Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th February 1807.
Reference Number: 18070218
Reference Number: f18070218-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 18th of FEBRUARY, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON. By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1807.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; JOHN HEATH , Esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; SIR THOMAS MANNERS SUTTON, Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Nathaniel Newnham , Esq. Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart. Sir Charles Price , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , Esq. Sir Matthew Bloxam , Knt. George Scholey , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Sylvanus Phillips ,

John Skipper ,

John Wright ,

Thomas Lane ,

Michael Trotter ,

Joseph Ray ,

Samuel Matthews ,

Collin Ross ,

John Benson .

Richard Riley ,

Edward Sage ,

Matthew Chesham.

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

James Herbert ,

William Hamilton ,

Jonathan Thompson ,

James Powell ,

William Cook ,

James King ,

George Dodson ,

John Williams ,

Thomas Moreton ,

George Sarr ,

William Armstrong ,

James Driver.

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Walter Thwaites ,

James Fisher ,

Ralph Webb ,

Henry Seabourne ,

Roger Percal ,

James Livingston ,

Thomas Wheatley ,

Thomas Horne ,

John Linsey ,

Robert Kennedy Dickwell ,

Richard Hallett ,

Thomas Durant .

Reference Number: t18070218-1

171. JOHN HOLLOWAY , alias OLIVER , and OWEN HAGGERTY , alias EGGERTY , were indicted for the wilful murder of John Cole Steele .

THOMAS STEPHEN GERARD MEYER . - Mr. Alley. What business are you. - A. I am a distiller of lavender water.

Q. Are you any relation of the deceased Mr. Steele. - A. I am his wife's brother.

Q. Where was his town house that he carried on his business previous to his decease. - A. No. 15, Catherine street in the Strand.

Q. Had he any place near Hounslow heath. - A. He had a place at Feltham, a small house, and a lavender nursery.

Q. Do you recollect in the early part of the month of November, his leaving town for the purpose of going to Feltham. - A. He left town on the 5th of November 1802.

Court. At what hour. - A. It was on Friday in the afternoon.

Q. When was he to return. - A. He did not state any particular time as to his return.

Q. In consequence of his not having returned did you go to Feltham . - A. We understood the fact on the Monday or Tuesday; I went on the Wednesday morning to Feltham to enquire after him.

Q. Were you able to discover him yourself. - A. He was not at his house.

Q. Did you go to the barracks and procure assistance to search on the common for him. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. After you had searched the common did you discover any thing of him. - A. I first discovered his great coat.

Q. Be so good as to tell me where you discovered his great coat. - A. It was on the side of which his house was.

Court. Which side is that. - A. The south side.

Q. You had much better state whether it is the right or left going from Hounslow towards Stains. - A. It was on the left hand going from Hounslow to Stains; that was the side on which his house was.

Mr. Alley. What was the colour of that coat. - A. It was a drab colour.

Q. Was that the same coat that he had on when he left London. - A. It was.

Q. Where did you discover it. - A. In a gravel-pit with rushes over it; it was concealed.

Q. How far from the road was it that you found the coat. - A. About ten or fifteen yards; after I had found the coat I went to the barracks, and with the assistance of the officers and the rest of the men, they discovered it for me; it was on the other side of the road that a discovery had been made of the body, and I came up the moment after it.

Q. Whose body was it. - A. The body of Mr. Steele, I saw the flap of the coat thrown over him. I did not see his features at the time.

Q. You had an opportunity afterwards of discovering that it was his body. - A. Yes.

Q.Which side of the road was the body discovered. - A. Of the right hand side of the road, on the opposite side of the road; I suppose it might be two hundred yards distance from the road, the hat was brought up to me by Henry Mandy ; he brought me an old hat, I picked up a piece of the hat myself besides.

Q. Did you see any thing of a stick. - A. I saw a stick afterwards at Bow street.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing whether your deceased brother put any mark on the hat he had from the hatters. - A. He used almost to write his name in every thing he had, I cannot say whether he did in this hat, he used to write his name in full length.

Q. Soon after there was an advertisement in the paper, stating a reward for the persons that committed it of fifty-pounds; was that to be paid sir, and by whom. - A. It was to be paid by the family.

HENRY MANDY . - Mr. Gleed. Where did you live in November 1802. - A. I lived at Feltham.

Q. You were at that time inspector of the works belonging to Mr. Steele. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you recollect Mr. Steele being down there. - A. Yes, on Saturday the 6th of November 1802.

Q. What time did he leave Feltham that day. - A As near seven as posible.

Q. When he left Feltham, do you recollect in what manner he was dressed. - A. He had on a light great coat, and striped waiscoat, and half boots.

Q. What hat had he on. - A. A round hat.

Q. I wish to know whether you recollect whether the hat was new or old. - A. It had been wore a little while, it was not quite a new hat.

Q. What was Mr. Steele custom to do of a Saturday, was it not customary for him to come down of a Saturday to pay the workmen. - A. He never came particularly of a Saturday, he came on any day, I was the person that paid the men.

Q. I do not know whether you know whether he took any money away from Feltham that night or not. - A. Yes, twenty six or seven shillings.

Q. In consequence of some application made to you, you searched Hounslow-heath. - A. Yes.

Q. On what day was that after the accident happened. - A. It was on Wednesday following.

Q. Upon searching the heath did you find any thing belonging to Mr. Steele. - A. When we came to the heath, there were three of us, me,

Mr. Meyer, and another gentleman; Mr. Meyer and I went on the right hand coming from Feltham to town, the other gentleman went on the left.

Q. You went on the right hand side of the road coming to town. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the right hand side of the road did you find any thing. - A. When we came to the third clump of trees, coming to the gravel-pit, I picked up an old hat, that was the right hand side; I picked the hat up, I brought it to Mr. Meyer.

Q. Your attention was drawn to the gravel-pit; in that gravel-pit did you find any thing, or did you see any-thing that was found there. - A. I saw the symptoms of a coat, he desired me to get it up; I put my hand under the flags in the water, I pulled up a great coat.

Q. Was the great coat nearly concealed under the flags. - A. Yes, under the water.

Q. Upon taking up the great coat, to whom did it belong. - A. To Mr. Steele, I hoped it on his back the night he left Feltham.

Q. Were there any marks on the great coat. - A. When we pulled the great coat up and unbuttoned it, we found a speck of blood upon the right shoulder.

Q. You have not answered that first question of mine, was there any particular mark, by which you are enabled to swear that it was Mr. Steele's coat. - A. No particular mark, I knew the coat well.

Q. After you had found the coat, what did you proceed to do next. - A. The other gentleman that went of the left handside of the way, Mr. Meyer, and I consulted together.

Q. Did you continue of the same side or go across. - A. We went across the road, and Mr. Meyer and I went to the barracks, and then we came back again; there was a great many people on the heath when we came back.

Q. All that you found was a great coat and a hat. - A. Yes.

MR. HUGHES - Mr. Gurney. In the month of November 1802 were you employed to search for the body of Mr. Steele. - A. I assisted in the search.

Q. Were you at or near the spot at the time the body was found. - A. I was, I was so near that I was the person that found it. I found it in the ditch by the clump of trees, it was laying in the bottom of the ditch with the bank pulled down which covered the body over.

Q. In what condition was the body. - A. The body was laying on the back, and the flap of the coat was over the face, with a strap round the neck.

Q. How was that strap round the neck. - A. The strap had at one time a buckle, the buckle was broken off and one end of the strap had a knife run through it, and the other end of the strap was drawn through, that it was very tight, the face was all over blood and dirt.

Q. Did you observe any injuries upon the head. - A. Yes, he had a violent blow upon the back part of the head.

Q. Did you observe any other blow on the head. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see the great coat, hat, and shoes, that were found there. - A. Yes, I did.

Court. Did you find the shoes. - A. I did, I found the two shoes about fifty yards from the place where the body was; on the same side of the road, where the body was.

Q. Do you know to whom they were delivered. - A. I believe to Mr. Bacon the beadle.

Q. Did you see them delivered to him. - A. No, I have seen them since at Worship street.

Q. Was there any shoes on the feet of the person, whose body was found. - A. None.

Q. Had the body any hat on - A.No.

MR. HENRY FROGLEY ; examined by Mr. Alley. You are a surgeon. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect after the body had been found on Hounslow heath, seeing the body of Mr. Steele. - A. I saw it at the Ship at Hounslow, on the 10th of November.

Q. You examined the body. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you examine the head particularly - A. Yes.

Q. Describe in what state you found the head A. I found on examining the head, a very large extensive fracture on the front of the head, with a laceration of the integuments, which appeared to me to have been given by a stick, or some blunt instrument; there was also a very large wound, a laceration of the integuments also on the back part of the head, but I did not perceive any fracture of the bone there on the back part of the head. Also there was much injury done to the neck, which was occasioned by the application of a leather strap, being put round it so tight, that this strap would have produced suffocation of itself.

Q. Did you make any other observations. - A. Likewise a very large blow on the upper part of the right arm.

Q. Did that blow appear to have been made by a blunt instrument. - A. A blunt instrument, it was such a blow as a stick would have made. My opinion was, that the blows he received on his head, was the immediate cause of his death.

Q. Were you before the coroner. - A. Yes.

Q. The deceased was there. - A. Yes, and there I examined him; I examined him first on the 10th, and I particularly examined him on the coroner's inquisition.

Q. You saw Mr. Nares. - A. I saw Mr. Nares but whether I saw him there, I do not recollect; I have seen him several times on this occasion.

[Mr. Gurney produced his Majesty's pardon of Benjamin Hanfield , alias Enfield, part of which was read in court.]

BENJAMIN HANFIELD . - Mr. Gurney. Attend to the questions that I ask you, give slow answers, be sure to speak the truth, and nothing but the truth - had you known the two prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known Haggerty. - A. About seven or eight years.

Q. How long have you known Holloway. - A. About six or seven.

Q. Have you known much or little of them. A. A good deal of them both.

Q. Have you been in their company much or little. - A. A good deal in their company.

Q. Was that the case before the month of November 1802. - A. Yes.

Q. At what houses had you used to meet them. A. At the Turk's head in Dyot street, the Black horse in Dyot street, and sometimes the Black dog the corner of Belton street.

Q. Do you remember being in their company in the beginning of the month of December 1802. A. Yes.

Q. Did any thing pass between you about going any where, and state what. - A. John Holloway came to me at the Turk's head in Dyot street; in the beginning of December 1802, he called me out and asked me if I had any objection of being in a good thing, I replied I had not; I asked him when and where, to which he replied it was low toby, meaning a fotpad robbery; I then asked him when and where, he told me he would inform me in the course of a day or two; upon which he came the day but one afterwards.

Q. Who came. - A. John Holloway , I saw him in the street, I asked him if he was ready for what he had proposed, he replied that he was, and that it should be done on the Saturday following; and he replied to me to meet him at the Black horse in Dyot street; I then asked him who was to be with us, he replied Owen Haggerty .

Q. Was it said where you was to go to. - A. Not at that time.

Q. Any thing more said at that time. - A. No more than our meeting afterwards.

Q. Where did you meet afterwards. - A. At the Black horse, as appointed.

Q. On the Saturday following who did you meet afterwards. - A. Owen Haggerty and John Holloway . Owen Haggerty informed me that it was to sarve a gentleman.

Q. What does that language mean. - A. That is, rob a gentleman on Hounslow heath, who he knew had property about him.

Q. How was he to know that that gentleman had property about him. - A. I do not know, it was John Holloway that found it out; we then stopped there till near the middle of the day, and from there we went to Hyde park corner.

Q. Before you went from the Black horse had you any liquor. - A. Yes, we had ale or beer, we had liquor, I cannot say what.

Q. You went away from thence towards Hyde park corner. - A. Yes; and then we proceeded upon the road towards Hounslow till we came to a public house on Turnham green, where we stopped, and had some porter, and from thence we went to Hounslow to the further end of the town, we stopped at the last house, a public house, with some trees before it.

Q. Do you remember the sign. - A. No, I cannot recollect; I have since seen it is the Bell.

Q. At what time did you leave the Bell. - A. As near as I can recollect it was past four o'clock; we then proceeded upon the heath till we came near the eleven mile stone towards Belfont.

Q. In your way there did any conversation pass upon the beginning of your going. - A. Nothing further than common discourse.

Q. Tell us what did pass. - A. Nothing more than we hoped to meet with a good booty.

Q. Was any thing said about how you were to do it. - A. Nothing; Holloway replied, that when we come near the eleven mile stone that that was their mark, but he thought we were too soon.

Q. Did you wait upon the heath any time. A. Yes, we struck out of the road upon the heath, to a place that is near a clump of trees (I have since pointed out the same spot); we waited there a considerable time, I suppose it was better than an hour, as near as I can say, not having a watch.

Q. Did you stay till after dark. - A. It was dark when we got to the clump of trees, or nearly so, but by the time that we had waited there the moon had arose; we walked out from the clump of trees on the left from here, and walked about half an hour, and then returned to the clump of trees.

Q. Which side of the clump of trees. - A. The left from here.

Q. Did you go beyond the eleven mile stone. - A. We turned down to the left just before we came to the eleven mile stone; at the time we were going to nigh where he died the moon was obscured.

Q. Did you observe any person coming across the heath; tell us what passed on the business that you went on. - A. We then came out of the clump of trees; Holloway said he thought he heard a foot, upon which we come out, and went along the road, upon which we could descry the figure of a man coming towards us.

Q. Which way was he coming. - A. Towards Hounslow.

Q. On which side of the road. - A. On the right hand side of the road going from there.

Court. On the right hand as you come to London. - A. Yes; he was near the road, on the path way by the road side, then on drawing near him I ordered him to stop, which he immediately did; Holloway walked behind him, between him and Belfont.

Q. How did he appear to be dressed. - A. He was dressed in a light coloured coat.

Q. Could you see whether it was a common coat or a great coat. - A. I did not observe whether it was a surtout coat or a close-bodied coat. I ordered him to stop and deliver his money, he replied he would willingly do that, and hoped we would not hurt him; Owen Haggerty went between me and the deceased, the deceased put his hand into his pocket, and gave Haggerty something, but what I know not, upon which Holloway asked whether he had delivered his book, I asked him whether he had a book and to deliver it, he replied he had not got any book, upon which Holloway insisted that he had a book, and if he would not deliver it he would knock him down, he replied that he had none, upon which Holloway knocked him down with the stick that he had in his hand.

Q. Could you see where the blow took place. - A. No, I could not.

Q. He was knocked down with a stick. - A. He was knocked down.

Court. Holloway was behind him at that time. A. Yes.

Q. You was before him. - A. Yes, and Haggerty too.

Mr. Gurney. Did the gentleman do or say any thing at that time. - A. I immediately took hold of his legs, and John Holloway stood over him, protesting, that if he said any thing he would knock out his brains.

Q. Did the gentleman say any thing. - A. Yes, he kept crying out, do not ill use me; Owen Haggerty proceeded to search as I described before; Holloway stood over his head, and the deceased made some struggle, and endeavoured to get up, upon which he struggled so hard that he got nearly across the road. He was very strong, it was as much as our main force could do to keep him down; upon which after he was down he cried out severely, after Haggerty proceeded to search him, and at the identical time, the sound of a carriage came near, upon which he made another violent effort to arise, upon which he could not succeed; upon which John Holloway said, I will silence the b - r.

Court. Holloway said that. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. On his second effort to rise before Holloway struck him, he had got off the road, which side was he then, of the common side, on the right hand coming from London. - A. On the opposite side, on the right hand coming from London. Upon his crying out very violently, John Holloway said, he would silence the b - r, John Holloway gave him several divers blows on his head and body.

Q. What size stick was it. - A. I do not know the exact size of it, it was a large black thorn stick; on receiving which the deceased gave a very heavy groan, in the course of half a minute afterwards he gave a second groan, and seemed to stretch out lifeless; upon which stretching himself out, I was a armed for my own safety; I was on my knees holding of his legs, I arose and said, John, you have killed the man; upon which he replied that I told a lie, that he was only stunned; I made him for answer, that I would stop no longer, I should go on to London, he might overtake me; upon which I made the best of my way to London, and came on towards Hounslow, leaving Holloway and Haggerty with him.

Q. You had heard the sound of some carriage wheels, did that sound at all approach you. - A. Yes, it had gone on before, it went by nearly at the time that the deceased groaned.

Q. What carriage did it appear to you to be. - A. I could not make out what it was, it sounded heavy.

Q. Did it go like a coach or a waggon. - A. A coach, it appeared to me as if it was one of the heavy night coaches.

Court. How far were you from it. - A. I suppose we were near thirty yards from it.

Mr. Gurney. You were then thirty yards out of the road. - A. Yes, I cannot ascertain how far we were.

Q. When you quitted them, which way did you come. - A. Towards Hounslow.

Q. How soon did you see either Holloway or Haggerty again. - A. I saw them at the end of Hounslow, I was waiting there near an hour, I saw them near the public house we had been drinking at.

Q. Were you in the house. - A. No, I was waiting there, just opposite the road going to Bath, I was just opposite of that.

Q. Where was the spot that this first took place with respect to the barracks. - A. It was not on the same side of the road, it was beyond the barracks, on the opposite side of the road.

Q. How near do you take it to be to the barracks. - A. I cannot say, the barracks lay to the right of us, some distance behind us.

Q. Have you since pointed out the spot to any person. - A. Yes, to John Vickery and Mr. Hughes, as near as my recollection would allow.

Q. You say that you had waited at Hounslow for near an hour. - A. Yes, or more.

Q. After you had waited there that time, did you see either of them or how. - A. They both came up to me again at Hounslow, at the further end; then when they came they appeared to be out of breath, and John Holloway observed that they had done the trick; upon which I asked John Holloway whether he was in earnest; he told me he was, and as a token of that he shewed me a hat which he had brought away; putting a hat in my hand.

Q. Was that the hat that he had gone down with to Hounslow. - A. No, it was not, I could tell that by the feel, it was a better hat a great deal.

Q. What sort of a hat was that he went to Hounslow in. - A. It resembled a soldier's hat to me.

Q. Has that hat since been shewn you. - A. Yes, before the magistrates at Worship street, but I do not know whether that is the hat or no.

Q. His hat was a hat like it. - A. Yes.

Q. You described the hat before you saw it. - A. Yes.

Q. To whom. - A. To John Vickery .

Q. When Holloway put this hat in your hand, what passed. - A. I returned it to him.

Q. What did you observe upon this. - A. I observed and said it was a cruel piece of business, and I was very sorry that I had any hand in it.

Q. Did you make any enquiry after his own hat. - A. I did; he said he had left it behind, he had served it, meaning he had disfigured it or buried it

Q. Serving, means altering some way or other - A. Some way or other sir.

Q. Did you ask any other question at that time. - A. Haggerty interrupted us, and said that it was time to proceed towards home.

Q. In searching the pockets of the gentleman had you taken any money. - A. No, I did not, I did not attempt to search him.

Q. Who did. - A. Haggerty searched him while I held his legs.

Q. Where did you come to in town. - A. There is one thing to observe, crossing a field I asked him whether they had got the book; Holloway replied, as I had not shared in the danger, I should not share in the spoil.

Q. When you arrived in town you came to the Black horse in Dyot street, what time was it then. A. It was past twelve o'clock when we arrived there, the house was shut up, but they were not gone to bed, we had half a pint of gin there, drank that, and parted for that night.

Q. Did you see each other the next day. - A. Yes.

Q. You have said that when you were going down to Hounslow, Holloway had on an old hat, did Haggerty go down in boots or shoes. - A. He went in shoes, and he made this observation when he went out, that he did not think the shoes would last him there.

Q. Did you observe whether the shoes fitted him well. - A. I did not.

Q. Did he come back in shoes. - A. I do not know, I cannot say whether he did or not.

Q. You saw him again the next day. - A. Yes.

Q. Did any thing pass upon the subject. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you meet the next day. - A. We met at the bottom of Dyot street; I was at the Turk's head on the next day, I saw them at the bottom of the street.

Q. What passed then. - A. I observed John Holloway when I came to him had a hat better than he usually wore, and that it was too small for him; upon which I asked him whether that was the hat that he had got the night before; he replied it was, and we appointed to meet the following day, which was on the Monday.

Q. Did you meet on the Monday. - A. We did, in the afternoon, I was at the Black horse, Owen Haggerty came to me and informed me that John Holloway was at the bottom of the street, I went to him and observed, that he had the same hat on he had the day before; I told him he acted very improper in wearing that hat, it might lead to a discovery, and I said I hoped he would get it done away.

Q. Did you see the inside of the hat. - A. Yes, upon which he took the hat off and gave it to me, and upon which hat in the inside was the name of Steele, upon which I pointed out the danger he was in by wearing it; he replied, that he would get the lining taken out; I told him there might be some marks about the binding or the buckle that might lead to a discovery, and I desired him that he would get it done away with; he replied that he should meet me again in two or three hours; accordingly he came again in the evening with another hat on, and something tied up in a handkerchief; he asked me if I had any objection of going to Westminster with him and Haggerty; we went into Parliament street together, I said I thought it was advisable to throw the hat over the bridge.

Court. What hat. - A. Mr. Steele's hat, the hat that he had worn in the day, he had got that hat in an handkerchief.

Mr. Gurney. You advised him to throw it over the bridge. - A. Yes, upon which he went on the bridge, and wanted to throw it over, I made an objection, I said it might swim; I went opposite to Astley's and filled the hat with stones; tied the lining over it, and we went on to the bridge to the Westminster side, where I throwed the hat over the bridge into the water.

Q. Now I would ask you in what manner were these two men dressed. - A. John Holloway had a short smock frock, a flannel waiscoat under that, and an old hat, apparently to me like a soldier's old hat.

Q. Was that a sort of dress he put on that day, or his usual dress. - A. His usual dress.

Q.What was he by trade. - A. He is of no trade to my knowledge, he had worked at Mr. Willan's at Marylebone, going with his team as a labourer. Haggerty's dress was a velveteen jacket, swansdown waiscoat, and velveteen breeches.

Q. What was he by trade. - A. He used to follow the bricklayers labourer's work, or plaisterers, or something of that kind.

Q. Was that the only day that he was dressed so or his usual dress. - A. His usual dress, sometimes he had the addition of a pair of blue trowsers on.

Q. You were sentenced to transportation, you were in Langston harbour; did the officer come down to you in November. - A. He came down to me in October or November, he brought me up in the Gosport coach.

Q. You came across Hounslow heath. - A. Yes.

Q. As you were crossing the heath, did you point out any thing to Vickrey. - A. I pointed out to the officer the spot where we first met him, I was going to speak but he silenced me.

Q. Had you told him before you came there, that you would give him a signal. - A. No.

Q. But you made some signal to him. - A. Yes.

Q. But you did not go on, why did he prevent you from speaking. - A. Because there was some people by us on the coach.

Q. Have you since been at the spot with Vickrey and Mr. Hughes. - A. Yes, and the beadle of Hounslow was there too.

Cross examined by Mr. Andrews. Hanfield, it is a long time ago all this that you have been stating. - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago was this. - A. In the year 1802.

Q.Did you make any memorandum of any thing that passed in the year 1802, so as to refresh your memory. - A. No, no other remarks than my own conscience.

Q. Then all that you have repeated to day, is from the mere result of your memory without the assistance of any memorandum. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first make this discovery, or when did you first repeat this story. - A. At Worship street.

Q. How many months ago. - A. In September or October last.

Q. Then the first time you repeated this story was in 1806. - A. Yes.

Q. How came you first to tell this story. - A. It was by mere accident.

Q. What was that accident. - A. I was in this jail, we were talking of different robberies that had been committed.

Q. You were talking of different robberies. - A. I do not say myself, we were talking of different robberies, and this unfortunate affair came up, when I said that there were only three men in England that knew it, upon which there was a rumour in the jail, that I wanted to turn Nose, (i. e. to betray his associates), upon which I was obliged to vindicate myself in silence; it struck me forcibly that I was in danger from this accident, and I was sorry for having said it on my own account.

Q. You said it by accident, and was sorry for saying it, and so you were sorry for disclosing the truth. A. I was not sorry for saying the truth, I was only sorry for saying it in that place; I was afraid and thought myself in danger.

Q. Should you ever have disclosed it if it had not been for that accident. - A. I do not know that I might.

Q. Why did not you disclose it further. - A. I was in too much fear.

Q. At the time that this murder was committed, you thought it was a cruel thing. - A. I did.

Q. You took no part in this murder. - A. No I did not, no further then being present.

Q. All that you did was to hold Mr. Steele's legs. A. Yes.

Q. But none of the blows were given while you held his legs. - A. I did not say so.

Q. If you thought it was a cruel and savage thing, why did not you resist it. - A. I knew it was of no utility to resist; I did not go out with any intent to murder.

Q. Can you read. - A. Yes.

Q. Then the moment you saw this hat in your companion's custody, you advised him to conceal it. A. Yes.

Q. Though you thought this was a very cruel thing, and at the time you did not chuse to have a share in the murder, you did not go to complain of this murder that had been commited by your comrades. - A. I did not.

Q. What induced you to make this disclosure, when the gentleman, sir John Carter , came to you. A. Compunction of conscience.

Q. How soon did this compunction come on you. A. It came on me ever since it was done, from the first instance of commission.

Q. How happened it then that in the course of four years you did not go before any magistrate to state it. - A. I was too much to my shame, in the habit of vice to think any thing about it, unless when I was sober in bed, or by myself alone, then I felt it bitterly; I was obliged to fly to company, or to drink to dispel my wretched thoughts.

Q. Have you never heard there is a reward offered for the conviction of a murderer. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever hear of any reward being offered for the apprehension of those who murdered Mr. Steele. - A. Yes.

Q. Notwithstanding that you did not make any disclosure. - A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Wilson. - A.- Yes, I believe I do.

Q. And a person of the name of Welden. - A. I do.

Q. Do you not know Isaac Wise . - A. I do.

Q. Do you know Dalton. - A. I do.

Q. Have you had any conversation with these men concerning this murder. - A. After I was transported I had a conversation with them.

Q. Since last September had you a conversation with Welden, Wise, and Dalton, can you recollect what it was about. - A. No.

Q. You cannot recollect what it was about, was it not about this murder. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Will you swear that you had not a conversation with these men more than once on the subject. - A. I will not.

Q. Will you swear that you cannot recollect whether you had or not. - A. I will not swear that.

Q. But you will swear about this transaction in November 1802, and yet you cannot recollect this transaction. - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Did you ever have any conversation with any body that you had got a something that would put five hundred pounds in your pocket, - A. I said so to a man in the jail, a Mr. Shuter, that a grandfather had died and left me some money, and I thought I should not be able to get it.

Q. Did you never say that by discovering something you could put five hundred pounds into your pocket. - A. No.

Q. You never said, by discovering something you

could put five hundred pounds in your pocket, besides getting your liberty. - A. No.

Q. Then if any body comes forward and swears that they will swear falsely. - A. They will.

Q. It was only compunction of conscience that induced you to make this disclosure. - A. I will swear that.

Q. How often have you been within the walls of this prison. - A. I have been here often, I have been confined in the jail, and. I have been tried and convicted here.

Q. And you were under transportation at the time this discovery was made; what promise was made to you, to induce you to make this discovery. - A. No promise at all.

Q. You had no other motive at all but to unburthen your conscience. - A. I had no other motive.

Q. When you met Holloway, you urged him to go on with the robbery, he did not come to you. - A. He was come for that express purpose, I met him in the street.

Q. You were not at all intending to commit murder. - A. No.

Q. Though the murder was committed, and you knew that the murder had been committed, you did not think it right to go to a justice to get these men committed. - A. No, I did not.

Q. After Mr. Steele was knocked down he went to the other side of the road, partly by your dragging him, and partly by his own exertion; no blows had been given him but by Holloway behind. - A. No.

Q. And the moment you saw this murder done, you went towards Hounslow. - A. Yes.

Q. It was you that proposed the concealing this hat. - A. Yes.

Q.How often have you been a witness for prosecutions. - A. I never was but once before.

Q. How long is that ago. - A. I cannot say, it may be a year and a half.

Q. How often have you informed against persons for burglary to entitle yourself to reward. - A. Never.

Q. Will you swear that. - A. That I will swear.

Q. At the time that you speak of being a witness here, did you come in the character of an accomplice, as you came here to day. - A. I came forward as fellow servant of a man who had committed the crime.

Q. All this you have told is not from any memorandum. - A. I have no memorandums.

Q. What way of life were you in before you were sent on the hulks. - A. I was a hackney-coachman.

Q. How did you get your living. - A. Sometimes by thieving and sometimes by industry.

Q. Who did you drive for. - A. I had many masters.

Q. Do you mean that every day you had a new master. - A. I do not mean that.

Q. How many regiments have you been enlisted in. - A. Several.

Q. So many you cannot tell. - A. I do not know that.

Q. How old are you - A. Twenty-six.

Q. How many regiments have you been in. - A. I cannot imagine how many, I have been in a good many.

Q. Will you take the trouble to enumerate how many regiments you have been in. - A. I have been in the East and West London militia.

Q. That is two. - A. The twenty-sixth light dragoons, and in the twenty-ninth dragoons, and in the army of reserve.

John Vickery ; examined by Mr. Alley. You are an officer of the police office, Worship-street. - A. I am.

Q. Were you at any time directed to go to Cumberland Fort, Portsmouth, for the purpose of apprehending of Benjamin Hanfield , the last witness. - A. I was, I think on the 15th of November last; I found him there, where he was delivered to me by the Captain of the Hulks at Langston Harbour .

Q. On your return to town, when you approached Hounslow-heath, do you remember his having done any thing. - A. When we came to Hounslow-heath, near to a clump of trees, on the right side of the road, between the ten and eleven mile-stone, as we were coming up, he made an observation with his finger, and pointed to the place; we were riding on the outside, at the back part of the coach.

Q. Were there any other persons on the outside of the coach. - A. Yes, there were three or four passengers on the outside.

Q. Did he say any thing. - A. He was about to speak, I told him not to say any thing then, on account of there being passengers on the outside of the coach.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Dunn. - A. Yes, Joseph Dunn , he was a parish officer for Paddington.

Q. I believe Holloway was apprehended by him. - A. The first time I saw Holloway was at Clerkenwell Prison.

Q. At that time had you communicated to him what he was in custody for. - A. I took him from Clerkenwell Prison to John-street, Bedford-row; when he was outside of the prison with me and Bishop, I read the warrant to him.

Q. You do not know how long he had been at Clerkenwell Prison. - A. Yes, I do, he had been there the night before.

Q. You then read the warrant that you hold in your hand. - A. Yes, that was the next day; the warrant charged him on suspicion of the murder of Mr. Steele, to this he said he was innocent, he said, Oh, Dear! I know nothing about it, I will down on my knees to you and the justice,

if you will let me go; this was in the presence of Bishop.

Q. Did you afterwards apprehend Haggerty. - A. I did, I took him on Saturday, the 29th of November, on board the Shannon frigate in the Downs, laying off Deal.

Q. Did you, at the time you apprehended him, communicate to him what you apprehended him for. - A. No, he was so unwell, he was obliged to be let down out of the ship into the boat; I was apprehensive that he would not live to come to London.

Q. Did you take him before the port-admiral. - A. I did, the same morning the admiral asked him how long he had been a marine, he said about two years; he asked him where he was three years ago, you could hardly hear him answer, he was so very unwell, he said he did not know, I believe that was the word; the admiral then said, pray where was you four years ago, upon that he made no reply, I saw his countenance alter, he would have fallen backwards if I had not have caught him; I then begged the admiral would let him have a little water and a seat to sit on, which was granted him.

Q. Did he answer where he was four years ago. - A. He did not.

Q. Did he give you any description of a hat and a stick. - A. No, he did not.

Q. Before the first examination did Hanfield give you a description of a hat and a stick. - A. He did.

Q. Have you since seen that hat and stick. - A. I have, he did not mention the stick, only the hat; the hat tallied with the description he gave as near as could be in the way it was mangled, it was cut in pieces when I saw it.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing Hanfield after you had seen the hat. - A. I think not, he was in the House of Correction, and an order for no one to see him without an order.

Q. Have you since you brought Hanfield to town, been in company with Hanfield to Hounslow. - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Was Mr. Hughes there also. - A. He was.

Q. Did Hanfield point out to you any particular place. - A. Yes he did, we went to the Bell, where we alighted out of the coach, he went on near to the eleven mile stone; when we went from the Bell, I desired him to go on as fast as he liked, and the way he pleased, he then pointed to the left hand side to the clump of trees; he was on the right going towards the powder mills, he turned round on the left, and said we were concealed in that clump of trees, or this I, cannot say which word he used.

Q. In point of fact he pointed out the place. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. You say Haggerty was so ill he could hardly come up to town. - A. Yes, we were obliged to leave him behind at Deal hospital.

JOHN SMITH . - Mr. Gleed. You are a coachman. - A. Yes, I am servant to Mr. Waterhouse, Swan with Two Necks, Lad lane.

Q. In November 1802, what coach did you drive. - A. I was the driver of the Gosport coach.

Q. What time does that coach leave London. - A. At six o'clock.

Q. Did it leave London in November 1802, about six o'clock. - A. Yes.

Q. What time does it get to Hounslow. - A. I suppose about eight.

Q. Do you recollect the report of Mr. Steele being murdered on Hounslow heath. - A. I do.

Q. On that evening do you recollect any thing happening. - A. I heard a man groan twice.

Q. What time was it you left Hounslow. - A. At eight.

Q. How far had you got from Hounslow. - A. Betwixt the trees, and the eleven mile stone; I heard a man moan as though he was in distress, the groans and moans I heard twice; I supposed it to be a man.

Q. Was the first time louder than the second. - A. The first time was louder than the last; and the last more faint.

Q. Was it on the right hand side or the left the sound. - A. On the right hand side, and apparently behind.

Court The right hand side as you were going along. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. Your mistress was a passenger in the coach. - A. She was.

Q. You drove on. - A. Yes I did, I remarked to the passengers, that I thought there was something amiss.

Q. Beside the groans, did you hear any voice. - A. I did not.

Q. How was it with respect to the night. - A. It was a moonlight night, but the moon was shaded at the time.

Court. It seems to me to be unnecessary to call any more witnesses to prove the fact; that Mr. Steele was murdered at that place, that is a matter of fact perfectly established. There is no doubt but the witness, Hanfield, had a hand in the murder; the question is whether the prisoners at the bar had, and whether they were the perpetrators of it or not, you need not call any other witness to corroborate what the coachman has proved, it appears to me to be a fact that cannot be denied. If, however, the gentlemen for the prosecution, are of opinion that any further evidence on this head may be necessary, I shall not pevent it.

ISAAC CLAYTON - Mr . Bolland. You are the beadle at Hounslow. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so in the year 1802. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you get any thing delivered to you, by a person of the name of Hughes. - A. I do not know whether it was Hughes or no; I rather think it was. I had a stick, a hat, and a pair of shoes they were given to me.

