr. Gurney. Are you servant to Messrs. Nowland. - A. I am; they have a soap house near Hermitage wharf .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he is an excise man . On Monday the thirtieth of March, he was at my master's soap house surveying there; about twelve o'clock I saw him in the cutting room, in the soap house where the men cut the slabs; I left the cutting room and returned there again in about three or four minutes, the prisoner was in the stoke hole.

Q. When you returned to the cutting room, did you observe any thing. - A. I observed a pile of bars of soap which had three at the top, and there was one gone; I immediately informed my master. I afterwards saw a green bag, it was pointed out to me by Mr. Nowland; I watched that bag for an hour and a half, and then I saw the prisoner take up the bag and go off the premises with it. I saw him brought back to the accompting house.

Q. When the prisoner went out I suppose he was relieved by another officer. - A. He was.

JOHN NOWLAND . - Mr. Gurney. What is the name of your partner. - A. James, my father.

Q. On the 30th of March you received information from your servant. - A. I did.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner go from your premises. - A. I did.

Q. Did you cause him to be brought back directly. - A. I did; he was brought into my accompting house, he had in his hand a green bag; I asked him if he had any objection to my searching the bag, he said he had not; this took place in the street. When I first stopped him I asked him what was in the bag, he said it was soap but not mine; this bag contained ten pieces; these are the pieces (the soap produced); that was not the particular quality of soap that we had on the premises, I was satisfied that it was not my property. I asked him where he had got it, he hesitated, and said if I would be kind with him he would inform me.

Mr. Knapp. Before he told you any thing in consequence of your questioning him, had not you told him there was an officer waiting ready to take him in custody. - A. I told him there was an officer ready to take him in custody, it was of no use to resist.

Mr. Gurney. Do not tell me what the prisoner said to you about accounting for the soap you produce; go on. - A. I told him he could expect nomercy of me as there were printed papers in the manufactory, stating if any person was detected they would be prosecuted; he said he had a large family. I said it was impossiable he could expect any favour of me; I asked where the soap was that he took from my cutting room in the morning; he said he had not got any soap of mine, nor he never robbed me; I told him I had strong reason to think a bar of soap had been gone that morning, and I must insist upon knowing where it was. At that moment I did not expect that he had the property about him, I thought he had hid it in the stoke hole; he still begged for mercy, I told him the officer was waiting for him; he then put his two hands into his pockets, and drew from each pocket a piece of soap, saying, that is the soap I took. (The soap produced.)

Q. Would these two pieces of soap make a complete bar. - A. They form a complete bar.

Q. Did you compare that soap with the soap in the pile. - A. I did, it matched in complexion exactly.

Q. Have you any doubt of it being your property. - A. From all the circumstances, I can have no doubt.

Q. The value is not above eighteen pence. - A. No.

Q. You sent for the police officer, he came and took him in custody. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you no other partner than your father. - A. No.

Q. I suppose this is common mottle soap. - A. Yes.

Q. Any other manufacturer could manufacture the same soap as you. - A. Certainly.

Q. Is there any thing to distinguish this soap from any other persons. - A. It is very dark, I very seldom have a boil so dark.

Q. There is no mark to it. - A. There is no mark at all.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-56

311. ELIZABETH GARBUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a cotton gown, value 5 s. the property of Ann Taylor .

ANN TAYLOR . I live facing the Thatched house, Islington .

Q. Did you lose a cotton gown at any time. - A. Yes, I hung it in the yard to dry, about nine o'clock in the morning on the 26th of March; I did not miss it till the next morning; I went into the Tatched-house, I told them I had missed it. I saw it that afternoon in the possession of the constable.

PHOEBE ABRAHAM . I live in Upper-street, Islington. On the 26th of March the prisoner came into my yard and stole a pair of breeches and a gown; there it was. This gown was found in her basket, hid under some matches.

Q. She appeared to be a matchwoman . - A. Yes.

CHARLES BRICE . I am a constable of Islington.

Q. Did you find the gown claimed by Mrs. Taylor. - A. Yes, I found it in her basket.

Q. What else was in the basket. - A. Matches and ballads.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my lord, I did not take it off the lines, it laid on the ground, any body might have took it as well as me.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-57

312. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , two sheets, value 14 s. four curtains, value 10 s. two flat irons, value 1 s. a pillow, value 3 s. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Maxwell .

ELEANOR MAXWELL . I am the wife of Thomas Maxwell , I live in St. John-street , the prisoner was a lodger.

Q. Did you let the lodging to her or her husband. - A. To the prisoner, I did not see the husband at the time of letting it. It was a furnished lodging, she was to pay four shillings a week for it; she said she was a married woman .

Q. Did the husband live with her. - A. Yes, she took it for herself and her husband.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-58

312. RICHARD GREEN and JAMES BRITTEN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , twenty yards of green baize, value 30 s. the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at No. 10, Clark's-place, Islington . I am a linen draper .

Q. Did you lose twenty yards of green baize at any time. - A. Yes, on the 25th of February, I had placed it in my shop between nine and ten in the morning; it was placed within three feet of the door in the shop. I saw it at Bow-street the same evening.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a smith, I live opposite of Mr. Brown's shop. On the 25th of February, between two and three in the afternoon, I saw Green and Britten, and a little boy was with them.

Q. You are quite sure that they are the two persons. - A. Yes, I know them to be three suspicious characters; I followed them from Clark's-place to Islington church; they returned to Clark's-place again, the little one that got away went into this shop and got this baize; the little boy went up the steps, the biggest stood against the door post, and the little one in a brown jacket clapped this green baize into the big one's arms.

Q. Did he go up the steps strait or creep up. - A. He crept up so as they could not see him in the parlour.

Q. You saw the tall one stand against the doorpost. - A. Yes, his name is Green, Britten was standing close by him; I saw the little one take this piece of green baize and put it into Green's hands.

Q. Could you see from what part he drew away that baize. - A. I thought it was a yard or two from the door post; it was standing upright when Green had got it in his possession; they all three made off together. I pursued them about twenty yards from the shop, and took Green in custody with the baize under his arm. A relation of mine came up at the time and took Britten.

Q. Have you had the green baize in your custody ever since. - A. Yes, it is the same that I saw these boys take out of the shop.

EDWARD LACK . Q. You are a relation of Samuel Lack , are you his brother. - A. No, his father is my brother; I saw Samuel Lack take Green with the green baize under his arm. Samuel Lack told me to go up Chapel-street after the other prisoners; I took Britten, I saw him in Chapel-street; there was a little boy with Britten in a brown jacket, he ran away when I laid hold of Britten. I told Britten I must take him back to his old partner with the green baize; he said he knew nothing about him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Green's Defence. I was returning from Balls'-pond with a parcel of goods for Messrs. Brown and Moffat in Goswell-street, a little boy came up to me in a brown jacket, and asked me if I would carry a parcel for him, I did, I thought it was too heavy for him. I was walking along with him, this Samuel Lack laid hold of me.

Britten's Defence. I am innocent of the affair. I never see this boy before in my life.

GREEN, GUILTY , aged 19.

BRITTEN, GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-59

314. ELIZABETH JOINER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a pair of sheets, value 7 s. the property of John Thwaites .

SUSANNAH NEWTON . Q. Do you live in Mr. Thwaites' house. - A. Yes, I serve in the shop; he lives at 306, High Holborn ; the prisoner was cook in the house; the sheets were not missed till they were found on her; she was going out of the house and leaving the service at the time Mr. Thwaites insisted upon searching her pockets; upon searching her

pockets I discovered the sheets, and she had about four pound of roast beef in her pocket, it was her pockets that stuck out and that was the occasion of her being searched; the sheets were pinned round her person.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have sent for my clothes and they will not let me have them.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-60

315. ANN MASON, alias ROWLAND , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , a pair of stays, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Scarlett .

JANE SCARLETT . I am the wife of Joseph Scarlett , I live at No. 6, Little Swan-alley, St. John street .

Q. Did you at any time lose a pair of stays. - A. Yes, I swore to nothing but the stays, I lost them on the 6th of March, I lost my stays from my two pair of stairs room, I was ill when I missed it.

JOSEPH SCARLETT . On the 2nd of March I went to Mr. Burgess's, pawnbroker, in St. John street, and there I found the stays.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Burgess, St. John street; on the 6th of March the prisoner pledged a pair of stays for one shilling and sixpence.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the prosecutor's child home and found it in board and lodging, the prosecutor is indebted to me at this time thirty shillings. I do not deny taking the stays, but I took them innocently by the consent of the prosecutor's wife.

Prosecutor. She had my child to take care of, and I am in debt to her for it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-61

316. JAMES BRESLEY, alias BRESTOW , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , a silver watch, value 1 l. a seal, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK . I am a coachman , I live with Mr. Shadwell, Upper Grosvenor street.

Q. He is a lord is not he. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you lose a silver watch. - A. The 5th of February, 1806, it had a key and seal to it. I went to sleep with a friend of mine at Mr. White's stables, Upper Cheyney mews . I laid my watch on the mantle shelf, the prisoner slept in the room in a chair; when I got up the watch was gone.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. Past twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room when you went to bed. - A. Yes. I got up in the morning before six o'clock, the prisoner said he had been out dressing some horses. I told him I had lost my watch, he said he knew nothing about it, he said he thought I could not have put my watch there. I got the watch at a raffle, it was worth a pound. I heard the prisoner had sold the duplicate of a watch, I saw the watch in the possession of the man that bought it, his name is William Ketteridge .

WILLIAM KETTERIDGE . Did you at any time buy a duplicate of the prisoner. - A. Yes, about eleven weeks back.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was very much intoxicated when he came home with Smith and me from the club, it was between two and three o'clock in the morning. I got up in the morning and did Smith's horses, for him. I never left the mews; when Smith came to the carriage, the prosecutor asked about his watch, Smith said that he never saw the watch. I met a person in August last, I bought the duplicate of him, I gave two shillings for it. I am innocent of stealing the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-62

317. JOHN M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , one cock, value 2 s. and two hens, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Miller .

THOMAS MILLER . I live at No. 75, Old Gravel-lane .

Q. Did you keep any cocks and hens. - A. Yes, I kept four hens and one cock.

Q. Did you keep them in the yard. - A. They were taken from the roost, they roosted upon the coalshed door, they had just gone to roost. A little before six I went into a neighbour's house; about half an hour after that a woman called at the door of the house that I was in, Mr. Miller, make haste home, there are theives in the house robbing you. I instantly went home, I saw the house full of people and among them was the prisoner. He was charged with killing three fowls; when I saw him two hens and the cock were laying at his feet.

Q. Did you know the poultry to be yours. - A Yes.

MARY MILLER . Q. Are you the wife of the other witness. - A. Yes, we keep a coal-shed . I was standing in my shop, I heard the fowls flutter, I went into my yard, I saw the cock laying on the ground by the coal-shed door dead; I saw the prisoner walk down to the bottom of the yard, trying to get out, with a hen in each hand, they were dead, I saw them alive just before I saw the prisoner. I secured the prisoner myself; as he was getting out of the yard he tumbled over a board of the fence that was down, and I held him down.

Q. What was the value of the cock and the hens. - A. They are valued at seven shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did you know this cock and hen to be yours. - A. Yes, I bred them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated with liquor. I did not know what I did, I have lived fourteen years in the neighbourhood, I always got my living by hard work.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-63

318. JONAS PARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , a bread cake, value 1 s. and half pound weight of cakes, value 1 s. 6 d. the

property of John Bridgeman and George Byfield .

ELIZABETH HAYWARD . I live with Mr. John Bridgman and George Byfield , they keep a confectioner's shop , No. 6, Vere-street, Oxford-street . The prisoner came in the shop and asked for a diet-bread cake, and half a pound of cakes; I gave them to him; he told me to set them down to lady Chambers, 43, Mortimer-street.

Q. You trusted him with the cakes believing him to come from lady Chambers. - A. Yes. He came on the following day and had a diet cake.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am butler to lady Chambers.

Q. Did the prisoner live at lady Chamber's. - A. Never to my knowledge; I know nothing of the man,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-64

319. JONAS PARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , four pound weight of butter, value 5 s. the property of John Wilson .

- WHEELER. I am servant to John Wilson , a cheesemonger in Oxford-market . On the 21st of November, in the middle of the day, the prisoner came into the shop and asked if we served lady Chambers; I told him we did not, she formerly was a customer. He told me the family was just come to town, they wanted butter for use directly; I asked him what sort, he said a lump of fresh, and two pound of the best salt; he said he was going strait home, he would take it in his hands, the cook was waiting for them; I delivered him the butter.

Q. You parted with it with your own free consent - A. I did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-65

320. JONAS PARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , two pound weight of wax candles, value 7 s. the property of Elizabeth Baker .

GEORGE FISH . I am apprentice to Mrs Baker, she is a wax chandler . On Saturday the 28th of February, the prisoner came into the shop for two pound weight of wax candles for lady Chambers; I replied we had not the pleasure of serving the lady a long time; he said no, he knew we had not. I asked him what size they were to be; he said sixes, and set them down. I then set them down, and by his ready reply I let him have them.

Q. Would you have let him have them if you had not thought he came from lady Chambers. - A. No, I thought I had done wrong; I followed him till he had gone past lady Chambers's house in Mortimer-street, then I took him by the collar and demanded the candles; he gave them me. I told him he must go back with me, he said he would not; we scuffled, and he got from me; he run back towards Cavendish-square, he fell over a child; we there scuffled, he got from me again; I at last took him back to the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-66

321. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , three quarters of a yard of Irish poplin, value 1 s. 3 d. part of a vallens of a bed, value 6 d, and a quarter of a yard of poplin, value 6 d. the property of George Stoddart .

GEORGE STODDART . I am a surveyor , I live in Park-place, Mary-bone .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, she was my servant , she had only been in my service ten days; the property was found in her box. I searched the box in her presence, I told her she was a thief.

Q. Upon looking into her box did you see these three articles. - A. Yes, she asked me if I would forgive her, as I had the articles back. I refused to do that; I said I must appeal to the laws of my country.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to live with this gentleman; I wrote a letter to a friend the place did not suit me; he opened my letter. I had no box in his house; I know nothing at all of these things.

Prosecutor. It is true she had no box, it was her mistresses' box which she had lent her; I found the things in that box with her wearing apparel.

Jury. Do you know whether at the time the box was delivered to her, there was any thing in the box. - A. That I cannot swear to; the box was delivered to her by Mrs. Stoddart.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-67

322. ELIZABETH LEOPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. the property of Heny Dewhurst .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated ; - the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-68

323. SAMUEL CRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , a velvet pall, value 21 s. the property of Thomas Bethell .

SARAH ANN BETHELL . I am the wife of Thomas Bethell , he is an undertaker in Ratcliff High-street . On Tuesday the 10th of March the prisoner came to my house and asked me if my husband was at home, I answered no he asked me if my husband had left him out a three foot pall, he said his name was Jones, my husband knew him very well, he had seen my husband the morning before, and he had promised to go to him, to know what he should want to finish the funeral, and said my husband had not been to him, he had waited till the last minute, the funeral was ready to set off; would I please to let him have the pall, I answered yes. I let him have it, and he took it away with him. When my husband came home, my husband informed me that he had never sent him.

Q. Did you ever find your pall again. - A. Never.

Q. Did you know the man before. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-69

324. ALEXANDER GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , two leather boots, value 14 s. the property of Thomas Freason .

THOMAS FREASON . I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 3, Cranbourn-street ; I lost the boots on the 28th of March, about a quarter after four in the afternoon; the prisoner came and took them down, they were hanging outside of the door post. I saw him take them down, I immediately came out of the shop, and took him within twenty yards of the shop. I brought him back to the shop and took him to the public office.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in my right senses when

I did this act; I have been subject to fits these eight years, and after the fit it flies into my head, so that I do not know what I do for two or three days.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-70

325. PHILIP HALLET was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 25th of February , a pair of candlesticks, value 8 s. two pair of snuffers, value 1 s. six japan waiters, value 9 s. four japan tea pots, value 20 s. and a coffee pot, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , Jonathan Higgins , John Walk , and Thomas Walk ; being the goods whereof James Palmer , James Ratcliffe , and - Lindon, at the assizes in the county of Warwick were convicted of stealing, the said Phillip Hallet , well knowing the same to be stolen .

Second count for like offence, the property of Thomas Ward and William Hunt .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS WARD . - Mr. Knapp. Who are you in partnership with. - A. William Hunt , we are japanner s.

Q. Had you received any order from a customer in London. - A I received an order for an assortment of japannery of Mr. Aaron Norton in London.

Q. What articles did you pack up. - A. Candlesticks, snuffers, japanned waiters, tea pots, and coffee pots; I sent them by Pickford's boat, I delivered them myself to Mr. Pickford's porter. On Saturday the 21st of February I packed them up in three boxes clipped with iron; the boxes were marked, A No. 1, 2 and 3.

Q. Afterwards from information that you received, were any persons taken up on that charge of stealing these articles. - A. I know nothing of that; I attended upon the trial of that.

Q. You were present at the trial at Warwick, what was their names. - A. I do not recollect.

JOHN NICOL . - Mr. Knapp. You produce the copy of the record of the conviction of Palmer, Ratcliffe, and Lindon. - A. Yes, I got the copy from Mr. Nicolls the clerk of the indictments. I compared it with the original, it is correct. (The copy of the conviction read in court.)

JACOB NORTON . - Mr. Knapp. Did you receive the invoicse of these goods. - A. Yes, this is the invoice.

Q. (to Ward) Look at the invoice and tell me whether that is the invoice of these goods. - A. It is my own hand writing.

Q. (to Norton) From whence did you receive the invoice. - A. By the post.

Q. (to Ward) Did you send it by the post. - A. Yes.

Court. All the things in the indictment are contained in the invoice. - A. The six waiters are not in the invoice.

Mr. Knapp. (to Norton) Were you the first person that unpacked them. - A. Yes, when I unpacked the box I found the deficiency, two pair of candlesticks, a coffee pot, and four tea pots; there was one coffee pot stand but not the coffee pot; the invoice contained the articles but not the box. I was the first person that opened it, the prosecutor was by when I opened it, and the invoice was looked at at the same time.

WILLIAM REECE . - Mr. Knapp. How old are you. - A. sixteen. I belong to the horses.

Q. Which vessel do you tow. - A. The Rose in June.

Q. Do you know Palmer. - A. Yes, he was half captain of the Queen of all Traders.

Q. Was that Pickford's vessel. - A. Yes. Lindon was half captain of the Rose in June; and Ratcliffe he was the other half captain of the Rose in June.

