Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th October 1806.
Reference Number: 18061029
Reference Number: f18061029-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 29th of OCTOBER, 1806, and following Days,

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORTHAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1806.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON,

BEFORE the Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Honorable EDWARD LORD ELLENBOROUGH , Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Alexander Thompson , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John William Anderson, Bart. Sir John Eamer , Knt. Charles Flower Esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxham , Knt. and George Scholey Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

William Bott ,

Richard Vandome ,

Joseph Barber ,

Alexander Young ,

Peter Jones ,

Thomas Bowgin ,

John Pim ,

Charles Fairbould ,

Nathaniel Cooper ,

Thomas Baxter ,

William Phipps ,

Edward Warner .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

Thomas Linton Rogers,

Robert Claridge ,

Henry Mason ,

John Ager ,

James Tegg ,

Edward Folkes ,

Samuel Burford,

Thomas Harman ,

William Williams ,

William Anstead ,

John Austin ,

Benjamin Busby .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

Henry Harris ,

John Newport ,

John Noble ,

William Smith ,

Thomas James Ludland ,

William Mason ,

John Richardson ,

Robert Williams ,

Thomas Coates ,

John Farmer ,

James Lathe ,

James Dawes .

Reference Number: t18061029-1

560. MARY BLACKSLEY , ELIZEBTH SIMMONDS , and MARTHA WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of September , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Thompson privately in his shop .

THOMAS THOMPSON sworn. I am a linen draper , I live in New-street Covent Garden . On the 27th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners Blacksley and Simmonds came into my shop under pretence of buying a shawl, they staid there some time bargaining with my shopman.

Q. Were you in the shop. - A. I was; Blacksley stood with her back against some calico placed at the window with some wire before them; my attention was taken up with some customers that I had in the shop; when they were gone I missed Blacksley in a moment, and immediately I missed her I missed a piece of print out of the window. I asked Simmonds where she was gone, she said she did not know, I ran into the street and found her hiding herself at a gentleman's steps in St. Martin's lane; I told her she had stole a piece of print, she denied it, I brought her back to the shop, and I said to her you had better confess.

Q. You must not tell what she said. - A. She had given the cotton to Wood the moment she left the shop, Wood was waiting in the street.

Q. Did you see Wood in the street. - A. No, not till Blacksley said where the print was, and delivered it up.

- ANTHONY sworn. Q. You are an officer; all you know is finding these things. - A. Yes, in a court in Windmill street.

Blackley's Defence. These two women are as innocent as a child unborn.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

BLACKSLEY - GUILTY.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

SIMMONDS, WOOD, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-2

561. WILLIAM ASKEW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Walter Collins , about the hour of seven at night on the 12th of October , and burglariously stealing therein a cloak, value 50 s. five gowns, value 3 l. two shifts, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. three pair of stockings, value 7 s. a night cap, value 9 d. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. six silver tea spoons, value 20 s. and a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 2 s. the property of Susannah Miles . Two silk handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 1 s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a metal watch, value 20 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a table cloth, value 4 s. and six guineas, the property of William Miles ; one guinea and two seven shilling pieces the property of Robert Tidmarsh . And ELIZABETH ASKEW , alias PRICE , for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

WALTER COLLINS sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Robert Lomas. I live at No. 17, Tabernacle Walk , I rent the house.

Q. What do you know about this business of the house being broke open. - A. In the evening a little before six o'clock on Sunday, I think it was the 12th of October, I went out with my wife, she was before me, I double locked the door, I returned in the evening a little before eight; and found the door single locked; I was a little surprised at finding it in that state.

Q. Are you sure that you left it double locked. - A. Yes, I am sure I left it double locked, I always make it a point. That is all that I know of the matter, I was alarmed, and presently Susannah Miles came in.

Q. Who is Susannah Miles . - A. She is a lodger, she has two rooms above stairs.

Q. You missed nothing of your own did you. - A. No, I missed nothing of mine.

Q. Did you observe by any thing else that the house had been opened. - A.Nothing else.

Q. Only the circumstance of finding the door single locked, and you left it double locked. - A. Nothing else, my apartments were all as I left them.

Q.Therefore the house was all as you left it except Mrs. Miles's apartments. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. You say you went out before six o'clock. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You had no circumstance to know when it was done, it might be done five minutes after six, or half an hour afterwards. - A. I cannot tell.

SUSANNAH MILES sworn. Q. When did you come home. - A. A few minutes before eight.

Q. What did you miss. - A. I missed my clothes.

Q. What clothes. - A. I missed five gowns, two shifts, one petticoat, three handkerchiefs.

Q. When did you see these before, how long before the time that you missed them, which was eight o'clock, had you seen them before you went out. - A. I missed them when I came home, I saw them just before I went out.

Q. When was that. - A. A few minutes before six, I went to chapel.

Q. Was that all that you lost. - A. No, I lost three pair of stockings, a night cap, a black silk cloak, and more articles.

Q. You remember these particularly. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen these since. - A. I have seen three of my gowns since, and my cloak I have seen since.

Q. And all these things you had seen a few minutes before six. - A. Yes, I am sure I had all my things, I locked my box, and I had got the key in my pocket.

Q. Were these things in your box. - A. Yes.

Q. Was your box broke open when you came home. - A. Yes, I found my box open, and what few things they left were thrown all about the room.

Q. Was there a pair of sugar tongs. - A. Yes, they were in the box along with the tea spoons, they were taken away.

Q. Have you seen them afterwards. - A. No.

Q. You say you have seen some of these articles, you have seen some gowns. - A. I have seen three gowns, my cloak, a pair of stockings, and nightcap.

Q. Where did you see them, and when. - A. I saw them at Worship street.

Q. Who had them there. - A. The officer, Mr. Armstrong.

Q. Were you sure they were yours. - A. I am sure they are mine.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. I was at the search with Ray; Ray produces some of the property, and Vickery the rest.

JOHN RAY sworn. I produce the stockings and the cap, which is what I found.

Q.(to prosecutor) Look at these stockings and cap. - A. I know them to be mine, and I know the gowns to be mine.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. I am an officer of Worship street; the way I had the gowns was of a man of the name of Noah Aaron , who is a jew. I went with Armstrong, Ray, Bishop, and Noah Aaron , to the house of the prisoner, Hatfield street, St. Luke's, we were shewed to a room up two pair of stairs by Noah Aaron .

Q. How do you know it was his apartments. - A. We found him in bed with the woman who is with him.

Q. What is the woman's name. - A. I know her by the name of Price. Armstrong knocked at the door, it was opened by the man prisoner; we went in and we told him that we must search his place; we proceeded to search, and in the cupboard in the room, standing in a bag, was these implements of house breaking - three crows, one large one and the other two small ones, two large picklock keys, and five small picklock keys for boxes, and a dark lanthorn; these were found in that cupboard (producing them). In another cupboard we found this file, and another file with it, and in the same cupboard was this piece of putty, with an impression of a key upon it; that putty is used for the purpose when they get hold of a key of a gentleman's door, to take the impression. In the same room we found a silk handkerchief, which the woman prisoner said belonged to her, she said she bought it at some place which she mentioned; this was sworn to by the woman to the best of her belief. This handkerchief we found in a box.

Q.(to Susannah Miles) Whose property is that. A. My brother William Miles 's.

Q. Does William Miles live in the same house. - A. In the same house.

Q.(to Vickery) That is the yellow silk handkerchief. - A. Yes. In the same box in the same room was this white handkerchief, it is a man's neck handkerchief, I believe; in the same place was the stockings and the cap belonging, I understand, to the woman. After we had searched the prisoners apartments and brought him to the office, we were then to the house of the prosecutors, me with Armstrong and another officer; we examined the box that were broke open.

Q. There were no marks on the door. - A. None at all.

Q. Did you look at the lock. - A. We did, we could not discover that any thing was done to the lock of the front door.

Q. The boxes were broken open. - A. They were; there were three boxes in the two pair of stairs, one in the front room, and two in the back room.

Q. Whose boxes were these (to Susannah Miles ). A. One belonged to me and one to my brother.

Q. Which was yours. - A. Mine was in the front room.

Q. Out of that box you lost these things. - A.Yes, I lost all my clothes.

Vickery. The boxes in the front room and in the back room I have no doubt but they were broke open by these tools, we fitted them; this tool has a jagged edge, there is the impression of this tool on the box exactly, this tool was rusty, and on the box the rust was left, and it fitted the impression exactly, it was a strong elm box, it took some force to open it.

Q. So that comparing the size of the tools with the impression on the box, and the rust that you found on the box, you think it was broken open by that tool. - A. Yes, and this other has a notch, a jagged edge, there is the mark of that jagged edge on the box. One of the boxes in this room is a stout deal box, it is painted, it had been broken open; that box belonged to Robert Tidmarsh ; it appeared exactly the same way as the other, the impression of the tool was on the box, the same as on the first; there was another box standing by the side of this large box; that was a much larger box, and much thinner. To that box they have used this tool, I have every reason to believe. These gowns I received from Noah Aaron , and that cloak, in consequence of a search warrant I had against another house. While we were searching that house Noah Aaron came in, we then searched his bag, hearing of this robbery, and hearing of the articles that had been lost. In his bag we found that silk cloak.

Q.(to Susannah Miles ) Is that your silk cloak. - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

Vickery. We took him to the office, he was examined by the magistrate.

Q.(to Susannah Miles ) Is that a black silk cloak. A. Yes.

Q. What is that worth. - A. I gave four pounds for it when I had it, I do not know what it is worth now.

Q. How long have you had it. - A. Above a twelvemonth.

Q. Is it worth forty shillings. - A. It is worth more, it is worth as much as I gave for it to me.

Vickery. Noah Aaron the following day produced these gowns.

Q. You took the cloak from him. - A. Yes, there

there were no other things taken from him at that time. On the following day these gowns were produced by him at the office.

Q. He after that produced the gowns. - A. Yes, the gowns were produced by him.

Susannah Miles . I am sure they are my gowns, I have pieces like them, I had them made in the country, I can swear to them.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. This is the top of one of them, I had it new topped since I came to London.

Q. Speak within the mark, what is the worth of them. - A. I should think that they are worth two pounds.

Mr. Curwood. (to Vickery) Are you sure they were the prisoner's lodgings. - A. Yes, both the man and the woman were in bed together; we only heard that these things were lost, we never could discover any of the other things than what are produced here.

NOAH AARON sworn. Q. How came you by this cloak and the other things. - A. This man came to my house, he asked me would I buy a lot of clothes on him.

Q. On what day. - A. Last Sunday fortnight.

Q. That is the 12th of October. - A. He came to my house on that Sunday evening, and asked me would I buy any clothes, he said to me if you can go with me home, I want some money, may be you will be out of town tomorrow; he should like to sell to night, that same night you know.

Q. I do not know, you must tell me, he asked you to go to his house. - A. Yes, I took my boy along with me. When I came there there was another man along with him up stairs, and that woman; they shewed me the clothes, they asked me seven guineas for them.

Q.What things did they shew you. - A. They shewed me a cloak, four gowns, one sheet, an old table cloth, and there were five or six handkerchiefs.

Q. That cloak was one that Vickery took from you. - A. Yes, and four gowns.

Q. What else. - A. There was a small metal watch, I sold it the next day in Duke's place, I bought them altogether of a lump.

Q. How much did you give for the whole lot. - A. Four pound fifteen.

Q. Should you know the watch again. - A. If I should see it I should know it again.

Q.(to Vickery) Do you know any thing of this watch. - A. No, the watch was never recovered, he said he sold it in Duke's place.

Q. Do you know whether he tried to get it back again. - A. I do not know.

Q.(to Aaron) Are there four gowns there. - A. No, one I sold in Rag fair, there is only three of them now. When they asked me the money I got up to go away, I said they do not suit me, I will call in the morning; I bid them four pound ten, the other man said let him have them for five guineas, and at last we concluded the bargain at four pound fifteen; that is all that passed.

SAMUEL AARON sworn. Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you remember going with your father in his house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the person of the man. - A. Yes.

Q. On Sunday the 12th was it. - A. Yes, on the 12th of October.

Q. Have you heard what your father said. - A. Yes.

Q. Did what he say pass in your presence. - A. Yes.

Cross examined by Mr. Curwood.

What trade are you bringing up to. - A. A watch-motion maker.

WILLIAM MILES sworn. You lodge in the house of Walter Collins . - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 12th of October. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lose any thing that evening. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you lose. - A. I lost six guineas out of my box, two silk handkerchiefs, a small metal watch, four half neck handkerchiefs, one pocket handkerchief, one pair of sheets and a table cloth.

Q. How long before you missed them had you seen them before they were taken away. - A. I saw my money and my things on Sunday morning, I put one guinea in the box then.

Q. Was the box locked. - A. Yes, as soon as I come home in the evening I met my sister at the door just before eight o'clock.

Q. You are sister to Susannah Miles . - A. Yes, she was very much alarmed indeed; she told me her apartment had been robbed, I went to my box, I found my money was gone.

Q. What sort of a box is yours. - A. A deal box, it was in the back room.

Q. Was it a strong deal box. - A. Yes, strongish.

Q. Did you see the marks of the tool which it had been opened with. - A. Yes, it was very evident it had been forced open. The next thing I was informed that my watch was gone, the watch hung at the fire place.

Q. What was the value of the watch. - A. A watch-maker told me he would allow me twenty-five shillings for it, to make me another.

Q. You have never seen it since. - A. No, I have not.

Q. Have you seen the other things that you have mentioned, the table cloth or the sheets. - A. Nothing but that silk handkerchief, I have every reason to believe that is mine.

Q. That silk handkerchief is a common pattern - A. Yes, it was just such a one as this.

Q. There is no mark to know it by. - A. No.

Q. It was a metal watch. - A. Yes a French watch.

ROBERT TIDMARSH sworn. What did you lose. - A. One guinea, and two seven shilling pieces out of my box.

Q. Yours was a little box. - A. No, a common strong box.

Q. When did you see it last. - A. On Sunday morning the 12th of October.

Q. Had you seen this money in it that you mentioned. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you return. - A. About ten o'clock on Sunday night.

Q. Then on looking in your box you missed it. - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw your money again. - A. No.

Q.(to Aaron) Where was the place that you

saw this man on Sunday evening. - A. In my house where I live.

Q.Where is your house. - A. At No. 3, Mitre-Court, Aldgate.

Q. Had the prisoner any thing with him at the time when he came to your house. - A. Nothing with him.

William Askew , let his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

Elizabeth Askew , alias Price, was not put upon her defence.

WILLIAM ASKEW , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26,

ELIZABETH ASKEW, alias PRICE, NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-3

562. HENRY SCOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Hembrow , about the hour of two, on the night of the 28th of September , and burglariously stealing therein a knife, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Hembrow .

THOMAS HEMBROW sworn. I live at No. 197, Piccadilly , in the parish of St. James. I am a butcher . On Sunday morning the 28th of September, between two and three in the morning I was alarmed by the watchman and other people, ringing and knocking at my door, I got up; and I was asked by some person if I knew the prisoner. I saw the prisoner in the shop in the custody of the watchman.

Q. Did you know the prisoner. - A. He was a servant of mine, he had quitted my service I believe nine days. I saw a knife that was taken from him, it was my property, it was marked T. H. the letters were burnt in on the handle; it was a large cutting knife; the watchman informed me that he found my cellar door and my house door open. Adjoining the shop is the accompting house; there is an iron chest fixed in the accompting house, that had been attempted to be forced with a hook that is now in court, and likewise with three of my large choppers; the wall next to the stone work of the chest, had been cut through. There was nothing missing from the house but the knife.

Q. That we shall hear, in fact you missed nothing out of the house. - A. Nothing at all that I know.

MICHAEL HAYDON sworn. I am a watchman of St. James's parish. On the night of the 28th I happened to be in that walk where Mr. Hembrow lives; about two o'clock as I was going my round, I observed the cellar door was open, first I slapp'd it to and tried to get something to fasten it up; I tried all the shutters, and when I came to the house door, I shoved my hand against it and it gave way and opened; I asked whether there was any body in the shop, with that, this good man made answer, yes there is.

Q. Did you see him when he made an answer. - A. No, he was far back, he came forward and said all was safe; I said it is all very well if all is safe.

Q. Then it was the prisoner that spoke to you. - A. Yes, with that he came up to me and thought to make out of the door, I said to him if you belong to the house, what are you hurrying out for, when I collared him he said he belonged to the house, I said I was not satisfied, with that he stooped down to pick up his hat that laid behind the street door.

Q. Had you hold of him, at this time. - A. I had, the door of him, I laid hold of him by the wrist; he had this long carving knife in his hand he threw me down in rescuing himself, he let the knife, fall, then he and I struggled for a minute he got the better of me, he got from me, I took old of, his coat and tore a piece from the flap, we were, struggling in the street at that time.

Q. How soon after did you see him again. - A.It, could not be more than one or two minutes; he was then in the custody of the watchman of St. George's parish, and he was brought back to the house.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner who was brought back to the house, was the same person that you had seen in the house. - A. Yes, his coat was torn when he was brought back. I produce the piece I tore off his coat; when he got from me I halloed out stop thief.

GEORGE SEDDALL sworn. I am a coal merchant. I live in Union street, Piccadilly.

Q. Early in the morning that has been mentioned, were you passing by Mr. Hembrow's door. - A. Yes, about two in the morning I saw the door open, I did not suspect any robbery; I supposed as butchers were early risers, they perhaps were going to market; I was going by the watchman came past, he looked in and said halloa, upon which I turned my head, I saw immediately afterwards a scuffle between the watchman and another person, they both fell on the ground, and the prisoner got up and ran away.

Q. The man, whoever he was, ran away. - A. Yes; I turned back, I asked no questions of the watchman, I ran after the man and called stop thief; when he turned up Bond-street, I lost sight of him till I came to Vigo Lane, there I saw the watchman bringing him back, I said to the watchman I believed he was the man by the dirtiness of his stockings that had been down with the watchman at Mr. Hembrow's, let us take him to the house to see whether he is the man; when we came to the bottom of Bond-street, we met the watchman who had been down on the ground with him.

Q. That watchman's name is Haydon. - A. Yes, He said this is the man, I have got a piece of his coat, he produced a piece of his coat.

Q. Did you observe that his coat was torn. - A. Not till the watchman mentioned it, and then I thought he was the person; the piece of coat which the watchman had, matched with his coat. We took him back to Mr. Hembrow's house; we asked him if he knew this man, he said yes, he had been his man; he took us into his accompting-house and there was a hole in the wall, it appeared as if they had been forcing the chest.

ROBERT EDWARDS sworn. Are you the watchman of St. George's - A. Yes, I was calling the hour of two o'clock, in New Bond-street, I heard the cry of stop thief, and the springing of the rattles. The prisoner at the bar came running down Bond-street.

Q. Did you see any body running after him - A. Yes this gentleman came up to me first, the last witness. I told him before he came to me to stop, he would not he turned up Grafton-street, and there I ran up after him and catched him. In the course of a minute or two, I was informed that he had broke open Mr. Hembrow's house, I saw the flap of his coat was gone off on one side.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. I was constable of the night of St. James's watchhouse, the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse; I borrowed a coat of Mr. Hembrow, and took his own coat off. I produce the coat, the watchman kept the piece, I saw them compared, and it matched the place exactly.

JOSEPH GREGORY sworn. I am a constable. The next morning I was sent down to Mr. Hembrow's. I found that the catch of the cellar door was wrenched off; I went into Mr. Hembrow's accompting house and perceived the wood work round the iron chest was broken down, and on the outside of that, the stone and bricks were broken to pieces.

Q. The iron chest was not broken open. - A. No, I saw two cleavers that were bent, with mortar and brick dust upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home to my lodgings at Knightsbridge, I was very much intoxicated with liquor; I had been drinking all the day, and as I was going by the door, I saw the door open, I put my hand and pushed it open, some person asked me who is there, I answered is it you Thomas? Yes, says he, come in, I went in, he told me to shut the door, I pushed the door, but I did not shut it; I sat down on the block in the shop, and when I sat down I found something under me, which occasioned me to get off, I found it was a knife, I stood up and leaned upon the knife, I was very much in liquor; I fell down, I very well recollect my hat falling off; the watchman came to the door and asked who is there, I answered me, he said who are you, I made answer, I belong to here; he catched hold of the knife in my hand, I let the knife go, and he catched hold of my coat; I recollect no more of the business.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-4

563. ANN MOLLINEUX and CORNELIUS LEARY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of October , three guineas, two half crowns and six-pence, the property of John Wood , privily from his person .

JOHN WOOD sworn. I live at No. 11, Chandos-street, Covent Garden. On Thursday the 16th of October, between the hour of twelve and one o'clock, as I was returning home along the Strand, the prisoner accosted me with open arms, and clasped me round the body, she let go my body and took hold of my arm; we walked on to Villiers Street .

Q. What part was it you first saw her. - A. About twenty yards from Villier-street, I stopped there two or three minutes.

Q. You and she stood there about two or three minutes. - A. Yes; during which time I put my hand into my breeches pocket, I found only a four halfpence and a shilling.

Q. While you was standing with her. - A. Yes, I immediately charged the watch with her.

Q. How came you to put your hand in your pocket while you was standing with her. - A.I felt her hand to my hip, I immediately conceived she had robbed me; at that time she had got my money.

Q. How near was the watch. - A. About twenty yards off.

Q. That is the prisoner Leary. - A. Yes; he came directly, I called him.

Q. Did she or you make the stand at Villier-street, who proposed stopping there. - A. I do not think there was any proposal about it, she stopped first, and I told the watchman she had robbed me, he said you both must come to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you both go. - A. We did.

Q. Did any thing pass as you were going along - A. I believe the prisoner spoke once or twice to the watchman, I did not hear what she said.

Q. Did Leary go with you to the watchhouse. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go in. - A. I cannot say that he did, if he did it was only for a minute.

Q. Who was the officer there. - A. Pilgrim.

Q. What did you see Pilgrim do. - A. Pilgrim searched the watchman and found a guinea in one of his cuffs, and two guineas, two half crowns, and sixpence, out of the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

In what situation were you. - A. I was not in liquor.

Q. Not at all. - A. I had been drinking, but I could tell what I was about.

Q. You could just do that. - A. Yes, I had drank two or three glasses of wine.

Q. When did you last perceive the money in your pocket. - A. When I was at the house in Pall Mall.

Q. How long before you left the house. - A. About twenty minutes, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. What pocket was it in. - A. In my right hand breeches pocket.

Q. You cannot pretend to swear to guineas. - A. I cannot.

- PILGRIM sworn. Your wife searched her and found nothing abot her person. - A. Yes. I searched him, I found in his right cuff a guinea; at the same time the constable had got hold of his left arm, I saw him take out of the left cuff two guineas, two half crowns and a sixpence.

Leary's Defence. He knows me to be an honest man, Mr. Holmes came to me about an hour and a half after; I took her to the watch-house; I know not how the money was conveyed into my cuff.

MOLLINEUX, GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

LEARY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-5

564. FRANCIS DUDDERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October ,

six brass bosses, value 4 s. two brass knocker plates, value 1 s. a brass hook, value 4 d. two brass carriages, value 8 d. an iron bolt staple, value 1 d. and thirty pound weight of lead, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Marriott .

THOMAS MARRIOTT sworn. Q. What are you. A. I am a smith and ironmonger , I live in Old Broad street; the prisoner at the bar has lived with me sixteen years as my foreman . The occasion of my knowing them to have been stolen, I was informed by an officer of Worship-street that they had taken one of my servants with some lead; I went with them to the dwelling house of the prisoner, they had a search warrant, and on searching the house I found in company with the officer, ninety five guineas in gold, in two paper boxes.

Q. That was not yours, you had not missed any gold. - A. We found a number of things in iron and brass that I recognised to be mine; part of them I have sworn to be my property, they came from my house.

Q. What are the articles you found. - A. Brass bosses, parts of brass door knockers, and what we call bell carriages.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. These articles are not peculiar to your warehouse. - A. The bosses are old bosses taken out of a crane which I had taken out from Mr. Newman of Snowhill; strictly speaking they are Mr. Newman's property, but under my care till I had sent Mr. Newman my account, then I should have allowed for the value of them.

Q. Have you ever seen these articles that you have been speaking of in Mr. Newman's house. - A. I saw them upon the arms of the crane in which they were placed, and I saw them in my house after they were taken out; and I had missed them for two or three days, they were laying on his vice board.

Q. This man you say had lived with you sixteen years, you must have had a good opinion of him. - A. So much so, his father who died in my service, after twenty years servitude, bound his wife's son apprentice to me; there was fifty pounds left. I made him a freeman, and made him a present of forty pounds odd, because the boy was to be instructed by him. He was a man that I should have been glad if this had not happened, I should have been pleased to have sacrificed five hundred pounds for him.

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer. On Friday the 17th of October I was in company with Mason, a brother officer, going down Purl street, in the parish of Christ Church; I observed the prisoner in an old iron shop with a bag, and out of that bag he shot into a scale that was in the old iron shop, about seventy pounds of lead. I went in immediately with Mason, and asked the prisoner where he got that lead; he hesitated for some time, I informed him that I was an officer of Worship street; it was my duty to know. He at last informed me he was foreman to Mr. Marriott, and that it was his perquisite. I took him to the office; my brother officer went immediately to Mr. Marriott's, to know whether it was the truth. Mr. Marriott appeared at the office; I produce the lead.

- BISHOP sworn. In consequence of a search warrant I went in company with Mr. Marriott, Mason, and Ray, to the apartments of the prisoner No. 5, Little Purl street. On searching his back room I found a quantity of brass articles.

Q. Have you got the bosses that Mr. Marriott speaks of. - A. Yes, I produce them.

Mr. Marriott. These are the bosses, they are those that have been worn by friction; these six bosses belonged to one frame, which composes the crane of the warehouse.

Q. Are you sure that they are those you took from Mr. Newman. - A. Yes, I saw them day by day; the prisoner put new iron ones in the crane for those he took out.

Q. Did you give these bosses, or any other article, to this man, allowing them as perquisites. - A. Never in my life, nor ever heard of such a thing. I should have stated they were found concealed in the hole of a forge in a bag in a little shop.

Prisoner's Defence. It ways always a rule in the trade ever since I have been in it, that is almost nineteen years, to have the old brass and lead. If the right person had them they belong to Mr. Newman, Skinner street.

THOMAS HILLSLEY sworn. I am a smith; the old brass which came out of the crane belongs to Mr. Newman, Skinner street.

Q. Is that any perquisites of the men. - A. It was always understood to be the perquisites of the men in the shop.

Court. What, Mr. Newman's goods to be perquisites.

JAMES POWELL sworn. I always understood the old brass and the old lead, iron, or what not, belonged to the person who did the job.

Court. You understand all the old materials belonged to the journeyman, and not to the master. - A. Yes, the old brass and the old lead.

Q. Then in a shop where there is a great deal of work done, it must be worth something to a foreman, the old brass and the old lead must be worth two or three hundred pounds a year. - A. No.

Q. How much then, he being the principal man, which would have the best place, the master or the man. - A. The master.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-6

565. CHARLES HOGG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , eight brass escutcheons, value 2 d. a brass plate, value, one halfpenny, two guineas, two half guineas, four seven shilling pieces, six shillings, and two sixpences , the property of Thomas Marriott .

THOMAS MARRIOTT sworn. Q. You live in Old Broad street. - A. Yes; the prisoner was my apprentice , he is the son of the prisoner's wife who was tried last, but by a former husband; he worked in the same shop with his father in law, I suspected him of robbing me a long while, particularly two two guineas out of the till.

Q. That was merely suspicion. - A. Merely suspicion; at his father's house I found some articles to which I had given to him to do what we call bell carriages and cranks; the officer searched him in

my presence at the office. I saw some brass escutcheons taken from his breeches pocket, and a brass plate; he had them to work a day or two before. He said he was going to the lackerers, they were not in a state to be lackered, I told him he had no business to take them to the lackerers without my orders. He then said he was sorry he was going to take them home.

Q. You know the escutcheons. - A. Yes, I have sworn to them. I have missed a variety of articles, and money out of the till; there is money in the indictment, but I do not wish to swear to it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You have stated that the prisoner said he was going to take them to be lackered. - A. Yes.

Q. Upon which you told him he had no right to take them without your leave, his answer was, he was sorry for taking them without your leave, and he was going to take them home to your house; what is the value of the whole of the articles found on him. - A. The value would not exceed three pence or four pence.

Court. Does your lackerer work in your premises. A. No, he lives of this side Tower hill; it is never our custom to send any thing to him without writing the name, and to be lackered.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. Q. You are a police constable. - A. I am. I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of this month in Worship street office. In his breeches pocket I found eight brass escutcheons, a piece of brass plate, and the key of a beer barrel; I asked him how he came by them, he said he was going to take them to be lackered, afterwards he said he was going to take them home, I went afterwards to the prisoner's apartment in company with Mason; in the prisoner's box, in his father in law's house, I found four small bags of gold and silver; the mother pointed out the box to me, the bags contained about seven pound in gold and silver; the the prisoner said that one bag containing two guineas, three half guineas, and three half crowns were his; the other bags he said he knew nothing about. I produce the articles in brass.

Prosecutor. They are my property, and taken from his work bench.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, the escutheons .

Privately Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-7

566. JAMES CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , in the dwelling house of George Jeremy ; twenty-eight yards of printed callico, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of George Jeremy , and that he afterwards burglariously did break out of the said dwelling house, about the hour of seven at night, on the same day .

GEORGE JEREMY sworn. I am a linen draper in Southampton-street, Covent Garden ; the prisoner at the bar was my porter . On the 7th of October, about seven in the evening, the property was taken from my house; I had seen it about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour before that at the further end of the counter, that comes into the passage of a night, in a place where we keep brooms and such things. I suspected some person in the house had thrown it there for the purpose of conveying it away. I went out and pulled the street door too, leaving my nephew, my shopman, and my porter, in the house; when I went out I waited about a quarter of an hour in sight of the door, at about thirty yards distance.

Q. You went to such a distance that you could see any body coming out. - A. The way I could see was by the opening of the door; when I saw the door open, I drew nearer. I saw him coming out, I saw it was the porter.

Q. How far off were you then. - A. From ten to fifteen yards, I walked up to him, I asked him what he had got there, he said nothing; I then requested that he would go back with me to see what the bundle contained.