Q. What did you do with that hat, stick and shoes. - A. I brought them and laid them down before sir Richard Ford , at the Red Lion at Hounslow.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you saw them before to day. - A. Five or six years ago I saw Holloway and Oliver, I saw Holloway with a turnip team, with a man that had a wooden leg of the same name; they had been pulling turnips either at Hanworth or Isleworth in that part that comes towards Hounslow heath, I knew the old man thirty year before that.

Q. Where did you see Holloway. - A. I am not certain whether it was at the Bell public house, or the Tankerville arms; when I was ordered to bring the clothes to Worship street, I saw the prisoner come in the coach to the office, and when I saw Oliver, I thought I knew the man, I looked at him very hard, he said I know you, I says I know you very well, I know'd you at Hounslow, I saw you either at the Bell, or at the Tankerville Arms; I saw you with a man of the same name that had a wooden leg that came out of Buckinghamshire: the prisoner Holloway said, he knew me very well.

Q. Do you know how he was dressed at that time when he came out of the coach, when you saw him go into the public office. - A. I did not take particular notice of his dress, I took notice of his features.

JOSEPH TOWNSEND . - Mr. Gleed. You are a patrol of Bow street. - A. I am, I produce this bludgeon, a pair of shoes, an old hat and a strap.

Q. From whom did you receive them. - A. Of the late sir Richard Ford at the office of Bow street, I have kept them from that time to this.

Q.(to Clayton.) Are these the things that you laid down before sir Richard Ford . - A. Yes, I swear to the strap, shoes, and stick.

Q.(to Hughes.) Did you find these things on the common. - A. I did - not the body of the hat, only the two pieces of the hat, the bludgeon, and the shoes.

Q. Did you deliver them to Clayton. - A. I do not recollect the man's name that took them out of my hand.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . - Mr. Bolland. Look at the prisoners at the bar and say whether you know them, point them out. - A. This is Owen Haggerty , (witness pointing to him.) I have known him six or seven years, and Holloway about a year and a half.

Q. Do you know Hanfield. - A. Yes, I have known him four or five years.

Q. Have you ever seen Hanfield in the company of Haggerty. - A. They have kept company together for these four or five years; I have seen them at the Turk's head and at the Maidenhead in Dyot street, and at the Black dog in Belton street.

Q. Do you recollect the time that Mr. Steele was murdered. - A. I do, about that time I saw Owen Haggerty , Holloway, and Hanfield together.

Q. How long is that ago. - A. About four years ago, I cannot say exactly as to the time.

Q. You cannot fix the time. - A. No, only about four years ago.

Court. That is only general evidence, it is no otherwise important than to prove a fact, which the prisoners have denied, he has stated his seeing them together, and that they were acquainted with each other.

Blackman. About four years ago, I cannot positively say to the month, I went into the Turk's head, Dyot street, Haggerty was there, he was drest in a velveteen jacket and breeches, and a new hat. I said to Owen Haggerty , you have been in a good thing lately, what are you at now, he said he was working in the country, serving the plaisterers. I said that is two to one.

Q. Did he say where he was working. - A. To the best of my knowledge he said at Hounslow. He said he had tied it up that is as much as to say he had left off thieving.

Cross examined by Mr. Andrews. He said he was working in the country, and had tied it all up. - A. Yes.

EDWARD CROCKER . - Mr. Bolland. You are a Bow street officer, tell me whether you know either of the prisoners. - A. I know Haggerty better than I know Holloway.

Q. Am I to infer from thence that you know them both. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Hanfield. - A. I do, I have seen Haggerty and Hanfield in company together several times.

Q. Have you seen them together in any public house. - A. Yes, the Turk's Head in Dyot street, St. Giles, and the Black horse in Dyot street.

Q. Do you remember about three or four years ago meeting them in any public house in Dyot street. - A. About three or four years ago I went into the Turk's head, Dyot street, Haggerty was there, he was drest in a blue jacket, all smeared with lime; he then said he had tied it all up, he had taken to work; he said he served the hawk for the plaisterers; I met with him several times in the street. I have frequently seen him with a stick, he had a lame ancle.

Q. What sort of a stick. - A. A black thorn.

Q. Was it a very large stick. - A. It was not a very large one nor a very long one.

CHRISTOPHER JONES ; examined by Mr. Gleed. What are you. - A. I am a Bow street officer.

Q. Do you know the witness Hanfield. - A. I have known Hanfield three years, Haggerty about five, and Holloway about six months.

Q. Have you seen them together. - A. I have seen Haggerty and Hanfield together in different houses, and in the streets; I believe about three years ago, I have never seen Holloway and Hanfield together.

RICHARD LIMBRICK ; examined by Mr. Gleed. What are you. - A. I am a Bow street officer.

Q. How long have you know Hanfield - A. I have known Hanfield about three years; I have

known Haggerty about five years, and Holloway it may be about two years, not more.

COLLIN M'DANIEL; examined by Mr. Gleed. What are you. - A. I am a publican, I keep the Black horse in Dyot street.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and tell me whether you know either of them. - A. I know one of them, Owen Haggerty , I have known him nine or ten years.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Hanfield. - A. Yes, I have known him five or six years.

Q. Did you see him and Haggerty together at any time. - A. I have seen them in one box to get her in my own house.

Q. How long ago. - A. Three or four or five years ago.

Q. Have you often seen them there. - A. Not very often.

WILLIAM BEALE ; examined by Mr. Gleed. Where do you live. - A. I live at the Turk's head in Dyot street.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners. - A. I know them all three; I know Hanfield and the two prisoners at the bar, I have known Haggerty about three years, Hanfield about two years, and Holloway rather better than a twelve month.

Q. Have you ever seen them together. - A. Never all together, I have seen Haggerty and Hanfield together about two years ago at my house.

Q. Do you mean in company or separate. - A. They were both in my tap room.

Q. Were they drinking together. - A. I never saw them drinking together.

JOHN PETERSON ; - examined by Mr. Alley. What are you. - A. I am porter at Billingsgate.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you have seen them any where. - A. I have known Owen Haggerty about five years, and Hanfield about three years.

Q. I want to know whether you have seen them in company together. - A. I have seen Haggerty and Hanfield together at Mr. Beale's house, at the Turks head, I have frequently served them with beer at that house.

JOHN SAWYER ; examined by Mr. Gleed. I live in Cumberland street, in the Strand, I lived at the Bell at Hounslow in November 1802.

Q. Just look round and tell me whether you know either of the persons of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I have seen this man about Hounslow, (pointing to Holloway); at what time, I cannot exactly take upon me to say; I have seen them two men about Hounslow.

Q. Have you seen Hanfield. - A. I have not the slightest knowledge; of him I left Hounslow in May 1803.

Q. It was before you left Hounslow that you saw the two prisoners. - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw the two prisoners at Hounslow, were they together. - A. I cannot say whether I saw them together or separate, nor do I know that they ever were at our house.

JOHN NARES , ESQ. - Mr. Alley. You are a magistrate of the county of Middlesex. - A. I am.

Q. You attended the several examinations at Worship street office. - A. Yes, I did. On the 8th of December last, the two prisoners were brought before me.

Q. Was the witness Hanfield examined in there presence. - A. He was not.

Q. I want to know Mr. Justice Nares, whether Hanfield gave any account of this transaction, and whether that account was read to the prisoners, or whether Hanfield gave any account of the transaction in the presence of the prisoners. - A. He did, I took it down in writing from him.

Q. In consequence of what he said, did you call upon the defendants to make any allegations, having previous to that read over what Hanfield said. - A. I examined the prisoners separate, I read the account of what Hanfield said to me, and what Hanfield first said in the presence of the prisoners; I examined them apart and took it down in writing, I told them afterwards they chused to sign a true account, that would be given in evidence against them they did not sign it.

Court. You should have told them whether they signed it or not, it would be adduced in evidence against them.

John Nares Esq. I asked Haggerty whether he ever saw Hanfield before, he said I never saw Hanfield to my knowledge before I went into the marines, I was a bricklayer's labourer at the time I enlisted, I had no work, I enlisted with serjeant Holmes in Belton street, I lived at that time in Dyot street, St. Giles'; I was in the habit of going to the Black horse in that street. I was in prison in Tothil fields in May 1802' and remained there till the last day of the session following.

Court. We ought not to regard that account unless it refers to something of this transaction; the account of a man's life may attend to other transactions. I would have the witness only to direct his attention to such parts as relate to the case. - A. This examination was to give an account where he was. -

"In November 1802 I was in prison in Tothil fields, and remained there till the last day of the sessions following, which must be July; work, he said, at that time was scarce, and in the winter I went to Mr. Smith's in Castle street, Seven Dials, he now lives in a court near Castle street, Mr. Humphries was the owner of the house, I believe; I worked for him all the winter; I never was in Dyot street, at the Black horse with Hanfield or Holloway in my life. Macdaniel, who keeps the house, knows me, and his daughter." Then he says -

"That he never was at or near Hounslow in his life. I generally dressed, when out of work, in a velveteen jacket and breeches; then he denies being at the Black dog or

Turk's head with Hanfield, or played with him at shove-halfpenny; then I asked him at another time as to Blackman and the other officers' evidence that they had given; he denied knowing any of the Bow street officers, and that he had ever worked at Hounslow, and that he never said to Blackman that he had worked for a plaisterer at Hounslow. That is all that is material, as to what Haggerty said. In consequence of what he said about working for Mr. Smith, Mr. Smith was sent for and examined in the presence of Holloway and Haggerty. Mr. Smith said he never worked for him at the time; and then the prisoner Haggerty said he would not say where he worked.

Mr. Alley. Did you pursue the same course with respect to Holloway as you had done to Haggerty. A. Yes, Holloway said -

"he knew Benjamin Hanfield , he had seen him three or four times in the street, but never was at any public house with him except after we came out of prison together in the year 1804;" when we went to the Buffalo's head in the New road, but did not drink with him there.

Q. Did he say any thing respecting Dyot street. A. He said -

"he knew Haggerty and had done so about two years and upwards, then he denies ever having been in the company of Haggerty and Hanfield; he said he never was in their company together in his life; I never have been at the Black horse above five or six times for sixteen years. I have not been there for the last five years."

Q. Did he say any thing respecting Hounslow. A.

"He denied ever having been at Hounslow in his life; he said I was never near Hounslow, or worked there in my life." Then when I enquired where he worked in November 1802, he said -

"that he worked for Mr. Rhodes and Mr. Stedman, and for different people." They were all examined in his presence, and they denied that he worked there at the time.

Q. This was Holloway. - A. Yes.

Q. This examination was particularly pointed to the month of November 1802. - A. Yes, and he gave different accounts of who he worked with at that time. I was particular to the month of November 1802.

A. And at each time he stated that during the month of November 1802, he had worked for different persons. - A. Yes, he mentioned several persons, and those persons denied it in all his examinations.

Q. He mentioned the different persons, in consequence of which you brought forward those different persons, and they denied it.

Holloway. The mistake that was made was this - I made a mistake in a year; the persons that I said I had worked for in the year 1802, I worked for them in the year 1803 and 1804.

Mr. Alley. (to Mr. justice Nares) Was that the mistake. - A. They said he had not worked at all for them in 1802, he had worked for them in different years.

THOMAS WALKER . - Mr. Gleed. What are you. - A. I am clerk to Mr. Rhodes, he lives in Hampstead road.

Court. Are you going through all these persons that the prisoner Holloway said he worked with in November 1802; not one of these facts goes to confirm the accomplice.

Mr. Gleed. I will just ask this one witness - you say you live with Mr. Rhodes. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner Holloway. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of November 1802 did he work for Mr. Rhodes. - A. He came to work for us in September 1803, he continued working for us until the 3d of March 1804.

DANIEL BISHOP . - Mr. Alley. You are an officer of Worship street. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the different times upon which these men have been examined. - A. I do.

Q. After each day's examination, were they confined in two separate lock up rooms. - A. Yes.

Court. How often were they examined. - A. Seven different times.

Q. When were they taken before the magistrate. - A. The first time was the 8th of December; both of them were taken before the magistrate.

Q. Were they examined all together. - A. Both together.

Mr. Alley. These conversations were between each examination. - A. They were.

Q. You say that after the examinations they were confined to different lock up rooms, describe what sort of rooms they were. - A. There is a strong partition of strong quartering between them, and over that iron plate; they are behind the office.

Mr. Andrews. What are you speaking from. - A. The paper which I have in my hand, I wrote it with my own hand.

Q. That is not the original. - A. I have the original in my pocket.

Court. Then take that, that is the best to refresh your memory. Where was your situation when you heard them. - A. I was put in the privy, within four foot of the lock up room.

Q. Could you hear what they said in the lock up room. - A. When they spoke loud enough.

Mr. Alley. Was there any other person confined there. - No.

Q. Then the conversation that you heard must be the conversation between the two prisoners. - A. It was.

CONVERSATION, December 8, 1806.

Holloway. Owen, are you there; I never heard such a man in my life.

Haggerty. Did you tell them you know'd me. - Holloway. I denied it entirely, I told the justice's I never was in his company in my life. I was astonished when they come to take me. I told them I never was on Hounslow heath in my life.

Haggerty. So did I. Have you got any money - Holloway. No.

Haggerty. I will pay for any thing for you - Holloway. I thank you Owen.

Haggerty. I told them I know nothing of you. - Holloway. They will not take his evidence. I thought you had been saying something.

Haggerty. I do not know what day of the month it was.

Holloway. It is two years since I have seen you, where have you been. - Haggerty. I have been in the West Indies. I told them I had never seen you.

Holloway. He told them about public houses, where we had been, but they can't tell who comes in, or who goes out in the course of a day.

Bishop. That is the end of the first conversation;

the next examination was on the tenth.

Mr. Alley. I do not think that is important.

Mr. Andrews. Pray read a part of the tenth.

Mr. Alley. Begin with the tenth.

CONVERSATION, December 10.

Haggerty. What a villain that must be.

Holloway. - It will be of no use now. I wonder where they got that hat and shoes, they wont fit me. They wont take his evidence; you see they wont now.

Haggerty. It is not fit they should.

Holloway. What a villain; Mac Daniel said he saw you and him drinking together. I don't think they much approve of his evidence now, we shall have a good many hearings yet.

Haggerty. Where are the officers gone now.

Holloway. I do not know. They asked him if that was the stick; I suppose the bloody villain will swear it; what a gallows rogue.

Haggerty. They can't do nothing in it now.

Holloway. They wont take his evidence now; if I had wore half boots I should have left them behind. - Haggerty. Aye, to be sure.

Holloway. It will be of no use what he says, and they think they have found out something.

Haggerty. The murder was done four years ago, and he says he was in the House of Correction; how should he know any thing about it.

Holloway. No man can give a better account of himself than I do, can they. This job will not be settled yet.

Haggerty. Did you work for Stedman this time four years. - Holloway. To be sure I did, I worked for him eighteen months; I dont think they much agree in what he says.

Haggerty. They never asked me much questions at all.

Holloway. But they will before they have done with you. It is four years ago when I worked at Watford for Davis and Barker for five months; he is a gallows rogue; if I was at Stedman's at the time, we never shut up shop before twelve or one; for it seems to hang that way a good deal.

Haggerty. And was not you there.

Holloway. Yes, I was, and that will clear me. The justice asked him if he knew where I worked at that time, he did not know. He be damned, they can't do nothing I see. I am more satisfied with this hearing than I was with the last, an't you. - Haggerty. Yes I am.

Holloway. I think he will bring himself in it at last, if he don't mind. Oh Lord; he will be found out in a hundred lies; what a stick he has got, good Lord.

Haggerty. If they thought his evidence was sufficient, they would have committed us before now. I don't see any of the friends belonging to him come forward.

Holloway. They won't take his evidence before the magistrate at all, I don't think that any thing that he has said is of any use. - Haggerty. No.

Holloway. I will see if I can't get a bit of writing paper; he has contradicted to day a good deal.

Haggerty. Yes, he has.

Holloway. I was a good mind to tell Hanfield it would all fall on himself.

Haggerty. No, never mind that. He has deserted from the Tower Hamlets several times.

Holloway. Why had not you told him that.

Haggerty. No, I denied him.

Holloway. His word wont be taken; what is he to hang people? for you know more about these things than I do; they will be at great deal of expence about the business. I suppose they in the office are some of Mr. Steele's friends - I wont nor can't know any thing about it. I would not give an halfpenny for an evidence, for they can't do any thing without people come forward; what a pair of shoes they brought; if one is cleared we shall both get clear, he ought to know what clothes I had if he was with me.

Haggerty. Where is it you told them you saw me. - Holloway. At the top of Dyot street, you know I must say somewhere thereabouts. There is no proof of any thing yet, nor there won't be none; which way did he say we came over the back fields. - Haggerty. I don't know.

Holloway. I never saw such a stick in my life as he has brought, I have got a hat at home now I had in 1802.

Haggerty. What sort of man is Mr. Stedman. Is he a good man, did he like you. - Holloway. Yes, he did.

Haggerty. Was it in the winter you worked for him. - Holloway. It was.

Mr. Alley. Now the conversation on the 15th of December.

Hag. Any body there but yourself. - Hol. No.

Hag. What do you think of it now. - Hol. I don't know.

Hag. Did you hear him swear I knocked him down. - Hol. No; I don't mind it of a halfpenny, they may all kiss my a - e. They wont mind what Old Red-nose said; it is all dickey.

Hag. Did Hanfield say we took the body and buried it any where. - Hol. He did not say such a word as I heard.

Hol. It was done in November. - Hol. Yes.

Hol. (Singing a seasong.) That red-nose old thief said he saw me at Hounslow; they shall never do me in a thousand years.

Mr. Alley. (to Bishop.) The beadle of Hounslow (the gentleman with the red nose) was examined on that day. - A. He was.

Hol. Where is the man you worked for at Hounslow. - Hag. I never worked at Hounslow.

Hol. I have got a good story to tell them but said but little - all his swearing won't frighten me.

Hag. Don't you know what master you worked for. - Hol. I worked for Dove - they all know you, the traps.

Hag. That's being so much about.

Hol. The old beadle said afterwards he did not know me, for I never work'd where they said, they may laugh and swear as much about Hounslow as they please, but I don't know nothing about Hounslow; we shall have more hearing yet. Who the hell does he suppose to frighten, if they keep me lock-up for a hundred years it is of no use, they say I am honester than you, for you denied him. - Hag. I know him; what clothes did he say I had on, a great coat.

Hol. Yes; if he don't die for it I will be shot. I know that beadle told them what clothes I wore,

they or would never have known it, I was there but once over in Surry.

Hag. Next Monday it will be either one thing or the other. - Hol. Yes.

Hag. Oh lord! what do you think of it now? there is none of them can swear they saw us together at the time; if one is done all is done.

Hol, What all three. - Hag. Yes.

Hol. It is all nothing; if people come from the Bell, Hounslow, it is the same, they don't know us. I know they could not swear before they come, all is of no use, I don't mind not a halfpenny for being lock'd up so, I carries too good a face to be daunted on this suit, I am not afraid of suffering for it.

Hag. Nor I, for I have been very ill, but I am better now.

Hol. It wont be settled next Monday, I think. - Hag. Do you think not - how comeyou to think that.

Hol. I do not know, how it is to be settled when there is no evidences. - Hag. I do not know.

CONVERSATION, December 22.

Hag. What did they say to you.

Hol. There is strong information come against me from Kentish town. The magistrate told me there is nobody there that knows us at all. You know that old beadle, don't you. - Hag. Yes. I like it very well.

Hol. So do I better than ever I did, there is nether of us will suffer for it, he has not got his pardon yet; nor won't have it. - Hag. No.

Hol. They bother'd me so I was a good mind to tell them they might find out where I worked, I told Armstrong I was always singing where I was, it an't as they wish it nor won't be; there is nobody comes forward to say what he does, ten to one if he an't tried for it at last. - Hag. I hope to God he will.

Hol. I laugh always, I don't know whether you do.

Hag. How did I look when I was in. - Hol. I don't know. The people will be tired of coming, it is nothing at all.

Hag. It is all right now.

Hol. I wonder what they think now. I suppose they consult together while we are out, I wonder why they did not examine private to day, I think it will be knocked off very soon, I am damned if they won't clear all Hounslow, we shall be turned up and I will satisfy you for all.

Hag. You never had a better pal in your life than I am. - Hol. No. I never was there but that year; that red nosed old ram was quite behind day; as to you, you have acted very well, I told them, I could not answer for you, I don't care who knows me so as they don't bring me in it. I know very well they think we are innocent; it runs in my head, he stands the worst chance, they an't satisfied now about him.

Hag. No counsel will come for one guinea. - Hol. No, they won't, we shan't be fully committed

Hag. He knows the law so well he must either commit or acquit us.

Hol. I can't think were all them things come from, the hat and bludgeon. (Singing a sea song.) Where have you been. - Hag. To the magistrate.

Hol. What about. B - r them all of a heap, I say, I would sooner be in the middle of hell flames than be here, there is never noboby locked up here but you and I, I wonder where they put them. - Hag. I don't know, it is all right now, I can see that well, what do you think of it now.

Hol. I don't know.

Hag. They are getting very cool upon it I can see that. - Hol. An't they

Hag. Here's luck I wish you as much harm I do myself, why don't you gammon to be ill. - Hol. I would not care a d - for them if I had these irons off.

Hag. He asked me were I worked, I would not tell him, I worked at Gardner's near Bow street, and he has run away since. I can tell the very day and hour where I worked.

CONVERSATION, December 26.

Hol. How do you get on.

Hag. What do you think of it now. We are not com-mitted yet.

Hol. I don't care a damn about it.

Hag. He speaks quite different about it to what he did the first time. - Hol. He does; I wonder what the justice thinks of it.

Hag. I do not know, his evidence will never do; did not he mention that the shoes was yours at first. - Hol. Yes.

Hag. What sort of a head is yours, big or little.

Hol. Big. Mr. Hanfield is a very nice man, ant he.

Hag. Yes, they put words into his mouth.

Hol. He could not tell about a good many things, he said he was not sure; we shant be commited yet a while; it is read over to us to see how we looked. - Hag. Yes.

Hol. He said you and I stopped behind and he went forward. - Hag. Yes.

Hol. I thought there would be some people here to day, did not you. - Hag. So did I.

Hol. Justice Nares does not know what to think about it now. - Hag. No.

Hol. You have been robbing with him he says. - Hag. They cant prove it.

Hol. He is the man that will answer for it all. What was that bludgeon brought for. That made him a liar, I can produce a hat I wore in 1802 if I like at home. It is very odd he did not know what things he wore, I think. - Hag. Yes

Hol. He did not know what money he took from the bloody villain; that gentleman's servant behind was with the bricklayer that found him, I suppose he is going to be examined, ten to one if he don't say something contrary.

Hag. Dont make such a talking.

Hol. I shall tie my handkerchief round my head and gammon sick.

Hag. But not before the traps, for they will put them down.

Hol. If I get commited for this job, I will have a councel; I will have Alley; that is very well in there, but it wont do any where else; it ant very seldom you her of such a job as this from a fellow that is transported; they sent for us to day, to see what they thought of us; his word ant worth one halfpenny, if I was before the lordjudge of England, I should not be asaid of geting clear, lord it is all nonsense. - Hag. He must know the day of the month, and every thing else when he comes there.

Hol. Yes, I do not see why we should be committed upon his evidence. - Hag. Nor I neither, you mark my word if he has not somebody to back his evidence they won't find a bill. - Hol. No.

Hag. I know where I worked every day in November. I know the very street and house, but it

is no use talking here about it.

Hol. It is all nothing at all. - Hag. Yes. I dont see why we should be committed upon his evidence.

Hol. It is a very wrong thing if they let him swear at the Old Bailey.

Hag. Where is it he said we parted with him. - A. At Hounslow.

Hol. Where did he say we had the gin. - Hag At the Black horse.

Hag. We must have had the gin there.

CONVERSATION, February 5, 1807.

Hag. What do you think of it now, we must cheer up, never mind. - A. Hol. I don't know.

Hag. Never mind Holloway, we shall get turned up by and bye.

Hol. But I don't like it much.

Hag. Well Holloway, my boy, are you asleep, don't cast yourself down. - Hol. No, he is a d - d rascal.

Hag. I wonder what is their notion for keeping us here so long before we go before the magistrate. - Hol. They don't know what to do, they can't make head nor tale of his story.

Hag. The best way for us is to insist upon bedischarged or fully committed this time. - Hol. Yes. - What do you think of that fellow.

Hag. I don't know.

Hol. What do you think of it now, they dare not commit us now. - Hag. No.

Hol. That fellow's confession has done him. - Hag. Yes. (Both singing a song.)

CONVERSATION, February 9, 1807.

Hag. We shall go to Newgate now.

Hol. Hanfield has got his discharge, I must get a counsel; I suppose we shall go together to Newgate.

Hag. They have caught him out in a good many lies.

Hol. I should not wonder if they do not find a bill he is a d - d villain. Knapp is a d - d good one, he will bother some of them; Beale's will do more harm than good. I do not know about old Macdaniel, he is a very honest man.

Mr. Andrews. (to Bishop) How could you distinguish the voice of one from another. - A. I knew which rooms they were in

Q. You were four feet distant from them, and the partition you say is strong quartering, with iron plate upon it. - A. In the privy that I sat in there were two panes of glass out of the top.

Q. There was some conversation that you could not hear. - A. Of course I did not take it down.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . - Mr. Gurney. You have a hat in your hand, from whom did you receive it. - A. I received it from the hand of Mr. Humphries, no Thursday the 5th of February, in the presence of the prisoners.

Q. Was Mr. Manby there at the time. - A. I did not know Mr. Manby at that time.

MR. CHARLES HUMPHRIES - Mr. Gurney. From whom did you receive that hat. - A. From Mr. Manby.

Q. Was that hat put on either of the prisoner's heads at the office. - A. It was put on the head of Holloway, the stout man.

Q. How was it with respect to fitting of him. - A. It went quite down on the man's head at the time Armstrong put it on.

Court. Was it put on any other man's head at the office.

Mr. Gurney. This was done only to shew that it would fit him.

Court. And it would fit any other head of the same dimensions.

Mr. Gurney. (to Mr. Manby) Did you bring that hat to the police office. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that one of the late Mr. Steele's hats. - A. Yes, it is one that he had wore a good while, and the lining is out, and it is rather larger by being without the lining, and much worn by some other person; it is a hat of Mr. Steele's.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . - Mr. Gleed. You are a hatter. - A. Yes.

Q. You were a hatter to the late Mr. Steele. - A. I only made him one hat.

Q. Do you recollect the size and dimension of Mr. Steele's hat. - A. Perfectly well, I sold him a hat in March 1802.

Q. We are informed that the prisoner Holloway had this hat put on him; would the hat of Mr. Steele fit the prisoner Holloway. - A. I recollect the size of Mr. Steele's hat, I should have thought it would have fitted him tight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews. How many years is it ago since you sold Mr. Steele a hat. - A. In March 1802.

Q. You never sold him but one. - A No.

Q. Can you remember from March 1802, what the size of Mr. Steele's hat or head must be. - A. Whenever I enter a gentleman's name in the book, I always put the size in the margin.

Q. This hat is rather larger than Mr. Steele's, you say it is an old hat. - A. That is the natural consequence of a hat being much worn.

WILLIAM BRITTEN. Mr. Gurney. I believe you made boots and shoes for the late Mr. Steele. - A. I did.

Q. Have you examined the size of the prisoner Haggerty's leg and foot. - A. I have.

Q. Are you able to say whether he could have worn Mr. Steele's boots. - A. I believe he might.

Q. Have the goodness to look to an old pair of shoes there, do they appear to have been worn by a person that they fitted, or that they had not fitted. - A. They appear to have been worn by a person that they were too long for.

Q. Have you compared them with the feet of Haggerty. - A. I have looked at these shoes, and I have looked at Haggerty's feet; they would be too long for Haggerty, I believe.

Cross examined by Mr. Andrews. There is no doubt, sir, that a shoe of a large man would suit a little foot. - A. They might wear them.

Q. Will you point out how you know that shoe has been worn by a person for whom it was too long. - A. By the toe not coming to the end, the toe is turned up, and the going in of the heel at the bottom.

Mr. Gurney. This is the whole of the evidence on the part of the prosecution.

Court. There is no evidence that Haggerty wore the boots, no boots whatever were found, only a pair of shoes.

Holloway's Defence. Please you my lord, I am brought here by the word of Hanfield, who is an entire stranger to me, please you my lord; I do not know any thing of the man whatever, I have seen the man in the streets, and that is all I know of him; and I think it very odd when he gave information of me, which was the cause of my being taken up, that he could not give the right name, which certainly he would have done if he knew any thing of me, my lord.

Haggerty's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, I stand here now a prisoner, I stand charged with an offence of which I know no more than a child unborn, although I stand here for it. I hope you will take it into consideration the former character of the witness Hanfield, who merely for the sake of getting his liberty, he has done all this and nothing else. I am perfectly innocent of the crime that I am charged with; it is clear and evident that he has contradicted himself in several places. When he was examined before Mr. Justice Nares, Mr. Justice Nares asked him what sort of a night it was, and what sort of clothes Mr. Steele wore; he replied it was a dark night, and he said he could not inform him of the colour of his clothes. My lord and gentlemen, Mr. Justice Nares is here, and he will inform you of the same.

Court. Would you have me ask Mr. Nares. - A. If you please my lord.

Q.(to Mr. Justice Nares) I am called upon by the prisoner to ask you whether Hanfield in the different examinations contradicted his account that he has given here, with respect to the night whether it was dark or not. - A. No further than he has said here that there was a cloud over the moon, it was dark at the time.

Haggerty. Upon the second examination there was a stick brought forth and a pair of shoes, and when the stick was taken up Mr. Justice Nares asked him if he knew any thing of that stick; he said yes, that was the stick; likewise the shoes were held up, he said them were the shoes that Holloway had; Mr. Justice Nares said to him, I thought you told me that Holloway wore high shoes, he replied no, he did not. Holloway said he never knew the stick. Mr. Justice Nares asked him if he knew any thing of the shoes, Oliver told him he knew nothing of the shoes, he never wore such shoes, that was very well. Upon the third examination Mr. Justice Nares examined the witness Hanfield again; he was asked with respect to what clothes he wore, and likewise his shoes, he told them that he supposed the shoes belonged to Haggerty, he said in reply as they will not fit Oliver, I suppose that they belonged to Haggerty.

Mr. Justice Nares. Hanfield denied knowing any thing of the stick.

Haggerty. Upon the third examination you asked him again, what sort of a stick it was that Oliver had, he made reply, a black thorn stick; upon his first examination he said that was the stick.

Mr. Justice Nares. My recollection serves me so well, I deny what he says about the stick.

JOHN SHUTER. - Mr. Andrews. Do you know Hanfield. - A. Yes.

Q. You are one of the head turnkeys of the jail, - A. I am one of the head turnkeys.

Q. Do you remember Hanfield being in your custody in this goal. - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Did you at any time have any conversation with Hanfield. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever make any confession to you. - A.We never had any conversation about this.

Q. Do you know any thing about his confessing any burglary, or any other crime for any purpose. - A. He never confessed to me.

HOLLOWAY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 39.

HAGGERTY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-2

172. MARY LIGO , alias MARGARET LYONS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , a pelisse, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Thwaites .

HENRY THWAITES . I am the son of Thomas Thwaites , a tailor , No. 56, road street, St. Giles's . On the 29th of last month about the dusk of the evening, I saw the prisoner take the pin out of the pelisse hat was hanging outside of the door, she put it under her coat and went off with it; I pursued her, I perceived a bulge in her coat, I put my hand in and took out this pelisse; I produce the pelisse, it has this ticket on it, and it is my father's property.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I picked up this pelisse, it was between the two houses, it laid on the ground. I was not above three yards from the door when he overtook me; he asked me what I had there, whether I did not pick up a pelisse; I said is it yours, he said yes; I immediately gave it him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-3

173. MARY LIGO , alias MARGARET LYON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , thirteen yards and a half of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of Valentine Scotney .

VALENTINE SCOTNEY. I am a linen draper , No. 115, Oxford street . On the 29th of January, I missed thirteen yards and a half of printed cotton. The next morning Seagoe the officer brought it me, and asked me if it was my property. It was hanging in the passage

Q. Are you sure it was not sold. - A. I am confident it was not sold.

JOHN SEAGOE . In taking the prisoner to the round house on the 29th of January, I searched her, I found this cotton upon her, here is the shop mark on it. I went to Mr. Scotney's in Oxford street; he said it was his.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. You know you did not find it on me, I was not in the shop at all, nor was I in the passage. I did not take it

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-4

174. PATRICK HIGGINS and TIMOTHY QUIN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Michael Macgee , about the hour of twelve at night on the 24th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein

a gold ring, value 4 s. four gowns, value 3 l. two cloaks, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 12 s. a pair of mits, value 1 s. a pair of gloves, value 2 d. and 27 l. 2 s. 6 d. the property of Michael Macghee .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MICHAEL MACGHEE . I live in George alley, Field lane .

Mr. Knapp. Do you keep a house there. - A. Yes, I let out part of it, I lived in the lower room.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes, one of them lodged in the upper part of the house.

Q. Was your room broke open on Saturday the 24th of January. - A. It was. I come home from pay-table about eight o'clock, I gave my wages to my wife and had my supper; two of the men came and asked me to go and have a pot of porter.

Q. What time did you go to the public house. - A. About nine o'clock, I suppose it was.

Q. Did you leave your door locked. - A. Yes; I was not hardly in the public house when she came along with me.

Q. Was the door fastened before she left the house. A. I heard her lock the door, and I walked on before.

Q. What time did you return again. - A. About half past twelve o'clock.

Q. Was it dark. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Did you and your wife return together. - A. Yes, and my brother in law was along with me when I returned with them; as soon as I came to the door my wife says, my door is broken open.

Q. Did you see that the door was broken open. - A. Yes, the lock was forced and bent. As soon as we went in I got a light, my wife came in, I told her to make haste and make the bed; as soon as she got a light she saw that her box was gone.

Q. Do you know any thing more of it yourself. - A. My wife kept the key of that box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Where is this house of yours. - A. George alley, Field lane.

Q. What parish is that in. - A. St. Andrew , Shoe lane. That part of Field lane is in Middlesex.

MRS. MACGHEE. - Mr. Knapp. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with your husband after you locked the door. - A. Yes.

Q. You returned with him. - A. Yes. When I returned I missed the box directly; I got a light; it contained twenty five guineas and a half, and a seven shilling piece; there were four gowns, two petticoats, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of mittens, and some small things that I did not make mention of. I had the key of that box in my pocket; the box and all was gone.

Q. Have you seen any of these articles since. - A. Yes, the officer has got them.

Q. Higgins lodged in this house of yours. - A. Yes, six months; he came in the same night this happened, about one o'clock in the morning; he made a piece of work about a watch that I had keeping for him.

Q. Was that watch in the box. - A. It was.

Q. Has that watch been found since. - A. Yes, the officer has it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Higgins slept in your house that night. - A. Yes.

