Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th April 1806.
Reference Number: 18060416
Reference Number: f18060416-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 16th of APRIL, 1806, and following Days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1806.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Honourable EDWARD LORD ELLENBOROUGH , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John William Anderson , Bart. Sir John Eamer , Knt. Charles Flower , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , Knt. George Scholey, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and Country of Middlesex.

LONDON JURY.

Thomas Perkins ,

Francis Carter ,

Joseph Hundlebee ,

James Lavington ,

James Philips ,

Francis Moxey ,

John George Dowse ,

William Stratton ,

Joseph Daw ,

Cuthbert Peart ,

Edward Trundle ,

William May .

FIRST MIDDLESEX JURY.

William Doe ,

Jonathan Hampson ,

Andrew Burgess ,

Ramsey Robinson ,

David Sharman ,

James Clements ,

William Booth ,

Richard Davis ,

Samuel Hutchins ,

John Gunter ,

Thomas Smith ,

John Hardwin .

SECOND MIDDLESEX JURY.

John Collins ,

William Warwick ,

Robert Schofield ,

Henry Shaler ,

John Gibbs ,

William Salmon ,

Samuel Marjoram ,

Benjamin Langford ,

Thomas Rich ,

Joseph Parr ,

Nicholas Bier ,

Joseph Tringham .

Reference Number: t18060416-1

212. HUGH MACK was indicted for the wilful murder of Timothy Kirby .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS LEE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You are a private in the fourth regiment of foot - A. I am.

Q. On Sunday, the 23d of March, were you at Barnet. - A. I was, with fifteen or sixteen other persons under charge of desertion, we were all handcuffed, there was a rope placed between the two columns of men, and one hand-cuff of each man was tied to the rope; we were escorted by an officer, a serjeant, and some common private men with arms.

Q. Who was the serjeant . - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. When you came to the Red-Lion at Barnet did the deserter s halt. - A. They did.

Q. Had any order been given by the officer for the company to halt. - A. Not in my hearing; the officer came up, and asked who had halted the men; they said they wanted their pay to get some subsistence, for he had promised not to march them further than there that day; he said they must go on to Highgate, and they said they could not, as they had had no refreshment from twelve o'clock the day before.

Q. What hour of the day was this. - A. About one or two o'clock; the officer told them to go on to the next public house, then he would halt them and give them some refreshment.

Q. Did they go on upon that. - A. Yes, till they had passed this public house, then they halted again without orders, and said they were not able to go without some refreshment; the officer said they must go on to Highgate; the deceased man said, as well as the other men, that he could not go to Highgate without some refreshment, the serjeant said he was able to go, and he must go, without any refreshment; the deceased told the serjeant that he should not be so cruel to a deserter, it was only three months ago that he was marched from the Savoy as a deserter himself; the serjeant said he was a liar, and then the deceased said he was a liar; the serjeant said he wished he had the pleasure of shooting them all; then the serjeant returned and struck him with the halbert, he took the halbert in both his hands, and gave him a hard blow with the cross bar on his head, the guard, the steel end of the halbert stuck in the scull.

Q. Did the halbert stay upon the place where he struck him. - A. Yes, it struck very fast, and it drew his head of one side when he pulled it out; he pulled two or three times before the halbert came out, his hat came off with the halbert, and the man cried out he was dead, the blood flowed when the halbert was drawn out. The deceased sat down and begged the officer to take off his handcuffs, and called for his wife and child, who were behind; the officer who commanded the escort sent for a surgeon.

Q. Did you stay with the man. - A. No, we were marched on to London.

Q. Did you halt at any place. - A. We did, about an hour afterwards; I saw Kirby brought into the Savoy that night, he was brought to the Savoy in a cart, and I saw him after he was dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You joined the party. - A. Yes, I was taken three or four miles below Barnet.

Q. The deserters halted twice; there were no orders given by the officer or the serjeant to halt. - A. No.

Q. Was the conduct of the deceased quiet and peaceable. - A. He was as peaceable as the rest, all of them refused to go on till they got their subsistence money.

Q. The words liar passed between both of these men. - A. Yes.

Q. Was not the blow immediately given on these words taking place. - A. Yes.

Q. There was some of them willing to go on. - A. No, there were none of them willing to go on till they got their pay.

Q. Was not the deceased the only person that pulled the rope. - A. I did not see one pull the rope more than the others.

Mr. Gurney. The deceased was before you. - A. He was.

Q. Might not he pull the rope back to stop the others without your perceiving it. - A. He might, I did not see the deceased pull the rope, they were all of them willing to stop to get their pay.

Jury. Was the deceased the first file. - A. About the second; I was the seventh file.

Q. Was he left hand man or right hand. - A. The right hand was handcuffed, and secured to the rope, his left hand was at liberty.

JOHN COOK sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Were you in this party of deserters at Barnet on the 23d of March last. - A. Yes, I came with the party from Chester.

Q. Had the deceased come from Chester likewise. A. Yes.

Q. I believe some of you come from Ireland. - A. The whole come from Ireland.

Q. Where did the prisoner at the bar take charge of you under the officer. - A. At Litchfield.

Q. Do you remember halting at Northampton. - I do, they halted about an hour before the goaler would take them in custody; during the officer's absence, the deceased and the prisoner at the bar had some words; I was in the rear file that day, I cannot tell what was the beginning of the words, I heard the soldiers grumble very much not getting their billets to get their dinner; I heard the serjeant say d - n the Irish rebels, they should all be put to death; the serjeant talked very hot to the deceased, and the deceased to the serjeant; the deceased said the serjeant charged him with being a deserter, he had been a deserter himself; the serjeant said he was very much obliged to the soldiers for telling the deceased that, otherwise he could not have known it; the serjeant said, if the d - ned rascal speaks to me again I will take his life.

Q. Did you come on from thence to Barnet. -

We remained there some-time before a place could be got to put the deserters in; there the deceased told the officer, that Mack threatened him with his life, and was abusing him in a gross manner; then the officer, that gentleman that is there, (pointing to him) told him to hold his tongue, brought us forward to another goal, and put us in there. On the next day we marched to St. Alban's, and on Sunday morning we marched from St. Alban's to Barnet.

Q. From Northampton to Barnet had any other dispute took place between the prisoner and the deceased. - A. Yes, at a place called Chalk Hill, near Dunstable, the serjeant impeached him again of being a d - ned rebel for flying from his colours; the deceased gave him as bad in return again, told him he must be a d - ned rebel for flying from his colours; with that the serjeant drew back, took his halbert, and swore he would run him through; the corporal of the party laid hold of the serjeant's arms to hinder him from stabbing him with the halbert, and then the officer gave orders for the serjeant to go on.

Q. In your march from Northampton to St. Alban's, what was the latest hour that you had refreshment. - A. About twelve o'clock.

Court. At what place had you the refreshment. A. About twelve miles from St. Alban's some had refreshment, and some had none; I borrowed some money of the officer to get some refreshment; my wife was in the rear, the last that we had was at Dunstable.

Q. Then on the morning of Sunday you had none. - A. No.

Court. Nor on Saturday afternoon. - A. No, we had none till Sunday at noon.

Mr. Gurney. When you came to Barnet the deserters stopped without orders. - A. All halted without any order; that was opposite of the Red Lion. The officer came up, and asked what was the matter; I told the officer he had promised a halt there, because we had marched the day before thirty miles, and by halting here, there would be a short day's march to London; then the officer told us we should halt at the next public house. We came out of the town, and there was only one public house to be seen, and at that public house they all halted again; the prisoner at the bar came up, and the officer came and asked who ordered to halt; some man said it was the serjeant; the officer desired them to go on; he said he would halt them at Highgate. They did not move for some time; some knew the distance, and some did not.

Q. Did the deceased say anything at that time. - A. He did not; some said it was only three miles. and the officer said it was only three or four miles, We all said that we could not go without some refreshment; we could see no public house; the officer told us there was a public house a little farther on; the serjeant came and struck the deceased on the head.

Q. How near were you to the deceased. - A. I was the rear file of the whole; I could hear them mutter some disagreeable words one against the other, but not enough to make him strike him; I heard the word Liar returned backwards and forwards from the serjeant and the deceased; one and all said they could not go on without having refreshment; Young said he would be d - ned if he would march any farther without he had some refreshment.

Q. Did you hear the deceased say any thing. - A. The deceased said he was not able to go till he had some refreshment; he was very much fatigued, his wife was in the rear to get some for him.

Q. Then you say you heard the serjeant and the deceased call each other liars. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any other angry words between them. - A. The serjeant said if he would not go on he would take his life.

Q. Did he say that to the deceased only, or to any other person. - A. To the deceased only, as I understood.

Q. Did you hear any more words from one or the other before the blow was struck. - A. No, I saw the serjeant give the blow with the halbert.

Q. What part of the halbert did the prisoner strike him with. - A. With the cross-steel bar, he struck him over the head (witness describing the manner the prisoner struck the deceased) with both his hands, with the cross-steel bar, he knocked it through his hat into his head.

Q. Did it come off from the head easy. - A. No, with great difficulty he got it out, it struck in the skull; he made several pulls to get the halbert out, and the deceased stooped his head for him to get the halbert out; the hat came off with the halbert being pulled out, and the blood flowed immediately; the deceased cried out that he was murdered, and begged the officer to let his handcuffs be taken off, and called for his wife and child; the deceased sat down, and they were taken off, and the witness that gave evidence before me was put in his place, he not having been handcuffed before.

Q. Did you stay with the deceased. - A. I was marched on I dare say about a couple of miles, when we stopped for some refreshment; we then came forward to London; I saw the deceased again at night when he was brought to the Savoy in a cart; he lived till the Wednesday or Thursday following, I do not know which.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understood you to have said, that Young said, D - mn him if he would go any further. - A. Yes.

Q. That was the opinion of you all. - A. No, I cannot judge of any man's opinion but my own.

Q. You were all desirous of having your pay. - A. That was my opinion, I do not know what any other man's was. I said I wanted refreshment; the serjeant would have stopped them if they had not stopped; the men said we were d - mned fools if we did go; the serjeant was as willing to stop as the men, if it had not been for the officer's order.

Q. Did not the serjeant halt you. - A. He did; because the officer said he would halt us at the last public house.

Q. Whereabouts was it in Barnet the deceased received the blow. - A. This near end to London.

Q. I think you said the words were as high of one side as the other. - A. Yes.

Q. Was not there an attempt at Stafford of you all to make your escape. - A. About ten were for going, and six were not for making their escape.

Q. Was not that the night before you was delivered

over to the officer and the present serjeant. - A. It was.

THOMAS WEBB sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you. - A. I am a shoemaker, I live at Barnet.

Q. On Sunday the 23d of March, did you see a party of deserters marching through Barnet. - A. I saw a party of soldiers escorting a line of deserters.

Court. Were there as many soldiers as there were deserters. - A. There were more, there were nine on each side, with fixed bayonets; the deserters were handcuffed together, fastened to a rope that went through the line, the prisoner at the bar was in the front, and the officer was behind.

Q. Did the deserters halt. - A. They halted for the first time opposite the Red Lion; when they halted, I came up to them, they appeared to be much tired, and I heard a general complaint amongst them of want of refreshment. I heard the officer and the prisoner at the bar order them to move on, the officer promised that they should stop lower down in the town; upon that order they moved on, I believe more than an hundred paces, opposite the lower Red Lion, the last public house in the town, and the nearest public house in the town towards London.

Q. When they came up to the lower Red Lion they stopped. - A. They did, I did not hear any order for stopping, the officer ordered them to move on, the prisoner at the bar then repeated the same as he had done before, they then moved on I believe about thirty paces, and then halted without any command, I then ran towards them, and I saw the deceased, for one, pull the string, he rather checked it back, he was in the second file; there appeared to be a general complaint throughout the whole line; I heard the deceased say he could not and would not go any further till he had some water; instantly I saw the serjeant leave the front, stepping a few paces he uttered some words, I did not distinctly hear, he then struck the deceased with the guard part of the halbert on the head.

Q. Did it appear to penetrate the head. - A. I saw the guard pass through the hat into the head, and it was with difficulty he drew it out, it brought off the hat on the pike of it.

