Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th September 1806.
Reference Number: 18060917
Reference Number: f18060917-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 17th of SEPTEMBER, 1806, and following Days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON. By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1806.

Reference Number: t18060917-1

[Pages missing in original.]Q. Had they the opportunity to see that you had notes besides the guinea when you took it out. - A.They had; when I put the guinea on the table, the first man took it up, and give it to the prisoner Travers.

Q. Was the landlord called for or the waiter. - A. No, I asked the first man for the guinea, he said I should have it in a minute.

Q. Did you get it again. - A. No.

Q. Did the first man say any thing when he gave it to Travers. - A. He said I should bet a guinea as well as him.

Q. Did you consent to bet at all. - A. No, I told him I could not bet, it was not my money; then I sat a little while, and got up, and I said I must go; they insisted on my paying for the porter, I pulled out the notes, and held a five pound Bedford note in my hand, and while I was returning the other notes in my pocket, the prisoner Burke snatched the five pound note out of my hand, I asked him for it, he said he would give it me directly.

Q. Did he give it you again. - A. No; then the tipsey man went out, he said he would order a crown bowl of punch; the first man and Travers went along with him, and left me and Burke together, I offered to go out, Burke said stop a minute, they will be in directly; I stopped, and then got up and said I will not stop any longer, I must go, then Burke got up and went to the door first and stopped me, he would not let me open the door; I said I will go, he went out of the door and went into Tavistock street, I followed him, I asked him for the note at the corner of Tavistock street; he put his hand in his pocket, took out a bit of paper, and said here is your five pound note, I was going to look at it, he said put it in your pocket, you fool, you will lose it; I was going to read it, then he offered to snatch it from me, I put it in my pocket rather than he should do that, I thought I had got my own note again; I followed him and asked him for the guinea, he said he would give me the guinea as soon as he got change; he went down Tavistock street, and just crossed Caroline street; at the corner of Caroline street in Charlotte street he went into a public house, he called for a pot of porter, I said I could not stop, I wanted my guinea; he said he must call for something to get change, he called for some gin, he drank it, and went out of the house the back way into Caroline Mews, I followed him to the back door, he set off running as fast as he could down Caroline Mews, I ran after him, crying out Stop thief.

Q. Did you catch him. - A. No, he ran down Great Russel street into St. Giles's, he kept all the while before me, I kept crying Stop thief, but nobody stopped him.

Q. In your way you lost him. - A. Yes.

Q. While you were pursuing him did you meet with a man of the name of Kelly. - A. Yes, he told me who the man was I was pursuing.

Q. Did you return to your mistress and give her the remainder of the notes. - A. I did.

Q. And after that Burke was taken up and Travers likewise. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of their being the men. - A. No, I am quite sure of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You say you went with them to a public house. - A. Yes.

Q. The drunken man and Burke tossed up for a bottle of wine. - A. Yes.

Q. And then a guinea was tossed up for. - A. Yes.

Q. It was proposed that you should toss up. - A. They asked me to bet a guinea.

Q. Do you mean to say that you did not bet a guinea. - A. Yes.

Q. This was in the back parlour, was there any landlord there. - A. No.

Q. I suppose the waiter came in and out occasionally. - A. He did, the guinea was taken out for the purpose of paying for the pot of beer.

Q. Had you nothing less than a guinea. - A. No.

Q. You say you remained sometime in the house drinking after this guinea was delivered. - A. Yes.

Q. And then you got up and said you must go away, but you wanted your guinea, but afterwards you tell us you took out a five pound note to pay for the pot of beer. - A. Yes, I wanted to go to the landlord at the bar, and tell him they had got the had got the guinea.

Q. Did you tell the waiter that came in and out of the room. - A. No, he never came in after they money.

Q. Have you never said that you gave the guinea to one of the men as a stakeholder. - A. No, I never said it, I laid the guinea on the table, the first man took it up.

Q. You know you might have called the waiter, as well as to lay it on the table; upon your oath did not you give the guinea into the hand of the man for the purpose of tossing up. - A. I did not.

Q. Had you any smaller notes than five pound notes that you were carrying with you. - A. No, none.

(The note given to Reddly by Burke was produced by Mr. Gee, and read in court.)

HUMBER BANK.

3 M 470

I promise to pay Mr. Simon Label , or Bearer, on demand, FIVE HALF-PENCE, Cash or Pills, for value.

(Signed) for CHA. JULEP.

Entered R. ELECTUAR.

SARAH NICHOLSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are servant at the Cock public house, Tottenham-court road. - A. Yes.

Q.On the 11th of June last do you remember seeing that young lad who has been just examined, at your house. - A. Yes.

Q. What room was he in. - A. The back parlour.

Q. Was either of the prisoners in his company. - A. Both of them.

Q. I suppose you went into the room to carry liquor in. - A. Yes.

LAWRENCE KELLY sworn. Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Byley and Co. brewers, St. Giles's. - A. Yes.

Q. On the afternoon of the 11th of June, did you see that lad who has been examined pursuing any body. - A. I did.

Q. What time of the day was it. - A. About four o'clock; I saw Burke pass by me, I knew him some time.

Court. Was he running or walking. - A. He was rather a running, he turned down Church street or Maynard street, St. Giles's, the young man came up just afterwards. I told him who the person was that passed me.

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Bow street officer. On the 20th of June I apprehended Burke over the water, by the Obelisk; when I searched Burke I found that paper on him, it is another note like the one that has been read in court. (The note produced and read in court.)

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I apprehended Travers on the 20th in Dyot street, St. Giles's.

Burke's Defence. On my going into the Cock public house, Tottenham-court road, there were three or four people in the room, I called for a pint of porter, and sat separate from them, I did not know any of them whatever; in about ten minutes time a tipsey man came in, he said he had been to New-market; the man that was drinking with the prosecutor said he would toss up with him for a pot of porter, if he would call three out of four; they tossed, and the tipsey man lost; the tipsey man then proposed to toss for a guinea a-piece, it was agreed to, I stood up on hearing they were tossing for money, I being a sporting man, and we all bet a guinea apiece, the prosecutor put down a guinea and lost it, we all lost a guinea a-piece; then the tipsey man said he did not mind if he tossed for five pounds, we all put down five pounds a-piece, the prosecutor put his five pound note into this man's hand, he lost it; they then left the room, and the tipsey man threw down a five pound note on the table, saying, there was a five pound note, take it and drink it among you; they left the room, and the prosecutor and I were left together, I took up the five pound note, O, says the prosecutor, I must have that five pound note, I have lost my master's money, I am a going to pay a bill in the city; I took up the note called the five pound note, the said note I had in my hand the whole time; I told him I had no right to give him any of the money back, for I had been losing my money as well as him; we both went to the door, and in the street he insisted on my giving him the money back, he took the five pound note out of my hand, whether good or bad I do not know, he put the said note in his pocket; he says, now all that I want is a guinea, I told him I had no right to give him any money whatever, I wished him to give me part of the five pound note that he had got in his pocket, he replied that he would not; I then left him in the street.

Travers's Defence. I was going down Tottenham-court road, I went into the Cock public house, I saw the prosecutor and another man at the door talking; the man who was along with the prosecutor said to me, How do you do, I replied you have the advantage of me; he said he was going in to drink, he asked me if I would drink with him, I said with all my heart; I drank with them, Burke came in, a little while after that a man came in intoxicated, he said he had been to Newmarket, and had lost a great many bottles of wine, he would toss for a pot of porter with them; he tossed, he lost, they tossed again, he said he would toss with them for a guinea a-piece, Burke put down a guinea, the prosecutor put down a guinea, they asked me to hold the stakes, with that I took up the money and held it in my hand, the drunken man won every time but once; at the last toss, the prosecutor he said to me, young man let you and I go out, I said no, they tossed again, and the man that was drunk won, the young man the prosecutor got up and said, I am ruined, it is my master's money; the tipsey man went out, and said he would send them a crown bowl of punch; Burke and he went out together, in about two minutes I went out, I knew none of the parties whatever till Burke's name was mentioned, I never saw him before.

Burke called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Travers called one witness, who gave him a good character.

BURKE - GUILTY, aged 29.

TRAVERS - GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house.

Transported for Seven Years.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-2

426. JAMES ALGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , privily from the person of Walter Burrel , esq . a pocket book, value 6 d. three promissory notes of the Dorking bank, value 10 l. each, and a bank note, value 5 l. and four bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Walter Burrel , esq .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES CHRISTIE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe, sir, you are a wine merchant residing in St. James's Market. - A. I am.

Q. On the 17th of June last were you in Bond street . - A. I was, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I there saw the prisoner at the bar in company with three other persons, I fancied that I had seen two of them before at Bow street; in consequence of my suspicious I watched them, they were close behind Mr. Burrel in Bond street, Mr. Burrel and his two friends were walking together; I observed one the men frequently put his hand into Mr. Burrel's pocket, I did not see him take any thing out, nor am I certain it was the prisoner, to the best of my recollection it was not the prisoner that put his hand into the pocket of Mr. Burrel, but one of them in whose company he was at the corner of Little Brooke street; I asked Mr. Burrel if he had lost any thing, he put his hand into his pocket, he said he had lost his pocket book.

Q. Where were these four men. - A. They were in Little Brooke street leading into Hanover square; we immediately followed them into Little Brooke street, they were conversing together, they separated, and the prisoners turned up King street, Mr. Burrel followed them, I went round by Marlborough street, meaning to go along Argyle street to meet them; I called at the police office to desire an officer to follow me; when I got to Little Argyle street I met Mr. Burrel with the prisoner, holding him by the collar; he was taken into the police office Marlborough street immediately.

Q. Are you quite sure that the prisoner at the bar was one of the four men that you saw together before

you saw them do any thing to Mr. Burrel. - A. I am certain, I have not the least doubt but he is the person.

WALTER BURREL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe you was in Bond street at the time that Mr. Christie has described. - A. I was.

Q. You remember Mr. Christie making application to you, and your feeling in your pocket, and losing your pocket book. - A. Yes; it was a red pocket book, containing three ten pounds Dorking promissory notes, one five pound bank note, and four one pound bank notes, it was in my outside coat pocket.

Court. Is that a place to put bank notes in. - A.(Mr. Knapp) It is not every body that has inside pockets.

Court. I know it is the fashion of the day to hold out temptation.

Mr. Knapp. At the time that Mr. Christie informed you, did you see the four persons. - A. Yes, the prisoner was one of these four persons; when Mr. Christie informed me, I put my hand into my coat pocket, I found my pocket book was gone; he told me they were gone down Little Brooke street, there I saw them, and I perceived one of them shift the pocket book from their right side to the prisoner; the prisoner put it in his coat pocket; we followed the prisoner into Swallow street, Mr. Christie said I will go to Marlborough street office, and get you an officer to seize him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him. - A. I followed them till they got into King street, he got rather the start of me, and ran about thirty or forty yards, I ran after him, and called out Stop him; we ran about two or three hundred yards till we got into Swallow street, I then took him by the collar, I said you have got a pocket book of mine, he said I - me - with evident marks of confusion; I told him I would not let him go without searching him; he then took the pocket book out, and I said that is mine, he gave it me, I said now you must go to Marlborough street; that is the pocket book I had missed at Marlborough street, I examined the pocket book at the office and the notes tallied, I have got them here, I know the pocket book to be mine.

(The notes produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-3

427. JANE RAFTRY , alias HOLDEN , was indicted for that she at the general quarter session of the peace held on the 7th of January, in the forty-fifth year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was thereupon sentenced to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more at the expiration of that time, that she afterwards on the 22nd of July , one other piece of false and counterfeited milled money made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good half crown, as and for a good one deceitfully and feloniously did utter to James Cook , she knowing it to be forged .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CALEB EDWARD POWEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe you are principal assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. - A. I am, I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner from the Sessions house, Clerkenwell, I examined it with the original record.

(The copy of the conviction of the prisoner read in court.)

WILLIAM BEEBY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Newport, at the New Prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do, perfectly well, I was present in January session 1805, when the was convicted for uttering base money; in consequence of that conviction I took her into prison, and she remained there one year.

Q. Do you remember that at the time the sentence was pronounced on her, that she was told if she offended again she was liable to be hanged for it. - A. Yes, she was told it in court, and she was told it in prison when she was discharged, that if she offended again it would be a capital offence.

JAMES COOK sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. You keep a green stall in Spital Fields market . - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, on the 22nd of July last did she come to you in the market. - A. Yes, a quarter before five in the morning.

Q. You have no doubt of her person. - A. None in the least, she asked me how I sold cabbages a dozen, I asked her one shilling and sixpence, she agreed for half a dozen for nine pence, she took half a dozen and tendered me this half crown, which I took from her; I gave her in change a good shilling and a sixpence, and three pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. You took the half crown then for a good one. A. Yes, I did; about half an hour after I recollected the person I took the half crown of, as I had no other half crown in my pocket.

Q. Did it strike you at the time that you had some knowledge of her. - A. Yes, I then said to my man, do you think you should know her, as I thought myself I should know her.

Q. Had you any opportunity on that day of seeing her again. - A. A little before seven on that morning she came to me again and asked me how I sold my onions, I asked her sixpence a bunch, she offered me another half crown, directly I perceived that was a very bad one, I pulled the other out of my pocket, I examined them together, and perceived they were nearly alike; I am sure it is the same woman, I looked at her very hard; says I, mistress, you bought some cabbages of me in the morning, which she denied; she hurried me for the change, said that I was mistaken for she was but just up and had come to market; I did not give her the change, she had the onions in her hand, I told her I would go and get her the change, intending to get a constable; I says to my man, take care of her till I come back; when I came back she was gone without her change; in about half an hour after I saw her again the other side of the market with Mrs. Oakes, cheapening a bunch of carrots, and she was offering a bad shilling; I asked her why she did not come for the change of her onions, then she answered me, give me the change, I took her in custody immediately, I was present when she was searched by the constable;

as we were going to Spitalfields watchhouse the constable perceived something in her hand, he was going to press it out of her hand, she said she would give it to me, which she did, it was a bad shilling; when she was searched there was one shilling and two sixpences found upon her, all good.

Q. Have you any doubt at all whether that is the person who gave you the first half crown. - A. None in the least.

JOHN RAY sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an officer of Worship-street,

Q. When you saw the woman at the office you asked her where she lodged. - A. I did, and she told me, but it was of no use for us to go to her lodging, they knew of her being in custody, and therefore we should find nothing there; she said she had the two half crowns of a Jew, in Petticoat-lane; she said the prosecutor had said right with respect to the two half crowns.

Q. You knew her very well. - A. Very well.

DAVID DODSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable of Spitalfields, I took the prisoner in custody; when I first took her away to the watch-house I preceived something in her hand, I tried to get it from her, she would not submit, she said that she would give it to Mr. Cook, she gave it to Mr. Cook, and Mr. Cook gave it to me, it was a bad shilling; I then took her into the public house opposite the watchhouse, (I put the shilling in my pocket with the two half crowns which Mr. Cook had given me before), I searched her; I found a shilling, two sixpences, and a few halfpence, all good; the money that I had I gave to Armstrong.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of Worship-street. - A. Yes, I produce the two half crowns and a shilling which the last witness gave me, I have had them ever since.

MR. JOHN NICOLLS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You, sir, are his Majesty's monier of the Mint. - A. I am.

Q. Upon your looking at these two half crowns will you tell me whether they are good or counterfeited. - A. They are counterfeited; they are very much alike, the shilling is a bad one likewise.

Q.(to Mr. Cook) Will you tell me whether these are the two half crowns that the woman uttered to you. - A. Yes, the two half crowns are the same I took of the woman, the shilling I took no particular notice of.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-4

428. THOMAS EVANS and THOMAS DONNOVAN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Kendall , about the hour of eight at night, on the 28th of August , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein sixteen pigs, value 20 l. the property of William Kendall , and one pig, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of William Turner .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be in the dwelling house of William Hawkins .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM KENDALL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You, I believe, are the son of Richard Kendall . - A. Yes, I live with my father, his dwelling house is in Pancras, the pigs were kept in a cow shed, Marylebone ; his man lives there, William Hawkins , it is all under one roof, it is all inclosed together in the yard with paling.

Q. Had you any pigs of your property kept in this cow shed. - A. I had eighteen, they were all my own, and there was one that belonged to Turner.

Q. Did you see these pigs on the afternoon of the 28th of August. - A. Yes, they were all right then; the next morning I missed them.

Q. How many did you miss. - A. Seventeen in all, sixteen of mine was gone and one of Turner's; on Sunday I received information from Chesterman, I went to his house on Saffron Hill, I there found the pigs that I had lost, and I had them home again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand from you this is a mere cow shed in the yard. - A. It is.

Q. There is no door from the cow shed into the house. - A. No, the house opens into the farm yard.

WILLIAM HAWKINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am servant to Richard Kendall .

Q. You live in this little house to which the cow shed adjoins. - A. Yes, I saw the pigs at half after eight at night on the 28th of August, I fed them and locked them up at that time.

Q. How near was it then to dark. - A. It was dark in the course of half an hour after.

Q. Was you on the spot during that half hour. - A. I was in bed.

Q. Were you awake during that half hour. - A. I cannot possibly say; the next morning a little after six I looked after the pigs, I missed seventeen out of the eighteen, I have seen them since at Chesterman's.

JANE TITUS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Hoxton.

Q. On the morning of the 29th of August when you got up did you find any pigs on your premises. A. My husband did, he is not here; Chesterman came to me in the morning, I told him the pigs should not be killed there, if they did not fetch them away I would turn them away; I think it was near eight o'clock when Evans fetched them away.

JOHN CHESTERMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 91, Great Saffron Hill, I kill pigs by commission. On Friday the 29th of August, Evans came to me about six o'clock in the evening, he asked me if I would kill nine pigs; I told him I was tired, I had been to work all day; I asked him the size of them, he said they were from five to seven stone, I told him if any body would go and assist me I would kill them; he said they were at Hoxton, and the water was all hot, and there was a man that would go with me to help kill them; on that consideration I got my tools ready and went along with Donnovan, who was then standing in the street; he pointed out Donnavan to me, Donnovan took me to Hare Walk, Hoxton, to the house of Mrs. Titus; Evans informed me they were the property of a person in the Fleet prison for debt, and that the wife of that debtor was afraid of an execution,

and had moved them off to have them killed; Donnovan shewed me the pen in which the pigs were to be killed, I saw there were more than nine pigs, I spoke to Mrs. Titus, she objected to having them killed there, she said the place belonged to a man that kept an ass there, Donnovan was present and heard it, Donnovan requested that she would not turn them out that night, but keep them till the next morning; I went home, and in little less than half an hour after I got home, Evans called on me and asked me the reason why I was not killing the pigs; I told him the reason, that they must be fetched away, and it was too late to kill them for the morning market; he asked me to kill them on Sunday morning, I told him I would not kill them on Sunday morning for any man; he asked me if I would keep them in my cellar; he came again about a quarter before ten, and in the room of bringing nine pigs he brought seventeen, I asked him the reason why he brought so many, Evans said they were all the woman had, I was to kill one for him that night, and he was to fetch it on the Sunday; eight I was to kill on Monday for Tuesday's market, and eight on Tuesday for Wednesday's market.

Q. On the Sunday did Evans come to you. - A. No, on Sunday morning I saw Evans, I went to his house, I asked him the reason why he had not come for the pig that I had killed, he replied, there is a pretty hobble about these pigs, they were all stolen, he had been to Croydon market on Saturday, and heard it there that they were stolen from a cow keeper at Paddington; he advised me to cut up the pig I had been killing of and make the most money of it I could, and take that money for my trouble; he would come in the middle of the night when all the people were a-bed, and take the other pigs somewhere else; alarmed at the situation that I stood in, I immediately went home and communicated to Mr. Lester what Evans had told me.

Q. After you had communicated this to Mr. Lester, did you and Mr. Lester go and find out the prosecutor. - A. I did, and he sent his son.

Q. Were those pigs that young Mr. Kendall saw at your house, the pigs that Evans and Donnovan brought to your house. - A. They were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. So you get your livelihood by killing pigs by commission. - A. I keep a butcher's shop on Saffron Hill, I have lived there ten years.

Q. When Evans told you that you were in a hobble, that they had been enquiring for them at Croydon market, and that they were stolen, you went home and communicated this to Mr. Lester. - A. I did.

Q. Had you ever killed pigs for him before. - A. Yes.

Q. He told you they were stolen. - A. Yes.

Q. He gave you an opportunity of going to the office to give information, was not that his intentian. - A. I do not know what his intention was.

WILLIAM FLATT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 86, Great Saffron Hill.

Q. On the evening of Friday the 29th of August did you see any pigs taken into his house. - A. I did, I assisted in holding the shutter while they were driven in, Evans put nine in at the private door, and the rest he threw down the cellar.

THOMAS LESTER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Great Saffron Hill.

Q. On the morning of the 21st of August did the witness Chesterman come and acquaint you with his having these pigs in the cellar. - A. Yes, I went with him to endeavour to discover the owner.

Q. You as last found Mr. Kendall. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. There is no doubt but he told you he was in a hobble about these pigs. - A. Naturally he told me that.

Mr. Gurney. And he told you who he had them of. - A. Yes.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. In consequence of information that you received, did you go with Chesterman to apprehend the prisoner Evans. - A. I did, I apprehended him in Brewer's yard, Chick lane, I told him the charge; he said that Donnovan came to him in the night mentioned in the indictment; and begged him to come to him at the end of Tottenham Court road, to help drive some pigs; he said he met Donnovan there with seventeen pigs, which they drove to Hoxton; after that they fetched the pigs away from Hoxton, and brought them to Chesterman's house. I afterwards apprehended Donnovan.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

EVANS - GUILTY , aged 60.

Of stealing only.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

DONNOVAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-5

429. SAMUEL BRITTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Wagstaffe , about the hour of twelve at noon on the 3d of July , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing six silver tea spoons, value 15 s. five table spoons, value 4 l. five gowns, value 5 l. one silk cloak, value 5 l. four petticoats, value 2 l. three handkerchiefs, value 4 s. one waistcoat, value 3 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. two shillings, three sixpences, a silver twopenny piece, and two silver penny pieces, the property of William Wagstaffe .

WILLIAM WAGSTAFFE sworn. I live at Hadley, Middlesex .

Q. Do you remember the day your house was robbed. - A. Yes, the 3d of July; I left my house myself between six and seven o'clock in the morning; my wife left it about ten o'clock.

Q. Was the prisoner with you any part of the day. - A. He was with me in the field a haymaking, I had hired him to haymaking.

Q. How long was he at work in the field with you. - A. Till about ten in the morning.

Q. Had you hired him at your house or in the field. - A. He had been at my house about a fortnight before, he slept where I was haymaking, that is about two miles from my house.

Q. How came he to go away about two o'clock in the morning. - A. He had got a wooden leg, he told me he could not do any more work without he got it repaired; he asked me to let him go and get

it repaired; he accordingly went away.

Q. Did he come back again. - A. No.

Q. How long did you continue in the field. - A. Till about seven o'clock at night.

Q. And he never came back. - A. No.

Q. What time did you get home. - A. About half past eight.

Q. In what condition did you find your house when you got home. - A. I found a pane taken out of the window, and the back door open, and the window case was open.

Q. Was your wife or any body at home when you came home. - A. Nobody was at home.

Q. Did you go into your house to see if you had missed any thing. - A. Yes, my wife and I went home together, I missed three large silver table spoons and six silver tea spoons out of a cupboard; my wife went up stairs and missed other things.

Q. You left her at home when you went out in the morning. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen these spoons in the morning or the night before. - A. I had not myself.

Q. Did you afterwards see any of these things. - A. No; in consequence of suspicion I sent a man after him that night; I could not find him.

REBECCA WAGSTAFFE sworn. Q. When your husband went out on the morning he has been speaking of, he left you at home. - A. Yes, I went out between eight and nine, I left nobody in the house, I went into the hay-field to my husband, and continued with him till we went together home in the evening.

Q. When you went out in the morning did you fasten the windows and the door of your house. - A. I fastened them all.

Q. Were there any pane of glass broke in your window in the morning when you went out. - A. No, when I returned with my husband in the evening I found a square of glass broke and taken out of the casement, I found the back door opened which I had fastened when I went out, there were some marks on the outside window frame of some person getting in.

Q. You had left no children or servant at home. - A. Nobody at all, there was nobody but my husband and me that was there.

Q. Did you miss any thing when you searched your house. - A. I missed my tea spoons and my table spoons, and my sugar tongs, out of my cupboard.

Q. When had you seen them in the cupboard before. - A. In the morning before I went up stairs and searched my drawers, I missed two table spoons from up stairs and three from down, and I missed my tea spoons and some linen.

Q. Did you miss any other clothes. - A. A gown, petticoat, and a black silk cloak; I have seen a few of the things since.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I produce two handkerchiefs, a pair of worsted stockings, and a silver penny piece, I received them from the constable of Hadley; I heard of the robbery, I went down there by order of the magistrate; the other handkerchiefs I received on the Sunday following at the sign of the Hart's-horn of the publican, who had received it from a waggoner; I looked at the window, and the place where it was broken open, I could see it was opened by a knife or some sharp instrument; the glass was taken out of the lead; the prisoner was taken on the 10th of July and brought to our office. As I was going to the prison with him he acknowledged having five spoons, and this paper he said he had borrowed of the post boy to wrap them up; he said he had found them, he denied that at the office.

THOMAS FENNING sworn. I am constable of Hadley.

Q. Did you deliver to the officer Trott some handkerchiefs, and stockings, and penny pieces. - A. Samuel Barling , the man that was with Mr. Wagstaffe, brought them to me.

SAMUEL BARLING sworn. Q. There is a handkerchief and a pair of stockings, do you know any thing of them. - A. That handkerchief and pair of stockings I bought at the Bull, Pit's End, of the prisoner that stands there, on the same day the robbery was done, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; I heard of the robbery the next day. After I had had my dinner in the public house the prisoner came in and called for some liquor, he sat a considerable time, then he pulled out these stockings and asked who would buy them, he said he must sell them, he wanted money

Q. Did you ask him whose they were and how he came by them. - A. No; after I bought the stockings, he fetched the handkerchief out of the waggon, he had put his bundle in the waggon, the waggon was standing at the door, I bought the handkerchief, the silver penny piece he gave me, he said he brought that from the Cape of Good Hope; I delivered these things to Mr. Wagstaffe, I saw him give them to Fenning the constable; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q.(to Mrs. Wagstaffe) Look at these pair of stockings, have you seen them before. - A. Yes, they belong to my husband, I know them very well, I am sure they are his; to the best of my knowledge there is no mark on them, one has a blue top and the other has not; the handkerchief I know, it is silk and muslin, it is mine, I have had it above a twelvemonth, I made it myself; the silver penny piece is mine, he took it from a little trunk, I know it by the colour, it changed colour by laying, I had such a piece and several others, which I missed; when I went out in the morning this handkerchief was in one of my drawers up stairs; and the stockings were in a chest which stands in the back kitchen.

JOHN PENDRY sworn. Q. What business are you. - A. I was at Barnet on the 3d of July, I was returning home with my father's chaise empty, about four o'clock in the afternoon; as I was coming by the Hart's-horn in Barnet, a man came out of the house and asked me if I would take a person to town, I said I would take him up.

Q. Who was the man you took up. - A. The prisoner; he had a wooden leg, and a bundle with him; when we come to Whetstone he asked me stop at the first public house we come to, to borrow some paper to put some spoons in that he had brought from the Cape of Good Hope.

Q. Did you see any spoons. - A. I had them in my hand, there was five table spoons, he put them

in the paper, and put them in his pocket; I brought him to town and set him down at the Blue Pig in Tottenham Court road with his bundle; he went away from me towards St. Giles's church, I saw no more of him.

BENJAMIN CLEMENTS sworn. I apprehended the prisoner on Hadley Green, just a week after the house was robbed, I delivered him to the constable.

JOHN - sworn. I was with the last witness when he was taken. I knew him when he worked for Mr. Wagstaffe, I saw him the day the robbery was, at the Hart's-horn, I was there putting a horse's shoe on; he came in the waggon, and was set down in the yard about four o'clock in the afternoon, he had a large bundle with him, I saw some silver spoons in his coat pocket, they stuck out, he said he brought them from the Cape of Good Hope to the waggoner; he offered to sell them, he said he had a good many things for sale; I saw him get into the chaise at the gate.

THOMAS NICHOLSON sworn. I am a police officer; the prisoner at the bar was delivered into my custody by the prosecutor and others on the 10th of July; on searching him I found a red and yellow handkerchief with a stocking rolled in it, the fellow stocking was on his leg; I produce them.

Q.(to Mrs. Wagstaffe) Look at those handkerchiefs and stockings. - A. The stockings are my husband's, I know them by the darning, I darned them myself when I went out in the morning, I left them on the arm chair in the house; this handkerchief is mine, it has got some slits in the corner, which I know it by, it was in one of my drawers up stairs.

Q. There has been no other things found has there. - A. No.

Q. Are you a judge of the worth of these articles that have been produced. - A. I suppose about twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in their house.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-6

430. MARY ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , two ounces weight of sewing silk, value 7 s. one ounce weight of thread, value 6 d. a yard of black silk cord, value 20 d. one hundred and fifty yards of ribbon; value 4 l. two cambric caps, value 5 s. and a pocket handkerchief, value 4 d. the property of Mary Cawthorn , widow , in her dwelling house .

MARY CAWTHORN sworn. I live at No. 27, Chiswell street , I am a haberdasher ; the prisoner was my servant ; on the 15th of August her fellow servant the cook informed me that she had robbed me; she was searched; in her pockets were found several pieces of ribbon, four pair of gloves, thread, pins, and needles; in her box was found velvet, caps, an handkerchief, a lace tucker, several bits of ribbon, and several other things.

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer belonging to Worship street; I was not present when the prisoner's pockets were searched, only her box. On the 15th of August, before I got there, the ribbon had been taken out of her pockets and put in the box; here is the pocket handkerchief, and a number of other things that was found in the box; I asked the prisoner how she came by them, she seemed very much alarmed and began to cry, she owned the whole of them belonged to her mistress.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-7

431. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Thomas Kirk , four bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

THOMAS KIRK sworn. I am a seaman ; the prisoner sailed with me in the Admiral Gardner. I called upon him at the Hercules public house, and asked him to take a walk with me to Charing Cross; we walked together to Craig's court, Charing cross; I told him to stop there till I came down, I went to the Artillery office and received four one pound bank notes, a half guinea, one shilling and sixpence. I put my notes in my right hand waistcoat pocket.

Q. Were you sober at that time. - A. I had nothing to drink at all but one draft of porter; we called at a public house and had a quartern of gin, I gave him a shilling, because he was without money; we walked to Bear street, Leicester Fields, and there we had something to eat and drink, I asked him if he knew where Barker, a shipmate lived, he said he did; we went to him, and there we had something to drink with him, I paid for it; I came away from there, and called a coach to drive me to Lower East Smithfield; the prisoner and I got into the coach, I told the coachman if he wanted any thing to drink we would stop at the watering house and have a glass a-piece; we had a shillingsworth of rum and water, he brought it to the coach door, the prisoner jumped out of the coach and called for half a pint of gin, I told him I would not stop by myself, I would go in and drink with him in the house, I paid for what we had; then I asked him to come away, he told me he rather would not, I took him by the hand, and bid him good by; I got into the coach again, when I got to the top of Holborn Hill I missed the four pounds out of my pocket, I called to the coachman, and we went back, and we found the prisoner in the same place that we left him; I asked him the reason he had robbed me when I had given him money in his pocket; he replied he had not, the coachmen were thieves; the coachman sent for an officer, and he was detained; when he found the officer was coming he gave me three one pound notes in my hand.

Q. Were they such as you lost. - A. Yes, the same; the officer coming up he took up the note, and in the scuffle we tore two of them; the landlord told the officer that he had changed a one pound note to pay for a pint of beer; the officer searched him and found more money on him.

Q. You was rather in liquor. - A. I was very sensible, I knew what I was about very well.

ELIZABETH HARDWICKE sworn. Q. Do you keep a public house. - A. Yes, the Coach and Horses in Holborn ; the prisoner and the prosecutor came into our house and called for some liquor, the

prosecutor paid for it and went away.

Q. Did the prisoner stay after him. - A. He did, he was going off, he met with a friend and returned, he called for a pint of beer, and changed a one pound note for it.

THOMAS EKELSO sworn. I am a police officer; the prisoner was searched by me and Trott the officer, we found fourteen shillings and sixpence upon him, I have three one pound notes which I received from the prosecutor, the prosecutor gave Trott and me seven shillings and a halfpenny, which he said the prisoner at the bar gave him with the three one pound notes.

Prisoner's Defence. This man came to me at the Hercules, he called me out of doors and asked me to take a walk with him, I told him I would not; I was afraid I should get intoxicated in liquor; before I went with him he asked me to give him some beer, from there we went to Charing Cross, I stopped at the end of the street while he went up to the office, when he came down he asked me to have something to drink at the White Swan, he called for a quartern of gin, I drank a glass of it, he went to another public house and had a quartern of gin from there, he went to Bloomsbury and had six half pints of gin; the coachman stopped at the Coach and Horses in Holborn, he wanted me to go out of the coach, I told him I would rather stop in the coach rather than go out in the air, I was fearful the air would make me worse as I had been drinking; he gave me some halfpence and the one pound notes, with that he gave me a shove out of the coach, and I put the notes in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-8

432. HARIOT HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of July , one half guinea, a seven shilling piece, and five shillings, the property of John Cullen , privily from his person .

JOHN CULLEN sworn. On the 10th of July between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going along Piccadilly returning home to Knightsbridge, I was laid hold of by the prisoner by the coat; she said, sir, I am in distress, give me something, I was walking very fast, I told her I had not any thing to give her and begged her not to stop me, I knew that I had some halfpence in my pocket, and to get rid of her I was in the act of putting my left hand into my pocket to give them her, I thought I perceived her hand coming from my other pocket, I immediately felt in my pocket to see if I had twenty-two shillings and sixpence, which I knew I had in my pocket before I met her; to my surprize I found it was gone, I immediately said to her where is my money which you have taken out of my pocket, she denied it, I said I am sure you have it, if this is the way you mean to reward my humanity I will punish you for it; I said, let me see what you have got in your hand, I took out of her hand a half guinea and five shillings, there wanted then seven shillings of the money; I said this is a proof that you have taken this money out of my pocket, here it is; she then denied knowing any thing of the seven shilling piece. I had in my pocket, a half guinea, a seven shilling piece, and five shillings.

Q. Did you find the seven shilling piece any where. - A. No, I took her over to the watchman, and he took her to the watchhouse.

Q. How long might she be with you. - A. Not a minute, in fact I could hardly believe that it could be possible that she could take the money in that time; I took the money out of her hand, I kept it in my hand, and gave it to the officer at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me half a guinea and five shillings, he took me up a passage, and after he had connection with me he wanted me to give it him back.

Prosecutor. She accosted me in the street, and almost tore the coat from my shoulder, that is the truth.

- GREGORY sworn. I was at the watchhouse, I was the officer, the prisoner is the person that was brought into the watch house, and this is the money the gentleman delivered to me (producing it); I searched her but could not find the seven shilling piece, she acknowledged taking the money from him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-9

433. MARY ANN DEOCHEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , a silver watch, value 20 s. a silver seal, value 2 s. the property of Henry Zenik , privily from his person .

HENRY ZENIK sworn. On the 31st of July last I was walking in New Gravel lane, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner asked me to go along with her, I went with her to No. 6, Elbow lane , I staid with her about a quarter of an hour, I gave her two shillings in silver; afterwards she drew my watch out of my waistcoat pocket.

Q. Did you perceive her draw the watch out of your waistcoat pocket. - A. Yes, then she took the candle and ran down stairs, and left me in the dark, I did not see her again that night.

ELIZABETH COLLINS sworn. My husband is a seafaring man, I am a tambour worker; the prisoner asked me to pledge the watch for her, she said the watch was left in her care; I pledged it and gave the money and the ticket.

- sworn. I am assistant to Mr. Windsor, pawnbroker. On the first of August Elizabeth Collins pledged this watch, I advanced twenty-eight shillings on it, I produce it.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking a walk in Ratcliffe Highway, he asked me to let him take a walk home with me, he gave me two shillings to get something to drink, he asked what he should give me to be with me some time, he said he had no more money, he would leave me his watch till the morning; after he was gone down stairs I took the candle, I saw the watch lay on a chair, and when I got down stairs he was gone out of the house; I did not hear any thing of his coming back in the mornning, I made free with it, I got that woman to pledge it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-10

434. EDMUND COPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , in the dwelling house of sir Richard Carr Glynn , bart. Charles Mills , Thomas Hallifax , and Henry Parry , an order for the payment of one hundred pounds, value 100 l. their property .

And three other Counts for like felony in the same dwelling house, stating it to be the property of her persons.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp).

HENRY PARRY sworn Examined by Mr. Bolland. I believe, sir, you are a partner in the house of sir Richard Carr Glynn - A. I am.

Q. Will you have the goodness to state what are the names of the partners in that house. - A. Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Charles Mills , Thomas Halifax, and Henry Parry.

Q. Were you in possession of any draft drawn by Wade, Stables, and Wilson. - A. I was, it was directed to Messrs. Marsh, Sibbald and Co. I did not receive it myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Is there not one person who participates in a profits besides those whom you have mentioned. A. Yes, there is a clerk, he has a salary, and a commission or centage, his name is Johnson; there is no other partners.

WILLIAM STABLES sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I believe you are partner in the house of Wade, Stables, and Wilson. - A. I am.

Q. Will you look at that draft, and state to the part whether that draft was drawn on your house. I believe it was a draft of my own drawing, I gave it to Messrs. Sanxter and Atkins, in payment them.

DAVID TAYLOR sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are clerk to Messrs. Sanxter and Atkins, did you receive that draft from that gentleman. - A.I received a draft of the same sum and of the same rate; I paid it on the 26th of July into the house of Messrs. Glynn and Co.

HENRY CARTER sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I am clerk to Messrs. Glynn and Co. I cannot recollect receiving the draft, I can prove by my books that I received a draft of the same amount, it is the original entry, I made it at the time I received it. (The entry of the draft read in court.) On the 26th of July I received a draft upon Marsh and Co. for one hundred pounds, which was placed to the account of Messrs. Sanxter and Atkins, it was paid in by Mr. Taylor their clerk.

JAMES SKELTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

You are a clerk to Messrs. Glynn and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that draft which has been produced, when did you see that in your house - A. I cannot say this is the draft, I charged out a draft of one hundred pounds on the 26th of July to Mr. Bannister, I made an entry of it in my book; this is the entry,

"one hundred pound draft on Marsh and Co.' There were two other drafts of Marsh and Co. one was eighty-five pounds three shillings, and the other was two hundred pounds.

Q. Then there was but one entry of one hundred pound to Marsh and Co. - A. There was not, I gave it to Bannister, our out-door clerk, for the purpose of collecting it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. What day of the week was this. - A. Saturday, towards the close of the evening.

Q.You make the charge, he calls them over, and you check, to see that he has all the bills with him. - A Yes, and Bannister takes them in his possession till he has sorted them.

Q. Then they were deposited in a box in the care of Mr. Parry, and by him locked up until Monday morning. - A. Yes.

Court. There are other clerks which you call outdoor clerks. - A. Yes, Bannister is one, and the prisoner is another, they both put their notes in one box, they are wrapped up in paper, separate, and tied up, and sometimes their names are wrote upon.

THOMAS BANNISTER sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. You are a collecting clerk there, do you recollect calling over with Mr. Skelton on the 26th of July any draft which he charged to your account. A. Yes.

Q. When was it to be delivered to you. - A. On the Monday.

Q. They consisted of bills for payment. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any draft drawn by Wade, Stables, and Wilson. - A. I did not look so particularly at that, because we merely called them over according to the sum; I called over the draft and Mr. Skelton read the book, the draft tallied with the book.

Q. On Saturday evening what did you do with these bills so charged to you. - A. I sorted them for the walk on Monday, bound them up with a bit of paper, and pinned them and put them in the drawer used for that purpose; on Monday morning the paper was round it, and coming from my round I found I could not answer this one hundred pounds; when I came home I found I was one hundred pounds deficient.

Q. State to the court what made you take these steps that you took with regard to the prisoner at the bar. - A. From the extraordinary manner in which he went on.

Mr. Gurney. Tell us facts. - A. He had two new suits of clothes, and the last evening that he was housekeeper he could not eat the supper, he ordered a fowl and some oyster sauce, at his own expence, and very lately he has been continually going to the Circus, and from thence to Vauxhall, with some girls of the town; in consequence of that we came to a determination to open a closet which belonged to him, the prisoner kept the key of it; it was on Sunday the 10th of August we opened it, and found therein three five pound bank notes, Mr. Aldridge and Mr. Willats were with me.

Q. When you found you were a hundred pounds deficient did you tell Mr. Parry of it. - A. No, the next day Mr. Hallifax told me I was to make it good or my securities.

Court. You had no knowledge of the deficiency till you came home to render the account at one

o'clock. - A. None.

Q. Why did not you immediately tell your master. - A. I applied to some of the clerks; I went to Mr. Marsh to stop the payment at five o'clock; I returned at one, I found at four o'clock that it was drawn by Sanxton and Atkins, I then immediately went to stop payment.

GEORGE ALDRIDGE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are a clerk in the house of Messrs. Glynn and Co. the prisoner was also a clerk. - A. He was.

Q. What was his salary. - A. Twenty-five pounds a year and small perquisites, and board in the house.

Q. When was the first time that you heard any thing of the loss of this hundred pound draft. - A. On Monday the 28th of July, the day it was lost, Mr. Bannister mentioned it when he came home from his walk.

Q. In consequence of any thing that you observed in the prisoner's conduct did that occasion any suspicion concerning him. - A. Yes, he used to go continually to the Circus and to Vauxhall with some girls of his acquaintance, and four nights in the course of a fortnight he slept out; he bought a gold seal, and had some new clothes come home.

Q. In consequence of all these suspicions did you, Bannister, and Willats, determine upon any plan to find out whether he was concerned in taking this note. - A. Yes, upon Sunday morning the 10th of August, I, Bannister, and Willats, went to the closet used by the prisoner, it was locked, and the prisoner had the key, as far as I know; the prisoner had slept out that night, we forced the closet, and after searching it some time, I found three five pound notes in the bottom drawer on the left hand side of this closet; the notes have been in the care of Mr. Parry, I gave them to Mr. Parry that morning they were found, we put our signatures on them when we found them. (The notes shewn to the witness.)

Q. Looking at these notes with your signature upon them, have you any doubt that these are the notes you found in the prisoner's closet. - A. No doubt, we all three went together to the closet, and all assisted in breaking it open.

Q.(to Bannister) Look at these notes, and tell me whether there are any marks on them you know, and whether these are the notes you found. - A. These are the notes.

- WILLATS sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. You are a clerk to sir Richard Carr Glynn and Co. A. I am.

Q. When did you first hear of the loss of a draft of one hundred pounds. - A. On Monday the 28th of July between two and three o'clock, from Mr. Bannister.

Q. Did you observe any thing in the prisoner's conduct that excited suspicion. - A. He used to go every night to the Circus or Vauxhall, and four nights after this note was missing he mentioned that he slept with a girl of the town at the Fountain.

Q. On the 10th of August, you, Bannister, and Aldridge, went to the prisoner's cupboard. - A. We did.

Q. Who was it that suggested it. - A. I believe I was the first that suggested it. On the 10th of August we went to Copps's cupboard, and took out three five pound notes, these are the notes, I know them by the initials that I put on them.

WILLIAM TITE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are clerk to Marsh, Wade, and Stables. - A. I am.

Q. Look at that draft, do you remember that draft being presented to your house for payment. - A. It is my cancelling, I paid it on the 28th of July in ten five pounds bank notes and fifty one's.

Q. Are these three of the notes that you paid on that day. - A. Yes, these three five pound notes answer to the dates and numbers that I paid for the one hundred pounds check.

Q. Do you happen to recollect to whom it was paid to. - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Do you know that it was not paid to the prisoner. - A. I should have known him if it was him, it was paid to a man dressed as a labourer; the prisoner has been to our house sometimes.

JOHN MINNS sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland.

You live with Mr. Limer, shoemaker in Fleet street, who works for the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes; on the 28th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening he called upon me and paid me a bill of six pounds fifteen shillings, odd, in six one pound notes; by the bulk I think he might have twenty when he took them out.

GEORGE SLOOK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are shopman to Mr. Price a tailor. - A. I am; on the 28th of July last the prisoner paid seven pounds eighteen shillings in one pound notes. I saw he had more about him, they were rolled up.

THOMAS HALLIFAX sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. You are a partner in sir Richard Carr Glynn's house. - A. Yes.

Q. What salary had that young man. - A. Twenty-five pounds a year; I do not know what the perquisites amounted to; we paid him on Midsummer day six pounds five.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-11

435. JOHN WHALLEY , alias HOWELL , was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

WILLIAM BIBBY sworn. I am clerk to Mr. Samuel Newport , New Prison, Clerkenwell, I produce the certificate of his conviction, which I received of Mr. Shelton.

(The certificate read in court.)

MIDDLESEX. - These are to certify, that at the Goal delivery at Newgate, holden at Justice-hall in the Old Bailey, on the 19th of February, in the forty-sixth year of his Majesty's reign, before his Majesty's justices then present, John Whalley , alias Howell, was in due form of law tried and convicted for that he on the 12th of October, in the forty-fifth year aforesaid, one cheese, value 10 s. the goods and chattels of William Hudson , he feloniously did steal, take, and carry away, and the said John Whalley , alias Howell, was thereupon ordered and adjudged to be transported for the term of seven years.

Bibby. I apprehended his man upon hearing he was returned from transportation; I know him well, I have had him in custody several times.

JOHN MASON sworn. I am turnkey of Newgate on the felon side.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, his name is John Whalley .

Q. Were you present when he was tried in February last. - A. Yes, and I was present when he received his sentence, I was likewise present when he was delivered from Newgate.

Bibby. On Tuesday the 12th of August, I was coming along Fenchurch-street, leading into Grace-church-street, I asked the prisoner how he did, he told me very well, I told him I thought he did not look very well, and that he had been transported for seven years, he told me that he had been pardoned and had got a regular discharge, I told him I did not know of that, at any rate I should detain him and take him before the lord mayor, on Wednesday, and if he could satisfy the lord mayor I should be content; he made resistance and told the public that I wanted to press him, that I should be the means of breaking his mother's heart; he drew a knife from his pocket and opened it, he said, cut my bloody head off, I told him no, I should not use him ill, he used many blackguard expressions, in fact, he cut his own hand with the knife, and I believe he would have done me some injury, provided the knife had not been taken out of his hand; there were two gentlemen who assisted, and I procured an officer, and he was examined.

Prisoner's Defence. The words he mentioned I did not make use of; I had a conditional pardon to go on board a ship and serve his Majesty; there were three men that were on board the ship, who had been tried for capital offences, they asked me if I would desert, I told them no, they said they should not hesitate, if I did not go with them immediately they would throw me overboard; when I got on shore it was my determination to get them apprehended, they kept me in the field by day, and marched me by night.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-12

436. JAMES MADAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a quart glass decanter, value 12 s. the property of Samuel Shepherd , Joseph Shepherd , and Samuel Rixton .

BENJAMIN SHEPHERD sworn. I am assistant to Mr. Samuel Shepherd, Joseph Shepherd, and Samuel Rixton , they are glass manufacturers at Charing Cross , the prisoner was a porter in the house; the evening before he was taken in custody I went to Bow-street to get an officer to be in waiting in the morning, I see the prisoner come out about seven o'clock on Friday morning; the 8th of August, I had placed myself in the parlour adjoining the shop, I saw him wait a little while about the shop, and after the boy was gone up stairs I saw him take a decanter, he placed it within his breeches, and waited at the door for the space of a minute, then he went out and shut the door immediately, I immediately ran after him, the officer who was outside waiting for him, stopped him with me, we brought him back and took the decanter from him; I produce it.

Q. Are you able to shy that is the decanter that you saw the prisoner take from the shop. - A. I am, it is the property of Messrs. Shepherd and Rixton.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Do you live in the house. - A. I do.

Q. Do you not know that this man was in the habit of going out in the morning to get some rum and milk for the purpose of treating the girls. - A. I do not.

Q. When you took him did he not say so; I see there is no stopple to the decanter, if a man had taken it, for his own use, he would have taken it with the stopple, the decanter would have been more useful with the stopple. - A. Certainly.

JOHN DORRINGTON sworn. I am an officer. On the morning of the 8th of September, I placed myself at the outside door, I saw the prisoner, he was looking about him as if he thought some person might see him; I brought him back to the shop, and took this decanter out of his breeches, this is the decanter.