Q. You saw a bundle then. - A. Oh, yes, when I came up I could see him as well as at broad day. I saw a bundle, he went back with me as far as the door, and when I was in the act of ringing the bell he disentangled himself by twisting my arm, and gave me a blow across my breast; in the act of escaping his arm came across my chest, he then ran down Southampton-street towards the Strand; I pursued him and cried out stop thief, he was stopped in the Strand.

Q. You came up to him. - A. Yes; he had not the bundle with him when he was taken.

Q. Where did you afterwards see the bundle. - A. I saw the bundle in my nephew's possession at the bottom of Southampton-street not a minute after. It contained a piece of our furniture cotton, about twenty-eight yards, it was worth two guineas to me.

THOMAS JEREMY sworn. On the 7th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard the cry of Stop thief. I ran to the door and ran down the street; finding the prisoner was secured in the Strand, I ran back to find the bundle. It was delivered into my hands by a young woman in Southampton-street, it was tied up in a handkerchief, this is the handkerchief, it contains the property.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that handkerchief yours. - A. It is a silk handkerchief, it is not mine, it was the covering that was on the bundle when I saw it under the man's arm. I saw the handkerchief by the light of a false hair shop.

Q. And the contents is yours. - A. I can safely say it is the cotton I saw in the place under the counter; I know it is mine.

ROBERT SHERY sworn. Q. Were you passing in Southampton-street about seven o'clock. - A. Yes, as I got into the Strand I heard the cry of Stop thief; he ran past me.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; he had something under his arm like a bundle; as he ran he fell down, and when he got up I did not perceive any bundle under his arm. I followed the prisoner and took him immediately. Thomas Jeremy shewed me the bundle afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings, and not burglariously breaking out of the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-8

567. WILLIAM ARROW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September , a saw, value 4 s. and a pair of pistols, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Leonard Crowder .

LEONARD CROWDER sworn. I am apprentice to Mr. Ditcham, No. 17, Sherborn lane , carpenter and boxmaker. The prisoner took a pair of pistols out of a box of nine, and a carcase saw. I do not know when he took the carcase saw out of my box, but the pistols he took on the 28th of September.

Q. What is he. - A. A boxmaker , he worked for my master.

Q. Did you ever find the pistols - A. Yes, he owned to having pawned these things.

- sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Smith, pawnbroker, No. 251, Borough I produce two saws and a pair of pistols, the shopman that took them in is gone away; the carcase saw was pawned in the name of James Arrow on the 15th of November last, and the pistols on the 30th of December in the name of Joseph Reaves .

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. They got me to say where the things were, then they said they would forgive me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-9

568. ROBERT SHIPLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Michael Hoye , Richard Newman , and Lydia Bourden , being in the house about the hour of one at noon on the 17th of September , and stealing therein, a coat, value 10 s. the property of James Vine .

RICHARD NEWMAN sworn. I am clerk to Michael Hoye , a merchant, No. 9. Size lane, St. Antling's . I went up stairs to get some dinner, on the 27th of September last, between one and two o'clock, I turned the key of the counting house door and left the key in it; I had not been up stairs above two minutes before I heard the counting house door go again.

Q. Does the counting house open to the street. - A. The street door is always open, and the counting house is on the left hand in the passage. When I heard the door I ran down stairs, I saw the prisoner go from the door with something in his apron, I followed him and stopped him, I undid his apron, I found he had a coat wrapped up in it. I took him back to the counting house and I sent for a constable.

DANIEL LEADBETTER sworn. I took the prisoner into custody; this coat was given me. I produce it; Mr. Vine's name was marked in the sleeve lining.

Prisoner's Defence. I was overpowered with liquor, I was not in possession of my faculties, I cannot give any account of it.

GUILTY, aged 55.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-10

569. SARAH SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of September , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Ireland .

ROBERT IRELAND sworn. I am a hosier , I live at No. 78, Holborn bridge . On Saturday the 18th of October, about six in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked to see some stockings; she was shewn a parcel containing three pair, she asked to look at some at a lower price; while the second parcel was getting she purloined a pair of the three pair of stockings that she had seen before. I charged her with taking them, she persisted in saying that she had not got them, that I might search her; I sent the lad for a constable, the constable came, she produced them, and asked me to forgive her; these are the stockings, they are men's ribbed worsted stockings, they are my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat.

Q. Did not she express some approbation of that pair of stockings, that in case she could not meet with some better she would have them. - A. Not at all.

SARAH WHITE sworn. I was in the shop when the prisoner produced the stocking; she concealed the stockings under her cloak. She denied having them, and when the constable was sent for she produced them, and said to Mr. Ireland, pray do forgive me.

The prisoner left her defence to her counter; and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-11

570. THOMAS COOKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September . two pieces of fir, value 9 d. and a piece of deal board, value 4 d. the property of Perrot Fenton .

PERROT FENTON sworn. The prisoner at the bar was a workman employed in repairing my house. On the night of the 19th of September I met him coming out of the house with a basket of wood. I made him take it back; on opening it I found some quartering cut in pieces, I selected the pieces, and joined them together, which made a piece of quartering and a deal board.

Q. I suppose they call them chips. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Mr. Laurence was the master carpenter who did the work at your house. - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted you did not superintend the work. - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You could not be by when the wood was stolen. - A. How do you know that.

Q. I dare say you was better employed; when the men first came to the house it was agreed they should have two pints of beer a day. - A. When you talk of agreements I must state to you, I will explain to you, because I must know more of it than you.

Q. Had not you agreed to allow each of them men two pints of beer in a day. - A. I had no agreement with these men; I stated to the carpenter that I employed, that the men should not take away any wood; I had other buildings, I found that I had been robbed under the pretence of taking away wood; they took iron and lead. He said these men will be discontented unless you let them take some chips for firing, I said let them have what beer you like by way of encouraging them, but then they robbed me to a considerable extent. I do not say this man, it seemed to be a general system, they had cut pieces of oak and carried it away. When I found the men were carrying away the wood and iron, I said I will allow no more beer, I told the men that there was not a splinter in this house but what is my property, and the first man that took out any I will prosecute him. Now that is what you call an agreement.

Court. Did you tell the men they must not take any thing out of the house. - A. Yes, I told them I would not suffer them to take any thing out of the house.

Mr. Alley. In point of fact the beer was stopped. A. It was.

Q. It was after the general allowance of beer was stopped you saw the prisoner carrying the basket. A. Yes, and he persisted he would do it. I believe the man thought he had a right; I told him I would put it in issue whether he had or not.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to work for Mr. Laurence, the first day I did not go to Mr. Fenton's; the next day I was sent about nine o'clock, Mr. Laurence says, Thomas, Mr. Fenton will allow you two pints of beer, take no chips; I said, very well. I did not take any during the time the beer was not stopped; after the beer was stopped the men began to take away the chips, and I took away the same; I met Mr. Fenton, he said where are you going with them, I said, to my lodgings, he said I must not have them, he threw the basket out in the entry; I said you must have them. I went to the public house and I had a pint of porter, I came back to the house again, at the the corner of the yard I met Thomas Haslem with a basket on his arm, I was taken into the office, they sent for Mr. Fenton, he came, he says, what have you done with your chips, Thomas Haslem said he had taken his home to his lodgings. Accordingly they went together and saw this man's chips, they said it was old rotten stuff; Mr. Fenton said, as for your part, I shall make an example of you; I was taken into custody, I did not know what was in my basket, they were put in by the other men. When I was at the bar I saw the alderman and Mr. Fenton whispering together, they asked me what I had to say in my defence, and whether I was willing to serve my king and country; I told them I was not sit, I had been fourteen years in the service, and I had been in a French prison. I said I must take my trial for it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-12

571. WILLIAM GLOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of October , five pounds weight of brass, value 5 s. and two pound weight of copper, value 2 s. 4 d. the property of Tomson Warner , John Warner , and Robert Warner .

ROGER DEVEY sworn. I am a brass founder, I live at No. 8, Shoe-lane. This day week, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop between one and two o'clock in the day, he had two parcels of metal tied up in a handkerchief; he emptied one in the scale, I asked him who the metal belonged to, he said his father, he kept an old rag shop at the further end of Shoe-lane; I knew there was no such shop there; I asked him to tell the truth, for I knew the metal must be stolen; he then said that she lived in Shoe-lane but her shop was in Holborn; he said he could not tell me but he could shew me the house; I told him he must tell me, because I was very certain it came from some founder's shop. I went with him along Shoe-lane, till he came to Robin Hood court, he went up the steps into Dean-street; and then made a push to run away, I then seized hold of him and brought him back and repeatedly requested him to tell me whose metal it was, and I would send for his master to take him away, and the metal together. I sent for a constable, he searched him, and then he said he worked for Mr. Warner; he then said after his master came, that he took one part on the night before, and the other part on Saturday night.

ELISHA WESTWOOD sworn. I am a caster for Messrs. Warner's, they are founders, they live at No. 8, Jewin-street, Crescent, Cripplegate.

Q. Who does the metal belong to. - A. I can swear to these three pieces, they are Mr. Warner's property; I believe firmly that the whole of it is Mr. Warner's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-13

572. MARY YOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September , a kettle, value 1 s. three curtains, value 7 s. an iron, value 9 d. a frying pan, value 1 s. a quilt, value 6 s. two blankets, value 8 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a bolster, value 3 s. and a pillow case, value sixpence, the property of Abigail Sumner , in a lodging room .

ABIGAIL SUMNER sworn. I live in Whitecross-street, the corner of Green-yard ; I keep the house, I am a widow . I let the prisoner and a man she called her husband, he has proved not to be her husband, I let them a ready furnished room, they continued with me about three months.

Q. What business was he of. - A. In the horse line, he worked at White's, Little Moorfields; they paid me pretty well for several weeks, but they owed me something when they went away,

they took all these things out of the room.

Q. When did they leave your lodgings. - A. A month last Sunday morning.

Q. They both went away together. - A. She went out first, and when he came home to breakfast, he said where is my wife? I said she is out, oh, says he, she will be home presently; he went away and never returned, he left his place at the same time.

Q. Did you find your things again. - A. Yes, they are all in court, what is in the indictment; I lost other things.

Q. All that you know you let your lodgings to this man and woman, and when they went away, you opened the door and found the things gone. - A. Yes.

JOHN HENRY SMITH sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Wood-street, part of the property I took in of the prisoner in the name of Mary Clark , there is two frying pans, tea kettle, flat iron, one blanket, two pillows and pillow case, they were pawned at different times.

Q. They were all pledged by the prisoner herself, and in the name of Clark. - A. Yes, I am certain of it.

WILLIAM FIELD sworn. I took the prisoner in custody, the prisoner delivered me up the duplicates directly.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it entirely to the mercy of the gentlemen of the jury. I have nothing to say myself, I am a poor distressed woman.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-14

573. MARY HINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , a gown, value 10 s. five petticoats, value 16 s. a shift, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a bonnet, value 2 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two children's frocks, value 2 s. a bed-gown, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 13 s. a shirt, value 3 s. and an apron, value 2 s. the property of Philip Gershen .

LUCY GERSHEN sworn. I am the wife of Philip Gershen ; the prisoner lived with me as a servant near thirteen weeks, at two shillings a week; I came home on the 30th of December from market, with some fruit, I called her to help the porter down with the fruit, which she did, and before the porter had gone, this woman was gone; my husband came home and I told him the woman was gone; I looked over my property and missed all these articles.

Q. You did not see her take any thing with her. - A. No.

CHARLES STANCEY sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 30, Red Lion-street, Whitechapel. I produce a child's petticoat, pledged on the 20th of September for eightpence, on the 13th of September, a white apron for one shilling and sixpence, and on the 22d a frock for one shilling. She pawned them in the name of Hinton.

Q. Look at the prisoner, are you sure it is her. - A. I cannot positively say it is her, but to the best of my belief I think is is.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Fleming, Newgate-street, pawnbroker; I produce a gown pledged for eight-shillings, in the name of Hinton. I have no knowledge of the prisoner, I took it in myself.

THOMAS SIMMONDS sworn. I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Windsor, 105 Whitechapel. I produce six pledges pledged by the prisoner; I took in three out of the six; I believe she is the person, I know her face.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-15

574. MARGARET RICE was indicted for that she being in the dwelling house of John, Jones, on the 7th of October , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. a shift, value 1 s. a cotton bedgown, value 1 s. three petticoats, value 12 s. a pair of stays, value 8 s. three habit shirt, value 3 s. three caps, value 6 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. two muslins gowns, value 1 l. a muslin apron, value 2 s. a bonnet, value 1 s. a woman's great coat, value 5 s. a silver watch, value 2 l. a ribbon, 1 d. and a metal key, value 1 d. the property of John Jones did steal, that she afterwards about the hour of ten. on the same night burglariously did break to get out of the same .

JOHN JONES sworn. I live at No. 3, Williams's Buildings, Brompton , I keep a laundry , I take in washing; the prisoner was a servant in the house to me and my wife.

Q. Had you any other servant. - A. No, only three washerwomen that were washing in the house, the prisoner lived in the house and had to serve them out with soap and every thing that was necessary when they wanted it.

Q. What day was it the prisoner left your house. - A. She left it on the 7th of October at night.

Q. Do you remember what day it was. - A. It was on the Tuesday; me and my wife went out to Sadler's Wells, we went off at four o'clock, when I went away I gave her particular care over the house.

Q. At that time were the woman there washing for you. - A. Yes, I gave her the order before the women, I gave her an order not to open the door after nine o'clock, I told her not to open the door to any person after then; but to go up stairs and look out of the window as it would be late before I should get home; it was a long way from Brompton to Sadler's Wells.

Q. What time did you return. - A. I returned at one o'clock in the morning of the 8th. When I came to the house the door was fast, I got a barrow and looked over the window, I saw a candle alight, the door was locked, I went to the back door as I found the key was gone, I went backwards, there was a window left open, and there was a candle left burning in the kitchen, the room that we always live in; the back window was open that laid over the washhouse, there is a board that we lift up to let

the steam out, I thought of going in that way, and I got in directly. I was very much afraid, I saw the light, I came down the stairs as quick as possible I could to my wife to let her in. I took the candle, I says you take another candle and see if any person is there to knock me down, we went through the house and through every room, and looked under the beds, we went into the room that we sleep in, we found nobody but the dogs, one large one and one little one that we keep. One of the women is in court that left the house at nine o'clock, she says that the prisoner bolted the door after her, and that she did leave Margaret Rrice in the house; when we went into the room my wife looked in the drawers, she says some person has been to the drawers, I went into the room with one candle and she with another; she says I have missed the caps.

JANE JONES sworn. Q. You searched the house. A. Yes.

Q. At the time your husband searched it. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you miss. - A. The first thing I missed was two caps, the next was two habit shirts, they were in my drawers, and two gowns.

Q. What do you value the caps at. - A. The caps are valued at a shilling a piece I think, the two habit shirts they are valued at the same, I believe.

Q. There are two gowns, what do you value them at. - A. I value them at ten shillings a piece, the three petticoats at four shillings a piece, there are two pair of cotton stockings, they are valued at sixpence the two pair, the bedgown I cannot say what it is worth, a pair of stays at eight shillings, a bonnet at one shilling.

Q. A woman's great coat, what is that worth. - A. I cannot say exactly, it is a very good one, I suppose it may be worth about twelve shillings.

Q. Is it worth five, that is what you valued it at. A. I dare say it is worth that.

Prosecutor. The watch is mine, I had it new in January, I gave four pounds two shillings and sixpence for it, I valued it at two pounds, I have got the receipt in my pocket, and the particular marks it has in it.

Q. How lately had you seen them before you went out in the afternoon. - A. When I came home again to town I gave she care of it to put it in the top drawers.

Q. You were present when she was taken up Mr. Jones. - A. Yes; I traced her that night, I went in the morning to Bow street, at half after five to get an officer. I found her between nine and ten on the morning of the eighth coming out of No. 73, Great Peter street, Westminster; says I, there she is, with my wife's clothes on, she had got my wife's great coat on and gown and petticoat; she said master there is the watch, she took it out of her bosom. I said I have nothing to do with it, deliver it up to the officer.

Q. Did you search her, and find all the rest of your things. - A. Yes, they were found on her arm, she was coming out of the door, and going away with them, except one bonnet the officer found in the room afterwards that she came out of.

Cross-examined by Mr. Barrow.

Q. Mr. Jones, what parish is your house in. - A. In the parish of Kensington, in Brompton division, the gentlemen collect the money for Kensington parish.

Q. Do you know that it is in Kensington parish. A. I do not know any further.

Q.(to prosecutrix) How came you to be so particular, did you examine where these things were before you went out. - A. I had taken things out of the drawers before I went out, I did not take the things out one by one.

Q. You took other things out of the drawer, and that is the only reason you have for recollecting these things were in the drawer. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw them together, did you not separate them. - A. No.

Q.(to prosecutor) With respect to the watch, Mr. Jones, you gave her that to take care of. - A. I had broke the glass, it dropped down while we were at tea with the other women, I says, Peggy, take the watch up stairs, and put it on the top of the drawers, which she did. I went up stairs to take my hat, I saw it there then.

Q. The officer found the bonnet afterwards in the room. - A. The bonnet was in the room, and he brought it afterwards.

Q. That is what the officer said, I believe you had a good character with this girl when she came to you. - A. Yes, I trusted her with a five pound note to take to a gentleman, I would have trusted her with any thing else in this world till this unhappy affair.

Q. Did you suspect her. - A. No, not in the least.

Court. If you call five hundred witnesses to her character, it cannot do away the fact, the girl goes out of the house, and the property is found on her.

MARTHA DRYDEN sworn. Q. Do you work for Mr. and Mrs. Jones. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at work on the 7th of October. - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go out of the house. - A. About ten minutes after nine o'clock.

Q. Did you leave Margaret Rice in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the doors and windows were all fast. - A. The doors and windows were all fast below.

Q. You do not know as to up stairs. - A. No.

Q. Nor you do not know as to the back window over the washhouse. - A. No.

Q. How was the door fastened below. - A. With a double lock and and two bolts.

Q. Did she lock the door after leaving you. - A. No, she did not lock the door at my going out, she followed me to the gate, I cannot tell about the door, she called the dogs in to protect her, and fastened the gates after me.

Q. Was there any other person left in the house with her when you went away. - A. No, we all three went away together.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her youth and good character.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-16

575. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for that he on the 21st of May , in the forty-fourth year of his Majesty's reign, in the parish of St. Mary Mac Felon, Whitechapel, did marry and take to wife one Rebecca Clarke , spinster , and that he on the 24th of June last, at the parish of Christ Church, Middlesex , feloniously did marry one Ann Jenkins , spinster, his former wife being then alive .

The case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Have you got the register of the parish of Whitechapel. - A. Yes, here is the register of the 21st of May 1804. - William Watts of this parish, bachelor, and Rebecca Clarke , spinster, of the same parish, were married in this church by banns, on the 21st of May 1804, by Thomas Wright , rector. William Watts , bachelor, and Mary Clarke , spinster. William Marshall and Sophia Watts were present, they were witnesses.

Court. You do not know the parties yourself. - A No, I do not.

WILLIAM MARSHALL sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. I live in Woolwich, I am a carpenter.

Q. Do you know Watts the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Rebecca Clarke . - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was married to Rebecca Clarke at Whitechapel church. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your hand writing. - A. Yes.

Court. You witnessed that marriage. - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Have you seen Rebecca Clarke lately. - A. I saw her last Sunday evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You very quickly said that he was married to Rebecca Clarke , was not her name Rebecca Sutton . - A. She went by the name of Rebecca Clarke .

Q. Cannot you answer me the question, they live at Hampstead, you know. - A. No, at West Ham. I saw her at Greenwich last Sunday.

Court. Of course the register was signed by the parties. - A.( Thomas Martin ) Rebecca Clarke has signed her own name.

Mr. Alley. (to Marshall) You know the mother, do not you. - A. I know her by sight.

Q. When was this last marriage. - A. In June.

Q. Do you not know that his first wife was married to a man two years ago, to a man she is now living with at Hampstead. - A. I do not know that.

GEORGE ASHTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. You are the parish clerk of Christ Church, Spital Fields. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you the register of William Watts and Ann Jenkins. - A. On the 24th of June, 1806. William Watts , bachelor, of this parish, and Ann Jenkins , spinster, of the same parish, were married in this church by license, by me West Welday. - Witnessed by George Carey and Elizabeth Imray .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You do not remember the parties yourself, I suppose. - A. No.

SARAH MORTOM sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Were you at the marriage of William Watts and Ann Jenkins . - A. Yes.

Q. On the 24th of June 1806. - A. Yes.

Q. Is Ann Jenkins here. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the person to whom the prisoner was married. - A. Yes.

Court They were married at the church of Spitalfields by, a gentleman in the habit of clergy man. - A. Yes.

ANN JENKINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Were you married to the prisoner Watts, last June. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you before you was married, know whether he was a single or a married man. - A. I understood from him he was a single man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You are a widow woman. - A. No.

Mr. Pooley. What was your name. - A. Ann Jenkins .

Court. Did he become possessed of any property of yours in consequence of marriage. - A. No.

Q. How long did he pay his addresses to you before you were married. - A. The first of May.

Q. He courted you for a month. - A. Yes.

Q. JOHN SALISBURY sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. What are you - A. I am a stone mason, I live at Highgate.

Q. You are acquainted with the woman this unfortunate man was first married to. - A. Yes.

Q. You have known him a long time. - A. About twelve years.

Q. She has been married separate from him. - A. Yes.

Court. When was it. - A. Last August was a twelvemonth.

Mr. Alley You have been led into this mistake, you are the husband yourself. - A. Yes.

Q. You all conceived by law this marriage was not good. - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-17

777. THOMAS CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , six pound weight of cheese, value 5 s. the property of Prudence Cook .

PRUDENCE COOK sworn. I am a widow woman, I keep a chandler's shop in Colchester row, Shoreditch . On the 22d of September between five and six o'clock in the afternoon. I went into the adjoining room to my shop to take a cup of tea; I thought I heard people come into the shop, I saw the shadow of some persons in the shop, I went into the shop immediately, and I saw three persons go out of the shop door, I suspected they came to rob me, I looked round and missed the cheese, I had just cut half a pound off and left it on the counter; I ran out immediately, I could not see them, I received information that they had crossed the field, I got Charles Beard to pursue them, I saw him lay hold of the prisoner and take the cheese from under his coat.

Q. What did he say. - A. He begged I would forgive him; he offered me money if I would forgive him.

Q. Had he any money about him - A. I saw some halfpence.

CHARLES BEARD sworn. I am a carpenter.

Q. In consequence of what Mrs. Cook told you. did you pursue after the prisoner. - A. Yes. I had seen the prisoner with two others, standing about the shop about half an hour before.

Q. How far was he from the shop when you overtook him. - A. About two hundred yards off. He had the cheese with him under his coat, I told him he must go back with me, he said he did not not care he had not taken the cheese, it was given to him; when I took him to Mrs. Cook he begged her to let him go, he offered all his money.

Q. Had he any thing more than halfpence about him. - A. No, I produce the cheese.

(The cheese identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence I was coming across the field and I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-18

576. JOHN DAVISON , alias CHAPMAN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Lion Jones, about the hour of three at night, on the 12th of October , and burglariously stealing therein twenty waistcoats, value 3 l. ten pair of men's breeches, value 3 l. 10 s. twelve pair of boy's breeches, value 3 l. two women's shoes, value 2 s. and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Lion Jones .

LION JONES sworn. What are you. A. I am a dealer in clothes , I live at No. 161, Brick-lane Spittalfields . On the 12th of October, I was awoke by the watchman between three and four o'clock it was dark, I got up and went down stairs, I saw the watchman standing by a broken window of my shop with his Lanthorn.

Q. Had it been been broke before you went to bed the night before. - A. No, the shutter was cut at the bottom, either with a knife or chisel; I had shut it up the night before myself, the window was cracked open, so that any body could put their hands in and draw the goods out.

Q. What did you miss. - A. Ten pair of velveteen corderoy breeches, twelve marsello waistcoats, eight swansdown waistcoats, twelve pair of boys small clothes, two pair of stockings and two women's shoes; I am sure they were there the night before. In the morning I went to Mr. Armstrong.

Q. How soon after did you see this person. - A. About eleven o'clock he was produced to, me at the office. I had seen the prisoner about five months before, he called in the shop and I sold him a waistcoat; he had the same waistcoat on when he was taken up.

- WILLIAMS sworn. I am a watchman of Bunhill-row, I got out of my box directly as St. Paul's clock struck four; I beat round past four towards Chiswell-street; at the corner of Chiswell-street, I saw the prisoner come past, I asked the prisoner what he had got there, as he had a bundle under his arm, he made me no answer, he ran away directly, I ran after him and sprang my rattle and cried out stop thief, I told my partner at the corner of Grub-street to stop him, that there was a man with a bundle come down there.

Q.(to Jones) What is the name of that watchman where the place was broken open. - A. I do not know, he is not here.

Q. Why did not you have him here. - A. I forgot of it.

Q.(to Williams) You sprang the rattle and called Stop thief, did you pursue him. - A. Yes, my partner said he did not come up his way; I said he has gone up Campden-court.

Q. You had missed him then a little while. - A. Yes, for about a minute; we found him on a flight of steps that goes up one pairs of stairs in Campden-court.

Q. Did you hear him run up. - A. No, my partner being at the end of the next court, we knew that he could not get past, because he stands at the end of that court and I knew he run up Grub-street; when he found he was detected he was coming down the flight of stairs.

Q. What became of the bundle. - A. I do not know, we could not find the bundle; we found a pair of shoes at the entry where he was at the top of the flight of steps, where he had been standing, we took him in custody to the watchhouse. I asked him directly I saw him on the stairs, what he had done with the bundle; he replied what, me the bundle, me the bundle; yes, I says, you are the man, I will swear; he said he knew nothing about the shoes.

Q. Were the shoes there. - A. Yes, I produce them.

Q.(to Jones) Can you swear to these shoes. - A. Yes, these are two odd shoes; one is lined with leather and the other with linen, the shoes lay within the reach of a man's arm at the window where the hole was.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. I am a watchman. I was beating four o'clock on the 12th of October, a little way down Grub-street. I heard the rattle go loud, and a voice of Stop thief crying to me, he was in Grub-street.

Q. Did you see any person running. - A. I cannot say that I did.

Q. You went with the man that sprung the rattle up to the flight of steps. - A. Yes, I said he must be up here, he could not go by me; he and I went up and found him on these stairs, we found nothing but the shoes; after we secured the prisoner we looked after the bundle, we could not find any bundle.

PETER MASON sworn. Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes.

Q. This man was brought in custody to you. - A. Yes, I had seen Jones in the morning in Golden-lane he told me that his house had been broke open; about eleven o'clock he was brought by the watchman to the office, the watchman gave the same account about seeing him with the bundle and finding the shoes as he has here, I told the magistrate I heard of a house being broken open in the morning, and with his permission I would take the shoes and shew them to Jones; I went to Jones's house and asked him if he had lost any shoes, he said yes, he had lost two odd shoes, one lined with leather and the other with linen, he said they had been a pair of his wife's mothers, she had bought them, they did not sit her, and she had left them to sell.

Q. Did you then produce them to him. - A. I did, and he identified them. I saw the shutter where is

had been cut out of the groove, and a pane of glass broke.

CHARLES STIRLING sworn. Q. Did you take any knife from the prisoner at the bar. - A. When he was brought in the watchhouse, while I was searching him, he took a knife out and said he had got nothing else; the point of the knife seemed rather blunt. I produce the knife.

Court. There is a little bit broken off, and but a little bit.

JOHN RAY sworn. Q. Did you take this knife to Lion Jones's house. - A. I did.

Q. Did you apply it to the place where the window shutter had been cut. - A. I did, to the frame of the window where the glass had been broken, it exactly corresponded.

Q. How do you mean it corresponded. - A. It fitted to where it had been between the wood work and the glass.

Q. Do you mean to say that you observed the wood work had been cut with that knife. - A. Yes, it exactly fitted the breadth of that knife between the wood work and the glass to raise the glass.

Q. You did not find any part of the knife broken off there. - A. No, I did not. The shutter appeared to have been done with a larger instrument a great deal.

Q.(to Williams) Was there any body with him at the time you saw him running. - A. There was a person that passed me and tried to shadow my light.

Q. Not the prisoner. - A. No another, at the time I was looking over the way he passed very slowly and asked me what o'clock it was; at the time the prisoner was passing on the other side. I did not mind what he said to me, I crossed over to the prisoner and followed him.

Q. You did not see him throw the bundle away. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out drinking, and I got intoxicated in liquor and lost my way, and got up this court, and sat on these steps and went to sleep till they came up the court; I heard the noise, and the watchman came up the court, they came and asked me where the bundle was, I told them I did not know what bundle they meant.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-19

577. JOSEPH PURVEISS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a grey gelding, value 7 l. the property of John Curtis .

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

JOHN CURTIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. You live in Spring street, St. Mary-le-bone. - A. I do.

Q. On the 23 of August last had you a horse to dispose of. - A. I had.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner. - A. At the back of my own house in the mews, he came to me at the stable, he said he heard that I had a horse to sell, he bought a person with him whom I had some little knowledge of, who lived in the neighbourhood. He likewise recommended him to buy the horse, he agreed to give seven pounds for the horse, the horse was shewn him, I asked him for a shilling earnest, he borrowed a shilling of the person that was with him and gave it me; he told me he was about taking some stables in the neighbourhood, it would not be convenient to take him away then, if I would keep it two or three days he would satisfy me for the keep of it; I told him I would, he went away.

Court. I understand from you that you had absolutely sold the horse. - A. Yes, when he had paid me for it.

Q. You stated that you agreed with him for the price of seven pounds, and you desired a shilling earnest, which you had, and then you had stipulated for two or three days that you were to keep the horse. - A. Yes.

Q. Then he might have taken it away immediately if he pleased. - A. If he paid for it.

Q. Was there any thing said then about his paying for it. - A. I do not know that there was, I considered the horse as sold, though I had not the money, and I considered that he would pay me the money when he took it away.