Q. When the prisoner struck the deceased with the halbert, in what manner did he hold the halbert. A. With both hands, and struck him as violent as he could strike him, with as much force as a butcher would strike a bullock; I was close up to him at the time, I heard the deceased exclaim, oh, I am killed! I am killed! the blood flowed from the wound; as soon as I heard the deceased say these words, I saw the blood stream over the right eye, he did not immediately fall with the blow, because he was supported up by his fellow deserter that was handcuffed with him, who held him up, then his handcuff was taken off, and he sat down; in about a quarter of an hour the surgeon came; I saw the deceased put into a cart.

Q. How soon was the deceased put into a cart, and sent to London. - A. I believe it must be more than an hour, because he was taken into a stable and searched by the surgeon.

Q. Before the prisoner struck the deceased with the halbert, had the deceased either struck him or made any motion towards striking him. - A. None in the least, I am perfectly sensible of that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You said that you saw the deceased lay hold of the string. - A. No, he did not lay hold of the string, he rather checked the string; the officer and serjeant requested them to go on, but they were all unwilling to go on till they had some refreshment.

Q. How near were you to the serjeant at the time the blow was given. - A. I was close to the rear of the party, I distinctly heard the deceased say the words that I have told you, there was a rumour of different people speaking, I might not hear all that passed.

MATTHEW SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You live at Barnet, and by business a baker. - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you are now headborough of the town. A. Yes.

Q. On Sunday the 23d of March, did you see a party of deserters march through Barnet. - A. I did, under an escort of a serjeant and an officer, and about twenty private soldiers, with their bayonets fixed; the prisoner at the bar was in the front with his halbert, and the officer was in the rear.

Q. Did you observe them to halt opposite of the Red Lion. - A. No, the serjeant halted them between the upper Red Lion and the sign of the Harrow; I was standing at my own door, about twenty yards from them.

Q. Did you hear any thing at that time. - A. I heard the officer ask who halted the men; one of the privates answered it was the serjeant, the officer said you must go on, they went on from opposite the sign of the Harrow till they came to what we call the lower Red Lion, then the men halted opposite the lower Red Lion in the road.

Q. Did you hear any word of command given for that halt. - A. No, but there was a murmuring between them, they said they had been marched so far the day before, and they could not, nor would not, march any farther, till they had some refreshment; then by the word of command being given by the officer, they marched on a few paces farther, till they came to the stonemason's beyond the lower Red Lion; when they come on these few paces they halted again, they were all determined, semingly, of going no farther, as there was no other public house for them to stop at; they were all dissatisfied, I did not see one more so than another.

Q. Did you see the rope pulled by any of them. - A. Yes, by several, I was close at the rear of them.

Q. Did you observe the serjeant do any thing upon their halting. - A. The serjeant uttered very bad words, he came from the front towards the deceased, and struck him.

Q. Did you hear any words that the serjeant made use of. - A. When he had got the halbert up, he said, I will murder you, you b - r.

Q. In what manner did he take up the halbert to strike him. - A. (the witness described here the manner in which the serjeant was carrying the halbert, and also the manner he struck the deceased) When the halbert was in the deceased's head, he tried to pull it out, he could not at first, he drawed

the man towards him; it was the guard part of the halbert that went into the man's head, and when he pulled the halbert out the deceased's hat came off with it, and in a very little time the blood flowed, the man did not drop instantly, but in a few minutes he fell to the ground, and the blood flowed over his right eye; the moment the deceased was struck, he cried, oh, I am killed! I am killed!

Court. Before he fell did you see or hear any thing more pass with respect of the serjeant. - A. Not a word; the serjeant returned back into the front of the party again, and never came nigh the deceased any more in my sight; the deceased begged for some water, and Mr. Birdstock, who keeps the lower Red Lion, brought him some water; a surgeon was sent for who came.

Q. Before the serjeant struck him on the head, had the deceased made any effort to strike him, - A. I did not see any thing of the kind, I am certain it is a very false thing if any body says so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. There was a general refusal among them not to proceed any further, till they had received refreshment. - A. There was.

Q. There were words used first between them. - A. Yes, but I cannot tell what the words were.

Court. Do you mean words between the prisoner at the bar and the deceased, or words among the men in general. - A. There were words among the deserters in general.

Q. Were there words used between the prisoner and the deceased while you was there. - A. Not a word.

Mr. Knapp. You saw him pull the string. - A. He did, and the others pulled.

Q. Was it not after the rope was pulled different ways that the blow was given. - A. The serjeant ran from the front immediately the refusal was signified by the whole party.

Q. And then the blow was given. - A. It was.

Court. Do you know whether the place by the stonemason's where the blow was given, is in Hertfordshire. - A. It is in Hertfordshire, in the parish of Chipping Barnet.

WALTER MORRISON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe, sir, you are a surgeon, residing at Barnet. - A. I am.

Q. On Sunday the 23d of March, was you sent for to examine a deserter that had been wounded in the head. - A. I was, I found the man in a stable at the lower Red Lion, I examined the head and found the wound to be about an inch in width, an instrument had penetrated the scull, and entered the brain.

Q. Was it such a wound as a part of the halbert would have made. - A. It was.

Q. Did you observe any part of the brain exudate from the wound. - A. There was.

Q. Was it a wound as might produce death. - A. It was, I thought it was a dangerous one, and so I told the officer that he would not live long.

Q. I do not know whether you saw the man put into the cart. - A. I did not see him put into the cart, I overtook him, and saw him in the cart, going to London.

Cross examined by Mr Knapp.

Q. The officer enquired of you, sir, I understand whether it would be safe to convey him to London. - A. It was my opinion that he might be removed without encreasing the danger.

Q. Upon that the officer had the cart to remove him. - A. It was.

- SAUNDERS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. I believe you are a post boy at Barnet. - A. Yes.

Q. On Sunday the 23d of March did you drive a cart with this wounded man to London. - A. Yes, I brought him from the lower Red Lion, his wife and child was put into the cart with him, I got some straw for him to lie easy, the woman let the man lay his head in her lap, as well as she could; when he was coming to town he never spoke, he never was in his senses at all; I stopped three or four times to get some milk and water for his wife to refresh him and wash his wound; I brought him to the Savoy.

PEGGY MOORE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the widow of Timothy Kirby. A. I am.

Q. We understand you was not with him at Barnet, at the the time he received the wound. - A. I was not, I came up to him before he was put in the cart, I came with him in the cart to the Savoy, he arrived at the Savoy on Sunday evening.

Q. Did you see him the next day, and so on till he died. - A. I did; he died on the Thursday morning.

Q. You saw him after he was dead. - A. Yes.

HENRY WORTH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the evening of the 23d of March, I saw the deceased in the Savoy, I examined his wound in the barrack room, in the presence of another surgeon, we were then both of opinion that there was no fracture, I gave orders immediately for him to be taken to my hospital, where I bled him immediately; the next morning I went up to see him, he was walking about the room, he said he had a pain in all his limbs, that he had undergone a long march; I told him he might go to bed, I would rather see him in bed than up; on Tuesday and on Wednesday morning he was very well, till about five o'clock, I believe, he then did not care to speak at all, his pulse was rather low; Wednesday evening he did not care to speak at all, he appeared sensible.

Q. Did he complain of the pain in his head. - A. Not at five o'clock; at ten o'clock I saw him, he told me he had a pain across his forehead; on Thursday morning about five o'clock, I was called up, he was quite dead; I opened the head; on removing the scull, I found there was a small fracture.

Q. Did the wound appear to have penetrated the brain. - A. On removing the pericranium, I perceived it had entered the dura mater.

Q. Have you any doubt that that wound was the occasion of his death. - A. No doubt at all.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time these deserters were delivered to the officer and me at Litchfield, I was informed by Mr. Allen that they were a very dangerous set of men. At Northampton the deceased was very refractory; I told him to be quiet till the officer could get a prison or some other place

for them; he abused me in consequence of his bad conduct. The officer commanding the escort put him in the lower part of the prison. About four miles from Northampton this Timothy Kirby was getting quite slack, he said he could not get on; I spoke to him, he called me all the villains, and swore he would take my life; I told a man of the name of Wilson to take notice of it. At Dunstable, he in particular grew refractory; most of the party were agreeable to go on excepting this Kirby, and a man of the name of Young, who said they would go no further; the officer then with the flat of his sword struck Kirby. At St. Alban's the prison-keeper would not let them in without a guard; this Kirby said he would not march, though he was able to do it. At Barnet they halted without any word of command whatever; I said to this man go on quietly; at one time he said he was not able, and the next reply he made me was, he was better able to march than me, but he would be d - mned if he would go on, and if I would come nigh him, for a rascal he would strike me dead. The party moved on till we come near the Red Lion, or below it; they halted again, he asked for the rascal of a serjeant at the front. The officer ordered the party to go forward; I said come on, he said if you come nigh me I will strike you dead, he made a pull to get at me, and rushed forward to make a blow at me, I took my halbert and thought to hit him with the wood part, he fell back, and then the cross pin catched him over the head.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you one of the escorts. - A. Yes, I am in the thirty-eighth regiment of foot.

Q. Were you with the deserters all the way from Litchfield to London. - A. Yes, we had the charge of sixteen, and the deceased was one of them.

Q. Did he and the rest of them conduct themselves quietly and orderly on their march. - A. The whole of them but Kirby and Young. Kirby behaved in a blackguard manner, he refused the orders of the officer on Sunday the 23d of March; we were coming through Barnet; the prisoners wished to stop to get themselves some refreshment, the lieutenant desired them to go on, the deceased laid hold of the rope and stopped the party, and said he would be da - ned if he would go any farther; when he gave these words the serjeant moved forward, and said he would stab him in the a - with the pike if he did not move forward; the deceased d - d the officer and him both, and if he came near to him he would kill him; the deceased made a push with his hand to strike the serjeant with his right hand; then the serjeant hit him with the pike, the deceased drew back his head, frightened at the blow, the pike just touched his head; I believe the serjeant meant to strike him with the wood part of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. After you had delivered the deserters at the Savoy, you and the prisoner returned towards Litchfield. - A. Yes.

Q. And it was in your way back that the prisoner was taken up on this charge. - A. It was.

Q. You and he conversed a good deal on this subject. - A. We did a little.

Q. Upon your oath have you any other reason to believe that he did not mean to strike him with the iron part of the halbert, but that he has told you so. A. I have no other reason.

Mr. Knapp. Did you ever escort a more riotous and disaffected party than these were. - A. No.

- WILLMOTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you of this escort party. - A. Yes; the deceased was one of the deserters under our escort, I came with him all the way from Litchfield.

Q. Was his conduct peaceable or otherwise during your march. - A. Very otherwise; he did not obey the officer's orders, and he threatened the noncommissioned officer many times on the road. On Sunday morning at Barnet the deserters halted themselves without orders; Kirby said he would not go any further till he got some refreshment; he d - d both the serjeant and the officer; the serjeant said if he did not go on he would job him with the pike. Kirby said if the serjeant struck him he would kill him if it was possible, he laid hold of the rope with his right hand, and drew the rope back, and would not let the other men go on; the serjeant struck him.

Q. Before the serjeant struck him had the deceased made any blow at the serjeant. - A. Yes, he held his hand up to hit him.

Q. Was it immediately after the blow that was aimed at him that the serjeant struck the deceased. - A. Yes, directly he struck him with the halbert; I was about two yards from him.

Q. Did he receive the blow or did he retire from the blow. - A. The man flew from the blow.

Q. Then of course the halbert would recline from him as he drew down his head. - A. Yes, and he received it in his head.

Q. Did it appear to you that it was the intention of the prisoner to strike him with the wood or the iron. - A. With the wood.

Q. If the deceased had not retired from the blow, or flew from the blow, as your expression was, would the wood part have hit him instead of the iron. A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You went back to Litchfield with the serjeant and the rest of your escort. - A. Yes.

Q. You had some conversation with the serjeant. A. No.

Q. Nor the rest of you. - A. I never heard any of of them.

Q. The serjeant and the deceased were not upon good terms upon the course of your march, were they. - A. No, they quarreled at Northampton.

Q. At the time they halted at Barnet the deceased d - d both the officer and the serjeant. - A. Yes, that was the last halt.

Q. Did he say it quite loud. - A. Yes, the best part of the escort heard it.

Q. He, a prisoner about to be tried for desertion, d - d the officer and the serjeant too. - A. Yes.

Q. And when the prisoner said he would not go on, he said he would prick him with the pike. - A. Yes.

Q. And then the deceased said, if you prick me, I will kill you if I can. - A. Yes.

Q. So that if the serjeant had not gone away he would have knocked him down. - A. Yes, the deceased stepped forward to hit him.