Mr. Alley. Did he say that he took it to get some rum for the girls. - A. Mr. Shepherd told me yesterday that he heard so.

Prisoner's Defence. When I left the shop I was going to the Rising Sun public house; Mr. Shepherd and Mr. Dorrington took me in the street, they asked me where I was going to, I told them to the Rising Sun, I have frequently took glasses to get liquor, and washed them afterwards.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-13

437. ROBERT BREWER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , four bushel of split beans, value 20 s. the property of William Jupp .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

WILLIAM JUPP sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am a cornchandler , living at Brentford, the prisoner at the bar was my servant . On the 2d of September I sent the prisoner to my miller at Drayton to get the remainder of some beans; in consequence of information, at night I asked him if he had not left a sack of beans to an ostler for four shillings at Harlington , he said he had, he was sorry for it, he had brought me home four sacks and a half from the miller, instead of that he should have brought five and a half.

JOHN KEENE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live at Drayton.

Q. Do you remember delivering any sacks of beans to the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, on the third of September, I delivered him five sacks and a codger.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-14

438. GEORGE REDFEARN was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-15

439. THOMAS MILLER and MATILDA MILLER were indicted for that they on the 11th of August , one piece of base coin, resembling the courent silver coin of this kingdom, called a shilling,

they falsely, decertfully, and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, against the duty of their allegiance , and

Several other counts for like offence.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an officer, in consequence of information I went to the prisoners' lodgings, on the 11th of August, about ten in the morning, one room was a one pair of stairs room and the other was a two pair, I I went in company with Brown, my brother officer, we found the house door open, we went up one pair of stairs, and opened the one pair of stairs room door, the moment we opened the room we secured the man and the woman; one of us bolted the door least any other person might come, we instantly examined their fingers and thumbs, and on each of the prisoners we found then green and yellow; I took a pin and pricked from under their nails, and took out that which had a strong smell of aqua-fortis, we both examined them; we told the prisoners they had been working lately, we told them if they smelled their own fingers they had the smell of aqua fortis.

Q. What did they say either of them to that. - A. They behaved exceedingly quiet, they made no answer; I then desired Mr. Brown to search the man, and to assist in searching the woman, when he had done with the man I searched the woman; among good money in her pocket I found nine shillings and two sixpences of base coin, I produce them, there was twelve shillings and sixpence good money in the same pocket; Mr. Brown assisted in searching the other pocket, I found nothing more on her person; after this I went up the other pair of stairs, which I understood to be their room, and left Brown in the charge of the prisoner; when I got into the second story room, I found the door open, I found this trunk laying on a bed, it contains forty counterfeit half crowns, three dollars, counterfeit, and six sixpences not fit for circulation; I found this little hand vice near by the fire side in the two pair of stairs room; an hand vice is used when they file, I found this piece of cork; that is likewise used in the process, I found this piece of leather with stuff upon them which they use for clearing up these sixpences to make them fit for circulation, I found this pair of scissars.

A. Are they calculated for any purpose. - A. Goods that are not cut with an engine they clip them round, and then they file them; I found several sheets of sand paper, that is used also; I found this tin, it is like a cheese toaster, this put upon charcoal is used for the purpose of coining; I will not say it has positively been used; I found several pieces of sand paper that had been used, that vial I will not say what has been in it; these sixpences can be put in a state of circulation with this piece of leather; on this cloth are several stains of liquid, such as aqua fortis.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was the first person that went into the room, I immediately secured them and handcuffed them together, I saw what was taken from their nails, their hands, I believe, were coloured with aqua fortis; I searched the man, and found on him three shillings and sixpence good silver, and some halfpence.

Q. Did you find any base metal on his person. A. One sixpence; I then searched the cupboard, there I found a quantity of le dust, I found this file with the filings of metal in the teeth in it; on the shelf of the same cupboard I found one counterfeit shilling, and I found some cream of tartar that is used in coining, I found by the side of the fire place in the same room, this charcoal; I found this bottle, in the cupboard, it a pears to me to be aqua fortis, but there has been asafoetida in it likewise; I found three pieces of cork in the shape they are now, they are necessary for coining; on the mantle piece I found a small piece of blacking, that is likewise used; I found these two pocket books in Mrs. Miller's pocket, and in one of the pocket books a counterfeited shilling; in this bottle I found some white liquor; these pans have been set over the fire apparently.

Q. Are these used in coining. - A. Yes, I found several cloths with the appearance of aqua fortis on different parts of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You know they are also applied to domestic purposes. - A. No doubt.

Q. You could not find any aqua fortis. - A. There was but a very little quantity.

Q. There is asafoetida in the vial, you know aqua fortis is necessary to complete the coining. - A. Yes.

Q. There is no aqua fortis there. - A. Very little.

MARY LASTER sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Do you keep the house where the two prisoners lodge. - A. I have the letting of the apartments.

Q. Are these the apartments of the two prisoners. - A. The one pair back room and the two pair back room.

ELIZABETH CAWTHORNE sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. You had an acquaintance with Mrs. Miller. - A. Yes, I had an introduction from Mr. Rogers of Shadwell.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mrs. Miller at any time about the materials that she had in her house. - A. Yes, she told me on Thursday the 7th of August that she had a deal of money in the house, but it was unfinished, and as soon as it was finished there would be plenty.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. You have seen all these articles. - A. Yes.

Q. Are the whole of the articles produced now, necessary to be used in the colouring of counterfeited silver. - A. Yes, and that bottle I saw on the 23d of August I found it had a smell of asafoetida, but still there was a prevalent smell of aqua fortis, I had no doubt but there was aqua fortis in the bottle.

MR. NICOLL sworn. I am the monier of the Mint; the nine shillings are all counterfeit.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-16

440. JOHN BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July , five shillings, the property of Nathaniel Searle , privily from the person of Jane Searle .

JANE SEARLE sworn. I am a married woman, my husband's name is Nathaniel Searle . On Wednesday

the 30th of July I was at Sadler's Wells , the prisoner sat there on my right hand; about nine o'clock, when the cascade went off, he took the opportunity of cutting my pocket.

Q. Did you perceive any thing. - A. No, just as the curtain dropped I got up to give a daughter of mine a shilling to get some oranges, I put my hand into my right hand pocket, I heard the money drop into the prisoner's hand as I suppose.

Q. You heard money fall somewhere. - A. Yes, I put my hand into my pocket to see if it was safe, and there was no money at all, I had only my cloak in my pocket; he was at that time sitting by me, when I heard the money fall, he never got up from his seat, but he rolled himself into the side slip of the shilling gallery and was gone immediately, directly when he went away I said that man has robbed me, I examined my pocket and found the bottom cut in a slit, it was a new pocket made with double cotton, I had felt my money safe in my pocket about an hour before; I saw no more of him for twenty minutes, then he returned back again, the people took him in custody, I charged him with the robbery, and he returned to me four shillings and five pence halfpenny, he said if I would go down stairs with him he would give me more, and not make a bother there; I refused going down, he asked me if I was satisfied, I told him I was, but the officers being there they took him in custody. One of the shillings I should know again.

- KNOTT sworn. I was the officer at Sadler's Wells that night, I was called from the pit to the one shilling gallery; when I came there he was just in the act of returning the money to the woman, at that time I said I must have the money; I took him in custody and took him into a private room, I found a one pound note and a half guinea in his fob; in the room that we searched him I found a small crooked knife that did not belong to any body.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. You cannot swear to that. - A. No.

Q. How long had he been out of the room before you found it. - A. About half an hour.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I was at the searching of the prisoner, I produce the pocket which was cut. I asked him for his name, he hesitated for a little time, I asked him why he hesitated, he said his name was John Brown, the next morning I found his name was John Bird .

(The money produced, and one of the shillings identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-17

441. ABRAHAM KNIGHT was indicted for that he about the hour of one on the night of the 22d of July , being in the dwelling house of George Smith , feloniously did steal four great coats, value 5 l. a waistcoat, value 12 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of the said George Smith , and that he afterwards on the same night burglariously did break and get out of the same .

GEORGE SMITH sworn. I am a stable keeper , I live in Tottenham Court road , the prisoner was in my service. On the 21st of July he was under ostler , he slept in the accounting house in the yard, where saddles, bridles, and some great coats were left, belonging to gentlemen, I knew he was in bed before twelve o'clock where this property was kept on the 21st of July last; in the morning soon after four o'clock the head ostler informed me that the back gate was open, and the things were gone.

Q. All you know is from the information of other; you say this room that he slep in, saddles, great coats, and bridles, were put there that belonged to customers. - A. Yes, they were put there for safety, there are two doors to that room, one went into the dwelling house, and the other into the yard, they are fastened with locks, the door that goes into the dwelling house I locked myself at eleven o'clock at night, he was in the room then but not in bed; the door in the yard has a spring lock and a latch.

RICHARD MOORE sworn. I am head ostler to Mr. Smith.

Q. Do you sleep at Mr. Smith's. - A. No, I sleep at my own house, on the 21st of July I was at Mr. Smiths, I left his yard at half past eleven.

Q. Do you know in what state the prisoner's room was when you left the yard. - A. The prisoner was in the room, I shut his room door that goes into the yard, and I left him there, I fastend the door both with the spring lock and the latch; I left four great coats there, a waistcoat, and a pair of buck skin gloves in one of the waistcoat pockets.

Q. Any body else sleep there besides the prisoner. - A. No, I returned in the morning about twenty minutes past four o'clock.

Q. Was it light at that time. - A. It was perfectly day light, I was going to call our post boy, he was to go to Barnet that morning at seven o'clock; I turned my head a little bit and saw the gates next John-street a little open, I went to the accompting house, where this man slept, to call him up to do his work, I saw the four great coats and the prisoner was gone, and the waistcoat; I never saw the prisoner again till he was taken.

ISAAC HORNER sworn. I am in the employ of Mr. Smith; I only know that the prisoner was in the employ of Mr. Smith, he absconded and the coats were missing. On the 5th of September, between one and two o'clock, in St. John-street, opposite Charterhouse-lane, I saw the prisoner, I asked him what made him go away in the manner he did, I signified to him that I should take him in custody, he ran away, I dismounted my horse and gave it in charge to a man and ran after him, he ran into a little court where there was no throughfare, I took him and gave him to a constable.

Q.(to prosecutor) Did you ever find these great coats again. - A. No.

Q.(to Moore) Can you take upon you to value the great coats. - A. I can safely say the four great coats are worth ten guineas.

Q. Can you positively swear that the four great coats are worth more than forty shillings. - A. I can.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty, I am quite a stranger here.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings, but not of breaking out of the dwelling house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18060917-18

442. CATHERINE MACNALTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , nineteen cotton shawls, value 36 s. the property of William Harby , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HARBY sworn. I am a linen draper , No. 137, Great Earl-street, Sevendials . On the 28th of August the prisoner came to my shop to purchase a cap, value two shillings and sixpence, she paid for it, after which she requested to look at some shawls, I was in the back room, I saw her come in and I saw her go out two or three times, the last time that she went out she was brought back by a constable; I searched her, we took three shawls from under her clothes, she then said she bought them in Holborn, afterwards she said she would pay for them if we, would let her go, she offered two guineas to let her go; we took notice she appeared very pregnant we asked her if she was pregnant, she said yes; we took her into a little back room, the constable searched her, we found eight shawls in each pocket, she had drawn the shawls in her pockets before her, it appeared as if she was pregnant.

Q. Had they been taken out of your shop. - A. They had; about an hour before I had them in my hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. How many persons were there in your shop. A. Two, they are not here.

JOHN NEWNHAM sworn. I was just coming by the White Lion, I saw the woman with her petticoats up to her knees, I saw three shawls hanging down; I says, halloa, mistress, what have you got here, I took hold of her and brought her into this man's shop, I said you have just taken them from here.

Q. How far was this shop from the place where you took her. - A. About twice the length of this table.

Q.(to prosecutor) What is the value of these shawls. - A. Thirty six shillings; they are marked S and R, my own mark, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of taking them shawls as this infant in my arms. I picked them up about thirty yards from the shop, I have got good and honest witnesses that will prove it.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing but not privately in the shop.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-19

443. MARY WOOTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , a bed gown, value 7 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a guinea, an half guinea, three seven shilling pieces, eighteen shillings, and nine sixpences, the property of Sarah Chipperfield , widow , in her dwelling house .

SARAH CHIPPERFIELD sworn. I am a widow; I lived at the begining of this month in Peartree Court, facing the Gun in Shoreditch , I had the lower room

Q. Who do you hire it of. - A. Of a gentleman in Hoxton Square, I cannot tell his name; the whole of the house is let out in tenements.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes she lived with me to look after my family, she lived with me only a week, on the Tuesday that she robbed me on the Wednesday.

Q. Where did she use to sleep when she was with you. - A. In my room, on the side of the bed.

Q. Had you hired her by the week. - A. Yes, and I paid her weekly.

Q. At what time was it that you missed any of your property. - A. I get my living in the street, I set in the street till ten or eleven o'clock, I sell fish and fruit; I always made it a rule to carry my silver and gold, or whatever I had, in a purse, which I put in my bosom; when I go to bed I take it out of my bosom and put it in my pocket, and I put my pocket under my head.

Q. You recollect the night that you was robbed. - A. Yes, I was robbed in the morning on the 3d of this month.

Q. When you went to bed at night, what did you do with your purse. - A. I took it out of my bosom, and put it in my pocket; as usual, I had in it a guinea, a half guinea, three seven shillings pieces, and nineteen shillings and sixpence; to the best of my recollection.

Q. What time was it. - A. It might be twelve o'clock when I went to bed, she and my children were in bed in the same room when I went to bed.

Q. What time did you awake in the morning. - A. About seven o'clock.

Q. When you awoke in the morning, did you see or hear any thing of the prisoner. - A. I looked round when I awoke, to look for her, she was gone, I thought she might be gone out to get something to light the fire, I went to sleep again, I awoke again in a few minutes, I thought she might have come in, she did not come in, I said to some of the children, did you see nurse, I looked under my head for my pockets and they were gone; after I missed my pockets I put on the remainder of my things, I spoke to my neighbours, and said she had robbed me of all my money.

Q. Did you miss any thing besides your pockets with the money in it. - A. I went to my drawers, and missed two silk handkerchiefs, and a pocket handkerchief out of them.

Q. How long did you stay at home that morning. - A. I went directly after her, but could not find her; on the seventh of this month I saw her again, a person told me she saw her go down Curtain Road; I found her at the public house next to the office, Worship-street, she was there drinking half a pint of porter, I says to her how came you to think of robbing me with five fatherless children, she replied if you live in a bad place where they rob you, more shame for them; I said you bad woman you have robbed me, she said you cannot stop me on a Sunday, I got an officer, the officer took her in a room and searched her, I was present, the officer took an old lace cap of mine out of her pocket, which had lain in my drawer.

Q. Did he take any thing else from her belonging to you. - A. A small bottle, and a bad sixpence, that was in my purse, with the money, there was nothing else of mine that was found upon her.

Q. Did you ever see any other part of your property, the gown or handkerchief. - A. No.

MARY WHITE sworn. I live in Peartree Court in the samehouse with Chipperfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, by living with her.

Q. Do you recollect the day when you heard of Mrs. Chipperfield being robbed. - A. Yes, I saw her in the morning about half past seven.

Q. Do you mean you saw the prisoner. - A. Yes, I saw her coming out of Mrs. Chipperfield's with something in her lap.

Q. You did not see what it was. - A. No, she went towards Shoreditch church, towards Hackney Road.

Q. Did you see her come back again. - A. No.

WILLIAM LOCKLEY sworn. I took up the prisoner and searched her, on Sunday five o'clock, in the afternoon, I found in her pocket a bottle, a cap, and a bad sixpence; the prisoner said she was innocent, I could not take her in custody of a Sunday.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Look at that cap. - A. I know that cap by the lace, I dare say I have had it two years; I am sure it is my cap, it was in the drawer, with my handkerchief.

Q. How much money did you lose. - A. A guinea, half a guinea, three seven shilling pieces, and some silver, I am sure they were in my purse, in my pocket at that time.

Q. You said she had been with you a week. - A. Yes, I gave her four shillings and sixpence a-week and her victuals, she had lived with me a week on the Tuesday, I paid her on Monday, she came on a Monday, I had not paid her at all for the Tuesday.

Q. Now look at the sixpence. - A. I can swear to the sixpence; on Tuesday an acquaintance of mine asked me to give her change for a shilling, I took my purse out of my bosom, I gave her that sixpence, she said this is a bad sixpence, I looked at the sixpence, I said it is a bad one indeed, I gave her another and put it in the purse again; I am sure it was in my purse, the prisoner did not deny it at the justice's, she said I gave her the sixpence on that morning, but I never gave her none; the bottle I used to put a bit of myrtle in, or any thing that I brought from the market, she has made a gin bottle of it, I saw the bottle on the Thursday before.

Q. You do not know whether it has been in your room since Thursday. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday morning Mrs. Chipperfield paid me, she abused me, and told me that she knew of a girl that would do better than me, she gave me that sixpence, I had not a farthing when I went out of the house in my pocket, nor nothing but my two or three clothes.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her good character, believing this to be her first offence.]

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-20

444. MARY BALLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of July , in the dwelling house of Ann Palmer , a bank note, value 10 l. and a bank note value 1 l. the property of Caroline Susan Herbert .

CAROLINE SUSAN HERBERT sworn. In July last I lived at No. 11, Dean-street , in Mrs. Palmer's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, she lived in the house while I was there as servant.

Q. Do you remember on the 9th of July her coming into the room. - A. Yes, it was in the morning about nine o'clock, I was awaked by the rustling of the curtains, the prisoner called out to me not to be, alarmed, it was only Mary come to take the candlesticks, she took them from the chair.

Q. At that time where was the money. - A. I had put it the night before on the dressing table, it was in my purse.

Q. Were there any bank notes. - A. There were notes to the amount of fourteen pounds, there was one ten pound bank note, I believe the others were one pound notes, I am sure there was a ten pound note, as to the others I am not sure.

Q. You had left this purse on your dressing table when you went to bed, I wish to know if you know what money you had in your purse. - A. I had expended some money in the day, having to go to Windsor.

Q. Do you know the number of the note. - A. Yes, I sent to Liverpool to know the number of the note from whence I received it; I saw the girl lay her hand upon the place, exactly where I put my purse, but I cannot swear that it was my purse that she took away, I heard a rustling, upon that I got up, I saw her take something from the very spot where I had placed it, when I got up I was just awaked, but I was so very sleepy that I could not tell whether I should arise or not; in consequence of suspecting her having taken something, I got up soon afterwards.

Q. Did you go to your dressing table. - A. Yes.

Q. Was your purse there. - A. No, it was not, the purse and the notes were gone, I followed down stairs after her, and while I was putting on a night gown she returned into the front room, and put the purse in the table drawer in the front room.

Q. How soon was this afterwards that you got up. - A. I dare say it was not above ten minutes altogether.

Q. You heard her go into another room, and there you found your purse with two one pound notes. - A. Yes, and the same seven shilling piece and some silver was in it that I had left there.

Q. You had searched the drawers before she came up. - A. Yes, with my child, and the purse was not there; I pursued her afterwards from information that I received from a companion of her's; I went down to Mrs. Palmer immediately, she was in bed, I awaked her from her sleep, and I found the prisoner was gone.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner again. - A. I saw her at Captain Fleming 's in Titchfield-street, she came in there the same day before eleven o'clock, with a large parcel under her arm.

Q. Did you then charge her with having taken

your property. - A. Yes, she denied it, and afterwards the acknowledged it,

Q. Before she acknowledged it did you tell her it would be better for her to tell you. - A. No, I told her I was determined to have my money, or she must be punished, then she confessed it; I said I saw her take it, and she confessed it immediately.

- LUCAS sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 4, Rider's court, Leicester square, I produce a ten pound note. When I came in the shop about nine o'clock on the 9th of July, a decent dressed short person, I believe it was the prisoner but she was decently dressed, I cannot swear it was her, the prisoner or some other person very much like her, came into my shop, the lad in my shop was going to deliver her a small parcel, I took hold of the parcel, and sent the lad down stairs to his breakfast; I put the parcel towards her, she put down a ten pound note for me to give her change for it.

Q. What did the parcel contain. - A. A table cloth, for four shillings and three pence halfpenny; I observed to her it was such a trifle to give change for, to which she did not make an answer, I then asked her her name and where she lived, she answered me her name was Mary Freeman , living at No. 18, Lower Water lane, Cheapside, which I wrote upon the back of the note, I then gave her change.

Q. Do you remember the table-cloth being pledged at your shop. - A. No.

Q. You will not swear that it was the prisoner that paid that note at your shop, - A. I have very little reason to doubt it, she was very differently dressed, I gave her in change a five pound note, a two pound note and two ones, and the rest in silver; I produce the ten pound note.

- sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 26, Cranbourn, street Leicester square

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, on the 9th of July last, about ten in the morning, she came to redeem two articles that were in pledge, and bought different articles of wearing apparel, she paid me seven shillings and two pence for the sheets that were in pledge, and for the articles that she purchased, to the best of my recollection, two pounds ten shillings, she gave me a two pound note, and a one pound note.

Q. Had she any other money about her. - A. I thought she had a five pound note in her hand, indeed she offered me the five pound note, I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner. I did not offer you the five pound note.

Witness. You did, you had all the notes in your hand.

Prisoner. I had not.

- sworn. I am a parish officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning in Titchfield street, Marylebone, I searched her, and found two seven shilling pieces, and sixpence in small change, and some halfpence; I enquired what she had done with the bank notes, she referred me to Mr. Lucas, where she had changed it to redeem a table-cloth, which is in my possession; I looked round and saw a quantity of linen which she had purchased at a linen draper's, and the bill of parcels was with it.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Look at the ten pound note, can you speak to it from your own knowledge, can you from any mark that is on that note say that it is the ten pound note that you lost from your pocketbook. - A. No, the account that I had of it from Liverpool was, there was Strut upon it, and I see the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I leave myself to the mercy of the jury.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-21

445. THOMAS MARIOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July , a wooden pipe, value 18 s. the property of the governor and proprietors of the New River company .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES DOWNES sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You belong to the New River company. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of any pipe being placed in Kingsland Road . - A. Yes, it was brought there in a truck, I had it in my custody in Union street, Kingsland Road, it was placed there for repairs; I left the pipe there on the 22d of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed it at ten at night; on the next morning, from information, I went to the prisoner's house, Saunders's Gardens, Kingsland Road, he is a pump maker.

Q. Who went with you. - A. Mr. Anderson; at that house I found a wooden pipe.

Q. Was that pipe you found there the one you brought to Union street, Kingsland Road, on the Tuesday morning. - A. I have not the least doubt but it is the company's pipe.

Q. Did it bear the same appearance as it had when you lost it. - A. No, he had squared it then all the length but nine inches.

Jury. What length was it. - A. Five yards long, it laid then across the prisoner's door, I did not take it away.

SHADRACH JACKSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an ostler at the Basing House, Kingsland Road.

Q. Do you remember on the 22d of July observing any men, and what they were doing. - A. I saw a good many men among the pipes with a truck, I was busy, I cannot say how many nor did I see them take the pipe away, I went about my business, and when I came back again the men were gone.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you you know his person. - A. I do not.

JOHN ARSTRONG sworn. I am an officer; I took the prisoner in custody on Thursday July the 24th in Saunders's Gardens.

WILLIAM ANDERSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. On Wednesday evening I went to the prisoner's house, Saunders's Gardens, with James Downes .

Q. Did you find any thing there. - A. I found a pipe in the prisoner's premises in a small inclosed yard, it was partly transformed into the shape of a pump, and a bit of the pipe had been partly cut away with a cross-cut saw, in order to take out the hook which is driven into the wood; one end of the pipe was not defaced at all.

Jury. Did you find that part which was cut off. A. No, but still on the end of the pipe there was the place where the hook had been taken out very evident, I knew it to belong to the New River company.

Q. Did you take the pipe away. - A. No, the pipe was removed from there to Kingsland Crescent, No. 1, in a gentleman's yard; the prisoner told us where he had removed it, he said it was not ours, he had bought it of a man of the name of Basing, the other side of the water.

Prisoner's Defence. They have taken a piece of timber out of my yard, they said it came out of the said pipe; I bought it of Mr. Basing, and I have got the receipt for my money.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-22

446. WILLIAM HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , two sheets, value 8 s. the property of Charles Kemp , in a lodging room .

CHARLES KEMP sworn. I live at the Black Lion, Berwick street, St. James's , I am a victualler . On Saturday the 26th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner enquired of me if I could let him have a lodging, I let him a lodging for two shillings a-week, he slept there on the Saturday and on the Sunday evening; on the Monday morning he went away about eight or nine o'clock, I never saw him again till I saw him at Worship street office; when the girl went to make the bed the sheets were missing from the bed.

Q. Did you ever find your sheets again. - A. Yes, they were pledged at the pawnbroker's.

RICHARD BERRY sworn. I am a pawnbroker; on the 28th of July, a pair of sheets were pledged at my shop for seven shillings, by a man of the name of Williams, I cannot recollect the man, I took the pledge in; I produce the sheets.

(The sheets identified by the prosecutor.)

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer of Worship-street, the prisoner was brought to the office in custody on the 22d of August; there were a number of duplicates found upon him, they were given to me by William Lack ; I produce the duplicate, I went to the pawnbroker's and found out the property.

WILLIAM LACK sworn. I am an headborough of Islington; I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of August, I searched him, I found upon him forty-three duplicates; this is one of them that Mr. Ray produced, I marked it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never slept in that man's house in my life, I do not know any thing of the sheets.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-23

447. WILLIAM WALLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a coat, value 10 s. and two pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Gutteridge .

SAMUEL GURTERIDGE sworn. I live at Lower Clapton , I am a groom to Mr. Rogers; I only know the prisoner had access to the place from whence my clothes were taken.

SARAH MARRIOT sworn. I am servant to Mr. Rogers. The prisoner's wife came to see me, and he came there and asked to sleep there, he said they were moving their goods; I gave him leave to sleep there.

- FRANCIS sworn. I produce the clothes; to the best of my recollection the prisoner at the bar pawned them, I was not quite certain till on my producing the articles before the magistrate and the ticket; on the ticket was wrote John Waller , and he said I pledged them in the name of William Waller .

Q.(to prosecutor) Look at the articles. - A. They are mine, I have had them five years.

JOHN RAY sworn. I apprehended him, and on him I found that ticket.

Prisoner's Defence. The servant Sarah Marriot sent a letter for my wife to come to her; in the evening I went to fetch my wife home, she asked me to stay all night, I was going to remove my lodgings, I asked her to lend me three pounds, she made answer she could not, if six shillings would be of any use she would lend me that, I told her that would be of no use, she said it was a pity that I had not some things to make the money of, and I might return them; on that I took these things.

Q.(to Sarah Marriot ) Is it true that you let him take these things to make money on them. - A. No, I did not know that he had taken them.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-24

448. HESTHER PEELE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , ninety-four pieces of muslin, value 91 l. 16 s. and fifty-eight pieces of muslin handkerchiefs, value 63 l. 16 s. the property of John Henry Eccles and John Eccles .

JOHN HENRY ECCLES sworn. I keep a Manchester warehouse in Cheapside , I have a partner John Eccles . On September the 5th in the evening I lost some muslin and handkerchiefs from the door, they were in a pack outside of the warehouse, they had just been delivered from Pickford's waggon, I saw them at the door, but I did not see them delivered.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn. I am a constable belonging to Worship-street. On the 5th of September, about half after ten at night, I went to No. 3. Miles' court, Type-street, Chiswell-street, I went up one pair of stairs to the room of the prisoner (she told me it was her room, and it was her's and her husband's furniture); the bed was down, and under the coverlid were these thirty-seven pieces of the cambric muslin; I took her in custody and brought goods away.

Q. Was her husband with her. - A. She was alone, only a young child with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-25

446. RICHARD SWAIN , alias WILLIAM

SWAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , in the Inner Temple , a bundle of records, value 30 s. and thirty rolls of parchment, value 30 s. the property of His Majesty , and

Several other counts for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JONATHAN HEWLETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to the prothonotaries in the Court of Common Pleas in the Inner Temple, the records are in the care of Mr. Sherwood and myself, we have access to them whenever it is necessary.

Q. On the 14th of May last as you were going out of the office did you observe any thing. - A. I observed the prisoner at the bar standing on a stool looking into the cupboard; he had removed the stool from the other side of the office, I told him it was very impudent of him being in that situation, he told me he was looking for a piece of waste paper, I desired him to go out of the office, and come there no more, he begged pardon and went away.

Q. Did you examine either of the closets, thereabouts. - A. I did not, it happened in the course of my business I examined the secondaries office, I found two shelves intirely stripped of the records.

- WELLS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to Mr. Loddington, one of the secondaries of the office in the Court of Common Pleas.

Q. Have you at any time seen the prisoner in that office. - A. Twice.

Q. At either of these times was your attention attracted by any noise that you heard. - A. Particularly so, it was about Hilary term in this year. I was in Mr. Loddington's office, I heard a noise of something falling, I went out and I found the prisoner in a nook or corner, to which no person that comes on business at either of the offices would go, I perceived three bundles of paper that I myself had taken out of a box, and I had put them on a high shelf, the papers belonged to the office; I asked the prisoner what business he had there, he replied, he was waiting for a person coming to the office.

Q.How near was he to this paper which was so down on the ground from off this high shelf. - A. He stood within three feet of the paper, and about four feet from the place where they were taken.

RICHARD PAYNE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Did you purchase a quantity of parchment from the witness, Scott, Falcon-street, Clare Market. - A. Yes, about the month of May last, I produce them; this parchment is worth about eighteen pence a-pound to make glue of; there is eleven pound weight of it.

REBECCA SCOTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Did you sell bundles of parchment of this description to the witness in the month of May last. - A. Yes.

Q. From whom did you buy this parchment. - A. I bought them at three or four different times from a man in our shop, I believe the prisoner to be the man, I gave him from sixpence to ninepence a-pound for them, some of them was mouldy.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. The quantity of parchment that is now produced you bought of a man two or three different times, you cannot tell me from whom you purchased it at any particular time. - A. No, the transaction took up a very little time.

Q. You are in a situation to buy parchment of that description. - A. Yes, we keep a bookshop, we advertise for parchment or waste paper.

Q. I take it for granted that as you purchase a vast quantity, you are not able to say that you purchased the parchment now produced of the prisoner at the bar. - A. I cannot swear positively that I bought it of the prisoner, but I believe to the best of my knowledge he is the man that I bought parchment of this sort.

Q. Did you take any particular notice of him at the time that the parchment was sold to you. - A. I did not, he appeared to be some lawyer's clerk, some underling.

Q. Now, I ask you upon your oath, will you take upon yourself to swear that is he the man. - A. No, I will not.

Mr. Gurney. You have bought parchments of different persons. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever buy parchment like that of other persons. - A. No, this is a particular kind, I never bought any before like it or since.

Court. Then where is your doubt, you first of all swear you believe him to be the man, then being pressed and asked about it, you say you will not swear he is the man, but now upon re-examination you say you bought no other parchment like this but of the prisoner. - A. I have no doubt in my own mind but he is the man, I think he is the man, but I will not swear positively.

Q. He is so much like the man that sold it to you that you have no doubt. - A. I have a doubt, I cannot swear to him.

Q. Now, ma'am, this kind of shuffling will not do, how came you to purchase parchment of a man whom you thought to be some lawyer's clerk, some underling, you know it could not be possible for him to have anything of this kind honestly. - A. I did purchase it.

(The parchment identified by Mr. Hewlett.)

Prisoner's Defence. In the court of Common Pleas and the King's Bench, there are offices where we stick up bills for employment; being out of employ I used to go to see if my bills were underwrote, Mr. Hewlett saw me standing on a stool, he asked me what I was about, I told him I was looking for a piece of waste paper to write a bill; sometime after Mr. Sherwood met me and took me to Bow street, there the husband of Mrs. Scott said that he never saw me in his life, and I was discharged. Three weeks afterwards I met Mr. Hewlett, he says to me, you are the person that we want, he took me to Bow street, Mrs. Scott came, she said the person that sold the parchment was a dirty man, she did not believe me to be the man. On the third examination, she said she thought I was the man; I am perfectly innocent, I never saw Mrs. Scott in my life, nor did I ever take any thing out of the office in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-26

450. THOMAS DAY was indicted for that he on the 9th of April was servant to George Hadden ,

Alexander Hadden , and John Hadden , and was employed by them and entrusted to receive money on their account, and that he being such servant, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 5 l. 8 s. 6 d. for and on account of his said masters, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

GEORGE HADDEN sworn. I am a hosier , I live at No. 2, King street, Cheapside , the prisoner was a porter to me on the 9th of April last.

Q. Who are your partners. - A. Alexander Hadden and John Hadden .

RALPH LONZELL sworn. I am a hosier, I live in Great Marlborough street; on the 9th of April I paid him 5 l. 8 s. 6 d. on Messrs. Haddens' account, for which he gave me a receipt.

Prisoner's Defence. It was through distress that made me make use of that money, I meant to refund it, I was twenty months before I went to Mr. Hadden's with bad legs, and people were pressing me for money, I made use of it in that way.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Gaol .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-27

451. JAMES SAFFERN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of July , a copper, value 20 s. the property of John Rigby .

JAMES RIAN sworn. I am porter to Mr. Rigby, No. 36, Shoreditch , ironmonger .

Q. Did you lose a copper. - A. We lost a copper on the 16th of July, it was taken from the door between six in the morning and four in the afternoon.

JOHN TURNER sworn. I am a constable. On Wednesday the 16th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Petticoat lane, I saw this man with the copper on his head, offering it for sale in the street to a Jew, he asked him a shilling a-pound for it, and the Jew rather saw me I believe, then he would not buy it, else he was going to buy it apparently to me; I then asked him how he came by the copper, he said he bought it of a man in the street, a stranger to him, and had given half a guinea for it, I told him he was selling it a considerable deal under the value of it, he said he did not know that; I took him in charge, I produce the copper, he had an old set of fire irons, he offered them all for fifteen shillings.

(The copper identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Crown street, Moorfields, with a set of fire irons, there was a man before me with this copper on his head, he asked me if I would buy it, I asked him what he wanted for it, he asked me half a guinea, I bought it of him for my wife, she takes in washing; when I took it home it was too little for the place, I was going to sell it and buy another.

Q. You was going to sell it to a Jew. - A. Yes, there was a boy walking with the Jew, I said put him in your bag, the man made answer he would sooner put my copper in the bag; with that I said I was going to sell it, if he was a mind to pay for it he might have it; he offered me a shilling a-pound for it, I did not let him have it.

Court. No, the officer came and hindered you.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Gaol .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-28

452. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of July , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Greenwell .

RICHARD WILKINS sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Greenwell. On Tuesday the 22nd of July, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, a lady came in the shop and asked me if I had lost a piece of print, I immediately went out of doors and missed the print; from her information I went after the prisoner, she turned up the first turning she came to, from that into an alley where there was no thoroughfare, there I took her; she had dropped the print, I saw her drop it, I picked it up and still pursued her.

Q. Are you sure it is the same woman who had the piece of print. - A. Yes, I produce it, I am sure it is my master's, there is his private mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done, I came very honestly by the property; a person gave me the property, and they gave me a shilling to carry it up the street.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-29

453. JOHN GRAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , a hat, value 9 s. 6 d. the property of William Ayres .

THOMAS LOCKEY sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Ayres, hatter , Fleet Market . On the 31st of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I observed a person standing about the door; there were two ladies come into the shop, each with a child, to be served with a hat, and while my attention was taken with these ladies, the person that I observed loitering about the door, he took a hat, which I observed, I went to the door immediately, followed him, and took the person with the hat in his possession, he was carrying it before him.

Q. Now, who was that person. - A. The prisoner at the bar, I am certain of it, I produce the hat.

Q. What is the value of the hat. - A. Ten and sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. At the present time that this business was transacted I was intoxicated with liquor, and having two severe cuts on my head, I do not know any thing what I do when I am in liquor; I was never guilty of any thing of this sort in my life before.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-30

454. JOSEPH PERRYHAM , alias PERRYAM , and ROBERT WALKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , two iron plough chains, value 8 s, the property of Andrew Upfull .

JAMES HARDY sworn. I live at Isleworth . I saw the prisoner Walker on the 13th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, take the chains out of a ditch adjoining Mr. Upfull's garden and the road. I followed him about two hundred yards, I overtook him, I asked Walker where he got them chains, he immediately said he had taken them out of Mr. Upfull's garden; on the Friday before he had put them in the ditch till that time, and he was going to sell them.

Q. You have not said a word about the other prisoner. - A. The other prisoner was present when he took the chains, and when he saw me he ran away.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Walker's Defence. I was walking up this lane, I saw this chain laying in the ditch, I did not think any harm taking it; we were bringing them home, and Mr. Hardy took us to his house, and put us in his closet and sent for Mr. Upfull.

Perryham was not put on his defence.

PERRYHAM - NOT GUILTY .

WALKER - GUILTY , aged 12.

Whipped in Goal, and delivered to his Father .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-31

455. SARAH PITCHER was indicted for that she on the 22d of July , previously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession, a certain forged note, purporting to be a bank note for the payment of 2 l. she knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18060917-32

456. JUDITH KELLY was indicted for that she on the 29th of July had in her custody and possession a certain forged note, purporting to be a bank note for the payment of 1 l. she knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18060917-33

457. JUDITH KELLY and SARAH PITCHER , were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting on the 25th of July , a bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intent to defraud the governor and company of the Bank of England .

Second count for disposing of and putting away the same, they knowing it to be forged.

And several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Fielding, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners having pleaded guilty to a former indictment, they were from this charge.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

458. The TWO PRISONERS stood indicted again for feloniously forging, counterfeiting, disposing of, and putting away, a forged bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intent to defraud the governor and company of the Bank of England .

And several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Fielding, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were from this charge

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-34

459. ROBERT HARRISON , alias BROWN , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charles Grafton , about the hour of one, on the night of the 2d of September , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being in the dwelling house burglariously to steal and carry away .

JONATHAN SHEARMAN sworn. I am a watchman, I was calling the hour of one last Tuesday fortnight.

Q. Did you observe any body come out of the house of the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q.Out of what part of the house. - A. I saw the cellar window open.

Q. Was it so that any person might enter - A. Yes, I went to the door and knocked twice, and then I returned back again, where two men attacked me.

Q. Did you see any body come out of the house. - A. Yes, while I was speaking to these two men the prisoner came out of the cellar, I pursued this man as he ran from me.

Q. Did you take him. - A. I pursued him and kept him in fight till he was taken.

Q. Did you come up to him. - A. Yes, he knocked at a door as though he wanted admittance there.

Q. Did he give any account of himself how he came to the cellar. - A. Not to us till we brought him back.

Q. Did you ever know the prisoner before this time. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. What did he say to you when you brought him back. - A. He said very little.

Q. You say you never saw the man before, how can you say now he is the man. - A. I kept him in fight till he was taken.

Q. Did not he turn round some corner. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you lost sight of him. - A. I was close to him.

CHARLES GRAFTON sworn. Q. What are you. - A. I keep the sign of the Crown in Whitechapel .

Q. You do not know any thing of the prisoner of your own knowledge. - A. No.

Q. Do you know any thing of this window being shut. - A. I fastened it myself that very night, I had two dogs (they are called) to go under the shutters, the shutters were fastened to them two dogs with bolts; the window appeared as if it had been forced open.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. How long was this ago - A. The second of this month.

Q. I suppose you keep good hours. - A. We shut up at eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you fasten the window before eleven. - A. No, the last thing when I go to bed.

Court. When did you fasten it that time. - A. About half after eleven.

- sworn. I am a watchman, I assisted in taking the prisoner.

Q. Did the prisoner give any account how he came there. - A. No, he asked me what was the matter when I came up to him, that is all he said to me.

WILLIAM BRETTEL sworn. Q. You are a headborough. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search the prisoner. - A. Yes, I found a few articles I have got here, I produce them, here his some matches, a flint, and a little knife, made like a steel.

Q. Did he give any account of himself. - A. When I searched him he said he came from the other side of the water.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. That knife is a very common knife, is it not, it is like all other knives. - A. No, I do not think it is, the back of the blade is notched as though it had been used with a flint.

Q. Do not you know that this man is a waterman. - A. No.

Q. You found no instruments of housebreaking upon him. - A. No, nothing but this knife.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE sworn. I am beadle of Whitechapel, when the prisoner was searched I found this large flint in the inside of his jacket pocket.

Q. How were his breeches. - A. The knees of his breeches were wet, and the hind part of his breeches were wet; there was water in the cellar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. There is water in the river too. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner being a waterman , might not there be water in the boat. - A. I cannot say.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18060917-35

460. JOHN BARNSLEY , alias BEAZLEY , was indicted for that he on the 25th of August , feloniously and without lawful cause was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

SAMUEL LEADBETTER sworn. I am an officer of the city, under the direction of the lord mayor; I produce a copy of the conviction of the prisoner from Mr. Shelton's office.

(The copy of the record read in court.)

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. I am servant to Mr. Newman.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, by the name of Beazley, I know him perfectly well.

Q. Were you present when he was tried. - A. Yes, in the year 1802.

Q. Are you sure that it is the same man who was found guilty. - A. I am sure of it, he had a conditional respite afterwards.

Q. He was transported afterwards, was he, upon that. - A. Yes, I ironed him that morning he went away.

Q. Therefore you delivered him from the goal. - A. Yes, that was on the 13th of March, 1804.

HENRY TYLER sworn. I am a waggoner for Mr. Pickford.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner. - A. In Wood street, I laid hold of him in Wood street, the corner of Maiden lane.

Q. What was he about there. - A. On the 25th of August I was coming from Paddington, and a partner of mine with me who left me in Holborn; as I was coming up Newgate street into Cheapside I observed three men at the waggon.

Q. What time of day was this. - A. About half past ten at night; when I first saw the prisoner he was in company with two other men, I secured him on the 25th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I got my pardon from the Hulks to serve his Majesty, I did go on board, and served duly and truly on board the Amelia frigate, the right honourable lord Proby was the commander, he died in the West Indies; we had three captains after that, and I was sent on shore.

Q. Have you got any certificate from your captain. - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-36

461. JOHN BARNSLEY , alais BEAZLEY , was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , a box, value 3 s. a stationer's plough, value 2 s. 6 d. a book called Henry's bible, value 5 s. fifty other books, value 2 l. and twelve other pamplets, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Pickford , James Pickford , and Mathew Pickford .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

- JACKSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Pickford, what are their names. - A. Thomas Pickford , James Pickford , and Mathew Pickford , they are carriers .

HENRY TYLER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a waggoner in the employ of Messrs. Pickford. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 26th of August were you driving a waggon loaded from Paddington to Wood-street. - A. Yes.

Q. When you had got as far as the entrance of Cheapside did you observe any person following your waggon. - A. I observed three men following the waggon.

Q. What time of the night was it. - A. It might be about half past ten.

Q. Did these three men follow your waggon in a manner to call your particular attention. - A. I took notice of them when I turned the corner of Newgate street into Cheapside.

Q. Did you notice them all the way fro them entrance of Cheapside to the corner in Wood street. - A. Yes.

Q. You were going to the Castle inn, Wood street . - A. Yes.

Q. When you turned down Wood street, did you observe these men go a different way, or did they follow your waggon. - A. Two of these men went of the off side of the waggon, and one came on the near side.

Q. Did you turn you horses' heads into the gateway of the Castle inn. - A. Yes.

Q. How many horses had you. - A. Four.

Q. When you turned the heads of your horses into the gateway did you go in with them. - A. I went in with them, and then came back to look behind the waggon.

Q. When you got to the tail of the waggon what did you find. - A. I found a box laying on the street, and the prisoner was standing about a yard from it.

Court. Was he standing in the highway. - A. He was standing on the carriage way.

Mr. Gurney. Where were the other men standing. - A. I did not see anything of them then.

Q. Upon seeing this box in the street, and the man standing so near, what did gou do. - A. At first he says to me waggoner you have lost a box, I said to him I suppose you had a mind to take it, I have taken notice of you.

Q. What did he say to that. - A. He said nothing, but a man who was by, said stick to him, for I saw him pull it off; I laid hold of him then, as soon as I laid hold of him another man came and struck at me.

Q. When you laid hold of this man did he give himself up quietly. - A. No, he struggled to get away, I got him down at the corner of Maiden lane, he struggled a minute or so, no long time; I never parted with him till he got to the watch-house.

Q. Did you look to see whether that box came out of your waggon. - A. Yes, that box had been loaded on the waggon at Paddington, it had been put on the top of the goods in the waggon.

Q. Was it loaded high behind. - A. It was loaded a little higher than the rail of the waggon, there was a rope over across it, it was bound on at Paddington.

Q. Was it so secure that it could not come out without violence. - A. It was put on secure, so that we could rely on it.

Q. Was the rope cut. - A. I do not know, I did not see the waggon afterwards till it was unloaded.

Q. Before it was taken out, and while it was in the tail of the waggon, would it appear as large as it is. - A. No, it would appear only a foot square.

Q. It is about four foot long, there was only the end visible, it would appear a smaller box. - A. Yes.

Q. You say you had told the prisoner that you had noticed him, can you say whether he was or not in your judgment one of the three men that dodged the waggon. - A. I have no doubt but that he was one of them.

Q. When you had taken the prisoner to the watchhouse do you know whether he appeared to be lame at all. - A. I did not see him walk lame, but when we took him to the watchhouse he appeared to walk lame.

Prisoner. When I was upon my examination the witness said there were only two men in company, me and a stout man.

Witness. There were three when I saw you first turning the corner of Wood street, but when I took you I saw no one but you and the man that struck me.

JAMES GILPAS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a porter at the Swan with Two Necks, Lad lane. - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 22nd of August did you happen to be in Wood street, near to this man's waggon. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any persons walking by the tail of the waggon. - A. Yes, I observed two men, I cannot say whether there were more or not.

Q. At the time the horses were turning down the gateway of the Castle inn, did you observe any body do any thing at the tail of the waggon. - A. The prisoner at the bar and another person came to the tail of the waggon, I saw the prisoner at the bar, he was on the side nearest to me, I was at the off side of the waggon, I saw the prisoner make a plunge at the tail of the waggon; the box came to the ground that was placed at the tail of the waggon.

Q. Is that the box. - A. Yes, this is the box; when the box came to the ground the waggoner came immediately.

Court. Are you sure that the prisoner made a stroke, or a plunge as you call it, at the tail of the waggon. A. Yes, and the box immediately followed it; the box came out on the left hand side, and then the prisoner was between the box and the other man, there was another person stood on the left side of the prisoner, but whether he assisted or no I cannot say, I was of the right side of the street.

Q. Is the street wide or narrow there. - A. It is just the width that two carriages could pass, I was across the street when the waggoner came.

Q. Did he lay hold of the prisoner. - A.There was a scuffle, I called to him to stick to him, I believed that was the man that took the box.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see any body strike the waggoner. - A. I did not, as soon as I saw him and the waggoner begin to scuffle, every thing disappeared, I saw nothing of the second man, he disappeared at that present time, he ran away.

Q. Did the second man come back again. - A. When I came to the assistance of the waggoner there was a man in Maiden lane, I called, Watch, stop him; he ran off.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner walking some way before he made a plunge at the waggon. - A. I saw two men, there might be three, walking.

Q. Did either of these men walk lame. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. When the prisoner was conveyed to the watch-house did you see him appear to be lame. - Q. When he was taken out of the yard I could not see that he was lame, but when he was taken out of the yard he appeared to be lame, and he said he would have a coach.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Wood street, going home to my sister to bed, I saw the waggon going along Wood street, I ran across the street, and the box fell as I was going across, I saw the waggoner, I said I fancy this box belongs to you, he said I had a mind to take it, I said I had no such intention.

GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-37

462. ELIZABETH LLOYD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Philip Winsor , about the hour of three at

night on the 23d of July , and burglariously stealing therein, five pair of silk stockings, value 20 s. three pair of worsted stockings, value 5 s, a pair of shoes, value 2 s. a brush, value 2 d. a saw, value 6 d. an umbrella, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a frock, value 2 d. a wash hand bason, value 10 d. a brown pan, value 1 s. and eighteen pound weight of beef, value 9 s. the property of Philip Winsor .

PHILIP WINSOR sworn. I live at No. 12, Parliament street . On the night of the 23d of July last, about a quarter past three in the morning, I heard the spring of a watchman's rattle, I got out of bed and went to the front window, I slid the window up and looked out, I saw the prisoner at the bar between two watchmen at the adjoining steps. No. 13; the watchman informed me they saw her come up from my area, with a large pan of salt beef; knowing I had such a thing in the house the night before, I desired them to keep the woman till I came down and examined the bottom part of the house; when I came down to the bottom part of the house I found the entrance of the area window to the house had been broke open, and two squares of glass had been broke into one.