Q. He was in your house the next day. - A. Yes.

Q. He was apprehended in your house. - A. He was.

Q. So that he did not run away. - A. He did not, he remained in my house till such times as he was taken in custody.

JOHN LYONS . - Mr. Knapp. You lodge in the house of Macghee. - A. Yes, I lodge in the one pair of stairs room over Mr. Macghee's room.

Q. On the Saturday night that this house was broken open, did you see either or both of the prisoners. A. They came both in my room at twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Had you heard them in the house before. - A. I had not; the child had heard them in the house before.

Q. Had you seen them before that evening. - A. No, I had not, the child in the house had.

JONATHAN TROTT . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the officers of Hatton garden office. - A. I am. - On the 25th of January I received information of this robbery. In the evening, in company with Chapman, I went to the prosecutor's house, where I understood the prisoner Higgins lodged, and where I saw the last witness, Lyons, he lodged there likewise. I found the prisoner Higgins laying in the bed, apparently intoxicated, he appeared to be so more than he was; we took him in custody on suspicion of the robbery, which he denied; we questioned him after that about the other prisoner Quin; he acknowledged that he had been drinking with him, but that he knew nothing of the robbery whatsoever. He was taken before the magistrate the next morning, and committed for re-examination till we found Quin. On the 31st of January, I received information that Quin was at work in Apollo gardens, in Surrey; we took Quin there. When I went up to him I asked him if his name was not Timothy Quin, he said no, it was not; I told him I was an officer, I had come to take him in custody on suspicion of house breaking. As soon as he saw my brother officer, Chapman, and the prosecutor, (the prosecutor had concealed himself) I said, do you know that man that is coming here, he says yes, he knows my name is Quin. I then searched in his pocket book; I found this duplicate of a watch pledged at T. Melton's, Westminster Bridge road, for eight shillings, in the name of Thomas Gibbons . I made enquiry there and found the watch, in consequence of that ticket; this is the watch I now produce. After that we brought him away; coming along he denied any knowledge whatever of the robbery, except of saying that Patrick Higgins gave it him to pledge. Afterwards he acknowledged where the clothes were, they were at his lodgings somewhere near Vauxhall gardens; he was some time hesitating where his lodgings was, at last he recollected, he said it was No. 2, White Lion court, where I went on Sunday morning; when I went in the house I saw nobody below, I walked up stairs very gently, I went into a room where a man and a woman were talking; I found these things sewed up in a bed, they have been in my possession ever since. After the prisoner was put to the bar for final examination, Higgins said the other prisoner had made a piece of

hemp for them, if I would go along with him to the back of Hearn's house, (he keeps a public house near to where the prosecutor lives), he would shew me where he had burried the money in a dirt heap.

Q. Had you made him any promise. - A. None at all; he said it at the bar, he called me to him and told me I went with him and Chapman the officer, he told me. where to dig with my cane, and there I found twenty one guineas and a half, two seven shillings pieces, and a gold ring.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. You found Higgins in bed at this house. - A. I did.

Q. He denied committing this robbery. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he say as Quin had made a piece of hemp for himself, he would tell you where the money was. - A. No, he did not.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. - Mr. Knapp. We need not go through all that Trott has told us, tell us whether you heard Quin say any thing or what. - A. When I had Quin in the public house after we had taken him; Trott wanted to go somewhere, he left him with me, Quin said it is bad company that has brought me to it, what have I to say, I shall say when I came before the court, I shall not say any thing more.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Look at these articles, and look at the ring first. - A. That is mine.

Q. Look at the watch, was that the watch that you had to keep for Higgins. - A. Yes, it belongs to Higgins all these articles, I have seen them; that is a ribbon that is mine, they are all mine.

Q. Was the money in a glove. - A. It was in a glove, but this is not the glove; it is all my property, there is a good deal more missing.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

HIGGINS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

QUIN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-5

175. ELIZABETH GODFRY was indicted for the wilful murder of Richard Prince .

EMILY BISSET . Q. Do you know the deceased Richard Prince . - A. Yes.

Q. You lodged in the same house with him. - A. I lived with him.

Q. You cohabited with him. - A. Yes, I lodged with him in the next room to the prisoner.

Q. Did the prisoner come into your apartment. - A. She came to my door.

Q. Upon what errand did she come to the door. - A. She came to the door and said she wanted to speak to Prince, he went to the door, there was no one there, he shut the door, and the second knock came. I then said why do you not take a light and see who is there.

Q. What time was this. - A. Between five and six o'clock in the evening.

Q. What day was it. - A. Christmas day.

Q. It was dark then. - A. Yes, just dusk, the moment that I said take a candle, she said it is me that wants to speak to you. He then went to the door, and she said what did you trouble your head to fetch the watch for me the other night; she made use of very bad words, she said there, take that. He then came into the room and said, Oh! I am a dead man; when he came into the room, he pulled the knife out of his eye, and threw it on the floor; momentary as he came in, Mr. Scott the landlord came up, and he said to her, why should you be so malicious as to hurt a fellow creature in that way; she then said, serve him right. I then took him over to the surgeon's, they said it was a dangerous a case, he must go into the hospital.

Q. The surgeon will tell us; how long did he live from that. - A. From Christmas day, till the 18th day of January.

Q. What is the surgeon's name. - A. Barry.

Q. He died then. - A. Yes, in Middlesex hospital.

Q. Do you know of any quarrel and dispute between the prisoner and the deceased before this time. - A. Yes, on the day before.

Q. What was that for. - A. Through his fetching a watchman for her on Tuesday night before, for which when he came home, she abused him most grossley.

Q. When was this quarrel. - A. On the Christmas day, between one and two o'clock in the day.

Q. I thought you said the day before. - A. No, the same day that the accident happened.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. The deceased was the man that kept the house, in which the prisoner and you lived. - A. No, a lodger.

Q. He cohabited with you. - A. Yes.

Q. There were several other women in the house in an unfortunate way. - A. Yes.

Q. The deceased was a gentleman's coachman . - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any intimacy between them. - A. He had never seen her before he took her to the watchhouse, she had only been living in the house four days before that.

Q. You said there had been a quarrel, and he fetched the watch, did he give the watchman charge of her. - A. He did not charge the watchman, the landlord did.

Q. Do you not know that she took out a warrant against him for cutting her hand. - A. No, I never heard of that.

Q. You lived with him, did not you. - A. Yes.

Q. You must be cautious, although he was your friend, to tell the truth; did not Atkins serve him with a warrant for cutting her hand. - A. No, I never Atkins till he came to take her.

Q. This accident happened between five and six o'clock at night. - A. Yes.

Q. After dinner time this man had been drinking something. - A. No, he was perfectly sober, we were just drinking our tea.

Q. How long had he been in your room after the quarrel that happened between one and two. - A. He never saw her after that time, till the knock came to the door, he never went out of the house after between one and two o'clock, from the time that they had the quarrel.

Q. Do you mean to say that you did not observe any more than the quarrel, and that you did not see Atkins, did not Atkins come to take him in custody. - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you see her hand cut. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do know whether her hand was cut or not. -

A. I heard that her hand was grazed.

WILLIAM SCOTT . You keep this house where the deceased and the prisoner lodged. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on Christmas day being called up - A. Yes.

Q. Say what happened to him. - A. On Christmas day, about five o'clock in the evening, I heard the deceased Richard Prince, he halloed out, I went up stairs, I saw Richard Prince was wounded in his left cheek just below his eye; he said oh, Mr. Scott, see how she has served me.

Court. You must not say that, that is no evidence, only say what you observed. - A. I saw a knife on the floor, the knife was half bent, and there was blood upon it.

Q. Did you ask the prisoner any questions about it. - A. I went to the prisoner, then I said, how could you be so malicicus to serve a man so, she said it served him right.

Q. Had she any thing in her hand at that time. - A. a case knife.

Q. Then he was taken to Middlesex hospital. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing that passed the day before Christmas day. - A. No.

Q. Was not the prisoner taken to the watchhouse. - A. The deceased came and acquainted me that there was a man in her room.

Q. Who took her to the watchhouse. - A. The deceased and I, the deceased fetched the watchman on that day before.

Q. Do you know what the charge was. - A. Yes, the deceased Richard Prince , he heard a man in her room, he came down and acquainted me that there was a man in the room, he said there was some dispute about half a guinea, and seven or eight shillings between the strange man that was in her room and the prisoner.

Q. That was the reason for your sending for the watch. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take it amiss that the prisoner should take strange men in her room. - A. He knew that the prisoner was not allowed to take any men into her lodging.

Q. That was the reason that he was sent for the watch. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any dispute with the prisoner and the deceased about two o'clock. - A. Yes, about two o'clock I heard a kind of skirmish, and the prisoner said when I went up to her, look Mr. Scott, (this was after she was liberated) she shewed me the back of her hand, it was grazed; she said I have got no man to take my part, and I will not put up with it; I bid her to drop the quarrel; she said no, I will not drop it so easy as you might think.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I suppose when she made use of that expression her anger still continued upon her. - A. Yes.

Q. He continued to be irritated. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing that man from between two and five o'clock, had you seen him at any time subsequent to that. - A. No, only that time, and when they were at the watchhouse.

Q. You do not understand me - had you seen her after two o'clock, when she shewed you her hand. A. She went directly to get a warrant.

Q. Do you know whether she brought an officer or not. - A. No, she did not, to my recollection.

Q. Then you do not know, in point of fact, whether that warrant was brought - A. No.

Q. Did you see Atkins on Christmas day. - A. No, I did not.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough street. I was only sent by the magistrate to the hospital to enquire into this business. I received this knife from Mr. Barry, the surgeon at the hospital, and the nurse.

CHARLES BARRY . Q. You are the surgeon of Middlesex hospital. - A. I was house surgeon at that time.

Q. Did you attend the deceased. - A. I did.

Q. Tell us in short of what he died, without any terms of art. - A. He came into the Middlesex hospital on the 25th of December; he died in consequence of the wound that he had at the time when he came into the hospital.

Prisoner's Defence. Sir, this is the second time that I have lodged in the house, I lodged there a year and a half ago, and this house is a noted house for women of the town lodging there, and taking men home to their apartments. On Christmas eve I slept out all night; when I came home I saw the deceased and Emily Bisset , they had been drinking and singing with Mr. Scott. I went to my own breakfast, so far was I from thinking of any harm, that upon the little child coming to me, I gave the child some mussin; Emily Bisset and the deceased stood on the stairs; he said to her, you b - y w - how have I pawned my things for you to go out, she made answer, how she had walked about to get a shilling for him, and she says, that woman knows that; he had never done any thing for his living for some months. I could not be of so furious a temper, if I had I could not have come in the house again. The deceased says to me, and you b - y w - , you shall not sleep in the house to night; I says, are you the landlord, with that Mr. Scott came up, I said it is very hard I cannot be let alone, I never insulted Mr. Prince, depend upon it I will send for somebody; he turned round, I had my pattens in my hand, he took my patten from me; he run to hit her, and he gave her a black eye; he turned round again, he made a blow at my head, he made a second attempt, and I met with the blow on my hand. I says Mr. Scott, this is the second time that I lived in your house; I have always been quit, he said yes. I went up to Bow street, I asked for Mr. Atkins, I shewed him my hand, I told him it was done by a patten; he says it is not done by a sharp instrument, you must take a warrant. I went home, I says to Mr. Scott, I have no man to protect me, why am I to be ill used by any person, I opened my door, his door was open, it hit against his door, my door opens the same as a cupboard door; they cannot go out of one door with the other open; he said who is there, I said it is me, he made a blow at me; this door was that way, and the table was there, (prisoner describing it), it was a little back room, it held but two chairs, a bed, and a table, the table was close to me, in the dark; I did not know what I took up; he certainly struck me first.

WILLIAM ATKINS . - Mr. Alley. Do you recollect

the prisoner at the bar coming to you on Christmas day for any warrant. - A. Yes, her hand was bleeding very much at the time.

Q. What time did she come in the office. - A. I know that she came before three, because I recollect going away to dinner before three o'clock.

Q. Did you accompany her to the house where the deceased lived. - A. I did not, I heard no more of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-6

176. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January , two silver watches, value 6 l. a gilt medal, value 2 s. a gold seal, value 10 s. a gold key, value 10 s. and a metal chain, value 10 d. the property of William Eustace , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM EUSTACE . I live in Old street , I am a publican ; the prisoner at the bar lodged in my house five weeks; he left my house on the 4th of January at three o'clock in the afternoon, he told me he was going as far as Hackney; he never came to my house afterwards.

Q. How long was it before you saw him again. - A. On the 17th of January.

Q. When did you miss any property. - A. On the day he went, about three quarters of an hour afterwards, I missed two watches and a medal, they were in a looking glass case drawer in my bed room. At the time when the prisoner went out I was at my dinner, he borrowed eighteen pence of me, he said he was going to see some friends. I went up stairs to put on my great coat, and I went to the drawer to get my watch to put in my pocket; I missed it then, it was gone; I saw it in the drawer at eight o'clock in the morning.

SAMUEL SIKES . I live at Brentford, I am a victualler. The prisoner came to my house on the 10th of January, between five and six o'clock at night; he was in my tap room offering a watch to sell, I bought it of him, I gave him two guineas for it; I gave the watch to the constable on the 17th of January.

SUSANNAH POTTER . I live at Brentford. About two months ago the prisoner come to my house, and asked for a lodging; he lodged at my house one night, he took a watch out of his pocket, and said he had broke the glass, he asked me to hang it up till the morning; I hung it up. He went away without asking for the watch. I gave the watch to the constable.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the man. - A. Yes.

JAMES MERCHANT . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of January at the Waterman's Arms, Isleworth. I sent a letter to Mr. Eustace that night, he came down the next day. We found the medal in the prisoner's stocking; he owned to where the watches were. They were delivered to me by Potter and Sikes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. He told me that if I would tell him where the property was, he would pay the expences, and freely forgive me, and let me go about my business.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-7

177. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward East , about the hour of two, on the night of the 23d of January , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being burglariously to steal .

EDWARD EAST. I keep the Red lion public house, Holywell lane, Shoreditch . On the night of the 23d of January I was called up by the watchman, I found my doors open, they apparently had been wrenched open by an instrument. I had fastened my doors up myself when I went to bed.

COLLIN FORBES . I am a baker. The back door of Mr. East's is right opposite of my house, about fifteen feet distance. About a quarter after two I was in my bakehouse alone, I heard a foot coming over the passage, which is boarded over, and then I heard a good deal of whispering, I heard one man say to the other, is there a light, which caused me to be curious to see what was going forward; I could not see well out of my own bakehouse, I had occasion to go up into my flour loft, on purpose to shoot down a sack of flour; I heard a crashing and wrenching, like a bursting something open, I looked through the hole of the door, there I perceived the prisoner at the bar and another man with him, with something of an instrument, forcing the outer door open; presently the outer door opened.

Q. Did this door open while you were looking through the hole. - A. Yes, I never took my eyes off; the inner door has a leaden casement on the top; I saw the prisoner's hands go through to the inside when that door opened; I then returned, as the wind was blowing from the hole at the door, to cough; I had a very bad cold, and with that they all run off.

Q. What sort of a night was it. - A. The moon shone very bright.

Q. Could you see the face of the other man. - A. No, the other man stood in the shade, out of the light of the moon, his hat was over his face; the prisoner stood in the light of the moon, halfway, I could see all his head, shoulder, and back; his face was sideways to me.

Q. Can you positively swear that the prisoner is the man. - A. Yes, I have seen him before, he frequented this public house. I came down and called the watchman, he and I called Mr. East up.

Q. Did you describe the prisoner to East or the watchman. - A. I did, the next day, as well as my knowledge would let me. I knew the prisoner by sight, I never knew his name.

JOSEPH HARRIS . Q. You are a watchman. - A. Yes. I was coming down Holywell lane upon the 23d of January, crying the hour of two o'clock; when I got within a few yards of the passage, Mr. Forbes called out Watch; I went up the passage, he told me Mr. East's house had been broken open. I found the outside and the inner door open.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship street office. On Saturday the 24th of January I had information of this robbery; in company with Armstrong, Vickery, and Bishop, I went and apprehended

the prisoner at the bar, at the Red lion in Holywell lane, he was sitting in Mr. East's tap room; we afterwards apprehended another man of the name of Nowland; we took them to the office. Forbes and the publican attended, Forbes identified the prisoner at the bar to be one of them, he said he could not be positive to Nowland, he believed him to be the man; the prisoner and Nowland were locked up in different lock up rooms. I heard the prisoner say how he would serve the Scotch b - r; the other said, stow.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of using the public house, I was in the house at nine o'clock that it happened; I went home to my wife and child, I got up in the morning and went to my work, I came in that same house at seven o'clock, and had a pint of beer. I know nothing at all of it, nor ever thought of such a thing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-8

178. JOHN BRIGHTWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , eleven pounds weight of Windsor soap, value 9 s. the property of William Patey , Thomas Butts , and William Froggatt .

THOMAS BUTTS. I am a perfumer ; my partners are William Patey and William Froggatt, I live in Three King court, Lombard street. The prisoner was our servant , he was employed to grind starch to make it into hair powder. On the 6th of this month Mr. Griffiths and Mr. Nowland, two officers of Lambeth street, informed me that they had one of our men in custody; I attended at the office, and saw the prisoner at the bar; there was some soap produced there, I believe it was our soap, there was some yellow marks upon it, that seem to correspond with the soap we had at home; this soap happened to be put in a frame that had palm soap, and that palm soap had adhered to that soap.

Q. Did you miss any soap - A. We did not miss it, through the quantity that we had in the house.

JOHN NOWLAND . Q. You are an officer of Whitechapel. - A. Yes; I produce some soap that I found in the prisoner's coat pocket. On the 5th of February, at eight o'clock at night; I was in company with Griffiths; we apprehended him close to a receiving house.

Q. You took him on suspicion. - A. Yes; he resisted a good deal, he would not be searched; we took him into a public house, opposite where we apprehended him; we found these cakes of soap upon him, he confessed that he had stolen it from his master, we apprehended him; we asked him whether he had sold any at that same shop before, he said never but twice; we asked him his master's name, he said he lived in the city, but he did not chuse to tell us his name; he said if we would let him go we might have the soap. He produced two half guineas, he said he would give us all the money he had in his pocket.

PETER NORRIS. I work for the prosecutor, I manufacture the soap from these bars into squares for sale. To the best of my knowledge it appears to me to be my master's property.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence (read in court). My lord, and gentlemen of the jury. - Being truly sensible of the enormity of my crime, I have nothing to say in extenuation of the punishment I deserve; I only plead for mercy for the sake of my distressed wife and children. Grant that I may be permitted to the benefit of clergy, and be once more restored to my family, and I will endeavour to render myself a useful member to society. Mercy is all I want; it is what God will shew, and man can grant.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-9

179. SAMUEL BROOKES OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of January , one hundred pound weight of yarn, value 3 l. and two yards of canvas, value 2 d. the property of John Griffith .

GEORGE RUSH. I live with Mr. Patrick, Feather-stone street, he is a rope-maker and twine spinner, I am his apprentice. On the 21st of January last, about half past seven o'clock in the morning, I was going up to our ground by the Shepherd and Shepherdess, I saw the prisoner; when I came up to him he asked me whether my master would buy any rope yarn of him, I said that I dare say my master would; he said that if I would come down with him to a little court he would shew it me. I went to this little court, there I saw it, wrapped up in a canvas cloth; it was in a wheelbarrow.

Q. Was there a large quantity of it. - A. Yes, there was one hundred and eleven pounds; he asked me when I could see my master, I said he could see him at nine o'clock. He brought it up to our ground, he left the yarn, I told my master of it, and I told him I thought it was stolen. He came up to the ground at nine o'clock; my master got an officer and had him taken up.

- PATRICK. I am a ropemaker, I live at No. 36, Featherstone street. About nine o'clock the prisoner came to me with my apprentice; my apprentice first spoke to me, and then the prisoner said he had some old rope ends to sell; afterwards I understood it was rope yarn. I asked him what he wanted for it, he said sixpence a pound. My apprentice said it was up in the ground. I asked the prisoner what quantity there was of it, he said about half a hundred weight. I asked him whether he was sure there was half a hundred weight, he said he was not quite certain, but whether there was or not, I should have it for half a guinea. He said the property belonged to his brother, but his brother was pressed, he had sent him a letter to dispose of his property.

Prisoner. I never said such a word about my brother at all.

Patrick. He said his brother worked in the King's yard, and he had an opportunity of coming out now and then, and of bringing out with him so and so, you know what, he said.

Q. Did you deal with him. - A. No, I went out for an officer, I told him I would meet him on the ground. I went to the ground, and while I was weighing the goods the officer was behind; he took him, and I delivered the goods to the officer.

PETER MASON. Mr. Patrick came to my house,

I went with him. When we came near the ground, I sent Mr. Patrick there first, to see if the prisoner was there, I followed, I saw the rope yarn hanging on the steel-yard, the prisoner's back was towards me, he did not see me. Mr. Patrick weighed it, and told him it weighed one hundred and eleven pounds, he asked him what he wanted a pound for it, he said sixpence. Mr. Patrick asked him if he would not take less for it, he said no. He asked him where he lived, he said at Deptford, on board an India ship; he said he must have better account before he bought it. I said, may be he will tell me, I took him in custody. He told me he found it at New Cross, at the time that I apprehended him. I produce the yarn.

JOHN GRIFFITH. I am a twine spinner, I live in Well street, Mile End, New Town. I made this yarn for the East India company, I lost it on the 21st of January, it is marked yarn. I missed the yarn and the piece of canvas at seven o'clock in the morning. I am well convinced it is mine.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. Sixty-three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never stole it at all from him, I got it from Deptford, near New Cross, I found it, and the canvas covered over it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-10

180. CORNELIUS SCANNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , sixty-five pound weight of lead, value 19 s the property of William Usher , Robert Campbell , Elizabeth Fann , and Sarah Birch , widow .

FRANCIS LYE . Q. Are you foreman to Messrs. Usher and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. What are they. - A. White lead manufacturers .

Q. Has he any partners. - A. Yes, Robert Campbell , Elizabeth Farr , who is lately dead, and Sarah Birch

Court. Gentlemen of the jury, there is a mistake in the indictment; Mrs. Elizabeth Farr was one of the partner's names, in the indictment it is spelt Fann.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-11

181. JOSEPH WHITE and JOHN COLLINS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , a japanned iron tea box, value 8 s. and one tin tea kettle, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Adshead .

JOSEPH ADSHEAD . I am a tin plate worker in Whitechapel High street . I missed my property on the 4th of February, when I went to take the rest of my things in I saw it hanging by the door between five and six o'clock.

JOHN RAY. I am an officer of Worship street. On Wednesday the 4th of this month, between the hours of six and seven, I was going down Montague street, about half a mile from the prosecutor's, I was in company with Kennedy and two other officers, I met the two prisoners, one had got a tea kettle in his hand, and the other a tea board; the moment they saw me they separated, White went into the middle of the road, he had got the tea board against his breast. I immediately got hold of him, and the other was stopped by Kennedy. I asked White where he got this tea board; he told me he got it from a man in the Commercial road.

Q. How far were you from the Commercial road. A. We might be three quarters of a mile; he said he was going to take it to his master's in Saffron hill. We took them into a public house; Collins then began crying, and he told me immediately where they stole them from; they had taken them from a shop the corner of Osborne street, in Whitechapel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed Recollect yourself, did not he say, I stole them. - A. No, he did not.

JAMES KENNEDY . After we had apprehended the prisoners, Collins said that he had stole the kettle from a shop the corner of Osborne street; White said that he had brought the tea board from the finishers in the Commercial road.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

White called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Collins called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WHITE, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

COLLINS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-12

182. GEORGE ALLWRIGHT was indicted for that he on the 16th of January , was servant to Richard Ellison , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him; that he being such servant, did receive and take into his possession one guinea; and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

RICHARD ELLISON . I am a cheesemonger , I live in Chiswell street.

Mr. Pooley. Was the prisoner Allwright employed by you. - A. Yes, as a weekly servant.

Q. Was it par of his employment to receive money for you. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any customer that dealt with you of the name of Lake. - A. Yes, Mrs. Lake keeps a chandler's shop at Walworth; she had some goods delivered on the 1st of December. Some time after I sent the prisoner at the bar to see if Mrs. Lake was ready to pay a little bill; he returned the same afternoon, saying Mrs. Lake had only paid one guinea, and that she had borrowed; the boy is here that was in the shop, that took the guinea of him, and handed it to me.

Q. Do you know his hand writing. - A. I have seen him write.

Q. Look at this letter, is it his hand writing. - A. I received this letter after the first night he was taken up; this is his hand writing.

Q. Had you made this charge against him before you received this letter. - A. Yes. (The letter read.)

Directed - Mr. Ellison, 27. Chiswell street, Finsbury square.

Mr. Ellison - I am in your power, and as you looked

for mercy, have mercy on me; you know I had no intention of robbing you, what I have done; I acknowledge I was wrong, consider my wife and infants. I am no longer your enemy, he is subdued. I hope you will not prosecute, and I will pray for your welfare.

GEORGE ALLWRIGHT .

Q. Did you see the prisoner after you received this letter. - A. Yes, the next day.

Q. Did you mention it to him. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This young man had been in business for himself before he came to you; he had unfortunately failed. - A. He had.

Q. It was an object to you to have a person that had some customers that he might recommend to you. - A. It might be of service.

Q. Did you not agree that he should have a certain commission upon all these goods that he should dispose of to his own customers. - A. Before he came to live with me as a servant.

Q. Did he ever live with you as a servant. - A. Yes, first of all when he came to me, he asked me if I would send some goods to customers that he knew of, and allow him a commission for his own trouble; I said I had no objection if he would send good customers, he said he would send goods to no customers but what would pay the money in consequence of that; as I was going out of Thames street, he said he would help me to move, I then told him he should be a servant at fourteen shillings a week and his victuals.

Q. I will ask you whether or not you did agree that you would furnish his own customers with goods provided he did or would guarantee the payments. - A. I never did. I allowed him a little commission money that he might put something into his pocket, but not for him to guarantee the debt.

Q. Was not there a dispute between him and you about that commission. - A. None.

Q. Did not he claim nineteen shillings as commission due. - A. He never did, he summoned me for nineteen shillings; but I do not know what it was for.

Q. Had you that summons before or after you knew that the money had been received of Mrs. Lake. - A. After the 16th of January the money had been received of Mrs. Lake; we knew it before he claimed the nineteen shillings; he came to me on Monday the 26th of January, I owed him for a week's wages.

Q. That was fourteen shillings; instead of that you gave him twelve shillings. - A. He was not a person that exactly suited us, he wished to be master.

Q. He summoned you, and that was the day that you took him in charge of felony. - A. That was the day.

Q. You never charged him with it before. - A. I did not know where to find him before.

Q. Did not you meet him in Tottenham Court road, and assaulted him there. - A. Yes.

Q. He took out a warrant for your knocking him down in Tottenham Court road; when you went to the police office, you knew that Mrs. Lake had paid him the two pound two shillings; did not he attend at Worship street. - A. Yes.

Q. And in consequence of that you appeared at at the police office. - A. I did.

Q. You knew that Mrs. Lake had paid him the two pound two shillings. - A. I did.

Q. You was bound over for this assault. - A. I was.

Q. You say you did not know where to find him, you met with him in Tottenham Court road, and next at the Police office; was it not where you attended to the summons at Fuller's Rents, Holborn, that you met with him there, and took him in custoday. - A. Yes.

Court. When he brought you the guinea, did not he claim any part of the money for commission - A. He never mentioned any thing of the sort, he came home and said, Mrs. Lake had paid only one guinea, he entered it in the book, the book is here.

Q. Did you know where the prisoner went after he quitted your service. - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Did you not know that his friends had taken a situation for him. - A. I knew that they had taken a house somewhere at Islington; he said when he came in the shop, when I was paying him his weeks wages; I have been round and served the customers from another shop.

Court. Did you know at that time that Mrs. Lake had paid him the two guineas. - A. I did not.

Q. You told me that these goods were furnished by you for Mrs. Lake, that she was a customer of his, how much was he to receive out of Mrs. Lake's money. - A. Two shillings, I believe.

THOMAS ELLISON . - Mr. Pooley. I am the nephew of the last witness.

Q. You live at your uncle's, were you there on the 16th of January. - A. I was.

Q. Do you know of his bringing any money to your master from any customer. - A. Yes, he brought one guinea; he came home and said Mrs. Lake had only given him one guinea, and that guinea she had borrowed; after that he went and entered it in the day book.

Q. Did you see him do it. - A. I did not see him write it, I saw him go to the book; there is an entry in the book, it is the prisoner's hand writing, (the book produced), Mrs. Lake by cash one pound one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Did not Mr. Allwright when he made that entry, did not he claim twelve shillings for commission upon it. - A. No, never any thing of that sort.

MARY LAKE . My husband's name is Thomas, I live in Park place, Walworth, I keep a little chandler's shop. I ordered the cheese of Allwright, I took it of Mr. Ellison's boy when he brought it and a bill in Ellison's name; I paid Allwright for it, two pounds two shillings on the 16th of January.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Lake, from whom I received the money, I told her that Mr. Ellison owed me nineteen shillings at the time, I told her that I meaned to secure one guinea for the payment of it, Mr. Ellison for whom I sold goods for, would not sell the goods to my customers till I had guarantee them

Prosecutor. I shall certainly deny, that a man in his situation should not guarantee one shilling for

me.

JAMES ALLWRIGHT . - Mr. Alley. Do you remember the day he was apprehended on this charge. - Yes.

Q. Had you known that the prosecutor had got a warrant against him. - A. I did know it from his own mouth.

Q. Did you know that your brother was going to where the prosecutor was. - A. I did not till he told me; when I communicated to him that the prosecutor had got a warrant against him he said he certainly should meet him at ten o'clock at the court; consequently he did go.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-13

183. CORNELIUS SCANNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of June , sixty five pounds weight of lead, value 19 s. the property of William Usher , Robert Campbell , Elizabeth Farr , and Sarah Birch , widow .

FRANCE LYE. I live with Messrs. Usher and Co. - they are white lead manufacturers .

Q. Who are the partners. - A. William Usher , Robert Campbell , Elizabeth Farr , and Sarah Birch , widow they carry on the business in Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes he lived in the service of Usher and Co. in June last. On the 25th of last June, at eight o'clock in the morning, previous to the bell ringing, I went to the necessary, I saw the prisoner at the bar come and make a plunge close to the partition, I had a full view of him, there was a crevise in the partition that I could put my little finger through; I watched him narrowly, he looked round every way, I could not see what it was, I saw him go into the men's necessary directly opposite with something he had taken up behind a basket, or under the basket, I do not know which; he stopped in the men's necessary two or three minutes, and, when he came out I called to the other foreman George Kemble ; we took him into the melting house - I insisted upon searching him, he surrendered it, partly out of his small clothes, and part flung round his body.

Q. What was it. - A. Half a pig of lead, it weighed sixty five pound.

Q. Whose lead was it - A. The property of the firm. I went for an officer; the other foreman let him go away, he never come any more.

GEORGE KEMBLE . I came to the assistance of the other foreman; the prisoner took the lead from under his waistcoat and out of his breeches; the prisoner made his escape from me, I was not strong enough to hold him; he went away the 26th of June, and was taken a little before Christmas.

Prisoners Defence. Kemble told me to go to my breakfast, then he said there would be no more bother. I went to my breakfast and went down to my old master, and worked there till they took me up. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with; on my being in the melting house I saw that lay in the yard, I carried it through the yard openly in order to melt it down the next day, it was not done with intent to carry away.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-14

184. ELIZA BURNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , two pelises, value 2 l , the property of Michael Benjamin .

MRS. BENJAMIN. Q. You are the wife of the prosecutor. - A. Yes; I was behind the counter in the shop when the pelisses were taken, they were hanging at the post of the door outside of the shop. I heard the cry of stop thief, I immediately went to the door and missed the two pelisses. I went about two doors off and took the pelisses from the prisoner, she gave them to me and said nothing.

MARY HOLDIS . I was at the prisoner's mothers house the day this piece of work happened concerning the pelisse; I asked Mrs. Benjamin what was the matter; she said she had torn the pelisses, and she must be paid for it. I answered she was in liquor, and I dare say if she come to morrow she would be paid for it; she came three times in all.

Prosecutrix. The first time I saw that woman was at the justice's, she then spit in my face.

ANN POWELL . I was at the house when Mrs. Benjamin came up, she wanted to be paid for the pelisses; she said that this person had dirted it very much.

- NEWTON. I heard the cry of stop thief, I went into the street, I saw the prisoner running away towards her own home, I followed her and overtook the prisoner at her own door, I desired her to stop, she said, no; I overtook her on the stairs, I told her I understood that she had stole two pelisses from Mr. Benjamin's shop; she said she had not got the pelisses. They were taken away from her before I saw her.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoners Defence. Mrs. Benjamin said if I would pay half a guinea I should not be prosecuted at Marlborough street; her husband said I tore these two pelisses; Mr. Newton swore that I took them away, she swore that she followed me into a wine vaults, and took the two pelisses from me. I went on a Sunday morning to exchange some of my cloaths, I left some of my cloaths with them, I have never got my property from their house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-15

185 JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously-stealing on the 24th of January , twenty nine pound weight and a half of copper, value 2 l the property of Owen Williams , Pasco Grenfell , and William Grenfell .

The case was stated by Mr. Watson.

WILLIAM MITCHELL - Mr . Watson. I am a servant to the prosecutors, their names are Owen Williams , Pasco Grenfell, and William Grenfell; they are copper merchants at Castle Baynard wharf in Thames street .

Q. Did you miss any copper from their premises. - A. Three pigs or cakes of copper, we lost on Saturday the 24th of January. I saw the prisoner on my masters premises.

Q. Was he a labourer with you. - A. No.

Court. Had he any thing to do on your premises. - A. He was employed by the box maker to the East

India company.

MR. WATSON. Your master served the East India company with copper. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner at the bar before I missed the copper; I had been down the warehouse, and on my return I met the prisoner near where the copper was placed; I told two of our men to watch him. I went into the accompting house, I was called out by Griffith Powel who had detected him. I followed Griffith Powell who had detected him, the prisoner was stopped by Powell; the prisoner was brought back to the yard, at the gate his pocket broke down with two of the cakes; the constable found another.

Q. Were those the property of Messrs. Grenfell. - A. Yes.

GRIFFITH POWELL , - Mr. Watson. I am porter to Messrs. Williams and Grenfell, at the copper warehouse.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, did you see him on your master's premises on Saturday the 24th of January. - A. I did, a quarter before nine in the morning; he came down the yard, and into the warehouse, no further than where the copper lay; I kept my eye on him, he had not been there five minutes before he went out again; I directly went to the copper and missed three cakes, I called to my fellow servant to come after me, I says he has got it with him; the prisoner was then just got into Thames street to the gates.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him. - A. No further than when he shut the wicket. I came up with him about twenty or thirty yards from the gates; I told my fellow servant to get a constable directly; the prisoner said, for God sake, Griffith, do not be too hard with me; I brought him back, and as he came just to the gate the pocket dropped away with the weight of the copper; I saw two cakes drop out; the constable searched him and found another.