Q. You considered the shilling as binding the bargain. - A. Yes, he said he would fetch it away on the Monday, or Tuesday following, and pay me for it, this was on Saturday; on Tuesday he came and trimmed the horse, and took it away; he said he was going as far as Paddington, he thought he had got a customer for the horse, he would go and shew it to a gentleman, and he would bring it back, which he did.

Q. Might not he have sold it to that gentleman. A. I expected he would either bring me the horse or the money back. He brought the horse back at five o'clock, he said it would not suit the gentleman. On Thursday he came into my own shop about one o'clock in the day and asked me to lend him the horse, he had been and sold a horse for sixty guineas, and he wanted to go to Cornhill to get change for a check, he should not be gone above an hour, he would then return and pay for the horse and take it away; on that ground I went out with him and delivered him the horse to go into the city on the ground of him coming back.

Q. What do you mean, on the ground of supposing him to come back. - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Q. Do you mean to come back with the horse. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ask him what necessity there was for him riding to Cornhill. - A. He said if I would lend him the horse he might as well ride as walk.

Court. Why did you not say he might as well walk as ride. - A. I did not say that.

Mr. Reynolds. Did he ever return the horse. - A. He did not. About a quarter of an hour after he had been with me that day my boy saw a boy riding the horse.

Q. That we shall hear from him, when did you see the horse again. - A. I saw the horse the next day, I saw a boy riding it about the neighbourhood.

Court. You saw nothing of the prisoner then. - A. No, sir, I saw the prisoner about three or four days afterwards I saw him pass where I live, I followed him into a public house in the the neighbourhood, I asked him where my horse was, I told him I heard he had sold it, I told him I would go and take him away from the man that had got it, he said I could not do that, he said he would put another horse into my custody till such times he had paid me for the other; I told him it was very well, I hoped he would bring

me another horse or pay me the money; I told him I thought he wanted to swindle me out of the horse, he made some fair promises, and I expected to see him again the same day; he never came.

Mr. Reynolds. I ask you upon your oath did you never part with this horse as a sale. - A. No, I never should have parted with the horse, except I had the money.

Q. On the Thursday when he came, your apprentice was present in the shop. - A. He was.

Court. What became of the horse afterwards. - A. I went to the man that had bought the horse, and I asked him if he had bought such a horse, he is here, his name is Henderson; I saw the horse last night.

ROBERT HENDERSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. I am a fishmonger, I live in Paddington-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes. On the 27th of August, about one o'clock in the day, he called at my house, I bought the horse of him, he said, Henderson, I see you were looking at this poney when I was buying it of Mr. Curtis (I was at Mr. Curtis's stables); he said I have bought him for a customer of mine, it does not suit him, and if you like to have him, I will sell him to you for seven guinear and a small dish of fish, whatever you like to give me; I bought the poney of him, I gave him seven guineas on that day, I have got the receipt in my pocket.

Q. Have you seen the horse again. - A. I have seen him; I disposed of him afterwards, the next day after Mr. Purveiss was taken before Mr. Conant; the horse was of no use.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask Mr. Henderson whether he did not go to Mr. Curtis the day after I had bought the poney, and Mr. Curtis told him he had sold it to Mr. Purveiss - A. I did. On Monday before the 27th I went into Mr. Curtis's stable yard, he says to me, what, Henderson, you are come niggling, or something like that, after my horse again; I said, Curtis, I think the horse will suit me, I should wish to buy him, his reply to me was you are too late, for I have sold him ten minutes or a quarter of an hour to that gentleman, meaning the prisoner at the bar, I made answer and said it is of no use of my saying any more about him; I went home and left them together.

Court. You say you sold this horse the day after the prisoner was taken before a magistrate. - A. I did.

Q. How came you to dispose of him when you knew this enquiry was before a magistrate. - A. I went down to Marlborough-street when I heard Purveiss was taken up, to hear if Mr. Conant said any thing about horse stealing.

Q. That was at the examination of the prisoner. - A. Yes, and I did not hear any thing that inclined me to keep it, and I was tired of it, it was not worth a guinea instead of seven guineas.

Mr. Reynolds. You say this horse was not worth a guinea to you, what did you sell him for. - A. He was restive and would not turn without backing him; I sold him for eight guineas.

Q. You sold this restive horse for eight guineas. - A. Yes.

Q. Was nothing at all said to you at Mr. Conant's office. - A. No.

Q. You were not told not to sell this horse. - A. Not at the office, there was a man came to me and said you must not part with this horse before we find Purveiss.

Q. Directly Mr. Purveiss was taken up you parted with it. - A. Yes, because I thought I might do what I liked with it then, I am not used to any thing of the kind.

GEORGE SARSONS sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You are an apprentice to the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on Thursday, the prisoner, Purveiss coming to your master's house. - A. Yes, he came to borrow the horse, he said he had been selling a horse for sixty guineas, he had got a check upon a banker at Cornhill; he asked my uncle, Mr. Curtis, to lend him the horse for half an hour, he said he might as well ride as walk; he said he would come back again and pay my uncle for the horse, and take him away; my uncle delivered the horse to him, and he went away with the horse.

Q. When did you see the horse again. - A. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards; my uncle sent me into High-street, Marybone, I was coming back through Paddington-street, I saw Mr. Henderson, the fishmonger's boy, riding the horse up and down the street.

Q. What distance of time would it have been from the time that Purveiss left your master's house to the time that you saw the boy upon the horse. - A. About twenty minutes after the time that Purveiss had the horse.

Q. What is the distance between your master's house and Mr. Henderson's. - A. Spring-street runs into Western-street, and Western-street into Paddington-street, it is not above two minutes walk.

Q. Did you see Purveiss there. - A. No, Mr. Henderson was standing at his door; I did not say any thing to him; when I came back I told my uncle I had seen Mr. Henderson's boy riding the horse in Paddington-street

JOHN HALL sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You are a glazier, living in Berkley-street. - A. Yes.

Q. There is a horse we have got here, from whom did you buy it. - A. Of a Mr. Garner, I cannot recollect the day, it is about three weeks hence, I gave ten guineas for him, the horse is in the stable at the New Inn; the prosecutor has been with me to the stable to see the horse.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is the horse that you see with Mr. Hall the horse that you lent to this man. - A. It is, I know him very well, I had him in my possession about fifteen months, or a year and a half.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 22d of August I was accompanied by Mr. Warral, a broker, in East-street, in order to purchase a poney he had for sale.

Court. Who had. - A. Mr. Curtis; Mr. Curtis was not at home, we retired to a public house and waited till he came in. He then took me to the stable and shewed me the poney; I saw the poney out, then I requested him to let me ride it to Chapel-street, Lisson Green; he asked me how long I should be gone, I said ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; the person I went to see was not at home. I returned immediately, he asked me on my return

how I liked the poney, I told him not at all for its riding part, as to its drawing part I did not know; I wanted one to do both; he told me it been accustomed to ride a very little, but it was a very good one in harness; he asked me whether I would make a purchase of it or not; I told him as he had let it till Monday, that would be time enough to decide about it; he said if I thought it would suit me, I might as well decide then, as on Monday; I asked him the lowest price he would take for it, he said seven guineas; I told him I never bought for guineas, I would give him seven pounds for it on Monday if it came back safe; he requested me to give him earnest, I asked him whether he wished for a shilling or a guinea, he said a shilling would do; I having no silver, I borrowed a shilling of the person that took me to him, which I gave him; I called on the Monday at one o'clock, which was the time limited for the poney's return, but it was not returned till the evening; I then called on the Tuesday, the poney was in a very rough state, I trimmed it and made it look in the best state I could, to shew it to another person; I shewed it to the person that I intended to sell it at the time I made the first purchase; I had two or three places to go on business, and after I had gone I returned the poney, I requested him to keep the poney till the end of the week, and I would allow him any thing reasonable for the livery of it, he agreed that it should stand till the end of the week. On Thursday I had occasion to go to two or three places on business, I went to Curtis and asked him to lend me his saddle and bridle, which he did, he put the bridle on and led the poney out, he desired me to take care that he did not kick me and throw me down, he wished that I might not bring it back again; when I got into the adjoining street there was a green grocer wished to look at it, he tried to buy it of me, I let him ride it up and down the street; Mr. Henderson, whom I had previously promised the poney to, provided that he did not suit the person whom I had purchased it for in the first instance, he met me in the same street, he told me that he had got the money for the poney in his pocket if I would take it to his house, which I did, he paid me the money and I gave him a receipt, I requested him to take care of the saddle and the bridle till my return, which might be about five or six o'clock, I did not return that evening; the next morning I went down to Mr. Curtis's, who I saw at his door, I called him to me, we went to a public house to drink a pint of porter, I told him that I had sold the poney, and that I should call and pay him in the course of two or three days, he said he wished to have the money, as he wanted to go to Barnet fair, I told him I should endeavour in the course of the day to get the money, and I was sorry to disappoint him; when I got to the stables where I had two horses that stood at livery, there was a direction left at the stables for me, to a gentleman in the New Road; on my way I called on Curtis, to say that if I was lucky in selling that horse I should call and pay him, but I did not sell it; I told him rather than he should be afraid of his money I would leave him a mare that was worth forty guineas, instead of his poney he requested me to go to his stable to look at his horse's eye; I went to several places to raise the money, but I did not.

Q. Did you go with him to look at the horse's eye. - A. I did go with him to the stable to look at the horse's eye; on the following day I went to two places in the country a little way, for money, when I returned I called in the adjoining street to the stables I had taken, where I was told that Mr. Curtis had been to look for me with three officers, to take me up for horse stealing, I said if that was the case I had got the principal part of the money to pay him, but I would not go near him, I turned my horses's head and went to Bayswater, where I live, and about nine o'clock in the evening he came down to my house with three or four men, I did not see him, I was apprised of it, I went out of the way; I was three weeks about the neighbourhood, I met with a friend of Curtis's, I desired him to send for him in order to settle the business, when he came he brought a constable along with him in order to take me into custody.

Q. Who did. - A. Mr. Curtis; I went before Mr. Conant in Marlborough-street, and Mr. Conant asked Curtis how long he had lost his horse, he said I had not stole it, he had taken earnest, a shilling earnest, he had sold it to me; Mr. Conant thought proper to commit me for it; I have another witness that I should be glad for your lordship to hear.

Q.(to prosecutor) I thought you said the agreement was made on the Saturday. - A. It was.

Q. Was the horse engaged to go any where - A. A neighbour of mine wanted me to lend him the horse, to go a little way on Saturday, and he would be home on the Monday.

Q. Did you lend him. - A. I did, it did not return till the Monday evening.

Q. You did not say a word about that before; when Henderson was down there on the Monday the horse was not come back. - A. No.

Q. You saw the prisoner on the Saturday following. - A. Yes, I was coming down the street where I live, he beckoned me and I followed him into the public house.

Q. Did he tell you there that he had sold the poney. - A. He did, I knew to whom he had sold it; I told him, as I had before, I would go and take it away, he said I could not, he would leave another horse in my custody, in case he did notpay me that afternoon; he never brought the horse. I certainly should have taken it if he had, till he paid me the money.

Q. After this did he accompany you with his advice about any horse's eye in your stable. - A. Yes, I asked him to go.

Q. Then during this time you had an opportunity of securing him. - A. I had if I had choosed to do it. I did not think that he would have used me as he had.

Q. You understood that he had sold your horse, and you understood that he had deceived you in getting possession of it. - A. I did.

Q. You had no thought of prosecuting him then for stealing it. - A. I had not; it was above a fortnight after that, he never came near me.

Q. How soon after this did you see him again, you say this was on the Saturday. - A. I think it was the Tuesday following he came and saw the horse's eye, or the Wednesday, I am not sure which; it was in the following week he came, and rid up to the door

and said he would call and pay me for the horse in the evening.

Q. How long was it after this happened that you actually took him up. - A. It was three weeks.

Q. Then if the money had been brought to you it would have been all well. - A. Mr. Conant told him at the office that if he brought the money all would be well then.

Q. Would you have consented to that. - A. Yes. He told the magistrate he never intended to pay for it.

WILLIAM WORRAL sworn. I am a cooper, I live at No. 3, East street, Manchester square. Mr. Curtis told me he had a horse to sell, he asked me if I wanted to buy one, I told him no, but I could recommend him to one that I bought mine of; I recommended him to Mr. Purveiss, he went with me and bought him; Mr. Curtis asked him seven guineas, he agreed to take seven pounds, he asked me to lend him a shilling to give earnest for the horse, as he had no silver, I did, he gave the earnest for the horse; he agreed to take him away in a few days. I heard no more of it till Mr. Curtis told me he had taken the horse away and had not paid him for the horse; I told him he did wrong to let him have it without the money.

Q. Did he tell you how he come to take the horse away. - A. No, he only expressed that he had let him have him away according to agreement.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-20

578. WILLIAM GROVE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of October , a rum puncheon, value 21 s. the property of James Butler .

CHARLOTTE GREVILLE sworn. Q. You live with your father. - A. Yes, at No. 49, St. John street, he is a watchmaker.

Q. What is James Butler . - A. A distiller .

Q. When did you see the prisoner near Mr. Butler's house. - A. On the 1st of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was then at the window of my own house; he was standing about the puncheon at Mr. Butler's door about a quarter of an hour, then he rolled it away from the door up towards Islington Road; I went over and told Mrs. Butler, Mrs. Butler had nobody in the way, she requested me to go to Mr. Ware for one of his men, I went and told one of them to pursue the prisoner. I saw the prisoner after he was brought back by Mr. Haydon.

ROBERT READ sworn. I am servant to Mr. Thomas, an apothecary.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 1st of October. - A. Yes, I was standing at the step of my master's door, he was walking on the other side of the way, he came and rolled a puncheon down towards Islington Road.

Q. Where was the puncheon standing. - A. By Mr. Butler's door.

Q. How far did you see him roll it to. - A. To the Pewter Platter; he rolled it down the stable yard, and then left it.

Q. Did he run or walk. - A. I do not know, I believe he went steady.

Q. Who rolled the puncheon back again. - A. I did in about a quarter of an hour afterwards; the prisoner was in custody then.

- HAYDON sworn. Q. You are servant to Mr. Ware are you. - A. Yes, I overtook the prisoner in Little Sutton street, he was running away.

Q. How far is Little Sutton street from the Pewter Platter. - A. Not a quarter of a mile.

Q. He was running very fast. - A. Yes, I called Stop thief once or twice, I overtook him and brought him back; he came very quiet, he did not offer to resist.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down St. John street, I saw a man dressed like a cooper, he said he had bought this puncheon, and he would give me a shilling if I would roll it down to his house at Clerkenwell Green, facing the church; he told me he should be at home as soon as me. Accordingly I rolled it away from Mr. Butler's door towards his house.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-21

579. HANNAH RAILTON and MARY DALEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , five silk handkerchiefs, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Page , privately in his shop .

GEORGE PAGE sworn. Q. You are shopman to Mr. Thomas Page . - A. Yes. The prisoner at the bar came to our shop on the 9th of October, about one o'clock in the afternoon, they asked me to shew them some silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Who asked. - A. I cannot say which, I believe both.

Q. They came together, and seemed acquainted. A. Quite so.

Q. Did you shew them any. - A. I shewed them several, and they purchased none.

Q. Do you remember the sort of handkerchiefs you shewed them. - A. I shewed them a great many sorts.

Q. How long did they stay. - A. Perhaps about five minutes.

Q. When they went out did you miss any thing. - A. No.

Q. When was your attention drawn to any thing. A. About four o'clock in the afternoon Charles Ross came in and said he had taken two people up, and upon them they found two silk handkerchiefs that they supposed to be stolen.

Q. Were there any marks upon them that you knew they had been stolen from you. - A. He described the colour of the handkerchiefs.

Q. From his description you recollected the handkerchiefs, and that you had shewn them to the prisoners. - A. The whole box of handkerchiefs were exhibited to them, but I had not shewn them to them.

Q. How came he to know they had been at your shop. - Q. He had been to several people to make the enquiry.

Q. Then in the course of the enquiry he came to your shop. - A. Yes. Presently after his master came in and produced the duplicates; I went to Mr. Dobree's, Charing Cross, to see the handkerchiefs.

Q. When you saw them did you recollect the handkerchiefs. - A. I recollect them very well, and had no doubt of their being Mr. Page's.

- LIMERICK sworn. Q. You are a constable. A. Yes, I belong to Bow street.

Q. Where did you first get possession of that handkerchief. - A. The two prisoners were brought to the office; not for this offence.

Q. They were brought to your office on suspicion of stealing a hat. - A. Yes.

Q. Then it was another charge. - A. Yes it was; upon searching of Daley I was going to put my hand into her pocket, she pulled out this handkerchief.

Q. Did you search the other woman. - A. No, I did not.

Q.(to George Page ) Look at that handkerchief, that was found on the person of Daley, are you sure that that was one of the handkerchiefs that you shewed them. - A. I am positive that I had such a handkerchief in the box.

Q. How many were there deficient. - A. They were all gone together, there were five in the piece.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. Q. You live with Mr. Dobree. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember these women coming with these handkerchiefs. - A. Perfectly so.

Q. When was it. - A. On the 9th of October, about two in the afternoon.

Q. What did they come to do. - A. They came to pledge a silk handkerchief, and likewise a ring.

Q. One silk handkerchief. - A. One.

Q. Who produced the one that was pledged. - A. I cannot possibly say, they were both together.

Q. Did both seem to take an interest in pledging, as if on one joint account. - A. Both perfectly.

Q. Both intermixed in the business, are you sure of their persons. - A. Perfectly sure.

Q. Did you stop them, or what did you do. - A. I took in the articles, not having suspicion of their being stolen; these are the articles which have been sworn to (producing them).

Q. There was a gold ring that was pledged at the same time. - A. There was.

Q.(to Page) Look at that silk handkerchief. - A. It is Mr. Page's.

FRANCIS GIBBONS sworn. I produce two silk handkerchiefs; they were pledged by the prisoners on the 9th of October.

Q. Look at the women, and see whether these are the persons. - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure of their persons. - A. Yes.

Q. What hour. - A. I cannot say what hour, somewhere about the middle of the day.

Q.(to Page) Look at them handkerchiefs. - A. I am quite sure they are my handkerchiefs.

Q.(to Gibbons) What name did Mary Daley pawn them in. - A. In the name of Ann Howell .

Q. Did they both seem to be engaged in it. - A. Yes, I cannot say who it was, they were both together.

Q.(to Page) At the time they were in the shop you did not miss any thing. - A. No, we missed them afterwards.

GEORGE RICHARDS sworn. I am a constable; I found that handkerchief (producing it) on Hannah Railton , I found it on her in Mr. Brothers's shop, I was called in there, he gave charge of her to me; that is where they were first apprehended, that makes five handkerchiefs.

Railton's Defence (read in court).

My lord, and gentlemen of the jury.

A recital of simple facts is the only defence in my power to make. On the morning mentioned in the indictment I met Mary Ann Woolley , having seen her at market before, being in the habit of resorting to Covent Garden to purchase fruit; she said she was going to purchase some articles of the prosecutor, and asked me if I would accompany her; I went with her only as an acquaintance, not having any knowledge of her having any intention to defraud; being perfectly assured of my innocence I stopped at the shop last, nor had I any thing of the kind, nor coveting any body's property without paying for it; nor in any part of this affair had I any knowledge, as I understood previous to pawning the handkerchief that she had purchased them of a duffer in the street; and this being my first time of being brought before any court, I hope you will take my unfortunate case into consideration.

Daley's Defence. I was going to market, I met this young woman, and on going to market I met a duffer in the street that had some handkerchiefs, I took a liking to them and I bought them; coming from market I came up Long Acre, this gentleman followed me and took me a prisoner.

Q. Who took you. - A. Thomas Brothers .

Q.(to Page) Look at these handkerchiefs, can you swear to these having been the property of your master. - A. I cannot positively swear, they are of course the same, there is one of them I had, it is the same which was marked in the window, which is the one I have with me now; we had one that the lamp overflowed in the window and spoiled a great many things; I recollect a lamp that overflowed and the oil fell on some silk handkerchiefs, that handkerchief was put up and was not shewn to any other person after the young man came in and let me know it. I recollect having the pattern of this piece when I shewed it to them.

RAILTON - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 17.

DALEY - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-22

580. WILLIAM KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of George Pritchard , privily from his person .

GEORGE PRITCHARD sworn. Q. What day was this on. - A. The 7th of October about the middle of the day I was walking along the Strand , I perceived somebody treading on my heels several times.

Q. What part of the Strand. - A. Near Southampton street, and on the opposite side of the way; after walking some time, and feeling myself incommoded by this man, I looked at him once or twice; afterwards the witness John Johnson told me that my pocket was picked.

Q. Had you said any thing before to the prisoner in the Strand. - A. Not a word; when the witness told me that my pocket was picked, I put my hand into my pocket and missed a handkerchief.

Q. How was your pocket. - A. Behind, similar to this, and part of my handkerchief was laying out, I had just put it in my pocket, I had been wiping my face, being very warm, just before I had seen him;

I turned round and saw the prisoner running away, I immediately followed him, and I saw him throw the handkerchief from him in the street, by a cart; I got up to him, I accused him of stealing my handkerchief, he denied it, I immediately took him to Bow-street, he was committed.

Q. What became of the handkerchief. - A. The handkerchief was picked up by a boy, who gave it me; I know nothing of the boy, I have not seen him since; I saw the boy pick it up.

Q. Are you sure that the handkerchief which you saw the boy pick up was the same handkerchief that you saw the prisoner throw on the ground. - A. To the best of my knowledge it was, I cannot swear to the handkerchief because there is no mark to it.

Q. Can you swear that the same handkerchief that you saw the prisoner throw on the ground was the same that you saw the boy pick up. - A. Yes, the same.

Q. Well, that is what I ask you; did you perceive the prisoner push against you at that side of your coat. - A. I felt him some few minutes before I missed my handkerchief treading on my heels, I thought it was by accident; the people passing and repassing, I thought he could not avoid it.

Q. What was done with the handkerchief. - A. The handkerchief was given to me, I kept it in my hand all the time.

Q. Have you got it here. - A. No.

Q. Have you got that handkerchief that was picked up. - A. It has been to be washed with others, I cannot pretend to say it is the same.

Q. How careless. - A. I did not know it was of any consequence.

Q. Was it a new handkerchief, or had it been wore. - A. I had it some time.

Q. You are not sure the one you produce is the same. - A. No, I am not sure, because none of them that I have are marked; I did not know it was of consequence so I did not retain the particular one.

Q. Were they all of the same age. - A. The handkerchiefs were all of the same age.

Q. How far had he ran before you over took him. - A. About fifteen or twenty paces.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You say this handkerchief was an old one, you had it a long time, it would not fetch much if it was sold. - A. It would but fetch a trifle if it was sold.

Q. You put the handkerchief into the side pocket of a new coat as they now make them, an handkerchief might easily fall out. - A. Certainly it might.

Q. You are not certain that you had put it intirely in. - A. No.

Q. Then it might have fell, and this man might have picked it up. - A. I cannot say that he did not, the boy was just before me, stooping for the handkerchief, as I sprang to lay hold of the man.

Q. However, it might have dropped down; if you had kept that handkerchief and looked at it now, you could not positively swear to the handkerchief - A. No, I could not, because I had no mark to it.

Q. And the handkerchief I see is a very common one. - A. It is a very common one.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. Q. On the 7th of October were you in the Strand. - A. I cannot ascertain the day of the month, it was the day of Lord Percy's election; I was coming up the Strand.

Q.(to prosecutor) This was the day of the election. - A. Yes, the people was standing at the duke of Northumberland's house as I came by.

Q.(to Johnson.) Whereabouts was you then. - A. I think I was nearly opposite Covent Garden, of the opposite side of the way, I saw this gentleman, Mr. Pritchard, walk very fast on the pavement.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at that time. - A. I saw a person following Mr. Pritchard very closely.

Q. Who was that person that was following Mr. Pritchard very closely. - A. He was a total stranger to me.

Q. Do you know him. - A. I cannot say it was the man at the bar.

Q. Was it the man that was afterwards taken to the public office. - A. Yes.

Q. What do you mean, you say you saw a person following him very closely, was that the same person that was afterwards laid hold off - A. I think it was.

Q. You yourself went to the public office, did you not go to give your evidence. - A. Yes, I gave my evidence there.

Q. What did you see this person do, whoever he was, that was taken to the public office. - A. This person, or Mr. Pritchard, run against me, and hit me on the shoulder, I saw Mr. Pritchard pass on with the handkerchief hanging out in this manner (a corner hanging out), it was visible to every body; I had not got above three or four yards when I saw Mr. Pritchard's pocket empty; I saw a man huddling a handkerchief up in this manner. (witness describing it.)

Q. Did you see any thing at the time it was taken from the pocket. - A. I only saw the handkerchief out of the pocket.

Q. You saw the man with the handkerchief in his hand, did you not see him draw it out of his pocket. - A. I cannot pretend to say directly that I saw him take it out of Mr. Pritchard's pocket, I saw it not a foot from his pocket.

Q. Then you did not see him take it from Mr. Pritchard's pocket. - A. I did not, I only saw it in his hand, and at that time there was no handkerchief hanging out of Mr. Pritchard's pocket, and directly after I saw the handkerchief in the man's hand, I informed Mr. Pritchard of it, I tapped him on the shoulder, sir, says I, you have had your pocket picked, the man after that turned back and ran off as fast as he could.

Q. How near was the man to Mr. Pritchard when you tapped him on the shoulder. - A. About a couple of yards, I passed the man to tell Mr. Pritchard, and in the mean time the man drew back, and endeavoured to make his escape; when I turned to see what became of the man, I pointed to Mr. Pritchard, and said there goes the man, Mr. Pritchard pursued him and laid hold of him; I did not see the handkerchief again till it was in Mr. Pritchard's hand; I accompanied Mr. Pritchard and the young man to Bow-street.

Q.(to prosecutor) Was the man that you stopped the same man that the witness had pointed out to

you as having your handkerchief. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that man the prisoner. - A. That was the man, I never lost sight of him from the time he pointed him out to me till the time I took him.

Q. Are you able to say who was the person that followed you so and trod on your heels. - A. I thought it was the same man, I cannot exactly say it was.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing more to say than I am a painter and glazier by trade; that on the day this affair took place I was so much intoxicated, in fact I cannot tell any thing what passed; I had been to work at six o'clock in the morning, I went home at eight o'clock in the morning to breakfast after getting some money of my master; I met a few friends, I got drinking till I got into the Strand, and whether I ran against this gentleman I do not know; as to the handkerchief being in my hand it was not.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of Ten-pence .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-23

581. CHARLES KELLY , alias JAMES BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of September , two hundred pounds weight of lead, value 42 s. the property of Charles Hamilton , esq. in his dwelling house .

The case stated by Mr. Reynolds.

CHARLES HAMILTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Your house is at Sudbury , in the county of Middlesex. - A. It is.

Q. Was your house repairing on the 23d of September. - Q. Yes; the roof part of it was taken off on the 21st of September, and part of the lead was put in the washhouse, I saw it on the night of the 22d, and early on the morning of the 23d I saw it again; I perceived a difference, I suspected that some part of it was gone. The prisoner was my gardener.

ROBERT WILKINS sworn. Q. You are foreman to Mr. Robinson, a furnishing ironmonger in Oxford street. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 23d did the prisoner at the bar come to your house. - A. He did, he came about seven o'clock, he said will you buy some small pieces of lead, I said let me see them; he with the assistance of a porter brought in an enormous piece of lead; the piece that came in first was from one hundred and fifty to two hundred pounds weight, it caused me to suspect that it was not honestly come by. I told him that I could not very well weigh it, he must leave it; he said that he particularly came to town to get money for some clothes that he owed for, he said if you cannot weigh it guess at it; this of course made my suspicion stronger.

Q. Did you see any cart there. - A. Yes. (The lead produced.)

Court. Did you advance him any money. - A. He pressed me very hard and I advanced him half a guinea; he came again the same morning. I had him apprehended.

JAMES CHAPMAN sworn. I live at Harrow. On the evening of the 22nd of September the prisoner applied to me for a cart, he said he wanted to fetch his wife into the country for a fortnight; he had the cart on that night.

JAMES PUTMAN sworn. Q. You are a plumber living at Harrow. - A.Yes, I am employed at Mr. Hamilton's house; the lead now in court I had ripped from a gutter, it is deficient at one of the corners; I am positive it is Mr. Hamilton's lead. I saw one other piece stand upright in the coal hole on the evening of the 22nd; that was also gone on the 23d.

Prisoner's Defence. This lead that I had in my possession was the property of my brother in law.

Q. Who is your brother in law. - A. He is a bricklayer, he lives in Bayswater, he went into Middlesex hospital; he sent to me if I would sell this lead for him it would be of service to him; I had taken some lead to Mr. Wilkins before he bought it of me this time. I borrowed Chapman's house and cart on Tuesday evening, I turned the horse into the field till the morning, and then I brought the remainder of the lead to Mr. Robinson's, I drove the horse up to the door, he gave me half a guinea, I returned in half an hour, he was not within; I came presently after again to his house, this was the third time, I called, I might have gone away if I would, I immediately went to Robinson's house after having a pint of beer; they had a constable then aud detained me.

Q.(to Putman) What day was it you saw the lead in Mr. Hamilton's coal house. - A. On the 22d.

Q. When did you go to Wilkins. - A. On the Saturday after I believe.

Q.(to Wilkins) Was the lead that you shewed to Mr. Putman the same as you received from the prisoner. - A. Yes.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-five shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-24

582. MARY ISABELLA KIRKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October a deal box, value 1 s. a bible, value 1 s. 3 d. three gowns, value 20 s. a shawl, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and a shift, value 1 s. and two petticoats, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Bryant .

SAMUEL BURLAND sworn. On Tuesday the 7th of October the prisoner at the bar brought a box to my house and offered it to sale.

Q. Had she any thing else. - A. She had a parcel of women's apparel in the apron; I asked her what she wanted to sell the box for, seeing that she had got apparel in her apron; she said that she wanted to buy a pair of shoes, I told her I would not buy the box till she fetched her mother; she went away, I then perceived the box had been broken open; I went after her and brought her back, and she put the things out of her apron into the box; I detained her and the box. I went down to Worship street, and there I asked the magistrate leave to publish some hand bills.

Q. In consequence of your publishing these hand bills somebody came forward. - A. Yes, I afterwards saw Margaret Bryant , who claimed the property. I produce the box and the things.