Q. Was the wood work broke. - A. Yes, the centre piece of the wood that parts the two squares were broken.

Q. Were there any outside shutters to it. - A.None.

Q. When did you see that last on the evening before. - A. About eight or nine o'clock.

Q. Was it perfectly secure, or a rotten frame. - A. It was a very good frame, and perfectly found the night before; I found likewise five pair of silk stockings gone, which laid in a bason in a pink dye, three pair of boys worsted stockings, a pair of boys shoes, a blacking brush, and a bottle in which blacking had been in, a saw, and the rims of an umbrella, all these things were below stairs in the lobby; there was a door to the kitchen, but that was not fastened.

Q. I suppose they could have got up stairs. - A. Yes, they might have gone to any part of the house whatever; about eight o'clock the next morning we found there was a flannel petticoat missing belonging to my wife, I went to the watchhouse and the constable found it on her.

Q. When the watchman took the woman did you go to her. - A. Yes, I went to the watchman, and saw the woman with his property on her, except the petticoat, which was afterwards found at the watchhouse.

Q. Did you know any thing of the prisoner before. - A. I saw her on a step of a gentleman's door in the same street, a week or a few days before.

Prisoner. I want to know what you found upon me. - A. There were six pair of silk stockings we out of the dye, tied up under your petticoats.

THOMAS BRADLEY sworn. I am a patrol in Parliament street, I was on that division that night. On the 24th of July in the morning, about a quarter past three, I was going down Parliament street. I heard a rattle spring, I went up to it; when I came up I saw these articles that are here laying on the steps next door to Mr. Winsor's, I passed these things that were on the step, I went to where the watchman and the woman was, I took five pair of silk stockings, they were tied to her apron string and under her apron, they were wet.

DAVID MURRAY sworn. Q. You are a watchman in Parliament street. - A. Yes, past three o'clock in the morning on the 24th of July, I saw the prisoner at the bar stand at the area gate No. 12, Parliament street, she was outside the railing when I first saw her, I saw her afterwards go down in that area, and she came up again almost directly; after she came up she removed something from the grating of the steps to the door No. 13, I directly went to see what she was doing of; when she saw me coming she ran away and left the things, I ran and laid hold of her and brought her back; when I came up to the door I saw this pan stand on the steps full of salt beef, with a white wash hand bason with three pair of silk stockings, three pair of worsted stockings, I blacking brush, and a pair of boys' shoes, an old umbrella frame and a saw she had got in her hand; I then sprang my rattle, which assembled several more watchmen and patrols, I called to Mr. Winsor, he came down and owned the things.

JOHN MOORE sworn. I was constable of the night, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, I found the petticoat on her.

DAVID SQUIRE sworn. On the 24th of July I heard the spring of the rattle, I found the prisoner and the watchman near the next door, I saw the pan stand on the steps, I heard Mr. Winsor say there were some silk stockings missing, I put my hand to the side of the prisoner, and I said I supposed they were in the bundle of wet linen she had there, the patrol took them from her.

MRS. WINSOR sworn. I know these things to be my husband's and my own property, I left them below stairs on the overnight, I recollect seeing them all in the evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I found these things outside of the house.

Court. That could not be, how came you to put the stockings under your apron, they were found under your apron, and the petticoat was found on you. A. The stockings I took out of the washhand bason, and the petticoat also.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-38

463. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing a lamb, value 20 s. the property of Richard Weekly .

RICHARD WEEKLY sworn. I am a farmer , I live at Hounslow .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a labourer , he lives at Stanwell . On the 5th of July we lost a lamb out of the fold; in the morning the shepherd brought me the skin.

Q. Are you sure that the skin was the skin of one of your lambs. - A. Yes.

JOHN HOWEL sworn. I am shepherd to Mr. Weekly.

Q. Where does he keep his sheep. - A. His sheep were on the common, I folded them from the common into the field, I found the skin of the lamb on the morning, as I lost the lamb on the overnight; it was on Sunday morning I found the skin, and the entrails and the head were tied up in the skin, it was laid in a copse about an hundred yards from the fold.

Q. Did you find you had lost a lamb. - A. I counted them and found one missing.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. I am a labourer, I live at Stanwell; that Saturday night that he did it he came to me on the Sunday night following, he told me that he had done it and he had brought a quarter of it home that night.

Q. Done what. - A. That he had killed it, and if I would go along with him at that time of night, I was to have part of what was left, he had hid what was left in the copse, he told me that it was Mr. Weekly's lamb; that Sunday night as we were going after what was left, the constable came to take him up about some spades and things that were lost on the common; I did not see him for a fortnight after that.

Q. How came you to be taken up. - A. We were together that Saturday three weeks; after that he wanted to have another sheep that night; they took me up in the field with him.

Q. What were you in the field for that night. - A. Why, sir, he wanted to have another sheep.

Q. So you went with him. - A. Yes, I was with him.

Prosecutor. We apprehended them on the third week following, they were both in the field, we took them up on suspicion, we thought they were going to do something, it was about a quarter past twelve at night.

Q. And then when he was in custody he told of this. - A. Yes, when he was in London.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it, I know nothing of the affair at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-39

464. MARY WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , a gold locket, value 5 l. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Brady Smith , in the dwelling house of John Willis .

MARGARET SMITH sworn. I am the wife of John Brady Smith , I live at No. 14, Barret's court, Oxford street .

Q. Whose house was it. - A. I cannot call to mind whose house it is, I have not lodged in it long; I have known the prisoner and her husband for several years, they lodged at a public house, and they had a little difference with their landlord, she said she could not wash there, I said she might come and wash at my house, as I was going to wash; she came on the 24th of May and brought her things, and we both washed together; one of my neighbours came and told me my child had gone down the court, I went after the child, and that was the time, I suppose, that she took the locket.

Q. Did you ever find your locket again. - A. Yes, at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM SIMPSON sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I produce the locket and the handkerchief, it was pawned by the prisoner at the bar.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it out of freedom, being my husband's first cousin, I was rather in liquor, I did not mean to deprive them of it, I hope you will forgive me.

GUILTY , aged 30

Of stealing only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-40

445. CATHERINE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of September , nine pound weight of bacon, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of James Dodd .

FREDERICK SEAMAN sworn. On the 12th of September, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the bar in Mr. Dodd's shop, and while Mrs. Dodd turned her back to get a knife the prisoner at the bar whipped the peice of bacon into her lap, and came out of the shop, I spoke to Mrs. Dodd, and fetched her back, I took it out of her lap; I produce the bacon, I made four notches on it.

(The bacon identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, that made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-41

446. CHARLES LEWIS LANGUIS was indicted for feloniously forging on the 3d of April , a bill of exchange, value 22 l. 15 s. and 7 d. with intention to defraud George Atkinson .

Second Count for uttering as true a like forged bill of exchange, with like intention, and

Two other Counts for forging and uttering as true an indorsement of a like bill, with the same intention, and

Two other Counts for uttering as true an acceptance of a like bill, with the same intention.

GEORGE ATKINSON sworn. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, he was in my employ from November 1803 till April 1806, as clerk .

Q. What is that paper you have in your hand. - A. It is a bill dated 18th of March 1806, for twenty two pound fifteen shillings and seven-pence, that bill was produced to me by the prisoner, I cannot tell what day, it was in the latter part of last March.

Q. For what purpose did he produce that bill to you. - A. He told me it would be doing his landlady a great favour if I would give him the money for it, she being a baker, it being drawn upon Mr. Savage, a customer of her's: accordingly I gave him the money.

Q. It had some time to run. - A. Yes, he having deducted the discount, which was two or three shillings, I gave him the balance; I had very frequently bills of him before drawn upon Mr. Savage, therefore nothing passed at that time but what I have related.

Q. Where did this pass. - A. In the front office of my own house in Castle-street, Falcon Square, Aldersgate-street , in the city of London; I kept the bill till it was due.

Q. Are you sure that bill you have in your hand is the bill that he gave you. - A. I am sure I kept it in my own custody till the 21st of May, when it became due.

Q. Did he continue still in your service. - A. No

I had discharged him on the 10th April, in consequence of a bill that he had forged.

Q. What did you do with the bill on the 21st of May. - A. On the 21st of May I sent a clerk with it for payment, I sent it this particular way, having reason to suspect, in consequence of what had previously passed; I sent a note with the bill and desired Mr. Savage to call; it was not paid; this is the same bill; I am sure that the same that I had sent by the clerk was returned by him to me; the whole of the bill is written by the prisoner himself.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing. - A. Yes, he was writing under my own eye, he was an elegant writer, he was transcribing letters for me two years and a half.

Q. From your own knowledge of his hand writing, do you believe it is his hand writing. - A. The body of the bill and the acceptance is his hand writing; the body of the bill I am certain is his hand writing, and the acceptance seems to be his hand writing seigned.

Q. The body of the bill and the acceptance is his hand writing, you do not speak to any other part; the drawer you do not speak to. - A. No, the drawer has none of his hand writing about it.

Q. To whom was it to be accepted by. - A. Mr. Savage.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of that person. - A. No.

Q. At the time that this bill was discounted with you, had you done any thing with it. - A. No, I had frequently bills of him of Mr. Savage's.

Q. Therefore at that time you did not particularly examine it. - A. No, I had frequently bills from him.

Prisoner's Q.(to prosecutor) I would wish to ask Mr. Atkinson whether he did not know, before the bill was presented for payment, that it was a bad and a forged bill. - A. I know to this extent, that he had forged one other to be paid on the 10th of April; in consequence of that I had every reason to suspect this was a forgery, that is all.

LEVIT PIGOT sworn. Examined by Mr. Miers. Q. Do you know Mr. Savage. - A. I do, for seven years past.

Q. What is his christian name. - A. James Savage , I live in his house, he is a carpenter at No. 37, Gray's Inn Lane.

Q. During the seven years that you have lodged with him have you seen him frequently write. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the name there, James Savage , is that his hand writing. - A. No, I do not believe it is, it is nothing at all like it.

DANIEL WARR sworn. Examined by Mr. Miers. Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 12, Furnival's Inn Court, Holborn, I am an organ builder.

Q. Do you know Hannah Winter. - A. Perfectly well, she is my mother in law.

Q. What is she by business. - A. A baker.

Q. Have you had frequent oppertunity of seeing Hannah Winter write. - A. Frequently.

Q. Do you believe that to be her hand writing. - A. I am sure it is not her hand writing.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Perfectly well, he lodged at my mother in law's house.

The bill read in Court.

L 22 15 7.

LONDON 18th March, 1806.

Two months after date, pay to my Order the sum of Twenty two pounds, fifteen shillings, and seven pence, Value received.

HANNAH WINTER .

To Mr. James Savage , Carpenter,

Gray's Inn Lane. AC. CD.

James Savage is the acceptance; endorsement, Hannah Winter .

Prisoner. The officer has a letter which he took from when me I was apprehended, it was written by Mr. Atkinson, I wish that to be read in court.

JOHN HANCOCK sworn. When I took him I searched him, I found this letter upon him.

Prosecutor. This is a letter I wrote to him, I discharged him on the 10th of April; three days after I had occasion to discharge him, I wrote this letter, I will explain the motive that made me write the letter, during the two years and a half he had been with me, he conducted himself with so much propriety that there was no action of his that could be dis approved of; on the 10th of April a client of mine having a bill drawn upon him by Mr. Languis, it became necessary that I should discharge him, I felt for his situation, it was such a circumstance that compelled me to discharge him, it was on a Friday, when I discharged him on the Sunday; he being a foreigner I felt myself uneasy, therefore on the Monday morning I wrote this letter, having previous to sending it away, shown it to a clerk in the office, and I asked him what he thought; this is the letter, I directed to Mr. Charles Louis Languis .

(The letter read in court)

Feeling for the uncomfortable situation you have placed yourself in, I am desirous to render you any service in my power. And that you may know my disposition towards you, I must inform you that I have had reason to be satisfied with your conduct till the day this extraordinary circumstance took place, that matter attracted my notice, and it was impossible you could remain with me one day longer. I desire you will apply to me on any occasion, where I can be useful in promoting your industry to advantage, if you can suggest which way of employing your time most useful let me know, and I will inform you how far it may be practicable.

I am Sir, your well wisher GEORGE ATKINSON .

Prisoner's Defence. My intention was not to defraud him of the money, as I am charged in the indictment.

Prosecutor. The prisoner was discharged on the 10th of April, although it was my intention never to take notice of it, he was taken subsequent on a bill he had issued; I had nothing to do with the apprehending of him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-42

447. FRANIS SHEPHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of July , a bank note, value 10 l. the property of Henry Target , in his dwelling house .

HENRY TARGET sworn. On the 14th of July, I kept the Green Dragon public house, King-street,

Golden square .

Q. What do you accuse the prisoner of. - A. She was the only person that had been in the room.

Q. What family had you. - A. Only my wife and myself, the prisoner was servant ; I lost this property from a chest of drawers in a bed-room; Monday was the collecting day of the gin distiller.

Q. Was the note locked up. - A. Yes, I told the money at nine o'clock in the morning in order to pay the distiller, I knew he would come in the course of the day, I had twenty-nine pounds, I left them together under under a clean shirt that was folded, I locked the drawer, and put the key in a tray that stood on the drawers, under some dirty linen; at eleven o'clock the distiller came for his money, I asked my wife for the key of the room, she gave it me, I went up stairs and looked for the money, I found the drawer unlocked, with the key hanging in it; the ten pound note was gone, I brought down the remainder of the money and paid the distiller.

Q. Did you ever find the money afterwards. - A. No, my wife told me that nobody had been to the room but the girl and her; immediately after dinner this girl went out, she came home late in the evening very much in liquor, she went out a second time and came home very much intoxicated, and went to bed; on Tuesday morning when I arose she was gone out, and while I was getting my breakfast she came in very much intoxicated, she remained there till between one and two in the afternoon asleep, then she came down stairs and went into the kitchen, and sent a lad for a pint of beer; I denied sending her the beer, she immediately went out and I never saw her till between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, she came home very much in liquor and went to bed; I got up at four o'clock in the morning in order to detain her before she went out; I went into the room to tell my wife that she was come down, and the girl went out, I never saw her after till I applied to an officer and took her.

Q. You never searched her all this time. - A. No, we never searched her till we applied to an officer, we found her in the street, just above my house on Wednesday about one o'clock in the afternoon; in the course of the time, I heard she had bought a great many things with the money; I found a one pound note upon her.

Q. Did you ever find the ten pound note. - A. No.

Prisoner. I never went away at that time of the day that you say.

ANN JACKSON sworn. I am a soldier's wife; on the 14th of July I went with the prisoner between six and seven o'clock in the evening; she bought two gowns and a cloak in Oxford street, she gave a one pound note, a half guinea, and a seven shilling piece for the gowns, and she had half a crown change, and for the cloak she gave a two pound note; she also bought a pair of shoes.

JOHN WARREN sworn. I am an officer; on the 16th of July I apprehended the prisoner, and immediately on my searching her she gave me a one pound note; she acknowledged before the magistrate the shoes, gown, and cloak, were bought out of the ten pound note.

Q.(to prosecutor) When you went before Mr. Neve did any thing particular pass. - A. She confessed finding it at the bar door.

Court. There is not a word in Mr. Neve's deposition about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime, I have lived with these people three times before, I never took any thing from them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-43

448. ELEANOR RUSSEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a gown, value 12 s. a pinafore, value 6 d. a child's shirt, value 6 d. a gold pin, value 1 s. 6 d. and 4 l. 4 s. the property of John Jaggers , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH JAGGERS sworn. My husband's name is John Jaggers , he keeps a public house .

Q. On the 23d of August what happened. - A. I missed the money from out of my pockets; when I went to bed I put my pockets between the bed and the mattress; I lost between five and six pounds, I only put down four pounds four.

Q. Was it in bank notes or in gold and silver. - A. In gold and silver, I had in my pocket twenty-three pounds in gold and silver, and I believe a one pound bank note; and when I had missed the money I had only eighteen pounds and some odd shillings.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of taking it. A. She was my servant , there was nobody else to go into the room but her.

Q. Did she go into the room. - A. She went into the room to make the bed; she took it in the morning before I got up, I saw her in the bed room; when I missed the money, I asked her if she had taken any thing from under the bed, she told me that she had not; I told her I had lost a great deal of money, she said she was very sorry for it, she was very ill at the time, she went out in the afternoon, and when she came home she saw me a fretting, she stood and cried, she said she was going away, the air did not agree with her, she went away that evening, I saw no more of her; on Tuesday I went up stairs to put on a clean gown, I missed it, I lost a child's shirt, a pinafore, and a gold pin.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. I am an officer; I went to Bristol after this woman, I got an officer, and took her there; I found the gown, the shirt, the pinafore, and the gold pin, in her box, and two guineas and a half in gold, and three shillings and six pence in silver.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-44

449. MARY PLOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of Martin Simkin , in the dwelling house of Ferdinand Bookmaer .

MARTIN SIMKIN sworn. I am a ship carpenter , I live at St. Catherine's .

Q. How long have you known the prisoner. - A. From the 11th day of last June; she was a servant

in my lodgings, I lost the watch at Mr. Bookmaers public house.

Q. How came you and the maid in the public house together. - A. I sat down and drank a pint of beer, there she came in with another man, whom she said was her husband, she came and sat by the side of me

Q. What day was that. - A. On the 21st of August; at half past one in the afternoon; she pulled my watch out of my fob, and put it in her bosom, so she went out of the door; I said I want my watch, she said you shall not have it, she went from there to the Golden Chain public house, at the Tower; I went after her, and asked her for my watch, she said you shall never have it any more; the master of the public house said you shall give the man his property, or you shall not go out of the door; I sent for an officer.

Q. Where was your watch. - A. She had got it in her bosom.

Q. You were too well acquainted perhaps; how came she to take the watch from you in that manner. A. I do not know.

Q. How came you to let her go out of Mr. Bookmaer's public house. - A. I would not make any disturbance, I thought she would give it. me again.

Q. You had been drinking together, had not you. - A. Yes, we had been drinking together before the watch was taken.

Q. And the watch was found upon her, after she was taken in custody. - A. Yes.

- WILSON sworn. I apprehend the prisoner at the Golden Chain, I asked her if she had got the watch, she said she had, and she would keep it, she said me nor no other blackguard should search her; we held her arms and a woman took the watch out; I produce it.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor)

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-45

450. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously forging on the 29th of August , an order for the payment of 90 l. with intention to defraud David Barclay , Robert Barclay , John Hinton Tritton , and David Bevan .

Second Count for uttering and publishing as true, a like order, with the same intention; and

Two other Counts for like offence, with intention to defraud John Partridge , Josephus Beddome , and Martin Petrie .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GEORGE DAVIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. How old are you. - A. I am fifteen, I live with Mr. Eddington a stationer.

Q. Do you know the person that stands at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know that person before you saw him that day. - A. I think I have seen him before.

Q. Where did you meet him on that day. - A. On Friday the 29th of August, I met him in Nag's-head-court, Clement's-lane, Lombard-street, he said here my boy, will you take this to No. 56, Lombard-street, he said they were to give me ninety pounds for it, four twenty's and a ten, he said he would meet me at the corner of Nicholas-lane, and he would give me a shilling, he asked me if ever I was at a banker's before, I told him no, I went and got the money, they gave me four twenty pound notes, and one ten, and I gave them the draft.

Q. Should you know the gentleman again who gave you the money. - A. Yes, after I got the money I went to the corner of Nicholas-lane.

Q. Did you find him there. - A. No, I went to Clement's-lane where I had been before, and he was not there; then I went to the banking house door, he came up to me and said walk on, I went as far as Ball-alley.

Q. Did he walk with you. - A. Yes, I gave it him; he said where do you live, I told him in Fenchurch-street, then he gave me a shilling, and bid me good by; I did not see any more of him.

Q. Did you tell any body the circumstance. - A. I told Mr. Galabin the circumstance as soon as he came in, and to my master, he took me back to the banking house.

Q. When you went back to the banking house did you see the gentleman that gave you the money. - A. Yes.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Mr. Petrie. - A. When I went to the bankers, then Mr. Petrie came.

Q. Do you remember going to Mr. Waylett's, a boot maker. - A. Yes, that was the Monday after Mr. Petrie went with me in the afternoon, to see if the man that gave me the draft was in the shop.

Q. Was he there at that time. - A. No, there were three young men in the shop, but not the person that we looked for; we went again at ten o'clock at night, we knocked at the door, the prisoner at the bar opened the door, I pulled Mr. Petrie's coat.

Q. How happened you to pull Mr. Petrie's coat. - A. Mr. Petrie said I was to pull his coat when I saw the prisoner.

Q. And upon the prisoner opening the door you did pull his coat. - A. Yes; then the officer who accompanied me and Mr. Petrie went in.

Q. Did the officer or Mr. Petrie tell him what they had come about. - A. No.

Q. Was Mr. Waylett, his master, present when you first went in. - A. No, he was in the parlour, he came in the shop in about five minutes.

Q. Had they charged him with any thing. - A. No, only the officer told him he was his prisoner.

Q. When Mr. Waylett came in what was said by any body. - A. When Mr. Waylett came in the man himself said he was charged with forgery.

Q. Are you sure that nothing was said, about forgery before Mr. Waylett came in. - A. Not before; then he was taken in custody.

Q. Look at the prisoner tell me whether you have any doubt that he is the man that gave you the draft. - A. No, I am quite sure.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You say you think you had seen the person before, do you mean that you had seen him before casually in the street, or that you have been in company with him. - A. I never was in company with him.

Q. Then if you had ever seen that person before

you had seen him walking in the street, the same as any other person. - A. Yes.

Q. And you take upon you to say this is the person. - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to Mr. Waylett's in the afternoon to see if any of the persons in the shop, was the person who gave you the draft; I ask you whether the subject of forgery was ever mentioned. - A. I do not know, I do not think it was, I did not hear it.

Q. Do you take upon yourself to say, that nothing might have been said by Mr. Petrie or the officer that you did not hear in the evening. - A. I cannot say, I did not hear any thing of the kind mentioned.

WILLIAM PROCTOR sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe you are a clerk in the house of Messrs. Barclay and Co. - A. I am; the partners names are David Barclay , Robert Barclay , John Hinton Tritton , and David Bevan .

Q. Do you know the last witness, the boy; do you remember his coming to your house on the 29th of August. - A. I do, perfectly well, he presented a draft of ninety pounds, signed by Partridge, Beddome, and Petrie, I paid the boy the money, in four twenties and one ten, bank; this is the draft, I put a cross upon it before I gave the boy the money; I have not the least doubt of its being the same draft.

MARTIN PETRIE sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember giving a draft to the prisoner. - A. Yes, he is foreman to a bootmaker of the name of Waylett; he came to me on Thursday the 28th of August, and told me his master would thank me if I would pay the account, it was only four pounds, I gave him a draft on Barclay's house.

Q. You sometime afterwards had a suspicion of a forged draft. - A. I had, in consequence of that I did my endeavour in finding out the man; by the description the boy gave me I had a suspicion of the prisoner; I took the boy and desired he would go into Mr. Waylett's shop, and see if he saw the man in the shop that gave him the draft.

Q. At that time were there any persons in the shop. - A. There were several.

Q. That was about two or three o'clock. - A. Thereabouts; the boy came out and said the man was not there, I went into the shop, he was not there; at ten o'clock Mr. Waylett sent up to me, to let me know the prisoner was come home; I then went down with an officer and the boy, I directed the boy if he saw the prisoner to pull my coat.

Q. Who opened the door. - A. The prisoner; the boy pulled my coat, I then asked the boy if that was the man, he said it was; I desired the officer to take him in custody.

Q. When you desired him to take him in custody did you tell him what it was for. - A. No, his master was not present.

Q. Did you at any time before the master came in tell him what he was apprehended for. - A. No, nor to any body.

Q. When Mr. Waylett came in what passed. - A. The prisoner said he was charged with forgery; he was secured, and taken to the compter.

Q. Is that your hand writing (the draft handed to witness), - A. It is not.

Q. Is it the hand writing of either of your partners. - A. It is not.

JAMES WAYLETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp Q. At the time that that the prisoner was apprehended in your house had he shewn you any draft that he had of four pounds. - A. I had got the money for the draft at that time.

Q. When was he taken. - A. On the Monday evening.

Q. On Friday had he shewn you the draft. - A. No, he told me that he had other money for me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. How long has the prisoner been in your service. - A.Two years.

Q. Part of his business was in collecting debts for you, he receiving an allowance from you for so doing. - A. Yes.

Q. I do not know whether he gave you that draft on Partridge, Beddome, and Petrie. - A. He gave me the draft of four pounds, on Partridge and Co. when he settled with me on Saturday night.

Q.During the time that you have known the prisoner, I ask you whether you have known any young man who has maintained a better character. - A. No.

Q. Do you happen to know whether he happened to go on your business to Stoke Newington on the Friday before this happened. - A. Yes, I have a great many customers there, I understood he went to them all.

Q. Do you remember upon your coming into the shop when Mr. Petrie was there the mentioning of forgery. - A. When I came into the shop on Monday evening he said Mr. Petrie had accused him of forgery.

Q. He was then in custody of the officer. - A. He was.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are the officer that accompanied Mr. Petrie to the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember before Mr. Waylett came in to him whether any body had told him of the crime that he had been suspected of. - A. No, I told him he was my prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Did not you tell him that you apprehended him for forgery. - A. I did not, I am quite positive.

(The draft read in court.)

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove that I was not the person, I was at Stoke Newington, I was never in Lombard-street that day at all; Mr. Greaves will prove that I was at his house at half after twelve, my brother will prove that I was at his house till half after five, and here is a gentleman will prove that he saw me go into my brother's house.

Court. (to Proctor) Do you recollect what time it was the boy gave you this draft. - A. I cannot recollect exactly, it was between two and half past three.

- GREAVES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Stoke Newington, I am a silk dyer. On the 29th of August the prisoner came to me on business for Mr. Waylett at about twenty minutes past twelve, he stopped about a minute with me, not more.

GEORGE JONES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the brother of the prisoner. - A.

Yes, I am a deputy oyster meter.

Q. Do you remember your brother being taken up on Monday the 1st of September. - A. No, I knew of it on the next day.

Q. Do you remember whether you had been in company with your brother on the Friday before he was taken up. - A. Yes, to the best of my recollection, about ten or eleven minutes before two o'clock I saw him in my room in Barking-alley, Tower-hill, I have occasion to remember the day, because I had buried my sister just three weeks and a day, right under my window.

Q.Do you remember whether it was a very rainy day or a dry day. - A. A very rainy day; he came in and remarked I dined late, it did not want above ten or eleven minutes to two o'clock, I looked at the watch which was hanging facing me, I said it was about four minutes and a half walk to Billingsgate; we leave at Billingsgate at twelve, and go again at two; when he came in we were at dinner, we had nothing but a mouthful of bread and butter for dinner, when he remarked we were dining late, I said we had not much to eat, and I was wet and weary, I sat drying myself; I left him a few minutes before two, I returned at five o'clock, and I found him there when I came back.

Q. When you left him a few minutes before two who did you leave there. - A. I left there my wife and Mary Mayling .

Q. Was this on Friday. - A. Yes, on Friday the 29th of August.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const.

Q. How do you know it was a Friday. - A. Because it rained very hard, he came in very wet and dirty with walking.

Q. He did not dine with you I dare say. - A. No.

Q. How long did he stay. - A. He staid till after five o'clock, I found him there when I returned.

Q. He never went out. - A. He went away about six o'clock and came back again about eight o'clock to supper; a little before or after we supped, about nine o'clock, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Do you recollect what you had for supper. - A. Yes, sheep's heads; he staid till about ten o'clock I believe, I generally go to bed at that time.

MRS. JONES sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the wife of George Jones .

Q. Do you remember your brother in law being taken up on Monday the first of September. - A. I heard of it the next day.

Q. Do you remember your brother-in law being at your lodgings on the Friday before that. - A. Yes, that I well remember, it was a very rainy day, I think he came about twelve or thirteen minutes before two.

Q. How soon after he came in did your husband go about his business. - A. About five minutes, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Did the prisoner stay with you - A. He staid till near six o'clock, till after five I am certain; he returned again and supped with us, we had sheeps' heads for supper that night, my brother said he should like them, that was the reason he came back.

MARY MAYLING sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you remember on Friday the 29th of August being at Mrs. Jones's, I am speaking of the wet Friday. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming on that day. - A. Yes, he came there about ten minutes or a quarter before two, he asked Mrs. Jones if they had not done dinner, Mrs. Jones asked him what was o'clock, the prisoner looked at the watch, and said it wanted ten minutes to two.

Q. How long did Mr. George Jones stay after that. - A. He staid about five minutes after that.

Q. Do you remember whether the prisoner mentioned at the time where he had been. - A. Yes, he said he had been to Stoke Newington, he was rather wet, he said he was obliged to stand under a tree on account of the rain; he remained there till past five o'clock.

JOHN NICOLLS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an oyster and fish-meter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, and his brother; on Friday the 29th of August, about ten minutes, or a quarter before two, I saw the prisoner go into his brother's house, Barking Alley, I spoke to him.

Mr. Gurney. Your lordship will see that none of the bank notes were ever traced.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18060917-46

451. PETER BAPTISTE , alias BEJAZET , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , a fustian jacket, value 2 s. a glass decanter, value 2 s. a japan lanthorn, value 1 s. three China cups and saucers, value 2 s. a pair of steel snuffers, value 2 s. two knives and two forks, value 2 s. a hammer, value 6 d. a glass tumbler, value 6 d. two clothes brushes, value 1 s. two wine glasses, value 6 d. nine earthen ware plates, value 1 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. and two iron keys, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Jervis , esq .

SARAH BEST sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are a servant to Mr. Jervis. - A. Yes, he resides in Russel square ; the prisoner at the bar was a servant to Mr. Jervis, he had lived there nine weeks.

Q. When did he leave your master's service. - A. On the 12th of July, after he was gone, I missed the property immediately, with the keys of the area door, and the key of the butler's pantry; on the 19th of this month I saw them again, they were produced by Mr. Pocock and his wife; when I saw them I knew them to be my master's property.

- ATKINS sworn. I am an officer belonging to Bow street.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Jervis with a warrant to a person of the name of Pocock. - A. Yes, on the 19th of July to his house Eagle street, Red Lion square; in Pocock's front parlour there was a trunk which belonged to the prisoner, it was locked, I broke it open; in that trunk I found a hammer and a pair of snuffers; in a bureau that was open, I found two clothes brushes, a cup and saucer, one pint decanter, one tumbler, two wine glasses, four earthen plates, two knives and two forks, and one japan lamp; in a box in the one pair of stairs back room, which I broke open, I found a red and white muslin handkerchief, five plates, two teacups and two saucers, and a drinking glass, that is all I found; I produce them. The prisoner was apprehended a week before that.

- POCOCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Do you remember Atkins coming to your house. - A. I do.

Q. Did you see the boxes and the trunks that he took away. - A. Yes, they were the prisoners; they were brought to my house on the 30th of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, by a man of the name of Matthews. Mrs. Pocock put the crockery ware in the bureau for fear they should be broke.

MRS. POCOCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you at home at the search. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the crockery ware described by your husband, that you placed in the bureau. - A. Yes, in the course of that evening he was taken to prison, (I cannot say the precise day) they were put in there, because they were in our way.

Q. Do you know that these things, that you put in the bureau, belonged to the prisoner. - A. I thought so, the person that brought in the boxes, brought the plates and glasses in a basket; the keys I gave to Mr. Jervis myself; I had tied them both together, and I hung them on a nail in the yard.

- MATTHEWS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a fruiterer and green-grocer, New Willmot-street, Foundling Hospital. I have known the prisoner some time, I was employed by him on the 13th of July last. He came to me, and said, he was going to leave Jervis's service, and asked me if I would move his boxes into Theobald's-road, which I did; I removed them from there and the prisoner helped me (I cannot say as to the day of the month), there were two deal boxes and two trunks. When I removed them from Theobald's-road to Mr. Pocock's, there were some plates and glasses in a basket.

Q. What time was it. - A. About seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Whatever he employed you to move to Theobald's-road, you moved them, and you also removed them to Mr. Pocock's. - A. Yes, I received them of the prisoner, he said they belonged to him. I delivered them at Mr. Pocock's.

JAMES PORTER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are journeyman to Mr. Pocock. - A. Yes, I received them things from Matthews; I put them in the parlour, the prisoner came with Matthews between seven and eight in the morning.

Q. Did you see the articles that were in the basket. - A. I saw some of them, I can identify the lamp, the brushes, and the knives and forks.

(The property identified by Sarah Best and Mrs. Griffith.)

Prisoner's Defence. - I took them, to make use of them, I meant to return them.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-47

452. ELEANOR SKEE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 6th of September , in the 39th year of his present Majesty's reign, a certain will and testament, purporting to be the last will and testament of William Cooper .

Second count for feloniously uttering and publishing, as true, a like will and testament, with like intention.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Pooley, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp).

CHARLES LOVELOCK sworn. Examined Mr. Pooley. - Q. You are clerk to Mr. Bishop, a proctor. - A. Yes, I was clerk to him in the year 1797.

Q. Do you know any thing of the probat of that will. - A. It appears that I wrote a part, part of it is my writing, not all.

Q. Who must have produced that will, before you granted that probat? - A. Eleanor Skee must have produced it.

Court. Some person must have come there and called themselves Eleanor Skee . - A. Yes.

PETER HASLEWOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Clutton. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time call upon Mrs. Skee, relative to a will of a person of the name of William Cooper . - A. Yes, I called on her twice, the first time was about six weeks ago. I told her I was desired to call upon her to look at the probat of Mr. William Cooper 's will, that lived at her house, she told me that I had no business with it, she asked me who I was, she told me to sit down, and she would shew me the probat. Presently she took the bill of costs from the proctor out of the drawers, and delivered it to me.

Q. Did you read that bill of costs. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM FOX sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. I am an Officer of the Thames Police-coffie, I produce the bill of costs from the proctor.

Q.(To Haslewood) Now look if that is the bill she shewed you. - A. I believe this to be the very same.

Q. What is the total of that bill. - A. The expence of the probat of the will of William Cooper , deceased; received of Mrs. Eleanor Skee , five pounds, one shilling, and fourpence, for Mr. Bishop, J. Dean.

Q.(To Lovelock) Do you know Mr. Dean, Mr. Bishop's clerk. - A. Yes, the signature is Mr. Dean's hand writing, he was clerk to Mr. Bishop at that time.

Q.(To Haslewood) After she produced that, did she produce the probat. - A. As soon as she put that into my hands, I said, this is not what I want, where is the probat, she said, that is the probat of the will, what is it you want; I said, no ma'am, that is the bill of costs, she said, sit down, I will shew you it by and bye; presently after she got up and unlocked the drawers, and gave me the probat and asked me what I wanted with it, I told her I was desired to call upon her to read it. Upon observing the subscribing witness to be Mr. William Coombe , attorney, and Robert Eamer, his clerk, I told her, I supposed the Mr. Coombe mentioned there, was Mr. Coombe, of Sampson's Gardens. She said it is nothing at all to you, it is an honest will, and I can prove it; I have got my witnesses ready any time when I want them. I asked her if she would do me the favour to go with me to Coombe's house, she said, no, perhaps I may to-morrow; I then asked if she would permit me to fetch Mr. Coombe to her, as it was but a short distance, she replied, no, you shall not, I will not see him to-day; I asked her what reasonable objections she could make to my fetching Mr. Coombe; she said, I shall have to pay for his attendance; I then told her I would pay Mr. Coombe the see for attending; she then said, if you fetch him, I will not see him, perhaps I may call on him to-morrow myself.

Q. When you offered to fetch him at last, she said she would see him to-morrow, meaning Mr. Coombe of Samon's Gardens. - A. Yes

Q. How long after that was it that you called upon her again. - A. Perhaps it might be four or five days.

Q. Was any body with you. - A. A person came in the room both the times, his name is Tate, he is in court, when I went the second time, she asked me who I came from, I told her it did not signify, I only wanted to speak to her about the will, I told her that Mr. Coombe had been to Doctor's Commons, he had seen the original will, and that he said neither the subscribing witnesses, neither his name, nor Robert Eamer were their writing, I was very apprehensive it was a forgery, she either said you lie, or it is a lie, it is an honest will, and I have got witnesses to prove it when it is necessary; I was present upon her being apprehended, and when her apartments were searched.

Q. Do you recollect at either of the times that you was present with her whether she said she pas present at the execution of the will. - A. Yes, the first time I asked her if she was present at the execution of the will she said no, it was brought to her by William Cooper when he was about going abroad, that she had every right to his property, having frequently lent him money to repair his house in Hermitage-street, and being bail for him.

Q. Have you seen the will since. - A. Yes.

Q. You say you read the probate when you was there; read that will, and see whether the probate that you read is the probate of that will. - A. I do, to the best of my recollection it is almost word for word like it.

Q. You say that when she was apprehended there were some papers found. - A. Yes, she seemed very unwilling to let Fox, the officer, look at any papers; Mr. Fox apprehended her in a shop in the street, he told her he had a warrant for her, she asked to go home, she went home and put a cloak on, he said he must look at her papers, she says you shall not look at them, then he replied I must by force; she took first out one paper and then another, and huddled them up, however, we arrived at the deeds; this is the conveyance of the estate to Mr. Cooper.

Court. As far as it is in evidence that man left these deeds with her in her house.

Witness. I observed to her that the will was executed in the presence of two witnesses only, therefore, she could not take the freehold house in Hermitage-street, she said it was a good will, she had shewn it to her attorney, and he said it conveyed it to her, she said she ought to have it, she had repaired it, and spent a great deal of money upon it.

JOHN DEAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Bishop. - A. I was at that time.

Q. Look at that receipt and tell me whether the signature of Dean at the bottom of it is your handwriting. - A. It is.

Q. Look round to the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you have any knowledge of her person. - A. No, I have not the least recollection.

WILLIAM COOMBE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are an attorney. - A. I am, I reside in Sampson's Gardens, I have resided there nineteen years.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Cooper . - A. I never saw him in my life, to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever witness any will for a person of the name of William Cooper , a seaman. - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. Was a person of the name of Eamer your clerk. - A. He was my clerk the latter end of the year ninety-five, and the best part of the year ninety-six.

Q. Was he your clerk in April ninety-six. - A. He was, his Christian name is Robert.

Q. Were you present with him at any time when him and you executed the will of William Cooper . - A. Never.

Q. Take that in your hand and tell me whether the attestation of William Cooper is your attestation in writing. - A. It is not.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Skee. - A. I do.

Q. Is there any other gentleman attorney of your knowledge of that name in Sampson's Gardens. - A. I do not believe there is a gentleman of that name in the profession, I am sure there is not in the neighbourhood; I spell my name with an e, not Coombs, I have a brother that spells his name so also; I have known Mrs. Skee twenty years and upwards, she resides in Little Hermitage-street, she keeps a chandler's shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Were you always so positive as you are now that this was not your signature. - A. I have said before the magistrate, that I believed it was not my hand-writing, I did it from charity towards the prisoner.

Q. We all know that persons will assume the name of attorneys. - A. Yes, I complained of it once at the Stamp-Office of a man of the name of Henshaw.

Q. Had you more doubt then than you have now. - A. I knew it was not my hand-writing.

Mr. Knapp. Did ever any body practice in your name attesting of wills. - A. No, nor any other way.

ROBERT EAMER sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. I reside at Boston, in Lincolnshire, I am clerk of the peace and town clerk.

Q. In the year 1796, were you clerk to Mr. Coombe, the person that has been just examined. - A. I was in Mr. Coombe's employ the greater part of 1796, and the latter part of 1795.

Q. Where you there in April 1796. - A. Yes, in Sampson's Gardens.

Q. Is that your hand-writing. - A. It certainly is not, I never knew William Cooper , nor Mrs. Skee.

JOHN CLUTTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner. - A. I was, I took the account that she gave to the magistrate in writing at the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Did you attend all the examinations, and take down all she said. - A. I verily believe I took down all she said.

(The examination of the prisoner read in court.)

I have employed Mr. Coombe to transact business

for me, he brought an action for me to recover a debt; William Cooper could not write, he gave me the will now produced in the same state, it appears, two or more years before he died; Peter Johnson saw him bring the will, he lives at No. 17, Angel court, Nightingale lane, he was on board the ship when he died. Alice Gibson , was present, she lives with Mr. Rogers, at the office, Shadwell, Mrs. Fish, who lives at No. 2, Northumberland court in the Strand, was also there, she is not in any business; she afterwards said she was not present, but she knew me and Mr. Cooper many years, and she knew Mr. Cooper and me had known each other many years, and she heard him declare I should have what he had; he brought it to me at No. 2, Hermitage street in the evening, I do not recollect what time of the year, but we had fires; he might have kept it a day or two in his pocket before he gave it me; it was a will and power to act and do for him, to take care of his property, and to take care of him; he lodged at my house, it was daylight in the evening, I am not certain of the hour; Johnson was not married then to the best of my knowledge, it was after dinner, between two and three o'clock, I am sure it was day light, he opened the will and read it, she said, she did not know whether she shewed it to any body; Cooper said, if I had a thousand or a hundred thousand I would give it you, she said the persons present must have heard it, she said she received his money when he was alive of Mr. Schneider in Finsbury square; he sent me home a letter, and I received it, he gave me a power to do it, he sent home some money and I received it; I also received the rents and paid the repairs; he died in the Bellisarius, which belonged to Mr. Schneider. She did not remember that he was in any other ship than the Bellisarius. After Alice Gibson was examined; the prisoner said it was not this witness that she meant, but Mrs. Johnson.

Q. Was Alice Gibson sent for upon the story that she told that you have been reading. - A. She was.

Q. Was she examined. - A. She was.

Q. She first of all said, by the account which you have read, that she was present. - A. Yes, and Alice Gibson could prove it; this was in the morning. In the evening after Alice Gibson had been examined, then she retracted and said it was Mrs. Johnson, I took the words down as she spoke.

Mr. Gurney. Hand me the paper; I should rather guess that this consists of answers to questions put to her by the magistrate. - A. Yes, by the magistrate, and occasionally by myself.

Q. You have not written down any one question. A. I have not.

Q. I observe by the appearance that you were obliged to write very quick to keep up with her, it depends whether you was perfect, accurate. - A. When one question was put, another question was not put till I had got that down; if I have not put down the exact words, I put down what I conceived to be the same.

PETER JOHNSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. You are a sailor. - A. I am, I live at No. 17, Angel court, Nightingale lane, I have lived there above three years; in the year ninety-eight, it was either in November or December, I shipped on board the Bellisarius at Liverpool.

Q. Was there any person on board that vessel of the name of William Cooper . - A. There was, he belonged to the Orkneys.

Q. Upon what voyage did you go from Liverpool. A. To Hambro, he was drowned there in the year ninety-nine, it was the latter end of April or the beginning of May.

Q. What time did you return to this country. - A. At the latter end of the year ninety-nine.

Q. What is your wife's name. - A. Elizabeth, I was married to her on the 10th day of February, eighteen hundred, she then lived with the prisoner at the bar.

Q. When was the first time that you knew Mrs. Skee. - A. In the year ninety-nine.

Q. After your return from your voyage to London after Cooper was drowned, did you ever know her before. - A. I never did.

Q. Do you know where she now lives. - A. She lives in the same house where I married my wife from.

Q. Were you ever at that house before Cooper died. - A. I may, but not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you ever recollect Cooper giving her a will or any thing in your presence. - A. No, I never saw them together.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON sworn. Examined by Mr Pooley. I am the wife of Peter Johnson , I have been married to him seven years next February.

Q. Did you at any time live servant with Mrs. Skee. - A. Yes, I lived with her at the time I was married, that was in February, 1806.

Q. When was it that you first saw Peter Johnson at her house. - A. About five or six weeks before I was married.

Q. Do you know William Cooper . - A. Yes, I have seen him many times he lodged and boarded there when I was there.

Q. Do you ever recollect seeing William Cooper give any paper into the hands of Mrs. Skee when your husband was present. - A. No.

Court. Did you ever see William Cooper give to Mrs. Skee any paper which he called a will. - A. I have seen him give her letters.

Mr. Pooley. Did you ever see him give her any thing he called a will. - A. No.

Court. Have you seen him give her any other papers. - A. I have seen him give her money, and different papers before.

Mr. Pooley. Do you recollect hearing Mrs. Skee say any thing about Cooper after he was drowned. - A. I have heard Mrs. Skee say that he had left her a will.

Q. Do you know of any house that William Cooper had in Wapping. - A. Yes, in Hermitage-street.

Q. After William Cooper died who took possession of that house. - A. She used to take the rent of it, they lived together in great habits of intimacy; I have heard him say that every thing he had, she should have it.

Q. You say that you have seen William Cooper frequently deliver a paper into the hands of Mrs. Skee but that you never saw him deliver any paper into her hands in the presence of your husband Peter Johnson .

A. No.

ALICE GIBSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you a servant at any time with Mrs. Skee. - A. Yes, three years, about nine years ago; I now live with Mr. Rogers, a Shadwell police officer.

Q. During the time that you lived with Mrs. Skee, did you know a person of the name of William Cooper , a seaman. - A. Perfectly well, he lived there when he came home, they were in great habits of intimacy together.

Q. Do you know Peter Johnson . - A. I never saw him at that time, nor did I ever see Mrs. Johnson till after I left Mrs. Skee.

Q. Were you present at any time with Mr. and Mrs. Johnson and the prisoner, Mrs. Skee, when she had a will given her by William Cooper . - A. No, I never saw him deliver any thing to her in the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson; I never was at Mrs. Skee's when Johnson and his wife were present before Cooper died.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You say that always upon his return from his voyages he resided with her, they were on terms of great intimacy. - A. Yes, she had the care of all his property.

Q. In fact she received his money, repaired his house, and gave him money when he wanted it. - A. Yes, and I know there was some sort of a deed or power made at the time that I lived there.

Q. When you say some sort of a deed or power do you mean a will. - A. I cannot say what it was, I have often heard him say if he had a thousand pounds he would give it to her; I always heard him talk of a power or will, or something like it, but being a servant, I did not take particular notice.

(The will read in court.)

MARGARET NORRIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. Did you know William Cooper , that lived at Mrs. Skee's. - A. Yes, he was my townsman, he came from the island of Rosa; I came from Stronemash, I have known him almost thirty years in London; I have seen him at Mrs. Skee's.

Q. Do you recollect his going his last voyage. - A. I recollect it well, he told me his mind before he went, what he meant to do with his property, he said he could not live any longer with that lewd woman, he should be obliged to go back to his old quarters, No. 10, Bow street.

Q. Do you know from him whether he had made a will. - A. He told me he had left a will to his friends at home, he was very averse to Mrs. Skee's conduct, she said he had made a will in favour of his relations.

JOHN COOPER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you reside. - A. In Kirkwall in the Orkney's.

Q. Have you any relations living there. - A. Few or none, I have one cousin of my mother's side, and one uncle's wife.

Q. Did you know William Cooper . - A. I knew him when I was a boy about seven years old, he was a farmer's servant, that is about the time he left the country, I never saw him after that time; he lived in the Island of Rosa he was about my second cousin.

Q. At this time, or during the course of your life, was there any other William Cooper living there. - A. Not to my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-48

454. HANNAH DIANA CONNOLLY , alias CONNER , was indicted for the wilful murder of her bastard child .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ANN GIFFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the wife of Timothy Gifford , where do you lodge. - A. In the same house with the prisoner, the sign of the Three Jolly Weavers, in Brick Lane, St. Luke's .

Q. In the Month of July did the prisoner lodge there. - A. Yes.

Q. Before Sunday the 13th of July, had you at all suspected that she was with child. - A. Not at all.

Q. As you were coming down stairs, on Sunday morning the 13th of July , did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, she came to her room door, it was about seven or eight o'clock in the morning, she asked me to get her a drop of beer, she told me she was very bad, I told her I thought a drop of gin would be better for her

Q. Did she say in what way she was bad. - A. Yes, in the same way as another woman is, she was out of order.

Q. Did you fetch her any gin. - A. Yes, she had a glass and I had a glass, she then asked me to get her a penny worth of wood to light her fire, I got her the wood and lit her fire, and during the time I lit the fire she dropped asleep upon the bed, she had her clothes on, I left her and went up stairs in my own room.

Q. When did you next see her. - A. In the afternoon, I cannot say what hour it was, it was towards the evening, when I was coming down stairs she was coming up the one pair of stairs.

Q. Did you go into her room with her. - A. I went into her room, I asked her how she was, and I came out again; I had no conversation with her at all. I went out I was gone about an hour and a half.

