Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th January 1807.
Reference Number: 18070114
Reference Number: f18070114-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 14th of JANUARY, 1807, and following Days,

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street,

1807.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir ARCHIBALD MACDONALD , Knt. Lord Chief-Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knt. One of His Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , Knt. Sir John William Anderson , Bart. Sir John Eamer , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Charles Flower , Esq. Richard Lea , Esq. Josiah Boydell , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

William Durant ,

William Fraser ,

John Gooderidge Gosling ,

Edward Simmons ,

Joseph Marshall ,

William Thomas ,

Dimech Evans ,

Thomas Manning ,

Henry Man ,

Benjamin Parrow ,

William Carp ,

Daniel Russell .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

George Prior ,

Richard Windsor ,

James Richardson ,

John Hatch ,

William Stebbing ,

James Abraham Heron ,

Richard Cook ,

Charles Kelly ,

John Hindal ,

William Walker ,

William Brazer ,

John Talkendon .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Bush ,

Francis Simmons ,

Thomas Holland ,

William Payne ,

George Fowler ,

Samuel Tillett ,

Joseph How ,

Edward Meloney ,

George Elsworth ,

William Smith ,

Edward Brook ,

John Stevens .

Reference Number: t18070114-1

70 ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Charles Clarke her husband, on the 21st of November , a piece of silver coin, called an Irish token, value 10 d. a bank note, value 50 l. a bank note, value 10 l. a bank note, value 5 l. a bank note, value 2 l. and five other bank notes, value 1 l. each, a bill of exchange, value 18 l a bill of exchange, value 10 l. and a promissory note, value 30 l. the property of Maurice Davis .

MAURICE DAVIS . On the 21st of November last, about nine o'clock in the evening, going up Holborn, I was accosted by Elizabeth Phillips ; she asked me to give her something to drink, she took me to her apartment in Cross lane, Newton street , where the prisoner Elizabeth Clarke was. Elizabeth Phillips sent Elizabeth Clarke out to get some gin to drink; I gave her a tenpenny piece, called an Irish bank token, she came back and said she could only pass it for sixpence; she returned it to me, I pulled out the bills and notes I had in my pocket, and gave her a one pound note. I had bills in my pocket to the amount of 130 l.

Q. When had you received these notes. - A. On that day, from my broker William Jones , Dartmouth street, Westminster.

Q. You took one of these notes and gave it to the prisoner. - A. Yes, a one pound bank note; she went out and got something to drink, and brought me part of the change; she brought some silver, and kept all the copper, I suppose to the amount of three or four shillings. I gave her some silver to get something to eat; it was getting late, and both she and Phillips persuaded me to lay down till towards the morning; accordingly I did, I soon went to sleep, and I awoke in the course of a little time; I found the prisoner was gone.

Q. Where was the prisoner when you went to sleep. - A. She and Phillips laid down on the same bed where I was.

Q. You found the prisoner was gone, where was Phillips. - A. Phillips was there; I searched for my property, it was all gone but two shillings and sixpence.

Q. Where was your property at the time you laid down. - A. I undressed myself and put my property in my left hand breeches pocket, and put them under my pillow; the bills and the notes were wrapped up together.

Q. You finding the prisoner gone, what did you do. - A. Phillips persuaded me to wait there till daylight; I did, I went to Mr. Wyegate the constable, and I gave Elizabeth Phillips in charge; I could not find the prisoner at that time, I searched after her every day till she was apprehended, which was about a month after the robbery. I have traced one fifty pound note to Stamford; they do not take account, I was informed, who they take them of; they only look to see that they are not forged.

Q. In what condition were you at this time. - A. I was rather in liquor a the time I went home with these women, they told me I should catch no harm if I went home with them.

Q. How near to the time that you met with these two women had you seen the notes. - A. I saw them in their apartment; they were all in one bundle, and in the same pocket, I did not look them all over.

JOHN WYEGATE . The prosecutor came to me on the 22nd of November, to look for these women; she was apprehended on the 18th of December by Mr. Blackman, at the Maidenhead, Diot street.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Davis came into the apartment where I was, with Elizabeth Phillips , they asked me to go out and get some gin, they gave me a tenpenny piece; I returned and told them they would not take it only for sixpence; Mr. Davis gave me a pound note, I went and got the gin, and gave the change; then we asked him for something to eat, he gave me some silver, and I got some cold ham and beef; I took part of it, the prosecutor wished to stay all night, if I was not afraid to sleep with them; I thought it was very improper for a man to sleep with two women; I got up and went out. I saw no more of his property whatever, than the one pound note and the tenpenny piece.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-2

71. JOHN LEMMON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , twenty-two brass pulleys, value 9 s. and six brass nobs, value 2 s. the property of Richard Knight and George Knight .

GEORGE KNIGHT . I am an ironmonger , I live in Foster lane . On the 22nd of December, between three and four o'clock, I was up stairs at dinner; the young man in the shop came up to me and said, that a man in the shop had stole some goods from off the counter. I went down stairs, I turned the prisoner round, put my hand in his pocket, and took out a parcel containing the brass pulleys. I took him into the counting-house, left him in the custody of my brother, and turned the key upon him. He let fall the brass nobs from his other pocket while I was sending for a constable.

JOHN GOODING . I am shopman to Mr. Knight.

Q. Has Mr. Knight any partners - A. Yes, his brother Richard. When John Lemmon came in the shop, there were about seven or eight customers in the shop, he did not ask for any thing, I suspected him; I saw him with a parcel of brass pulleys in his pocket. I informed my master of it. When he came he took the brass pullies out of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The brass pullies belong to me, only the brass nobs belong to him; I beg for mercy.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-3

70. ROBERT GRIG , alias RICHARD GRIG , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 30th of December , on Benjamin Shepherd , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, nineteen shillings and sixpence , his property.

BENJAMIN SHEPHERD. Q. What are you. - A.

My father keeps an agency office for servants, I am at home with my father, he lives in Hanover court, Houndsditch. On the 30th of December, as I was coming home, between one and two o'clock in the morning, walking very fast in Fleet street , I passed the prisoner and a woman; the woman followed me and began pulling me about, I told her if she did not leave me alone I would charge the watch with her; Richard Grig came up and asked me what was the matter, I told him I wanted to have nothing to say to him; the woman kept pulling me about all the time, I told her I would charge the watchman with her; the prisoner said he would shew me the watch-house. I walked on a little distance, he took me into a small passage called London house yard, the north side of St. Paul's church yard; he said here is a watchhouse, he collared me directly, and held me till the woman took the money out of my right hand side breeches pocket.

Q. Was you sober. - A. Yes.

Q. She followed you all the way from Fleet street up to St. Paul's church yard. - A. Yes, both of them.

Q. You had passed some watchman surely before that. - A. No, we had not, there was nobody walking at all. He held me by the collar while she took the money out of my pocket, and then he held me till she got away; he shook me about all the time. When she was out of sight he knocked me down, and directly tried to make his escape.

Q. Did he make his escape. - A. No sir, he did not; just as he got up the passage the patrol seized him immediately, I never lost sight of him.

Q. What money did you lose. - A. Nineteen and sixpence; a seven shilling piece, and the rest in silver.

Q. Did you ever see the woman again. - A. No, never.

Prisoner. When I was going to goal he saw a woman, he said that was the woman; he did not take her.

Prosecutor. I thought it was the woman, and when I looked her in the face I saw it was not the woman.

Prisoner. There was another man took in the watchhouse with me; he let that man go away, and kept me.

- MACARTY. I am a watchman in Castle-baynard ward. On the 30th of December, about two in the morning, going my round, the patrol came up to me and asked me if all was well, I told him all was well; in about a minute or two we heard a scuffle just at the entering into London-house yard, Pater-noster row. We heard a voice say, take off from me, let me go, or I will give charge of you; the patrol ran immediately towards the place, I followed him, and as the prisoner was going out of the passage the patrol seized him. As soon as the patrol seized him, he said, Macarty, you lay hold of him, and I will go and see what is the matter, where the rest are; he catched hold of another young chap that was there. Shepherd was getting up, Shepherd said he was knocked down and robbed. I saw Shepherd coming towards him without a hat.

Q. Did he say by whom he was robbed. - A. As soon as Sepherd came up to the prisoner, he said, this is the man who held me while the woman robbed me; he held him till the woman got out of sight, and then he knocked him down; we took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What did the prisoner say. - A. The prisoner said that he was robbed in Fleet street, and he wanted his assistance; after that he said that he knew the woman, and if we would let him go, he would procure the woman and get the money back.

Q. Was the other man brought into the watch-house. - A. Yes, he was there, but the prosecutor said he had done nothing, he had no charge against him.

Prisoner. He says very false indeed; when I was in the watchhouse there was another prisoner there, a lamplighter, they turned him out of the watch-house, they mentioned his name, and they said they knew his father.

- FITZGERALD. I am a patrol. Going along I heard a noise, I paid attention for a minute, I heard words pass, 'let me go, or I'll give charge of you.' I ran over directly, and in the passage I met the prisoner, I secured him, I called my partner to hold him till I found the others; I saw Shepherd without a hat, he was standing on his legs when I came up to him, I took the other lad, he was standing along with Shepherd; I asked Shepherd what was the matter, he said that man that has gone up the passage has held me while a woman robbed me, and had knocked him down. I desired Macarty to bring his man, which is the prisoner; he said he was the man that held him while the woman robbed him. Going along to the watchhouse the prisoner said, if you will let me go I know the woman, and I will bring back the money to the lad; I told him I would not let him go. In the watchhouse I asked Shepherd whether the young man struck him, he said no; I said, then you do not mean to give charge of him, he said no. I turned him about his business. The young lad called me by my name and told me who his father was; I knew his father, but the lad I did not. The father has lighted our ward about four or five years ago.

Q. (to prosecutor) Was any body by at the time. A. Nobody but the prisoner and the woman.

Q. What did this boy do. - A. He seeing the scuffle, came and asked me what was the matter, he never gave me any offence, he only helped to pick me up.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Westminster, I had been to sell a horse, it was late when I took it, the man said he would not buy it without he had a trial of it; with that I came along Fleet street, and that gentleman said he was robbed by the woman, and if she did not give him the money he would give charge of her; we came along, and the lamplighter too, he knocked the woman down, the woman got up, held her patten up, and knocked his hat off. I never saw the woman before in my life.

Q. (to prosecutor) Had you picked up this woman. - A. No, she had no pattens at all.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-4

72. JOSEPH INGRAM was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 12th of December , a bag, value 3 d. and three hundred and one pound weight of iron, value 10 s. the property of George Hilsley and Thomas Hilsley .

MR. HILSLEY. I am a tire-smith , I live in Whitechapel, High street , the prisoner is a soldier in the third guards , he has worked for me three or four years; two women came in my yard and told me that Joe was in trouble, I had no suspicion of his robbing me; he could earn five or six shillings a day, if he was prudent and worked.

- CRAB. I am an officer. Last Monday evening, between five and six o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Cornhill, he had a bag on his back, I asked him what he had there, he told me it did not concern me; I told him I was an officer, I would know; he told me he had iron, he was going to Drury lane, he was a farrier; he said he had brought it from Whitechapel, but where he would not tell me; I told him if he did not choose to give me a proper answer, I should take him to the Counter; he told me he lived in Cross street, Holborn; if I wanted to enquire about him I must go to Hackney. I took him before the lord-mayor, he sent for his master, he came and said he stole the iron.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take it into consideration, I have a wife who is lame at home and two children; I have been a soldier thirteen years, I have been wounded abroad; I beg for mercy.

GUILTY aged 35.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy .]

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-5

73. JOHN FORDHAM , JOHN HARVEY , RICHARD HARTFORD , and WILLIAM BRIDGE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Spencer , about the hour of seven at night, on the 18th of December , at Ponder's End, in the parish of Enfield ; with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, a coat, value 1 l. a watch, value 2 l. a purse, value 2 d. and 8 s. the property of John Mays Taylor . A hat, value 6 s. and 1 s. 6 d. the property of James Spencer .

Second count for feloniously making an assault on the aforesaid day, and in the same parish, on James Spencer , putting him in fear and taking form his person and against his will, a hat, value 6 s. and 1 s. and 6 d. the property of the said James Spencer .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

Gentlemen, This indictment charges the prisoner's with a capital offence; the first count charges them with a burglary in Mr. Spencer's house; and the second count charges them with assaulting and robbing Mr. Spencer's son.

Gentlemen, On the evening mentioned in the indictment, the servant heard a knock at the door, and on her opening the door, I think four persons rushed into the house, and immediately a pistol was presented to her; they had masks upon their faces, or were disguised; and upon hearing the noise young Mr. Spencer came out, and during the time he was engaged with them he received a violent blow, in which his hat was knocked off: the maid servant ran into a room where her mistress was sitting, and escaped out of the back window. Two persons followed; who knocked down Mrs. Spencer; others entered into another room, in which Mr. Spencer was sitting by the fire side, one of them presented a pistol to him, and the keys were demanded of the bureau, in which the money was deposited.

Gentlemen, There would be some difficulty in identifying the persons of all the prisoner by the persons who where in the house; the maid servant saw them but a short time, and therefore was able to make but little observation: I believe she will not be able to speak to the persons of any of them. Mrs. Spencer, Mr. Spencer, and young Mr. Spencer, they had a longer opportunity of seeing them; you will find some of them, speaking to one, and some to two of them, and I believe some speaking to the best of their belief that the prisoners at the bar were the four persons that were engaged in this nefarious transaction.

Gentlemen, The servant that escaped out of the window ran to a public house, and before the robbers had escaped, a number of persons assembled about the house, but seeing six men armed with pistols and one with a crow, were afraid of attacking them; they did come out of the house, brandished their pistols and went off. I told you that young Mr. Spencer had his hat knocked off, and that hat was lost, and instead of that hat another hat with something of oilskin was left in the house, which belonged to one of the prisoners.

Gentlemen, Information was sent to the police office, Hatton Garden, and the police officers were sent out to discover who were the perpetrators of this dreadful plot. On Monday evening, four days afterwards, they apprehended the four prisoners at the bar, together with a man of the name of Roberts, who was apprehended first, at a public house called the Blue Boar, Whitechapel: and on their being searched, such things were found, which demonstrates what sort of persons they were pistols and masks were found upon some of them: the lodgings of Harvey was searched, a mask was found there; there was found on the prisoner Bridge, Mr. Spencer's hat. On the person of Fordham there was a pistol found, and on Roberts there was another pistol found that matched with the pistol found on Fordham.

Gentlemen, After they were all taken into custody, it was thought prudent for the purpose of attaining as much justice as possible, to admit one person as witness against the rest; and Roberts was willing to disclose what he knew. On searching the person of Bridge they found the duplicate of a coat, which coat will be proved to you to belong to the servant in the house; therefore you can have no doubt respecting his person.

Gentlemen, You will have the evidence of the accomplice, and you will receive it with all caution as from a bad man, thus spared from standing at that bar but; weighing his evidence with all that caution, you will see whether you can entertain any doubt of the truth of his testimony. He will state to you where he found the four prisoners, he will describe the manner the robbery was committed, the part he took in it, and the manner in which they made their escape. All this evidence will be confirmed in so many circumstances by the belief of the prosecutor and the other witnesses, as to the identity of the prisoners, so that you will not be able to entertain the smallest doubt as to their guilt.

SARAH TAYLOR ; examined by Mr. Gurney. Are you the wife of John Mays Taylor. - A. I am.

Q. On the 18th of December were you servant to Mr. John Spencer , at Ponder's End. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what parish it is in. - A. Enfield.

Q. Is the house in the high road. - A. No, it is in what they call South street, Ponder's End.

Q. That is the road leading to the river Lea. - A. It leads to a river, I do not know the name of the river.

Q. On the evening of Thursday the 18th of December, did you hear a knock at the door. - A. I heard a knock at the door, a sharpish knock, about seven o'clock in the evening.

Court. How long had it been dark. - A. About an hour and a half, or more. On this sharpish knock I opened the door, and there was a tall person rushed upon me with a disguised face.

Mr. Gurney. State what you mean by a disguised face. - A. It was a black face, but whether it was a mask of a black face I cannot tell.

Q. Did you observe his dress at all. - A. A dark dress.

A. Had he any thing in his hand. - A. A pistol, he was a stout man, and to the best of my belief he had a dark great coat buttoned down him.

Q. You cannot say whether it was a blue or a brown. - A. I cannot say, by candle light I could not tell the colour, he had a pistol in his hand, he presented the pistol to my face, as soon as I opened the door, my young master Mr. Spencer came up in my defence; with that the man left me, and presented the pistol to his face.

Q. While he was doing this did any person come to the door. - A. There was a second, I saw no more, the second was close by the first.

Q. What sort of a man was the second. - A. A lower man than the first, he appeared very dark and dismal.

Q. By a lower man I suppose you mean a shorter man. - A. A shorter man, he had a dark and dismal look.

Q. Therefore whether his face was black you do not know. - A. No.

Q. All his appearence except his face was dark. - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell whether he had a great coat on. - A. No.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand that you saw. - A. I did not see.

Q. What did they say. - A. Not any thing to me.

Q. Describe what you saw next after the tall man left you, and presented the pistol to your young master. - A. I ran up stairs, threw up the sash, and jumped out of the window, and went over some pales to a neighbour's, a public house, and gave an alarm.

Q. When you gave the alarm, did you return to the house. - A. I did not. I saw no more of it.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you have any recollection of the persons of any of them. - A. I cannot say more than his being a tall stout man.

Q. Is there any man there that appears to you to be the size of the first man that rushed in. - A. Fordham seems to be the size of the man that first came in.

Q. When you returned they were gone. - A. All was gone.

Q. Did you find that any of your property was stolen. - A. Yes, a watch, a great coat, and a purse with three sixpences, two shillings and a half crown piece; they are my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. With respect to Fordham you said that he was more of the size of the first man. - A. Yes, he seems to be more of the size than any one of them men.

JAMES SPENCER ; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are the son of Mr. John Spencer . - A. Yes

Q. Were you at your father's house on this night of the 18th of December. - A. I was; I heard a knock, the servant opened the door, I heard a noise of several men; I got up from the fire side and went towards them. I thought there were some drunken men that came into the house; as soon as I got to the kitchen door, one of them presented a pistol to my head.

Q. A man. - A. Yes, he had either a mask on or his face was black; he was a very tall man with a dark brown coat, he said if I offered to stir or maked the least noise he would blow my brains out. At that time there was another came up to me with an iron crow, that we found in the house afterwards; he also said he would knock my brains out if I offered to stir.

Q. Describe the dress of that man with the iron crow. - A. He looked very dark, his face was disguised; I rather thought with black crape. I did not take particular notice of his dress.

Q. Was he a stout or a thin man. - A. He was a stoutish man, but not so tall as the man that presented the pistol to me; he was not particulary stout.

Q. Did you see any more than these two. - A. Not at that time I did not; then they asked for my money and my watch.

Court. The men that you have spoken of. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Did you give them your watch and your money. - A. I told them that I never wore a watch, I told them I would give them all the money that I had in my pocket, that was a shilling and sixpence; that was all that I had got in my pocket.

Court. To whom did you give the shilling and the sixpence to. - A. I rather think it was to the shortest of the two, but I am not certain; they were very dissatisfied with the sixpence and the shilling that I had given them. They said they would blow my brains out; after that they left me. I saw them go to my father, and a little time after that, I saw one of them bring my mother out of the parlour.

Mr. Gurney. Was that one of these men. - A. No, I think it was another man, I saw four of them then.

Q. What room was your mother in. - A. In the parlour; my father was in the kitchen, and I was in the kitchen at that time.

Q. You saw four in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Can you describe the dress of the other men at all. - A. Yes, there was one in a blue jacket and blue trowsers.

Q. Was that the one that brought your mother out of the parlour. - A. I rather think it was, but I am not sure. After they had been with my father, my father begged that they would not hurt him, he would give them the keys of the bureau.

Q. Had any of them been saying any thing to your father to induce him to say that. - A. I believe they had, but I did not hear it; he gave them the key of the bureau. Three of them went up stairs, and one kept at the kitchen door with a pistol to

keep us in, threatening to shoot us.

Q. Was your mother in the kitchen. - A. Yes.

Court. Who was the man that stood at the kitchen door threatening to shoot you. - A. It was the tall man.

Q. That you first spoke of. - A. Yes, the tall man, he has very much the appearance of that man in the red waistcoat (pointing to Fordham); the three men came down stairs to ask my father for the keys that belonged to the two up stair drawers: I then got up and threw my hands right in the man's face that stood at the door, I struck at him to get my way out. As soon as I did that, I sprung the lock of the door, got out of door, and then there were at the door when I got out, two or three men; I cannot say which were about me, I cannot say whether these two or three men were outside or at the door, or whether they had come from the fire side after they had been talking with my father.

Q. You had a scuffle with them. - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of that scuffle did you lose any thing. - A. Yes, they knocked off my hat, they gave me a black eye; luckily I had a great coat on, one of them had hold of the flap of my coat, it tore off, and I got away from him and run away. One of the men ran after me that tore my coat.

Q. Did you see any more. - A. No, I saw some of my neighbours, and one of them caught hold of the man that pursued me.

Q. Did you stop to see whether he kept hold of him. - A. No.

Q. On your return they were all gone. - A. Yes.

Court. Did you return when you found your neighbours were there. - A. No, it was dark, I could not see then, they were my neighbours.

Q. Have you since seen any of the persons, look round and see whether you see any of the persons here, that in your judgement, you believe was concerned in this transaction. - A. Yes, that man in the red waistcoat, is very much the appearance of that man that stood at the door (Fordham), and likewise the man whith one hand, (that is Bridge); that man I looked at for about two minutes.

Q. What part of the transaction was he engaged in. - A. I cannot say, he never came to me, I looked at his face, he had no mask on.

Court. The man with one hand had no mask, you looked at him for about two minutes; do you believe the prisoner Bridge to be that man. - A. I do, to the best of my knowledge he did nothing particular as I saw in the transaction, I only saw him in the house.

Q. What was he dressed in. - A. In a blue jacket and blue trowsers.

Q. At the time that you saw the prisoner Bridge at the office, did you recognize him by knowing any thing about his face. - A. By his whiskers being carrotty.

Q. Does he bear any thing of that mark now. - A. The only difference is, the whiskers are not so long.

Q. You mean they have been shaved off. - A. Yes.

Court. You observed the man with one hand had carrotty whiskers when you saw him at the office. - A. Yes.

Q. By whiskers, you mean the beard by the side of his face, you do not mean his whiskers on his lip. - A. No.

Q. Are you able to speak to either of the other prisoners. - A. No, before I made my effort to make my escape, I thought I heard the pistol snap from the man at the door. They still kept threatening every minute that they would blow our brains out.

Q. Was he standing at the kitchen door, or was he within the kitchen. - A. Sometimes he was within the door, and sometimes at the door; he would come within and threaten us.

Q. What do you mean by the pistol snapping. - A. I thought I heard the noise, and saw the fire of the flint.

JOHN SPENCER ; examined by Mr. Gurney. What parish is your house in. - A. The parish of Enfield.

Q. Where you sitting by your kitchen fire at the time that you heard the knock at the door. - A. I was, they rushed in before I could get up.

Q. Did they come into the kitchen to you. - A. Yes.

Q. How many came in first. - A. Two apparently, a tall man with a black face, and one that was not quite so tall; I believe he had got a crape on his face, and both their coats were dark, they came up to me, and the tall man presented a pistol, and said, if I spoke a word they would blow my brains out. I begged him not to use me ill, I put my hand into my pocket, and gave him the key of the bureau.

Q. When you gave them the key of the bureau, did any of them leave you. - A. Yes, they took the key and went.

Q. Did you see any more than these two men. - A. Yes, I saw four.

Q. How many went up to your bureau. - A. Two or three, I do not know which; one man stood to guard me.

Q. Was that man that guarded you armed or unarmed. - A. He had a pistol, he said if I looked up to him he would blow my brains out.

Q. What sort of a man was that that staid to guard you. - A. He was a tall man.

Court. Was that the man with his face black that you spoke of before. - A. Yes, it was; I believe he snapped the pistol at me twice, at last I heard it. He told the others to go up and get what they could, and he said he would guard us that we should not come out of the room.

Mr. Gurney. Did any of the men come down. - A. Yes, two afterwards came and demanded the keys of the two drawers, that they could not open. My wife was present, they threatened that they would blow my brains out, if I did not deliver them immediately. I begged of her to give them her keys, she gave them the keys.

Q. What did he do after that. - A. That was the time my son struck the tall man and made his escape.

Q. Was it while your wife was delivering the keys your son struck the tall man and got away. - A. Yes.

Q. That was when there were three in the kitchen. - A. As soon as my son got out I went to the door, there were three men that were jamed at the house door to keep me in.

Q. What became of the man that your son struck. - A. He ran after my son; I followed him, two of them throwed me down on the outside against some milk pans, which bruised me; I throwed one of them down, and another I got down by the throat. I was afraid that some of them would come up; I got up and ran away towards the mills.

Q. Now, Mr. Spencer, look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you believe any of them to be the persons that robbed you. - A. I think the person with the red waistcoat was the person that guarded us (Fordham).

Q. The man who first presented the pistol to you, he was the man who afterwards guarded you while the others went up stairs. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to speak with any certainty or belief with respect to any of the others. - A. There were those two; the carroty one that is nearest me, and the other with the pale face.

Q. You speak of Bridge, the man that is this way. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you able to speak to the other. - A. I cannot say.

Q. What did you observe Bridge do. - A. I observed him by his whiskers.

Q. Are you certain that he was one, or do you only believe it. - A. I do not like to swear positively, he looks like one of them.

Q. Was Bridge one that you saw in the house, or was he one of the persons that you had the scuffle with at the door. - A. He was in the house, he was one that came in and asked for the keys; there were two that came in and asked for the keys.

Q. Are you able to speak with any certainty or belief with respect to the persons that you scuffled with at the door. - A. No, I fought my way through to get out,

Q. Do you know any thing more. - A. No, I do not.

ELIZABETH SPENCER . Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You are wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of the knock at the door you was ironing in the parlour. - A. Yes, on the 18th of December in the evening.

Q. Upon the knock of the door did you hear the door open. - A. I did.

Q. What did you hear or see next. - A. The servant came running back to me in the parlour, she could not speak, she opened the sash and got out of the window; two men came to me immediately after she was out of the window, they asked me if there was any body else in the house besides our family, I told him no; one of them pushed me down in the parlour, I cried out Murder; they put their hands to my mouth and dragged me into the kitchen.

Q. Who did you find in the kitchen. - A. My husband and my son, and the man keeping guard over him. I was put in the kitchen with my husband and my son, and the man stood with a pistol over us.

Q. Where was the other men gone at that time. A. Up stairs; three of them came down for a small key to undo some drawers; in the mean time while my son took an opportunity to get out, then my husband made his resistance and got out.

Q. Then when they were gone, were you left alone in the kitchen. - A. I was. I got up, and when I came to the door there were two of the men picking up their pistols, or something, at the back door.

Q. Was this the back door that they came in at. - A. Yes; I went by them, and ran down the yard.

Q. When you returned I suppose they were all gone. - A. Yes; there were a many people there when I returned.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether you know any of their persons. - A. That man there (witness pointing to Hartford), I think he was one of the men that dragged me, I know him by his face.

Q. How do you know him by his face. - A. I took such particular notice of his face.

Q. Was his face blacg. - A. No.

Q. Are you able to speak to any of the others. - A. No, I cannot say that I am, I was so very much frightened.

Court. How was that man dressed that you think is one of them. - A. I did not observe his dress, I only observed his face.

WILLIAM IVES ; examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a barge master, residing at Ponder's End. - A. Yes.

Q. How near do you live to Mr. Spencer. - A. Two or three hundred yards.

Q. On the evening of the 18th of December were you in the Falcon public house there. - A. Yes.

Q. How near is that public house. - A. About two or three hundred yards.

Q. Did Sarah Taylor come there that night. - A. Yes.

Q. Did she give any alarm respecting mistress Spencer's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did any persons go with you out of the house. - A. Yes, several other persons that were in the house with me.

Q. When you come near the house, did you see any person come out of the house. - A. I saw Mr. Spencer junior running out; I was not sure at the time who it was, it was either father or son, I will not say which. A man was running after him, reaching his left hand after him, to catch hold of him; he had a pistol in his right hand, he tried to catch him with his left.

Q. Was there any thing particular about that man's face. - A. His face was disguised, it was either blacked or a dark crape upon it, I cannot say which.

Q. What sized man was he. - A. He was a tall stout man. I immediately held the man by the left side of his coat, and he immediately turned the pistol into my face; I waved my head backwards and forwards. I stood in that position some time, expecting the pistol to go off, and finding myself unsupported by the people behind me, I drew from him; I begged of him not to fire, saying that my life would be of no use to him. I let go, and the man run away down the lane.

Q. Now look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether any of them resembles the man that you laid hold of. - A. Fordham is the man most likely to be him by the size, he did not speak so then as he does now; that I cannot recollect him by his voice, he

appeared to be as near the size as can be. He had a dark great coat on, and hanging loose as mine is now.

Q. Did you see any other person escape from the house. - A. No, my whole attention was paid to him, he had leather gaiters on; I think they were over his knees. That is all I can say of him.

ROBERT IVEY ; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are an apprentice to Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker in Whitechapel - A. Yes.

Q. On the 19th of December was a woman's great coat pawned with you. - A. Yes.

Q. By whom was the great coat pawned. - A. By William Bridge, I know him perfectly well; I have seen him many times before. I lent him seven shillings on it.

Q. Did you give him a duplicate. - A. Yes.

JONATHAN TROTT ; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are a police officer of Hatton Garden office. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information, did you go with other officers to the Catherine Wheel , in Essex street, Whitechapel. - A. I apprehended some before that. On the morning of the 22nd of December, I received information; I went with my brother officers to the Blue Boar, Aldgate, commonly called Whitechapel, where the person who is to be admitted as an evidence was apprehended; my brother officer apprehended him, after that I went to an house in Hackney Road, near Shoreditch church; at a small cook's shop, where I understood Harvey lodged. I saw the prisoner Harvey sitting reading some book, or paper, with the landlord of the house, in the back room adjoining the shop. I left my brother officer out side of the house; I beckoned the landlord of the house out, and in consequence of that, I beckoned to my brother officer, he came in, and from the denial that was made, I insisted upon searching the house. I left my brother officer with Harvey; I went up stairs, and in a bag among other things, I found this dark coloured coat, and this mask. The coat is very muddy, it appears to be country dirt; it was wet at that time.

Q. Was it as if it had been rained upon. - A. It was as if it had been rained upon; I called out to my brother officer, and said take care of the man; that is the man; he had a handkerchief tied round his face, having a black eye.

Q. Which eye was it. - A. I will not be positive whether it was the right or left, he said his name was not Harvey.

Court. Did you ask him. - A. I asked him whether his name was not Harvey, he said it was not.

Mr. Gurney. Did you ask him whether that was his lodgings that you searched. - A. He said he slept there, but another man lodged there; the landlord said that man was a smith that lodged there. After that he said his name was Harvey; he said master I used to bring coals to your house, when you lived in the country, but I believe I shall never bring you any more. I then put him in the coach, and went to Fordham's lodgings in Bethnal Green, at the sign of the Peacock; I enquired for the person, I was denied; I would go up stairs.

Q. Did you find Fordham at home. - A. I did, at the Peacock, laying on the bed.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. Sometime in the afternoon; he was laying on the bed without his coat, shoes or hat; he had all his clothes on but them. I entered the room, and when I saw him, I knew him, I had known him from a child; I told him what I wanted, and we were officers, and were come to take him; he seemed to be very restless; I said if you attempt to be in any way, in which I think you are in, I will blow your brains out; I then called my brother officers to search the coat, that was laying upon the bed.

Q. Was any thing found - A. A pistol was found, I believe by my brother officer; I afterwards saw it. My particular attention was directed to him, seeing him so restless. I found a pair of bullet moulds in the same room; he was handcuffed, and after he was handcuffed, he threw himself down stairs, with intent to run away; but he fell down two flight of stairs. I likewise found this great coat in the room; this coat is likewise daubed with country mud.

Q. Was it wet or dry. - A. It appeared more damp than the coat that I found at Harvey's. We then took him away to the office, and then proceded to the Catherine Wheel , in Essex street, Whitechapel; there I saw Bridge and Hartford, I called out Bridge first, seeing him with one hand, and having a description of him; I saw a hat taken from him, which was shewed to Mr. Spencer afterwards. I then returned and spoke to Hartford, I said what is your name, he said my name is Dick; I said well, I know it, I knew him before. I then brought him backwards, where he was handcuffed, by my brother officers. This crow (producing it) was given into my hand at Ponder's End. by Mr. Spencer.

Q. By which of them. - A. They were both together, and an old hat with an oilskin, the oilskin was in it exactly as it is now; it is an oilskin to cover a hat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to say that when you went to the house you found the landlord and Harvey together at the cook's shop. - A. Yes.

Q. The landlord was at home. - A. He was at that time.

Q. The conversation was with the landlord. - A. Yes.

Q. He denied your going up stairs. - A. Yes.

Q. You said you had a conversation with Harvey, you asked him whether it was his room. - A. Yes.

Q. At that time it was accompanied with this, that there was another person, a smith, who lodged there. - A. He did, and Harvey afterwards said that these things that I found, and different things that I have got at home, the mask and shirt, they did not belong to him, they belonged to Vardon; that is the other person that is indicted.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN ; examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. I believe you are likewise a police officer of Hatton Garden office. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go in pursuit of the prisoners. - A. I apprehended Roberts by myself in Whitechapel, on Monday December 22nd.

Q. At what house. - A. I apprehended him in the street, he run out of the Blue Boar yard; I was in the street looking for him, he came out of the Blue Boar yard, ran round a coach and attempted to throw

away a pocket book; I picked it up before I laid hold of him, I took him into custody, I searched him, I did not find any thing upon him that is owned by any body. I found a pistol in his right hand breeches pocket; then I took him to the office.

Q. Did you afterwards go with Trott to Harvey's lodgings. - A. I did, Harvey was reading a newspaper in the back room behind the shop. I watched him while Trott went up stairs and searched the room.

Q. When Trott came down what passed. - A. I asked Harvey where he worked and what his name was; he said he worked at the London dock, and denied his name being Harvey; we took him away, we went in a coach to the Peacock.

Q. Did you go into the room where Fordham was. - A. Yes, and as he arose up in the bed I struck him down, and then I turned to his coat-pocket and found a pistol; it was not loaded, it was in two pieces, the stock and the barrel. I have got the key of the pistols and the bullet moulds. This pistol matches with that I took from Roberts. I produce first of all the pistol that I found upon Fordham. and this is the pistol that I found upon Roberts. They are both alike, and the bags are both alike.

Q. Where did you find the bags. - A. The bag I found at Fordham's was in the box, the bag of Roberts' pistol was in his breeches pocket; both the bags and the pistols are a pair. We took them to the office.

Q. In the evening did you go with Trott to the Catherine Wheel . - A. I did; and there we apprehended the prisoner Hartford and Bridge. The first thing I did I took off this hat from off Bridge's head, which Mr. Spencer claimed to be his. In Bridge's pocket I found a duplicate of a coat, pawned at Mr. Dexter's.

Q. Did you search either of their lodgings. - A. No, we did not, we took them to the office.

ENOCH ROBERTS ; examined by Mr. Gurney. On Thursday the 18th of December was you in company with any persons. - A. On Tuesday the 18th of December I was in company with John Fordham , John Harvey , William Vardon , Richard Hartford , and that one-handed man William Bridge. I was in their company at the Catherine Wheel public house, Catherine Wheel alley, Whitechapel, we there agreed to the robbery of the house belonging to Mr. Spencer at Ponder's End. As soon as the evening came on we started from there.

Q. At what time. - A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; just as the dusk came on we started from there, there was four went together, they met the other two at Lower Edmonton. There was me, William Vardon , Richard Hartford , and William Bridge, we went from London together; at Lower Edmonton we met Fordham and Harvey, we joined them there, and went on till we came in the field at the back of Mr. Spencer's house; we agreed there to go in, and which were to go in, and take the money where we could find it, and Fordham was to go and knock at the door; William Vardon , Richard Hartford , and the one-handed man was to follow after the door was open; we agreed that me and John Harvey were to stop out of the door to give the alarm if any body came, to those who were in. Fordham knocked at the door and the door was opened to him, we saw them all go in; I saw nothing more till young Mr. Spencer came out, crying Murder, Thieves, and seeing John Fordham following of him.

Q. What had Fordham. - A. He had a pistol in his hand.

Q. Upon Fordham following young Mr. Spencer what happened. - A. John Harvey and me turned round to see that the others were following, we ran away. The one-handed man carried this iron crow.

Q. Did not that iron crow belong to the one-handed man. - A. He carried it from London, and that oil skin hat he wore to go down there.

Q. Had any of the others any arms. - A. Yes; Vardon, Harvey and Hartford. Vardon had one of these pistols, and Fordham the other.

Q. The next day did you see any of them. - A. Yes, I saw Richard Hartford and Bridge, the one-handed man, in the street.

Q. What passed. - A. The words passed were - I told them that I thought information would be given against us, they had better take care; the one-handed man took off Mr. Spencer's hat from his head, he says I have got one of their hats, and I have left my hat and the oil case. Richard Hartford said that old Mr. Spencer had thrown him down, and he had got him by the throat, and he had got a very hard matter to get away from him, but with long struggling he did; that was all that passed then.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see either of them again. - A. In two or three days I saw Fordham.

Q. Did you ever have any share of what was taken. A. No, I believe I saw Fordham about two or three days before they were taken, he came to me at my lodgings in Whitechapel.

Q. What passed. - A. Nothing particular about that business.

Q. You were taken up on the Monday morning, and a pistol was taken from your breeches pocket. - A. Yes, John Fordham bought a pair, and gave twenty five shillings for them at a shop in Whitechapel he told me.

Q. How did you come by the pistol and case. - A. I had the pistol of John Fordham .

Q. When had you it of him. - A. The day before I was taken up; I advanced him half the money for them three months before that.

Q. When did he tell you he bought them, at what time. - A. About three months before this, and I advanced him half the money to pay for them. I gave the officers information where to find them, Fordham, Harvey, Hartford, and Bridge; accordingly as I told them they found it true.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Have you any honest way of livelihood. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you of any trade. - A. No, only in the farmering line.

Q. How long had you been in custody when you gave the information. - A. Half an hour.

Q. You got frightened, then you accused them. - A. I thought I should die for it, and I thought I might as well tell the truth as not.

Q. You say you was at the Catherine Wheel

the day you committed the robbery, how long did you stay there. - A. About an hour or more.