MARGARET BRYANT sworn. Q. Are those your

things. - A. They are, they were in my box; I trusted the prisoner to carry my box from the City Road to St. James's market.

Q. Did you know the prisoner. - A. No. I knew nothing of her, I met her in the street as I was carrying the box myself.

Q. You put this box into the woman's hand and trusted her to carry it, were you to accompany her. A. Yes, she took it as far as Newgate street, I went into a shop to buy a pair of pattens, and there I missed her and the box.

Q. You have looked at the things to see that they are all there. - A. Yes, they are all in the box.

JOHN RAY sworn. The prisoner was brought to the office on the 7th of October; I was informed that she had been to an old clothes shop in Long Alley, where I went and found some articles she sold there.

Prisoner's Defence. That gentlewoman asked me to carry the box for her as I was going up the road; I went by her once, she looked after me, as I came back, she said I'll be glad if you will carry this box to James's place, I will give you two shillings for it; I took it to Cheapside, I crossed over the road; going into St. Paul's church yard, I missed the gentlewoman, and on missing her I set the box down and rested myself; I took it to our house (she not coming) in Little Cheapside, my mother was angry when I brought it up, and my father told me to go to the public house and enquire whether any body owned it, I asked him if I might leave it, yes, he said, girl take it up stairs, I was very uneasy; I went to Mr. Burland, I said if you please sir, will you buy a box, I asked him half a crown for it, he asked me if they were my cloaths in it, I told him they were.

Q.(to prosecutrix) What was the day that you gave her these things. - A. The 4th of October.

Q. Did you bid her wait, or did you tell her you was going into the shop. - A. No, she saw me go in, I did not stay above five minutes, she was gone when I came out.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-25

583. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October a hamper, value 5 s. a pair of boots, value 1 l. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. two shirts, value 14 s. and two pair of stockings, value 4 s. the property of John Gilbert .

JOHN GILBERT sworn. I am a waggoner , I live at Leicester, I drive Mr. Pickford's Manchester waggon.

Q. Where did you lose these things. - A. In Aldersgate-street , last Monday night, a little before nine.

Q. Where was your waggon - A It was in Aldersgate-street, going out of London to Manchester, here is the man that saw it done; I was at the Bear the corner of Barbican, paying the fourpenny toll.

- COLES sworn. I am guard to the Manchester waggon, I was in Aldersgate street when I last saw these things.

Q. A little before nine in the evening. - A. Yes, I was of the side of the waggon, I saw a man behind the waggon, I went behind the waggon, and I saw the prisoner in the waggon; I asked the man that was following the waggon what he wanted, he said nothing, I told him I supposed he did, or else he would not be so close to the tail of the waggon; then he drawed away, I took my opportunity and got up the ladder, and caught this man in the waggon.

Q. You took the prisoner in the waggon. - A. Yes, I ta'en a man in the waggon.

Q. That is the man is it. - A. Yes.

Q. What had he done in the waggon. - A. He cut the hamper string that hung the hamper hooks to the waggon, I put my foot on the ladder as it hung up behind, and laid hold of his collar; then he got down out of the waggon, and the hamper fell out before him. The hamper was tied inside of the waggon.

Q. You took him in custody, you are sure he is the same man. - A. I am sure it is the same man, and that is the hamper that was inside the waggon.

- ROBINSON sworn. I am an officer of Aldersgate ward. On the 27th of this month, about a quarter before nine, the prisoner was committed to my charge, I took him to the Poultry counter; I produce the hamper.

Gilbert. I am the owner of the hamper.

Prisoner's Defence. I have but a few words to say; I left home about six o'clock, I went to the King's Arms public house, Aldersgate street, I stopped there till about half after eight o'clock; when I came to the corner of Barbican I crossed over the way, I saw a waggon, I asked a man that stood at the Red Lion inn gateway, he had a smock frock on, if I might get up and ride, he said I might; I had not been in the waggon two minutes before I was secured.

Q. How came this hamper to tumble out before you. - A. He said the hamper ropes were cut, I had not a knife about me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-26

584. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of October , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of George Whitely , privily from his person .

GEORGE WHITELY sworn. Q. What are you. A. I am a merchant . I was going down Cornhill the 15th instant between ten and eleven o'clock, I was about opposite of Bank buildings, I was called to by an officer, he had a man in custody, he told me he had stole my handkerchief; at the same time he was wresting the handkerchief out of his hand; he asked me if it was mine, I told him it was. I put my hand into my pocket, I found it was gone.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS sworn. Q. You are a city officer. - A. Yes. On the 14th of this month I was in Gracechurch-street; I am generally there every day; I was standing of the opposite side of the way, where the prisoner was and another man; I observed them for some time (half an hour before this happened); I watched them very narrowly, the prisoner and the man that was with him were very genteely dressed, and with boots on (not as he is now), and a clean white apron, rolled up; I should

have taken him to be a decent mechanic; I traced them from there to Cornhill, they went backwards and forwards into Cornhill, and then into Gracechurch-street; just as they came to a caricature shop opposite the Exchange, there was a number of people standing there, and a hackney coach, it was very inconvenient to pass, I thought then if he meant to do any thing he would do it at the time, as the prosecutor was going by the hind wheel of the coach, he kept from it as much as he could to keep it from dirting his clothes as I supposed; I see him lay hold of the handkerchief, of the side of it, the long end hung down and he throwed it up to catch the other end, that moment I put my hand upon him, I halloed lustily to the gentleman, he stopped; I was not able to manage his companion, for fear of letting go this. I produce the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief, it has my name on it in white silk letters.

Prisoner's Defence. The way that I come by the handkerchief was passing by, I picked it up, this gentleman came and catched hold of me, and said I picked the gentleman's pocket, I told him I did not, I picked it off the pavement.

GUILTY, aged 53.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-27

585. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , a pair of saddle bags, value 5 s. the property of Robert Gray .

ROBERT GRAY sworn. I keep the Bell Savage inn . On Tuesday the 7th of October, the saddle bags came up to my house by the Salisbury coach, the porter took them out with the cart, with other goods, to deliver them; they were directed to Mr. Woodward in Milk-street.

JOHN WADE sworn. I am porter to Mr. Gray; I took the cart out with goods to deliver, about the middle of the day, from the Bell Savage, I arrived in Milk-street, next to Lad-lane, about two, I drove up Milk-street about ten yards, I got out of the cart to deliver a parcel in Aldermanbury, when I came back from delivering the parcel, I came on the opposite side of Milk-street, I saw the man go up to the cart and put his arm into the front part of the cart (it was not open behind), and take out the saddle bags, he put them under the left side of his coat; he walked gently across the street to Clements court, I ran directly I saw him enter the court, he turned round and saw me, he then threw the saddle bags down; I asked a gentleman to take care of the saddle bags, and I pursued him out of that court, cross Goldsmith's-court into Gutter lane.

Q. You are sure it is the same man. - A. I knew him before he went to the cart, by sight, he has been a carman; I produce the saddle bags, they are the saddle bags that were given into my possession.

Prisoner's Defence. To what is alledged against me I am as innocent as a child unborn, I have got my living all my life by hard labour.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-28

586. MARGARET JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , a gold ring, value 3 s. and a frock, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Skevington .

JOHN SKEVINGTON sworn. I am a labourer at the West India docks, my wife gets her living in the street, by selling greens and fruit, she was obliged to have a girl to take care of her child, the prisoner lived servant with me about three weeks or a month, at a shilling a week and her victuals, drink, and lodging. On the 10th of September she went away from our house; in the evening I found the ring missing; I went in search of the girl.

Q. Was it a gold ring. - A. Yes, I found the girl in Winfield-street, I persuaded her to come along with me and return to her mistress, as we were coming along I met Thompson the officer, I gave him charge of her; she took us with her to Mr. Windsor, the pawnbroker, where we found the frock and the ring.

- sworn. I am servant to Mr. Windsor, a pawnbroker, in the Minories. I produce a ring pledged for three shillings, and a frock for one shilling and sixpence, on the 10th of September, by the prisoner, in the name of Mary Smith .

Prosecutor. My wife lost her wedding ring, I believe it is the same; the frock I can swear to be mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-29

587. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October forty-five yards of flannel, value 4 l. the property of Richard Bracken . Thomas Williams , and Launceolot Bracken .

RICHARD BRACKEN sworn. I am in partnership with Thomas Williams and Launceolot Bracken; I am a flannel and baize manufacturer and warehouse keeper , No. 2, Packer's court, Coleman-street .

Q. Do you know any thing more than this is your property. - A. I do not.

GEORGE WHARTON sworn. I am clerk to Messrs. Bracken and Williams. On the 1st of this month, coming into Packer's court in the evening between six and seven o'clock, I turned round to make water, I saw two men at the upper end of the court, apparently making exchange of something from one to the other; they immediately came forward, I saw that one of them had a piece of flannel under his arm, I immediately turned round and asked them what they were going to do with it; I was answered it was nothing to me; I attempted to catch the man that had the flannel, he immediately throwed the flanuel across my legs, before me, so that I could not go forward till I had picked it up.

Q. They attempted to make off. - A. Yes, as soon as I got the flannel up I called out Stop thief, almost immediately the man was brought back, and by the voice that I heard, it was the man that had

spoke to me, it was the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the man that had the flannel. - A. I am sure the prisoner is the man that answered me, by his voice.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing his person. - A. I had not.

Q. You are sure by his voice it is the same man that answered you, it is nothing to you when you asked them where they were going with it. - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot identify his person any otherwise. - A. No.

Q. How soon was he brought back to you. - A. One minute I presume, not more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

You say you had not an opportunity of knowing their persons. - A. I had not, it was too dark.

Q. Soon after the prisoner was brought back to you, will you undertake to swear that the prisoner was the person that passed you. - A. I will undertake to swear that it was him by the circumstance of his voice.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before, or hear him speak before. - A. No.

Q. You undertake to swear that the prisoner at the bar is the man, by these few words, having never heard his voice before. - A. Yes.

Mr. Curwood. Then I will say no more to you, I will leave it to the jury to judge.

WILLIAM WOODMAN , sworn. I am a serjeant in the first guards; on the 1st of October, I was in Coleman street, between the hours of six and seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner come out of the gateway belonging to Mr. Bracken, the prisoner struck his shoulder against the gateway, and that stopped him from running so fast, he trod on my foot, being in haste, a little while after that I heard a voice from the gateway, crying stop thief; I followed the prisoner and took him about forty yards distance by a gentleman's one horse gig; just as he turned the horse, he cried out stop thief himself.

JOHN COLLIS sworn. I am a constable. On the 1st of October I was in Coleman-street, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, I was walking up Coleman-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner at the bar called out stop him directly, opposite the gateway of Packer's court, there stood a horse and chaise, the prisoner run round the horse's head, and I seized him, he asked me the reason of stopping him, I said I believed he was the person that was wanted; Mr. Woodman came up and assisted me, he said the prisoner was the person he was in pursuit of.

Q. Could you see what court he came from. - A. No, he come round the horse's head running swiftly on.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a bookbinder , I am a travelling man in the country, and as I was walking along the street with one man and two women, that man came up to me and took me to the warehouse, the sergeant of the guards swears that I was the man that ran against him. I was not running.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-30

588. JAMES MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October , five shillings, a penny piece, and seventy halfpence , the property of James Hunt .

SARAH HUNT sworn. I live at No. 10 George's Row, City Road, St. Luke's , my husband's name is James, he is a baker .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He was a journeyman in our employ about two months.

Q. When was it you lost the money. - A. I cannot say when nor how I lost it; I missed money at different times from the till. On the tenth of October I went into the prisoner's room to get a coat that laid under his bed, in taking out which, I heard money between the mattrass and the sacking of his bed, I took it from there, it was tied in two handkerchiefs belonging the prisoner; there was five shillings in silver, and two shillings and eleven pence in copper. One halfpenny I have sworn to be taken out of my till. I lost it all in copper at diferent times, before I was out of bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned three shirts for seven shillings and sixpence; I had half a crown in halfpence, and five shillings in silver. I pawned a waistcoat for half a crown, eighteen pence in copper and a shilling in silver for it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-31

589. WILLIAMSON MILLER and THOMAS APPLEBEE , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , ten glass bottles filled with Champagne wine, value 50 s. seven glass bottles filled with Sherry wine, value 21 s. one glass bottle filled with Madeira wine, value 5 s. one glass bottle filled with Port wine value 4 s. the property of Benjamin Le Mesurier , Esq.

The case was stated by Mr. Arabin.

BENJAMIN LE MESURIER , Esq. sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. I live in Warnford Court, Throgmorton street.

Q. Had you occasion on the 15th instant to have a butt of sherry wine bottled. A. I had, the two prisoners at the bar were sent to my house for that purpose by Mr. Heathfield a wine merchant; they bottled the sherry wine in my cellar, and packed it in prickets.

Q. Was the wine so packed in prickets, and there was one pricket in which there was no wine. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you direct them to fill that pricket with any other wine. - A. Yes, with champagne.

Q. This was in your cellar in Warnford-court. - A. I told them to put in four dozen of that in that pricket.

Q. By which means, of course they had access to the champagne; did you see yourself the wine put in. - A. No, I cannot say that I saw them particularly put the champagne in with it; my direction was for them to go to my house at Hackney with it; I only ordered them to fill the pricket.

Q. Did you observe the other basket there besides the pricket. - A. I cannot say whether I did or not, I might have seen them put that basket in the cart with the rest of the prickets; I did not know whether

there was any thing in it.

Court. You did see the hamper put in. - A. I did, I had not ordered it to be put in.

Q. When the wine arrived at your house at Hackney there were these two men and the carter there - A. They were there about a quarter of an hour before I arrived there; I set them to work in the cellar; I opened the inner cellar for them to get some saw-dust.

Q. What wine did that inner cellar contain. - A. It contained some port, maderia, mountain, and other wines; I believe I shewed them the place where they were to put the wine, and then I went to dinner.

Q. Were both the cellars open when they were at work. - A. They were; when I came out from dinner I observed the cart at the door with two or three prickets in it, I put my hand into one of the prickets, to see whether they were full or empty, I felt a bottle, I put my hand in the straw and felt another bottle; I went into the parlour and told the gentleman in the parlour the circumstance, he came out with me, we found these two bottles were corked.

Q. Did you continue your examination any further. - A. I did not at that time, I went below in the cellar to see how they were coming on, I saw them at dinner with my servants; on my coming out again I saw the pricket overset and the straw loose about the cart, that made me think it was intentionally done to be carried away.

Q. I do not see how the oversetting the pricket would make you suspect. - A. I suspected the carman had seen me feel these prickets, and that he himself had been in the mean time and taken them out; I then called for a candle to see what was become of the wine.

Q. You perceived nothing more than two bottles, do you know what the quality of that wine was. - A. No, on a candle being brought me by my stable boy, who is by me, I observed a small basket underneath the cart; I said Charles take the candle and see what is underneath in that basket, upon that he brought out nine bottles, I saw that myself.

Q. He took nine bottles out of a basket flung underneath the cart. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what that wine was. - A. I supposed it was sherry, I cannot say, then I called the coachman up, in the mean time the carman was by, took it off the ground and carried it down the cellar.

Q. Were the other two put on the ground at the same time that you saw before. - A. I did not see them taken out of the pricket at all, they were taken out in the interval that I went down in the cellar.

Q. Have you ever ascertained what wine it was - A. Not till it was taken down into the cellar, I then asked the prisoners how they could do such an act as that, they laid the charge upon the carman; upon that the carman laughed and seemed very careless about what he had done; I then told the servant to go for a constable; in the mean time they told the carman he ought to be ashamed for laughing so, and to say he was sorry for it, and they dare say I would forgive him; the two prisoners, after I had sent for the constable for them, they went into the cellar and stowed the remainder of the wine, and when they had finished the nine bottles that they had brought down from the cart, which were put upon the rest of the wine to shew me that the quantity was right, I think it was forty eight dozen and ten bottles.

Q. Did these nine bottles prove to be sherry. - A. I thought they were, I did not look at them then. On the Saturday following Mr. Heathfield came to me, I went down the cellar to shew him the wine, the nine bottles were set apart, he then observed that two of the bottles were not his bottles, which he brought up stairs, and drawed the cork, one proved to be a bottle of madeira, and the other a bottle of port, which madeira must have been taken out of the cellar behind the door; there was madeira there, and there was port in the next bin; when they had done binning the whole of the wine I told my coachman I would have all them prickets brought out of the cart, upon which the prisoners said they had forgot one hamper, which hamper was taken out of the basket under the cart, and it proved to be this small hamper of champagne in it; there were four prickets of champagne in the cellar in town.

Mr. Arabin. What did this hamper contain. - A. ten or twelve bottles, I did not take them out, there is a person that can prove it; the small hamper of champagne was emptied in my cellar.

Q. Did it appear to be the same fort of wine that you had in the cellar. - A. To the best of my knowledge it was, they were champagne bottles.

Court. The question is, whether this was part of the champagne that was brought from the hoard, or whether it was taken out of the cellar, that you do not know, there were the same fort in both. - A. Yes, and the same fort of bottles.

Q. Did they claim it. - A. No, they said it was left behind in a mistake, they had forgot that small hamper; I told them only to fill the prickel, they had that hamper over and above what they brought in the prickel.

CHARLES STRANGE sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. You are a servant to Mr. Le Mesurier, do you recollect this cart coming to your master's, and the prisoners at the bar coming with it. - A. Yes, My master came out with a candle, he told me to look into the hay basket, I looked in and pulled out nine bottles, I put them on the ground.

Q. Do you know who took them in afterwards. - A. No, I went for a constable.

HENRY - sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. You are coachman, do you recollect this cart being there. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoners dine in the kitchen. - A. Yes, and the carman came to dinner in about ten minutes after.

Q. Do you recollect your master calling you to the cart. - A. Yes, I saw the lad take five bottles out of the basket, and afterwards four more; my master told me to take the empty prickets out of the cart.

Q. Did the men hear your master order you to search the cart. - A. They might have heard it, he spoke loud enough; as soon as I saw the men they said there was a small hamper in the cart, which they had forgot, I found the hamper and took it out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. The carman did not come for ten minutes after these men, might not he have taken them nine bottles in at that time. - A. I cannot say.

Q. He had an opportunity for taking away the nine bottles if he had been so inclined. - A. I should think so.

Q. With respect to this hamper of wine, you heard the men ask for this small hamper of wine and say they had forgot it, you cannot tell whether it was before or after your master ordered you to search the cart. - A. I cannot.

GEORGE KANE sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. I am a carman.

Q. Were you employed to carry any load from Mr. Le Mesurier's Warnford court, on the 15th of October. - A. Yes, I cannot say exactly the day of the month, it was a fortnight yesterday.

Q. There were thirteen prickets I believe, and a one dozen hamper, who put that hamper in. - A. One of Mr. Heathfield's men, one of the prisoners at the bar, I cannot say which.

Court. They put it in at Warnford court. - A. Yes; when we came to Hackney we unloaded the prickets, they told me that the one dozen pricket was to be left in the cart, but it was not, one of them took it down in the cellar; then they began to put the wine away, and after they put part of the wine away, I cannot say how much, they told me that the one dozen hamper was to come back, they told me to put it in the cart, I did, and I brought it up stairs by their order; some considerable time after that they said there was some bottles in one of the prickets, and they told me to take them out and put it in the hay basket.

Q. Did they tell you to put them in the hay basket. - A. I cannot say whether they did or did not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. You supposed you was acting very honestly all this time. - A. I did not know what they meant do with it.

Q. I dare say you thought that two men had better be hung than one man, than you; when did you first tell this story. - A. When I had my hearing.

Q. You were taken in custody, and then you told this story. - A. Yes.

Q. And not before. - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to say you were doing an honest thing. - A. I cannot say, I was only the carman, I spoke the truth and nothing but the truth.

Court. You must know they were full bottles. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you must know that you were carrying away a quantity of wine belonging to Mr. Le Mesurier. - A. I cannot say what they meant to do with them.

Q. You must know they were carrying away Mr. Le Mesurier's wine. - A. I have spoke the truth.

MR. HEATHFIELD sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. You are a wine merchant. - A. Yes.

Q. Of course a judge of wine. - A. Yes; when I was at Mr. Le Mesurier's, Mr. Le Mesurier pointed out nine bottles of wine in a bin, he said that sherry had been put into them; on examining them I found two bottles which I said had not been mine, we took them out of the cellar, drew the cork of one and tasted it, it was Madeira, we did not draw the cork of the other; I examined the bottle with the candle, it appeared to be red port; the other seven bottles were the bottles that I had sent to him to be applied to the sherry and the same fort of wine appeared to be in them.

Q. You went to see these men in prison. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hold out any threat, or promise them any favour to induce them to say to you what they did. - A. None, they asked me to be as lenient as possible with them; I told them they could not possibly have any favour from me. I then left them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. Did not they deny all knowledge of the transaction. - A. No, not to me.

Miller's Defence. What I am charged with, my lord and gentlemen of the jury, I am as innocent of as a child unborn; what wine the carman had in the cart it must have been concealed while we were at dinner

Applebee's Defence. Whatever they have laid to my charge, I am perfectly innocent of as any gentleman in the court.

Miller called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Applebee called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOTH- NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-32

590. WILLIAM MAIDMENT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , two glass bottles, value 3 d. a pint of rum, value 2 s. and a pint of gin, value 1 s. the property of James Smart .

JAMES SMART sworn. I keep the sign of the Lamb in Bethnal Green ; the prisoner lived servant in my house. On Wednesday the 15th of August I observed a bottle of gin up the chimney in the back washhouse; the same evening I found a bottle of rum in a cupboard in the beer cellar; on Saturday I found another bottle of rum in that cupboard. I missed the first bottle of rum on Wednesday night; when I went to bed it was gone.

Q. What had become of the gin that you found up the chimney. - A. I missed that on Thursday morning. In consequence of some advice, a friend of mine marked fourteen empty bottles with a file at the bottom of them; we put them in the cupboard where the rum had been; this was on Saturday. On Sunday morning I got a friend to place himself in the coal cellar a little after six o'clock.

Q. How is that coal cellar situated. - A. It is opposite the spirit cellar; the spirit cellar is on the side of it, there is a kind of a lattice work or railing; I observed on the Sunday morning a nail drawn from one of the rails, and there were only twelve bottles remaining in the cupboard, and I saw the officer take two marked bottles out of the kitchen; they were behind some washing tubs.

Q. What did these two bottles contain. - A. One rum and the other gin, they were full.

Q. Had you rum and gin in that cellar that you are speaking of - A. Yes, in casks.

MARY MAWLEY sworn. I am servant to Mr. Smart.

Q. What have you to say respecting this gin or rum. - A. I have seen the prisoner go in the spirit

cellar several times, I have seen him take bottles and fill them.

Q. How did he used to get in. - A. Over the door, there is a small place open at the top.

Q. You have seen the prisoner go through a hole over the door. - A. Yes, four or five times, and I have seen him bring out liquor.

Q. Then you always told your master of it. - A. No, I did not, I only told him of it at last.

Q. What did he used to bring out. - A. Sometimes one sort, and sometimes another, which he thought proper.

Q. On the Sunday morning did you see him do any thing. - A. No, on Tuesday I saw him go through the hole.

DAVID HOLLINGSWORTH sworn. Q. You are an acquaintance of Mr. Smart's. - A. Yes, he applied to me on the Saturday night respecting some liquor. In consequence of what he and I agreed on, on Sunday morning about five minutes before six in the evening I concealed myself in his coal cellar, in a way so as not to be seen by any person coming down the stairs; about a quarter after six the prisoner at the bar came down the cellar stairs, he had a lighted candle in his hand, he placed it upon one of the ale barrels next to the liquor cellar; he got two quart bottles and a pint pot, he placed them on the barrel where the candle stood, he then got over the liquor cellar door, he stepped one foot on the ale barrel, and them climbed over; I saw him go over the door, the door is about four foot high; he then took the two bottles and the candle through the lattice.

Q. Was the lattice open. - A. It was open enough for him to take an empty bottle through, he was then within the cellar, I saw him fill the bottles with liquor; where I was placed I could see all over the liquor cellar by the light, I saw him fill the two bottles, he filled them out of different casks, he took the pot and drew near a pint of gin from the barrel into the pot; having so done, he knocked down one of the bars of the lattice work, and put the two bottles out upon the ale barrel, he then put out the pint of liquor and the candle; he then got over the door the way that he got in. Having done that he took the bottles away, and afterwards took the pint of liquor and the candle, and went up stairs: Where he took the liquor to I cannot say.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. I am an officer. On Sunday morning the 19th of this month I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Smart's, and in the wash-house behind a washing tub I found these two bottles, one containing rum and the other gin. I produce them.

JOHN ANDERSON sworn. Q. Did you assist in marking the bottles on Saturday. - A. I did, I marked fourteen between twelve and one o'clock, I marked them with a three square file at the bottom.

(The bottles identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-33

591. ARTHUR LANGFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a pound weight of silk, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of James Deboos .

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

JAMES DEBOOS sworn. Examined by Mr. Curwood. I am a silk dyer , I live in Spitalfields. On the 19th of September I directed my foreman to put up a load of silk into different parcels, and to be particular in the silk which he put at the bottom, which was to be loose. I directed him to give it to Arthur Langford .

THOMAS EVANS sworn. Examined by Mr. Curwood. I am foreman to Mr. Deboos.

Q. Did you receive the directions from your master. - A. I did, I weighed out a parcel of Piedmont silk, ten pounds; I am quite certain as to the weight, I put some silk at the bottom of the bag, as I usually do; I called he prisoner to take the bag to the markers, which he did, he took it from me.

Q. Did you see the parcel of silk brought back by Mr. Deboos. - A. I did, in the space of twenty minutes; I weighed it and there was a pound deficient, of Piedmont silk.

Q. Who was present when you weighed it. - A. Mr. Deboos's brother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. How long is it since you have been so accurate, and so very attentive to your business. - A. I have always been attentive since I have been in my master's employ, that is my business.

Q. Are you always so attentive. - A. I generally am.

Q. Then sometimes you are not. - A. I am always as particular as I can be, I was told to be more particular with that parcel than any other.

Q. You have made a mistake before, did it not occur to you that the men accused you of making a mistake. - A. I have made a mistake at times.

Q. And when the men said they were wrongfully accused you found that you was wrong, you found that you was mistaken; was not there a case of three pound of silk that you miscalculated. - A. There was once, that was three or four months ago.

Mr. Curwood. Supposing you had made such a mistake before, was the silk found in the men's lodgings. - A. No; I am certain I was accurate with this.

CATHERINE BATES sworn. Examined by Mr. Curwood. I am a silk marker.

Q. On the 19th of September, do you remember the prisoner bringing any Piedmont silk. - A. Yes, he delivered it to me in my room, I had no other person in the room but myself; it was never out of my sight till Mr. Deboos came.

Q.(to prosecutor) We understand that after your goods went to be delivered to the markers you followed it. - A. I did, I brought it back; I left the room and sent Evans in to reweigh it in the presence of my brother.

Mr. Arabin. When you searched this man's premises how did he behave. - A.Exceedingly well.

Q. You had no officer to take him. - A. None, he went with me himself.

Q. And the silk you found at his house he produced himself. - A. He produced some silk in the box himself.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. Examined by Mr.

Curwood. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, where I found Mr. Evans; in a back room, on a bed, I found this largest parcel of silk in a handkerchief; under the bedstead, on the floor, I found this small parcel; I found the prisoner at the public house, next door to the office with Mr. Deboos; I took the silk to the public house, and there I saw Mr. Deboos and the prisoner, and I believe the brother of Mr. Deboos; I then produced these two parcels of silk, addressing myself to the prisoner this way, I have found this at your apartment, how did you come by it; I think his words were, Is a man to convict himself, I said I did not ask you that, how did you come by it; he then said he found it in Paul-street the day before, but it was not his master's.

Q. What day was this on. - A. On Friday the 19th of September. I produce the silk.

Q.(to Mr. Deboos) Look at that silk, which is Piedmont silk. - A. These are.

Q. Can you identify that silk to be yours. - A. I cannot, it is of the same sort.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning that this mistake occurred between Thomas Evans and me, he came back to me in a separate apartment, he told me he had some silk to go to Mrs. Bates's, the marker's, I asked him if he could send any body else, I came to him in the room where the bag was, I took it as the bag was, it was full of silk, I went to Mrs. Bates's, where I threw the bag off my shoulder and emptied the bag, I turned the bag inside out, I came off and left the bag in the presence of Thomas Evans; at breakfast time I went home, and I saw my master and Thomas Evans , and his brother, my master asked me if I had any property of his; I said that I had some silk that I had picked up the night before, and thinking it would be advertised, I went readily to the office.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-34

592. ELIZA GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of October , two aprons, value 2 s. and a tablecloth, value 1 s. the property of William Tucker .

MARY TUCKER sworn. I produce two aprons and a table cloth, they belong to William Tucker , my husband.

Q. When did you lose them. - A. On the 4th of October, the prisoner walked in my shop, about half after eleven o'clock (I keep a clothes shop), I did not see her come in, but I saw her go out, she dropped the aprons in the shop and trod upon them, I saw it and I took the rest from her myself, I pursued her and took her about two hundred yards off; I produce the table cloth and the aprons, it is marked I. G. that is my first husband's name, I Gibbs; the apron is my own wear; I can be upon oath they are all mine.

CHARLES TREADWAY sworn. I am an officer. On the 1st of October I took the prisoner, when she was running away from the prosecutrix, and within two minutes the prosecutrix came up with the property in her hand; then I took her to Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a gown, I took it off my back on Sunday to sell it, I went into two or three shops to offer it to sale, they said it was not worth a sale; I went into this shop, I throwed my gown in it, I saw no one in the shop, I took it up and went away, but I did not know that I had taken any thing out with it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-35

593. SARAH HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of September , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s, 6 d. the property of Francis Day .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-36

594. SARAH HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of September a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of Richard Barlow .

George Wright , the constable, who took the pot from the prisoner, not appearing to produce the property and to give his evidence, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-37

595. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of September , three ducks, value 4 s. and a drake value 1 s. the property of William Matthews .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS sworn. I live at Islington , I am a gardner . On the 29th of September, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner stand by the door of the privy, which is within twelve yards of my house; I saw another man crossing the yard, coming towards me, with the ducks in a bag, I opened the chamber window (which rather alarmed them) and called my brother, I told him to get up and run down stairs to stop them; when I called my brother out of bed I told him I saw some people in the garden, they began to run, I saw another man come out of the privy.