Q. How did she appear to be when you saw her that time. - A. She appeared to be as well as a woman could be in that state; I went out again, I returned again in about an hour and a half.

Q. After you came back did you hear that she had been delivered of a child. - A. When I came back the last time, I saw it either upon a chair or a stool in her own room.

Q. It had been found by somebody. - A. Yes.

Q. Was she in the room too. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you speak to her respecting the child. - A. Not at all, the child was dead.

Q. Was it a male or a female child. - A. I think they said it was a female child.

REBECCA HORN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in the same court, at the back of the Jolly Weavers.

Q. On Sunday night the 13th of July, in consequence of any thing that Mrs. Richards said, did you go to the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I did, towards eleven or twelve o'clock, Mrs. Richards and me together examined a closet in her room, the prisoner was in the room at the time.

Q. Was she awake or asleep. - A. She was very soon asleep after we came in; we saw on the right

hand side of the cupboard there lay some dirty clothes.

Q. Did you see the clothes in such a condition that you suspected there had been a child. - A. Yes, upon that we sent for a midwife, she came and saw these things; after the midwife had looked at them, I awaked the prisoner, I said Hannah awake, she made some reply, but what she said I cannot tell.

Q. When she awoke in what state did she appear to be. - A. She appeared as if she had been drinking, I fancy in the course of the evening she had been drinking.

Q. Did she appear to have been drinking, so as not to be able to understand your questions. - A. She did; I asked her where the child was, she replied she had had no child; I said to her Hannah you lay in an indecent posture, get up and have your bed made, she said she would not get up, her bed did not want making, I said you must get up your bed does want making, and another thing, I know there must be a child about; I told her if she would not get off the bed by fair means we must take her off; the midwife took hold of one arm and I took hold of the other, we got her off the bed, and sat her on a chair, there were two or three more people in the room, they lit a candle, I took the bed, and began to throw what I thought was the bed from the head to the foot.

Q. What was that that you thought was the bed. A. It was something in a sack, I saw nothing then, I took the other that lay against the ground, and the last thing that I took off the ground I saw something lay all of a heap, it lay upon that part of the bed where her arms and her head was.

Q. What did you find that matter to be. - A. Why a child.

Q. Alive or dead. - A. Dead, it was wrapped up in a piece of coarse flannel.

Q. But what was laying upon it at the time that she was laying her head and arms upon it. - A. Nothing but these two sacks that were stuffed with something, it lay under them two sacks, it was completely covered.

Q. Was it sewed up in a cloth. - A. No, it was folded up in a cloth.

Q. Was that cloth wet or dry. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Was there any water about in her room. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Did you look at her person. - A. Yes.

Q. You have had children yourself. - A. Sixteen.

Q. In your opinion had she lately been delivered of a child. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it a boy or a girl. - A. A female.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about the child, how it was born. - A. She told me on the following day that it was born on a Saturday; that night I shewed her the child, she said she had no child, it was not her's.

Q. But the next day she told you that she was delivered of a Saturday. - A. Yes, she told me it was by a married man, which was the reason of her denying it.

Q. Had you at all suspected before that that she was with child. - A. O yes, she lived in the neighbourhood some time, and I have suspected is many times.

Q. Did you find any baby linen in the room. - A. No, I found no one thing; we searched first for the child, and then we searched for them.

Court. When you awoke this woman she appeared to have been in liquor. - A. She did.

Q. After she had awaked herself, then she said she had no child, then she understood your question. A. She seemingly to me was very much overcome in liquor as she lay asleep, I then roused her and awakened her, and then I did not think she was so much in liquor as I thought she was, I shook her and asked her what she had done with the child, she said that she had no child, I said I was sure that she had.

MARY RICHARDS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you lodge at the same house. - A. I lodge at the adjoining house.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner on the Saturday. - A. Yes, she appeared to be ill, she told me on the Friday she catched cold walking on wet ground; and on Sunday morning betwixt seven and eight o'clock, I went into her room to light a candle, Mrs. Gifford was there.

Q. I believe you saw her again the same day about noon. - A. Yes, she was very well then apparently she was carrying beer out.

Q. Did you see her again in the evening. - A. Yes, about six o'clock, Mrs. Gifford was there then.

Q. Did you hear her say any thing to Mrs. Gifford. - A. I did, I heard her say she wished her to to be gone, she did not want her there, it was late in the evening then, she appeared to be in pain.

Q. When she wished Mrs. Gifford to go, did she say she wanted to say any thing to you. - A. She said she wanted to speak to me; I told her I would be in presently when I had put the children to bed.

Q. Did you go and put your children to bed and return. - A. Yes, I suppose I was gone about three quarters of an hour.

Q. In what state did you find the prisoner then. - A. She was then lying on the bed asleep, it was light enough to see her on the bed; I opened the door, I did not approach any further, it was near dark then, I went away.

Q. Were you at some time afterwards called by Mrs. Holden. - A. Yes, I went into the room then, she was laying fast asleep.

Q. Did you and Mrs. Horn look in her closet. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing that induced you to suspect there had been a child. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. When you looked at her what state did she appear to be in. - A. Confused.

Q. What passed when she was awake. - A. We did not awake her till the midwife came, then we asked her what she had done with the child; she said she had no child; we at last searched and found a child, I saw it found.

Q. You saw the child found in the way Mrs. Horn has described. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it concealed. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you at all suspected that she was with child. - A. No, I had not known much of her.

Q. Did you see the tub of water in the room. - A.

Yes, it was standing by one corner in the fireplace.

Q. What quantity of water was there. - A. I cannot exactly say, a small quantity, it was about half full, it was a little tub.

Q. Was it about from sixteen to eighteen inches wide, and two foot high. - A. Yes.

Q. What colour was the water. - A. It was discoloured.

Q. Did you find the body of the child wet, or any of the linen of the child wet. - A. No, I do not think it was.

SAMUEL MOORE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are landlord of the house in which the prisoner lived. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with her after this discovery was made. - A. I was in the room an hour and a half, I believe it was about eleven o'clock when I heard of it, I believe I was in the room till about one. I asked her how she could be guilty of such a cruel action as she had done.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to tell. - A. I did.

Mr. Gurney. Then we cannot hear it.

THOMAS WIGGINTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. You are beadle of the parish of St. Luke's. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner I believe was put into your custody. - A. Yes, she was.

Q. Did she ever inform you whether she was a wife or a widow. - A. She informed me she was a widow, she said her husband had been dead about four years, and he was buried at St. George's in the East.

Q.(to Mary Richards ) Do you happen to know whether the prisoner was a married woman or not. - A. She told me that she was a married woman, and that her husband was living, she told me that some few days before we found any thing of the child.

ANN TAYLOR sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you sat up with the prisoner some nights after the delivery. - A. I did.

Q. Did she tell you any thing respecting the father of the child. - A. I put it to her, but she never would divulge it; I said Hannah, why do not you tell who is the father of the child? No, says she, I would not with a rope round my neck, I love him dearly, I could not enjoy him, he is another woman's property, so why do you ask me, do not ask me.

MR. EVANS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. You are a surgeon. - A. Yes, I live in Old Street.

Q. On the morning after this discovery were you sent for. - A. I was sent for about one o'clock in the night.

Q. Was the child shewed to you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to be a child at its full time. - A. At its full time I believe.

Q. There were no marks of violence upon it. - A. None at all. I examined it minutely.

Q. Are you able to say whether that child had performed life. - A. According to our mode of examining, the lungs had inflated.

One of the Jury. Is it possible that you could mistake in it. - A. It is.

Court. The lungs might be inflated before it was born. It might have died in the act of delivery, therefore you cannot at all say whether the child was born alive or no. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday morning I went to work about eight o'clock, and I came home about eight o'clock, because I was not well; a woman was with me, she came with me on the night, I was not very well in the afternoon, and I went to bed, I gave her some money to bring in some liquor, and she brought me a pint of beer; I then drank it and went to bed for a good bit, I got up a while after, we had plenty of liquor, and between three and four o'clock on the Saturday morning, I was brought a bed, then she gave me some more liquor, I told her to take care of the child, she said never mind the child, take care of yourself.

Court. Who was that person. - A. Mary Barrett .

Q. Is she here. - A. No. So she gave me more liquor, and took a great coat that was hanging up and laid it down upon me and left me there, I thought I was getting very weak and low in the afternoon, I went to the door and came back again.

GUILTY .

Of concealing the birth of a bastard child, but not of the murder.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-49

456. SARAH HAYWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of George Rich , in the dwelling house of John Clare .

GEORGE RICH sworn. On Thursday evening the 7th of August, about ten o'clock in the evening, I met this woman on Westminster bridge; she asked me to give her a glass of ale, I went into a public house and gave her a glass of ale; she then asked me to go with her to a house in Whitcomb street , I went into a house there with her, and we went into a room by ourselves, when I went in the room I pulled out my watch and put it on the table; in about a quarter of an hour she left the room and went down stairs, I went out of the room directly after her, and when I got down stairs I recollected my watch, I went up stairs again into the bed room we were in and the watch was gone; I told the people of the house of it.

Q. You did not recollect your watch before you came out of the room. - A. No, and when I came down stairs again, the woman was gone out of the house, I went out of the door but I could not find her, I did not see her again till she was apprehended; Gillmore the officer, shewed me the watch at Queen square.

JOHN GILLMORE sworn. I am an officer of Queen square. On Monday night the 11th of October, I was out with a warrant to take up disorderly persons; on Tuesday morning about two o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner at the corner of Whitcomb Street, in company with two other women of the town, I saw her almost in a state of nakedness, and two women were dressing her, I conveyed them all three to the watchhouse; in the pocket of the prisoner I found this watch, I asked her how she came

by it, she told me it was her husband's watch; there being a particular mark in the inside case, I asked her if she knew the watch by any particular mark on the inside case, she said there was no mark in the inside case, it was quite plain; that convinced me it was not her husband's watch; I enquired at all the houses in Whitcomb street, till I found the prosecutor out.

Prisoner. Mr. Gilmore asked me for five pounds, and then he said I should have the watch again; he found a tin box in my pocket and fifteen duplicates, there he stands.

Gilmore. The box and the duplicates are as she describes, but all the rest is false; why, I hold the duplicates are for five shillings, it is not five pound, it is for what she had at the watchhouse that I am accountable for.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

MARY PARSONS sworn. Q. Do you live servant at this house in Whitecombe street. - A. Yes, I recollect the prosecutor coming on that night to the house with the young woman.

Q. Who keeps the house. - A. John Clare .

Q. Do you remember whether the prosecutor went back again. - A. Yes, the prisoner went out and the gentleman followed her, he went into the street, and came back again; he told us he had lost his watch, he left his address, and when Mr. Gilmore enquired we told him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw that lady in my life before, nor do I ever recollect seeing that gentleman before I saw him on Westminster bridge; he wanted to do a very bad thing with me, and instead of the money he gave me the watch to keep me quiet, he said he had not a farthing of money about him; he wanted to do that which does not become a man.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-50

457. MARY GOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , three shirts, value 10 s. two shifts, value 4 s. seven handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a jacket, value 7 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. three petticoats, value 6 s. a gown, value 10 s. an apron, value 1 s. and three caps, value 1 s. the property of John Whitby , in his dwelling house .

CATHERINE OGLE sworn. I am servant to John Whitby , he lives in High street, St. Giles's .

Q. Who washes for them. - A. Ann Stewart , she sends her little girl for it.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. No, not till she came on Wednesday evening for the dirty linen, the little girl used to fetch it, I told her it was not ready; the next morning she came for it about eleven o'clock, I delivered to her all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Whose property were they. - A. Mr. Whitby's and mine; the little girl came about ten minutes afterwards, I told her I had delivered the clothes to a woman.

Q. Did she say what she wanted the linen for. - A. She came on the Wednesday, and when she came on the Thursday I thought it was right.

ANN STEWART sworn. Q. You wash for Mr. Whitby. - A. Yes, I generally send my little girl for it; I know the prisoner, she had drank a cup of tea with me on the morning she got these things from Mr. Stewart's servant.

Q. Did you direct her to go for the dirty linen on, the 3d or 4th of September. - A. No, the prisoner never brought the linen to me; I sent my little girl for it, they told her there had been a person for it, and had taken it away.

- DONALDSON sworn. I apprehended the prisoner at Ann Stewart 's, I produce the property; I put her in the watchhouse at night, in the morning I took her up to Carpmeal's; while I was at Carpmeal's, the husband of the prisoner came and a little girl, and in their arms they had got this bundle, which I produce.

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN sworn. These I believe to be the articles that she pledged with me; her husband came about six o'clock in the evening, and pledged a coat for a pound, and took these things out.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor and Catherine Ogle .)

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy; the gentleman promised me if he received this property by the evening he would not hurt me, and I got it him.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-51

458. JOSEPH WESTWOOD was indicted for feloniously forging on the 8th of August a certain order for the payment of 150 l. with intention to defraud Samuel Fearn .

Second count for feloniously publishing and uttering as true a like order, with the same intention.

Two other counts for feloniously forging, uttering, and publishing as true, a like order for payment of money, with intention to defraud Benjamin Bond , Joseph Bond , and Stephen Pattisal .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN METCALFE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are a porter. - A. I am.

Q. On the 8th of August did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. I did, at Seagoe's coffee house in Holborn , about three o'clock in the afternoon; he employed me to take a draft to Messrs. Bond and Co. No. 2, 'Change Alley, Cornhill, to get payment, and I was to come back to him with the money if I got it.

Q. Did you get the money at the banker 's. - A. I did not, they refused payment, they said it was a forgery; upon that I returned back to Seagoe's coffee house again; one of the partners kept behind me till I got near to the coffee house.

Q. When you got to Seagoe's coffee house, did you go into the coffee house. - A. I went to the ground floor of the coffee house.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there. - A. I did.

Q. Was it the same person that you saw there that had given you the draft. - A. The self same, that person was the prisoner; when I came in he asked me if I had got the money, I replied no; I told him they said it was a forgery, and they had not

paid me the money; that was Mr. Pattisal and another gentleman that was with him said it was a forgery; then he replied, I must go to the person that gave it me; I made an answer no, you must not go at all; he got up up and I got hold of him by the collar, he was too strong and too nimble for me, he got out of the door, I made hue and cry, and he was making off across Holborn, making as it were for Brookes street in Holborn; Mr. Pattisal was at the door then, he made hue and cry, and in consequence of that he was taken before he got across Holborn.

Q. Did you get up to him at the time he was taken. - A. I was close by, I saw him when he was taken, he came into the coffee house after he was taken.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing at the time he was taken or afterwards. - A I did not.

Q. Did you look at the draft to see how much it was for. - A. Yes, one hundred and fifty pounds, upon Messrs. Bond and Co. he gave me the direction to go to Messrs. Bond and Co.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you have any doubt that he was the person that gave you the draft, and whom afterwards you found in the coffee house. - A. I think it is the same man.

Q. Do you entertain any doubt. - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. At what time was it you saw him at Seagoe's coffee house. - A. About three in the afternoon, I cannot say to a minute.

Q. You brought him a letter from Gray's inn. - A. I did.

Q. He opened the letter in your presence did he not. - A. He had broke the wafer as he came down stairs, he had not entirely opened the letter.

Q. Therefore you saw the letter in his hand before it was completely opened. - A. Yes, it was not completely opened.

Q. I believe you saw him take the check that you was to go with, out of that letter. - A. I did.

Q. He took it out of that letter which you had brought sealed, and desired you to go to Mr. Bond with it to get the money, and he would wait your return. - A. Yes.

Q. And then when you informed him that the bankers had not paid it, they believed it to be a forgery, he said he must go to the man that sent it. A. He said he must go to the man that gave it him.

Q. You were the person that gave it though you brought it from another person, to whom did you give the check to at Messrs. Bonds and Co.; when they refused payment you left it there. - A. I left it with Mr. Pattisal.

WILLIAM BOND sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are the master of the Seagoe coffee house. - A. I am.

Q.Seagoe coffee house is in the city of London is it not. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before this time. - A. I never saw him before that day to my knowledge.

Q. Do you know his name. - A. No.

Q. Were you at the coffee house at the time when the check was given to the porter. - A. I was in the way when the prisoner came in first, he called for a glass of brandy and water, and said that he expected a letter in the name of William Williams; in the course of ten or fifteen minutes a porter brought the letter.

Q. Was that Metcalfe. - A. The same man, I called the waiter and sent the letter to him; he came down and sent the porter with the draft, I saw him do that; I saw nor heard no more of it till I heard a bustle with the prisoner at the bar, I heard the bustle of the prisoner running out, and being brought in again in custody. I was not there when Metcalfe first returned; the prisoner is the same person, I have no doubt of his person.

STEPHEN PATTISAL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe you are one of the partners in Mr. Bond's house. - A. I am.

Q. What are the names of the partnership. - A. Benjamin Bond , Stephen Bond , and Stephen Pattison , that is myself.

Q. Do you remember Metcalfe, the porter, coming with any draft to your house. - A. On the 8th of August last, he presented a draft, the draft which I have in my hand, for one hundred and fifty pounds for payment; I asked him how he would have it, meaning what sort of notes, he said it was not material, I then asked him for whom he received it, he told me for Mr. Williams; knowing it to be a forgery, or at least strongly believing it, or having little doubt about it, I desired him to walk into the accompting house, that I might question him how he came by it more closely; I asked him who he was, he said he was a porter of Gray's Inn; I then told him he must go back to Mr. Williams, from whom he had it, and I would go with him, and if he was stopped on the way by any person to receive the money from him to take them in custody, I should be close at hand to assist him in taking them; he went to Seagoe's coffee-house, and I went after him, he went in, and in a short interval of time the prisoner at the bar rushed out of the coffee-house; I immediately cried out, Stop him, and followed him, before he had got across the way he was seized; I do not recollect who took hold of him first, he was brought back to the coffee house, I had hold of him myself; I sent for an officer and took him in custody.

Q. Did any thing pass there from the prisoner at the time he was apprehended. - A. He expressed a readiness to go any where, he made no opposition after I got him; there were several that stopped him, and there was a mob collected, as is usual on these occasions, in two minutes, I suppose.

Q. He was taken to a magistrate. - A. He was taken to Bow-street, and was afterwards committed.

Q. Have you a customer of your's of the name of Mr. Samuel Fearn . - A. We have, for several years.

Q. Did he keep cash with you at that time. - A. Yes, and does to the present moment.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand writing. - A. Particularly so, I have seen him write a number of times.

Q. Look at that draft, and see whether Samuel Fearn is his hand writing, or is it not. - A. I verily believe it is not his hand writing.

Q. Do you know any thing at all respecting the body of the draft. - A. Yes, it appear to be the same as the signature.

Q.Do you believe the body of the draft to be his hand writing. - A. By no means.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Are there no other partners. - A. None but those I have mentioned.

JOHN RICHARDS sworn. Do you know Mr. Fearn. - A. Very well, I have known him seven or eight years.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand writing. - A. Extremely well, indeed.

Q. Look at Samuel Fearn , and the body of the draft, and tell me whether either of them are his hand writing. - A. I do not believe that either of them are his hand writing.

JOHN CHERRY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are clerk to Mr. Fearn. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand writing. - A. Yes, perfectly well.

Q. Look at that, is that the hand writing of Samuel Fearn . - A. I believe it is not.

Q. The body of the draft, what do you think of that. - A. It is not his hand writing.

JOSEPH FEARN , JUN. sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are the son of Mr. Samuel Fearn . - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with your father's hand writing. - A. Most assuredly.

Q. Is that your father's hand writing, or not. - A. I believe it is not.

Q. What do you think of the body. - A. Certainly not.

THOMAS AMOS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you in Holborn at the time of the prisoner's apprehension. - A. I was coming along Holborn at the time Mr. Pattisal was crying out Stop him, I took him immediately and took him into the Seagoe coffee-house.

(The draft read in court.)

LYGSTH Th. 1806.

Messrs. Bond and Co. pay to J. Williams, Esq. One Hundred and Fifty Pounds.

SAMUEL FEARN .

150 0 0

Prisoner's Defence. I assuredly say that I am intirely innocent of the charge I am indicted for, I laboured under very heavy embarrasments, in consequence of that I made application to a person for money, he sent me this draft to Seagoe's coffee-house, and the consequence of my not going by my right name was for fear of being arrested; I sent the porter with the draft; when he returned, in consequence of seeing people with him, I ran away, the person that sent me the draft was to have half the money; I made application to find him out but I could not; being in embarrassed circumstances the person promised to assist me, he sent me that draft, which was the only way of bringing me into trouble.

Mr. Gurney. Have you the name and the address of that person that sent you the draft to give to the jury. - A. I have not his address, his name is Cook.

Court. (to Pattisal.) You have heard what he has said to the jury, did he say it to you at that time. - A. No, I do not recollect any such circumstance taking place, or any thing like it,

Q. Did he account to you now he came by the draft. - A. He did not, he was rather desirous of going before a magistrate.

Q. Did any thing of this sort pass before the magistrate. - A. No.

JAMES LAWSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. What are you. - A. I am a navy agent.

Q. Have you known the prisoner at the bar for any length of time past. - A. No more than seeing him twice, I have a warrant of attorney against him for twenty-eight pounds, which is over-due and not paid, it is a joint warrant against him and a person of the name of James Cook .

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-52

459. ELIZABETH FARMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , three guineas, a half guinea, and a one pound bank note, the property of Michael Dee , in his dwelling house .

MICHAEL DEE sworn. I am a housekeeper, I live at No. 2, Coal-yard, High-street, St. Giles' s; I had seven guineas and a half and a seven shilling piece in a purse in my chest, and a one pound note in the chest was in my sleeping room.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, she lodged four nights in my house, I was not at home when I lost the money; one of the guineas I think I should know again, it is a remarkable one.

NORAH DEE sworn. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember the day when the money was taken out of the chest. - A. It was on Sunday, the 13th of July, about three o'clock; the prisoner, Timothy Leary , and two more were in my room.

Q. During the time they were in your room did you go out any where. - A. Yes, the prisoner told me to go out and buy a glass of cherry brandy, she gave me three pence.

Q. Do you know whether at that time your chest was locked, or the key with it - A. The key was in the lock, I was not gone a quarter of an hour; when I came in the room I found the prisoner and the others in the room, I took the key out of the chest and put it in my pocket.

Q. Had you been to that chest a short time before. - A. Yes, after dinner when I dressed myself, and I saw the money there at one o'clock, and the note.

Q. When did you discover that the money was gone. - A. On Monday morning at nine o'clock I missed the money, I went to my chest to put in my clothes.

Q. Did you examine it to see how much you had lost. - A. I did. I missed three guineas and a half and a one pound note, I had eight guineas and a half and a one pound note in it.

Q. Did the prisoner continue to lodge in your house. - A. She had not lodged with me but three days before, she came on a Saturday and went away on a Wednesday, and took a lodging in King-street, Seven Dials; she came to my house to see me on the Sunday.

Q. Did you ever see your note or any of the money

again. - A. Yes, Mr. Blackman has got it.

TIMOTHY LEARY sworn. I am a labouring man, I was working out in the country all the week, I came home on Saturday night.

Q. Were you in the room on the Sunday when the prisoner and Mrs. Dee were there. - A. I was. The prisoner desired her to dress herself to go out a walking, after she had dressed herself, then the prisoner said she could not go out because she was sick at her stomach; go out said she, to Mrs. Dee, for a glass of cherry brandy for me, Mrs. Dee went out, and left the prisoner and me and three or four men in the room.

Q. While Mrs. Dee was gone, did you see the prisoner do any thing. - A. Yes, I saw the key in the box, she took the clothes that lay on the top of the box and laid them on the bed, and then put down the box lid again; after that she went to the box again, she did so three times.

Q. Did you see whether she took any thing out. A.- No her back was towards me.

Q. Did you say any thing to her. - A. I did not, I did not think that she would do any such thing, nor any one else; Mrs. Dee came in and took the key out of the box as soon as she gave the cherry brandy to the lady.

Q. Did you tell her what you had seen. - A. I did not think in my life that she would do any such thing, the prisoner staid in the house till nine o'clock at night. This lady here (pointing to the prisoner) said will you have a pipe of tobacco, she went out and brought in seven pennyworth of tobacco.

Q. When was it that you told the woman of the house that you had seen the prisoner go to her chest. - A. On the Monday morning when she searched her box, I told her the prisoner had searched her box two times.

MARY BARTON sworn. I live at a chandler's-shop facing Mr. Dee's. On the same Sunday about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and bought seven pennyworth of tobacco, I changed her half a guinea, I saw she had plenty of silver in her purse, she said the silver was not hers, she wanted change particularly for the half guinea.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I took the prisoner in custody on the fourteenth of July, I searched and found upon her three guineas and eleven shillings, I produce them, she said they were her own.

Q.(to Prosecutor) Look at these guineas, is there any one of these guineas that has got any thing particular about it. - A. This is a remarkable guinea, I had it for two years and a half, the head is a different way from the others.

Prisoner's Defence. I had sent my box on in the waggon, I went to look for creditable lodgings, I asked a woman that I met in the street, to recommend me to creditable lodgings, I found myself mistaken, she recommended me to Mrs. Dee's, Broad-street, St. Giles's, when I went there, Mrs. Dee took off the sheets from her own bed and she laid on the blankets, I left them on Wednesday, and on Sunday I went to her house, I took out my purse in which I had four guineas and nineteen shillings in silver; on Monday morning when I came there again, they swore I had robbed them, she gave me liberty to go to her box, there was nothing in it, and I believe all in the house was not worth ten shillings; she took the advantage of a poor stranger; I hope the gentlemen of the jury will take pity on me, that is my purse and my money. I gave her a new skirt, two silver spoons, three white handkerchiefs, six new knives and forks, and an apron. I think it is hard to loose that money, when my poor husband is in the army at Brighton.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Upon your oath did she give you these articles. - A. She exchanged a skirt, for a shawl, and she gave me a couple of old handkerchiefs and six knives and forks.

Q. Do you know any thing of two silver spoons. - A. There were two bits of a mustard spoon, they are not worth a sixpence.

Q. When did she give them to you. - A. Two or three days after she came to me, I believe they are in my place.

Q. Are they silver. - A. I do not know, they look like silver.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-53

460 ALICE BUNTING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d. of July , three petticoats, value ten shillings, an umbrella, value six shillings, a coat, value seven shillings, a bonnet, value two shillings, and two gowns, value twenty shillings, the property of Eusebius Eady , in the dwelling-house of John Twyby .

ELIZABETH EADY sworn. I am the wife of Eusebius Eady. I live at No. 1, Portugal-street, in the Borough. In April last I lived at, No. 18, Shoreditch , at Mr. Twyby's house. The prisoner lived with me on the 22d of April On that day I went out at six o'clock to a day's work, I left the prisoner in my appartment; when I returned at nine o'clock at night I missed the articles in the indictment, the prisoner was out, the door locked, and the key put under the door.

Q. When was it after that, that you saw the prisoner again. - A. On the 2nd of July, I met her in Drury-lane, I took her to an acquaintance's house of my mother's; there I left her, and went and got a constable, then she acknowledged every thing.

EUSEBIUS EADY sworn. I am the husband of the last witness, I live at No. 99, East-Smithfield, she had eloped from me some time before April.

Q. Where does your wife live. - A. I really did not know, till I heard her now.

BENJAMIN MOXON sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Cordy, I produce a coat pledged at our shop for three shillings, in the name of Elizabeth Eady . I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. I produce a gown pawned on the 22d of April, in the name of Elizabeth Eady . I do not know the prisoner.

FRANCIS COTTON sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I produce a petticoat pledged on the 22d of April, in the name of Elizabeth Eady . I cannot recollect the prisoner.

ROBERT M'KENZIE sworn. I produce a flannel petticoat pawned by Margaret Abbot , on the 30th of April, for one shilling.

MARGARET ABBOT sworn. Q. Look at that flannel petticoat. A. I pawned that at Mr. M'Kenzie's,

the prisoner asked me to pledge it for her for a shilling.

EDWARD TRINGHAM sworn. I am an officer; I produce the petticoat, the prisoner said she made it out of one of the gowns.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent them things to me to pawn them, I was to pay her when I got my quarters wages.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-54

461. CHARLES FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , a box, value 6 d. fifty yards of linen, value 8 l. twelve neck handkerchiefs, value 2 l. a pair of shoes, value 7 s. three waistcoats, value 1 l. a great coat, value 2 l. three pair of breeches, value 2 l. one hundred and twenty yards of muslin, value 20 l. a gross and a half of lacing, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of George Ward .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-55

462. JOSHUA ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , a pocket book value 2 s. a pencil, value 2 d. and a pencil case, value 2 d. the property of Charles Schneider .

Second count for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Valiants.

JOHN HOWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Valiants. What are you. - A. I am in the charcoal line, I live at No. 21, Wilson street, Finsbury square. On the 19th of August, about twenty minutes before one o'clock at noon, I was coming down London bridge , I saw two young men walking together very close, I saw their eyes very attentive to the pocket of captain Schneider, I turned myself round, and in a short space of time I saw the prisoner's hand in the pocket of captain Schneider, with which he drew out a small red pocket book; I immediately stepped up to the captain, and asked him if he had lost any thing, he put his hand in his pocket, he said his pocket book; I asked him the colour, he said it was a red one; I said that is the person that has got it, pointing to the prisoner at the bar, who was then crossing to the other side of the bridge; the captain went up and collared him, the prisoner made away with the book.

Court. After you saw the pocket book taken out of the gentleman's pocket by the prisoner, did you see what he did with it. - A. I did not see the book go out of his hand; the captain wanted assistance to take him before the lord mayor, the prisoner begged for mercy very much, and said he would not do so any more, but at first he denied having meddled with it.

Mr. Valiants. Did you look over the balustrades. - A. I did, and I saw a red pocket book lie on the sterlings below, close to where he was; a gentleman got a waterman to get it, I gave the captain my address, and went away.

WILLIAM LANKHORN sworn. Examined by Mr. Valiants. I am servant to John Blake , Ludgate hill; I was passing over London bridge, I saw the prisoner there, and as soon as Mr. Howell came up to captain Schneider, the prisoner went to the balustrade and shoved a red pocket book through, I saw him do it.

Q. Did you send a waterman round. - A. I did not, some people coming up desired a waterman to go round and get it; the prisoner at first denied having meddled with it, but some people came round the captain, and begged him to detain him, he then begged for mercy and hoped the captain would forgive him.

EDWARD EGLENTINE sworn. Examined by Mr. Valiants. You are a waterman. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on London bridge that day. - A. I was sent down by some gentlemen, I found a pocket book on the south sterling under London bridge, under the exact spot from where the prisoner stood.

Q. What may it be worth. - A. I cannot say, I look upon it to be one of the common sort.

Q. Is it worth sixpence. - A. Yes, I dare say it is.

Q. Did you go before the lord mayor. - A. Yes, and captain Schneider attended when I was there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Has that pocket book been in your possession ever since. - A. No, the captain had it some time to look after the memorandums.

Q. Who did you deliver the book to before the magistrate. - A. I cannot swear, I believe to Mr. alderman Lea, it was delivered again to me immediately; after that I had it locked up in my house, and the day before yesterday I left the book at Beal's house, the man that was with me, it has only been out of my possession twice; I have not a doubt but it is the same book by the writing that is in it.

Q. Were these cards in it at the time it was taken. A. These cards were on the sterling.

FRANCIS HOBLER sworn. Examined by Mr. Valiant. You are clerk to the lord mayor. - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner. - A. I was.

Q. There was a person came there who gave information on the subject and claimed the book. - A. There was; the gentleman gave his name captain Charles Schneider , he declared that he came to England, and was going to sea in three or four days.

Q. Did the prisoner ever claim that pocket book. A. He did not in my hearing, he knew at that time he was accused of stealing it; he heard every thing (the court was very full at the time), the deposition was taken in the minute book, and then a fair copy, as it is here, was read over in the prisoner's presence, on purpose for cross examination.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-56

463. MARY MELLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a watch, value 5 l. a ribbon, value 1 d. and a watch key, value 1 d.

the property of William Marks .

WILLIAM MARKS sworn. I am assistant to a druggist , I live at No. 8, Fleet street ; I was standing at the door of the house I live in, I had rang the bell to go in, and as the parlour door opened this woman came up and put her arm round my neck and drew my watch out, I told her that she had it, she denied it, I immediately charged the watch with her, she was taken to the watchhouse, and the watch was found on her.

Prisoner. Ask him if he was not in liquor, and he gave me the watch to go and sleep with him all night.

Court. (to prosecutor) What time of the night was it. - A. Near twelve o'clock.

Q. Where you in liquor. - A. I was not, perfectly sober.

Q. Were you sober enough to know what you were about. - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. Did you offer her the watch at all. - A. Not in the least; so far from it, when she was taken to the watchhouse she said I gave her two shillings. I wish you to use as much lenity as you can.

- sworn. I am a patrol; the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutor were brought to the watchhouse (the watchman is not here), he charged the prisoner with picking his pocket of his watch, I searched the woman, I could not find any thing upon her; the watch was at the front part, I saw her handling herself there when the watch was taken from her, then she said that the gentleman gave her the watch to have connexion with her; I took it from her front part under her petticoats.

JAMES LAMBERT sworn. I was constable of the night; the woman was brought in about a quarter after twelve o'clock at night; the prosecutor charged her with taking the watch from him, I asked her for it, she denied having seen any watch, the patrol searched her, and took it from her in the manner he has stated; the watch was in this pocket I now produce.

(The watch produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-57

464. RICHARD HOSIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , forty pound weight of sugar, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of John Teasdale and Robert Teasdale .

JOHN TEASDALE sworn. I am a grocer , I live in Compton street, Soho .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Have you any other partner beside Mr. Robert. - A. I have a brother that is concerned, his name is Henry.

Q. Does he receive a part of the profit or loss. - A. Undoubtedly.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-58

465. DANIEL COLLINS was indicted for that he on the 29th of April , about the hour of three at night, being in the house of Ann Middleton , feloniously did steal a pair of woollen blankets, value 15 s. a cotton gown, value 1 l. 3 s. a black silk handkerchief, value 6 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 6 s. two flannel shirts, value 2 s. a mattress case, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. the property of Ann Middleton , and that he afterwards burglariously broke out of the said house .

The prosecutrix and witnesses after being called, not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-59

466. ELIJAH ORAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , two shillings and four halfpence, the property of Elizabeth Tilley , privily from her person .

The prosecutrix not appearing in court, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-60

467. THOMAS MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , eight pound weight of lead, value 3 s. and two brass cocks, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Sustenance .

SAMUEL SUSTENANCE sworn. I am a plumber , I live at No 10, Cow Cross ; on the 9th of August we were casting, and one of my men was taken poorly, and Mitchell was called in on that day, he afterwards got in liquor; as he came down stairs I conceived that he had some thing that did not belong to him, that he had taken from my premises; he said he hoped I would forgive him.

WILLIAM FIZZARD sworn. I am a constable, I searched this man, between his jacket and his shirt I found this brass cock; three pieces of lead he dropped in the shop when he was detected.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say in my behalf, I leave it to the court.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-61

468. SUSANNAH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of August , a metal watch, value 1 l. a frock, value 1 s. a shirt, value 4 s. and a shift, value 3 s. the property of James Wixen .

FRANCES WIXEN sworn. I live at No. 33, Church-street, Shoreditch ; I lost the watch on the last day of October, in the last year, and the other things I lost about a week before; the prisoner was with me about ten days in the whole; upon my missing of her I looked to see what I had lost.

Q. How long had she left your house before you missed these things. - A. Not half an hour, I did not see her from the last day in October till three weeks ago last Thursday.

Q. Where was this watch kept. - A. In a little box on the side of the bed, the shift was washed the day before, and the frock and petticoat were taken from a little drawer; the pawnbroker delivered up

to me the shift and the frock.

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer of Worship-street, I apprehended this woman in a court in Holywell-lane in Shoreditch, I told her I took her for robbing Mrs. Wixen of a watch and other articles, she said she was very sorry, she was in liquor when she committed the robbery; she informed me that she had sold the duplicate of the watch to Abraham Jacobs ; in consequence of that I went to Jacobs; the watch was produced before the magistrate and the prosecutrix claimed it.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Of stealing the watch.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-62

469. SARAH LEGHOUCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July ten pound weight and a half of tobacco, value 1 l. 11 s. the property of Zechariah Kemp .

ZECHARIAH KEMP sworn. I live in John-street, Clerkenwell , I keep a shop there, I employed the prisoner to strip tobacco . On the 4th of July I lost the tobacco, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner complained that she was poorly, she then left my shop, my wife called her back to give her something to nourish her; when she was called back, I went back and looked at the sides of the woman, I had suspicion, but I could not tell, because of her petticoats, some women put on a good many, but when she took the cordial it struck me that guilt was about her; she went out again, I spoke to Mrs. Kemp to fetch her back directly, she had got about two hundred yards, I went after her and called her back, I told her Mrs. Kemp wanted her; Mrs. Kemp searched her, I did not see the first part of the search, I saw a part of the tobacco taken from her, while I was there it was taken out of her pockets, it was unmanufactured tobacco in the leaf, about nine pound and a half, and some manufactured, she said she was going to take the nine pounds and a half of leaf tobacco to learn a little child to strip.

ELIZABETH KEMP sworn. My husband brought the prisoner back, I took her up stairs and searched her, I found nine pounds and a half of tobacco in the front of her clothes; from above her knees to the bottom of her petticoat was a convenience made like a pocket, it was tied with a string and spread regular about; she said she hoped I would forgive her, she was going to take it home to learn a child to strip; I said why did not you ask Kemp to let your child come, he would have let her come and sit by your side.

(The tobacco produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. My husband left me in distress.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-63

470. THOMAS HOWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a mahogany cat, value 1 s. 6 d. two rolling pins, value 1 s, and last, value 1 s. the property of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. I am a turner , I live in Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel , the prisoner was in my employ; from information, I went to the prisoner's lodgings on the the 8th of August, I saw the property there.

SARAH CURTIS sworn. I live at No. 18, Gloucester-street, Whitechapel; the prisoner brought home two rolling pins and a cat one morning; since that time I heard he had robbed his master; I produce them, I had them of the prisoner.

(The cat identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. That woman asked me for a rolling pin and a salt box; I had them things from a man in Oxford-street that was going to sea; if I went out this minute I could buy an hundred of rolling pins turned like them.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Whipped in Goal, and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-64

471. ALEXANDER M'KENZIE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 3d of May , a certain order for the payment of 25 l. 16 s. purporting to be drawn by Henry Frazer , with intention to defraud Richard Down , Henry Down , and Richard Free .

Second count for uttering and publishing as true, a like order for payment of money with the same intention; and

Two other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud John Henderson .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN HENDERSON sworn. Examined by Mr. - . I live in Warwick-square , I am a taylor .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do. On Saturday evening, the 3d of May, he called to pay me a bill of eighteen pounds, which he owed me, I do not know exactly how much it was.

Q. Did he give you that draft which you have now in your hand. - A. Yes, I read it over, I asked him who Mr. Frazer was, he said it was Simon Frazer , King's Arms yard, Coleman-street, one of the East India directors; I took the draft, he wanted me to give him the difference of the amount of my bill and the amount of the draft.

Q. Did you give the difference. - A. No, a part, I gave him a pound note.

Q. Do you mean that Saturday night. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he upon this go away. - A. Yes, with a promise to call the next day.

Q. Did he call the next day. - A. He did.

Q. That was Sunday. - A. Yes, he said then he was going to Richmond by the coach, and he wished to have the difference with him, I gave him no more and he said it did not matter, he seemed indifferent about it.

Q. What did you do with the draft. - A. I gave it to my daughter to present it.

Q. When did you see him next. - A. Never till I saw him at the office, perhaps six weeks back.

Q. Then he never called on you from this Sunday till the time you saw him at the office. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. He did keep his word, and called on you on the Sunday, and told you he was going out of town. A. Yes.

Court. You had read over the draft before you asked him whom this Mr. Frazer was, did it not strike you as singular when he said Simon Frazer . A. I had heard of the name before.

Q. Was the draft signed Simon Frazer . - A. It was signed S. Frazer.

Mr. Gurney. It is S with a flourish or S C, is Warwick Square in the city of London. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known him before. - A. I have known him six or seven years, he is clerk in a merchant's counting house.

SARAH HENDERSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Were you present at the time the prisoner gave this draft to your father. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his asking who this Mr. Frazer was. - A. I do, he described him to be Simon Frazer of King's Arms yard, Coleman street.

Q. Did you take the check to the banking house. A. I did, I believe about half past eight that same evening.

Q. What time was it that he gave it to your father. - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. Did you take it and present it on the Monday morning. - A. I did.

Q. Was it paid. - A. It was not.

Q. This is the check. - A. It is.

Q. Did he assign any reason why he had not taken the check to the bankers himself. - A. The reason he assigned was, that he wanted the money, as he had stopped so long with Mr. Frazer in the afternoon he could not receive it himself, the banking house was shut up.

JAMES KITE LEBURN sworn. Examined by Mr. - . I believe your are clerk at Mr. Down's house. - A. Yes.

Q. What are the partner's names. - A. Richard Down , Henry Down , and Richard Free .

Q. On Monday morning, the 5th of May last, do you remember the last witness presenting any check. A. I cannot say positively the day of the month, I know it to be on a Monday morning.

Q. Do you know the check. - A. I had it not long in my custody, I believe that to be the check.

Q. Did you pay it. - A. No.

Q. Does Mr. Simon Frazer of King's Arms yard, keep any account whatever in your house. - A. He does not, nor ever did to my knowledge.

JAMES HENRY HOUSTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are in the counting house of Mr. Simon Frazer of King's Arms yard. - A. I am.

Q. How long have you been there. - A. Seven years.

Q. He is an East India director. - A. Yes.

Q. And is now in court. - A. He is now in court.

Q. Be so good as to look at that draft, and tell me whether it is the signature, or any of it his handwriting. - A. Not the least part of it.

Q. He is an old gentleman very near fourscore. - A. Yes.

Q. Does he keep any account at Messrs. Down's. A. He does not, he certainly has not for the last seven years.

PETER MASON sworn. I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner at the bar at the house of Mr. Brown, a bootmaker, Curtain Road, on the 18th of July last.

(The check read in court.)

LONDON 5th May, 1806.

25 16 s.

Pay to Mr. Mackenzie or bearer, Twenty-five pounds, sixteen shillings.

S. FRAZER.

Messrs. Down and Thornton, Bankers.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-65

472. DAVID DREW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a gelding, value 15 l. the property of Stephen Horton .

STEPHEN HORTON sworn. I live at Peckham in Surry .

Q. When did you lose your gelding. - A. My horse was put in the field on the 3d of July at nine o'clock; I wanted my horse very early the next morning, I got up about four o'clock, I believe it might be half after four when I got to the field, I missed my horse, I brought my other horses home, and then I went and searched for this horse, I could not find nor hear any thing of him; about ten o'clock I came to London, and went to Mr. Dixon in Barbican, I told him I had lost a horse; from that I went to Mr. Sadler's in Goswell street; then I came to Smithfield, I believe it was about five o'clock when I came there, there was about four horses tied up to the rails, and there among them four I saw my horse; I said to my friend who was with me, there is my horse, he was tied up to the rails for sale; me and my friend went over the way and contrived how we should get the horse, I went and got a constable and he went and cheapened the horse; I came back again with the constable with me, I told him there was a horse there that I had lost, I looked at the horse and asked the price, whether he was to be sold, and who it belonged to; me, says the prisoner at the bar; I directly then gave the constable charge of him; the man that was with me took him over to the Greyhound, and I took the gelding there likewise. The constable then gave the landlord charge of the horse, and we went to the lord-mayor the next day.

Q. Are you sure that it is your horse. - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a mare or a gelding. - A. A gelding.

Q. Any marks. - A. Blind with one eye, he has got a blaze in his face; we have got the horse here just by.

Q. You are sure it is the horse you had lost. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man. - A. No, I never saw the man with my eyes, till I saw him in Smithfield.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. How long was it after you lost the gelding that you saw it again. - A. I saw it the next day, the day before it had been at work in the hay-cart all day.

Q. When you saw him again he was public in the market. - A. Yes, with his tail done up in a nice

order.

Q. It is a very nice horse perhaps. - A. Yes, it is a very good one.

Q. When you asked who owned the horse, the prisoner said it is my horse, did not he tell you he bought him at Bromley. - A. He did say something about that.

Court. What colour was the horse. - A. Black.

Mr. Alley. What was it, a horse or a gelding. - A. A gelding.

- WINTER sworn. I am a shopkeeper at Dulwich. On the 4th of July I went to Mr. Sadler's, I met Mr. Horton, he told me he had lost his horse, he was looking for it; he said he had been to the other repositories, he was then going to Smithfield.

Q. Did you go with him. - A. I did; there I saw the horse which Mr. Horton owned, I asked him to look at him again to make himself sure, he did so, and then he agreed to go and fetch a constable, and that I should bargain for the horse; I did, I asked the prisoner at the bar if that horse was his, he said yes; I asked him if he had had him long, yes, he said, a good while; I asked him if he was a good draught horse, he said yes, he broke a chain in last week's drawing; I asked him the price of it, he said fourteen pounds, I then saw the horse run up and down the market, I cautioned him not to say it was his horse if it was not, as many people brought horses to Smithfield that never saw them before; he said it was his horse, he had had him a good while. I then bid him seven pounds for it, I bid him that money to detain him, he said he would not take that, but he would take ten pounds; then Mr. Horton came with the constable, he told the prisoner it was his horse; the prisoner said it was very odd, he bought it that morning at Bromley.

Q. Did he say who he bought it of at Bromley. - A. No, he did not know the man, he had a string of horses, and he bought one of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. When you saw the horse he was publicly in the market. - A. Yes, and he told me he lived at Bromley.

Q. It is no uncommon thing to make a horse look fine, or to set him off in order to sell him to the best advantage. - A. No.

- BETTS sworn. I am a constable; on Thursday the 4th of July last, Mr. Horton, the prosecutor, came to me at the corner of Hosier lane and asked me whether I was a constable, I told him yes; he said he wanted me to come along with him, he said he had lost a horse the night before, and he had found the horse in Smithfield; I went up along with him, I saw Mr. Winter with the prisoner and the horse; Mr. Horton asked the man who was the owner of the horse, the prisoner at the bar said that he owned the horse, Mr. Horton says, I give you charge upon suspicion of this man stealing his horse; I took him in charge and took him to the Poultry compter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. The prisoner notwithstanding the accusation said it was his horse. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 4th of July I went into the country, our business was dead, I went down to see my brother, with intention of going into business myself; I intended to purchase a horse to carry goods about the country; when I came to Bromley this man came out of the road with five horses in a string together; he asked me if I wanted to purchase a horse, he asked me several times over, in consequence of that he prevailed upon me; I asked him the price, he said ten guineas, I told him I did not want one; he asked me again, he said the horse was rather refractory, he wished to sell it, I asked him the lowest that he would take for it, he said nine guineas, I bid him seven guineas, he took it; I had but eight guineas and three shillings; I took him to Smithfield, I had not money enough left to purchase any goods, and therefore I thought to sell the horse to see if I could get any thing by it, and to buy another cheaper, and to go into business myself.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-66

473. MARY GUNTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Johnson , no person being therein, about the hour of five in the afternoon on the 5th of July , and stealing therein a silk gown, value 20 s. and a cloak, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Johnson.

SAMUEL JOHNSON sworn. I live at Stag Gardens, Westminster . On Saturday the 5th of July, about four o'clock, we all went out together, my wife, me, and my children.

Q. Did you fasten your house safe. - A. The door was perfectly fastened safe, and the window was shut down; we returned the same day, my wife returned first, I returned about nine o'clock the same evening, I supposed the robbery happened that evening; I saw no difference till the Tuesday following. On the Tuesday following I observed the window curtain on the ground floor was tore, and pinned over as a deception for us not to see it, the curtain was down, and likewise the pulley line of the sash was broken.

REBECCA JOHNSON sworn. I went out about four in the afternoon, and came home about seven in the evening; I did not at that time take any notice of the house, I did not perceive any thing amiss till Tuesday, I then perceived the window curtain was very much torn indeed.

Q. Upon that did you look to see if you had lost any thing. - A. Yes, I missed my gown directly out of my drawer in the same room.

Q. When did you see that gown in the drawer before you missed it. - A. On the Thursday before.

Q. Did you miss any thing else. - A. Nothing else then, we missed a cloak and a sheet before in February.

Q. That we cannot enquire about; this was in July. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see your gown again. - A. I saw it on the 8th of July, the same day the prisoner was taken, the office produced it to the magistrate.

Q. Where did the prisoner live. - A. The very next door, she kept the house, we had her place searched before she went to the justice's.