Q. Are there any of the people of the house here. A. I do not know that they are.

Bridge. I ask him whether he ever knew me in my life before he saw me at the Catherine Wheel ; I never saw him before I saw him at the Catherine Wheel . - A. I saw you on the morning of the day of the robbery, that was the first morning that I saw him.

Court. How came you to go to Mr. Spencer's house. - A. It was proposed by William Vardon ; William Vardon was always brought up on the spot, from what I have heard say. Going down the road from London to Ponder's End, the one-handed man ran after a gentleman's one horse chaise.

Hartford. Ask him if ever he saw me in my life before he saw me at the office, he never saw me on Thursday morning the 18th of December.

Court. He has said that he saw you, and that you was one of the party.

Hartford. There were four gentlemen came to the office to prove that he was an highway robber, and that he had shot one man.

Court. (to James Spencer ). You spoke of your hat being lost in the scuffle, look at that hat that was found upon Bridge, is that your hat. - A. It is my hat that was knocked of in the scuffle; I knew it by that little bit of leather that is behind, besides the yellow lining of the inside, I have had it a twelve month, I have no doubt but it is mine. When the man was first taken I took the hat from his head, and I said where did you get this hat, it is my hat.

Q. Sarah Taylor , look at the dark great coat, is that your coat. - A. Yes, I have had it about a twelve month; I knew it to be mine when I first saw it. I know it to be mine, by the make, colour, and the fitting, and every thing. That is the coat that I lost on the night of the robbery, it was folded up on my chair; it was taken out that night of my chamber, where I sleep.

Fordham's Defence. I am as innocent of it as a child unborn, so help me Jesus Christ.

Harvey's Defence. I am innocent of it; I have got particular witnesses to bring forward, I never went out with them in all the course of my days.

Hartford's Defence. There is none of these people saw me in their lives before I was brought to the office; I never knew any of the men in my life before I was brought to the office.

Bridge's Defence. Please you, my lord, I was sitting in the Catherine Wheel drinking a pint of beer, Roberts came in and asked me if I would go in the country with him, I told him no, that I had no money, I could not go along with him; he told me never to mind that, he would give me money if I would go with him. I went, and when we came to the place, he came behind the back of the house, he put a mask on his face; there is not a soul here that went with him and me, there were four of us and no more.

THOMAS DEMPONEY ; examined by Mr. Knapp. What are you. - A. I am a sawyer by trade. I live at No. 7, Duke street, Worship street, Moorfields.

Q. Are you a master. - A. I am a master sawyer; I employ men, sometimes two or three, and sometimes only myself.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Harvey. - A. Yes.

Q. Where you in his company on the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. Yes, he came to my house at eleven o'clock, and dined with me, he was with me the whole afternoon, till about four; at four o'clock he went away, he was gone about three quarters of an hour, he returned again about ten or five minutes before five; he drank tea with us, he continued with us till about eleven o'clock at night, or a few minutes before eleven.

Q. Where was it he was with you, at your own house, or at a public house. - A. After we had drank tea, we went over to the Brown Bear , in Worship street, that was about seven o'clock at night, there we remained till about nine; then we came home and had our supper.

Q. Who was in your company at the public house, or at your own house, besides Harvey. - A. There was my son-in-law, his name is Oland, he was with us all the time; and there was Meggs the pieman, he was at the public house with us.

Q. Did any thing pass between Harvey and Meggs the pieman. - A. Nothing further than he bought some pies of him, and he gave orders for a minced pie of half a crown to be brought on Christmas day Oland was present at the time.

Q. Are you quite sure that it was the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. Yes, upon my honour.

Q. You are upon your oath. - A. Upon my oath, so help me God.

Q. Was any body else there. - A. Nobody else but my daughter, who will testify the same; and there was a person of the name of Mrs. Edington, she was at my house that evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Mr. Demponey is your name. - A. Yes.

Q. How lately have you employed men. - A. Twelve or fourteen years.

Q. Down to the present time. - A. Yes.

Q. What is Harvey. - A, He is a bargeman by trade.

Q. You and he were very intimate. - A. We were, he is my wife's nephew.

Q. You knew where he lodged at that time. - A. He lodged at that time just by Shoreditch church, at a cook's shop; I did not know then where he lodged any more than you, he was rather out of employ at that time.

Q. How many months is it ago since he has done any work at the barges. - A. I suppose it is five or six months, or it may be more.

Q. What makes you know that this was the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. By the work that I did, and the bill that I delivered to the master of the work.

Q. You told me that you was a master. - A. Yes, but I work under masters.

Q. Have you got any bill of the work that you did on that day, to shew my lord and the gentlemen of the jury, that you are right on that day. - A. I have got nothing with me. I am certain of the day.

Q. Do you remember all the particulars of the Wednesday as well as of the Thursday. - A. Yes. I

begun the sawpit on the Wednesday on the Tenter-ground, and finished it on the Thursday; on Friday I was at work in the pit, and also on the Saturday.

Q. On this Thursday what time did he come to you. A. As I was digging the pit.

Q. How near is your sawpit from the house. - A. About two stones throw.

Q. Did he stay with you at the sawpit, you know he made an idle day of this. - A. Yes, because he had nothing to do.

Q. He was at your house, and you went to him. - A. Yes, because I went to my dinner; I said till one, and then I went away. After one o'clock he came to us again and helped to throw the dirt out of the pit, and helped us forward.

Q. What had you for dinner. - A. We had some boiled beef and some soup.

Q. What joint was it. - A. I cannot say, I believe a piece of brisket, and some soup and some carrots.

Q. What had you for supper. - A. The same as we had for dinner, and the soup warmed up again.

Q. And tea; I suppose you had some toast as it was cold. - A. We had some toast, as it was cold weather, to make us comfortable.

Q. When was it you was called upon to remember that day. - A. I was called upon no farther than Mr. Harvey was pleased to send to me to remember that day; then I put it in a memorandum, I remembered it in my own mind.

Court. Did Harvey send to you to make a memorandum of it. - A. He sent to me to recollect that day; that was three days or something after Christmas.

Q. Then in order to know what day it was, you referred to your master's books. - A. Yes, because if I come before gentlemen, I would not wish to say a wrong thing.

Q. Do you remember what liquor you drank for dinner. - A. A couple of pots; I do not know that we had any thing else.

Q. What liquor had you for supper. - A. Three or four pots.

Mr. Knapp. When you referred to your master's books, and it confirmed you of the day, you speak from a good recollection of the subject. - A. I do, from my heart.

Court. Who was this master whose book you talk of. A. Mr. Evans, Hill street, Worship street, Finsbury square, he is a master carpenter.

Q. What work were you doing for him that day. - A. After we had digged the pit we took on timber on the pit; we cut the timber on the Friday.

Q. Has Harvey any family. - A. He is a married man, his wife lives at Waltham abbey, she lives along with her mother, I believe, at this time.

Q. How came she not to be living with her husband. A. She did live with her husband when he lived there, but after he came away she went and lived with her mother; he was keeper of two barges on the river Lea, and sometimes the water of the river Lea was shut up, he had nothing to do, and then he came round to see his friends, and when the water was full he returned to his barges.

Q. Then his business as a bargeman was on the river Lea. - A. Yes, from London to Ware, and to Hertford, and that part.

THOMAS OLAND; examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a sawyer, I live in Duke street, Finsbury square.

Q. Do you know Harvey, the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with Demponey, the witness who has been examined. - A. I live in the same house with him.

Q. Do you remember seeing Harvey on the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. Perfectly; I believe on the first part of the day I saw him at Mr. Demponey's, he dined there about twelve o'clock; when I went from my dinner I left Harvey in the house, Demponey my father-in-law, and me, went to our work. About three o'clock Harvey came to us and lent us a hand to dig the saw pit, he might then be with us an hour or more.

Q. Did he go before you had finished the saw pit. - A. He did, he left us to finish the saw pit.

Q. How soon did you see him again. - A. It might be half an hour or better; I saw him at Mr. Demponey's house. We went over and spent the evening at a neighbouring public house, the Brown Bear in Worship street.

Q. How long did you stay in the public house together. - A. To the best of my knowledge till between eight and nine o'clock at night.

Q. Do you recollect what hour you went to the public house. - A. I believe it was some minutes after six, and there we staid till nearly nine.

Q. Was Harvey in your company all the time you were in the public house. - A. Justly so.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Meggs. - A. Yes, he is a baker that lives in the neighbourhood.

Q. Do you remember his being in the public house. - A. Perfectly well, he came there to sell pies; he sold some of his pies to Harvey, and Harvey gave an order for a minced pie, to the best of my recollection.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Were you at work all that day with your father. - A. Yes, I was digging in the saw pit.

Q. When you went home you found the prisoner sitting with his aunt. - A. Yes, I had not seen him before on that day.

Q. By what means do you know it was Thursday. - A. I know so, particularly in our digging the pit; Mr. Evans employed us to dig the pit, Mr. Harvey came down and lent us a hand to finish digging the pit; we prove it in every respect by our master's bill that was sent in of the Saturday night.

Q. What was the amount of that bill. - A. Our bill was very trifling.

Q. You do not in the bill specify each day's work, you specify the work done. - A. Just so.

Q. What had you for dinner that day. - A. I really cannot pretend to say, I know what I had for supper; it is a question with me whether I had any dinner or no. I am not in Mr. Demponey's family, though I live in the house. I dined with my wife.

Q. You did not go into the room where the prisoner was. - A. Yes, I went into the room where they were.

Q. What was their dinner. - A. I believe it was beef. I supped with them, we had some cold beef for supper.

Q. There was some hot broth, of course. - A. Yes, but I had none.

Q. You cannot tell what you had for dinner, and you question whether you really had any dinner or no. - A. I really think I had some dinner, but what I had I do not know.

Q. How long did you stay at home at your dinner. - A. I very seldom stay at home at dinner above ten minutes any day.

Court. How long was Demponey that day at his dinner. - A. He might be half an hour for what I know, I cannot exactly say to a few minutes of the time that we left our work and went to it again.

Q. How long has Demponey and you talked this matter over at all. - A. I do not consider that we have talked any thing about it, I have not heard any thing about it till this day or two.

Q. You say that you did not know any thing about this till a day or two ago. - A. Exactly so.

Q. Who was it that wanted you to prove it. - A. I heard Mr. Demponey say that Mr. Harvey was so and so.

Q. What is so and so. - A. That he was in trouble.

Q. And you did not know that Harvey was in trouble till a day or two ago. - A. Yes.

Q. Then it was he that told you that you was wanted to prove something before Christmas day. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you never understood that you should be wanted to prove any thing till a day or two ago. - A. Exactly so.

Mr. Gurney. It is very odd that you never heard of it before; upon your oath did not you know that Demponey and your mother-in-law went to the office to see him about a fortnight ago. - A. I know nothing about it.

Q. You and Demponey have been working together every day since that. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not tell you a fortnight ago that Harvey was taken up. - A. I have heard him mention it.

Q. How long, a fortnight ago. - A. No such thing, I cannot exactly say to a day or two; to the best of my belief it might be a week or more.

Q. Then what did you mean to say just now that you did not hear that Harvey was in trouble till within this day or two. - A. Till within these few days.

Q. You have said that you did did not know that Harvey was in trouble till within this day or two, you mean within a few days. - A. I do.

Q. Upon your oath have not you heard it above a fortnight ago. - A. I believe if it is that time, it as much as it is.

Court. Do you think it might be a fortnight ago that you heard it. - A. I cannot pretend to say, I know nothing of the business; to the best of my knowledge it might be seven, or eight, or nine days. I heard it of Mr. Demponey, he was the first person, I believe.

Q. What trade is Harvey. - A. I believe a bargeman.

Q. You are speaking of your wife's cousin. - A. Exactly so.

Q. How long ago is it since he worked at his profession. - A. I cannot say.

Q. How long has he lived in London. - A. I do not know that he lived any where else than in Waltham Abbey.

Mr. Gurney. Then you supposed that he came up with his barge, and so came to see his uncle. - A. I knew no otherwise.

Court. When was it that you went to Mr. Evans's. - A. I was there yesterday and I was there today.

Q. Have you seen any book that told you the day, or any thing like it at Mr. Evans's. - A. Not this week.

Q. When was it that you went to look at Mr. Evans' list. - A. Saturday night, I gave my bill into my master's hands, and he paid me our bill.

Mr. Gurney. I understood you to say you had been to Mr. Evans's to look at his book to see when the pit was dug. - A. Yes, on Thursday the 18th of December, Mr. Evans told me the pit was finished.

Q. Have you any reason to say that the pit was finished on Thursday the 18th of December except what Mr. Evans told you. - A. I know it perfectly well; we began that pit on the Wednesday, on Thursday afternoon we finished it; on the Friday we began to work.

Q. The question is whether you have any reason to say that that Thursday the pit was finished was Thursday the 18th of December, have you any reason for saying so, except Mr. Evans having told you so. - A. I have so far as this, I made a recollection in different things by our own earnings, I know it must be.

Q. You are desired to satisfy the jury that this Thursday was the 18th of December, the reason that you gave some time ago was, that you had seen Mr. Evans's book. - A. I never saw Mr. Evans's book.

Court. I should be glad to know what enables you to say it was the Thursday before Christmas day, you may very well begin a pit on a Wednesday and finish it on a Thursday, there is no circumstance that enables you to say that it was on that Thursday, independent of what any one told you. - A. There is a circumstance that I recollect perfectly well; on that day the master-bricklayer had four loads in.

Q. What master bricklayer are you talking on. - A. On the building that we are engaged in; that master sent for two pots of porter to treat us with, and the master-bricklayer partook of the porter.

Court. So he might; that might be the week before as well as the Christmas week.

WILLIAM MEGGS ; examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a baker by trade.

Q. Do you know the Brown Bear in Worship street. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Demponey. - A. I have seen him many years, and I know Oland his son in law.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner Harvey. - A. Yes. I think to the best of my knowledge it was on the Thursday before Christmas. I am in the habit of carrying pies, and have been for these nineteen years back; about half after six I happened to drop into the Brown Bear ; that is generally the time t I go in there.

Q. When you went in there did you see Harvey. - A. I saw a man in a white coat, who is an acquaintance of Demponey's.

Q. Look round. - A. That young man in the white coat is the person that I sold the pies to (Harvey), I sold him pies to the tune of eighteen pence.

Q. Was Demponey and Oland by at the same time. A. Yes, they were at the same table; Demponey was sitting of one side of him and Oland on the other; he had nine twopenny pies, and he gave me an order to carry in an half crown pie on the Christmas evening, which I did.

Q. Was Harvey there the whole time. - A. He was not there the whole time, he was out about ten minutes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You went to his aunt's to take the pie on the Christmas evening, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Oland there. - A. No. I see one

of the daughters, and Mrs. Oland was there. I took the pie into Mr. Demponey's house, Mrs. Demponey took the pie in.

Q. Did not she tell you that poor Harvey was confined. - A. No, I knew nothing of Harvey.

Q. It was Harvey, not Demponey, that ordered the pie. - A. He did, against Christmas day.

Q. Then when you went to Demponey's house with the pie, did not Mrs. Demponey see you take the half crown for it. - A. If I am obliged to speak the truth, I am not paid.

Q. Pray where do you live. - A. I live at No. 26, Worship street.

Q. When was it you first heard that Harvey was in trouble. - A. Mr. Oland was speaking to me a few nights ago, a week ago; Oland told me at the Brown Bear , I go there every night for these nineteen years.

Q. Inasmuch as you go there every night, can you give me any good reason why it was the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. By that one order that he gave me, the order for the pie; he was coming there to have his Christmas dinner.

Q. Why might not this be on the Wednesday night. - A. Why, I am upon my oath; to the best of my recollection it must be on that Thursday night when he ordered the pie; this day week, says he, remember is Christmas day; he said he had enough for to-night, he told me twice eve to mind and bring the pie on Christmas night; he said this is Thursday.

Q. Did he say any thing when Christmas day would be at the time you sold him these nine pies, and he gave you an order for a Christmas pie, or did he say what day that was. - A. We were all drinking jovial together; so help me God, he told me to bring the pie on Christmas night to Mr. Demponey; he said this day week.

Q. Did he say he was to dine at Mrs. Demponey's. A. I cannot say.

Q. Pray when was you first of all examined about coming here - A. They subpoenaed me to-day, and not till to-day about eleven o'clock.

Q. Was you examined. - A. No, nothing of the kind.

Q. Have you told any body what you was to prove. - A. I never saw any body.

Q. Have you told any body since you came here what you should prove when you was sworn. - A. I come here to speak the truth.

Q. Have you told any body before you stood up there what you had come to prove. - A. Not a soul.

ANN DEMPONEY ; examined by Mr. Knapp. Are you the wife of the witness that has been examined to-day. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner Harvey being at your house and when. - A. On Thursday before Christmas day he came to my house between ten and eleven, he staid with me till near four, I asked him to stay and have some tea, he said he should be back in a few minutes; he went out, and came in just before five, and he had some tea. I take in washing, and there were clothes hanging about in my house, and my husband and he went over to the Brown Bear to drink some porter; about seven o'clock he returned, and brought me some pies that he had bought of the pieman, and returned again. I went over at night and asked Harvey and my husband if they would come over to supper in the course of half an hour; they came to supper, and Harvey left me about ten minutes before eleven.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

How do you know this was the Thursday before Christmas day. - A. I know by my work. I met with a person of the name of Egerton, she was going to pledge something, I went with her, here is the duplicate; it was that very day, she asked me to keep the duplicate for fear she should lose it. This was after dinner; I left him at my house and found him there when I came back.

Q. It being washing day, you had some make up dinner. - A. We had some boiled beef for dinner.

Q. And with your tea you had bread and butter. - A. No we had toast.

Q. Had you not pies enough for supper. - A. No, I had got children, I saved them for my children.

Q. How soon afterwards did you hear that he was taken up. - A. On Monday the 29th of December I saw him at Hatton Garden office.

Q. You came back and told your husband where you had seen him, you told your daughter and your son in law. - A. Yes

Q. Certainly you remember telling Oland of it; how long has he lived at Waltham Abbey. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Has he lived there this last six months. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you know where he lodged when he came and dined with you. - A. No.

Q. Then where he lived, and how he got his livelihood, you did not know at that time. - A. No, I only know that he happened to be at my house that day.

Q. When did you tell Oland of it. - A. The Monday following Christmas day.

Q. You say he was in your house from eleven till four, do you mean to say that he was there the whole of the time. - A. I left the house about one o'clock, and I was gone about an hour to deliver a parcel containing some tea and sugar; he asked me to go, on my return at two I found him at home.

Q. You say your husband dined there, did your husband go to his work before you went out with this parcel. - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to carry the tea and sugar to the Four Swans. - A. I always carry the parcels.

Q. He was as capable of carrying the parcel as you were, taking in washing, he was idle and doing nothing; how came you not to desire him. - A. He was going to help my husband, I believe that was the reason.

Q. Was it the particular reason. - A I do not know that was the particular reason, he asked me to go, and I carried the parcel.

Q. He asked you to go, and you who had work to do went 2nd while you were going upon this occasion you went to the pawnbroker's. - A. Yes, I met with this woman, and she gave me the ticket.

Q. Have you got the duplicate you talk of.

Mr. Knapp. Yes, I have (producing it).

MARY ANN EGERTON ; examined by Mr. Knapp. Do you know Mrs. Demponey the last witness. -

A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember meeting her on any day going to a pawnbrokers - A. Yes, on the 18th of last December.

Q. Where did you pledge a gown and petticoat. - A. At Mr. Brookes', in Houndsditch.

Q. You got a duplicate at the pawnbroker's. - A. I did, I requested Mrs. Demponey to take care of it, as I was going to my mother's

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Where did you meet Mrs. Demponey - A. In Bishopsgate street.

Q. Did you go home with Mrs. Demponey. - A. No, I was not at her house all the day.

Q. What are you. - A. My husband is a professsional man in the law in Lincoln's inn; I live at Hoxton.

Q. Do you carry on any business. - A. I carry on the child bed linen business, I have served in lord Auckland's family and lady Pelham. Mrs. Demponey is a laundress, she washed for me; I requested her to go with me, I wanted to go down to my mother's, I happened to meet Mrs. Demponey.

Q. Now, your being reduced, it was not a pleasant thing to you. - A. Surely not.

Q. And a thing you were not accustomed to, and as it hurt your feelings, how came you to take a companion with you. - A. I was not doing any illicit thing, I was not taking any person's property than my own, and from that candour of disposition that I possess I told her what business I was going upon.

Court. Why could you not take care of this tieket yourself. - A. I might have done it to be sure, but I was going out of town; she had things of mine in her possession, and it was not a very pleasant thing to carry about with me.

Q. Where was the harm of a bit of paper. - A. Probably as I was going down to my mother I might be under some necessity, or some circumstance or accident might occur that might produce it; therefore my giving it to her to keep for me it would put it out of my power of informing my mother of it; that was my only reason for my giving it to her.

Q. Mrs. Egerton did you give this paper to this woman without any acknowledgement, in order that this might be safe. - A. I had a very high opinion of her principles, or otherwise I would not have invested it in her hands.

Q. Has Mrs. Demponey had the ticket from that time to this. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been returned to town from your mother. - A. About a fortnight. I have seen Mrs. Demponey two or three times since I came to town; I did not request it till I had the power of taking out the things; she said Mrs. Egerton my nephew was at my house and was not you with me when I carried the parcel, I said certainly; now says she, this will be a principal thing; I says I am very happy that you have it. She applied to me to let her have it in her possession.

Q. Had you applied to her for it. - A. No, she could not tell when I should have applied to her for it; when the occurrence happened, she anticipated the thought that I might have asked her for it.

Q. How do you know that. - A. I am only judging.

FORDHAM, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

HARVEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

HARTFORD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

BRIDGE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-6

74. FREDERIC SMITH, alias HENRY ST. JOHN , was indicted for feloniously stealing from Thomas Bartlet , privily and without his knowledge, on the 10th of July , a bank note, value 300 l. his property.

Second count for like offence, in the dwelling house of Michael Kelly .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS BARTLETT ; examined by Mr. Gurney. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 32, James street, Commercial road.

Q. Do you carry on any business. - A. Yes, I deal a little in the slop way for a livelihood .

Q. In the latter end of the month of June last was the prisoner at the bar introduced to you. - A. He was, by Mr. Benjamin Davis , that lives in Took's court, Cursitor street; he calls himself an attorney.

Q. By what name and description was the prisoner introduced to you. - A. By the name of captain Smith of the army.

Q. After he was introduced to you, did you and him become intimate. - A. Yes, I lodged at the Robin Hood , Leather lane, Holborn, and there the prisoner was brought to me by Mr. Benjamin Davis . I slept in one room in the house and he in another.

Q. He slept in an adjoining room to you. - A. Yes, and we were frequently together in the day.

Q. In consequence of any thing that passed, did you on the 7th of July last sell out stock. - A. I did, by the advice of the prisoner.

Q. What reason did he give you for selling out. - A. This is the particular reason; he said, Mr. Bartlett there is a conspiracy against you to rob you of your liberty, and they will also rob you of every shilling that you have got.

Q. Did he say who had formed that conspiracy. - A. He said Mr. Bill, my own attorney, and Mr. Davis, his attorney, had agreed together to bring me in a lunatic, because they saw I was very uneasy in my mind; and at the time he told me this he made me promise not to tell; I did.

Q. Did he tell you whether any other person was in it. - A. No.

Q. To prevent that he advised you to sell out the stock. - A. Yes; he said they were going to apply to the lord-chancellor, and they had got two men to swear at a guinea a-piece that they saw me run up and down the street naked; I said you know better than that. He says, that is no matter, I know the men that will swear it; and if they swear it, you will be kept out of the money all your life. He offered to take his oath of it that this conspiracy was formed against me.

Q. In consequence of that you sold out your stock. A. Yes.

Q. Who did you employ as your broker. - A. Mr. Richardson. I received 619 l.

Q. What did you receive of your broker. - A. A check. Upon that I went to Mr. Boldero and Lushington, and received two three hundred pound bank notes, one of the three hundred was No. 738; I do not know the date of the other I changed; that I kept and carried to Ramsgate with me.

Q. As soon as you had got this did he propose any hing to you. - A. Yes, he proposed to me to go down to Ramsgate.

Q. To see your wife. - A. Yes on a reconciliation between us.

Q. When you went to Ramsgate did you in point of fact see your wife. - A. I did no, he would not let me; he said let me have the management of the business.

Q. Did he tell you whether he did or not see her himself. - A. He told me that he went to the house and that he could not see her, he had seen a female servant whom he was very well acquainted with, her name was Patty Smart ; he even said so far that he was connected with her.

Q. You need not go so far as that. - A. He said he had used every means, but my wife said I was such a rogue.

Court. Did he say that he had employed her. - A. He said that he had used all the means he could to persuade her, and Patty Smart told him that she could not prevail upon my wife to let me live with her, she said that I was so bad a rogue that she would not live with me.

Q. What did the prisoner advise you to then. - A. He said, now I have thought of another plan; let us go back to London again; I hear you have a son at squire Newbolt's at Fulham, and the mother loves that boy uncommonly I am told; now let us go back there, and we'll go and take him, you have a right to take him, and try and see whether he cannot prevail upon her; if not, and the mother will not be reconciled, we will tell the mother that we will carry him to America, or take and put him on board of a man of war; we shall surely make her come to then.

Q. Did you and he then come from Ramsgate, and go to Fulham. - A. Yes, we took post chaise and went to Fulham.

Q. Who paid all the expences. - A. I paid all the expences, he had no money.

Q. What day did you get to Fulham. - A. It was somewhere about the 10th of July, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon; we went first of all to the Eight Bells, then Smith said let me go in, do not you go in to the boy upon no account in the world, and if I see him I will take him.

Q. Did he leave you at the Eight Bells and go. - A. Yes, I waited; when he came back he said he was gone with his master to Oxford, and that he was not there.

Q. Did you after that go to Mr. Newbolt's yourself. - A. Yes, I was informed the boy was there, I run over several rooms in Mr. Newbolt's house, I could not find him.

Q. Did you come back to the Eight Bells to the prisoner. - A. Yes, and I attempted to run away from him, finding that he had told lies. I had not found him out before I got into a boat and made my escape from the prisoner; I was got about half way over the river, when he and a person named Gayton hailed the boat, and the boatman came back.

Q. Mr. Gayton was a friend of yours. - A. Yes,

Q. When the waterman came back did you join in conversation with Smith and Gayton. - A. Yes.

Q. How long did Gayton stay with you. - A. Not long.

Q. Did you afterwards find the money in your pocket. - A. I had all the money in my pocket then.

Q. You say when you came from Fulham you had all your money in your pocket. - A. I had; I took it out of my pocket and I found that they were all right in my pocket book; which I have in my pocket now.

Q. What time of the day was that. - A. About an hour before the prisoner and I came to London together; I was alone by myself.

Q. Was that before you went to Mr. Newbolts. - A. No, it was after, I was alone then.

Q. Did you then see that you had the three hundred pound bank note. - A. That I did not particularly look to; I looked to see that they were all right.

Q. Which pocket did you put them into. - A. The right hand outside coat pocket.

Court. A great coat. - A. No, my close coat, I had no great coat.

Mr. Gurney. How did the prisoner and you come from the Eight Bells, did you walk or ride. - A. We came in a hackney coach.

Q. Had you drank any liquor that day. - A. The prisoner all that day was forcing me to drink.

Q. You had drank too much had not you. - A. I had not drank so much but what I could remember the greatest part of what passed.

Q. Where did you come to in the coach. - A. We came to Peter street, Soho, to Mr. Kelly's house; Smith said that he would take me to that house to have a cup of tea, he said he was going up to the Oxford coach. He was going up to that part of the town, to see whether he could see my son coming from Oxford; he could not. When the prisoner was in the Welch Harp , Peter street, Soho; at Mr. Kelly's, the prisoner talked to an elderly man, he talked to that man as if he had seen him before; it appeared so to me.

Q. Did you have some tea. - A. We first had some brandy and water, and then Smith called for a quartern of brandy, and kept forcing me to drink.

Q. Were the prisoner and you sitting at a distance or close to each other. - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Do you recollect which side he sat of you. - A. I do not; there was no person near enough to take the book out of my pocket but Smith.

Q. After you had all that you chose to have there, did you offer to pay the reckoning. - A. Yes, I missed my pocket book; I searched for my pocket book to pay the reckoning.

Q. When you opened the book did you find the notes. - A. No, they were all gone, and I charged him with the robbery.

Court. The pocket book was there was it. - A. Yes, and the notes were gone.

Mr. Gurney. Were you sober enough to know whether you were awake or not all the way. - A. I had not slept all the way from Fulham; when I charged him with the robbery, he got up and said he was a good mind to knock me down, he held his fist in my face, and then he ran away; and the landlord and I ran after him.

Q. I believe you never see him again till he was taken in custody. - A Not till he was taken in Mr. Henson's house. The prisoner has acknowledged to me at Newgate, that he had got two hundred and

eighty pound, that he robbed me on.

Q. How came you to see him in Newgate, - A. His wife and Davis, offered me four hundred pound.

Q. You must not tell me what any body else said to you, in consequence of what his wife said to you, did you go to Newgate. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make use of any promise or threat to him. - A. I did not.

Court. Did you say it would be better for him. - A. The words were these; how much money have you got left, that you robbed me off. I took him aside, and spoke to him privately.

Q. What answer did he give. - A. Two hundred and eighty pounds, he said that is all I have got of your money left; if you will not appear against me, I will give you that.

Q. Did you lose the whole six hundred pounds. - A. Except what I spent; I bought him a new pair of boots.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. At the time that you arrived at Mr. Kelly's house, you were at that time a little in liquor. - A. I was.

Q. Do you recollect how many people there were in the tap room. - A. To the best of my recollection there were one or two more than me and Smith, and they joined company together, they drank together; but whether I drank with them I cannot say.

Q. How near were they to you. - A. I cannot say, there were no one near enough to take it out of my pocket but Smith.

Q. Are you able to state that fact, that nobody was near enough. - A. I can speak to the best of my recollection.

Q. You were not quite sober to speak positively. - A. Yes, I do particularly recollect that.

Q. I suppose the man that drank with Smith, the prisoner, came to the place where you sat. - A. They came both much at one time.

Q. I am asking you whether the man that drank with Smith did not come to him. - A. I and Smith and the other man went out of the parlour into the tap-room.

EDWARD GAYTON ; examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are valet to Mr. Newbolt. - A. I am.

Q. On the 10th of July last, did you see the prosecutor and the prisoner together at Fulham. - A. I did.

Q. Was the prosecutor at that time perfectly sober. - A. For any thing I know of.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner saying any thing to you respecting the prosecutor having any thing about him. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 10th of July did the prisoner say any thing about the prosecutor having money. - A. As Mr. Bartlett returned from the water side, after he was out of the boat, Mr. Bartlett said that he was in a great deal of distress about his wife, he said that he would give her all the property he had about him to live with her, and to get her back again; he said he would give her all he had about him, which he said was six hundred pounds.

Q. What did the prisoner say to that. - A. The prisoner said that he had the money about him, and that he would restore it to his wife.

Q. The prosecutor's son was in Mr. Newbolt's service. - A. He was.

Q. Was he gone to Oxford. - A. No, he was at home at that time.

MICHAL KELLY; examined by Mr. Gurney. You keep the Welch Harp , Peter street, Soho. - A. I did at that time.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor coming to your house on that day. - A. I do, I cannot particularly tell the day.

Q. It was in July. - A. Yes.

Q. There was another man with him - A. There was three of them.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober. - A. No, Mr. Bartlett was not.

Q. After they had been in your house some time did you see any thing pass about a pocket book. - A. Yes; they were first in the tap-room and then in the parlour.

Q. Did you see a pocket book in his hand. - A. I saw the pocket book open in the prisoner's hand.

Q. Did it appear a pocket book like that. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that it was in the prisoner's hands, did any conversation pass between the prosecutor and the prisoner. - A. Yes, the prisoner said d - n it there is nothing in it.

Q. What reply did the prosecutor make. - A. Then he said you have robbed me.

Q. Did you stay in the room any longer. - A. No, I came out immediately and went into the tap room.

Q. Did you see how it came in the prisoner's hand. - A. No.

Q. How long did they stay. - A. About five minutes; then the prisoner and the man that was with him rushed out together.

Q. Was that an elderly man that was with him. - A. Yes; it was an elderly man; I followed and I could not overtake them. Instead of going up Berwick street they went another way; I went up Berwick street.

Q. So they illuded you. - A. Yes.

JOHN GIBBONS; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are clerk in the library in the bank of England. - A. Yes.

Q. Pray, sir, have you a cancelled bank note, No. 738, 30th June 1806, three hundred pounds. - A. Yes. (Producing it).

JAMES DICIKNSON . Q. You are one of the out-tellers. - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive that note from Messrs. Masterman and Co. on the 9th of August last. - A. I did.

Q. From your bringing it into the bank it was cancelled. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CLOSE . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Masterman and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive that note. - A. It was remitted to me from Mr. Haywood at Manchester. I have got my book here.

Q. On what day was it remitted to you. - A. On the 9th of August. I received it from Messrs. Haywoods at Manchester.

GEORGE HUNTER . Q. I believe you are a clerk to Messrs. Haywood and Co. who are bankers at Manchester. - A. I am.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar at Messrs. Haywood and Co. in the month of August last. - A. I did, on the 7th of August.

Q. By what name did he describe himself. - A. Henry St . John.

Q. Did he say what he was. - A. No.

Q. Did you observe any thing about him that induced you to believe what he was. - A. We took him to be a captain in the army.

Q. Did he pay any sum of money into your hands. A. A three hundred pound bank note.

Q. This is the note, look at the note, do you see any thing written on it, do you see the name of Henry St. John written there. - A. Yes.

Q. By whom was it written. - A. I cannot exactly say whether he wrote it or no.

Q. Did you remit that afterwards to Messrs. Masterman and Co. - A. I did, on the 7th of August on the same day.

Q. How much of the three hundred pound was drawn out of your hands. - A. About two hundred and ninety-three pounds that he drew out; there is a small balance left.

GEORGE ARNOLD. I am a stock-broker.

Q. Did you give a check on Messrs. Boldero and Co. to the prosecutor. - A. On the 7th of July last I gave a check on Messrs. Boldero and Co. for six hundred and nineteen pounds; that was the consideration for a thousand pound stock sold in the three per cent, consols; it was given in the presence of the prisoner.

EDWARD STEVENS . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Boldero and Co. - A. I am.

Q. Did you on the 7th of July last pay the prosecutor that check. - A. I did.

Q. Look and see whether a note, No. 738, three hundred pounds was given on that day for that check. A. Yes, dated the 30th of June.

GEORGE HENSON . Q. In consequence of something did the prisoner call on you on the last day of October. - A. He did; on the 31st of October the prisoner called upon me, he said his name was Henry St. John . I asked him if he was the person that paid in the note that came from Messrs. Haywood and Co., he said he had, and he had called upon me for the ballance. I asked him if he knew what that balance was, he said no; I told him that I had mislaid the letter, and I did not know the exact account of the balance, that I had put it down in my lower office, I would go and look for it; this was up stairs. I went down stairs and sent my clerk for a constable, I went up again to the prisoner, and told the prisoner that I could not lay my hand upon the letter, but my clerk was looking for it, I begged him to sit down, and I dare say I should find it; he said he could not stay, he had a lady ill, in a coach, and desired me to pay the balance to a Mr. Wren.

Q. Do you know such a person as Mr. Wren. - Yes, a publican in Cow Cross; I told him I must have his authority, and begged him to write it; he began to write the authority, he did not finish it, but begged that I would write it, and put that which he was writing in his pocket. I accordingly writ an authority, and desired him to sign it, which he did, which I have now in my hand; he then was going away. I told him he could not go for that the bill of three hundred pounds that he had paid into the hands of Messrs. Haywood and Co. at Manchester had been stolen from a client of mine, and that I suspected him to be the man; first he said he would go, I was on the stairs to stop him, he pushed by me to the door, but my clerk taking the precaution of locking it, he could not get out; he afterwards was very quiet and sat down when he saw I was resolute, and he said his name was not St. John. The constable came and he was secured.

Q. Look at the writing of Henry St. John at the back of that note, do you believe that is his hand writing. - A. I believe from having seen him write once that is his hand writing.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first instance I wish your lordship to understand that the prosecutor has perjured himself in his evidence twenty times; Mr. Henson's amounts to the same thing. So far when he asked my name prior, I told him Frederick Smith , that I acted as agent to St. John; he charged me with respect to the acquaintance I had with that man (I am speaking of Mr. Henson), I said that I come from him, I would show him the man, and take him myself; that was refused. The last time that I was brought here I had respectable people from the country; at the present instance I have none; many of them live in Hampshire. The prosecutor has brought these people from Manchester, whom I know not though I do not deny that I negotiated the note. The man was with me and put his dot on the note.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-7

75. MARTIN ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , thirty pound weight of lead, value 7 s. affixed to a building belonging to our Sovereign Lord the King .

Second count for the like offence, laying it to be the property of Thomas Pope , affixed to a building of his.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RICHARD TAYLOR; examined by Mr. Knapp. In what situation are you. - A. I am a bricklayer, I was employed in his majesty's building of the Mint by Mr. Pope.

Q. How was you employed on this day. - A. I was pointing the lead flushing.

Q. Was this lead completely finished in laying it completely down. - A. It was affixed completely to the building, the holdfasts were drove in.

Q. On the day the prisoner was apprehended what was the business the prisoner had to do there. - A. He was employed as a scaffold man to attend upon the masons. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon I saw him first on the place where the lead was missing, he had no business there that I know of; then I had to go to another part of the building to do my work, and by that time I had got to that place he had got round to a place where he was cutting the lead up and beating it to pieces; I observed him half an hour before I informed Mr. Pope.

Q. What lead did it appear to you to be. - A. Gutter lead flushing; it was like the lead that belonged to the same place; I went there and informed Mr. Pope of it, he gave me strict charge to watch him, and to do nothing else all the day. At the time that I got back to the place again, he was still at work

beating of it up, he did not see me, I was above him; he continued cutting it up till he had finished it, then he broke a hole through the centers and let it down into another apartment; I watched him into the same place where it was dropped; I could not see him any more then till he came out again.

Q. Had you at any intermediate time given any information to Wood the porter. - A. Yes; then I watched him till he put on his coat; the bell rang, and I followed him to the gate, I saw Wood stop him, I saw the lead taken from him; it was about thirty pound weight.

Q. Was it taken from him or had any dropped from him. - A. There was some dropped from him, and Wood took one or two bits from him that was hid under his waistcoat; the prisoner begged Mr. Pope's pardon when he was taken. He said it was the first offence that he had ever done.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Are you quite sure that the lead was affixed, or only placed to be affixed. - A. It was quite fast, it only wanted pointing to stop it up.