JOSEPH COWELL . - Mr. Watson. I live opposite Messrs. Grenfell. On Saturday the 24th of January, I saw the prisoner brought back in the custody of Powell, I saw the prisoner's pocket give way; I saw two cakes of copper fall. I searched him, he immediately said, for God's sake have mercy on me, I have got another, take it from me; that one came out of his breeches.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge the justness of the cause, that as my character has been all my life with out a strain; I humbly implore the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-16

186. THOMAS SHARP BARKER was indicted for that he on the 14th of February, in the forty fifth year of his Majesty's reign , was clerk to Peter Esdaile , William Esdaile , John Hamet , and James Esdaile Hamet , bankers , and was employed and entrusted by them, to receive money and notes for them, that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive, and take into his possession, a bank note of 500 l. for and on account of his said employers, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete, steal, and embezzle the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-17

187. THOMAS SHARP BARKER was again indicted for that he on the 29th of December, in the forty fourth year of his Majesty's reign , was clerk to Peter Esdaile , William Esdaile , John Hamet , and James Esdaile Hamet , was employed and entrusted by them to receive money and notes for them, that he being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, a bank note, value 500 l. for and on account of his said employers, and that he afterwards feloniously did, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY ,

Transported for Seven Years ,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder:

Reference Number: t18070218-18

188. CAROLINE LAVENDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , five watches, value 20 l. the property of Richard Webster , in his dwelling house .

Second count the property of Richard Webster , Esther Webster , and Sarah Webster .

RICHARD WEBSTER. I am a watchmaker , No, 26, Change Alley . The prisoner at the bar came into my employ as a servant in December; she had scarce been in the house above a fortnight before I missed one watch, I could have no suspicion of her, she never was allowed to be in the shop. On the 13th of January she was dismissed about eight or nine o'clock; on the 14th, when the time of winding up the watches came, I missed three more. In the evening my man takes the watches down to the safe, and deposits them, and he comes up again with the box; in the morning he takes them up again, he comes up with one box first, the safe is left open while he comes for another parcel; I judge she went to the safe and took them. When I missed them, I supposed it must be her, I went with the officer who is present to apprehend her, he searched her, and found two tickets, and one watch was found upon her. There were produced before the lord mayor, five watches, two by the pawnbrokers, and two by Mr. Aldridge, and one that was found in the water closet.

Q. Who is the owner of the house. - A. I have the lease of the house. I have two sisters live in the house, they have nothing to do with the rent of the house, they have one third of the business.

Q. Had you a character with her. - A. A very good character with her; I turned her away for being so dirty, I dismissed her before I missed all the watches.

MR. ALDRIDGE. On Tuesday evening the prisoner at the bar came to my house, about eight o'clock in the evening; she said she wanted a gold key, I shewed her some, she fixed on one, then she asked me if I bought watches, I said no, not on my own judgment, not being acquainted with watches, but that I would shew them to a watchmaker, and get them valued; if she would call again the next day at twelve o'clock she should know the value of them. She came the next morning at ten o'clock, I had not shewn them to the maker then; she said that she wanted to go to Brighton with her mother and a child that was bit by a og, that made her call so soon, it would be near a fortnight before she returned; she wanted some money in order

to defray the expences. With that she said I should have the two watches all the time; she had a guinea first and then I lent her four shillings, I was to keep the watches till she returned. She came no more. The next day the city marshall came from my lord mayor, to let me know that she was in custody.

Q. Are you sure that is the young woman. - A. I should not know her now, I swore to her before the magistrate; she was then in a pelisse, in the same state as when she came to my shop not in that state she is now.

WILLIAM NEAVE . I am servant to Mr. Sadler, No. 68, Aldersgate street. On the 14th of January last, the prisoner at the bar pledged a watch with me for twelve shillings and sixpence.

- I am a pawnbroker, No. 42, Watling street. On the 3d of January the prisoner pledged a watch with me for two guineas and a half.

WILLIAM SHERIDAN. I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of last month; on searching of her. I found a duplicate of a watch in her pocket, pawned at Sadler's for twelve shillings and sixpence, in the name of Nightingale.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope the gentlemen of the jury will have mercy on me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-19

189. REBECCA WOLLERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , two guineas, and a bank note, value 40 l. the property of James Preston , in his dwelling house .

JAMES PRESTON . I am a dealer in rags , I live at No. 74, Long lane, Smithfield , I rent the house.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. I have known the prisoner about four months. The first time she came was on the 4th of July, she came till she could get a place; she continued with me about three months, before she could get a place, she had her provision and lodging for nothing, she was a countrywoman's of my wife, she came from Dartmouth; she got a place, and staid about a fortnight, she came back again, and was with us about a fortnight, and then she went away. She said she was going to her aunt's, she left one of her boxes, she came for it on the 15th of December, she went up to her box, and that was the time I suspected she took the forty pounds and the two guineas, as my wife was busy washing. On the 22nd of December I went up stairs to get the note and the money, it was gone; the money was in a tin case in a pocket book.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Where was this pocket book. - A. In a drawer in a chest in the one pair of stairs room.

JEMIMA POWDITCH . I am servant to Mr. Charlton in Chancery lane. The prisoner on the 15th of December came to me, saying it was a note of Mr. Turner's, a shipwright at Deptford.

Q. What value was the note. - A. Forty pounds; saying he was going to leave his yard at Deptford. and was taking his money; she said she was going to her place that night. As the note could only be changed at the bank, she begged me to go and get it changed for her. I not having time to go, I begged Mr Brown to change it for me. In about an hour after the young woman came and took the change of the forty pound note, all in small notes.

Mr. Knapp. You did not take any particular notice of the note. - A. I did not.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a painter I live in Bell yard, The last witness asked me to change her a forty pound bank of England note. I got it changed at the bankers in Chancery lane, Messrs. Dawson and company; the change was principally one pound notes, and one fifteen.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 10th of January last I apprehended the prisoner at the bar near Yarmouth in Suffolk. I told her I came to apprehend her upon this charge; she seemed very much alarmed. I told her to pull her pockets out, that I might see what was in them. I found in her pocket a small pocket book, containing a half guinea, a seven shilling piece, and a bunch of small keys. I then asked her if she had any box there, she said she had only one trunk, she pointed towards the trunk that was there, I said I must go to it. I had to go round a mahogany table, it was a genteel house where I took her, at a relations. While I was trying to undo the trunk, she said she would not be taken to London, she said I will sooner do this first. I was then stooping down to unlock the trunk; she was dressed in a habit shirt, and she pulled it down, I saw her draw something across her throat, I did not see what it was; the guard of the mail coach was there at the time that I went down with. He caught hold of her arm, and then I returned round the table, seeing the blood come from her neck; presently after, I got the knife from her, but not till we had cut her thumb. In pressing her wrist a great deal, I believe I hurt her thumb. Afterwards I unlocked her trunk, I found nothing in it but wearing apparel; she said she had took the forty pound note, but the two guineas she said she had not. She said she took it for some imprudent liberties that I did not think it prudent to ask her about.

Q. Did you say any thing to her at all. - A. No more than asking her if she was guilty of the crime. She was in that agonising state after she had attempted to cut her throat, what she said was so incoherent you could hardly understand her, and indeed from the flurry that she was in, and the blood flowing, she was cut an inch and a half; she bled so much that her clothes were obliged to be taken off. I asked her where she got the the knife, I was certain that she had no knife in her pocket. She said she took it out of a workbag.

JOHN GIBBONS. I am clerk in the bank. The forty pound note was paid in the bank by Dawson and Co.

Q.(to prosecutor) Have you any body from Chancery lane. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-20

190. WILLIAM WEBSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , a pound weight of iron pins, value 12 s. and six saws, value 2 s. the property of Richard Knight and George Knight , privately in their shop.

GEORGE KNIGHT. I am an ironmonger in Foster lane . I am in partnership with my brother Richard Knight .

Q. When was this done. - A. This morning about

twelve o'clock. I saw our apprentice and the prisoner at the bar having a scuffle at the shop door, the apprentice shewed me a saw that he had taken from him. I immediately took him into the counting-house, I there searched him, I took out of his pocket a parcel of iron pins. He immediately fell down on his knees, and asked for mercy. He pulled out of his pocket five more saws, and placed them on the desk. I sent for an officer.

AUGUSTUS FINCH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Knight; the prisoner came into the shop this morning, and asked to see some pins. I shewed him some of several sorts, he said they were all too large. I left the drawer on the counter and went up stairs for more; Mr. Knight was behind the counter, and the shopman. I returned and told him we had no smaller, and took the drawer away. On my return, he was looking at the saws, I observed him look round the shop, and shuffling his hand into his pocket. I observed him do it a second time, I then went to him, and he paid me for one saw; he asked me then to let him see some shears; I went up stairs and shewed him some, they did not suit him. He was going out of the shop, I then stopped him, I told him that he had got some saws that he had not paid for. He took one saw out of his left hand coat pocket. I called Mr. Knight, and he took him to the accounting house.

SAMUEL PORTER . I am a marshalman. I was desired to step into Mr. Knight's shop. I took the prisoner into custody.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I trust you will have mercy on me, I have a mother of sixty years of age that has nothing but me to support her.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privately

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-21

191 JOHN LINLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , eleven pound weight of brass, value 9 s. the property of George Penton .

GEORGE PENTON . I am a brass founder , I live in New Street square, St. Bride's. On the 4th of February I lost the brass between six and seven o'clock in the morning. I was called up by one of my workmen, who detected the prisoner.

JOSHUA NAUGHTON . I am a servant to Mr. Penton; the prisoner came to work between six and seven o'clock in the morning, he came to about three yards off me, where there was a quantity of metal in a cask; he made a stoop over the cask, I was rather confident that he took something out of it. I communicated the circumstance to Dowton, and while we were talking the prisoner went into the street, we both went after him. Dowton laid hold of him by the collar and asked him where he was going, he said he was going to get a glass of gin. Dowton put his hand in his pocket and felt the metal there. I saw him take it out, it weighs eleven pounds.

- DOWTON. I took it out of the prisoner's pocket. I can swear it is Mr. Penton's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope your lordship and the prosecutor will be as merciful as you can; if I had been in my proper senses I should not have done it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-22

192. SARAH JONES and SARAH BONNER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a silver watch, value 5 l. and seven seven-shilling pieces , the property of Henry Carlof .

HENRY CARLOF . I am a Prussian. I am a cooper , I live in Prince's place, Ratcliff Highway. On the 17th of last month I was in a public house, Catherine Wheel alley, Whitechapel, between nine and ten at night; Sarah Jones met me in the public house; I had a pint of beer to drink with her; then she had something else to drink, which I gave her. I was a little drunk. Then she asked me to go home with her. We all went to a private house close by the public house; we went up stairs together, she began playing with me. She took my watch out, and put it in my coat pocket.

Q. You were so drunk you did not know what she did with you. - A. She said she would take the watch down to the mistress; instead of that she run away; that was the little one. The tall one took the seven shilling pieces from me.

Q. You were so drunk you could not hinder neither. - A. Yes, I was so drunk.

Q. Look at the prisoners, are you sure they are the persons. - A. Yes.

JOHN LENCH . I saw Sarah Bonner come out of the house with a trunk on Saturday morning (I went to the play house with Sarah Bonner ), she told me that Sarah Jones had sold the watch for twenty eight shillings and she said she took the seven shilling pieces. I told my shopmate of it.

JOHN NOWLAND . I took charge of the girls at the play house.

Jones's Defence. I was going with this young woman to her mother's about one o'clock in the afternoon, and when we came, the landlady said there had been a gentleman ill used; we did not know any thing of it.

Bonner's Defence. I went to my mother's house at five o'clock in the afternoon, I never come from my mother's till ten. When I came home my landlady said there had been somebody ill used. I do not know any thing of the man.

JONES, GUILTY aged 16.

BONNER, GUILTY aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-23

192. JOHN ELLIOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of January three pieces of leather, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Skilson .

JOHN MURPHY . I am a currier in the employ of Thomas Skilson , No. 10, Crown street, Soho . On the 23rd of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop to purchase some leather, he paid for some. I missed

some pieces, I went after the prisoner and he came back to the shop with me, and I found some pieces of leather about him, these are the pieces of leather so far as my knowledge goes to tell the truth; when I got home from Hicks' hall the string got loose, and it fell among some other pieces of leather. I cannot possibly swear that they were the pieces of leather.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-24

194. WILLIAM BUTCHER and JAMES JEAL were indicted for that they and divers other persons, whose name to the jurors are unknown, to the number of three or more, on the 12th of December , with force and arms and being armed with pistols and other offensive weapons, unlawfully and feloniously did assemble themselves together in order to be aiding and assisting in illegal running and carrying away a large quantity of foreign brandy, rum, and gin, to wit, one hundred gallons of brandy, one hundred gallons of rum, and one hundred gallons of gin; the same brandy, rum, and gin, being uncustomed goods and liable to be seized and secured .

Second count for like offence and with the same intention.

Third count for assembling together it order to be aiding and assisting in carrying away like goods.

Fourth count charged with like offence, that they then and there were aiding and assisting in carrying away the like goods.

Fifth count with being assembled in like manner, in order to be aiding in the rescuing and taking the like goods from Robert Cocks , he being an officer of our lord the King.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence from this charge, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-25

195. WILLIAM DISNEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's highway upon Mary Langfield , on the 15th of February , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a cloak, value 5 s. and two gold rings, value 5 s. the goods of William Langfield .

MARY LANGFIELD . I am the wife of William Langfield .

Q. Were you robbed lately. - A. I was going to my house in Harrow alley in Aldgate, the person met me in Rosemary lane , near half after three in the morning.

Q.Whereabouts in Rosemary lane. - A. Near the Minories.

Q. How came you to have been out so late. - A. I had been out to a labour, a laying in, I was returning home.

Q. Are you a midwife. - A. No.

Q. Did the person that robbed you overtake you. - A. No, he met me.

Q. who is the person that met you. - A. The prisoner is the man, I never saw him till that moment.

Q. What did he say. - A. He never spoke; he made a catch and took this cloak (witness pointing to the cloak she had on) and in my endeavouring to get my cloak again, he pushed me down upon the flags, and he held me by my waist and put two of my fingers in his mouth, and pulled down my two rings. I had such a cold I could not call out, I got my sister to call out.

Q. Were they gold rings. - A. Yes, the watchman came and took him in custody

Q. He was taken on the spot. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I never had her fingers in my mouth.

SARAH LANCASTER . I am sister to the prosecutrix.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner offered any violence to your sister. - A. Yes, he laid hold of her cloak and pulled it off her shoulder, and with the scuffling she trying to save her cloak, he shoved her down, he put two of her fingers in his mouth, he was drawing her two rings off I called to the watchman; he came instantly.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner into custody, I found him leaning upon the woman's breast with both of his knees.

Prisoner. That gentleman cannot say that I was kneeling upon the woman at the time he came up.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 29.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-26

196 WILLIAM BALDWIN was indicted for stealing on the 9th of January , two pieces of linen value one penny, 14 guineas, 32 half guineas, the property of Charles Hurley , in the dwelling house of Jeremiah Crowley

CHARLES HURLEY . I live at Limehouse , I live in the house of Jeremiah Crowley .

Q. He is the man that keeps the house and lives there. - A. Yes.

Q. And you lodged there. - A. Yes; the prisoner lodged in the house and slept in the same bed with me for four months, if not better.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the room with you. - A. Yes, another man that worked in the same shop with me, and nobody else.

Q. Did you lose your money any time. - A. Yes, on the 9th of last month, that man robbed me.

Q. What time did you get up on the 9th of last month. - A. I got out of bed the night before, and took a pair of stockings out of my chest, locked the chest, and I put the key in my pocket, and I put my clothes on my chest.

Q. When you opened your chest and took out the stockings did you see what you had in your chest. - A. No.

Q. When had you last seen what you had in your chest. - A. On Sunday I counted my money, thirty guineas in gold; I always kept the key in my pocket, I had thirty guineas in guineas and half guineas; there were fourteen whole guineas and the remainder in half guineas, in all thirty guineas; they were in a black piece of silk and two pieces of linen outside of the black silk. On the 9th of January I got up at six o'clock, and the other man that worked with me he got up at the same time.

Q. Did you and the man who slept in the single bed get up and go out together. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner go out before you. - A. I left him in bed, I worked in Ship yard, it is called Hog yard; I am a smith and the other man worked in the same shop

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. A blacksmith he

worked at Wapping at another place.

Q. Was he a journeyman. - A. Yes, and so am I.

Q. What time did you come home. - A. I came home after my day's work at eight o'clock, and the other man along with me.

Q. The other man had been working with you all day. - A. Yes, he had been working with me all day.

Q. When you came home did you find the prisoner at home - A. No, he was not at home.

Q.Did you see your chest, in what condition was it. - A.At ten o'clock I went up to bed, the other man and I went up together, I had a candle in my hand, I found my box open.

Q. Was the other man with you all the time. - A. Yes.

Q. He had supped with you. - A. Yes, sir, at the same table.

Q.You say you found your chest broken open. - A. I found my chest broken open.

Q. Were there any force used, or was it only unlocked. - A. The hasp was broken, and the bolt was in the hasp; I hallood out to my landlord and landlady, I told them I was robbed in their place.

Q. Did you look to see what was gone. - A.Not before I called up my landlord and landlady; they came up to me, I says my box is broken open, now says I, I am robbed in your place, I clapped my hands upon where it was before it was gone.

Q. What was gone. - A. Thirty guineas. I missed nothing of my clothes, only thirty guineas.

Q. You had no particular marks about the money. - A. Yes, there were two half guineas which were remarkable money.

Q. How soon after that did you see the prisoner again. - A. It was ten o'clock at night when I missed it. The next day I went to his master's.

Q. I must not hear what his master said. - A. I found him in the public house in the Borough.

Q. When you found him there did you say any thing to him. - A. I saw the man there through a glass in the passage, I went for an officer, and the officer took him; the officer asked him where my money was. I told him the fourteen guineas were of the old coin, and all but two of the half guineas were chiefly new, and the two half guineas were remarkable.

Q. That we shall hear by and by - There were some money found upon him. - A. Yes, nineteen guineas and a half.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford. You are sure that Crowley lives in the house himself. - A. Yes.

Q. He sleeps there himself. - A. Yes.

Q. And there is another man lodges in the same room, he sleeps in another bed. - A. Yes.

Q. And on that Thursday night when you went to bed you locked up your chest. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen the money then. - A. No.

Q. The last time you had seen it was on Sunday. - A. Yes.

Q. Then between Sunday and Thursday you had not seen it at all. - A. No.

Q.Were there any other persons that lodged in the house besides the three you have mentioned. - A. No, only us three.

Q. What is Crowley himself. - A. He is a labourer in Ship yard, he goes out to work; he and his wife sleeps in another room, he had no business with us.

Q. Who takes care of the house in the day. - A. His wife.

Q. You do not know whether she was at home that day. - A. No.

Q. Do you know that the house door is left open. - A. No.

Q. Do you not know that the children were left in the house alone and that they were left to take care of the house. - A. No, I did not know, it is no business with me, I am always out at work.

WILLIAM CROSS . Q. What are you. - A. I am a smith.

Q. Do you lodge in this house of Crowley's. - A. No.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, I have known him thirteen or fourteen years, by his being a shopmate of mine, but not when he had done the robbery.

Q. You remember hearing of the robbery. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner at the public house. - A. I was at the public house with him on the day when he did the robbery.

Q. What day was it. - A. I do not know.

Q. How soon did you hear of the robbery. - A. The next day the robbery was done, he was with me.

Q. You heard of it the day after. - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day. - A. Between twelve and one.

Q. Do you know what day of the week it was. - A. I cannot rightly say.

Q. What public house were you at. - A. The Crown, Blackfriar's road.

Q. Were you drinking there. - A. Yes, we drank as much as came to three or four shillings, him and me and two more; he being an old shopmate we drank with him, he paid three shillings for the first reckoning, and after that he said we will be a pot a piece, with that we went to another public house, the sign of the Gibraltar, Gibraltar row, we had so much as came to six pence a piece. I pulled my watch out, and then I pulled my money out; he says will you sell that watch, I says, will you give me money enough for it, he offered me thirty seven shillings for the watch, I said if he would give me two pounds for it he should have it, he paid me two pound for it, one guinea, half a guinea, and the rest in silver; he chucked two guineas down, I said I had no change, the landlord changed one guinea. After that I told the prisoner I would spend half a crown, and he to pay for a gallon of beer.

Q. Was that all spent and drank. - A. Yes, and we parted.

Q. That is all you saw. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been in the habit of keeping company much with him about that time. - A. I had not seen him before for five weeks.

Q. How came you not to be at work that day. - A. He came to our shop about dinner time, I said to him if you are going to the Crown public house, I will come in to you.

Q. You did not see any more money than the two guineas. - A. No, no more.

Q. Nor you had any more conversation with him. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Between twelve and one you went to the Crown in Blackfriars road and there you had so much to drink as came to three shillings, and then you went to another public house, you were pretty drunk. - A. No, not among five of us.

Q. At the next public house each of you spent six pence. - A. Yes.

Q. And after that you spent half a crown and the prisoner a gallon. - A. Yes.

JAMES LOCKEY . Q. Are you an officer. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect being applied to by Hurley - A. He came to my house on the 10th of last month, he informed me that he had been robbed by a man of the name of Baldwyn of fourteen guineas, and as many half guineas as amounted to thirty guineas, chiefly of the old coin, and that the half guineas were almost new ones.

Q. You have the money that you found upon the prisoner. - A. I have.

Q. Did he take you to where the prisoner Baldwyn was. - A. He did, he took me to a public house in Gibraltar row, St Georges fields; he pointed out the prisoner to me. I took the prisoner into a private room, I asked him how he came to rob this man, he denied having any knowledge of him. I told him I was a police officer, I must search him; he behaved in a very violent manner, I was obliged to throw him down. After that he behaved more quiet, and suffered me to search him.

Q. You had not asked him many questions. - A. No, I searched him. In one waistcoat pocket I found a watch, in the other waistcoat pocket I found a leather bag, which contained twelve guineas and fifteen half guineas. Hurley then described the pieces of linen rags which the money was wrapped up in. I searched him again; I found them in the inside pocket of the prisoner's jacket. I produce the fifteen half guineas, the twelve guineas, and the two pieces of rag. I asked the prisoner how he counted for having all this money about him, he said it was his own money what he had worked for.

Q. Before you searched the prisoner you said the prosecutor described the sort of money, did he say whether it was in a purse or not. - A. He did not tell me before I found it, he told me what the money was before I found it, after I found the money he told me there were two pieces of rag and a piece of black silk, that was before I found the rag, and which he said he should know. These are the two pieces of rag.

Q.(to prosecutor) You said that your money was wrapped up in a peice of black silk and two pieces of linen rag, you saw it before, when it was found upon the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that rag do you know it. - A. Yes, that rag that was outside of the black silk, and this was the outside of all it has a remarkable mark, I told the officer what kind they were before I saw any of them

Q. What is the mark. - A. It is hem'd just in this part; the outer one had no mark only the length, and it had a rent in the middle. I told the officer the length of this, I am certain of these two piece of linen they are mine, that I can swear to, and that my money was wrapped up in them.

Q. Look at the money, I take it for granted there is none of them you can speak particularly to, - A. I have been three years working for them; one half guinea is bent like a six-pence, and the other half guinea is bent a little at the edge. If he has not made away with them, I can swear to them. These are the two half guineas (witness showing it).

Q.(to Lockey.) Before you searched the man, did he describe any particular money having any particular mark. - A. I believe he did, I am not quite positive.

Mr. Walford (to Prosecutor.) You do not mean to swear to the two half guineas. - A. I will not swear to the two half guineas, I will swear to the linen, I am positive to the linen.

Court. The prisoner did not come home that night. - A. No, he did not.

MRS. CROWLEY Q. This man and the prisoner lodged in your house. - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is it in. - A. Saint Ann's, Lime-house.

Jury. It is Saint Ann, Middlesex, commonly called Limehouse.

Q.(to Mrs. Crowley) Were you out on the day this man called you up. - A. No, I was at home all the day till between ten and eleven o'clock; I went out, and while I was gone out the prisoner went out.

Q. How came you to go out so late on that day. - A. I do not know, he never staid so late before, when I went out I left the prisoner at home.

Q. How came he to know the prisoner was at home. - A Because the child told me that he went out.

Q. That I cannot hear, you do not know that he was at home when you went out. - A. No.

Q. He had lodged with you how long. - A. About four moths as nigh, as I can guess.

Q. Had you seen him have a quantity of money. - A. Never but a very little indeed, I never saw him have any, he always pleaded very poor, I do not know whether he was or no.

Q. Did he pay you for your lodgings. - A. He always paid me regular if he did not pay one week he did another.

Cross examined by Mr. Walford How many lodgers had you: - A. Three.

Q. What is your husband. - A. He is a labourer.

Q. What is your employment. - A. I do any thing that I can get, and sometimes I go out to work.

Q. Had you been out at the time this happened. - A. I had been out four days.

Q. Then from the Monday till Thursday you were out at work. - A. Yes, at different times.

Q. Your husband goes out to work. - A. Yes.

Q. Who takes care of the house. - A. Why the door of the house is generally locked, my husband comes backwards and forwards to the house and gets his meals, and then he locks the door. I was at a neighbour's.

Q. Who was the key left with. - A. The children.

Q. Then whether the children left the door open you cannot say; then both you and your husband

was absent from Monday to Thursday, and during that time the key was left with the children. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, this is the first time that I have had occasion to stand before a bar. What I am charged with here I am totally innocent of. I was born in Hampshire of honest parents, who inculcated into me honest principles. I was brought by my father to Mr. Cook's in St. George's fields, in whose employment I continued for a considerable length of time, and from whom I generally earned two pounds a week. From there I went to Wapping wall, in whose employ I was when this unfortunate circumstance happened; I only mention this circumstance to satisfy you, my lord, and the gentlemen of the jury, that I had a better opportunity of having money of my own than the prosecutor, who is only a hammerman, and can get only eighteen shillings a week. On the morning this happened, I found myself incapable of going to work, so from there I went to St. George's fields to my old shopmates, they persuaded me to stop the night. On the next day, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I was taken in custody. I humbly submit to your consideration, if my prosecutor can swear to money, that is the grand criterion: he in madness of despair, because it was lost, swore that one of the half guineas was crooked. If he had any private mark on the money he would have shewn it. Under the foregoing circumstances, my prosecutor might have sworn to the money of any one in court as well as mine. Therefore I submit my case to you, hoping I shall have an acquittal.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-27

193. GEORGE JEFFREY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , eight pair of shoes, value 1 l. and a pair of half boots, value 5 s. the property of Walter Martyn .

WALTER MARTYN . I am a cordwainer , I live at No. 13, Marybone lane . I only know that I lost the shoes and the half boots, they were hung at the shop door, on the entrance of the shop. I had seen them there in the morning.

THOMAS CAVE . I am a Chinaman. On the 15th of February, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the bar, and a lad with him, loitering about for half an hour, I kept my eye upon them, from their appearance, to see what they were about to do. I saw them both at Mr. Martyn's door, they were both in the act of lifting off a bundle of shoes from a hook, they were tied in a bundle together; the prisoner at the bar had a sacking apron on him. When they were taken off the hook he held his apron up, and they were thrown into his apron. I judged they were coming towards me, instead of which they went up Marybone lane. I had a door in my warehouse that led there, I went through after them, and in the middle of the road, about ten yards further, I laid hold of the prisoner; the other boy made his escape. I brought him to Mr. Martyn's, he not being at home I took him to the watchhouse. I delivered the shoes to the constable.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy as I was running along, says he to me will you have some shoes, I says yes, if you will give them me, I want a pair very badly. He said take these.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-28

198. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , a writing desk, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Handford .

THOMAS HANDFORD. I am a cabinet maker , No. 94, in the Strand .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking your property of your own knowledge. - A. No, I saw it in the morning before it was taken, between nine and ten o'clock. Between four and five o'clock the prisoner was brought back with the property.

GRACE HANDFORD . I was sitting in my back parlour, I saw the desk turned round by somebody, I did not know by who; with that I saw it immediately taken from the pile. I ran from the parlour into the shop, I met Mr. Baddely at the door, he said some man had taken a desk. I ran thirteen or fourteen doors off, I met the prisoner with the desk in his hand. Being in a public situation, an hundred people came to my assistance. The man made no resistance, he came back with me, I laid hold of him myself.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-29

199. RICHARD WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , two pound weight of-beef, value 16 d. and a mutton chop, value 2 d. the property of Abraham Slade , senior, and Abraham Slade , junior.

JOHN BEDFORD. I live servant with Mr. Slade, senior and junior, they are butchers in Tottenham court road.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant to them. - A. Yes, on Wednesday the 4th of February I saw him come by my window in the slaughter house, with some beef steak and a mutton chop in his hand. I went backwards, and I saw them in the slaughter house; in half an hour they were removed from there. I acquainted my master of it, my master fetched a constable, and they were found in the prisoner's box in our room.

Q. What quantity of beef and mutton was there. - A. Two pounds and ten ounces.

Q. Did the prisoner and you eat as well as lodge in your master's house. - A. Yes.

Q. You were dieted there, as well as lodged there. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin. Is it not usual for journeymen butchers, when they want any thing for themselves, or fellow servants, to take it. - A. It may.

Q. You have done it yourself. - A. Not to conceal it in a box.

Q. He could not have put it there for sale, could not you have eat a bit of it if he had asked you, if it had been done very nice and hot. - A. I dare say I should.

ABRAHAM SLADE , junior. I was very much irritated at the ingratitude of the prisoner. At the request of Bedford I went into his room and saw his box opened before the constable came. I saw the parts in the shop where they were taken from.

Q. Do you permit your servants to take beef or mutton out of your shop. - A. Certainly not, they have a good table to sit down to.

Prisoner's Defence. I only took it in view of taking it

for supper for my fellow servants; I had no intention of taking it out, but of dressing it in our own house.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-30

200. JOSEPH WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , four pigs, value 4 l. the property of Robert Bettel .

ROBERT BETTEL. I live at Hendon , I am a labouring man . Last January the 26th, I had four pigs, in a little place that I made myself, what they call a stye, but not a proper stye; I saw them a little past three o'clock, when I left home.

Q. In that stye that you made for them. - A. Yes, I left home to bring some sheep from a field at Mill-hill, for Thomas Harris to take to market; when I came to Hendon with them I called Thomas Harris up, and while I was waiting for the drover, this man came on the road driving my pigs; it was near half past four then; I asked him where he was going with the pigs, he did not make me any answer; I said they were my pigs; then he said he was taking them to the pound; I asked him what was the reason that he did not leave them as he came past the pound.

Q. He had come past the pound had he. - A. Yes, he said he was quite a stranger to the place, and he thought the pound had been further on. I asked him what he did with such a nice little whip to drive pigs with; he said that he found it on the road, coming from Baldock on Sunday. Then Mr. Harris and I took him in custody, and we called up Mr. Cooper the constable at Hendon, and gave him charge of him; he secured him in the cage.

Q. Are you sure that the pigs were your pigs. - A. Yes, they were at Mr. Cooper's that day, and the next I took them home on the Tuesday evening; I saw them at home when I left home this morning. The prisoner said he was quite a stranger to the place at day light; I found he was very well known, so far as being thereabouts in the summer.

Prisoner. The prosecutor knew me before. - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge, more than that he said he was a stranger to the place.

THOMAS HARRIS . Q. Was you with the last witness on the 26th of January. - A. Yes, he called me up about four o'clock, he brought a few sheep; he asked me if I would let them come along with mine to Smithfield market as I was a coming down there; I got up and struck a light and came down to him.

Q. Did you see any person driving pigs. - A. Yes, I went to Bettel, he was out side my gates, waiting for the drover; we saw a man coming in the road, that was a little before five, apparently driving of something; it was a moonlight morning; we had the curiosity to o to meet him in the road, to see what he had got; when we got to him, Bettel said to the prisoner where are you going with them pigs, these are my pigs, I looked at the pigs; I knew them; I directly whipped up to the prisoner at the bar, and took him by the collar.

Q. You knew the pigs. - A. I knew the pigs, they went home with some sheep of mine after he bought them. When I laid hold of the prisoner he seemed to be confused; he did not speak for a minute; then he said he found these pigs in the road, and he was going to take them to the pound; I said you have come by the pound; I said to Bettel you had better go and call Cooper the constable to come and secure him. While Bettel was calling the constable, the prisoner at the bar says to me, as soon as Bettel was come back, you are two poor men; and I am a poor man, I have half a guinea; I will give you that to let me go; we delivered him to the constable.

Prisoner. Q.(to prosecutor) Did not you ask me where I was going with the pigs; you said they are my pigs, I said take them, I said they are not mine. - A, You said they were not your own, you were driving them on the road, about a mile and a half from my house.

COOPER. I am a constable, I was called up about half past four, and the prisoner at the bar was delivered into my charge; I put him into my yard till the next day Monday morning; then I conveyed him to Hatton Garden office; he begged that we would not hurt him; he did not mind what he gave.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been very bad, and I had been down in the country a good bit, for three quarters of a year. I was coming out of the country; I came as far as Barnet, that was Sunday night; I stopped there to refresh myself; I wanted to get to town; I had a few shillings to take of one man there; a poor man came in and had not got money to pay for a pot of beer, he had got a whip, I bought the whip of him; I did not know where he had left it, a man says the whip is in my house; I went and fetched it, I took it with me as a walking stick, I set down in Mill hill, with that I came to that man's house; I met a man and a dog, he wished me good morning; and I wished him good morning; when I came a good distance on the road, I saw four pigs, I went back to this gentleman's house; I was in hopes of getting something to drink; I went to the door, I did not lift up the latch, I did not see any body; I drove the pigs along seeing nobody; I tried to put them in a farm yard, I was very well known in that neighbourhood; I could not get in; the gate was locked. Then I tried another farm yard; I shut them in there, and I set down in the rick yard, being poorly; and when I came out of the rick yard, two of these pigs went out of the yard; then I let the other two out; I knew there were some pens at the watchhouse. I drove them a little way on, I saw two men stand in the road, I was in hopes they were watchmen, the pigs were at a distance from me; I heard the owner say, they are my pigs; when I came up the man said, where are you going with these pigs; says I; I am going to put them in the pound; I called that the same as the pound; he says they are my pigs, I says then if they be your pigs, take them; I knew they are not mine. I told them I always thought there were watchmen here: if I had stolen the pigs, I could have turned down two roads, a mile and a half from there; I had no thought of doing such a thing; I have done my best to take care of the pigs for the owner; I says I am a poor man, and you are a poor man, I do not wish to take any thing from any body; I have one half guinea in my pocket, I will sooner give you the half guinea, than be put in this place, and I will give you my address where I live.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18070218-31

201. MATILDA GOULDING , alias ROBERTS ; and GEORGE ROSE , alias ROBERTS , were indicted

for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , a gold watch, value 8 l. the property of Martha Lowe .