Q. Were these three persons tried and convicted at Warwick assizes. - A. Yes.

Q. Where do your boats first start. - A. I meet them at Newbolt upon Avon.

Q. Is that the place where the returned boats meet. - A. Yes.

Q. Then the boats that came from London to Newbolt, shift their property to the boats that come there. - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you saw about this box. - A. I saw Lindon go out of the cabin with a pair of pincers and a chissel, and Palmer came from the Queen of all Traders and helped him; they opened a large square box, clenched with iron; they took out some waiters, I do not know how many; four japanned tea pots, four candlesticks and a coffee pot; they brought the things into the cabin, and locked them up; they fastened the box again. I saw nothing else till we came to Uxbridge; we stopped there and gave our horses some corn. We went into the Sawn and Bottle public house and had some beer. Hallett was was sitting at the other side of the house; Palmer went to him and talked with him a good while; we stopped there two hours, and then we started again. Hallett followed us, he came on board the Rose in June, a good bit below Cowley-lock, and then Lindon unlocked his cupboard and took the things out; he asked Hallett if he would buy them, he said yes, he did not care if he did; Hallett asked what was the price, Lindon said fifteen shillings; Lindon packed all up in a handkerchief, all but the four tea pots. The prisoner Hallett said they must go home with him; Ratcliffe had taken them out of the boat, they all three went together, I kept on, they came back again; Ratcliffe said he had got a spade-ace, that means a guinea. I afterwards told Mr. Lee.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You did not tell the prisoner when he came on board that the things were stolen. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-71

326. DANIEL COOMBE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , a quartern loaf of bread, value 1 s. five loaves of bread, value 10 d. and eight pound weight of flour , value 2 s. the property of James Johnson .

JAMES JOHNSON . I am a baker , 271, in the Strand .

Q. What do you accuse this man of. - A. Of taking one quartern loaf, five two-penny ones, and eight pound weight of flour. On Monday the 6th

of April from information of this servant robbing me. I went to Bow-street.

Q. Was he a servant of yours. - A. Yes, I went to Bow street and took a police officer and made him open his box, a quartern loaf, one twopenny, and these two bags of flour, the box has been made on purpose.

Q. Do you believe it to be your property. - A. I do. I can swear to my own bread the same as you can to your own writing.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 72.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-72

327. MARY NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Frederick .

JOHN FREDERICK . I am a carpenter .

Q. Where did you lose your watch. - A. In Nightingale-lane on the 6th of April, between seven and eight in the morning.

Q. You had been up all night, were you drunk. - A. Not quite. I met her in the street and I went home with her and staid two or three hours, I went to sleep; when I awoke I took my watch and looked at it, she took it away, she said go to sleep again I will give it you; when I awoke again she was gone out of the room. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's and I found her in a house drunk.

- LEVY. I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged it with me on the 6th of April between ten and eleven o'clock.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me the watch instead of money, I returned to give him the duplicate, he was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-73

328. TIMOTHY DEALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , a bag, value 6 d. a travelling case, value 48 s. eleven silver locks, value 5 s. 6 d. three pieces of ribbon, value 5 s. a pocket book, value 6 d. two seven shilling pieces and six halfpence , the property of Thomas Wells .

JAMES DANIEL SHIPLEY . Q. How old are you. - A. Thirteen on the 3rd of September, I am servant to Thomas Wells , he is a pocket-book maker and small worker in silver . On Monday the 6th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I had with me a travelling case and fourteen shillings and threepence, it was in a green pocket-book, and eleven silver locks and three pieces of ribbon of my master's. I was going up Fleet-street , a coach came by, I run behind it, the prisoner ran behind the same coach that I did, the prisoner said I had better get up, I said I would rather not for fear of damaging the things; he said give me your bag to hold while you get up, I gave him my bag and got up behind, he was then by the hind wheel, and then he got to the front wheel, then he got to the horses, head and then he ran as fast as he could. I halloed out stop thief and got down; a gentleman stopped him between Buckingham-street and Viller's street; then he came up and said this is the child that the bag belongs to.

Mr. DOWNMAN. I am a taylor, I live in Church-court, Strand. On the evening of the 6th of April towards Charing cross, I heard the cry of stop thief by the boy, I saw the prisoner running with the bag as hard as he could, I laid hold of him, a gentleman came up, we charged him with taking the boy's bag, he had it in his hand; the prisoner asked what we stopped him for, the boy came up directly crying; he said the man had got his bag; we took him to Bow street.

GEORGE DENMAN . I live in Queen street, Grosvenor-square, I am a jeweller. I heard a boy cry stop thief, I saw the prisoner going as fast as he could towards Charing cross; the witness laid hold of him, perceiving he had a bag in his hand I took the bag away.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. The prisoner made no resistance. - A. No, he said it was the boy's property.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy asked me to hold the parcel while he got up behind the coach, I unfortunately consented; he had not got up long when the coachman cut with his whip, I ran away and called to the lad to go with me, whether he heard me, I do not know, when I missed the lad I would not give the parcel to any one but the right owner.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-74

329. JOSEPH HICKES was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 12th of August , eighty-nine pound weight of gunpowder, value 8 l. 18 s. the property of William Henry Tuesly , and Joseph Cooper , being part and parcel of the goods whereof Thomas Field and John King were tried and convicted in the county of Surry for feloniously stealing, the said Joseph Hickes well knowing it to be stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

WILLIAM HENRY TUESLY . - Mr. Walfard. You produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Field and King. - A. Yes, I have examined it, it is perfectly correct, I got it from Mr. Knapp's office. (The copy of the record read in court.)

Q. Mr. Tuesly, do you recollect at any time losing any quantity of gun powder. - A. I lost three or four hundred pound weight of it in July 1806. I did not miss it till the 6th of August when we took stock. In consequence of the loss of the powder I applied to a magistrate. In the month of August I was sent for to Whitechapel office, there I saw Hall and the two persons that have been convicted, and the prisoner; they were in custody.

THOMAS GRIFFITH . - Mr. Walford. You are an officer of Lambeth-street office. - A. I am. In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, I called on him, I told him I had an information of his receiving some gunpowder; going to the office, I asked him if he had sold any gunpowder, he said he had, he said it was brought to him by a man in a smock frock; he said he did not know where to find him, he had seen him but once; some time before then he brought a quantity of gunpowder to him, he

said gave a shilling a pound for it, I asked him if he kept any for his own use, I know he went a shooting at times, he said he had about two pounds, it was in his bedroom upon the coppers; he meant a heap of halfpence; I went to the prisoner's house, I saw his wife, I told her I would thank her to go along with me, her husband had sent me for some gunpowder; she took a candle and went up immediately; she said that she had moved it from the halfpence on the drawers; she gave me a pound in one paper, and about a pound in an other paper; it was sealed up in this form (producing it).

Q. What is the prisoner at the bar. - A. He kept the Hampshire Hog in Rosemary-lane at that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. That gunpowder that is there was not sent down to Kingston. - A. It was not, it was in my possession.

Q. (to prosecutor) Was there any evidence given by the accomplice of what had been sold to Hickes. A. None whatever; all the evidence that was given was forty-eight pound sold to Bulkely, and the remainder Field sold to somebody, but to whom Field took it Hale did not know.

Mr. Gurney. I submit to your lordship, that makes an end of this indictment.

ABRAHAM HALE . - Mr. Walford. Were you concerned with Field and King at any time in taking gunpowder from your master. - A. Yes, in June we all three met, we told John Field there was a board knocked down by the horses in the stable, that led into the warehouse, where the gunpowder was; Thomas Field and I went in the next morning, Field took the gunpowder away, King was not present, he had part of the money for knocking the board up again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How many different times did you take gunpowder from that warehouse. - A. Three different times.

Q. Was any part of what you stole at any time sold to Hickes, within your knowledge. - A. No, not to the best of my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-75

330. MARY STAFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , two silver tea spoons, value 4 s. part of a pair of scissars, value 6 d. three shirts, value 5 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. a tablecloth, value 5 s. and one shilling , the property of Richard Lane .

RICHARD LANE . I live at 24, North Audley-street , I am a surgeon , the prisoner was my servant .

Q. Did you at any time lose any silver tea spoons, shirts, stockings, and tablecloth. - A. Yes, on the 28th of February.

Q. Did you miss all the things that are in the indictment at one time. - A. I did I went to Marlborough-street, the officer returned with me, and found part of the articles on her person. I was present when they found a silver bow of a pair of scissars, a shilling and a tea spoon. I found the other things in her box.

Prisoner. I would ask my master if he did not lose any thing before I went into his service. - A. I believe the day before she came into my service, that very day she was on a visit to one of my servants.

JAMES KENNEDY . Q. You are an officer of Marlborough-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search the prisoner. - A. I did; when I first went in she dropped a tea spoon upon the parlour carpet; after we had charged her with robbing her master, Burton searched her pockets in my presence, and found a silver bowl of a pair of scissars; she directed me to her box below stairs, I brought it up stairs, I asked her if it was hers, she said it was; I found a silver spoon, a shirt, a pair of stockings, and some handkerchiefs of Mr. Lane's.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Lane always told us to keep a spoon in our pockets to stir the tea in the morning, because she had lost so many; the other things I bought of a servant that lived there.

Prosecutor. That servant left us because of indisposition; the prisoner knew where she was gone to.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-76

331. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March , a sword-case bolt, value 1 s. 6 d. one other sword-case bolt, value 1 s. 6 d. a piece of board, value 6 d. an iron bolt, value 1 s. a wooden clothes horse, value 1 s. and a piece of brass plate, value 1 d. the property of John Taylor Thompson , William Thompson , and James Steward Thompson .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES STEWARD THOMPSON . Q. What are the names of your partners. - A. John Taylor Thompson and William Thompson , we are coachmaker s in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square ; the prisoner worked for us about two years.

RICHARD BURTON . Q. You are a police officer. A. Yes; I searched the prisoner's apartments, No. 8, George-street, Portland chapel. I found this bolt in the cupboard door, and this on the bureau bedstead door; I found this iron bolt in the fireplace, it was made use of as a poker; this piece of board was under the table, and this clothes horse was under the bed; a small bit of brass I found in his chest at the shop, and a pair of small hinges.

Q. Was the chest locked. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You found a vast deal in this man's house; is that a sword-case bolt, it seems to be a handle of a door, this you found on a cupboard. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the prosecutor's name stamped on them. - A. No.

Q. What is that thing you call a poker, that was in the dust hole, I suppose. - A. No, in the fireplace.

Q. There was no concealment at all of any of these things. - A. No.

JANE EDWARDS . - Mr. Gurney. Do you live at No. 8, George-street, Portland chapel. - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner for some time past lodged in your house. - A. For four months he occupied the first floor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. I believe from what you saw, the man conducted himself honestly and soberly. - A. Yes.

CHARLES THOMPSON . - Mr. Gurney. Did you go with the officer to search the prisoner's lodgings. A. Yes.

Q. I believe you assist in your brother's business. A. Yes.

Q. First of all look at these sword-case bolts, are they properly described. - A. They are, and they are the property of my brother. I have given such out to the men; I have no doubt of all the articles being my brother's property.

Court. Are you able to swear that that board has ever been in your brother's manufactory. - A. I cannot swear to that, we have similar boards.

Mr. Alley. Are you a married man. - A. No.

Q. A married man can point out every beauty spot in his wife, can you point out any beauty spot or mark on them articles. - A. I can only swear to these hinges, they are made on purpose for my brother.

Q. Is not there ten thousand pair of the same sort, is there any mark upon them that you know them by. - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-77

332. ELIZABETH GRADY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , three silver forks, value 9 s. two silver table spoons, value 10 s. and a key, value 1 d. the property of John Hubert .

ANN HUBERT . I am the wife of John Hubert , I live in Bennet-street, St. James's . On the 13th of February my servant left me, and then she said she missed three silver forks and two table spoons, my servant had the care of them.

Q. Did you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she was a servant to one of my lodgers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. This young woman conducted herself very well. - A. Yes. I beg to observe it was not my intention to prosecute her.

JOHN CLARK . I am a jeweller, Dorset-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I cannot say I do. In February a silver fork and spoon was brought to my shop and left with my servant for my approbation who brought; or who took it away, I do not know.

JAMES KENNEDY . On the 27th of March, I searched the prisoner's box; I found this small key, the prosecutrix said it was her's; the prisoner had three other keys, she said she took it by mistake.

(The property produced and identified.)

LOUISA ANN BETTSWORTH . I lived servant with Mrs. Hubert.

Q. Had you the care of her plate. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any thing to say to the prisoner at the bar respecting these forks and spoons. - A. No, I did not suspect that she had taken them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-78

333. RICHARD CADDLE, alias CATTLE , was indicted for feloniously stealing fourteen pound weight of copper, the property of Peter Wetton , affixed to a coach-house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be affixed to a certain building.

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-79

334. ELIZABETH PURCEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , thirteen guineas, a half guinea and seven shillings , the property of Michael Kelly .

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a labourer .

Q. Did you at any time lose thirteen guineas and a half and some silver. - A. It was a friend's money that I had to remit to Ireland. I lodged in the same room with the prisoner and her husband in Bembridge-street, St. Giles's .

Q. Where both your beds in the same room. - A. Yes; the money was in my fob, it belonged to this woman's husband, she made bold and took it; if it had been my property I dare say she would not have took it, but as it was his property she took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-80

335. JOHN SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of February , an ox, value 18 l. and two heifers, value 20 l. the property of Joseph Hughes .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

The prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-81

336. DENNIS DEMPSEY was indicted for that he upon one Patrick How deceased, who had served our Lord the King on board the Eurus, and to whom certain prize money was due, unlawfully did take a false oath in order to receive the said prize money; that he the said Dennis Dempsey believed that Patrick How died a bachelor without parent, and that he was the natural brother by the half blood and only next of kin, whereas in truth and fact the said Dennis Dempsey well, knew that he was not the natural brother by the half blood, and only next of kin . And

Several other counts for like offence, with like intention.

EDWARD BATE , ESQ. - Mr. Pooley. You are the deputy treasurer of Greenwich hospital. - I am.

Q. Have you got the prize list. - A. I have got the prize-list returned to me by the prize agent upon oath.

Court. It is the original. - A. It is. This is the prize-list that was sent to me by the agent upon oath.

Mr. Pooley. It contains the names of those that are claimed and those that are unclaimed, that in your hand is the official documents. - A. It is.

Q. Do you upon that document pay and receive. - A. Certainly.

Q. Have you the name of Patrick How in that list. A. I have.

Q. Does it appear whether any money was due to Patrick How in that list as part of prize-money. - A. There appears to be 24 l. 1 s. 6 d.

Q. How is Patrick How described in that list. - A. He is described supernumerary private.

Court. What is the meaning of private. - A. Private soldier.

Q. What is the meaning of supernumerary. - A. Not belonging to the ship's company.

Q. That distinguishes him from a marine on board. - A. It does.

Mr. Pooley. Does it purport that twenty-four pounds one shilling and sixpence was due to him as prize-money. - A. It does, it is marked as unclaimed, and you will find that it is refunded.

Court. Here is in the list an officer of the name of Hutchinson, and his prize-money is no more than a private. - A. No; they are all supernumeraries, they have no regard to supernumeraries.

Q. They make no part of the ship's complement. A. None in the least.

Q. Then when they are called supernumerary sergeant, it is not that he is a sergeant of the marines. - A. No, only the rank; all the supernumeraries on board are entitled to a private seaman's share, twenty-four pounds, one shilling and six-pence; they are put upon that class.

SAMUEL HINMAN . - Mr. Gurney. In what situation are you. - A. I am clerk in the navy office.

Q. Have you the muster-book of his Majesty's ship the Eurus of the year 1796. - A. I have.

Q. You bring it from the navy office, where they are deposited. - A. I do.

Q. Will you have the goodness to look whether the name of Patric How appears on the month of October, November, and December. - A. I find Patric How borne upon the November list as a private of the 87th regiment; and from the 15th of October to the 11th of November 1796, he appears on board the Eurus.

Court. That is not quite a month. - A. It is not a calendar month.

Mr. Gurney. If any prize was taken at that time he was on board, he would have a share of it. - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him after that. - A. He was disembarked at Spithead with the rest of the party afterwards, on the 11th of November 1796.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS : Q. I believe you are in the commissary-general's department. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the muster-rolls of the eighty-seventh regiment, 1796 and 1797. - A. I have.

Q. Does the name of Patrick How appear there in the months of October and November 1796. - A. Yes, a man of the name of Patrick How was received from the sixty-third regiment on the 26th of July 1796; the date of his death is the 12th of October 1797, and then returned that he died; the muster-roll is dated Domingo, Fort Charlotte, St. Lucie.

JOHN PRIOR WARD. - Mr. Knapp. You are clerk in Mr. Isherwood's office, a proctor in Doctors'-commons. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your office on the 22nd of May last. - A. Yes, I think it was on that day.

Q. Was there any body in his company. - A. Yes, a person who had been with me to take out letters of administration.

Q. What name did that person go by. - A. I think it was George Addy .

Q. Had you any reason to know afterwards whether his name was George Addy . - A. I afterwards saw him tried by the name of Knight; they came together.

Q. Tell us what they came for, and what passed. A. When they came, I think Addy spoke first, who said that he had brought the prisoner to administer; I then, speaking to the prisoner, asked him to whom; he (the prisoner) said to his brother-in-law, he was on board the Eurus when she took the prize; he stated that he died in the West Indies.

Court. Did he state that he wanted to administer to his brother. - A. He did. I then asked him the deceased's name, he said Patrick How ; he said there was due to him twenty-four pounds, one shilling and six-pence when the Eurus took the prize; I asked him what capacity he was in, he described him as a private in the eighty-seventh regiment; I asked him whether the deceased had ever been married, he said no, that he had died a bachelor; I asked him if there was any father or mother alive, he answered they were both dead; I then asked him what relation he was, he said he was his brother; I asked him his name, he replied Dennis Dempsey . I then asked him how he could be the brother, as the deceased was of one name and he of another; he replied he was the half brother by the same mother, but two fathers; I asked him if there were any other brother or sister, he said no, there had been others, they were all dead. I then prepared the usual warrant leading the administration, and went with him before the surrogate, Dr. Charles Coote , and the usual oath upon granting administration was administered to him before the surrogate.

Q. What are the terms of that oath. - A. It is a verbal oath; the tenor of it is - you swear that you believe Patrick How died a died a bachelor, intestate, without parent, that you are his natural and lawful brother by the half blood, and only next of kin; that you will exhibit a true inventory, and render a just account of your administration if by law required, and that you believe the personal property of the decased not to amount in value to forty pounds, so help you God.