Q. What sort of a place is it. - A. It is called the New Mint, it is a strong building.

- WOOD; examined by Mr. Knapp. You are the porter to the gate. - A. I am.

Q. Did you stop the prisoner. - A. When he came to the gate he was not willing to go, he seemed as if he wanted to turn back again; I took him into the lodge; I took one piece of lead from his person, the five pieces he dropped, they were cut into small pieces. He went down on his knees and begged for mercy.

THOMAS POPE ; examined by Mr. Knapp. You were superintending the work of his majesty's mint. A. Yes.

Q. You are responsible for the whole. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you in consequence of information that you received, observe afterwards where the lead was taken from. - A. Yes.

Q. Did there appear that there had been a quantity of lead affixed cut. - A. It had been drawn out of the wall; it was one of the gutters of the principal building, and some lead had been taken away.

Q. Afterwards did you see some lead produced. - A. Yes, it is here in small pieces of five or six pounds.

Court. How did they appear to be taken off. - A. It was drawn out of the plant of the wall; it was new lead, and the pieces are new lead.

Mr. Knapp. I do not now ask you whether you can swear to the identity of the lead, but all the lead that was on that building was under your charge. - They are, the whole is under my charge.

Court. Was the lead affixed in this case as it is in all others. - A. Yes, it is.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a scaffolder at the mint ; I went upon the flat to get me a brace for the scaffold, there I saw this lead lay, I took it up, says I, I do not know how this came here; I chucked it down below, and when I came to the gate I was thinking of giving it into the gatehouse, but in going out of an evening the place is so crowded I could not get into the house. Mr. Wood stopped me with this lead; and immediately he charged me with it, I gave it him.

GUILTY , aged 42

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-8

84. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , a silver watch, value 50 s. and a gold seal, value 25 s. the property of Isaac Woolmoor .

ISAAC WOOLMOOR . I am a servant . On the 3d of December, between the hours of eleven and twelve at night, I was carrying a child of my master's from the play; I had got about an hundred yards in Brydges street, Covent Garden .

Q. What age was the child. - A. About seven years old. When a mob of people collected, and in the mob I saw the prisoner in the act of pulling my watch from my fob; I observed the prisoner drawing the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Your master and family went to the play that night. - A. Yes.

Q. You were carrying a girl in your arms, and while you were carrying this girl to the coach you found somebody take the watch from your pocket. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do then. - A. I collared him; I said, you rascal you have robbed me; my master called out to me to give him the child. Then I laid hold of the prisoner with both hands, I called out to the watch, to whom I gave him in charge; I saw him shift the watch from one of his hands to another; I called out there goes my watch. After stopping twenty minutes two other watchmen came and took him to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

You were coming out of the door into Brydges street. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence when the play was over there were a great quantity of people. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that you saw the prisoner with your watch in his hand. - A. I am certain of it.

Q. Did you give that account at Bow street. - A. I did.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-9

76. JANE LENNAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , three sheets, value 6 s. three neck handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Mason . One gown, value 4 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. a shawl, value 1 s. a cap, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Fossit .

BENJAMIN MASON. I am a publican , I live at the George, Greek street, Soho . On the 16th of December the prisoner came into my service; she continued with me till the 20th, and when she was gone a number of things were missing by my niece; on the Monday following I was told that she was getting her dinner at the alamode beef shop; that was on the 22nd. I had her taken into custody, she had a bundle with her, and in the bundle part of the property was found, and she gave me the duplicates of some of the other things; the pawnbroker produced them at Marlborough street and gave up the property. She took me and the constable to an old clothes shop in Great St. Andrew street, where

she had sold a pair of sheets for five shillings. When the constable searched her he found two more duplicates besides, which were my property, and they were given up at Marlborough street.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-10

77. ELIZABETH BRIANT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Morgan , he and his wife being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon on the 8th of February , and stealing therein one habit shirt, value 2 s. five caps, value 5 s. two yards of lace, value 1 s. three ribbons, value 6 d, five half handkerchiefs, value 2 s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 5 s. two frills, value 4 d. one muslin frock, value 1 s. a cambric cap, value 6 d. and a gown, value 2 s. the property of John Morgan .

ANN MORGAN. I am a married woman; I lost these articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. When had you last seen these things before you missed them. - A. On the 8th of February at twelve o'clock, and I missed them at one o'clock they were in my back parlour on my bed. I saw them again at the office in Lambeth street.

JOHN GRIFFITH . On Thursday I was sent for to take this woman in custody; I went to a room where she lived in Peter's court, Rosemary lane. I found nothing in the room, but I took her in custody, and as I was bringing her to the office, between seven and eight in the evening, as we went along Rosemary lane I saw her throw something from her in a dark passage that appeared white like linen; I went up the passage and picked it up just as it was throwed down, this habit shirt and three caps. I brought her to the office, and the prosecutrix said it was part of her property that was stolen out of her room.

Q. Do you know that you ever saw the prisoner before. - A. No.

Q. You do not know how the goods came to be missing. - A. No.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter at Billingsgate ; I had been to the Fourteen Stars, I was rather in liquor. Going along I met a woman in a dark brown coat, she was in liquor, she said she knew my husband, she was his countryman; she said will you go along with me, she asked me to pledge some handkerchiefs; I said, I will go and pledge these handkerchiefs at the Fourteen Stars; I went backwards, I shewed them the handkerchiefs, they would not take them in, this woman gave me the handkerchiefs, she staid in the street. I went with her to three pawnbrokers, there was never a one would take it in, they were so old; she gave me these things to take care of till Friday, I did not know that she had stole them, and Mr. Griffith's coming up and taking me, I was frightened; I threw them out of my pocket. I am very innocent, I know nothing of it; if I was to drop down dead I do not know where that woman lives.

GRIFFITH. A little before three o'clock this woman was brought up with these handkerchiefs, she was discharged, we did not know who they belonged to; I went round to the pawnbroker's, they told me that this woman had been to pledge these handkerchiefs and they would not take them in.

GUILTY aged 35.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron

Reference Number: t18070114-11

78. BENJAMIN REECE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December , one shirt, value 4 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. two waistcoats, value 7 s. and one pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of James Dunkley .

JAMES DUNKLEY. On the 16th of December, near eight o'clock in the morning, I went into the Magpie, Fetter lane, I called for half a pint of beer; after I had been an hour, I asked the landlord's son, to take care of the bundle while I went to look after some work in the stables; I told him to be sure not to deliver it to any body but me, and I would call for it in an hour or two. The prisoner at the bar was sitting in the room all the time. I returned at eleven o'clock, and asked for my bundle, the landlord said he had delivered it to a man that described the handkerchief. The landlord and a young man in the tap went out in pursuit of the prisoner; he was brought back by the young man, but the bundle was not found.

Q. You are sure he was the man that was there in the morning when you left the bundle. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PERCH . Your father keeps the Magpie in Fetter lane. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Dunkley coming into your house on the 16th of December. - A. Yes, between seven and eight in the morning, he gave me a bundle in a dark handkerchief; he told me to keep it till he came for it, he was going out for work.

Q. When he came in with the bundle was any body else there. - A. Yes, the prisoner sat in the same box opposite of the prosecutor, he heard what he said, and he saw the bundle. At ten o'clock I went out with a message, and then the bundle was delivered in my absence.

WILLIAM PERCH , SENIOR. You keep the Magpie. - A. Yes; my son left a bundle in the bar. The prisoner at the bar was sitting in the taproom when I got up a little before eight; the boy did not say any thing to me that he had taken in a bundle of any body; some time after, I do not know whether the clock had gone ten, the prisoner came up to the bar and said I shall thank you for the bundle I left with your boy. He described it to be a dark handkerchief with a hole in the bottom; I looked for the parcel, I found an handkerchief of that description, containing a bundle, I takes up the parcel, I called the young man that was in the house, I asked him if he had seen that man deliver the parcel to my son, he said he had not. I delivered the parcel to him, he said that was his stable jacket at the bottom, he had been over the way to get work.

Q. I suppose you could see the stable waistcoat at the bottom. - A. Yes, through the hole. I am sure

the prisoner is the man whom I delivered it to.

Q. How soon afterwards did the prosecutor come. A. About twenty minutes afterwards the prosecutor came and asked for the bundle, and then I called the young man that was in the tap to go and look after the man.

JOHN CRANK. I am a porter to the White Horse, Fetter lane.

Q. Do you remember to whom the parcel was delivered. - A. Yes, to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. When the prosecutor came and gave information you went in search of him. - A. Yes. I met with the prisoner at a public house in the Strand, he was smoking his pipe. He asked me to drink, I told him no; I asked him whether he had not been in Fetter lane that morning, he said he had not; I told him he had, and he was the person that took the bundle out of the landlord's hand. I asked him to come back along with me, he said he would; he came along with me to Mr. Pearch's, and I fetched a constable.

Q. Did you find the bundle. - A. No, he had nothing with him when I took him. They said at the house they did not see him bring in any thing with him there.

Q. Are you sure he was the man. - A. He was the man that took the bundle from the landlord.

Q. Dunkley, what did your handkerchief contain. - A. One shirt, two white handkerchiefs, two pair of stockings, two jackets, and a pair of shoes. The handkerchief had a hole at the bottom.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge brought against me. I was not on the spot that morning, I was at Lambeth.

GUILTY aged 40.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-12

79. JOHN FORDHAM and JOHN HARVEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Whitebread , about the hour of seven at night on the 15th of December , in the parish of Tottenham, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 30 l. in monies, numbered, and two bank notes for the payment of ten pound each, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Whitebread .

The case was stated by Mr. Arabin.

SARAH WHITEBREAD ; examined by Mr. Arabin. Are you the wife of Thomas Whitebread . - A. Yes.

Q. Where is his house situate. - A. In the parish of Tottenham, Middlesex .

Q. Were you at home on the evening of the 15th of December last. - A. Yes.

Court. What is Mr. Whitebread by employment. A. He works at Mr. Driver's, he works at the barges and minds the wharf . On the 15th in the evening I was at home, and the boy William Trueman . A little before seven I heard a knock at the door, and the boy went; he asked who is there, I was in the kitchen, I heard the boy.

Mr. Arabin. Was it dark. - A. Yes, they said they wanted Mr. Whitebread.

Court. Were there more voices than one. - A. Only one answered. I asked what their names was, they said their name was Brown, as I understood them. I told the boy to unbolt the door, and there were three men came in.

Q. Describe the appearance of these men. - A. The first man had a black face, and a rough brown coat on; a tall man.

Mr. Arabin. Was that a black face, or a mask, or how. - A. I cannot say; they took hold of my arm, and my arm was all black. The first man was a tall man, the second man was a man with a light coloured coat on. I cannot recollect the third, I was so frightened.

Q. Did you observe any one else. - A. Yes, there was one outside the door, there was four in all; the man that was of the outside, he took the door and pulled it to, and when they came in the first man said your life or your money.

Q. Did he do any thing at the same time. - A. No, not to me; the second man had fire arms of the same sort as the first. The tall man asked me for my keys, I went into the parlour and took them out of the buffet, he pushed me up stairs before him, and I shewed him where the money was in the secretary; he said that was not all; he took the keys out of the secretary, and made me go to a dressing glass.

Q. Did he take any money out. - A. Yes, out of the secretary he took two ten pound notes and gold, I cannot say rightly the sum of the gold, it was all loose.

Q. How much do you suppose, was there fifteen or twenty guineas. - A. There were more than that; they asked me to shew them the key of the dressing glass, and I did, there was nothing in the drawer; they looked in a closet in the bed room, they did not take any thing from there; then they came down stairs.

Q. Which of them was it that took the money. - A. The tall man that first came in the dark coloured coat, they went down stairs and went into the parlour, they asked me for my plate, I told them I had none; they looked round the parlour, then they went out.

Q. Was the fact so that there was no plate in the house. - A. There was plate in the house, I told them that there were none.

Q. They were satisfied that you told them so, had you any considerable quantity of plate in the house. - A. No, we had silver tea spoons, table spoons, and sugar tongs, and things of that sort.

Q. Now look at the two prisoners at the bar, and see what is your opinion as to their persons only, say as to your belief. - A. I cannot swear to them, they were so disguised, they are about the size of them.

Q. Was the tall man much of the size of one of the prisoners. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the man in the light coloured coat like the least of them. - A. Yes.

Court. Was it a coat of the same colour he wears now. - A. Yes, the same colour.

Q. Was it the same make. - A. I did not take notice of the make.

Harvey. I should have thought that she would know my voice, by seeing me before. - A. Nobody spoke but the first man, he spoke very gruff.

Court. Have you heard him speak since he was taken up. - A. Yes, but he did not speak the same as

he spoke then; he said, Come along, in a very gruff way.

WILLIAM TRUEMAN ; examined by Mr. Arabin. Are you are a servant to Mr. Whitebread. - A. Yes.

Q. How old are you. - A. Fifteen years of age.

Q. Were you at home on the 15th of December, about seven in the evening. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect a knock being given at the door. - A. Yes, I went to the door, I asked who is there, they said they wanted Mr. Whitebread; my mistress asked who was there, they said their name was Brown. I opened the door, and one tall man came in first, the next was a man with a white mask on; the tall man had a black face and a large rough brown coat on. There was a third man came in, I cannot say how he was dressed.

Q. What sort of clothes had the second man on. A. A white coat like that he has on now (witness pointing to Harvey), the second man presented a blunderbuss to my mistress, she run into the parlour and got the keys out of the buffet.

Q. Who told her to go and get the keys. - A. Fordham, the tall man; he took hold of her arms and shoved her up stairs, and another followed her, and one looked inside the stairs and went a little way up. I cannot say how far he went up, he staid there till just as they were coming down, and then he come down before them; when the three men came into the house I had the latch of the door in my hand, they pulled the latch of the door out of my hand, and somebody on the outside pulled it too. When they came down stairs they took the candle and went into the parlour and asked for the plate; my mistress answered I have got no plate; they looked into two or three of the other cupboards, and they found nothing there; they went out.

Q. Now look at the prisoners at the bar and see what is your belief respecting them. - A. The tall man is very much like the man that first came into the house, and I think the other is very much like the man that had the white mask on his face and the white coat.

Harvey. He knows me very well ever since he was a little boy by working at the river. Vardon that lodged with me is just my size.

Court. (to Trueman) Have you known this man. A. Yes, he is a bargeman.

Q. What has he been doing for some time past, has he been at work there. - A. Yes, about half a year ago.

Q. You do not know that he has been there for this last half year. - A. No, not to my knowledge.

Q. How happened you to see him so frequent when he was at work, did the barge come near to your house. - A. It came past our house, I have seen him in the public house frequently.

Q. In the course of his business the barge came by your house. - A. Yes.

Q. So that you was very well acquainted with him. - A. Yes.

ENOCH ROBERTS; examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you remember where you was on Monday the 15th of December. - A. I do, I was at my lodgings, and likewise in two or three different public houses.

Q. Were you, among other houses, at the Catherine Wheel . - A. Yes.

Q. With whom were you in company. - A. With John Fordham , John Harvey , and William Vardon .

Q. Did any conversation pass between you. - A. There was, concerning the robbery of Mr. Whitebread's house, just under Stamford Hill, by the side of the river Lea.

Q. Who proposed it. - A. John Harvey and William Vardon ; they said that they particularly knew the man, and knew that he had been in the habit of saving money a long while, and they knew that he must have in the house between two and three hundred pounds. Harvey and Vardon asked Fordham and me if we would go and join them, and help get into the house, there was money in the house, and the money was to be got very easily; after a long while we agreed to go with them.

Q. What time did you set out. - A. I believe a little before six o'clock in the evening, from the Red lion in Black lion yard, in Whitechapel; we walked towards Stamford hill, and just as we came upon the hill, going across the field to Clapton, by the river Lea, we there made a stop, and agreed who was to go into the house. John Fordham was to knock at the door, John Harvey , William Vardon , was to follow, I ( Enoch Roberts ) was to stand with the door in my hand, outside. Accordingly we went to the house, we disguised ourselves, John Fordham buttoned his coat all the way up and blacked his face with pearl black; he wetted his hand and put it on with water.

Q. Will this black easily come off. - A. Yes, it will easily come off and black your hands. John Harvey blacked his face in the same way; after blacking his face he put on a white mask. He blacked his face for fear the mask should be knocked off. William Vardon had a black crape over his face.

Q. What sort of a coat had Harvey got on. - A. Harvey had rather a whitish coat.

Q. Was it like that which he has got on now. - A. Rather darker than that.

Q. How was Vardon dressed. - A. He had on a smock frock and white cotton stockings.

Q. Had any of you any weapons. - A. Yes, John Fordham had a pistol, and Harvey and Vardon had a pistol.

Q. The other three had each a pistol, had you any. - A. No, they did not think it necessary for me to have any pistol, thinking I should not want we went to the door, John Fordham knocked at the door. I hearing an answer in the house, by a boy as I thought, saying who is there, John Fordham asked if Mr. Whitebread was at home; they answered no, what did he want of him, the boy asked; he said he wished to see him. The boy asked if he would leave any message, as he was not at home; he said no, he would not leave any message. She asked what the name was, he answered Brown. I heard the woman say, oh, it is Brown, open the door she said, and the door was opened. John Fordham entered in, John Harvey was next, and William Vardon followed; I took the door in my hand after them, standing of the outside. I heard Fordham demand the keys of the woman, and ordered her up stairs to shew him where the money was; from which I saw nor heard no more till they came down stairs.

John Fordham came to the door to me, telling me he had got the money, but could find no plate; asking me what they had best to do, whether they had best to take any thing else or not, I answered him no, not to take any thing else, I said come along; he turned round and called the other two, who followed him out of the house. The woman came to the door, she looked out of the door and spoke crying, and said, how could you serve me so. We then walked away, we met a man about an hundred yards off, we passed by him, and bid him good night, and he did the same; we went to the top of the hill, we made the agreement how to get in the house at the top of the hill, and there we parted the plunder at the top of the meadow.

Q. Who produced what they took. - A. John Fordham produced the money.

Court. Did he say from where he got it. - A. I understood that he said he got the money from the bureau, all the money that he produced was twenty three guineas in gold, and three bank notes of one pound. We parted the money equally alike, excepting three shillings that the prisoner Harvey had in his possession; we agreed to go to the Nag's-head, in Hackney road, and there to spend the three shillings which was not parted between us. We went to the Nag's-head, we had some ale and some gin.

Mr. Gurney. Before you came up the hill, had any thing been done with respect to the disguise. - A. We washed our faces with the water that we got before we came to the hill.

Q. That is on the common then. - A. Yes.

Court. What became of the mask. - A. John Harvey had it in his pocket.

Mr. Gurney. Did you share the money. - A. Yes, we shared that upon the hill.

Q. Did you go to town together. - A. We remained at the Nag's head near an hour, we then parted two and two. I went with Fordham as far as the Peacock, Bethnall green, to his lodgings, he went into his lodgings, and I went on to my lodging; he saying when we parted he should come to my lodgings to-morrow; he accordingly came to my lodgings the next day, on Sunday the day before I was taken up. I then received a pistol from him, and likewise some balls he had run and gave me.

Q. Had you known any thing respecting that pistol before. - A. I had seen it before, I saw it just after he had bought it; as near as I can guess about three months before.

Q. Did you know from him how he came in possession of it. - A. He told me that he bought it at a small shop like a pawnbroker's, in Whitechapel, for twenty-five shillings, and I gave him half the money for it. The pistol that I had on that Sunday was one of that pair. I was apprehended on the Monday following, the next day after I received the pistol.

Q. When you was apprehended was that pistol found upon you. - A. It was the pistol.

Q. On your being apprehended did you give the officers any information. - A. I did, here is a stick that was carried by John Fordham .

Jonathan Trott . That stick was delivered to me by Mr. Whitebread.

MR. WHITEBREAD; examined by Mr. Gurney. Where was that stick found. - A. It laid under the secetary, and the drawers laid upon the top of it; the drawers were pulled out and put upon it.

Q. I need not ask you whether it was there when you went out. - A. No.

Roberts. John Fordham pulled it out of the edge just as we crossed the common, just before we came into the meadow, a very little while before we came unto the house; such a stick as this he pulled out of the edge, he took it with him, with respect that if any of the house was at home, if he could not frighten them with the pistol, to strike them with this; not to fire at them.

Fordham. Enoch Roberts is the man that bought the pistols, I know nothing more about Mr. Whitebread's robbery than a child unborn,

JONATHAN TROTT ; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are a police officer of Hatton Garden office. - A. I am.

Q. On Monday the 22nd of December, did you with Chapman go in pursuit of Roberts. - A. I did; he was taken by Chapman in my absence, I saw him after Chapman had taken him. In consequence of information that he gave me, I went to a small cook's shop in Hackey Road, where I was informed Harvey lodged; when I entered the house I left Chapman outside of the house, I saw two men in the back room; the prisoner with a handkerchief tied round one of his eyes; the other I believe was the master of the house, he called himself so; I asked the landlord if Harvey lodged there, the man made answer no. I then asked Harvey if his name was not Harvey, he said no; at that time he was reading something, I cannot say whether it was a newspaper or not. I then directed my brother officer to come into the house and take care of him, I had great suspicion that that man was him. I went up stairs to search the house.

Q. What room did you go to up stairs. - A. I think the two pair, I am not positive; in a room in a bag I found this mask, I then called out to my brother officer that all was right, to be sure and take care of the man below. I then came down and took Harvey into custody and he acknowledged that his name was Harvey. I told the landlord in Harvey's presence that it was wrong to deny Harvey's lodging there, he admitted it was wrong, and he said he should not have lodged there if he had known such a thing had been, or something to that purpose.

Q. Did you then ask Harvey any questions concerning of that room. - A. Yes he admitted that he slept there and that this mask was not his, it belonged to another person.

Q. Did he say who that person was. - A. He did not, the landlord said he was a little smith that lodged there. We then took Harvey in a coach to the Peacock on Bethnal Green; I went to the room described where Fordham lodged; when I entered the room I found Fordham laying in the bed, with his hat, shoes, and coat off; all the rest of his things were on.

Q. What time of the day was this. - A. It was in the afternoon, it was day light. He lifted up his head and looked in an alarming way; seeing him so restless as that, I pulled out a pistol and said Jack be quiet; he was putting his arm out as if he was going

to take his coat. I told him if he offered to resist I would blow his brains out. I then called to Chapman to take hold of the coat and to search- it, he searched it, and a pistol was found in one of the pockets.

Q. Did you handcuff him. - A. Yes, he was handcuffed. I searched the room and found a pair of bullet moulds. While I was in the act of searching about the room and Chapman too, he made a sudden spring, and he, I imagine, meant to run down stairs. He tumbled down stairs and went to the bottom, we caught him and secured him, and we returned up stairs again. This coat was laying in one corner of the room, it has got country dirt on it.

Roberts. That is the same coat he did the robbery in.

Q. (to Trott) Did you go to these two lodgings of Fordham and Harvey in pursuance of information given by Roberts. - A. I did, else had it not been for that I should not have known where to find them. I found two papers of powder black, I take it to be lamp black; in the hurry and confusion we were in it was all spilt.

Court. Do you know such a thing as pearl black. - A. I know lamp black, I believe this is lamp black, the inside of that mask shows there has been some blacking in it.

Mr. Gurney. The right cheek of the mask has some blacking in it now.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN ; examined by Mr. Gurney. You are likewise a police officer, and was with Trott on the day he has mentioned. - A. Yes; I apprehended Roberts in Whitechapel, near the Blue Boar. I found a pistol in his pocket, I produce it.

Q. From the information that he gave to you and Trott, did you go after Harvey and Fordham. - A. We did, as quick as possibly we could.

Q. You apprehended Harvey as he has described. - A. Yes.

Q. You went and apprehended Fordham. - A. Yes, after I stroked him down to see what he had got about him, then I turned round and found the pistol in his coat pocket; the coat was on the bed.

Q. Did you compare that pistol with the pistol you found upon Roberts. - A. I have, they make a pair exactly.

Fordham. I have a question to ask Roberts; pray Roberts where did you see me the Sunday before I was apprehended. - A. At my lodgings, in Black Lion yard, Whitechapel, No. 4.

Fordham. I was never out of the house all day, did I buy the pistols or you.

Court. The question is did he buy the pistols or you. - A. He told me he bought them, I never saw him buy them.

Fordham. You do not care whose life you swear away, to save your own neck. I have nothing further to say.

Harvey's Defence. I have got two separate people where I lodge to come forward; I have nothing further to say than this, the other prisoner at the bar knows that I was never out a thieving in my life.

Fordham. I never knew him in my life.

CRISPIN JESSOP . How long have you known Harvey. - A. The first time of my knowing him was, he coming and taking the lodgings, about seventeen days before he was taken.

Q. You are the cook, are you. - A. I was officiating for my brother in law, he was in the country. On the 15th of December, I remember seeing Harvey come in, I did not know his name then; as near as I can recollect somewhere about eight o'clock in the evening.

Court. I would advise you to take care of what you say, because if the jury disbelieves you there is an end of Harvey.

Jessop. I had been to meet my brother in law, who was coming out of Sussex by the coach, and he and I came home with the bundle from the coach.

Q. Is your brother here. - A. Yes, the coach came in about half past six, we came directly from the Flower Pot , in Bishopsgate street, to my sister at the cook's shop; my brother in law had not been in town to the cook's shop since my sister took it; I sent my sister to him.

Q. You told me that you both came together from the coach. - A. Yes, but my brother went to my house, and I went to the cook's shop. I sent my sister to my house to her husband, as was to be, they were married the next day.

Q. Who is it that keeps the cook's shop. - A. My brother in law.

Q. Was he the man that came out of Sussex and was married the next day. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you mean to say this was on the day, the 15th of December, the day before your brother was married. - A. Yes, and about half an hour after seven, or half an hour before eight, my sister and brother in law came in, they came in and had not sat down a long while, about half an hour; in came John Harvey . I did not know his name at that time.

Q. How long after your brother came in. - A. Half an hour, or somewhere thereabouts.

Q. Harvey was a stranger. - A. He had lodged in the house a few days.

Q. Then you did not know your lodgers' name, who let the lodgings to him. - A. She left it to me to take the lodgers in.

Q. You that had been in town so long, and knew London very well, did not you ask him what his name was - what are you. - A. I am a shoemaker.

Q. He had lodged there some days. - A. Yes, I told him of the affair; I told him that I was not the landlord, I was only officiating for my brother in law, who was in the country; when he came in, he says is this my new landlord that is come, I says no, I did not like to satisfy him, they were not married, the banns were up and out; I says it is not your new landlord. He would not be satisfied, with that he joked, and we had a glass of brandy; I noticed that he was there at the time of eight o'clock.

Q. What had that to do with whether he was married or not, what occasion had you to say any thing to your lodgers about it. - A. He was inquisitive.

Q. It was very natural to ask whether this was his new landlord or not, what had that to do with marriage. - A. I did not give it a thought of any thing of that kind.

Q. What was your objection of telling him whether

it was his new landlord or no. - A. All the objection was I did not like to satisfy him to have an uproar respecting the marriage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Where do you live. - A. No. 22, Turk street, Bethnall green; I am a journeyman shoemaker.

Q. At this time your sister was conducting this cook's shop, and you lived there. - A. Yes, I slept one night along with him and another man, that came and took the lodgings.

Q. Whose name you do not know. - A. Whose name I do not know; another man and him took the lodgings together.

Q. Did you enquire the name of the other man. - A. No, they both said they come out of the country, and they had slept at a public house two or three nights.

Q. Did you take any reference for their character. A. No.

Q. You had not the curiosity to ask their names, nor ask reference for their character. - A. No.

Q. You found them regular sort of lodgers, coming home at their hours, they never staid out all night. - A. Yes, one night they were out all night; at other nights they come home pretty regular.

Q. You never let them in when it was late. - A. I never let them in after hours.

Q. What do you call after hours. - A. After the shop was shut up, between ten and eleven o'clock; sometimes they were in by dusk.

Court. What was the latest hour except this one night. - A. I cannot positively say, it might be ten.

Mr. Gurney. Did they tell you that they worked on the water. - A. They came home one night and said they had been unloading some flour.

Q. Did they tell you who they worked for. - A. No.

Q. When was it that you was first of all asked to come here. - A. This morning; a stout man came to me, I did not know his name.

Q. Did you not know before this morning that you should be wanted. - A. No, I did not know till this morning, a man applied to my brother.

Q. You said you went with your brother to your house that night. - A. I went with him to my own house, to my wife.

Q. You say he did not come to stop that night, how long did he stay. - A. I cannot say, I went out and came away again.

Q. Where was he then. - A. I do not know.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. I cannot positively tell, because I had not calculated it in my mind. I know that it was on the 15th of December that I saw him at that time.

Q. Yes, that is the burthen of your song. - A. I should not have known it then if it was not for the circumstance of my brother and sister going to be married the next day.

Q. What time did you go to bed, was it before midnight or after. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Then it might be three or four o'clock for what you know. - A. I cannot say.

Q. It might be two. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Yes, you must know this memorable night when your brother was going to be married. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Who was the last person that you was in company with before you went to bed. - A. My sister, I believe.

Q. What time did your brother leave. - A. That I cannot tell.

Q. Was it before or after midnight that your brother left you. - A. It takes me at such a nonplus I cannot say. You should not get a lie out of me if I could help it.

Q. No, I want the truth. - A. When I left my sister and brother in the house I went into the city to a friend, and there I was, I cannot positively say, till eleven, and then I went home to my sister; my brother was returned to my house, I did not see my brother no more that night.

Q. Who was that friend in the city. - A. Several shoemakers in the city. It was a shoemaker's club.

Q. Give me their names, I will take them down. A. There were several shoemakers there.

Q. What time did you go out. - A. About nine.

Court. This was on the 14th. - A. No, on the 15th.

Mr. Gurney. Where did you go from. - A. Hackney road.

Q. You saw several people there, and apparently they were shoemakers, where was the house. - A. At the Golden Key, Tenter alley, Little Moorfields.

Q. How long did you stay there. - A. Till nearly eleven; from there I went to the cook's shop again in Hackney road.

Q. You did not stop any where by the way. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. What did you mean to tell me just now, that you were there all the evening, except when you left and went to your wife, you said so. -

Court. You said you had a wife. - A. So I have, I called upon my wife before I went to the meeting.

Mr. Gurney. You have just told me that you went there. - A. If I did it was through flustration.

Q. Which is true, did you or not go to your wife. - A. I cannot recollect, I did go to my wife because it was almost in my way when I went to the meeting.

Q. Where did you sup. - A. If I recollect right I supped with my sister.

Court. What hour was it that you told me you left the cook's shop. - A. About nine; I left my brother and my sister and the prisoner behind; they were in the little back parlour, as much as I recollect.

Q. Where did you go at the moment you left the cook's shop - A. I cannot say, I hardly know whether I called at my wife's or not, I know I went to the meeting, and staid there till nearly eleven, and went straight back to the cook's shop.

Q. Who did you find there. - A. My sister; the prisoner was in bed.

Q. How do you know that. - A. I slept in the room.

Q. What time did you go to bed. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Was it early, was it before six in the morning, or before four. - A. Yes.

Q. Before two. - A. Yes, between twelve and one I really believe I was in bed.

Q. What time did you go out. - A. About nine.

Q. Was your sister up when you returned. - A

Yes.

Q. When you went to bed did you find the prisoner in bed. - A. Yes.

Q. You supped with your sister, did the prisoner sup with you. - A. No, he was a-bed, there was nobody up but my sister when returned.

Q. How long before this had you let the lodgings to the prisoner. - A. I think to the best of my recollection it was the Friday preceding.

Q. That is three days before. - A. I cannot say whether it was the Friday before or the Friday week before.

Q. How long before had your sister the cook's shop. - A. About a week before; I recollect that it was a week before the Monday that I let him have the lodgings.

Q. Was your sister all the time with you in the house. - A. Yes she was, she was in town looking out for a situation, she was a cook in a family and he was a coachman.

Q. How long did your sister keep this cook's shop before this time. - A. I do not know whether it was a fortnight or three weeks, I do not know which altogether.

Q. Where had you been before nine o'clock that you went out to the city. - A. I had been looking after the coach; it was about half past five I went out to meet the coach.

Q. After you had been looking after the coach you went to your brother's house. - A. Me and my brother in law went with the box and parcels, and my brother in law went to my house, No. 22, Turk street, I went to the cook's shop.

Q. What o'clock was that. - A. About seven o'clock I went to my sister's house.

Q. Who did you see there. - A. My sister.

Q. Any body else. - A. No, not to my knowledge; I told my sister that her intended husband had come up and that he was at my house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner then. - A. No, he came in about eight o'clock, a few minutes under or over.

Q. Did you stay there till nine o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. When did your brother in law come to the shop. - A. He came about half past seven, it might be a little more, I cannot exactly say, when he came in.

Q. Where was you. - A. I was in the little parlour or else in the shop.

Q. Where did the prisoner continue after he came in at eight o'clock. - A. In the back parlour.

Q. He remained one of the company in the back parlour. - A. Yes.

SAMUEL AUSTIN . Q. What do you know of this young man. - A. I do not know much of him.

Q. You are a stranger to him I understand, when did you come up to London from Sussex. - A. On the 15th of December.

Q. What makes you know that it was the 15th. - A. I know it by being married on Tuesday, Monday was the 15th and Tuesday was the 16th.

Q. You came to London by the coach, where did you alight. - A. I got out at the sign of the Bricklayer's Arms.

Q. Before you come to town. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you arrive. - A. About five o'clock. I got into the coach again.

Q. Where did the coach finally stop. - A. I forget the name where the coach stopped.

Q. Was it somewhere in the city. - A. It was somewhere in Westminster.

Q. What time of the day did you quit the coach for good and all. - A. I think it was between six and seven.

Q. Where did you go then. - A. I went to my brother in law's house.

Q. How did you find your way there. - A. An acquaintance of his came and shewed me the way there; I came home with his acquaintance, his apprentice.

Q. Did you meet your brother in law himself. - A. Yes, I cannot exactly say the public house.

Q. When you got out of the coach, did you find him there. - A. Yes, he was at the Bolt and Tun.

Q. Was that where the coach stopped in Fleet street. - A. The coach stopped at another house; he met me there.

Q. About what time of the day was that. - A. I think it was near seven

Q. Your brother met you there did he. - A. Yes.

Q. Did his apprentice come there. - A. Yes.

Q. Any body else. - A. No, then we went to his own house.

Q. What time did you get there. - A. Somewhere between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. How long did you stay there. - A. I believe a quarter of an hour.

Q. Where did you go from thence. - A. To a cook's shop in Hackney road.

Q. What time did you get there. - A. It was near about eight o'clock.

Q. Who did you find there. - A. The woman that is my wife now.

Q. Who besides. - A. Nobody directly.

Q. Did any body come in afterwards. - A. Yes, there came in a man almost directly afterwards I arrived at the cook's shop.

Q. Who was that man. - A. My mistress said it was her lodger.

Q. Had you heard his name. - A. No.

Q. What part of the house was the lodger. - A. The shop. to the best of my recollection.

Q. How soon did your brother in law come in. - A. He came in almost directly.

Q. You both went together from the Bolt and Tun. - A. Yes.

Q. You found your wife there and soon afterwards there came in a man. - A. Yes, when we was at tea.

Q. In what room were you at tea. - A. In the back parlour.

Q. How many were there at tea. - A. Three of us.

Q. That is your wife, your brother in law, and yourself. - A. Yes.

Q. This was about eight o'clock that you came in, how long after eight o'clock was it that you sat down to tea. - A. We sat down in a very little time, I believe in a quarter of an hour.

Q. How long did you continue at tea. - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q. What became of the lodger. - A. He sat in the shop I believe.

Q. He was not in the back parlour. - A. Not to my recollection.

Q. How long did your brother in law stay with you. - A. Till ten or eleven o'clock, I believe.

Q. Did he stay with you in conversation till ten or eleven o'clock. - A. Yes, to the best of my recollection.

Q. What became of your brother. - A. He went then home to bed.

Q. Home to his own house. - A. No, I went home to his house, and he slept in that house

Q. What time did he go to bed. - A. I believe about eleven o'clock.

Q. Then all the while, from the time you sat down to tea till ten or eleven o'clock, your brother was present. - A. Yes, and then I went home to bed.

Q. When your wife and you sat drinking tea, you are sure your brother was there all the while. - A. Yes.

Q. You think it was about eleven o'clock when your brother went to bed, and you left the house and went to his house. - A. Yes.

Q. You never had seen this lodger before had you. A. No, nor I have not seen him since frequent.

Q. How long did he stay at your house after that. A. A few days.

Q. What account did your brother give you of this lodger, did he tell you his name. - A. No.

Q. Did he tell you on what terms he had let the lodgings. - A. He told me that he had let the lodgings at eighteen pence a-week; there was another man that lodged with him, but I never saw him in the house no further than I saw him come in once and go out again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

What time did you sup - A. We did not have any supper, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Were you at tea when the lodger came in. - A. No, we were not at tea then.

Q. You say he was in the shop, did you ask him in the back room. - A. No, I have no recollection that we did.

Q. Did he stay when he came in. - A. Yes, till he went to bed, somewhere about ten or eleven o'clock. I think my brother and he went to bed together, I will not be certain.

Q. How long was it after they were gone to bed that you went to your brother's to sleep. - A. Directly.

Q. Did you stay in the house after they were gone to bed. - A. No, I think I went away just before.

Q. If you had gone away before, how do you know they went to bed together. - A. I know no more than my wife told me.

Q. Were you the person that when the officer came, told him that no such person as Harvey lodged there. - A. Yes, not knowing his name, I said there was no such man as I knew of; the gentleman said shew me the lodging up stairs, and I directly went and shewed him the room where Harvey lodged.

Q. You say that you did not see the other lodger there more than once or twice. - A. No.

Q. When was that. - A. I cannot say I am sure.

Q. Perhaps you will recollect presently. - A. It was in the daytime that I saw him.

Q. You had no occasion to get up in the night and let any body in. - A. No, not that I know of.

Q. It was only a week that they lodged in the house before Harvey was taken up, you must know whether you had any occasion in the night to let any body in. - A. Yes, once.

Q. Early or late in the night. - A. It might be about twelve, I do not know exactly.

Q. At what inn was it your brother met you. - A. I forgot the inn that the coach stopped at, and I forget the name of the street; I came by the Hastings coach.

Q. In what street was it that your brother met you. A. I do not know.

Q. Over which bridge did you come. - A. We came over no bridge.

Q. Yes, yes, you must; you say you came from the Bricklayer's Arms. - A. Yes, I am sure I did not come over Westminster bridge; we came along Kent street.

Q. Did you come over London bridge or Blackfriars. - A. I do not know; the coachman told me it was about a mile and a half or two mile from Shoreditch church. I know nothing of London.