Q. So that if the serjeant had not gone away, he would have knocked him down. - A. Yes.

Q. How far did he step. - A. About four steps.

Q. Then he must go about three or four yards. - A. Yes, to make his blow at him.

Q. And the blow that he made to the serjeant was so violent, that if the serjeant had not got away, it would have knocked him down. - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you think the blow touched the serjeant. - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. You say he made three or four steps forward, you do not mean to say that each step is a yard at a time. - A. No.

WILLIAM PRICE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Were you one of the escort bringing the deserters from Litchfield. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Kirby the deceased being one of the deserters. - A. Yes.

Q. What was his conduct coming along the road. A. Sometimes he would be very stubborn, and use ill language to the officer and serjeant; he d - d and and bl - d them, and called them all the rascals he could think of; when we got to Barnet the deserters refused going any farther.

Q. Was the deceased one of the most active of those that refused to go any further. - A. Yes, the serjeant desired him to go on; he said I will not for you nor the officer nor any of the party, and d - d the officer and serjeant; the officer gave the word, Shoulder arms, and told the parties to go forward, march quick time; upon which the men were going; Kirby laid hold of the rope and pulled the party backwards, the serjeant at the same time struck at him with the pike.

Q. Did he hold up his hand towards the serjeant as if he was going to strike at him. - A. Yes, it was aimed to strike him, but it did not hit him.

Q. Then you saw the serjeant strike him with the halbert or pike. - A. Yes, the deceased and the serjeant were about two yards distant.

Q. How did the serjeant aim his blow at the deceased. - A. From what I saw, the way that he meant to strike him was on the shoulder.

Q. Can you tell us what part it would have been likely to hit him with the halbert. - A. About a foot or eighteen inches from the top part of it.

Q. Then it would be with the wood part of it. - A. Yes.

Q. What was the position of the deceased at the time he received the blow. - A. He stood upon his legs.

Q. Did he run from the blow. - A. Yes, and the deceased received the blow as he was retiring from it; he was struck with the cross-bar on the head.

Q. Supposing the deceased to have stood his ground, and not to have receded from it, would the cross bar have hit him then. - A. It would not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. After you had delivered the deserters, you went back to Litchfield with the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Of this unlucky occurrence had you any conversation among you. - A. No.

Q. Did not the serjeant talk to you about it. - A. No, nor I to him.

Q. Did you never open your lips about it before you come here to-day. - A. Not among the escort, I have to other people.

Q. You say the conduct of the deceased was somewhat stubborn. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the serjeant and the deceased upon good terms on the course of the march. - A. They were when they first started.

Q. Of course, because they were strangers, when they got to Northampton it was otherwise. - A. Yes.

Q. And they were upon ill terms all the way to Barnet. - A. Yes.

Q. The deceased was to be tried for desertion. - A. Yes.

Q. And he knowing he was to be tried for desertion, d - d the officer. - A. Yes, I believe every one of the party heard it.

Q. And he made a violent blow to the serjeant. - A. Yes.

Q. How many steps did he take when the blow was attempted to be given. - A. Two or three steps from the line.

Q. And made a violent blow at the serjeant with his double fist. - A. Yes.

Q. If it had hit the serjeant, I suppose it would have knocked him down; do you know where he aimed to strike him. - A. From the way that he struck at him, I think it was his head.

Q. And every body could see him. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember what the serjeant said before he struck the deceased. - A. He told the deserters to go on.

Q. When he lifted the halbert to strike the deceased, upon your oath, did he not say d - m you, I will murder you. - A. I do not recollect his saying the words.

Q. How near was you. - A. About four or five yards from them.

Q. He struck very gently. - A. Yes.

Q. He did not mean to hurt him. - A. I do not think that he did.

Q. He meant to give him a gentle pat on the shoulder only. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand that you had the command of this escort. - A. I had come from Litchfield with them.

Q. You remember the deceased being one of the deserters. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Was he quiet and peaceable under your orders during the march. - A. No, excessively riotous all the while; at Northampton I had some difficulty in getting them into a goal, the town goaler refused taking them in; the serjeant and the deceased had a dispute, I said nothing to him, and when I had them put into a goal, and the prisoner for his ill conduct was put into a lower cell; the next morning they marched, I believe we went to Newport; the day after we went to Dunstable, and when we halted the serjeant took me to a stable to shew me to put the deserters in, it was a good stable, but the price was too high; I asked them whether they would take that stable or go on to St. Alban's, some were willing to go on, and others were not, they wished for refreshment; I told them when they got to the end of the town, and the mob had left them, I would give them refreshment, the majority being willing to go on I gave the word, Quick march, and ordered them to go forward; they all went on but this Kirby, he seized hold of the rope with his right

hand, and pulled the men back, and swore that he would not go on, I went up to him, drew my sword, and struck him with the flat part of the sword, on his back, then he moved on; when I got to the top of the hill, this side Dunstable, I halted; the deceased then seemed content; after he had some drink, and after he had received his refreshment, he swore that he did not mind if he marched to London that night, he only considered his wife and child that were behind; we then marched on to St. Alban's, where we put them into a goal; the next day being Sunday, we marched for Barnet, intending at the same time to make London, as I was allowed eight days to march from Litchfield to London; this was the last day I had for my march; in the former part of our march the roads were excessive bad, and they would not go more than eight miles a-day; when we got to Barnet the deserters supposed they were to halt there; when they saw that I did not give the word to halt, they halted themselves, and my not wishing them to halt in the street, to have a mob about them, I told them to march to the end of the town, I would there halt and give them refreshment; when we got towards the end of the town, they halted again; I immediately asked what was the reason for halting, they answered that they wanted refreshment; I told them that I would not halt there, but if they would go on about half a mile to a public house, we there would have refreshment.

Court. You knew there was a public house there. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Tell us the reason for your not stopping in Barnet. - A. Because a crowd would come about the deserters; some of the escort had ordered their arms, I told them to shoulder the same; the deserters moved on, particularly the three leading files, upon which Kirby, the deceased, took hold of the rope with his right hand, saying, he would be d - d if he would move for either officer or serjeant; seeing a number of people round the escort, I turned round to them, and told them to go away; I then saw serjeant Mack standing about the third file, on the right of the escort; I saw the deceased extended with the rope, he pulled the man on the left out of the line, very near to serjeant Mack; at which time I saw Mack lift his halbert, and make a blow at the deceased, which blow I am very confident had the deceased remained in the situation he was in, would have struck him with the wood of the halbert; when he saw the blow coming, he moved himself and fell away, by which means he received the cross bar of the halbert in his head.

Court. By moving himself he brought himself within the reach of the cross iron of the halbert. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, do you believe from the manner in which the blow was given by this man, it was meant to hurt him on the head. - A. Upon my oath, I do not believe it was, and I am very positive, had the man remained in the situation he was in, the iron would not have hit him on his head.

Q. Had you known any thing of this serjeant previous to the time you had him at Litchfield. - A. I was the officer who received him as a volunteer from the Lancashire militia, of which he was a private; I received an exceeding good character with him from the officer; I have paid more attention to his behaviour than to any other serjeant; he has always behaved well; I never found him inhuman.

Q. We have heard that the prisoner has been a deserter. - A. When we received the volunteers, they were ordered to the Isle of Wight, to join the first battalion; we left the volunteers there, at the Isle of Wight, the prisoner was one, and he, in consequence of the good character from the Lancashire militia, was made a serjeant in the second battalion, in the thirty-eighth regiment; and after I had left there, he received a pass from the Isle of Wight to Lancashire; when he got this pass he was proceeding to join his regiment, and some person took him up as a deserter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You say he was excessively riotous several times, you marched in the rear of the escort, can you tell me of any other instance that you know of your own knowledge. - A. Frequently going along the road, I have heard him speak words that were very incorrect, both to me and the serjeant.

Q. From Newport you marched all the way to St. Alban's, that was thirty miles, that was a very long march. - A. It was.

Q. A very unusual march for deserters. - A. It was.

Q. You stated that you thought there was a public house half a mile this side of Barnet; in point of fact do not you know there is none till you come to Whetstone. - A. I do not know exactly the place, I did not proceed with the deserters; I sent the deserters on, and remained with the deceased, to see that he was taken care of.

GUILTY, OF MANSLAUGHTER , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-2

213. JOHN SKAFE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , nine strips of leather, value 5 s. the property of William Harman .

RICHARD CLARK sworn. I am an harness maker, I live in John-street, Oxford Road . The prisoner at the bar came to work for Mr. Harman, a coach-maker , on the 4th of March. when I was ill. In the forenoon of the 8th of March I went to the shop, and cut out some strips of leather, and left them on the board in the shop; in the evening the prisoner went from Mr. Harman's shop; at seven o'clock in the evening. I saw the prisoner at the Bull in John-street; I asked him what he had got in his pocket; two officers came from Marlborough-street, and he was taken.

Q. What did you find in his pocket. - A. Eight strips of leather he took out of his pocket.

Q. Whose leather was it. - A. Mr. Harman's; when he was taken before the magistrate he was searched, there was another strip of leather found upon him.

- sworn. I worked in the same shop with the prisoner, and when we left the shop he had no property about him of that description.

Q. What time did he leave the shop. - A. About half past six that evening; afterwards we went to the public house, and I perceived his pockets full of leather; I informed Mr. Clark. He had been back to the shop with an excuse for an awl, and then he got this leather, I saw the eight pieces of leather taken out of his pocket; he then begged leave to go and desired us to say nothing about it.

Prisoner. I never was in the shop all day by myself; when I went into the shop for an awl, there was a man there.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 8th of March I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody at the Bull in the John street; when I came there Clark was sitting by him with this leather in his hand, and this here piece of leather I took from him before the magistrate; it was in his apron. (The leather produced, and identified by Clark).

Prisoner's Defence. Them pieces of leather were cut out the day before, and some of the leather I had in my pocket; while I worked for Mr. Harman, Clark did every thing to counteract what I did; the second witness is Clark's man, they both work piece work. I took the work home on Saturday, intending to do the work on Sunday; I was treating these men on Saturday evening, when Clark was very much intoxicated, and I was the worse for liquor; they took me in a state of intoxication. I should have done the work on Sunday had I not been put in prison.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-3

214. WILLIAM KENNOVAN , JOHN GABLE , and JOSEPH PARKER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Moss , about the hour of eight at night, with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, four pair of worsted stockings, value 11 s. 8 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. and a pair of silk and cotton stockings, value 6 s. the property of Richard Moss .

RICHARD MOSS sworn. I am a hosier , I live at No. 14, Shoreditch . On the 25th of March last, near eight o'clock at night, the officers brought the three boy s into my shop, and one pair of stockings with them.

Q. How lately had you seen these stockings any where. - A. About ten or fifteen minutes before the boys were brought in they were in the window, with a great quantity of other stockings; I missed six pair from the window, a pair of dark cotton, four pair of worsted, and a pair of silk and cotton stockings.

Q. In what state did you find your window. - A. One pane was cut or broken with a knife, and the bits of glass were laying on the outside.

Q. Had the stockings been laying so near that pane, so that any person putting their hand in that pane could take them out. - A. Yes.

Q. You had seen nothing of the prisoners before. A. No.

Q. What kind of light was it when the prisoner was brought back. - A. Very light; there were three lamps in the shop.

Q. What light was it out of door. - A. Very light; the prisoners were searched in my shop, and I saw the cotton stockings taken from one of them.

PETER MASON sworn. I am a constable of Worship-street. On the 25th of March I was going out with the patrole, about eight o'clock, into Shoreditch; as we were going along, we were of the opposite side of the way to Mr. Moss's; we saw three or four boys at his window, there were four at first at his window, he had a very great light in his window One of them crossed over to that side where we were watching them, and one (I think it was Parker) crossed over to him; Parker was one that was standing at the window. The others walked a little distance from the shop once or twice; there was a house that was quite shut up next door to Mr. Moss's, and it being a dark night, we had lost sight of them for a few minutes; in a minute or two, by the light of Mr. Moss's shop, we could see them all three quite plain, as Parker had returned, and only one remained of the dark side where we were, whom we have heard was his brother. At first I thought they might only be looking out of curiosity; I sent Gleed the officer over to see if they were doing any thing; Gleed then laid hold of Kennovan and Gable, Parker walked away, I immediately ran across with Ferris, Ferris went after Parker and fetched him back; Gleed was in the act of stooping down with the boys, I thought they would get from him; I pushed the two boys and Gleed into the shop altogether; Ferris brought Parker into the shop directly, he had only gone one door off. Gleed searched the prisoners in my presence, and took one pair of stockings from one of them, I being behind them did not see from whom.