Q. What house does your brother sleep in. - A. We both sleep in one bed; my brother ran down stairs and then he and I pursued them.

Q. Which did you take. - A. I took this man at the bar.

Q. Are you sure that he is one of the men that you saw at the privy. - A. Yes.

Q. How far was he from the privy when you took him. - A. About two or three hundred yards.

Q. Was he running. - A. He was running when we pursued him, but when we got up to him he got up to a corner as if to hide himself.

Q. Did you see the other men run. - A. Yes, they were running on when he stood at the corner; I took the prisoner up into Lower-street, Islington, and there I saw Austin, the watchman; I being in my shirt, I insisted on him taking this man to the watchhouse, he and my brother took him to the

watchhouse, in the mean time he was taken to the watchhouse, I went home and I saw I had missed three ducks and a drake.

Q. They had no bag with them when they went off. - A. No, they stuck the bag in the privy, when they run off; in the mean time I was going up to the watchhouse to tell him what I had lost; the watchman came down to see what I had lost, and my brother found I had lost three ducks and a drake, they were stuck in the privy.

JOHN MATTHEWS sworn. Q. You are a gardener too. - A. Yes.

Q. You pursued the prisoner, did your brother. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the privy. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of the man. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him come out of the privy. - A. Yes.

Q. Was Austin with you when you looked down the privy. - A. Yes, I looked down the privy, and saw three ducks in a bag down the privy, and the drake was down in the privy, but not in the bag.

Q. Were they your brother's ducks. - A. Yes, I had seen them in coop, that night, I brought them up, and I know them by their feathers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. What time was this. - A. One o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was it very dark. - A. It was a very clear morning.

Court. Did you say it was one o'clock. - A. No, five, I made a mistake.

Mr. Arabin. Your brother called you up, you were half a sleep and saw double. - A. No I was not.

WILLIAM AUSTIN sworn. I am a watchman, I produce the ducks, I searched down the privy, and these are the ducks that I brought out; they have never been out of my possession.

(The ducks identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 29th of September, which was quarter day, returning down that place, I went to the privy, but I never went into the privy; I never was in the place at all, I only stopped to make water, this man came and laid hold of me, and said you know where my ducks are, I said no, I do not; at the watchhouse, the constable wanted to discharge me, but he said he would not. In about half an hour afterwards he went and found where they were. I knew nothing about them.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character,

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-38

596. DANIEL AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of October , two quartern loaves of bread, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Cox , and John Dixon .

DANIEL MASON sworn. I am a journeyman baker, I live with Thomas Cox and John Dixon ; I lost these loaves on the 22d of this month at the corner of Type street , Ropemaker's street. I pitched my basket, I was going to serve a customer close by; I never went into the house; as I stood at the door, I saw this man look into the basket, I saw him put his hand into my basket and take out two quartern loaves; he put them under his arm, and was running down Ropemaker's-street with them; I pursued and overtook him, I told him it was my bread, I seized him and took the loaves away from him at the end of Finsbury street, he struggled and got away, I gave the loaves to Hurst, and followed him again, and took him in Beech street; I never lost sight of him, I delivered him at the guard-room, Bunhill-row.

- HURST sworn. Q. This man struggled and ran off, did he. - A. Yes, and I took the bread from the other witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out all the morning seeking after a day's work, I could get nothing to do, and coming up Type-street, I saw the man's bread in the basket, I was going to take a corner off, as I was going to get a glass of gin; the man came up, he said you are going to take my loaves away, I said I was not, he took hold of me by the collar and he struck me on the eye, and then let me go; I walked along till I came to Barbican, and there he took me again, and then he took me to the guardroom and delivered me to the officer.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-39

597. MARY GODFRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of September , a gold seal value 40 s. and part of a gold watch chain, value 40 s. the property of John Ree the younger.

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-40

598. JOSEPH MAXWELL was indicted for stealing on the 11th of September , a copper, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Willett , and William Willett .

Second count for like offence, only laying it to be the property of William Flooster , otherwise William Fluster .

The case was stated by Mr. Arabin.

- DORRINGTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Do you recollect at any time on the 11th of September last, being in Cumberland-street. - A. Yes, at about a quarter to nine in the evening, a man passed me with a copper; I took little notice of his passing me the first time, but he passed me the second time; he was going to go over some fields, but there was some paling prevented him, he turned back and went across Berkley-street. Upon seeing him with this large copper, I suspected it was stolen, and I told the watchman and he pursued him; I was walking slowly along towards the way the watchman went, I heard then a very great sound, as though it was a copper falling upon the pavement in the direction the prisoner had walked in. I rather then

hastened towards the spot, and in less than half a minute after the noise of the copper, a man came running along as hard as he could.

Q. Who did that. - A. The prisoner at the bar, with his hat in his hand; I made a catch at him, and he said which way is he gone? what is the matter, or what is it; says I, my friend you know what is the matter; he seemed very much fatigued, I had hold of him by the coat, he just got himself losened from me, but two people coming along, one of them catched him in his arms, or else he would have made his escape; he said I was mistaken in the man, he was going to his father's, instead of that, he was going contrary way to his fathers, he went the Edgeware Road way.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. I know no further of him than what the neighbours told me where his father lived, and he said he was going to his father's, but according to the account I had, he was going the contrary way, he was stopped and taken to the watchouse; I went with him, I saw the copper at the watch house.

Q. Have you any doubt of the man that you stopped, being the man that passed you with the copper, I ask you as to your belief. - A. I saw but the front part of him as he went past; I did not see the face of the man that passed me with the copper.

Court. Neither the first nor the second time. - A. No.

Q. You cannot form any judgment whether it was the person or not. - A. I only go from seeing what fatigue he was in; he had his head in the copper when he was carrying it, it covered all his face.

RICHARD BARR sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. On the night this happened I was in Berkley street towards Cumberland Place, I heard a tremendous crash, I thought that something had fell down, I hastened toward the spot where it had fell, the watchman sprang his rattle as I came to the corner of Cumberland Place; I heard the cry of Stop thief, I saw this man running, the prisoner at the bar was running towards me, I secured him and took him to the watchhouse; when I stopped him he said it is not me, do not stop me; he seemed to be rather warmish, and he was running very fast.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. Q. Were you on duty on this night, on the 11th of September last. - A. I was. After Mr. Dorrington spoke to me I went as soon as I could up to the prisoner in Cumberland Place, I said to him my friend what have you got, he made me no answer as I could understand; he had this large copper on his head, he hastened the copper off his head as soon as possible, and threw it on the ground; he turned round and ran towards Berkley street.

Q. Was that towards Mr. Dorrington. - A. Yes.

Q. When he threw it off his head and ran, did you see his person. - A. I saw his person plainly by two lamps that stood at a gentleman's door; I made towards him, he got away about ten yards from me, he was not out of my sight from the time he threw the copper down till he was taken.

Q. Did you see him taken. - Yes, I saw him at the time he was taken at the corner of the place going into Berkley street, they brought him by me to take him to the watchhouse.

Q. You remained with the copper till somebody came to help you to take the copper. - A. Yes, I went to the watchhouse as soon as I could, and the copper was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Was that copper afterwards shewn in your presence to Mr. Willet and Leach. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. Mr. Williams you have lately recollected this story, do you recollect going to Marlborough street. A. Yes.

Q. Did not you refuse to identify his person there. A. No, after I saw his face again at the watch-house, I knew him again; I swore to him the first time at Marlborough street.

Court. When you first saw this man with the copper, was there any man in company with him. A. There was one walking on his left hand side; as soon as I come nigh that man ran away, which gave me a great suspicion that it was a stolen thing.

Q.(to Dorrington) Did you observe any body with the man that had the copper. - A, I did not, I was busy talking to a friend of mine.

JOHN LEACH sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Are you apprentice to Mr. Thomas and William Willett . - A. Yes, they are tallow chandlers and oilmen in Oxford road; their warehouse is in North row.

Q. Do you recollect on the 11th of September fastening their warehouse up. - A. Yes, I fastened it up on that day between one and two in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see a copper in the warehouse. - A. Yes, that I am sure of, it was not fixed; about nine o'clock in the evening I went to the warehouse with a lanthorn. I found it had been broken open; the lock was lost.

Q. Did you see the copper there. - A. No, I did not; I next saw the copper in Marlborough street in the office.

Q. Was that the same copper that you had seen in the warehouse on the 11th. - A. Yes, I know it by the burnt marks.

THOMAS WILLETT sworn. Q. You recollect the copper being in your warehouse. - A. Yes, some few days before the 7th, 8th, or 9th, or possibly all these days, I had seen it in the warehouse; I know the copper perfectly well, I saw it again at Marlborough street office.

Q. Do you know it to be the copper that was taken from your warehouse. - A. Yes, it had three burnt marks; the copper is in the yard, I am certain it is the same copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my father, he lives in Berkley street; as I got to Cumberland Place the watchman sprang his rattle, I ran to see what was the matter, I passed the watchman while he was springing the rattle, and several people more, there were three or four more people running, and I ran with them, and just as I came to the corner of Berkley street bar, then Dorrington came up and laid hold of me and knocked my hat off and cut my eye; they laid hold of me and took me to the watchhouse, I told them I was going to my father, that he lived within twenty yards where he stopped me; about a quarter of an hour after I had been in the watchhouse the watchman came in with the copper

and some more with him, he enquired of the watchhouse keeper which was the prisoner; I was sitting along with four or five more people round me; he says which is the man that you stopped, one pointed me out and says, that is him; he said that is him and I will swear to him.

Williams. When I came in the watchhouse the prisoner was surrounded, I suppose, by near a score people, he was sitting down on a bench; not seeing the prisoner, so many people being around him, I immediately enquired where the prisoner was, I went up to him, I says that is the very man, I knew him immediately when I saw him; I will swear that he is the same man.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-41

589. ANN CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October , in the dwelling house of Thomas Harrison , a pocket book, value 6 d. and twenty-two bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Thomas Bordman .

THOMAS BORDMAN sworn. Q. You are a trader at Manchester. - A. Yes.

Q. You came to town and lodged at Mr. Harrison's. - A. Yes, I came last Monday morning by the mail coach.

Q. What house does Mr. Harrison keep. - A. The Tavistock hotel, under the Piazza, Covent Garden .

Q. The prisoner was chambermaid of the house. A. I believe so, I did not see her till she was apprehended.

Q. You came to town on the Monday, when did you miss your pocket book. - A. On the Tuesday morning before I had left my bed room.

Q. Where had you left your pocket book. - A. In my portmanteau; on the evening before I had no occasion to make use of that portmanteau after four o'clock that I dressed myself.

Q. Was it locked or fastened any way. - A. It was a leather portmanteau with a common lock to it.

Q. What was in your pocket book. - A. There was the value of twenty-two pounds in it, they were almost all of them one pound notes, but I believe there were one or two of them two pound notes.

Q. You had not seen the prisoner yourself before you missed these things. - A. I had not seen her to notice her, I might have seen her in the course of the morning; when I missed the notes I enquired for Mr. Harrison, he was not in the house at the time; in a quarter of an hour afterwards he came in; I communicated the circumstance to him.

THOMAS HARRISON sworn. Q. You keep this Tavistock hotel. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was your chambermaid was she. A. Yes.

Q.(to prosecutor) Did you lock up your chamber. A. I did not.

Q. You went out I suppose. - A. I did, I returned and retired to rest about eleven o'clock I think.

Q.(to Mr. Harrison) During the time that Mr. Bordman was absent the prisoner had access to his room. - A. She had, she had the care of his room.

Q. She was in your service at the time he came there. - A. Yes.

Q. What became of her the next morning. - A. She absconded the next morning before we got up, I got up at eight o'clock, she was gone then.

Q. How long did she live with you. - A. About three weeks; I applied to Bow street for an officer to go after her.

Q. Did you know where to send after her. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you send to. - A. To Hare street, Spital Fields, I accompanied the officer there.

Q. Did you find her there. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with the officer when she was apprehended. - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the officer. - A. Atkins.

Q. Was anything particular said by you or Atkins to encourage her to tell what became of the money or whether she had taken it. - A. Nothing more than I said I was very glad to find her where I did; I left her with the officer till I fetched a coach; she wanted to know what we wanted to do with her; she said that she had robbed nobody, we might hang her if we pleased, that was in the room she said that.

Q. Did you charge her with any robbery. - A. Yes, she was examined by the officer, he searched her pocket, I told her that she had robbed a gentleman; then she said that she had robbed nobody, we might hang her if we pleased, that was in the presence of the officer when we were searching her in the room.

Q. Did she say any more. - A. Not in my presence, I went out for the coach, she was searched while I was there; there were nine one pound bank notes; there were three pounds in change, half guineas, seven shilling pieces and silver. There were various other articles in a bundle that she had with her, and there was a little pocket book.

Q. That was not Mr. Bordman's. - A. No.

Q. Did you find any red pocket book about her. A. No, not on her person; there were various other articles found about her, and two duplicates.

- ATKINS sworn. You went with Mr. Harrison to take up the prisoner in Hare-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take her in custody. - A. Yes. When I went to the top of the stairs and asked the woman that I saw in the room for the prisoner, she pretended not to know any such person; I saw the prisoner sitting near the door, and when I mentioned the name of Mrs. Clements, I saw her moving herself as if to hide herself behind the door. Mr. Harrison went into the room first, and said here she is; I went in and laid hold of her arm; I said I am an officer, I shall take you in custody on suspicion of robbing a gentleman at your master's house, and I told her I should search her, which I did, and in her right-hand pocket, I found in a black pocket book, nine one pound notes; and in her left hand pocket I found three half guineas, two seven shillings pieces, and fourteen shillings and sixpence. I found in her pocket, a silver thimble, and a new gold ring, and in her bundle, I found a new cloak, new stockings, and some new ribbons. I asked her how she came by that money, she said her husband had

sent it her.

Q.(to Mr. Harrison) When she hired herself to you did she say that she was married or single. - A. She was married, but he died before she came, after she was hired; her daughter lives at our place now, she is bar maid.

Atkins. I told her I did not believe it, I believed that she had taken the gentleman's pocket book and money, she burst out crying, and said, hang me if you please, I have robbed nobody, I have picked it up in the gentleman's room, all except two pound, which my husband sent me; she cried very much and said she would not go when Mr. Harrison was gone after the coach, he arrived and we went in the coach; when were we in the coach I asked her what she had done with the pocket book, she said, in the coach, in the presence of Mr. Harrison, that she found it on the top of the stairs.

Q. The pocket book. - A. No, the notes; she said she found all the notes, except two pounds, at the top of the stairs, she repeated it several times going to the office; when I went to Mr. Harrison's Mr. Harrison had got the pocket book, which was found on the leads under the window where this woman slept, there is a person here to speak to that. I produce the pocket book, I had it of Mrs. Harrison, she is not here; the boy is here who took it off the leads.

WILLIAM CLENT sworn. Q. Where did you find that pocket book. - A. I found the pocket book on the leads.

Q. Of whose house. - A. Our house.

Atkins. He lives at another house, the back of his master's house comes to the back of Mr. Harrison's hotel.

Q.(to Clent) You found it. - A. Yes, on the leads adjoining our yard.

Q. What did you do with it. - A. I gave it to my master, my master gave it to the girl, and the girl took it up to Mrs. Harrison.

Q.(to Mr. Harrison) You heard the boy describe where he found it. - A. Yes.

Q. Is it near any particular bed room of your's. - A. It is near a square yard, twelve feet by six, it joins our leads, it is surrounded by bed rooms, and our servant slept in one of these bed rooms, the window goes into the back yard.

Q. Shew Mr. Bordman the pocket book. (The pocket book handed to the prosecutor.)

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that your pocket book. - A. It is.

Q. Did you observe your portmanteau after you lost your pocket book, whether it was locked or not. - A. I believe it was locked, I did not discover the pocket book was gone till I had opened it. I am sure it is my pocket book.

Prisoner's Defence. Me and my mistress had a few words of the overnight, and mistress gave me warning, I told her I should go in the morning; with that in the morning I came away; as my daughter and I had some words I came away in a pet.

Q. The mistress you speak of is your daughter. - A. No, she lives servant in the house; these notes I found, I picked them up on the stairs on the overnight, I did not know what they were till the next day, I was going to my sister, because I could neither read nor write.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-42

600. THOMAS MOSSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , forty pounds of beef, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Smith and James Taylor .

Mr. Reynolds, counsel for the prosecution, under the direction of the court, declined offering any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-43

601. WILLIAM DIXON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Thorn , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 17th of October , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, three shifts, value 12 s. one shirt, value 5 s. one habit shirt, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 8 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a night cap, value 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. six odd stockings, value 2 s. a child's petticoat, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two yards of linen, value 2 s. the property of John Thorn .

JOHN THORN sworn. I live in the Bayswater Road , I am a bricklayer .

Q. Are you a housekeeper. - A. Yes, my house is in Paddington parish; all that I know is on the 17th of October I fastened the house, and went to bed about eleven o'clock.

MARY THORN sworn. Q. Do you know any thing about the house being broken open. - A. About half past three in the morning I heard a noise, I supposed it was the cats in the room, we have two large cats and they were put in the room adjoining on the over night; I had been awake about half an hour when I heard the noise, I did not take any notice, I told my husband I thought it was behind time for us to get up, I thought it was half past six, that is the reason that I knew the hour of the night, we looked at the watch, I found it was only half past three; I heard nothing more of it till about half past six in the morning, my husband came in, and told me that we had been robbed of the linen that I had washed of the overnight.

Q. Where had you left that linen. - A. In the adjoining room where I heard the noise, where the cats were.

Q. What are the things that you lost. - A. Three shifts and a shirt, there were more lost, some were not found.

Q. Who is the person that first found the house broken open. - A. James Lawrence .

JAMES LAWRENCE sworn. I am a carpenter; in the morning as I came to work at six o'clock, passing by the window of Mr. Thorn, I perceived the shutter and the sash open, I knocked at the door, and the servant girl opened the door to let me have the tools, I told her that the window was open.

Q. Did not you go down and see how they came in. - A. I went in for my tools, they lay in the same room which had been broken open; I work on the premises.

Q.(to prosecutor.) How was the window opened. - A. It was opened by the man that took the things, I suppose.

Q.(to Mrs. Thorn.) Stand up, Mrs. Thorn, you have got more sense than your husband, how was this window opened. - A. I suppose it was opened at the time I heard the noise, and I suppose they had raised the bolt of the shutter and shook the window, and I supposed that was the noise that I heard in the night, it is a ground floor window.

Prosecutor. He must have got over some palings to get at the window, it is a trafalgar building, they are all enclosed, and there is no garden at all to it. When he got over the railing he could then very easily get into the house, by opening the shutter.

- CHAPMAN sworn. I am a farmer. On Sunday the 19th of October, I was walking about my ground, in the middle of my ground I have a wood.

Q. Where is your ground. - A. In the parish of Greenford.

Q. How far is that from this place. - A. Near nine miles. Going through the wood I turned my head round, and saw something white; I immediately made up to it, and when I got within twenty yards of it I saw the prisoner sitting and apparently picking marks out of a sheet; he appeared to be in that position. I went up to him and saw there was a large quantity around him, and he was in the middle of it, I said to him my friend, what do you do here, he said I am drying some clothes, I then laid hold of a part of it and it was wet; I said to him you scoundrel you have stole it; his answer was that he had found it; I then took him by the collar and secured his hands behind him; I told him I thought that if he had found it he had no occasion to come to so secret a place as that to dry it; I took him to a neighbourr's house, a constable, but he was not at home; I then took him to a Mr. Horner's, and he committed him to the cage, being Sunday, he was a new magistrate and almost the first time of acting; I then brought him to Bow-street and took care of the linen; it is here.

JOSEPH BAKER sworn. I am an officer of Bow street, I produce the property; these things were given into my custody, I traced the person who was the owner of them, and by the order of the magistrate, I was three days tracing them.

Q. Now Mrs. Thorn, look at these things. - A. The shirt is marked I. T. they are all my property.

Q. Are they all you lost, or only part. - A. Part.

Q. Did you lose a great deal more. - A. No, not a great deal, some he left in the basket in the yard close by the place, I have them again, he did not take them all, there is one mark in the sheet almost picked out.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I found the things on Sunday morning about a mile from the wood.

Q. Then you will call somebody who was present when you found them, we cannot take your word. - A. There was no soul saw me, I did not see any body about.

Q.(to Mr. Chapman) What time was it when you saw him on Sunday the 19th. - A. About eleven o'clock in the forenoon. When he was examined before the justice we found a night cap and two stockings belonging to these persons in his pocket.

Q.(to prosecutor) What time was your house broken open. - A.On Saturday morning.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing, but not of burglariously entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-44

602. MARGARET WARING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , twelve sheets, value 4 l. the property of John Davidson .

JANE DAVIDSON sworn. I live in Short's buildings, Clerkenwell , my husband's name is John, he is a cheesemonger , the prisoner lodged in our two pair of stairs front room; on the 24th of September I went to the adjoining room of the prisoner's, the two pair of stairs back room. On opening the box which contained my linen, I found six pair of sheets lost. I ordered my box to be brought down into my own room, and in the hearing of the prisoner, I said that somebody was dishonest in my house. I went to where the prisoner had lodged before, I then suspected her, and I got an officer to search her apartment and found in the apartment one sheet that I suspected to be mine, it was cut, but I found nothing else in her apartment that belonged to me.

Q. Did you find any thing at the pawnbroker's. - A. The duplicates were given to me by the husband on the Monday morning.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I produce three sheets pledged in the name of Mary Waring , on the 12th of September.

Q. Who brought them. - A. I do not know, one of my young men took them in.

Q. And why is he not here. - A. I told the magistrate, and he said it was of no consequence.

Q. You know as well as the magistrate that it was of consequence, if you had been the magistrate, you would have said, send for the man that took them in; was any thing else taken in at your shop. - A. No, only these three sheets.

Q. Mr. Page, the magistrate has put it down that you took the sheets in. - A. I told the magistrate that I did not take the sheets in, Mr. Trott the officer asked me whether I took the sheets in, and I told him no, before the magistrate.

Q. Then all that you know is that there was a duplicate produced to you by Trott. - A. Yes, Trott had the duplicate, this is the counter part of it.

Q.(to prosecutrix.) This room adjoined to where the prisoner lived, did you keep it locked. - A. It was my order to be kept locked, when I went up stairs I found it locked; the key was kept down stairs in the parlour upon a hook.

Q. What has become of the sheet that was cut. - A. They are here.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Q. You are an officer of Hatton Garden. - A. Yes. On the 25th of September I went with a search warrant to search the prisoner's room; I acquainted the prisoner with the business, she denied any knowledge of any thing of the transaction; she seemed very much alarmed at the time; I searched about for a long time, and

at last, I found two half sheets upon the bed, sewed to something (they are hardly fit to be opened) to make it look as if it was a pair of sheets on the bed; the prosecutrix said she was sure the half sheets were hers. In a drawer I found this key, (producing it) it opened the lock of the door without any trouble at all; I took the prisoner to the office, she was then committed for re-examination, and during the time of her coming again, I had this ticket given me by the prosecutrix, for three sheets, pledged at Mr. Page's in the name of Mary Waring . The prisoner confessed before the magistrate, that she had pledged the three sheets at Mr. Page's; she said she could not tell what possessed her to do it. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-45

603. WILLIAM ARTHUR , THOMAS WILLIAMS , and WILLIAM GRAY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October , three brass weights, value 19 d. the property of Richard Perrot .

ANN PERROT sworn. Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Richard, he is a porter , we live in Pierpent row, Lower-street, Islington , I keep an eating house; the prisoners came in for a pennyworth of pudding, I served them, and they went out with it. About three quarters of an hour after, Mr. Lack came in and asked me if I had lost any weights, I looked, and I found I had lost a pound brass weight, a half pound and an ounce weight.

SAMUEL LACK sworn. I am a smith, I live at Islington. Last Monday I saw the three prisoners go by where I went to work.

Q. What time. - A. About half past three in the afternoon, Arthur and Gray went into the cook's-shop, and Williams stood looking in at the window; I went and did my job, and when I came back, it was about three quarters of an hour afterwards, I went into the shop and asked Mrs. Perrot if she had lost any weights, I had one or two chaps for stealing of weights, and I thought they had been stealing of weights. I found a two pound weight, a one pound weight, a half pound and ounce weight upon Arthur; the pound, half pound and ounce weight belonged to the prosecutrix, but this weight, I never found an owner to. I made the best of my way to the City Gardens, I looked over the fields on the bank, I saw Arthur and Williams tossing up in the fields; Gray, the little one, was standing looking on. I went up and told them they must go along with me, I tied Arthur and Williams together and searched them. On Arthur I found a two pound weight in his left pocket; a one pound, half pound, and an ounce weight I found in his right hand pocket, two shillings and seven pence halfpenny in money. On Williams I found sixpence in halfpence. On Gray I found nothing.

(The property produced and identified.)

Arthur's Defence. As I was coming along I met these two boys, they said they were going a little way, I went along with them; they went in for a pennyworth of pudding, and I went in for another pennyworth of pudding.

Williams's Defence. I never was in that shop, I know nothing of the shop.

Gray's Defence. Please you, my lord, he took the weights out of the scale and put them in his pocket; I asked him what they were, he said nothing. I did not know what it was till the constable searched him.

ARTHUR - GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAMS, GRAY,

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-46

604. PATRICK CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October , four squares of plate glass, value 40 s. the property of Thomas Quinton , James Callendar , Isaac Parry , and William Scott .

JOHN CARTER sworn. I am foreman to Thomas Quinton , James Callendar , Isaac Parry , and William Scott , they are plate-glass manufacturers in Upper East Smithfield. On the 24th of September I gave the prisoner four plate glasses to polish. I saw the prisoner several times, but I never saw the glasses again till the 23d of October Abraham Israel came to the counting house and informed the clerk that some glass had been offered him for sale; Mr. Lea came to my house and informed me of it. We went to the Black Horse, the corner of Butcher row, where Abraham Israel was, we went in, secured the prisoner and the glass; the prisoner worked on and off with us for five years.

EDWARD ANSON sworn. I am clerk to Messrs. Quinton and Co. I am only called upon to say whether it is my mark upon this glass.

JOHN STAMFORD sworn. I work at the same manufactory, two of them have my writing on them.

ABRAHAM ISRAEL sworn. I live in Baker's row, Whitechapel. This man stopped me at East Smithfield, he asked me if I would buy the glass, I told him yes, and I would give him a good price for them; he took me to the Black Horse, where this glass lay; I says to him here is two pence half-penny for you, go in doors and get a pint of beer while I go and get change for a ten pound note; through that I went up and acquainted the gentlemen of the factory. He asked me twenty shillings for them, I left him in doors while I went; I returned, I pulled out a guinea, I told him I would give him a guinea, a shilling was no object, and just as I was going to pay him the guinea, Mr. Lee and Mr. Carter came in and laid hold of him.

(The property produced and identified.)

Q.(to Israel) Are these the glasses the prisoner offered you. - A.Yes, they are worth forty shillings.

Q. And he would have sold them to you for twenty. - A. For less, I suppose, if I would have bought them.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, not called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-47

605. HANNAH CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of October , a gold broach, value 10 s. 6 d. and twelve bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Robert Fish .

ROBERT FISH sworn. I live in New street in the City road, I am a stationer . On the 3d of October I left my counting house, and from thence I went to Doctors' Commons about six o'clock in the evening; I left Doctors' Commons about nine in the evening, and was going towards home. In Bunhill row two women accosted me, they asked me to give them something to drink; I consented. After some few words had passed, we went into the White Swan, Bunhill row, nearly opposite the Artillery gate; we had two glasses of gin and water there. After I had paid for it I went lower down with them to an adjoining passage (I beg leave to observe in the mean time, had I not taken a glass of liquor I certainly should not have submitted to have gone); I went to an apartment in Blue Anchor Alley , into a house with them, they said they wanted something to eat, I gave them a shilling to get them something to eat, I gave them likewise another shilling to get them something to drink. I was then solicited very strongly to stop all night.

Q. How long did you stay. - A. Not above an hour and a half from the time I entered the room to the time that I left the house, I had then twelve one pound bank notes, which I changed a check for at Smith's, a gold broach, and several other things. I even went to bed there; I had not been in bed long before my coat fell from a line where it was hung, I found my small memorandum book absent immediately, it was inside of my coat pocket, I made my alarm to the parties, the prisoner at the bar was present, there was a second person in the room, I heard her rush out immediately, I then searched for my umbrella, I found it absent, I repaired immediately into the street, and called for assistance.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property again. - A. None, I could not get the watch; immediately I went to the watchhouse in Bunhill Row, to obtain a constable, when I returned to her apartment she was absent and a padlock was on the door; I continued my searching until one o'clock in the morning, without effect; the next morning early I repaired to the house, and was informed that she had not been home all night, I then found by difficult search that she was gone to her mother's (whom I did not know) at Brick Lane, I accordingly went in search of her, and met her walking down the lane with her mother, I recognized her immediately, I took her by the arm and told her she must go with me, she went with me and stood in the street some time while I got a constable; the constable secured her and brought her before a magistrate.

Q. How many women had you spoke to that night as you were walking along. - A. I do not believe that I had spoken to any person previous.

Q. You were a little fresh. - A. It brought me to my recollection afterwards.

Q. Were you stopped by any other women. - A. No.

Q. Where was your book. - A. In my side coat pocket, outside; I rather suspected that the prisoner at the bar took it and gave to the other.

Q. What reason have you to accuse her taking it, the other woman might as well as her. - A. I admit it in one sense, but I do not believe it; I cannot swear that the prisoner took it, I do not think that the other woman took it, she was on the reverse side.

Q. And you were upon the bed; you never found the other woman. - A. No.

- sworn. I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, I searched her, I found nothing at all upon her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-48

606. JOHN JONES and JANE JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , two blankets, value 8 s. and four pictures, value 1 s. the property of Francis Tadman in a lodging room .

MARY TADMAN sworn. I live at No. 2, Hare-street Hill, Coldbath Fields , my husband's name is Francis.