Q. Did you look to the clock when Harvey came in. - A. No.

Q. How long do you think it was from the time he came in to the time that you went away. - A. I should think it was three hours that he was in the house.

Q. You yourself did not get in till eight o'clock, how long after that did he come in. - A. Almost directly.

Q. Might it not be so late as nine when Harvey came in. - A. No, my wife told me it was just eight o'clock when I came in, and the prisoner Harvey came in soon after.

Q. You tell me when you left the cook's shop, you went home to go to bed, who did you leave behind you in the house. - A. I left nobody but my lodger, my new wife, and my brother-in-law, to my recollection.

Q. Where were they. - A. I think Harvey was in the shop, to the best of my knowledge they two sat in the little room.

Q. Are you quite sure that you left your brother in-law when you went away from your wife. - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. (to Trott) How far is this cook's shop from Shoreditch church. - A. About sixty yards.

Q. (to Mr. Whitebread) How far is your house from Shoreditch church. - A. Going across the fields it must be near four miles. Hackney way it must be four miles and a half.

- I am the clerk of Shoreditch church. I produce the register of the marriage. (The book handed to Mr. Gurney.)

Q. Is this your hand writing. - A. It is.

Harvey. I have nothing to say in my behalf, but that I am as innocent as a child unborn. I mentioned to this landlord's wife to ask the smith that lodged with me if he meant to quit his lodgings, I thought she might look to me for the money.

Court. (to Austin) Can you take upon yourself to say that is the man that was in your house that night. - A. Yes, that is the lodger.

FORDHAM, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

HARVEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-13

80. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a piece of copper called an Anglesea penny, value 1 d. sixteen penny pieces, and eleven halfpence , the property of William Heath , William Thomas Heath , and Edward Jones .

EDWARD JONES . I am a stationer , I live in Queen street, Cheapside.

Q. Have you any partners . - A. Yes, William Heath , and William Thomas Heath . Early in the begining of December, we discovered that some persons had taken the liberty to take money out of our till.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant to you. - A. He was a porter , he had been three years in our service I believe; in order to lead to detection, on the 12th of December I took copper money to the amount of three shillings and six pence; I marked it and put it in the till, I locked the till, and took particular notice to see that the bolt was up; this was between the hours of eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I unlocked the till between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, and found to the amount of two shillings taken out. On discovering the loss, I got an officer and took the prisoner into custody; upon searching him we found on his person one and two pence halfpenny, the principal part of my own marking. I marked them with my own initials on the Britannia side under the hand.

Q. Had there been no change given that morning. - A. No, I had the key in my pocket. I apprehend he lifted up the counter and took out the till.

WILLIAM WALTER . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner, I found in his waistcoat pocket one and tenpence halfpenny.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called his master, who said he had a very good opinion of him.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his master's good character ].

GUILTY, aged 23.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-14

81. WILLIAM COLEBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , thirty yards of kerseymere, value 7 l. 18 s. the property of John Blacket , Thomas Blacket , and James Blacket , in the dwelling house of Thomas Blacket .

THOMAS BLACKET . I live in Newgate street , I am a woollen draper .

Q. What is your partners names. - A. John Blacket , and James Blacket. On the 8th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was coming down stairs, I heard a noise in the shop; the next witness brought a boy in who had taken a piece of cloth out of the shop.

Q. Where was it before it was taken. - A. It was laying upon a table in the middle of the shop.

PETER MALLARD . I am a stay maker, I was coming down Holborn last Thursday about six o'clock in the evening, I saw this boy in company with another by the middle of Turnstile, Holborn; he was standing by the edge of the pavement, whistling and calling some other person to him; I told him he had better go about his business for he was doing no good there. And just as I was coming into Newgate street, they passed me again; I crossed over the way, and they went up Newgate street, I saw him stop at the shop window, and look into the shop; there was a coach coming by just at the time, and I saw the prisoner run across the way with this piece of kerseymere; I took hold of him and took him over to Mr. Blacket's house; he sent for an officer, and took him in custody.

Q. What became of the other boy. - A. The other boy ran down the street.

Q. You are sure this is the same boy that you saw before. - A. Yes, because I looked him full in the face, and told him he would do no good there.

JAMES WOODLAND . I am an officer; the prisoner was given into my custody, and this is the bundle; I have had it ever since.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I should be very happy to go to sea.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-15

82. JOSEPH MURFIELD and JAMES GASTEEL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of December , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of certain persons unknown.

BENJAMIN GRAY . On Sunday the 14th of December last, as I was passing through Islington, I saw a gentleman coming towards me; Murfield the prisoner and another boy was running close and slowly after him, which attracted my attention. I then saw Murfield take a pocket handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, he put it between his coat and his waistcoat, turned back, and ran away with the boy that was with him. I ordered the coachman to stop, I got from the carriage and went towards them; then Murfield gave the pocket handkerchief to the other boy.

Q. Who is that other boy. - A. I do not know.

Q. What became of the gentleman. - A. I do not know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You could not see in the gentleman's face whether he had a partnership, look whether any body else had a partnership in the handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-16

83. GEORGE EARL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a copper, value 4 l. the property of James Mullet , and Paul Mullett .

JAMES MULLETT . I am a broker and auctioneer , I live in Moorfields.

Q. Have you any partner . - A. Yes, my son Paul Mullet . On the 6th of this month, the prisoner stole the copper from my door; on being taken and brought into my accompting house, he acknowledged that he

stole it, and that he was mad for so doing.

JOHN BELL . I am porter to Mr. Mullett. I was shutting up the shop a little before five, I saw a man stand by the copper, and take and chuck it on the top of his head and walk away with it. I thought the copper was not sold, I asked my young master if any of them had sold that copper to-day, he said no; we pursued the man, and he chucked down the copper; my young master brought back the man, and I brought back the copper.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not own that I stole the copper.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-17

83. EDWARD RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , one yard of Florentine silk, value 10 s. one yard and a half of lutestring, value 5 s. 3 d. seven yards and three quarters of a yard of sarsnet, value 2 l. 3 s. 6 d. one yard and a quarter of a yard of lutestring, value 5 s. 7 d. and six hempen wrappers, value 3 s. the property of William Clay , Richard Smith , and John Haines .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

RICHARD SMITH ; examined by Mr. Gleed. I live in Crown court, Cheapside, my partners names are William Clay and John Haines , we are silk manufacturers . The prisoner at the bar was in our employ for eight years as porter , and trusted with the management of silks, which silks he was to measure and roll up .

Q. In consequence of any information did you say any thing to the prisoner and when. - A. I had some reasons to suspect him, in consequence of some suspicion. On the 5th of January I taxed him with robbing me, and he immediately confessed; I said to him, Edward you have been in my employ a great while, I conceive you are a very great rascal; I told him he had robbed me, he said, sir I have. I asked him what he had done with the property he had taken from me; he refused to tell me. In consequence of that I sent for Leadbetter the constable.

Q. Did Leadbetter and you go to the lodgings of the prisoner. - A. We did.

Q. Where was his lodgings. - A. Golden lion court, Aldersgate street.

Q. Did you find any thing in his lodging and what. - A. We found in a box that his wife refused to open, but Leadbetter broke it open, a variety of remnants of silk; these are the articles that are now in court. Leadbetter took them away, and brought them to my warehouse; we compared them with certain goods in our house that matched with them. I have no doubt but they are my property. He confessed that he had taken them before the lord-mayor.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The charges that my prosecutor has raised against me are not facts, nor is there any truth in what he has alledged against me at all. I have served that man in every shape, I have done my duty, and I have protected him in every transaction. I am now a prisoner standing at the bar, and he is a gentleman that has come out of nothing, not so much as I am myself, although I am cast down. I know Mr. Smith for ten years past, he is rising, he has left his duty. I have been the man that is faithful to him; my wife is in the millinery and mantua-line, and what was in her possession I know no more than a child unborn; but this Mr. Smith came to me in prison, he came to try me with all his invention, which is his character, and he is well known by every person in the line to be one of the most deceitful men upon earth. He invents things which is most astonishing, it is beyond the conception of a human being to imagine, that man has such things in his heart. He has come to that property which he possesses by nothing but merely by his own artful invention, and the very person that has gone into partnership with him he knows a mere nothing in the business, he knows he has a tool in his hand; this is the character of my prosecutor, which is my misfortune to be his servant. As to those things I know no more of them than a child unborn; as to those wrappers, he mentioned to me one day, he says, when we have some wrappers, just take them home to your wife to get some bags made; he knew my wife was distressed well enough; she made some for him although she had other work to do, by doing which she would have got a great deal more money; there were some wrappers left, and as she was to make them into bags, I thought it frivolous to bring them back; and these wrappers are brought against me as if I stole them. All this he knows if he would speak to his conscience.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-18

84. THOMAS HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of December , a saw, value 3 s. an axe, value 3 s. three chissels, value 3 s. and a rope fall, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Pelham .

THOMAS PELHAM . I am a carpenter , I live at No. 38. Monmouth street. I was at work at Tavistock square , I lost the tools on the 10th of December, I locked them up about five in the evening, I returned to work at seven the next morning, I found the door forced open, I missed some tools, and a rope fall that I had for hoisting of timber up. I found the chisel, axe, and saw, at Mr. Hinckesman's; the rope fall was found upon him.

- HINCKESMAN. I am a pawnbroker, No. 30, St. Giles's.

Q. There was some tools found in your shop, where did you get them. - A. Of the prisoner at the bar. On the 10th of December, towards the evening, he pledged them with me in the name of Thomas Potter ; he brought a basket of tools, containing a hand saw, a mallet, some chisels, and an axe. I gave him five shillings for them.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found this basket of tools by Russel square; I stopped there five minutes, I took it up; not seeing any person own it I went and pawned it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-19

85. JANE METCALFE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of January , two silver table spoons, value 30 s. and two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the property of George Mitchell .

SARAH MITCHELL . My husband is a broker , we live at 190, Church street, Shoreditch . On Thursday the 1st of January, about two o'clock, the prisoner came to serve me with milk, she went down as usual into the kitchen to leave the milk, I had suspicion of her when she came from the kitchen. I asked her if she had left the milk, she said she had left a pennyworth, I went down stairs, I missed a spoon, I went after her and fetched her back, I told her that she taken a spoon out of the kitchen; she denied it, I told her I was sure she had taken it, as there was nobody down there but her. She then gave it me out of her pocket; I told her that she had taken the others, but she denied it.

Q. What others. - A. I had lost some before this.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She lives with her father and mother, they are milk people.

PETER MASON . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of this girl. Mrs. Mitchell gave me this spoon that she took from her, she said that she had lost one before; she denied it. I found that she had pledged a spoon the day before and took it out again. I went to the girl's father and mother, and there I found this spoon locked up in the tea-chest.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Whipped in Goal , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-20

86. JOHN SQUARE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 30th of December , on George Huntley , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a hat, value 10 s. his property.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . I live with Mr. Phoene, upholsterer. On the 30th of December I was coming from a benefit club held in Artillery lane, at about half past twelve in the night. I met the prisoner and a woman; we went to the castle in Long alley, there we had a glass of gin a-piece.

Q. Had you been drinking a good deal at the club. A. I was a little in liquor; we were coming down Long alley together, the woman parted from us, and the man said he would see me part of the way home; and just as we came to Ball alley , he snatched my hat, turned back, and ran away with it.

Q. Did you know the man. - A. No, nor the woman.

Q. Did you ever see your hat again. - A. Not till the watchman brought it up to the watchhouse. In about half an hour afterwards he was brought to the watchhouse hat and all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

When you was at the Castle do you recollect pulling any money out of your pocket and throwing it about. - A. I dropped a seven shilling piece; the prisoner picked it up and gave it me.

THOMAS WEBB . On the 30th of December, between the hours of twelve and one at night, the prisoner and the prosecutor passed me arm and arm, and a young woman was with them. I was on my duty then, and within five minutes the prisoner ran back and passed me again; the prosecutor cried out, stop him, he has robbed me of my hat. I found where the prisoner lodged, and the constable and I went and took him; we found the hat in a lumber room in the same house where the prisoner was.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the hat.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not of the highway robbery .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-21

87. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a shaving box, value 3 s. and part of a brush, value 1 s. the property of William Marshall .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . Q. You are a brush maker living in Old Bethlem . - A. I am; the prisoner was my servant .

Q. On the 29th of December, in consequence of any suspicion that you had, did you send for an officer. - A. I did. When the officer came he searched her; I observed she moved from one part of the room to the other, and threw down part of a brush, and let a purse fall. Her box was searched in her presence, and a pair of stockings was found, and a shaving case.

RICHARD SUMNER . Q. You are the constable that was sent for to search her. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. The brush was for the kitchen, and the shaving case I had to put my cap on in general. I believe the children took it up and put it in my unlocked box; the stockings were taken in a mistake, they were old, and very bad ones.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-22

88. MARY CRAWLEY and ANN BOLTON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , twenty four yards of gingham, value 40 s. the property of John Harrison , privately in his shop , and ELIZABETH SMITH , for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to be stolen .

JOHN HARRISON . I live at No. 308, High Holborn . I am a linnen draper .

Q. What parish is your house in. - A. St. Andrew's .

Q. Do you remember on the 6th of this month any of the prisoners coming into your shop. - A. Yes. about four in the afternoon, it may be a few minutes before or after, I cannot say.

Q. Which of them was it that came into your shop. - A. Mary Crawley , I can swear to her.

Mr. Walford. Did you see her come in. - A. Yes,

Ann Bolton I think came in with her, but I was engaged with the customers in the shop, and not seeing her face, I cannot swear to her, she had her back to me. At the time that she came in, the prisoners at the bar did not ask for any thing, and while I was at the bottom of the shop, my apprentice was in the accompting house, directing a newspaper for the country. I begged him to come forward, to wait upon three customers that came in; during the time that I was giving change for two dollars to take six shillings, the prisoner dropped some halfpence.

Q. The prisoner at the bar is, I suppose, Mary Crawley , and the woman who came in with her. - A. Yes, I heard the prisoner ask my young man to shew her some gingham, which I suppose is the woman, but I cannot say which. I heard Ann Bolton make him an offer of sixteen pence for.

Q. You heard the woman. - A. Yes, which he refused to take. The girl went out of the shop first, and the woman followed; the woman did not go out of the shop quite, but returned, said will you take sixteen pence for the gingham; my young man said he could not take sixteen pence, it cost eighteen, which he asked for it. In about a minute afterwards she went away. In about ten minutes afterwards a gentleman came down with the prisoners Elizabeth Smith and Mary Crawley .

Q. Come down where. - A. In about ten minutes afterwards he brought them into the shop, Elizabeth Smith with the child in her arms, and Mary Crawley ; in his hand he had a piece of gingham.

Q. Have you got that piece of gingham. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with that piece of gingham. - A. He left it with me, and I put it a one side; he asked me when he came in whether I knew that piece of gingham, which piece of gingham was on my counter not ten minutes before the prisoners was there; my young man made an observation that it was necessary to put it on the shelf, as we were rather shorthanded. On my observing to the prisoner Elizabeth Smith , that I should send her across the water, she fell upon her knees and begged for mercy; she and the prisoner Crawley begged for mercy.

Q. What became of the piece of gingham. - A. I took the gingham myself to the magistrate in the evening.

Q. Elizabeth Smith had she been in your shop or house before she was brought back by this gentleman. - A. No.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN I produce the property.

Prosecutor. This is the gingham.

Q. Are you sure that is your property. - A. Yes, I know it by a mark that is cut out, I know it by a place where a pattern was cut out a day or two before by myself.

Q. You are sure that it was laying on your counter ten minutes before that girl and woman came in. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of that. - A. The value of it is forty shillings.

Q. Is that the selling price. - A. No, it cost me more than that, but I value it at forty shillings, there are twenty four yards.

Jury. Will you be so good as to shew the mark. - A. It is usual when we cut out a pattern to cut it out of a fag; the gingham was bought in a very large lot. At the moment the gentleman brought it in I recognised the gingham.

Q. Did you ask the gentleman his name. - A. No, I do not know the gentleman's name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. What persons were in your shop besides yourself when they came in. - A. None at all but myself.

Q. Where was your apprentice standing. - A. In the accompting house. I have a square in my accompting house to see through into the shop, that when I am in there I can see what is going forward in the shop.

Q. It was dusk at the time that you attended the shop. - A. Merely so.

Q. What makes you speak to Crawley, it being dusk. - A. It was not so dusk but I could see the prisoners, and Bolton's dress was so remarkable.

Q. What was remarkable in her dress. - A. She had on a kind of a fawn coloured bonnet, and she had it on when she was brought back to the shop.

Q. You cannot speak to her face. - A. I cannot swear to her face, I know her from her dress, she had on a dark green gown with a check apron, and a fawn coloured bonnet.

Q. Smith was not in your shop at all. - A. No, she was not till she was brought there.

Q. Do you happen to have any linen hanging outside of the door. - A. A very little way.

Court. Was this gingham hanging outside of the door. - A. No.

EDWARD CLEMENTS . You are the apprentice of Mr. Harrison. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing any of the prisoners in your master's shop. - A. Mary Crawley , the little girl.

Q. Who did you see besides. - A. Ann Bolton .

Q. Did you see Ann Bolton 's face. - A. I did not see her face, because it was getting dark.

Q. How do you know it was Ann Bolton . - A. I know her by her dress, her dress was a dark green check gown, a check apron, she dropped some halfpence; I remarked the apron, by her picking them up and putting them in her apron; she dropped some halfpence close by where this piece of gingham was laying on the counter.

Q. How far was you from the place that she dropped the halfpence. - A. About three yards, I was waiting on some other customers.

Q. How do you know that she dropped the halfpence. - A. I know that she or Mary Crawley dropped them.

Q. Why do you say if you do not know. - A. I know the halfpence were dropped.

Q. Why do you say she dropped them. - A. They were put into her apron. After I had done waiting on these other people, I waited on Ann Bolton and Mary Crawley , I told our boy in the shop to put them in the apron, he did not. I stood and saw them put them in myself, I saw Mary Crawley and Ann Bolton put them into her apron, it was a large check apron; Ann Bolton asked me for some pieces of gingham, I shewed them some.

Q. Was that the piece of gingham you shewed

her. - A. No, it was not; there were three other pieces were laying by the side of them when I shewed her the gingham, she bid me sixteen pence, I told her I could not take it, they went away to the door, both of them went away; Ann Bolton returned to know whether I would take sixteen pence a yard, ( Ann Bolton went no further than the door) I told her I could not take the money she offered me; then she went away.

Q. During the time that you were in the shop did they do any thing to give you suspicion. - A. No, they did not; I did not miss it till the gentleman brought Elizabeth Smith and Mary Crawley back with the gingham.

Q. How long was that after they had been in the shop. - A. About eight or ten minutes.

Q. When Ann Bolton came in and asked you whether you would take sixteen pence, did she come near the gingham. - A. No, not by three yards.

Q. Had you seen the gingham on the counter that day. - A. Yes, within half an hour before it was taken away.

Q. Are you sure that they came up to that part of the counter where it was laying. - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at the gingham, and tell me whether you are sure it is your master's property. - A. Yes, I know it is my master's property, by cutting patterns out of it three days before to send in the country.

Q. You speak to Mary Crawley as being the girl that came there, how do you know her. - A. I know her by her dress, I cannot speak to her face, I cannot swear to her face.

Q. How was she dressed. - A. She had on a light shawl, it seemed to be almost a new one, and a dark green gown hanging very loose about her.

Q. Was she dressed in the same way when the gentleman brought her back. - A. Yes, she was dressed when she was brought back the same as she was when she came in the shop; the gown that she had on was made for a person three times as large as she was.

Q. Had you observed the size of that gown before she was brought back. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Then when she was brought back you had an opportunity of seeing her face. - A. Yes, I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. I understand you to say, when this woman came in your shop, whoever it was, it was quite dark. - A. It was dusk.

Q. One was drest in a dark green gown and a check apron, and the other in a light shawl. - A. Yes.

Q. You were waiting in the shop at some distance, you did not observe their faces. - A. No.

Q. You cannot say from any knowledge of their faces, that the women which were brought back were the same that had been in the shop before. - A. No.

Q. What part of your shop was your master. - A. At the bottom of the shop.

Q. What opportunity had he of seeing their faces. - A. He was at the bottom of the shop.

Q. How far off do you suppose he was when they come in. - A. About six yards.

Q. And it was dusk. - A. Yes.

Q. You say they made first of all an offer for this gingham, and the girl went out of the shop, and the other to the door, at that time she went out of the shop the gingham was on the counter. - A. Not that gingham.

Q. The little girl went out of the shop, the woman went partially out, when the little girl went out was the gingham laying on the counter. - A. I did not see it the second time that Bolton came in, she was not nigh that part of the counter by three yards.

Q. How happened you to take notice of Crawley's gown being of that size. - A. Because I did.

Q. Why did you take any more notice than you usually do to customers that come in the shop. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Who was this boy you were talking of. - A. The boy that lives with us.

Q. Was he in the shop when they came in. - A. I cannot say whether he was in the shop or not.

Court. (to prosecutor) Had you any opportunity of seeing the girl's face, so as to know her again when she came in the first time. - A. I had, she came up to the counter, I saw her and took notice of her then, and I went down to the bottom of the shop; I had an opportunity to know that she was the girl that came in the shop to buy the gingham.

Q. Had you such an opportunity of observing the features of her face so as to know her again. - A. Yes.

Q. Your apprentice said though he stood by he did not know her face. - A. He ought to know her.

Q. I do not know that he ought, if he could not see I do not know that you could see. - A. I positively swear that she is the girl.

A. You may swear that she is the girl because she was brought back; I want to know whether upon your oath, you can say that you had sufficient observation of her features before she was brought back; to be sure that is the girl. - A. Yes.

Mr. Walford. How far off were you standing in the shop when they came in first. - A. Nearer than I am to you.

Q. Suppose you had seen them half an hour afterwards in the street, should you have been able to recollect the girl. - A. I could have sworn that she had been in the shop.

Court. Had you any reason to suppose they had stole the gingham, before they were brought back. - A. No.

Q, You saw nothing in their conduct that gave you any suspicion. - A. No.

SAMUEL BANNISTER . I live with Mr. Thompson, Middle row, Holborn, he is an hosier.

Q. Did you see at any time any of the prisoners at the bar in Holborn. - A. I did, it was the day before yesterday week.

Q. That was Tuesday sen'night; what time in the afternoon. - A. About half past four.

Q. What part of Holborn was it. - A. Against Great Turnstile. I saw a man trying to catch Smith, the prisoner at the bar; that is the taller woman with the child in her arms.

Q. What was she doing. - A. She was walking away from him, he was coming after her to catch

her he pointed at her, and I took particular notice of her.

Q. Did he say any thing when he pointed at her. - A. I cannot say that he did.

Q. Did he overtake her and catch her. - A. Yes he did; there was a little girl with the woman.

Q. Do you know the little girl. - A. I know about the size she was, but I cannot positively swear to her.

Q. Look at that little girl there, was she about that size. - A. That is a girl like her.

Q. How was she dressed, did you observe that. - A. No, I did not take any particular notice how she was dressed, only she had on a shawl; she was like her in size and features.

Q. How near were you to her. - A. As near as I am to this gentleman.

Q. Upon the gentleman taking hold of the prisoner Smith what did she do. - A. The little girl run away and he after her, just as she ran away from her to catch the girl, the prisoner Smith dropped a piece of gingham; she had on a short bed gown and a short white cloak, she dropped it somewhere from her petticoat behind her, this piece of gingham.

Q. Who took the gingham up. - A. The man. I called out she has dropped something; the man that caught hold of the woman was running after the girl, he turned round and picked it up, then run away after the girl with the gingham; I kept my eyes close to the woman, I did not lay hold of the woman. Smith, she walked towards Mr. Harrison's back again down Holborn, she did not run but walked very deliberately.

Q. What became of the man and the girl. - A. He ran after the girl, and brought her back to the woman; I did not see him catch her, and we all went together to Mr. Harrison's.

Q. Did you see them go into Mr. Harrison's. - A. Yes, I stopped at the door and just looked in.

Q. Did he carry the gingham to Mr. Harrison's. - A. He did, I saw him take it in, it was exactly that pattern, I can swear to the pattern and nothing else.

Q. Was you near enough to be able to swear to the pattern. - A. Yes, I just saw the man shew Mr. Harrison the print, and I went about my business.

Q. Was Smith, the prisoner, and the girl, in Mr. Harrison's shop, at the time you saw the man give Mr. Harrison the print. - A. They were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. You say you saw a man trying to catch a woman. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the woman's face. - A. I did.

Q. Was it not nearly dark, it was in the dusk of the evening. - A. It was.

Q. You cannot undertake to swear positively to her face, but you believe that to be the woman. - A. Yes.

Q. The little girl you did not see her face. - A. Yes, I saw her face.

Q. That you cannot swear to positively. - A. I cannot.

Q. When Smith was going back she walked very deliberately, as if nothing had happened to her. - A. She did.

Q. And when the man called out to somebody to stop her, and when he was running after the girl, the woman made light of it and walked back. - A. Yes.

Q. And when she found that the man was coming after her with the girl, what did she say. - A. She said something like, they may catch me; I cannot say the exact words.

Court. This woman dropped this piece of gingham from behind her. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure it was the same woman that dropped it, that went into Mr. Harrison's shop. - A. It is.

Q. Therefore without speaking to her face, you can say that the woman that dropped the gingham, was the woman that went into Mr. Harrison's shop. - A. It was.

Q. Was there any other woman in company with the girl and Smith. - A. Not in company with them, there were several people passing by.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . You are an officer, of the police office, Hatton Garden. - A. Yes; I went and fetched the prisoners, Crawley and Smith, from the prosecutor's house; the girl Crawley, said that Bolton called upon Smith at her home, and requested her to go along with her, and she would buy Smith's child a frock, that they came from over the water, to the end of Fleet market; they went up Holborn Hill, and they went into several shops.

Q. She said nothing about what passed in Mr. Harrison's shop. - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. After she had been examined by the magistrate, did she give any account of what passed at Mr. Harrison's shop. - A. No, she went down for a further examination, and then she would not say any thing at all. Bolton came in the office and said that she heard of it, and she flew to the prisoner Smith, and said what she had brought her sister to.

Crawley's Defence. Sir, I never picked up any of the halfpence at all.

Bolton was not put on her defence.

Smith's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Smith called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

CRAWLEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 10.

BOLTON, NOT GUILTY .

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-23

89. THOMAS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of December , twelve pound weight of lead, value 3 s. the property of the surviving trustees of the honourable society of the Inner Temple .

The case was stated by Mr. Valiants.

GEORGE WAGGONER ; examined by Mr. Pooley. You are a watchman of the Temple. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on the night of Christmas day stationed at the bottom of King's bench walk. - A. Yes, adjoining the King's bench office. I saw the prisoner go by my box.

Q. Was it light enough for you to know him. - A. No, in about ten minutes after he went down, I went down to it, I heard a cracking among the slates;

it was another watchman that told me that the man was down there getting the lead off. I told him to be carefull when I give him the alarm; I went back to the place, I heard something drop; by the hollowness of the found I thought it was lead, the prisoner at the bar came forward, I asked him what he had got there, he said it was lead, he said he had nothing but what he had brought with him; he was carrying it under his jacket under his arm; I sprung the rattle, and the other watchman came up to my assistance; he took the lead from him, we secured him.

Q. Did you afterwards go and look at the place from whence the lead had been taken. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any had been missing. - A. Yes, it was evident to be seen.

Q. What time of night was it. - A. The clock had gone six, before he came down, it was about twenty minutes after six. The constable fitted it to the place.

WILLIAM SHERIDAN . Q. you are a constable. - A. Yes. I produce the lead. I went and saw it fitted to the place, it fitted exactly; there is fifteen pound of it; there is two pieces taken from the gutter and one from the ridge, they corresponded exactly.

Q. Then there is no doubt for you to say that that is the lead that was taken from that place. - A. There is no doubt of it.

MR. NORRIS. I produce the deed.

Q. Is that the deed of trust. - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as to say the names of the trustees. - A. William Lascelles , Esq. Francis Maseres , Esq. James Mingay , Esq. Right Hon. John Lord Redesdale , Joseph Shaw , Esq. William Chayton , Esq. John Eamer , Esq. Right Hon. Nathaniel Bond , Benjamin Way, Richard Richards, Richard Baker , Robert Foster , and Sir Richard Clayton ; these are the surviving trustees. I am the first treasurer.

MR. BETHEL. Q. Did you see that deed executed, A. I did.

Q. I believe your hand writing is there. - A. That is my name.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Black-friars road, and going across the end of Water-lane I found this lead coming on as far as the Temple I had occasion to go to the privy, and when I got to the privy I heaved this lead down on the flag stones, and when I got out again I took it up. I was going to Ogle street.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-24

90. MARTIN FLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , one pond weight of tea, value 5 s. the property of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

Second count for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS BUCK ; examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are a labourer in the East India company's warehouse. - A. Yes, I was employed at the warehouse in Cutler street, Hounsditch , at the same time with the prisoner. On the 6th of January I observed the prisoner at the bar sitting on a chest of tea, he appeared to me as if he was concealing some tea about his person. I went down and accquainted the elder Mr. Clements.

Mr. CLEMENTS; examined by Mr. Knapp. I understand you are assistant elder to this warehouse in Cutler street, Hounsditch. - A. I am. I went up to the prisoner, I ordered him down stairs. In consequence of what Buck said, I told him he had something about him that he should not have, he hesitated a little, I said it is of no manner of use hesitating; if he had got any thing to take it out himself, upon which he turned himself rather round, and in the presence of the commodore he took out a quantity of tea from his breeches. I looked at the tea to see if it corresponded with the tea in that floor where he was at work; it corresponded exactly.

- READ. I produce the tea; the tea weighed a pound and one ounce.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, he called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-25

91. ELISHA HODGKINSON was indicted for that he on the 31st of October was servant to John Stirtevant , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for and on his account, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, two shillings for and on account of his said master; that he did afterwards feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN STIRTEVANT . I am a hosier , I live in Bishopsgate street Without , the prisoner was my shop-man for about nine months. Having some reasons to suspect his honesty, I marked some money, to the amount of nine shillings; six shillings in silver, a half crown and a sixpence. I went to a neighbour and requested her to let her servant go to purchase four pair of stockings, to the amount of that money; this was on Friday the 31st of October.

SARAH WILKINS . I am servant to Mrs. Edwards haberdasher and milliner, Bishopsgate street; my mistress gave me some money; I went and bought four pair of stockings, two pair at half a crown, and two pair at two shillings a pair; I paid him six shillings, half a crown and sixpence.

Q. Was that the same money that you received from your mistress. - A. Yes, it never was out of my hand till I give it to the prisoner; there was nobody else in the shop, it was about two o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Your purchasing these things were only a pretended circumstance; you were not to keep the stockings were you. - A. No.

Q. You were to give them to the prosecutor Mr. Stirtevant. - A. That I did not know.

Q. This was a contrivance of Mr. Stirtevant for the purpose. - A. I suppose so, I do not know.

Q. You know it was so; did not you buy them for Mr. Stirtevant. - A. Yes.

Q. The ladies are not so rude as to say yes at all times; did not you give the stockings to Mr. Stirtevant. - A. I gave them to my mistress.

Prosecutor. I came into the shop afterwards; it might be about half after two, I asked him if he had sold

any goods, he said he had. I unlocked the till to see if the money corresponded with the articles sold.

Q. Did you know what money was in the till before. - A. No, I did not, the till was locked up, having strong suspicion of him; he had been accstomed to put the cash on the desk, he contrived to put this cash between the top of the counter and the till into the till, so that when I had unlocked the till there was the money exactly as he had put it in; there was the half crown and the four shillings; the till was partitioned off close up to the counter, it was impossible for it to go where the other silver was, there was no silver but that in that partition. I then requested the prisoner to go to his dinner, finding the money did not correspond with the purchase; after he returned from dinner he was requested to put down his articles in a book, which I kept for that purpose, he put down the articles. He was asked if he put down all the articles that he had sold, he said yes; that was sufficient for me.

Q. What was in the book. - A. One pair of woman's cotton, two shillings, one pair ditto, half a crown, and one pair of woman's black worsted, half a crown, that made seven shillings.

CHARLOTTE EDWARDS . Mr. Stirtevnat came to me and desired me to send some marked money to his house; I gave it to my servant, and she went.

Q. The same money that he gave to you you gave to your servant. - A. Yes.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found two shillings on him that the prosecutor claimed.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witness to character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgement respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-26

92. JOSEPH LONGMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , three pair of shoes, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Carey , John Kelly , and James Carey .

JOHN KELLY . I live at No. 45, Fleet street .

Q. Who are your partners . - A. Richard Carey and John Carey. In consequence of suspicion, on Saturday evening the 13th of December I took this man to the counter, and the officer afterwards searched the prisoner's apartments, and in a corner cupboard of his room there was found three pair of shoes.

Q. Had they ever been sold in your shop. - A. No.

Q. What was the prisoner. - A. A clicker , as they are termed by the trade, a shopman that cuts out shoes . When he was taken up the constable said he would search his lodgings; he said we might if we pleased, there was nothing there belonging to us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Did you take up any body else that evening. - A. I was about to take up my brother that very evening, but from the behaviour of the two men I had more right to suspect this man than the other. I searched both the apartments, and found none in one, and three pair of shoes in the other.

Q. That is your argument; you did suspect your brother, did you take him up. - A. I believe I might say for a minute or two, I desired him to go in the coach; he was put into the constable's hands.

Q. How do you know they had not been sold in your shop during your absence. - A. His wife said they had been brought there that night.

Q. She might say that not to injure herself; suppose six pair were brought from the maker, all of one size and of one sort, and three pair were sold, should you be able to distinguish them from the others. - A. Certainly not; I know they are of my make, and they have my daughter's mark.

Q. So they would if they had been sold. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-27

93. CLEMENTINA CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of December , one shirt, value 7 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Holding .

THOMAS HOLDING. I live at No. 16, Church street, Islington, my wife is a laundress, she washed for a family in Pater noster row. On the 2nd of December I brought this basket of linen from my house and left it in Half-moon street, Bishopsgate street till I returned from the East India warehouse. I returned, and took the basket from Half-moon street to Pater noster row; when the linen was taken out there was a shirt and a sheet missing; the bill was in the basket. I returned to my wife, I asked her if she was sure that she had sent all the linen, she said she had; I told the person in Half-moon street that I had lost a shirt and a sheet during the time that I left the linen there, and suspicion fell upon the prisoner at the bar; she was nursing the person's wife in Half-moon street where I left the parcel. I challenged the prisoner with it, she denied it, I traced the pawnbrokers and could not find it; I was obliged to pay for it one pound twelve shillings. On the 29th the prisoner was taken up for another robbery, she was in the Poultry counter; I went to her there, she confessed that she took them, and that the duplicates were in the lining of her stays at her lodgings. I went to her lodgings, and found the duplicates as she told me. I went to the pawnbroker's and found my property.

THOMAS HATTONBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker, Crown street, Finsbury square. I produce a sheet, pledged for five shillings, on the 2nd of December, pledged in the name of Ann Page .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I never saw the prisoner before.

JAMES CASTLE . I am servant to Messrs. Monnitt and Sadler, Bishopsgate street, I produce a shirt pledged for seven shillings, pawned in the name of Mary Page on the 2nd of December.

Prosecutor. They are my things.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about them.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-28

94. JEAN LOUIS BAPTISTE BARRILLIET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , thirty gallons of wine, value 24 l. three table cloths, value 3 l. a napkin, value 3 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Dupre, earl of Caledon , in that part of the kingdom called Ireland, in his dwelling-house .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

EARL CALEDON ; examined by Mr. Gleed, May I take the liberty to ask your lordship's name. - A. Dupre Alexander .

Q. Is your lordship properly described as the earl of Caledon in that part of the kingdom called Ireland. - A.

Q. Where was your lordship's house in town. - A. In Stretton street, Piccadilly, St. George's .

Q. The prisoner at the bar was in your lordship's employ, in what capacity was he. - A. A valet ; he had lived with me about six months. In the month of August I had sent my steward and other servants to the Cape of Good Hope; in consequence of that I placed the same confidence in him as I should have done in my steward. On the 27th or 28th of September, I received an order, a note, from the Admiralty, saying when the sloop of war would be ready to receive me on board. In consequence of that I gave the prisoner an order to get all the goods packed up and sent to Portsmouth.

Q. Among these articles were there any table cloths. A. There were table cloths, and I believe there were table cloths packed up, but whether they were packed up I do not know, I certainly meant them to be packed up.

Q. You did not mention table cloths, but your order included them and napkins, and every thing that you intended to be sent to the Cape. - A. I included every thing but three beds and linen; it was in consequence of a very hurried state I desired every thing should be packed up.

Q. Was there an order given respecting wine. - A. There was, the prisoner was to pack up some wine also for the Cape.

Q. Were you present at the time these articles were packed up. - A. I saw them in the cart which was to convey them to the waggon office in Warwick lane; there were thirty-two packages to be sent to Warwick lane, and ten to be sent to the Borough.

Q. At the time that you left this country did you leave any wine in your house. - A. I left this country the first week in December for Ireland. I cannot recollect the exact time I was last in the cellar, but when I was last in the cellar I did leave wine in it; there ought to be wine in the cellar when I left this country.

Q. Had the prisoner the key of your lordship's cellar. A. When I was packing up I sent for my wine merchant, Mr. Harrison, directing him to send me some man to pack up some wine; during that time I entrusted the prisoner with the key of the cellar.

Q. Did you leave it in his possession during the time you were absent in Ireland. - A. I cannot be positive, there were two keys of the cellar, one was in my pocket.

Q. Then whether you had left the other key you are not certain. - A. I cannot say.

JAMES MORRIS ; examined by Mr. Alley. Were you in my lord Caledon's service as coachman. - A. Yes.

Q. When he left this country for Ireland you remained behind. - A. Yes, I resided in the house previous to his departure.

Q. Were you and the prisoner employed to convey a number of packages from his house to an inn in the city. - A. Yes, to the Oxford Arms in Warwick lane.

Q. Did you or the prisoner assist in making the packages. - A. I did not. I saw him assist, and both of us went with the packages to the city.

Q. What were the number that you delivered to that inn. - A. Thirty-two.

Q. Were they counted at the time that you delivered them. - A. They were.

Q. Did any thing particular occur at the time they were counted. - A. I found the prisoner was not very correct in numbering the packages; he asked me particularly why I counted them twice over, and then he asked the carman about the packages.

Q. Do you recollect when he counted them whether he made them greater or less than you made them. - A. He made them less.

Q. Can you tell me how many. - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Were there any directions on them packages. - A. On all; some to my lord Caledon, and some to Mr. Dupree Alexander.

Q. When lord Caledon was in Ireland, after he left London, did you see whether any of these packages were brought back to my lord's house. - A. The very next day after my lord's departure I saw some of them brought back.