MARTHA LOWE . I am a widow , I keep a house, and let lodgings; Matilda Goulding was a lodger of mine; she went away last August.

Q. Out of what place did you lose your watch. - A. It was hanging on the chimney piece, on the 15th of December the prisoner came in about seven o'clock at night; I missed the watch after she was gone; I saw the watch when she was in the room.

Q. Was her husband there at that time. - A. No, I never saw him till I saw him at the office at Queen square.

ROBERT BARKER . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a watch. I took it in pledge of both the prisoners.

(The property produced and identified.)

Goulding's Defence. When I called upon Mrs. Lowe, there was a woman in the kitchen; she is an unfortunate woman upon the town; she went out and fetched liquor while I was there, and a knock came to the door; I went to the door, and nobody was there.

Prosecutrix. I saw my watch after that woman was gone.

Roses' Defence. When I first saw the watch, she told me she had it of a friend over the water, she asked me if I would go with her to pledge it.

GOULDING, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

ROSE, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-32

202. JOSEPH RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of January , eight pound weight of nails , the property of Nathaniel Dowrick , and ELIZABETH HILL for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

JOHN ADAMS . - Mr. Pooley. You are a Thames police officer, do you know where the prisoner Hill lived. - A. Yes, at Limehouse. On the 24th of January, about six in the evening, I saw the prisoner go into her house; William Thomas was in company with me; suspecting that he had something, I listened at the door; after a minute I heard something go into the scale, as if it was metal.

Q. What shop does she keep. - A.Her husband is a blacksmith, he keeps a shop of ironmongery, and buys old iron; I then lifted the latch of the front door to try to get in; I found it was fast; I went round to the back door, I left Thomas at the front door; when I came to the back door it was fast, when I got back again Thomas had got into the house; I went in to him at the front door, and Thomas had hold of Randall by the collar, and these nails were lying on the floor; and the woman at the bar was standing close by him. I then asked Randall where he got the nails; he says what nails, I know nothing of any nails, I brought none here; I then asked Mrs. Hill where she got the nails, (pointing to the nails on the floor); she told me that she had them of the prisoner Randall; they were both standing together, he said not a word. I then took Randall to the office; I searched him; I found two nails in the inside of each pocket; as I was carrying him to the office, I asked him what yard he worked in; he said he worked in no yard at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. You do not know that this woman was in the shop at the time this man went into the shop. - A. I cannot say that she was, she was there when I went in.

Q. You never did take the prisoner Hill up. - A. No.

Q. She in point of fact, voluntarily came up to the office. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am an officer, I was in company with the other witness; the prisoner lifted up the the latch of Mrs. Hill's door, and immediately went in; Adams tried the latch just afterwards; he could not get in; I was with him, he went round to the back door; in the mean time, I lifted up the latch, and the door was opened to me.

Q. Did you hear any thing after he lifted up the latch. - A. I heard a jingling, as if iron nails had been put in the scale; I went in the shop; Mrs. Hill turned the nails out of the scale into her apron, and went immediately into the back parlour; I asked her what she did with the nails that she took out of the scale; she said, what nails; I said the nails that you had from the carpenter that just come in with them. She then threw the nails out of her apron on the floor; I turned my head then and saw Randall; I took hold of him, he was just by the door; we took Randall to the office; I saw the two nails taken out of his pocket.

NATHANIEL DOWRICK. - Mr. Pooley. You are the owner of the ship called Governour Mill. - A. I am, the vessel was in Hermitage dock.

Q. Look at these nails, are these sort of nails used about shipping. - A. Yes, they are composition nails.

HERMON HILL . You are a ship builder. - A. Yes, I live at Limehouse.

Q. Had you a ship at Hermitage warf, and were you repairing it. - A. Yes, for Mr. Dowrick, we were coppering her with other repairs.

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. He was a dock labourer.

Q. Were you coppering any other ship at that time. - A. Not at that time.

Q. Look at those nails, are those the sort of nails that were used about the Governour Mill, - A. These are exactly the same description of nails, such as we were using.

Q. Was the prisoner employed about the Governour Mill. - A. He was cleaning under the ship's bottom.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. The nails are the exact size as any other shipwright would use. - A. They would use such sort of nails.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Randall called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hill called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-33

203. JANE SEAMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , a sheet, value 4 s. the property of Mathew Sizer .

MATHEW SIZER . I live at the Blue Anchor,

Cable street, Saint Georges in the East . I am a publican ; the prisoner at the bar lived with me as a servant . On the 16th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon she came down stairs, I observed something white hanging over her shoes, and she appeared bulky; she immediately went out when she came down stairs. I told my wife when the prisoner returned, my wife asked her what she had done with the sheet; she replied it was doubled up under her bed; her mistress said she would go and see; the prisoner called to her as she was on the stairs, and told her she had pawned it.

GEORGE OSWING . I produce a sheet pledged by the prisoner on the 16th of January.

Prosecutor. That is my sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed; I did not intend to defraud my master.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-34

204. JOHN WAINWRIGHT and JOHN MATHEWS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the house of John Warne , about the hour of seven in the night of the 26th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, seven pair of stockings, value 13 s. 6 d. five pair of gloves, value 3 s. 4 d. and four pair of braces, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of John Warne .

JOHN WARNE . I live at 420 in the Strand , I keep a hosier's shop .

Q. Was your house broken open. - A. Yes, I was at home between five and six in the evening; the prisoners were brought into me by the witnesses; they said they had caught them in the fact of breaking my window and robbing me, and they produced the property.

Q. Between five and six o'clock you could discern the features of a man's face, did the prisoners say any thing upon that charge. - A. They denied it.

- NASH. I am an optician. On the 26th of January I was going along the Strand, I stopped at Southampton street with a relation of mine. The first I observed of the prisoners they were at Mr. Granger's window, a woollen draper's. I went and fetched my shopmates Owen and Tudor, with intent to take the prisoners. When I returned I saw Wainwright first at a cutler's shop window, and then he went to Mr. Warne's window; we saw it was cut, we walked by there, and we went of the other side of the way; we saw the other prisoner standing by the post at Adam street. My two shop-mates and me went by him, and we crossed the way. and then I took hold of Wainwright by the shoulder, and Mr. Owen took hold of him by the other side; he dropped a pair of stockings and a pair of braces; and Mr. Tudor caught them almost before they fell to the ground; we took him into Mr. Warne's shop; we went and took the other as he was standing at the post with the remainder of the stockings in his apron. We took him to Mr. Warne's with the stockings, and afterwards took him to the watchhouse. They behaved in a desperate manner; they said a knife would be my death within a fortnight.

JOHN TUDOR . Nash came to inform me he wanted assistance to secure the prisoners; we went with him, and we passed a cutler's shop. Wainwright was at that window when we passed, he says that is one of them; we crossed over the way, and we saw the other prisoner at the post the corner of Adam street; we crossed over the way again. Wainwright was at Mr. Warne's window, they collared him; he unbuttoned his coat and the stockings dropped down. I picked them up almost before they came to the ground; they left me with Wainwright while they went and fetched Matthews.

Matthew's Defence. I went to work on Monday morning, apparently my master had not much work for me to do, I went into St. James's park, and from there to Blackwall. I was returning along the Strand, when three men laid hold of me, they carried me into the shop of Mr. Warne, they charged me with robbing this shop, and one of these men said I had the gallows in my face, and I should sure to be hanged.

Wainwright said nothing in his defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

WAINWRIGHT, GUILTY, aged 15.

MATTHEWS, GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-35

205. JOHN CRADLE , alias CADLE , was indicted for feloniously marrying Martha Widmore , his former wife being then alive .

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am the parish clerk of Staines church.

Q. In the year 1798 was the prisoner at the bar married at that church. - A. Yes, I know him. I I have got a copy of the register of his marriage; I have compared it with the original, it is a true copy. (Read in court.)

John Cradle of this parish, a bachelor, and Jane Townes , were married by banns, 2nd of April 1798, by me, George Puddington , curate.

This marriage was solemnised between us.

John Cradle. Jane Townes . Her mark.

In the presence of John Jackson and William Richards .

Q. You are the William Richards that witnessed that. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the first wife. - A. Yes, she is alive now, I knew Jane Townes when he married her. I saw her at Hampstead, and drank tea with her last Monday.

MARTHA WIDMORE . Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner. - A. Five years; he was an apprentice in Brentford, we were both children together.

Q. When he was in Brentford did he pass as a single man. - A. Yes, I have been married to him four years last May, at Ealing church; he left me a twelve month ago, at that time I was with child.

Court. At the time you was married to him, you did not know that he was married before. - A. I did not, another woman came and claimed him; then he left me.

Prisoner. She knew I was married before, I lived in the same parish were she was.

Court. Did this man and his former wife live in the same parish where you lived. - A. He lived in the parish with this woman, but he told me he was not married to her.

Q. Was that Jane Townes . - A. Yes.

Q. Was he living with that woman at the time that he married you. - A. No.

Prisoner. She absconded from me, and I did not know but what she was dead.

Q. What situation were you in when he married you. - A. I went out washing and charing.

GUILTY ; aged 30.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-36

206. JOSEPH NOBES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , a sack value 2 s. and a bushel of oats, value 4 s. the property of John Willan .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN AVORY . - Mr. Knapp. You are a patrole. - A. Yes. On the 3d of February last I was on duty in Kingsland road; about eight o'clock in the evening, as I was passing by the King's arms, I saw the prisoner with a sack hanging over his shoulder, part of the oats were behind in the sack and part before. I asked him what he had got there; his answer was, what was that to me, I asked him where he was going, he said to the Lamb. We took him into the King's arms, there he said he had them from where he was at work at Hornsey; I looked at the sack; I told Bacon, a brother officer all was right; Bacon said you work for Mr. Willan do not you; he then said yes; and these are Mr. Willan's oats, he said yes. I searched him, I found the key of Mr. Willan's stable door; I took him in custody, the sack was turned inside out, there is Mr. Willan's name upon it.

JOHN BELLAS . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are bailiff to Mr. Willan, look at that sack. - A. It is Mr. Willan's, and to the best of my judgment the oats are the same as Mr. Willan's; the prisoner worked for Mr. Willan.

- BACON. I saw this man walking in the middle of the road, the other officer took hold of him; we took him into the King's arms. Avory had some knowledge of the man's face, he says you work for Mr. Willan, do not you. he says yes; I said these are Mr. Willan's oats, he said yes, first he said he had bought the oats at Hornsey.

Prisoner. I told them that it was Mr. Willan's bag. I found the oats in the road.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-37

207. ELIZABETH JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , two shifts, value 7 s. a gown, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. a silk spencer, value 2 s. 6 d. a tippet, value 3 s. 6 d. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a pocket book, value 5 s. and a silver thimble, value 1 s. the property of Rebecca Mitchell .

REBECCA MITCHELL, Q. Was the prisoner in your employ. - A, No, I was in her employ; the prisoner took in linen to make up for warehouses.

Q. And she employed you. - A. Yes, about a week before Christmas, Miss Stears was taken ill; the prisoner and Miss Stears were in partnership. Miss Stears asked me to come and take care of her lodgings, she was going in the country for a week; in consequence of my being there to take care of the lodging; I had some clothes there; and Jenkins locked them up in a box of hers. I asked her several times to let me have the clothes out of the box, and she always said that she forgot to bring the key of the box from Miss Stears. Friday after Christmas day Jenkins came in the morning; she asked me to take a letter to her brother; the while I was gone she went away with my clothes in the box.

Q. How do you know that. - A. Because she went away; on my return I missed the prisoner and the box containing my clothes, I saw no more of her till I saw her at Hatton Garden office.

Q. How long was that afterwards. - A. I think it might be about five weeks afterwards.

Q. Have you seen any of your property since. - A. No.

ABIGAIL MILL . I let the lodgings to Stears and Jenkins.

Q. Do you remember Jenkins going away - A. Yes, on the 26th of December she took the box that contained the clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of her clothes, she lent a red net tippet to Miss Stears; I left all the property belonging to the prosecutrix at the lodgings, I should not have left the house till she returned from my brother, but the landlady because I would not quit the lodgings knocked me down stairs.

MILL. There was not an article left in the lodging but a piece of printed cotton.

Q. Did you knock her down. - A. No, I insisted upon her quitting my apartment, she bid me defiance, and said she would not quit.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-38

208. JAMES TANFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , a sack, value 10 d. the property of John Thomas Pocock .

EDWARD JOHNSON. I am clerk to Mr. John Thomas Pocock . On the 26th of January, in the afternoon we loaded a cart with twelve sacks of coals, at St. Bride's wharf .

Q. What is Mr. Pocock. - A. A coal carter .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. A coal porter ; this cart was loaded and stood on our premises till the next day, the team came in so late. On the next morning early, coming down to the wharf, I was informed that we had been robbed of a sack of coals, I examined the cart, and found a sack was gone, and the coals also. The sack I afterwards saw, it proved to be the property of Mr. Pocock.

JOHN HART . I am a watchman, I was going my round at twelve o'clock at night, on the 26th of January, I stopped the prisoner with a sack of coals, I called two watchmen to my assistance; they took him to the watchhouse, and I took care of the coals. The prisoner told me they were his own property, and that he had left them at a public house till he

took them home, I told him it was not a proper time to take coals home.

- I was constable of the night on the 26th of January; the prisoner was brought to me by the watchman, and a sack with a bushel of coals in it. The sack had bursted at the bottom.

Hurst. That is the sack I took care of; I went and picked the coals up. I went to Mr. Pocock's wharf, I examined the tail of the loaded cart; I found the hind sacks tumbled about, as if one had been removed. When I was taking him to the counter his hands were tied, he said he had a knife in his pocket, which he was feeling for; he said if he could get it, he swore he would cut me, that he should know me and one of the watchman again, and he would prostrate us. His pockets were searched before I untied his hands; I took this knife from him.

JOHN DENLEY . I am a watchman. I assisted Hart in taking the man to the watchhouse.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was really in want. I had been out of work a long while.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-39

209. JAMES BRANAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of February , five groce of brass rings, value 6 s. ten thousand nails, value 17 s. and twenty four locks, value 10 s. the property of Mary Millington , Thomas Vardon senior, Thomas Calvert , and Thomas Vardon junior.

THOMAS SMITH . I am agent to the house of Mary Millington , Thomas Vardon senior, Thomas Calvert, and Thomas Vardon junior.

Q. Do you know any thing of the loss. - A. Yes, from information I immediately recognised the property, by being marked with the private mark of the company.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer belonging to Portsoken ward, Aldgate. On the 6th of February, between the hours of seven and eight, I met the prisoner in Aldgate High street, with a parcel, which I had suspicion that he had not honestly come by; after he had past by me, I turned round and followed him as far as Black horse yard, in Aldgate; he turned into the yard, and there I stopped him. I asked him what parcel he had got under his arm, he made reply, what did I think; I made reply that I might think a great many things before I thought right. I asked him where he brought it from, he told me he should not tell me; by his not giving a satisfactory account, I took him into custody. Then he informed me that a man gave him the parcel, at the corner of Hounsditch. I asked him if he could find that man, he said no; he informed me that he meant to sell them at the first iron shop that he came to. I took him to the watchhouse, there I searched him. I found four parcels of rings, and fourteen guineas upon his person. The bundle he was carrying was two dozen of locks and I do not know how many thousand nails.

- MIDDLETON. Q. You were in company with Forrester. - A. Yes, we stopped him at Black horse yard, I took the parcel from under his arm; Forrester searched him, and took out these parcels from his pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never was guilty, I got them of a man at Hounsditch; he told me to bring them as far as Petticoat lane, he said he would pay me so much to carry them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-40

210. MARY PRINCE was indicted for that she on the 24th of January , feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her possession and custody, divers false, forged, and counterfeited bank notes; one bank note for the payment of two pound, and one other bank note for the payment of two pound, she knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

Second count that she on the same day, feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, had in her custody and possession, a certain other forged note for the payment of two pound.

To this indictment, the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-41

211. MARY PRINCE was indicted for feloniously forging on the 24th of January , a bank note for the payment of two pound; with intent to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

Second count for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, a like forged note, knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Third and Fourth counts for feloniously forging, and uttering, and publishing as true, she knowing it to be forged, a certain promissory note with like intention, and

Four other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud Charles Parry .

Mr. Fielding, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-42

212. MARY PRINCE was again indicted for feloniously forging a bank note for the payment of two pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

Second count for like offence, with the same intention.

Third and Fourth counts for uttering, and publishing as true, a certain promissory note, with the same intention, and

Four other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud John Lamb .

Mr. Fielding, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-43

213. MICHAEL DUFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of February , a great coat, value 7 s. the property of Pelham Bradbrook .

PELHAM BRADBROOK. I am a gentleman's servant ; I live at No. 34, Argyle street .

Q. What day was it you lost your great coat. - A. On Saturday last the 14th of February. There are great folding doors between the street and the table, where the coats were laying upon.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of taking it. - A. He came at half past nine o'clock and rang the bell; he said there was a chaise ordered for Mr. Warren at ten o'clock on Sunday morning, and he came to know where they were to go to, as Mr. Shephard forgot to ask him. I said I do not think there was one ordered, he said he was sure there was. I went to the pantry to ask the butler whether there was one ordered; in the mean time he went off with the great coat; the butler pursued him. I have seen the coat again.

Prisoner. Can you swear that I went and took the coat from the hall. - A. I can.

Q. Can you swear that you saw me. - A. No, I did not see it.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I am a butler. On Saturday the 11th, at half past nine in the evening, from information, when I went into the hall, I missed the coat that used to lay upon the table; I saw the prisoner going out of the front door, I hallooed to him, stop thief; he went out of the door, he threw the coat in the channel, I hallooed stop thief; the watchman stopped him.

Prisoner. Did you see me take the coat. - A.I saw you throw it in the channel.

Prisoner. You did not see me with the coat.

Witness. We brought him back to the house; he acknowledged that he took the coat.

Prisoner. You will swear any man's life away, I can bring forward people that will prove it.

- KEARN. Q. You are the watchman. - A. Yes, I heard this man call out stop thief; I stopped the prisoner a few doors from Mr. Warren's house; I brought him down to Mr. Warren's hall; he acknowledged that he was guilty of the fact.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person that did it, the great coat laid on the curb stone. It was not in the channel, there was some men in the street before me running away.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-44

214. JAMES HURT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of January , six trusses of hay, value 15 s. and a bushel of oats, value 3 s. the property of James Wyatt , esq. and ROBERT MADDOX for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

ROBERT COOPER . I am a bailiff to James Wyatt , esq. at Hanworth, near Hounslow .

Q. When did you lose your hay. - A. On the second of January this boy came to town with eighteen trusses of hay in a light cart; then after that he came to town with a smaller cart, and he left the cart at his master's door, in Queen Ann street; he was discharged for doing so. After that he made his brags that he had sold some hay and corn at the half way house, to a witness.

JAMES HINDE . I am servant to Mr. How, at Hanworth park; James Hurt told me that he had put a sack of corn and some hay down at the half way house, and he had half a guinea for it.

Q. Did he say where he had got the hay and corn from. - A. He said he took it out of the cart as he was coming to town.

Q. Did he tell you when he did it. - A. No, that is all he said.

- PEARCE. I am servant boy to Mr. Wyatt at Hanworth, I drive the plow some times. I saw him put some hay down when I was a going up the road with him. On the 2nd of January we were going with half a load to the stables in Queen Ann street.

Q. How much hay. - A. Six or seven trusses; he put them down at the half way house, between Kensington and Knightsbridge; he delivered it to Robert Maddox the ostler; and coming back we brought some corn back; and then he put down about a bushel of corn. We brought the hay from Hanworth, and the corn from the town stable; he took it in the stable at the half way house. I did not see him give it to the ostler.

Q. Where was the ostler then. - A. I fancy he was feeding the horses at the door.

Q. Did you see him. - A. Yes.

Q. When he delivered the hay, where was the ostler. - A The ostler was there when he delivered the hay, I put some of it in; there was a soldier took some of it in, and the ostler took some in; the soldier packed it up in the stable.

Q. Did Hurt take any in. - A. He took it off the load. I saw no money paid.

Hurt's Defence. I do not recollect telling James Hinde any thing at all about it. Pearce was not present when the hay was thrown down, he was gone to get a pint of beer warmed.

Maddox's Defence. What hay I had received of him was owing for his horses in going up and down to town.

Maddox called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HURT, GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

MADDOX, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-45

215. CHARLES BRINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of January , a cloak, value 10 s. a gown, value 5 s, a petticoat, value 3 s, a sheet, value 2 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Ann Reynolds ; a gown, value 3 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Richard Cullen .

ANN REYNOLDS . I live at 17, Queen street, Seven Dials . On the 17th of January, between ten and eleven in the morning, I lost these things out of my apartment; I live in the kitchen. I only know that they were taken away.

MARY CULLEN . Q. Are you the daughter to Mrs.

Reynolds. - A. Yes, my husband's name is Richard Cullen , I live with my mother. I lost a gown and a handkerchief, it was in my mother's kitchen.

ELIZABETH BASSE . On the 17th of January, about 11 o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Reynold's kitchen with an apron full of things; he had a flannel jacket on. I did not know that he had robbed the woman then.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man. - A. I believe him to be the person, he was taken on the Sunday.

HENRY ASHFORD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cordy, Snow hill. On the 17th of January I took in a bed sheet, tablecloth, and check apron.

Q. Who was the person that you took in the pledge from. - A. I believe the prisoner to be the man, but I cannot be certain.

JOHN WYEGATE . I am a constable of St. Giles's; I took the prisoner in custody; he told me where the things was pawned. I went to Mr Cordy and stopped them.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, this is the first offence; I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-46

216. JAMES JOHNSTONE was indicted for that he about the hour of twelve at night, on the 10th of February , being in the dwelling house of Thomas Dawson , feloniously did steal a trunk, value 5 s. a sheet, value 1 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. two gowns, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 6 d. a table cloth, value 6 d. and a sheet, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Dawson , and that he afterwards did burglariously break out of the said dwelling house, about the said hour, on the night of the same day .

ELEANOR DAWSON . Q.What are you. - A. I am a housekeeper, my husband's name is Thomas Dawson , he is a smith , I live in Charles street, Drury lane . On the tenth of this month, at the hour of eleven o'clock in the night, we were all in bed; there was a rap came to the door, he rapped again and again before I left the bed; at last I went to the door and asked who is there, he said James Johnstone , I want a lodging.

Q. You let out lodgings. - A. Yes, at three pence a night; when he came in he did not go to bed, there was a single man in the bed. I told him to go to bed; he said no - he stretched himself upon a couple of chairs; my husband waked; he desired me to go and fasten the street door and lock the room door.

Q. Did you lock him in. - A. I did, he laid in my own room; between twelve and one o'clock I jumped out of bed, I saw my two doors open, and he turning out of the door with the trunk under his arm. I was alarmed by Mrs. Truelock.

MARY TRUELOCK . I lodge in this house in the back parlour.

Q. Who inhabits the front. - A. Mrs. Dawson.

Q. What happened that night. - A. I heard a tap at the window, I heard a tap at the door, it was opened on the outside. I heard somebody walking backwards and forwards in the passage; this gentlewoman's bed room door was in a short time burst open; upon hearing her bed room door burst open, I called Mrs. Dawson; she got up, and I saw Johnstone going out.

Q. How is the street door fastened. - A. there is a bolt to the street door, the lodgers can open it on the outside with a string that is fastened to it.

WILLIAM MASSEY. I am a smith, I lodge at Mr. Dawson's; about twelve o'clock I was alarmed by the woman in the next room. Mrs. Dawson got up. I was sleeping in the bed; where she wanted him to come.

Q. Were you sleeping in the same room where Dawson and his wife were. - A. Yes, she followed him and catched him with the trunk, she went out in her shift.

Q. Did you see him brought back. - A. Yes, I laid hold of him when he came to the next door; he had the trunk under his arm when she caught him.

Q. How was your bed room door fastened. - A. It was locked, and the key in the door. The bolt of the street door was not shot back, it was the staple that was forced.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking with this young man the smith; I enquired if I might have a lodging there, they told me I might; I laid down on two chairs close by the fire; I never heard any alarm, I run out the same as they did; she said you are the villain that took my trunk out, at the same time she had the trunk in her lap.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-47

217. MARY STARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21th of January , three gowns, value 30 s. a shawl, value 5 s. an umbrella, value 6 s. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. 6 d. and a leather satchell, value 6 d. the property of Catherine Satchell .

CATHERINE SATCHELL . I am a widow ; I go out a nursing, I live in Arthur street , the prisoner lodged in my room one week, I went out a nursing last Wednesday night was a month; I came home the next morning, I found all the things gone out of my box and the prisoner gone. I left my niece to sleep with her, because she did not give me her right name.

Q. Have you found any of your things. - A. No.

REBECCA COBLEY . I am twelve years old, I went to my aunt's lodgings at ten o'clock, I found my aunt's lodger there, I went to bed, the prisoner said she was going to get half a pint of beer; she came back and put the candle out and said she had left her pattens; she went out again and never returned all night.

Q. Did you go to sleep. - A. No I kept awake; I thought she would come every minute.

SARAH MONDAY . My husband, Thomas Monday , keeps the house in Arthur street. Mrs. Satchell lodged with me; she went out and left her candle with me for her lodger. A little before ten o'clock the lodger came and took the candle, and went up, as I thought, to bed. About half an hour afterwards she went out, and returned, and then she went out again. She said she had left her pattens at the public house.

JOHN COMPTON . On the Thursday night following I took charge of her; she was intoxicated; I searched her, but I found nothing at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what I am charged with. That person never locks her door, and likewise this person goes and leaves the house

with the children. I came home the night following, and then she accused me certainly. I knew myself innocent of the affair. I was very happy to see myself righted.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-48

218. JONATHAN FORBES was indicted for feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, having in his custody and possession, a forged and counterfeited bank note for the payment of two pounds, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded -

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-49

219. JOHN MONK was indicted for that he, on the 4th of April, in the forty-sixth year of his Majesty's reign , unlawfully did take a false oath to obtain letters of administration of Neale Nugent , a soldier who had served out Lord the King on board a certain ship called the Eurus, in order to obtain the prize-money that was due to him on account of his service .

The indictment was read by Mr. Gurney, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SAMUEL HINMAN . I am clerk in the navy office.

Q. Have you the ship's muster of the year 1797. - A. Yes.

Q. Was part of the 87th regiment on board that ship. - A. Yes, in the years 1796 and 1797. On the 30th of October 1796, there is the name of Neale Nugent , a private belonging to the 87th regiment, at that time on board the ship Eurus.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS . I am clerk in the commissary general's office.

Q. Have you the muster-rolls of the 87th regiment for the years 1796 and 1797. - A. Yes.

Q. In the muster roll of 1796, does there appear the name of Neale Nugent as a private. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you find him continue in these muster rolls down to September 1797 - do you find any minute of his death in that month. - A. I do. He died on the 3d of September 1797.

Q. Was there any other man of the name of Nugent in that regiment. - A. Not any.

EDWARD BATE. I am the deputy treasurer of Greenwich hospital. I produce the prize-list of the Eurus frigate; it was delivered to me by the agent; upon which I either pay, or it is paid, in my office.

Q. Does the name of Neale Nugent appear there. - A. It does; he appears there as a supernumerary private - due to him 24 l. 1 s. 6 d.

JOHN PRIOR WARD. I am clerk to Mr. Isherwood, a proctor in the Commons.

Q. Was any application made to you on the 3d of April last. - A. Yes, by two persons; they came into the office to me.

Q. Were they two men or women. - A. Two men. They told me that they had come to obtain letters of administration to a soldier that was dead, in order to obtain some prize money that was to be received at Greenwich hospital. I asked him the name of the person that was dead. They gave to me a certificate of major White, that was I think the name to the best of my recollection, which stated that Neale Nugent was a private belonging to the 87th regiment, and that he died in the West Indies, on board the Eurus frigate.

Q. Did either of the persons tell you the name of the person that died intestate on board the Eurus. - A. Yes, one of them said Neale Nugent . I asked him what relation he was. The person that was to take out the administration told me he was the brother. I asked him whether the deceased had ever been married, or died a bachelor; he said he died a bachelor, without a father or mother, that he was the brother, and that he was the next of kin, or the only next of kin. I then prepared the usual warrant or instrument, leading the administration. After that I explained the nature of it to the person who was to be sworn; having done that, I went with him, and the person who was to be his bondsman, to the surrogate's chambers, Dr. Samuel Pearce Parsons , LL. D. The oath was administered to the person; the tenor of it was - You believe that Neale Nugent died a bachelor, without a parent (my instructions were Naile Nugent), that you are the natural and lawful brother, and next of kin, and that you will faithfully administer his goods by payment of his debts, and making distribution according to law; that you will exhibit a true inventory, and render a just account of your administration if by law required.

Q. By whom was the oath administered. - A. I will not say whether the oath was administered by myself or the surrogate. It was administered before Dr. Samuel Pearce Parsons .

Q. Did the person that administered take the oath. - A. He did. After that was done I accompanied him to the Prerogative office, where the usual bond was entered into, which was executed by myself, and the security's name to the best of my recollection was Robert White . When that was done he returned to Mr. Isherwood's office.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know whether he was one of the men. - A. I do not particularly recollect the man to swear to him.

Q. Do you recollect when you went down to the office, whether you saw any man standing in the street. - A. I saw a man, whom I recognised on going to Bow street. When I went from the surrogate to the Prerogative office, he was standing about twelve yards from my house; he seemed to be loitering his time away for somebody. When I came back again he was still standing there in the same manner, and much about the same place; I am certain it is him, I pointed him out immediately I saw him. I afterwards observed that the two persons that came to administer joined together with him after they had been sworn; this took place on the 3d of April. On the 5th, the same persons who had been to my office on the 3d, came to the office, and received letters of administration of me.

Q. Which of them received the letter of administration. - A. I am not certain. I believe I gave the letter of administration to the person who had taken the oath.

Q.Was Smith there that day. - A. I do not recollect seeing Smith there that day.

JAMES BOOTH . - Mr. Gurney. You are an apprentice

to Mr. Ward. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any person applying to him in April last, for letters of administration for Neale Nugent . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember how many persons came to Mr. Ward. - A. I do not.

Q. Can you say whether it was more than one. - A. I cannot. One, I remember, I heard him say his name was John Nugent . I remember his going out of the office to be sworn with Mr. Ward. I saw him two days afterwards when he came for the letters of administration; and I saw him afterwards coming up the steps of this court. I went up to Dorrington; I asked him if that was not Nugent,

Q. Was that person that you asked Dorrington about, that you saw coming up the steps of this court, the same person that came to Mr. Ward for letters of administration of Neale Nugent . - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar; is that person the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; I believe him to be the person.

Prisoner. I never saw that boy before I saw him now.

GEORGE SMITH . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a soldier in the third regiment of guards.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, his name is John Monk ; he formerly belonged to the eighty seventh and the tenth regiments of foot, according to what I have heard him say.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Timothy Gibbons . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in company with Timothy Gibbons and the prisoner any where in April. - A. I do not know whether it was March or April I went with him to Doctor's-commons. Before I went to Doctor's-commons one Vaughan wrote a letter as if coming from major White; Monk and Knight produced a list of names of men that belonged to major White's company at Monk's lodgings in Orchard street, Westminster; Knight and Monk together gave Gibbons fourteen names out of the list of major White's company in the eighty seventh regiment; and they consulted with him which was the best; the particular name that was taken at that time was Neale Nugent .

Q. Upon taking that name what was to be done then - A. They were to go to Doctor's-commons. Monk, Gibbons, and myself were to go to take out letters of administration; he said that was no hurt to any body; we went to Doctor's-commons. Monk was to go by the name of John Nugent . I was to wait in the street; Monk and Gibbons went in. I saw Mr. Ward along with Monk and Gibbons. I saw them come back again and Monk went into Mr. Ward's house, and, I believe, Gibbons, I am not sure of that. When they came but, we all joined company and went away together; they were to call in two days for the administration. On the day they were to call for the administration it was coming off guard; I was to meet them at the public house in the street were Mr. Ward lives.

Q. Did you meet them there. - A. Yes, I met Monk and Gibbons. We went down to Greenwich hospital. Monk went into the office there, and I was to wait outside of the gate.

Q. Do you know which office it is. - A. He went into one of the further side of the yard first, and then he went into another. I waited at the outside about twenty minutes; he returned to me after he came out of the office and he (Monk) gave Gibbons twenty four pounds one shilling and sixpence; Gibbons took it and gave him what he pleased.

Q. What was your share. - A. Two pounds fifteen. I believe Monk had about four or five pounds, and Gibbons had the remainder for paying for the administration and the coach hire.

Q. How long have you known Monk. - A. I have known Monk these two years or more.

Q. Did you ever know him by any other name than Monk. - A. No, I never knew him by the name of Nugent only as going to Doctor's-commons; Gibbons said it was no harm to nobody going in the name of Nugent; he chose that name, he said it was a sure one. Monk and Knight said they knew he was dead. Knight said he had no relations at all; that he was to go as his brother.

Court. When was this that you made the discovery first - A. I was taken up in the city. I made the discovery before the lord mayor; I was liberated to take Vaughan. I took Vaughan myself, he said I knew all about it; he made the discovery not to me, I was taken up after that to Bow street.

Q. Then you made the discovery to save yourself. - A. I was not guilty of any thing as I know.

WILLIAM ATKINS . - Mr. Pooley. You are an officer of Bow street. - A. Yes.

Q. John Dorrington , an officer of Bow street, had some concern in this transaction; is he dead. - A. Yes. I got this paper from Dorrington's wife.

JOHN DYER . I am secretary of Greenwich hospital.

Q. Were you at the office in Bow street at the time Monk was under examination. - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember Dorrington producing any paper. - A. I do; he produced it in Monk's presence. Dorrington said he got it from the lodgings of the prisoner, and the prisoner acknowledged it to be the muster roll of major White's company. I understood it to be the eighty seventh regiment which the prisoner belonged to.

Q.(to Smith) You have been speaking about a list of names of the company; look at that and see whether that is the list produced by Gibbons when you were at Monk's lodging. - A. I am certain of it by the colour of it. I have seen it in Monk's hands, and likewise in Dorrington's. I saw it several times before I went to the Commons, not before; in the list there is the name of Neale Nugent .

Prisoner. He never saw that list before that morning he came to me; then I gave it to him.

WILLIAM BERRY . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are deputy seal keeper of the Prerogative court. - A. I am.

Q. Have you any warrant for the letters of administration for Neale Nugent . - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the official care of that warrant. - A. I have. (The warrant read in court).

DR. SAMUEL PEARCE PARSONS . - Mr. Knapp. You are a surrogate of the right honourable William Wynne , LL. D. who is a master keeper of the Prerogative court of Canterbury; look at that warrant, and tell me whether that is your hand writing. - A.

It is.

Q. That warrant was swore before you. - A. I can only say, that a person appeared before me and described himself to be John Nugent , brother to the deceased.