Q. That is the usual oath administered to all persons coming for administration. - A. It is.

Q. And that oath was administered on this occasion to the person stating himself so related. - A. It was. Afterwards I accompanied him and the person so describing himself to be Mr. Addy, into the prerogative office, where the prisoner and his sureties executed the usual bond.

Court. Who was the security. - A. Addy.

Mr. Knapp. That person afterwards turned out to be Knight. - A. Yes.

Q. This is the usual bond. - A. It is. That being done, he went away for that day, and the administration was made out. In the course of conversation on this business, the prisoner stated that every thing was very fair, he was well known at Greenwich; he said he was a pensioner at Greenwich hospital. I delivered the letter of administration to him on the 23d, or the morning of the 24th, I cannot

state which, he did come and had the admininistration.

Q. Now, looking round at the prisoner, tell my lord and the jury whether you entertain any doubt of his being the person that came to you. - A. None in the least.

Q. Is there any thing particular about his person that you observed that would strengthen that. - A. He has but one leg; I observed that at the time.

Q. You have no sort of a doubt about it. - A. No doubt at all. When he came to Bow-street, I said Dempsey are you here; he asked me how I did.

WILLIAM BERRY . Q. Have you got the warrant leading the administration. - A. I have, I brought it from the prerogative office, it is signed by Dr. Charles Coote .

DR. CHARLES COOTE . - Mr. Pooley. Be so good as to look at that paper. - A. I wrote this in the month of May last; I am the surrogate to sir William Wynne .

Q. You heard Mr. Ward examined. - A. Yes. I cannot say that I have the smallest recollection of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Would a person so circumstanced and so related as Dempsey stated himself to be, have that oath administered to him which Mr. Ward has represented to have been given before administration. - A. It is the usual oath. (The warrant read.)

JEREMIAH BIRKWOOD . - Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I am a clerk to the register in the prerogative office.

Q. Have you the bond which you bring from that office. - A. I have.

Q Are you the subscribing witness to that bond. A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the person that executed that bond. - A. I cannot undertake to say.

Q. Who was with him. - A. One apparently of the name of George Addy .

Q. All that you know Mr. Birkwood is, that a person of the name of Dennis Dempsey executed that bond together with his security, that is George Addy . - A. Yes.

Q. (to Ward) You were present at the time that bond was executed. - A. Yes, I was present at the time, I accompanied him to the office.

Q. The prisoner at the bar is the person. - A. He is. (The bond read).

ROBERT ADKINS . - Mr. Pooley. Look at that paper, did you serve a copy of that notice on the prisoner. - A. I did, on Thursday last. (Notice read.)

JOHN ELLINGTON . - Mr. Knapp. You are clerk to Mr. Smith, who is clerk of the check at Greenwich hospital. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember on the 24th of May last any application made by the prisoner at the bar. - A. I remember the prisoner coming several times to the office, making applications; I cannot particularly recollect in May.

Q. Was Mr. Smith by at the time. - A. Mr. Smith was in the office at the time the application was made.

Q. Was it in the spring of last year. - A. I remember his coming to the office on the 1st of July.

Q. That was the second time, had he not been there previous. - A. He had, it might be a month or six weeks before; he then said he came to claim the prize-money due to Patrick How , who had served on board the Eurus, as a soldier belonging to the eighty-seventh regiment.

Q. At that time when he came to make this claim, did he produce any administration to you. - A. He did, as far as I can recollect; in consequence of there having been several applications for the same ship from different persons I took him to Mr. Smith before I examined the prize-list. Mr. Smith asked him several questions, and took down memorandums. I recollect his coming to the office again on the 1st of July; I made out the usual certificate.

Q. Before the money can be paid the certificate must be made out. - A. Yes.

Q. That is the usual one. - A. Yes; and here is a petition attached to it, which I saw the prisoner sign. and this certificate on the 3d of July was signed by Mr. Smith, and given to the prisoner, I think, by myself.

Q. Did you see Mr. Smith sign it. - A. I cannot recollect seeing him sign it.

Q. Upon that certificate being granted that would be an authority for some one to pay it. - A. It would.

Court. Where would it go then. - A. It would go to the treasurer's office, and they would pay it.

Mr. Knapp. Look round at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you entertain any doubt of his being the person. - A. None in the least. (The petition read.)

MR. RICHARD SMITH . Q. I believe you are clerk at Greenwich hospital. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to you at any time. - A. I do; on the 24th of May he was brought into the room by the last witness; Mr. Ellington stated that he came for prize-money due to Patrick How ; I asked the prisoner what his name was, he said Dennis Dempsey ; I asked him what relation he was to Patrick How , he said he was his half brother; I asked him if he had administered, he said he had, he produced to me the letter of administration; I asked him if he was the person named in the administration, he said he was, I then asked him where he was born; he said at Mount Merrick, Queen's county, Ireland; I asked him if he had any brother or sister, he said no, he had had brothers and sisters, but they were dead; I asked him if he could refer me to any person at Mount Merrick to whom he was known, he said he left Mount Merrick when he was young, and all his family were dead; he said his father was a cabinet maker, and had kept a public house; I asked him particularly about his father's and mother's name, he said his father's name was Murteagh, and his mother Eleanor, aud that they were dead. I then said there must be certainly somebody in the place that would certainly remember something of his family. He then mentioned the reverend divine, the parish priest, who was likely to know his father and mother; I told him I should write to make enquiry to know whether what he told me was true. When I told him that, he said if I had any doubts, he had some other proof; he produced two certificates, one of his own baptism, and the other of Patrick How , they were both of Mount Merrick, but I have no recollection who they were signed by.

Q. Do you recollect what these certificates contained. - A. They were general certificates of baptism, that such a person was born at Mount Merrick at such a time, and the other at such a time.

Q. Was one of them that Patrick How that was born at such a time, that you forgot. - A. Yes; Patrick How was born in the year 1773, and himself in the year 1770; I asked him how he came by these certificates, he said that he had been over to Ireland to obtain them, not above a month ago from that time; I asked him as he had been to Ireland so recently, if he had not found any body that knew him, some of his old acquaintances or relations; he said he had not found any body that knew him, as he went away at such an early age, they were all dead. I told him to call in a fortnight's time, when I might hear from Ireland, and if the account was correct it should be paid; I did write to Ireland, to our deputy treasurer, and there I could get no satisfaction; after that I wrote to the adjutant of the eighty-seventh regiment. The prisoner came several times and was extremely angry that the money was not immediately paid him; in the mean time I had a description of Patrick How , of the eighty-seventh regiment, that induced me to pay him. I signed the certificate on the 3d of July, that was the day it was given to him, and that appears to be the day on which it was paid.

Court. Upon the strength of the letter of administration and his own representation you paid him, you supposed him to be entitled. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You supposing him to be entitled you made that order. - A. Yes, the description he gave, and the description I received of Patrick How from the adjutant, tallied; and because the man had been a pensioner of Greenwich hospital, and we always take down the description, and that together with the administration made me pay it.

Court. He was an out pensioner. - A. He was an in pensioner first, and was afterwards discharged an out pensioner upon the chest; he was an out pensioner of the chest, at the time he applied at the hospital, of seven pound a year.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know of Dorrington the officer being sent to Liverpool. - A. I do, I went to the office and made the application; I knew he was at Liverpool, I had a letter from him.

Q. Was it to apprehend the prisoner. - A. Yes, upon this charge.

Q. Did you afterwards see the prisoner at the bar, in the presence of Dorrington at Bow-street. - A. I did.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the person who had been brought from Liverpool upon this charge. - A. Yes, as I understood.

Q. Was you present when Dorrington gave the account of what he said at Liverpool. - A. Yes.

Q. It was reduced to writing. - A. Yes, I heard it read in the presence of the prisoner.

ROBERT SMITH . - Mr. Pooley. You are clerk in the treasurer's office at Greenwich. - A. I am.

Q. Have you got the certificate to pay twenty-four pound one shilling and sixpence. - A. I have.

Q. Who brought that certificate to you. - A. The prisoner at the bar, Dempsey.

Q. Are you certain that he is the man. - A. I am certain.

Q. Upon that certificate being produced to you, did you pay him any money. - A. I did; twenty. four pound one shilling and sixpence, first entering it in the usual book kept for that purpose. It was on the 3d of July 1806, he signed the entry in the book, (entry read in court).

JOHN STAFFORD . - Mr. Knapp. You are chief clerk at Bow-street office. - A. I am.

Q. You had a person of the name of Dorrington, who was one of the officers of Bow-street. - A. Yes.

Q. He was dispatched down to Liverpool to apprehend the prisoner at the bar. - A. He was, upon this charge.

Q. Did Dorrington bring the prisoner from Liverpool to Bow-street office. - A. He certainly brought him to the office, and said to be from Liverpool.

Q. Was the prisoner's examination and the depositions of the different witnesses taken in writing before the magistrate, Mr. Read. - A. Yes.

Q. What was the christian name of Dorrington. - A. John Dorrington .

Q. Did John Dorrington give that in evidence which you took in writing from him. - A. Yes, in the prisoner's presence.

Q. Was it taken in the prisoner's presence, and in his hearing, so that he could hear what Dorrington said. - A. Yes, the prisoner's examination was taken first in writing, then after what the prisoner had said, Dorrington's examination was taken; Dorrington contradicted the prisoner, he said this cannot be true, because you told me such and such things at Liverpool; I was not aware of that fact before.

Q. And then it was that Dorrington gave the account that you took down at the time he gave it. - A. Yes.

Q. And the examination which was taken down of the prisoner, and the examination which was taken down of Dorrington, were taken before Mr. Read the magistrate. - A. Yes.

Q. And signed by the prisoner. - A. Yes, his own examination; and signed by Dorrington his own examination; and both of them were signed by Mr. Read.

Q. As you were present Mr. Stafford at the examination, was there any thing said to induce him to state what you took in writing. - A. Nothing was, he never attempted to deny the fact of taking the administration out; he said that he was the person entitled to take it out.

Q. Dorrington I believe is since dead. - A. He is, I did not see him dead, his widow attended at the office.

Prisoner. When Dorrington took me at Liverpool, he put me in the goal, he came personally himself and another officer that belonged to Liverpool; he gave me four glasses of liquor, then he brought me privately in a parlour, privately by themselves; if I was dying this moment it is the truth, they offered me five guineas.

WILLIAM YORK . - Mr. Knapp. You are the brother in-law of John Dorrington , who was a police officer of Bow-street. - A. I am.

Q. Is he dead or alive. - A. He is dead sir, he died the 3d of February last.

Q. Did you see him dead. - A. I did.

Q. (to Mr. Stafford.) This appters to be Dempsey's examination, is that the one that was taken before Mr. Read the day it bears date. - A. It was.

Court. There was nothing said to him wishing him to give any account of that transaction, was it his own desire to do it. - A. It was.

Q. It appears to be signed by Dempsey and by Mr. Read the magistrate. - A. It was, I saw them both sign it.

Mr. Knapp. That was taken previous to Dorrington's examination. - A. It was, the prisoner gave this as a sort of defence it was his own act. I do not know that he wished to have it reduced to writing, it was read over to him twice and it has been read over to him since, and he signed it. (The examination read.)

Q. Look at Dorringron's information and tell me whether you saw it signed by Dorrington and by Mr. Read. - A. I did.

Q. Did you administer an oath to Dorrington upon that occasion. - A. I did. (Read in court.)

Middlesex to wit. The information of John Dorrington , Public office, Bow street. He being upon oath faith, that he apprehended the prisoner Dennis Dempsey at Liverpool, and when he had the prisoner in custody at the Golden Lion, he said it was all a forgery and that Knight had led him into it. Informant had frequently asked Dempsey whether he knew where Gibbons was, told him he would give him five pounds if he would tell him, but particularly cautioned him not to say any thing about himself; he said he did not know where Gibbons was; informant told him he did want him to make a mistake, he did not want him to say any thing of himself but Gibbons. He said it was a forgery, that Patrick How was not his brother, that Knight came to his lodgings and teazed him to go and do it; he then did it and he was sorry for it; signed J Dorrington. Before me, I. Read.

Mr. Gurney (to Stafford.) When Dorrington signed it did you ask him whether the contents of this was true - A. Yes, he said it was, in the presence of Mr. Read the chief magistrate of the office.

THOMAS DIGAN . - Mr. Gurney. Where do you live when you are at home. - A. In Queen's county, Ireland.

Q. How near do you live to Mount Merrick. - A. A little better than a mile.

Q. How long have you lived there. - A. I have lived in that part above twenty years.

Q. How much more than twenty years. - A. Ever since I was born, near sixty years. I have lived there and thereabouts all my life.

Q. Do you know of any persons of the name of Murteagh Dempsey and Eleanor Dempsey living thereabouts. - A. I do.

Q. Are they man and wife. - A. They are, they live in a place called the Red-house.

Q. How long have you known Eleanor. - A. On or about forty years.

Q. What was her name when you first knew her. - A. Eleanor Maclong .

Q. Was that her maiden name. - A. It was the name that ever I heard for her.

Q. How old do you think she was when you first knew her. - A. She may be between thirteen and sixteen, she was a girl. She then was an apprentice to a mantua-maker at Mount Merrick.

Q. Do you remember her being married to Murteagh Dempsey . - A. I remember hearing of it.

Q. Was she ever married to any body before she was married to Murteagh Dempsey . - A. Not that I heard of.

Q. Did you ever hear of her being married to a man of the name of How. - A. I never did.

Q. Has she always lived thereabouts or has she been out of the country. - A. Always within Mount Merrick or within three miles.

Q. Have you always lived in the country close by her. - A. Always.

Q. Do you remember whether Murteagh Dempsey and Eleanor had any children. - A. I do, I never knew but two sons, I heard there was another son, he went abroad.

Q. Do you remember hearing of one of their sons that had been to sea coming home some years ago. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard that one of their sons had an accident. - A. Yes, lost a leg.

Q. Where. - A. I do not know where, not about Merrick.

Q. You had not known him before that. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. You saw him when he came home and had lost his leg. - A. I did.

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether he is that person. - A. He is the person that passed for Dempsey's son, whether he is the son I cannot say.

Q. How long is it since he returned. - A. About four or five years ago, I cannot be positive; then he staid some little time and went away again.

Q. Has he ever come back again. - A. I never saw him in the place again.

Q. Is Murteagh Dempsey and Eleanor Dempsey living now. - A. They were when I left the place.

Q. When did you leave the place. - A. On the 30th of March.

Q. Mr. Stafford came over and brought you. - A. He did.

Q. When the prisoner was over there four or five years ago did he tell you where he lost his leg. - A. No. I had very little conversation with him.

Q. You told me that you never heard any body say that Eleanor had ever been married to any body but Murteagh, was Murteagh ever married to any body but Eleanor. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Have you all your life lived near the prisoner's father and mother. - A. Pretty nigh some time; I often saw them in the course of that time.

Prisoner. Be so kind as to say whether you heard me call Eleanor and Murteagh father and mother. - A. I never did.

Court. What reason have you for calling the prisoner their son. - A. He passed for their child.

Q. You have given no account how you came to know him. - A. I never knew him till he came home after he had lost a leg.

Q. You thought him to be their son, did you use to visit the family. - A. No.

Q. Were you ever in company with the prisoner. - A. I do not think that I ever sat down in his company.

Q. Did you ever see him with this Murteagh and

Eleanor. - A. I do not recollect that I ever saw him in their company.

Q. What is it makes you say he was one of their sons. - A. Because he passed for one of their sons when he came home and had a wooden leg. I asked when I saw him, they told me he was the son of Murteagh Dempsey.

Q. Did you ever know any body of the name of How. - A. I did. I knew him in the village where I lived.

Q. Did you know any other persons, a neighbour at Mount Merrick of the name of Murteagh Dempsey and Eleanor Dempsey . - A. No.

Q. And these two were living when you left Ireland in March. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Do you know whether the How that you know had any connection with the Dempsey's. - A. Not as I know of; his name was John How , he was a weaver; he left the place a year or two ago.

Q. You had no particular acquaintance with this family of Murteagh Dempsey, and Eleanor Dempsey . - A. No other then seeing them, meeting them, and passing them like a neighbour.

Prisoner's Defence (read in court). My lord, and gentlemen of the jury. I trust you will permit me to intrude upon your patience, while I make my defence, and relate to you my sad situation; and I trust that liberality which is shewn to other prisoners of my description, will be shewn to me; and that you will extend your humanity to an unprotected and moneyless man; far from his country and friends; and as your lordship's benovelence is often extended to unfortunate prisoners at this bar, I humbly hope my case will be taken into consideration; I have been in prison ever since Christmas last, upon suspicion of defrauding the next of kin to Patrick How , my brother in-law; who was the son of William How and Eleanor, and I am the son of Murteagh Dempsey and Eleanor, and brother by the half blood to the said Patrick How , and next of kin, and the legal representative upon whose death I took out letters of administration at Doctor's-commons; as the legal representative and next of kin to Patrick How , to which I conceived, I was legally entitled, having no brother or sister alive. I can solemnly assure you, that I have not took any step, or trick, or artifice, to take his money by any false pretence, or colour, or under any undue interest whatever; I went in my own name. I subscribed my own name, and did every act openly; nor was I ever conscious of doing any wrong. My lord, and gentlemen, I beg leave to suggest to you, that I fought with the deceased lord Nelson, in defence of my King and country; I have served eight years, both by sea and land. I trust from all the circumstances, you will see that I am an injured and oppressed man, and that you will extend your merciful compassion to me in my unprotected situation; I have only to rely on divine providence and you; and on that providence and you I rely with the utmost confidence for my deliverence from this prosecution.

Q. (to Digan) What business did Murteagh Dempsey follow. - A. A sawyer, and coarse carpenter; he kept a public house.

Q. You are sure that there were not two Murteagh Dempseys, that had wives of the name of Eleanor where he lived. - A Not that I heard or recollect.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18070408-82

337. CHARLES MERRITT, ALIAS MERRICK , EDWARD ROACH , and THOMAS HAYES , were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway on the 14th of March , up on James Bowler , putting him in fear, and taking from his person five guineas, six half guineas, eighteen seven shilling pieces, ten shillings, a bank note, value 10 l. two other bank notes, value 5 l each, ten bank notes value 2 l each and ten other bank notes value 1 l. each, the property of James Bowler .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES BOWLER . Q. You are a farmer. - A. Yes, I live at Preston, in the parish of Harrow . On Saturday the 14th of March I had been to town to sell my hay; I returned home in the evening on horseback. I had about me seventy pound in gold and bank notes

Q. In your way home what time did you get upon the top of Deadmans-hill. - A. About seven o'clock. I got off my horse to make a little water.