Q. How many was brought back. - A. One, the prisoner himself brought it back in a hackney coach.

Q. Was any more brought back. - A. Not as I see.

Q. Do you know whether there were any more packages in the house, whether you saw them brought back or no. - A. I saw four of those that were taken down to Warwick lane; there was no other servant in the house but my wife who was confined in bed sick, and my sister who was attending her.

Q. Did you bring them back. - A. No.

Q. Was any thing done to these packages when they were brought home. - A. The locks were entirely wrenched off after they were brought home.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing what the contents of these boxes were. - A. No, I had not.

Q. I mean after the boxes were broke, and when the locks were broken off, did you see the contents. - A. I saw some wine and some wearing apparel, and some perfumery.

Q. Did you see any cambric. - A. No.

Q. You know where the cellar is in your master's house, did you see any body go to the cellar after your master absented himself. - A. The prisoner, several times.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take any thing from the cellar. - A. Several times, I have seen him take wine.

Q. Did you at any time in your master's absence breakfast with the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. How long after your master's absence. - A. I cannot exactly say, it was before the box was broke open.

JOHN BATHY . I am bookkeeper to the Oxford Arms, in Warwick lane.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar.

A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect his coming to the Oxford Arms with the last witness any time, and when. - A. He came on the 30th of October to our inn and brought thirty-two packages.

Q. Were those packages delivered to your care. - A. They were.

Q. Do you recollect in what manner they were directed. - A. Some were directed, Lord Caledon, Cape of Good Hope, and some of them, Mr. Alexander, by the same conveyance as lord Caledon.

Q. How soon after that did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. Either one or two days afterwards he gave a general order to stop the goods, until a further order from his lordship; the goods were not sent. In about ten or twelve days he then came in lord Caledon's name and demanded a part of the packages back. He at that time opened one box, and took out some boots and shoes and tied them up in a handkerchief, and took another trunk and put it in the coach, and ordered the coachman to drive to lord Caledon's house in Stretton street.

Q. Were any other packages delivered to him at different times. - A. Eight more; they were all taken away in a coach, and ordered to be taken to lord Caledon's house.

JOHN SMITH . Q. You are a linen draper, and live in Piccadilly. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you have ever seen him before. - A. I saw him at my house on the 12th of December, he brought some table linen, which he wished me to put a value on.

Q. What quantity and what sort. - A. Two damask table cloths, one diaper table cloth, and one damask napkin.

Q. What said he to you when he brought these. - A. He wished me to set a value upon them, in consequence of his being about to dispose of them; he said that he had a variety of plate, china, and other things to dispose of, to the amount of ten thousand pounds.

Q. Did you purchase any of them. - A. No, I merely gave my opinion of the value of the linen he left at my house from Friday till the Monday; he was to call in half an hour. He did not return till the Monday; it was discovered, and he was examined at Marlborough street.

ANN KENNET . Q. You live at No. 13, Charlotte street, Portland chapel. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, I first saw him at Covent Garden theatre with a female friend of mine.

Q. Afterwards you went with him to Stretton street. A. Yes; when I went with him to Stretton street, the prisoner told me it was his house; this was about three weeks since.

Q. Were you in Stretton street any morning in the month of December. - A. I went there to breakfast.

Q. What did he represent himself to be. - A. He told me that he was aid-de-camp to lord Caledon, that he was going to the Cape of Good Hope.

Q. Did he make you on that morning any present. - A. He gave me five handkerchiefs; I delivered them up at Marlborough street.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-29

95. JEAN LOUIS BAPTISTE BARRILLIET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the first of December , four sheets, value 2 l. two pair of pantaloons, value 2 l. five waistcoats, value 2 l. a pair of drawers, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and two deal boxes, value 4 s. the property of John Alexander , esq.

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-30

96. WILLIAM MARSDEN and JAMES BUTLER were indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Isaac Scott , on the 15th of December , a seven shillings piece, eight shillings, and three bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

ANN SCOTT . Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Isaac Scott , we live at Edmonton , we keep a house there. On Monday the 15th of December, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a noise at the front door of the shop, I was in the kitchen, I went to the door, I heard a lad coming in, I asked him what he wanted.

Q. Were there any more lads than one. - A. There were two outside the door; only one came in, I asked him what he wanted, he answered a halfpennyworth of tape.

Q. Was he in the shop, or only at the door. - A. He was only at the door, I went in the shop and served him with a halfpennyworth of tape.

Q. Where were the others. - A. The others were out of door all the time. I went into the kitchen, and I had not been there above five minutes before I heard the door go again, I went to the door, I saw one go from the door, I went into the shop, I perceived I had been robbed.

Q. Who did you see in your shop. - A. Nobody then. I looked into my till, I missed three one pound notes, a seven shilling piece, two half crowns, and some shillings and sixpences; how many of them I cannot say. I lost about three pounds sixteen, in notes and silver.

Q. When you went to your shop the second time did you see the boy who come in before. - A. No, I saw one go from the door, it appeared as if he had been in the house, because I saw his hand on the door, pulling it after him; he walked very quick away.

Q. Did you see any other boy then. - A. No.

Q. Did you see his face. - A. I saw the side of his face.

Q. Did you see sufficient of it to know it again. - A. Yes, it was Marsden, he with the blue jacket on, the tall one.

Q. When you went into the shop to serve the boy with the tape, did you take notice of the boy when you looked out, was the other prisoner the other boy. - A. Yes, he was leaning upon the chains before the window.

Q. Did you see Marsden in the blue jacket at the time that you served the tape. - A. I did not see him at that time.

Q. In consequence of this you got somebody to run

after the boy. - A. Yes, and I saw them both before the magistrate about four o'clock; and there was some silver found upon each of them.

THOMAS SMITH . Q. You are a constable of Edmonton, I understand. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you desired by Mrs. Scott to go after some boys that she suspected had stole some money. A. Yes, I overtook them about two mile from Mrs. Scott's house on Stamford Hill. I apprehended the prisoner Butler.

Q. Where was Marsden. - A. They were running, there were three in company, they divided when they saw us.

Q. Was any body with you. - A. Yes, Harwood the constable; he apprehended Marsden; I waited with Butler till he brought Marsden back; we took them both to the magistrate; the other boy got off; I searched Butler, I found these watch chains and this silver.

- HARWOOD. Q. You are likewise a constable of Edmonton; on the 15th of December did you go in search of a boy that had been in Mrs. Scott's house. - A. Yes, I overtook William Marsden , and found upon him him this silver.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Take that paper which is next to you and see if you can find any thing that you can speak to. - A. Yes, this one shilling was in my till before the robbery was committed; I had seen it about five minutes before, there is a P and a kind of a cross, and a couple of dents in it; I know it by these marks.

Q. Take the other paper, look into that. - A. I know this one shilling to be mine on account of it being a bad one; I had seen that five minutes before, it is a large one and dented on two or three places. I am certain it was in my till.

Q. When had you seen the notes in your till, had you seen them within five minutes of it. - A. Yes.

Marsden's Defence. I was never nigh that place, I was never so far down in the town.

Butler's Defence. I went down as far as the George Tottenham , I went there to see if they wanted a waiter; I heard say that they wanted a lad to carry out beer. I went there, they were suited, I never went no further than the George at Tottenham.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Butler was not the boy that came to buy the tape. - A. No, I saw him then, swinging on the chains outside of the window; when I served the boy with the tape Marsden was the boy that I saw; when I heard the door go a second time his hand was at the door.

MARSDEN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

BUTLER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

[ The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of their youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-31

97. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of November , a bank note, value 5 l. the property of William Marshall .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . Q. Was the prisoner your servant on the 4th of November last. - A. She was. On going to bed that night I left my waistcoat on a chair by the side of the bed, in the pocket of which was a five pound bank note, No. 1650. dated 6th of February last; on the 5th I looked in the waistcoat pocket, it was gone. On the 29th of December, when Summers searched her, she dropped a purse from her side, containing four pounds thirteen shillings.

Q. Did you accuse her of having stolen a five pound note. - A. I did.

PETER GOULD . I am a porkman in Bishopsgate street. The prisoner came to my house on the 30th of September, and asked me for change of a five pound note; I gave her change all in cash. I paid it to Mr. Grove, I had no other five pound note at the time.

THOMAS GROVE . Q. You are a butcher residing in Bishopsgate street, do you remember receiv- any money from the last witness in notes. - A. I received about thirteen pounds, but what number I cannot say. I pay all my cash to Messrs. Barclay and Co.

Court. The notes that you received from the last witness who did you pay them to. - A. I do not know, most likely I sent it to the banker's.

Q. Do not you keep a banker's book. - A. I do, but their own book would give a better account than mine; mine is not here.

Court. No, your own book will give as good an account, which is the receipt for the money.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-32

98. PATRICK PRENDERGAST , JAMES HAYES , and CATHERINE PRENDERGAST , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Bell , about the hour of one on the 18th of September , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing, a silver coffee pot, value 5 l. eighteen silver spoons, value 5 l. a watch, value 2 l. and seven pounds in monies, numbered , the property of George Bell .

GEORGE BELL . I live at Brent Bridge, in the parish of Hendon .

Q. What are you. - A. I am what they call a gentleman , I am no business.

Q. Did you live at Brent Bridge in the month of September. - A. I have lived there twenty eight years.

Q. You were at home on the 18th of September were you. - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the week was it. - A. I do not know that, I cannot tell, I swore to it at the time, I am so destroyed since.

Q. Did any thing happen in your house. - A. I will give you the shortest and best account I can. I think it was in September, and I think on the 19th I do not swear now what I did in the indictment. At one o'clock in the morning I heard the window shake, something gave a motion, they called it night in Bow street; however it was one o'clock, I jumped out of bed, I went to the window, I saw a ladder against it, and that Prendergast with a lighted torch in his hand, in secret, with something like a bladder over it.

Q. Was he upon the ladder or what situation was he in. - A. He was upon the ladder, he was ascending the ladder, about half way up.

Q. Had you known his person before. - A. His daughter was my housekeeper, and he had every day a pint of beer and some cold victuals at my

house; I looked out at him and I saw him, I had got my sword drawn just by, at my right hand, I always kept it there at night time; I looked at him and knew him as perfect as I do now.

Q. What sort of a night was it as to light. - A. Why the night was just in the common way as the weather might be; it was not frost, but it was light enough; but what I saw him by was the light that he held in one hand, in something like a bladder, and the torch burning in it.

Q. Was it the light of the torch that enabled you to see him distinctly and to know him. - A. Yes. He came up to the window and attempted to push it up, but I held the window down with my left hand; and now upon my oath, as I shall soon appear before God, I was as cool as I am now, and more than I am now. I said within myself I will not shed blood, I shall soon die, my hands are pure, and I will keep them so; I could as easily have done it as I could have put out my hand. He came up to the window and attempted to push it open; I held it down, he began smashing the squares of glass with his hands, still I kept it down and could have done what I liked with him, but I looked into the court opposite, I saw an amazing quantity of men, there were not less than nine or ten; at last he ascended up close to the window with his feet, others ascending behind him up the ladder and held him; he began to smash the frames with his feet. He smashed in the lower frame of the window with his feet, and down he came, his feet hit my leg and knocked me down upon my back; down he came into the room.

Q. He came in and threw you down upon your back. - A. Yes, he hit my leg, but I do not believe it was by design, but he bruised my leg, he bruised my flesh, sinews, and bone, that I could have no case since, my torture is exceeding great. - [The prosecutor was a gentleman very far advanced in years, and appearing to be in a fainting and languid state, the court ordered him some brandy and water and a chair to sit on.]

Q. When he got into the room as you have described, and you fell down, what happened next. - A. I hardly can tell; but this he said to me, lie down quietly in bed and be quiet, we will not hurt you, but we must have the treasure for travelling expences; I laid down in bed, and two men with black faces, and another with a bladder over his face, with eyes and mouth cut in it, came in before them; they came in at the window and up the ladder, the same as the other man, into the room. Prendergast came to me and took hold of my two hands, and said I must go down stairs and shew where the treasure was, and must have a light, I called to his daughter in the garret, who is my housekeeper, and desired her to come down, and I entreated and desired these men to be kind. I called to his daughter to come down and bring a light, she did, and she struck a light; the house were all alarmed. Then I saw his face and the other three in my bed room besides; there were four of them.

Q. There was no disguise to Prendergast's face. - A. No, none at all, no more that it is now, it was quite visible, they were all around me then; I had a friend, a Mrs. Lewis, that was in the back room next the road, and the waggons and carts began to come; she threw up the back window and screamed out Murder and Thieves, they went into the room to her, they said, you blasted b - h, if you do not hold your tongue we will blow your brains out; she then ceased making any further noise, He took me with his two hands, he led me down stairs to him where the treasure was and to unlock the outer door of the house into the court; I unlocked it, I believe, and I do not know how many men rushed in; I pointed to the bureau, and told them that the money and plate was there; then I went up stairs to bed. The bureau was locked; they had got a dung fork and broke it open.

Q. You did not part with the keys to them. - A. No.

Q. You did not see them break it open. - A. No.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see it broke open. A. Not till the next morning at day light, about eight o'clock, I could not get up before. I then saw it was broken open, and there were three pocket books gone; in one was six guineas in gold, and a note for sixty pounds, I had been looking at it the day before; a note for fifty pounds, and another for twenty-six pounds. There was missing from the bureau, a silver coffee pot, and twelve silver tea spoons, and different spoons for casters, and a watch, and I do not know how many other silver spoons.

Q. Do you know the persons of any of the other people besides Prendergast. - A. I cannot swear that I do; one of the men had a black face; his features were very much like one of Prendergast's sons, but I do not swear to him.

Q. Had the coffee pot the lid. - A. Yes, the lid was to it, it was complete.

Q. What other persons were in the house as part of the family, you have mentioned Mrs. Lewis. - A. There was a Mrs. Akenhead, she belonged to Mr. Sharp the engraver, many of you might have heard of him, she was in his employment and for her health, she happened to be down there.

Q. Had any of them any fire arms. - A. I cannot tell, they said they would blow Mrs. Lewis's brains out, but I did not see any.

CHRISTOPHER JONES . I produce the coffee pot.

Q. You are an officer. - A. Yes. On the 17th of December last, between the hours of one and two, in Hart street, Bloomsbury, I saw the prisoner Prendergast, he was one side of the way and I was on the other, I crossed, I saw something under his left arm, I took him in custody, and I took this said coffee pot from under his left arm; it was wrapped up in a sheet of brown paper. He said he found it in a ditch near Edgware. I had a spoon at that time in my pocket, with the same letters on it that are on his pot, it is marked M A A.

Prosecutor. That is my last wife, and her former husband's name.

Jones. I then took him down to the house of correction, I acquainted the magistrate I had apprehended Prendergast; then I went down to Hendon and apprehended the prisoner Catherine Prendergast , and the two brothers belonging to the same sister. At the time I apprehended Patrick Prendergast , as we were going along, he said that he had

robbed Mr. Bell; I asked him if this was Mr. Bell's property, he said yes, he said he was one of the people that robbed him, and Hayes was another. I have had this pot in my custody ever since; it was without a lid then, as it is now.

Q. (to prosecutor) Will you look at that coffee pot. - A. I have seen it before, and I know it was mine, and it was upon the bureau when the house was broke open; and when I examined the bureau it was gone, and the spoons and the watch were all gone, and more than I can tell. I know the coffee pot by the marks at the bottom, but I have not got my spectacles, and the colour of the handle.

Prendergast. (to Jones) Was there any one along with you when I told you that was Mr. Bell's pot. - A. Yes, Michael Lea was.

Q. Will you swear that. - A. Yes.

Prendergast. Then you may go on swearing any thing, you are a bad man.

MICHAEL LEA . I am one of the patrols in Bow street, I was with Jones when he apprehended Prendergast.

Q. Tell us what passed on that occasion. - A. He said he found it in the hedge first, the same as Jones has told you. In the house of correction he confessed, and they sent up a note to the office, I was present at the time, Mr. Aris and his son were both there at the time, and he told the names of four or five people that were along with him; one is the prisoner at the bar, and another is in the house of correction now; he said that he went to rob this man's house, and he was called up at Mr. Franklin's barn, just by where the robbery was committed; one of them came up there, and drew a bottle of gin out of his pocket; he said there were five of them there; he said we are going to rob Mr. Bell's house. Prendergast said do not do that, my daughter lives in the house.

Q. Do not say what he said of others. - A. He said he was in the robbery.

Q. Did he say any thing about the coffee pot. - A. He said it belonged to Mr. Bell.

Q. Did he say how he came by it. - A. He said he was in the robbery, he did not say how he came by it; he said he took the lid off, and went with it to the pawnbrokers, and asked five shillings for it; the pawnbroker said he would give five shillings for it; he said he would have half a guinea for it, and then the pawnbroker stopped it.

JOSEPH BAKER . I went to the Isle of Wight to apprehend Hayes. I apprehended him on the 4th of January.

ELIZABETH PURCELL . I live at No. 8, Bembridge street, I am a widow.

Q. Were you there in November last. - A. Yes, I keep a chandler's shop.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, James Hayes . - A. Yes, he lodged in my premises for nearly a twelve month; he has left me better than half a year ago.

Q. Did you see him at any time in November. - A. He happened to come into my house one evening between ten and eleven o'clock, it is pretty nearly two months ago, my husband was up in his chair, sitting by the fire, I was in bed; he said he was going on board a ship, and that he would throw his life in his hands if Mr. Purcell would be so good as to assist him, he would tell him where the property lay, and he would shew him where it was. He said that he had none of the property, and there were seven of them that went to a farmer's house in the country, and that the property lay near the Edgware road, and he mentioned that there were some of it in town.

Q. Did he mention how far the farmer's house was from London. - A. He did not. I got up and said he had no business in the house, and Mr. Purcell bid him give him down the names of the people that did the robbery; he said if the property was brought away it could be sold, he was going on board a ship, he could not stop in town.

Q. Did he give any description of the farmer, did he say he was young or old. - Q. He said he was an old man. There was another man, I believe, he came with him, I saw him while the conversation was going on, his name is Sullivan. Here is the names of the gentlemen who were in the fact, Mr. Hayes wrote it.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I am a dyer.

Q. Did you know Purcell, the late husband of the witness that has been examined. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar Hayes. - A. Yes.

Q. Where you at Purcell's house about two months ago, or rather better. - A. Yes, or rather better. I went into Mr. Purcell's house by myself to pay him a little money that I owed.

Q. What time in the evening was it. - A. Between nine and ten; the prisoner Hayes came in about ten minutes after I went in.

Q. Was there any intimacy between Hayes and you. - A. there was.

Q. Did you hear any conversation pass between Purcell and Hayes. - A. I did; Hayes said to James Purcell that he was going to sea, and that he would leave him his absent bond, and that he owed him some money, that he should leave it in part of payment; till such times as he should receive his money. He mentioned that he was accused of a robbery that was committed in the country, about four or five miles off, I cannot say what part; he said he knew a party that had been in the robbery, he lived within a few doors, if they would go and get him taken up he would declare who the persons where that took the property. He said that the house had been sold for half a year before the robbery was committed, and the man that sold the house his daughter lived in the house with the person that had been robbed. James Purcell took down every one of their names that he gave him in a pocket book, which he took out of his side pocket.

Q. Then Purcell put down the names. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he explain how he came to know the parties. - A. No, he said he was accused of it, and that he was innocent of it.

Q. Did he say where any of the property was. - A. No more than if Mr Purcell would take such a person up he was sure to discover who had the property; he said the person lived within a few doors of his house.

Q. That person's name was not named. - A. No, he mentioned Harry Hayes and Thomas Hayes were of the party.

Q. Mrs. Akenhead, were you in Mr. Bell's house to sleep on the night the robbery was committed. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you hear or see any thing transacted. - A. Yes, about one o'clock in the morning I was awoke by hearing a thrusting at the window in the adjoining room to where I sleep.

Q. Was that the adjoining room where Mr. Bell slept. - A. Yes, there were two rooms on the floor. I got out of bed, I did not know where to go, I went to the door of the first stair case, I opened the door and shut it immediately and locked it, and went round my bed to another door in the room which leads up to the garret; when I went there I heard the servant girl open the garret door, just at the same time I opened mine.

Q. That was the prisoner Catherine Prendergast . - A. Yes, going up to the garret stairs, I heard a voice say lye still and be asey, we will not hurt you my good master. I said to Kitty what shall we do, she said come up here; I went immediately up to the garret, a dark garret adjoining to her's, we continued there about five minutes, then we went into her own room where she slept. I wished to get out of the garret window to secret myself in the gutter but she would not let me.

Q. You mean she persuaded you not. - A. She persuaded me not, she said I should catch my death by going there; she directly asked me if I had brought up my watch with me, I told her no; she asked me to let her go down and fetch it, I told her she should not, I was afraid she might be seen. She knew that I set a great value upon my watch and therefore she asked me to let her go down, I refused, and she did not go. After a little while, her master, Mr. Bell, called her to come down and get a light, he called several times, and she cried very much and told me that she was afraid to go down, she was afraid she should get murdered; I told her she had better put on some of her things if she went down, which she did, and some man cried out is the light coming; on that she went down and took a light. When she was gone down I heard her speaking to Mr. Bell, and just at the same time I heard the men go into my room (either one or two); I heard one say here is a bed, here must be somebody, where are they. I heard Kitty come up stairs into the first floor, I heard Mr. Bell call out Kitty where is my key. When she was down stairs I thought it was the key that she had in her pocket that he wanted; as she always used to lock up the spoons and the mugs before she went to bed. It was not that key, she did not give him any key at all; then I heard a shriek of murder both from Mrs. Lewis and from Kitty. I could not tell where Kitty was at the time; I heard a man come running a part of the way up stairs, but what he said I do not know, it was apparently after her. I was so much alarmed I could not stand any longer, I flung myself on her bed, and some man that was out in the garden said, come we must be off.

Q. What became of your watch. - A. I left it in my bed underneath my pillow when I went up stairs.

Q. When you come down stairs again after the men were gone did you see whether it was there or no. - A. After the men were gone I went into Mr. Bell's room, they called me down and said I might come down now.

Q. Did you find it when you went into your own room. - A. No, nor a pocket handkerchief, that was not there. Mrs. Harrison and her husband were in the house before I came down, and a carter.

Q. Did you examine the state of the bureau. - A. The drawers were all out, and the papers were throwed about the parlour. Mrs. Harrison examined them very much, I did not because I had no clothes on.

Q. Did you know Mr. Franklin that lived in the neighbourhood. - A. I have heard of him; Mr. Bell has pointed out the place to me, it is called Oxgate farm.

Q. Do you know whether there was any connection between Mr. Franklin and the prisoner at the bar. - A. Prendergast used to work there, and while, I was at Mr. Bell's, he employed him two or three days.

Patrick Prendergast 's Defence. I only know the truth in my own defence, what I told you before; let I die or be innocent, I will tell the truth, I do not care, they may do what they will do. If I had any intention of robbing Mr. Bell, my daughter and me could have robbed Mr. Bell, without bringing a gang about his house. At the time Mr. Bell was robbed, these villians were making of hay thereabouts; and they were talking about it; I told them they should not do it when they came to me, I was laying within Mr. Franklin's loft, Jack Saunders came to me and brought me out of bed, and told me that James Hayes was going to Ireland, and this man owed me three or four shillings, and that he wanted to give it me, and they had a bottle of gin, and we took and drank it; and then I said I would not go there, I would sooner be killed on the spot; they said if I did not they would cut my throat, with that I went along with them, I did not go in; I went no further than Mr. Bell's gate, there were two carmen coming down with their waggons, and the women within they hauld and bawl'd out to them, and away myself I run home, and went where I slept; my daughter said that she knew this man that went in at the window. Jack Connor , the man that went in at the window, cut his hand, and I went down in the morning and shewed my hand that it was not cut, from that and two months after that; I found that coffee pot in a ditch, I was afraid to send it home; with that I brought it to Martin M'Heron, I asked him to buy it; if I was a thief and a robber all the world would know it. I acknowledge I was innocently brought into it, I saw no more than the coffee pot; I am sure my daughter used to have the keys of his gold and silver, it would be easy to take away his money when she had the keys; then I get a whole gang to rob him. One woman would be able to rob him; I work hard and honest for my bread, I worked along with Mr. Franklin, I believe he is in court, and if he heard me do any thing that is wrong, I will give you leave to do what you may do; and that rascal who is now confined in the house of correction, has that lady's watch, if there was a good charge made.

Hayes' Defence. I say there is nothing of the

truth in what he has uttered.

Prendergast. You do not like it I suppose; I have told the truth, if I was going to die tomorrow.

Catherine Prendergast was not put on her defence.

Q. (to prosecutor) It was in the month of September that your house was robbed. - A. I swore it in the indictment, and I believe it was; I then swore to an hour.

Q. You have told us that you knew perfectly well the person of Patrick Prendergast . - A. Yes, as much as I do now.

Q. How happened it that Patrick Prendergast was not apprehended till the 17th of December. - A. I knew it then. I told some confidential friends, it was such a crime that I thought it would not be credited, till there were some corresponding circumstance. I was as cool when he came two days after the robbery, when he came and had his pint of ale and some cold victuals; there were some things brought back on the Sunday morning, that were stolen; I had a deal of it returned; I thought I might have all or the principal part come back. I knew it was him, and I told my neighbours, I told several that he was the man that came up the ladder, with a lighted torch in his hand, in a bladder. I likewise told you that I had not a minute's rest in this leg, it was in consequence of his weight in falling when he crushed the sash.

Q. When did you tell some of your confidential friends. - A. The next morning, before twelve o'clock, I told Mrs. Harrison and Mrs. Lewis.

Q. Have you any doubt now. - A. No; as I told your lordship, I could have run him through as easy as hit my finger, but I would not.

Q. How long did his daughter live with you after the robbery. - A. Till they fetched her away. I saw the danger, I put her in the room behind mine, facing the Edgware Road; there I put her and there she was. I thought I might have passed it off, and that they would have brought the things back.

Q. Have any of the things been brought back. - A. Yes, I have had above twenty ounces of plate sent back, and a suit of mourning, and I do not know how many things, and I thought I might have passed it off, but the impression it has made, has never left my mind to the present time.

Q. Perhaps the daughter continued to live with you till the father was taken up. - A. Till after, there she is, I told her if she would take care of me I would make her happy, but so perverse was she in all her ways.

Q. Do you know Mr. Franklin. - A. I do, he lives at Oxgate, near to my house. I had the farm once myself that he lives in.

Q. Do know what servants were in his employ. - A. Yes, I knew the eldest son of Prendergast was, and I believe him to be a good young man, and Prendergast was employed by Mr. Franklin and sometimes by me.

Patrick Prendergast . (to prosecutor) Did not you mention whoever went into the window, he broke the sash, and his hand was cut, and there was a great deal of blood in the house the morning following. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw me the next day and I shewed you my hands. - A. You did not come near me on that day.

Q. I was at work the next day, and Mr. Franklin he saw my hand that it was not cut. - A. I tell it openly in the court; that man's hands are not clean in this business. The ladder that they broke in at my window, he came down and looked at it, he said it was not his, but his was broke, and it was placed at my window when I went out to buy something for dinner; when I came back the ladder was gone. Now this man, there he is, he came and saw the ladder, and he sent one of his men to fetch the ladder away, after he had disowned it; he said it was Grindall's ladder, and that Mr. Grindall has got it.

Q. I understand you to say now, that the man who smashed the glass of the window, did cut his hand. - A. He did, I did not see his hand cut, but I saw the blood on his hands; I saw Prendergast when he led me down stairs, and when he was leading me out of bed; I am positive, I shall be out of time very soon; I held down the sash with my hand, but I was not cut in any way.

ISAAC FRANKLIN. I am a farmer.

Q. The prisoner Prendergast was in your employment. - A. He was.

Q. You live very near to Mr. Bell do not you. - A. Very near.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar on the night of this transaction, was he at your place. - A. I cannot say whether he was or not; he slept in my loft when he was there, whether he was there that night I cannot say.

Q. Did you see him the day after the commission of the robbery. - A. I did, I was with him.

Q. Did you know that he was at all charged with the fact at that time. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Or suspected. - A. I did not till Mr. Slade, a farmer just by, came and informed me that Mr. Bell's house was broken open. I was down in the field where Prendergast was spreading a manure, I stood looking at him one or two hours, and two more men where with him spreading the manure.

Q. Having no suspicion you could not be called upon to examine him. - A. No, I had no suspicion.

Q. Are you able to speak with respect to the condition of his hands. - A. I saw no cut at all in the least; I did not examine them, I saw no plaister on them.

Q. (to prosecutor) Mr. Bell, did the prisoner shew you his hands himself, he says that he shewed you his hands sometime or other himself. - A. He never did directly nor indirectly.

Catherine Prendergast . Yes master he did, Mrs. Lewis saw his hands.

Patrick Prendergast . My lord, will you let me speak one word, I want to let you know, do you think that I would be such a fool as not to disguise my face when Mr. Bell knew me as well as myself.

PATRICK PRENDERGAST , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

JAMES HAYES , NOT GUILTY .

CATHERINE PRENDERGAST , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-33

99. JOHN COLLOM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December a wooden cask, value 4 s. and four gallons and a half of ale, value 5 s. the property of John Hubbard and John Keen .

Second count for like offence, the property of John Keen only.

JOHN KEEN . I am a brewer , I live at No. 2, Back lane, Bethnal green ; my late partner's name was John Hubbard . I gave the prisoner at the bar the key to draw some beer for supper, on the 15th of December last, which he did, at about ten o'clock at night, he was brought back a little before eleven at night; by the officers, who asked me if I had given the prisoner leave to take home any beer, I said no, of course, I was obliged to swear to the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford.

Q. Was the prisoner entitled to drinking any ale in the brewhouse. - A. Yes, but not to carry any away.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I am a patrol of Bow street. On the 15th of December, as Valentine and I were coming across Bishop Bonner's fields, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, we met the prisoner with a cask on his shoulder, we asked him what he was carrying there, he said table beer; he said he was going to take it some where; we asked him if his master knew of it he said about a fortnight before he had asked him for some, but he did not believe that his master knew of his bringing it away that night. We took him to Mr. Keen, he said he knew nothing of it, not had he give him leave to take it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Keen gave me leave to drink some beer in the brewhouse, which I saved; I had to get up at four o'clock in the morning to go to Whitechapel; I thought I should want some beer and some victuals before I went out, and I took that cask. I had saved that beer up,

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-34

100. ELIZABETH HOLLOWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of November , a sheet, value 3 s. a cravat, value 1 s. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a piece of dimity, value 1 s. the property of Robert Clayard .

SARAH CLAYARD . I live at No. 4, Phoenix street . The prisoner has lodged in my house, and since that she has frequently come to my house. I missed my things; the officer searched her lodgings, and found the duplicates, and the pawnbroker produced the things.

- THREADWAY. I am an officer. On the 28th of December, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, Compton street, St. Giles's, I searched her box, and found these two linen handkerchiefs in her box; in her pocket I found some duplicates, they are the duplicates. The prisoner said she had found them.

JOHN COLLINGWELL . I am a pawnbroker, High street, St. Giles's. The prisoner at the bar pledged a sheet, two handkerchiefs, and a remnant of dimity with me.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me these things, we were in the habit of lending one another things.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-35

101. ELIZABETH DOWLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , thirty pieces of cotton, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Judith Wilkinson , in his dwelling house .

JUDITH WILKINSON . I live in Dartmouth street, Westminster , I am a linen draper . On Tuesday the 30th of December, about one o'clock in the forenoon, I missed from the side of my door, they were partly in and partly out, a quantity of remnants of printed cotton, I had seen them at eleven o'clock myself, and at a little after one I missed them. I immediately gave information to the police office, Queen's square.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 9th of December I was applied to by a man giving me information that the prisoner at the bar was at Mr. Morrat's in York street, I went there; the prisoner was there in the act of pawning these three pieces. I asked the prisoner if she had brought these three pieces; they were then lying on the counter. She said she had brought them to pawn.

WILLIAM RENNY . Q. You was along with the other witness at the time that the prisoner was apprehended. - A. Yes, I took these twenty two pieces of cotton from under her arm; the prisoner told me they were her own property.

JOHN BASTIN . On the 9th of December, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner pledged two pieces of cotton for three shillings.

JOHN STOCKS. I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of December, between the hours of one and two in the afternoon, the prisoner brought three pieces of cotton to our shop. I lent three shillings upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along by the door, and a young woman overtook me, and asked me if I would take them for her.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-36

102. MARY PLANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , a silver watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 2 s. and two keys, value 2 s. the property of William Hall , in his dwelling house .

SARAH HALL . I am the wife of William Hall, he is a shoemaker , I live in Tottenham court road . On the 23d of December Mary Plant came into my house, I have known her for these nine years; when she came in the watch was hanging at the fire place, on the side of the mantle piece. She took the child out of my arms and kissed it; she then set the child on the ground and went away.

Q. Did you observe her go to the mantle piece where this watch hung. - A. She was within half a yard of the mantle piece the whole time.

Q. Who was in the house besides. - A. No one, except herself, and me, and the child; I was sitting at the fire place, I did not see her take it. On the 26th of December I saw the watch at Marlborough street. I met the prisoner in Holborn, my husband was with me, we laid hold of her, she said do not say any thing to me in the street, if you will come to me in Lincoln's Inn fields I will tell you where the watch is; she told me that she took it from the mantle piece. We found it at Mr. Page's in Liquor Pond street.

ELIZABETH STONE . I went with the prisoner to the pawnbroker's, she had lodged with me five weeks; I pawned the watch in my own name, because I knew Mr. Page. She said it was her father's watch, and she had borrowed it of her mother; she owed me money.

Q. How much did you get on the watch. - A. A guinea and a half.

WILLIAM PAGE . I am a pawnbroker. Elizabeth Stone pledged the watch with me on the 23d of December; she said it was her own.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-37

103. ELENOR PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , eleven cotton pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 l the property of Thomas Blowers , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BLOWERS . I live at No. 108, Tottenham court road , I am a linen draper .

Q. In consequence of any information did you go after the prisoner. - A. I did. I saw her going out of the shop, I overtook her about thirty yards from the house, she had a long Bath cloak on; I told her that she had taken something out of the shop, she said that she had nothing; I pulled the cloak open, I saw nothing, and shaking her petticoats, she dropped eleven handkerchiefs from between her legs. I took the handkerchiefs up, and took her to the watchhouse; I gave charge of her, and I left the handkerchiefs in the custody of the watchhouse keeper.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Tottenham court road; a woman in a cloak dropped these articles. I picked them up and put them in my pocket.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-38

104. ALICE GUY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , three pair of black silk stockings, value 3 l. the property of William Churchill , privately in his shop .

- ARKLEY. I live with Mr. Churchill, hosier , Oxford street . On Tuesday the 13th of January the prisoner came into the shop, she said she wanted to purchase some silk stockings, she looked out six pair and desired a bill to be made of them; she left the shop without purchasing, but said she would call again for what she had purchased; I put the six pair of stockings on the further end of the counter.

Q. Did you miss any articles. - A. I cannot say that I did.

THOMAS LODGE . Q. You are a hosier in Oxford street. - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect any thing of the prisoner at the bar coming into your shop on Tuesday the 13th instant. - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock. In consequence of my suspecting that she had taken a pair of stockings from me I took her into the parlour.

Q. Was any search made. - A. Not in the first instance; I was called to the shop by other customers in my shop; while I was there my wife came and said here is some more stockings.

Q. You did not find them, is your wife here. - A. No, it is impossible for us both to be here without shutting up the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-39

105. ALICE GUY was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , a pair of black silk stockings, the property of Thomas Lodge , privately in his shop .

THOMAS LODGE . The prisoner came to my shop on the 13th instant about twelve o'clock, she said she wanted six pair of black silk stockings for an undertaker; I shewed her four or five papers of silk stockings; just after she came in I had four different customers come in, and I was obliged to leave her a little now and then to one customer in particular, I was obliged to leave her to shew a piece of flannel, when my attention was again directed to her. I saw a paper of black silk stockings which I had shewed to her, all of a heap, and every pair discomposed. I took them pair by pair, and folded them up, she was sitting by at the time on a stool. I found there was but five pair, with two pair that she had thrown by, that she intended to buy; that gave me a suspicion of her. I thought there should be six or seven pair from my observation before.

Q. Did you see any thing of the appearance of her being in the act of stealing. - A. No. After I had this suspicion she had looked out one pair more, she would leave three pair, and as I seemed busy she would call in again in about ten minutes, if I would make out a bill; she put only three pair by, and that excited my suspicion stronger. Upon her telling me this I told her rather in a peremptory way to stay till I had served my other customers, she did so; I then said to her, as you said when you first came in that you wanted six pair, and you have only looked out three, suppose you look out the other three pair; she said I would oblige her very much if I would send some to America place, Baker street; I then desired her to walk into the back parlour, she did so; I told her that I suspected she had stole something, I should send for a constable to search her; she directly produced a pair of black silk stockings from her muff, which she acknowledged was my property, and sell down upon her knees and begged for mercy. I sent for an officer and took her into custody.

Q. When she produced the stockings you took them from her. - A. Yes, and I know them to be

mine, I threw them across the table in the parlour.

Q. Did you see the officer take them. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. How long was it before he came. - A. About ten minutes.

Q. Was any body present. - A. There was my wife and two or three neighbours came in before the officer came. I certainly received a pair of stockings from the prisoner, which are my property, and I put them on the table; somebody gave them to the officer. They were handed about, they had my private mark on them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. Where was your wife at this time. - A. I cannot say. I am positive that she was not in the shop during any part of the time.

Q. There were four persons in the shop. - A. There were four or five different persons in the shop.

Q. What observations they made you do not know, whether they suspected her or not. - A. I suppose they did not.

Q. Do not be angry. - A. I am angry; I gave you a direct answer.

Q. One of them entered into a kind of discourse with her; is she here. - A. She said they were cheap.

Q. I only want to know, as you are angry, whether you will venture to swear that those other three customers knew any thing of it. - A. I cannot swear that they did not.

Q. You had a considerable suspicion of her. - A. Not at first, not till I folded up the five pair of stockings and found one pair short.

Q. You have said that you entertained a considerable suspicion of her, and then you attended to two or three other persons, will you swear that she did not take the stockings at that time. - A. She could not, I will swear it positively.

Q. Was your manner before her as angry as you are to day; you said you addressed her peremptorily. - A. Yes.

Q. You frightened her may be. - A. No, she did not seem to be such a sort of a lady.

Q. You say that she burst out in tears' and fell upon her knees and begged for mercy; you was very violent. - A. Not half so violent as you are now.

Court. Conduct yourself decent and answer the questions.