JOSEPH MASTERS. - Mr. Gurney. I produce the letters of administration. This is the notice I served on the prisoner. (Notice read in court.)

THOMAS CHARLTON . I am one of the registering clerks in the Prerogative office. I produce a bond, it was executed by a person calling himself John Nugent . the lawful brother of Neale Nugent . That is the bond whereby the administration was granted. (The bond read in court.)

Q.(to Mr. Ward) That is the bond that was entered into by the persons applying to the Prerogative office for letters of administration. - A. It is the bond, it is filled up with my hand writing. It is signed by the person calling himself John Nugent , and the person who goes by the name of Gibbons, whose name is signed Robert White , he was security.

- WATKINS. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a clerk in the check office at Greenwich hospital. - A. Yes.

Q. Was any application made to you in the month of April last for money due to Neale Nugent - do you hold in your hand a certificate made by yourself. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the date of that certificate. - A. The 5th of April last.

Q. What application was made to you to ground that certificate which you wrote. - A. A person must have come with letters of administration, stating himself to be John Nugent . (The certificate read in court.)

Q. You say some person must have come, stating himself to be John Nugent , and brother to Neale Nugent - was it the purport of your giving this certificate, to enable the party to get the money at the treasurer's office. - A. Yes.

JOHN BARLOW NEALE. I signed the bond.

Q. Then the next step of the person applying for that certificate, would be to go to the treasurer's office to get the money. - A. Yes.

ROBERT SMITH . I am clerk in the treasurer's office. On the 5th of April last, a person calling himself John Nugent , presented this order, which I have in my hand, calling himself the brother of Neale Nugent ; this empowered me, being in the treasurer's office, to pay him twenty-four pounds, one shilling, and sixpence. I cannot recollect his face.

Prisoner's Defence. I know none of these gentlemen that have appeared against me, only Smith. He took that list of names of me, and took out what he thought proper. I was discharged the 14th of March 1796, after coming out of a French prison. I know nothing of this prize money; I was in bed that morning when they came to me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-50

220. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously forging on the 31st of January , a certain order for the payment of money , which is as follows: - January 31, 1807. Pay Mr. John Smith , or bearer, one hundred and twenty pounds.

Signed. H. Dyson.

Directed, Messrs. Prescott and Co.

With intent to defraud George Grote and William Willoughby Prescott .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true a like note, with the same intention.

And several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS WARD. Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Prescott and Co. - A. I am.

Q. What are their names. - A. George Grote and William Willoughby Prescott ; these are all the partners in the banking house.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come, and when, to Mr. Prescott's house. - A. On Saturday the 30th of January last, about five o'clock in the afternoon, he presented a draft to me for payment in the usual way of business; the amount of the draft was one hundred and twenty pounds, it was signed H. Dyson. I then immediately asked the prisoner who he received it for; he said he received it for his master, Mr. John Smith of Hockley in Hertfordshire, and that his master received it in payment of Dick Dyson , for the purchase of three soldiers. I asked the prisoner if he did not mean two horses, he said he did I then shewed the draft to some of the clerks that were standing by, to submit it to their judgment whether it was the signature of Mr. Dyson; and then I told the prisoner that the signature was different to the signature of Mr. H. Dyson, and before I paid it, I must submit it to our partners for their approbation. Mr. Prescott was up stairs; I went and shewed the draft to him; then I come down stairs and told the prisoner that the signature was so different from Mr. Dyson's, we could not pay the draft without going to Mr. Dyson to ascertain it. The prisoner said it would be a very great inconvenience if he had not the money. I accordingly agreed with the prisoner that he should sustain no inconvenience, and that if the signature was Mr. Dyson's, I should take the money with me; the prisoner was to accompany me to Mr. Dyson's house. The prisoner made no objection to go with me; I immediately sent our porter for a coach. I had occasion to go to another part of our office to another person; the prisoner took the opportunity of going out of the door. Of course the coach came, and I went up to Mr. Dyson to apprize him of what had happened, and that the prisoner was gone away.

Q. Mr. Dyson was a customer of your house. - A. He was, and had been many years.

Q. Have you seen him write. - A. I have seen him write occasionally, and paid him a great many checks.

Q. You looked at the draft. - A. Yes; I believed it not to be his hand writing. I should not venture to pay upon it.

Court. Are you well acquainted with his hand writing. A. I am.

Mr. Knapp. How soon did you see the prisoner afterwards. - A. In about a week or ten days.

Q. Where did you see him next. - A. I saw him at the mansion house. I think, on the Tuesday week following; he was brought up there upon another charge.

Q. Was the person that you saw at the mansion house, before the lord mayor, the same person that you saw in the shop, and the same person that tendered the

draft. - A. Exactly the same. I have no doubt at all in my mind about it.

Q. Have you got the draft. - A. I have. (Witness producing it.)

Q. Is that the draft that the prisoner at the bar presented to you. - A. It is.

Q. What is Mr. Dyson's name. - A. Harman Dyson .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Has it ever been out your possession. - A. It has once.

Q. Is there any thing particular that you can undertake to know that draft by. - A. I am confident that it is the same draft that was tendered to me.

Mr. Knapp. That draft is the same draft that was tendered to you. - A. It is the same.

Q. I believe you parted with it out of your possession to Sayer the officer. - A. I wrote my name upon the back of the draft before it went out of my possession; it was taken out of my possession to compare it with other checks. I am confident it is the same draft.

Mr. Alley. There is Thomas Ward on the back of the draft. - A. That was done when it went out of my possession. Sayer desired me to write my name upon it. (The check read in court.)

Q. From one part of your evidence, it appears there was a doubt upon your mind upon the check when it was first presented to you. - A. Yes.

Q. If you had not had any doubts you would have paid it. - A. Yes. I submitted it to other clerks because of my doubts.

Q. Therefore you had your doubts at that time. - A. And therefore I would not venture to pay the money for it.

Q. Therefore when you had a doubt, you would not venture to say it is the hand writing of Mr. Dyson. - A. No, I would not venture to pay upon it.

Q. You say the prisoner at the bar went away when you called for a coach - you are confident it is the same person. - A. I am.

Q. The first time you saw him after this was about ten days afterwards, and then you saw him at the mansion house. - A. Yes, he was then in custody.

Q. When you first saw him at the mansion house, did you charge him that he was the person that presented the draft. - A. I merely went when I heard that he was to be brought up; I was desired by our partners to go and see if it was the same man or not.

Q. That is not an answer to my question - did you or not when you saw him before the lord mayor, state to the lord mayor that the prisoner at the bar was the person that attempted to defraud your house. - A. No, no charge was made then.

Q. How long was it before a charge was made. - A. The lord mayor ordered him for re-examination on the Friday following.

Q. Then for aught you knew, the prisoner might have been discharged. - A. No, he could not, because our charge had not been gone into.

Q. Your complaint was not on the first examination, but the second; therefore he might have been discharged before the second. - A. No, I attended on the first day.

Q. What day was that. - A. On the Tuesday.

Q. Then you made no charge against the prisoner at the bar. - A. I did not.

Q. You made no charge on the first examination; three days afterwards he was examined again, and then you made the charge. - A. I did.

Q. You say you are confident it is the same man. - A. I am confident it is the same man.

Q. Does not that confidence arise from something subsequent, and not from the impression that arose when you first attended before the lord mayor. - A. It arose from the recollection I had in my mind; it is still strong in my mind. I should be sorry to say he is not the man that tendered me the draft.

Q. Does not that positiveness that you now entertain, arise from something that has taken place subsequent to your attending at the mansion house. - A. It does not.

Q. Do you mean to tell me that at the time when you first attended at the mansion house you were positively certain that the prisoner at the bar was the man that tendered you the note. - A. I was.

Q. Why did not you charge him then. - A. Mr. Prescott said our charge was not to be preferred that day; I might go to the mansion house to see whether it was the man or not; he understood he was to be remanded for another examination, when our charge was to be made.

Q. How long has Mr. Dyson kept money at your house. - A. Ever since I have been in the house.

Q. You perhaps were not very well acquainted with his hand writing. - A. Yes; I have paid several of his checks, and I have occasionally seen him write.

Mr. Knapp. When you first saw the prisoner at the mansion house he was there under examination, and he was going to be remanded for another examination. - A. Yes.

Q. And then your charge was to be made. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the least doubt of the prisoner at the bar, from the first time that you saw him at the mansion house, down to the present time you are now speaking about it. - A. I have no doubt at all about it.

WILLIAM POOLE . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are a clerk to Messrs. Dyson. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. Harman Dyson . - A. Yes, perfectly well.

Q. How long have you been their clerk. - A. About five years.

Q. Have you seen him frequently write. - A. Yes, daily almost.

Q. Now, look at that hand writing, and tell me whether it is Mr. Harman Dyson 's writing. - A. It is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. You are the clerk to Messrs. Dyson, what are their partners names. - A. James Dyson , Harman Dyson , Richard Dyson , and Charles Dyson .

Mr. Alley (to Ward). You talked about the firm of the house - do you mean to say that there are no other persons that have any share in the business besides Mr. George Grote and Mr. William Willoughby Prescott . A. No other.

Mr. Knapp (to Pool). Are you acquainted with the prisoner. - A. Very well.

Q. Had he ever been a servant to Messrs. Dyson. - A. He took care of some horses there at one time; he was only occasionally employed.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of all the Dysons. - A. Yes; that is not the hand writing of any of the partners.

JOHN CLARE . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the marshalmen of the city of London. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner. - A. I did; I apprehended him in sir Matthew Bloxham 's house, on a similar charge; I was sent for, I searched him. I found nothing on him but nine pence and a knife.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not had sufficient time to prepare for my trial. I leave what I have to say to my counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Of uttering, knowing it to be forged.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-51

221. JOHN BURLING and THOMAS BURLING were indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-52

222. WILLIAM FISHER was indicted for feloniously forging on the 9th of February , a certain order for the payment of money to the tenor following: - that is to say, February 9th, 1807. No. 76, Pall Mall. Messrs. Hammersley and Co. Pay J. and W. Lowndes, or bearer, forty pounds; signed, J. and W. Lowndes. With intention to defraud Thomas Hammersley , Hugh Hammersley , Charles Greenwood . John Rose Drewe , and Henry Brooksbank .

Second count for uttering as true a like forged order for the payment of money, with the same intention, and

Two other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud William Lowndes , and James Lowndes .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MARMADUKE PYBUS. - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a clerk in the house of Messrs. Hammersley.

Q. What are their names. - A. Thomas Hammersley , Hugh Hammersley , Charles Greenwood , John Rose Drewe , and Henry Brooksbank .

Q. Are they all the partners that are in that house. - A. Yes.

Q. Is Messrs. Lowndes a customer of your house. - A. They are.

Q. What is their christian names. - A. John and William Lowndes ; they generally signed J. and W. Lowndes.

Q. Do you remember a person offering a check to you. - A. Yes.

Q. When was it. - A. Last Monday week, I think, about twelve o'clock; the witness that is here presented it to me.

Q. Dudfield is the person that presented the draft to you. - A. That is the person.

Q. That person presented the draft to you from Mr. Lowndes for payment. - A. He did; the moment he put the draft into my hands, it struck me that it was not the hand writing of Mr. Lowndes. I then asked him who he came from, he referred me to Mr. Bray's, No. 3, Water lane. I shewed the draft to Mr: Clark, a gentleman in the office, who went into one of the partners.

Q. Did Mr. Clark bring back the note to you. - A. No, to Mr. Steel, another gentleman in the office; I was busy at the moment.

Q. Is that the draft that Dudfield presented to you. - A. It is, I have not the least doubt.

Q. Do you know the hand writing of Mr. Lowndes. - A. I know it perfectly well.

Q. Where did you get this draft now from. - A. Mr. Steel, he is now here.

Q. Are you quite sure that that is the draft that Dudfield presented to you. - A. I have not the least doubt of it; and I have not the least doubt that it is not Mr. Lownde's hand writing, the characters are different, it is written in a stiff hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Nobody that knew Mr. Lowndes' hand writing could be deceived in it. - A. I think not.

Q. Dudfield was the person who brought it to you at the office. - A. Yes.

Q. You stated the name of the person that was on the draft, was James and William Lowndes , you do not know that is the name of Messrs. Lowndes. - A. No.

THOMAS DUDFIELD . - Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a carpenter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I have known him about two months.

Q. Do you remember his giving you any check to take to Messrs. Hammersley's. - A. Yes; he came to me at No. 22, St. James's street, Grovesnor square.

Q. Is that draft that he gave you. - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

Q. What did he give you that draft for. - A.He asked me if I would go along with him to the bankers to get cash for it.

Q. Did he go along with you. - A. Yes, to the banker's house, and then he proposed for me to go in.

Q. Where was the banker's house. - A. No. 76, Pall Mall.

Q. Did you see the last witness, Mr. Pybus, there. - A. Yes.

Q. You presented the check to Mr. Pybus for payment. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get payment for it. - A. No, they doubted it being Mr. Lowndes' hand writing.

Q. They refused payment. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that what happened. - A. Mr. Pybus gave it to another gentleman; it was taken into another gentleman, Mr. Hammersley, I believe; upon its being returned into the shop, Mr. Pybus asked me if I would go along with him to Mr. Lowndes, I told him I would.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Lowndes. - A. Yes, and Mr. Lowndes denied its being his hand writing. Mr. Lowndes said I must be taken in custody, unless I could give a good account who I had it from. I told him I did not know the man's name; I had heard his name several times, but I could not recollect it at that moment. I described the person, and that he was waiting near the banking house, or the palace gates. We went to the prisoner.

Q. Who went with you. - A. Mr. Steel.

Q. Did you come up to the prisoner there. - A. Yes, the prisoner said he did not know it was a bad note; he found it in a letter in Grovesnor square. Then the prisoner was taken to Bow street.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Can you read or write. - A. Yes.

Q. You had put no mark on this check before you went to the bankers. - A. No.

Q. Therefore you cannot say whether it is the same check or no. - A. I have not the least doubt but what

it is, I had read it before I delivered it.

Mr. Knapp. Was that the only forty pound note that you presented to Hammersley's. - A. Yes, the only one.

RICHARD STEELE . - Mr. Knapp. Do you remember this draft. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you remember this draft. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take it into the inner part of the house. - A. No, Mr. Clark did it; it was given me by Mr. Clark to go to Mr. Lowndes to know whether it was a good one.

Q. Is that the draft that you received. - A. Yes.

- WHITE. I am a journeyman to Mr. Lowndes, he is a trunk maker.

Q. There are two partners are not there. - A. Yes, James and William Lowndes .

Q. Look at the draft, do you know their hand writing. - A. Yes, I am in the habit of seeing it every day.

Q. Tell me whether it is their hand writing. - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Alley. Are you interested in the business. - A. No.

SAMUEL HODSON. - Mr. Knapp. I believe you know a lady of the name of Sarah Barr . - A. I do.

Q. Did you send any letter to Miss Barr. - A. Yes, I received it from the country. I enclosed it in a sheet of paper and sent it to her; it came by the post and I sent it to her by a porter.

Q. You do not know what the contents of that letter was. - A. Yes, I opened it when I received it from the general post in the morning.

Q. Was there any thing in it. - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me whether that letter was the letter. - A. Yes, this is the letter.

Q. Are you quite sure that when you received it by the post, to forward it to Miss Barr, that it had no bank note or any thing at all in it. - A. No, it had not; there was nothing at all in it. I saw it again on the Sunday following.

SARAH BARR . - Mr. Knapp. Miss Barr, I believe you received a letter from the country, forwarded by the last witness. - A. I did.

Q. Is that the letter (a letter handed to the witness). - A. That is the letter.

Q. At the time you received it of course you opened it, did you find any thing in it. - A. No.

Q. Was there any draft or check from the bankers in the letter. - A. No, as I received it so I lost it. On the Sunday afternoon I took it up to Argyle street; going home on Sunday evening I folded it up and put it in my muff; I lost it out of my muff going home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. To be sure you put nothing in it; you cannot tell what any body else might; it was open when you lost it. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. There was nothing in it when you received it, nor did you expect it. - A. No.

Q. Had you been in the habit of receiving any draft from this gentleman. - A. No. (The check read in court).

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the letter coming along Grovesnor square; Edmond Wright saw me pick it up, and he saw me read it in the public house; I did not know it was forged. I picked it up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

On the counts for uttering.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-53

223. JAMES MACKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , a gold watch, value 30 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. and two gold seals, value 2 l. the property of John Hembry , privily from his person .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN HEMBRY . - Mr. Gurney. On the 5th of this month were you at the masquerade, at the Opera house. - A. I was; and about one o'clock in the morning, three men forced me from the party of gentlemen that I was conversing with into the crowd; I was before out of the crowd, and they pushed me one against the other; I turned round to ask what they meant by it, and they made off.

Q. At the period had you perceived that you had lost any thing. - A. Not at all.

Q. Upon their making off what did you do. - A. I put my hand to my fob, I found my watch was gone; I immediately went to Townshend the officer, and told him of it.

Q.How soon afterwards did you see your watch or the prisoner. - A. I saw my watch the next morning; I was not by when the prisoner was apprehended.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. We all know it is a crowded place, and a great deal of confusion. - A. Yes.

Q. They huslted you about, you could not perceive your watch was gone from you. - A. No, I did not indeed.

HENRY MORRIS SAMPSON . - Mr. Gurney. You sir, are a captain in the East India company. - A. I am.

Q. You were at this masquerade. - A. I was.

Q. About three o'clock did you see any person pursued for picking a pocket. - A. About three o'clock, as I was returning from the supper room at the masquerade, I was returning down stairs, I heard the cry of stop thief; I perceived the prisoner pursued by several persons. I took hold of the prisoner as he was endeavouring to pass me: on which he threw or dropped from his hand a watch. I picked it up, still continuing holding of the prisoner, until we were against the partition of the bottom of the stairs, where I held him a short time, till Petherick took hold of him. The prisoner wanted us to let him go, he said we had no business with him. Previous to my delivering him to the officer, some other gentleman came up and assisted, when he dropped another watch. The first watch I kept possession of; and I took it to Bow street.

Q. Was it there shewn to Mr. Hembry. - A. It was.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blane.

Reference Number: t18070218-54

224. ELEANOR EVANS was indicted for that she on the 6th of January was servant to Charles Greig , and was entrusted and employed by him in receiving of money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into her possession, on account of her said master, the sum of two pounds; that she did afterwards feloniously embezzle part of the said sum, that is to say, 2 s. 7 d.

And several other charges for embezzling, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Bolland, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-55

225. GEORGE GROVES and WILLIAM HOLMES were indicted for that they, on the 30th of January , two lambs, value 20 s. wilfully and feloniously did kill, with intent to steal the whole carcases of the said lambs .

Second count for feloniously stealing the said lambs, the property of the aforesaid person.

JOHN MALLARD . - Mr. Bolland. What are you. - A. I am a working man , I live at Finchley .

Q. Had you any lambs on the 28th of January. - A. Yes, I had seventeen.

Q. When did you see them last. - A. On the 29th of January last, I saw them about ten o'clock in the day. I missed them on Friday the 30th of January, about ten or eleven o'clock; one was six weeks old, and this, I think, was about five weeks.

Q. Had you put any ochre marks on them. - A. I had; the ram lambs were red upon the head, and the ewe lambs upon the head and loins. They were both ewe lambs that I lost.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any suspicion that you had, go to Groves's house. - A. I went to Groves's house on Monday morning about ten o'clock; Groves lives at Mill Hill, it is within two miles of my house. I only saw the woman when I went into the house. I saw two lambs dash out of the cupboard, one of my two lambs were behind them; as soon as I saw it, I knew them to be mine.

Q. What lamb was that. - A. An ewe lamb, that I took to Hatton Garden. I put it to its mother, and the mother took it, they both maa'd together.

Q. Was there any mark to it. - A. The same as this, it was marked on the head and loins.

Q. Are you sure it was one of your lambs. - A. I know it is; because I put it to suckle to a blind sheep, its mother. The mother knew it directly, they both bleated together as soon as I put it out.

Q. Did you find any thing else at Groves's house. - A. No.

Q. Did you see Groves there. - A. No, he was not there. I went and fetched Mr. Stratton; the gardener shewed us where he was loading of hay. That was the Monday following after he stole the lambs.

Q. Was it the same Monday that you found the lambs. A. Yes, the same Monday.

Q. Did you tell him what you took him for. - A. Yes. He wanted to know what we wanted him for; we told him it was for stealing of lambs. He said he had no lambs but what he had bought.

Q. Did you in consequence of any information take Groves into custody. - A. Yes, we took Groves into custody; Groves told us where this black-legged lamb was.

Q. Before any thing was said by Groves, did not you say you did not want to hurt him. - A. Not before.

Q. Did you in consequence of information search Groves's house again. - A. Yes. I found a young lamb that belonged to Mr. Shepherd.

Q. Did you find any other lamb there. - A. No, this was in the cupboard that we had missed when we looked there. We went to Holmes's at Highgate hill, and there we met the father-in-law and his wife; Holmes was there.

Q. Had you told Holmes it would be better for him to confess. - A. No, not then. His wife came and said, if you can settle it, Mr. Mallard, I will tell you where the black-legged ram is, she says, if you will let Holmes go and make it up, and not hurt him. I said, very likely I may.

Q. In consequence of what she said, did you find the lamb. - A. I went home with the woman; she pulled it from underneath the bed, the flesh was warm, it was black in the fore legs, and it had the ochre mark on the back and loins. I am sure it is my lamb.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Should you have been sure of it, if you had not been told by the woman. - A. As for the blind ewe's lamb, I should have known it if I had been turned into it blindfold.

Court. What was the day that you searched Holmes's house. - A. On Monday, about nine o'clock on the same day.

Mr. Bolland. These lambs were not of an age to sell in the market. - A. No, they were not of age to take away from the mother; they were not old enough to sell in the market.

Q. How near did the prisoners live to one another. A. They lived close together, both houses joined.

GROVES - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 32.

[The prisoner Groves was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of its being his first offence.]

HOLMES, NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-56

226. GEORGE GROVES and WILLIAM HOLMES were indicted for that they on the 30th of January , a lamb, value 10 s. the property of John Drewry , esquire, wilfully and feloniously did kill, with intent to steal the whole carcase of the said lamb .

Second count for feloniously stealing the said lamb.

JOHN SEDDINGTON . I am bailiff to Mr. Drewry's farm; he lives in the parish of Finchley .

Q. Had Mr. Drewry, on the 28th of January, any lambs. - A. Yes, a good many in the house, and five in the field. On the 29th I saw them all in the field. I missed two on the following day at ten o'clock in the morning, and this is one that is the property of Mr. John Drewry ; I received it from the officer, Read, at Hatton Garden office; I went there and owned it. It corresponds with the lamb that was lost with respect to wool, it being a close-bodied wool.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. It is impossible for you to swear that this is the property of your master. - A. I cannot swear to it.

PHILIP MORGAN . - Mr. Bolland. What are you. - A. I live along with Mr. Drewry. I am a shepherd's boy, and to do any thing that he orders.

Q. Had you the care of the lambs. - A. The shepherd had; I attended with him.

Q. How many lambs had he in his field. - A. Five. I had seen this and my own lamb in the field two days before it was gone, and when I saw this at Hatton Garden, I knew it to be Mr. Drewry's lamb.

- READ. - Mr. Bolland. You are an officer of Hatton Garden office. - A. Yes. On Monday the 2nd of February, I searched the prisoner Holmes's house; I found two lambs quite dead under the stairs; one was covered over with hay.

Mr. Alley. Holmes was then in custody. - A. Yes.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-57

227. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for that he on the 30th of January , a lamb, value 10 s. the

property of Philip Morgan , feloniously did kill, with intent to steal the whole carcase of the said lamb .

Second count for feloniously stealing the said lamb.

JOHN SEDDINGTON. - Mr. Bolland. You are Mr. Drewry's bailiff. - A. Yes. On the 30th of January I lost two lambs; one of them was Mr. Drewry's, and the other belonged to a boy that he had, Philip Morgan . I believe it to be Philip Morgan's.

PHILIP MORGAN . - Mr. Bolland. Look at that lamb; had you any lamb of your own on the 20th of January. - A. Yes. I saved my pocket money that Mr. Drewry allowed me, and bought two sheep with it. I gave three pounds for the two sheep.

Q. Is that the lamb that was produced from one of these sheep. - A. Yes; it was nearly a week old.

Q. Did you at any time miss that lamb. - A. Yes, I missed it on the 30th; I saw it again on the Tuesday following at Hatton Garden. I am sorry to swear to a lamb, but I have not the least doubt it is mine; it was a very long limbed lamb; it is seldom you see one with limbs so long.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You say you cannot swear to this lamb. - A. No, I do not mean to swear to it.

WILLIAM READ . This is one of the lambs I found at Holmes' house on the Monday evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of it. I cannot tell which way they came into the house; I was in custody at the time. My wife went to her sister, and left the key with Groves.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-58

228. ABRAHAM STANHOPE was indicted for feloniously stealing privily from the person of Thomas Younger , on the 10th of February , a tin box, value 1 d. and two bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

THOMAS YOUNGER . I am soldier belonging to the Royal East London militia.

Q. Had you your pocket picked lately. - A. I had, on the 10th of February, between dark and ten in the morning; I cannot say exactly the hour, I was in liquor. I laid my head down on the table at the Eight Bells in Ironmonger row ; I saw it when I went into the public house; I did not miss it till I went to bed. I had been drinking with the prisoner, he belonged to the same company as I do.

- I am a soldier. I was sitting at the same table with Younger and the prisoner; Stanhope lent Younger his coat for him to go and get his pension. I saw Stanhope take a box out of his own coat pocket, and put it into the coat pocket that he wore at the time, and when he went up stairs he missed the box out of his pocket.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 11th of February, the prisoner was brought to the office by Harper, who is at this time unwell; he had been searched by Harper; Harper delivered to me a pound note in the presence of the prisoner. I searched the prisoner after that in the office, and on him I found two seven shilling pieces; he told me he got them from the Three Tuns in Ironmonger row, in change of a one pound note. I told the prisoner there was no such sign there whatever; before Mr. Moser he said he was drunk, and he was sorry for what he had done.

Prisoner's Defence. In the course of the evening I asked him for some tobacco; he gave me some. I took the box and took some; he laid his head on the table; I did not return the box to him, but I laid it down upon the end of the table, and when I wanted some tobacco, as he was laid down asleep, I took the tobacco box and took some. I put it in my pocket; the room was full of people.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-59

229. GEORGE GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , four pair of boots, value 6 l. and one odd boot, value 5 s. the property of Charles Fidean , in his dwelling house .

Second count for like offence, only laying the property to belong to Thomas Wyatt , in his dwelling house.

THOMAS WYATT . I am agent to my brother-in-law, he is a shoe-maker ; I manage his business in town; he resides in Birmingham; his name is Charles Fidean ; I live in his house, No. 29, Jermyn street .

Q. You do not pay rent nor taxes; does your brother ever lie there. - A. No; the lease is in his name.

Q. When did you lose these goods. - A. On the 17th of this month I was sitting at breakfast in the parlour behind the shop, about half after eight o'clock; on turning my head towards the shop, I saw a man crossing the side of the shop towards the door; I immediately ran into the shop and caught him by the skirt of his coat, before he had got out of the door, and at the moment of seizing him by the coat, one pair of boots dropped either from under his arm, or from under his coat. I took him by the collar and forced him across the shop into a chair, and on looking on the floor I saw a large bag. I desired my wife, and them that were in the shop, to take the contents out of the bag; they did; it proved to be three pair and an odd boot that was in the bag. I am sure they are my property; the name is marked in full length on the inside of the tops; there are the boots; they are all new, and were hanging on the inside of the shop on brass hooks on a rail.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I took the prisoner into custody; I was at the watchhouse, he said he was a shoemaker, he had a wife and a child; I searched him, and found nothing at all about him.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-60

230. MARY NEWBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of January , 6 l. 6 s. the property of Susannah Powell , in the dwelling house of John Probat .

SARAH MORGAN . I am servant to Samuel Mawman ,

Bishopgate street.

Q. What is Mrs. Powell. - A. She is so infirm that she cannot appear, she is ninety five years of age.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She is a young woman lately come out of the workhouse; my grandmother took her in because she had no where to go; my grandmother lives at No. 5, Broad yard, Turnmill street .

Q. When was this money taken. - A. I left my grandmother to go to the situation I am now in. On Monday the 26th of January Mr. Ford sent for me to come and see whether my grandmother's property was safe. I came, and on opening the drawer where the box was in, I found it gone. I found it in the third drawer, and there were only two guineas in it; the last time I saw it it contained nine guineas.

RICHARD FORD . I am a scale maker. I live at No. 4, Broad yard, Turnmill street, Clerkenwell. Mrs. Powell lives next door. John Probat keeps the house, he does not live there himself, he lets out the whole house in lodgings; he lives at the top of the yard in another house. I had suspicion; I sent for her grand daughter to come and see if her grandmother's property was safe I went up to Mrs. Powell's apartment, the prisoner was sitting on her bed; I asked how she could be so cruel after Mrs. Powell had been so kind to take her in, for to take her property from her. I then told her if she had any of it to produce it; I would have a constable and search her if she did not. She then produced nineteen shillings and sixpence farthing, I said to her this is not all you have left out of the seven guineas. She said she did not take seven guineas, she only took four. I heard her confess that the clothes that she had bought was with the money that she took from Mrs. Powell.

- MILES. I am a constable. I was sent for to take her in custody; when I went there she pointed out the things that she had bought with the old woman's money; I have brought them here; she said she took four guineas from the old woman.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Miles asked me what money I could make up for the money I had taken. I gave him nineteen shillings and two pence farthing. I told him that was all that I had got. He said it would be a great deal better for me if I would own to it.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing four guineas, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-61

231. SUSANNAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , a gown, value 14 s. a cloak, value 20 s. a shawl, value 5 s. a shift, value 3 s. and one window curtain, value 10 d. the property of Edward Schirm , in his dwelling house .

MARY SCHIRM . My husband's name is Edward Schirm ; we live at No. 6, New Round court in the Strand .

Q. What is your husband. - A. He is a waiter . The prisoner's mother lived in the same house with me; the prisoner was out of place, she lived with her grandmother. On the third of January she was cleaning my apartment; I left her in my apartment with my little boy while I went out, and while I was gone she opened a trunk of mine and took these things out. As soon as I came home she was gone; and my little boy told me she had taken the clothes out of the trunk. I went to the trunk. I found all the things gone. She never came nigh her mother for six weeks after she had done it; and then she came home and she was taken in custody. I asked her if she was not ashamed to serve me so; she said it was all come home to her, for she had parted with all the things, she had not a rag to her back; she had pawned and sold the things.

ELIZABETH HOWARD . Q. Who are you. - A. I keep a clothes shop Stanhope street, Clare market. The prisoner came to me and offered me a ticket; I gave her half a crown for it. I bought the articles, and I have parted with all but the window curtain.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am exceeding sorry. I hope you will be more favourable to me than I deserve. It is the first offence.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-62

232. JAMES FRAILE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , ten pieces of leather, value 5 l. and eight morocco skins, value 4 l. the property of Frederick Briant , in his dwelling house .

FREDERICK BRIANT . I live at No. 203, High Holborn . I am a leather seller . In consequence of losing vast quantities of leather, I was led to Hatton Garden for assistance; and, by the activity of the officers, I found some of my property in various parts of the town. I found some buck and doe skins at Mr. Claxton's, Bethnall Green; and some morocco skins, all of which I know is my property. The prisoner lived with me about three years and a half ago; I found some skins at Brown's, and some at Pike's; I knew that my porter was in possession of them goods.

Q. Who is your porter. - A. The witness Partridge, who was brought from the Nore. I found this property was sold by the prisoner at the bar.

MR. CLAXTON. I am a pocket book maker; I live at No. 4, Paradise Row, Bethnall Green. I have known the prisoner between six and seven years. I first knew him by dealing with his father.

Q. When did you buy these skins of him. - A. About three months back, I bought three dozen of green skivers, and a dozen of yellow morocco; I gave nine shillings and six pence each for the yellow morocco.

Q. What did you give for them all. - A. To the amount of ten pound one shilling and sixpence.

Q. What did you give a piece for the morocco skins. - A. I had nine skins of red morocco; I gave four pound for them. The green skivers I have worked them up.

Q. You know the prisoner very well. - A. I have known Mr. Fraile between six and seven years; I

dealt with his father. I considered him an honest young man.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a breeches maker, I live at Uxbridge. I have known the prisoner between five and six years. The first time I knew him was at the Bell and Crown gate way, Holborn; he came for orders.

Q. What did you purchase of him. - A. Five doe skins for fifty shillings; four of them are here. I am sure I bought them of the prisoner.

JOHN HANCOCK . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Brown's and found four doe skins and a piece of another, now produced, which Mr. Briant identified at the time; I found these skins at Mr. Claxton's; and this is a receipt of the prisoner Fraile; I had it of Mr. Claxton.

Q.(to Claxton) Look at that receipt, whose receipt is that. - A It is the receipt that was given me by the prisoner Fraile, it is a bill of seventy days after date.

Q. It is a bill that you paid Fraile. - A Yes.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . Q. What are you. - A. I am a leather dresser; I worked for Mr. Briant. About a year ago Mr. Fraile came from Birmingham, and was put into Gilspur street Compter. I hearing that he was there went to see him; nothing particular passed at that moment. One time when I was going to his father with the cart for Mr. Briant, he asked me whether I could get any skins; I said I would try; he said he would give me a pair of braces the first opportunity, if I could get him a black skin, a red, and a blue skin. It went on with that, and he gave me a pair of braces.

Prisoner. I was never in Mr. Briant's house to take any of these things; what I received came through the hands of Partridge that stands before you.

Q.(to Partridge) Did he ever go in the house with you. - A. He went up and down by the side of the house, and took these things from me. I was in the house, I slept in the house, and he was waiting to receive it.

Q. Do you remember these doe skins. - A. I remember there were some doe skins, and some yellow morocco skins delivered to him.

Prisoner. I never went into the house, nor near the house, he brought the skins to me.

Prosecutor. These things I know to be mine; the bulk had not been broke of these; I can identify them, there is a mark upon the neck. I cannot swear to the whole. I believe the prisoner was a very honest lad while he lived with me; Since that there have been eight men living upon me; I have been robbed of above a thousand pounds. I do not look upon the prisoner Fraile equal in guilt with Partridge, whom I supported; we found the property was sold by Fraile; the magistrate admitted Partridge an evidence.

Q. Are you the owner of the house. - A. Yes, I did not lodge in the house at the time the skins were taken out; it was made use of principally as a warehouse then. This Partridge was my porter, he laid there; I had about six or seven thousand pounds worth of property in it. I lived within fifteen doors of it; it is a very respectable house; I had recently bought the lease; I went into it myself as soon as it was repaired. I inhabit it now.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I must leave myself to your mercy, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, under the idea that he was capable of reform, as he was an intelligent, and a very industrious young man.]

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-63

233. JOHN KNOWLYS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of February , a copper, value 24 s. the property of James Wynne .