Q. Whereabouts is Deadmans-hill . - A. About six or seven mile from town, in the parish of Harrow. While I was off my horse four persons came up to me: a tall man went by me within a yard of me, I put my glove on; at the time he was going by, I had my foot on the stirrup and the other going over the horse, when I was pulled down by the men; the tall one came up, they did not ask me any thing at all, they all rifled my pockets; I was standing with my back to the horse, they searched all my pockets and took every thing they could; I stood quiet, I had no power to do any thing, they said not a word to me; when they all four had rifled my pockets, I said to them, gentlemen I hope you will not use me ill; I was then standing, and they all four around me; the tall man knocked me down directly; the blow cut me very much under my eye.

Court. You do not know whether it was his first or with a weapon. - A. I do not. Then after he had knocked me down they began thrashing of me.

Mr. Gurney. Are you quite sure it was the tall man that knocked you down. - A. Yes; I was laying on the ground when they thrashed me.

Q. Did they take from you all the money and notes - A. Yes, the money notes and all I had about me I had about a dozen little errands for my family in my pockets. I received many blows from them on my body; they beat me with sticks. They all went away; the tall man went away about three yards he came back, he said old man you have got a good great coat, he pulled it off; I was laying on the ground at the time. I was not able to get up, I saw him put it on, he turned back to me again, and put a pistol to my head, and said you rascal if you follow us a yard, we will blow your brains out.

Q. Had you seen a pistol before. - A. Yes, in the tall man's hand; he jobbed the pistol to the side of my head, and went away; they went towards London.

Q. How soon were you able to get up and get on your horse again. - A. I suppose in the space of five or ten minutes; when I go on my horse I went after them.

Q. Now during the time the men were robbing of you, did you or did you not look in their faces. - A. Yes; the tall man was dressed in a blue jacket and trowsers, like a sailor, with round nobby buttons, and a blue handkerchief round his neck; two of the others were in light brown, one a drab cloth, and the other a Bath coating; they had nothing over their faces.

Q. Now look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether either of them are the men that robbed you. - Q. Yes, they are the three.

Q. Which of them do you describe as the tallest. - A. Hayes, in the blue jacket; he came back and took my coat.

Court. Are you equally sure of them all. - A. I am equally as sure of one as I am of the other.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see them again - A. In about ten days.

Q. When you went after them to London, did you get sight of them again. - A. No; I met two friends on the road, it was light enough to see their faces. I saw four men at Shadwell office, and the three prisoners were among them; I knew them directly. Hayes was not dressed on the first examination as he was when he robbed me; the second and third examination he was dressed the same as when he robbed me. I had no doubt of their being three of the persons that robbed me. I knew them on the second examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have never been fortunate enough to recover your property. - A. No.

Q. You had never known these persons in your life before. - A. No.

Q. And the only opportunity that you had of observing their persons was, at the time they were robbing of you. - Q. Exactly.

Q. I think you were a good deal alarmed at four persons coming up to you. - A. I was not frightened, I was rather alarmed; I looked at them very much before they knocked me down.

Q. How much time might it take up while they were robbing of you. - A. About five minutes.

Q. Have you always been of the same opinion that you were equally sure with respect to all of them. - A. On the third examination I was.

Q. Then you were not certain at the first examination. - A. I was, but I did not mark them out; I only marked out Hayes and Merrit.

Q. Before you went to Shadwell office, had you given information to Bow-street office. - A. I did as well as I could on the Monday after the robbery.

Q. Did you describe their dress then as you have now. - A. I cannot tell, I was very ill, I described them as well as I could.

Q. You have now said the tall man was dressed in a blue coat. - A. Yes.

Q. Then if you have ever said he was dressed in a dark great coat that must be a mistake of your's. Are you quite correct when you stated to my learned friend just now, that at the time of the robbery, that the tall man put on the great coat - A. Yes.

Q. Have you always said so. - A. Yes.

Q. Then if you have ever said the short man put on the great coat that is a mistake too. - A. I never said so to my knowledge.

Q. Then if it is put down in the book so at Bow-street office there is a mistake somewhere. - A. There is a mistake somewhere, I never said so in my life.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. It was moon light. I am certain as to their persons.

EDWARD ROGERS . - Mr. Gurney. You are a police officer of Shadwell. - A. I am; I apprehended the prisoner Hayes, in company with Mr. Brown. On Saturday the 21st of March we took him in bed, at a place called Chiswell Hill, Ratcliffe Highway; there was laying by the bed a large great coat, such as riggers wear; he had a jacket which he put on under that, he had blue trowsers, there was a blue silk handkerchief laying by them. Brown and I apprehended Merrit in Essex-street, Whitechapel, commonly called Catherine Wheel-alley; he was in bed at the time. The coat which was joined to the rest of his clothes was a drab coloured coat. We took Roach on the Saturday following; he was in bed at a house in Parish-street, in the Borough; we took him to the office. Hayes was examined in a dark drab coat; on the second examination, Hayes was dressed in a blue jacket, without the long coat on.

Q. When the prosecutor came the first time, did he speak to any of them. - A. He pointed out Hayes and Merrit. On the second examination he pointed out the same men; he looked at Roach, but said he would take time to consider of him. On the third examination he swore positively to the three.

Q. Of course, being an officer, you know there is a forty pound reward. - A. Very well.

Q. You have not been able to discover any of the property. - A. None at all.

Hayes' Defence. I solemnly declare my innocence before God, and this court; I had no hand in the act, or part in it, nor was I ever on the road since I came in the world.

Merrit's Defence. I should not know my way to the place without asking; I declare I was not nigh the place.

Roach's Defence. I can say the same as they; I was never on the road in my life.

JOHN MILLER . - Mr. Knapp. You are an assistant clerk to Bow-street office. - A I am.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor coming to make any information relative of this robbery. - A. Yes, on the Monday after the robbery.

Q. Look at that book and tell me whether that is the information that you took from the prosecutor of the robbery. - A. Yes, the 16th of March 1807, Mr. James Bowler gave information that Saturday last he was robbed, as he was returning home from London by the seven mile stone, Harrow-road, he was stopped by four foot-pads; robbed of several papers, and nearly seventy pound. A tall man, had on a dark great coat, and there was another tall stout man, the other two were much shorter, and the shortest man had a round plump face; he said a fresh colour, but I did not put it down; thinks he should know them. One of the short men put his great coat on, which he can identify.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Now Miller, where was it you took this. - A. In the clerk's office.

Q. How many people were there talking. - A. Not many; it was about twelve o'clock.

Q. That is the busiest time of the day. - A. It did not happen to be then.

Q. Are you sure you are correct in all its parts. -

A. I am.

Q. You did not read it over to him. - A. No.

Court. It certainly would be much better to read it over to the party after you took it down.

Mr. Gurney. Are you sure that when you asked him for this description you are correct, that he said a short man put on the great coat. - A. I am.

THOMAS LANE . - Mr. Knapp. Are you servant to Mr. Messer. - A. I am a journeyman to Mr. Messer, a mathematical instrument maker, 155, Minories.

Q. You know the prisoner Merrit. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in his company on Saturday the 14th of March. - A. Yes, last Saturday four weeks, I was in company with him, at the sign of the Catherine Wheel, Essex-street, Whitechapel; and Cohen was there.

Q. Is that where he lodges. - A. No, he keeps a house facing of the Catherine Wheel ; I was in his company at the Catherine Wheel , from half past seven till half past eight; I am sure he was in the public house the time I was there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Be so good as to give me the reason that you knew it was the 13th of March, that you saw the prisoner at the Catherine Wheel . - A. You must understand that my wife's birth day was on the 17th; I can give you another instance, which will satisfy you further; there was a woman in the house, she asked Merrick to treat her with a glass of liquor, he denied it, he said he had a guinea in his pocket, it was as much as he could do to pay his way; Mrs. Merrick came in, and there was a little bit of jealously, Merrick struck his wife, she was turned out, and she broke one of the windows, and it is not mended yet. Mrs. Merrick came and asked me if I could remember when she broke the window, I said I could; it was the Saturday before St. Patrick's day.

Q. Can you remember all the people that were there. - A. Cohen and the landlord was there, and the woman servant.

BENJAMIN RANAGHAN . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am hair dresser, I live at No. 2, Essex-street, almost opposite the Catherine Wheel .

Q. Do you know the prisoner Merrick. - A. Yes, he is a neighbour.

Q. Do you remember shaving him on Saturday the 14th of March. - A I remember shaving him four weeks last Saturday, about seven o'clock, at my shop; I remember it perfectly, I saw him at the Catherine Wheel at eight o'clock, when I went over for my beer; he was in the tap-room at the Catherine Wheel .

Q. Have you any reason to recollect why it was that particular night. - A. I have; on the 13th of March I bought a clock, the alarm of the clock was wrong, this man came, I asked him to put the alarm right, as he was in the watch line; and on Saturday night there was a noise in the house at the Catherine Wheel . I heard what it was afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. When was you first applied to to come here. - A. Last Saturday week his wife came to me, she asked me if I recollected shaving him on Saturday the 14th of March.

Q. At what hour. - A. I cannot say.

Court. Did not she ask you whether you recollected shaving him any particular hour. - A. Not at that time, she did about three days afterwards; she then asked me what hour her husband was in my shop, told her about my supper hour.

Q. When was you subpoenaed. - A. Last Friday night, by an attorney.

Q. When you went to the public house, can you tell me how many persons were there. - A. There were great many, Lane and Lane's wife was there.

Q. What were they doing. - A. They were drinking.

Q. Are you sure they were drinking. - A. I thought they were drinking.

Q. Where they drinking or dancing, as you was there you can tell me. - A. They were drinking, Cohen was in the same tap-room.

Q. Who was Merrit sitting and drinking with. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you see the landlord there. - A. I saw a man there they called Davey. The landlady's sister served me, the landlady was laying in, she is not expected to live; she was sick a bed, and is now; I just looked in to see if any of my customers that had been in my shop were there.

Q. I should have thought you would have looked in to see whether any of your customers that had not been in your house were there, that is most likely; give me a reason for your looking in to see if any of your customers that were shaved were in there; is it your habit to go there and see if any of your customer are in that house. - A. On Saturday night when the shop is vacant I go in, if I see any of my customers I tell them the shop is vacant.

Mr. Gurney. You told me you were looking after customers that were shaved, you took my hint very well.

Mr. Knapp. You shave a great many persons resident in that neighbourhood. - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday night you go there for your beer, to see if any one wants shaving - A. Yes.

Court. What is there makes you recollect his shaving late on that Saturday. - A. Because I speak the truth.

Q. That is no reason; have you any reason for saying so; is there any circumstance that fixes it on your mind, that that man was shaved late rather than early, if there is no circumstance you will say so. - A. None sir.

Q. Every thing was quiet when you went in the public house. - A. Yes, there were girls of the town there; I recollect a noise in the public house, like making a fight; after I got my supper beer, they said this Merrick was fighting his wife; I understood the next day there was a pane of glass broke; the young woman told me Merrick shoved his wife against it, and broke it.

Q. When was it mended. - A. I cannot tell, it was mended within a fortnight.

Q. You are sure it is mended. - A. I think so, I am sure it is, I saw the panes of glass were all right.

NATHAN COHEN . - Mr. Knapp. Where do you live. - A. I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Do know the prisoner Merrick. - A. Yes.

Q. You use the Catherine Wheel. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in Merrick's company on Saturday the 14th of March. - A. I cannot recollect the day of the month, last Saturday four weeks I was in his company, when he had some words with his wife; he came in about six or a little after; I said I am going to take a little refreshment, and then I will smoke my pipe, and he said I am going to be shaved; he returned in about four or five minutes into my company.

Q. Did you drink together. - A. No, I had a pint of beer and he had a pint of beer; he came in about six, and went out about seven; he came in and staid till eight, or it may be nine; I cannot say the particular time.

Q. Did you see Merrick's wife there. - A Yes; a woman asked him if he would give her something to drink; his wife was jealous; then there was a quarrel, Merrick struck her; the landlord said he would have no noise there, he turned her out.

Court. You are sure that was the landlord. - A. Yes; the landlady is very ill. When Merrick struck her she fell in the middle of the box in the tap-room; when the landlord shoved her out she broke a window in the door.

Q. Did you see Lane there. - A. Yes, Lane came there about eight o'clock, or half past eight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. What part of the house was the window broke. - A. At the door.

Q. Is that window mended. - A. I do not think it is mended; they keep the shutter up still, because the window is broke.

Q. Did Lane come in before or after this woman was turned out. - A. He came in after the quarrel was over.

Q. Are you quite sure that he came in after the woman was turned out and the window was broke. - A. Merrick was there and Lane's wife was there; I cannot say whether they came together or went away together.

Court. (to Lane) Was your wife there. - A. I believe she was not there.

- TOWERS. - Mr. Arabin. What are you. - A. I am a smith, I work for Mr. Shephard, Fair-street, Horsleydown.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Roach. - A. Yes, I was in company with him on Saturday evening the 14th of March, at the Hoop and Bell, Fair-street, Horslydown. Roach came in between five and six o'clock, and staid till between ten and eleven; he was not out of my company all the time for more than five minutes.

Q. Have you any particular reason for recollecting that he was in your company this day. - A. Yes, I recollect the prisoner was reading the paper; Emma Reynolds , the servant of the house, asked me what day of the month it was, the prisoner told her it was the 14th; Emma gave half a pint of gin and bitters because it was her birth day; it was four weeks ago last Saturday.

- TURNER. - Mr. Arabin. What are you. - A. I am a lighterman, I live in Fair-street, Horslydown; I was in Roach's company on the 14th of March last; Roach was in the house before I was; I came in at six o'clock.

Q. Was Towers there. - A. Yes; it was the servant's birth-day; I had one glass of gin and bitters.

Q. How long did you stay there from six o'clock. - A. Till between ten and eleven; he was not absent more than five minutes the whole time.

EMMA REYNOLDS . Q. Are you servant to the Bell and Hoop public house. - A. Yes, and I was servant there on the 14th of last March.

Q. Did you see the prisoners Roach and Turner and Towers there. - A. Yes, Roach came in between five and six o'clock, and staid till eleven o'clock in the evening; I recollected from its being my birth-day. I gave away half a pint of gin and bitters, and they all drank of it:

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-83

338. THOMAS HAYES was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway on the 16th of March , upon John Tingey , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, eight half pence his property .

JOHN TINGEY . I am a labouring man . About a quarter after seven o'clock in the evening we were in the green lane near the lane that turns up to Hornsey Wood house , I was coming along in company with Haslewood; we were stopped by two footpads; only one came to each of us.

Q. Which came to you. - A. Thomas Hayes ; he clapped a pistol to my breast, he told me my money or my life, no hesitating; he rifled my pockets and took four pennyworth of halfpence; I believe I had a few more, but I am sure I had four pence.

Q. What sort of a night was this. - A. It was moon light.

Q. Did you observe how the man was dressed. - A. He had got long sailor's trowsers on, and a long light coloured great coat.

Q. What was under that. - A. I could not tell, it was buttoned up to the top.

Q. What colour was the coat. - A. A road colour, and his trowsers I took to be blue.

Q. Did you observe his countenance. - A. Yes, I looked in his face all the time.

Q. How long might he be with you. - A. He was with me as much as five minutes, I'll be bound for him.

Q. Did you ever see him before. - A. No, never sir, to my knowledge.

Q. When did you see him afterwards. - A. I heard there was such a person taken; I saw him afterwards get out of a coach; it struck me directly that he was the man.

Q. Where. - A. At Shadwell office.

Q. What day was that. - A. It was the second time of their being examined. I was robbed on a Friday; this was almost three weeks afterwards.

Q. Did you know he was in custody when he come out of the coach - had he irons on. - A. Yes, he had irons on when I saw him at the office.

Q. The question is, whether you knew when you saw him that he was a prisoner. - A. Yes, I was sure he was a prisoner. There was Roach's brother he came to me when I was in the yard; I walked over to the other side of the yard.

Mr. Arabin. That has nothing to do with this business.

Prosecutor. Roach's brother said to me so sure as I swore against these men, we were all dead men.

Court. Now look at the prisoner, are you sure he is the man. - A. I am sure he is the man.

Q. Do you swear to him by his features. - A. Yes, and by his nose; I looked at his face when he undone my small clothes, and when he held the pistol to my cheek I took notice of his nose all the time; the other man presented the pistol to my cheek, I saw him but once, and by that I will not say I am sure of him; the other man I took to be Roach.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. How often have you been robbed. - A. Never before in my life.

Q. When he put the pistol so you you was alarmed. A. I was at first, till I threw my purse away.

Q. You had a pistol put to your head, that alarmed you - when persons are alarmed they have not their senses so much about them. - A. I know that.

Q. What sort of a hat had this man on that robbed you. - A. A largish round hat.

Q. It come over his face. - A. No.

Q. He had his hat on, and you say it was a moonlight night. - A. Yes.

Q. Then the moon coming on the top of his hat you could not see his face. - A. That did not hide his face from me. I dropped my purse down between two trees, I marked where it was.

Q. Which did you think most about, your money or your life. - A. I thought more about my purse than my life; I had four pounds about me.

Q. You said that when you saw the prisoner get out of the coach it struck you that he was the man. - A. Yes, I did not like to swear to him then.

Q. Did not you say that you could not swear to him, - A. I said I will not swear to him then.

Q. Did not you attend three or four examinations before you swore to him. - A. No, only one.

Q. You did not swear to him at the first. - A. No, I said I won't; I did at the second examination.

Q. Did you hear of a reward afterwards. - A. No, I had heard of that before.

Q. You never hand any conversation with any body about any reward. - A. Not now.

Q. You are talking to me now, has no one told you that there is a reward for convicting a man of a highway robbery. - A. I have been told so.

Q. You expect to get a great deal more than four-pence. - A. I do not expect to get any.

Q. If it is to be given do not you expect to get part of it. - A. Yes, if it is given.

Q. Then you do expect it. - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you say so at first, have any of the officers told you. - A. No, I have heard it in different places in the country.

DANIEL HASLEWOOD . Q. Were you robbed. - A. Yes, I was robbed of my watch and a shilling on the 13th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. By whom. - A. I do not know, by a tall thin man in a dark coloured coat; I cannot give any account of his features.

Q. Was there two or one. - A. There were two came to this man and me; one came to me, and the other went to this man.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. Look at him. - A. I cannot say any thing to the features of the person; my being deaf I could not hear a word he said.

Q. You could see him. - A. I could see him to be sure; he was a tall man, he had a dark coloured great coat on.

Q. What breeches had he on. - A. I do not know; I am sure his coat was buttoned over all.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer; I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoner.