- GLEED sworn. I am a patrol of Worship-street office. On the 25th of March I was with Mason and Ferris; I observed the three prisoners at Mr. Moss's window, the house on the left hand side (to where they was) of Mr. Moss's was shut up, I observed them all three walk away.

Q. Had you seen them do any thing. - A. Not then.

Q. Did you see a fourth person. - A. Yes, he was of the side of the way where we was; after the three prisoners had walked away they returned to the window the second time; I crossed over the way by Mr. Mason's desire to see what they were doing. When I had crossed over the way I catched Gable's right arm in the window, and the prisoner Kennovan had this pair of stockings in his left hand; Kennovan seeing me, dropped the stockings on the ground, and tried to kick them away with his foot; Parker walked away immediately. I then stooped and picked up this pair of stockings off the ground, and by the time that I picked up the stockings, Ferris brought the prisoner Parker back; I am sure Parker was one of them. We searched about the street, there was no more than one pair of stockings found. When I was pushed into the shop I had this pair of stockings in my hand; I says to Mr. Moss, are these your pair of stockings, he said he had a whole row in the window.

Q. Was there any search made upon the prisoners in Mr. Moss's shop. - A. I did not see them searched there. When we came to the office, I searched the two prisoners that I had apprehended, and in Gable's left hand pocket I found this knife; when I took it out of his pocket, I said to him the

knife has got the putty on the point of it; he replied that it was not putty, that it was eggs that he had in his pocket and they had been broke; I examined his pockets, I could not see any appearance of eggs whatever, there is putty on the knife now. After I had searched them at the office, I immediately went to Mr. Moss's shop, I with a candle examined the window, I observed there was a piece of glass taken out of the window, it was big enough for me to put my hand in.

Q. Was that the part of the window where you saw one of their hands in. - A. The same place, and the knife fitted the hole in the putty.

SAMUEL FERRIS sworn. Q. We understand that you was in company with Mason and Gleed. - A. Yes; on the 25th of March I saw the three prisoners at the bar at Mr. Moss's shop window.

Q. Did you see more than three at any time. - A. There was four at first, one of them crossed over to the side of the way that we were, I could not see which of them it was.

A. Did you see any of the other prisoners move from the place where you first saw them. - A. They all moved, but we did not see where they went to.

Q. You afterwards saw them at the window again. - A. Yes, Gleed was sent over by Mason to see what they were doing, and I crossed at the same time, Gleed ran, and was rather nearer than me, I observed Gleed catch hold of Kennovan and Gable, Parker walked into the next house, a grocer's shop, which was open (the house of the other side was shut up), he just walked in and turned round, and as I got to the door he was coming out again, I caught hold of him at the door, and put him into Mr. Moss's shop; I just rubbed them all three down, and found there was nothing on them.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. I am a constable belonging to Worship-street. On the night of the 25th of March the prisoners were brought to the office. I asked Parker what had become of the other stockings; Parker said the other boy had got all the other stocking; but that one pair. I went to his mother's in Wheeler-street, and to several other places, but I could not find him. (The stockings produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Kenovan's Defence. I was coming up the street along with Jack Gable : the stockings were hanging half out of the window where it was broke, Jack Gable took them out and gave them to me; Parker went and put his hand to the window at the same time to take them out, and made a noise; the stockings fell, I picked them up; one of the men came and laid hold of me, and I dropped them.

Gable's Defence. I was coming along with this boy up Shoreditch, we perceived the window broken and a pair of stockings hanging half out, I pulled them out, and gave them to Kennovan; Parker put his hand in the window and made it crack. I let them fall on the ground, Kennovan went and picked them up, and put them in his apron till the officer came, and then he dropped them.

Parker's Defence. I had not been to work all that day; my master was not at work (I work at the chip hat business), my master could not get his irons to cut his wood, I was playing about the street, after I had done playing I sung a song, then I went to the tripe shop in Bishopsgate-street for some tripe; coming back I saw these two boys stopping at the shop-window, I went to the window, I knew them, they shoved me away; Gable put his hand into the window, took out the stockings, and gave them to Kennovan. I walked into a grocer's shop, and asked how much his rice was a-pound, he said sixpence; I immediately come out again, having only four pence. A gentleman came to me at the grocer's door when I had the tripe in my hand, and shoved me into Mr. Moss's shop. I put the tripe I had been buying on the counter, and there I left it.

Parker called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Gable called one witness to his character.

KENNOVAN, aged 10.

GABLE, aged 8.

Both GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the house .

Transported for Seven Years .

PARKER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-4

215. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March a great coat value 2 l. the property of his grace James Duke of Montrose , in his dwelling house .

JOHN STRODE CURTISS sworn. I am a servant to the duke of Montrose. On the 5th of March near three o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at the porter's hall window in Grovesnor-square . I saw the prisoner go up the area steps, I suspected him, and went to the door and followed the prisoner: I observed that he had something under his arm, I catched him by the coat and asked him what he had got; I took him back, and it appeared he had this great coat with him.

Q. Can you say whether the prisoner had the coat in his possession. - A. I can swear that the prisoner had the coat in his possession when I took him; I brought him back and the coat; the coat belonged to a servant in the house that acted as baker and the young ladies' footman. The prisoner told me that he found it in the passage that leads from the front area to the servant's hall.

MARMADUKE MILLER sworn. This man came to me at the watchhouse; I took the prisoner into custody. I produce the coat.

Curtiss. The coat is the duke's property; on the buttons is the duke's crest and coronet.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming across Grovesnor-square, I saw the coat laying across the corner of the area steps; seeing nobody near it I took it up.

Q. (to Curtiss) You are very sure that he told you that he found it in the passage below, as you understood him. - A. I asked him where he took it from, he said in the passage; he beckoned to me at the same time to the passage leading to the servant's hall. There is but that passage at that part of the house.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-5

216. JAMES PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March a quadrant, value

47 s. the property of William Ross in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM ROSS sworn. I keep a navagation warehouse , No. 31, Wapping Wall, Shadwell . On Saturday evening the 8th of March between seven and eight o'clock, I missed a quadrant from my shop window; on the Monday following in the morning, it was brought by a city officer to my shop; my name is on the arch, I knew it was mine:

JOHN TURNER sworn. On Monday. the 10th of March about ten o'clock in the forenoon, I met the prisoner at the bar with the quadrant, going down Crutched Friars; it was under his arm wrapped up in a woman's apron as it is now; I took it from him and asked him what he was going to do with it, he said he was going to sell it where he could; he said a boy gave it to him to sell, pointing to a boy who then stood opposite. An officer who was with me went and took that boy; we took them both to the Mansion House; the boy was discharged by the magistrate and the prosecutor's name being on the quadrant, we went to his house. I produce the quadrant.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and a gentleman stopped me and asked me whether I wanted a job, I said what job is it, he said take this thing to the Two Bells, Whitechapel; he said he would give me six-pence; as I was going there two gentlemen stopped me. This gentleman stopped me and asked me to carry it for him to the foot of London Bridge, and when the officers took me he ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-6

217. THOMAS SMITH, alias DANIEL FINCH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , a bay mare, value 8 l. a saddle, value 20 s. and a bridle, value 5 s. the property of James Vaughan .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH WOODHOUSE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are bailiff to Mr. Vaughan. - A. Yes.

Q. On Tuesday the 8th of April last, did you go on a horse of his to Enfield Chase . - A. A mare.

Q. What colour was she. - A. A bay mare.

Q. Did you halt at the entrance of the farm yard. A. I alighted in the farm yard.

Q. Did you tye her up, and where. - A. I hung her up inside of the gate, on the paling.

Q. Had you a stick with you. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with the stick. - A I laid it on a seed scuttle, close to the mare's head.

Q. How far did you go. - A. A very little way.

Q. Was it twenty, thirty, forty, or fifty yards. - A. It might be more than twenty yards.

Q. What did you do. - A. I put a bush into a hurdle.

Q. How long had you left the mare before you found she was gone. - A. In about five minutes I looked to the place where I had left her, and I found she was gone, I looked into the road, I saw a man on her, she was upon the full gallop, as fast as she could go.

Q. Had the man any thing in his hand who was riding her. - A. He had a stick.

Q. What was he doing with the stick. - A. Beating her on the right side, to make her go as fast as he could; I went to the seed scuttle, to see if the stick was gone as well as the mare, that was gone; I went into the road to see how far the man was gone, he was beating her then: I went into the plow field, and took a horse out of that field, and rode after him, and at the King's Arms, Palmer's Green, about four or five miles off, I found the mare, she was standing at the house.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at the bar there. - A. Yes.

Q. What past between the prisoner at the bar when you came there. - A. He was talking to a man of the name of Baker when I got to him, I heard him say he would not take a farthing less for her, but he would not mind spending a crown.

Q. Upon hearing of that, what did you do. - A. I catched hold of his collar, I said, You are the villian that stole the mare out of my yard, he stood for a second, and then he said, I did not steal your mare, I found her on the road, I said how came you by that stick.

Q. Was that the stick that you put in the seed scuttle. - A. Yes, he said he found the stick in the stirrup; I had laid it in the seed scuttle; he said he was sorry for what he had done, if I would go to Islington, where he lived, he would give me a guinea for my trouble, if that would satisfy me; I told him that was more than I dare do, it was not in my power to let him go; then I sent a man for a constable, and just at the constable's house he said if I would let him off, he would give us a guinea a-piece.

Q. Did you find the saddle and bridle of Mr. Vaughan's. - A. Yes.

Court. It had a bridle and saddle on it then. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. This was in the middle of the day, was it. - A. About half past one o'clock when I hung the mare there.

Q. When you observed that you had missed your mare, you saw a man upon her, which you say is the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. You saw a man riding the mare very hard, he was beating her very unmercifully. - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear that he was conducting himself as though he was perfectly sober; how did he appear. - A. I cannot tell, I am not acquainted with the man, I never saw him before.

STEPHEN BAKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On Tuesday, the 8th of this month, were you at the King's Arms, Palmer's Green. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing the landlady said to you, did you go to the outside of the door. - A. I did.

Q. Who did you see there. - A. I saw this gentleman on horseback.

Q. Who do you mean, is the man here, did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I saw him there upon the mare's back.

Q. What passed between him and you when you saw him. - A. When I got to the door I asked him if he had got a mare to sell; he said he had, and he must sell her before he got home; I went out of the door and looked at the mare; I said, my friend, you have rid the mare a great pace; if you want to sell the mare why did not you go to Barnet fair; he made

answer he wanted to get home to his wife; I asked him first what he wanted for her, first he said seven guineas, then he fell to seven pound, and from that to six pound ten shillings; I said I will bid you nothing for her without trying her; he said he had been on the cruise to St. Alban's with his brother, he had spent a great deal of money, he had no money to take home to his wife; he said he had her five years, and afterwards he said he had her three years.

Q. While you were talking about it did the last witness come. - A. Yes, and took hold of him, and challenged the mare for his own that this man offered to sell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Was he sober. - A. He seemed to have had a little.

Q. What they call half and half. - A. There a ways.

JAMES GLASCOUGH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I took him to Mr. Mores's.

Q. In your way going to Tottenham did you meet with any recruits. - A. We met a file of men and two privates and a corporal, he said, soldiers, I deliver myself up to you, I am a deserter from the seventeenth regiment of foot; I told them they were not to have him before I went to the magistrate with him, they enquired where the magistrate was, I told them at the Ship; the magistrate ordered me to take care of him till the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent, if I had done any thing, it is unknown to me what I have said.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-7

218. THOMAS EADY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of March , a gallon of neat's foot oil, value 5 s. the property of John Emblin .