JAMES WYNNE . I am a broker , I live at No. 91, Grub street . On Wednesday evening last, I was sitting at tea in the kitchen, at the back of the shop; my daughter called out that a man had stole a copper; she run out, I followed her; I heard the copper fall a few yards from my door; I pursued the prisoner, he was stopped in Bunhill row.

Q. Did you see him with the copper. - A. I only heard him drop it; when my daughter catched hold of him he dropped the copper. I am sure it is the same man, I followed him and took him immediately.

JEMIMA WYNNE . Q. You are the daughter of this man. - A. Yes. On Wednesday night I was sitting at tea, I saw a man reaching over the stall board and take the copper; I ran out and saw a man with the copper in his hand. I went to lay hold of the copper, and with the weight of the copper, he having it in one hand, he dropped it.

Q. Look at the prisoner. - A. That is the same man that had the copper; my father brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish to go on board a ship if you please.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-64

234. JUDITH LIGHTLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , a pelisse, value 2 s. a quilt, value 2 s. three bed gowns, value 3 s. a shift, value 3 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of James Guy .

MARY GUY . I live in Wiltshire lane, Wapping ; my husband's name is James Guy .

Q. What is the prisoner, do you know her. - A. I have known her seven or eight years. On the 12th of January she came into my house about half past two o'clock in the afternoon; I was very much alarmed to see her; I heard that she was in prison. I asked her if she would eat any thing, she thanked me; I put out a bit of cold mutton to her. After that I asked her to stop to tea; she told me she was much obliged to me. I pulled off my pelisse, and hung in on the screen. I had been out all day; I made the fire, and asked her if she would go out for some butter; I gave her the butter pan in her hand, and I laid the butter pan down on the table. I went into the yard for a tea kettle of water, and when I came in she was gone out as I thought for the butter; I did not see her any more for that evening. I waited for tea till dark.

Q. How long was you absent for the water. - A.

About five minutes. At dark I got my tea; I wanted to go out, I looked for my pelisse, I could not find it; I went up to my one pair of stairs room, I saw my bed routed; upon examining the bed, I found my quilt and my bottom sheet gone, and two bed gowns that were on the bed, and my shift was gone out of the drawer; I looked round and saw the butter pan which I had given her to fetch the butter, standing upon the table.

Q. Did you find any of your things. - A. No, not one. The next evening I heard where she was; I sent for an officer. When he went into the room she fell a crying, and told me if I would not send her to prison, she would get me the things the next day.

Q. Did she tell you where the things were. - A. No.

Q. What is her name. - A. Judith Godfrey .

ROBERT ELSOP . I am an officer of Lambeth street office. On the 13th of January, Mrs. Guy came to me and said she had been robbed the day before, and she wished an officer to go with her and take this woman in custody. I found the prisoner in Rosemary lane, she was treating five or six people with gin; she went into a private house; then I took her into custody. I searched her; I found a seven shilling piece, two shillings in silver, and eight pence in halfpence; she said if I would let her go on the next day at twelve o'clock, she would bring Mrs. Guy her property back again; she said she had sold them in Ratcliff Highway.

Q. Did she say where. - A. No.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-65

235. ROBERT WAPLES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , in his dwelling house, one bank note, value 50 l. and a bank note, value 40 l. the property of Abraham Farrow .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

ABRAHAM FARROW . Q. You are a sailor . - A. Yes.

Q. On the 21st of January last did you come to Billingsgate. - A. Yes; I came from Gravesend, and I landed there in the evening.

Q. After you had landed you saw the prisoner Waples - did you know the prisoner Waples. - A. I had never seen him before in my life. After I had landed I got a pot of beer at a public house; I was speaking to a woman that I had got prize money due to me in the town; Waples said to me you can go along with me if you please, and I will take care of you, and pay your expences till you receive your prize-money. I went with him, he lived in Sun yard, Nightingale lane; he procured me a lodging in some other house. I told him I should go to the agents the next day and draw my money; I told him I had got a hundred pounds to take. I went on Thursday to the agent's, they told me to come on the next day for my money, and they would give me an order on the bankers; I went the next day, and they gave me a draft, and I went to the banking house the next day for the money.

Q. Where was the banking house. - A. I cannot say the name nor the number, it was in the Strand; I cannot read; Waples was with me when I went. There I received a fifty pound bank note, a forty pound, a five pound, and four one pound bank notes, and five shillings in cash.

Court. How do you know there was a fifty, a forty, a five, and four ones. - A. I told them. I did not understand the figures of the notes; he said he knew the number of the notes better than what they did. I know a one pound note; there was four of them.

Mr. Pooley. How do you know that one of the other notes was a fifty pound note. - A. I trusted to the gentleman that paid me. I put them all in my pocket book, in the same pocket I have now; we went and bad something to drink.

Q. Were you sober. - A. Yes; we drank about sixpennyworth of rum and water, it began to rain; we went home in a hackney coach; going home in the coach, he said he should like to look at the number of the notes I had in my pocket; I said stop till I get home and you shall be welcome to look at them; I did not shew him the notes in the coach. When I got home there was a dinner dressed; I sat down and had my dinner, and then I asked him what I had got to pay; he told me it was four pounds for my lodging and for a pair of boots that I had of him, and for his trouble of going along with me. I took my pocket book out and gave him the four one pound notes; he said I am able to take better care of your notes than you are yourself, you may go out and spend them, and I may be brought to account for it; I told him I was able to take care of my own money, I was the person that went out and fought for it; I let him have them, I was not willing to breed a disturbance in the place; he put them in his pocket, he said he would take care of them; he took them out of the pocket book and returned me the pocket book again. He told me that if I would come to him the next day in the morning he would return them to me. I did not sleep in his house all night, I believe I went into the Star; I had only the change with me that I took from the banker's; I thought he was an honest man, I was glad that he had them to take care of them for me. I went to his house the next morning, I told him I would be glad to have some money to pay for my breakfast; he gave me some money to pay for my breakfast, he gave the money for my breakfast. I asked him for some more of the money that he had taken from me the night before; he told me that he had not got any money of mine, and that he did not know any thing about it; he supposed I had been out and I had lost it.

Q. You have stated that when you went to the banker's, you went home with him and went to dinner there, you asked him what you had to pay - had you any thing to drink. - A. Not much; a pot of porter, and a glass of rum; I was sober.

Q. When you asked him for some money to pay for your breakfast, how much did that amount to. - A. About nine pence; and when he charged four pounds, he took the book out of my hand, and took the whole of the notes that were in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say that you supposed the prisoner to be an honest man, and therefore you consented he should have the notes till the next morning. - A. Yes.

Q. On the next morning you looked to him to pay for your breakfast. - A. Undoubtedly.

Q. The day before at dinner time you drank a pot of porter and a glass of rum. - A. Yes.

Q. That was not all that you drank. - A. No.

Q. You drank more than that. - A. Not before I had paid what his demand was; after dinner I drank some rum that was in a bottle.

Q. You were groggy. - A. I was very sensible.

Q. So are all drunken men - do you mean to say that you was perfectly sober. - A. Persons if they be not sober may know what they are about; I was so sober as to know that was the man that had the money.

Q. How much liquor did you drink after dinner. Q. I am not able to say every spoonful.

Q. You was pretty fresh. - A. I was certainly on board a ship a long time; I drank freely. I thought the money was safe; I found to the contrary.

Q. You went to a dance afterwards. - A. I went to the Star, to a dance, along with a woman that I paid for.

Q. They tell me that sailors when they go to a dance generally give some money. - A. What they give they are welcome to, but not so welcome what they take away.

Q. You shewed some notes there did not you. - Q. No.

Q. What day was it when you said the man took the notes away. - A. It was Friday in last month; I forget the day of the month.

Q. How soon after he got the notes from you did you apply to have him taken up. - A. I applied on the Wednesday following. On the Sunday the prisoner took me to Gravesend to get me on board a ship, thinking that I was a poor foolish lad, I would not not think no more about it. I took him up last Friday was a week. On Saturday, the next day after I received my money, the prisoner said he would get me a good ship on the Sunday; he went with me to Gravesend on board the ship. I told him I was not going to be impressed that way, I thought he was going to pay me the money down on board a ship; I asked him for my money, he told me he had none of my money and none he should return me. I went to his house on the Tuesday night following; he told me to go out of his house, he would have no more to do with me.

GEORGE WINCHESTER . - Mr. Pooley. You are clerk to Messrs. Ommaney and Druce, navy agents; do you know the prosecutor. - A. Yes. On the 22d and 23d of January the prosecutor and the prisoner both came to me. In November Farrow was entitled to prize money for the Lively; I paid him twenty-six pounds. In November he left one hundred pounds with me, to buy stock in the funds. On the 22nd of January he came in the afternoon for us to sell it out; we told Farrow it was too late that day to sell it; the prisoner was with Farrow; he sent him in again; he said he had better sell it out that day; we said it was impossible; we sold it out on the 23d of January, I paid him ninety nine pounds nine shillings; that is a check that I gave him on Hodsoll and Co. I have likewise brought the receipt which was witnessed by me, and I got it witnessed by the prisoner at the bar, who said he was a friend of Farrow's, and Farrow said he was a friend of his.

THOMAS JONES . - Mr. Pooley. You are a clerk at Hodsoll and Co. - A. I am.

Q. Look at that draft, and look at that man on your left hand, do you know him. - A. On the 23d of January I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner at our house, and this draft; I speak to the best of my recollection. One of them presented that check. I paid four small notes, a five pound note, a forty pound note, a fifty pound note, and nine shillings in money. I cannot recollect which I paid; I believe the prisoner to be the person that come with him, (The draft read in court.)

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a waterman and lighterman upon the river Thames.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, I have known him about three months. Near about a month ago I saw the prisoner at the Black Horse in Well street, in the evening, he was in the back parlour; a young man and he was sitting together; I was sitting opposite, I could hear the conversation that passed between them; I heard Waples say that he expected the officers would be after him concerning a sailor, saying he had robbed him of ninety nine pounds; Waples had ordered this man to give the sailor a receipt for three pounds; the young man that was sitting by, said he expected they would have him, for he had wrote the receipt; he called for a glass of rum and water, and said somebody must pay for it; I went away and left him. James Guy was in company with me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. This conversation of the prisoner's was about a sailor for a receipt of three pounds - do you not know that the prisoner surrendered himself at the office. - A. I do not know.

Mr. Pooley. I admit that fact.

JAMES GUY . - Mr. Pooley. What are you. - A. I am an engraver.

Q. Do you know William Wood . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, I saw him at the Black Horse in Well street, I was there in company with Wood, it is near a month ago; Waples came in after we were sitting there, we were in the parlour, and Waples and Bradley came in together. I heard Waples say that the officers were after him; somebody in the room asked him how was that; he made answer that Bradley had given a receipt for three pounds, and that he had received ninety-nine pounds of the sailor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. You do not mean to say that he said he had ninety-nine pounds. - A. I do; I say that he said he had ninety-nine pounds; that made me take notice of it.

SOLOMON HART . - Mr. Pooley. What are you. - A. I am a dealer on the water.

Q. Do you know Waples. - A. I saw him when I was at a public house called the Standard, the prisoner was with a man of the name of Bradley; before I sat down one Lions, a jew, came in; he asked Waples why he did not settle that business with the man; Waples said, what I have got I shall keep; he pulled our a long paper from his pocket book, and swore, and said how am I to pay my attorney's bill without I had such customers.

MORRIS SOLOMON . Q. What are you. - A. I am a slopseller. I am come to state what Mr. Waples.

told me. I think about four weeks ago, I cannot be punctual at the time, I had just come out of sickness. He said Soloman, I have done a b - r of the best of a hundred, and they can do no more to me than they have done before; they could only tap him on the shoulder, and then he must stash it.

Q. What does that mean. - A. To settle it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Stash it, is a term that you know very well. - A. I have heard it several times before.

JOHN FORBES . Q. You are a Thames police officer. - A. I am.

Q. Had you any warrant for Waples. - A. I had on the 6th of February.

Q. Did you know where Waples lived. - A. Yes; I went to his house, I could not find him; I looked for him four successive days.

Q. Did he after that time come and surrender himself. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutor and I came home together to my house, I asked him to leave his money with me, he answered no; he had fought for it, and he was capable of taking of it. I said if you are afraid of trusting me with it, I am afraid of trusting you. I says how much do you owe me, he says here is four pound notes; and he says if there is any coming to me out of the four pound, give it me to-morrow; and if there is any thing coming to you, I will pay you. He directly fastened up the pocket book, and went out of the house to a woman. He was brought home the next morning by a pork butcher; he says to me, pay for my breakfast; I says pay for it yourself, you left no money with me but four pound notes; he then says I left all my money in your care; I says you have not, he says you do not mean to say so; if you have not got it, I have lost it I have none, he says to me, pay the fifteen pence for my breakfast; I put my hand into my pocket and gave him one shilling and three pence. He says if you have not got it, I lost it last night with the three girls I was with. I says, Abraham, it is a bad job, you had better have left your money with me. I says, Abraham, there is some difference between you and me, I will make out the bill. I was going over to the London docks; there was a jew called him by name; I says, Abraham, do you know this man; he denied it at first, till the man came up to him; he asked him how long he had been out of the Cumberland Indiaman; he said that he was discharged from that ship, and he would go forward and declare it; this man said, I do not think that such a stout able man as you was discharged. I said I will be accountable for him; he had been misfortunate enough. He had been out last night, and had lost ninety nine pound. I then went home and called over my bill, which is eight pound nine shillings; I asked him which way I was to be paid, as I had only four pound; he said I can pay you out of my absent bond. I called Bradley to write out the bill for eight pound nine shillings; saying on the bill, received the above, and saying I am in debt to Robert Waples four pound nine. He was satisfied, and he went down to Gravesend with me, and the man brought him to the captain, he said he was impressed. He then came on shore; he said he would not go on board. I said if that is the case, you owe me money enough, you shall not run any further in debt; he came to my house one day afterwards. I saw no more of him for fourteen days; I heard a warrant was out against me. I surrendered myself up, knowing myself to be an innocent man.

- SHEALE. - Mr. Knapp. You are a sailor I observe. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Farrow the prosecutor. - A. I have seen him twice. I have seen him with Mr. Waples.

Q. Where did you see them together. - A. At Mr. Waples's house last Friday four weeks, they both came in together at half after six o'clock in the afternoon; and the prosecutor asked Mrs. Waples if she had the tea ready, she replied the kettle was boiling, she would soon get it ready; she said you had better stop to tea, you appear pretty fresh, the tea will do you good; he said he would go out, he wanted a little drop; Waples said you had better let me have the money; no, he said, he had worked for it, and was as capable of taking care of it as any one else. Waples said as you are afraid of trusting me, I am afraid of trusting you. So accordingly he asked him what was coming to him, he said about four pounds, he said if you will stop a little I will let you know, I will make out the account; he said he would not stop; he opened his pocket book and laid the pocket book along the table; he took out four pound notes, and put the pocket book in his pocket with the other notes; he catched hold of the notes, here says he is four pound notes, if there is any thing coming to me, return it to-morrow. All very fair said Waples, I will; he said he would go out and have a dance where the fidler was, and have something to drink.

Q. What became of the pocket book and the other notes. - A. He put the other notes in his pocket book, and he put the pocket book into his trowsers pocket, and he laid the four pound notes down on the table.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. Where do live. - A. In Rosemary lane.

Q. How long have you known Waples. - A. Five years.

Q. You are sure that this was about Friday four weeks, what makes you particular. - A. I am particular in any day that I take notice of; I called on Waples that day, for Waples to get me a birth in the London Packet. I got the birth the Monday after that happened. I used to call at his house two or three times a day. I am sure it was Friday about four weeks.

Q. Was any body with you. - A. No, Waples's mother was there.

Q. Was not he there. - A. No, he did not come in for an hour and a half after me; I went there about half after four o'clock; Mrs. Waples waiting for them coming to tea. Farrow and the prisoner came in about half after six.

Q. Who was it that asked how much was due. - A. The prosecutor asked how much was due to him, he said something about four pound.

Q. Did he tell him what it was due for. - A.For liquor, lodging, or something or other.

Q. He did not make mention of any thing particular

from that. - A. No.

Q. Did you hear the whole conversation. - A. Yes; Farrow went out, and I stopped till nine o'clock.

Q. He said it was for lodging and drink. - A. Yes.

Q. Then supposing it had been said by any body it was for boots, handkerchiefs, and jackets, that is not so. - A They made mention about something of boots, but I cannot recollect what; they made mention of several things that I do not.

Q. If he has made mention of several things, why did you say it was for liquor and something or other, when you was asked what the four pound was for. you said it was for liquor and lodging. - A. Yes, and he made mention of the boots and several things else that I did not notice.

Q. Did you go the police office. - A. I did the second time.

Q. Did you give any account to the magistrate. - A. No I was not called.

Court. What time did you go to Waples's house. - A At half after four in the afternoon.

Q. You had called there twice before on that day. - A. Yes.

Q. What hours did you call. - A. The first time was about one o'clock, he was not at home, the mother was there.

Q. Was she at dinner. - A. No. I called again about three o'clock, I rapped at the door, the mother said he was not at home; then I went at half after four, and waited till he come home.

Q. Did you stop after they came home. - A. Yes, I stopped till about a quarter to nine o'clock.

Q. The prosecutor Farrow went away very soon after he came in. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see any other person. - A No.

Q. When you saw him the next morning, was he drunk or sober. - A. He was drunk.

Q. Had he been rolled in the mud. - A. No; he was talking to a girl up against Nightingale-lane.

ANN WAPLES . - Mr. Alley. You are the mother of the prisoner. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor Farrow. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him any time at your house before the prisoner surrendered himself into custody. - A. Yes, I saw him there ever so many days.

Q. When did he first come to you. - A. I cannot rightly say, he first came of an evening; he boarded in the house seven days, he had a pair of boots of my son, and handkerchiefs and shirts.

Court. How long had he lived at your house before he took his money. - A. I believe four nights.

Q. Do you know the last witness. - A. Yes, he was in the house when my son and he came in; they came in about half after six.

Q. Was there any thing said about bank notes. - A. Yes, when he was at tea, the prosecutor said he would go out; my son said, you had better give me your money to keep; he said no, he had fought for it and worked for it, and he was able to take care of it; my son said, if you are afraid to trust me, I am afraid to trust you, let you and I settle then; he put his hand into his pocket, pulled out his pocket book, and took out four one pound notes.

Q. Can you read. - A. No; I know a one pound note. I know he pulled out four, he looked at them, he had a great many more papers and notes; the four he laid on the table, and the rest he put into his pocket book.

Q. Did the prosecutor go out again. - A. Yes; he said Waples here is four one pound notes, if there is any thing coming to me, to morrow morning you will give it me, and if there is any thing coming to you, I will give it to you then. Directly he had given him the notes, he said he would go out and have a dance; I saw him no more till the next day, I brought him home at eleven o'clock; he was enquiring in the street for Waples.

Q. Was he drunk or sober. - A. He was not drunk nor sober; he came out of the house where he had breakfasted, he was all over mud; the man came home with him to our house, and asked us to pay for his breakfast; Waples replied to him, Abraham pay for it yourself, you have got money; my son said, I have got none of your money; Farrow said, if you have not got the money; I have lost it among the whores.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. When you brought him home he was all over mud, that you observed you are sure of. - A. Yes.

Q. So much, that if any body had been in the room, they must have seen it. - A. They must.

Q. What time in the morning did your son go out with Waples for the money. - A. That was in the afternoon, my son did not go out with him, he lit of him in Cheapside.

Q. What day was it. - A. It was on a Friday, to the best of my recollection.

Q. What time was it your son went away. - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock; Farrow went out after breakfast, between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. They went out in the morning and came home again. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did they come home. - A. Between one and two.

Q. What had they for dinner that day. - A. They had no dinner that day.

Court. Did they both come home together.

Prisoner. Do not be alarmed, mother, speak the truth. - A. No, I am not alarmed.

Court. No, she need not be alarmed - I will take care of her. They both went out and they both came home together. - A. My son came home, but not Farrow; my son returned home at half after one - Farrow did not come home till my son and him came in together at half-after six.

Mr. POOLEY. Do you recollect Farrow having any porter or rum. - A. Yes, I fetched it while we had tea; I fetched a bottle of rum and a pot of porter; we all drank some of the porter; he drank the rum himself; we never tasted it.

Q. You do not mean to say that he drank a bottle of rum. - A. Very near, he did.

Court. Who were the persons that were at tea. - A. My son, Sheales, the woman belonging to the sailor, and myself.

Q. How long have you known Sheales. - A. I have known him about half a year.

Q. Was Sheales in the house before your son and the prosecutor came in. - A. Yes, he was there about an hour and a half waiting for my son.

Q. Had Sheales been at the house before that day, - A. No, not as I saw; Sheale's came about half after four; I told him to come again, and then he went out

and came in again in about a quarter of an hour, and staid while they came home and while they went away; he was the last person that went out.

Q. How many persons were there in the house - A. Five.

Q. You and your son, Sheales the prosecutor, and another woman. - A. Yes, she came in about half an hour before Waples came in.

Q. Was she sitting so as Sheale's could see her. - A. Yes, we must all see her.

Q.(to Winchester) Have you any recollection of the time of the day that the prisoner Waples and the other man came to your office on the 23d of January. - A. I rather think it was between three or four o'clock that I paid him the check.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18070218-66

236. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , in the dwelling house of Thomas Metcalfe, a bank note of fifty pounds, four other bank notes of ten pounds each, three bank notes of five pound each, four other bank notes of two pounds each, and ten other bank notes of one pound each , the property of Thomas Metcalfe .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS METCALFE . Examined by Mr. Alley. What way of life are you in. - A I am a dealer in old building materials ; I live at No. 4, Pelham-street, Stepney . The prisoner at the bar lived with me between three and four years; she was a servant and a sort of a companion to me.

Q. On any time previous to Christmas day did you see your pocket book. - A. Yes, I saw it on that day mentioned in the indictment - I was in my warehouse when I counted my notes - I had notes in Bank paper to the amount of one hundred and twenty-three pounds; I put the notes into my pocket book, and I put the pocket book in the inside pocket of my coat; I wore the coat till I went to bed, then I pulled it off.

Q. Where did the prisoner sleep. - A. In the front room, and I slept in the back room. In the morning I put my coat on.

Q. Did you examine your pocket book in the morning. - A. I did not; I wore the coat all day; I did not examine it; I did not want any thing out of it. On Saturday night I locked that coat up with the pocket book in the inside pocket. On Sunday morning I put my coat on; when I opened my pocket book every note was gone.

Q. When you missed the notes did you speak to the prisoner. - A. I did, I challenged her with it; she denied that ever she knew or saw any of them.

Q. Do you know the number of the fifty pound note. - A. I do not - I received it from Mr. Bloxham's - I received it and a ten pound note for a check of sixty pounds, the check belonging to Mr. George Eding , of Bermondsey-street.

Q. The check bears date on the sixth of November, 1806, did you receive it on the day it bears date? - A. I received it on the day before.

Q. You received the fifty pound note of Messrs. Bloxham's - did you there learn the number of the note. - A. Yes, and I went to the bank and left word for them to give me instructions; they did: I received that letter from the bank and another; in consequence of that I have seen my note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. You are now a dealer in old building materials. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been to the police office. - A. I have been once there.

Q. No oftener; have you not been there twice. - A. I have been once at one office, and once at the other.

Q. Were you there as a prosecutor. - A. No, I was there, and there was an information against my house; I do not know what it was about.

Q. Of course no harm came to you about it. - A. No.

Q. You was not imprisoned at all. - A. I was in Clerkenwell one night.

Q. This woman was your servant. - A. She lived in my house, not at that time.

Q. She has not lived with you as your wife. - A. She cannot be a wife of mine.

Q. I ask you whether she lived with you as your wife or not. - A. Some part of the time.

Q. It is said (I do not know how true it is) that you bought her. - A. I did; I gave three guineas for her.

Q. You have let her go as your maid - did not you take her for better and for worse. - A. I did not look upon it as such - I found it to go worse.

Q. Have not you let her go by your name. - A. I never gave her the liberty.

Q. Do you know any thing of this advertisement?

"The public are requested not to trust Ann Wright , she goes by the name of Metcalfe." Look at it. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did not you put that in the newspaper. - A. I put an advertisement in, I cannot tell whether that is it or no.

Q. I will take it so - you do not know whether you did or not, how long is it ago that you bought her. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Is it three years ago? - A. I suppose it may.

Q. You say you received a fifty pound note from Messrs. Bloxham's in November, did not you pay away a good deal of money between that and Christmas. - A. I did not pay that away; I do not know what I paid away.

Q. Are you a very sober man. - A. I do not know what I am.

Q. Are you sober now. - A. I think I am as sober as ever I will be as long as I live.

Q. When you missed these notes you had this woman examined at the police office. - A. I had.

Q. She surrendered herself up without being taken up - A. Yes, the officers were after her.

Q. Was not she examined and dismissed three several times. - A. Twice.

Q. She came a third time without being taken up. - A. Yes.

Q. Because she was dismissed from one office you went to another, where you was less known. - A. She was first examined at Worship-street.

Q. You were too well known at Worship-street. - A. Not as I know of; I am not known too well any where.

Q. She was dismissed twice, and then she came to Lambeth street office. - A. Yes; I had not received the letter from the bank then, but I have now.

Q. When you traced the note she was committed for trial. - A. Yes.

SIR WILLIAM BLOXHAM Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Mr. Bloxham look at that check: 7th of November paid sixty pounds, I believe it was paid to this gentleman, a fifty pound, No. 3435, and a ten pound, No. 1146.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Is that your handwriting on the check. - A. No.

Q. Then you paid the check, whether he received it or his friend you do not know; are you quite sure it is the check. - A. It is impossible for me to say; it is here George Edings.

Q. Does your memory lead you to believe that to be a payment of that indentical check. - A. No.

Q. That check might come in your possession twenty days after the date, it is dated on the sixth. - A. It is.

Q. Nor can you say that it did not come on the sixth or the seventh; there is nothing in your book to fix it on that identical check, George Eding is a customer of yours. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you paid any other check. - A. All that I can say, here stands my own writing on the seventh of November, and here paid away a fifty and a ten pound; George Eding , he keeps cash at my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18070218-67

237. RICHARD FOX and RICHARD SARGEANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a bay mare, value 10 l and a bay gelding, value 5 l. the property of Rebecca Plum , widow .

WILLIAM PLUM . Q. Are you the son of Rebecca Plum . - A. Yes.

Q. Where does she live. - A. At Aylesbury, in Kent .

Q. Do you know of her losing a bay mare and a bay gelding. - A. Yes, I have the care of her concerns.

Q. When was the last time that you saw the mare and the gelding before they were stolen. - A. On the 8th of February, about twelve o'clock.

Q. Out of what place were they lost. - A. From the stable; I missed them the next morning about six o'clock.

Q. At this time did you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes, both of them; Richard Sargeant was a labourer, he lived at Aylesford, and Fox was a plumber and glazier by trade, and had dealt in horses; he lived at Chatham.

Q. What is your mother. - A. A miller.

Q. When did you see your horses after they were lost. - A. I saw the bay gelding in Smithfield, on Friday the 13th, in the possession of Mr. Davis, a horse-dealer; I saw the mare at Mr. Longman's at Hoxton.

Q. How long had your mother this mare. - A. About three years.

Q. Had the mare any marks. - A. The near hind feet was white; it was a cropt mare, and she was a little broken winded.

Q. Have you any doubts about her. - A. Not in the least.

Q. How do you know the horse. - A. He had two ring bones in both hind legs.

WILLIAM LONGMAN . Q. The prosecutor claimed a mare in your possession. - A. Yes.

Q. What are you. - A. I keep two or three horses and a brick cart; I work for Mr. Scott.

Q. How came you by that mare. - A. Sargeant came into my yard, he was on a poney, and a boy was on the mare: he said that he understood I wanted a cart mare; he offered it for sale, I bought it; I gave six pounds in money and a poney worth four pounds for it; I asked him his place of abode, he said he lived in Spitalfields and his stables were there.

Q. Did you buy the mare without asking him his name. - A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a horse-dealer; I am come to give account of the bay gelding; I was going into the Curtain-road, Shoreditch, I met a boy belonging to this gelding; he was riding a poney, I asked him if the poney was to sell, he said it was; he asked ten guineas for it; I made answer, I think it is too much money for it, the boy made answer, if you call at my master's, he will sell you that and another together; we agreed to chop for the poney and the gelding, I gave five pounds and my hackney; I bought them of Sargeant.

Q. You are sure this is the man. - A. I am positive it is the man.

Q. When did this happen. - A. On Friday the 13th, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon.

JOHN DAVENPORT . Q. What are you. - A. I am a gingerbread baker; I was in the Elder Tree public house on Thursday, Sargeant asked me to ride the horse and to exercise it about, if any body asked me the price of it to tell them. I met Mr. Davis, he asked me if it was to sell, I told him it was. I took him to Mr. Sergeant.

MICHAEL RICHARDSON . Q. How old are you. - A. I am about fifteen. Coming through Smithfield a short time ago, I saw Fox.

Q. How long ago. - A. About three weeks ago.

Q. Did you know Fox at that time. - A. Yes, I lived with him once. He asked me to live with him again. I said I would, as I had not constant employ, that was on Friday. I went on Saturday to his stables.

Q. Where is his stables. - A. In Elder street, Norton Falgate. On Saturday morning he took from Smithfield two horses to the stable. I did not see any more of him that day nor on the Sunday; and when I found he did not come home, I took the key home with me in my pocket; I did not see him till Monday; when I came on Monday morning at nine o'clock, I found two strange horses in the stable, both belonged to Mr. Plum. I enquired of Mr. Sergeant how he got them in.

Q. Was Sergeant any acquitance of Fox. - A. Yes.

Q. How. - A. I do not know any farther than seeing them together. He told me that he told Mr. Beesy, the cooper, that belonged to the premises, he had lost the key, and he let him in the back way; when I come I unlocked the door.

Q. They were Sargeant's horses then. - A. Yes; by what I could understand.

Q.Had Fox let him the stables. - A. I do not know that Fox let him the stable, Fox had the stables in his own name.

Q. Then he must let him put them there. - A. Yes; the horses were very much fatigued and splashed all over; I took one out of door to clean it, and Sargeant told me I ought not to do that, he would catch cold if I cleaned them out of door; so I took him in; I asked Sargeant whose horses they were, he said they were his own. Then Fox came in the morning, I was saying what two fine horses they were; he replied, pho! d - n

you, I ought to know what horses they are, I sent Thomas down to Chatham after them.

Q. What became of the horses afterwards. - A. On Wednesday night Sargeant said get on the mare and ride behind me, and he got upon the poney.

Q. Do you know one Longman. - A. Yes.

Q. You sold it to Longman, did not you. - A. Yes, we saw Longman's man. Sargeant told him they were his horses, that was at first.

Q. After all, whose horses did you understand them to be. - A. I understood them to be Sargeant's only by what I heard from Sargeant.

Q. Fox told you that he sent Thomas for them, how could you understand they were Sargeant's horses. - A. I do not know whether that was true or not.

Q. How long ago was this. - A. About three weeks.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Bush. - A. I have seen him lately, he never came nigh the stables.

JOHN BUSH . Q. What are you. - A. I am a fruiterer, I have got a little horse and cart of my own, I buy apples, I live at Aylesford.

Q. What do you know of Sargeant. - A. Richard Sargeant told me as I was going to Chatham Market, that he had taken Plum's two horses and took them up to London for Fox, and he had put them into Fox's stables.

Q. I suppose you are very intimate with Sargeant, are not you. - A. Yes, I am his brother-in-law, worse luck; here is a young man that was along with me.

SARGEANT. I never said such a thing to him.

THOMAS BEESEY . I am a cooper. On the 7th of February the prisoner Fox, in company with the prisoner Sargeant, came into my yard about noon, where I was at work, and enquired of me whether I had a stable to let; I told them I had; I let the stable to Fox, he seemed to signify that he wanted a very early possession.

Q. Did he put any horses in there. - A. He did; he put in two horses about two o'clock. On the Monday following, about eight o'clock, the prisoner Sargeant came up to me, and asked me whether I could let him go into my stable my private way; the man appeared fatigued, I opened the stable and he took the horses in.

Q. What horses were they. - A. I had not an opportunity of observing the horses.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer of Hatton Garden, I took the prisoners in custody.

Sargeant's Defence. When I came to the stable there were two horses tied up to the door splashed with mud, I went and asked him whether I could take them in the stable the private way, because I had lost the key; one horse had a saddle on, and one was without, they had stood there some time before I asked the cooper. I went to the Elder-Tree to know whether they knew any thing of the key or the boy. Mr. Fox came to me about eight o'clock that night, he asked me if I saw two horses at the stable door, I said yes; he said, well Tom you must sell them to the best advantage.

Fox was not put upon his defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

FOX, NOT GUILTY .

SARGEANT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-68

235. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of February , ten yards of calimanco, value 10 s. the the property of John Richardson , privately in his shop .

JOHN RICHARDSON . I live in Oxford Street , I am a mercer ; on the third of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop with the child she has now with her, she asked to look at some calimancoes, I shewed her some, she agreed for five yards, which I cut off for her; see offered me three pence halfpenny, saying that she would call for it on Saturday when her husband received his wages; I told her I could not take so small a sum, she then made it up sixpence; she asked me to shew her some white lace; while we were bringing the box round, I said, woman what have you got under your petticoats, she said I have got nothing. I jumped over the counter, I saw a piece of calimanco drop from between her legs.

Q. On taking up the calimanco, did you know it was some of the goods that were in your shop. - A. Yes, I knew it was my property, she said the child had pulled it down, it was impossible, it laid in another part of the shop.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On my removing the child, the bit of stuff, as I believe, might fall, I was going over to look at a bit of lace; when I took the child up, I dare say it pulled it down, but unknown to me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-69

236. ELIZABETH JENKINS and SARAH STEARS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , two blankets value 11 s. a pair of sheets value 9 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. 6 d. a counterpane, value 10 s. two pillows, value 4 s. a bolster, value 4 s. a tablecloth, value 1 s. 6 d. two towels value, 1 s. a silver tablespoon, value 10 s. three silver tea spoons, value 4 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Tod , widow , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH TOD . I am a widow woman, I live in Paul's street, Pimlico .

Q. You keep the whole house. - A. Yes. The two prisoners came to lodge with me the Friday before Christmas day, they had the back one pair of stairs room at five shillings a week.

Q. They rented it jointly, did they. - A. Yes, and they had all the articles mentioned in the indictment in the room for their use; Miss Stears never went out of the room but once, till they left the lodgings, after staying five weeks. I think it was the 26th of January, when they went way.

Q. Had they paid you any rent while they were there. - A. No, not a farthing.

Q. Did Jenkins use to go out frequently. - A. Yes, half a dozen times of a day. They went away in the morning before I was up, they never gave me any warning.