EDWARD ROGERS . I know nothing more than apprehending him. Hayes was in bed when he was apprehended; his clothes lay on a table and chair close to the bed's head; there was a blue coat like a rigger's coat, and trowsers; he dressed himself in them, and we brought him to the office.

Mr. Arabin. It was not a dirt coloured coat. - A. No, it was blue, such as rigger's wear.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn; I had neither hand, act, or part in this, nor the crime alledged against me before.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-84

339. CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of January , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of William Freeman .

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am a bargeman . Some time in January last, between two and three in the morning, I had been to Putney, I was returning to my barge; I and another went into a house in George-alley, Field-lane , we went up stairs, there were seven or eight men and women; I knew none of them.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I had been drinking. After staying a quarter of an hour, I gave them a shilling for what I had drank, and the prisoner followed me down stairs; at the bottom of the stairs stood a man, he asked me what I was doing, at the same time the girl took the watch out of my pocket and ran up stairs, and while I was talking to the man she came down; I took her to the watchhouse, and they let her out of the watchhouse after I went away.

ROBERT STANTON . On the 20th of January the prosecutor came to me and said he had been robbed by Charlotte Chapman ; I knew her. On the 23d of March I had information that Chapman had left the duplicate of Freeman's watch at Tom Rolfe 's; I went there and found the duplicate; I went to the pawnbroker's, he produced the watch; it was without the outside case.

THOMAS ROLFE . I live at No. 8, White's-yard, Saffron-hill; the prisoner dropped the duplicate in my room, I did not find it till the next day, I saw it in her hand. I put it in the tea-pot, and there it was when the officer came.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. About four months ago, me and my friend went to see a wake; this man and another woman came. When me and my friend were going away, he stopped at the end of the alley with the woman, and then he came after me and took me to the watchhouse and searched me and sent me home. The other night he said he was looking for a man; he said I would do as well as the man; he took me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-85

340. DANIEL HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of March , a waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of William Morle .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I was employed by William Morle , a publican , Green Gate, City Road , on the 24th of March, to do a day's work. I saw the prisoner take the waistcoat from the pot-horse; I pursued him, he threw the waistcoat away; I took him, I never lost sight of him.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-86

341. MARTHA WARDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of March , a gown, value 10 s. three petticoats, value 13 s. and a shawl, value 7 s. the

property of Elizabeth Rogers .

ELIZABETH ROGERS . I live in Rose-street, Long-Acre . I work at the army work.

Q. How did you lose this gown, petticoat and shawl. - A. The prisoner lodged in my room. On the 31st of March I went out about seven o'clock to my work, she came to me about eleven o'clock in the day, she said she was going out, and said she would call for me at eight o'clock. I went home at nine, and did not find her there; I missed all the articles in the indictment. On the next day I found she had pawned them at Mr. Allen's, Russel-street. The prisoner did not return.

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN . I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 6, Russel-street, Drury-lane. On the 31st of March the prisoner pledged a gown, shawl, and three petticoats for one pound.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix had lent me things on a Saturday night when I had no money, and that was the reason of my taking these things.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-87

342. WILLIAM PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of March , a silver fork, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Beale .

THOMAS BEALE . I live at 43, Jermyn-street , I keep an hotel .

JOHN KNOTLY . I am a waiter at Mr. Beale's hotel. On the 11th of March the prisoner came into Mr. Beale's hotel, and asked if that was the Union hotel; I informed him the Union hotel was in St. James's-square; I had suspicion he had took some part of the plate from the side-board; he was standing by the side-board in the passage. I asked him what he had got in his pocket, he said he had got nothing belonging to me; I asked him to draw his hand out of his pocket, and after he took his hand out of his pocket, I took the fork from between his fingers; I asked him what he meant by taking it. He said take what, I said this fork that you have got between your fingers; he said if I have got it you put it in my pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I shall not intrude upon your time long. The situation of my three motherless children can be better concieved than described. I only was in the passage, I was not in any room nor did I open any door. I am forty-eight years of age; you must be aware the stigma this must cast on my character. I rely upon you to restore me to my family - and, gentlemen, if you are not guided by mercy, I must be for ever an outcast upon the earth.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-88

343. RICHARD YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , two brass candlesticks, value 5 s. the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . I am a victualler , I keep the Welch Harp, Fullwood's rents . The prisoner at the bar came to my house three different times, he came about seven o'clock in the morning and called for half a pint of porter; first of all he asked for his partner, a stone mason that was to call there. About a month after he called again and asked for half a pint of porter, and asked if his partner was come then; I said no. I lost a candlestick each time; then on the 28th of March he called for the boy to open the door, he asked if his partner was come; the boy said no, but he dare say if he had promised him to meet him he would be there; the boy had suspicion of him as well as me. The prisoner went into the back room, the boy saw there were two brass candlesticks on the table, he ran up stairs and taps at the door and said the partner is come again; he went down stairs and stood at the door; when I came down stairs he came out of the room and asked me for half a pint of beer; while I was unlocking the machine the boy went into the back room, he saw the candlesticks were gone; the prisoner made a bolt towards the door, the boy says stop him, he has got the candlesticks. I told him now he happened to meet with the right partner; I said how dare you steal my candlesticks, he said he had not got them; I told him he had them in his pockets; he pulled one out of each pocket then.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a trowel, a tobacco-box, and a large letter in my pocket; it was impossible for me to put the candlestick in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-89

344. ELEANOR COCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , two pint pewter pots, value 2 s. and a quart pot, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Andrews .

SAMUEL ANDREWS . I am a publican , I keep the Old King's Arms in Gray's-inn-lane ; I suspected the mother much more than the prisoner.

ANN MASKILL . I go out a charing; I was in the house where these people live; I called the little girl to let the dog in her room; I opened the door a little way, I saw a quart pot being melted in the frying pan.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. You did not see the prisoner in that room. - A. No.

Q. It was not the prisoner's room. - A. No.

Court. It was not found in the prisoner's apartment at all. - A. No.

The prisoner was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-90

345. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously and unlawfully setting fire to a certain house, then being in his possession, known by the name of the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane, in the City of London , thereby to injure and defraud the directors of the Sun fire office , and

Eleven other charges of like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The indictment was opened by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH CARTER . - Mr. Pitcairn. You are in the employ of the Sun fire office. - A. I am not now, on the 7th of February last I was; I was in the new policy pepartment.

Q. Do you remember at any time any instructions being given for a policy of six thousand pound. - A. I do; on or about the 27th of August 1805.

Q. By whom was the instructions given. - A. I believe

by Mr. Williams himself.

Q. Do you know whether it was or not. - A. I cannot take upon me to say that.

Court. Were you the person that received the instructions. - A. I was.

Mr. Pitcairn. All that you now prove is, that there were instructions given to that amount. - A. Yes.

RICHARD ATKINS . Q. You are in the employ of the Sun fire office as collector. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you in consequence of any instructions for a new policy, take a survey of the Swan with Two Necks. - A. I did.

Q. Was that policy made out. - A. Yes, I took it to Mr. Williams, he gave me a check for the premium.

Q. After this were there any instructions given for any other policy. - A. In the month of December 1805, Mr. Williams applied to the office; I cannot recollect the day.

Q. Was it before the fire. - A. Yes, he asked me to call upon him some morning, for the purpose of increasing the insurance; I did call, he then increased the insurance; he gave me the order to make out the policy to the sum of nine thousand pound; the policy was made out for the sum of nine thousand pound.

Q. Was the insurance upon the goods or the house. - A. Upon the goods and the stock.

Q. Did Mr. Williams give you any premium. - A. No.

Q. Do you know who that policy was delivered to. - A. No.

Q. Did Mr. Williams say any thing about the repairs. - A. He did, he said that he had laid out a sum of fifteen or sixteen hundred pounds upon the building, and he wanted me to increase the policy upon the building; that policy was never made out; he said when the policy for the nine thousand pounds was effected, he then would come and insure for the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. How long have you been in your situation in the Sun fire office. - A. Seven years.

Q. There are a great many proprietors, have you a book where all their names are entered. - A. No.

Q. Some of these are stated as directors. - A. I believe they are.

Q. Did you go over any part of the house. - A. I think I was only in the coffee room and in the bar.

Q. Did you go and see any improvement that he had been making. - A. Only in the coffee room and the bar, the improvement was painting and papering.

Q. Any other part of the house you did not see. - A. I did not.

JAMES HALL . - Mr. Bolland. Which did you receive of the prisoner (papers handed to the witness). - A. I received two of the prisoner, one from the Sun fire office, and one from the Globe.

Mr. Gurney. The Globe is dated the 10th of August, and the Sun fire office, the 30th of August.

Mr. Hall. I received this policy on the 16th of January 1806.

Mr. Dancey. They were in the same state when you received them as they are now. - A. They were.

Q. What is your connection in the Sun fire office. - A. I am surveyor to the Sun fire office.

Q. We understand the Sun fire office consists of a great number of proprietors. - A. I believe they do.

Q. The directors are the persons who manage the business, I presume. - A. The directors are.

Q. Are you aware of what number they consist of, is there a book of their names. - A. I do not know whether there is or not.

Q. You yourself have not seen it. - A. No.

Q. This policy that you received on the 16th, do you know by whom it was cancelled. - A. The seals were torn off by Mr. Williams in my presence, (read in court); January 16th 1806, I do hereby acknowledge that I cancel this, and accept only of the loss, sustained by me in December last; amounting to the sum two hundred and fifty-six pounds four shillings and three-pence; signed, William Williams . He signed it in my presence.

THOMAS PETTY . - Mr. Bolland. I see the name of Thomas Petty to this policy, is it your name. - A. That is my name, I witnessed it.

Q. I see the name of Mr. Tourzey. - A. He was in the office at that time, in the same department with myself.

Q. Where is Mr. Tourzey. - A. I do not know, he has left the office some time.

Q. Have you made any enquiry after him. - A. I have not.

Q. Were you present when the policy was signed by the directors, whose names are signed to it. - A. No, the policies are first signed by the directors, before they are given to the clerks to make out.

Q. Look at the signatures, do you know their hand writing. - A. I believe Mr. Watts' to be his hand writing.

JOHN RICHARD . - Mr. Gurney. You are clerk to the Sun fire office; do you know Mr. Tourzey. - A. Yes, he was clerk to the office, he has left the office about a twelvemonth.

MR. BRAHAM. - Mr. Gurney. I believe in the month of August 1805, you was clerk in the Globe fire-office. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that (a paper handed to the witness), does your name there appear as attesting witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you or did you not see these gentlemen sign the policy. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Serjeant Best. How long have you been in the Globe fire office. - A. Since the establishment, 1803.

Q. The Globe insurance has a great number of persons who are proprietors. - A. Yes.

Q. There is a book of their names. - A. I believe there is.

THOMAS DESBOROUGH . - Mr. Gurney. You are a clerk in the Globe insurance office. - A. I am.

Q. In the month of August 1805, was sir Theophilus Metcalf and sir Walter Stirling , bart. directors. - A. Yes, they are directors still.

Q. Have you frequently seen these gentlemen write. A. I have, I believe that to be their signatures.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You have said these gentlemen were directors. - A. I know that they have subscribed to a declaration, and that they were elected proprietors; I have seen the minutes.

JOSEPH CARTER . - Mr. Pitcairn. You are a clerk in the Sun fire office. - A. I was.

Q. Do you see your name there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the directors sign that policy. - A. I did not.

Q. This is the nine thousand pound policy that never was delivered. - A. Never, I believe.

Court. Was the premium on this policy ever paid. -

A. I believe not, nor ever delivered.

Q. He reserved a claim of two hundred and fifty-six pounds. -

Mr. Gurney. And the same at the Globe.

WILLIAM COLLINS . - Mr. Bolland. What are you. A. I am a carpenter.

Q. Did you make this model. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make it from any survey of your own. - A. From the survey of Mr. Hall, and from Mr. Hall's instructions on the premises.

Q. What is the scale. - A. Half an inch.

Q. Then you mean to say the model answers to the premises. - A. Exactly sir.

Q. (to Mr. Hall) Did you see the policy when it was returned, making it a cancelled instrument. - A. Yes.

JOHN RICHARDS . Q. Look at that policy, at the names of the directors, did you ever see any of them gentlemen write. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that their hand writing. - A. I believe it is; I have no doubt whatever that is the nine thousand pound policy; signed Thomas Watts , Hugh Watts .

THOMAS TRIGGEY . - Mr. Pitcairn. Were you in the service of the prisoner in December 1805. - A. Yes, as chamberlain.

Q. How long had you been in his service in December 1805. - A. I was nearly three years in his service then.

Q. Were you chamberlain in 1803. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you leave him. - A. I have left him about three months.

Q. Do you remember on the 29th of December 1805 any fire happening. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was you when the fire broke out. - A. I was at a friend's house in Fleet-street.

Q. What time did you leave the Swan on that day the fire broke out. - A. I think between one and two o'clock.

Q. When did you first hear that the fire broke out. - A. About six in the evening, the chambermaid sent her son to me; she knew where I was gone, she sent to me, to let me know the house was a fire; I took my hat and came as fast as it was possible the boy could go with me. When I returned I found the fire at the extremity of the building, called the wood-room.

Q. When you returned did you see your master. - A. I saw him in the passage when I came in.

Q. What was he doing. - A. I do not know that he was doing any thing particular. I think I said to him, sir, where is the fire, he said it is in the wood-room; I went up immediately to my own room, I threw off my coat, I went up the gallery stairs, I took a bucket or a pitcher of water with me; when I came to the top of the building, the fire was flaming along that passage where the chimney was; I found it was of no use throwing the water down on that passage; I came down immediately, I saw Mr. Williams in the passage; when I came down again, he says to me, the fire is very bad, you had better take care of your things; I went up into my own room, and packed up what belonged to me.

Court. Was your room distant to where this fire was. - A. About one hundred feet distance. I took my things to the Castle in Queen-street; I came back and assisted the chambermaid, I took her things to the coach office. I then assisted in getting Mr. William's beds and things out of the rooms; I took them into the coach office; I took the luggage which gentlemen had left out of the store-room, and put them in the coach office; it is attached together under one roof; but some distance from the wood-garret.

Mr. Pitcairn. What time was this fire in the wood garret extinguished. - A. I suppose it was completely out between ten and eleven.

Q. When was it got under. - A. In an hour and a half or two hours; the roof fell in, and it burried the fire.

Q. How soon after this fire was extinguished did you perceive any other fire. - A. About eleven o'clock; I was standing opposite a small stair case, direct opposite the bar accompting house.

Q. How long was that after the fire in the garret was extinguished. - A. A very little while; it was a little after eleven when I was standing in that situation.

Q. When you was standing in that situation, what did you see. - A. It appeared to me there was some smoke coming down that stair case, and there was a candle and candlestick which stood in the dish larder, within about a yard of the stair case; I took the candle and went up stairs, I thought there appeared to be a great deal of smoke coming down there; I concluded that there must be a fire about that spot; I looked in the lower rooms, I found all was perfectly safe; then I went into the second flight, which was four rooms, 27, 28, 29, and 30; I opened the room door, No. 30, I saw Mr. Williams in No. 30, his back was towards me when I went into the room, and the window was a little pushed up.

Q. Had he any light with him. - A. No, he had none; the door was shut, I opened the door.

Court. Was there any light of any lamp, or candle, or fire burning, so as to light the room. - A. No, it was a back room, it was perfectly dark; there was a great deal of smoke in the room where he was.

Mr. Pitcairn. You say you saw Mr. Williams there, describe the manner you saw him there. - A. I saw Mr. Williams there; I will not swear whether he was sitting or standing, his back was towards me; I said as I went into the room, who is here, I saw it was Mr. Williams. I said, sir, here is a great deal of smoke here; he said all is very safe, go and get something to drink; I said sir I will throw the windows up and let the smoke out. Mr. Williams replied I have opened the windows myself; I did not notice that, I opened the window of the room adjoining 29; Mr. Williams was in No. 30, that window was a little open; there was a little smoke in No. 29; I then went into No. 28, there was a little smoke there; in that room there are three panes of glass that pull down; I pulled them down myself; then I went to No. 27; when I opened the door, the flames rushed out immediately; the flames came out so rapid, that I was obliged to drop on the ground to prevent myself from being burned. I went down immediately, and gave the alarm to the firemen that No. 27 was on fire, and they came up in the course of a minute or two.

Q. The firemen were in the house, and several engines there when you discovered this fire in No. 27. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say any thing to your master. - A. No; I did not see him when I came up again; the foreman of the Sun fire office came up stairs, and the first thing they did, they pulled the bestead to pieces, threw water over the room, and got the fire under:

Q. After the fire had been extinguished in this room had you any opportunity of observing the state of it. - A. Yes, I saw that every thing was burned to pieces, and a candlestick was found under the bed; the fireman of the Sun fire office brought it out of the room.

Q. Did you see the candlestick found under the bed. A. No, I saw the candlestick brought out of the room; the fireman said he had taken it from under the bed; I did not see him. Some little time after that fire was extinguished I saw my master in the passage walking about; he said nothing to me, nor did he make any enquiry about that fire.

Q. This was the fire in No. 27. - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after did you discover any other fire. A. There were several more discovered after that.

Q. Do you know what became of your master after this fire in No. 27. - A. I do not know: I saw him about some time after in the passage; he came to me, and desired me not to put any body to sleep on that side of the house. There was another fire at No. 16, the top gallery on the right hand as you go up the staircase, the same side as No. 27, and separated by a brick wall; that fire was discovered near three o'clock in the morning. Mr. Williams came to me about half past one, he said if any thing should happen, I am going to bed at No. 62, you come there to me. After he went to bed the firemen gave the alarm that the top gallery was on fire at No. 16.

Q. How soon was this after your master had gone to bed. - A. I suppose about an hour; I went up first with the firemen to see where it was, and at the top room, No. 16, the fire was flowing out of the room over the doorway; it is a thin partition over the door, and it is a narrow passage; the door was shut to, the firemen split the door open to let the fire out; they played in water upon the room and put the fire out.

Q. Did you in consequence of what your master had told you alarm him. - A. I did, I knocked at No. 62, I told him the top gallery was on fire, No. 16; he came out immediately, whether he had his clothes on or off I cannot say; he came out in the passage. I did not observe any thing particular in his manner at that time.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing this room, No. 16, after the fire was extinguished. - A. Yes; No. 98, which was a room adjoining to 16, it appeared as if there was a large hole through, which I thought the fire came from 98; I found every thing in 16 burnt, the two beds, bedsteads, and the clothes, and it burnt through the ceiling into the coffee room.

Court. You say you thought the fire came from 98, was it on fire. - A. Part of the partition was on fire, a large place was burnt through.