The indictment was read by Mr. Arabin, and the case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN EMBLIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at No. 67, Leather-lane, Holborn , I am a tripe dresser ; the prisoner at the bar worked for me twice, he worked for me about six weeks the last time; on the night before the robbery, I put the kettle that contained about six or seven gallons of oil on the copper, where it was constantly kept, in the workshop; having missed oil before, and there I left it; in the morning I secreted myself on the cellar stairs; the men came to work at four o'clock, I saw the prisoner and three other men that worked for me come in and go into the workshop; in about ten minutes I saw him return from the workshop, with something in his hands; seeing him with something in his hands, and suspecting it to be my property, I followed him into the street, I took hold of his collar, and asked him what he had got, he replied he had got nothing, I said I would take him, and see what he had got, and I called the watchman to my assistance, he then said he had got a little neatsfoot oil, it was for his own use, he did not intend to make a property of it, he hoped I would forgive him; he endeavoured to get away, I called the watchman, he came up and took hold of him, he then dashed the bladder on the ground and bursted it, I picked up the bladder and went with him to the watchhouse.

Q. What did it contain. - A. Neats foot oil; when it came day light, I examined the place, there was a great quantity of it on the pavement.

Q. Was it the same sort as yours. - A. Exactly.

Q. What was the value of this oil. - A. We sell it for five and sixpence a gallon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson.

Q. There were more men in the shop. - A. There were.

Q. You could not see them, nor the place where the oil stood. - A. No.

- HOLDSWORTH sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you remember coming up, and assisting in taking him in custody. - A. Yes, he said a little while after he put the oil down, he hoped his master would forgive him, it was a little for his own use, and he would never do the like again.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-8

219. JOHN GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , ten linen bales, value 20 s. and eleven bags, value 4 s. the property of John Beck and James Allan .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM SHANKLIE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are warehouseman to Messrs. Beck and Allan. - A. Yes; John Beck and James Allan are seedsmen , living in the Strand, their warehouse is in the Adelphi ; the prisoner was their weekly porter .

Q. Had he applied to you in the course of the afternoon for leave to go out. - A. Yes, on the evening of Tuesday the 8th of April, I gave him leave to go, he had been sent for to speak to somebody, I told him to return as soon as possible, as he would be wanted, he went away and never returned, we saw no more of him till we saw him before the magistrate, he was taken that same night.

PETER MASON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Worship-street; on the 8th of April, about half an hour after two, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, Horshoe-alley, at the back of Finsbury-square; I saw his wife, the prisoner was not at home; I searched the room and found a parcel of bags and bales, under the bedstead; I searched the cupboard and found some bags and split peas, some whole peas, some canary seeds and some rape and hemp seed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson.

Q. You went to this house and found a woman there that inhabited this one room, and found some things under the bedstead; of your own knowledge you do not know that it was his, room. - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Was it a house kept by a person of the name of William Miller . - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MILLER sworn. Examined by Mr.

Knapp. I live in Horshoe-alley, the prisoner has lodged in my house ever since a week after Christmass.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the police officers of Worship-street. - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 8th of April, about a quarter before ten at night; I went in company with Mr. Miller, Vickery, and Kennedy, into Broad-arrow court, Grub-street, up one pair of stairs, at one Sadler's, a baker, there I apprehended the prisoner, I told him I apprehended him for some bags found in his room: he said he knew nothing about them.

(The bags produced and indentified by Shanklie.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-9

220. ANN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of February , a great coat, value 20 s. the property of Benjamin Petit .

BENJAMIN PETIT sworn. On the 21st of February as I was sitting at my breakfast, the prisoner went up stairs to my apartment; she came down in a short time afterwards, and went out of the door; I went out and saw her, being brought back with my coat under her arm; I took it from her, and assisted in bringing her back to the premises. I and Farrel, the person that went after her first, were at breakfast below with the landlord, when she came in and went up stairs.

MICHAEL FARREL sworn. Q. You lodge in the house with the last witness. - A. Yes; as we sat at breakfast there is a window that looks on the stairs, I saw the woman go up stairs, I followed her out of the door, and about three doors off I stopped her, and asked her where she had got that coat; it was under her arm, covered with her cloak; she told me it was her husband's coat; when the prosecutor came up he claimed the coat. (The coat produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I begged the prosecutor to hear me; he would not, but dragged me into the house.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-10

221. DAVID GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a trunk, value 2 s. a velvet pelisse, value 5 l. a shirt, value 5 s. and a pair of silk stockings, value 8 s. the property of John Buswell .

The case was stated by Mr. Watson.

JOHN BUSWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. On the 27th of March I was coming down Holborn in a post chaise, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I received information by a boy; upon which I ordered the driver to stop, I found the man was taken, and that my trunk was in the possession of a person.

ROBERT FIELDING sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you. - A. I am a fisherman.

Q. Were you passing along Holborn on the 27th of March. - A. Yes, about half past seven in the evening; I saw the prisoner and three other men as I was coming along Holborn; there was one on each side of the chaise and two behind: I saw the two that were at the fore part of the chaise, the prisoner and another man at work at the trunk, accordingly they got a little further, and the trunk fell from the chaise.

Q. At the time that you saw the trunk fall, did you see the prisoner there about the trunk. - A. He was in the act of taking it on his shoulder; the other three men lifted up the trunk on this man's shoulder, and when he came to the end of the pavement I catched hold of him with the trunk on his shoulder.

Q. You said you saw him working at it. - A. I saw him trying to loosen it, I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with it, he said what is that to you, it does not belong to you; I was afraid of my life, for fear they should cut my throat, they being all around me; I called out Watch and Stop Thief, and the other three run off; in my scuffle this one got from me, I held fast of the trunk; he got about forty yards from me before he was taken.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner at the bar is the man that you saw at work at the chaise, and the man you saw with the trunk on his shoulder. - A. I am sure of it; the chaise was stopped by a butcher's boy, who ran after the chaise; I staid with the trunk till the prisoner was brought up to me by a person of the name of Warren.

JAMES WARREN sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Were you in Holborn on this 27th of March. A. I was standing at my door, I live there, I heard the cry of Stop thief; I saw this man and another running down the street as hard as they could run, I run across the street, and stopped him, and brought him to the end of the street where the mob was, and where Fielding had the portmanteau in his hand.

- LAVENDER sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. I produce the trunk. I am an officer of Bow-street, I received it from Fielding. (The property identified by the prosecutrix and prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I live in Newton-street; as I was running there, a man came up and knocked me down, he said you have robbed the chaise; that gentleman said he knew the man that cut the trunk from the chaise; then the gentleman that is here brought a butcher's boy, and there were four or five who saw the transaction, they all said they never saw me at all, nor was I ever nigh it; Mr. Ford the magistrate asked him whether he knew me, he said, no, he did not see me at all.

Q. Have you any witnesses here that heard it. - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-11

222. MARGARET REID was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of William Roberts .

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. I live at the corner of Downing-street, Westminster; I am a soldier in the Guards . On Friday the 14th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming from Tottenham Court Road, where I had been to see a friend of mine, and it was rather too late to go to my lodgings, they always shut up at eleven o'clock; I met the prisoner at Charing Cross.

Q. You was rather in liquor I presume. - A. I had been drinking a drop; I went with the prisoner to Simon's Buildings .

Q. Did you sleep there. - A. Yes; I had my watch when I went to bed with her, I took it out of my breeches pocket and put it in my waistcoat pocket, I slept in my waistcoat.

Q. Had you any liquor at that house. - A. No.

Q. Any by the way. - A. No; I gave the girl a glass of gin at Westminster Abbey. I bolted the door when the prisoner and I went to bed; about seven in the morning I missed my watch; the prisoner got up before that time and went to bed again, I had two half guineas in my pocket, a seven shilling piece, and some silver and halfpence; I missed none of my money. I promised the prisoner half a guinea if she would let me have it. When I awoke in the morning I observed the door open.

Q. You had not given her the watch. - A. No, I gave her two shillings, I never saw the watch again.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man was very much intoxicated in liquor when I took up with him, I never saw him have a watch; when he came into the room I saw he had gold and silver in a purse, when he gave me two shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-12

223. JOHN IBBETSON was indicted for a felony, in not appearing to a commission of bankruptcy, which was declared against him .

Mr. Const, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-13

224. JANE OLIPHANT was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Ann the wife of William Pritchard , on the 11th of February , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, five yards of cotton, value 10 s. the property of William Pritchard .

ANN PRITCHARD sworn. I am the wife of William Pritchard . On the 10th of February, at half after eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I was going into Beech-street to purchase five yards of striped cotton; returning back from the shop I was stopped by three women the corner of Golden-lane : they asked me what I gave for the cotton; the one who was convicted last session held me by the hand while the prisoner at the bar robbed me of my property. When I looked at the prisoner at the bar, she said she would knock my day lights out of my head if I looked at her, then she snatched the property from me, and ran immediately up Golden-lane; when the prisoner took my property, I kept the other two women in hold; Sarah Thorp twisted my wrist round, I called out Murder, and the other one that is not found made her escape.

Q. Then you never secured the present prisoner. A. No, I never saw her from the 11th of February till the 24th of March, I saw her at Worship-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Arabin.

Q. Did you ever see the woman before. - A. I never saw either of them before in my life.

Q. I suppose you was not quite yourself, you was a little alarmed. - A. I was very much alarmed.

Q. Do not you know there is a forty pounds reward. - A. I do not know there is a reward, nor do I wish for a reward.

Court. Have you ever found your property. - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. No property was ever found upon her. - A. No.

JAMES GEARY sworn. I received information that the prisoner stood indicted; in consequence of that I went into a public house in Gloucester-court, about twelve o'clock at night on the 23d of March, I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her, and found nothing on her.

Mr. Arabin. I will not ask you whether you know there is a reward. - A. To be sure I do.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-14

225. DANIEL CROSSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , a cash, value 10 s. and twenty gallons of shrub, value 13 l. the property of John Stracey , Thomas Browning , and William Browning .

THOMAS BROWNING sworn. I am a distiller , I live at Smithfield Bars.

Q. Have you any other partners. - A. Yes, John Stracey and William Browning ; I know nothing of the transaction.

JOHN BUNNING sworn. I am carman to Messrs. Stracey and Browning. On the 22th of March about seven o'clock at night, I was going to Blossom's inn, Lawrence-lane, with this cask of shrub in the waggon; in Trump-street I was obliged to move a one-horse cart to get by, and while I moved it this cask was taken out of the waggon; I drove the waggon to the gateway, and missed the cask; I returned back to the place, where I found the prisoner rolling it away; I run up to him, and asked him what he was going to do with it, he immediately ran away, I halloed out Stop thief, and as soon as he was stopped, I went up to him and brought him back to the cask. A constable came up, and I gave charge of him.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man. - A. I am sure of it, I never lost sight of him from the time I saw him roll the cask till he was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. This was not a cask that a man could take under his arm and run away with it. - A. No, it was a large cask.

Q. It very often happens that jostling a cask it may tumble off. - A. No this cask was in the middle of the waggon, and if it had tumbled out it would have dashed it all to pieces.

ROBERT HALL sworn. I am a warehouseman. About ten minutes past seven on the 12th of March I was passing through Trump-street, I saw the prisoner rolling the cask, he had rolled it about twelve yards, when the carman came up and asked him what he was going to do with it, he immediately jumped over the cask and made off; the carman cried Stop thief, I followed the prisoner, I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

JOHN FERON sworn. I am a constable; I was coming by and heard a cry of Stop thief; I saw the prisoner, and took him in custody. (The cask produced, and identified by Bunning.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going about some business over the water, just on this side of St. George's

church; I am a clock maker by trade. When I went by the bottom of Honey-lane Market in Trump street, I saw this cask laying in the channel, I put my foot to the cask and moved it about two yards; there was a young man that went and told the carman, and brought him back and discovered the barrel, who told him it was within two yards of where he first saw it lie.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-15

226. JOHN M'GEE was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Gogtfriead Henry Panzer , on the 21st of February in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a metal watch, value 40 s. a metal chain, value 1 s. and a gilt seal, value 5 s. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Watson.

GOGTFRIEAD HENRY PANZER sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. On Friday the 21st of February were you walking in the street. - A. I was, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon; as soon as I crossed over Bedford-street , the prisoner run up against me just like a drunken man, and gave me a violent push on my breast, at the same time my watch came out.

Q. Just a little describe that, you say he rushed against you. - A. He gave me a violent push, his breast hit against mine; at the same moment I felt my watch go away, because my pocket is so narrow.

Court. You perceived it come out. - A. Yes, directly.

Q. Nothing was said, but you perceived your watch go out. - A. Yes, then he took to his heels directly, and ran down Bedford-street: I ran after him, and cried out Stop thief, stop thief.