Mr. Reynolds. Had you said any thing about this prosecution, about what is called a Tyburn ticket. - A. I asked if the woman should be convicted whether I should be entitled to one.

Q. And you hoped you should get one. - A. No.

Q. I caution you now the first time, have not you said that if this woman was convicted you hoped you should get a Tyburn ticket. - A. I did not express a wish, I only asked if a man convicted a woman whether he should be entitled to a Tyburn ticket.

Q. You expected it; I have not had any positive answer, I ask you if you convicted this woman did not you expect to have it. - A. I should have applied for such a thing.

Q. Should not you expect it.

Court. Attend to the gentleman's question. - A. I expected it; I should have applied for it, I do not know whether it would be granted to me or no

Mr. Reynolds. Did you at any time make any promises to the woman to favour her. - A. I told her husband that if in case she was convicted I would recommend her to mercy.

Q. At the time before she fell down on her knees did you promise her any thing. - A. I did not.

Court. Had you any suspicion of this woman being at all about to steal your stockings till you had attended this woman that wanted this piece of flannel, and you observed this heap of stockings had been discomposed. - A. No, otherwise than the general suspicion that I have of every body that comes in the shop unless I know them.

Q. You did not know who this person was. - A. Not in the least.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-40

106. JOHN KEETING was indicted for that he on the 5th of January upon Elisheba Winter , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Elisheba Winter feloniously and against her will did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-41

107. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of December , a silver watch, value 30 s. one guinea, and half a guinea , the property of Alexander Gordon .

ALEXANDER GORDON . On the 29th of December I went to William Clark 's to enquire for some linen that I had washing there; they told me it was not ready, to stop a bit and I should get it; I sent out for something to drink, they wanted me to stop all night in that house.

Q. How was you when you went in there. - A. I was sober when I went there. I went to bed along with two of his children.

Q. After drinking a good deal of beer there you got drunk. - A. Yes, a little.

Q. What age was the children. - A. I suppose about four or five. In the morning my watch was gone out of my fob, and a guinea and a half in gold out of my pocket book, which was in my coat pocket. I had four pound notes in my breeches pocket, they were not gone; the prisoner went out very early in the morning to work, he came in at six at night, I stopped till he came in; I asked him if he knew any thing about my watch, he told me no. I got two officers, they found the watch upon him and part of the money.

Q. Did you see them find it upon him. - A. No.

Court. Then do not tell us what you do not know of your own knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Walford. Who sent for something to drink when you stopped in the prisoner's house. - A. Me.

Q. Who did you find in the prisoner's house. - A. His wife, himself, and some children.

Q. How much did you drink. - A. Two or three half pints of gin was sent for.

Q. You missed your watch in the morning, do you

recollect having it before you went to bed. - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did the prisoner come home in the evening. - A. About six o'clock.

Q. Have you ever said that you would make up this matter for two pound. - A. No.

Q. Never in your life. - A. No.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer of the Thames police. On the 30th of December I was sent for when I went the prisoner was standing at his own door, when my brother officer and I went into his house; we asked him where the watch was.

Q. Who asked him. - A. Gillmer; I heard the prisoner say something about going back to the privy, I told him not to let him go, we would search him first; I looked down and saw the watch chain; my brother officer directly tore the watch out, pocket and all.

(The watch produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I work in ballast lighters. Upon the 30th of December; I went to my work about twelve o'clock, my wife always knows me to come home at high water, she expected me that night, and coming into my own bed chamber I catched this man sleeping in my own bed where my wife and I sleep together, I catched him by the breast and asked him what business he had there, he did not speak a word to me, he appeared to be very much in liquor. There was a watch laying upon the table at a distance in the room, I took the watch, I could get no sense of him; I took this watch till I knew what he come about. I went up stairs, having a strong suspicion of jealousy, but finding her locked up in one of my lodger's rooms I went away. In the morning after my going away to my work, he arose and went up to where she lay, and sent the woman out of the house and had connection with her in the bed. I never denied having the watch to the officers; I put it in my pocket only to find the man out; he fetched this Mr. Walker and swore against me, and that he was captain of the Canary; he is neither captain nor owner, nor does he belong to the ship. At the time of my imprisonment in Clerkenwell he lived in my own house with my wife, and took her from me. He came up to Newgate to tell me if I would not prosecute him for having to do with my wife and give him some money, he would not appear against me. I have witnesses to prove the same.

Q. (to Walker) Upon Gillmer coming up to him did he desire Gillmer to go backwards with him. - A. Yes.

Q. Why did you not tell me that before. You represented it that he wanted to go to the privy as if to conceal something. Then he wished Gillmer to go backwards with him to the privy to talk with him. Look at this, and tell me whether this is your examination; is this Thomas Walker your hand writing. - A. It is.

Court. It is there he said to Gillmer if you will go back with me to the privy I will talk with you.

ANDREW HOLTWELL ; examined by Mr. Walford. Were you ever present when the prosecutor wanted to make it up with the prisoner. - A. Yes, Mr. Gordon came up where I lodge, and said if he had so much money as would take him into the country he would not appear against the prisoner; he said so to Mrs. Campden, Clark's mother in law.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-42

108. WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th December , eight leather howzells, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of John Trueman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury , and

Other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

EDWARD COLTEN . I am a drayman to Messrs. Hanbury, their brewhouse is in Spitalfields.

Q. Did you, and Haley your fellow servant, go to deliver any beer in Field lane. - A. Yes, on the 8th of December, to Mr. Robinson, the Brown Bear . We left the drays on Saffron hill, between the hours of seven and nine; when we returned, we missed the leather howzells from off the horses, they seemed as if they had been cut off with some sharp instrument upon that we made enquiry, but could find nothing out about them. We went home and informed the master of it; the day after we saw them at Worship street.

Q. Were those howzells that you saw at Worship street, the same that were on the horses before. - A. Yes, they are the property of Messrs. Hanbury.

THOMAS DIBBIN . I am store house clerk.

Q. What are the names of the partners. - A. John Trueman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . You are an officer of Worship street. - A. I am, I went on Monday the 8th of December in the afternoon, with Vickrey and Bishop, to a house situated in Brewer's Yard, Chick Lane, I left Bishop in the front part of the house; I and Vickrey went round the back way, and went into a stair case, that led into a room where the prisoner was sitting, two women were in that room, one he said was his wife. I asked him if he lived there, he said yes, he had lived there a twelvemonth and paid 8 s. a week. I asked him if he had got any thing there, (I believe them were the direct words) he said no, I looked into a cupboard of the left hand side, and in a minute or less, Vickerey said it was all right. I then from that called up Bishop, bolted the door, and in one minute I saw Vickrey lift up a board, and take out this (producing the leather howzells) from between the ceiling below; they were handed to me, and I put them on a table, I believe there were eight of them, and I knew eight were lost. I then says to the prisoner, how came you by this, his answer was, I know nothing about them; the prisoner was secured instantly, and in coming away, he said, I wish you would go up stairs for they had been brought in there by a little boy, that found them in the necessary. I went up stairs, I tried the door of the room, it was padlocked; then I took them to the office; they were sworn to.

WILLIAM NEWDY . I saw the prisoner at the corner of a court, coming into Safforn Hill. I had no suspicion of the man.

Q. Are you sure that he was the man that was there at that time the drays were there. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning when I was coming down stairs, I saw two boys in the privy, I asked them what they had there, they said that they had some leather that they found in the privy; they said it did not belong to them; I asked them what they wanted, they said they were going to call a drover up that lived there, if I was a mind to have it, I might have it; when the officers came the drover was out; the drover came up to the office to me, I asked him for the boys, he told me he would bring them, but the boys have gone on board a ship this fortnight.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-43

109. MARY COWLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , a shawl, value 50 s. the property of Mary Ann Lister , widow , in the dwelling house of Thomas Lister .

MARY ANN LISTER . I am a widow, I live at 33, King street, Holborn ; I live in my son in law's house, his name is Thomas Lister ; the prisoner lived with me a servant six or seven weeks.

Q. When did she leave your service. - A. On Friday the 26th of December.

Q. Did she give you any notice of her intending to quit your service. - A. No; on the Sunday following I went to my drawers, I missed a shawl and various other articles.

Q. When had you seen it in these drawers. - A. At two o'clock on Friday the 26th of December.

JAMES FLINT , I am a pawnbroker, Broad street, Bloomsbury. On Friday the 26th of December, the prisoner at the bar brought this shawl, I lent her five shillings on it.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of twenty shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-44

110. WILLIAM CASTELLO was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , five yards and three quarters of a yard of chambry, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Abraham Holford , privately in his shop .

JOHN FIELD . I am shopman to Abraham Holford , he is a linen draper , No. 6, Bishopsgate street . On the 6th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop making motions that he wished to see something for handkerchiefs; I left the prisoner and went to look for the articles, and when I returned I perceived him putting something in his pocket. I afterwards saw his jacket pocket projected out very much, and from the manner of his keeping his arm down, I suspected that he had stole something. I called Mr. Holford from the other side of the shop, he immediately went up to him, and took the chambry out of his pocket. The prisoner at first said it was his; upon Mr. Holford shewing him the mark, the prisoner endeavoured to get away.

Prisoner. The muslin was not in my pocket.

Q. (to Field) Are you sure that this chambry was in his pocket. - A. Yes.

CHARLES GRIFFITHS . Q. Are you shopman to Mr. Holford. - A. Yes; the prisoner at the bar came to Mr. Holford's shop, he signified by pointing to his neckcloth, that he wanted some muslin for handkerchiefs. John Field waited upon him, to shew him the articles. In a few minutes he informed Mr. Holford, that he had reason to suppose that the prisoner had stolen something; Mr. Holford went up to the prisoner, and took it out of his pocket; I saw it hang partly out of his pocket. The prisoner denied having stolen it, he said he had bought it; he was then taken in custody, and taken to the counter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland

Q. When Castello first came in the shop, he asked for some muslin. - A. He did, he asked for white muslin, this was a check.

Q. Was it not a natural colour for a foreign sailor to use. - A. Provided it was in handkerchiefs.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Here is several of them, they all tell one story of my having this in my pocket; I deny it. I have no one for me but God; I said how much, they said four shillings, me give two shillings; and after me put down two shillings, they would not take it, they bring me a prisoner.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-45

111. WILLIAM BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , a packing case, value 7 s. the property of James Harman .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES HARMAN . I deal in ironmongery , I am an agent and factor . I live in Bush lane, Cannon street, I have likewise a wharf in Thames street. The prisoner was my porter .

Q. On the third of this month, in consequence of any suspicion that you entertained, did you search his lodgings. - A. I did, the officer went with me; I went in pursuit of other things that I lost. I I found this packing case. I had left the prisoner in the accompting house in custody.

Q. Is that packing case you found, your property. - A. It is the property of James Wolley , Francis Deakin , John Bond Dutton , and Francis Johnson , at Birmingham; I am their agent. I account to them for them.

ACHAR SIDEBOTTOM. - Mr. Gurney. You are clerk to Mr. Harman. - A. I am; I was in the accompting house while he was in custody; when the officer returned from searching his lodgings, the prisoner acknowledged that he had taken the case for a rabbit hutch; and when he had money he should pay for it; he said it was one of the chests going to the Hambro' wharf, to be returned to Birmingham. They are made strong and of beech, to bear journies. I saw them on the 1st of November in the steel yard, I made a note of the cases myself, to give to the car-man to take to the wharf; I never missed the case; he

must have replaced it by another smaller one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

You say there was a given number sent to that wharf to be returned to the country, and that given number was sent to the country, can you swear that that case was one that was lost. - A. He must have replaced it by another.

Q. Do not give me your argument, will you undertake to swear that is one of those that has been lost. - A. That I cannot.

Mr. Alley. You talk of an exchange, an exchange is no robbery.

ELISHA CRABB . - Mr. Gurney. Did you go with Mr. Harman to the lodgings of the prisoner. - A. Yes, the prisoner told me where he lodged. I produce the packing case I found there.

Prosecutor. When this case was brought back it was marked P, it is so planed out now that I could not swear to it, It is worth seven shillings; we only break up old hogsheads that are not worth sending back.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was in Mr. Harman's employ I had it in my power to break up as many cases for fire wood as I pleased. I took this home for a rabbit hutch, I meant to pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

112. WILLIAM BURN was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , twenty-four shovels, value 50 s. the property of James Harman .

Second count for like offence, laying it to be the property of other persons.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-46

113. ELIZABETH STACEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Elizabeth Paul , widow , on the 19th of December , about the hour of three in the afternoon, and feloniously stealing four gowns, value 1 l. 12 s. six silver tea spoons, value 1 l. three petticoats, value 10 s. two shifts, value 3 s. three cotton shawls, value 3 s. one neck handkerchief, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. and one sheet, value 3 s. the property of Elizabeth Paul , widow.

ELIZABETH PAUL . I am a widow, I live in Fleece alley, Tower street , I keep a house, it is in the parish of Allhallows Barking . On the 19th of December I went out to my labour about ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. What are you. - A. I get my bread by a barrow in the street at the top of Tower street; I returned about one o'clock, my bed room door was fast. I returned again a little after four, and my bed room door was open, and all my drawers open, and every thing was taken out, and all my clothes were gone.

Q. Had you any body else in the house. - A. Yes, there were two people, Samuel Ward and Ann Ward , they were both so infirm they could not stir out. I took the pieces of my gowns, I went to five pawnbrokers, and at the sixth I met with my clothes, and then I ordered the pawnbrokers to stop the clothes, and then I went and got an officer; he made the pawnbroker produce the things.

Q. What is the prisoner, did she live with you. - A. She did, but she was not quite so well as I wished, so I turned her out of doors on Wednesday the 17th. She came on the following Friday and robbed me.

Q. You suppose she robbed you on the 19th. - A. Yes, between the hours of one and four.

JOHN GARRARD . I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 109, East Smithfield. On the 19th of December, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon I took in these things, which I now produce, of the prisoner at the bar; there is two gowns, two bed gowns, three petticoats, a sheet, a shift, a shawl, and six silver tea spoons, on which I lent her two pounds; and I lent her four shillings on two pair of stockings and two handkerchiefs.

Q. Did you ever see her before. - A. No, the prisoner came the next morning to redeem part of them; I detained her, and sent for an officer, and took her into custody.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. On the 19th of December this woman called upon me and said that she had been robbed, and that she had found the property at the pawnbrokers. I went with her to the pawnbroker's and desired him to shew us the property, which he did; I desired that if any person came for the property to stop them and send for us, and the next morning as I was going down the street I met Mr. Garrard and an officer with the prisoner. I desired them to bring her back to me to go and search the girl's lodgings, I went and searched them, she was a long while before she would shew me where she lived. In her lodging I found this handkerchief and shift, which the prosecutor swore to be her property. I asked her how she came by them, she said they were her own. When I brought her to the office I asked her how she got in this place where that property was; she said that she broke the door with a chisel, near upon three o'clock, and went immediately to the pawnbroker's. I searched her; in her pockets there were one half guinea, two seven shilling pieces, and a five shilling piece, which she said was her money she pledged the things for, and a great number of duplicates.

Prosecutor. The shifts are mine; one is a calico one, and it is torn, and the other is joined across the loins; that is my sheet, it is a calico sheet; the petticoats are mine, and the spoons are mine, five of them are brighter than the other, and one is bent by wearing of it more than the others; the gown, handkerchief, and the shawl are mine; they are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this woman's house, I took a chisel and opened the door, I went and took these things out of the drawer.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her youth .]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-47

114. JAMES BARKER and WILLIAM SAUNDERS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , eight pair of gaiters, value 12 s. 6 d. the property of William Haywood .

WILLIAM HAYWOOD . I am a salesman , I live in

Barbican. On the 8th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners lurked about the door, which gave me a suspicion. I watched them, they had some conversation together and returned. William Saunders , I saw him pull something out of his pocket, and cut the gaiters from the door post; they were hanging on a nail. I followed them and took them both; they dropped the gaiters. Barker was taking them from Saunders.

(The property produced and identified.)

Barker's Defence. I never saw the things before I saw the prosecutor bring them in.

Saunder's Defence. I was going along Barbican, I stopped to look at the picture shop; in the mean time the prosecutor came out and collared me and this young man, he said I had been taking his gaiters away. After he had brought us in his shop, he went out and brought the gaiters in.

BARKER, GUILTY , aged 19.

SAUNDERS, GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-48

115. WILLIAM CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , seventy pound weight of pork, value 3 l. the property of William Walden .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM WALDEN . I am a cheesemonger , I live in King street, St. James's. On the 14th instant, about eight o'clock in the morning, I bought two pigs at Newgate market , and I saw them taken out of my cart by a man in company with the prisoner, I saw that person put it on the prisoner's shoulder. I took hold of him, and he threw the pork down. I secured the prisoner.

Q. What is become of the man that put the pork on the prisoner's shoulder. - A. He run away.

Q. The pork that you bought is the same that was taken out of the cart. - A. It was.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry some pork down in the street, and the gentleman said he would give me sixpence for carrying it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-49

116. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , forty-six pound weight of cheese, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Hems .

ELIZABETH MEREDITH . I am servant to Mr. Hems, cheesemonger , Bishopsgate street . On the 7th of this month, about half past six in the evening, a man and woman came into the shop, and the prisoner followed behind; he stood behind the man and woman for a little time, and looked over their shoulders to the person that was serving them. I stood at a short distance from him and looked at him all the time, from the first of his coming into the shop till I saw him take two cheeses under his arm; he went out of the door with them; before he went out of the door, I called out that man has got the cheeses, stop thief. They never turned their heads. or else they could have stopped him before he had got out. I run out of the shop after him, I saw him turn to the right, he turned up a court, there he dropped the cheeses, both of them. He ran out again immediately, ran across the road, turned to the left hand, and was taken at a short distance.

Q. Are you sure that is the man. - A. I am certain of it, I never took my eyes off him from the time that he came into the shop till the time he took the cheeses.

GEORGE HOLT . Q. What are you. - A. My father keeps a public house. I found the cheeses up a court by the water spout. When the prisoner came by the house then I ran out, I see a man hold out his arms, and he caught him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was a going to Mr. Dixon's in Cheapside, that I work for, I called into the Flower pot, Bishopsgate street, there was a young man in there that told me that there was a shop in Threadneedle street where he could get a cheese for nothing, and if I would go with him I should have half of it. There was a call out when I got to Threadneedle street of Stop thief, and a man stopped me and said I was the thief.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-50

117. ELIZABETH COBB , alias FARMER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , two pelisses, value 35 s. three cloaks, value 7 l. 2 s. 6 d. a piece of lace, value 5 l. a laced cap, value 4 s. seven yards of lace, value 20 s. two caps, value 9 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. six gowns, value 26 s. a gown skirt, value 4 s. six yards of muslin, value 10 s. three sheets, value 15 s. the property of Robert Barker and Charles Lancaster . A silver ladle, value 20 s. two silver tea spoons, value 5 s. two table cloths, value 2 l. four shifts, value 20 s. two petticoats, value 15 s. a sheet, value 5 s. two yards of lace, value 10 s. a gown piece, value 10 s. two caps, value 4 s. and four napkins, value 4 s. the property of Robert Barker , in the dwelling house of Robert Barker and Charles Lancaster .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be committed in the dwelling house of Robert Barker only.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROBERT BARKER . - Mr. Gurney. You are in partnership with Charles Lancaster as pawnbrokers . A. Yes, No. 42, Old Compton street, St. Ann's Soho . I reside in the house, Mr. Lancaster resides elsewhere.

Q. Has the prisoner for a short time past lived in your service. - A. Yes, she came on the 15th of December.

Q. On the 7th of this month, in consequence of any thing that occurred, did you go up stairs to search her box. - A. I did, Mrs. Barker and one of my journeymen went with me. I asked her for the key of her box in the parlour, before I went up stairs; she said that she would take me up stairs and open the box herself. When I got up stairs she pretended that she had left the key in the kitchen, she went down stairs and came up again, and said that she could not find it, she must have left it in the room; she went away again, and took me to the

bed room twice.

Q. Where was her box. - A. In the bed room. After she had been in the kitchen a second time, she said she could not find the key, she desired me to break the box open with the poker, which she took from the kitchen in her hand; after a great deal of hesitation she put her hand into her pocket, took out the key of her trunk, and likewise the key of my warehouse.

Q. Where was she then. - A. In the kitchen; this was the duplicate key, we have two keys to the warehouse, they are kept in a secret place in the shop.

Q. Had she any business either in your shop or in your warehouse. - A. No. When she gave me the key she opened the box, and this kerseymere pelisse laid at the top, it is an article that I took in pledge, with a muslin gown; these two articles were missing. I found this shawl in the box, and this cloak I believe to be an article that was in the warehouse; this silk cotton handkerchief was in the box, and four duplicates of things pawned at other pawnbrokers; on these things being found in her box she begged for mercy and went down on her knees, and hoped I would forgive her, and attempted to run away, and said she must have been in liquor when she took them. She said that she had taken the pelisse the evening before I had detected her.

Mr. Knapp. Your partner's name is Charles Lancaster , is no other person interested in your business. A. No.

GEORGE KING . I am a constable, I produce twenty-eight duplicates.

Mr. Gurney. There are only four of them applicable to this charge, were these four found in her box. - A. Yes.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Webb, Chandos street. On the 6th of January the prisoner at the bar pledged two muslin gowns for seven shillings and six pence, and on the 1st of January two gowns and three cloaks.

JOSEPH HAYWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Markham. The prisoner at the bar pledged a handkerchief on the 1st of January.

WILLIAM JONES . I am servant to Mr. Dry, pawnbroker, St. Martin's lane. I have one pledge on the 1st of January, a sheet, waistcoat, and pantaloons, for half a guinea.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, to the value of twenty-three shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-51

118. GEORGE PHILLIPS , alias JAMES SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , four bed curtains, value 14 l. 14 s. the property of Stephen Bird , in his dwelling house .

STEPHEN BIRD . I live at No. 7, Newcastle street in the Strand, it is a corner house going into Wych street.

Q. What is your business. - A. I am constable, auctioneer, elastic brace maker, and cabinet maker .

Q. Have you seen the prisoner before. - A. Yes, I know him perfectly well; on the 8th of December after my shop was shut up, I was up stairs I heard a knock at the door. I did not come down, but my sons did, and they let the prisoner in. After the prisoner was gone, my son called me down stairs.

Q. Was any thing missing when you come down stairs. - A. Yes, the furniture which I charge the prisoner with, I had seen it ten minutes before the boy was at my house.

Q. Do you know any thing relating to the present charge of your own knowledge. - A. No, several days afterwards this boy came again with another boy, then I apprehended them both.

STEPHEN BIRD , junr. I am the son of the last witness.

Q. Were you at home on the night these curtains were missing. - A. Yes; I heard a knock at the door, I answered it, it was between five and six o'clock; the prisoner and another boy came in and asked if I had any braces, I told him yes, to walk in; I took them up to the braces, the other boy looked at a pair of silk patent, he asked the prisoner if he should have them, the prisoner said he did not care, he told him to try the braces on his shoulder, and while he was trying them on the prisoner at the bar went out of the shop; going out of the shop he made a stumble, the other boy said I dare say my brother George is only gone out to make water, he said he would call in the morning, and he went out of the shop. When they were both in the shop the prisoner at the bar was behind the other boy just by the curtains.

Q. What light had you in the shop. - A. Only one candle.

Q. Had not you the opportunity of seeing what the prisoner was doing while you served the other boy. - A. No, there was a book case between me and him, a sideboard, and a big table.

Q. Had you seen the curtain's before. - A. I saw them as I let him in, they were laying on the side board tied up.

Q. How large a bundle did they make. - A. About three quarters of a yard wide and pretty thick.

Q. Was it possible that such a boy as that could take away a bundle like that without your seeing. - A. It was just by the passage door on the sideboard, I missed the curtains as soon as they were both gone. He first came on the 8th for some braces, he came again on the 17th.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to swear positively from your recollection of his face that he is the same person. - A. Yes.

ISAAC BIRD . You are brother of the last witness. - A. I am.

Q. Were you with your brother at the time he let two boys in, in December. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you stay with him all the time the same two boys were there. - A. Yes.

Q. Should you know either of the two boys if you were to see them again, look round and see if you can find one of them. - A. The prisoner at the bar is one of them, I know him by his face.

Q. Which of them went out first. - A. The prisoner at the bar, and he stumbled when he went out on the step of the door.

Q. Did you see the cotton bed furniture. - A. Yes, on the sideboard; I saw it when they were

coming in.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-52

119. JAMES HARDING , RICHARD MEARS , THOMAS HAYES , and ROBERT COOK , alias SEABROOK , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , a gelding, value 20 l. and a mare, value 20 l. the property of James Briant .

Mr. Gurney. counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

120. JAMES HARDING , RICHARD, MEARS, THOMAS HAYES , and ROBERT COOK , alias SEABROOK, were again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , a cart, value 10 l. and thirty hundred pound weight of barilla, value 40 l. the property of James Briant .

Second count for like offence, laying them to be the property of Samuel Cleaver and Charles Cleaver .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN ROW . I am clerk to Mr. Samuel and Charles Cleaver , they are soap manufacturers in Brewer's yard, Shoe lane.

Q. On the 7th of January did you attend at the London Dock by their directions. - A. I went there for the purpose of seeing this barilla weighed at the warehouse No, 5. I saw the prisoner Harding there about one o'clock on that day, he had Mr. Briant's horses and cart with him, he was servant to Mr James Briant , he keeps horses and carts for hire. I saw Harding, and there was thirty hundred weight of barilla loaded in his cart.

Q. What is the value of it. - A. About eighty pounds; he drove away with it and I saw no more of him.

Q. What directions had he when he went away. - A. I gave him a note to deliver the barilla to Samuel and Charles Cleaver in Shoe lane. I knew Harding, he had carted barilla in Mr. Briant's cart to Messrs. Cleaver before.

Q. What time did you get home to Mr. Cleaver's in the evening. - A. By five o'clock.

Q. When you got home at five o'clock did you find the cart and horses and barilla there. - A. They were not there.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was this barilla in the dock, or in a private warehouse of Mr. Cleaver's. - A. It was in a vessel on the wharf.

Q. You say this man was a servant of Mr. Briant's, do you understand that of your own knowledge. - A. I do.

WILLIAM HERMITAGE . I am clerk to Messrs. Cleaver.

Q. On the evening of the 7th of January were you attending in their accompting house to receive this barilla. - A. Yes, I attended, but no barilla arrived.

JAMES BRIANT . - Mr. Gleed. You are a master carman. - A. Yes, I live in Lower East Smithfield.

Q. On the 7th of January last was the prisoner Harding in your employ. - A. Yes, as carman; I sent him to the London Docks, No 5, to load some barilla for Messrs. Cleaver of Shoe lane. I saw Harding between seven and eight o'clock, then he came to my stable, I told him that I thought he was concerned in taking the barilla. In consequence of that I sent for an officer directly. When the officer came he dropped on his knees and begged that I would not send him to prison, for he knew nothing at all of it.

Q. In consequence of some information that you received you went to him at the watchouse. - A. Yes, and he said he would speak the truth; he said that Mears and Hayes were the two persons that applied to him in the morning for some barilla, and Hayes and Mears were the two persons that drove the cart and horses away.

Q. Are you answerable, Mr. Briant, for the delivery of this barilla. - A. Yes.

GEORGE WILLIAM TANNER. - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Briant. - A. I am.

Q. Was Harding in his service as a carman - A. He was.

Q. On the seventh of January do you know what cart he had that day. - A. A blue cart. We have two blue carts, the other was not out on that day; Harding came to my house about four o'clock on that day, he told me he had lost his cart and horses and barilla. I asked him how he came to leave his cart and horses; he then told me that he had not had a bit of victuals the whole of the day, that he went to get a bit of bread and cheese and a draft of beer, and while he was gone his horses and cart were driven away. I then went immediately and informed Mr. Briant. It was near four o'clock when I first heard of the horses and cart. I went immediately after them, and did not see them till eight o'clock. On my return home I saw the cart and horses in the Minories, they were going home, in the custody of Mr. Kee's men, and the barilla was gone. I immediately went home, and the prisoner was in the stable with Mr. Briant. I fetched an officer and he was taken to the watch-house.

Q. Did you afterwards go with Mr. Briant to the watchhouse. - A. I did; the prisoner then said he knew nothing about the horses and the cart and the barilla, he said he did not know how they were taken away. He afterwards sent for me, I went to the watchouse to him, he said he was very sorry for it, he would tell the truth; he said Mears and Hayes were the two men that drove the cart and the horses with the barilla away, but where they were gone to he could not inform me. Mr. Briant was outside of the watchouse, he came in and heard him say it; he said it twice over. He said that Mears had applied to him for some barilla in the morning.

Mr. Alley. What partners are there in Mr. Cleaver's house. - A. Samuel and Charles Cleaver , I am not positive.

THOMAS LEE . - Mr. Gleed. You are a constable, you was sent for to take Harding in custody. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at the time that the last witness and Mr. Briant were together. - A. Yes; at the watchouse Harding said he would tell the truth, he said that Mears and Hayes were the two parties that drove the cart and horses away, and

that Mears and Hayes had made applications to him in the morning, knowing that he was carrying barilla out of the docks, to let them have some.

JAMES MARDOCK . - Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a carman employed by Mr. Myers, who contracts for the dust in Spital fields. - A. I am a scavenger.

Q. And your master is a scavenger, you are employed in working in the streets, do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know Cook and Mears. On the seventh of January, about four o'clock, I saw Richard Mears and Robert Cook , I was at the top of Rose lane. Robert Cook was driving the horses, and Richard Mears was walking of the off side of the cart; it was a large blue cart.

Q. How many horses. - A. A horse and a mare. Mears was about a yard and a half from the cart, walking just upon the curb stone. Mears was first looking one way and then the other, I knew the cart and horses, I have worked for Mr. Briant before, and driven the same horse and mare.

Q. What pace did the horses go. - A. As quick as they could go. I looked into the cart to see if it was dust in the cart, instead of dust there was barilla. Hayes came up after the cart, he was about fifty yards behind, he said, they do not drive fast enough.

Q. Who did he say that to. - A. To some man that was with him; Hayes went on a-head in the same direction that the blue cart had gone on.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. You said this was barilla, had you seen any before. - A. Yes, I have loaded it in the docks.

JAMES COKER . - Mr. Gleed, You are also employed by Mr. Myers, the master scavenger. - A. Yes; on the seventh of January about four o'clock, I was about the top of Quaker's street leading into Wheeler street. I saw Robert Seabrook (i. e. Cook) and Mears. Cook was driving the cart, and Mears was of the off side of the cart. It was a blue cart of Mr. Briant's, I worked it one day for him.

MARK COKER ; examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you likewise work for Mr. Myers. - A. Yes, I am son in law to him. On the 7th of January, about four o'clock, I was working in Lamb street, Spitalfields.

Q. How near is that to Quaker street. - A. A very little way off; between three and four o'clock, I saw two horses and a blue cart coming along, of Mr. Briant's. I saw Robert Seabrook , he was driving it, and Mears was walking of the off side of it; he was looking about him; I know them well, they turned into Webb's square, I was watching them to see if they took any dust.

DANIEL SPARKES . - Mr. Gleed. I am a dustman. I was working with the last witness; I saw Seabrook in Lamb street, Spitalfields, he was driving the cart; I saw Mear's with him, he was walking of the off side of the cart. I knew it was Mr. Briant's cart, because I had worked the cart, it was a large blue cart.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. Between three and four o'clock.

SAMUEL CLEAVER . - Mr. Gurney. You and your partner carry on this soap manufactory. - A. We do.

Q. Was Mr. Briant to bring the barilla to your warehouse. - A. He was.

Mr. Alley. It was never in your possession. - A. No, it was to have been.

Mr. Gurney. I believe you was to pay for it. - A. I was, I purchased it on board the ship, she was laying in the river, and afterwards she came into dock.

Harding's Defence. When I wanted to get my dinner, I brought it out of dock, I set the cart a- against the pails; I went home to get a bit of bread and cheese, and when I came back the cart was gone; which way it went, I do not know.

Cook's Defence. I was at work all that day, till past three o'clock loading a barge with ashes, I was not there with them.

Mears's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. I am as innocent as a child unborn, of what is alledged against me.

Hayes' Defence. I am innocent of the crime alledged to my charge; I know nothing of it before God.

Hayes called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HARDING, GUILTY , aged 22.

MEARS, GUILTY ; aged 24.

COOK (alias SEABROOK), GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

HAYES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-53

121. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , five iron cart streaks, value 4 s. the property of Anthony Harvey , and JOHN SPAWL , for receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN NOKES . - Mr. Gurney. Are you a workman in the employ of Mr. Harvey. - A. Yes, he is a coachmaker and wheel wright at Tottenham.

Q. Was the prisoner Andrews in his employ. - A. Yes.

Q. On Monday December 22nd, did you see the prisoner in the manufactory. - A. I saw him in the yard, he was at work in the morning, but not in the afternoon; I saw him about a quarter after five in the afternoon. Then he had his coat on, he was standing just by the old iron streaks, that lays against the door; I saw him standing there, what he took out I cannot tell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. I understand you to say that it was an heap of old iron, that lay behind the door. - A. Yes.

Q. That was old iron taken off of old wheels, of old carriages, your master had it taken off and put there. - A. Yes.

THOMAS PIPER . I am a watchman at Tottenham; my walk goes by Mr. Harvey's manufactory. On Monday evening December the 22nd, I was standing in the road; I saw John Andrews go past, it was a quarter after six o'clock.

Q. How near did you see him to Mr. Harvey's manufactory. - A. Within about thirteen or fourteen yards, when I first saw him he was going towards Edmonton; he had something on his shoulder, and something in one hand; but I did not go to examine

what he had got.

Mr. Alley. Then whatever he had got, he did not conceal it all. - A. No, he had it on his shoulder.

JOSEPH PIPER I am a watchman of Tottenham, next box to Thomas Piper . On Monday evening the 22nd of December, Andrews came by me as I was on my beat, a little after six o'clock, with four streaks of iron on his shoulder, and one in his hand. I followed him with the next watchman (White) towards Edmonton. We followed him to the shop of John Spawl , an old iron and rag shop.

Q. How near did you and White keep to him. - A. It might be within a dozen or fourteen yards of him, we lost sight of him just before he went into the shop, on account of something that were passing. We looked through the shop door, and there we saw him selling the five streaks of iron to Spawl.

Q. Did you see what money he received. - A. I did not see him receive any money; when he came out I asked him how he came by that iron that he had carried in; he denied having any, the other watchman laid hold of his collar, and took him in the shop; I asked Spawl if he had bought any iron of him; I went in, Spawl said he bought five streaks of him, and there it was, pointing his finger to the counter. The prisoner Andrews then owned that he had bought it of him, and had given him the full value for it. Andrews said he was very willing to go before a magistrate, he could make his case good how he came by it.

Q. Did you hear either of them say how much Spawl had given for it. - A. Not then, afterwards they did. I took John Andrews that night, and left Spawl; we brought the iron away. Spawl went before the magistrate the next day with Andrews.

MR. MORES. - Mr. Gurney. Was this examination taken before you of Spawl. - A. Before me, that is the original copy; (the examination read).

John Spawl says - I live at Tottenham, and keep an iron shop. On Monday evening the 22nd of December, about seven o'clock, the prisoner Andrews brought five streaks of iron, which I weighed and found to be about forty pound; upon which I said have not you been making free with some one's property here; upon which he answered no, he had bought it. I asked no more questions, but gave two shillings and four pence for it. He told me that he worked for Mr. Harvey and Gill.

Mr. Alley. (to Joseph Piper ) After Andrews came out of the shop, you went in, and Spawl said he had bought it of Andrews. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it after you went with the prisoner Andrews to the magistrate, that you came back to the shop of Spawl, by the magistrate's directions, for the iron. - A. It might be half an hour or three quarters an hour.

Q. You left Spawl in the shop. - A. Yes, I did not take him in custody that night.

Q. He came the next day before the magistrate. - A. Yes.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a watchman of Tottenham.

Q. On the night of Monday the 22nd of December, did you see the prisoner Andrews. - A. Yes, he passed me.

Q. Is the account that Piper gave correct and true, - A. Yes, it is?

(The property produced and identified.)

Andrew's Defence. I bought this iron.

Spawl's Defence. When he came into the house he told me he bought it, openly along the street; I bought it of him.

Spawl called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

ANDREWS, GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

SPAWL, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-54

122. JOHN KEMP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of December , an earthen ware dish, value 1 s. and ten pound weight of pork, value 7 s. the property of John Baker .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court, there recognizances were ordered to be estreated; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-55

123. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of December , two pound weight of iron nails, value 2 s. the property of John Harnby .

JOHN Harnby . I am an ironmonger and smith , No. 4, Tottenham court-road .

Q. Did you lose two pound weight of iron nails. - A. Yes. On the 15th of December last, between eight and nine in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop for an hinge, that he had left for an alteration. In consequence of what my shopman informed me; I followed the prisoner to his master's shop, he went in at the door of his master's work shop. I went in at the house door, I told his master, Mr. Stone, that he was suspected by my shopman, I and Mr. Stone went to him; I told him that I was informed by my shopman that he had robbed my shop; he said he had not. I told him that I thought he had something in his coat pocket; I put my hand into his coat pocket, and I pulled out two papers of nails; one is marked by my shopman, and the other by my wife; then he fell down on his knees and begged for mercy. When I went for an officer, he ran away; I pursued him and took him.

Q. What is the value of that quantity of nails. - A. They stand me in two and two pence.

Q. While he was in your shop are you sure that he did not buy any nails. - A. I am.

Prisoner. Will you swear that those nails found upon me were your property at the time they were found upon me. - A. Most assuredly they were.

ALEXANDER SCULTHORP . I am shopman to Mr. Hornby.

Q. Look at those papers of nails, and see if either of them are your hand writing. - A. One of them is. On the 15th of December the prisoner came into the shop while I was there, I kept my eye upon him, I saw him put his hand in the place were these things were; I informed my master.

Q. Can you say that the packages of nails now produced were in your shop that morning. - A. To the best of my recollection they were. I never sold him any nails of that sort, they are shoe nails. I

saw nothing of him after he went out of the shop, till he ran by, and my master after him, crying out Stop thief; he ran down Falcon and Bird court, I went round the other way, I found him behind a cart, I told him to stop, my master came and took him by the collar. Roberts said; for God Almighty's sake Mr. Hornby, save me from utter destruction.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came out of Mr. Hornby's shop I went to Mr. Stone's shop, I pulled off my coat and left it hanging up in the shop; there is a man that works for Mr. Stone that would take my life away, he might as well have put them in my pocket as well as any other man.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-56

124. JAMES WILLIS was indicted, and the indictment stated that on the 6th of July, in the forty-first year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish church of Christ church, he did marry and take to wife one Elizabeth Ticknell , spinster, and that he afterwards on the 19th of July, in the forty-sixth year of his Majesty's reign , at the parish church of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , feloniously did take to wife one Eleanor Large , spinster, his former wife Elizabeth being then alive .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SAMUEL CHIVERS . - Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, - A. I know him very well.