Q. Was any other part of 98 burnt. - A. Not any.

Mr. Pitcairn. After this fire had been extinguished, did you see any thing of the prisoner. - A. Yes, I saw Mr. Williams after the fire at 16 and 98 was extinguished, several times in the passage.

Q. Did he make any enquiry respecting this fire. - A. No.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again. - A. About four o'clock in the morning; the chambermaid Simpson, and me, were drinking a cup of tea in the chamberlain's room; it is very near to the bar, and faomg it on the same passage.

Q. Who were there. - A. Mrs. Simpson, the chambermaid, Mr. Tourzey, and the cook and myself; while we were drinking tea Mr. Williams came past with a candlestick and candle in his hand, he says why do not you go and get yourself something to drink; the chambermaid and myself made reply, we did not want any thing, we were drinking of tea; Mr. Williams passed us and went up a flight of stairs that led to No. 66, 67, and 69; in about ten minntes afterwards Simpson and myself went up stairs, and followed him to see if every thing was safe; it was expected that he was going to do some mischief.

Court. Some suspicion in your mind led you to go there. - A. Yes.

Q. You went up where he had gone with the candle and candlestick. - A. We did; I looked in room 69, I found every thing perfectly safe, and 67 every thing was safe; I then went to 66, every thing was safe there; in the passage opposite there is a cupboard, it formerly was a water closet.

Mr. Pitcairn. Is there any chimney in it. - A. None at all; it had been fitted up by Mr. Williams to put fruit in to keep it from freezing; at that time there was nothing in it, it had been emptied a long time. When I opened the door, Simpson said, good God, Triggey, here's fire; there were two shelves in the cupboard, the lower shelf was all in a blaze, it was totally alight. It appeared to me by the fragments that were left, that there had been some paper there; there were some of the little pieces of the paper in the cupboard, and it appeared as if they had flew about; the paper was all burnt, there was the cinders of the paper left, and a quantity of ashes. On the upper shelf, which was of the same size, there was a decanter with brandy in it; I think it was a pint one. Simpson the chambermaid took it from the shelf herself.

Q. How much of the shelf was burnt. - A. The lower shelf was burnt; the upper shelf was not, it was very hot. but not burned.

Q. You say there was brandy in this decanter, how do you know it was brandy. - A. I tasted it.

Q. You put this fire out. - A. Yes, there was a mahogany flap to a table and green baize in this cupboard; I took the green baize, rolled it up, and put the fire out with it; they both were placed against the fire. In about a minute after I had put the fire out, I saw Mr. Williams coming from the Sun tavern room, he was coming towards us (the tavern rooms have all distinct names); as he came towards us he said I have put that fire out; I told him that he had not put it out, we had put it out, meaning the chambermaid and myself; he made no reply, but went away.

Court. Did you see no more of him after that time. - A. No, I heard he had gone to bed.

Mr. Pitcairn. When did any person come from the Sun fire office after this, and make any enquiry. - A. Mr. Hall came in a few days after this.

Q. About the time of Mr. Hall's coming, or previous to it, did any conversation pass between you and the prisoner on the subject. - A. Yes; previous to Mr. Hall's coming, Mr. Williams slept at Islington after the fire, he used to come home in the morning, I saw him in the passage, I told him there had been a gentleman enquiring if I knew any thing concerning the fire.

Q. Who was that gentleman. - A. I do not know.

Q. Had there been a gentleman previous to Mr. Hall coming. - A. Yes; I went into the parlour and told Mr. Williams of it, a day or two after the fire: I

told him I would point out the gentleman to him when I saw him again; I said sir, if the fire office knew of the fire in the closet opposite 66, your insurance would not be worth a farthing; he told me to knock the boards down and put them out of the way. That was all that passed at that time.

Q. In consequence of that you knocked them down. - A. I did; I put them away in the store room for some time, and put trunks upon them; after the storeroom was cleared of the luggage, I took the boards out and put them under a large dresser where we put foul clothes in in the chamberlain's room; I nailed a skirting board before them, so that they were completely out of the way.

Q. When did you find the boards again. - A. Mr Nalder, the city marshall found them; he knocked the skirting board down and took the boards from under the dresser, and soon after this Mr. Hall from the Sun fire office came.

Q. How long after the fire was this. - A. Some few days.

Q. Did you mention any circumstance of the fire in the closet opposite 66. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you mention any circumstance of finding your master in room No. 30. - A. I did not, and the reason why I did not mention it, Mr. Williams came up to me in our own room, I believe it was the day Mr. Hall came; before Mr. Hall examined me, he desired us to say if we were asked, that he made all enquiry respecting the fire that he could. The fact is, he never did to me neither at the fire, nor any other time.

Q. How long after this did you continue in Mr. Williams' service. - A. I left him near five or six months ago.

Q. What was the cause of your leaving him. - A. A dispute between Mrs. Williams and my wife respecting a gentleman.

Q. You did not mention the circumstance of the fire in the water closet while you lived with him. - A. I did not; the first time I gave the information, was to Mr. Wilson the coach-proprietor, and the Sun fire office, a fortnight after I left the house.

Q. Did you go to the Sun fire office. - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. You came to the situation of chamberlain in 1803. - A. Yes.

Q. What had you been before. - A. I had been a labourer in the India house seven years.

Q. What situation are you in now. - A. A publican.

Q. You left Mr. Williams in consequence of a dispute that took place between Mrs. Williams and your wife. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that dispute you were very willing to leave that situation as chamberlain. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not like to stay in a family that you could not live easy and comfortable, you are quite sure that you did not desire to stay. - A. No.

Q. Nor to offer any terms for which you would stay, nor make any threats in case you were to be turned away. - A. No, I made no threats.

Q. You went most willingly away. - A. No, not till my books were settled.

Q. The first person you disclosed it to was the coach-proprietor. - A. Yes.

Q. I should be glad to know whether Mr. Wilson is the owner of the house. - A. I do not know.

Q. Had you ever any idea of taking this house yourself - A. No.

Q. You mean to swear that. - A. Yes, I do.

Q. You were not there when the fire broke out, you came in about six o'clock in the evening. - A. A little after six.

Q. In what room did the fire begin. - A. It was in a wood room where the fire began.

Q. There was a great deal of dry wood in that room. A. All sorts of wood, it was mixed wood.

Q. There was some very dry. - A. I do not know that; it was not my business to examine it; there was old chairs and wood of every description almost.

Q. Was there any wood kept in that room for the purpose of firing. - A. It was kept for that purpose.

Q. I ask you whether you do not know that there was dry wood there. - A. It was not my business to know that, it did not concern me, I concerned myself only with the beds.

Q. Did not a great many people make enquiry that night how this fire happened. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Endeavour to recollect yourself. - A. They could only judge by the same as I did myself.

Q. Now I should like to know your judgment of it. A. I gave my judgment that it was wilfully done.

Q. And that you gave that night. - A. I did.

Q. And you gave no other judgment that night. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of King Thorn. - A. I do not know any such person; I know Mr. Thorn of the Freemason's tavern.

Q. Were you never a potboy to Mr. Thorn that kept a public house, to Mr. King Thorn , do not you know him. - A. I do not.

Q. I ask you whether on that night you did not say you had no idea how it happened, whether you did not say so to Mr. King Thorn - do you know the man that keeps the Black Swan. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him that night. - A. I believe I did.

Q. Is not his name King Thorn, do you know his son, he is here, did you see him that night. - A. No, not as I know of.

Q. I ask you upon your oath if you did not tell him that night how it happened. - A. I might say I did not know how it happened in the wood room.

Q. But you are sure that you never said when you were speaking of the other fires, you did not know how they happened. - A. I do not think I could.

Q. Upon your oath did not you say respecting all the other fires that they happened by removing the furniture from one room to the other. - A. I might say that to Mr. Hall.

Q. But you never did to any other person. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Did not you say so to two other persons, and these two other persons you shall presently see - did not you say so to the landlord of the Black Swan, and his son - recollect yourself; upon your recollection this man's life depends. - A. Upon the best of my recollection I never did say so in their presence.

Q. Do you know Mr. Waterhouse. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never say so to him. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Mr. Waterhouse is a gentleman that has a large concern, he is the owner of the horses that are kept at this house. - A. I believe he is.

Q. I ask you whether you did not say to Mr. Water-house, with respect to the other fires, that they happened through the carelessness of the other servants moving

the goods, and leaving the candles in the rooms. - A. I do not know that I did; I was desired by Mr. Williams to say many things.

Q. Your opinion was the direct reverse to this; you think you never could have said this. - A. My opinion was averse to this, I had my doubts upon me.

Q. Do not you know that the next morning after this fire happened, you were examined by the officers of the Sun fire office, and that you never hinted to him that these places were set fire to by any body. - A. I never did.

Q. Did not you say to him that they happened by accident in your judgment. - A. I do not know but that I might.

Q. Did not you say that the account you had given to the Sun fire office was a true account. - A. I said so to Mr. Hall.

Q. Did not you say so to other persons. - A. I did not.

Q. You never abused the servants for removing the things from one place to another. - A. I never did.

Q. Do you wish to state that positively. - A. I do.

Q. And you are quite certain that at the moment they wanted to get rid of you, you did not want to stop. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Miss Mather. - A. Yes.

Q. She is the sister of Mrs. Williams. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with Miss Mather the night before your master turned you out of doors. - A. No particular conversation.

Q. Did not you use these words I am going to say, remember these words are taken down; did not you say, Miss Mather, Mr. Williams and I had better part friendly. - A. I believe them are the words exactly.

Q. You did say that. - A. I believe I did.

Q. Did you say any thing more. - A. I do not know, in the general conversation something else may come in.

Q. Recollect yourself, I can bring proof what you said; did not you desire Miss Mather to intercede with Mr. Williams, for Mr. Williams to suffer you to stay. - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you before you was turned away, threaten Mr. Williams. - A. I told him I certainly would discover something that would be very serious to him. I never asked him to stop.

Q. He turned you out that night. - A. He did.

Q. He persisted that you should not stop. - A. Yes, he was very tipsey.

Q. How many days after he turned you away was it before you found your way to the Sun fire office. - A. A fortnight.

Q. Had you been to Mr. Wilson first. - A. I saw Mr. Wilson in the coach yard, I believe that was about a fortnight after, and then I mentioned it to him; that was before I went to the Sun fire office.

Q. I will now take you back to No. 27, when you discovered the fire in No. 27, Mr. Williams was in No. 30; you are quite positive of that. - A. Quite positive.

Q. You saw him in the room. - A. Yes, I spoke to him.

Q. The door was shut, and the window was open. - A. A little open.

Q. So that a person sitting there with a light, and any person going in there and opening the door, the wind might blow it out. - A. It might.

Q. You saw him in 62, you went and called him when the fire broke out at No. 16. - A. Yes.

Q. How far was he from 16. - A. I suppose sixty, eighty, or one hundred yards.

Q. To go from there to No. 16, they must go down one stair-case and go up another. - A. Yes.

Q. He must have got out of his bed at No. 62, passed down one staircase and gone up another, and must have passed through where the firemen were; were they not stationed there. - A. They were in the rooms adjoining; he could have gone through a long stone passage, without coming where the firemen were; the two rooms where the firemen were, were at the bottom of the staircase; the firemen were in the Manchester and Liverpool rooms as they call them.

Q. Were there no other firemen in any other rooms. - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Did you ever threaten Mr. Williams if ever he turned you away. - A. I mentioned it to him when he discharged me.

Q. You never did mention it to him till after you was discharged, that was near a twelvemonth after. - A. Yes.

Q. Have not you said that you could hang him, and that you was sure you could do it. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Will you swear it. - A. I will.

Q. Have you never threatened to accuse him of any thing else. - A. No.

Q. Do you swear to that. - A. Yes.

Q. You have no doubt about that. - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you threaten him to charge him with an unnatural crime. - A. No, I never mentioned any such thing, not to Mr. Williams.

Q. Did you never hint to any other person, that you could charge Mr. Williams with the commission of an unnatural crime. - A. No, I never did.

MR. FRANCIS NALDER . - Mr. Gurney. You are one of the city marshalls. - A. I am.

Q. About the time that Triggey was examined before the lord mayor, did he go with you and point out where the boards were. - A. Yes, he stooped down and took out the boards himself and gave them to me.

Q. Had he occasion to knock down any thing. - A. Yes, there was a small skirting board before them; he knocked that down, and then he pulled out these two boards (producing them), they have been in my custody ever since.

Q. (to Triggey) How were these shelves. - A. That part that is scorched was on fire in blazes; that is the lower shelf, the fire was upon that shelf, the shelf above it was hot, and it had the decanter of brandy upon it.

Court. You did not say what quantity. - A. I did not know exactly the quantity.

MRS. SIMPSON. - Mr. Gurney. In December 1805, you were chambermaid to the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember at what time the fire first broke out in the evening. - A. At a quarter after six.

Q. Where was that fire. - A. In the wood garret.

Q. Where was Triggey the chamberlain at that time. - A. He was out, it was a considerable time before he came.

Q. When was that fire put out. - A. As soon as possible.

Q. In the course of that evening did any fire take place in No. 27. - A. Yes.

Q. How lately before that fire broke out had you seen your master. - A. I saw him at various times in the passage.

Q. Do you remember whether you had seen him shortly before the fire in No. 27. - A. I cannot justly say.

Q. Do you remember your master going to bed. - A. I heard he did go to bed.

Q. Did you and your husband go to bed. - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. What part of the house did you sleep in. - A. In the bed room adjoining the chamberlain's room.

Q. That is not far from the bar - A. No.

Q. After you went to bed, was you alarmed by the cry of fire again. - A. Yes, I heard there was a fire in No. 16.

Q. Did you get up in consequence of that alarm in No. 16. - A. Yes, I heard of it, but I did not see it.

Q. After that fire was put out, what did you and your husband do. - A. We went into the chamberlain's room and took a cup of tea.

Q. While you were taking tea in the chamberlain's room, did you see your master. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come into the room after the fire was put out. - A. Yes, between three and four o'clock.

Q. Who was in company with you at the time that you saw your master come in. - A. There was my husband and Triggey.

Q. When your master went through the chamberlain's room, where did he go. - A. He went up stairs towards No. 69; he had a candle and candlestick in his hand.

Q. Did you and Triggey follow him at any time afterwards. - A. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Q. Why did you follow him. - A. To see if all was safe.

Q. Did you go up the same stair-case that he had gone towards 69. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and Triggey look in 69. - A. Yes, and we looked in 67 and 66; we then looked into the closet.

Q. When you looked in the closet in what condition did you find it. - A. There was some fire in it.

Q. Did you see apparently any paper burnt down to an ash. - A. Yes.

Q. Where was that paper. - A. On the shelf, and the shelf was some of it burnt.

Q. Was it on fire and in flame. - A. I cannot recollect any flame, the shelf was black.

Court. Was there any smoke. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Who put it out. - A. It was put out by Triggey, with the green baize, I believe.

Q. Where was that green baize. - A. It laid under the shelf.

Q. How came that green baize there. - A. It was out of use, it had been used over a carpet.

Q. Was there any fire near that closet that day. - A. No; we found the door put to it, it had a lock, but it was not locked.

Q. How long did you stay there. - A. A very few minutes.

Q. Did you return down the same stair-case that you came. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing on the other shelf. - A. Yes, a decanter.

Q. Was there any thing in that decanter. - A. No, except the drainings; there had been brandy in it.

Q. Did you take it off the shelf or Triggey. - A. I cannot say, I brought it down stairs.

Q Then you mean to say it was empty when you found it. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw no appearance of any brandy having been spilt there. - A. I did not.

Q. None of the paper was wet. - A. It was burnt.

Q. Did you at all go into the room called the Sun below that. - A. No, I found Mr. Williams in the Sun after we had found the fire in the closet; Triggey spoke to him, but I do not recollect any of the words that passed. I brought the decanter with me, and the next day Fletcher, the head waiter, smelt the fire and saw it.

Q. Did you point it out to your husband. - A. Triggey shewed it to my husband. I went up when Fletcher was there, and Tourzy the cook.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Hall the surveyor coming and examining you and the other persons in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Hall any thing about that fire in the closet. - A. I did not.

Q. Why did not you. - A. I had no particular reason for not telling him.

Q. Did your master make any particular enquiry respecting the fire the night it happened. - A. He said he did not know how it could happen in the wood garret.

Q. On the day following the fire did he ever question you about the manner, or which way this fire could possibly have happened. - A. No.

Q. Did you the next day discover that there had been a fire in No. 27. - A. I found there had been a fire in 27; I did not discover it myself.

Q. That is two stories under the wood garret, and accessible by a passage; did you go into that room. - A. I did; the bed-furniture was perfectly burnt; the mattress and coverlid was burnt round.

Q. Had you ever mentioned the fire in the closet opposite to No. 66, till you was examined before the lord-mayor. - A. To no one but Touzy, Fletcher, Triggey, and my husband.

Cross-examined by Mr. Dancy. What situation were you in that house. - A. Chambermaid, and Triggey was chamberlain.

Q. He was out that day. - A. Yes; my son boarded with him.

Q. When did Mr. Williams come in the house - A. Mr. Williams came in the house on the 5th of April, and the fire was on the 9th of December.

Q. How long has Triggey been there. - A. Triggey was there a few days before Mr. Williams was there.

Q. Was he chamberlain when he first came: - A. No; he acted about the house. He came, I fancy, in expectation of having the place.

Q. The fire broke out about six o'clock. - A. About a quarter after six o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect where Mr. Williams had dined that day. - A. To the best of my recollection in the parlour with company.

Q. About what time. - A. The usual time is between three and four o'clock, but the particular time on that day I cannot say.

Q. Perhaps you are able to say who dined with him. A. I believe captain Dickson and Mrs. Williams.

Q. They went out after dinner. - A. Yes, I understood

they went up to Islington.

Court. Who was in the parlour at the time the alarm of fire was given. - A. I understood, Mr. Williams, captain Dickson, and another of the company were in the parlour. I had not seen them, nor had I been in the room.

Mr. Dancy. When the alarm of fire was you saw them. - A. Yes, Mr. Williams ordered me to get the keys; I told him that I did not know that I could; I would get somebody to get them, and before I had got to the door the people had got the keys, and they were removing the goods; I saw every one about the house using the greatest exertions they could, and I saw Mr. Williams about in different parts of the lower part of the house.

Q. I suppose this fire created no small confusion. - A. A very great one.

Q. Were the things removed in that hurry that that confusion would create. - A. They were.

Q. How soon were the firemen there with their engines. - A. It might be three quarters of an hour.

Q. The fire was got under in this wood garret. - A. It was.

Q. Before the firemen came were there other persons assisting in getting this fire under. - A. Yes, all of the servants were carrying up water.