Q. Did you loose sight of him. - A. No, he went no farther off than this room; he was stopped by a man and I came up to him; he called out I am not the man, the gentleman let him go again; he crossed over the street, and took to his heels again, I cried out again, and he was taken again.

Q. When he was stopped the second time, was it by the same person, - Q. I do not know who the first person was that stopped him; when I come up to him I asked him where my watch was, he said what do you mean by your watch, I am an honest man, I have no watch; then says I if you are an honest man you shall go to Bow-street, he says very well, I will; he then walked off directly, and the people that stood about him left him; he had not been gone half the length of this room, a gentleman came and says, he has your watch in his hand; I then said to him where is my watch, he said, you blackguard, I have no watch; he crossed upon his heels and ran down Bedford-street; I called out the third time Stop thief, when I came up to him again; that gentleman wrenched the watch out of his hand.

Q. Who is that gentleman. - A. Mr. Taylor, he is an engraver, his hand was all cut with the glass of the watch.

Q. You said the gentleman wrenched his hands, was it some time before he parted with it. - A. Yes, ten minutes, he would not part with it, till at last the glass cut his hands, and then he parted with it; then the prisoner was taken to Bow-street.

Court. When you took the watch from him, the glass was broke. - A. I had it not in my hand.

Mr. Watson. The prisoner's hand was cut. - A. The man who tried to get the watch from him, his hand was bloody; when the prisoner was at Bow-street he let one hand be seen and not the other.

Court. I understood you to say that he run against you, and gave you a violent blow on your breast. - A. Yes.

Q. At that instant you perceived your watch go, did you see him take it. - A. No.

Q. Nobody saw him take it. - A. Only one witness, he saw him take it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn. Examined by Mr Watson. On the 21st of February did you see the prisoner at the bar. - A. I did.

Q. You are an engraver, Mr. Taylor. - A. I am.

Q. Where did you first see him. - A. In Bedford-street in the Strand, towards the bottom of it, he was then running violently.

Q. Was there any cry of Stop thief at that time. - A. Yes, which first attracted my attention towards him; seeing the prisoner I apprehended him to be the thief; at the instant of time that he came up I should have stopped him, but being fearful there might be a gang, and the prosecutor talking so unintelligibly, I took but very little notice of it, but turned on my heel and left them; a minute had not elapsed before I heard the cry of Stop thief, reiterated with the addition that he had got the watch in his hand; I have seen it, I looked round, he then might be about twenty yards from me, and then he was running down the street which he before had ran up, seeing that I was then decided what course I should pursue, and as he approached me I knocked him down and kneeled upon him, and after a severe struggle I took the watch from him, and kept it till I went to Bow-street; and had I not done it another witness would have done it, as he had hold of the chain, and I had a more powerful grasp, having hold of the body of the watch.

Court. Q. Was your hand cut. - A. No, my glove was tore, I believe with the chain.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing. - A. Not a syllable.

Q. You took the watch to Bow-street and the prisoner also was taken by you to Bow-street. - A. Exactly so.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that you stopped. - A. I am certain of it.

Prisoner. Q. How long was you and me struggling before you got the watch out of my possession. - A. It was so small a portion of time it is imposible to divide it, I may safely say it was a minute before I could get a good grasp.

Q. Was your hand in a gore of blood. - A. I could not tell, I had my glove on, when my glove was off there was no blood on it then.

Court. Q. How long had you him down before you got the watch from him. - A. About a minute.

Mr. Watson. You said there was two endeavouing to take the watch from him, did you observe whether

the other man's hand was cut. - A. It might have been possible, he having hold of the chain, and in addition to his having hold of the chain the watch glass was broke.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say at Bow-street that you wrenched the watch out of my hands. - A. I did.

Q. Did not the other gentleman say that you took it from under me, and then you said we must keep in one story. - A. Upon my oath as a man I never did, I disdain it.

WILLIAM WILMOT sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are a plaisterer. - A. I am.

Q. On the 21st of February, did you see the prisoner and where. - A. I met the prisoner in Bedford-street in the Strand, in my way home, as I was coming from my work; I saw the prisoner standing in a drunken position, I saw him reel against the prosecutor, and he almost knocked him off the curb stone into the road; the old gentleman ran after him up Bedford-street, I could not well make out what he said; the prisoner said he was an honest man, what did they mean by stopping of him; he said he had a wife and children, they directly told him to take the old gentleman to Bow-street for having his character taken away.

Q. The mob was disposed to believe the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, soon after the alarm was given again, stop thief, Mr. Taylor happened to stop him; if he had missed, Mr. Taylor he could not have missed me, as I was not above two yards from him when he fell, or not so far as that, he stopped him in such a way that the prisoner fell at a door, when I suppose the watch fell and the glass was broken; the watch was taken out of his hand by Mr. Taylor, I had got hold of the chain, and Mr. Taylor had got hold of the body of the watch.

Q. Was any body's hand cut. - A. My hand was cut just here.

Q. How was the glass of the watch. - A. It was broken upon the stones; the prisoner was taken to Bow-street and the watch also.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take the watch out of my hands. - A. I had part of the watch out of your hands.

Q. Did you ever see the watch out of my possession. - A. I can hardly say.

Court. You say you saw the watch upon the ground. - A. I saw the watch on the ground, and then he catched it in his hand directly.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect when you was at the public house at Bow-street, that the gentleman said he took the watch out of my hands; you said no it was taken from under me. - A. I said the watch was on the ground, and you took it up again, but from which hand it was taken from I cannot tell.

- LAVENDER sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street; I was present when the prisoner was brought to Bow-street, I produce the watch.

Q. Is that the watch which was brought with that prisoner to Bow-street. - A. Yes, I received it from Mr. Taylor, I have kept it ever since.

Q. (to prosecutor) Look at that watch. - A. This is my watch, chain, and seal, the glass is out, I have had it five or six years; it is an odd sort of a thing, it opens behind, I know the chain and seal and the whole of it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge as a child from its mother's womb, I am a native of Hull in Yorkshire; I have a wife and four children who now resides there; I was seven years in his majesty's service last war, till the proclamation of peace took place, and since the commencement of this war I have been two years in his majesty's service; an unfortunate accident happened, I was cut down by a Spaniard, which rendered me unfit for service. I have nothing more to say than recommend myself to you, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-16

227. ESTHER MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , eight handkerchiefs, value 3 l. the property of Abraham Alford , privately in his shop .

JOHN ACOMB sworn. I am a linen draper, I live with Abraham Alford . On the 14th of March last about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came under pretence of buying a quarter of a yard of callico at eight-pence a yard, she walked to that part of the shop where there was some silk handkerchiefs on the counter, she took the handkerchiefs and concealed them under her apron.

Q. Did you see her take them. - A. I did not; George West , the other young man that was in the shop, having a suspicion that she had something concealed, cautioned me not to let her go without-examining of her, I accused her of having them, she denied it, I took up one side of her apron, she then conveyed them to the other, on taking up the other side I found that she had eight silk handkerchiefs in her possession.

GEORGE WEST sworn. Q. You are shopman likewise. - A. Yes, I was waiting upon a lady about five yards distance from the prisoner at the bar, I saw her hand by her side, which gave me suspicion; she was drawing her hand up, as if she was putting it up under her apron, I immediately cautioned Mr. Acomb not to let her go out of the shop without examining of her, I immediately examined on the counter to see if there was any thing missing; I gave him a second caution; the girl told me that she had a pain in her belly, I told her I could easily relieve her of that disease, upon which Mr. Acomb immediately took the handkerchiefs from under her apron; I took her into the back room and sent for Mr. Sapwell.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. I am an officer, I produce eight silk handkerchiefs.

Q. You know nothing about the prisoner do you. - A. Yes, I know something about her.

(The handkerchiefs indentified by Acomb.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going into the Minories of an errand, I met a woman, she asked me to go into that shop to buy three quarters of a yard of callico, and if I saw any thing on the counter to take them, I did.

Q. Who is that woman, what is she. - A. I do not know indeed, she was by the shop, and when she saw that gentleman take them from under my apron, she ran away.

. GUILTY, aged 11.

Of stealing, but not privately.

[ Recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her youth .]

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-17

228. JAMES DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , one brass skillet pattern, value 40 s. seven brass cock patterns, value 15 s. two brass cock key patterns, value 8 s. nine lid patterns, value 13. 6 d. two brass house bell patterns, value 10 s. 6 d. twelve brass patterns, value 7 s. five pieces of nail head patterns, value 1 s. 6 d. one side of a horse bell pattern, value 4 s. one side of a three-quarter inch ferrol pattern, value 4 s. and one side of a strait ferrol, value 4 s. and four wood patterns, value one farthing , the property of John Warner .

JOHN WARNER sworn. I live in Blackfrier's Road , I am a founder . I lost these things from my manufactory in Blackfrier's Road, I can only swear to the property.

THOMAS HAWKINS sworn. I am a watchman. On the 8th of March, at half past eleven o'clock, there was a hackney coach come to the end of Field-lane, I saw the prisoner come out of the coach, and directly he came out the coachman handed him a parcel out of the coach, he got on his box and drove away; I went up to the prisoner and asked him what he had got, he told me not to make any noise, and offered me four shillings if I would let him go; he finding I would not let him go, nor take the money, he wanted to shove the metal on me; I put my hand up to save the metal from hurting of me, he got from me and ran up Shoe-lane; I sprang the rattle, and called out Stop thief; he was stopped by another watchman, and we took him to the watchhouse, there he said be brought the property from Blackfrier's bridge.

Q. You are sure that is the man that had the property. - A. He is the same man, I saw him on Friday night, he came with a parcel then; I produce the property, Howard picked it up when I ran after the man.

JOHN HOWARD sworn. I was in the watchhouse when this was thrown down, it made a vast noise; I went out and found the metal on the pavement, and took it to the watchhouse; immediately afterwards the prisoner was brought in. (The property identified by the prosecutor and John Hughes .)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a public-house drinking over Blackfrier's Road, I was very much intoxicated when this happened; a man who worked for Mr. Warner, and who has since absconded, asked me to carry some brass cocks, and told me he would give me seven shillings to carry them to his shop; no further can I say.

Mr. Warner. This man was in company with my man; the man absconded the very night the prisoner was taken.

Prisoner. I never was in that public house only that same night.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-18

229. CATHERINE CHANDLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , a shawl, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL sworn. I live at No. 69, Bishopsgate-street , I am a linen draper . On the 18th of March, between two and three in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came to purchase some calimanco for a petticoat, which she did, and paid for it; I suspected the prisoner and searched her; I took the shawl out of her pocket.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. I took the prisoner in custody, I produce the shawl.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this gentleman's shop to buy a petticoat, I cannot say I was so well as I ought to be; he has known me these eight or nine years, I have laid out a great deal of money with him.

Prosecutor. What the prisoner says is perfectly correct.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-19

230. MARY GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , a silk cloak, value 5 s. the property of John Goddard .

HANNAH GODDARD sworn. I am the wife of John Goddard , my husband is a soldier in the third regiment of Guards .

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She is a glover . On Saturday the 15th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went to the prisoner's room, I asked her for my cap and apron I had lent her, she said she had pawned them, but she would get them when she had done her work; she asked me to sit down, which I did, she then told me of a book she had been reading concerning of a son and mother at Margate; I told her I should like to see this book; she went out to fetch this book, I staid in her room; it was half an hour before she returned.

Q. How far is your lodgings from her's. - A. I live at No. 4, in the Broadway , and she at No. 99. I missed the cloak about seven o'clock the next morning; when I went home I found nobody in my room, nor did I leave any body in my room when I went out, it was taken while I was in her room; she told me she would get my things out of pawn on Monday morning; I went to her immediately I found out my loss, and asked her for these things again, she told me that she had often blamed me for leaving my door unlocked, I told her it was somebody that knew my room well, she said I thought it was her that had taken it, if she heard me say it she would severely punish me. On Monday morning I went to Mr. Wright's, the pawnbroker, in Tothill-fields; there I found it pledged in her name.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. I am servant to Mr. Wright, a pawnbroker. On Saturday the 15th of February, the prisoner pledged this cloak for three shillings, between seven and eight in the evening; I produce it.

JAMES BLIGH sworn. I apprehended the prisoner; after the pawnbroker shewed her the cloak, she owned to pawning it.

Prosecutrix. That is my cloak, I worked part of it myself.