Q. Was that the same day. - A. Yes, we found a pocket book with a great many duplicates in it, the

officer has them, I found them myself in the ticking of her bed, in her house amongst the feathers or stocks.

Q. Was the officer with you when she was searched. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. How long have you lived there. - A. Nine months, the prisoner lived at the next door when I came.

Q. This was a ground floor window, it is not impossible but your neighbour's children might have torn it, children could reach it. - A. They could.

JAMES GILLMORE sworn. Q. Are you the officer who searched the prisoner's house on Tuesday the 8th of July. - A. Me, and my brother officer, Renley, executed a search warrant on the house, the prisoner was present at the time, I told her my business; I searched all but the bed, the prisoner requested I would not search that, because it was not in a situation for a man to see; I requested Mrs. Johnson to search it, Mrs. Johnson immediately called to me and said she had found this book, I was just at the door, I saw her take it from the bed; in that pocket book I found the duplicate of a cloak, which appears to be the property of Mrs. Johnson; the prisoner immediately said if I would let her go she would go and take the gown out, she had pawned it for fifteen shillings, I told her I could not let her go, she must consider herself in custody; she did go, and I followed her, she went into the shop and asked the pawnbroker to bring down that gown she had pawned on Saturday night; the gown was sent down by some one that was in the warehouse; at that moment I said stop this, it is a stolen gown, produce it before the magistrate immediately.

Mr. Gurney. Did you advise to prosecute for a capital offence. - A. I laid it that way, I thought it was so.

JOHN BANNISTER sworn. I am a pawnbroker; I produce a gown pledged on Saturday the 5th of July, (I do not know by whom) in the name of Elizabeth Murray .

Q. Were you present when the officer and the prisoner came to your house. - A. I was, the woman came in and said she had lost a duplicate of a gown which she had pledged on Saturday, for fifteen shillings, in the name Elizabeth Murray ; I immediately called for it down, I had not taken any other silk gowns on Saturday but that, Mr. Gillmore came in, he said stop that gown, it is a stolen one.

Mr. Gurney. (to Mrs. Johnson) You yourself have children. - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of Thursday you might have been out while your children might be in the house, were not you. - A. I do not know that I was out of the house on Thursday.

Q. You might be up stairs for a part of the day. - A. I might be for a few minutes to make the beds.

Q. And on Friday you had the same occasion to go up stairs to make your beds, and you might have left your children below. - A. Yes, and the same on Saturday morning.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Of stealing only.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor.]

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-67

474. TIMOTHY COAKLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Theodosius M'Millan on the 31st of August , between the hours of twelve and one at night, and burglariously stealing therein, four saws, value 10 s. a stock and bit, value 1 s. twelve bits, value 2 s. and a cramp iron, value 1 l. his property .

THEODOSIUS M'MILLAN sworn. I live at No. 115, in Charlotte-street, Shoreditch , I am a chair-maker .

Q. Do you know the prisoner Coakley. - A. Yes, he had worked with me.

Q. How long before the month of August, had he left your employ. - A. Three months before, I think he came to my shop about six weeks before that, and did some work, but I am not sure.

Q. You have a workshop have not you. - A. Yes, the house stands in the street, and the shop is built in my yard, between the house that I live in, and the next house in the next street, it all belongs to one landlord.

Q. Where does the door of the workshop go to. - A. In the yard. On the 30th of August, about two o'clock, I and a young man that worked along with me went down to Blackwall, to see a ship launched. I had not been in the shop from two o'clock on the Saturday till about seven o'clock the next morning; I then observed a drawer on my bench, and another man's bench with many of the articles that should have been in them out, but nothing from that part gone, this gave me a suspicion; I looked about the place, I found there was a cramp gone, a stock, and four saws; I missed these at seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. You have a yard. - A. Yes, our common way of entering into the yard is through the house, but there is a gate that leads into the street, and there is a door by the side of it.

Q. Do you know in what state you left that door. - A. I had not opened that door for two or three days, we do not open it only when we get timber in, if any person is in the yard they have free access to the shop; I did not observe any door or window broken open. I have seen some of the articles again.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask my master to give me a character.

Prosecutor. There was one circumstance which I think was rather to his advantage. A young child had been playing with a pair of boots the prisoner had of me, the child had dropped a silver tea-spoon in one of them without our knowledge, the prisoner took them home and returned the spoon. While he worked with me, his character was that of an honest man.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the second of September, and upon searching him, I found two duplicates; one is a duplicate of two saws, pledged at Mr. Tillier's in Field-lane, the other is a duplicate of another saw, pledged on the

same day, the 1st of September, at Mr. Fleming's in Fleet-market; I asked Mr. Tillier if he knew the person that pledged them, he said yes. I went to Mr. M'Milian's and he swore to the property.

- TILLIER sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I produce two saws, pledged by Gommersall, in the name of the White, for three shillings and sixpence, on the 1st of September.

- GOMERSALL sworn. I am in the East-London militia.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time pawn at Mr. Tillier's two hand saws. - A. Yes, on Monday, in the name of White, they gave me three shillings and sixpence on them. I got these saws from the prisoner, he gave them me on Monday about nine o'clock, for the purpose of pawning them, and he told me they were his own saws.

Q. Why did not you pawn them in his own name. - A. He told me that as he was a chair maker and was going to sell the tickets, he did not like his fellow tradesmen to know he was so poor. Mr. Tillier asked me whose they were? I told him they belonged to Coakley, he knew Coakley very well, and then he took them in.

Q. Then you understood they were his. - A. Yes. On Sunday morning between six and seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner with these hand saws, he asked one Parkes and me in Field-lane, to wait there for him, he said he had some tools at his landlady's that he had left for some rent, and he went and fetched them. He said going along, Parkes, you did not think that I had got such good tools as these, as I was a soldier; I said that I did think that he had, because he had often told me that he had such tools; we carried them over Blackfriar's bridge, and left them at a public house. On Monday when we were at the parade, he said to me, Gomersall, come up to London with me. I want to pledge some of them tools, I went with him, we went into Fleet-market and pledged a saw, and I took two saws to Mr. Tillier's in Field-lane; I only pawned the saws for him. The next day he asked me to carry the things to Shoe-lane, I carried them up in the middle of the day to a public house in Shoe-lane. He then asked me to go to Mr. Tillier's, and ask him if he would take a cramp in pawn, I told him I should not go, as I did not understand what a cramp was.

Prisoner. What hour did I ask you to go to Mr. Tillier's and pawn that cramp. - A. About five o'clock in the afternoon.

Court. Did you go. - A. I did. Mr. Tillier would not take it in, he asked what this work was about the two saws. Previous to that time, Stanton had been to me, I told him the saws belonged to Coakley.

Prisoner. I was in custody at that time.

Q.(to Stanton.) Did Gomersall tell you that the saws belonged to Coakley. - A. He did.

Q.(to Gommersall) What time on Sunday morning was it that you separated from him. - A.The left of our parting was when he went to fetch the things from Mother Burke's house, when he came t, d - n her, says he, I have got the things from the old b - h, and I will not pay her a farthing.

Prisoner. On the Saturday night we were playing a game at back gammon, at a house of an acquaintance of his, where did you part with me at that time.

A. At the public house door. He had got some money for some stools that we had been making, and he would not pay the reckoning, ; we quarrelled, and I was almost ready to fight with him, then he parted with half the money. There is one thing will prove that he is the person; he said that when he was at the gate he was stopped by the watchman of the night, he told them at the watch-house that he was a soldier and a cabinet-maker; the constable of the night let him go, he having his apron on.

- sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Fleming, I produce two saws, pledged on the 1st of September; one was pledged by the prisoner to the best of my knowledge.

- TURNER sworn. I took in the stock and one bit, on the 2d of September, on the early part of the day, which I suppose was pledged by the prisoner. I produce them.

Prisoner. I never pawned the articles, I believe I was in custody at the time.

TURNER. From the slight knowledge I have of him, I have no doubt. He told me at Hatton-Garden that he was in custody at the time, the magistrate told him he was apprehended in the afternoon, this was pledged in the forenoon.

(The articles identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. Gomersall and I was both in one regiment and in one company. He was generally at me when I was working at Greenwich, to learn him my trade; the chief objection was, I had not tools when I was at Mr. M'Millan's place, he wanted me to take these tools, I said if such a thing happens, I shall be the only person to blame, I will have nothing to do with it. On the evening we came up from Greenwich, we were together till between twelve and one o'clock, the reason that we quarreled, I wanted to go home. I was sitting down looking on at them at back-gammon; I went to the Artillery passage and slept there two hours, he came and another man to me, he had these things; this man met him in Finsbury-square, if he was here, he he would prove that he met this man with the things this man asked him if he knew me, he told him that he knew me, and that he had left me asleep in Artillery-lane, they both came together and awoke me out of my sleep; I never knew a word of it till he brought them to me, though the pawnbroker says I pawned the tools. I never pawned any of the tools.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-68

475. WILLIAM SEAMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alice Elstop , one James Price being therein, about the hour of five in the forenoon, on the 7th day of August , and stealing two great coats, value 5 l. the property of Elizabeth Dowager Lady Hawke .

JAMES FAULKENER sworn. I live servant with Dowager Lady Hawke, her name is Elizabeth, I

am coachman. On the 7th of August last, at half past five o'clock I went to the coachhouse, I found it broke open.

Q. Was it locked the night before when you left it. - A. Yes, there was a padlock on the outside of the door, the padlock was wrenched off; I missed my fellow servant's coat and likewise my own, I left them the night before on the box.

Q. Where was this coachhouse of lady Hawke's. A. In Montague mews , at the back of lady Hawke's house; it has no communication with her house, you cannot go to the stable or coach house only by going round to the mews.

Q. Who is Alice Elstop . - A. The woman that owns the building, she lives in the buildings, the the rooms have no communication with the coach-house; a man sleeps over the coachhouse.

Q. Did you see the great coats again. - A. Yes, the same morning I missed it I saw it in the watchman's possession.

CHARLES WISE sworn. I am a watchman, my beat is at Gloucester place.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner. - A. I never saw him in my life before I took him. On the 7th of August, at half past four in the morning, I met him at the bottom of the mews at the back of Gloucester place; he says to me when I met him, watchman I have overslept myself, I am an hour beyond my time, I am afraid I shall be too late; I turned round, and saw he had got a box coat under his arm, I thought he did not look like a coachman, I followed him into Portland street, Berkley square, there he went down a little mews; I laid wait for him, I knew he must come back again; he came out of the mews with a footman's coat on, he had changed his coat, I did not see him do it; when he went in first he had his own coat on, when he returned his own coat was wrapped up with the box coat under his arm, I followed him into Portman square, and there I took him into custody; I said to him, my friend, where did you get these coats, he said they are my own, says I, I do not doubt but they are your own, but where did you get them; O lord, says he, watchman I will go back to the place where I got them from, I would not let him go back; he then said he took the coats out of a coachhouse in the mews, where he spoke to me.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

(The coats produced and identified by James Faulkener .)

GUILTY , aged 33.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-69

476. JOHN O'DONNELL , SAMUEL CARTER , and JOHN GORE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Jonathan Kendall , about the hour of nine at night on the 29th of August , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a bank note, value 20 l. a bank note, value 10 l. ten bank notes, value 2 l. each, and ten other bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of Jonathan Kendall .

Second count for like offence, only stating the house to be the dwelling house of Walter Shepherd .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

MARTHA WOODFAINE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You live, I believe, with Mr. Jonathan Kendall . - A. Yes, he keeps the Worcester coffee-house tap .

Q. In what parish is it. - A. St. James's , I believe.

Q. What part of this house does Mr. Kendall inhabit. - A. The cellar; Mr. Walter Shepherd inhabits the upper part of the house.

Q. Is there any communication between that part that Mr. Kendall inhabits, and that part that Mr. Shepherd inhabits. - A. None that I know of.

Q. In order to get into that part that Mr. Kendall inhabits you go down some steps that bring you into the lower part. - A. Yes.

Q. When you first come down the steps what room do you come into. - A. The tap room.

Q. On the left hand side of the tap room there is a little parlour, which you call the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you go to on the right. - A. Into a small parlour, there is a door way which separates the passage from the parlour.

Q. When you are in the parlour there is a door leading into the bed room. - A. Yes, and the parlour is separated from the bed room by a wainscot.

Q. Is there any door in the wainscot which separates one from the other. - A. There is a door leading from the parlour into the bed room.

Q. Has that door got a lock. - A. Yes.

Q. In the bed room is there a bureau. - A. Yes.

Q. What use does the prosecutor make of that bureau. - A. He puts paper, receipts, and money.

Q. You, I believe, have access to that bureau. - A. Yes.

Q. You manage Mr. Kendall's business for him A. Yes.

Q. You live with him in point of fact. - A. Yes, I am his housekeeper.

Q. On the 29th of August last had you occasion to go to that bureau. - A. Yes, about six o'clock in the morning, to the best of my recollection, I went there, I saw the notes, I did not count them over.

Court. Were there any particular notes. - A. I cannot say to the number, there was a twenty pound note, a ten pound note, and a five pound note, and some one's and two's.

Mr. Gleed. Do you know the persons of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know John Gore and John O'Donnell.

Q. Did you see O'Donnell and Gore there on the 29th of August. - A. Yes, Gore I had seen two or three times in the day.

Q. At what time of the day had you seen Gore first. - A. To the best of my recollection he was there about ten o'clock in the morning, he came again in the afternoon, but I cannot tell what time; Cuddiford was with him in the morning and in the afternoon. In the evening I saw Gore and O'Donnell there about nine o'clock, when O'Donnell came down Gore was there.

Q. What part of the room did they sit in. - A. Sometimes they sat in the parlour, and sometimes in the tap room, they were drinking together.

Q. Was Cuddiford there. - A. He was drinking with them.

Q. Where were they drinking together. - A. In the tap room.

Q. Which of the three, or all of them of these names you have mentioned, were in the parlour, was O'Donnell in the parlour. - A. He did go in, he came out directly; Gore went in the parlour, and Cuddiford was in and out of the parlour.

Court. And Gore the same. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. Did you or did you not see the other prisoner Carter there. - A. No, I did not, I did not know him, he might be there for any thing I know.

Q. You in point of fact did not see him there. A. No.

Q. Was there any thing particular in the conduct of O'Donnell, if there was describe it. - A. When he came down stairs he came singing, laughing, and dancing.

Q. Where was Gore at that time. - A. Gore was sitting there to the best of my recollection, he was sitting on a chair by the door way.

Q. You have told us there was a door that led from the parlour into the bed room. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fasten that door, and at what time. - A. I fastened it when Mr. Kendall went to lie down about four o'clock to rest himself; about six o'clock in the afternoon I locked the door again myself, I am sure I left it fastened, I put my hand against it and tried it, I hung the key up in the bar.

Q. What time did you retire to rest that night. - A. About ten minutes after eleven; I took the key out of the bar, and went to unlock the bed room door, as there was no latch to the door, I found the door open.

Q. It was in a different state to what you had left it at a quarter after six o'clock. - A. Yes, I went to the bureau, I found it had been forced open.

One of the jury. When you first looked at the lock of the bureau was it sticking up. - A. The bolt was shut as if it was locked.

Mr. Gleed. How was the shot of the lock. - A. It was completely up; I opened the little drawers where the notes were, I found they were gone.

Q. Who is Cuddiford. - A. I had seen him frequently at the house ever since Mr. Kendall has been there.

Q. Was Cuddiford a person that Mr. Kendall ever employed. - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot of your own knowledge tell me how Cuddiford was employed in the day. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to say, that the last time you saw the notes was at six o'clock in the morning, that was quite daylight. - A. Yes.

Q.O'Donnell was not in the house till the evening of that day. - A. No.

Q. Cuddiford was there the greatest part of the day, going backwards and forwards from the tap to the parlour frequently. - A. Yes, he had been used to the house a great length of time before we came there.

Q. So that he knew every room in the house, and every place there. - A. I do not know that.

Q. I mean as far as from the parlour to the tap room and the bed room. - A. Yes.

Q. He knew the house better than these persons that were dancing and drinking there. - A. It was the first time that I saw O'Donnell there myself.

Q. And this honest Mr. Cuddiford, that had known the house a great while, he was there a great while in the day time, and O'Donnell was not there till the evening. - A. No.

Q. You never saw your notes after six o'clock in the morning, Cuddiford was there a great many times in the course of the day, and he was in the bar. - A. I did not see him in the bar.

Q. He had an opportunity of doing it if he had seen fit. - A. Yes.

Q.O'Donnell came in the evening, might not the notes have been lost in the morning while Mr. Cuddiford was going backwards and forwards, as well as in the evening. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Therefore for any thing you know they might have been lost in the morning when any body was going backwards and forwards, as well as in the evening. - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore O'Donnell not being there till the evening, the notes might be taken away in the morning by any body so disposed so to do, for any thing you know. - A. Yes, but I cannot say.

Q. Mr. Cuddiford you say you do not know a great deal of. - A. No.

Q. Do you know any good of him, I am speaking in plain English; do not you know of your own knowledge that he is as big a thief as there is in London at this time. - A. I cannot say that, his character is quite a stranger to me.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you lived there. - A. About three months, to the best of my recollection.

Q. How many rooms are there. - A. A tap room, bar, small parlour, and a bed room.

Mr. Knapp. Only one bed room. - A. No.

Q. Gore is the son of a respectable baker in Bond street. - A. He is for any thing that I know of.

Q. Do you not know perfectly well that he is the son of a respectable baker. - A. I am told so.

Q. You said that before this robbery took place he frequented your house for refreshment as workmen do who frequent your house, as he lived with his father as you knew before. - A. Yes.

Q. You described some extraordinary singing and dancing in your cellar, did that never happen before. - A. No.

Q. A drunken man dancing and singing, that never happened since you have been under the Worcester coffee house; have not you always been of the opinion that O'Donnell was very noisy, have you not always said so. - A. No, I saw him come down the stairs singing, dancing, and smiling.

Q. He made no noise after he came down stairs. A. No.

Mr. Gleed. Who kept the key of the bureau. - A. I kept it in my pocket, it was in my possession the whole of the time, till I went to bed that night.

Q. You had not parted with it. - A. No.

Q. Who did you see in the tap room with Gore on other days, who has been his companion. - A. I did not know that he had any companion in particular.

Q. Have you seen him in the tap room with Cuddiford drinking together. - A. Yes, and I have seen him drinking with any other person that was there.

JONATHAN KENDALL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You occupy the lower part of the Worcester

coffee house in Oxford Road. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the persons of the three prisoners at the bar. - A.I do.

Q. Have you seen either of them, and which on the 29th of August last. - A. They were all three there between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Had you been to your bureau in the course of the day - A. I had not.

Q. There is no communication between that part of the house that you occupy and the part above. - A. No, only down stairs.

Q. Is there any way from that part which you occupy into the coffee room, without going into the street. - A. None.

Court. There is no cummunication between the tap-room and the coffee-house, but by going into the street. - A. No.

Mr. Gleed. Therefore can you tell me at what time the door was fastened that leads from the parlour into your bed-room. - A. At six o'clock at night.

Q. Did you see it fastened. - A. I did, by Mary Woodfaine , my housekeeper.

Q. As you were in your bed room, did you observe your bed room before you left your bed room. A. I did not take any notice of it.

Q. When had you last taken notice of the bureau. A. Not since the morning about eight o'clock.

Q. You know Cuddiford very well, how does he get his livelihood. - A. Attending coaches when they come to the warehouse as a porter.

Q. Did he used to wait about there. - A. Yes, he did, he was not employed by any particular person.

THOMAS CUDDIFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where do you live. - A. No. 4, King street.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner Gore. A. I have known him these two years or more.

Q. What is Gore. - A. He lives with his father, his father is a baker in Bond street.

Q. On the 29th of August last did you see him. - A. I did, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

Q, Where did you see him on the day before, on the 28th. - A. I met him at the top of the cellar, he was going for some yeast for his father.

Q. Tell me, did any thing pass between Gore and you, and what. - A. He asked me if I would go along with him, I told him I would; as we were walking along I told him that there was some money that I thought we might get at; he asked me if I thought so, I told him I did.

Q. Did you give him any reason why you thought so. - A. The people that lived there before Kendall, I had seen them pass in and out to get change there.

Q. Did you tell Gore that. - A. No, he said if I thought so we would try, he thought, it would be a good thing for us if we could get it; he asked me if he should see me ormeet me the next morning, which day was the 29th of August; he came in the morning, he asked me if I thought any thing more of what we were speaking of yesterday, I told him yes, I thought there was money in the bureau which stood in the bed room, and the key hung up in the bar; he went away and said he would soon come back, he came back about noon and asked for something to drink at the cellar.

Q. Where you down in the cellar when he came down. - A. I was, he had something to drink, we had some gin and bitters, and so had Kendall and his wife (she went by the name of Mrs. Kendall); soon after that he asked me for the key of the bed room, I unhooked it and gave it him.

Q. Where was the key hanging at that time. - A. Inside of the bar, he took the key, he went towards the door, and he brought me back the key again, I hung the key up where I took it from; he was absent with the key about half a minute; after he gave me the key, and I hung it up, he said the door was open and he said he thought he could do it, he went in, and tried to open the bureau; I heard him say that he had broke the top of the scissars in the lock, and that he could not open it, he brought out a cloak or a black silk handkerchief, I did not know which.

Q. What was done with that. - A. I do not know.

Q. Was it left with you. - A. No, it was never in my hands.

Q. Did any thing further pass between you and Gore at that time. - A. Nothing.

Q. When did you see Gore again. - A. He came down to me at the top of the stairs in the evening, and said that he would go and look for John O'Donnell, I think it was between seven and eight o'clock then; he went away, and I went into Tottenham Court Road with a trunk; when I came back I went down into the cellar to get something to eat.

Q. When you were down first in the cellar, at what time did you first see Gore. - A. I think it must be nine or between nine and ten, he came down just before the other men.

Q. Did you at that time know the persons of the other men. - A. A very slight acquaintance, I never saw but one of them before in my life.

Q. After Gore came down how soon did you see the other prisoner's. - A. They came down directly.

Q. That is Carter and O'Donnell. - A. Yes, Sam Carter came down very quick, he went towards the bed raom, and John O'Donnell, he began to jump about the place, and kick up a noise, he sang a song, and broke a pipe, I joined with him and many more at that time.

Q. Was Carter in the tap room. - A. No, he was in the bed room; I believe Gore was in the door way, between the tap room and the bed room.

Q. How long might this continue. - A. It might be ten minutes or more.

Q. Gore, you said, stood in the door way between the tap room and the bed room, how long was he gone. - A. He was gone for more than ten minutes.

Q. How long was Carter gone. - A. I might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. You did not see Carter for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Where was Mr. Kendall and Mrs. Woodfaine. - A. I cannot say where Mrs. Woodfaine was, Mr. Kendall was sitting by the side of me on a box in the tap room, Sam Carter came into the room, passed very quick through, and ran up stairs, John O'Donnell ran after him, and John Gore ran after

him.

Q. What became of you. - A. I was sitting where I was.

Q. How long did you continue sitting where you was. - A. It might be eight or ten minutes; after the eight or ten minutes John Gore came down stairs and beckoned me to come up stairs, I went up stairs to him, he told me to come along, I did; walking down King-street, he told me that they had forty pounds, we were to meet them down here, that was the word spoken, we went on and met them in Carnaby-street, or thereabouts.

Q. Who did you meet in Carnaby-street. - A. Sam Carter and John O'Donnell; when Gore and I met them there, I heard John O'Donnell say that he would go and try to change the twenty pound note, he went away by himself, he was gone for some minutes, he came back and said he could not change it; we went from there and called at a public house, going along there, we had a pot of porter, some we drank and some we left, after that we went to St. Martin's-street, to a public house there, the sign of the Horse and Dolphin, we all four together went into a room there, called the parlour.

Q. Did you have any thing there, - A. Yes, three bottles of wine.

Q. Do you recollect who brought you the wine. - A. I cannot positively say, but I believe it was the landlord, we went from that room into the taproom, and called there for a pot of porter, where they put me down seven guineas in way of share.

Q. Who put you down the seven guineas. - A. I cannot say whether it was Sam Carter or John O'Donnell. I put it into my pocket.

Q. Before you got the seven guineas, do you know how they were supplied with it. - A. They changed a ten pound and a two pound note. I believe the landlord brought the change.

Q. Do you know what the landlord brought by way of change. - A. I believe part of it was gold, but I cannot say it all was gold. I believe Sam Carter gave the ten pound note to John O'Donnell, and John O'Donnell gave it to the landlord

Q. Who gave the two pound note. - A. That I do not know.

Q. Did you see more than one note pass. - A. Yes, of what value the other was I do not know.

Q. What time of the night was this. - A. I think it must be between ten and eleven o'clock. After they gave me the seven guineas, I saw them put down to John Gore , seven pound more to him in notes.

Q. Who put that down. - A. It was either Sam Carter or O'Donnell; I got up, and went out and in at the door twice after that, and the next time I got up I went away and left them all three there; that is all I saw that evening.

Q. On the next day were you at the cellar. - A. I was, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon. (I have more to tell); John Gore came to me in the morning of the next day, and asked me if I had been yonder, I was at the Green Man in Bond-street, he asked me if I had been in the cellar, I told him no, I had not; he said he thought it very odd, as I used to go there generally every morning, I told him I was so very ill. that I did not know I could be any where at all; he said you mean to be there in the evening do not you, I told him I would call in the evening if I could, I thought I should call.

Q. Did you call. - A. I did, when I went down; I saw John Gore , he was in the tap room, and I went into the parlour; I called for four pennyworth of brandy and water, there was a great many people there, but I did not know any other than John Gore , instead of their bringing me the brandy and water, they brought me four pennyworth of gin and water, after that I saw Gore brought back by the Marlbrough-street officers; Foy, and others the officers, said they wanted Toney and myself. I heard John Gore say, I suppose you want me too. When they were taking us from there, as I was going out of the tap room, I saw Gore's brother, I slid the seven guineas into his hand.

Q. Did Gore's brother take them. - A. Yes, and we all were taken to the public house the corner of Marlborough street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

When you were brought before the magistrate you were not set at liberty I hope. - A. I was not.

Q. You told me that when Sam Carter went into the inner room, Mr. Kendall was sitting close by the side of you. - A. Yes.

Q. Then he must see Carter go into the room. - A. He was sitting at the other end of the room when he went towards the bed-room.

Q. Kendall must see him go towards the room, must not he, he had not lost the use of his eyes. - A. No, I cannot say whether he saw or no.

Q. However he had the opportunity of doing it; You said they were gone above ten minutes, Kendall sitting by you all the time. - A. Yes.

Q. Seven guineas out of forty pounds, was a poor share to you, was it not. - A. It is the first thing that ever happened to me.

Q. It is not the first time I put this question to you, you know seven guineas is not a share of forty pounds. - A. That is all I had.

Q. It is not a share of forty pound, you know it to be improper. - A. That was what was given me.

Q. You ought to have had ten pounds. - A. That is all I had.

Q. And that you slipped into Gore's brother's hand afterwards; before you was taken into custody, you did not tell this story to Mr. Kendall or any body else. - A. I told the officer.

Q. After you was taken up. - A. Yes.

Q. You thought then man, you were likely to be hanged yourself did not you; you thought you were in danger yourself. - A. I never did any such a thing before.

Q. Was not that the reason that induced you to tell the story. - A. I told the story voluntary.

Q. Then you had no fear or any alarm about yourself being tried for this offence. Do not you hear me. - A. Yes.

Q. Am I to understand you that you had no fear or alarm upon your mind of being tried for it. - A. No.

Q. Then you think a man that had been committing an offence of this sort, and having been taken up for it, would not be likely to be tried for it;

upon your oath, did you say a word about it, but what you have said here to day but to save yourself from being tried, and to save your own life. - A. No.

Court. What then induced you to make this discovery. - A. I made a discovery, as far as this, for the good of my country.

JOHN WHISTLER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You keep the Horse and Dolphin in St. Martin's-street. - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I do, I know one.

Q. Which is the one that you know. - A.O Donnell, I have seen him about four times.

Q. On the 29th of August last was O'Donnell at your house. - A. He was.

Q. Who was with him. - A. There were three others, I never saw them before.

Q. Have you seen them since at Marlborough-street. - A. I have.

Q. Are those the persons that you saw at Marlborough-street with Cuddiford; were they the persons that were at your house in St. Martin's-street. - A. Yes, I believe they are.

Q. You saw them the next day at the office. - A. Yes, the next day but one.

Q. Had you any doubt, when you saw them on the Monday, of their being the persons that were at your house on the Saturday evening. - A. I had none.

Q. What time in the evening did they come there. - A. It was after ten o'clock.

Q. What had they. - A. They had three bottles of wine.

Q. After ten o'clock at night did you serve them with three bottles of wine - A. They had two in the first instance, then they had another bottle in a another room mixed with negus.

Q. Which of the three prisoners partook of the last two bottles that were made into negus. - A. I believe they were all together.

Q. Did either of the prisoners make application to you to do any thing. - A.O'Donnell applied to me for change of a ten pound note, I gave him change for it, deducting for the two bottles of wine.

Q. Did you change any other notes. - A. I did, a two and a one, I do not know who that was to, it was for the negus, they were in company together, it was for one of them; I gave them nine guineas and two shillings in change for the ten pound note, deducting for the two bottles of wine; I do not recollect what I gave them in change for the two and the one.

Q. In what part of the house were they sitting. - A. In the common coffee room.

Q. Did you go in and out. - A. Yes, frequently, I had twenty people in the house at the time.

Q. You say you delivered them in change nine guineas and two shillings, did you observe what was done to them. - A. No more than I put them down to O' Donnell, O 'Donnell counted it and it was right.

Q. Did you see any other notes in the possession of the prisoner. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you observe what was done with the money, did you see any money pass from one to another. A. I did not.

Q. What was done with the money that was laid on the table. - A.O'Donnell took it up.

Q. Did you see any thing further pass between the prisoners at that time. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see O'Donnell the next day. - A. I did, he came and had a lamb chop, he asked me if it was convenient to me to change a twenty pound note, I told him it was not, he never offered it.

Q. Was it convenient for you so to do. - A. No, that is all that I saw.

JAMES BRIDGELI sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I attended with the officer, Mr. Lovet, Mr. Foy, and Mr. Petherick.

Q. In consequence of some information that you received you went to the house of Mr. Kendall. - A. Yes, I went about nine o'clock in the evening, I think it was the 29th of August or the 30th, I cannot be positive, it was on Saturday evening; when we got to the corner of Oxford street in Swallow street, Gore was then going to cross the road, Mr. Lovett went immediately up to him and laid hold of him, and told him that there was a warrant out against him; we then went down into the cellar, Mr. Kendall's tap, taking him with us; we found Cuddiford there, we apprehended him, Mr. Petherick had him in custody, and Gore's brother was walking by the side of him; I saw Cuddiford put his hand into his pocket, and give John Gore 's brother some guineas.

Q. That you saw done. - A. I did, it was done as we were going up the steps with Petherick, he put his hand out, and held out some guineas to him, Gore's brother held out his hand, he gave him the guineas into his hand, Gore's brother put them in his right hand coat pocket.

Q. Did you know John Gore that was in custody and his brother. - A. Yes, I knew them both; I said to Gore's brother, Thomas you had better come down to the Marlborough Head, and see what becomes of your brother; he followed us down to the Marlborough Head, and we went into the parlour, I came out of the parlour, leaving the officers in the care of the prisoners; I wrote a note.

Q. Did you take the money from Gore's brother. A. Yes, at the Marlborough Head; we took seven guineas from his right-hand coat pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

At this time I understand you are speaking of Gore and Cuddiford were apprehended, you had not apprehended O'Donnell and Carter. - A. No.

Q. And the only information that you had of them was through the information of what Cuddiford said. - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore it depends upon what Cuddiford told you, now what are you. - A. By profession I am a tailor.

Q. You are bringing up to be an officer. - A. I suppose so.

Q. I suppose you have learned there are three forty pound rewards in case these people are convicted. - A. Certainly so.

Q. That is the first thing that you learn. - A. No.

Q. Had you a warrant on purpose to apprehend them. - A. No, their names were not upon the warrant.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. Examined by Mr.

Gleed. I consequence of some information that you received, did you go to apprehend the prisoners. - A. I did, I apprehended Gore and Cuddiford.

Q. In consequence of some information that you received from Bridgell, did you search the brother of Gore. - A. I did, I found upon him seven guineas in his right hand coat pocket.

Court. Where did you search him. - A. At the public house close to the office, the office was shut up; I produce the seven guineas. About two o'clock on Sunday morning I apprehended O'Donnell in Spur street, Leicester Fields.

Mr. Gurney. You searched Gore, you found nothing upon him. - A. Nothing upon him.

JOHN FOY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. You are an officer. - A. Yes, I apprehended, O'Donnell at a public house in Spur street, Leicester Fields, on Sunday morning two o'clock; I found on him seven pounds in notes, this watch, two guineas in gold, and twenty shillings in silver.

Q. How many notes. - A. Five, two's, and one's.

O'Donnell's Defence. I am innocent of it; the ten pound note that I changed at Mr. Whistler's was my own, and as for the seven guineas that Gore had was my own.

Carter's Defence. I have nothing to say about it.

Gore's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Gore called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

O'DONNEL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

CARTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

GORE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of their being led into it by their accomplice.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-70

477. ANN BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of April , four shirts, value 8 s. a shift, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. two gowns, value 5 s. three aprons, value 2 s. four neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. three caps, value 1 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. five frocks, value 10 s. eight diaper clouts, value 2 s. and three bed gowns, value 2 s. the property of Henry How in his dwelling house .

HENRY HOW sworn. I live in Long Acre , in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields; the prisoner decamped from my service on the 7th of April, she had left the child crying on the bed, Mrs. How heard the child cry, she went in the kitchen, and found the child on the bed; Mrs. How found the things missing; the prisoner had only lived with me ten or eleven days.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. I live in Strutton Ground, I am a pawnbroker; I produce five frocks, I do not know whether they were pawned by a man or a woman; they were pawned on the 8th of April.

Q. Were there any thing else pawned that was afterwards taken out of pawn. - A. Yes, there were two sheets for ten shillings, they were pawned at the same time.

Q. What was the other things pawned for. - A. Ten shillings.

ELIZABETH GOUDGE sworn. Q. Do you know Mr. Wright's, the pawnbroker, in Strutton Ground. A. Yes, I pledged them things on Easter Tuesday, and I pledged a pair of sheets for ten shillings at the same time.

Q. How came you by these things. - A. I had not seen the prisoner for three years before, she told me she had been on board a ship, and she had had a child, and she was married, she said if I pledged them I might get more than her; the pawnbroker knowing me, I pledged them, I gave her ten shillings for one, and ten shillings all but a penny for the other, the pawnbroker had that for the duplicates.

Q. Where do you live yourself. - A.51, Old Pye-street, I have lived there a year and a half.

Q. How came the prisoner to find you out. - A. She was coming accidentally down the street.

Q. What business do you follow yourself. - A. I am an unfortunate woman.

Mr. Bolland. The prisoner has put a paper in my hand, I am not engaged for her, the paper states the witness has been convicted for a capital offence herself.

Court. You say you have been living in this Pye-street a year and a half. - A. Yes, I lived there before I lived in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you mean that you moved from Oxford-street to Pye-street. - A. No, not till I got my liberty from being convicted.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. When my master apprehended me at Somerset House, I told him I would take him to Elizabeth Goudge ; when the constable went to her for the tickets she told him she had lost them, when she was brought to the pawnbroker's she said that she got them out and delivered them to me, which was false, I was not in town at the time, I am innocent of it; Elizabeth Goudge came and told me my husband's ship was coming home, I went out with her, I got in liquor, she told me she had got these things from my master's, which I knew nothing of till she told me; I went to Portsmouth to my husband, being ashamed to go to my place, when I returned my master took me; she has been a transport from this place, and has only been at liberty thirty days last Sunday.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-71

478. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a tin box, value 1 d. three bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note, value 10 l. the property of John Bell , privily from his person .

JOHN BELL sworn. Q. Do you remember going to the Horse and Dray in New Gravel-lane. - A Yes, last Tuesday week, between seven and eight in the evening, I believe; the prisoner came in much about the same time, I believe, we sat in one box, and drank together a great part of the time; I was waiting for a person, he did not come, I got pretty fresh.

Q. Who paid the shot. - A. I paid the shot.

Q. How much. - A. That I cannot tell, nor can I tell how much we drank.

Q. Cannot you tell from want of memory or from not being sober at the time. - A. I was a little intoxicated, but I knew what I was about, I recollected what money I had about me; I took out my protection

box to pay the landlord, it contained a certificate, a ten pound note, and three ones; I gave him a one pound note, he gave me half a guinea, a seven shilling piece, and a shilling in change, I put the box in my pocket, then I wanted to go home, the prisoner got me a coach as I was lame; I told him to tell the coachman to drive me to my lodgings, No. 62, East Smithfield; I not being acquainted with the town, I did not know where he took me to, he wanted me to have some beer on the road, I told him I did not want any, he stopped the coach, I believe, at Sparrow Corner, at the sign of the Blue Boar public house; he went into the house, and what he did I cannot tell; as soon as he was gone I put my hand into my pocket, I missed my protection box, I says to the coachman that man has done me; however he was off.

Q. You are quite sure that you had it when you left the public house. - A. I am positive that I had it when I got into the coach.

Q. Did he set on the same side of the coach as you. - A. He sat on my right hand side, and it was in my right hand jacket pocket, he was present when I paid the landlady, he saw what I had in it.

Q. Are you sure that you was sober enough so as to be upon your guard. - A. I was so sober as to recollect I had it, I was a little fresh, but my mind was not affected.

Q. Did you perceive the prisoner's hand in your pocket. - A. I never perceived that.

Q. You did not discover that you had lost your pocket book and contents, not till after he was gone. - A. No, not till after he was gone.

ELIZABETH HALL sworn. Q. Does your husband keep the Horse and Dray, New Gravel-lane. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the last witness, Bell, and the prisoner being at your house. - A. I remember the prisoner being at my house several times prior, I had seen Bell once before; between eight and nine o'clock the prisoner came in, after he had taken a bason of tea he immediately got into company with Bell, and said he knew him in the East Indies, then he partook of half a pint of shrub, and after that several half pints of shrub, Bell paid for it, and gave it to any person that was in the room; Bell gave me half a guinea first for the shrub, and bread and butter and oysters that he had, and as he was going into the coach he pulled out his protection box, and gave me a one pound note out of it; I saw he had a ten pound note and three one pound notes; he was at my house from half after eight till eleven, and being intoxicated, he could not put his notes into his box, the prisoner assisted him, and then he went into the coach and the prisoner with him.

Q. Do you know what he did with the box. - A. He put it into his right hand jacket pocket.

- sworn. I keep the White Swan, Rosemary-lane; on the 9th of September, between five and six in the afternoon, I went to Mr. Levi's in Rosemary lane, where the prisoner was, I searched him, I found in his pocket Bell's protection, a one pound note, two seven shilling pieces, a half guinea, a dollar, one shilling and eight pence halfpenny; I was informed by Mr. Levi that he had got a five pound note of the prisoner's, and that he had sold him a bargin to the amount of thirty shillings; I begged Mr. Levi to defer the bargain and to restore me the note, Mr. Levi said the bargain was made before I came in, and he should suppose the bargain good; he gave me three pound ten out of the five pound, which I put along with the rest.

JOHN COCKRAN sworn. I live at the Blue Boar, Sparrow Corner. On the 9th of September, about half past twelve, the prisoner got out of a coach at our door, and came into the tap room, and the coachman with him, he asked the coachman to drink, he had a glass of brandy, the prisoner pulled out his protection box, and asked for change of a one pound note, the coach was at the door, and John Bell in it, I did not know it at the time; I gave the prisoner change, two seven shilling pieces, a dollar, six pence and three pence in brass.

Q. Do you know what there was in that box. - A. I saw a ten pound note at the bottom, I opened them, for him, he was all of a tremble when he came in, and they were rolled very tight; I changed the dollar for the prisoner to pay the coachman, he paid him three shillings; he told the coachman not to over charge him, and to go to No. 25, Cheapside, and to take care of him, for he was lame, he was going to an uncle or brother, I am not sure which, that would be very glad to see him; he thought the coachman charged too much, I said coachman, do you charge from here, he said no, I took them from the Horse and Dray, Gravel-lane, and now I have got to go to Cheapside; the coachman seemed very anxious for the prisoner to go in the coach, he said if he could not find it out it would be very hard to turn the man in the street, as he was very lame and intoxicated, the prisoner said he was in a hurry, he had to go over London Bridge, the coachman said if he would go and see the sailor safe home he would take him to London Bridge; the prisoner went out, and we both wished the prisoner to go in the coach, he said he must go and pump ship, I was obliged to go in; on my coming out again, John Bell said where is the sailor, I said he is gone to pump ship, he said he has done me, he has got my protection box.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober. - A. He was not; there were three carpenters in the the room at the time at dinner, and they saw him come out of the clothes shop, and that is the way he was apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of the crime alledged against me by my prosecutor and the witnesses he has called; we were drinking together at the Horse and Dray one hour and a half on the ninth instant, my prosecutor insisted upon having a coach to convey him to East Smithfield, he prevailed upon me to convey him thither, a coach was called, we entered it, being much in liquor; on our way to the prosecutor's lodgings the coach was stopped at several public houses by his order, we drank freely of spirituous liquors, which further irritated our intoxication; during the time we were in the coach his protection box fell out of his pocket, and I put it in again; the last time it fell out he desired me to put it in mine, as he observed he might lose it in the coach, I received the box with great reluctance from him, after that we called at another public house, I went and offered him the box in the coach, he said bring

me the box in Gravel lane; I wandered up and down the place to find him; that is the true state of the facts.

Prosecutor. That is my protection box, and the paper that is in it is mine.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-72

479. ELIZABETH BROWNING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , a set of bed furniture, value 1 l. 10 s. a sheet, value 2 s. a table cloth, value 7 s. and a gown, value 8 s. and sixteen yards of linen cloth, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH sworn. I live in Rope-Maker street, Moorfields , I am a hot-presser .

Q. Did you at any time lose any linen cloth, some bed furniture, and sheets. - A. Yes, on the 18th of August I missed it; the prisoner at the bar lived with me as a servant .

Q. Had she the care of these things. - A. My wife was out of town; the prisoner had not the care of them, only the management of the linen, she had not the keys of the drawers.

Q. When did she leave your service. - A. She went to Margate on the 18th of August with a child of mine, by the advice of the faculty; on that day about noon I had occasion to go up stairs for the cotton bed furniture; that led to the discovery.

MARY M'LACHLAN sworn. I keep a pawnbroker's shop in Grub street; the prisoner came to my shop four times in the month of June; the first thing she brought was the bed furniture, I lent her one pound ten shillings upon it; after that she pledged a table cloth, a sheet, and a gown, in the name of Brown.

ROBERT SAMUEL HUDSON sworn. I am servant to Mr. Read, pawnbroker, Red-cross street, Cripplegate; I produce a piece of linen pawned at our shop on the 31st of July, it was pawned by a woman.

Q. But the face of the woman you do not recollect. - A. No.

- FIELD sworn. I apprehended the prisoner, I found the duplicates in her box; I fetched the box from on board the hoy at Margate, and brought it to Mr. Smith's house; I produce the duplicates.

Q.(to prosecutor) Do you know the prssoner's box. - A. Yes, the prisoner gave me the key of it, it had been in my house.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to live with Mr. Smith, in consequence of his putting away his wife; when I went into the family he had one child blind and deaf; in consequence of my taking care of the child and restoring her to health, he seemed to have a partiality for me, and he even offered some familiarities, and gave a woman every encouragement; the bed furniture and the other articles were in my own care; after I had been in the country, he told me if I would confess, and give him up the duplicates, he would not hurt me; in consequence of that I gave him the keys of my box.

Q.(to prosecutor) Did you ever permit this woman to dispose of any of your property, to pawn it for and money. - A. Never; I kept the keys of my drawers myself, and when I was at work, I carried them in my jacket pocket.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-73

480. GEORGE FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , fifty yards of linen, value 8 l. twenty-four dozen of shirt buttons, value 5 s. two ounces of sewing silk, value 4 s. four yards of cambric, value 1 l. 10 s. and thirty-six yards of silk cord, value 2 s. the property of Christopher Wilson , Henry Wilson , William Wilson , and Thomas Watson , in their dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. On Tuesday the 9th of September was you with Nash and other officers in Silver street. Wood street. - A. Yes, I was, about six o'clock in Vincent's court, Silver street.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner come there. - A. He appeared to be going to a person's house of the name of Lloyd, the first house of the left hand side; he had a parcel with him tied up in brown paper; when he came in the court he saw me and my partners talking to Lloyd, Lloyd gave him a wink with his eye, which I took to be a signal; Leadbetter said to him where are you going, he said, to the top house in the court; Nash went with him to the top house in the court, I joined them immediately; the person that opened the door of the house said they knew nothing at all of him wanting to come in there with a parcel; he came back, then we stopped him, we asked him what he had got there in the parcel, he was very much flurried, he said for God's sake do not stop me, it is not my master's property, I told him I should take him in custody, which I did directly; I asked him where he got the parcel from, he said he could not tell me, somewhere in Bread street, and then he said in Watling street, he could not tell me any person at all, he said he was going to send it in the country; I said how could you tend it in the country, there is no inn nor no place to send goods in the country here. Nash and I took hold of him by each arm, he said Cartwright (knowing me by name), I am ruined, do not take me to the compter, he repeated it over and over.

Q. Did you know him. - A. I knew he lived at Mr. Watson's, I took him to the counter. On searching him I found this twist in his pocket, and his keys I took from him.

Q. What did you find in that brown paper parcel. A. A large piece of flannel; I went to Messrs. Wilsons and Watson, I told them what had happened, and then we proceeded with the keys, in company with Mr. Watson, to search three drawers and his box.

Q. Did the keys that you took from him open the drawers and the box. - A. Yes, we found three drawers locked and one open; in the middle drawer, which is adapted for him at the side of his bed in Mr. Watson's warehouse, the first thing we found

was a quantity of bank notes loose, and some Irish linen, here is one piece and here is another; I found another piece of Irish linen in a box that was locked in the lower warehouse, four yards of cambric, a quantity of shirt buttons, twist and thread; we found in a box not locked, which the prisoner had over the other box that was locked, some trimmings, tape, two pounces of sewing silk, a great quantity of shirts, and a large quantity of wearing apparel.

THOMAS WATSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Be so good, sir, as to give the names of the partners of your house. - A. Christopher Wilson , Henry Wilson , William Wilson , and myself Thomas Watson .

Q. I believe the prisoner has for some time past been in your employ as porter . - A. He has, for more than four years.

Q. Were you at home when the officers came on Tuesday the 9th of this month. - A. I was, I superintended the search which they had in the drawers and boxes of the prisoner.

Q. You saw these things found which the officer produced. - A. I did.

Q. Have the goodness to look at the Irish linen, what is it worth a yard, the wholesale price. - A. Four and sixpence a yard.

Q. In the first place have you examined to find whether you have any linen of that description which you now have in your hand. - A. I have.

Q. Did you find any quantity of that description and that mark missing. - A. I have examined the sale book of linen which we bought of the maker, James Russel , and we found two pieces missing of that number and maker's name.

Q. Are all the pieces of one chest of the same number. - A. No.

Court. There are two numbers missing out of that book, and these numbers you find on these pieces. - A.(Mr. Gurney) There is only part of two pieces, and only one mark remaining.

Q. What is that number. - A. One hundred and three; it is cut in lengths of three yards and three quarters, there is about seventeen yards altogether.

Mr. Gurney. Do you find upon comparing the pieces together that they match. - A. Yes, they match, I believe it all to be one piece.

Q. Do you believe it to be the property of yourself and partners. - A. I do, I have not the least doubt of it, there is one new shirt, I believe that to be of the same quality; the shirt buttons have my private mark on them, I have not the least doubt they are my property; there is no mark on the cambric, it is worth upwards of eight shillings per yard, as to the sewing silks they are articles that we deal in, and I have not the least doubt from the circumstance attending it but they are mine; they are such things as we deal in.

Court. What number of yards of linen may there be. - A. About seventeen or eighteen yards.

Q. The piece of linen was cut. - A.Yes.

Q. Have you any pieces of Irish linen cut in your trade. - A. None.

Mr. Gurney. Upon the day after the prisoner was in confinement did you receive a letter from him. - A. I think it was the Thursday after he was taken, I received a letter from him desiring me to go to him; in consequence of that I went.