Q. After they left the lodgings, did you go into the lodgings. - A. No, not till the Thursday following, when the week was up, then I sent for a smith, and had the door opened, then I observed all the things in the indictment gone.

Q. Have you found these things since. - A. No, nor never heard of them.

MARY TOD . I am the prosecutrix's niece. I was there two or three days before they left the room.

Q. The account that your aunt has given is true. - A. Yes. I was at a house in Tottenham Court road, I saw Jenkins go by, that was a week afterwards, I followed her, she asked me what I followed her for; I told her for stealing the things, she told me if I would go back and not follow her, she would return them in a few days, I followed her as far as Covent Garden church yard, there she sat down for about an hour, and then she got into a coach.

Jenkins's Defence. I can only say that Miss Stears through ill health knew nothing of the transaction between me and Mrs. Tod. I wrote a note to Mrs. Tod, that she should hear from us in a day or two. I believe it is for owing her the money that she has done this; could we take all these things away, as she opened the door for us; there are other lodgers in the house, there is other keys that opens the door, and there is a large yard that any body could easily get in.

Stears's Defence. It is a very unjust thing laid to our charge. I acknowledge that I do owe rent.

JENKINS - GUILTY , aged 25.

STEARS - GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-70

237. THOMAS WATERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of February , two blankets, value 1 l. two sheets, value 8 s. and a counterpane, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Iredale , in a lodging room .

SARAH IREDALE . Q. Are you the wife of Joseph Iredale . - A. Yes. I live at No. 20, Queen street, Golden Square . On the second of February, the prisoner took a room of me.

Q. What room did he take. - A. A room across the yard, it formerly was part of a shop, we made it into a sleeping room; he took it by the week, and was to pay 3 s. 6 d. a week.

Q. Of course you expected him to stay one week. - A. Yes, he took it on the second, and slept there on the third of February.

Q. Did you ever see him after the third. - A. Not till I met him in Carnaby street on the eleventh.

Q. Did he give you any intimation that he was going. - A. No.

Q. I suppose he only wanted the room to sleep in. - A. No; he had for his use in the room, two blankets, a counterpane, and two sheets. On the next morning I went into his room to make the bed, I found the sheets, blankets, and the counterpane was gone, and a large quantity of horse-dung left, which had been emptied out of an handkerchief; when he came he had a large bundle in a handkerchief; which I supposed to be his clothes, and a great basket, that I supposed to be his tools; he said he was a carpenter. When I met him in Carnaby street, I spoke to him, I said you are the man that robbed me, he said he had not, I said I would take my oath he was the man, he said if I would let him go he would fetch me the bed clothes; I laid hold of him, he drew me into the middle of the street. I called Mr. Marshall, whom I knew in the market, he came and secured him.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer of Marlborough street. I searched the prisoner's other lodgings, Marybone court, he lodged there with his wife; we found the things relating to this charge at the pawnbrokers.

JOHN FAROM . I am a servant to Mr. Marriot, pawnbroker. I took in these blankets on the fourth of February, of the prisoner Waters, I lent him nine shillings on them.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer of Marlborough street, I produce two sheets, they were brought by the prisoner's wife to Marlborough street.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. My wife paid for the sheets.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-71

238. MARY WIDDISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 3 d. and a quart of beer, value 5 d. the property of Richard Jackson .

RICHARD JACKSON . I am a publican , I keep the sign of the Pitman's arms, Pitman's street, St. Luke's . On the Wednesday preceding the fact in the indictment, I carried out my tray and went forward to serve my customers; when I returned to the tray I found two pots filled with porter gone, I communicated the circumstance to my lodger. On the 15th I got him to watch the tray, and went on before, and left the tray in the identical spot. I went forward to serve the customers. In about five minutes afterwards, the person that I had watching, called out, Jackson I have got her with a full pot of porter, she had got a quart pot full of beer, she had formerly been a customer of mine.

Q. Did she say any thing for herself. - A. She said she was sorry, and had not stole all the pots I lost.

WILLIAM AYLETT . I saw the woman take the pot out of the tray; it was about eight o'clock on the 15th of February, it was moon light. I took hold of her, I asked her what she had got, she said nothing; I immediately took the quart pot nearly full of beer from under her cloak.

- I am a constable. I took the prisoner and searched her lodgings, and I found this melting thing that she had melted the pots in; she said she had melted some on Tuesday, but they were none of Mr. Jackson's.

Prisoner's Defence. I never melted a pot in my life; I told the officer that I melted in the pan some odd pieces of pewter.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-72

239. JAMES MANNAKEE , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a pelisse, value 50 s , the property of George Brown .

JOSEPH ESKINS . I am servant to George Brown ,

Brown, silk mercer , Shoreditch .

Q. Do you know any thing of the loss of a pelisse. - A. Yes, from Mr. Brown's shop door; it hung partly in and partly out, I had seen it hang there about five minutes before it was taken away. About five o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at the end of the counter, and having an idea that something was pulled from the door, I went out, I saw it was missing; I saw some men at the corner of an alley, I ran to the alley, I saw the prisoner running up the alley with the pelisse under his arm, which he was endeavouring to put under his coat; I ran directly after him, he looked back and immediately dropped the pelisse; I called out stop thief, he ran to Grey Eagle street, Spital fields; he went in at a back door of that street. I attempted to go after him, I could not, the door was fastened; I went to the other door of the house, I was informed that he went into the house opposite. I went for the officer; he came and searched the house, he could not find him. In half an hour after that he was brought to our house.

Q. Are you quite sure that he was the same man that you saw running away with the pelisse; I am positive of it. It is a cotton velvet pelisse, it is worth fifty shillings.

THOMAS MAHAM . I am a constable; in consequence of information given me by a neighbour that the prisoner was in a pigeon lost, concealed in this very house that we had searched before, I went and searched the pigeon lost and found him there.

I told him what I took him for; he said a man had given the pelisse to him in the street to carry. I took him to Mr. Brown's, when the last witness saw him he said he was the man.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-73

240. JOHN M'CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on 21st of January , a brass kettle, value 1 l. and a copper stew pan, value 1 s. the property of James Bruce .

JAMES BRUCE . I live at No. 5. New Gravel lane, Shadwell , I am a brazier .

Q. Did you at any time lose a kettle and a stew pan. - A. Yes, on the 21st of January about three or four o'clock. I had seen them in the forepart of the day, they were put out of the door.

JOHN GILL . I am an officer of the Thames police. On the 21st of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I stopped the prisoner about two hundred yards from Mr. Bruce's house, he had a brass kettle and copper stew pan upon his head, I asked him whose property it was, he told me his own; he refused to give me any account where he got them from. I took him in custody, I enquired about the neighbourhood, Mr. Bruce claimed them.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man in the street asked if I wanted a job, I told him yes. He gave them me to carry for him as far as old Gravel lane, he said he would give me a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate and publickly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-74

241. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , two garden chairs, value 6 s. and a wainscot table, value 3 s. the property of Edward Bacon .

WILLIAM LEE . I am a watchman, I live in Well street, Hackney. On Tuesday morning the prisoner passed me with two chairs and a table, I stopped him, and with the assistance of the other watchman we stopped him; when we laid hold of him, he said he was going to take them to Hackney road; on the next day they were claimed by Williams.

- JUDD. Q. You are a watchman of Hackney. - A. Yes, as soon as we laid hold of him we brought him back a few yards, he threw the chairs and the table from his head and away he ran; I ran after him and halloed stop thief. Davison the next watchman took him.

JOHN WILLIAMS . Q. Do you know Edward Bacon . - A. Yes, he lives in Church-street, Hackney .

Q. Do these two chairs and table belong to him. - A. Yes, they were in his summer-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I found these chairs on Stamford Hill.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-75

242. HANNAH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of January , two table cloths, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Carter .

SARAH CARTER . Q. What relation are you to Benjamin Carter . - A. We live at 9 Abingdon street The prisoner was a washer woman , she washed in the house; we lost five table cloths, we found two out of them at Mr. Allen's the pawnbroker's; we missed them at different times.

THOMAS WINTER ALLEN . I am a pawnbroker, Russel court, Drury Lane. On the 16th of January the prisoner pawned two table cloths for five shillings in the name of Ann Wells ; I have known her this ten years.

JAMES GILLMORE. I am an officer of Queen square; last Thursday week I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found a duplicate that led me to Mr Allen's, and there I found the table cloths.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only washed for Mr. Carter four times; the servant told me they had a great many chair women, it is very hard I should suffer for that I never was in Mr. Allen's shop before a week, last Easter.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-76

243. THOMAS BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of January a hen, value two shillings , the property of Samuel Special .

SAMUEL SPECIAL . I live in Whitechapel , my house is by itself, it is called the ducking pond; six weeks ago I lost twenty six fowls all at one time, since that time I catched this man, he came in the yard for one more of them.

Q. What time was it when you lost this hen. - A. On the 4th of February, between six and seven

o'clock in the evening, I found the prisoner close to where the fowls were, he was peeping behind a stack of wood. I struck him, I said I suppose you are the man that stole the other fowls; he had killed a hen, it was in a bag, and the bag was close to his feet. I called to Davis, and he laid hold of him by the collar and took him to the magistrate.

Q. Did you know it to be your hen. - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge it was.

Prisoner's Defence. He took the law in his own hands, he beat me with a stick a yard and a half long, he would have killed me if it had not been for the woman.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-77

244. WILLIAM CONNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , a cotton gown skirt, value 2 s. the property of John Winter .

JOHN WINTER . I am a pawnbroker , I was sitting in my parlour talking to a friend, the boy called out to me that a man had stole a gown skirt; I ran out, and with the assistance of a man I secured him; he had the gown skirt in his possession, it was hanging in the shop before he took it

Q. What time in the evening was this. - A. About nine o'clock.

- GOOM. I am a watchman. I saw the man open the door and snatch out the gown and run away, I pursued him, I never lost sight of him, I took him in a court better than an hundred yards off, he had the skirt when I laid hold of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Drury Lane, on Monday night about eight o'clock, I saw a man drop something in the dark, I did not know what it was, just as I was going to look at it I was taken by this man and I was brought to this gentleman's shop.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-78

245. EDWARD ROUS , JOHN RICHARDS , WILLIAM SMITH , and WILLIAM KNIGHT , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , one hundred and eighty nine pound weight of lead , the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

JONATHAN HUNT . I keep a little coal shed and an old horse and cart in the Edgeware road, Paddington side. On the 16th of February, returning from my stable I met Smith and Richards, Smith had something tied in a blue apron, and Richards had a sack upon his left shoulder apparently very heavy; I met John Tanner , I desired him to follow me. I heard the prisoner Smith say to Richards let us cross over the road, they crossed over, I said to Richards, you seem very heavy loaded (it was about half after six in the morning just getting light); I asked him what he had got, he said he had got nothing, I insisted upon seeing, he said he would see me b - r first. Richards said if I wanted the stuff I might have it, and down he threw it. Smith rather refused putting his down, I insisted upon it, he put the blue apron down and then the lead was uppermost, the apron was not big enough to cover it completely. I told them they had got what I thought they had, for our neighbourhood had been infested with such sort of people; Smith said I might have it if I would, I replied I must have you as well as the lead; he run away as hard as he could, I ran after him and knocked him down, I secured him, Richards made his escape. I stopped with the lead and Smith till he was brought back to me; we delivered the lead to the constables.

JOHN TANNER . I had Richards by the collar, he bit me on the mouth and ran away, I halloed after him; he was brought back by Cannon.

EDWARD CANNON . I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued Richards and brought him back to Smith and Tanner.

- THORP. I am a gardener, I live at Lisson green. Last Monday between six and seven in the morning I was going to my work up Edgeware road; I met the two prisoners as before described; afterwards I met Rous, he was near an hundred yards behind Smith and Richards, he had a bundle with him tied up in a pocket handkerchief, I heard the cry of stop thief, Rous immediately put the bundle he was carrying into a garden as he was walking along; then I followed Rous and took him, a man that was talking with me went and brought the lead out of the garden. Rous begged for mercy and said if I would let him go I might take the lead; it was about thirty pound of sheet lead.

JOHN BONNAM . I took Knight about five minutes after John Thorp took his man, he had lead in a blue apron, about twenty two pound. We delivered the prisoners and the lead to Walton the constable.

- HUNT. We made enquiry, we could not match the lead.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-79

246. SUSANNAH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , a cotton gown, value 15 s. the property of John Akers .

SARAH AKERS . Q. Did you loose a cotton gown at any time. - A. Yes. On the the 19th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, it was hanging in the yard to dry. I had seen it there half an hour before it was taken away.

Q. Where is your house. - A. No. 199 St. John street . On the following day I found the gown at Mr. Hill's, Turnmill street.

Q. What is the value of the gown. - A. Fifteen shillings.

- BURGESS. I am a servant to Mr. Hill, Turnmill street. On the 19th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening the prisoner pledged this gown, I lent her eight shillings on it.

Prisoner's Defence. The gown was gave to me to pledge.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-80

247. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of February , three gowns, value 1 l. the property of Elizabeth Taylor .

The prosecutrix not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070218-81

248. JOHN MORRICE COLLINS ELLWORTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of January , a silver tea pot, value 10 l. 10 s. the property of Thomas Wirgman , in his dwelling house , and CHARLES MORRISON , alias CHAPROMERE , for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

Indictment read by Mr. Gleed, case stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES GUEST . Mr. Gleed, Who do you live with. - A. I am a porter to Mr. Wirgman, a jeweller , No. 67, St. James' street .

Q. Ellworthy lived in the same service. - A. Yes, as chief clerk with the same master.

Q. Do you recollect at any time receiving any order from Ellworthy respecting some tea pots; how long ago is it since. - A. Rather more than about three weeks I received an order from him; I took four tea pots in a bag to No. 6, Great Cumberland street.

Q. Did you see from what place the four tea pots were taken by Ellworthy, and put in a bag by Ellworthy. - A. He told me to take them to 6 Great Cumberland street, and he gave orders that they were not to be shewn to any one till he came himself; this was about twenty minutes after nine o'clock in the evening.

Q. What time does your shop generally shut up. - A. The windows are shut up after dark; the shop continues open till ten o'clock. I took the tea pots in a bag, agreeable to Ellworthy's directions, and delivered them to captain Morrison's servant, Thomas Frost .

Q. You knew Frost to be servant to captain Morrison. - A. Yes

Q. After delivering the tea pots, what did you do. - A. I went away and did Mr Wirgman's business, I returned to Mr. Wirgman's in about twenty minutes to eleven.

Q. Did you afterwards see Frost - A Yes, and afterwards I saw Ellworthy and Frost they were togather in the parlour. Morrison I did not see.

Q. What instructions did you receive from Ellworthy at that time. - A. Ellworthy brought three tea pots and papered them up, and put them in a bag; this was in the front parlour.

Q. Were these three tea pots that were brought, three out of the four that were taken. - A. Yes.

Q. What directions did Ellworthy give you. - A. I was to take them to Mr. Gaddenne, Crown and Scepter court, St. James' street, about two hundred yards from my master's house.

Q. I presume as Ellworthy directed you, you did. - A. Yes.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp How long have you lived with Mr. Wirgman. - A. One year and a half the eleventh of next month.

Q. And Ellworthy has lived there all the time you have lived there. - A. Yes

Q. He was the principal manager for Mr. Wirgman to carry on his business, and you was the person that had them delivered to you by Ellworthy in the presence of the shopman. - A. Yes.

Q. There was nothing extraordinary in these goods being delivered to you by Ellworthy to be shewn to customers, any more than had been done before. - A. They were to be taken unknown to Mr. Wirgman.

Q. So it might be in many other goods. - A. Yes.

Q. It was done in the usual way in which other goods are delivered to you. - A. Yes.

Q. When they were taken to this house in Cumberland street, you say there were four tea pots, and these four tea pots were taken from the shew glass where all the other tea pots were, and in the presence of the shopman, and when they were taken to Mrs. Mc Veigh, they were put in the parlour. - A. I put them in the parlour myself, they were to remain there till Ellworthy came back. Ellworthy told me that the other was to be returned with the three that I brought back, but Mrs. Mc Veigh was indisposed and gone to bed; that the tea pot which is in this bag had received the approbation of the company in the drawing room, but it was to remain there till the next morning, they having approved of it; if was to remain to see whether Mrs. Mc Veigh approved of it in the morning.

Q. It was remaining then for the approbation of the lady of the house till the next morning. - A. Yes, Ellworthy told me the tea pot was to be brought back the next day after Mrs Mc Veigh's approbation.

Q. When goods are taken to be shown before an actual sale has taken place, do you know enough of the business of the shop to say whether, any entry is taken when they are left for approbation. - A. They are left for approbation; they are booked on choice, and there would be an entery made if the whole was not brought back.

Q. You told us these goods remained till the next morning for the approbation of Mrs. Mc. Veigh; would that be entered on that night, or remain till Mrs. Mc Veigh had made approbation of it. - It should be booked that night.

Q. Of course when you got back, Ellworthy would have left the shop, it being late, and he would not return till the morning. - A. No, had he ordered it to be booked, Mr. Wirgman, or the shopman, would have entered it.

Q. I understood you to say you took the three tea pots to Mr. Gaddenne. - A. Yes; the shop being shut up Ellworthy was scarfull of Mr. Wirgman's anger, he did not want him to know it; that was the reason I was to leave them at Gaddenne's I returned them the next morning to Mr. Wirgman's shop by Ellworthy's directions.

Mr. Gleed. Did Ellworthy live in your masters house. - A. Yes, he did not sleep in my master's house that night.

Q. Was your master in the shop on the next morning when you returned the three tea pots. - A. He was not.

Mr. THOMAS WIRGMAN . Mr. Gurney. You are a jeweller in St. James's Street. The prisoner Ellworthy has been five years in your service as clerk. - A. Yes.

Q. Has he been entrusted to sell articles and to go out to your customers. - A. Yes.

Q. When was the prisoner Morrison first introduced to you. - A. About the 14th of November

last, by captain Wallace of the Duke of Cumberland's regiment; they came together.

Q. By what description was he introduced to you by captain Wallace. - A. As a captain of the Navy.

Q. In consequence of that introduction, did you credit the prisoner Morrison with articles of jewelry. - A. Yes; in the course of a few days to the amount of seventy pound: they were purchased at divers times.

Q. Had the prisoner Ellworthy waited upon him in the course of serving him. - A. Chiefly so.

Q. What was the date of the last article that you sold to him. - A. It could not be more than seven or eight days from his first introduction. At that time captain Wallace called upon me, he told me in the presence, and in the hearing of Ellworthy, that captain Morrison of the royal navy was a swindler, and he feared that the property I had sold to him was lost, but as a man of honour he found himself bound to make good any loss I sustained by him.

Q. This you say Ellworthy heard. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you upon that give Ellworthy any orders. - A. No. He absented himself three days; upon his return he brought back the gold watch and chain I had sold to Morrison, and there might be a little ring, that reduced the seventy pound to about ten pound and sixpence; he stated that he got them from captain Morrison.

Q. Did captain Morrison ever come to your shop after that. - A. Never. I told Ellworthy and all my people not to trust him.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received, did you in this month go to the prisoner Morrison, and where did you find him. - A. In the lock up house, Shire lane.

Q. Did he say any thing to you respecting the tea pot. - A. Yes. He told me if I would go to his house, No. 63 Great Marybone street, and ask his servant to deliver the silver tea pot to me that he had purchased of Ellworthy, he would do so, which he did.

Q. Did you upon that go to the house that he described to you. - A. I did. I received a silver tea pot from his servant Frost; this is the tea pot, there was tea leaves in it.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. About ten pound.

Q. Had Ellworthy ever apprised you of his selling that tea pot to Morrison, or to any other person. - A. No.

Q. Was Mrs. Mc Veigh a customer of yours. - A. No, never. I have my book here, there is no entry of it being sold to Morrison or to Mrs. Mc Veigh. It was his duty to have entered it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. - I understand you to have stated that captain Morrison was first of all introduced to you by captain Wallace. - A. Yes.

Q. He had not been trusted with any property till that period. - A. No.

Q. Then the goods that was afterwards delivered to him on credit, was in consequence of the introduction of captain Wallace. - A. Yes, they were.

Q. Afterwards you said that captain Wallace returned, and said that captain Morrison was not that person as he expected; to what amount did you trust him. - A. To the amount of seventy pound.

Q. You said that after captain Wallace had given you the information, Ellworthy was absent three days, and at the end of three days he brought back so many articles as reduced the seventy pound to ten pound; he was then absent on your business. - A. He was absent without my leave.

Q. At that time you have said these goods were sold to Morrison by your leave. - A. They were.

Q. As soon as it was found out, your servant went and brought back all the goods, which he returned as soon as he could get them. - A. So, he said; it did not require three days to recover them, as they were brought back from Great Cumberland street.

Q. He brought back the goods and found out the man. - A. He did.

Q. He was your chief clerk. - A. He was.

Q. I take it he was authorised to take out goods to all your customers. - A. To my customers.

Q. He was authorised to sell goods to persons that came into your shop. - A. If the persons were not known, it was necessary to inform me.

Q. He was your managing servant to sell for you, and to dispose of your goods, in your house, in your absence - A. Certainly.

Q. When you asked about the loss of these things did not he tell you where they were. - A. No.

Q. Did not he tell you that Mrs. Mc Veigh had them. - A. No.

Q. Did not he tell you he would go to Mrs. Mc Veigh. - A. No. He might have said that he would go to Cumberland street.

Q. Had captain Wallace told you where he lived. - A. No, he had not.

Q. When was it that Ellworthy told you that the goods were at Great Cumberland street. - A. On the evening of the 10th of February, and I went that evening.

Q. Did he tell you the number in Great Cumberland street. - A. No. I was directed there by the Swedish ambassador, on the next morning; there I saw Mrs. Mc Veigh.

Q. Did not you ask for the articles that came there. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you not to be paid for them by Mrs. Mc Veigh. - A. No. She would not give them up without much difficulty. I told her I had a search warrant.

Q. Did you not at that time tell her that you hoped after the marriage had taken place that you should have an order to a large amount. - A. No.

Q. Do you positively swear that. - A. I will sir.

Q. Then you deny that positively. - A. I do.

Q. After Ellworthy was charged with this, did not he bring back some of the things from Great Cumberland street. - A. He did.

Q. He went from your shop by himself. - A. Yes.

Q. And returned with them. - A. Yes. So he told me; it was in my absence.

Q.When was he taken into custody. - A. Between five and six the morning after he had brought

them back I went twice to the house in Great Cumberland street; the first time I saw Miss Amelia Durnford , then I brought a watch away, she acknowledged it to be her's, I prove it to be mine; the second time I saw the young lady, and then I saw the old lady, that was the 11th of this month. I saw her in her bed room, I desired her to give me the diamond ring which I was informed by the Swedish ambassador that she had, she told me that if I left the room I should have it.

Q. Who was present in the room with you - A. Mr. Mayhew.

Q. At that time was there any thing said about a further order for any marriage of captain Morrison and her. - A. Nothing at all, I only went to ask for my property, and to insist upon having it.

Mr. Alley. When captain Morrison was first introduced to you, was Ellworthy present. - A. He was.

Q. Afterwards, when captain Wallace called and gave you that account, was Morrison present. - A. No, Morrison was not present.

Q. You have a good deal of dealings with officer's of the army and navy. - A. Yes

Q. It is no uncommon thing to call a lieutenant a captain. - A. No.

Q. After you had received that intimation from captain Wallace, how long was it after, before you saw Morrison. - A. Never till he was in custody.

Q. Consequently he did not know whether you would give him credit or not. - A. No.

Q. But from the first introduction of Morrison by captain Wallace you intended to credit him. - A. Certainly.

Q. Is it not usual, if a gentleman and lady has been once introduced to you, and dealt with you, to send out your servants with goods without their calling at your shop. - A. Yes, except it is forbid.

Q. When you found Morrison, you found him under an arrest for debt. - A. Yes.

Q. You said something about the Swedish ambassador. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not the Swedish ambassador call upon you to know if Morrison was in debt. - A. No.

Q. He is a relation to this old lady. - A. I have heard so.

Q. Did not he come to your shop and enquire if Morrison was in debt. - A. He did.

Q. Did he or did he not come for the purpose to prevail upon you to arrest that young man, for the purpose of his not marrying the woman. - A. I do not know.

Q. He was taken out of bed. - A. He knew my family, I thought he was doing me a great piece of service to tell me my man was robbing me.

Q. What was the account between this man and you. - A. Ten pound and sixpence.

Q. He was in the spunging house. - A. Not on my suit.

Q. You lodged a detainer afterwards. - A. Yes, of ten pound.

Q. When you called on this young man in the lock up house, he told you where the tea pot was. - A. Yes.

Q. He made no difficulty. - A. He told me he had purchased it of Ellworthy, my servant.

Q. And in consequence of what had happened he would tell you where it was that you might get it. - A. Yes.

Q. This tea pot had been used, and tea leaves were in it at the time it was returned to you. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Had you any idea of what was going on, until Baron Nolkein came to you. - A. Not the smallest.

Q. You was asked by my learned friend whether you did not on the 10th of February, in consequence of something said to you, get the things from Mrs. Mc Veigh. - A. Yes; I got a diamond ring, a pair of gold spectacles, two gold eye glasses, and a gold watch of Miss Durnford.

Q. What is the value of all that you have recovered. - A. About two hundred pound.

Q. When you saw Morrison in the lock up house, did he say any thing about Ellworthy or his father. - A. He told me he purchased the tea pot of Ellworthy.

GEORGE DURNFORD . - Mr. Gleed. I live at No. 6, Great Cumberland street. The house is kept by Mrs. Mc Veigh, she is my grandmother.

Q. Do you know the person of Morrison. - A. Yes, and Ellworthy.

Q. Have you seen them both frequently at the house No. 6, Great Cumberland street. - A. I have.

Q. Do you recollect at any time, any tea pots being brought there. - A. Yes, I remember them being brought up in the drawing room; there were four tea pots; my sister was present, Miss Durnford.

Q. Miss Chapromere is the sister of Morrison. - A. Yes.

Q. Was Ellworthy a stranger to you. - A. I understood that he was a servant to Wirgman. I saw the tea pots on the piana forte first; in a short time Morrison looked at the tea pots, and took two of them up stairs, he was gone about twelve minutes; he said he had shewed the tea pots to Mrs. Mc Veigh, and she had made her choice; she made choice of it for him, and after he came in the drawing room, her choice was shewn.

Q. Did Morrison say so. - A. Yes; the tea pot that my grandmother made choice of for him was not kept.

Q. Is that the tea pot that was chosen by Morrison himself. - A. It was.

Q. Did any further conversation pass. - A. It was stated that the tea pots came from Mr. Wirgman.

Q. What was done with the other three. - A. They were taken away, and this was left and sent to his own house.

Q. Was Ellworthy a person that was intimate with your grandmother. - A. No, he was introduced by the prisoner Morrison; I had seen him frequently, and when he did not come, there were frequently letters and notes passed between them. He has been there and drank tea there, and I have seen him at the General Wolfe coffee house, and I have seen him and Morrison lodging together; they seemed as if they were familiar and knew each other perfectly well. I have known Morrison about three months, and Ellworthy six weeks; and for the last six weeks I have seen Morrison and Ellworthy frequently together.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You know Ellworthy as the servant to Mr. Wirgman. - A. Yes.

Q. As a jeweller's servant in St. James' street. - A. Yes.

Q. You only know him in that character. - A. Only in that character.

Q. Was there any thing at all in these tea pots being shewn that was secret, or in a clandestine way, or was it in a way that is usual to any other shop. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Where does Morrison's mother live. - A.Winchmore Hill.

Q. Is not one of your brothers on a visit at Morrison's mothers. - A. Yes.

Q. He has been there with the knowledge of your family. - A. It was before we knew of this business.

Q. It was before you knew of any contract of marriage had taken place. - A. No, not before that.

Q. Your grandmother is a woman of property. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. These were articles that he would have had it in his power to have paid for if the marriage had taken place. - A. Yes.

Q. And your own brother is at his mother's for the benefit of his health. - A. Yes.

Q. You have told us that the two young ladies, Miss Chapromere and Miss Durnford, looked at these articles, and that Miss Chapromere is sister to this young man. - A. Yes.

Q. And the other your own sister. - A. Yes.

Q. Your grandmother is now in Cumberland street. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the knocker on the door now or not. - A. Yes.

Q. For these last four days the knocker was off the door, to prevent any one from having communication with her when this man was taken in custody. - A. Yes.

Q. The knocker was taken off for four days to prevent your grandmother coming forward as a witness. - A. Not to prevent that, to prevent any of his party coming to our house, because she did not wish it.

Mr. Gleed. Do you know this young man. - A. I only saw him the day before; the knocker has been taken off some days; I saw him yesterday.

MR. JACOBS. - Mr. Gurney. You keep the General Wolfe 's Head coffee house, Oxford Road. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar, Morrison and Ellworthy. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known Morrison. - A. Within these two months.

Q. Have you known Ellworthy as long. - A. Much about the same time, they have been together at my house several times; they have breakfasted together, captain Morrison had a room there, and slept there about three weeks. Ellworthy has slept there, they slept in separate rooms, never together; and then breakfasted together.

Q. Did they seem intimate together. - A. Yes.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-82

249. JOHN MORRIS COLLINS ELLWORTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January . a diamond ring, value 9 l. the property of Thomas Wirgman , in his dwelling house , and THOMAS CHARLES MORRISON , alias CHAPROMERE , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-83

250. JOHN MORRIS COLLINS ELLWORTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a gold watch, value 15 l. the property of Thomas Wirgman , in his dwelling house , and of THOMAS CHARLES MORRISON , alias CHAPROMERE for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-84

251. JOHN MORRIS COLLINS. ELLWORTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of February , a gold watch, value 12 l. the property Wirgman , in his dwelling house , and THOMAS CHARLES MORRISON alias CHAPROMERE , for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18070218-85

252. WILLIAM BUTCHER and JAMES JEAL were indicted for that they, and divers other persons, on the 12th of December , with force and arms, at the parish of Kings-down, in the county of Kent , did make an assault upon Thomas Gibbs and Thomas Pyat , officers of our Lord the King in the service of the excise, they being on shore in the due execution of their duty, in securing and seizing one hundred gallons of geneva, and a thousand weight of tobacco, which were liable to be seized .

Second count for opposing and hindering the said officers in the execution of their duty.

THOMAS GIBBS . - Mr. Knapp. I believe you are an officer of the excise . - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so on the 12th of December 1806. - A. I was. I live at Mitcham in Kent.

Q. Where was you on duty on the 12th of December 1806. - A. I and Thomas Pyat went to Mr. Pratt's house at Kingsdown on the afternoon of the 12th. I found eighteen bags of tobacco in an outhouse adjoining Pratt's house; these eighteen bags of tobacco were covered over with some faggots. In the house I found eight tubs, containing twenty gallons of Hollands geneva; I made a seizure of them, I got a cart and conveyed them to the Cock public house at Kingsdown; Mrs. Hackney keeps the house, I put them in Mrs. Hackney's parlour. Between one and two o'clock in the morning a number of smugglers came; the constable went out of the room, and just as he went out of the room four smugglers came in; two came to me, and two to the other officer, Pyat; they threw me and Pyat on the floor, the candle was knocked off the table; when the constable came in he took one of the smugglers from me; I got free of the other; I went to the assistance of the other officer. I took a pistol from Mr. Pyat, we called for a light, and found part of the goods we had seized were gone. One of the smugglers swore that he would have the remainder of the goods; I then presented a pistol and said, that I would shoot the first man that attempted to carry off any more of the goods. He says, fire away and be d - d, and takes out a pistol, which he had taken from the officer, and presented it to me,

and said, he would shoot me if I attempted to fire at any of the others. There was a party in the house of smugglers, some with pitchforks and some with club sticks; the man that had a club stick they called Old Bob.

Q.Had you known previous to this time the man who went by the name of Old Bob. - A.No, I knew none of them.

Court. You did not know none of the parties. - A. None. The other officer, Mr. Pyat, locked the parlour door.

Q. What locked you and the smugglers in. - A. No; we left the room: the smugglers were in the passage, Mr. Pyat locked the room up, and put the key in his pocket; there were three or four of them in the house till four of five o'clock in the morning; they swore that would have the remainder of the goods, but they did not make the attempt; afterwards they went away with the goods they had rescued.

Q. What injury did you receive. - A. I received no injury at all; they threw me on the floor, and kept me on the floor, while the remainder of them took the goods away.

Court. All this obstruction was on shore. - A. Yes.

JOHN PYAT . - Mr. Bolland. You are an officer of the excise. - A. I am.

Q. Were you with Gibbs at this time. - A. I was with him when the seizure was made.

Court. You know none of the parties. - A. No. They threw me on the floor, they threw themselves on me; one took hold of my hands, and the other seized the pistols out of my hands; I presented one to Gibbs, and the other fell on the floor; before I got my liberty he cut me in the face. After I got my liberty I put a piece of paper in the fire and got a light: Gibbs and I went to the passage to the person that had got my pistol; he presented to him, and swore that he would have the goods; they stood pistol to pistol.

Q.No pistol was fired by any body. - A. No.

Q. It was neither of the prisoners that presented the pistol. A.No, I should have known them if it had.

ANN PAYNE . - Mr. Fielding. You live at Dartford. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Butcher and Jeal. - A. Yes.

Q.You are acquainted with Scissley, John Dow , Richard Dow , and Old Bob. - A. Yes; Old Tom they used to call him.

A. In December last did you happen to be at Mrs. Hackney's house when the officers were there, and the smugglers were assembled. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. What time of the night was it. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Mr. Gibbs and Mr. Pyat, the two officers, were there A. Yes. I and the rest took the goods away; I was not in the house, I stood against the door post; John Dow gave me the goods, I handed them to Scissley; what he did with them I cannot tell.

Q. What goods were they. - A.Tobacco and gin.

Q. When you kept waiting and acting in that way, where was Butcher and Jeal. - A. I cannot say where they were, they were in the party.

Q.Is Scissley a person you know very well. - A. Yes, I lived with him as his wife at that time.

Q. How long after you left Scissley was it before you told this. - A. The next day.

Q. On this night how was you dressed. - A. Am I to say so.

Q. Yes. - A. I was dressed in men's clothes; I had pistols.

Q. You went before the magistrate at Bow street. - A. I was there twice.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate that you were dressed in men's clothes. - A. I did not; I did not like to expose myself.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate the same story at both times. - A. I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070218-86

253. JOHN M'DERMOTT was indicted for a fraud .

WILLIAM HENRY WINTER. - Mr. Gleed. You are assistant secretary to the patriotic fund. - A. I am.

Q. That fund is managed by a committee. - A. Yes. On the 18th of June last the defendant made application at the office, and produced a certificate from the hospital at Greenwich; in consequence of his name not being returned in the usual manner, several questions were put to him.

Q. What did the defendant say. - A. He stated generally that he was in the battle of Trafalgar on the 21st October.

Q. Did he state on what ship he was on board. - A. I am not certain that he named the Leviathan; but he produced a paper stating he was on board the Leviathan.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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