Q. Were you present at any marriage that took place between him and any body else on the 6th of July 1801. A. Yes, at Christ church blue-coat school; he married Elizabeth Ticknell , she is now in court. I acted as father.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney, How old was he. - A. I did not ask his age.

Q. Was he a man. - A. He looked like a man, I cannot tell whether he was or no.

Q. You do not mean that he was twenty years of age. - A. I cannot tell.

MARY CHIVERS . - Mr. Knapp. Were you with the other person at the marriage of this prisoner and Elizabeth Ticknell . - A. Yes, they were married at Christ church, London, on the 6th of July 1801.

Court. Did you know the young woman before. - A. I knew her; when he put the banns up he seemed to be very happy that he was going to enter into such a family; he told me that she was a very respectable young woman. He married her from No. 10, Soho square, he was a painter there, he met with her himself.

JOHN BURNLEY . I produce the register. - James Willis of the parish of Christ church, bachelor, and Elizabeth Ticknell , spinster, of the same parish, were married on the 6th of July 1801, by Samuel Crowder , vicar, in the presence of Mary Chivers and William Hemson Ticknell .

GEORGE LEMING . I produce the register of the parish of Shoreditch. James Willis of this parish, and Eleanor Large , were married at this church, 19th of July, 1806, in the presence of John Fotherby and Alice Grubnall .

ELEANOR LARGE . - Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever married to him at Shoreditch church. - A. Yes, in July last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Are you the prosecutrix of this indictment. - A. I am not, I am very sorry to come upon the occasion, I could have wished to have been three hundred miles off.

Q. Who is it that prosecutes him. - A. I do not know indeed, I was forced to come.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-57

125. JOHN BRACEGIRDLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Joel Marks , privately in his shop .

JOEL MARKS . I lived at Cross court, Drury lane , I am a salesman . On the 7th of January the prisoner and two others came into my shop about one o'clock in the day, he asked me to shew him a pair of breeches, I shewed him some, and he pretended there was none to suit him; they then went out all three together. I have a line withinside of my window, upon which I hung up this waistcoat, exposed to sale. I suspected them as soon as they went out of the shop.

Q. Did they meddle with any of the goods. - A. They did not appear to meddle with any, but my suspicion arose from the trouble they gave me. I missed the waistcoat off the line that minute they went out.

Q. How lately had you seen it. - A. Just the minute before they came in. I went out after them, I met them coming up my court, in a direction from Drury lane playhouse; the prisoner being the nearest to me I catched hold of him by the collar and brought him into my shop, I then taxed him with robbing me; he said he was very sorry, he would give me any recompence.

Q. What became of his companions. - A. I do not know, they made their escape. The prisoner in my shop took this waistcoat from under his coat; it cost me five shillings.

WILLIAM LODDIN . Q. Were you in Mr. Marks' shop when the prisoner was there. - A. Yes, Mr. Marks called me in, he taxed the prisoner with the robbery; the prisoner said he was sorry for it, and he would make him any recompence for it, and then he pulled it out from under his coat.

Prisoner. Did I not say that I did not know that the property was stole at all. One of the young men gave it to me about three or more streets off. I should not have come back to the court if I had known it had been stolen. - A. That was after he was out of my shop, going to Bow street. The clerk asked if any body had access to the shop as well as myself, I told him my wife had; at the same time before I accused him of the waistcoat, I asked her if she had sold any thing; she then described this waistcoat, and that it was hanging in that situation.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-58

126. JANE EARLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , nine handkerchiefs, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of John Thwaites , privately in his shop .

GEORGE MAYNARD. Q. You live with Mr. Thwaites, in Holborn . - A. I do, he is a linen draper . From information, I missed nine cotton handkerchiefs from the door, on Thursday the 15th of January, about three o'clock. I hung them at the door a quarter of an

hour before.

Q. Do you know that they were not sold. - A. They were not; I pursued her, she dropped down on the pavement just by White-hart court; whether it was for concealing the goods or by accident I cannot say; when she saw me she jumped up and ran away. I caught her with the goods upon her, and when I caught her she threw the goods about a yard and a half from her. I took her down to my employer. Mr. Thwaites ordered me to take her to Hatton Garden.

- BAKER. I am a single man, I lodge at the Broad Arrow, Grub street, I am a smith

Q. Were you in Holborn on Thursday last. - A. I was, about three o'clock. I saw the prisoner fumbling about the handkerchiefs at Mr. Thwaites' door, she unpinned the tickets from the handkerchiefs; I was across the way, I had suspicion that she was going to take them, she rolled them up in a bundle; then she put them at the back of some more linen that was at the door; she stopped about a minute and a half, till the people passed, until she had an opportunity of taking them; then she put them under her blue apron, crossed the way, and went up White Hart court. I came over and acquainted Mr. Thwaites of it, and I saw her taken.

Q. Did you see the bundle then. - A. Yes, it was rolled up.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than you do at this moment; I was very much in liquor when this gentleman laid hold of me. I have got this child, and I work very hard for my living.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chnmbre.

Reference Number: t18070114-59

127. ANN TUBBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , a tub, value 1 s. and one hundred and eighty six oysters, value 3 s. the property of James Ballance .

JAMES BALLANCE . I am a fruiterer and green grocer , I live at No. 6, White-lion street, Whitechapel. On the 8th of December, between the hours of ten and eleven o'clock at night, from information I went to the end of the street, and round the corner, about thirty yards, I saw the prisoner standing at the end of the court, I did not perceive any thing with her at the time, I heard some water spill, I immediately ran to her and caught her by the shoulder, she immediately dropped down the tub and the oysters before her; she exclaimed, you wicked man, she said there is the man, he ran before me and dropped the oysters, I said, there is no person ran before you, there is no person nigh; the tub was close to her. It was my tub, I valued it at one shilling, and the oysters at three shillings.

ELIZABETH ELL . Q. Do you know any thing of this prisoner taking the tub and the oysters. - A. Yes, I was fetching three or four pails of water, I saw a woman take the tub and the oysters. I went over directly and told Mr. Ballance. I saw the woman afterwards, it is the same woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent woman, I never saw the oysters in my life.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-60

128. JOHN CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , one lead cistern, value 3 l. the property of Richard Scurrah .

RICHARD SCURRAH . Q. What are you. - A. I am a plumber ; this cistern was at the landing, outside of my door: my shop lies in the mews. It was a little cistern that I made for a gentleman, he wanted some alteration; it had only been put to the door that morning to be sold.

JAMES PRING . As I came out of Grafton mews I saw the cistern at my master's door, I saw a man take it from the door and put it down on the flags.

Q. You mean the foot path. - A. Yes, this was the day before Christmas day. I saw this man speak to a milkman, what he said I do not know; the milkman put it upon the top of the prisoner's back, when I saw him go off with the cistern; I went round Fitzroy market and met him, I said what are you going to do with this cistern; by Jasus, he said, I do not know; I said, my friend carry that cistern back where you took it from and start off.

Q. Did he carry it there. - A. No, I told him to clap it down upon a bundle of hay that was just by, and start off directly; he took the knot off his shoulder and began to run, I knocked him down. I secured him myself and took him to goal.

Q. Are you sure that is your master's cistern. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You did not perform your promise with him, you told him to start off, and after he put the property down you knocked him down. - A. He tossed it off his shoulder and injured the cistern.

Q. If he had put the cistern down upon the bundle of hay you would not have knocked him down. - A. I should not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Whipped in Goal and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-61

129. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of January , a chest, value 10 s. a coat, value 4 s. and a jacket, value 14 s. the property of James Liddle .

JAMES LIDDLE . I am a seaman . On the 6th of January I brought my chest to Rebecca Cross, Blackwall , it was to lay there till it was called for; on the 7th I went to enquire for the chest, it was gone, I found the chest in a Gravesend boat on the 9th; the prisoner was going on board of an Indiaman, he was not on board at the time. I says who owns this chest, I had my key in my pocket, I found the lock broken open, I went on deck, I saw the prisoner come out of the alehouse, I asked him what was his name, he said John Johnson . I said you have robbed me of my chest; he said if I have got yours, I have left mine in the same house; he said you may have your chest, we went to the chest, he opened the padlock and took out what belonged to him. I found a jacket, a black coat, and some other articles; I said you have robbed my chest, and you shall not go unpunished by the laws of this country; he denied robbing the chest. I got an officer, he was taken before a magistrate,

he confessed, and told where to find the woman that he had given the duplicates to, and the woman delivered the tickets to the officer.

SARAH CROSS . Q. Where does your mother live. - A. She keeps the sign of the East India house, Blackwall.

Q. Do you remember this prosecutor leaving his chest there. - A. Yes, on the 6th of January.

Q. What became of that chest. - A. The prisoner on the 7th of January came and took it instead of his own. Johnson's chest had his name on, and the prisoner's chest had his name on; my mother was busy, she thought he would take his own.

Q. Are you sure that he is the man that took the chest away. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was in the night when I fetched the chest away; I was very drunk, I put the chest in a coach; the lock sprung up, and so I put a padlock on it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-62

130. JAMES FIELD , and THOMAS WARD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , three calves, value 20 l. the property of Ann Adams , widow .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

RICHARD BIRCH . Q. Do you live with Mrs. Adams. - A. Yes, she lives at Wimley, half a mile from Wimley Priory, she is a widow, she carries on the farming line.

Q. What was your employ. - A. I was cowman, I had the care of the calves. On the evening of the 20th of December I fed them.

Q. On the morning of the 21st did you look after them. - A. Yes, between seven and eight o'clock, I could not find them. I went across the yard, I found the gate open, I went back to my mistress and told her.

Q. Did you return and endeavour to pursue the track. - A. Yes, I went across several fields into another field that did not belong to my mistress, there we lost the track of the calves, and there we found the track of a cart.

Q. Why did you judge there had been a cart there. - A. It seemed as if there had by a horse trampling there along, and by the dung; I pursued the track out of that field into the road towards Little Wimley.

Q. Was that on the road to Stevenage. - A. There were about a couple of pole along Wimley, and then turn towards Stevenage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What is the name of your mistress. - A. Adams, her christian name I never heard.

THOMAS HALE . - Mr. Alley. You live at Stevenage. - A. Yes.

Q. What distance is that from the prosecutrix's house. - A. About two mile.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar and tell me whether on the 20th or 21st you saw them at your house. - A. I saw them both on Saturday the 20th. I keep an inn, they had a little bay horse and a cart, they came between eight and nine in the morning; they had some refreshment and went away; they had left the horse and cart. I did not see any more of them till between five and six o'clock at night, they both of them called and took the horse and the cart away.

Q. Was there any thing in the cart at the time they left it with you. - A. Yes, there was an old sack and an old bridle they went towards Hitchin, towards the prosecutrix's house through Wimley.

SQUIRE PRIMET. I do business for this Mrs. Adams.

Mr. Alley. Did you in consequence of hearing of her loss come to Smithfield market. - A. I arrived about five o'clock in the morning; on waiting there some, time seeing the prisoner Ward coming into the market with a small bay horse and a tilted cart and in it three calves that I could swear to be the property of my mistress, I took Ward by the collar, I said who belongs to these calves, not me he said, I was hired to drive them from Hendon this morning. I asked him again who they belonged to, and he said James Field, I said is James Field in town, he says yes, he is to meet me at the New inn in the Old Bailey. I directly asked him what sort of a man James Field was, he told me he was pitted with the small pox and wore a blue coat he says if you let go me and go there, you will be sure to find him; I said I shall not let go you till I find the man that owns them. Then I charged the constable Tillcock with Ward; I went down with Tillcock and this man to see Field, the people in the house said there was no such man there; I and the officer returned with Ward to Smithfield, and there I left him in the hands of the officer; I waited there a little while, I went down to the New inn again, I went into the house and asked for him again, I waited at the New inn half an hour or more; while I was waiting there Field came towards me; as he was coming towards me he met the girl of the house, he stopped, she whispered to him and he to her, I took it she said he is waiting in the house for you. I saw him behind me, and he run off; I ran after him and cried stop thief; he ran for a good distance, at last there was a man coming out of a court that stopped him; there I overtook him and gave him into the custody of an officer.

Q. Was he ever out of your sight. - A. No.

Q. The prisoner at the bar run away when the girl of the house said to him there is a man in the house waiting for you. - A. Yes, that I can swear to.

Q. I think that you have already told me that you saw the calves, and that they were your mistresses' property. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Is there any partners with your mistress. - A. No, her name is Ann Adams , she is a widow.

Q. How do you know the calves. - A. I have seen them pretty well every day.

Q. Do you mean to swear that they are your mistresse's calves. - A. Yes, I can clearly; I could distinguish them from fifty or a hundred if I saw them.

ROBERT WATKINS . - Mr. Alley. Where does your mother live. - A. At the White Lion, Redburn.

Q. It is a public house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the two prisoners at the bar a little while before they were taken into custody at your house. - A. Yes, I saw James Field with a small bay horse, with a tilted cart, up my mother's yard on Sunday about five o'clock in the afternoon, the day before they were apprehended.

Q. Did you at any time he remained in the house see the other prisoner. - A. He was not in the house, I saw Field undoing the horse of one side, and the prisoner Ward undoing the other side of the horse at the same time; I knew Field a long time.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing whether any thing and what was in this tilted cart. - A. Yes, three calves.

Q. Did you know whether these calves legs were tied or not. - A. I did not see them, I understood they were.

Court. Q. Did you see the colour of them. - A. I believe one was a dark red and the other black and red. They stood up when I saw them.

Q. You knew Field before. - A. Yes, he lived at a place called Hendon. I am sure as to his person; Ward I never saw before to my knowledge.

Q. You are sure he is the man. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You say you knew Field before; then whatever he was doing, he was coming to a house where he was perfectly known. - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN SILLS . - Mr. Alley. You are the ostler at the inn where that young man's mother lives, at the White Lion at Redburn. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the Sunday that he has been speaking of, seeing either or both the prisoners at your house. - A. Yes, both of them about five o'clock in the evening; Field brought a tilted cart up the yard, with a little bay horse and three calves.

Q. During the time they were there was there any thing done to the calves. - A. After we shot the horse out of the cart, I took him to my stable. they hallooed out to me for my knife, no I says that will not do, if there is any thing to be done with it I will come and use it, myself, I was not willing to part with my knife; when I came to cut one of the strings of the calf's legs, I said these here calves have never been tied by any man who understands tying of calves; and one of them, said I think Ward, damn the man, he did not know how.

Q. How where they tied. - A. They were tied with three legs, and a great many knots of each side, and not a string that they tie calves with.

Q. What did the man say. - A. Damn the fellow that tied them he did not know how.

Q. Did either of them assist you in untying the calf. - A. No they both assisted in helping it up. I said these calves are almost spent, I fetched a pail of water and refreshed them a little, then they began to stand up.

Q. Were they all three tied. - A. I cannot say, there was one or two tied; when I got there I cut one string.

Q. Both the prisoners was present all the time and assisted in getting of the calves up. - A. Yes.

Prisoner Ward (to witness.) Did not you ask me whether I was hired, I told you I was; did not you tell me they were stolen goods. - A. I told you they were; I says young man I am very sorry for you; you says why, I said you did not come by them things honest, they are stolen calves.

Prisoner Ward. I told you I was hired to drive them, I did not care for no one.

Witness. He answered and said they were not his.

Mr. Alley. What did the other man say. - A. He was gone. I said to Ward you could never come to a worse place than this is, and where you are a going to you never will come back any more, you may depend upon it; he says I shall return back this evening, I says if you return back this evening I will spend a shilling with you.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

When you said to him they were stolen goods Ward's reply to you was, that he had come honestly by them, you said so before the magistrate. - A. Yes he said that he had.

WALTER ADAMS . - Mr. Alley You are the son of the prosecutrix. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your mother's losing the calves. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen these calves since. - A. I saw them at Smithfield market; we missed them on Sunday morning the 21st of December, and I saw them in Smithfield on Monday, in the possession of the prisoner Ward.

Q. Have you any doubt of the calves that you saw in Ward's possession that they were your mother's property. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Do you live with your mother. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in business with her. - A. No.

Q. No concern in the firm. - A. No.

Q. Nor any property at all in it. - A. No.

Joseph Martin . I am a city officer.

Q. Do you remember being called upon to take the prisoner in custody. - A. Yes, I was coming along the Old Bailey, I was desired to take Field in custody, I was going to take him to the Compter, but Primet said I had better take him to the Ram, there was another man in custody there.

Ward's Defence. When I got about a quarter of a mile before I came to Stevenage, this man, three soldiers and their wives, overtook me; they asked me to go to that gentleman's house to have part of a pot of beer; I told them I was seeking after work. I worked at Hendon half a year, I came out of Warwickshire; when I came out of Stevenage at five o'clock. I saw him talking to another man in the street, I asked him if he was going home, he said. no he was going to have part of a pot of beer, I asked him if he knew of any one in the country that he thought would employ me, he said no, he did not know that he did. With that we parted, he made one way with his horse and cart, and I made the best of my way home; I went on Tuesday. On Sunday I met him and another man coming together, with that this here man asked me if I would drive his horse and cart. I told him I was going to London, he asked what he should give me, I told him I would have half a crown; It was not Field that told me so, it was this here other man that

asked me to drive the horse and cart.

Court. Who is the other man. - A. I cannot say who he is, I do not know, he said Field would give me the half crown if he was in town first. I went to Smithfield, I was to go to the New inn in the Old Bailey; in Smithfield I was detained.

Field left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Ward called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

FIELD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

WARD, GUILTY - DEATH , 24.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-63

131. MARY SALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , a silver watch, value 1 l. the property of James Grinnell .

JAMES GRINNELL . I am a sawyer .

Q. Were you in possession of a silver watch. - A. Yes, I cannot say that I lost it, I was very tipsey, I do not know whether the woman took it away from me or not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-64

132. JAMES WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of November , a silver watch, value 4 l. two coats, value 2 l. two hats, value 16 s. a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Hinks , in his dwelling house .

BENJAMIN HINKS . I live at No. 11, Church court in the Strand , I keep a house there, I am a green grocer .

Q. Did any thing happen to your property on the 10th of November. - A. Yes, I went to Covent Garden about eight o'clock in the morning; when I returned I found the door was wide open.

Q. Who did you leave in the house. - A. Nobody. I have a girl that comes in the morning and goes home at night; I have been married fourteen years, my wife has been dead two years. I locked the door, and left the key in the door, as I have frequently done before, expecting the girl to come every minute.

Q. How long were you absent. - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was there any body going with you to Covent Garden. - A. Yes, there was a man that was with me, that I was in company with at the public house the night before. I foolish enough asked him to go home and sleep with me, he accepted of it; in the morning, a little before eight o'clock, I got up, and the prisoner did not attempt to get up. I said to him Wilson (he said his name was Wilson) you must get up, I must go to Covent Garden for some things that I want in the shop, you cannot stop here; he got up, and we both came out together, out of the shop door that opens into the passage, and I left the key in the door, expecting the girl to come every minute.

Q. Before you came out together had the prisoner any opportunity. - A. Not at that time; we went out together, as far as the end of Bedford street; at the end of Maiden lane he was going to bid me good morning, I said stop a minute, if I have any halfpence I will give you something to drink, so I gave him two pence, I said get something to drink, or lay it out as you think proper. He wished me good morning and said he was much obliged to me indeed. I went on to Covent Garden, he went on to Maiden lane; I returned from Covent Garden in about a quarter of an hour, I found the door wide open, I was not much alarmed then, because I thought the girl had come. I looked in the parlour, and saw the girl was not come, I was rather alarmed, I went into the parlour, I looked round and missed my watch, that was hanging on a hook at the wainscot.

Q. When had you seen it there. - A. Just before I went to Covent Garden, I saw it that morning; I looked further, and I missed my great coat and my close bodied coat, two hats, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. Did you miss any thing else at that time. - A. There was a new pair of gloves in the coat pocket.

Q. When had you seen these articles last. - A. I had pulled them off the night before. I saw them in the room the night before I went to Covent Garden. I made some little enquiry at the pawnbrokers, I could make no discovery of what I had lost, so I gave it up. On the 9th of December, about a month afterwards, this James Wood was taken up for stealing a coat; the constable knew me, and knew that I had lost these things; he acknowledged to every article that he had taken.

Q. There was no acknowledgment made to you. - A. No.

Q. Is it usual when you go out to leave the key in the door. - A. I have done so many times before.

Q. Were you sober the night before. - A. I had been drinking, but I was sober enough, I knew; he was an entire stranger to me.

Q. How came you to take a stranger home. - A. When we came out of the public house he said he did not know what he should do for a lodging, I said I can get you a good lodging for a shilling at the watch-house, he said he had no money. I foolishly observed that I slept by myself, that he might go and sleep with me if he thought proper, and he agreed to it.

Q. Had he any liquor at the public house. - A. Yes; he had some halfpence. The prisoner took the liberty of sitting down, he put his hand in his pocket and took out some halfpence, and insisted upon having something to drink, and some of the company made it up half a pint of gin together.

Q. The watch you have seen since. - A. Yes, we took him down to the pawnbrokers, and there I saw the watch and a coat that was pledged at the pawnbrokers; the silk handkerchief he acknowledged that he had sold.

Q. What was the value of that. - A. It cost me seven shillings.

Q. Have you seen the gloves since. - A. No, they are worth half a crown; they are new, I wore them only three times. - The hats I have not seen since; one was a very good one, the other an indifferent one; they might be worth about fifteen or sixteen shillings together.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable of St. James's, Westminster, I was sent for at St. James's market. I apprehended the prisoner for two offences on the 9th of December, about dusk. I asked him what he was, he told me his name was James Wood ; he referred

me to Mr. Hincks, the prosecutor of this indictment; I asked him what Mr. Hincks, he said of Church court in the Strand. I asked him what Mr. Hincks was, he said he was a lawyer's clerk; I knowing Mr. Hincks, as we were going along to St. James's watchhouse, I said how came you to rob Hincks, it struck me this man was the man. Going along Jermyn street, I put the question to him again, how came you to rob Hincks, he answered as soon as ever I saw you I knew I was done; says I what have you done with the things, then says he I may as well tell you, I know it is all over with me. Walking on, before we got to the watchhouse, I put the question to him again; some he said he had sold, and some he had pawned, and he was very sorry that he had robbed Hincks; he said he sold all the things in the street, except the coat and the watch, and them he had pawned, and the tickets he had tore in St. James's park into small bits. I said, I suppose you have pawned them in Westminster; he said very near to the abbey one, and the other was further up, but the name of the street he could not tell, nor the the name of the pawnbroker's. I then put him in watchhouse, and I went and informed Hincks of it; Hincks returned to me in the course of the night. I took the prisoner the next morning along with me to shew me the pawnbroker's. Going along he said the pawnbrokers were very deep; as he had not got the duplicates he must manoeuvre it well, otherwise we should not find the watch. When we got to the pawnbrokers he asked for the watch, and the watch was produced, and he wanted ten shillings more money on it, that pawnbroker's is in York street, I forget the man's name. Hincks was with us, he saw the watch, and he knew it to be his watch; we went to the other pawnbroker in the Sanctuary, by the abbey, and saw the coat; we found only one coat, I took him to the magistrate, and the pawnbroker produced the things.

JOSEPH HEALY . I am a servant to Mr. Marriot, pawnbroker, York street. The prisoner pledged the watch on the 10th of November, I believe it to be him to the best of my knowledge; he is so much disguised now that I cannot swear to him, but by his features I think he is the man. I produce the watch.

Q. What sort of a watch was it. - A. A silver watch. I advanced one guinea and a half on it.

Q. Are you a judge of the value of watches. - A. I suppose it to be worth three guineas.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at any time after that. A. I saw him when he came with the constable, and asked for more money on the watch; then I thought it was the same person, but I could not exactly say.

Q. What more money did he want upon it. - A. I think five shillings, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Are you sure that it was him that the officer brought to your house. - A. Yes, that I am quite sure of. I produce the watch.

Q. I take it for granted you let him have a duplicate for leaving the watch. - A. Yes, he had a duplicate of the watch. I have had the watch in my possession ever since.

JOHN BANNISTER . I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Sherrinew, Great Sanctuary.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner at the bar at any time. - A. Not till he came to enquire for the coat.

Q. You did not receive the coat of him. - A. Not to my knowledge. I think I have seen him before; I am sure the prisoner is the person that was brought by the officer; he asked for a coat pledged for ten shillings, in the name of James Wood , he said he wanted more money on it. I produce the coat, we had no other coat in that name.

WILLIAM PILGRAM . Q. You keep the watch-house at St. Martin's. - A. Yes. On the 9th of December, Gregory came to me in the evening, with the prisoner, and asked where Hincks was.

Q. Is Hincks an officer. - A. He is an officer of St. Martin's. I went with Gregory to Hincks, I with Hincks went to the pawnbrokers that evening; 9th of December I found the coat at the pawnbrokers.

Q. (to prosecutor) Look at that watch, do you know it. - A. Yes, I know it to be mine by the watch-string, it is a black string that I usually wear, it was rather two long, I tied it in two knots to make it shorter; I likewise know it by the maker's name; I have had it three years, it cost me four pound ten.

Q. You do not know the number. - A. No; the coat is mine, I have had it some years, it is worth a pound.

Q. What is become of the great coat. - A. The prisoner acknowledged that he had sold it to a fence; that was worth about a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18070114-65

133. JOHN SILVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , two yards and a half, of toilenet, value 18s. the property of James Welford , privately in his shop .

OWEN FINCHAM . I am servant to James Welford slop seller , the corner of Wellclose square . On the 24th of December, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came in under pretence of buying a waistcoat; I shewed him one, he did not like the pattern nor the price; he staid about ten minutes.

Q. Was there any body else serving in the shop. - A. No.

Q. Did you see him do any thing. - A. No, nor I did not suspect him, while he was in the shop; as I was returning from the other side of the shop, where I had been to get some other waistcoats to shew him, the prisoner was going out of the shop, and immediately after he went out I missed a piece of toilenet from the shop window. I went out to look after him; I saw him about a yard or two off, I went after him and stopped him, I opened his coat and found a piece of toilenet, I took him into the shop; I called John Hall from the inner room to come and detain him; while I went for an officer he got away; as I returned with the constable I met the prisoner, the constable then apprehended him. I am sure the toilenet is my master's property, I had it in my hands two minutes before he came into the shop.

JOHN HALL . Q. Are you able to say what passed while this man was in the shop. - A. No.

Q. In consequence of what Fincham told you, did you take this man in custody. - A. I endeavoured to do it, but he got away from me almost immediately.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to that gentleman's shop, I asked to purchase a waistcoat, he shewed me some, for which he asked me ten shillings; I offered seven shillings; with that he was very angry and we had some words together. The gentleman was alone, and because I would not give him his price he charged me with this; I never took any thing from him nor did he take any thing from my person.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings and ten pence .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-66

134. JEREMIAH ABEL was indicted for that he on the 20th of October , in the parish of Caustin, in the county of Norfolk , unlawfully and forcibly did obstruct and hinder James Osbrook , William Gascoign , and Robert Kimbard , officers of our Lord the King, in the excise , in duly seizing and securing one hundred gallons of brandy, one hundred gallons of rum, and one hundred gallons of gin, which were liable to be seized by them .

To this indictment he pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-67

135. THOMAS MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of January , thirty seven trusses of hay, value 4 l. the property of Henry Grundle .

HENRY GRUNDLE . Q. Do you know any thing of this business. - A. I am certain the hay is my property. I am a farmer and cow keeper , North street, Manchester square ; the prisoner was a servant of mine, he lived at the farm house, he was a constant servant of mine about three days in the week. On the evening of the third of January, I was accquainted of it by the officer.

SAMUEL PRICE . I am a merchant, at No. 10, Nicholas lane, Lombard street; the hay was in my barn, which is said to be stolen, it was brought there by a man who is run away, he was my servant.

WILLIAM BEARD . I am a watchman of Hampstead. On the first of January last, at half past four o'clock in the morning, I stopped a cart with a quantity of hay, which the prisoner was driving; I asked him where he brought it from so early in the morning, he told me Edgeware, I asked him how he came there with it, it was quite a contrary road; he told me he brought it through Hendon, and up North End hill, which if he had he must have crossed the box that I was watching, and which I knew he had not done, that gave me reason to suppose the hay was stolen. I then stopped him, he told me that he could call the master of the property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Before he said that, did not you tell him it would be better to confess. - A. Yes, then he called Jem three or four times, the man came, and he refused to be taken; he asked him what occasioned him stopping, he told the watchman, he asked the prisoner to give him the whip out of his hand, to knock me down; making use at the same time of bad language. I pulled out my pistol and took him in custody, and let the prisoner go on with the team; he offered me half a guinea first, then a guinea, not to say any thing about it; I refused to take his money, he told me he brought the hay from Needham, I asked him if he knew the man that was driving the hay, he declared he did not before that morning; he said he was going with the hay to Mr. Price's at North End, and I saw the hay unloaded there.

Q. Whose team was it. - A. Mr. Price's

Q. (to prosecutor) How far is your farm. - A. At Hendon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

The man that threatened to knock you down has escaped. - A. He has.

Q. Did not you understand from him, that the prisoner was employed by him, and that he was a servant of Mr. Price. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended the prisoner on the fifth of January, at his masters yard.

Q. (to prosecutor) You have seen this hay in Mr. Price's barn, how do you know it is your property. - A. To the best of my knowledge thirty seven trusses are my property; there was fifty six trusses in the whole in the barn, there is one truss convinces me the hay is mine; I borrowed some hay of Mr. Ship to make my rick up; his hay is indifferent and brown as a nutmeg, and mine is green, one third of the truss is coarse, and the other part is fine.

Mr. Knapp. Will you venture to swear that hay is your property. - A. I will not.

Q. (to Mr. Price) You have a small farm at Hendon, and in your barn there is fifty six trusses of hay, is there any of it your property. - A. None I believe.

Q. Do you not know it is not. - A. No.

Q. Have you bought any. - A No, I have a rick in the yard, I sell hay.

Q. Is this like your hay that you send to market. - A. Not at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-68

135. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for that he on the 24th of November was servant to John Smart , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and on his account, and being such servant did receive and take into his possession, 2 s. and 2 d. and that he afterwards fraudulently secreted, and embezzled the same .

THOMAS SMART . I am a baker , I live in Bethnall green; the prisoner was servant to me.

Q. You entrusted him to receive money for you. - A. Yes, of my customers on my account; he came into my service on the first of November last; from information I received from a customer, I suspected him, after he had been with me three weeks; I then made out the bills of customers accompts who had been in the habit of paying for bread, on delivery; there is two witnesses in court, that I sent bills to

and neither of them owed me a farthing.

SARAH LUCEDON . I live in Wilmot street, Bethnal green.

Q. You deal with Mr. Smart the baker. - A. Yes, I am in the habit of paying for my bread on delivery, except the prisoner could not give change, then I paid the next day. On the 12th of December, Mr. Smart sent a bill of fourteen shillings and three pence farthing, which I was very much surprised at, knowing that I did not owe for a single loaf; I am sure that I paid him for every loaf of bread that he delivered.

Prosecutor. The person where the bill of indictment was made, said it must be some specific day only, I selected the 24th of November.

Q. (to Mrs. Lucedon.) Did you pay for the 24th of November. - A. I did, if I did not pay him on that day, I paid him on the next.

Q. (to prosecutor.) On the 24th of November, did you receive that money. - A. I did not, here is the book he made return that day, half peck loaf to Mrs. Lucedon.

Mrs. Smart. That is my writing, I booked it from the man's own mouth that day, two shillings and two pence halfpenny.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge alledged against me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-69

136. BENJAMIN ASHWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , six files, value 2 s. the property of John Kenworthy Cook and William Joshua Cook .

JOHN KENWORTHY COOK . I am in partnership with William Joshua Cook , we are iron founders and machine makers ; the prisoner was a labourer and lately a carter in my employ.

WILLIAM BARRIOT . I am superintendant to Messrs. Cook. On the 26th of December, as the prisoner was going out of the door, I heard something rattle, I went to the door, I perceived the prisoner going a contrary direction to where he lives; I called to him, he made no answer, I pursued him; I saw that he had something in his hand, I asked him what he was going to do with them files, he said to make a fire grate, he hoped I would not take any notice of it; I told him I could not discharge my duty, if I did not. I produce the files, they are the property of my employers.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called no witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-70

137. PRISCILLA PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , two pair of shoes, value 12 s. the property of William Knight .

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am a shoe maker , I live at No. 1, Little Windmill street, Haymarket . On the 5th of January about ten o'clock, the prisoner came in for work for her husband; I gave her work, and she went away; we missed a pair of shoes immediately. I went after her and could not find her. At three o'clock she come for some more work, and brought some work in. I observed the shoes as they lay when she came in, fifty pair, I had packed on a box and they lay as I put them; I stooped down to pick up some soles to give her, and on rising up I found one pair of shoes gone, the top pair; she went out of the shop about twenty yards. I brought her back, I told her she was a thief, she had stolen some shoes; I ordered her to open her apron, then she dropped the shoes down, she went on her knees and begged for mercy. I produce the shoes, they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. Forgive me Mr. Knight, O , what have I done.

Prosecutor. The husband is a very industerious man and she is a very industrious woman.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in Gaol and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-71

138. DAVID ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , two gowns, value 5 s. a sheet, value 2 s. and a pocket, value 6 d. the property of John Smallwood .

DIANA SMALLWOOD . My husband is a carpenter , we live in Hungerford market . On the 27th of December, a little after four o'clock, I saw the prisoner going out of the house, I asked him what he did in my house, not knowing the man; a little girl that I have got saw a piece of my gown hanging out of his jacket. I took hold of the gown and took the man home to my own place, and he delivered the property up. I produce the property, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stupid in liquor, and I have had a hurt in my head ever since I was discharged from the service.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-72

139. EDWARD STANLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , three printed books, value 4 s. the property of John Moodie .

JOHN MOODIE . I live in Swallow street , I am a book seller . The books were the property of a lady, she had given them to me to bind. I missed them in March, I found them at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a pawnbroker's servant. I produce three volumes of Rosseau's works, they were pledged on the 12th of March, but by whom I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-73

140. EDWARD STANLEY was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a printed book, value 2 s. the property of John Moodie .

- LAWFORD. I live in Swallow street, nearly opposite to Mr. Moodie, I saw the prisoner take the book from off the stall. I went and brought him back.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I must leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-74

141. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of December , 200 lb weight of lead, value 3 l. fixed to a certain building , the property of Elias Heintz .

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JAMES CHEARSLEY . I am a watchman of Hackney ; as I called the hour of two o'clock in the morning, I heard a strange noise, as if something was being ripped up, at the back of my walk at Stamford hill . I and another watchman made away to the noise, and there we saw a man rolling up some lead; he took it off the summer house of Mr. Heintz. I asked him what he was at there, he immediately ran away down the garden; I jumped over the hedge, expecting he would come over the wall, he turned up to the top of the garden, just where we had seen him at the summer house; my brother officer would not let him come out there, he turned back and scaled the wall, my partner saw him get over the wall, and he halloed out, he is over the wall, and as soon as ever he was over the wall, I saw him myself, he was running across the fields as fast as ever he could run; I ran after him about one hundred and eighty yards, and I catched him; as soon as I catched him, he desired I would not say any thing about it, he said he had got the value of five or six shillings in his pocket, he would give it me if I would not mention it. I told him I should get blame of the gentleman, it would not do for me; then he dropped this crow out of his hands; when I had got hold of him, my partner took the crow up; the saw was afterwards found in the garden where he was, and the knife was found about him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Was it light or dark. - A. A very moon light night.

Q. How many men were there. - A. I saw only one, I was as nigh to him as I am to you.

Q. Who does the summer house belong to. - A. To Mr. Robert Howard .

Q. Do you know Mr. Heintz's christian name. - A. No.

WILLIAM HEARN . I am a watchman. I was calling the hour of two, I heard a noise, I made away to it, and there we see the prisoner at work, knocking up the lead, I spoke to him, I says halloo, what are you about there, the prisoner ran down the garden, I had got the rattle by my side, I sprang the rattle, he come up the garden again, and run along the garden two or three times from the hedge. I was of one side of the hedge and he of the other, after that he scaled the wall, I told the other watchman he was getting over; says he, I'll have him before he gets far. I found that he had taken him, I made to him as fast as I could, and after I got up to him, he dropped that iron crow out of his hand; he begged very hard for us to let him go, he offered what few shillings he had in his pocket, and likewise his watch, and asked the number where I lived, and he would call upon me; we took him to the cage, and after that we went on the premises, and found the lead, and the saw laid just by the lead. The constable found the knife on him.

Q. Do you know Mr. Heintz's christian name. - A. No.

JOHN BROADBRIDGE . I am plumber to Mr. Heintz; the lead was fixed to the summer house at the north side of Mr. Heintz's garden. I compared the lead to the place, it answered exactly.

Q. What is Mr. Heintz's christian name. - A. I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-75

142. JOSEPH COOMBIE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of December , half a peck of flour, value 2 s. the property of James Clark , and THOMAS HUMPHRIES for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES CLARK . I am a baker , I live in Wardour street, Soho , the prisoner was my apprentice . On the 10th of December last, about seven o'clock, I took notice of the flour in the bin, which was a peck; at ten o'clock my wife told me there was not a pound. I laid wait from the 10th to the 16th; on the 16th I was watching the shop, thinking he would take something out of the till; my brother-in-law told him it would be better for him to tell the truth.

JOHN WELLS . On the 16th of December Mr. Clark sent to me that he had got Coombie in the watch house; I went to him, I told him it would be better for him to tell who was the receiver.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-76

143. JOSEPH COOMBIE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December, two penny pieces, and twenty halfpence , the property of James Clark .

JAMES CLARK . I am a baker . On the 16th of December, about twenty minutes after seven in the morning, the prisoner Coombie came down and went to the bakehouse, he then returned with a lighted candle into the shop, took up this instrument and opened the till; he took out copper to the aamount of one shilling and a halfpenny.

Q. Did you see him do all this. - A. Yes, I was in the cupboard, which commanded the whole of the shop. I looked through a broken window; he made the till fast, he returned the instrument from whence he took it, and went into the bakehouse; I opened the shop and went into the bakehouse to him, and demanded the money, out of his right hand waistcoat pocket, which he had taken out of my till; he then took the money out of his waistcoat pocket, and gave it me. I took him to the watchhouse. I will not swear to the money, only the manner he took it in.

Prisoner's Defence. I went home on Sunday afternoon to my father, I told him that I wanted my small clothes mended, I told him I did not like to ask my master, because he was mean enough to deny me. My father gave me half a crown. On Tuesday I got up to work and went down stairs, and cut off a piece of cake of gingerbread, I was hungry; with that my master thought I was robbing the till.