Q. Did you make use of any promise or threat to induce him to confess. - A. I did not, this was after the first examination and before the second; when I went into his room in the counter, I asked him what he wanted with me, he was in bed, he seemed to be exceedingly distressed, and felt much anxiety on his situation, I told him he had acted very improperly, I again asked him what he had to say to me, he did not give me any answer particularly to what he had done, he said what shall I do, what must I do, and several expressions of that nature; I then told him that I examined one of the pieces of linen which was found in one of his drawers, that it had the seal of Russel, and the number corresponded with the assortment of linen which we had bought of Russel; I then said that he had stole this linen from us, and that he must be satisfied in his own mind it was so; he then acknowledged that he had taken this piece of linen from me, I then asked him how he could say on his first examination that he had bought this linen of his mother in Devonshire; he replied, he did not know what to say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. I find this house is charged in the indictment to be the house of four gentlemen, you do not all live in the house. - A. Henry Wilson and myself live there constantly, Christopher Wilson about half his time, and the other partner lives in Lad lane, he is allowed out of the trade a separate proportion to pay for his rent and taxes, living elsewhere.

Mr. Gurney. Are the rent and taxes paid out of the joint funds of all the parties. - A. Out of the joint funds of all the parties.

Q. Does your servants sleep there. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the parish's name. - A.St. Mary the Virgin, in the ward of Cripplegate Within.

Mr. Knapp. That is not the parish mentioned in the indictment.

SAMUEL WILSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. What is the name of the parish. - A.St. Mary the Virgin, Aldermanbury.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q.How are you acquainted with the name of the parish. - A. I have served the office of church warden.

Q. How long ago. - A. I cannot exactly recollect.

Q. Do you know the name of the parish except from what you have collected from other people. - A. Nothing particular.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Mr. Gurney. I am desired by the prosecutor to recommend this man to mercy, on account of his former good character, and the contrition he has since shewn.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-74

481. RALPH GOODALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of July , two seven shilling pieces and a sixpence , the property of Joseph Hedgeland .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOSEPH HEDGELAND , sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a grocer in Fleet-street , the prisoner was my shopman .

Q. Had you missed out of your till any money, and to what amount. - A. I missed money at various times to a very large amount.

Q. In consequence of that you found it necessary to apprehend the prisoner. - A. I did, on the 9th.

Q. Tell us what passed with respect of the two seven shilling pieces. - A. On the 11th of July, about four or five in the afternoon. in the presence of Mr. Dagnell and Mr. Bennett, we asked him what money he had got in his pocket, he gave us two seven shilling pieces and a sixpence out of his pocket, which he said he had taken out of my till on the 9th, he said it was all the money he had taken on that day; I looked at it, and one of the seven shilling pieces I had some recollection, there was a dot on it which I had remarked on the Wednesday in the till.

Q. Upon finding this, what did he say to you. - A. He begged for mercy, he said he had robbed me to a considerable amount. I said he could not expect mercy from me, he was one of the worst of villains, he entreated to remain in the house till Saturday, till his father or uncle came to town. On Saturday he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

What is the name of your partners. - A. I have none.

Q. When was it you first charged the prisoner of robbing you. - A. On the 9th of July.

Q. How long was it he remained in your house before he was taken in custody by an officer. - A. From Wednesday till Saturday evening.

Q. So that he was taken before the justice on Monday morning. - A. He was.

Q. And on Friday he made this confession to you. - A. It was.

Q. Was not he kept expressly in your house for the purpose of seeing whether his father could or could not raise money enough to keep you from prosecuting him. - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, I ask you, whether before you delivered him into the custody of the officer, you had not been treating with the father, and you could not get money enough. - A. I never was treating with his father at all.

Q. No! neither you nor your attorney. - A. No person authorised by me; I produce the seven shilling pieces.

Court. There is only one seven shilling piece that you can swear to. - A. I do not know that I can swear to it, there is the mark that I saw on it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-75

481. MARY MALE was indicted for that she on the 28th of June , unlawfully did obtain from William Barnfield , a tin box, value 1 d. and two 7 s. pieces ; also four other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM BARNFIELD sworn. I am an oilman in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. What is she. - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of Thomas Male . - A. I saw him after he was dead, he was described to me as Thomas Male , I did not know him previous to his death. I am churchwarden of Bishopsgate, and on Friday evening the 27th of June, a house fell down in Skinner-street, and two persons came into the workhouse that had been dug out of the ruins.

Q. A man who was dead of the name of Thomas Male , and who was killed by the fall of a house, was brought into the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take possession of the property that was found about him. - A. I did, I took a tin box and two seven shilling pieces.

Q. Did you see it taken from the person of the deceased. - A. I did not; the master of the workhouse took it from the persons who took it from him, the master of the workhouse gave it up to me as the churchwarden.

Q. Are there any relations here of the deceased, who know the fact of the money being taken from him. - A. Here is the wife, who knows of it being taken from him, her name is Ann Male .

ANN MALE sworn. Q. You are the widow of Thomas Male , who was killed by the fall of a house-in Skinner street. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he live in the house. - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether at the time he was killed he had a tin box about him and two seven shilling pieces. - A. He had more money, I knew he had a tin box about him, he had it many years.

Q. Had he it with him at the time he was crushed at the falling of the houses. - A. To the best of my knowledge I begged him to go up stairs to assist, as I had a good deal of money to receive from Jacob Male ; when we were up we had not time to say, Lord have mercy upon us, before the house was upon him; I am his lawful wife, and I have my certificate in my pocket, I was buried with my husband in the house.

Q. Were you well enough to go about when you were taken out. - A. No, I was not.

Q. You knew that your husband had a tin box. - A. Yes, and the last time I saw it it was in Mr. Barnfield's hands, he always carried it about him.

Q. Do you know whether he had any money in this tin box, on the day he met with his accident. - A. I am sure of it, he shewed it me, it was a very remarkable thing for him to do so, I saw three seven shilling pieces in it, and I gave him change for a crown piece, I did not see it after the morning.

Q. What time did the house fall in. - A. It fell in just after the bell rang eight in the evening.

Q.(to Mr. Barnfield) The same box that was given to you, had you shewn it to her. - A. Yes, she saw it at the examination before the lord mayor; I have it in my pocket.

Q. What day of the month was it the houses fell in. - A. On Friday the 27th of June.

Q. How long after this box had been delivered to you did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. About

one o'clock on the 28th my son came to me, told me that Mrs. Male the wife of Mr. Male was at the door, and wanted an order to see her her husband; I told my son to send her into me at the counting-house, she immediately came.

Q. That is the prisoner called herself the widow of Male; the widow of the man who was crushed by these houses, who lay at the workhouse. - A. Yes, she said she wanted an order to go into the house to see her husband, that she had been there, they had refused to let her in without an order, which is the custom of the house, I gave the order; we had a good deal of conversation on the subject before she went over to the house; I asked her her whether it was true of the danger they were in, she stated that her husband came home a little after eight o'clock, that she represented to him what people said, what danger the houses were in, he flew in a great passion, said she was a great fool, she asked him if he meant to go on that way, he said he did not, he meant to go out all night and get drunk; she then took on, and said she had lost her daughter who was buried in the ruins; she had been over to the public house where the people had been very kind, and had given her the gown she had on her back, as the other was torn off being dug out of the ruins; I then asked her what stockings her daughter had on, she said her daughter had white stockings, I then told her the young woman that had been dug out of the ruins could not be her daughter who was lying dead at the house, she had black stockings; I then told her to go over to the house with this order, to see the body, and if the young woman was not her daughter to send the master of the house over to me; very soon after the master of the workhouse came over to me, and told me that the young woman was not her daughter; I went to the house and found the prisoner apparently in distress, taking on exceedingly, she said she had seen her husband, but she had not seen her daughter, I asked her what she would do with herself, she appeared far advanced in her pregnancy, I asked her how long she had to go, she said about three weeks, I told her she had better stay in the house till she was delivered, she said she was very much obliged to me, but if I would give her her husband's watch, and tin box with two seven shilling pieces and some silver which was taken from her husband, she would go to her sister who kept the Ship public house, Leadenhall-street; believing the story to be true, I directed the master of the public house, Mr. Chapman, to give her the money, I saw him open the box, I saw there were in it two bits of paper with two seven shilling pieces, I told her I did not think there was any watch; immediately upon the delivery of that she went away; I did not know at that time that Mrs. Male was taken from the ruins; after I found I was imposed upon, and being directed to the place where Mrs. Male was laying in bed from the bruises that she had received.

Q. You afterwards found the real Mrs. Male. - A. A. Yes.

Q. That is the witness that has just been called up. - A. Yes.

Q.When did you see the prisoner again. - A. I immediately left the spot with the officer, in hopes to find her, I turned up the alley where the workhouse is, I met the beadle, he told me he had seen Mrs. Male, he had been treating her with part of his dinner and beer; I went into the public house and charged her with being an impostor, of defrauding me of the tin box and fourteen shillings, I directed her to give me the money, or of course she would be searched; in the course of the time the beadle was gone she had changed one of the seven shilling pieces.

Q. You received the tin box and one seven shilling piece. - A. Yes, this is the same that she delivered over to me.

Q. She persisted that she was the widow of this man. - A. She has always said that, she did before the lord mayor, the lord mayor remanded her for two days, in order for her to send to Chelmsford for her register.

- CHAMPMAN sworn. Q. You are the keeper of this workhouse. - A. Yes.

Q. The dead body of Thomas Male was brought there. - A. Yes, I saw this woman the second time she came to the house, she represented herself to be the wife of Thomas Male , the deceased, I gave the tin box and the two seven shilling pieces to her by the order of Mr. Barnfield.

Q.(to Mrs. Male) How long have you been married. - A. I was married at Shoreditch Church, on the 19th of July, 1790. I have got the certificate of my marriage; we have always lived together from that time in comfort and happiness till he met with this accident.

Q. Had you any reason to suspect or believe that your husband was married or cohabited with any other woman before. - A. No, nor did I ever see this woman before.

Q. Had your husband a daughter that met with the same dreadful death as he did. - A. No, there was no daughter buried in the ruins with him.

Prisoner. You say Mrs. Male that you never saw me, did not you see me and my child at Mr. Freeman's, when I was obliged to lay away from my husband, you common f - t. - A. I never saw you, you are a false wicked impostor.

THOMAS CHIP sworn. Q. How long have you known Thomas Male , that was crushed to death with the fall of the house. - A. I have known him in the year 1790; I was present when he was married to the last witness, I gave her away, her name was Ann Hale .

Q. Had you ever any reason to believe that he was ever married to any other woman. - A. No.

Q. Did he cohabit with any other woman. - A. I am well convinced to the contrary, from habits of intimacy I must have know it, I frequently saw him, I lived near him.

WILLIAM MALE sworn. Q. What relation are you to the poor man that met his death by the fall of the houses. - A. I was his brother, I was upon good terms with my brother, and have been all my life, sometimes I saw him three or four times a week, and sometimes but once, I have been in London twenty-six years, and my brother too, I never saw the prisoner, I must have known it if he had cohabited with her.

Prisoner. He is well certified that I am his brother's wife.

Witness. You never was, I can take my oath of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was bred and born in the parish of Chelmsford, I was sixteen years old when I was married to Thomas Male , he lived with me three years; this is the same woman he strolled with, I believe he has been married to her fifteen years; when he left me I left my home, and never could rest, I have a parish it is true, which is Waltham Abbey; I was married at Springfield Church, October 2nd, eighteen years ago, my name was Mary Stokes .

Q. Have you the certificate. - A. I have not the certificate; I leave myself to the mercy of the court, and if I am to die he was my husband; I am willing to part with my life, I do not wish to live an hour longer in this life.

Q.(to William Male ) About eighteen years ago did your brother reside at Chelmsford. - A. I do not think that he ever knew where Chelmsford was for the last twenty years, I never heard him mention a word about it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-76

482. HARRIET HAZLETON and ANN HENRY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of July , a cotton frock, value 6 d. a habit shirt, value 4 d. and four window curtains, value 4 s. the property of James Bartlett .

HANNAH ORMSTON sworn. I was servant with James Bartlett , he keeps the Globe and Pidgeon public house, Ratcliff Highway . On the 14th of July the prisoners came in about ten o'clock, and called for sixpennyworth of gin and water; I missed four window curtains, a habit shirt, and a frock, from off the sofa in the parlour; I had seen the things at twelve o'clock.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. On the next day after the robbery was committed, I apprehended Hazleton in Mill Pond-street, I found upon her the duplicate of the curtains, Mr. Brown apprehended Henry, they both acknowledged they took the property, they said they were foolish enough to do so, and they hoped we would let them go.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. I took Ann Henry in Cannon-street Road, I searched her, in her right hand pocket I found a habit shirt, we took them before the magistrate, and there they acknowledged taking the property, they said they were something in liquor; I found the child's frock at Mr. Mitcham's, by Henry's directions.

(The property produced and identified by Hannah Ormston .)

Harleton's Defence. Going up Ratcliff Highway, we met a young man, he said he had not got the money he owed us, he gave us these things, he said pawn them till I get the money.

Henry's Defence. I was along with her.

HAZLETON - GUILTY , aged 17.

HENRY - GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-77

483. ELIZABETH BRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , nine curtains, value 4 l. a counterpane, value 1 l. 15 s. a pair of sheets, value 1 l. 5 s. two pillows, value 1 l. four towels, value 2 s. two pillow cases, value 6 s. a looking glass, value 10 s. two table cloths, value 1 l. 5 s. a silver table spoon, value 18 s. and six silver tea spoons, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Davis , in a lodging room .

THOMAS DAVIS sworn. I live at No. 5, Bedford-street, Holborn . On the 24th of July, the prisoner took a second floor furnished of me at sixteen shillings a week; on the 21st of August, in consequence of some information, I went into her apartment to see if the things were there, I then missed all the things mentioned in the indictment, and several more; when we went into the room she forced herself against the door as much as she could, but when we got in she took a knife, and said she would either kill or be killed before she would be taken.

Q. I suppose you soon overpowered the woman, and took the knife from her. - A. Yes, we found where part of the things were, we took her to Hatton Garden, she told us the spoons were at the corner of Dean-street, and there we found them; with several other things.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. The prisoner and her sister lived together. - A. I only let the room to her, she brought her sister, and they lived together; the sister came the next day after the prisoner came, the sister laid in there.

JAMES - sworn. I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a curtain, a looking glass, two pic. tures, three tea spoons, and a table spoon, they were pawned at different times by an Irish woman.

Q. None of them were pawned by the prisoner. - A. No.

JAMES JONES sworn. I live with Chandler and Benton, High Holborn; I produce two curtains, they were pawned by the son of a neighbour, in the name of Easton, I advanced three shillings on one and half a crown on the other, they were pawned on the 18th of August.

JAMES EDWARDS sworn. I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of August in the forenoon, I went up stairs and knocked at the door, the prisoner at the bar opened the door, she said she expected us; the prisoner went to a closet, took up a knife, and held it in her hand with the blade towards herself.

Q. Then the mischief she intended was against herself, not against you - A. No, I do not think it was, she begged permission to go into the adjoining room where her sister was, lying in bed (she had only lain in a fortnight), I gave her permission, and put my foot against the door, to prevent her from shutting it, she stood behind the door, keeping it close to my foot, she endeavoured to prevent my coming in; some conversation passed between her and her sister, about a moment, I saw their hands pass from one to another, whether there was any thing in it I do not know; then I pushed the door and went in, she said, Oh! Charlotte, this is all through you, if it had not been for you I should not have done this; her sister hung upon her, and to appearance she seemed to be in sits, I got her away and took her to the watchhouse; I went back and searched the apartment, and I found nothing there; at twelve o'clock I took her before the magistrate; when she came near the office, she burst out in tears, she told me that the

table spoon was pledged at the corner of Dean-street in her sister's name.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, I knew not that any thing was taken out of the room.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, believing it to be done through the distress of her sister.]

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-78

484. ANN SINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , a purse, value 6 d. and six pieces of foreign coin, called double pistoles, value 9 l. the property of Frederick Weise .

FREDERIC WEISE sworn. On Saturday the 9th of August I was going through the Park, by Buckingham Gate, going home between nine and ten o'clock, I met the prisoner at the bar, I passed her, I turned round and looked after her, she asked me to take a walk with her; we went over the way and had something to drink, we then went into the Park again, and going through the gate that leads to William-street , by some means or other she drew out my purse with the money; I asked her for the money, she denied having it, I offered her half a guinea to let me have the money, she said she had it not.

Q. What was in your purse. - A. Six double louis d'ors, they are called so in Prussia; two soldiers came by at the time, I spoke to them as well as I could, I said she had robbed me, the soldiers were with me, when I came into William street she asked to go into a public house, I said no, I had another public house where I liked, where the two soldiers lodged, the Two Brewers, she rather objected to go in there, I with the two soldiers gave her a sudden pull and drew her in.

Q. Was she searched. - A. The landlord sent for a constable, I do not know whether she was searched or no; when the constable returned with the woman he had the money.

THOMAS RENNY sworn. I am a constable; I was sent for to the Two Brewers, Brewer street, Westminster, just before ten o'clock on the 9th of August; I found there the prisoner at the bar, the soldiers, and the prosecutor, I certainly did take the prisoner out and rub her down, I looked very hard in her face, she said Renny if you will go out with me I will tell you where the property is; she took me two hundred yards, lifted up her petticoats, and was going to drop the things in my hand, I took the money and returned with the prisoner, and I asked the gentleman to tell what it was; he described the purse and the gold pieces, I produce them.

Prosecutor. It is my purse, and the sort of money that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the money up from the place by the prisoner's side. I at first denied I had it; as soon as the constable was charged with me I delivered it to him.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Of stealing, but not privily from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-79

485. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of Daniel Arnold .

DANIEL ARNOLD sworn. On Sunday evening the third of August I was going home, I live at Shadwell market.

Q. Do you keep a house there. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you a married man. - A. Yes. I met the prisoner at Wapping Wall, she asked me to go along with her, I did, we went up New Gravel lane , she and I set down together for an ilicit purpose, a voice being heard stopped it, she went to hear what the noise was; I missed my watch.

Q. Did she come back again. - A. No.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. I am an officer; Mr. Dexter delivered the prisoner up to me, and the watch. I produce the watch.

THOMAS DEXTER sworn. Q. Look at that watch, did you deliver that watch to Nowlan. - A. Yes, on the Monday morning between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop to pledge the watch, I suspected it, I stopped the watch and the prisoner; I took her to the police office.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was often in my company before that, he had but one sixpence in his pocket, he asked me to go with him to New Gravel lane; he delivered the watch into my own possession to do what I pleased with.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Of stealing, but not privily.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction . and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-80

485. HANNAH M'CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of July , five shawls, value 10 s. and a half shawl, value 1 s. the property of Robert Poole , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM CAVE sworn. I am assistant to Robert Poole , linen draper , No. 150, Ratcliffe Highway . On the 22nd of July, about two o'clock, the prisoner with another woman came into our shop, they enquired for some cambric muslin, which I shewed them, and none suited them, they then asked to see some prints for gowns, I shewed them all that was likely to suit them, they observed there was nothing that suited them, they would call in another day.

Q. How long did they stay in your shop. - A. About a quarter of an hour; at the time they were going out of the shop, I suspected them, I let them go out of the shop, and then brought them back, I examined them, I found enclosed in M'Carthy's apron five shawls and a half, she threw them from her apron on the floor.

Q. What shawls were they. - A. Printed cambric shawls, I produce them.

Q. When had you seen these shawls before she took them. - A. I had shewn them to a customer a little while before, which was the occasion of their being on the counter.

Q. In order to shew the cambric muslin did you turn your back to get it to shew them. - A. Yes, I was under the necessity of going to the window.

Q. Who was in the shop at the same time. - A. No person at the time, Mr. Poole came in the shop during the time they were there, he rather suspected them himself.

Q. Did you see either of them take the shawls. - A. No, I am confident I knew nothing was taken, I only suspected them.

Q. Did M'Carty say any thing when the shawls dropped out of her apron. - A. Nothing at the time.

ROBERT POOLE sworn. Q. You are a linen draper, I understand. - A. I am.

Q. You have got some printed shawls, whose property is that. - A. My property.

Q. Were you present when the women were brought back. - A. I saw them drop out of her apron on the ground, I took them up, these are the handkerchiefs (producing them); I kept them in a handkerchief ever since.

Q. Do you remember from which of the women's aprons these shawls dropped out. - A. The prisoner at the bar, I am certain of it.

Q. You took both the women up. - A. We did, the other woman was discharged.

Q. You was in the shop when these women were there. - A. Yes, I was out and in frequently, I had suspicions of these women.

Q. Did you keep your eye upon her. - A. I did.

Q. Did you see her take it. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see the other woman take it. - A. I did not.

Q. Yet you had suspicions on her. - A. Yes.

Q. What is the prime cost of these shawls. - A. Two shillings a piece, there is five shawls and a half.

Q. And two shillings they are worth to a tradesman. - A. They are.

Q. They are old fashioned goods, are they what would fell for two shillings. - A. Oh, yes, they are in wear, and have been in wear for years.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

[The jury and prosecutor recommended her to mercy on account of her good character].

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18060917-81

486. WILLIAM ASHMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , a purse, value 6 d. and thirty-eight guineas, the property of Edward Holmes , in the dwelling house of John Field .

EDWARD HOLMES sworn. I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 22nd of August I lost thirty-eight guineas and a purse, I lodged at Mr. Field's the night before I was robbed, at Chelsea , he keeps a public house.

Q. Did any body else lodge with you. - A. Ashmore lay with me that night; I got up between seven and eight in the morning, I had thirty-six guineas in my waistcoat pocket in a purse, and three guineas in my pocket pinned over it; I saw the money all safe in the morning, when I got up, I put two of the guineas to the thirty-six, and one I kept in my breeches pocket.

Q. Did he see you put them in. - A. I shewed him the two, I am not sure that he saw the whole after that I went down stairs, I treated Ashmore with a glass of spirits, and paid my way with Mr. Field; a man was sent for who wrote me a petition, after that we had some more drink, and with my being weak, having just come out of the hospital, the liquor had effect on me; this Ashmore took me up stairs that I might have a sleep, I was put on the bed; after a bit I felt at my pocket, I said I am robbed; Ashmore was then sitting at the foot of the bed, Ashmore said you had but two guineas, I said I had more than that, and I think it is you that robbed me, because I have been in no man's company only yours, and the man that wrote me the petition this morning; I said let me have my money again and I'll give you half a guinea, he said he knew nothing about the money; I went down stairs, told Mr. Field that I was robbed of thirty-eight guineas, Mr. Field came up stairs, with Mack his waiter, and a foreigner, the prisoner was sitting at the foot of the bed then; as soon as they began searching him there was six of the guineas found under him, where he sat on the bed, there were twenty two guineas found on the left side of the bed, by the wall, in the purse, and there was four guineas found in the prisoner's right shoe; there was six guineas wanting, I had thirty-eight.

JOHN FIELD sworn. Q. You keep the public house, do you. A. Yes, the Earl of Howard's head.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I have known the prisoner some years. Ashmore, came to me and said he was broken down and he would be glad if I would give him a night's lodging; I gave him one, the prisoner and the prosecutor both went up to bed together, I did not know they slept together till the next morning.

Q. Do you recollect their coming down. - A. Ashmore came down first, for a pot of beer, he said it was for the man that was robbed. I sent the pot of beer up, then Holmes came down about a quarter of an hour afterwards and changed a guinea, they had two or three glasses together, the prosecutor then begun talking why he should not have the augmentation as well as the other soldiers, he sent for a sergeant to write the petition, the sergeant said if he wrote it he was not fit to go before the officer to get it signed; he went up to lay down, in about twenty minutes afterwards, Holmes came down and told me that he was robbed of thirty-eight guineas; I called my man Mack, I says come up stairs, we all went up, and another man a German; I found Ashmore sitting on the bed, I said to Holmes are you sure that you had this money, he said he had, I said I shall search you first; I searched him, he had nothing, I said to Ashmore I must search you, there has nobody been in the room but yourselves; I am certain had two guineas, he had three yesterday. I changed him one; when Ashmore got up, we found six guineas under him, Mack found twenty-two between the bed and the wall, I made him pull off his shoes, and there was four guineas in one of them. I cannot say whether right or left, we researched the room, and the bed, and every thing, but we could not find the other six guineas. The prisoner said a guinea and a half of the money found in his shoes was his.

- MACK sworn. Q. We understand you was

waiter there, you have heard the account Mr. Field gave - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the money was found. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it found in the way he has related. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I said that the money did not belong to me.

Prosecutor. I did not hear him say that.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged in Mr. Field's house that night, and the next morning we had three glasses of rum at his bar; afterwards he went in with an old college man to get a petition wrote, he could not stop with the man, he was getting too much in liquor, I was in liquor too, we both laid down on the bed, in a short time this man got up and was counting his money, he laid down again, after that he bounced up and says I am robbed, I got up and put my shoes on my feet, he goes down stairs and calls out to the landlord, the landlord came up with a Dutchman, and the waiter with him; the four guineas fell in my shoes, he was so drunk he reeled against the wall, and I would not move for fear he should think I had got the money.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-82

487 MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , two gold seals, value 40 s. a gold chain, value 30 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Cornelius Fay , privately from his person .

CORNELIUS FAY sworn. On the 20th of July I had been invited to supper, and having staid later than usual, I was quite intoxicated, I was returning home, as I suppose, about twelve o'clock; I have no further recollection than about nine o'clock the next morning I found myself in a house in Bow-street, Covent-garden; I missed the gold seals, a watch chain, and a silk handkerchief.

- CHATER sworn. I am a servant at No. 20, Bow-street , Mrs. Davis is the proprietor of the house, and a waiter carries the business on.

Q. Do you recollect the last witness coming to your house. - A. I let him in on a Saturday night, between one and two in the morning; he had the prisoner with him, I had seen the prisoner before with other gentlemen, they seemed to be both of them very much in liquor.

Q. Did you shew them into a room in your house. - A. I did. It was about three o'clock when she went out, she went out by herself, and left him in the room.

JOHN SMITH sworn. On Sunday the 20th of July, I went to No. 4, Charles-street, Long-acre, and there I found the prisoner; I told her what I came about, she said the gentleman had given her the handkerchief, she gave the handkerchief to me, and there were two seals and a chain wrapped up in it, and she said she did not know how they were there; I produce them.

Q.(To prosecutor) Do you know the chain, seals, and handkerchief. - A. The chain was fixed to my small clothes pocket, and the seals were hanging to it.

Q. What became of the handkerchief you do not know. - A. No, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor had only three bad half guineas with him, he gave me the handkerchief, and I left him upon that condition.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-83

488 JOHN O'DONNELL was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's high-way, upon Luke Codgell , on the 23d of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 5 l. his property .

LUKE CODGELL sworn. I live at Wilsden-green, On the 23d of August, I was going home between ten and eleven o'clock at night, from London; I was stopped by two men in a lane leading from Kilburn to Wilsden-green , they came to the side of the cart and said stop; I was in the cart, and my daughter she was asleep in the cart.

Q. Did they both say Stop. - A. Only one.

Q. Who was that. - A. The prisoner, he got upon the shaft of the cart and put a pistol to my breast, and demanded my money and my watch; the other man stood at the horse's head with a pistol; he then took hold of my watch-string and broke it, and he forced me to give him the watch, he felt about my pocket for money, but never, put his hand into my pocket; he asked me if I had money, I told him I had none; they robbed my daughter likewise.

Q. What sort of a night was this. - A. Very ligh night.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar, are you quite sure that he is the man. - A I am, I knew him before; they told me to go on, after they had robbed me and my daughter. I went on about twenty yards; I got out of my cart and run back, then I thought they went over Kensal-green, I crossed a field, thinking to meet them; I never met them at all. I came up to Paddington and stopped there, thinking they would come up the Harrow road, but they never came, then I went home.

Q. You knew O'Donnell before. - A. Yes, I had seen him about six weeks before that at our green.

Q. Knowing the person that robbed you, what did you do. - A. I came up to Paddington, there I met with one of the Bow-street men, who staid with me an hour.

Q. Did you tell him the man that had robbed you. - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you meet with O'Donnell. - A. I heard of his being taken the Friday after, I ordered the Bow-street man to give notice.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You told the Bow-street patrol you had been robbed and who had robbed you. - A. Yes, I took hold of the Bow-street man, I thought he was one of the parties.

Q. You found out you were mistaken, and you found him to be a Bow-street patrol. - A. Yes.

Q. You heard on the Friday after, that he was taken up, did you go to Bow-street, or any other office, to make an enquiry. - A. No.

Q. Have you always said that you told the Bow-street

officer. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Whistler. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you tell him that you had not told the Bow-street officer the name of O'Donnell. - A. No.

Q. Will you say that you did not tell him that you did not know his name. - A. I do not remember that I told Whistler that.

Q. Did you tell any body else that you did not know the name of the person that robbed you. - A. To the best of my knowledge I always said that I did know his name.

Q. You are quite sure that you did not say to any person that you did not know his name. - A. I always said that I knew his person.

Q. Did not you say to some person that you did not mention his name to the Bow-street officer, and that you did not know his name. - A. I do not know that I did, I cannot swear one way or the other.

Q. He was afterwards committed, that you heard. - A. Yes.

Q. You never went to Marlbrough-street, after he was committed. - A. I did, I saw Foy, I went there to ask what officer took him.

Q. You never intended to make any charge, till after he was committed, you never made any charge to the magistrate that he had robbed you. - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you mentioned to Foy that he was the person that robbed you. - A. I forget, I will not swear it.

Q. You went to Marlbrough-street for the purpose of ascertaining who was the person that apprehended him, did you tell Foy that O'Donnell was the person that robbed you. - A. I might or I might not, I will not swear that I did or I did not.

Q. Did you ever prefer your bill until you saw the prisoner at the bar for trial at this sessions. - A. Yes, I went last Thursday.

Q. That was after the sessions had begun. - A. I did not know that.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds, if you convict the prisoner. - A. I do not know, I have heard such a thing.

Q. Do not you understand there is a forty pounds reward, and that you would perhaps have a share in it. - A. I do not want it.

Q. Do not you suppose that you would be entitled to a part of it. - A. I know now you have told me, I did not know it before. I have heard many say so both before I preferred the bill of indictment and after.

- CODGELL sworn. I am the daughter of the last witness, I was with my father on the said night, I was asleep when the man was in the cart, my father awaked me, he told me there was somebody wanting money, there was another man at the horse's head; I did not know the man in the cart; after he had robbed my father, he laid a pistol across my lap, and he desired me to give him my money, I told him I had none, he said he knew better, if I had it not about me I had it in the cart. I then told him I had some halfpence, he put his hand into my pocket and took a handful, he dropped some in the cart, I gave him the rest, he got out of the cart and told my father to go on; we went on, about twenty yards, and then my father said he would go after them, I went home with the cart and my father went after the men.

Q. Now look at the prisoner. - A. I do not know him.

Mr. Knapp. - There was no property found that ever belonged to this man.

Prisoner's Defence. (read in court) My Lord, I have had the misfortune to be here tried, and convicted of a capital offence. I hope that circumstance will not operate against me on the present occasion; I was led into that offence by Cuddiford, who was the principal witness in that case. I most solemnly declare I am innocent of this charge, and to this declaration. I call upon God to witness, as I expect for mercy here and hereafter. I did not know of this charge against me till last Wednesday, when I was informed that my prosecutor had sworn that I was the man that robbed him, that he knew my person only from happening to see me at prize fights. I understood also that he went to the Bow-street patrol, and informed him of the robbery, but not of my person. If he had known my name he ought to have mentioned it directly and have gone to the Police-Office. If he had so done, I should have been directly apprehended. He must also learn from the public newspapers that I was in custody, and had been several times examined at the Marlbrough-street office. I should humbly think he ought to have gone to the office and made his charge, and then I should have heard what he had to alledge against me, and when the circumstance was recent I might have brought to my friend's recollection where I was, but in this course of time I cannot; I must trust my case to your Lordship and the jury, being well assured that notwithstanding my unfortunate situation, every justice will be done me.

NOT GUILTY , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18060917-84

489. REBECCA PYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a shawl, value 5 s. three gowns, value 15 s two guineas, a half guinea, two seven shillings pieces, ten shillings, and a bank note, value one pound , the property of Ann Waklan .

ANN WAKLAN sworn. In June last, I lived servant in Air-street, Piccadilly . The prisoner came to me and told me she would tell me my fortune, she had first the shawl, and then the other things, she sold me a parcel of stuff, and said she would make it up three hundred pounds to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-85

490. MARTHA ROGERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Phillis Adams , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 15th of August , and burglariously stealing therein a bonnet, value 18 s. thirty shillings, and two bank notes, the property of Phillis Adams .

PHILLIS ADAMS sworn. I am a single woman . On the 15th of August I went to bed about ten o'clock at night. I had fastened my door, about

three o'clock in the morning, I awoke, I found the door broken open; I found the prisoner asleep on the ground.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same house. - A. Yes, she lodged in the same room with me.

Q. What are you. - A. I am an unfortunate girl.

Q. What is she. - A. The same; I awoke her, I asked her how she came in, she said she did not know; I immediately went to my bed to look for my money, I found it was gone; the next day she took the bonnet and put it on her head, and went out of the room; I met her between eight and nine o'clock, I asked her for the bonnet, she refused giving it me, she had it on her head.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived along with this woman a considerable time; what was mine was her's and what was her's was mine; she took the bonnet off my head, she used to lend me her things; she said first that the woman in the next room had taken her money, and then afterwards she accused me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-86

491. SARAH GOUCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a gown, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. and a pair of stays, value 1 s. the property of Arthur Jones .

MARGARET JONES sworn. On the 26th of June I happened to have a few words with my husband, he used me ill and turned me out of doors, I was crying in the street, the prisoner came to me and asked me to go home with her, she lives in Charles street, Drury lane .

Q. What is she. - A. I really cannot tell, I never saw the prisoner before.

Q. What time was this. - A.About two o'clock in the morning; I went with her, I pulled my things off; being drowsy, and went to bed, I awoke about three o'clock, she was gone and all my clothes; three weeks afterwards my husband and I met her on Holborn Hill, she had my gown on, we took her to the Counter in the city, they threw a great deal of water over us; the prisoner then made the best of her way from us, we overtook her and took her to Hatton Garden office.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. On the 12th of July in the morning I was sent for to the Royal Oak, I went there, and saw the prisoner with a kind of a blue gown on, which the prosecutrix said was her's, I searched her, I found a duplicate of a petticoat belonging to the prosecutrix; I did not take off the gown, if I had she must have been quite naked; I produce the petticoat.

Prosecutrix. This is my petticoat, and I am certain the gown she had on is mine.

Prisoner. Here is the gown, she had lent it me.

Prosecutrix. That is my gown, I did not lend it her.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lent me that gown, I never meant to deprive her of it, I had no other intention than to return it her.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-87

492. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of August , a yard of Kidderminster carpet, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Sadgrove and William Sadgrove .

WILLIAM SADGROVE sworn. I am an upholsterer , I live in Moorfields ; the prisoner was my servant .

JOHN RAY sworn. I was in company with Armstrong on the 29th of August at an old iron shop, Raven row, Spital Fields; when we were in the shop the prisoner at the bar came just with in the threshold of the door with something of that kind wrapped up in his apron; the shop is kept by a jew; he gave the prisoner a wink with his eye and a nod with his head, he immediately turned out of his shop and I immediately followed him; about ten yards from the shop I got hold of him, I told him I was an officer of Worship street office, and I would certainly see what he had got in his apron, I looked in his apron, I saw this bit of carpeting, I then asked where he lived or who he worked for, he said that was no business of mine; I searched his pockets, I found a letter with Mr. Sadgrove's direction, I sent down to Mr. Sadgrove, he came up to the office and said it was his property.

(The property identified by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's Defence. I took the piece of carpet to carry a bedstread; I never was in any jew's shop in my life, I was walking along, the officer stood on the cill of the door, he asked me what I had got there, I said I had a bit of carpet.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-88

493. JOHN CURETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a metal bell, value 7 s. 9 d. the property of Thomas Vigue , esq .

JOHN ALDRIDGE sworn. I am the smith that hung the bell for Mr. Vigue, he lives at Snaresbrook, Walthamstow .

THOMAS EVERTON sworn. I am a patrol. On the 4th of July, half after four in the morning, John Webb and I were coming down the field between Clapton and Hackney, we saw John Carleton coming down the back lane, I could see he had got a bundle, I stopped him and asked him what he had got there, he said his own property, it was old bell metal, what he dealt in, he said he brought it from Cambridge; I examined the bundle, and found eight bells.

Q.(to Aldridge) You are the smith that hung this bell. - A. I believe this is the same bell that I hung for Mr. Vigue, I cannot swear to it, because the spring is broke in two pieces, and one half is gone; I have no doubt but this is the bell I hung for Mr. Vigue.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid the full price for them, I bought them at different parts of the country, I am sure they never came from that part.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-89

494. JOHN CURETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a metal bell, value 4 s. the property of Richard Miles , esq .

RICHARD STONE sworn. I am a coachman to

Mr. Miles, he lives at Snaresbrook in the parish of Wanstead . On the 4th of July, about twelve o'clock at noon, I had been to Fairlop fair with the carriage, I came home between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the bell was gone.

SAMUEL EVERTON sworn. Q. You are a patrol, you observed the man coming down the back lane at Hackney. - A. Yes, at half after four o'clock in the morning, there were eight bells found upon him, and this was one of them.

JOSEPH LANGLEY sworn. I am a smith at Wood-ford, I know that this spring belonged to the bell that I hung for Mr. Miles; I took it down the 9th of July, the bell was gone.

Q. Does the spring fit the bell. - A. Exactly.

Q. Are you able to say that is the same bell that you put on that spring. - A. I have no reason to doubt it.

Prisoner's Defence. I came by the bells all in one parcel.

Court. Then you must be the receiver.

Prisoner. I gave ten pence a pound for them, which is the price than any body would give in London.

Q.(to Stone) Do you know any thing of the prisoner. - A. The prisoner had worked at hay-making for my master a week before with me in the fields.

Prisoner. Will you swear that I was hay-making in your fields. - A. Yes.

Prisoner. The lord have mercy on your soul, I never was hay-making in my life.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-90

495. DANIEL GRANT and EDWARD HARRIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of August , one leaden weight, value 3 s. the property of George Palmer .

GEORGE PALMER sworn. I live in Pelham street, Spital Fields , I am a publican .

Q. What did you lose. - A. A leaden weight on the 29th of August; about nine o'clock in the morning these men came into my house, they were there about an hour and a half, then they went away; I went out and was gone about an hour, when I returned I missed the clock weight; I found the weight at an iron shop in Wheeler street, I had every reason to suppose they had taken the weight.

- BARNARD sworn. I live in Wheeler street, I keep an old iron shop; two brothers brought the weight, named Grant; being neighbours' children, I did not know but it was safe my buying it, I do not know Harris, I gave them two pence a-pound for it; having no money in the house I went out and sold it to Mrs. Davis.

Q. Are you sure that Grant is the man that brought it to your house. - A. Yes.

MARY DAVIS sworn. Q. You keep an old iron shop too. - A. Yes, in Purl street, Spital Fields; I purchased the weight of Mrs. Barnard.

JOHN RAY sworn. On the 29th of August the prosecutor said that the two Grants had been to his house with Harris, and had stole the clock weight from him; he saw them as he was coming down Wheeler street, they ran away from him; I went to Mrs. Barnard, I asked her if the Grants had been there with a clock weight, she said they had, she had not money enough to pay for the weight, she sold it; I produce the weight.

Prosecutor. I have every reason to believe it is mine.

Grant's Defence. Mrs. Barnard swore at the office that this weight weighed fourteen or fifteen pounds, and now she says she gave two pence a-pound for it; at the office she said she gave three pence. God knows, I did not sell it.

Harris's Defence. These men and I drank two pots of beer together, I never saw them afterwards till I was taken up; I am as innocent as any body that stands round here.

BOTH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-91

496. FRANCIS MARFLEET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , eighty nine pound weight of flour, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Swann .

THOMAS SWANN sworn. Q. You are a baker at Kensington ; on the 30th of August last did any thing take place with respect to the prisoner. - A. Yes; having suspicion of the prisoner robbing me, I went to a neighbour's house about a quarter after three in the morning; the prisoner came, he usually rang my bell, and the boy let him in; after he had been in the house about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, I perceived the prisoner coming out with two bags of flour.

Q. How much was it. - A. Eighty nine pounds of flour; after he came out a gentleman, who is in court, and I, pursued him, he made a kind of a stop and let one of the bags fall, holding the other under his arm; I then went to him, and asked him what he had got, he made me no answer, I said I suppose you have got my flour; he begged me to let him take it back and put it in the trough where we had taken it from, and if I would forgive him, he would leave the town; I told him I could not think of doing that, he must go along with me.

Q. How long had he lived with you. - A. Nearly four years.

JOSEPH HUGHES sworn. I produce the bags of flour.

- TONY sworn. Q. Do you recollect what the prisoner said respecting his master. - A. He said his intention was to bring his master to the workhouse by May next, and then to leave him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Did you see him take the flour and put it in the bag. - A. Yes.

Q. And you permitted him to do it, a very honest lad you are. - A. When I first went to Mr. Swann he was robbing his master then, and he said if I told Mr. Swann he would kill me; I saw him bring those bags out of Mr. Swann's house, and Mr. Swann took them from him.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-92

497. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a cotton gown,

value 8 s. the property of Sarah Fuderall .

SARAH FUDERALL sworn. I am a widow , I live at No. 34, Castle-street, Liecester Fields .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She is a stranger to me, she visited the woman that lived in the next room to me on the same floor; I saw the gown on Thursday, I missed it on the Friday evening; I thought the woman had taken it because she was poor.

Q. You yourself do not know who took it. - A. No.

RICHARD BERRY sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Pultney-street. On the 24th of July, in the afternoon, I took in a gown; I produce it.

Q. Who did you take it in of. - A. I cannot swear to the prisoner. On the Sunday morning following the prisoner came to me and told me that she had lost the ticket, I stopped her, the prosecutor's girl having been at my house on the Saturday evening and said she had lost a gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the gown, I happened to go to see an acquaintance in the same house where the prosecutrix lives, I was charged with the gown; I never saw the gown with my eyes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-93

498. JOHN GALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of July , ten knives, value 10 d. eleven forks, value 11 d. and a spicket and a soffit, value 2 d. the property of George Davis .

GEORGE DAVIS sworn. I am a serjeant in the marines ; I delivered these things to John Barnard.

JOHN BARNARD sworn. I live in Dyot-street , at Mrs. Nunnery's.

Q. How did the prisoner take these things. - A. He came to lodge there on the Saturday night.

SARAH NUNNERY sworn. Q. You keep a house in Dyot-street. - A. Yes, Barnard lodged with me, he asked me if I had a room to let, I told him I had, he said Davis desired him to look out a room for him; I shewed Barnard the room, when he came out of the room he said shall I leave this parcel here, I said he might, he laid it on a table and came out; I locked the door and put the key in my pocket; Davis not coming to the time to look at the room, I forgot the parcel; in the evening the prisoner and his wife came, asked for a lodging, a great many people were in my shop, I opened the door, gave him the bundle, and came away; I knew the parcel was there when he and the woman went in.

Davis. On the following day after I had delivered the knives and forks to Barnard, I went into the Spread Eagle, I saw the prisoner at the bar there with a handkerchief that I well knew, I asked him to let me look at it, as I thought I knew the handkerchief, he told me he would not let me look at it, nor no one else, he had just bought it and gave half a crown for it; I called the landlord, I asked him it he ever saw that handkerchief, I told him that was the handkerchief I had delivered into his hands at three o'clock in the morning, till I found Barnard; he knew it directly, he said that was the handkerchief; I got away the handkerchief from the prisoner, it contained ten knives and eleven forks, I am sure they are my property; I had him apprehended, on the following day.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I apprehended the prisoner. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at this woman's b - y house all night with a girl, she gave me this property.

Blackman. The man confessed before the magistrate that he saw a bundle on the table, he opened the bundle and saw what was in it, he thought he might as well take it, for the next person that came would take it if he did not, and that made him take it.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-94

499. GEORGE HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , two books, value 5 s. the property of Walter Row .

HENRY RICHARDS sworn. I am an apprentice to Mr. Row, a bookseller , Great Marlborough-street . On the 4th of July, as near as I can recollect, the prisoner at the bar was walking backwards and forwards before the shop, and would now and then come and look at some books that were on the stall; he would take them up and put them under his coat, and lay them down again, he kept on for two hours, I was watching him; about seven o'clock Mr. Foy, the officer, came in and told me to watch him, he stopped with me till eight o'clock; the prisoner took two books, put them in his coat, and then walked off; the officer and I went out after him, he threw down the two books directly he saw the officer; Mr. Foy took him in custody, I picked up the books and gave them to Foy.

Q. What are the books. - A. They are Philosophical. Differtations on the Egyptians, 2 vols.

JOHN FOY sworn. I am an officer of Marlboborough-street office. On the 4th of July I saw the prisoner in the neighbourhood of this shop, I went in there to observe him, I saw him take up these books and go off, I followed him; when he saw me he dropped the books and ran away. I produce the books.

(The books identified by Richards.)

Prisoner's Defence. I always lived in respectability, and never did any thing of the kind.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-95

500. PHOEBE JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , a coat, value 10 s. and a pair of breeches, value 7 s. the property of John Wilkinson .

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. I live at No. 17, Hatfield-street, Goswell-street, I am a tin plate worker ; returning home from Tottenham Court Road I passed Dyot-street, I met the prisoner, I told her I wanted a lodging, I was a great way from home; she took me to a lodging, it was then between eleven and twelve o'clock; I awoke about three o'clock in the

morning I lost my coat, handkerchief, and breeches.

Q. How long did you get home. - A. The landlord of the house lent me clothes. I met Mr. Blackman, he took the woman.

Q. Are you sure it is the same woman. - A. Yes.

MARGARET SIMPSON sworn. I am a servant to the Black horse public house, I bought the duplicate of the handkerchief of the prisoner.

HANNAH COTTERELE sworn. The prisoner chucked this bundle in my room about four o'clock in the morning, I asked her what it was, she said it was a quartern loaf.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. On the 31st of July I met the prosecutor in Dyot-street, he said he had been robbed of his coat, hat, breeches, and handkerchief, at a lodging-house in the galleries. I enquired who had got them, they said Scotch Peggy; I met her in Dyot-street, after I took her in custody, I got the handkerchief from the servant, and the bundle from Mrs. Cotterell; I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. When I picked up the man in the street, he said he had only as much money as would pay for the bed, he said he would give me the handkerchief to sleep with me all night; he paid for his bed, we went to Mrs. Welch's, Phoenix-yard , there was neither lock nor bolt to the door, there came up five or six men into the room, they wanted to rise this man from the bed, he would not, he sent me for a pot of beer, and while I was in the street, they came and gave me these clothes. I gave them half a pint of gin for them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-96

501. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Coats .

THOMAS COATS sworn. I am a linen-draper , I live in Oxford-street . On the 31st of July between two and three o'clock, a person passing by my shop, pointed out the prisoner to me, I observed the prisoner a minute or two, I saw him take the printed cotton; I pursued him and took him with it.

Q. Where was this piece of cotton. - A. It was hanging up on the outside, but properly secured.

(The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of your lordship and the jury.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-97

502. CATHERINE TURNER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a metal watch, value 30 s. the property of William English .

WILLIAM ENGLISH sworn. I am a glass-cutter , I live at No. 34 Brick-lane, St. Luke's.

Q. How did you lose your watch. - A. I went to Peckham fair; coming home, I was going down Holborn ; the prisoner prevailed on me to go home with her, it was late, I said at day light I would leave her. I pulled off my coat and waistcoat and laid them under my head, at day light I found the watch was gone, I left the prisoner between three and four o'clock, and went home in the afternoon; I went to an officer and told him what had happened; he went to her and found the property.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman. - A. Yes.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. He left the watch with me, and said he would leave it there in the morning. He put it in the cupboard himself; we were both very much in liquor.

Prosecutor. I was very much in liquor, I was just out of my apprenticeship, otherwise it would not have happened.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-98

503. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of August , eighteen yards of printed callico; value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Russell and William White .

JOHN RUSSELL sworn. I am a linen-draper , No. 209, Tottenham-court road , my partner's name is William White ; on the 12th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the gentleman living at the next door asked me whether I had lost a piece of print from the door, I told him I had.

Q. Where was the print hanging. - A.Outside of the door.

Q. How far was the prisoner when this gentleman gave you the information. - A. About forty yards off when I first saw her; when I came up to her, I saw the print on her arm with her gown over it. I put my hand on her shoulder, and asked what she had got there, she said nothing. I charged her with having stolen the print, she said I will go back with you; I took it from her; and brought her back, I produce the print. I am sure it is the print I took from her, and I am sure it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than the child unborn.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-99

504. MARY LAURENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , a copper tea-kettle value 3 s. the property of William Christie .