Q. Then if any one said it was impossible for any one to carry water there, it is not true. - A. It is not; the fire in the garret was partly out when Triggey came home.

Q. Then it was possible for any one to throw water there. - A. I was not there.

Q. Did you see persons carrying water up. - A. I did; the waiter, and the housemaid Jane, Thomas Nicolls , Eleanor Barnet , Hannah Swain , Francis Cocksedge , and another; one met the other, and took the water from them.

Q. Perhaps Triggey was afraid of fire, did he go near it. - A. He went up stairs.

Q. Did he carry up water and throw it on. - A. I do not think there was any occasion then.

Q. I think you say you drank tea in Triggey's room. A. In my own room.

Q. In your own room; then did not Mr. Williams go through your room while you were drinking tea. - A. He did not.

Q. Then if Triggey has said that if Mr. Williams went through, that is not true. - A. It is not.

Q. Did he go through before or after you was drinking tea. - A. I do not know whether it was before or after; it was not at the time that we were drinking tea.

Q. Do you remember when Mr. Williams went away to inform his wife. - A. I think it was after the second fire had been extinguished.

Q. Then he was present after the second fire had been extinguished. - A. He was about the premises.

Q. Where was the second fire. - A. At No. 27.

Q. Did you see Mr. Williams at any time before there at No. 27. - A. Yes, he was at the bottom part of the house.

Q. How long did you think Mr. Williams was absent when he went to inform Mrs. Williams of the accident that had taken place - was it an hour or more. - A. I think it must be that before he returned.

Q. After he went through the chamberlain's room, you yourself went up stairs to that place that led you to No. 66 - did you open the closet door or Triggey. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You say you do not recollect there was any flame there, the shelf was black and smoking, it appeared as if paper had been burnt out, as if it had been extinguished and gone out. - A. It was burning then on the decline, it was black and smoking.

Q. You said the green baize laid on the ground underneath the shelf. - A. I think the baize was on the ground; I cannot say.

Q. Was it put up before the door to hide the fire from you. - A. No.

Q. There was a decanter there, it had the drainings of brandy in it, and as Triggey might be alarmed, he might take a little brandy at that time. - A. I did not see him.

Q. You stood by and never saw him. - A. No.

Q. The decanter was cold, it did not burn your fingers. - A. No.

Q. Do you remember whether it was any time in contemplation for the office of chamberlain and chambermaid to be united. - A. Mr. Williams offered me the chamberlain's place in addition to mine; I mentioned it to Triggey the same evening.

Q. How long was this after the fire. - A. About May or June after.

Q. When you mentioned it to Triggey was he pleased or angry - A. He was not pleased.

Q. Then I may venture to say he was angry. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him do any thing particular after this anger of his, do you remember his taking a rule and measuring the distances of places afterwards. - A. Yes, the same evening he got a rule and line measuring; he was an hour and a half measuring the distance about different parts of the house.

Q. He was measuring distances afterwards, and putting down his distances upon paper. - A. I did not see what he wrote.

Q. Did he write. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not take that situation. - A. No, Triggey continued as chamberlain; I left the house.

Q. Do you remember his tearing a leaf out of a book. A. Yes, the bed-book.

Q. That leaf that he tore out enabled him to know all the numbers of the rooms. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Williams went to bed that night. - A. He did, in No. 62.

Q. That is one pair of stairs higher than the Liverpool and Manchester; were the firemen stationed in the Liverpool and Manchester. - A. Yes, and in the yard.

Q. Then to come down from Mr. Williams's room No. 62, he must come along the same passage where the Liverpool and the Manchester rooms were - A. Yes.

Q. Do you cross the yard after you come by the Liverpool, to go where the fire had been. - A. No, there is the passage, and then the stairs front you; it is near the bar; the bar is of one side of the passage, and the stairs of the other.

Q. Then all the people who are in the bar, if they look that way, would see the persons who went up that stair-case. - A. Certainly.

Q. So then he must come by the Liverpool and Manchester, where the firemen were, and by the bar;

where any body might have seen him. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. You never went up stairs while the fire lasted. - A. No.

Q. Then whether you could get at it to throw water upon it you do not know. - A. I do not.

Q. Now at the time your master went to bed at 62, do you know whether the door of the Manchester or the Liverpool was open or shut. - A. I do not know.

Q. If they were shut he might pass without any person seeing him. - A. Certainly.

MR. HALL. Q. You have told us you was a surveyor in the Sun fire office. - A. I am.

Q. On the day after the fire was, did you go to the Swan and Two Necks to see what damage the fire had done. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the appearance of fire in these different places. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see all that is now mentioned, or was there any exception. - A. I saw all that is now mentioned, with the exception of the closet.

Q. Does this model describe the form and manner of the house in the best purpose. - A. I think it does.

Q. Was the access to the wood garret up the staircase, and through that narrow passage. - A. Certainly.

Q. Would it have been an easy thing for persons to go along that narrow passage and throw water. - A. I think not, presuming it was full of smoke.

Q. You examined the remainder of the wood garret. - A. Yes; the floor was burnt very much, the room had fallen in; that part of the building was considerably injured. I examined 27, the fire left a very strong mark there, there was a burnt place in the floor, just at the end of the foot of the bed; the floor of 28 was very much burnt indeed.

Q. Were there any means by which the fire of the wood loft could be communicated to 27 and 28. - A. Certainly not.

Q. Would any persons bringing wood out of that garret, come past there. - A. I should think it highly improbable, it is an hundred yards distance.

Q. There is a party wall between them, is there not. A. Yes.

Q. Was that wall injured by fire. - A. Certainly not, the wall was perfect.

Q. Did you afterwards examine the rooms 16 and 98. - A. Yes; 16 was very much injured; the floor of 16 was burnt through into the coffee room; 98 was as if the fire had come through 16 to 98, and not as if it originated in 98; in 21 the curtains and vallens were consumed, and the panes of glass in the windows were cracked; it evidently shewed that there was a great degree of heat; glass that has been cracked by fire, the lines have a different appearance from those effected by a blow.

Q. Did you see a candle in the room. - A. I cannot take upon me to say at this distance of time whether I did or no.

Q. Was there any communication that you could trace between that fire and any of the others. - A. None whatever.

Q. From what you have seen of this closet, was there any thing that this fire in the closet could be communicated by any of the other fires. - A. I think certainly not.

Q. In consequence of what you saw there did you ask any questions of Mr. Williams, and did he give you any account of the fire. - A. He did; which account I took down in writing at the time. I have now the original writing in my hand.

Court. Did you take it down so that Williams saw you were taking it down from him. - A. Certainly; we were at a table together, and I had pen, ink, and paper from the inn. That was on the morning of the 30th of December, the morning after the fire. (The examination read.)

Mr. Gurney. Did he at that time mention to you about the fire in the closet. - A. Not a word.

Q. You also examined some of the servants. - A. I did.

BENJAMIN TAYLOR . - Mr. Bolland. I believe you are the acting churchwarden of St. Lawrence Jewry. - A. I am the beadle.

Q. In what parish is the Swan and Two Necks. - A. St Lawrence Jewry, in the ward of Cripplegate Within.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is alledged against me; had the premises been destroyed I should have been totally ruined. I thank my friends for their assistance.

MR. DICKSON. - Serjeant Best. You are an officer in the army. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you dine there on the 29th of December 1805. - A. I did.

Q. Who dined in company with you. - A. Mr. Muiret, his wife, and two ladies; we sat down to dinner at half after two or three o'clock, in the bar parlour.

Q. Did you continue with him till the alarm of fire was given. - A. I did.

Q. Is the bar parlour a great distance from the garret where the fire was. - A. A great way.

Q. From the time that you dined till the alarm of fire was given, was the prisoner at the bar out of the room time sufficient to have gone to that place. - A. I do not think he left the room for two minutes; when he did leave the room some gentleman called out where is the master of the yard; he was not out more than a minute or two minutes at any time; I am certain of it, or else I would not say it.

Q. Do you remember the alarm of fire being given. A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect by whom the alarm was given. A. I do not.

Q. Upon the alarm of fire being given, what was done. - A. Mr. Williams and me went up, and we did every thing that possibly could be done; Mr. Williams was very much agitated and hurt.

Q. During the time you were at dinner, till the alarm of fire, did you perceive any agitation upon him. A. None at all.

Q. Did Mr. Williams give directions for putting the fire out. - A. He assisted, as well as myself; he ordered the engines, and he asked for the keys of the church, I fancy to put his goods in.

Q. Did you observe Mr. Williams during the fire, till it was put out. - A. Most of the time.

Q. You observed him during the whole time. - A. I did.

Q. From what you saw, did he appear to be doing all he could do, in order to put out the fire. - A. Upon my honour he did.

Court. You are upon your oath. - A. Upon my oath, my lord, he did all he could.

Mr. Serjeant Best. I believe, sir, the ladies left you. - A. They did; I believe they went to Mrs. Williams' mother.

Court. Did you dine there by accident or by invitation. - A. It was an invitation; I lodged in the house two or three months prior to that.

JAMES MUIRET . - Mr. Dancy. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Williams. - A. I have known him nine or ten years; at the time the fire happened I was an inmate of his family.

Q. How long had you been so. - A. From the time that he separated from his partner. Mr. Simpson. the July preceding; at that time it was his particular request that I should reside in it, having leisure hours in my own business, which I could be of service to him.

Q. Do you recollect at what time you dined on that day, when the fire took place. - A. About three o'clock.

Q. What company dined there. - A. Mr. Dickson, his wife, myself, Mr. and Mrs. Williams, and another gentleman.

Q. From the time of dinner did your company continue till the fire broke out, did the ladies continue with you or go else where. - A. The ladies continued till between four and five.

Q. The company consisted of yourself, Mr. Dickson, and Mrs. Dickson, Mrs. Williams, and the prisoner; at what time did the fire break out. - A. About six o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Williams being absent during that time. - A. No more than going into the bar to put any thing down, or when he was called out, then he returned immediately.

Q. You call this room in which you dined, the bar parlour. - A. Yes.

Q. Can you see from the bar parlour into the bar itself. - A. Yes, the division is of glass.

Q. Was he with you at the time the fire broke out. - A. Yes.

Q. Had there been any thing in his manner, that any thing extraordinary was likely to take place. - A. Nothing at all; he was perfectly cheerfull and paid attention to his guests.

Q. You say it was about six o'clock when you first heard the alarm of fire. - A. Yes, on or about six when we first heard any alarm.

Q. Do you recollect who made that alarm to you. - A. No, one of the servants came in very much flurried; I do not know which it was; the fire was at the back of the premises.

Q. What did Mr. Williams do on that occasion. - A. Nothing more than anxious to render any assistance, giving directions for water to be taken up. He appeared to act perfectly as he ought to have done; I carried up water myself.

Q. How near might you go with the water to where the fire was. - A. I went into the narrow passage where the fire was; it was so full of smoke I was obliged to leave it; I threw the water along the passage, in hopes of it getting to the fire. A great many other persons carried up water; there was a great quantity of water carried up, but I do not think if the engines had not come, it would have put it out. Mr. Williams placed himself in the bar, from whence he could see what was done, and he gave directions.

Q. Were there many persons engaged in getting the fire under. - A. Yes, all the servants, and I think as many as twenty, rendered every exertion possible.

Q. How long since you first heard the alarm of fire, before the engines were brought. - A. I was so busy employed, I did not observe when the engines came; the firemen were in the house and got the pipes up before I observed it.

Q. Until the engines came, did Mr. Williams continue to act in the way you have described. - A. He did.

Q. When that was got under, do you recollect what became of Mr. Williams. - A. Mr. Dickson and I went up to his wife, to break out this intelligence to her.

Q. You did go and break this intelligence. - A. I did; she was at her father in law's. Mr. Williams said he would follow as soon as he could get things in order. He came, and returned with him and Mr. Dickson to the inn.

Q. Were there any exertion made with respect to the furniture, what was done with that. - A. I saw a quantity of furniture taken out of the house; I was told it was taken to the church, particularly the plate, of which Mr. Williams had great quantity.

Q. There was a considerable confusion during this business. - A. A very great confusion indeed, the servants were flying in all directions.

Q. It was after day, it was dark, so as to require candles. - A. Yes.

Q. Had the servants got candles with them. - A. I do not recollect seeing persons with candles, I was principally in that part of the house where the fire began.

Q. There were a great many rooms about this place. - A. Near one hundred.

Q. How long did you continue at the inn after the time that you returned to it. - A. I think I might stay up about an hour, then I went to bed.

Q. Then had any other fire taken place in any other room than that garret. - A. I understood there had, I saw it in the morning, at No. 27; I slept at the further extremity from the fire, I heard nothing of it till the morning.

Q. Can you tell me how many firemen there were. - A. Thirty or forty I think; I left them there when I went to Mrs. Williams, I think they were encreased when I came back; and when I got up in the morning the firemen were there.

Q. Did Mr. Williams seem anxious of extinguishing the fire. - A. He did; when I came to him in the bar, to ask him to let the firemen have a little liquor, he told me to do as I like, and take it to them to increase their exertion, which I did.

GEORGE KING THORN . - Mr. Alley. You are a publican living in Lothbury. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day that the fire happened at Mr. Williams' house. - A. Yes, I think I do, I went there in the evening about eight o'clock, I saw Mr. Williams there; I remained there till ten o'clock.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing Mr. Williams' conduct. - A. Yes, he seemed very fatigued in assisting to get the fire under. The next day I saw Triggey, I asked him if he could ascertain by what means the fire happened, his answer was, he did not know, he was not there when the fire began; I asked him how the second

fire began, he said it must be by removing the furniture from one place to another. A day or two after he told me had been examined, and the company were perfectly satisfied.

Cross examined by Mr. Gurney. How many fires did Triggey shew you. - A. Two.

Q. Did he shew you that there had been a fire in the closet. - A. No, he never pointed out the fire in the closet.

GEORGE THORN . - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am an attorney, I live in Leatherseller's-buildings, London Wall. I am the son of the last witness.

Q. On the evening of the fire were you at the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes, I attended my father about eight o'clock in the evening; I heard the alarm of fire at the inn, I went as a friend of Mr. Williams; I found the house in great confusion; the first fire had been put out. I was in the bar, I saw persons carrying things backwards and forwards.

Q. Did you observe whether they had candles or lights in their hands. - A. There was a great many lights carried about; when the fire was said to be extinguished Mr. Williams seemed exhausted by fatigue; there was a second alarm of fire when I was there; when that second fire was extinguished, Triggey came into the bar, he was warm, and appeared as if he had exhausted himself on the occasion; he complained of persons moving the goods from one room to another, and he thinking it his duty, had gone into several rooms, and by accident saw the second fire; he said it was by the d - d foolish conduct of carrying the things from one room to another.

MR. WATERHOUSE. - Mr. Serjeant Best. I believe you have some interest in this inn. - A. I am the landlord; the horses belong to me.

Q. The tavern part to Mr. Williams. - A. Yes; I carry on the coach business. When the fire was first discovered, I had just been round all my stables to see that all was right; there is seven mails go from my yard of a Sunday night at six o'clock.

Q. Who gave the alarm of fire. - A. I think one of Mr. Williams's servants, he hallooed out to me he believed the stables were on fire; I told him it was impossible to be there, because I had just left the stable; I looked into the front yard which adjoins the stables, I discovered it blazing out; I then said it is in the house. Mr. Williams's waiter or porter, I don't know which, he run in the house and called Mr. Williams from the bar parlour; he came running to me, and said my stable was on fire; it did appear to a person coming from where he was, as if it came from the stable; it is a double roof.

Q. Did Mr. Williams take any pains to put the fire out. - A. He immediately called his servants together, and told them to get the keys of the church to put the best of his plate and furniture in.

Q. I believe you have some interest in this concern. A. Yes, I should have been ruined had not the fire been got under, I am not half insured.

Q. Who gave the order for the engines. - A. Mr. Williams and myself.

Q. Do you remember of there being any failure of water for the supply of the engines. - A. We are supplied with water from two companies, the New River and the Thames; the New River pipe failed. I communicated it to Mr. Williams, he said that he was afraid that we should all be burned down and ruined.

Q. Did you see Triggey. - A. I saw him the next day; I wished to see where these fires had been, and what damage had been done; he took me to the wood room garret.

Q. Did he take you all round. - A. No, to no other place than that; I asked him how he could account for that, he said God knows how the first began, he said he could not account for the other, no way but this, but by the confusion of the servants leaving candles in the rooms too close to the bed furniture.

JOHN FLETCHER . - Mr. Dancy. You are waiter to this inn. - A. I have been waiter there two years and a half.

Q. Do you remember on the day this accident took place, the company dining in the bar parlour with your master. - A. Yes, captain Dickson was one of them.

Q. How early in the evening was it that you heard any thing of the fire. - A. About a quarter after six.

Q. Where did it appear to you to come from. - A. From the back part of the buildings, a great way from the bar parlour.

Q. When you first saw the appearence of fire, it was at the top of the inn; when you first saw it where was your master. - A. I believe he was then in the parlour; we went to the parlour to him.

Q. Who are the persons you speak of besides yourself. - A. Henry Brand , and Thomas Nichols , who are also waiters in the house. We told him there was a fire which we believed to be at the top of the house; he gave directions to get the keys of the church to put the plate in; and the company immediately began to lend their assistance to get the flames under; water was carried up, and I believe I saw Mr. Williams on the third pair of stairs, he brought up brandy for us to drink.

Q. Was water carried up by different persons to this lumber garret. - A. Yes, by all the gentlemen in the parlour, and by the servants in the house.

Q. Did you carry water up. - A. Yes, I took water up and threw it in the room.

Q. How long was it after the fire was first discovered before the firemen came with the engines. - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q. Were you getting it under then - A. Yes, it had begun to decrease at the back part, after the sky-light had taken fire, it was near seven o'clock when the sky-light had taken fire.

Q. After the engines did arrive was that fire got completely out. - A. I believe it was; I did not see the second fire till the next day, that was in No. 27; Mr. Williams went to bed soon after one o'clock; he gave me the keys of the bar, he said I might as well set up during the remainder of the night. About three o'clock in the morning the firemen came to the bar door and knocked, they told me they thought it was not all safe; they asked me to give them candles, I did. That fire was in No. 16.

Q. In consequence of the alarm of that fire; did you call Mr. Williams. - A. I did, I found him in No. 61, or 62; he was in bed.

Q. Did you see him in bed. - A. Yes, I saw the shirt on his breast; I informed him what had happened, he got up immediately and came down, the engines then had just began to work; the fire was at No. 16. After that there was a fire discovered in No. 28; the furniture was consuming without a flame, it was mouldering,

it was like a rag that had been partly burnt.