Q. Do you keep house. - A. Yes. I let one room furnished to John Jones and his wife, I gave him three blankets on their bed, they left only one.

Q. Were there any pictures in the room. - A. Yes, four small pictures.

Q. When did they come. - A. Sometime in August; they were to pay me five shillings a week for the room, they continued with me about seven weeks. John Jones was a farrier , he worked on Back Hill, he had taken his partner's week's wages and gone away, I had suspicion that he had gone and left me in the same way. On the 11th of October last I broke the door open, I found two blankets and the pictures were gone, they owed me ten shillings rent; I never saw them afterwards, till Mr. Trott pursued them to St. Alban's.

Q. Did they live together the whole time. - A. Yes, and they went away at the same time.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 2, Turnmill-street. On the 11th of October last I took in of the prisoner, Jane Jones , a blanket, for two shillings, I delivered it to the officer.

Q. Was the husband with her. - A. No.

THOMAS LAKE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, in St. John-street. On the 11th of October last, I took in a blanket and apron for four shillings, in the name of Mary Jones ,; I believe to the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the person; the prosecutrix claimed the blankets before the magistrate, and the prisoner the apron.

BRIDGET LEA sworn. I goes out washing and takes in a little needle work. Mr. Trott came to my house and Mrs. Tadman on Sunday morning. On Saturday evening Mrs. Jones and her husband were with me, Mrs. Jones begged of me to let her husband bring the box to my house, I told her she might bring the box and welcome; her husband brought it in on the Friday morning, and took it away on the Saturday night, he came again on the Saturday night and said he would have a pot of beer

with me and my husband before he parted, so they remained till two o'clock on Sunday morning, then they went away; the woman gave me four small pictures for a keepsake, I did not know they were not her own, and I gave them to Mr. Trott.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. These are the four pictures she gave me. On the 20th of this month I received information, I went to the last witnesses' house and I enquired for the prisoners; she denied for a long time, at last I found there was a box sent down to St. Alban's to be left at the Peacock; there I found the box, they had not come down, I left word with a friend when they came, to apprehend them; in consequence of that, they were apprehended; I received a letter from the magistrate of St Alban's. I went down and took them coming up, the woman confessed where she had pledged them; I found them at two pawnbroker's, the man said they never should have done it if it was not for Mrs. Lea; we found no tickets upon them, nor should we have found them out if the woman had not confessed.

[The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.]

John Jones said nothing in his defence.

Jane Jones ' Defence. My husband is an innocent as a child unborn, he new nothing about it; this woman persuaded me to pledge the blankets, she advised me to bring the four pictures or else she said I should not have my box away.

JOHN JONES - NOT GUILTY .

JANE JONES - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18061029-49

607. WILLIAM QUELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of October , nine pieces of iron, value 6 d. four pieces of steel, value 1 s. two chaise cushions, value 20 s. the property of James Holditch and Edward Holditch .

JAMES HOLDITCH sworn. Q. You are a coach-maker in Long Acre . - A. Yes.

Q. What is your partner's name. - A. Edward. Hill gave me some information, I saw the property taken from the prisoner.

JOHN HILL sworn. I am a coach-smith, I work for Mr. Holditch on the 2d of October I went up in the loft of the shop; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, he took out some pieces of iron; and put them in his pocket, he left the workshop, and while I was coming out of the loft, I lost sight of him for a while; I walked up the yard into Long-Acre, to see if he had gone out; I could not see him, I went down to the corner of Charles-street. There is a side gate to the shop, I went to see if he had gone out that way, I then had a view of both my master's gate at the end of the street where I stood; I stopped there a short time, I could not see him, I went back again, and as I was going down my master's yard, I saw him again in Long Acre, turning down Charles-street, I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, come back to Mr. Holditch, I I have been missing iron a long while, and I was watching to see who did it. I told him I saw him take it, he begged me not to bring him back to Mr. Holditch to prosecute him, I told him he should come back, that Mr. Holditch might see who took the things out of the place. I brought him back to Mr. Holditch, I told Mr. Holditch that I detected him taking the iron out of the shop, I said here it is at his breast; I took out these two pieces from his breast.

Q. What are they. - A. They are spring steel; some we sell for old steel and some me work up; some that runs long and good we can work it into new steel; the four pieces of steel are worth one shilling. Mr. Holditch went and got an officer, the officer searched him and took the other iron from his person in my presence. I saw him take up two of the pieces of iron, and one of the pieces that was taken from him I was working of the night before.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. I am an officer. I was sent for to take this man in custody; I found these nine pieces of iron in his right hand coat pocket; in his left hand coat pocket I found these pieces of iron; in his left hand breeches pocket I found these two pieces of steel; in his lodgings I found these two cushions.

CHARLES JOYCE sworn. The cushions that were brought from his house were made by me, they are Mr. Holditch's property; they are new.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the cushions home to make a temporary bed. I did not take them with the intention of keeping them, I worked for Mr. Holditch.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-50

608. GEORGE COOPER , alias GEORGE REID SMITH , was indicted for that he on the 25th of September feloniously did forge, falsely make, and counterfeited a certain order for payment of money, signed Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, Hulme and Co. bankers, Lothbury, London, for the payment of two thousand five hundred and sixty pounds, with intention to defraud Samuel Jones , William Jones , Lewis Lloyd , William Fox , Ardem Hulme , and Edward Lloyd .

Second count for uttering as true a'like order for payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention, and

Two other counts for like offence, only ting it to be a warrant for the payment of money, lead of an order for the payment of money, with like intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Jones.

JAMES WOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Jones. Q You are clerk in the house of Jones, Lloyd, Hulme, and Co. - A. I am teller; on Thursday the 25th of September I saw the prisoner; he produced a letter and shewed it to me; I found it was the same hand writing as that letter that came the day before.

Q. Is that the letter that he produced to you. - A. Yes, I believe it is; I took the letter to Mr. Hulme, and he came into the front office to the prisoner.

ARDEM HULME sworn. Examined by Mr. Jones. - Q. Are you one of the partners in the house at Manchester. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 25th of September, did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes; our clerk James Wood brought a letter to me, in consequence of that I found the

prisoner in the office, I gave him the letter, and begged that he would write his name and address on it, he wrote his name on the letter, George Smith , London Coffee-house, the letter begins

SIR, - You will do me the favour to call upon Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co. to receive two thousand five hundred and sixty pounds.

I told him that we had no order from the house at Manchester to pay the money; he expressed his disappointment, saying that he had fifteen thousand pounds in their hands, he said it would be very inconvenient to him, as he had made some engagements in Oxford road; I then asked him if he knew any body in the neighbourhood that could identify him, he said no, he was a stranger, having come from Brighton the day before. I told him it was impossible for me to let him have the money without he could bring some person to vouch the truth of what he said. I begged he would call again, when my partners would be in, I would keep open till near eight o'clock for him; he went away, leaving the letter he had produced in my possession.

LEWIS LLOYD sworn. Examined by Mr. Jones. Q. I believe it was on Friday morning you saw the prisoner. - A. Yes, on Friday the 26th I saw him near the gate of the entrance of our office; I went out to him and asked him if he was the person that applied to our office for some money the afternoon before, he said he was.

Court. Did you ever shew him the letter that you received on the 24th. - A. I did not, I told him I was sorry I was not at home the day before when he called; I asked him to walk in, which he did, I said it was a little extraordinary that our house had not apprised us of the money that he wanted, he said he was surprised at it, he had fifteen thousand pounds in their hands; he told me that he had written to them and they had sent him that letter.

Q. He did not produce to you any order. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-51

609. MAY PILKINGTON, alias KNIGHT , was indicted for knowingly and feloniously taking a false oath, with intent to obtain letters of administration of John Jacob Dyson , deceased, who had served our lord the king, on board a ship called the Eurus, in order to receive prize money due to him .

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You belong to the commissary geneneral's office. - A. I do.

Q. Look at the roll of the eighty-seventh regiment and tell me at what time the muster roll bears date. - A. From the 25th of June to the 24th of November 1796.

Q. Be so good as to look at the letter D, and tell me whether you find a person of the name of Dyson any where or not. - A. There is no such name as Dyson.

Q. Now look at the letter T, and see if you find it Tyson there. - A. Here is George Dyson who was received.

Court. I thought you said there was no such name - A. I do find it in the effective roll of the regiment, but that is not the man; I am quite unprepared; I have found Jacob Dyson .

Q. I shall not trouble you any further with it, the muster roll must be John Jacob Dyson .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-52

610. JAMES VAUGHAN was indicted for feloniously taking a false oath, with intent to procure letters of administration of John Neason , in order to obtain prize money due to him, as a soldier belonging to his Majesty's ship, Eurus , and

Several other counts, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

EDWARD BATES sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are deputy treasurer of Greenwich Hospital. - A. I am.

Q. Have you the prize list. - A. Yes, it is here. Producing a book.)

Q. First tell us what you call that book. - A. It is the Eurus prize list, furnished by the agent, Mr. Harrison, and sworn to by him.

Q. Looking at that book do you find the name of Neason any where. - A. Yes, he is supernumerary sergeant, twenty four pounds, one shilling, and sixpence, appears to be due to him on this list.

Q. Does there appear any Christian name. - A. Not any.

Court. It is without any Christian name. - A. Yes, without a Christian name.

Q. It is a list that is transmitted to you in the course of this office, and from which you pay persons making proper applications. - A. Exactly so.

Mr. Alley. The money due to that name is twenty four pounds, one shilling, and sixpence. - A. It is.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. What are you. - A. I am clerk of the commissary general's office; I produce the muster rolls of the eighty-seventh regiment, from the 25th day of June, 1796 to the 24th day of December, 1798.

Court. Is there any thing in the prize list that connects him with the eighty seventh regiment. - A.(Mr. Gurney. It only says Neason, supernumerary sergeant, twenty-four pounds, one shilling, and sixpence, it is the produce of a capture on the 30th of October, 1796.

Q. What is found in this muster roll produced, is the name of Neason found there, by what rank is he described there. - A. As corporal, from the 25th of June to the 24th of December, 1796.

Q. That is his description during the whole of that period.

Mr. Gurney. Do you find him in the beginning of the next year a corporal. - A. Yes, the last half year of 1797 he was promoted to a sergeant.

Q. Can you give us any account of this person in the name of Neesham or Neasam. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you meet with John Neesham as a corporal in the latter part of 1796. - A. Yes, and

there was another man of that name a private.

Q. I am asking you of the muster roll of the latter part of the year 1796, you have produced to me a man of the name of Neesham. - A. It is Neason.

Q. Do you find any name of Neesham there. - A. The clerk of the regiment has altered his name through inadvertency, this Neason is changed into Neasom.

Q. On the second part of the half year how is the name spelt there. - A. Neason is changed into Neasom.

Q. On the second part of the half year how is the name spelt there. - A. Neasom, and he was in the last half year of 1797 promoted to a sergeant.

Q. Now the first half year of 1798, how was his name spelt then. - A. It is spelt Neasom, and the last month of ninety eight Neesham.

Q. The July roll of 1798, tell me how that is - A. July it is spelt Neasom, August it is Neason, in September it is spelt with an M, in October he is spelt John Neesham .

Q. There is no other person's name in the list, Neesham or Neasom. - A. There was a private of the name of Neasom or Neesham, who was left in Europe.

Q. Was that Neasom a soldier in the 87th regiment, at the time this prize was taken. - A. In July 1796, John Neasom was received from the fifty-fifth regiment, and he appears at that time to have been left in Europe.

Court. You have proved that there was such a man as John Neason , a corporal, called a supernumerary serjeant.

SAMUEL HINMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a clerk in the Navy office, have you the muster-book of his Majesty's ship the Eurus. - A. I have, 1796 and 1797.

Q. In October 1796 and 1797 of the Eurus muster book, at that time does it appear that there was any company of the 87th regiment actually on board. - A. There are several names borne on the muster book of the Eurus, supernumeraries at the second and third allowance.

Q. Is that the way soldiers are always described when they are on board a ship. - A. Always so described.

Q. Do you find any person of the name of John Neasom or Neason. - A. Here is the name of Neasom borne as a serjeant on the supernumerary list.

Q. When does he first appear on the muster book. A. On the 15th of October 1796, he continued on the muster book until the 11th of November, 1796, when he was discharged at Spithead.

Q. Does it state upon what he was discharged. - A. It does not.

Q. Is there are any other of that name, or no other. - A. There is no other on board that ship, neither Neasom, Neesham, nor Neason. I suppose he was put on board another ship.

Q. Does it mean only discharged out of that ship, or discharged from the service. - A. Oh no, only discharged from that ship, he was discharged from that ship allowances certainly.

Court. Is there no list from the war office to prove that this man is dead. - A. Yes, here is the return of the muster roll that he is dead.

Q. Neason, the private, what is the list roll that he appears in. - A. Ninety-six.

Mr. Gurney (to Butts). When do you find him last in the muster roll. - A At the 27th of September, 1798.

Q. When did he first appear in the muster-roll. - A. At the time that he volunteered from the fifty fifth regiment; he appeared left in Europe at that time.

Q. Did his name continue to be Neason, or altered to Neesham. - A. It is altered to Neesham. I know nothing further of him.

Court. That man in 1798 is described as a private, was he promoted to the rank of a sergeant. - A. No.

JOHN PRIOR WARD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am clerk to Mr. Robert Isherwood , Doctors' Commons.

Q. Do you recollect on the 9th of May last the prisoner coming to you. - A. On the 9th of May last the prisoner applied to me at Mr. Isherwood's office, to obtain letters of administration; he produced a paper signed by major Welch, it was in the form of a letter.

Q. Look at this (a paper handed to witness). - A. I did not mark it, I suppose it to be the same.

Court. Did you look at its contents. - A. Yes, it has the same contents as that which was produced to me, I believe it to be the same hand writing.

Q. Did he say for what purpose he produced it to you. - A. He did not say for what purpose, he applied for a letter of administration.

Q. He produced that as something verifying his claim, that he was the right person. - A. Yes.

Q. He presented this to you in order to make you think that it was correct. - A. Yes, I asked him what relation he was, he said he was the brother.

Q. To whom. - A. To John Neason , the deceased.

Q. Was the circumstance of the deceased mentioned by him. - A. He told me that he died in the West Indies, he swore to it afterwards, he said he believed he died in the year 1796, he did not say what time.

Q. Did he say what Neason, what did he describe him, as a private in the army. - A. To the best of my recollection he said he was a corporal, and that he shared as a private.

Mr. Alley. You are sure that he mentioned the word corporal. - A. I believe he did, I am pretty positive. I then asked him if the deceased died a bachelor, he said he did; I asked him if had left either father or mother alive, he said no; I asked him if there were any other relations in equal degree with him, or any other brother or sister, he said that he did not know that there were any alive, he believed they were all dead; in consequence of which I prepared the usual warrant.

Q. What is that. - A. A warrant which is drawn, leaving the administration; I then described to him what he was to swear, I told him to swear that he believed the deceased died a bachelor intestate, without a parent, that he was the natural brother and next of kin; he accompanied me before the surrogate, the surrogate is the officer who administers the

oath.

Q. Who was the surrogate. - A. I believe it was Dr. John Dalby , he is the surrogate.

Q. Was the oath administered. - A. The oath was administered to him, it is a parole oath, the surrogate signs the warrant, certifying that he was sworn before him; there is no written oath. The whole of this warrant, except the name of John Dalby , the number, and the margin, is my writing. This is the warrant or granting of administration to James Neason , that John Neason was a private in the 87th regiment, died intestate, that he was a bachelor, without a parent, that he was the natural brother and next of kin; that was produced by the prisoner and signed by Dr. Dalby.

Q. That is what you call a warrant and the way it is written. - A. Yes.

Q. Repeat the terms of the general oath. - A. The tenor of the oath is, you swear that John Neason the deceased died a bachelor, intestate, without parent, that he was his natural and lawful brother and next of kin, that you will faithfully administer his goods by paying of his debts and making distribution according to law, that you will exhibit a true inventory, and render a just account of your administration, if by law required.

Q. You are sure that the oath in these terms was administered. - A. Yes.

MR. W. BERRY sworn. I am clerk to the seal keeper of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. I produce the warrant.

DR. DALBY sworn. Examined by Mr. Reyonlds. You are a doctor in the Prerogative court. - A. Yes.

Q. As such do you administer the oath to persons coming to get letters of administration. - A. Yes.

Q. Dr. Dalby see whether that signature is yours. A. Yes.

Q. Did you administer the oath to the prisoner. - A. I have no recollection of the person.

Prisoner. I only wish him to swear positively whether I was the person that administered, because I was not the man that administered. - A.(Mr. Ward) I can swear that it was to him that the oath was administered.

Court. Was there any other person with him. - A. There was another person with him.

THOMAS CHARLTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am one of the registering clerks in the Prerogative office.

Q. Have you any thing to produce. - A. I have a bond of James Neason to produce, that he is the lawful brother and next of kin to John Neason , late of the city of Dublin, a private in his Majesty's 87th regiment of foot, on board the Eurus frigate.

Court. (to Ward) Did you see the prisoner execute this bond. - A. This bond was filled up by me and executed by him.

RICHARD SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe, sir, you are a clerk to the Check at Greenwich hospital. - A. I am.

Q. On the 10th of May last did the prisoner make application to you at the Check office, Greenwich hospital. - A. Yes, he did, he stated himself to be James Neason , the brother of John Neason , who was a soldier in the 87th regiment, and was in the Eurus when she captured a prize, that he obtained letters of administration, which he had lost out of his pocket coming down to Greenwich. It was on the 12th of May that he came down, I asked him why he did not come to the office at the time; he stated that it was on the Saturday preceding that he had lost it, this being on the Monday he stated that he was ashamed to come without the administration, and that he immediately went back to London to give notice, in order that he might obtain a duplicate.

Q. Did he tell you what the proctor had directed him to do upon his hearing the loss. - A. He told me at that time the proctor desired him to give notice at my office, that no other person might receive the money.

Q. Did you give him any information of any application having been made to you by any other person - A. I told him that another man had been at my office on the Saturday preceding, on the day which he had lost this letter, and had produced the letter of administration to this Neason, stating himself to be James Neason ; that I had declined causing him to be paid the money, having some suspicion of his being an impostor.

Q. Did you ask him for any reference. - A. I asked him how long he had left Ireland, in consequence of his having stated that he came from there (it is stated in the letter of administration too); he said he had left Ireland about six weeks. I asked him where he was born, he stated in Merrow in the county of Cork, that he had left that place at the age of three years with his father, and dwelt himself in Dublin, that he was by trade himself a tailor, that it was also his father's trade, that he had lived at James Gate street, Dublin, and was well known to Mr. Mac Gennis , a brewer in James Gate street, that he was well known to Mr. Curran, an attorney at Dublin. I then told him that I should write to Dublin to make enquiry, that he must come again on the Saturday sennight, at which time probably he might have an answer.

Q. Did you ask him any questions respecting the person that he represented himself to be. - A. I asked him about the brother's name, whether he was born in Dublin or Merrow.

Q. Did you ask him what he had been in the regiment. - A. I do not know that I did; he produced this letter from major White. I am not certain whether it was on that day, but he did produce it; he came to me again on the 17th of May, he produced a letter from Mr. Ward, the witness that has been examined.

Q. Look at that letter. (The letter read in court.)

Sir, - The bearer of this letter, who was sworn to be the testator of John Neason , deceased, he having lost the letter of administration, this is to have the same effect as the letter; I am not personally acquainted with the man, only know that he was sworn.

I am, sir, JOHN PRIOR WARD.

- A. That letter he produced to me on the 17th.

Q.(to Mr. Ward) Is that letter your hand writing. It is my writing.

Q.(to Mr. Smith.) Upon his producing this to you what did you direct to be done. - A. I then told him that I had not heard from Dublin; as it appeared

to be a question to come before the board of directors, and not to be decided by myself, I desired him to write a petition to go before the board; (the petition read in court) I saw him sign it, after he had signed it, I told him that he must wait a few days longer, that he had better come the next Saturday, as I had directed him first to do, in order to receive an answer from my letter. On Saturday the 24th of May he came and produced a duplicate of the letter of administration, on that day, the 24th, I told him that I had received an answer from Dublin to my letter, by which it appeared that the person he had referred to knew nothing of his family or person.

Q. Which of these persons. - A. Mr. M'Gennis, (our agent to whom I wrote to did not think it necessary to apply to Mr. Curran,) he did not know any such person as James Neason, or any of the family. He affected much surprise, and said that Mr. M'Gennis knew his family very well, for that he had worked for him a long time, he then gave me other references to persons in Dublin, one of the name of Figgeny, a mealman, and one Flood, that kept an eating house in Dublin; I told him that I would write to Dublin again, that he might attend in a few days, but as I had every reason to believe him an impostor, I referred him to a board that is put up in my office, stating part of the act of parliament, and several persons annexed to it who had been convicted under it; I told him if he was not sure that he was the real brother of Mr. Neason not to let me see him again; he persisted in it still that he was the real brother, and asked me if I thought he would come so often if he was an impostor; he then went away, I told him to come again some day, he came again afterwards; at that time I had another letter from Dublin, I told him the contents of that letter.

Court. What time did he come afterwards. - A. I do not know exactly the day.

Q. Was it time enough for the return of the post. - A. It must be in the beginning of June I think, I then told him I had another letter from Dublin; that one of the men he had referred me to, Mr. Figgeny, the mealman, had been dead six years (he had told me that he had left Dublin six weeks); he described Mr. Figgeny as a person then living, and had referred me to him for his character; I told him that Mr. Flood, the other person that kept the eating house, was dead near ten months, and the widow kept the house still, never heard such a name as his; he seemed to be surprised as before, and begged that I would write again to Mr. Curran. After that he came twice upon the business, once with a letter from an attorney, requesting to know why the money was not paid, and the second letter was to know why the letter was not answered; the first letter came by the post, I believe.

Q.At either of the times that he came did he see the secretary. - A. He did, one Mr. Dyer; I took him down to the board, in course the secretary, Mr. Dyer, spoke to him, I was with him all the time he was before Mr. Dyer.

Q. Did you afterwards see the prisoner when he was taken in custody. - A. I saw him in the Poultry Compter.

Q. Had you any conversation with him. - A. I had.

Q. Did you make use of any promise or any threat to make him confess. - A.Certainly not.

Q. Did any other person. - A. Not one.

Q. Did he then tell you whether he was the person that he represented himself to be. - A. He told me that he was not; he said that he was not the brother of John Neason , and he knew nothing about him.

Q. I believe you afterwards saw him examined. - A. I did, and I have heard him repeat it; I have two letters in my hand which were intercepted while he was in custody, I have shewed him them, he said they were his hand writing, and that was his name that was written at the letter, James Vaughan . (One of the letters read in court, signed James Vaughan .)

JOHN DYER sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am secretary to Greenwich Hospital.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar at any time. - A. I saw him twice at Greenwich, at the latter end of May or the beginning of June.

Q. Did he produce any certificate to you. - A. Yes, after that the prisoner was brought into the room to me.

Q. Did you mention any thing about the person that has been mentioned. - A. The clerk of the check having stated in the first instance to me that he believed him to be an imposter; John Neason 's name was mentioned in the board to him by me, he told me that his brother had been a sergeant, that he believed at the time the capture was made he was a corporal; I asked him what became of his brother, he told me that he heard that he died in the West Indies.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Smith knows that one George Smith sent the other man for the money, they are both in custody; he sent me some time afterwards, and made me say I had lost the administration; when the man was refused the money, he applied to me to go there, that is all I have to say; Mr. Smith, clerk of the checks, knows that it is true, and George Smith , a prisoner, was to pay me for my going; Mr. Smith has stated in his evidence that another man went before me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-53

611. JOSEPH KNIGHT was indicted, and the indictment stated that James Addy who had served as a soldier on board the Eurus, and that certain prize money was due to him at the time of his death, that he the said Joseph Knight well knowing the same, on the 10th of April , knowingly and feloniously did obtain letters of administration of the said James Addy , deceased, in order to receive the prize money that was due to him at the time of his death , and

Several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH EDWARD BUTTS sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You belong to the commissary general's office. - A. Yes.

Q.Have you got the muster rool of the eighty-seventh regiment. - A Yes.

Q. Look at the dates from the 25th of June to the 24th of December, in the year 1796, look at the letter A, and tell me whether you find the name

of James Addy , a soldier, there. - A. Yes, James Addy.

Q. Do you find any note from whence you can infer whether that man is dead or alive. - A. He died on the 9th of October, 1797.

Q. It speaks so in words. - A. Yes.

Court. Is that memorandum made in the margin of 1796. - A. Yes, the reason why this remark is made in 1796, was because the muster roll was not taken till 1798; it was not in the power of the regiment to make up the muster, therefore the clerk of the muster has made the remark as dead in 1796, for 1797.

Q. Look at the year 1797. - A. This commences from the 25th of June, to the 24th of December 1797; there it appears that James Addy , corporal, died on the 9th of October in that year.

Q. How is he described in the roll in 1796. - A. He is described as a corporal.

Q. You said a soldier, before he is described in the former roll as a corporal. - A. Yes.

Q. There does not appear any other James Addy . - A. Not any other.

SAMUEL HINMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. In what department are you. - A. In the Navy office.

Q. Have you got the muster book of the ship Eurus. - A. I have.

Q. Be so good as to look and tell me whether in the months of October, November, and December 1796, a person of the name of Addy, a soldier in the 87th regiment, appears to be on board. - A. There is a person of the name of Addy.

Q. I believe there is no Christian name there. - A. No.

Q. Does his rank appear there - A. He appears to be a sergeant in the 87th regiment, he is borne as sergeant on the supernumerary list.

Q. Read the entry. - A.15th of October 1796, Addy sergeant, part of the 87th regiment discharged 11th of November 1796, Spithead. That was the day the party disembarked.

Q. The discharging from the ship has nothing to to do with the regiment. - A. Not anything.

Q. Does he appear to be there the 25th of June. A. No, only from the 15th of October to the 11th of November 1796, to be on board the ship.

Q. He was not on board a month then. - A. No, not a calendar month, and exactly a lunar month.

EDWARD BATES sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. You are the treasurer of Greenwich hospital. - A. I am.

Q. What do you produce there. - A. The prize list of the Eurus.

Q. Is that the official document that you received from the agent. - A. It is.

Court. By which you pay. - A. By which I both pay and receive.

Mr. Reynolds. You will look, sir, and see if the name of Addy is there. - A. Addy appears, he is a supernumerary sergeant.

Q. Any Christian name. - A. Not any.

Q. Is there any more than one Addy. - A. No, there does not appear any other, they are put alphabetically.

Q. In what sum does he appear to have been entitled. - A. Twenty four pound one and six-pence as prize money.

Q. Does it appear in that document when the capture was made. - A. On the 30th of October, 1796.

Q. Does twenty-four pound one and sixpence appear to be unclaimed. - A. It is returned by the agent as unclaimed. It was paid into Geerwich hospital.

JOHN PRIOR WARD sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am clerk to Mr. Isherwood, a proctor in Doctors' Commons.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether the prisoner called on you at your office any time. - A. On the 25th of April he called to take out letters of administration.

Q. You speak to the person of the prisoner. - A. Yes, the person of the prisoner. He called at Mr. Isherwood's office, I was present, he said he came to take out letters of administration to James Addy , deceased; he described himself as brother and next of kin, he said his brother was on board the Eurus.

Court. What day did he call. - A. On the 10th of April last, he said he was entitled to prize money. I then asked him if he was the nearest relation of the deceased, and whether the deceased died without a father or a mother; he said that he had died a bachelor, without a father or a mother, and he described himself to be the brother and next of kin; I am sure that he described himself as brother. In consequence of this I prepared the usual warrant, leaving the administration; having so done, I informed him the nature of the oath that he was to take, and then I accompanied him before the surrogate, Dr. Coote.

Court. Did you explain to him the terms of the oath. - A. It is my general custom so to do, and I believe I did; I went with him before Dr. Coote, the surrogate, and the oath was administered to him.

Q. The oath on granting letters of administration was administered to him. - A. Yes.

Q. Repeat the terms of the general oath. - A. The tenor of the oath is - You swear that you believe James Addy the deceased died a bachelor, intestate, without parent, that you are his natural and lawful brother and next of kin, that you will faithfully administer his goods by paying of his debts and making distribution according to law, that you will exhibit a true inventory, and render a just account of your administration if by law required, and that you believe the property of the person deceased to be under forty pounds.

Q. That is only added where parties believe it to be so. - A. Yes, and on account of the stamp duty.

Mr. Alley. You say the oath was administered. - A. Yes, and the surrogate signed the warrant.

WILLIAM BERRY sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I now call you to produce the warrant, you are clerk to the Seal office. - A. I am.

Q.(to Ward) Is that the warrant. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at it, and see whether upon that the letters of administration were granted accordingly. - A. The letters of administration were granted accordingly, that is the warrant which I prepared for the letters of administration.

DR. CHARLES COOTE sworn. Q. Is that your

signature. (a paper handed to the witness) - A. This is my signature and my hand writing. I administered the oath, whether the prisoner at the bar did or did not take this oath I cannot ascertain, a person appeared before me and took the oath.

Q. You are a surrogate of sir William Eaton . - A. I am.

Q. And he is the keeper of the prerogative court of Canterbury. - A. He is.

ROBERT SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. You are a clerk in the treasurer's office, Greenwich-hospital. - A. I am.

Q. On the eleventh of April last did any person receive any money on account of James Addy . - A. George Addy received twenty-four pounds one shilling and sixpence.

Q. A person calling himself George Addy came on the eleventh of April, and I think you said received twenty four pounds one shilling and sixpence, upon account of James Addy . - A. Yes.

Court. Have you any recollection of the person. - A. I have no recollection at all of the person, I see so many.

Q. Read the entry. - A. Eurus, James Addy , twenty four pounds one shilling and sixpence, paid 11th of April 1806, to George Addy .

Q. You do not say in what character George Addy appeared. - A. No, that is not mentioned.

Q. Have you got the order. - A. Yes, the order is here.

Q. You do not say whether it is by letter of Attorney or by administration, that you do not mention. - A. I had nothing to do with it, I merely paid it by an order merely from the clerk of the check office.