WILLIAM CHRISTIE sworn. I live on Great-Saffron-hill , the prisoner lodged in my house, I lost my tea-kettle on the 4th of September.

HARRIET CHRISTIE sworn. I missed this tea-kettle on the 4th of September before breakfast, I found it on the same day at Mr. Hill's.

HENRY VICKERS sworn. I am a servant to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, I took the tea-kettle in of the prisoner, I gave her one shilling and sixpence on it; I produce the tea kettle.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that your tea kettle. - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the place after nine o'clock in the morning, till ten o'clock at night. I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-100

505. ANN HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and four towels, value 2 s. the property of Jeremiah Greaves .

JANE GREAVES sworn. I live at Islington .

Q. When did you first miss these articles. - A. I had missed them for two months; in consequence of suspicion I went to Mr. Wildman's in Upper street, Islington; I found the stockings and towels there in pawn.

WILLIAM WILDMAN sworn. I am a pawnbroker. I know the prisoner perfectly well, she pawned a pair of stockings and four towels with me at different times, I advanced two shillings and eight pence upon them in the whole.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-101

506. MARGARET GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of July , two pair of trowsers, value 11 s. the property of John Silver .

Second count for like offence, laying them to be the property of Elizabeth Blacklock .

ELIZABETH BLACKLOCK sworn. I work at slop work . On the 8th of July Mrs. Silver gave me eight pair of trowsers to make, I lost two pair out of them on the 13th of July; I live at No. 18, Crown court, East Smithfield , the prisoner lodged with me. I saw the trowsers again at Lambeth street office.

LYON AARON sworn. I am a salesman, I live in Petticoat lane, I am a jew. On Sunday the 13th of July the prisoner at the bar offered me these trowsers to sell, I stopped her and sent for an officer, and the next day I attended before the magistrate; I produce the trowsers, I have had them in my custody ever since.

(The property identified by Elizabeth Blacklock .)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mr. Aaron with them, Mrs. Aaron gave me two shillings for one pair, Mr. Aaron was not at home, I would not leave the other pair for two shillings, she stopped me.

Aaron. I stopped her myself.

(The property identified.)

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-102

507. HENRY FARRER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of July , a metal watch, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Thomas Gelding .

THOMAS GELDING sworn. I live at No. 19, Denmark street, in the Strand , I keep an oyster and a green shop .

Q. Did you lose a metal watch at any time. - A. Yes, I lost it on Saturday the 5th of July, I had seen it about two o'clock, I had seen it about a quarter before two o'clock, I had left it by the fire side; I saw the watch at Bow street on the 7th.

JANE GELDING sworn. My husband left his watch at home about a quarter before two o'clock, I missed it about twenty minutes after two; the prisoner worked in the house, he was articled to a shoemaker ; he came in and asked me how I did, he sat down, two gentleman came to the door, I went out to serve them; the prisoner went out and wished me good by; the moment I went in I looked for the watch, I found it was gone.

Q. You afterwards found it at the pawnbroker's. A. Yes.

ROBERT ESSEX sworn. I am a pawnbroker in the Strand.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I know he was the person that pledged the watch for seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time that they charge me with taking the watch I was at Blackfriar's Bridge.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-103

508. ELEANOR EMMETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , a gown, value 4 s. an apron, value 9 d. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a tea caddie, value 9 d. the property of Mary Pugmire .

MARY PUGMIRE sworn. I am a widow woman, I live at No. 16, Headon street, Swallow street .

Q. When did you lose your property. - A. On the 18th of August I went out about four o'clock in the morning to wash; I left the prisoner in my lodgings, I had taken her in to live with me, I had kept her in victuals and drink for almost three weeks; she had left her aunt.

Q. You took her in because you believed her to be in distress. - A. Yes.

Q. What time on the 18th of August did you come back. - A. About twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. Was the prisoner there when you returned. - A. No, she was gone with my clothes, she left me nothing but what I have on me now; I saw her again when she was in custody, and my clothes were on her back.

Prisoner. I gave your mother a shilling for the tea caddy, I gave a shilling off the bed gown, and whatever I had to expend they partook of.

- GREGORY sworn. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of August; I found this gown on her back, and she had the stockings on, I believe, but the woman could not be sure; she acknowledged to the magistrate they were the prosecutrix' stockings; I produce the gown. I did not take her for this offence, I took her for six more.

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged a light gown of mine to fetch this woman's out of pledge; I lent her a shilling to fetch some soap and candles; I was to give her a shilling for the tea caddy, the mother said this shilling will pay for the tea caddy; the bed gown I was to have for eighteen pence, I paid the mother a shilling off that to get some breakfast.

Q.(to prosecutor) Did you give her permission to pawn your things. - A. I never gave her any permission.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-104

509. WILLIAM BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of July , a copper saucepan, value 10 s. the property of John Tapper .

ELEANOR TAPPER sworn. I am the wife of John Tapper , I live at the King's Head, White Lion street, Seven Dials .

Q. Did you on the 8th of July lose a copper saucepan. - A. Yes; the prisoner at the bar had been drinking in my parlour for two hours and a half, the saucepan was in a little side kitchen; my husband said to me he is in and out of that kitchen, then we both watched him, we saw him come out of the kitchen with his two hands before him, he had a large coat on him, I saw something behind him, he had the handle of the saucepan between his legs, he pretended to be very tipsy; this was about eight o'clock, we had just lit the candle, we lighted him out of the house; I then went into the bar, my husband and a young man, who is a witness, went after him and brought him back with the saucepan.

JAMES TURNER sworn. I produce the saucepan; I was in the public house in the parlour with him and others, he was in company with seven of us; the prisoner went into the back kitchen, I saw him take something from the top shelf, I could not see what it was, I thought it did not belong to him, I tapped Mr. Tapper on the shoulder and told him, he was very busy, I took hold of him by the coat, he lifted up the saucepan to knock me down, I received a blow from him with this saucepan which I found upon him; he would not deliver up the saucepan to me, I called out to Mr. Tapper, he came, and we secured him; this is the saucepan I took from him.

Q. Did he appear to you to be deprived of his senses at the time. - A. No, he appeared perfectly sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite intoxicated in liquor, I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-105

510. CATHERINE CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , a coat, value 12 s. the property of James Durham .

JAMES DURHAM sworn. I live in Kingsland road, I am a gardener .

Q. Did you lose a coat any time. - A. Yes, on the 27th of August out of Mr. Markham's nursery ground, Kensington ; I hung it on a yew tree in the ground about one, I missed it about two o'clock; I found it the same evening at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN AMOR DAKERS sworn. I am a pawnbroker at Kensington; the prisoner pledged the coat with me about seven o'clock in the evening on the 27th of August, I gave her four shillings upon it.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the coat, it was about a quarter after seven when we left the ground.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-106

511. BENJAMIN ENDFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of July , a pair of leather shoes, value 2 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn. I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 163, White Cross-street On the 3d of July the prisoner came in my shop, about a quarter before four o'clock, he asked for a pair of shoes for himself, I told him to sit down, I got a pair to fit him, he bid me six shillings for them, I told him I could not take that; he took a pair of children's shoes from a chair that was behind him, and he laid them on a chair by the side of him.

Q. Did he ask to purchase any children's shoes. - A. No, after he offered me the six shillings he went out; I looked at the chair where the shoes hung, I found they were gone, I called him back, he being just inside of the step; I said you have got a pair of shoes, he said he had got none of my shoes; I told him to deliver them up or else I would charge a constable with him, I searched his coat and waistcoat, I could not find them; I said though I cannot find them about your clothes I am sure you have got them, I have lost a great many before, and I know you are the person that took them; while the constable was gone for, my wife saw him take off his hat, and the shoes fell out of his hat.

Q. Did your wife say any thing. - A. Yes, she said he took them out of his hat; I heard them fall, I picked them up myself; I saw Tringham the constable, I called him in, and I said take charge of this man.

SARAH SMITH sworn. Q. When this man was brought back to your husband's shop what did you see done. - A. After my husband had searched him I saw him take off his hat, and throw them down by his side; I called out to my husband directly, and told him I saw it.

- TRINGHAM sworn. I produce the shoes; there were more shoes at the back of the shop, he asked to look at them; the prisoner took a pair in his hand and hustled them, and said now, d - n you, which are the shoes. These are the shoes Mr. Smith gave me.

Prosecutor. They are both pair my shoes, made by my men.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-107

512. WILLIAM HARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , a pair of coach lamps, value 10 s. two head plates, value 5 s. and a brass roller, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Wilmot , and JANE HARPER for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

DANIEL WILLMOT sworn. I am a Hackney coachman . On the 7th of September my coach was locked up in the coach house, Reeves Mews, Mount-street ; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Was your coach house broken open. - A. No,

they were taken out by some instrument.

ALEXANDER BALL sworn. I am a constable. On the 11th of September the prisoner, Hardy, was brought into the watchhouse; the next day I took him before the magistrate; I went to Mrs. Harper's house with a search warrant, she keeps an iron shop, No. I, Pultney-court, Little Wild-street; I found there the lamps broken to pieces, they had sold the other things to a brass founder, they were melted down.

JAMES SLADE sworn. In consequence of a search warrant, I went to Messrs. Walker's in Great Wild street, they gave up these head plates, the other property was melted down.

- sworn. I live with Mrs. Harper; the prisoner said he had an aunt that lived in Westminster, and these lamps belonged to her; I gave him after the rate of a shilling a pound for the brass, I sold it to Mr. Walker.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the head plates, there is Mr. Gordon's crest upon them, I bought them of Mr. Gordon himself.

HARDY - GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HARPER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-108

512. WILLIAM HARDY was indicted for stealing on the 28th of August a single horse chaise cover, value 3 s. the property of John Nutting , and JANE HARPER for feloniously receiving it, knowing it to be stolen .

- sworn. I look after the stables for Mr. Edward Daniels , Bell Yard, Mount-street ; I missed a one horse chaise cloth belonging to Mr. John Nutting .

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. He has been in the neighbourhood a long time, he is a bad character; I asked him whether it was him or not that stole it, he would not tell me, I told him I should put him in the stable that night, and then he told me he had stolen it, and sold it to Jane Harper , I went to Jane Harper ; she told me she gave the boy half a crown for it, and she had sold it for three shillings; Jane Harper fetched it back and delivered it up at the office. This is the cloth, it is John Nutting 's cloth, it was left in my care.

HARDY - GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HARPER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-109

513. JOHN HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , one hundred half guineas, and a hundred seven shilling pieces , the property of James Wiggett .

Second count the property of James Boyce Wiggett .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-110

514. SARAH BURGESS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , two sheets, value 10 s. two pillows, value 6 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. 6 d. two cotton bed curtains, value 20 s. a bolster, value 1 s. and twenty pound weight of feathers, value 5 s. in a lodging room ; the property of Mary Jackson .

MARY JACKSON sworn. I live at No. 3, New street, Old street . On the latter end of February I let the prisoner a ready furnished room at four shillings and six pence a-week, she had every thing necessary for a ready furnished room; I believe she went away on the 6th of March; when she quitted the apartment she had paid but one weeks rent.

Q. What way of life is she. - A. A horse-hair server , she left the door locked. On the 7th I entered the room, I found every thing in the indictment missing.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property again; A. One pair of sheets pledged at Mrs. Fothergill's in Aldersgate street, and the other articles at Mr. Salmon's.

JAMES GEARY sworn. I am an officer; on the seventh of March I was sent for to break open the door, and searching the apartments I found the things missing, and these duplicates in the table drawer.

THOMAS NELSON sworn. I am a pawnbroker's servant, I live with Messrs. Salmon and Gadson, White Cross-street; I produce a sheet pawned by Sarah Burgess .

Q. Are you sure it was her. - A. I am not positive it is her, but is was pledged in that name, on the 20th of February.

Q. You believe it is the prisoner. - A. I have no reason to doubt it.

JAMES MARRIOTT sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mrs. Fothergill; I produce a sheet pledged in the name of Mary Jackson , I gave three shillings and six pence for it; I cannot recollect the prisoner.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed, I made away with the sheets; Mrs. Jackson let the room to me and another woman, I happened to stay out all night, she told me to come no more there, for her place was stripped; the other person that lived with me brought another person there while I was out.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-111

515. GEORGE COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July twenty, five pound weight of lead, value 7 s. the property of - Jortan , Esq. affixed to a certain building of his, called a house .

Second count for like offence, stating it to be affixed to a building.

- NICHOLSON sworn. I was employed to do some repairs to squire Jortan's house; I employed Mr. Graham to do the bricklayer's work, Mr. Graham sent me the prisoner at the bar; on the 2nd of July, at four o'clock the prisoner refused to go to his beer, he staid behind, in consequence of that I went down the stairs; squire Jortan called me in, and communicated something to me respecting the workmen;

while I was waiting there, perhaps three minutes, I saw Collier come up the area steps with something on his shoulder, I cannot say what is was, he went across the street; I do not know whether he took it or no.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-112

516. MARY BROAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , four sheets, value 21 s. two table cloths, value 9 s. an apron, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Middlebrook .

JAMES PAGAN sworn. (producing a paper.)

Q. Do you know Mrs. Middlebrook is bad in bed. - A. Certainly (the certificate of the surgeon read in court). Mrs. Middlebrook is pregnant, she is also in the last stage of a consumption; she is altogether so ill that she is not able to get out of bed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-113

517. MARGARET LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , a dollar, value 5 s. the property of Richard Wilson .

RICHARD WILSON sworn. I am a printer , I live in Artillery Place, Spitalfields. On the 13th of September, I was returning home at night, I met Margaret Lawrence , with whom I had some slight acquaintance before; at half after twelve I went with her to some house in the Ambro .

Q. Where was you in the morning. - A. In the morning she went away, I missed a dollar; I gave her two shillings.

Q. Had you any more loose money. - A. I had about me two shillingsworth of halfpence in my pocket.

Q. That she did not take. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever find your property again. - A. Yes, the officer that took her found it on her; but I cannot say whether she found it on the bed, or took it out of my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-114

518. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a coat, value 7 s. the property of James Harrison .

JAMES HARRISON sworn. I live at No. 10, Bowling green-lane, Clerkenwell , I am a bedstead maker ; I left my coat on a bedstead that was for sale in the shop, I lost the coat about seven o'clock in the evening, on the 23d of August; the principal witness brought the coat and the prisoner to me, and said here is the prisoner that took the coat away.

ROBERT GILDING sworn. I am a carpenter; on Saturday night, the 23d of August, I was just come home from my work, I was standing at my door, facing Mr. Harrison's shop, as I usually do; I saw the prisoner walk by Mr. Harrison's shop, he passed the shop and looked in, he was with another man; they went from the shop and they parted; I thought they were suspicious characters, I watched them; one went and sat down three doors from the shop, the prisoner returned back to the shop again, he put his hand into a crib bedstead for children, he did not take any thing out, he returned to his companion again, they both returned to the shop, and the prisoner at the bar took the coat out of the bedstead and ran off; I immediately left my door and followed him, I did not lose sight of him; I took him at the corner of Baker's Row, I collared him, I said, you rascal, what do you do with this coat, he had the coat under his arm; he began crying, I took the coat from him, and took him back to Mr. Harrison's shop; I gave Mr. Harrison the coat, he said it was his.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. I am an officer; the prisoner acknowledged to me taking the coat after I had got him in custody.

(The coat produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man that was with me told me to take the coat.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-115

519. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of September , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. the property of John Tennant .

JOHN TENNANT sworn. I am a linen draper , I live at No. 3, Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; I saw the witness bring the print back to my shop.

GEORGE GREENWELL sworn. I live at No. 55, Bishopsgate-street; I was passing up Crown-street on the 1st of September, about twelve o'clock at noon. I saw the prisoner at the bar with a piece of print in her hands, as I thought, not as if she was going to buy it, I was at the door at the time, it was fixed up at the door of the shop; seeing me take notice of it, she sufficiently eyed me, and by so doing I took notice of her; I crossed over the way, and as I was returning she was just then coming from the house; I was sure, by her going away so quick, that she had got something. I had not an opportunity of going to the shop, she turned up a little court where there is a thoroughfare, I followed her, I was afraid of losing fight of her; I went up to her, and asked her what she had got there, she said nothing, I pulled away her cloak, and under her cloak she had got a piece of print. I directly brought her back to Mr. Tennant, he owned the print.

(The print produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along this alley this gentleman took me; I picked up this print, he said I stole it, I know nothing of it, there was a woman coming along, I asked her if she knew any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-116

520. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of June , a bolster, value 1 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a pair of blankets, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. a looking glass, value 2 s. a tea caddie, value 1 s. a set of fire irons, value 1 s. a pitcher, value 6 d. a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of George Nash , in a lodging room .

ANN NASH sworn. I am a married woman, my husband's name is George Nash , I live at No. 117, Drury-lane . On the 16th of June I let the prisoner a three pair back room, ready furnished, for three shillings a week; she staid in the house till Saturday the 21st, I never saw her afterwards; on the 23d I went up into my rooms and found the things were gone.

CHARLES TAYLOR sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at Mr. Edwards's in Clare street; I produce a flat iron, I took it in pawn of a person of the name of Smith, I am not positive as to its being the prisoner, to the best of my belief it is her, she pawned it on the 21st of July, I lent her eight pence on it.

- THERDWAY sworn. On the 21st of July, I took the prisoner into custody, I was going to search her, she told me I might search her, she had got no duplicates at all; I took her to the office to search her, I found something under her arm, which is this bundle of duplicates; among which there was a duplicate of a flat iron.

Prosecutor. That is my iron.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took the premises there was no bolster in the room; I went down and told Mrs. Nash so, she said she did not know there was no bolster, I had an iron in pledge, that is my iron.

One of the jury. There is no particular mark on that iron. - A. There is no mark on it, I know it to be mine.

Q. What is the maker's name. - A. That I cannot say.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Whipped in Goal, and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-117

521. JOHN PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , six pounds weight of lead pipe, value 1 s. 6 d. and and a brass cock, value 1 s the property of Thomas Tomkins .

THOMAS TOMKINS sworn. I live at No. 2, Lower-street, Islington , I am a carpenter . On the 8th of August, I lost a leaden pipe and a brass cock, it was laying in the garden, there was about eighteen inches of pipe, and the brass cock was fixed to it; I am landlord of the house.

JAMES FARLEY sworn. I live at the corner of Jordan Place, in Elder Walk, Lower-street, Islington; I missed the pipe in the morning, on Thursday, August the 8 h.

Q. How long before that time had you seen it. - A. On the evening before; I have seen it since at Worship-street.

Q. What was the length of the pipe. - A. About sixteen or eighteen inches.

JAMES WATTS sworn I am a patrol of Islington. On the 8th of August, about three o'clock in the morning, as me and my partners were going to Frog lane, we observed the prisoner in Elder walk, which goes into Frog lane.

Q. Mr. Farley's house is in Elder walk. - A. Yes; I asked him what he did there, he immediately dropped two pieces of lead pipe out of each hand; I picked them up and took the prisoner to the watch-house. I produce the pipe and two brass cocks.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing on me when he stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and Whipped One Hundred Yards near Elder Walk .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-118

522. JANE HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , six yards of printed cotton, value 14 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Fisher Bell .

GEORGE BEACH sworn. I live with Charles Fisher Bell, he is a linen draper , No. 39, Oxford road . On Wednesday the 10th of September, in consequence of information from a hackney coachman, who pointed out to me the prisoner, I pursued her and took her, I charged her with having the print, she denied it, I took her into the next linen draper's shop, where I knew Mr. Bell was, I found the goods concealed in her gown or apron, I cannot be sure which; I had seen the print about five minutes before it was taken away, I had put it at the door in the morning with some other linen.

WILLIAM CRAG sworn. I am an officer of Marlborough street, I took charge of the woman. I produce the property.

(The property identified by the witness.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street, ten yards from the door.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-119

523. ELIZABETH LUTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of August , a sheet, value 4 s. a shift, value 1 s. and a napkin, value 6 d. the property of Richard Waterman .

SARAH WATERMAN sworn. I am the wife of Richard Waterman , he lives at No. 10, Red Lion street, Spital-fields ; the prisoner lived with me a servant .

Q. Did you at any time miss a sheet and a napkin. - A. I missed them on the 14th of August, I went to her lodging, I found part of the property; she said that she sold the sheet.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess. - A. I told her if she would confess the truth, I did not wish to hurt her.

Q. Did you know it was her lodgings. - A. The people told me so.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-120

524. MARY STAFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , a child's frock, value 1 s. and a child's petticoat, value 6 d. the property of Timothy Lane .

TIMOTHY LANE sworn. I live at No. 6, Blue Anchor yard, Whitechapel .

Q. Are you a married man. - A. My wife is dead two years back, I was not at home when my child was taken away and stripped; I left the child (she is three years old) in the care of another girl of mine about twelve years old, it is about eight or nine weeks back, on a Monday, I cannot recollect what day of the month it was.

Q. When you came home you was informed the child was stripped. - A. Yes, the next day when the prisoner was in custody, I was sent for to swear to my property.

Q. When you came home at night did you perceive that any of your child's clothes were gone. - A. Yes, I missed the frock and petticoat; she left her under petticoat on her shift and shoes, and that

was all.

Q. Did you afterwards see the gown and petticoat when the woman was under examination. - A. I did.

ANN CARROL sworn. I live in Rosemary lane.

Q. Do you know Timothy Lane's child. - A. Yes, she is a little girl of three years of age; the prisoner passed me at the corner of my court, where I sit selling my fruit; she had the child, she asked me who owned the child, I said Timothy Lane.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you are certain she is the woman. - A. I think she is the woman.

Q. Go up close to her, is that the woman. - A. I partly guess it is, I cannot rightly say, I believe so.

Q. You had no suspicion of her at that time. - A. No. In about an hour after I saw people coming and looking for the child, I described the woman, and told them I saw the child with her; the child was found again the same afternoon. I saw the child again, it had only a little smock and linsey petticoat on then, it was about two hours after I saw the child with the woman.

Q. Did you see this woman again when she was before the justice. - A. I do not know whether it is the same woman, she is altered very much.

Q. Did you see the woman who was taken before the justice for stripping the child. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know her to be the woman that laid hold of the child in the morning. - A. That it was, certainly.

Q. But you say the person at the bar, if she is the person, is very much altered. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that the woman you saw before the justice upon that charge, was the same woman that took the child. - A. Yes.

THOMAS BURTON sworn. I am servant to Mr. Bourne, pawnbroker, No. 55, East Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do, I am positive of her. On Monday the 21st of July, about six o'clock in the afternoon, she pawned a child's frock and petticoat for eighteen pence, she asked half a crown, she went out of the shop and returned again in about ten minutes, I saw her twice, I have not the least doubt she is the woman. I produce the property, I have had them ever since I saw her in Lambeth street office on the 22d.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. I am an officer of Lambeth street office.

Q. Did you apprehend this woman. - A. She is so altered, I cannot hardly speak to the woman, I hardly recollect her; when I apprehended her, it was about six or seven o'clock in the evening, she was so deplorable in dress she was nothing but rags, she was as black as a sweep; I believe her to be the woman that I took up, she was pointed out to me, she was laying drunk in a room in a court in Whitechapel.

Q.(to Carrol) What sort of a woman was it you saw with a child. - A. She way very dirty.

Q. What time in the day was it. - A.Between four and five in the afternoon.

Q. Did she appear to be sober at the time she laid hold of the child. - A. Quite sober and sensible as I thought.

Q.(to Burton) What was the appearance of the woman when she came to your shop. - A. She was quite dirty and black when she pawned these things, and at the time she pawned these things she was quite sober; she went and got drunk with the money that she got for these things. I am certain that she is the person.

Griffiths. I have not the least doubt of her now I look at her face particularly.

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY sworn. Q. Have you the commitment of the prisoner at the bar. - A. I have.

Q. Was this woman committed upon that charge of stripping the child of Timothy Lane. - A. She was, she was committed on the 22nd of July, I have the original commitment before me.

Q. Was that the commitment of the prisoner at the bar upon a charge of stealing a frock and petticoat the property of Timothy Lane. - A. It is so.

Q. That is the woman that was brought in upon that charge. - A. Yes, it is.

Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newman, the keeper of the gaol. - A. Yes.

(The property produced and identified.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-121

525. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Eyling on the 7th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two dollars, value 10 s. a seven shilling piece, and two bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of William Eyling .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

WILLIAM EYLING sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. On the 7th of August last where was you. - A. I was in a lane that parts the road from Hampstead to Highgate .

Q. What time of the day. - A. About a quarter after six in the evening.

Q. What manner were you travelling. - A. With a single horse chaise.

Q. Did any thing happen as you were travelling along in a chaise between Hampstead and Highgate. A. Yes.

Court. Is that the lane by Caen wood - A. I believe it is, I am a stranger to that part. In the lane there is a kind of a turning almost like an elbow, and just at the elbow there is a rising ground; the horse was walking up the rising ground, the prisoner came round that turn, and came up very near to my horse.

Mr. Gleed. Did he overtake you or did he meet you. - A. He met me, he was on horseback, he came very near my horse; I saw him put his hand in his pocket and pull out a pistol.

Q. At that time how near was he to you. - A. I suppose about the distance from me to you on the horse.

Q. On pulling out the pistol what did he do. - A. I thought I saw him cock the pistol, he came still nearer to me; he came close to my horse, and as I understood him, he said Surrender; my horse walked very slow and I did not stop him; he called out a second time the same way.

Q. Did you stop then. - A. I did. Upon my

stopping, I asked him what his pleasure was, he held his pistol up, I then understood him, he said, Your money. I told him that I was very sorry that he was so very much mistaken, as I had not hardly money enough to pay my turnpike to London; he said, Give me your money, sir, give me what you have got.

Q. Did you upon that give him your money. - A. With a little hesitation; I repeated to him the second time, it is not worth your notice, I have hardly got any money at all, I should be ashamed to offer it you. He repeated and said, Give it me instantly.

Q. Did you upon that give it him. - A. Yes, I pulled out my canvas bag, in which I had got two one pound notes.

Q. Did you give it him. - A. I did, afterwards.

Q. Was there any money in the bag. - A. Two one pound notes, a seven shilling piece, and two dollars; I was endeavouring to give him the two five shilling pieces, and keep back the other. When he found me doing that, he said, Give me your bag.

Q. Did you give him the whole. - A. I did; when I had done so, I told him that I was a very poor man, I had no money to pay on the road; I asked him to return me the money again.

Q. Did he return you the money. - A. He said his father was in jail, give me your address, I will pay you again. I think he said his father was in Newgate, but I will not be positive. I begged of him to give it me a second time, or a part of it, he then gave me back one five shilling piece (a dollar), and the canvas bag.

Q. How long time did that take place. - A. I think about five minutes; it might be about half after six, quite light.

Q. Are you sure that it is the same man. - A. I am very sorry to say that I am.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. From all that took place on the occasion the man behaved very well. - A. He did, in his situation.

Q. You had never seen the young man before. - A. Not to my knowledge; as he came near to me I thought he looked like one of my neighbours.

Q. Still you are certain that he is the person. - A. Yes, I am very sorry to say that I am.

Q. You was somewhat alarmed. - A. I was something alarmed, or else I should not have given up my property.

Q. This man's life is at stake upon your evidence. - A. I know it.

Q. From the alarm that you were in, do you mean to swear that that man is something like one you have seen before, and having only that opportunity of seeing him, do you mean to swear that he is the same man. - A. I do; certainly I cannot avoid it, without doing a great injustice to my country and to myself, I should be very happy if I could have done otherwise.

WILLIAM TAY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I live at Friern Barnet.

Q. You apprehended the prisoner. - A. I did, I apprehended him in a lane leading from Edgware in the Edgware road; I apprehended him on the 7th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening. I searched him no further than I took from him a brace of pistols, I took one pistol from his left hand breast pocket, and the other from his left hand coat pocket.

Q. Did you examine them. - A. Not instantly; I did afterwards, they were loaded. I gave the pistols to Bridget, who came up some time afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You say the pistols were loaded, there was no priming in them. - A. There was priming in one and not in the other.

WILLIAM BRIDGET sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am one of the horse patrol of Bow street, stationed at Edgware. In consequence of information I went in pursuit of the prisoner.

Q. When you came up to him you found him in custody of Mr. Tay. - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any thing upon him, and what you did, produce. - A. I found this purse as it is, in his breeches pocket; here is in the purse two one pound notes, a dollar, a seven shilling piece, and a six pence, this was loose; in the same pocket, eight shillings, seven sixpences, and two seven shilling pieces. In his waistcoat pocket I found this key, and a pair of black silk gloves in his right hand pocket. I found this smelling bottle full of gunpowder, and a bullet also; here is the powder that was in the pistols, and the two bullets; these are the pistols. I found this watch on him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him. - A. No, he was at the Bear at Hendon when I came up to him.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of his good character and his youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-122

526. JAMES CARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , two ducks, value 2 s. the property of Edward Austin .

[To this indictment the prisoner would not plead.]

EDWARD AUSTIN sworn. Q. Are you the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know this man before this affair happened. - A. Yes, we used to think that he was out of his mind, and that sometimes he shammed it; I really believe he is not right in his mind.

Q.(to Mr. Newman) How has he been since he has been in your custody. - A. Raving the most part of the time.

VERDICT - That the prisoner stood mute by the visitation of God .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-123

527. TIMOTHY COAKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , a metal watch, value 20 s. the property of John Morley .

JOHN MORLEY sworn. I sharpen saws , I live at No. 11, King's-head court, Blue Anchor alley, Bunhill row . I cannot exactly tell the day I lost my watch, it was some time in July, I lost it out a my workshop up two pair of stairs.

Q. Why do you accuse this man of having stolen

it. - A. He brought me a saw to sharpen, he left it, he came again for it, it was not done, he came again for it and it was done; he did not take it away. He came again one morning between eight and nine o'clock, and paid me for it. I was called down to breakfast, we went down together, the prisoner going first; there is a passage goes along to my door, he pretended going along that passage, he watched me going down another flight of stairs to breakfast, I went down them stairs, he returned back again in about three minutes after he came down. We did not see him go up, we heard him come down a few of the stairs; my wife says to me, there is a man going in our house. Then we saw him come from the steps by the kitchen window; I pursued after him, but having my slippers on, I could make no ground, I returned back again, went up stairs and missed my watch.

Q. Had you seen it before you went down to breakfast. - A. Yes, it hung before me.

Prisoner. I was never in that man's place in my life.

Prosecutor. I know the man very well, he was the last man in the place.

GEORGE YOUNG sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Barker, No. 91, Hounsditch, I took in the watch on the 29th of August, it was pledged for 9 s. in the name of John Watkins . I have not the least knowledge of the prisoner.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer of Hatton-Garden, I had the prisoner in my custody on the 2d of September, and on the 4th I received information that he had left some duplicates with Mrs. Barret, he lodged with her on Saffron Hill. I found three duplicates, there is one a duplicate of the watch pledged at Barker's in Hounsditch, in the name of John Watkins ; that was delivered to me by Mrs. Barret.

JANE BARRET sworn. I can neither read nor write.

Q. Did you receive a paper of that kind. - A. I had two duplicates, I gave them to Mr. Stanton.

Q. These duplicates that you gave to Stanton, from whom did you receive them of. - A. This man, his wife, and sister, came to lodge at my house, they staid at my house a week. I was cleaning up the place after they were gone, at ten o'clock the prisoner at the bar came to my house (they had slept there the over night) while I was cleaning, I found these duplicates, I do not know who left them.

The watch produced and identified by the prosecutor.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-124

528. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniniously stealing on the 1st of August , a truss of hay, value 5 s, a truss of straw, value 1 s. one quarter of oats, value 32 s. the property of Charles Mills .

CHARLES MILLS sworn. I am a hackneyman .

CHARLES MILLS junior, sworn. You are the son of Charles Mills , what is your father. - A. He is a hackneyman, he lives in Rochester-row, Westminster.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He keeps a horse and cart in Stretton-ground , in the same yard with with my father; in the next stable but one, he used to come to me and borrow things, such as brooms, &c. Sometimes he used to ask me to give him oats, hay, and bits of straw, then I asked him to buy some of me; the first that he had, was a bushel of oats, one truss of hay, and half a bushel of beans, he gave me five shillings for them.

Q. How old are you. - A. Sixteen.

Q. Then you gave the money to your father. - No sir, I did not.

Q. How came you to sell your father's property. - A. I had a mother in law, she never gave me half a bellyfull.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-125

529. EDWARD HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of July , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Horsley .

JOSEPH HORSLEY sworn. I live at the Golden-lion, Cannon-street, St. George's . On the 19th of July, the prisoner came to my bar, he asked for half a pint of porter, it was drawn him, he stood at the bar and drank half of it, he went into the tap-room to drink the remainder of the half pint, he then walked towards the door, the pint pot was standing on the table, I saw him stoop down and put it in his breeches, he wore a canvas apron which hid the pot. I stepped up to him, and said, what have you got, he said nothing, I unbuttoned his small clothes and took out the pot, he begged very hard to let him go, he said it was his first offence. I sent for an officer and gave charge of him, he searched him, and in his coat pocket he found another pint pot; that was mine also.

- Fox sworn. I am a constable, I produce the pots.

Prosecutor. They are both mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, call two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-126

530 MARY BARNADIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , two silver tea spoons, value 6 s. the property of Robert Storey .

MARY STOREY sworn. I lost my spoons on the 1st of July, between twelve and one o'clock, from my back parlour; I keep a cook's-shop . She came in for four pennyworth of victuals, the shop being full, I put her in a back parlour, I had four spoons in a bason standing on the bureau, she took two of them. I missed them five minutes after she was gone.

ANN BIRCH sworn. I lodge in the house; I followed the prisoner, I missed her, I went to the pawnbroker's and found the spoons.

BROOK WARD, a pawnbroker, was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-127

531. THOMAS WATSON and ROBERT BURGESS were indicted for feloniously stealing on

the 1st of September, fifty pounds weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of William Coltson .

BARNARD GLEED sworn. I am a patrol of Bow-street, attached to Worship-street. On Monday the 1st of September, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was going down Paul-street, Finsbury-square. I passed the two prisoners, Burgess had his great coat under his right arm, and Watson had this bag over his shoulder. I stopped them both, when I took the great coat from Burgess; this lead and this bag was in his coat, and Watson had lead in his bag when they came to the office to be examined. Mr. Saffell, the beadle of Bishop's gate was there; he said this lead was stolen from Mr. Coltson, he keeps the Crooked-Billet at Clapton. I took this piece with me to Mr. Coltson, it fitted the trough exactly, this part was torn off, and the other piece was remaining, one side of it is torn off and the other side is cut.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners. - A. I know them both, they are in the Tower-hamlet militia, they told me they were going to carry this lead to Deptford, they brought it from Tottenham, that I did not believe. On Burgess I found this knife, there is no doubt but it is the knife that cut the lead, it is all over pitch, and the trough at the bottom was pitched.

JAMES MARS sworn. I was coming down Paul-street, Mr. Gleed desired me to assist in taking them.

WILLIAM COLTSON sworn. I keep the Crooked-Billet at Clapton .

Q. Did you lose any lead at any time. - A. Yes, three weeks ago last Saturday, I think it was the 30th of August, it was cut and pulled out of my trough; it was there on Saturday evening, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw it there myself; and when I got up it was gone. The trough was outside of the house for watering horses. I have seen Burgess before when they have been parading. I saw the lead fitted to the trough, it fitted exactly, I am sure it is my property.

Burgess's Defence. We were working at a gentleman's house at Tottenham High Cross, Friday was a holiday for us. On Saturday we went to work, we had got four or five hours to finish it, on Monday morning we went down to finish it, this lead was on the premises, there was a man there that gave us the lead to take down to Deptford, we took it to go down to Deptford with it, we got into Shoreditch, and this gentleman stopped us and took us before a magistrate.

Watson said nothing in his defence. - Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

BURGESS, - GUILTY , aged 20.

WATSON, - GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-128

532. WILLIAM TRUELUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , a pair of breeches, value 12 s. the property of James Lloyd .

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. I am a baker, No. 22, Old-street road . On the 13th of August, a quarter after two o'clock I was called, out of the bake-house into the shop by my daughter, to shew me the man who had stole a quartern loaf. She pointed to Mr. Lloyd's shop window, she says that is the man that is at Mr. Lloyd's door; the prisoner then stood at Mr. Lloyd's door, I saw him at the same time put his left foot in the shop, and with his right arm he put something into his apron, he doubled his apron up and came towards my shop on the other side of the street; I went over the way and took hold of him by the collar, and asked him to walk back with me; I took him to Mr. Lloyd's shop, and called Mrs. Lloyd to the door, I asked her if she had missed any thing from the door, she told me a pair of corderoy breeches; I found upon him a pair of corderoy breeches, these are them (producing them).

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a good deal of distress; I shall leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-129

533. THOMAS PULLINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , seven deal boards, value 12 s. the property of William Rolfe .

EDWARD WILLIAM ROLFE sworn. Q. What is your father. - A. A builder , his name is William Rolfe ; the prisoner is a carpenter .

EDWARD WARD sworn. I am foreman to Mr. Rolfe. On the 7th of April last I went to lodge at Mr. Pullinger's house, he lives in Baldwyn's Gardens; he was not in the employ of Mr. Rolfe at that time; some time after that he went to work for Mr. Rolfe, I had property in his cellar, which he gave me leave to put there; I only rented the one pair of stairs room; a little after that he went to work for Rolfe. By going down the cellar I perceived wood there, such as bottoms and thick deals; in consequence of what I heard from the painters at Snow Hill, I perceived them deals belonged to Mr. Rolfe; I had seen them in the cellar before, I looked at them in the building, I found they matched; and seeing them in the building, and from what the painters informed me, I thought it my duty to mention it to Mr. Rolfe, Mr. Rolfe had a search warrant, and then he found them himself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You being a lodger in this house had the consent of the prisoner to put some articles in the cellar yourself. - A. I had.

Q. How many other lodgers in this house. - A. I cannot say, there was a shoemaker in it, I never had any thing to say to them.

Q. You frequently went down into the cellar. - A. I went down into the cellar when my business called me.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner bring these boards into the cellar. - A. I did not.

Q. Do you recollect the day of the month when you saw the boards come there. - A. No, I cannot recollect.

Q. You had some little dispute with the prisoner at the same time. - A. None in my life, any more than seeing him not behave himself as he ought, he spoiled some work in the building, and that he ought not to have done, I never had any great dispute

with him in my life.

THOMAS DURBY sworn. Q. Are you a painter - A. Yes, I work on Snow Hill, on Mr. Rolfe's buildings. On the 3d of September there were some boards lent to the Swan public house, by permission. of Mr. Rolfe, at the fair time; these boards were not carried over from the building to the public house till they had just left their work, the men that had them, they appeared to be running with them instead of walking; in consequence of which I thought they were taking them by stealth; I told the foreman, as he was a stranger to the buildings, I told him to keep a good look out, he had some sharp ones to deal with; I saw the prisoner take some boards from No. 49, Skinner-street, the prisoner was at that time working in Fleet Market. I saw the boards in the cellar, but they did not correspond with what he took at that time.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. I am an officer. I obtained a search warrant, I went to the prisoner's house, Baldwyn's Gardens, there I found seven boards, two boards appear to have been used; we carried the boards down to the hoard in Fleet Market, there we found some boards had been taken away; we compared them with the hoards that were standing, there were some paper on them all, we compared them with the nail holes and the length, they had been in the ground; it tallied exactly.

Q. Were there more than one board of that kind. - A. There were two, they both tallied, exactly the depth in the ground and nail holes.

Mr. Rolfe. I was with them when they compared the boards; I have no doubt but they are my father's property.

Q.(to Edward Ward ) You are the foreman, look at these boards. - A. They are the fellow boards as come from the fence, there be fifty of the same sort, and Pullinger was at the moving of them for the building of the houses; I do believe upon my oath that they are the boards; the boards were all put in the earth, through the brace as they go along; the nail holes tallied, they all answered exactly.

Q. Do you know whether all the boards of that hoard belonged to Mr. Rolfe. - A. Yes, they do.

JOHN HALLIBACK sworn. I am a carpenter, I know them to be Mr. Rolfe's property by matching them with those that are standing; I was two years foreman to Mr. Rolfe, I was perfectly conversant with Mr. Rolfe's goods.

Q. Did you see the board that they were taken from. - A. Yes, they tallied exactly, not only in the length of the boards, but in the nail holes, and the depth of the ground they were put in, by the colour of the board, and the splash of mud above the ground as well as the mud on the board that was in the earth; I sincerely think that they are part of the hoard, and Mr. Rolfe's property.

Q. What is the value of them. - A. Two shillings a piece.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the boards of a man one evening as I was standing at the door, he had the boards on his shoulder, he said he bought them for scaffolding, he was a plaisterer, he said he wanted some money for his club, or else he should be struck out of the book, he asked me two shillings and six pence a piece, I told him they were not worth that money, I gave him three shillings and six pence for them.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-130

534. MARY DOE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September , eight yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Charles Price .

JOHN ITHELL sworn. I am a servant to Charles Price , No. 86, Oxford-street . On the 2d of September, this piece of printed cotton was on the outside of the shop, twisted round an iron bar; I had seen it about an hour and a half before, I heard it was lost between twelve and one o'clock, I pursued the prisoner, in consequence of information, and took hold of her arm.

Q. How far was she from the shop when you took hold of her arm. - A. About sixty or seventy yards; she was walking in a direction from the shop, I asked her to walk back, she complied and walked back, and threw the cotton on the ground, it was concealed in her gown or apron, I am not positive which, I picked it up and brought her into the shop.

- KENNEDY sworn. I am an officer; on the 2nd of September I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I have kept the cotton ever since, I produce it.

(The property identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. Coming down the road, this gentleman came to me and asked me to come back with him; I did, I found the print in the road; he said at the office he found it twenty yards from me, now he has told a different story.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-131

535. ANN MARIA HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of July , a wooden box, value 4 s. thirty-five books, value 35 s. five unbound books, value 5 s. one hundred and fifty pound weight of paper, value 50 s. one hundred and fifty pound weight of parchment, value 50 s. seventy two prints, value 6 s. a book, value 6 d. and ten spar stones, value 5 s. the property of James Parkinson and John Parkinson .

Second count for like offence, laying them to be the property of James Parkinson only.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN PARKINSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Albion street, Blackfriar's road . I am in partnership with my father.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Had there been left any papers of Mr. Hawkins, the husband of the prisoner, in the care of your father. - A. There had.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar apply for leave to inspect these papers. - A. Yes. About six months back she applied, she was allowed to come and look at them from time to time; the two first times she came there was a person to watch her; after that

there was not. I suppose she came seventy or eighty times.

Q. Were they placed in a garret by which she would have to go near any quantity of books, papers, and parchment. - A. There were books and spars in the garret, and in the lost there were papers and parchment.; she would have to pass by the door of the garret where the books were, but she had not to go through, the door was not locked, nor was the door of the lost locked where the papers and parchments were.

Q. In consequence of any thing that you had discovered, did you go with Dorrington, the officer, to the Plough in Carey street. - A. I did, on the 4th of July; the son was drinking in the tap room. When I went there he requested me to walk in his own apartment, the first floor, in which he informed me there were books of mine.

Q. In that room in which he took you, did you find any books belonging to you. - A. I did.

(The property produced and identified.)

Q. Had the son ever access to that lost for the purpose of searching. - A. He had been there about a dozen times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understood you to tell my learned friend that the son has been there a dozen times, perhaps he has been there more. - A. I think more.

Q. He has run away. - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with this woman. - A. I have heard of her from my infancy, but not personally acquainted with her.

DEBORAH BYFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Do you live in the service of Mr. Parkinson. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming and getting leave to look at the cock lost. - Yes, I helped her down with that box the last time she was there, it was very heavy indeed.

Q. Look at that box, examine it all over, and tell me whether it is the box. - A. I think it is, it was just such a box as that I helped her down stairs.

Q. Do you remember her son William Hawkins coming there occasionally. - A. Yes, I never saw him take a box out, he never went out without some of us letting him out. I have seen him take papers in an open basket more than once. He never was there after the King's birth day.

Court. If there had been any writing on the box do you think you should have observed it. - A. Yes.

SARAH BROWN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I never saw the prisoner take any thing out but loose papers.

JOHN DORRINGTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I took the box to Bow street, and I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. Did you put any mark on the box, or was any mark put on the box by any person to know it again. - A. I can swear to the box by the lid being cracked; there is no mark on it.

Court. There is, 419.

Q.(to prosecutor.) Had you remarked any writing on the box. - A. I had not.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-132

536. ANN MARIA HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , three bound books, value 2 l. and twelve unbound books, value 3 l. the property of James Parkinson and John Parkinson .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-133

537. ANN MARIA HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June , two pamphlets unbound, value 1 s. and eight other pamphlets, value 4 s. the property of James Parkinson and John Parkinson .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-134

538. ANN HORN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of August , one sheet, value 5 s. the property of David Lehay , in a lodging room .

DAVID LEHAY sworn. I live at No. 12, Church lane, St. Giles's , I rent the whole house; the prisoner was a lodger, she had only a bed in the one pair of stairs. On the 22nd of August there was a sheet gone from one of the beds, it was missing in the afternoon, the prisoner came home at night. I had her taken up.

Q. Did you find your sheet again. - A. I never saw it since.

ANN RICE sworn. Q. Did you sleep in the same room with the prisoner. - A. Yes, I and three or four more; I went out in the morning, I left the prisoner in the room at that time, I did not remark whether the sheet was gone or no; the landlady came up stairs to put some clean linen on the beds, there were four beds in the room, there was one sheet missing; she came home at night and called her husband, I gave her the candle and she came up stairs, I told the landlady the good woman was come home, the landlady asked her what she had done with the sheet; the prisoner told her not to make a piece of work about it, she would replace the sheet in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said any such thing; the landlady came up and asked me what I had done with the sheet, I said my sheets were on the bed, I did not know about the others; she swore that if I did not own to it she would transport me, there was eight people slept in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-135

539. BARNEY KEELING and JAMES HALL , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of July , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of John Bridger and John Gilbert .

EDWARD GOOCH sworn. I am servant to Messrs. Gilbert and Bridger. On the 22d of July we lost

the article, it was piled outside of the door, exposed to sale, I was standing near the door, I saw the print begin to move from its place, I then began to watch it; it moved very slowly till it was half off the pile, then they drew it off very quick.

Q. Did you see the persons who were doing it. - A. I did not see them doing it, I detected them both with it.

Q. You did not look out far enough to see who were the persons that were doing it. A. No, the moment I was quite out, I went to the passage adjoining the door, I saw the two prisoners at the bar in the passage, they had both of them hold of the cotton, I seized them they immediately dropped the cotton; the tallest of the two desired that I would let them go, as he lived up the court. I took them both and sent for Mr. Griffith.

(The property produced and identified by the witness.)

KEELING, - GUILTY , aged 10.

HALL, - GUILTY , aged 11.

Sentence respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-136

540. JOHN HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a pocketbook, value 6 d. and four dollars, value 20 s. the property of Richard Hoffman .

RICHARD HOFFMAN sworn. I am a seafaring man , I came from China last. On the 9th of this month, I and another young fellow came on shore, we were very groggy. This young fellow and I took the prisoner's coach (he is a hackney-coachman ) at Leadenhall-street , he was to take us to Mile-End . I had not been on shore for nineteen months.

Q. When you got into the coach, had you senses enough about you to know what you had in your pocket-book. - A. I know I had four dollars in it.

Q. How came you to know you had four dollars. - A. I went to a woman that I had left money with before and got the four dollars, I knew I had four dollars, but whether there was a shilling or so in the pocket book I will not say.

Q. When did you miss these dollars. - A. When I came to Mile-end, I says to Joe, d - n my eyes I have lost my pocket-book; the gentleman of the house suspected the coachman, hearing me say so.

Q.Had the coachman been drinking with you on the road. - A. Yes, we were treating him at different public houses; I had the pocket-book when I was in the coach, I missed it when I came to Mile-end, coming out of the coach. The landlord at the public-house, he stepped back and saw him taking the money out of the pocket-book, and putting it in his breeches-pocket, and the pocket book was found in the privy.

Q. What opportunity had he of taking your pocket-book. - A. As I was stepping out of the coach, the pocket-book was in this jacket pocket that I have on now, and the dollars were in the pocket-book; the landlord charged him directly with it. I saw the dollars again, it was all found.