Prisoner's Defence: A woman that frequented this woman's room gave me this cloak to pledge, and sixpence for pledging it; I pledged it in my own name, not thinking it was a stolen cloak.

Prosecutrix. She means a young woman that frequented my room; she was not in my room that night from five o'clock till eight at night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-20

231. MARY GRIFFITHS was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , a silk cloak, value 5 s. the property of John Harrison .

ANN HARRISON sworn. I am the wife of John Harrison , my husband is a soldier , I live at No. 30, Rochester-row, Tothill-fields, Westminster . On the 19th of August I had my cloak on, and on the 31st I missed it, I recollect having no person with me but her at the time; I found it on the 20th of February at Mr. Dobree's, Charing Cross, I know it is my cloak.

HANNAH GODDARD sworn. The prisoner gave me the ticket of Mrs. Harrison's cloak about three months before I delivered it into the officer's hands, I went to her and asked for a gown I had lent her, she asked me if I wanted a silk cloak, she said she had a very nice one at Charing Cross, she told me it was her own. After my cloak was stole, I met Mrs. Harrison, she said she was very glad I found out the person that stole my cloak, she said she suspected her of stealing her cloak; I told her the prisoner had given me a ticket of a black silk cloak about three months back; she went to look at the cloak at the pawnbroker's, she knew the cloak, I gave the ticket to the officer.

JAMES BLIGH sworn. I produce the ticket, I received it of Mrs. Goddard.

JAMES ROBERTS sworn. I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce the cloak, it was pawned the 30th of August. at Mr. Dobree's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am accused wrongfully; there were different people at work in the prosecutrix's room when I was at work there.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-21

232. WILLIAM RICHARDSON, alias HARRIS, alias EDWARDS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , a leaden pump, value 2 l. the property of John Whitling ; and JOHN ENGLISH for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

SAMUEL POTTER sworn. I gave an order for a pump to be put down in Thirlwall Square, Bethnall Green ; I saw it brought, I did not see it put down.

JOSEPH MOUZET sworn. I live at No. 10, Thirlwall Square; I remember the pump being fixed in the earth adjoining another pump, in the middle of the square, for the benefit of all the inhabitants.

Court. This is a subject of trespass.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-22

233. WILLIAM RICHARDSON, alias HARRIS, alias EDWARDS , was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of March , twelve pound weight of lead, value 3 s. the property of William Mellish , in a certain building of his called a house .

Second Count for like offence, only stating it to be affixed to the dwelling house of William Mellish .

WILLIAM EMERSON sworn. I live at Bush Hill , I am tenant to William Mellish , esq .

Q. When was it that you missed any lead from your premises. - A. The day after this man was taken up, about the 5th of March; I missed it from the top of the four posts of the gates going into the stable yard, it was not affixed to the building.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-23

234. SOPHIA WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , five shirts, value 1 l. 2 s. and two shifts, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Rice .

THOMAS RICE sworn. I keep a laundry , the prisoner was employed by me; from information, I went to Mr. Moratt's a pawnbroker. I found the shirts, I had them to wash for a gentleman, and I was answerable for them.

MRS. RICE sworn. I am the wife of the last witness; I also missed the shirts, and we found them at the pawnbroker's.

BENJAMIN CHARLTON sworn. I live with Mr. Moratt, a pawnbroker, York-street, Westminster.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar pawn any thing with you. - A. Yes, two shirts and two shifts, which I produce.

Prosecutrix. They belong to me.

SAMUEL GLASS sworn. I live with Mrs. Barrow of Dean-street; I produce two shirts pawned by the prisoner in the name of Sophia Williams , she pledged them for nine shillings.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-24

235. GEORGE GREERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of February , one shirt, value 2 s. and a half handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of William Leach .

WILLIAM LEACH sworn. I live in Carnaby Market , I am a sadler ; I missed out of my box in my room a shirt and a half handkerchief, I believe on Sunday the 24th of February; the duplicate of the handkerchief was found in the possession of the prisoner; the prisoner lodged in the same house.

Prisoner. Q. (to prosecutor) If you recollect, when I came home you was very much in liquor, I said to you will you have the goodness to lend me a shirt and a neckcloth, I wanted to go to Richmond to see my son; you said yes, you are exceeding wellcome; I said to you you will recollect what I said.

Prosecutor. I never lent him a shirt, I was not in liquor.

JAMES SLADE sworn. I was constable of the night, I took the prisoner into custody, and the duplicate of the half handkerchief was delivered to me by the prosecutor. In the morning I went with the prisoner to the place where the handkerchief was pawned; the pawnbroker delivered it up, I produce it. I found the shirt at Mr. Layton's, a pawnbroker in Wardour-street.

WILLIAM NICHOLS sworn. I produce a shirt pawned at Mr. Layton's, I cannot say who it was pawned by.

(The property indentified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a son that lives at Richmond, I took this unwarranted liberty to take these articles in order to dress myself up as well as I could to see my son; he lives with a reverend gentleman at Richmond.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Six Months, in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-25

236. JOHN LEACH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Frodsham , about the hour of six at night, on the 7th of February , and burglariously stealing therein a gold watch, value 15 l. 15 s. the property of William Frodsham .

Second Count for like burglary, only stating the watch to be the property of John Frodsham .

JOHN FRODSHAM sworn. Q. Do you live with William Frodsham . - A. Yes he gave up the business and the house to me, on the 20th of January, previous to the robbery, he at present lives in the house, I am accountable to him for the property, I have paid taxes for the last quarter, I was to pay what was due at the time I took it.

Q. Where is your shop. - A. In King-street, Red-Lion-square .

Q. Has the shop any communication with the house. - A. It is at the front of the house; I went out on the 7th of February, between three and four in the afternoon. In the shop I had before me a rail, where I put my watches to time; I had left hanging in the window several watches; I returned home near six in the evening, or a little after; immediately on my return I put up the shutters and shut up the shop, and then went down to tea.

Q. Did you perceive any thing was missing. - A. No, I never looked, I shut up in a hurry; while I was at tea a person came for his watch or a glass; I went into the shop, and in attempting to take down the watch for the person, I discovered a third part of the rail entirely bare; there were about seventeen watches I have since found out were missing from off the rail in the shop.

Q. Did not you observe at that time whether the window had been broken. - A. I conceived at that time that somebody had come in by the door having been left open; my grandfather found it out, he sent to me at Bow-street, about eight o'clock, that he had discovered the window broken; between eight and nine I returned back to the shop, and found on the left hand of the window, a pane of glass was cut in a circular hole, big enough to admit a man's arm.

Q. Can you say whether that hole was there when you went out. - A. I can safely say it was not.

Q. Could an arm put in at that place reach the number of watches that you had lost. - A. It could.

Q. Out of these number of watches, did you ever see any of them again. - A. One of them I saw on the 27th or 28th of February, in the possession of Crocker the officer.

Q. Was it in the same state as when you lost it. - A. There was a pair of gold hands on it then, it had no hands when lost.

- CROCKER sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street; on the 27th of February, I was in Mercer's-street, Long Acre, I saw the prisoner at the bar and another; I knew the prisoner to be a deserter from the navy ; going round the end of Bow-street, I observed the prisoner run up against William Pring , I saw him put his right hand (I had hold of his left) very near the jacket pocket of Pring; I thought at the time that he was going to pick Pring's pocket from his motion, I saw him take his hand away, but nothing was in it; I took them into Mr. Carpmeal's, and in about three or four minutes Pring came in, Pring challenged the prisoner at the bar with putting a watch in his pocket; Pring delivered the watch to me, I produce it.

WILLIAM PRING sworn. Q. What are you. - A. I am a coach-trimmer; I live at No. 5, Mercer's-street, Long Acre; I was at home at dinner, I heard a noise in the street, opposite to where I lived; I looked out of the window, and saw Crocker, had the prisoner and another, one on each side of him; I went out and followed them to Bow street, out of curiosity, hearing Crocker say they were the two lads he took up at Croydon; at the corner of Bow-street, I was close by the side of the prisoner, at the bar, I felt him touch my left hand jacket pocket, I wondered what he touched me for, I was not afraid of his picking my pocket, because I had my jacket on; I waited outside of the door while he took them in, in about two or three minutes I put my hand in my jacket pocket, I found a watch in my left hand pocket, it not being my property, I thought it was proper that I should give it up; I knocked at Carpmeal's door, I went into the little room where Crocker and the two prisoners were; the prisoner addressed himself to me, he said young man come and set down, and let us have something to drink, he seemed very urgent to get me to set by him; and after he had put that question to me twice over, I looked at him very steadfast, and said what did you put that watch in my pocket for, he then said, I put that watch in your pocket, I never saw you before in all my life, you b - y thief; I left the watch in Crocker's custody; I am positive no one put the watch in my pocket but the prisoner, because I felt him touch me so plain, and I had my hands in my pockets before when I was walking along. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-26

237. THOMAS BURTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway

upon Jeremiah Earle on the 16th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a hat, value 5 s. the property of the said Jeremiah Earle .

JEREMIAH EARLE sworn. On the 16th of March I was coming from Mr. Hall's chapel in Grub-street, I then went into London Wall to see Thomas Ash ; finding him not at home, I returned to go through the quarters of Moorfields to go home, when I arrived nearly in the middle a tall man came up to me and looked very earnest at me, I stepped a foot back, I thought I knew him; not knowing of him I hastily went on, I was about two yards from him, when he said we have had a great deal of rain, I replied a little rain would do the land no hurt; he replied how slippery it is, I had like to have fell coming across; I said it is slippery, I had like to have slipped myself; I went a few yards further, he lays hold of my arm with his hand, he said you will excuse my freedom, I replied no offence, sir, he says we shall have one another from falling; I thought it very odd, but I went along more swifter, he still keeping hold of me; but before I could get out of the sailings, I was within two yards of getting out, opposite of Mr. Mullard's at the end of the fields, the prisoner came up and gave me a violent blow on the left side of my head.

Q. Did you see the person of the prisoner before you received the blow from him, so as to be certain that it is the same man. - A. I saw the prisoner as soon as he attempted to strike me, not before; the tall man who had been talking to me before struck me another blow on the breast, I fell to the ground, the prisoner struck me again, before I could recover to get up, he likewise kicked and stamped upon me; he said I was a bl - y fo - e, my hat came off, the prisoner gave it a kick from me; the other two men took it up hastily.

Q. There were two others besides. - A. I think there was six, but five I saw; a short man came up and said you are a bl - y f - e, the prisoner had said so before; aye, aye, says the prisoner, we'll do his business for him; he then rushed his hand into my pocket, while with his other hand he had hold of my handkerchief in order to choak me, by drawing my neck handkerchief very tight.

Q. Did he take anything from you at all. - A. No, I had nothing in my pocket:

Q. Had you a watch. - A. Yes, the tall one put his hand in my breeches pocket, they attempted to get my watch; I had the chain concealed in the inside, they could not get at it; I usually carry it in that manner. The short one said, do you want anything to do his business, we will rip the bl - y f - e open; the short one put his hand to his pocket and drawed his knife, held it to my head, offering it to the prisoner.

Q. What did he hold it for, did he demand any property. - A. In order to do some execution with it, he struck at me in order to stab me, but I struck his hand away, I struggled, I got up, and shrieked out Murder as loud as I could.

Q. Did you understand by what they did, that they wanted to stab you. - A. The expression used was, Cut him open, we will cut his t - st - s off, and make him an entire figure. When I shrieked out murder, two gentlemen came from Broker-row; the prisoner attempted to strike me again, I took hold of him by the collar, and never loosed him; he was conducted to the watchhouse by the assistance of these gentlemen; the other men all ran away when they came up.

Q. Are either of these two gentlemen here. - A. No, the watchhouse was rather in a confused state, because the watchmen were coming to their evening duty.

Q. That does not explain to me why you did not learn these two gentlemen's names. - A. When he was taken into the watchhouse the door was put to immediately, I could not utter a word for five minutes, when they opened the door, which was full ten minutes, the gentlemen were gone.

Q. Is the watchman here. - A. No.

Q. Was the hat carried away. - A. Yes.

Q. You said you saw two little ones, and they carried it off, and they then returned afterwards in order to cut your throat. - A. The short one returned, that was the time that he drawed his knife.

Q. What did they want to cut your throat for, what was there to hinder them, there was six of them about you, do you apprehend that they wanted to kill you; what could they want to kill you for, you had nothing about your person. - A. I cannot say, I prevented being cut by striking his arm off.