Q. Was it a bed room. - A. It was, I saw that fire.

Court. Do you know of any instance of furniture being removed from one room to another. - A. I do not of my own knowledge; the furniture was removed in great confusion from different parts of the house to the coach office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Did you during that night know any thing of the fire in the closet, 66. - A. I did not; I accidentally went in the room 66, I thought I smelt a very strong smell of fire; I mentioned it to the cook, he went up and looked at it, and Mrs. Simpson.

Q. What condition did you find that closet, were they like these boards (shewing the boards produced by Mr. Nalder.) - A. I did not perceive that they had been burnt through; they were nearly like as those are now.

LUKE PARK . - Mr. Alley. Were you a waiter at the coffee-house at the time this fire happened. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of having discovered this fire, did you communicate it to Mr. Williams. - A. Yes; he said for God's sake do all that lies in your power.

Q. From your observation of his conduct was it the conduct a man would assume anxious to put out a fire. - A. It was.

Q. When the confusion that the fire created, and while it continued, did you observe any furniture carried from one room into another. - A. It was brought down the stair-case where the fire first began and carried towards 27.

Court. Did you see any carried into 27; are you aware of the distance from No. 27 to where the fire first began. - A. I do not know the distance, I know it was carried there.

Q. Do not you go through a circuitous passage; be upon your guard upon this occasion; did you see the furniture taken from the top of the house where this wood-garret was, carried through three distinct stair-cases, the distance of an hundred yards, and that you saw the furniture taken towards No. 27. - A. I did not see the garret.

MISS MATHEWS. - Mr. Serjeant Best. You, I believe, are sister to Mrs. Williams. - A. Yes.

Q. You know Triggey. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever in your presence say that Mr. Williams had been guilty of a crime. - A. Yes.

Court. What did he say in your presence to the disadvantage of the prisoner. - A. Mr. Williams told him he was a rascal, or something like; Triggey said I am a man, and no sodomite. Mr. Williams said what do you infer from that, do you mean to impute it to me; Triggey said what did I bore the holes in No. 39 and 40 for, but to look through.

Q. Did Triggey address this conversation to you. - A. No.

Q. Was this dispute between Williams and Triggey in your presence. - A. Yes, and Triggey was discharged that night.

WILLIAM HENRY RAINSDON . - Mr. Dancey. Did you happen to be in company with Mr. Williams and the last witness. - A. I was up in Triggey's room at the time of the quarrel.

Q. There was a quarrel between Triggey and Mr. Williams, and Miss Mathers was by; did you hear any part of what Triggey said. - A. I did; I took particular notice of the words; Triggey said I am a man and no sodomite, there was more conversation but I did not hear it; I heard what I have mentioned; it particularly struck me at the moment. That was the evening he was turned away.

MATHEW MORE. - Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am clerk to the bank of England.

Q. Where you in the house the next morning after the fire. - A. Yes. I asked Mr. Triggey if he could account for the way in which the fire had happened; he said he could not account for the first. The second fire had happened in removing the goods by a candle having been left near the bed in a hurry.

Mr. Bolland. Did he say any thing to you about the fire in the closet. - A. He did not.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18070408-91

346. LUCAS CARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Payne .

JOHN PAYNE . I am a bricklayer , 36, Bread-street, Cheapside .

Q. When did you miss these trowser. - A. On the 16th of March; on the 28th the prisoner had them on, when the constable took him. I lost them from the tool house at Hoxton.

- HAWES. On the 28th of March John Payne told me the prisoner had the trowsers on; he was plaistering in his master's buildings when I took him.

Mr. Arabin. He very readily told you where he took them from. - A. Yes.

Q. (to prosecutor) He was at work in your own premises. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever tell him of it till you quarreled with him. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-92

347. ANN JONES and ANN GRETRIX were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , a bushel of apples, value 6 s. the property of William Johnson .

- LAWNER. I am a fruit salesman in Covent-garden . On the 4th of this month I saw Ann Gretrix . bring a bushel of apples from Mr. Johnson's place, in a bushel basket, she emptied them out into her basket the other kept watching towards Mr. Johnson's stand, which gave me a suspicion that they were not paid for; I asked Mr. Johnson if he had sold them, he said no; he pursued them.

WILLIAM WATERS . I am a bricklayer. I was standing by Mr. Johnson's stand; I saw the prisoner Gretrix take the apples.

Jones' Defence. As I was going round the market I saw this woman, she asked me to give her a hand up, I helped her; I went round the market to buy some things, I saw a mob; a little time after I went to see what was the matter, I saw this woman again; I helped her up with them. I am innocent of the charge.

Gretrix' Defence. I gave six shillings and six-pence for that bushel of apples to a man. I asked this woman to give me a hand up; that gentleman stopped me.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I was there for three hours, nobody asked me the price.

Jones called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Gretrix called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

JONES, NOT GUILTY .

GRETRIX, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-93

349. MARY BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , a coat, value 20 s. a waiscoat, value 10 s. a neck handkerchief, value 2 s. and a pair of braces, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Hillier .

JOSEPH HILLIER . I am a farmer . On the 20th of April, I had been with a friend, I was going back to the coffee house; being a stranger to the place, I enquired the way of the prisoner, she said she would shew me, and took me into several gin shops, to get me a lodging; she said they were gone to bed where I was going; she told me I had better go with her; she took me up stairs in a yard; I pulled off my coat and waistcoat.

Q. Were you sober. - A. I was not tipsey, I was what you call comfortable, I knew what I was about. She blew the candle out and left me in the room; she took my coat, waistcoat, braces, and neckcloth; the people told me I had better not go out; I told them if I was a countryman, I was afraid of no man; I unbuttoned the door and jumped out; I ran into the next house, the watchman was sitting there, I called him to my assistance.

Q. Where was this. - A. In Dyot-street, St Giles' .

Q. You had not been to sleep. - A. No, I said I would not go to bed.

WILLIAM LANE . I am a watchman in Dyot-street. On Friday morning about four o'clock this gentleman came to me.

Q. You were in a house. - A. I went in for a light; he told me he had been robbed; I went after the girl, I found her sitting at the bottom of the street with the salop woman, with the things in her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman went up stairs with me, I was never in such a place before; I insisted upon his not taking his clothes off, as I did not know who was in the room; he would take them off, and insisted of me taking care of them; I said you had better put them under your head; there was but a little bit of candle, I said I will go and get a candle, I put them in my lap, I could not get a candle; the salop woman said I have got a candle at home; I sat down at the door with her, while the candle was fetched. The gentleman and the watchman came up, they said I had robbed him of his things; I did not intend to robbed him of his thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-94

350. THOMAS BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , twelve pound weight of packthread, value 9 s. the property of William Goldsworthy .

JOHN CORMICK . I live in Redman's-row, Mile-end, New-town , I had been robbed three nights; on the fourth night, the 12th of March, I was sitting up in the ground to watch; between seven and eight, I saw from a light at a distance some person was crossing the ground; he had not been in the ground more than a minute, before I heard the work fall; in a little time he past by me, rolling it up on his hand. I stepped across the ground, and told him it was of no use to make any resistance; he threw down the work that he had in his hand; I immediately laid hold of him; it turned out to be the prisoner; he had about twelve pound weight of packthread.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. Nine shillings: we were making it for Mr. Goldsworthy.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-95

351. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of March , four quartern loaves, value 4 s. the property of James Imray .

WILLIAM YOULDEN . I am servant to Mr. Imray, a baker . On the 3d of March, between the hours of twelve and one, I left my basket at Mr. Stubbs' gateway, Whitechapel ; I had a stone's throw to go when I pitched the basket; I had seven quartern loaves and two half quarterns; when I came back I found four qurrterns gone.

CHARLES LOVEL . I was passing by Mr. Stubb's, between twelve and one o'clock; I saw the prisoner take four loaves out of the basket; in about five minutes I saw the baker, I told him the basket had been robbed; I shewed him the way the man went that took the loaves.

Q. (to Youlden) Did this young man shew you the way the prisoner went. - A. Yes, I pursued him; I over took the prisoner in Montague-street. I found four loaves on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in distress, I had been out of work.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18070408-96

352. ANN ALLEN was indicted for that she having been convicted of uttering bad money, afterwards, on the 11th of February , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good piece of lawful current money, called a sixpence, as and for a good sixpence unlawfully did utter to James Randel White , she at the same time knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWEL . I believe you assist the solicitor of the mint, in these prosecutions. - A. I do.

Q. You produce a copy of the record, of the conviction of this woman in September session 1805. - A. I do; I have examined it with the original, in the office of Mr. Shelton; it is a true copy, (read in court).

JOHN RAY . You are an officer of Worship-street. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, perfectly well.

Q. Did you apprehend her previous to the time of her last conviction. - A. I did. I was present at her-trial.

Q. Is she the person that was convicted by this record that has been read. - A. The very same.

Q. Did you hear the judgment pronounced. - A. I did.

JAMES RANDEL WHITE . Q. You are employed by Messrs Wells and Fisher, they are haberdashers in Fleet-street . - A. They are.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to your shop. - A. I do, on the 11th of February, between eight and nine in the morning; she came into the shop alone, as she had frequently done before; there was a girl waiting outside of the shop. I had frequently turned the prisoner away for bringing of bad money. She came that morning for a quarter of an ounce of thread, which came to a penny, I gave it her, she produced the sixpence which I have here; I gave her five pennyworth of halfpence in change; she then went out of the shop. In a few minutes after, the girl that was with her came into the shop, she produced a fellow sixpence to the one that I had taken; she wanted a quarter of an ounce of thread; I told her I thought the sixpence was bad, I returned her the sixpence she gave me, keeping the other. She went away. After shewing both the sixpences to one of the partners, I went out of the shop on purpose to follow them. I saw Mr. Browning, an assistant in the shop, he went in pursuit of them; I have had it ever since (producing it).

- BROWNING. Q. You also assist in this shop of Messrs. Wells and Fisher. - A. I do; I pursued the prisoner, I had seen the girl in the shop, I afterwards saw the girl join in company with the prisoner. I followed them down Fetter-lane till they came to Hatton-garden; the girl went into a shop and offered a bad sixpence; I went for an officer, and while I was gone the girl made her escape. When I came back the officer took the prisoner in custody.

JONATHAN TROTT . I apprehended the prisoner. I asked her what she had got in her left hand, she said nothing; I unclenched her hand; in it I found this sixpence, which I produce; she had eight pence in her pocket, and four or five small quantities of thread; she denied knowing the girl, and ever having been in prison before.

Q. (to Powell) Look at the sixpence uttered. - A. That is a counterfeit; the other sixpence found in her hand is the same make as the other.

Prisoner's Defence. To the best of my knowledge it was a good sixpence.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that Time to find Sureties for good Behaviour for Two Years afterwards .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-97

353. CATHERINE RICHARDS and JOHN CARTER were indicted for that they on the 2nd of April , one piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of good and lawful money of this realm, as and for a good seven shilling piece unlawfully did utter to George Macguire , they at that time knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GEORGE MACGUIRE . I live at 29, Fore-street, Cripplegate , I am a grocer . The boy John Carter came in the shop last Thursday evening about seven o'clock, just at the time of lighting of candles; he offered this seven shilling piece for half an ounce of tea and half a pound of sugar; I asked the boy if he had passed any seven shilling pieces for the same purpose; after I had weighed it, he said eleven besides that; the seven shilling piece would not weigh a five and threepenny piece; I asked the boy if he had any acknowledgment for passing them; he said sometimes a penny, two pence, and three pence, and sometimes more for passing them, and the whole of them was passed that week. Catherine Richards came in to know what the boy was so long about; I told the woman it was a bad seven shilling piece; I asked the boy if that was the woman that gave him the seven shilling piece, he said yes; the woman also said it was her own seven shilling piece; I then asked the boy if that was the person that sent him with the other eleven, he said yes; the woman said the boy told an untruth and frightened the boy, saying his mother would punish him for telling stories; the boy then denied what he had said. The boy said he lived in some court in the neighbourhood with the prisoner.

- ROSOMON. Q. You are an officer; did you take the prisoners. - A. Yes; I produce a seven shilling piece that was given me by Mr. Macguire, I have had it ever since. The prisoner Richards told me that she bought this seven shilling piece of Sarah Ash , who lived at a gingerbread baker's London Wall. I took her there; Sarah Ash denied it.

MR. POWELL. Q. Look at that seven shilling piece, and tell me whether it is a counterfeit. - A. It is a counterfeit.

Mr. Peal addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoners.

RICHARDS, GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and find Sureties for her good Behaviour .

CARTER, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-98

354. STEPHEN PARKER was indicted for that he on the 10th of February , by means of false pretence, unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, did obtain of and from John Thorman , two pound weight of tea, value 16 s. three pound weight of moist sugar, value 2 s. and three pound weight of loaf sugar, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas Palmer , Archibald Palmer , and William Allies , with intent to cheat and defraud them of the same .

JOHN THORMAN . I am shopman to Messrs. Palmer and Co. On the 10th of February last the prisoner came to our house with a written order, directed to Messrs. Palmer and Co.; this order was delivered into my hands; the contents were - Gentlemen, let the bearer have two pounds of eight shilling tea, three pounds of moist sugar, and three pounds of loaf sugar, and I will call and pay you.

JOHN STOUT , Steward of the Trinity yatcht.

Q. Do you know Mr. Stout. - A. Yes, he is a customer; my not having any knowledge of the prisoner, or of Mr. Stout's hand-writing, I asked him several questions, which he answered me in a satisfactory way; I put up the goods, and the prisoner took them away. On Saturday Mr. Stout came to our shop, I asked him if he had sent any person with an order, he said no, he knew nothing of the note; the prisoner said after he was taken, he did it through want.

JOHN STOUT . I am steward of the Trinity yacht.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. I know him perfectly

well; twenty-three years ago he was an apprentice to a school master in Rotherhithe.

Q. Did you ever send him to Messrs. Palmer's - A. No, I never gave him any order or verbal message whatever to go there.

Prisoner's Defence. I appeal to this honourable court, to shew me mercy.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070408-99

355. BENJAMIN ISAACS , JOHN RYE , and WILLIAM WELLDON , were indicted for a conspiracy .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

JOHN EDWARD EVE . Q. You are a salesman attending Smithfield market . - A. I am.

Q. What is the course of the trade with respect to the sale, to whom is the money paid. - A. To the bookkeeper who resides in Smithfield, different salesmen has different bookkeepers; my money receiver or bookkeeper was Mr Coles, No. 87, Smithfield; after the beast is agreed for I send my drover to see if the money is paid to the bookeeper before the beast is delivered.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Welldon. - A. I have some recollection of his person. On the 16th of March he had the appearence of a butcher, he came to me about eight o'clock on that day; he asked the price of the beast, and he agreed for it.

Q. What was he to pay for it. - A. Eighteen guineas, it was a red heifer, with white along her back; when he bought it, I asked him what his name was, he said put it down in the name of Rye; he marked the beast. On his examination he said Rye was with him; I did not see Rye at that time.

Q. Do you recollect the bullock going away. - A. I do not.

- RHODES. Q. What are you. - A. I am a drover to any body. On the 16th of March, I saw Benjamin Isaacs , between nine and ten o'clock, he asked me if I would lend him an hand out with two beasts.

Q. At that time did you see either of the other two prisoners there. - A. No, I went with Isaacs and helped to untie the beasts at Mr. Eve's place, where the beasts stood.

Q. When you came there, did you find a red heifer with a white mark down its back. - A. Yes; and Mr. Eve was there, Isaacs untied the heifer, Mr. Eve asked me if I took the heifer. I said, no, I only helped a hand out of it; he asked if it was was paid for, Isaacs made answer, it was all right; that was all that past.

Q. What became of the heifer. - A. I lent him a hand up Duke-street, Smithfield, and after that I saw Isaacs in Bishopsgate street; he had the two beasts then.

MARY DISTELL . Q. What are you. - A. I am a widow, I keep a slaughter-house; I live at 165, Church street, Bethnall-green .

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes. On the 16th of March, Mr. Welldon and Rye were at my house, killing a couple of beasts; one was a red heifer with white down its back, the other was a bullock; I did not know who they belonged to when they came in; I and my servant opened the door and let them in; one was horns and the was polled .

Q. Did you hear whether they belonged to Welldon . - A. Welldon took some of the beef away; they were slaughtered by Welldon and Rye; Isaacs and Rye came with the beasts.

CHARLOTTE - Do you recollect the beasts being brought by Isaacs and Rye. - A. They were; one was red with white marks down the back; I saw Mr. Welldon come on the next day and take two quarters away.

WILLIAM COX . Q I believe you are a salesman in Leadenhall-market. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know Welldon. On the 16th and 17th of March I was not at market, I was unwell, I live at Camberwell; on the 18th I come to town by the ten o'clock coach; when I got home it was eleven; in about a quarter of an hour I saw Welldon's son; in consequence of what past between Welldons son and me, he fetched his father and Rye; when they came into my room Welldon said he wanted money for six quarters of beef, says I, I do not think I shall pay you for them Welldon, I have my doubts, this beef has not been honestly come by; Rye then made answer, if you do not chuse to pay for them, we shall get a writ against you; they seemed both of them to make an equal demand for the money; I asked Welldon to tell me how he came by the beasts, the answer was, that they bought one of Mr. Eve, and one of Mr. Durant, I believe the name was; I said have you paid for them, he said that is nothing to you, if you do not pay me I will arrest you; upon that that I paid him twenty pound, six shillings, and eleven pence.

JOSHUA COLES . You I believe are the bookkeeper to Mr. Eve. - A. Yes, I am the person to whom the money is paid for the bullocks sold by Mr. Eve.

Q. Did you receive any money for the heifer. - A. I did not, there is entry made in the name of Rye, but no money received. That entry is made by Mr. Eve on the subsequent part of the day, after he had finished his business.

Court (to prosecutor). How came you not to send your drover to see if the money was paid before the heifer was taken away. - A. I never was applied to to take it away, they took it without my knowledge.

Q. Rhodes' evidence is, that you saw it, you asked if it was paid for; Isaacs said, it is-all right; I helped him out with it, and drove them down Duke-street. - A. I do not remember any such circumstance; had he asked me to take it, I should have said, you shall not take it till the money is paid; the man being a stranger.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. When were they taken. - A. On the Friday morning.

Q. Isaacs was taken in the market, I believe. - A. He was, my drover had them taken up.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury, on behalf of the defendants.

ISAACS, NOT GUILTY .

RYE, and WELDON, BOTH GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and to be placed upon the Pillory in West Smithfield, between the hours of Twelve and Three o'Clock, upon a Market-Day; within the first Month .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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