Q. Did the person sign the book - A. The person made a mark in the book, a cross.

RICHARD SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Reynolds. You are a clerk of the check office at Greenwich hospital. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your signature. - A. It is my signature. It is a certificate of the money of the prize that was due to James Addy , late supernumerary sergeant on board the Eurus, which is the usual authority for the treasurer to pay the money.

Q. What is written upon the top of that. - A. As George Addy brother and administrator to James Addy a sergeant, that imports that George Addy had applied for the prize money.

Q. That is some person calling himself George Addy . - A. Yes, It likewise shews that George Addy applied as administrator, it is brought to me by one of the clerks, and I sign it. Mr. Watkins is the clerk that filled it up and who made the search in the book.

RICHARD ROWLEY WATKINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are under clerk in the office of clerk of the check in Greenwich-hospital. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember any person coming to you and making any application upon which you made out that paper. - A. Some person came but I do not know the person that applied, I filled up the certificate.

JOHN STAFFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the chief clerk to the police office, Bow-street. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar being brought to that office under the charge of what we are enquiring into. - A. perfectly well.

Q. Did he say any thing, and was what he said reduced to writing. - A. He did say a great deal, and that was reduced to writing.

Q. Was it taken in writing by yourself as clerk. - A. It was.

Q. Is that the paper. - A. This is the paper.

Q. Was it signed by the magistrate in your presence. - A. It was, after the prisoner had signed it.

Q. Before it was signed by the prisoner, was it read over to him distinctly. - A. It was by myself.

Q. Was any inducement of any kind either by threat or by promise made use of to him to confess. - A. None whatever.

Q. Was any hope held out to him to confess that, and that he should be made use of as a witness against others. - A. Certainly not, he appeared himself extremely anxious, and desired to disclose every thing that he knew of the transaction; he would frequently appeal to his maker to what he was saying, with extreme sorrow and contrition for what he had done and he attributed it to a man of the name of Gibbons. He said he was resigned to his fate, and he hoped it would be a warning to others, that he came of a respectable family in Ireland, and he was very sorry for the disgrace he had brought upon them.

Court. Was he sworn to that examination. - A. No he was not sworn at all.

- DORRINGTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Did you take up the prisoner. - A. I took him into custody; I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. Whether you yourself or any other person to your knowledge made use of any promise or any threat to induce him to confess. - A. I did not, I do not know that any other person did.

(Part of the prisoner's examination read in court, the tenor of which was as follows.)

Signed Joseph Knight , 1806, Middlesex to wit. Joseph Knight faith I was a corporal in the 87th regiment of foot and belonged to captain White's company; I was on board the Eurus; frigate when she captured a Dutch ship, I knew Monk, when I came to London sometime in June, I went to his lodgings where I used frequently to meet with George Smith at Monk's, a little before Christmas last, Smith came to me at Woolwich, where I was then one of the keepers of the convicts, he then said do not you know Smith that you have been in company with at Monk's; I then immediately recollected him, we went to drink together at a public-house, Smith then said you can give me the names of some of the 87th regiment that were on board the Eurus frigate. I did not think there was any harm in mentioning them. I told Smith several names, I have forgot them now, I paid for what we had to drink. Sometime after Christmas, I was discharged from Woolwich, I met Smith and Gibbons, Smith professed a great deal of kindness to me, as well as Gibbons, they invited me into a public-house, Smith asked me for some more names, saying that the names I had given him before were of no use, he did not find they had been on board, I gave him some more names, Gibbons asked me for some

names, Smith seemed unwilling to let him have any names; after some words had passed then Gibbons began to ask me a great many questions about them, what sort of men they were, whether they were short or tall, and what complexion, and many other questions; after drinking some time we parted and I went home to my lodging. Sometime in the month of March Smith came to my lodging, and I and Smith went to Monk's lodging; Monk took a roll out of his trunk, Smith wrote the names down and put them in his pocket; we all went to a public house and had some conversation over some beer, nothing particular passed, nor did they say what they wanted their names for. A few days afterwards we stopped close to the commissaries office, a little way down Charing Cross; I had there met Smith and Gibbons, Smith said he would do something for me if I would be a good boy, his wife had gone out and brought a true search of Thomas - . The next day I called upon Smith, Gibbons was there, and Smith said he was not able to find any thing out of the Eurus frigate, I told him then that captain White was major, and that he lived in the Edgware Road. The next time I saw Smith he told me that he had seen major White, that he told him he was George Field , the brother of Michael Field , that the major had given him a certificate, and told him to go to Greenwich, and that the coach went from Charing Cross, and gave him directions to go there, supposing he was a stranger.

Mr. Gurney. Now pass over to where Smith and Gibbons brought some more paper.

After Smith and Gibbons brought me some more paper, I was then to go as George Addy , the brother of James Addy , a corporal in the same company I was in; Smith said he would administer himself when we got to the commons; they over-persuaded me to go in, and Smith said he would do the next, and told me there was no oath. I went in and I administered, and then we came out to Gibbons who was waiting; the next day I went to Greenwich and got the money, and I gave it to Smith who was waiting outside, they divided it, giving me six pounds and some odd shillings.

Prisoner. I did not receive the administration myself from Mr. Ward.

Court. You have heard that you took the oath in the name of George Addy ; will you ask him any questions upon his evidence.

Prisoner. I cannot contradict what he has said, no farther than I did not receive the administration from him.

Prisoner. Pray Mr. Ward, who did you give the letter of administration to. - A. I believe I gave them to Gibbons, the prisoner was there at the time, I believe; the prisoner was the person who was sworn, Gibbons went by the name of Robert White to me.

Q. Was I present at the time the administration was taken out and paid for, no, that I was not, I never had them. - A. The bondsman's name is Brown, and I delivered them to White, I remember White coming for it the next morning.

JEREMIAH BURKITT sworn. Q. Did you witness the execution of this bond. - A. I did.

Q. You do not know the person. - A. No.

Mr. Ward. The prisoner signed that bond in my presence.

Q. Mr. Burkitt was present. - A. He was.

Court. Who wrote the name of George Addy to that mark. - A.(Mr. Ward.) It is my witing, the prisoner made his mark in my presence.

Prisoner's Defence. I never received this letter of administration at all, I do not know the person that received the money, I thinking to acquit myself. I thought it better to say that I had received it myself as I could not tell the person who received it, to make it clear how I was seduced by this Gibbons and Smith.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy in consequence of the confession he had made.]

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18061029-54

612. JANE SMITH and ANN EVANS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of October , fifteen yards of callico, value 45 s. the property of James Angus , privately in his shop .

JANE ANGUS sworn. Q. What are you. - A. I am the wife of James Angus , I live in Hare-street , we deal in linen and calico ; between the hours of twelve and one, three weeks ago last Thursday, the prisoners came to purchase some muslin, I was busy serving a customer with calico, I did not see them do any thing, I only suspected that they had the property by the bulk they seemed to have under their gown.

Q. Did you watch them. - A. Yes.

Q. Have not you said before the magistrate that you saw each of the prisoners take hold of a piece of calico. - A. I stepped from behind the counter, I saw them secreting something under them.

Court. Gentlemen, the capital part is taken off now, it is stealing only.

Q.(to prosecutrix) You saw them both in such a way as excited your suspicion - A. Yes, I shut the door upon them, an officer was sent for, I had taken the calico from them, Jane Smith dropped her piece, and in my fright I threw it among the others, then I took the piece from Ann Evans .

Q. What did you do with that piece. - A. I threw one piece on the counter and one behind the counter, the piece I threw behind the counter I was not able to find it again, the other I put on the counter, I know again.

ANN SEAGOE sworn. I was in the shop at the time these two prisoners came in the shop, I saw one piece of calico taken from Ann Evans ; that one piece I picked up from the floor, that is all I know.

JOHN WOOD sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I produce the calico. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Smith's Defence. Ann Evans is as innocent of it as as child from its mother's womb; I took the two pieces.

Q. Do you mean to say that you took them both. - A. I did indeed, I declare to God, upon my soul I did.

Evan's Defence. I know nothing of it, I am innocent of it.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

EVANS - GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18061029-55

613. MARY HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , a pelisse, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Page .

WILLIAM WATSON sworn. On the 30th of September, about half after six, a gentleman came in the shop and informed us that a person passing by took something from a horse at the door; I missed a pelisse from the horse, I pursued the prisoner, and in Rider's court, Cranbourn-street, I saw the prisoner drop the pelisse from her hands.

Q. You are sure it is this woman. - A. Yes, I took up the pelisse; it is my master's property.

(The pelisse produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going through the court he asked me if I would go back with him, and when I came back he accused me of the pelisse, there were several women going through the court at the same time as I did.

Court. He charges you with dropping it.

Q.(to Watson) Was she standing separate from other people. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I was standing by the image shop when he catched hold of me, it is a false oath that he has taken.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18061029-56

614. HANNAH WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of September , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of John Schofield , in his dwelling house .

SARAH SCHOFIELD sworn. Q. You are the wife of John Schofield . - A. Yes. On Monday the 29th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, a young man that I had seen before in company with my husband, came to my house to enquire for my husband, he told me that he had left a man and a woman at the Cape of Good Hope, he came to my husband to know if he could give him any employment; I went with this young man that came to my husband, to shew him where my husband was; as we went along we met the prisoner at the bar and her husband in Ann-street; we all went to the Five Bells at Limehouse, where my husband was, and my husband asked the two men in; I asked the woman if she would go home and sit at my house till her husband knew whether he could have employment or not.

Q. What line of life is your husband in. - A. He is a foreman in the West India Docks. The woman went home with me and sat down, in the mean time I was called out to go to a gentleman that I have attended at Limehouse for three years; when I was going out I took the candle from the table and looked at the silver watch that hung over the fire place in the front room where I had been sitting with the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room when you looked at the watch. - A. Yes, it was half past six by the watch, but it was half past seven by the night.

Q. Then this watch did not go well. - A. No, it had lost some time in the day.

Q. It had lost an hour by the day. - A. Yes, I went out at that time, I desired the prisoner not to leave the place till I returned, I left my little girl with her, her name is Mary Ann Covell ; I returned about half past eight, and not seeing the prisoner there I asked the little girl where the prisoner was.

Q. Never mind what she told you. - A. The prisoner was gone and the watch was gone.

Q. Did you ever see the watch afterwards. - A. No.

MARY ANN COVELL sworn. Q. What relation are you to Mrs. Schofield. - A. I am own sister to Mrs. Schofield.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into the house in company with your sister. - A. Yes.

Q. How long had they sat in the room before your sister was called out. - A. About a quarter of an hour, and then the prisoner was left with me.

Q. Had you taken any notice of any watch in the room. - A. No.

Q. Neither before your sister went out nor afterwards. - A. No; as soon as ever my sister went out she got into another chair, she sat there some time, and then she asked me to go backwards; when she came in out of the yard, she came in with a candle in her hand, she went and sat in another chair by the stairs; I left her setting in the chair; I went and fastened the back door.

Q. How far is the back door from this room. - A. Out of one room into another; when I came into the room she was holding her arms up, and her face was towards the mantle; as soon as I came into the room she took her arms down, she went and sat in a chair by the cupboard, and one hand in her pocket, and the other hand leaning on the table; she said it is very near eight o'clock little girl, I said I believe ma'am it is, she said I shall go to my husband when the clock strikes eight, she said that she had five miles to go, and if she did not go to fetch her husband, she should not be able to get him home, and as the clock struck eight she went and I heard no more of her.

Q. Was any body in the room besides the prisoner and yourself. - A. No.

Q. From the time that your sister went out. - A. No.

Q. Were you at all out of the room during the time. - A. No, only when I went to shut the door.

JOHN SCHOFIELD sworn. Q. You are the husband of the first witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect your wife coming to the Five Bells, where you was. - A. I do, my wife and the prisoner went away together. About ten minutes after eight she came back to the man, and they both went away together; about half an hour after they went my wife came, in consequence of her information, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in a passage in Newgate street, I waited there till half after one o'clock, the prisoner and the man came home together; after they both sat down. I questioned her about the watch, she told me that she left it hanging up on the mantle piece, and she looked at it

when she came out; she denied having it, I sent for an officer, he searched her in the room, and then he took her to the watchhouse, and then he searched her over again.

Q. Was the watch found. - A. It was not.

WILLIAM MONTSOM sworn. I was constable of the night; I took the prisoner into custody, I searched her and found several duplicates, but nothing relating to this charge.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, my husband went down to this man after some work. The man with my husband went to this woman's husband, and asked this woman where her husband was; this woman went to the public house with my husband, this woman asked me to go home with her; when I went home with this woman there was a woman in the house who was cooking a supper. I had not been there long before a man came in, he took great liberties with the woman.

Court. What woman do you mean. - A. Mrs. Schofield. After this man had been gone out about five minutes, Mrs. Schofield followed this man, my lord, she asked me to stay until she came back, I told her if she was gone long I would not stay until the came back. After this woman had been cooking supper she went in next door and left me and the little girl alone; I asked this little girl to be so good as to give me a bit of candle, as I wanted to go into the back yard. I came in and bolted the door after me, I gave the little girl the candle and thanked her, then I set down by the side of the door in the same seat that I was in before, I told the little girl I must go when the clock struck eight. I went to the public house and staid till ten o'clock, and Mr. Schofield was with me; when I came from there me and my husband went into Whitechapel to the Blue Boar tap, there we staid, it might be two hours, my husband and me came together into Newgate street; when I came to my lodgings Mrs. Schofield was at my lodgings, Mr. Schofield said that he had lost his watch, I told him that I did not see the watch, he sent for the officer to search me, and when the officer had searched me he told the officer to take me to the watchhouse and strip me; when he searched me, I told him he might do as he pleased. I never took a pinsworth from any body in my life, I had not been long out of the country.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18061029-57

615. BENJAMIN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of October , in the dwelling house of the said Benjamin Hughes , a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Laurence Mitchell .

LAURENCE MITCHELL sworn. I am a hairdresser .

Q. Did you lose a five pound bank note at any time. - Q. Yes, I did, and a ten rolled up along with it; I lost it on Monday the 13th of October at the house of the prisoner, he keeps a public house , I frequented it; he keeps the Half Moon and Seven Stars. I keep a house hard by in Chapel street.

Q. Tell us how you lost it, and what time of the day was it. - A.Between three and five in the afternoon; I was eating my dinner there, I had occasion to draw out my purse to get a seven shilling piece.

Q. You dined there did you. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober at that time. - A. Yes, I was both hungry and dry, I went in and dined there; this happened after dinner, I was preparing to go away, I had been there perhaps an hour and a half, I had drank two pints of beer.

Q. Had you been drinking any thing else in the day. - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You must know. - A. I cannot know.

Q. You had not drank that day before to be intoxicated. - A. No, no.

Q. Was the landlord close by when you took out the purse. - A. Yes, he saw that I had gold and notes.

Q. How did you miss your notes at last. - A. If you remember, I told you I was in the act of getting change; I laid the notes down while I was looking at the silver.

Q. Are you sure that you took the notes out of your purse. - A. I am certain of that, because I put them in my teeth, and I laid them on the table or dropped them on the floor.

Q. Then whether you put them on the table or dropped them, you are not certain. - A. I am not certain as to that.

Q. Did you leave the house before you missed the notes. - A. Almost immediately.

Q. He gave you change for the seven shilling piece. - A. He did, and I looked at the silver.

Q. Then when you had left the house you had not missed the notes. - A. No, I had not missed them then.

Q. Then how can you be sure that you did not take them out of the house and dropped them, as you do not know whether you had them on the table or dropped them on the floor. - A. I recollect that I forgot putting them up in the purse.

Q. You recollect that you forgot is an odd thing, how could you recollect afterwards, when you tell me you do not recollect whether you put them on the table or dropped them on the floor. - A. The next morning I drawed the purse out and not till then.

Q. About what time in the morning. - A.As near as I can guess it might be about midday.

Q. You thought at that time they were in your purse. - A. I looked to be certain that I had got the money ready for the payment of the bill.

Q. Then you took out the purse and perceived that the notes were not there. - Q. Yes.

Q. How came you to be certain at that time that you had left them on the table. - A. I recollected that I put them down from my hand while I was looking at the silver; I put the silver in my waistcoat pocket.

Q. Where did you spend the evening after you had been to the public house. - A. I went home directly.

Q. Have you ever seen the five pound note since. A. I have, I think it was on the 21st or the 22nd of October, I saw it at Mr. Frith's.

Q. How did you know that it was the same five pound note that you had lost on that day. - A. What do you ask me.

Q. Are you sober now; the question I ask you is, how are you certain that it is the same five pound note that you lost at the prisoner's house. - A. If you will hear me I will tell you, Mr. Frith sent for me.

Q. Did you know it was the same note. - A. Yes, I knew the note, I had made a mark upon it, there was an endorsement of J. Dewry. I saw Mr. Dewry endorse it himself.

Q. Was that endorsement upon it when you lost it. - A. Yes, certainly, I never parted with it till I lost it, I wore it always. When I saw it in the possession of Mr. Frith I claimed it, I said it was my note.

Q. Did you at any time between the 13th and the 21st and 22nd, speak to the landlord about it. - A. I did; as soon as I missed it the next day I went to Mr. Hughes, and told him that I had lost it at his house, and I told him the endorsement upon it; I told him over and over, because I went to him several days about it, he denied having seen them. After I had seen it at Mr. Frith's I went into the prisoner's house, he said he heard what happened, he said, Mitchell, I have heard that you have come to the knowledge of one of your notes; I told him yes, that I had seen it, and I said that I hoped to see the other ten pound note again, as I think I am sure they were rolled together; I said if you have found them I will not mind being something handsome for a dinner; he still denied knowing any thing about them.

JOHN DEWRY sworn. I endorsed a five pound note for Mitchel on the 13th of August, J. Dewry, I gave it him in change for a draft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

I suppose you always endorse the notes that you take. - A. I never endorsed a note in my life, and I should not that, if I had not been asked particularly.

THOMAS FRITH sworn. I am a victualler, I keep the Duke of Gloucester's-head, in Park-street.

Q. Were you in possession a five pound note at any time which was afterwards claimed by Mitchell. - A. Yes; I received it from Thomas Payne , and I am quite sure that I had no other five pound note than what I received from him at that time; the note was endorsed J. Dewry, they are both worthy characters, the prisoner at the bar and Thomas Payne .

THOMAS PAYNE sworn. I am servant to lady -

Q. How came you in possession of a five pound note that you changed with Frith. - A. On the 17th I went to Mr. Hughes with a ten pound note to get change, he gave me two five pound notes; I went in about half an hour afterwards and got one of the five pound notes changed at Mr. Frith's. I am quite sure it was one of them I had taken of the prisoner, I had no others.

Q. Did you observe any endorsement, at the time. - A. I did know whether it was endorsed or no, I am sure that the prisoner did not know that it was endorsed any more than myself.

Q. You are not quite certain of that all you can say, you believe him to be an honest man. - A. Yes.

Court. What he knows you cannot say.

JAMES KENNEDY Q . You are an officer of Marlborough street. - A. Yes, a week ago last Thursday, I took the prisoner into custody, when I went to his house, I shewed him that I had a warrant against him on suspicion of stealing a five pound note; he was very willing to go to the magistrate. I produce the bank note.

Q.(to Dewry) Is that your hand writing. - A. Yes, I am quite sure it is my own endorsement.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 13th of October Mr. Mitchell came to my house and dined; he had two pints of porter, and after he had done dinner he went out of my house; I lent him a shilling about a hour and a half after he had done dinner, he came into my house with a strange woman, he had a glass of gin with the strange woman, he asked me to give him change for a seven shilling piece; he went out of the house and never said that he had lost any money that night. On the next morning he said she had lost the bank notes, I said I was very sorry; he said that he had been in the city to pay the bank notes away, the man was so very busy he could not receive the money, he must go again; he told me to look if I had got a note of the name of J. Dewry, which I had not. The night that he lost them. I did not refer to the two five pound notes I had taken on that day.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Seajeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-58

616. ROBERT ATKINS , JOHN STEVENS , and JAMES WARNER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of September , twelve pair of worsted stockings, value 20 s. the property of John Moor , and

Two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

JOHN MOORE , JUNIOR, sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You live at Leicester. - A. Yes, we are hosiers .

Q. Did you send any hosiery goods to Mr. Watkin Lewis on the 13th day of September. - A. Yes, I saw them put in and I sent an invoice.

Q. Were there any worsted stockings among these goods. - A. Yes, it was directed to Mr. Watkin Lewis , Love lane, Aldermanbury.

Court. Are you in partnership with your father. - A. No, my father is the only person concerned in the business (the stockings produced); these are the stockings that were part of the package, I saw them safe into Mr. Pickford's cart, and I attended the packing up of the goods.

URIAH CLANG sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. You are a clerk to Messrs. Pickford. - A. Yes.

Q. You remember that package that you saw put in by Mr. Moore. - A. I took it at the warehouse at Leicester, I saw it loaded on Mr. Pickford's waggon to go to Bronston.

SAMUEL LEE sworn. Q. You live at Bronston, did you receive by Pickford's waggon, a certain packet directed to Mr. Lewis, Love lane. - A. I did; when the waggon came to me I unloaded it and examined the contents of the load; according to the invoice there was a packet for W. Lewis.

Court. I do not know where this Bronston is. - A.

Bronston is in Northamptonshire, about thirty miles from Liecestershire; my duty is to receive them, to see that they are safe, and to forward them on to London by a boat; I put them on board the boat, Stevens and Warner were the persons that were to navigate the boat, they were equal in point of trust and profit, Atkins is a servant of their's; Stevens and Warner were there, I gave them a pound each, I do not know whether the other was there or was not.

Q. Stevens and Warner took the charge of all this property. - A. They were the persons who took the charge of it.

Q. I suppose you did not examine the package exactly. - A. It appeared to be in a good state.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are employed at the wharf in Paddington, you are a servant to the prosecutors. - A. Yes, the prisoners were employed all the way from Paddington to Bronston.

THOMAS WARTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Who are the proprietors of the waggon and boats. - A. Thomas Pickford , James Pickford , and Matthew Pickford , and Messrs. Pickford pay for the conveyance of the goods, they are in their custody till they are delivered in London.

Q. You examined this boat. - A. I did; on the 18th of September, I went on board the boat, the three prisoners were on board the boat, I went into the cabin, we had a suspicion, I looked into the cupboard under the side bed, I found this dozen pair of worsted stockings, I asked them how they came there, I said it is a very improper place to put this parcel, they said they did not know how they came there; they were among loose ropes; I said I was positive they must know something of their coming there; there was tarpaulin tied over the cargo, it would have been impossible for any body to untie the tarpaulin and get at the cargo without their knowledge; they said themselves there were no passengers on board. I had them taken into custody.

Q. You sent Mr. Wallworth to Mr. Lewis, to make inquiry. - A. Yes.

- WALLWORTH sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are also in this employ. - A. Yes. I know nothing of the prisoners, I was desired by Mr. Pickford to find out who the stockings belonged to, I found they belonged to Mr. Lewis.

Q.(to Mr. Wright) You had not an opportunity of seeing the packages when you detected the stockings. - A. I saw the package, we were in a greathurry of business, I did not know of any truss being broken open, there might be two dozen pair taken out, I should not have observed them.

RICHARD DALES sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. What is your master's name. - A. Watkin Lewis , he has no partner.

Q. Did you receive from Mr. Moore the package from Liecester. - A. Yes.

Q. Was there in fact the quantity that should be in the package when it was opened. - A. I had the invoice, there appeared to be a dozen short.

Q. Did all the dozen pair come out of that package. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. About twenty shillings.

Q.(to Mr. Moore) You have seen the stockings before and swore to them. - A. Yes.

Atkins' Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Stevens's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn of its mother.

Warner's Defence. John Stevens is the head captain on board, he said that he saw them lay on the bottom of the boat, he kicked them on the hay, and when they were all gone away he picked them up and put them in the cabin.

ATKINS - NOT GUILTY .

STEVENS - GUILTY , aged 28.

WARNER - GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-59

617. JOHN POINTER and ELIZABETH POINTER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , two shirts, value 10 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 s. a brush, value 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a pair of gaiters, value 1 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of John Henry Theodore .

JOHN HENRY THEODORE sworn. I am a corporal of the 60th regiment . On the 22d of September I lost my clothes in a bundle at the White Horse, Broadway, Westminster , they were in the tap room, I left them there while I went to the cook's shop in the evening; I enquired after them in the morning, the prisoner and two of his comrades were drinking there that evening; I saw the bundle the next day at the police office.

WILLIAM GLEW sworn. I am a shoemaker. On Tuesday morning, the 23d of September, about seven o'clock, a person knocked at the door, I was not up, my wife answered the door, Mrs. Pointer walked in with a bundle in her apron, she asked me to be so kind as to let her leave the bundle there a few minutes.

Q. Where is your house. - A. No. 15, York street, Westminster, she said there was a dispute between her landlord and the landlord's landlord, her landlord owed a twelvemonths rent; I gave her leave to leave them there a few minutes, as I knew the woman; in about a couple of hours afterwards I heard that Pointer had robbed a soldier of a bundle, I employed an officer to bring Mrs. Pointer to my place, to take the bundle away; when she came I asked her what she brought that bundle there for, she said it belonged to her.

Q. Was that bundle afterwards delivered to Renny and Gillmore. - A. Yes.

FRANCIS MILLER sworn. I am a shoemaker, I live at No. 68, York-street. On Monday, the 22nd of September, about five o'clock in the afternon, Mrs. Pointer brought a bundle into my room.

Q. Did she lodge in your house. - A. Yes, and her husband lived with her, she asked me if I would take care of this bundle for her, I told her I would.

Q. Did you see the husband afterwards. - A. No, I heard him go into his own room about three quarters of an hour before the bundle was brought into my room.

Q. What regiment is the prisoner in. - A. The

Coldstream guards. She gave me strict charge not to let any one have it, come who would, but herself; I suspected from her own words that the bundle was not her own, I gave the bundle back again to her; the next morning I saw the bundle afterwards, I believe it was the same bundle that Mrs. Pointer left with me; when I was telling my landlord of it at the lower part of the house where the lodgers fetch their water from, I put my hand in between the ceiling and the floor, and I took out a brush, the prosecutor said it was his. The prisoner Pointer, and every lodger in the house, had the use of that kitchen.

JOHN MURPHY sworn. I am the landlord of the White Horse. On the 22nd of September, the prosecutor came into my house to ask for lodgings, it was between three and four in the afternoon, I saw him bring the bundle in and lay it down on the bench in the tap room; directly after that the prisoner came in with two of his comrades, he sat close to where the bundle was, and he and his comrades drank to the amount of three pots of beer, and then they went away.

Q. Before they went away, had Theodore left the room. - A. Yes, he had left it a great while, he went to the cook's shop to get his dinner, with nine recruits; I saw him leave the bundle behind him when he went to dinner, but I did not see the prisoner take the bundle.

Q. What hour of the day did Pointer leave the room. - A.About five o'clock.

Q. Did Pointer's wife come into the tap-room while he was there. - A. No, I had not seen her all the day.

Q. Did you see Theodore's bundle before he found it out the next morning. - A. No, about eight o'clock he missed the bundle; then I had a strong suspicion that it was Pointer that took the bundle. I sent for two officers from Queen square, and the prosecutor and the officers, together with myself, went to the house where the prisoner lived, and there the brush was found, as has been described while I was there.

(The property produced and identified.)

John Pointer 's Defence. Please you, my lord, about six or seven o'clock my wife told me that there was a man came and enquired after me, and my not being at home he asked permission to leave the bundle there. I did not go home till half after nine at night, and then my wife told me of it.

Elizabeth Pointer 's Defence. There were words between my husband and me about the bundle. I took it out of the room and left it there, as the bundle was brought up by a strange man.

JOHN POINTER - GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and find One Shilling .

ELIZABETH POINTER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-60

618. GEORGE GREARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , a coat, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 12 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. two shirts, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a pair of braces, value 2 s. 6 d. and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Evan Jenkins in the dwelling house of Daniel Price .

EVAN JENKINS sworn. Q. Where did you lodge at the time this happened to you. - A. I lodged at No. 2, York street, Piccadilly in Daniel Price 's house, I lodged there a fortnight.

Q. How many lodgers had he in the house besides you. - A. There were three; the prisoner came to lodge there in the same room with me.

Q. What day of the month was that. - A. The 15th of October.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night. - A. At eleven o'clock; the prisoner went to bed after me. I never saw him before.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning. - A. I got up at a quarter to seven, I left the prisoner in bed, he slept in the same bed with me.

Q. What time did you return. - A. I returned about ten at night, and I went up into my bed room, I missed my clothes, I had left them in a bundle handkerchief.

Q. How came they in the handkerchief. - A. Because I had not been in their lodgings long, I had not brought my box.

Q. Your bundle contained your wearing things did it. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss any thing else beside your clothes. A. I missed my hat and I got this old one.

Q. What kind of a hat was yours. - A. It was not a new hat.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner after that day again, after you left him in bed. - A. Never, he never came to the lodgings again.

Q. How soon did you see him again. - A. After I missed my clothes, I saw him the next night at a public house in Bow street; he was taken up then, he had my shirt, my stockings, and my small clothes on; then I saw my coat and my hat here. I recovered all my things again but one dark handkerchief, and my small clothes he made away with after he went to prison.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. Q. You are a patrol to the public office, Bow street. - A. Yes; on the 17th of October I went into a public house in the Strand, I cannot recollect what day of the week it was, it was about seven o'clock in the evening; on the 17th of October I apprehended him at the Blackmoor's Head, Exeter-street, Strand, I received information from Price the landlord; I found all the property here; he had got the hat upon his head, he was wearing the coat, waistcoat, shirt, small clothes, and stockings; I found another shirt tied up with the gloves and the braces; I produce them, I have had them ever since, except the small clothes, those he wore when he went to Tothil fields bridewell; he has made away with them by some means.

Q.(to prosecutor). Jenkins, look at these articles, you have examined these articles. - A. Yes, they were the things that were in my bundle, I know them all, I know the hat by the stamp.