JAMES RANT sworn. I keep the Plough at Mile End. The hackney coachman stopped with these two sailors at my house, I saw they were groggy; as soon as I went into this parlour I heard this young man say to his messmate, he had lost his pocket book, he swore pretty roundly, as sailors mostly do. Upon hearing this I went to the coach, which was standing at the door, I looked in the straw, I could not find the pocket book; somebody said the coachman was in the necessary, I went and found him shut up in the necessary, he was sitting in the necessary, he did not see me look over the door, I saw him take the pocket book from under his great coat, and empty the dollars out of the pocket book; dollars are a thing that make a great noise when they are disturbed; I put my head over the door and said Holloo, he said, Master, it is only the coachman doing a little business for himself, I says, it is a very wet day, I have been taking a little physic; he came out and I went in, I looked down the necessary, and there I saw this man's pocket book and protection, I put my hand down and took it up from the soil; when I got hold of the pocket book I saw the sailor's protection, he was discharged at the Nore; I shewed him the pocket book, he says there is my protection in it, I will take my oath it is mine. I called the coachman, I asked him if he knew any thing of that pocket book and protection, he said no; I said you are a great rascal, I saw you take the pocket book and protection and throw it down the necessary, and you took the man's dollars; I says for this business I will take you in custody, he said I was a great rascal for accusing him; I took him to a constable myself; he denied it to the very last push.

- MORGAN sworn. I am the officer that took the prisoner. Mr. Rant and two men brought the prisoner down to me, I searched him, I found four dollars upon him, he took them out of his left hand pocket.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Gaol .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-137

541. CHARLES PEELE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , ninety four pieces of muslin, value 90 l. fifty eight pieces of muslin handkerchiefs, value 63 l. the property of John Henry Eccles and John Eccles .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN HENRY ECCLES sworn. Q. Who is your partner. - A. John Eccles , our warehouse is in Cheapside .

Q. On the 5th of September had you a bail of goods that arrived by the Manchester waggon to your house. - A. We had; I cannot exactly say what time the goods came to our house, it was delivered; I produce the invoice, there was one hundred and ninety two pieces in the whole; altogether was one hundred and fifty five pounds.

Q. At what time in the evening did you see it there. - A. I saw it at the door about half past seven; it was delivered at our door, we had not time to take it in, we were very busy.

Q. How soon after you had seen it did you miss it. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon missing it what did you do. - A. There were three or four gentlemen there, we all went different ways, but could not see it, we gave information to the several offices. On Monday or Tuesday

afterwards, we saw some part of the goods at Worship street office, they corresponded with our invoice, I know they were the goods that were sent to us.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Do you know of your knowledge of the bale of goods being delivered. - A. I saw it, and I saw the number upon it, I did not see it delivered, it was close to the door, we had not opened it.

Q. All that you saw was a bale of goods at your door with a number upon it, the contents you cannot tell. - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. It was a complete delivery to you as any other goods you have delivered. - A. Yes.

Court. You are accountable for the value to the manufacturer. - A. Most assuredly.

What is the name of the manufacturer. - A. Farden and Slater.

Mr. Knapp. Looking at the goods there and looking at the invoice, are you able to say they are the goods they sent you. - A. Yes.

EDWARD WEBB sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are the porter to these gentlemen, were you present at the delivery of this bale. - A. I received it myself for my master, about twelve or one o'clock in the day; we missed them just as the clock struck eight; I saw them about half after seven.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Worship street. I went to No. 3, Miles's court, Type street, on the 5th of September, at half after ten at night, to the lodgings of Peele the prisoner up one pair of stairs. I knocked at the door, and his wife came.

Q. That is the woman that was tried this sessions A. Yes, the prisoner was not there. On the bed, under the coverlid, I found these thirty-seven pieces of cambric muslins, I searched the room, I took the woman into custody, and I took the property to the office.

Q. That was the same muslin that you shewed to Mr. Eccles. - A. It was, it has been in my possession ever since. I produce it.

Q.(to prosecutor) I ask you, sir, whether that is the same that you saw before the magistrate. - A. Yes.

Q. And that is a part of that which corresponds with your invoice, have you any doubt that it is yours. - A. I have a doubt; from the invoice the quantity does not correspond, they have divided the pieces.

Q. How many yards are in each piece. - A. Two.

Q. Whether two yards in each piece is the same as in the invoice. - A. Yes.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You are an officer belonging to Worship street. - A. I am.

Q. Did you, in consequence of the information that you received, endeavour to find Peele the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. You were unsuccessful till the day you apprehended him, where did you apprehend him. - A. He was apprehended in Pump court near Barbican; we took him in custody to a hackney coach stand, put him in a coach and took him to New Prison; we told the prisoner that if we had been in town that night we should have got the whole of the property; the prisoner said if it was not for the bloody Nosers we should not get half the swags we did. The next day the prisoner behaved very troublesome, he said that he saw us when we came to the Coach and Horses in Fann street. On the day after the robbery he was there and had bees steaks, though we did not see him.

Court. What day was it you were in Fann street. A. The day after the robbery. We were searching after the parties, we went to the Coach and Horses in Fann street; the prisoner said if we had come where he was, we should have a four corner bowl, meaning the bowls that they played with they should have thrown at us; Armstrong and Vickery were present in the coach.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lodged. - A. I did, I never say him in his apartment, I understand it was his.

Prisoner. You are a bloody villain to say what you have. Gentlemen of the jury, for the sake of a pound or two, these fellows would swear any man's life away.

Bishop. Mr. Armstrong was in the coach, and heard what the prisoner now denies.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You were with the last witness Bishop. - A. I was.

Q. I ask you whether the conversation that Bishop has been now describing, passed between the prisoner and you in the coach. - Q. I heard nothing about the bowl, with respect to the Swags I did.

Court. Do you know where the prisoner lodged of your own knowledge. - A. I know the court, I never saw him in the room; I was in pursuit of him, and never met him till the 18th, we took him on this charge.

ANH BECKFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. You live in Miles's court, Type street. - A. Yes, I occupy the two pair of stairs.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he lodged in the same house as I did, No. 3, on the 5th of September.

Q. Was that the same house that the officers came to. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the property found. - A. Yes, at nine o'clock at night, Friday was a fortnight, I was coming down my stairs, Charles Peele came in and went up stairs, he called to his wife, he told her to open the door, he had a bandbox on his head. I went to the door and ran my hand against a man; he asked me if he was at home.

Q. How long after that did you see Mrs. Peele taken into custody. - A. About an hour and a half, I heard her call out Peele.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You lodge in the same house with Peele the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Your lodging in the house, it is not an unusual thing to see the husband return to his wife. - A.No.

Q. You saw upon his head a milliner's band-box, was it as long as that. - A. It might be full as long as that.

Mr. Knapp. It was long enough to contain that I make no doubt, had it any lock and key. - A. A black lock and key.

Mr. Gleed. Was there a cord round it the same as

if it came by a waggon. - A. I cannot say, he seemed to be all of a great heat.

Court. (to prosecutor) How many pieces are there. A. Thirty-seven.

Q. What may be the value of them. - A. Twenty-eight pounds.

Q. You have not been able to recover any more of your property. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling gingerbread at Bartholomew Fair . When these gentlemen came in this place, my wife opened a band box with gingerbread nuts, which I had brought there; they had not been gone long before I returned; I was informed that my wife was taken into custody, the people of the house said for God's sake do not come here, your wife is taken up, which occasioned me to keep out of the way as long as the money lasted I had taken at the fair. It was usual for my wife to leave the key for me, when she went out, on the stairs, some one must have brought the goods there, and left them when she was out.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-138

542. FREDERIC DETMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September , a bed, value 2 l. a coat, value 1 l. three blankets, value 1 l. 2 s. two pair of trowsers, value 10 s. and three jackets, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Page .

JOSEPH PAGE sworn. I lost these things on board a ship at Cherry Garden Stairs .

JOHN GOTTY. I am a surveyor of the Thames police office. I took the prisoner into custody on the 22d of this month, at the Gun public house, Wapping, kept by Robert Green; after I had taken him into custody, he said he had sold some of the things; he took out two guineas and a seven shilling piece, he said that was some of the money he sold them for; there was a bed and blanket found in Mr. Green's house, the prosecutor said was his; I took the prosecutor with me, where he had sold the other articles, he identified them. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. I know them all, they are mine.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Publicly Whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-139

543. EDWARD STEVENS was indicted for that he on the 16th of July was servant to William Hill , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that he being such servant, did receive and take into his possession one pound one shilling, on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudelently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM HILL sworn. I am a baker , I live at 94, Bunhill Row, St. Luke's ; the prisoner at the bar had lived servant with me from six to nine months, I had strong suspicion that he has been in possession of considerable sums of money from my customers; on Saturday the 16th of August, I had him taken into custody; on Sunday a fellow servant of his put into my hand this paper.

Q. Is that servant here. - A. No; I applied to my customer, whose name I saw on this paper, I found he had gave her a bill of his own writing, and that bill was paid.

DEBORAH COLLINS sworn. I live at No. 42, Seward-street.

Q. Do you deal with Mr. Hill, a baker. - A. Yes, I paid the prisoner at the bar one guinea, on or about the 16th of July, he gave me an acknowledgment of it on the back of that bill (witness producing the bill.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are not sure as to the day. - A. No.

Court. (to prosecutor) How do you prove that this money did not come to account. - A. I prove it by the following bills; after this time they are all made out in his hand writing; I am in the habits of delivering to my customers, by my servants, the weekly bill; that bill is my hand writing.

Q. You may be a very good baker, but this is a very bad way of making out your accompts; are your books here. - A. No.

Q. The question now by me is, whether he has delivered to you any account of this one pound one. - A. I positively swear that he never brought me the one pound one

Mr. Knapp. How do you know it. - A. By looking over my books at home.

Q. That book is not here. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-140

544. JOHN CORMACH , alias M'CORMACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , a silver watch, value 15 s. the property of Hugh O'Riley .

HUGH O'RILEY sworn. I am a merchant , I am only in this country on business; I lost my watch on Sunday, the 14th instant, at my lodgings in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn fields ; I had occasion to go down stairs to the privy, I left the watch on the pillow; I returned up stairs in a short time, I missed my watch, I immediately concluded that some person in the house must have taken it; the prisoner lodged in the garret; the watch is in possession of the pawnbroker.

WILLIAM WATKINS sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street; I produce the duplicate of a watch I found in the prisoner's fob pocket; I apprehended him on the Sunday morning following.

JOHN BROOKES sworn. I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Is that your duplicate. - A. It is, I lent the prisoner fifteen shillings on the watch, on Thursday the 18th. I produce the watch.

Q. Do you recollect his person. - A. I do.

Prisoners Defence. I found that watch in the necessary.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-141

545. WILLIAM MARKWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , one dollar, value 4 s. and one crown piece, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Knowles .

THOMAS KNOWLES sworn. I am a mariner . On the 17th of this month I got up at half past five, I missed my dollar and crown piece.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with it. - A.

Being a stranger in the house

ROBERT GREAVES sworn. I am an officer; I went into the prisoner's room, I found this American dollar and this crown piece, they fell out of his stocking. I produce them.

Q.(to prosecutor) Is that your American dollar and crown piece. - A. I cannot say, there is no particular mark on them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-142

546. LUCY CHALDECOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a pair of sheets, value 8 s. two candlesticks, value 2 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a piece of green baize, value 1 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. 6 d. a table cloth, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a blanket, value 5 s. the property of Eliza Harris , in a lodging room .

ELIZA HARRIS sworn. I live at Somers' Town ; I let my first floor to the prisoner and two other gentlewomen.

Q. Was it furnished. - A. Yes; they came on the 4th of August, they took it for a month; after they had been there a few days I had suspicion of them, because they brought no property there; I thought they were bad people, I desired them to go, they said they would stay till the month was out; before the month was up on the Thursday, they went away on the Tuesday; one of them was a quaker lady; after swindling, and going in debt in the whole neighbourhood, they went out on this Tuesday, and never returned.

Q. How soon did you find all your things gone. - A. A quaker man who visited the quaker lady, he brought some tickets to my house, his name is James Fossit ; I never missed my things till Saturday.

ARTHUR LEE sworn. I am a constable. I was sent for by the prosecutrix, to take the prisoner into custody.

Q. When was it you took her into custody. - A I took her in custody the 17th of September. She gave me a parcel of duplicates from her breast, among which was one for a flat-iron; Mrs. Harris previous to that, gave me eight duplicates which she had received from a quaker, seven of them Mrs. Harris owns. I intercepted one or two letters directed to this quaker.

WILLIAM HEWITSON sworn. I produce a pair of sheets, pledged by the prisoner at the bar, on Monday the 8th of September. I lent her eight shillings on them. I produce them.

RICHARD DUNBAR sworn. I produce two pillows, and pillow cases; table cloth, a bit of baize, a flat-iron and candlestick. I took them in pledge of the prisoner, on the 22d, 27th, 29th, and 30th. of August, and on the 2d and 3d of September.

Mrs. Harris. They are mine every article I will swear.

Prisoner's Defence. I was servant to this quaker-woman and the other, Mr. Fossit caused me to be taken up, he could tell where they are, if he choosed.

Q.(to Mrs. Harris) Was she servant. - A. She was partner with them.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060917-143

547. WILLIAM MACKLAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , seven shillings , the property of John Clark .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court their recognizances, were ordered to be estreated. The prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-144

548. SUSANNAH JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of September , two aprons, value 3 s. and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of Susannah Fisher .

SUSANNAH FISHER sworn. I am a servant .

Q. Did you lose two aprons and four handkerchiefs any time. - A. Yes, on the 16th of this month, she came into the King's-Arms, Gray's-Inn Lane , about three o'clock; at that time my handkerchiefs and aprons were hanging in the yard to dry, behind the house. She came into the house with an old man, she asked for a pint of porter: I had seen my things in the yard not a minute before she came into the tap room for the porter. She staid there about five minutes and went out, she came in again and called for another pint of porter, after drinking part of that pint she had another pint, she fat about five minutes, she asked if she might go into the back yard, she went into the yard and was there about ten minutes and then she went into the street, my mistress told me to go into the yard and see if every thing was right; I went into the yard and missed the things, I pursued the prisoner and overtook her in a chandler's-shop, six doors off, I charged her with stealing them, she swore at me and said she had not got them, I pulled her pocket-hole, I saw the apron wound round her middle, my master brought her back and sent for Chapman, he took them from her person.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. I am an officer, I was charged with the prisoner, I found these four handkerchiefs in her pocket, this apron was dropped as I took her in the room, and this I found pinned under her gown, there is four handkerchiefs, they have not been ironed.

(The handkerchiefs produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed at the time.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-145

549. THOMAS PARKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of August a banknote value 1 l. the property of George Nott .

GEORGE NOTT sworn. On the second of August between eight and nine o'clock in the evening I was coming up Oxford-road, I was going to the White Horse, Fetter-lane, I enquired for the White Horse, Fetter-lane, one in company with the prisoner said he was just going there. The man I first see and I crossed the road; one of these

persons that he met on the other side of the road, says, Jack where are you going, he replied I am going into Fetter Lane, and this young man is going into Fetter Lane. I came from Bristol, I had not been in London two months.

Q. After he had said this to these people, did they join company together. - A. Yes, this person said I am going to take part of a pot of beer, will you go with me. This man that I enquired the way of, he said you may as well go and take part of a glass of beer, I at last went with them.

Q. The other two joined you did they. - A. Yes, we went to the Crown in Hog Lane , it is near Tottenham Court Road.

Q. Then there were three other persons with you, making four in the whole. - A. Yes, they took me through the house into a little dark parlour, and called for a pot of beer, the person I enquired the way of, drank once and gave the pot to me, then the prisoner came in and seemed quite intoxicated in liquor, he says, gentlemen I will toss with you for a five pound or a ten pound note, or what not, or any other sum you please. This person said that I enquired the way of, he was an old farmer and had got plenty of money, we will get his money from him, but I said I would not toss, I had no money to part with; they went on tossing, the four were tossing together, and when the beer came to me again, I said, gentlemen, it will not suit me to stop here, I am not in company that I think will suit me, I will pay my pot and go my way. I took my one pound note out into my hand, I put the note on the table and laid my hand on it, and then this person that sat by me that I asked the way of, damn me, he says, you shall be in it, he lifted my hand up from the note, the halfpenny laid on the table that they were tossing up with, he took and put the halfpenny in his hat and handed my note over to the other notes. I scrambled for my note, but a person shoved me back, he says to this other person, what will you have, at the same time one hand was going that way with the note; the prisoner says tail, and the man that I enquired the way of, says it is a woman by God, the money is all your own; the prisoner took up all the money and run away, he left the room immediately, I jumped over the table and stopped the man who took the money, and that was the prisoner. I took him, he was not gone out of my sight no further than the first door; I took him at the second door to the street. I called the landlord to assist me, but he did not come.

Q. Are you sure that he heard you. - A. I cannot say, the others came out, and there was some papers that passed between them, the prisoner gave them notes, and notes were given by them to the prisoner, I took the prisoner from the house and dragged him into Oxford street; the other men ran down Hog Lane. I dragged the prisoner as far as No. 3, in Oxford road, I made as much noise as I could, but nobody came out of the tap room to assist me.

Q. How far is this house in Hog Lane from Oxford street. - A. Thirty or forty yards. A man then of the name of Eakins assisted me. Then when he found himself overpowered, he threw down five shillings, two sixpences and a half penny, on the pavement, and said that was it. Mr. Eakin's the cheesemonger, desired me to pick it up, I did; Mr. Eakins said this is not the note, I desire you to give the young man the note, he said I will, he took out a ten guinea blank note, and proposed to give it me. I told him to give the note to the cheesemonger, and he refused, he would give it to me, but not to him; then the cheesemonger took it out of his hands.

Q. Did you at last get your one pound note. - A. No, then Crocker came up and took him into custody.

Prisoner. Did not you and three men go out of the house five minutes before me. - A. No.

Q. Did not I come out of the door towards Oxford street where you was. - A. No, I never let loose of you till after I got assistance.

Q. And when the landlord came, says you, you have got a one pound note of mine. - A. The landlord never came, nor the landlady.

Q. Did not you send for the landlord or landlady, to Bow-street. - A. No.

Q. They did come and they were sent for. - A. They did not come by my sending, I saw them there.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street. I was going up Oxford street, I saw a great mob collected together, I went up and saw the prisoner in custody of the prosecutor, and Mr. Eakins said I am very glad you are come Crocker, Mr. Eakins gave me this blank bill in the presence of the prisoner, he said that he had been taking money from the prosecutor and he had got this blank note from the prisoner.

(The note read in court.)

N 22, OLD BOND STREET.

I promise to pay to

or bearer, the sum of Ten Guineas;

LONDON, day of 180

William M' Gordon Edward

Crocker. I searched him and found a half guinea and a seven shilling piece. Mr. Jones followed me down to the watch house, thinking to find the companions of this man.

Q. Who keeps the Crown in Hog Lane. - A. It is the King's Head.

Q. Did he shew you the public house. - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. It might be the King's Head, it is the only public house there.

Crocker. It is about twenty yards from Oxford-street on the right hand side.

Prisoner (to Crocker) You was not nigh me when the man snatched that paper from me. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw a one pound note, nor never saw the man in my life before, there was nobody in the house but three men that were drinking with him, I do not know him.

(The prisoner produced a paper, which was read in court.

To the Worshipful Recorder of the City of London. The humble Petition of Thomas Parkin.

May it please your Worship, your petitioner has a wife and two small children, and has it not in his power to employ attorney or counsel, your petitioner therefore humbly implores you will grant him every assiance in your power, and your petitioner is in duty bound, ever to pray.

THOMAS PARKIN .

Q.(to Crocker) Did the prisoner appear when you came up to him as a drunken man - A. Not at all.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-146

550. JAMES WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 16 s. the property of William Drew Francis , esq. Carey Bailey , Alexander Bennet , Edward Sykes , and John Dancy , and

Three other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

THOMAS ELLIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. You are a constable of the parish of St. Clements. - A. Yes; on Wednesday the 17th of September, between four and five in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar going up Clement's-lane, towards Clare Market; he had a hod on his shoulder, covered over with a brown jacket; it had a suspicious appearance, I followed him to an old iron shop in the same lane, I saw him go in, and he shut the door, I found the door was fast, I had suspicion of the house, and knowing the way of the house, I went to the back window.

Q. Who keeps it. - A. That I do not know; I there saw him take the hod off his shoulder, and shot the jacket and the lead out, the lead now produced in court is the lead that he shot out of the hod from his shoulder; I took the man and the lead too.

Q. You went into the shop. - A. Yes, I asked the man what he had got there, he told me that he had nothing, I told him that I had suspicion of that house a long while, and that was the lead that he had on his shoulder, and I remarked it; he said he wished me to hush it up, or else he should be transported, and he would give me his weeks wages; I told him it was of no use offering me any thing, he must go to the watch-house.

Q. Did you see this lead afterwards fitted to any part of the New Inn. - A. I fitted it myself to the ridge of the roof of No. 5, New Inn .

Q. Did it appear as if it was cut from there - A. It was the whole that was cut from there.

Q. I believe you gave notice to the porter. - A. Yes, there is five nail holes on the ridge of the roof, he had got the nails out first, and then he tore it away; the nail holes in the lead matched the nail holes in the timber.

Q. Do you know whether the man was in the employ there. - A. I am sure he was not in employ there, he was a bricklayer's labourer in that neighbourhood.

JAMES WYNE sworn. You are the head porter to New Inn. - A. I fetched the lead from the Rising Sun, where it was deposited; I was with him when it was fitted down, it exactly corresponded with the place.

JAMES THOMSON sworn. Q. I believe you are the steward to the New Inn. - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as to tell the names of the surviving trustees. - A. William Drew Francis , esq. Carey Bailey, Alexander Bennet , Edward Sykes , and John Dancey .

Q. Are these the whole of the surviving trustees. A. Yes.

Q. Who is Mr. Thomas Warr . - A. He is the occupier of the top floor.

Prisoner's Defence. The same evening I had the lead in the day time, I asked the man if he would come at beer time, I went down to the public house, he was not there, I found him in his own room; he told me he would give me a shilling to take a parcel to Clement's lane, he put it in the hod as I went down stairs; I took it to Clement's lane. When I took it there the constable laid hold of me, he ran away, he followed me there; he has never come for his money nor his tools. He has not worked for his master afterwards.

Q.(to Constable) When you saw him carrying this lead was any person with him. - A. No, when he was in the iron shop a person came up to him when I was bringing him out.

Q. There was no person when you came up to the house. - A. No.

Q. What may be the weight of this lead. - A. Upwards of sixty pounds.

Q. Was he sober. - A. Yes, a drunken man could not carry sixty pounds weight, he was not drunk.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-147

551. JANE DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of August , six caps, value 3 s. six handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a shift, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 6 d. and a bed gown, value 6 d. the property of Esther Eglin .

ESTHER EGLIN sworn. Q. Did you lose any caps, handkerchiefs, shifts, and petticoats, at any time. - A. Yes, on the 27th of August I lost them from Mrs. Burgen's house, I board there, I missed them in the afternoon.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, she was in the habits of going to and fro there. I had seen my things in the morning, they were in a bandbox under the kitchen dresser, the box was tied with a cord, they have never been found since.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge why you charge this prisoner with taking them. A. I cannot charge her, Mrs. Burgen says there was no one else in the house.

ANN BURGEN sworn. I live at No. 82, Queen Ann street, East . On the 27th of August I met the prisoner two doors off, I was going to get a quartern of rum, she was drinking beer in the public house, she had been only two days out of prison; I says to her if you will come home. I'll give you a bit of victuals; I think she came about twelve o'clock,

and staid about half an hour.

Q. Was Mrs. Eglin at home then. - A. No, she was at work, I went out to get some starch, I left a person with her in the kitchen, Mrs. Eglin's things were under the dresser in a band box.

Q. Is that person here. - A. Yes, she went up stairs and left the prisoner there by herself; when I came back the prisoner did not stop long; when I went out she went out with me.

ELIZABETH BOSWELL sworn. I live at Mrs. Burgen's house. I heard the prisoner was in the kitchen by herself, so I went in; the other lodger was left there, she went up stairs. When I came in I found the prisoner by the dresser, but I did not see her take any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mrs. Burgen met me in the street, I was going to have some beer; she asked to come and have a crust of bread; he whole time I was in the house was fourteen minutes; I did not stay by myself more than five minutes, she said she was going to pawn a pair of boots, and I went out of the house along with her. I never saw the things.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-148

552. JAMES WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of September , five pound weight of fodder, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Pratt .

JOSEPH PRATT sworn. I am a plumber ; the prisoner was in my employ about a week. On the 18th of September the prisoner was at work at my shop in the afternoon, my apprentice told me there was something going on wrong, I went to Marlborough street office and got an officer; after the prisoner went out of my shop he was brought back and searched in my presence; there was two cakes of fodder and a leaden weight taken from him; the fodder was found in his pockets, and the leaden weight in his breeches.

JOHN TIBB sworn. Q. You are apprentice to the prosecutor. - A. I am; I saw him take the fodder out of the pot, between three and four o'clock, I told my master. When he took it out, he put one cake of fodder under the sand, and the other in the cinders; we had missed several weights before, there is the mark of the ladle on the fodder, the ladle was tore at the bottom.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. I am an officer; I took this man about twenty yards from his master's door, I told him he must go back with me to his master's. In each of his pockets I found a cake of fodder; I found this weight supported by something or other down his thigh.

Q.(to prosecutor) What is the fodder worth. - A. About three shillings and sixpence; the lead is worth three shillings and sixpence also, it cost me more than that.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the lead going from dinner, I brought it into my master's shop.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

[The jury recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of his good character.]

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-149

555. MARIA HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of September , ten yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of John Drake , privately in his shop .

JOHN PERRY sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Drake, linen draper , Ratcliff Highway .

Q. Do you remember in September the prisoner coming into your shop. - A. Yes, about ten o'clock in the morning she came for some prints for a gown, I shewed her a number; after I had shewed her several different patterns, she said none of them suited, she wanted a frock instead of a gown; she fixed upon a pattern, she bought a yard at two shillings a-yard; knowing that not to be enough for a frock or a gown, it gave me some suspicion that she had stole something, I followed her out, I told her I wanted to speak to her, I thought she had taken more than she ought, I lifted up her apron, I found between ten and eleven yards of print under her arm; I produce it.

Q. Who was in the shop when you were shewing her these prints. - A. Mrs. Drake only.

Q. Is she here. - A. No.

Q. Do you know that print. - A. Yes, it was the first piece that I took from the shelf to shew her, I laid it on the counter. I took it from the prisoner in a minute or two afterwards.

(The print produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privily.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18060917-150

553. MATILDA MILLER was indicted for that she on the 11th of August , ten pieces of false counterfeited milled money and coin, each made to the likeness of the current milled money of this realm called a shilling, the same counterfeited pieces of money not being cut to pieces, did put off to Elizabeth Allcock , at a lower rate than they were denominated for, that is to say, for five shillings .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office.

Q. On the 11th of August did you employ Elizabeth Allcock to go to the house of the prisoner. - A. Yes, with Brown; I gave her seven shillings and two sixpences, all good; I marked them in the presence of Mr. Brown, I desired her to go there, and we would wait in the neighbourhood till she returned.

Q. How soon did she return. - A. In less than a quarter of an hour. She then produced to us ten counterfeit shillings, folded up in a piece of paper; I produce them, I have had them ever since, and kept them separate.

Q. Did you search her for the remainder of the money that you had marked. - A. She gave them to me, the three shillings, they are marked.

Q. Did you afterwards apprehend the prisoner. - A. I afterwards apprehended the woman, and Mr. Brown apprehended the man. I apprehended the woman instantly in her own room Saffron hill; her husband was standing by her, and another woman, whom she said was her sister-in-law. I searched her, and found nine shillings and two sixpences counterfeited money; much like these Mrs. Allcock gave me. I found four shillings and two sixpences of the marked money

at I had given to Mrs. Allcock upon her.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Shadwell.

Q. Did you see the money marked by Rogers, as he has been describing. - A. Yes, I saw Mrs. Alcock go into the house; in the course of a little time afterwards Mrs. Allcock and the prisoner came out into the street, they stood together for the course of a minute or two, Mrs. Allcock left her, and Mrs. Miller went into the house; I saw Mrs. Miller searched. I saw four marked shillings taken from her, I searched her pocket book, she had two, in one of them I found this counterfeit shilling I now produce.

ELIZABETH ALLCOCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you employed by Rogers and Brown to go to Mrs. Miller's on the 11th of August. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any money given you to go there, and for what purpose did you go there. - A. I went to see if I could purchase any bad money; Mr. Rogers gave me seven shillings and two sixpences good money, I put it in a paper by itself; when I went to Mrs. Miller's I saw a young woman with a child in her arms, she told me Mrs. Miller would be in presently. She and her husband came in together, they seemed to be quarrelling, she told me to go down stairs, and she would follow.

Q. You had known Mrs. Miller before had not you. - A. Only on the 5th of August, that was the first time I was there. When I went down stairs she followed me down di- directly, she asked me what I wanted, I told her I did not mind particular, she might let me have five shillingsworth of bad money, she put her hand in her pocket and gave me ten shillings, she put them in a paper, I gave her four shillings and two sixpences, part of the money Mr. Rogers had given me; I put the money she gave me in paper in my bosom, and kept it there till I gave it to Mr. Rogers in the street. I then went with him to the Northumberland Arms. there I gave him the three shillings, the remainder of the money he had given me.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Mr. Powell, you are an assistant to the solicitor of the Mint, you are acquainted with bad money and what is good, will you look at these ten shillings, are they good or bad. - A. The ten shillings are counterfeit, they appear to have a composition upon them, which is the last thing they do before they put them into circulation.

Q. Look at the shilling produced by Brown. - A. That is a counterfeit also. I believe them to be of the same manufactory.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-151

554, THOMAS MILLER was indicted for that he on the 7th of August , one piece of false milled and and counterfeit money and coin, made as and for the good and legal current coin of this realm, called a half guinea, the same not being cut in pieces, unlawfully did put off to Elizabeth Allcock , at a lower rate and value than it was counterfeited for, that is to say, for three shillings and sixpence .

ELIZABETH ALLCOCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Did you go on the 7th of August to Mr. Miller's. - A. I did, Mrs. Miller and I went to the White Horse; coming out of the White Horse Mrs. Miller pointed to a man (the prisoner at the bar), who came up to us; Mrs. Miller asked him if he had got any thing about him, he said no, but he had got one half guinea in the house, which was rather the worse for wear. I went up stairs into his house with him, he told me to stop at the head of the stairs (Mrs. Miller went into the yard), and he would bring it out to me (there seemed to be several people in the room he went into), he brought me a crooked half guinea, I asked him the price of it, he said it should be five shillings, but as it was wore he took three shillings and sixpence. He called his wife up stairs, she came up, he told her he had not a sixpence to give me, she gave me a sixpence good money out of the four shillings I gave him. I wrapped up the half guinea in paper immediately, I put it in my box, and I put the box in my pocket, and I gave it to Mr. Rogers when I got out at Shadwell. I had no other money in my pocket.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. We understand this woman was employed by you on this occasion. A. Yes, I produce the half guinea; this is the half guinea that Mrs. Allcock told me she purchased of the prisoner, in the presence of Mr. Brown, for three shillings and sixpence.

CALEB EDWARD POWEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Look at that half guinea. - A. It is a counterfeited one.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Did you search the prisoner. - A. I did, I apprehended him on the 11th. I found a counterfeited sixpence on him in a bag with some other silver.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18060917-152

555. ISAAC WISE , JOHN STEWART , and JOHN DOWTON , were indicted for that they on the 4th of September , a piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of a seven shilling piece, as and for a good one, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Sarah Daniels , they knowing at the same time that it was counterfeit, and that they at the same time had in their custody and possession one other piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness of a seven shilling piece, they knowing that also to be counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SARAH DANIELL sworn. My husband keeps the Swan's Nest, in Coleman-street Buildings . On the 4th of this month, between nine and ten in the evening, the three prisoners came together into my house, they came to the bar and requested a glass of liquor, two of the three had shrub, and the other rasberry, I charged them sixpence for the three glasses; Stewart tendered me a half guinea, he found I was inclined to give him all silver in change, he requested a seven shilling piece, as part of the change for the half guinea; I replied that I had not one, otherwise I would not part with the silver. Dowton observed that he had halfpence enough in his pocket (I had returned the half guinea to Stewart); Dowton searched his pocket, he said he had only four-pence halfpenny, on that Wise put his hand in his left pocket and took out a seven shilling piece, he stood a little reclined from the bar, I had not as good a view of him as I had of the other, but I am sure I took it of him.

Q. Then you took the seven shilling piece of him. - A. Yes, I weighed the seven shilling piece, it was a good one; I was going to give him change for it when Dowton said he should not change, for he knew Steward had in his pocket a penny and a halfpenny, they should be able to pay me in copper.

Court. When Dowton said that Steward had three halfpence did you return that seven shilling piece. - A. I did, Steward took it up, I told him it did not belong to him, when I accused him of doing it he muttered in his own language, I did not understand what; he said he had detained it, and when he failed of finding the halfpence to make up Dowton's four pence halfpenny, he put down a seven shilling piece, observing you must take it out of it now; I took it up and put it in the balance, the same as I did the other one Wise gave me; I found it to be a bad one, I asked him how he could be so base to give me that one, I conceived it to be a bad one; my husband hearing an altercation at the bar, stepped-out of the little room, and enquired the cause of it, I told my husband, in the prisoners hearing, what had happened, my husband was not satisfied with me, he went into the bar and put it in the balance, he found it a bad one; on that he stepped out of the bar, and went into the parlour, in which Mr. Batho the ward beadle was sitting, he said Mr. Batho, I stand in need of some of your assistance, for he thought he had got some men imposing bad money on his wife; on hearing the name of Batho, Wise and Steward endeavoured to make their escape; Wise took to the right, which is the front of the

house, and Stewart made off at the back door; I put my hand upon Dalton, and observed that he should not go till the other prisoner returned, he did not attempt to go; my husband pursued and brought in Wise, and Stewart was brought back also; they were all then taken into the tap-room.

Q. The last seven shilling piece you took of Stewart, what did you do with it. - A. I gave it to my husband.

CHARLES DANIELS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you remember the three prisoners coming to your house. - A. I do.

Q. Are those the three persons, the three prisoners at the bar. - A. They are; when I got to the bar my wife was disputing with the three prisoners at the bar, I asked what was the matter, my wife gave a seven shilling piece into my hand, she told me that Wise put down a good seven shilling piece, Stewart had taken it up and gave her a bad one; I put it in the balance, I found it light, I opened the bar door, called out Batho, I shall thank you for your assistance, I have got three men at the bar that want to impose upon my wife; Wise ran out of the front door on my calling out to Mr. Batho, I perceived him running out, I said you shall not escape, I catched him at the corner of the warehouse, opposite to our house, I laid hold of him, we had a scuffle, we both were down, some neighbours came to my assistance, we took him and brought him into my house; when I came in with him, Stewart, Wise was brought back, and Dowton was standing with my wife at the bar; when we got them all three in the tap-room Mr. Batho insisted on searching them.

Q. You say that you received the seven shilling piece in charge from your wife. - A. I had it, I believe, I left it on the bar, my wife gave it me afterwards.

Q.(to Mrs. Daniels) I understand you to say that you had given the seven shilling piece to your husband. - A. Yes, to try it on the ballance, afterwards it was put on the bar; I afterwards returned it to him.

Q. Was that the same seven shilling piece that he had left upon the bar. - A. It was, upon my oath.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Did you keep your eye upon it the whole time. - A. I had one eye upon the prisoner and one upon that.

Prosecutor. After the bustle was over I gave the seven shilling piece to Mr. Batho; when Mr. Wise was searched, after he had put down a certain quantity of small gold, there seemed to be one bad one, Wise snatched at the bad one, and said that is mine, nobody shall have it from me.

Q. How many seven shilling pieces did you weigh. - A. Six or seven, and two were light.

SAMUEL BATHO sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the ward beadle of Coleman-street. On the 4th of September, in the evening, I was in the parlour at the Swan's Nest, Mr. Daniels called me out, I followed Mr. Daniels into Coleman-street Buildings; I searched Wise in the tap-room, I found six seven shilling pieces upon him, five good and one bad; I rang them on the table, I says this is a bad one, Wise said we had nothing to do with his money, he took it and put it in his mouth, we had a long struggle to make him drop it, he dropped the seven shilling piece in his hand and it fell under the table; I went into the parlour and weighed them all, there was five good ones and two bad; the one was bad that Wise dropped out of his mouth, and the one Mr. Daniels gave me; I gave them to Woodman, the officer, separate; I searched Stewart, I found a good half guinea, and a good seven shilling piece; on Dowton I found some half pence and a good shilling.

WILLIAM WOODMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable. - A. I am.

Q. Did you go to the Swan's Nest, Coleman-street. - A. I did; I produce the two bad seven shilling pieces; I had five good seven shilling pieces, I produce four; the lord mayor advised me to give Wise one.

Q. Did you search either of the prisoners. - A. I did, I found half a guinea and a seven shilling piece on Stewart, and one shilling and four pence halfpenny on Dowton.

CATES EDWARD POWEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe, Mr. Powel, you are assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. - A. Yes.

Q. You are acquainted with good and bad money. - A. Yes, these are two counterfeits, they appear to be of the same die, they are merely gilt, in the way that they generally are for counterfeit seven shilling pieces.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury for the prisoners.

WISE - GUILTY .

STEWART - GUILTY .

DOWTON - GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that Time to find Security for their good Behaviour for Two Years more .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-153

556. JOHN BEALE was indicted for that he on the 14th of August , two pigs of copper, value 10 l. the property of Francis Morgan , James Morgan , and George Wood , then lately before stolen by an evil disposed person, did receive and have, he well knowing the said goods to have been feloniously stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ROBERT KEATES sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are the names of the partners of Mr. Morgan. - A. Francis Morgan , James Morgan , and George Wood , they reside in Whitechapel, they have another warehouse in Colchester-street, Whitechapel.

Q. In May last was your warehouse broke open. - A. It was, in Colchester-street , between the 28th and 29th, in the night, we missed upwards of fourteen hundred weight of copper.

Q. Who produces the pigs. - A. Crab, the officer.

JOHN VILLASCOE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Still Alley, Hounsditch; when the copper came I lived in Stoney Lane, Petticoat Lane, in the City of London.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, he brought the first piece of copper, on Tuesday morning, August the 12th, he came with Richards, the porter, himself, he brought this very piece (witness putting his hand on one pig of copper); my wife was with me, he asked me fourteen pence a pound fer it, I said that is too much, I offered him a shilling a pound for it; he let me have it for a shilling a pound, he told me there was ninety three pounds; I borrowed five pounds, I gave him four pounds thirteen shillings. I went down stairs to the public house, we had a quartern of rum together, with that the prisoner at the bar said to me, do not carry it into Hounsditch; with that my heart sell at my feet.

Q. You then began to entertain suspicions. - A. Yes, I thought my liberty would be taken away if I had been taken with it, perhaps he would not have owned that he had sold it me; I kept it from the Tuesday till Wednesday evening, I was very surprised, I could not do any business; the Thursday morning I met Mr. Crab and Hart, two constables, in Petticoat-lane, I told them what I had done with that man, that I had bought some pigs of copper of him.

Q. Did you agree together that Crab should be at your house the next time the prisoner came. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you agreed with the prisoner on the first time when he should come again. - A. No, I delivered the first piece to Mr. Crab. On Thursday evening the prisoner came to my house again, he told me he could not bring it till between nine and ten o'clock in the evening; at that time the prisoner and Richards came together, he brought another pig in his little basket, he told me that weighed one hundred pounds, I do not know whether he meant the short or the long hundred.

Q. Did you buy it. - A. No, upon his coming my wife went and called Mr. Crab and Mr. Hart, and they came up stairs, Mr. Crab said, I suspect you have got some stolen copper in your house, he laid hold of this basket; the prisoner was there, but the porter had just gone down stairs to the public house; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it, it did not belong to him; the porter owned that he had brought these two pieces of copper at different times, he first denied it, and

then he owned that he brought it from the prisoner's house; they were both taken into custody.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He keeps a broker's shop , it was an old iron shop, in Rosemary lane.

EDWARD RICHARDS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you a porter employed by Beal. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at any time employed to carry any copper to Villascoe's House. - A. I was employed to carry them in a basket, I did not know what was within it; I took it to Villascoe's house in Petticoat-lane; I brought them from Mr. Beal in Rosemary-lane.

ELISHA CRAB sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable of the city of London. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of information from Villascoe were you waiting at a public house any where. - A. Yes, on the 14th of August, I waited there from nine in the morning till between nine and ten in the evening.

Q. In consequence of your being sent for by the desire of any body did you go to Villsaco's house. - A. Yes; about a quarter or ten minutes after nine o'clock I went to Villasco's house, I saw there the prisoner at the bar and Villasco, and no one else; when I got up stairs I saw this basket laying on the ground, I said that I had information that something was brought up there that was not right. Mr. Beal sat behind Villasco, I kicked against the basket, nobody said a word, I opened it and saw a pig of copper in it; I then says to Hart, take care of this man and I will take care of the pig of copper; I took the pig of copper to where the other was; when I came back after I had taken it away, Hart told me that the porter was at the public house. I took Richards into custody and brought him to Beal; he said in the presence of Beal that he had been carrying it from Beal's house. The prisoner said not a word, I took them both to where the copper was.

Q. Had the other pig of copper been delivered to you. - A. Yes, by Villasco in the morning.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He keeps an iron shop and broker's shop; I obtained a warrant and searched his premises, they are very extensive premises, and there are a great variety of articles there.

(The copper identified by Keats.)

Q.(to Crab) You remember Lion Levi. - A. Yes, he was apprehended in Hayden yard.

Q. Where was the copper that was in that place offered to sale. - A. At Oakes and Brown's, Houndsditch.

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner.

HENRY REDSTONE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. I have lodged with the prisoner two years and a half.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Myers. - A. I have known him almost the time I have been at John Beale 's. I remember him coming about the middle of last month, he was there weighing of some metal (what it was I do not know) with the son of the prisoner.

Q. Was it in the shape and form of what is laying here. - A. It was; the son of John Beale had not weights sufficient to weigh it, Solomon Myers went out to the next door and borrowed half a hundred weight, and he and the son weighed it afterwards; Myers took out the half hundred weight and returned it to the person he had borrowed it of.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You lodge at the prisoner's, what way of life are you in. - A.I am at present a labourer in the East India company's warehouse.

Q. Are you acquainted with metal. - A. No.

Q. Is Mr. Myers a jew. - A. Some people say he is a jew, and some say he is not a jew because he does not stick to the rules as he ought.

Q. Have not you heard him called Solomon Levi . - A. Never, to the best of my knowledge.

Court. Have not you ever heard that Lion Levi was tried here last May for stealing copper belonging to Messrs. Morgan. - A. God knows, that I never heard.

Mr. Knapp. Upon your oath was not that Lion Levi that was tried in May last, the person that you call Solomon Myers , or the brother in law to this Myers. - A. I think that I have heard that he was a relation of his.

Q. Was Richards a person employed by Beal. - A. Yes, as a porter, I believe.

Q. Have you any doubt of it. - A. No.

JOSEPH BEAL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You live in your father's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Soloman Myers. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of August last, do you recollect Myers coming to your father's house. - A. Yes, in the middle of August, he came to my father's house, once with a piece of metal between six and seven in the evening, he and his porter brought it, he asked me if my father was at home, I had but one half hundred weight in the house; Mr. Myers went to Mr. Davis's next door, and borrowed another half hundred weight.

Q. How many pieces of copper were there. - A. One, this was Tuesday evening; on Thursday evening he called again; I saw my father and Mr. Myers weighing another piece, my father gave him eleven pence a pound.

Court. Q. The first transaction was between you and Myers. - A. Yes, it was sold to a man that lived in Petticoat-lane, I have seen the man.

Q. Should you know him again if you was to see him, is that the man (Villascoe was standing near him). - A. Yes, my father sold the copper to Villascoe; Richards the porter carried it.

Q. Were you acquainted with this Myers. - A. Yes, he was a dealer in pens and quills.

Q. Do you buy copper of men that deal in pens and quills. A. No, we never bought any such commodity as copper before now; I told my father who brought it, I told him I had agreed to give eleven pence a pound for it; after it was weighed Myers went over to the public house, he said if my father a me home to send him.

Q. Did your father and Myers meet. - A. Yes.

Q. Then he adopted this transaction. - A. Yes; Myers disputed the weight of it; my father paid him three pounds in part of payment, he was to have the other in the morning; it weighed ninety-two pounds, he thought it weighed more, he was very scrupulous.

Q. You had a right to be scrupulous on your side, did you ask him how he came by it. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The next day when my house was searched by the officers, my wife told Mr. Crab, in the presence of the officers, that the property was bought of Myers.

Q.(to Crab) Did she. - A. Yes; I asked her what name; she told me that Myers had a brother a butcher, I was satisfied he had no brother a butcher, he had no brother at all.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that Time to find Sureties, Himself in One Hundred Pounds, and Two other Sureties in Fifty Pounds each .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-154

557. MARY ROACH was indicted for that she on the 15th of August , ten yards of ribbon, value 5 s. and a yard of lace, value 5 s. the property of Mary Cawthorn , widow , then lately before feloniously stolen, feloniously did receive, she knowing them to have been stolen .

MARY CAWTHORN sworn. I live at No. 27, Chiswell street , I keep a haberdasher's shop . On the 15th of August the officer went to the prisoner's house and found the yard of lace and ten yards of ribbon on her, I was with the officer.

Q. How long before was this ribbon and lace in your shop. A. I believe the 12th of August, it was taken by her daughter, she lived with me till the 15th of August, when the officer took the lace out of her pocket; she said she had it from her daughter.

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer of Worship-street, I told the prisoner my business was to search her house for stolen

property; for articles that Mrs. Cawthorn had been robbed of. I asked her if she had any such kind of articles in the house, she said no, I told her I should certainly search her house, she said I was welcome, for she had got no property belonging to Mrs. Cawthorn; I was going to open a closet, I saw she was very restless and wanting to put her hand into her pocket. I immediately said I shall search the right hand-pocket, I found nothing there, I searched the left hand pocket, I immediately took from there some ribbon and some sewing silk, there is more than ten yards of ribbon; I dare say there is twenty yards in the whole, and about one yard of lace; Mrs. Cawthorn looked at it and said it was her property, I informed her her daughter was in custody. She seemed very much alarmed, and said that her daughter had brought them; I took her in custody.

(The property produced and identified.)

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-155

558. STEPHEN PARKER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM GRACE sworn. I am a stationer , I live at No. 4, West Smithfield ; I know the prisoner, he had formerly been in the employ of Mr. Imber, of Hatton Garden. On the 31st of July he came to my shop, he said he wanted a ream of writing demy, and a hundred of writing pens.

Q. On his own account. - A. No, he had been in the employ of Mr. Imber, a long time; I understood Mr. Imber, the auctioneer, had sent him; I let him have them and he took them, with him, he debtored Mr. Imber for them, I believed at that time he came from Mr. Imber.

Q. What was the value of this paper. - A. Two pound, fifteen shillings, and eight pence. On the 5th of August he came again for a ream of fools cap and an account book.

Q. Did he say on whose account he came for them. - A. I cannot say that he said he came for them on account of Mr. Imber, he always when he came mentioned Mr. Imber's name. On the 5th of August he asked me to give him a black lead pencil, as Mr. Imber was so very close a man, he only allowed so many in such a length of time, and he had cut his up. On the 6th of August he came for a ream of thick post.

Q. Did he take the second parcel with him. - A. He did, and he took the ream of thick post.

Q. Had you seen Mr. Imber from the 31st of July to August. - A. I had not till some time in the middle of August; it was discovered then, Mr. Imber struck off these articles in his account; about a week or a few days after that I saw the prisoner, he passed my door, I told him to walk in, he did, I accused him of taking these articles, I told him what Mr. Imber said, that he had no authority from Mr. Imber to get those articles; the prisoner was exceeding sorry that he was detected, and requested me to let him go home to his wife and family, said he would return in the morning; he said he had left Mr. Imber's service in March, he hoped I would not take any steps in it, and he would pay me for the articles; I sent for a constable and charged him.

EDWARD IMBER sworn. Q. Are you an auctioneer in Hatton Garden. - A. I am, I have been a customer to Mr. Grace for several years; the prisoner left my service to the best of my knowledge the 28th of last March.

Q. Did you send him on the 31st of July last for any order of paper and pens. - A. Certainly not, nor did I receive them. I never sent him on the 5th of August for any fools cap paper or account book, I never gave him any authority for this book or paper.

Q. On the 6th of August was he authorised by you to receive any thick post paper. - A. No, nor did I receive them, nor know any thing of it till I received Mr. Grace's bill; I never saw him from the time of his quitting my service till he was taken into custody.

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month in Newgate. and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060917-156

559. GEORGE BROCKET was indicted for wilfull and corrupt perjury .

The witnesses not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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