JAMES COOMBIE . I am his father. I gave the boy on Saturday night half a crown to pay for his washing.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-77

144. JOHN MASTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December , one hundred and fifty pound weight of lead, value 30 s. the property of the united company of merchants of England trading to the East Indies .

Second count for like offence, the property of William Green and Charles Man .

Third count, the property of persons unknown.

ISAAC CRISP . I am superintendant to Mr. John Allen , who serves the East India company with lead.

Mr. Gleed. On the 12th of December last did you deliver any lead to any barges. - A. I recollect we weighed one hundred tons the 12th or 13th of November, for the East India company; that lead was delivered to two different barges, it is all pig lead; one of the barges was the Martha, and the other the Trafalgar.

Q. Do you know the owner's names of these two barges. - A. Mr. Green and Mr. Man; the lead was marked with the East India company's mark.

JAMES GRANT . - Mr. Knapp. You are a bargeman. - A. Yes.

Q. On Monday morning the 15th of December what quantity of lead did you receive on board the Trafalgar. - A. I do not know the exact quantity; I took in a quantity of lead, it was marked, I took it to Blackwall; that is after I stopped and moored her to a lighter astern of the Worcester; they could not get down till flood tide.

Q. I believe you are bargeman to Mr. Green, what is Mr. Green's partner's name. - A. Mr. Man.

WILLIAM GREEN . - Mr. Gleed. Does the Trafalgar belong to you. - A. Yes, and Charles Man , and the Martha too.

- DURANT. I am quartermaster on board the Worcester. On the 15th of December, late at night, I am the boatswain's mate went below to make our bed; we saw a pig of lead secreted under the cable, we removed the lead into a place of greater security. The next morning four lumpers came on board; they looked for the lead.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar one of them. - A. I cannot swear that he was one or no; they looked for the lead, and not finding it where they left it they lit a candle and found it; there were four persons, they came down, found the lead, and took it away to the Lazoret. In consequence of some noise I went down, I saw the pig of lead laying upon the support of the bits, and a carpenter's hand saw about an inch into it; there were three men rushed out against us. When we went in, the prisoner at the bar came to me; he says, d - n you, I know you are down to it, but we will splice it.

Q. How long time might this be when you went there, after you saw four men take the lead away. A. A quarter of an hour.

Q. When the prisoner made that observation, what did you do or say. - A. I said not for a thousand guineas; I will not have any hand in it, and I would advise you to let it alone, or else you will come to harm. I left the Lazoret again, and returned in about ten minutes; after that I found it there the third time, and then the lead was nearly cut in two, all but half an inch.

Q. Was there any other division in the lead. - A. Only one, nearly cut off to make two pieces of it; says he, d - n me, we will cut it off, then says I you must stand to the consequence. I then left sight of the lead, and immediately they took possession of the lead I gave the information.

Q. How much did the lead weigh. - A. One hundred, one quarter, and fourteen pounds; they divided it to carry it.

JOHN GOTTY . - Mr. Knapp. You are a surveyor belonging to the Thames police. - A. I am; the lead was delivered to me on board the Worcester by the chief mate; it is what they call pig lead.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner. I am quite innocent of it, I know nothing of the lead.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-78

145. JAMES LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , three pound weight of cheese, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Gates .

HANNAH GATES . Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Samuel. I keep a shop in Little Britain.

Q. Did you lose any cheese at any time. - A. Yes, on the 20th of December, about a quarter after eight, I was at the counter serving another boy, when this cheese was taken.

THOMAS CORBIT . I work in the Tower; I was going by to work, I saw the prisoner take out the cheese from the window of Mrs. Gates' shop. I immediately took him, I asked him why he did it, he said because he was hungry.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hungry, and I took it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-79

146. ANN SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. two bed curtains, value 4 s. a window curtain, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Carlisle .

ELEANOR CARLISLE . Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Thomas; he is a butcher , No. 27, Grosvenor street, Grosvenor square . This woman was a chairwoman , she worked for me ten days, then I missed the several things which are in the indictment.

Q. Did you ever find them again. - A. Nothing but the window and bed curtains; she pulled out two duplicates out of her pocket, and owned to the taking of them.

WILLIAM DYER . I took in of the prisoner, on the 26th of November, a curtain, she pledged it for a shilling.

JOSEPH BAXTER . I produce two curtains pledged for two shillings on the 21st of January.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing further than I gave the duplicates to Mrs. Carlisle of the window curtains.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-80

147. JOHN BEAZOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of December , six pound weight of beef, value 2 s. the property of James Basset .

JAMES BASSET . I am a butcher , I live at No. 2, Wheeler street, Spital Fields . I saw the piece of beef go from the stall-board, I did not see who took it, I ran out and I saw the prisoner running; he fell down about an hundred yards off. I picked the beef up just by where he fell.

Q. Are you sure it was your property. - A. It was such a piece of beef, I cannot swear that it was my beef.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-81

148. ANN BIRON and SARAH BLAKENEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Edward Pike .

ELIZABETH CAITHNESS . On the 5th of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Sarah Blakeney take the print from Mr. Pike's shop, and put it into Biron's lap, and Biron carried it up Russel court. I informed Mr. Pike of it.

EDWARD PIKE . I am a linen draper , Ratcliff Highway.

Q. You went and pursued these women. - A. I took Biron; my young man took Blakeney. They did not take the print from the shop, they took it from two irons that hung outside; they were obliged to tear it in two to get it off the irons.

(The property produced and identified)

Blakeney's Defence. I went to get the child a halfpennyworth of milk; a gentleman came over the way and took me; that is all that I know of it.

Biron's Defence. I never saw that woman before I saw her in Mr. Pike's shop. I picked the print up at the corner of the court.

BIRON, GUILTY , aged 28.

BLAKENEY, GUILTY ; aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-82

149. JOHN LAWRENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , thirty-six pound weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of John Wall , affixed to a certain building called a house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be fixed to a building generally.

JOHN WALL . I live in Oxford street .

Q. When did you lose this lead. - A. On the 12th of January it was taken off a place that projected off the house, about ten or eleven feet high.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I am a watchman. I was going my round, and just opposite of this gentleman's house I found this lead, I then looked up to the house, and there I spied the prisoner. I sprang my rattle, he jumped down from off the place; I was not so far from him as I am to you; I pursued him. As soon as he came nigh another watchman he catched him, I never lost sight of him. I told King to mind the man, and I went and fetched the lead; we matched the lead with the place, it is exactly the same.

Q. How did he get up. - A. I do not know how, I think he must have help. We went back to the place where the prisoner was upon, we found his hat and his knife; the next morning he said the knife and the hat were both his.

- KING. I heard the other watchman spring the rattle, and I stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was about eleven o'clock when I was coming from my sister's house, when I heard the rattle spring; somebody jumped off from the top, and the lead knocked my hat off.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18070114-83

150. ELIZABETH KEARN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of December , two silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of Mary Millington . - ANN THOMPSON for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen ; - And ANN PRICE for that she after the felony was done and committed, feloniously did receive, harbour, and conceal the said Elizabeth Kearn , she knowing her to have done and committed the said felony .

MARY MILLINGTON . I am a widow , I live in Great Turnstile, Holborn . The prisoner Elizabeth Kearn left my service on Christmas day, she left me without any notice between nine and ten at night; about eleven o'clock at night I found two table spoons missing, they were on the table at dinner. There were six table spoons on the table at dinner; they were given into her charge to lay on the table for supper, and when the cloth was laid for supper, there was only four remaining, and she had absented herself. On Friday we traced her to Price's apartments in a court on Saffron hill.

Q. Did you find her there. - A. The prisoner Thompson and Price were there, they said Kearn had been there a few minutes before. When I came in I said it was of consequence to them to find her, otherwise they would be implicated, for that she had robbed me, I did not say of what. The prisoner Thompson then said she would find her, she could find her in a few minutes (I had Mr. Dobson with me at the time); I told her I would stay till she returned, she said she would be back in a few minutes; the prisoner Price sat in the room but said nothing. This happened at twenty minutes past twelve. I waited in Price's room with Mr. Dobson, till about a quarter past one, I then went home, I left Mr. Dobson in the room. I returned about half past two, and continued there till near five; I at last supposed Thompson had gone to tell the girl to keep out of the way. I told Price they were doing wrong, for I was determined to find her. I then said she

had robbed me of two table spoons; Mrs. Price said if she had she was then in the house. If it had been for a trifle she would have concealed her, but she would not for so much as that; with that the girl came out, she had concealed herself behind the fire place in the room.

Q. Kearn came out. - A. Yes. An officer was fetched, he searched her, and found nothing upon her. I saw my spoons on the Saturday before the magistrate.

MR. DOBSON. Q. Did you go with Mrs. Millington to the lodgings of Price. - A. I did, the prisoners Thompson and Price were in the room, I went away; on Mrs. Millington's return, and on my returning again, I found Elizabeth Kearn sitting in the room. I fetched the officer.

THOMAS INKELSO . I belong to the police office, Hatton Garden. On the 26th of December, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Price's lodgings to apprehend Kearn, I searched her and found nothing on her; I searched Price, and in her apartment I found nothing there. The next morning she confessed to me, and in consequence of what Kearn told me, I found Thompson, she told me she had them of Kearn to pawn for Kearn. The spoons were produced at the office before Kearn; and Mrs. Millington swore to them there.

JAMES REORDEN . I am apprentice to Mr. Rossiter, Blackfriars road. A spoon was pawned with me on the 26th of December by a woman. I cannot swear to the woman.

JOEL BARNES . I am a pawnbroker; this spoon was pledged with me on the 26th of December by a young man.

Kearn's Defence. I have nothing more to say than that these two others know nothing of the business.

Thompson's Defence. I know nothing at all about it whatever.

Price's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Kearn called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

KEARN, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

THOMPSON, NOT GUILTY .

PRICE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-84

151. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon John Field , on the 27th of December , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a hat, value 3 s. and a book, value 1 s. the property of Abraham Man , and William Barnard .

Second count for like offence, the property of John Field .

JOHN FIELD . Q. How old are you. - A. I am fifteen.

Q. Were you in December last, the servant of Mr. Mann and M. Barnard. - A. Yes.

Q. What is Mr. Mann's christian name. - A. Abraham.

Q. And Mr. Barnard. - A. William; they are merchants , they live in Size lane.

Q. On the 27th of December were you in Finsbury square . - A. Yes, on the 27th, about half past five, I was just by one of the garden gates; as I was walking along, four stout lads came up to me, and the prisoner was one of them, the prisoner damned my bloody eyes, and hit me.

Q. Where did he strike you. - A. Over the rim of my hat, he knocked me up against the iron rails, and one of them snatched the parcel from under my arm.

Q. What was in that parcel. - A. A book, and another of them took my hat from me; two of them ran towards Chiswell street, and two of them towards the City road.

Q. Did the prisoner run. - A. Yes, he ran up the City road, I ran after him, and overtook him just at the beginning of the City road.

Q. Was he stopped by any body. - A. I asked a gentleman to stop him, and he did.

Q. Are you sure that he was the boy that struck you. - A. Yes, I never lost sight of him.

Q. When the gentleman stopped him what became of him. - A. He took him to Mr. Barnard in Finsbury square.

Q. Is Mr. Barnard in Finsbury square, the same Mr. Barnard that carries on the business in Size lane. - A. Yes.

Q. Who had the book. - A. I do not know.

Q. Who had the hat. - A. One of them that ran away.

Q. Neither hat nor book was recovered. - A. No.

Jury. Was it dark when you was knocked down. - A. It was duskish.

Q. Then you followed him by the light of the lamps only. - A. Yes.

JAMES STONE . I tied the parcel up and gave it to the lad, to carry to Mr. Barnard in Finsbury square.

Q. What was the parcel. - A. A manuscript letter book, with sundry papers and accounts.

Prisoner's Defence. When the boy was knocked down, I was of the other side of the way.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged. 15

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18070114-85

152. JOHN CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of January , two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Mackenzie .

MARY MACKLEE . I am the wife of Thomas Macklee, he is a rigger, I live in Shadwell.

Q. Did you lose two silver spoons. - A. Yes, on the 12th of January; I saw them safe on the mantle-piece between eleven and twelve, I missed them a little after four in the afternoon; the prisoner lodged in my house, he had belonged to a man of war; there were two more men in the house, and when they were missed they said they were willing to go before a magistrate, and when Jack Conner came in, the men said here is been two spoons missing. Jack said he had not took them, he could swear by St. Paul and St. Peter; I searched for them and at last I found by Mr. Rolfe, that he had bought them. He had, owned that he had taken them before I went there.

JOHN ROLFE . I am a silversmith, No. 34, High street, Shadwell.

Q. Did you buy any spoons of the prisoner at any time. - A. I did; on Monday the 12th of January in the afternoon, about six o'clock. I gave him six shillings for them. I am almost certain of his face, but then he has but one arm; I did not percieve it then.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sold the gentleman no spoons; I have been eleven year's in his Majesty's service, and I was wounded in my head, and I lost an arm with lord Nelson. I cannot bring to my recollection any thing of the kind, being very much intoxicated in liquor; if done, it was not meant to defraud. It is the very first crime that ever I have been charged with.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-86

153. JEREMIAH COLEBERT , JOHN ABBOTT , THOMAS KNIGHTLEY , MICHAEL FOLEY , and JOHN TAYLOR , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , two children's frocks, value 6 s. a child's petticoat, value 1 s. a child's coat, value 3 s. a check apron, value 1 s. a night gown, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 1 s. the property of James Briscoe .

MARY BRISCOE . Q. Did you lose any children's clothes. - A. Yes. On the 12th of December I had seen them safe in the clothes basket, near towards the close of the evening.

Q. Was the clothes basket in your house. - A. Yes, my house is in Old Gravel lane ; the basket was in my shop, I keep a glass and Staffordshire warehouse, my husband's name is James Briscoe . I missed them on the Sunday morning, I saw them again in the week following at the magistrate's.

- VISCAR. Q. Do you know these lads. - A. Three of them, Taylor, Knightley, and Foley. On the 12th of December, at about a quarter after ten at night, as I was going along, I saw them three in Spital fields market, I saw them at a cheesemonger's shop, outside, placed where they put the shutters in the day time, I and Mr. Hart desired them to come out; they were not dressed as they are now, they were meanly dressed indeed. They came out, and we took them to the watch-house, and Mr. Hart will tell you what he found upon them.

Q. Did you see Hart take any thing from either of their persons. - A. Foley had a shirt in his breeches, and a check apron was found upon Taylor. Taylor is thirteen years old, Foley eleven, and Knightley eleven.

- HART. I am a constable. On the night of the 12th of December last, the prisoners were brought to the watchhouse by the patrol, Taylor, Foley, and Kightley; the patrol told me he found them under the place where the cheesemonger's shutters were placed, and while the little one was running away, the shirt fell out of his breeches, here it is. I took this child's great coat from Kightley, from under the waistband of his breeches, and this shirt and check apron were buttoned under the coat of Taylor; I asked them how they came by them, they told me they found them by Well street playhouse. We did not believe the story; the next morning they said two other boys brought it to them, who represented that they had found them there, and they had kept them for these two boys.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other two boys. - A. No; and the next morning they said they took them from a China shop in Old Gravel lane. Mrs. Briscoe afterwards came and claimed them; they told us that the other two boys were their companions, and we brought them up by the order of the magistrate.

(The property produced and identified.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-87

154. EDWARD EDDINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , a firkin of butter, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of James Fitch and George Fitch .

GEORGE FITCH . I am a cheesemonger , I live at No. 83, Leadenhall street, I am in partnership with James Fitch. I can only speak to the property.

SIMON SOLOMON . I am an officer. On the 12th of December, at six in the morning, as I was going to put my horse out, I saw the prisoner with a firkin on his head, just by Petticoat lane, it was very dark; I asked him what he had got there, what is that to you he said; I said I wished to know, he said he should not tell me. I seized him by the collar, made him put the firkin of butter down, and took him to the watchhouse. When he was before the magistrate he said he was a porter, he was hired to carry it. I wished to find out the owner of it, I advertised it; by that means the owner came to my house.

Mr. Alley. There was no concealment in this action. A. None.

(The property produced and identified.)

JOHN CONWAY . I am a staymaker.

Mr. Alley. Do you remember on the morning of the 12th of December being at Aldgate. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner at a public house door there.

Q. Is there any place there at which porters apply. - A. I believe there is.

Q. What time did you see him there. - A. About seven o'clock; I cannot exactly say the time, it was between six and seven.

Court. Mr. Solomon, what time was it you saw the prisoner. - A. Six o'clock, the bell had just began to ring.

Q. (to Conway). What time do you usually get up. - A. I usually get up between six and seven; that morning I had to go to Westminster, I got up before six.

Q. Where do you live. - A. At that time I lived in Sun street. I had my brother with me, I called in the Minories for a glass of brandy.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-88

155. EDWARD JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , a dollar, two shillings, five sixpences, and four halfpence , the property of Samuel Newman .

Second count for like offence, the property of Ann Gadd .

ANN GADD . I am servant to Mr. Newman, Turnmill street. On the 13th of November the prisoner called at the house, and ordered two pots of porter and change for half a guinea, to be sent into Castle street. I took the porter and the change, he went with me, and at the corner of Castle street he asked me if I had got the change, I told him yes; he asked me to give it him, I gave him the change, a dollar, two shillings, five sixpences, and four halfpence; the beer came to tenpence,

that made the change.

Q. Did he give you the half guinea. - A. No, he put a halfpenny into my hand; I turned round to see what I had got, he was off, I halloed after him; he was not taken till the next morning. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the fact.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-89

156. JOHN NEAL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of January , a plane, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Barker .

SAMUEL BARKER . I am a carpenter . On the 10th of January, about eleven in the morning, I lost my plane from a house that I was at work in, Cole yard, Drury lane . I went out to speak to the plumber, it was safe then, I was gone five minutes; I returned and the plane was gone.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am a bricklayer, I was at work about five yards from the place. The prisoner came and spoke to me; he walked away and took this plane, I called my labourer to take him; he threw down the plane within four feet of where he took it up; I saw him take it, I have kept the plane ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the plane till it was shewn me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined in Newgate One Week , and publicly Whipped

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-90

157. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a bank note, value 2 l. and two bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of John Lisle .

Second count for like offence, the property of Sarah Mumford .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

JOHN LISLE . - Mr. Reynolds. You I believe were ill. - A. Yes, I was ill of the dropsy, and I was attended by that woman at the bar as a nurse, about a year and a half ago; this was on the 19th of June 1805.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Sarah Mumford . - A. Yes; I had previous to my illness, deposited in her hands four pounds. I desired the prisoner to go to Mrs. Mumford for one pound only.

Q. Had you said any thing to her that she had no more. - A. Yes, I said that I had four pound in her hand.

Court. Did you ever get any money of her. - A. No, not a farthing; I never saw her till she was taken up this day week.

SARAH MUMFORD . - Mr. Reynolds. I am a widow woman, I live in St. Martin's street, Leicester Fields.

Q. Do you know John Lisle . - A. Yes, I have known him for these forty years; he had placed four pounds in my hand. The prisoner on the 19th of June, came to me and asked me for four pound for Mr. Lisle. I said what does he want with four pound, she said that they had began to lay on the water in his house, and she supposed he wanted it to pay for it; I had no suspicion of any fraud. I gave her the money, a two pound note and two ones.

Q. Did you ever see the woman again. - A. No.

Q. How soon did you discover this fraud. - A. The same night; they sent to me to know whether she had been or no,

SARAH SPILLER . - Mr. Reynolds. In the month of June 1805, did you see that woman. - A. She came there to the poor house, she said that she had a fortune left her, and that she had got this four pound to convey her in the country. She came in a coach, and she changed n one pound note to pay for the coach.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a drop too much on that day, I was very sorry the next morning that I had done it, and I thought I should have broke my heart.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-91

158. WILLIAM CHAPMAN and WILLIAM EADE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , a pint pewter pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of James Whitnell .

JOHN CLARK . On the 8th of January I was in Mr. Whitnell's house, having a pint of porter; there was a dispute about a pint pot, the prisoner Eade pulled a pint pot out of his pocket.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner do any thing. - A. No.

JOHN NEWLAND . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoners; Eade said he was very much in liquor when he did it.

(The property produced and identified.)

Eade's Defence. That pint pot was standing on the table, I never had it in my pocket at all.

CHAPMAN, NOT GUILTY .

EADE, GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling >.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-92

159. WILLIAM CHAPMAN and WILLIAM EADE were again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , a quart pewter pot, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of James Aylet .

MARY ANN AYLET . I am the wife of James Aylet , I keep the White Hind, Bishosgate street . On the 8th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into my house, they called for a pot of porter, when they drank that, they called for another; they left my house without my observing any thing. Mr. Newland came to me about an hour after, and asked if two soilders had been there that evening; he produced two pots, they were our pots.

JOHN MOOR . I found a quart pot in Chapman's pocket. I was drinking in Mr. Whitnell's house.

THOMAS MACKEY . I was sitting in Mr. Whitnell's bar, I seized Chapman and took a pint pot out of his pocket.

(The property produced and identified.)

Chapman's Defence. As I was going to Red Lion street, my comrade was a little behind me, he says here is two pots that belong to the house in Bishopgate street, where we have been, we will carry them back; I says to him going along, we had better part them, or else we shall be taken for pot stealing.

CHAPMAN, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

EADE, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-93

160. THOMAS HINCKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a sack value 2 s. two bridles, value 2 s. and a breeching, value 1 s. the property of Charles Medley .

CHALES MEDLEY. I live at the Black-horse, Piccadilly.

Q. Did you lose a sack, two bridles, and a breeching. - A. They were brought to me on the 7th of January, they were kept in a small room called the ostlery, at the Bolt and Tun in Fleet street; the prisoner had liberty to sleep there, he was employed by a tenant of mine, he was not my direct servant.

- COLTSON. I am a constable of Hornsey, I took this man at Hornsey on the 6th of January. I saw an old man offering these things for sale, I saw the old man deliver the things to the prisoner, I asked the prisoner how he came by them, he told me he bought them in Smithfield, but he could not tell the man, he said he lived at the Bolt and Tun; I looked at the sack, I saw the gentleman's name on it. On seeing that, I secured him and brought him down to the Bolt and Tun; the bookkeeper said he left the yard on Sunday morning. I asked the bookkeeper whether he knew these bridles and sack; he said yes.

(The property produced and identified)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Smithfield market, the Monday in Christmas week.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-94

161. MARY NEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 4 s. the property of Francis Chinnery .

FRANCIS CHINNERY . I live in Cranbourn passage , I am a linen draper . On the 27th of December, about three o'clock, from information I followed the prisoner, I brought her back and found the print on her, it was under her cloak, it was placed at the door on a chair, I had seen it myself there at ten in the morning.

ANN HOWARD . On the 27th of December, between three and four o'clock, I was going home with my two children, I saw this woman and another standing at this gentleman's shop looking at the cotton. I went about five or six yards off, I looked, I perceived the prisoner taking the cotton from the chair, and then she put it under her left arm, she walked round the corner, and I gave information immediately to Mr. Chinnery; he pursued her and brought her back. I saw the cotton taken from her.

Prisoner's Defence. She tells false; I saw the cotton lay at the door, and I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-95

162. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term, for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN HANSON . I am servant to Mr. Newman, keeper of Newgate; the prisoner was tried in January sessions, one thousand eight hundred and three, for stealing a five pound note, the property of John Ferry , this is the certificate of his conviction (read in court).

Q. Were you present at the trial. - A. Yes.

MARK COX . I am one of the conducters of the patrole of Bow street. I saw Mr. Shelton sign the certificate, I saw the prisoner in Union court, Holborn, on the twelfth of December, he was up two pair of stairs in a cupboard.

Q. You apprehended him I suppose. - A Yes.

- SALMON. I was present at the apprehending of the prisoner with Mark Cox .

Prisoner's Defence. Ever since I have been from that unpleasant situation in Woolwich, I have been in his Majesty's service in the Isle of Man, stationed under lieutenant Clark; and by my wife being taken remarkably ill, I came to see her. I was in a vessel, laying along with the Princess in the river; I received a letter from my wife, I went to see her; in consequence of that, a bosom freind went and sold me to these gentlemen. I was a midshipman under lieutenane Clark, and that your lordship will see. (A letter was handed from the prisoner, to the court.)

Q. How long have you served on board. - A. Two years and seven months. I was a midshipman on board his Majesty's tender, Three Firends, stationed the Isle of Wight.

Jury. Had you leave of absence. - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged. 38

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury .]

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18070114-96

163. ELIZABETH RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , a coat, value 5 s. the property of John Price and Elizabeth Price .

JOHN PRICE . I live in Wentworth street, Whitechapel, I am a pawnbroker , I am in partnership with Elizabeth Price , she is my mother . On Monday the 8th of December, the prisoner came to our shop just before we shut up, and pledged a cloak for two shillings; we had folded up a great coat, it was on the counter just by were she stood, she took it away.

Q. Did you see her take it away. - A. No, it was missed soon after she was gone, and suspicion fell upon her; I saw her the next morning about nine o'clock, I charged her with it, she told me she knew nothing about it. I sent for Mr. Griffiths the officer; she then owned that she pawned the coat at Mr. French's, White's row, Spitalfields.

- FRENCH. I am a pawnbroker; on the 6th of December, about half past eight in the morning, the prisoner pledged the coat with me for five shillings.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to Mr. Price's shop to redeem the cloak, he says, my dear, did not you take a cloak last night; he took me into the parlour, and with a great deal if persuasion I confessed. I was very much intoxicated, or else I would not have pledged it if I had known it was not honestly come by.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her

a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-97

164. EMMIA HANVILLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , a half guinea, two half crowns, and a shilling , the property of Nicholas Byerley .

NICHOLAS BYERLEY. Did you lose any money on the twenty ninth of December, between five and six in the afternoon. - A. I am a chemist and druggist , No. 105, Holborn hill , the prisoner was a servant in the house.

Q. Were there any marks on your money. - A. Yes, it was kept in a drawer of an iron chest in the accompting house; I marked it on Saturday, the twenty ninth of December, in the forenoon; it was safe in the drawer there. I left the accompting house between two and three, to go to dinner, and between five and six I looked in the chest; there was gone then the half guinea, two half crowns and a shilling. We searched the prisoner's chest, and found a new pelisse, and the bill of parcel that led to the shop, where part of the money was found, a half guinea, and a half crown.

THOMAS KEPLING . I am superintendant for Mrs. Dolben, Holborn hill. On the 29th of December, the prisoner paid me two pound three shillings, for the difference of a pelisse, that had been bought on the 22nd of December, I put the money in the till. I very well recollect how she paid me, a guinea, a half, two half crowns, and seven shilling piece; I had other change in the till. Mr. Byerly came and picked out a half guinea, and half a crown, saying that was the money that he marked, and put in his iron chest.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have this to say in my own defence, that I am the daughter of a clergyman, and was bred up in a plain genteel way, till the death of my father, I was obliged to go to servitude. I am now left without a friend to give me good advice; if I was not ashamed, I could bring forward those who could prove that I never was in disgrace; they would prove that I was never before a magistrate before.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-98

165. THOMAS PARSONAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , two coats, value 40 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Richard Fay .

RICHARD FAY . I am a post boy , I drive for Mr. Newman, Great Windmill street.

Q. Did you lose two coats and a silk handkerchief at any time. - A. Yes, on the 27th of December they were in the stable; I had just come home with my horses, I pulled off my two coats to light a candle, and when I returned to put my horses up they were gone.

Q. Did you see who took them. - A. I saw a man go from the stable, and he acknowledged it was him on the Monday following at the watchhouse.

WILLIAM SMITH . I work in the same yard with Fay, we came home together, I saw a man run across the yard, I pursued him, and lost him; I saw the prisoner in the watchhouse, I asked him if he knew any thing about the coats, to tell me, as I had lost three coats before, and I had never a one to put on.

JAMES BLAND . I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. On the 29th of December he pledged a great coat for a guinea, and a coat and handkerchief.

(The property produced and identified)

ROBERT TOWNSHEND. I took the man in custody on the 29th of December last, at the Turk's Head in Dyot street; I told him I apprehended him for stealing these coats of these people, I took him to the watchhouse, I searched him, I could find no tickets; I found a knife that one of them says belong to one of them; I went to the pawnbroker's and found the property,

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called no witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-99

166 MARY SWINNEY was indicted for feloniiously stealing on the 12th of December , one washing tub, value 1 s. and two pails, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Schultz .

DIANA SCHULTZ. I am the wife of Daniel Schultz . I lost a washing tub, and two pails on the 12th of December. I live at No. 7, Harrison's buildings ; I put the tub and pails into my shed; I went to look for them on Saturday morning, and they were gone. On Monday I saw the tub to be sold in King David lane, at Mr. Barnes's; I knew the tub to be mine, I never saw the pails since. The prisoner lived in the same court with me.

JOHN BARNES . I am a carpenter. On the 12th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought the tub to me, and one pail. I gave her three shillings for them; I sold the pail before I knew they were stolen.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along in the evening, the gentleman stopped me and asked me if I did not sell him a pail and a tub, I told him I knew nothing about them; he said I have got your description, and you must be the person; I went willingly to the office.

GUILTY aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-100

167. MAZARINE BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September , a parasol, value 4 s. a hundred feathers, value 10 s, five pieces of bed furniture, value 1 s. two candlesticks, value 6 d. and a bird cage, value 2 s. the property of John Brookes .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

JOHN BROOKES . - Mr. Alley. You live in Piccadilly . - A. I do, I keep a menagerie ; the prisoner I the bar came into my service in January last, he continued till May, and then he absented himself. I told the prisoner I had missed them, he said it was a

great pity, and he wondered very much how it could be.

Q. When did you miss these things. - A. I missed them sometime before he left me. In November I went to his house. in East Smithfield; I found the property there, he was not at home when I went in, and we did not begin to search till he came in; and then he said we should find some feathers, and that would be all. He said the parasol he had found in the shop. I said Bell you and I have always had a good understanding, till you went away in the manner you did; how is it you have these things; he said he took them for his own security, he said he had offered the feathers for sale, and could only get a guinea for them, or else he would have sold them. Then we went to Marlborough street. When he was with me he was to have fifteen shillings a week and his wife was to have fourteen shillings a week, during the exhibition.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. This man came to your service in January, and staid with you till April or May; were you at home all this time. - A. No, I was a good deal out.

Q. For pleasure or business. - A. Only on my business.

Q. Where might you have been at these times. - A. In Buckinghamshire.

Q. Were not you in Surry. - A. Yes.

Q. By the bridge. - A. I was in the bench.

Q. You stated you went to Marlborough street. - A. I did.

Q. It was not the first time you was there. - A. No.

Q. In what character have you always appeared there, as prosecutor; do not hesitate Mr. Brookes, did you always appear there as a prosecutor. - A. No, I appeared there in consequence of having a dog, it was a false charge, the gentleman swore to it. I was obliged to give bail to it.

Q. You were not satisfied with the magistrate, you were tried at the sessions, and there the magistrates were of the same opinion with the magistrates at Marlborough street. - A. I was convicted of a penalty and I paid it.

Q. This man's wife was to have fourteen shillings a week, was it ever paid. - A. I never knew what was due to them, they received money at the exhibition, and paid themselves. I do not believe that I am in debt to them a shilling.

Q. Did he never say so. - A. No.

Q. In the month of May when he left your service, and till the month of November, you never saw him. - A. Yes I did.

Court. When did you first see him. - A. A little time before he was taken into custody; I said Bell I am very glad you are come, for Mr. Richardson charges a bill of twenty pounds which you have paid.

Mr. Reynolds. Was that after he left his lodgings in Rupert street that he called at your house. - A. I did not know where he lived.

Q. Did you tell him that you had been robbed. - A. No, I did not think it right till I knew where he lived.

Q. Why did not you send for a constable. - A. I was in great business.

Court. What was that great business. - A. I cannot say.

Q. You say you had some great business, I insist upon your telling the jury - A. I had some particular circumstance.

Q. What was that great business that prevented you from sending for a constable; do not you know the obligation of an oath. - A. Yes.

Q. An oath is to swear to the truth and the whole truth and nothing but the truth; as you have told the jury that you had business so extremely pressing, what was that business so extremely pressing. - A. Why I was in fear of being arrested.

Q. Did that prevent you from sending for a constable, I will have an answer to the question, or I will send you to Newgate. - A. I had an execution in the house, I was obliged to attend to it, I can say nothing more.

Q. Then how dare you say you had business to attend to; your goods then was in the hands of the sheriff's officer. - A. I considered that was business of consequence to me.

Q. Was that the business that prevented you from sending for a constable. - A. It was. I was going to get the money that was owing me, and if I had given charge of him I must have gone to Marlborough street.

Q. What prevented you from making the charge the second time you saw him. - A. I wish to make up this matter of twenty pound between Mr. Richardson, if I had taken him up I did not conceive he would have come respecting the twenty pounds that he had paid, he went to Mr. Richardson, I was not satisfied with the account that he gave to Mr. Richardson; I immediately after that searched his house, the next day or the day after.

Mr. Reynolds. You have now spoke to two times of that man coming to your house. - A. I do not think that he came more than three times.

Q. Why did you not take him up the third time. - A. The third time I think I met him in Cranbourn alley, and the third time he called at my house I was so ill.

Q. This makes four times you saw him without taking one single step to apprehend him. - A. I cannot state whether it was two or three times.

Q. Pray, sir, when you met him in Cranbourn alley did you come up to him, or he to you. - A. We met, I cannot speak positively.

Q. Upon your oath have you no remembrance of what he said to you in Cranbourn alley (witness paused), are you dumb or deaf. - A. To the best of my recollection it was about Mr. Richardson's business.

Q. Was there any conversation about the money you owed his wife. - A. There was nothing passed about money, but Mr. Richardson's business.

Court. Do you swear that he made no demand either upon account of his own service or his wife's in Cranbourn alley. - A. I cannot say that he did.

Q. Do you mean to put your credit to the jury, whether this man who is suspected by you of having robbed you, made any demand of money due to him. - A. I cannot recollect; the conversation that passed was only momentary in Cranbourn alley.

Q. Then if it was momentary you must recollect

what passed. - A. All that I cannot recollect respecting money due to him, says I, Bell this business of Mr. Richardson's must be made up.

Q. Mr Brookes do not imagine the court to be imposed on in this way; I ask you upon you oath did he in that momentary conversation make any demand of money due to him, aye or no, I ask you again, do you swear that he did or did not demand money at that time. - A. I cannot swear whether he did or not.

Mr. Reynolds. You did not turn back to apprehend him. - A. I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-101

168. JAMES EVANS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of December unlawfully did obtain a pound weight of tobacco, value 3 s. 6 d. and half a pound weight of snuff, value 2 s. the property of Grace Hoare .

THOMAS BUTCHER . I am a porter to Grace Hoare , No. 114, Fleet street. On the 9th of December, between six and eight in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop, he said that he came from Mr. Dickenson for a pound of tobacco and half a pound of snuff; Ann Taylor served him, I packed up the tobacco and Ann Taylor packed up the snuff; we let him have this to the credit of Mr. Dickenson.

Q. Then the prisoner came without paying for them. - A. Yes, we served him, thinking Mr. Dickenson would pay for them.

Mr. DICKENSON. I live in Clare court, I have been a customer to Mrs. Hoare, but I have declined selling tobacco and snuff.

Q. Did you request him, or give any authority, to go to Mrs. Hoare's shop for a pound of tobacco and half a pound of snuff. - A. I never did.

Prisoner's Defence. I did get the tobacco and snuff. I meant to have paid for it.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-102

169. JONAS TAYLOR was indicted for a misdemeanor .

PETER SIDEBOTTOM . I am clerk to Mr. James Harman , Bush lane, he is an agent to a principal house in Birmingham. On the 5th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, Jonas Taylor came into the accompting house with an order (which I have in my hand), purporting to be an order from Messrs. Welch and Newell. (The order read.) - Mr. Harman - One dozen common, and one dozen large sized frying pans, for

Welch & Newell.

JAN. 5, 1807.

Q. Who is Welch and Newell. - A. They are customers of ours, they live at Anchor wharf. He told me the porter had sent him; I looked out the goods for him.

Q. What was the value of two dozen frying pans. A. Two pounds, six shillings. I followed the prisoner; instead of going to the Anchor wharf, he went up Walbrook, he met with the officer Crabb, and he was in the act of stopping him; I told Crabb what I suspected; he lodged both him and the pans in the Poultry compter.

JAMES WELCH . Q. Do you know the man at the bar. - A. No. I am in partnership with Mr. Newell, Anchor wharf; we never sent this order.

ELISHA CRABB . I am a constable. I met the prisoner, I asked him where he was going with these frying pans; he said he was going towards Blackfriar's bridge.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday I was returning home along Thames street, a man like a porter says, soldier, will you go of an errand for me to No. 10, Bush lane, for a dozen of large size, and a dozen of small size frying pans. I will give you eight pence, he says; come to this place, and I will be here when you come back. I went to No. 10, Bush lane, and received the goods.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18070114-103

170. LEVY MORTIGEM was indicted for unlawfully and by false pretence obtaining from Anthony Lewis , twenty two pounds and one shilling , his property.

ANTHONY LEWIS . I keep a wine vaults in White Cross street; on the 29th of October I lived at the Three Pigeons, Butcher-hall lane .

Q. The prisoner came to you on the 29th of October at Butcher-hall lane. - A. Yes; he said he was an interpreter in the pay of this country, he said he wanted eight pounds to pay some foreigners, as he had not time to go to the banker's; I had known him some length of time, he had breakfasted and dined with me when I kept the Three Pigeons, and he saying he was an interpreter in the pay of this country, and seeing some Turks come after him, I let him have this eight pounds, that was soon after breakfast; on the same day, after he had dined, he returned, and said what he would have for supper, for four or five Turks; he requested to have a private room, as they were not allowed to drink wine, or to see wine drank, and he wished me to let him have fourteen pounds, that would make up twenty one guineas, and that he would make up the money when he came to sup with me.

Q. Did you let him have that. - A. Yes, in gold and notes.

Q. If he had not represented himself an interpreter in the pay of this country, you would not have lent him the money. - A. Certainly not, I would not have trusted him from his own appearance.

Q. Did you ever get the money back again. - A. No, he never returned to the house again. One evening a little girl that I had in the house said she had just seen him; I went out and saw him in Cheapside, I followed him into the Poultry, I asked him

why he did not return and pay me the money, as he said he would, and have the supper that was prepared for him. He said government had sent him off express to Portsmouth.

Prisoner's Defence. I know that I owe Mr. Anthony Lewis the money; he lent me the money, and now he makes it a defraud.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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