Q. That is no great knowledge in that, every hat has a stamp, you lost such a hat. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked this young man, Jenkins, when he came to bed, I said to him I am going to work for Mr. Miles in Holywell-street (I am a stay maker), it is a situation I have long wished for; says

I to him I have a singular favour to beg of you, you are a meer stranger to me, as I am to you, will you have the goodness to lend me a better coat to put on, in order to solicit for work; he says you are a mere stranger, I says I am, I cannot say what I can do in this business, I really can get better employ if I can get better clothes; he says I am sure I cannot lend you my clothes, you are a stranger to me; sir, says I, I am, it is a rough question to ask you; he would not condescend to lend the clothes, and when he got up in the morning I took that unwarrantable liberty to put them on; I went to Mr. Miles, and asked him if he pleased to employ me, he told me he would, with that I was to go in the morning; I was on my way back, in order to take the clothes off and to tell the young man the affair, I was detected in the road.

Q.(to prosecutor) Did he make any application to you to borrow your clothes. - A. No, not a word of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 64.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18061029-61

619. RICHARD MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , three loaves of bread, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of David Clark .

WILLIAM GEARY sworn. I am a servant to David Clarke , a baker , King-street, Bloomsbury. On the 27th of October I left my basket, just by Mr. Mr. O'Brian's door, I went to my master's for some more bread, I had not been in the shop two minutes before a boy came and said the man had stole the loaves out of the basket.

Q. When you went to your basket did you find any loaves missing. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, the lad had taken the loaves from him; I ran up to him and took him, he offered to give me half a guinea to let him go.

Q. Had he half a guinea about him. - A. I do not know, I took him home to the shop, David Miller took the loaves from him. I produce them, they are my master's loaves.

DAVID MILLER sworn. I saw the prisoner turn down the basket and take two quartern loaves and a half quartern out, I was looking through a glass door at the time, I was within two yards of him; I went out and took the bread from the prisoner's hands.

Q. Did he resist. - A. No, he told me he would go and shew me the man that told him to fetch the bread out of the basket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent from the Cobham's Head, Clerkenwell, for a pail of yeast, when I got into Bloomsbury Square I met a journeyman baker, he had got a quartern loaf in his hand, he says will you have any thing to drink; I said I cannot stop, I have another pail of yeast to get, he says you can stop to have part of a pint of beer, my basket stands there, fetch me two quartern loaves of bread, I am only going to take this loaf into Southampton-street, accordingly I went and turned the basket down; as I took the bread out, he mentioned the journeyman baker's name that belonged to the basked, I said it is the journeyman that sent me for the bread, if you will hold the bread I will go and fetch the man, I run down Southampton-street, I could not see the man; I put the pail of of yeast on my shoulder and went on.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Privately Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-62

620. SARAH WEBSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Bride .

EDWARD BRIDE sworn. I keep the Queen's Head, Fashion-street, Spitalfields ; I only know that the pot that was brought to me by the constable was my pot, and I gave the prisoner in charge.

MARY LANSDOWN sworn. I live in No. 22, Dorset-street, I live in the lower room. On the 30th of September I saw the prisoner on the landing place (of this house) of the first floor; when she came down stairs she asked for one Mrs. Aplebee, a velveteen weaver; I have lived in the house ten months, there was no such person lodged in the house all the time I have been there; I saw her go out with her apron in her arm; immediately missing the pot from the landing place of the first floor, I ran after her into the lane, where I caught her.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of her from the time that she left the door. - A. Yes.

Q. You are quite sure that she is the same woman. - A. I will not nt be positive, I asked the prisoner what she had in her lap, she told me a quart pot, she said her master had sent her for it.

Q. Did you secure her. - A. Yes, and afterwards I left her when I saw the constable had got her; she had the quart pot in her apron, in a bag belonging to herself.

LAZURAS JACOBS sworn. I am a constable, I took charge of this woman. On the 30th of September I was coming by, there was a mob of people round her, I instantly went up; the quart pot was in her hand.

Q. Did you see the last witness. - A. Yes, she said that she had got a quart pot from her stairs, I asked the prisoner how she came by it, she said she had it given her; she appeared to be very much in liquor; I produce the pot.

(The pot identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN TURNER sworn. I work at Rotherhithe, in the rope ground; I have known the prisoner seventeen or eighteen years, she is a very honest woman, she is apt to get out of her head at times, ever since she has lost a great girl.

MARY CLEGG sworn. I work at the slop work, I have known the prisoner above twenty years.

Q. How has she supported herself. - A. By her needle; she is at times very deranged in her mind, she lost a daughter fourteen years of age; the night before this happened I took care of her, she was very deranged, I kept her in the room all night.

Q. Had she got too much liquor. - A. She was very tipsy indeed; I am positive that she did not know what she was at; that morning I could not keep her in, do all I could; she is apt to be tipsy, she has been in every madhouse about London, she was nine months in St. Luke's.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-63

621. CHARLES AMMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of Nailes Languist , privily from his person .

NAILES LANGUIST sworn. I am a sailor .

Q. Do you know this man at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 10th of October were you in his company. - A. I was not in his company, no further than I was in the house, he came to me between five and six o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What house were you in. - A. I was at the sign of the Duke of York, Ratcliff Highway .

Q. Were you acquainted with this man before. - A. Many days before; I went into that house to a man of the name of Johnson, I owed no more than four pounds to him, and I was made to pay twelve pounds; the prisoner came in and shook hands with me, I had my watch in my pocket at that time.

Q. You were in the tap-room. - A. I was in a small room, it was the tap-room or parlour.

Q. Are you quite sure that you was sober at that time. - A. I was sober,

Q. How long before that had you seen the watch. - A. About an hour, I had my watch when I came into that house, I had it in my trowsers pocket.

Q. Now tell us how you lost your watch. - A. He came in and shook hands with me, and then he run out of the house directly; I went out afterwards.

Q. Had you any body else in company with you. - A. There were two men and one woman.

Q. At the time that you went out, you did not know that your watch was gone. - A. O yes, when I went out he came and laid hold of me by the arm and walked up to the prison house.

Q. When you went out was that the time you lost the watch. - A. After he left me and came out in the street, I had my watch then.

Q. Did you go after the prisoner. - A. I did come out in the street, the sheriff's officer laid hold of me.

Q. Was you under arrest for debt at the time that this man came and shook hands with you. - A.No, the prisoner came and pointed me out to the officer.

Q. What was the man's name that caused you to be arrested. - A. Johnson.

Q. After the officer had taken you for this debt of Johnson's did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, he came to me again outside of the door.

Q. The officer took you out to take you to prison. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner go with you and the officer. - A. Yes, the officer took hold of one arm and the prisoner took hold of the other.

Q. Are you then quite sure that you had your watch when the officer arrested you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss your watch before you got into the lock-up house. - A. No, I do not know what they call it, it is in Princes Square, Ratcliff Highway; the prisoner went with me all the way to the lock-up-house, then I did not see him any more that evening.

Q. Are you a foreigner. - A. I am, a Swede.

Q. How soon was it that you perceived your watch was gone. - A. I was not two minutes in the house when I went down below, when I was down below I went to look at my watch and it was gone.

Q. In the way that you was conveyed from the Duke of York to the lock-up-house, did you perceive your watch go from you. - A. I did not perceive it go from me, it was gone when I was in there, and there were no other persons that took hold of me but them, and nobody near me but the people that were passing.

Q. What was your watch. - A. A silver watch, I had given four pounds ten shillings for it three or four days before.

Q. When you found your watch was gone did you tell any body. - A. I told the servant girl and another prisoner that was down stairs, I pulled off my trowsers directly to see if I had dropped it in my trowsers.

Q. Did you say to her who you suspected had taken it. - A. I did not know who had taken it.

Q. What reason have you to supposs that the prisoner took it any more than the bailiff. - A. I had nobody else with me, only he and the bailiff; which way it was gone I cannot tell.

Q. Did you feel his hand near at all to your trowsers pocket. - A. No, not as I know of.

Q. Which side do you keep your watch. - A. This side (the right side).

Q. Was the prisoner of your right side. - A. Yes, he was the right side too.

Q. When did you charge the prisoner of having been guilty of this. - A. The same evening, I sent to my landlord, he came in about half an hour after the same evening, his name is Joseph Field , I told him that the prisoner was in company with me, I did not tell him who had stole it.

Q. Have you seen your watch since. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You have told my lord that you was sober. - A. I was not drunk, I do not deny that I had been drinking.

Q. You have said that there was two men and a woman there, was not there a great many women of the town. - A. There were three women of the town that came in.

Q. I take it for granted that they were drinking as well as you. - A. I was standing in the middle of the floor, I do not know what they were doing.

Q. When Jenn the sheriff's officer came in the room he arrested you, and took you in custody, the prisoner ran out directly you came in, and took you in custody, - A.Yes, and when I got in the street the prisoner was there.

Q. The prisoner is a countryman of yours. - A. I do not know but he can talk my own language.

Q.How long were you in the sheriff's office before you were locked up. - A. Not three minutes.

Q. You have said that there was another prisoner there. - A. Yes, his name is Schedrol, he was there at the same time that I was.

Q. You thought it an ill natured part of the prisoner

to point you out to the sheriff's officer. - A. Why could I be angry, I was obliged to pay my money.

Court. The gentleman asks you whether you felt angry with this man for pointing you out to the sheriff's officer to oblige you to the lock up house. - A.No, it I was not angry with him.

Mr. Alley. Give me leave to ask you, and consider whether you did not say to Mr. Schederoll, in the officer's house, that the moment you got liberated you would have your revenge upon the prisoner for pointing you out; now let me caution you, Mr. Chetterhulme is here. - A. I did say it was very ill done of him coming and shaking hands with me and pointing me out so.

Q. Now I ask you whether you did not further add that the moment you got your liberty, you would be revenged of him. - A. Not on that day.

Q. At any other time have you threatened that you would be revenged of the prisoner. - A.Not that I know of.

Q. Did you desire your landlord to go to the public house to enquire if you had left your watch there. - A. That I am sure I did not, I am sure the watch was not gone there. I desired him to go to Mr. Ammers and ask him if he knew any thing about my watch, because he was in my company that night, he told him no.

Court. Had you been drinking with these women. - A. I was drinking with them, before I was going away, I am sure I had the watch in my trowser's pocket when I was outside of the house.

Q. You did not like to be conveyed to prison very much, did you struggle. - A. No.

HRENY STRONG sworn. Q. What are you. - A. I am a sailor, I was walking in the street, there was a woman walking in the street, she hailed me, and asked me where I was going.

Q. Did you see Nailes Languist. - A. He has given me a couple of pence in the street many times.

Q. Did you see him when he was taken to the bailiff's house - A. No. I told the woman I was going to a gentleman's house to get some supper, it was between nine and ten o'clock, the woman told me there was laying a watch, it was between the Duke of York and the White-hart public house; I took up the watch, and I went into the White-hart public house with it; I kept it three days.

Q. Was that the 10th of October. - A. It was last monday evening, two weeks to-day.

Q. It is a fortnight to-day, is it. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it on the footpath, or on the highway. - A. On the highway.

Q. Was the watch afterwards claimed by Languist as his property. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that it was not three weeks. - A.No, two weeks to-day.

ANDREW HOLTER sworn. That man shewed me the watch, I told him to take care of it, for fear that any of the neighbours should enquire after it.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar. - A. No.

JOHN VILLEEN sworn. I go look at that man first, that man say I lost my watch, he say you go to Ammer's house, I was to go to Ammer's house, I seek that man's watch, I asked Ammers, you got that man's watch, Ammers said no. The first Monday that I come out in the street, Ammers took hold of my arm, he said come to my house next monday, I will shew you the watch.

Q. What day was it that Ammers told you to come to his house, and he would shew you the watch. - A. That is three weeks to-day. I never went to his house, I only told Lanquist.

JOHN SMITH sworn. I am an officer belonging the Thames police office. I know nothing further than apprehending the prisoner on the 18th of October. He knew me perfectly well, he saw me very early in the morning out of the window, he asked me if I had got a warrant against him, I told him I had, he immediately bid his wife open the door and let me in, I was so far satisfied of his innocence, that I took his word and his attorney's for his appearance, he knew the charge was for stealing a watch.

Q. You had no right to take his word for his appearance, you did very wrong, we are not trying the prisoner by your opinion of him, have you the watch. - A. No, the watch was brought to the office by Strong, and claimed at the office by Languist.

JOSEPH KING sworn. I live in Cinnamon street, Wapping, I keep the sign of the White-hart, Languist lodged with me, on the 10th of October about four o'clock, he drank tea with me.

Q. At the time he left your house, do you know whether he had a watch or not. - A. I am quite sure that he had.

Q. At the time that he drank tea with you, was he sober or not. - A. Yes, he was as sober as I am at this minute, I heard that he was arrested at seven o'clock, I went then to the lock-up house, I was then informed that he had lost his watch, he said he supposed it was taken from him by the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about the watch, I never saw the lame man in my life, (Henry Strong) they they have got a spite to me and that is they reason the have done it; I came of a respectable family, I think myself better than to do such things as them. The prosecutor said when I was down along with him for that you show me to the officer, I shall do you a spite again; I do not think that he could do any more spite to me than he has done.

WILLIAM JENN sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. You are a sheriff's officer for Middlesex. - A. I am.

Q. We understand the prisoner accompanied you and pointed out the prosecutor for you to arrest him - A. He did.

Q. When you came in the street it was about five o'clock, what distance was it from the public house that you found the prisoner at your house. - A, About three hundred yards.

Q. It was quite daylight. - A. Yes,

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing the conduct of the prisoner during the time that you were on the journey to your house. - A. I was close behind him, arm in-arm with the attorney's clerk. I think he could not have robbed the man without my seeing of him.

Q.When you went into the public house, how many women were there. - A. Eight or ten, or more than that; the moment that Ammers shook

hands with him, a number of women got around him and he was arrested by Ammers. I said no, it is Johnson, I dare say there was forty women and sailors in the house together. I never heard that the watch was lost till after he was taken into custody.

ANDREW SHEDDROL sworn. I am a foreigner.

Q. Do you know of the prosecutor being arrested, did you see him when he was in custody. - A Yes, I was there at the same time; I asked him which was he lost the watch, he said he lost the watch coming from where he was arrested; sometimes he said he had it when he left the public house, and sometimes he said he did not know whether he had it or not.

Q. Do you mean to say that he was not certain where he lost it. - A. Yes, sometimes he said he did not know, but he might have lost it among the sailors, and the women that were there; he said many times that when he got out he would be revenged of the prisoner one way or the other for showing him to the officer.

The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant,

Reference Number: t18061029-64

622. JOHN GENOU was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , six-silver tea spoons, value 15 s. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. the property of George Gosling , in the dwelling house of Esther Genou .

ANN GOSLING sworn. I live in Oxendon-street On the 20th of October I rented a room in the prisoners' mother's house; my husbands name is George Gosling, he is a muffin baker .

Q. When did you lose these articles. - A. O the 10th of October; the prisoner was son to my landlady.

Q. What time of the day had you seen these thing - A. I had seen them on the fourteenth.

Q. Had you been absent from home between the 14th and the 20th. - A. Yes; to put my furniture in. On the 20th, about six or seven o'clock in the evening I entered the room, I found the things were gone.

Q. Did you have your room door locked. - A Yes.

Q. Had the padlock been forced or picked. - A. The door was not forced, I found they were both locked; when I come I cannot say, whether he got in at the door or at the window, it was in the front garret.

Q. How was the window fastened. - A. The window had no fastening at all.

Q. When did you see your things again. - A. The next day.

Q. I suppose you know nothing of your own knowledge, that this man took them. - A. I cannot say.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. Q. You are a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields, did you apprehend the prisoner. - A. I went with a search warrant to No. 45, Wardour-street.

Q. Who lives there - A. Mr. Genou; the prisoner's mother is the house keeper.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Is that the house that you had the room in. - A. Yes.

Donaldson. I searched the prisoner's bed room as I supposed; I found nothing in that room, I then went down to the landlady, Mrs. Genou, to enquire where her son worked.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner. - A. Yes, I told him that I wanted him to go home with me to be present when I searched his bed room; in the shop where I took him, I asked him if he had any keys, with that he pulled out these keys, he said these are all the keys I have; he went home to his bed room with me; I searched his person, I found these two duplicates, one of a table spoon, and six tea spoons; the other duplicates is two sheets, and two table cloths.

Q. Did you get any thing by these duplicates. - A. Yes, the prosecutrix, as soon as I got the duplicates, she was very much alarmed indeed; the pawnbroker has got the spoons and all the property. I then told the prosecutrix to bring me the padlock; I tried these keys, they would not open it; I said to the prisoner where is the key you opened the padlock with, he said I lost it.

Prisoner. I deny it.

Donaldson. I am quite sure that he said that, my brother officer is here that heard the same; this other key is the key of the bed room door, and this key will open the room where the prosecutrix's things are; it opens the front, and the back garret, this key was in the back garret door.

Prisoner's Q. Can you solmnly swear that I told you that I had lost the key that opened the padlock. - A. You did, you told me that you had lost the key, that I swear to.

JOSEPH LANCASTER sworn. I am a pawnbroker's apprentice, No. 5, Little Pultney-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. He is the person from whom I took the things in; I know him perfectly well, I took these things on him, on the 20th of October; there are six tea spoons, a table spoon, two sheets, and two table cloths. I advanced him two pound ten shilling on them. The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day that these things were missing, I came home on the latter part of the afternoon in liquor. I was going up to bed, I tumbled against the prosecutor's door; on tumbling down I felt my head soft upon something, I got up with it, and went down the street, I went to this pawnbroker's and pawned them for two pound ten shillings, I was very much intoxicated in liquor at the time.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18061029-65

623. JOHN ADNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October , a pair of women's shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Sotcher .

WILLIAM SOTCHER sworn. I am a shomaker , I live at Poplar , the prisoner worked for me; on the 27th of October the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me to lend him six-pence, which I did, I went into my back room, and while I was there I saw him put a pair of shoes in his pocket, and he

made off with them and when I took him to the magistrate I found a pair of women's shoes in his pocket.

(The shoes produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in and asked that gentleman to give me sixpence, I said here is a pair of shoes that will fit a person that I know; if you are a mind for me to take them, I will take them to the person; he went in doors, and I put them flight in my pocket, half in and half out. If I had a mind to have stole them, I should not have done so.

Q.(to prosecutor.) Did you ever permit him to take shoes from your shop. - A. No, I never let him have a pair of shoes in my life.

GUILTY , aged 71.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-66

624. JONAS BOND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of August a pair of trowsers, value 16 s. and two pair of braces, value 5 s. the property of John Baster .

JOHN BASTER sworn. I am a tailor , I live in the Strand. On the 1st of August I called at the Duke of Clarence's Head, Charing-cross; Mr. Delare had two pair of braces which I knew, from thence I went to Bow-street, I got an officer and went to the prisoner's lodgings, Of-alley, Buckingham-street, and after taking him in custody, I found among his duplicates, one respecting a nankeen pair of trowsers pledged in Chandos-street. The trowsers and the braces are mine.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He has been my journeyman eighteen months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

How much did you happen to owe this man at the time. - A. Properly, not one penny.

Q. Was not you arrested by this man because he could not get his money of you. - A. I was.

Q. For how much. - A. I think he swore to eleven pound.

Q. The day after you was arrested by this man, you made this complaint against this man and proceeded as you have stated. - A. I did.

Q. You was arrested at this man's suit. - A. I was.

Q. Did not the officer say to you, are you sure that there are no money matters between you. - A. I do not deny it direct, there was some trifling mention of it, I said there was some the day before he had arrested me.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. I am a pawn-brober, I live in Chandos-street, I produce a pair of trowsers, pledged by the prisoner or his son. I took them in, the ticket is my own writing.

THOMAS DELLARE sworn. I keep the Duke of Clarence, Charing Cross. I produce two pair of braces I bought of the prisoner.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. I am a constable. I took up the prisoner, I produce a duplicate that I found in the prisoner's lodgings for a pair of pantaloons. I said to Mr. Baster, has there been any money matters between you, or any summoning, he told me positively no.

Mr. Reynolds. How long have you known Mr. Baster. - A. I have known him some time.

Q.Would you believe him upon his oath. - A. I should have a doubt if I was a juryman of his oath: When a man tells me a lye upon the outset of the business, I should not believe him much upon his oath.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. May it please you my lord, I never was taxed of thieving before in my life, till the day after I arrested my master for eleven pounds nine shillings, then he swore he would be up to my gossip.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-67

777. JAMES WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , a waistcoat, value 2 s. and two silk handkerchiefs value 5 s. the property of William Hawkins .

WILLIAM HAWKINS sworn. I live at the corner of Great Woodstock-street, Nottingham row, I am a servant to John Brine , a cheesemonger and pork-man. On the 14th of September I left my box at Mrs. Garret's, I went in the hospital. On the 14th of September I came out for some things, I found my box had been broken and my property taken out. I lost two handkerchiefs and a waistcoat.

HENRY VICKERS sworn. I am a pawnbroker's lad, I live with Mr. Hill, No. 64, Turnmill-street. On the 5th of September this prisoner came and pledged a waistcoat with me for eighteen pence his sister pledged the handkerchief with Mr. Hill.

CAMDEN GARRET sworn. The prisoner lodged with me three nights, he left me on the Saturday, as he came to lodge with me on the Tuesday, when the prisoner came in the room, the box was fast, and after the prisoner was gone I found it open.

Q. Whose box was it. - A. William Hawkins.

ANN WELLS sworn. Are you a relation to the prisoner. - A. Yes, I am his sister in law; the prisoner at the bar came to me at Bartholomew fair time, he left with me two silk handkerchief tickets, I gave him one shilling for them. I had pledged them for him.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. The landlady came to me on the 22d of September. I went and took this prisoner, I searched him, I found nothing upon him, I found that his sister had been buying the duplicates of him. I went to the pawnbroker's and stopped the things and ordered them to be forthcoming; the prisoner himself acknowledged that they were in pledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went and lodged at Mrs. Garrett's on the 25th of August. I bought these things of a young fellow that was going abroad.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-68

626. MOSES JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of October , a pencil case, value 6 d. a pocket book, value 6 d. five bank notes, value 2 l. each, and ten bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of William Strachan .

The witness Henry Burkham not appearing in

court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-69

627. GEORGE LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of October a sack, value 2 s. 6 d. and two sieves of onions, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Susannah Glover and Richard Glover , and FRANCIS SHEATH , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

RICHARD GLOVER sworn. I am a gardener , I live at Tottenham .

Q. What is Lane. - A. He is a carman . On the 30th of October I found a quantity of onions in my stable with a sack covered over them; I watched Lane, he went out with his horse, I followed the cart till it came up to the Birdcage public house, Stamford-hill, the cart stopped there, and I saw the hostler take out of the cart a small bit of hay, he went forward and looked round and ran back again to the hind part of the cart, and the carman delivered to him the onions; with that the witness and I drew up the chaise, and the moment that we got there, the hostler got a key out to unlock a place to put them in; that is all I know.

SAMUEL RICH sworn. Was you with Mr. Glover. - A. Yes, I followed the cart to the Birdcage, I saw Mr. Glover's carman give the sack to Francis Sheath .

Lane's Defence. That man did not know what I was going to do with them. I was going to make a present of them.

Sheath's Defence. I took in the parcel of him, I put them in the gateway; I am hostler, I take in parcels from coaches and carts.

LANE - GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

SHEATH - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-70

628. THOMAS PRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of October , a grate, value 6 s. the property of Edward Hutchins .

EDWARD HUTCHINS sworn. I live at No. 17, Great Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone . About seven o'clock in the evening a person told me that a young man had stole a grate from my door; the stove was brought back from the man to my house.

ROBERT HOWARD sworn. I am an officer; between six and seven o'clock on Tuesday last, as I was going down Westmoreland street, I heard a violent crash, and the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner at the bar coming out of Little Bedford-street, followed by a Mr. Elliott, at about the distance of ten yards, I pursued him, and he turned up Great Mary-le-bone street, he had nothing with him at that time; I caught him in my arms and took him to Mr. Hutchins's house, and in taking him to the watchhouse he made a terrible resistance and got away; I afterwards caught him at the corner of Weymouth street.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man. - A. I am.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, I never had the stove on my back.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-71

629. THOMAS WILSON , and HUGH HUGHES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a metal watch, value 40 s. the property of William Holmes , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM HOLMES sworn. I live in Bowling Alley, Turnmill-street .

Q. Are you a house keeper. - A. No. On the 15th of October, about seven o'clock at night the prisoners called where I was at work.

Q. Did you know them. - A. I know Wilson. I took them into my house to shew them a jack; I lit a candle, and put it down on the dresser; they took the candle and blowed it out. I had no fire, we went out after that; when I came home again, I went to look what o'clock it was by my watch; it hung by the dresser, just by where he stood; it was gone. I had locked the door, and had got the key of the room.

Q. How long were you absent. - A. About an hour and a quarter, or thereabouts, when I returned my watch was gone.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. No.

Q. Is this the only reason that you accuse these men. - A. Yes, because there was nobody in the house, when these men were in, and while they were there I looked to see what o'clock it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Did not Wilson call upon you after you had accused him of stealing the watch; did he not tell you that he would bring an action against you for defamation of character. - A. I believe he might.

Q. Was it not after that, that you went to Hatton Garden. - A. I thought he had taken it in a joke, and would return it again; he came and offered me a guinea and a half if I would make it up with him.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Wilson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Hughes called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-72

630. EDWARD JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Brady , about the hour of nine at night, on the 30th of October , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing therein, fourteen pound weight of pork, value 10 s. the property of Henry Brady .

HENRY BRADY sworn. I live at Hampstead . On the 27th of October, the prisoner was quartered on me; I went to London, I returned the same evening. I desired the servant to take the key of the cellar door to draw me some ale, she did so, and soon returned and exclaimed sir, the cellar head! I runs out into the back yard where the cellar head is, and I saw it wrenched open; I pushed it down with my foot; I goes into the cellar, I saw the prisoner concealed behind the butt. I saw a leg of pork, and a spring of pork, on the cellar flap, removed four yards from the spot.

ELIZABETH HARRISON sworn. On Friday evening about nine o'clock, I went into the cellar,

found the prisoner on the cellar stairs, he ran down and hid himself; he said do not tell him I am here, I told my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to go into this yard. I fell right into the cellar, the trap door was open.

GUILTY, aged 26 .

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-73

631. JOHN WISE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of October , a coat, value 7 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. a hat, value 10 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and seventeen shillings, the property of Robert Street ; a pair of breeches, value 7 s. two handkerchiefs, value 7 s. three shirts, value 8 s . the property of James Goodey ; two shirts, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 5 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Picknell .

THOMAS STREET sworn . I live at Great Ealing , I am servant to Mr. Patten. On Tuesday last, when I went to bed , I looked in my box, my things were safe, and on Wednesday my box was stripped; I lost waistcoat, stockings, and about seventeen shillings in my breeches pocket; all my things were in my box on the Wednesday ; this man was a shepherd ; on Wednesday his dog was in our yard, and on Thursday his dog was gone, the barn being broken open we suspected him; I knew the dog; on Thursday afternoon I took the prisoner at Hounslow with this bundle on his shoulder.

Q. Does that contain all your things. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the things to carry to his friends .

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18061029-74

62. MARY JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM SPALL sworn . Q. You are a journeyman to Mr . Newbury, a baker, in London Wall. - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday the 16th of October, do you remember her coming to your house. - A. Yes, she asked me for a twopenny loaf , then she asked me for a stale half quartern, I put one down to her, that came to sixpence halfpenny , she put down a shilling, I was going to give her change in copper, she asked me to give her sixpence in silver; I gave her sixpence out of my right hand and with my left hand I picked up the shilling from the counter, instantly as I picked the shilling up Mr. Ankers and Mr. Jenkins came in, they asked me what money I had taken of the woman (she was present), I told them that shilling that I had in my hand, Mr. Ankers said look at it, I looked at it and refused it, I said it was not a good one; Mr. Ankers looked at the shilling, saying, that he had one before, he had rubbed it, he said that is not the shilling, she has that shilling upon her now he believed; Mr. Ankers then ordered the constable to search her, she put her hand in her pocket and laid half a guinea on the table, she said she had no other money, they believed that to be a good half guinea; the officer turned her pockets out and found six sixpences and thirteen or fourteen pennyworth of halfpence; she took the half guinea from the counter and put it into her mouth, the officer forced it out, and then three shillings came out of her mouth; they appeared equally as bad as the other shillings .

WILLIAM ANKERS sworn . I keep the White Hart, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. On the evening that we have been speaking of the prisoner came to your house. - A. Yes, she asked for a glass o gin, she tendered me a shilling, which I discovered to be a bad one, I laid it on the floor and rubbed it with my foot and spoiled it, then she offered me half a guinea, I told her I I could not change it; she told me she had taken the shilling of a butcher in Leadenhall Market, she would carry it back and get it changed; I followed her into London Wall.

Q. In going there did you see Jenkins, the constable. - A. I desired him to go with me, I followed her into Mr. Newbury's, I saw Spall, I asked what she gave him, he said a shilling, he sounded it on the counter, he pronounced it a bad one, I then immediately gave her in charge to the officer; he searched her and produced some halfpence and six sixpences out of her pocket; the sixpences that were taken from her were good.

PHILIP JENKINS sworn . Q. You are a constable, you went to the house of the baker. - A. Yes, I searched her, I found a quantity of halfpence, six sixpences , and a half guinea, upon her; I saw her take the half guinea from the counter, and put it in her mouth; I asked her if she had any more silver about her, she said no, I asked her where the half guinea was, she said she was afraid she had swallowed it, I forced her down on the floor, I put her head between my knees and I forced her lower jaw open, I saw silver in her mouth, I turned it out, it was three shillings and a half guinea. I produce them, and the shillings that I received from Mr. Spall.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. Q. You are assistant solicitor to the Mint. - A. I am.

Q. I am now showing you the shilling that was tendered to Mr. Spall. - A. It is a counterfeit, and the three shillings are counterfeited.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came from my work on Saturday I had about seven shillings, I had a half crown piece and the rest sixpences and halfpence; I was going to market and to my sister, I have had a little boy of her's a year and a half, I went to her to receive half a guinea for the child's two weeks; as I came from there there were some Jew boys playing before me, I kicked this paper before me, which contained the five shillings; I went into Mr. Anker's for half a quartern of the best gin, I thought if one was bad the others might not , I told him I had taken it at the butcher's; I thought if I had said that I picked them up he would have said that I stole them.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that Time to find Security for her good Behaviour for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder .


View as XML