Q. What way of life are you in. - A. I am a shoemaker , I keep a house in Bethnal Green, I live with my mother.

Q. What chapel is this that you had been attending. - A. The chapel in Grub-street is a dissenting chapel, a Calvinist dissenter, a very fine man, attends there, which was the occasion of my-going, I either go to Grub-street chapel or Oliver Mount , which is nearer to me.

Q. What o'clock might this be. - A. Near half after eight o'clock.

Q. You never met with any interruption before. A. No, and I always went through the same place before.

Q. How came you not to have the watchman here. - A. The officer who took him in charge attended the three examinations at Worship-street, I called upon him to know whether he should attend the trial, he said he was not bound over, and without he had been bound over he should not attend.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You say you had got a watch in your pocket at the time the attack was made upon you, can you shew me the watch. - A. It is at home in my box.

Q. It does not go, I suppose it is out of order. - A. It is not.

Q. You have no clock in the house. - A. No.

Q. You have a watch, and for the purpose of the use of your house you lock it up in your box, have you got the key of the box in your pocket now. - A. Yes.

Q. May I ask you what the maker's name of the watch is. - A. I cannot charge my memory with it, nor the number exactly.

Q. I suppose you can tell me this, that there is a a reward of forty pound upon the conviction of a man for a highway robbery. - A. No, I never heard it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-27

238. CHARLES HEMMINGS and GEORGE BEVAN were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the rev. Henry Craven Orde , on the 24th of March , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a leather purse, value 2 s. a seven shilling piece, and a bill of exchange, value 18 l. the property of the said rev. Henry Craven Orde .

Second Count for like offence, only stating the instrument stolen to be a warrant for the payment of money, instead of a bill of exchange.

Third Count for like robbery, only stating it to be an order for the payment of money.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Alley, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

REV. HENRY CRAVEN ORDE sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. You are a clergyman. - A. I am, I reside at North Mims, in Hertfordshire.

Q. Were you in London on Monday the 24th of March. - A. I was.

Q. About ten o'clock in the evening, what part of the town was you in. - A. In the Strand .

Q. In what direction might you walk. - A. I come from Southampton-street, and crossed the Strand.

Q. Did you go on the river side of the way. - A. Yes.

Q. What course did you pursue when you got on that side. - A. I intended to go on the left towards Temple Bar.

Q. Did any thing intercept you in your course. - A. Yes, before I had time to turn either to the right or to the left a man jostled me.

Q. Was that man a stranger to you at that time. A. Perfectly so, he said that he met me a night or two before, he was very poor, and wanted the twenty pound I had promised him, I said I had never seen him before, and would not give it him, he said he must have it, as he knew me and would swear to me any where.

Q. Which way were you then walking. - A. At that time I rather went to the right; the man was very importunate, and said, that he must have some money; he repeated several times that he had met me before only a night or two ago; I had only half a guinea and a seven shilling piece in my pocket, I gave him the seven shilling piece and told him to go about his business, he said that would not satisfy him, he must have the twenty pound; two men came up, and took me under each arm, said they were Bow-street officers, and that I must go with them; they hurried me down the street, I resisted, and said I defied them, I said I had done nothing that they could hurt me for; they all said that I had met that man a night or two before, and had promised him twenty pound, that they would swear to me any where; I said I had made them! no such promise, and would not give them the money, they said I must on account of my character, as they would all swear I had; one of the men whispered to me and said, I see you are a gentleman, you had better give him the twenty pound, and we will let you go; I was frightened at being surrounded by three men.

Q. When all this was said respecting your character, what impression was made by that declaration on your mind. - A. I concluded that they meant to accuse me of some unnatural crime; I put my hand into my pocket and took out my purse; one of the men snatched it out of my hand and said now you may go; I run to Richardson's hotel, where I had just left a friend of mine (Mr. Wheathley), I told him what had happened.

Q. What was in your purse and what sort of a purse was it. - A. A red leather purse, it contained a draft for eighteen pound, drawn by my brother John Norman Orde .

Court. On whom was it drawn. - A. On Mr. Fogous for eighteen pound.

Q. Had the draft been accepted at that time. - A. No.

Q. What else had you in your pocket book. - A. There were some receipts and memorandums, there was a bill of Mr. Clay's, and a bill and receipts of Powel's, and a list of bills I had to pay while I was in London.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Who the person were Mr. Orde, I understand you to say you know nothing of. - A. Nothing at all.

Court. Did you take any notice of the colour of their clothes, or of the size of the men. - A. I think the two men who took me under the arm were very tall men.

Q. When you took the pocket book out of your pocket, what was the purpose that you pulled it out for. - A. Probably I should have given it the men.

Q. You pulled it out for that purpose in consequence of what they had said. - A. Yes.

Q. Was it under the impression of terror that they had excited in you at the moment. - A. Yes.

Q. You mean to say it was under the same terror that you had given the seven shilling piece to the man at first. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You mean to say it was the terror of that accusation that they suggested to you. - A. It was, and to get rid of them.

WILLIAM LINGHAM sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a tailor and breeches maker in the Strand. - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 25th of March did the two prisoners at the bar, or any other person, come to your shop. - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve the two prisoners and another man, who called himself Muir or Mier, I am not certain which.

Q. What passed when they called. - A. I went forward to take the orders from them, my foreman followed and said, I know one of these gentlemen, he had a suit of clothes when you were in the country.

Q. Was that in the hearing of the prisoners. - A. Yes, I believe Bevan accosted me first, and Muir or Mier, the other man that is not here, they said that they wanted superfine great coats, and after agreeing for the price, my foreman measured them; the while my foreman was measuring Bevan and

Muir, Hemmings said that he would have a waistcoat and a pair of breeches.

Q. Was that waistcoat to be made, or one ready made. - A. He concluded to have one that was lying in the window; I then showed him some stuff for breeches, he fixed on the Manchester stuff for breeches, and Bevan produced the draft.

Q. Look at that draft, and see whether that is the draft that Bevan produced to you. - A. I believe it is the same, but not in the same state in which I received it from him; that is the draft, I endorsed it.

Q. You gave it to Lavender at the office. - A. I did, in the presence of the magistrate.

Q. For what purpose did Bevan give you the draft. - A. When he presented that draft to me, he said, Mr. Lingham you will see if it is all right, and we will call in the course of an hour for the ballance; they all three left my shop; before they went away Bevan endorsed his name, he asked for a pen and ink, and wrote upon it G. Bevan, Grosvenor-street.

Q. After they were gone did you take the draft to Mr. Fogous to be accepted. - A. I did, almost as soon as they went away it was accepted.

Q. How soon did they call upon you again. - A. They did not call so early as I expected, I left the money with my people, it was about two o'clock, they all three came together, I then gave them the ballance, amounting to 7 l. 18 s. deducting 10 l. 2 s.; I gave the change to the man who is not here, to Muir, who was a taller man than either of the prisoners.

Q. At what time was the coat to be finished that was ordered. - A. The coat was to be finished for Muir by six o'clock in the evening, but it was got off till seven o'clock.

Q. When was Bevan's coat to be finished. - A. In the course of a day or two, and Hemmings' breeches was also to be finished in a day or two.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners afterwards at your house. - A. No.

Q. On the 28th you presented the bill to Drummonds, was it made payable. - A. On the 31st I did for payment, there was three days grace.

Q. Then I believe the payment was stopped. - A. It was, and Hemmings was in custody.

Cross-examined by Mr Knapp.

Q. I understood you to say that after your foreman told you he knew one of the persons, he measured them for the clothes, which occupied some time. - A. He did.

Q. It was in the middle of the day. - A. It was, and publicly done in the shop.

Q. And Bevan, the person who was known to be in the shop before, was the person that gave his name. - A. He gave his name, and endorsed it on the back of the draft.

Q. Upon their leaving you the draft, Mr. Lingham, as you are a man of business, I ask you was there any thing that lead you to suspect them, they giving you an opportunity of knowing whether it was good or bad, or whether it would be accepted or not. - A. That gave me a better opinion.

Q. How long a portion of time was it agreed upon that you should have for making the enquiry. - A. They said in an hour they were to call.

Q. So that after the person had described his name, and after they all had given you the same paper for the purpose of making the enquiries you thought fit, these persons came publicly to your shop again. A. They did, as near two o'clock as possible.

Q. I think I understand you to say, my friend, it was not Bevan that received the money, but Muir, who is not here. - A. Muir received the money, but Bevan gave the check.

Court. You said you gave the ballance of 10 l. 2 s. A. I paid the change in this manner; a five pound note and three one pound notes to Muir, Bevan gave me half a crown back and I gave him sixpence.

Q. How did you send the clothes home. - A. By the directions left, they were all to be sent to Bevan's house.

Q. Then he was the only person that gave any direction, the others gave no direction. - A. No more directions than they were to be sent to Bevan's house, as Muir was to call at night for the account.

Q. Then as to the residence of the other persons they gave no account. - A. They did not

Prisoner Hemmings (to prosecutor). Did you ever see me at that time on the night you was robbed. - A. I do not know that I saw you.

Mr. Gurney (to Lingham). You say Bevan was the only one of the three who gave you his address. A. Yes.

Q. And the address that he gave you was Grosvenor-street. - A. Yes, I have another direction, one hundred and something in Swallow-street.

Court. Have you got that direction here. - A. One of the officers has, I gave the officer the direction.

Q. When did he give you the direction of Swallow-street. - A. At the time that he ordered the goods.

Mr. Gurney. He was taken in consequence of that. - A. Yes.

Court. Did he give the address to Swallow-street at the same time he wrote on the back of the bill. - A. Much at the same time.

Q. Did it not strike you the address being in Swallow-street, and on the bill is Grosvenor-street. A. The goods which he ordered while I was in the country were sent to Grosvenor-street.

Q. Did it not strike you as something extraordinary that he should write on the back of the bill Little Grosvenor-street, and give you a direction to Swallow-street. - A. That was where they were to be sent to.

Q. Do you know whether he lived there. - A. I do not.

Q. Then you did not attend to this bill to see if he had endorsed it. - A. I did not look at the back of the bill till it was shewn me at Mr. Drummond's office; on their leaving it me, I looked at the front of the bill (I saw there was three days grace) to see if it was good, I did not look at the back of the bill to see the endorsement.

Q. You mean your observation went no farther than to the person to whom it was payable. - A. Yes.

JANE BAYLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are employed in the shop of Mr. Lingham. A. I am.

Q. Do you remember on the 25th of March either

of the prisoners at the bar coming to Mr. Lingham's shop. - A. Yes, I knew Mr. Bevan before that.

Q. Who was with Mr. Bevan when he came there. - A. A person of the name of Muir, and Hemmings.

Q. Some clothes were ordered. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember their calling again in the evening. - A. Yes, they all three called in the evening, I was the only person that delivered the dark olive coat to Muir, he said he would not take it away that evening because it was not finished to his order, he said he would call the next morning for it: he did not call himself, he sent two women in the evening; I afterwards delivered that to Muir himself on the 26th in the evening.

Q. Did you deliver a coat to Bevan. - A. I did not, I saw it delivered on the 28th by the foreman in Mr. Lingham's presence, to a women that I afterwards saw at Marlborough-street, and Bevan was with her at Marlborough-street; and I likewise saw the coat that was delivered to her, at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. The person of Bevan was known to you before. - A. Yes, I saw him several times in the month of February.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer of Marlborough-street; on the evening of the 31st of March, I went to Bevan's lodgings, from a direction to Swallow-street, which I received from Mr. Lingham; I and Foy searched the lodgings, his wife was there, I saw that duplicate found by Foy.

Q. By any direction that you received from his wife, did you go to the dead wall in Saville-row. - A. I did, and took her with me, and apprehended Bevan.

Q. Did you take any coat away from him. - A. I did, and this coat I now produce.

THOMAS VINCENT sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Page, a pawnbroker. - A. I am, I produce a pair of breeches, pawned by Mrs. Bevan; I afterwards saw her at Marlborough-street; that is the woman I had them of.

Q. (to. Mr Lingham.) Who was that coat made for. - A. This coat was made for Hemmings.

REV. JOHN NORMAN ORDE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You I believe are the brother of the prosecutor. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of this robbery, were you in town with him at No. 22. Sackville-street. - A. I was.

Q. You are I believe the drawer of this bill of exchange. - A. I am.

Q. And you gave it to your brother. - A. Yes

Q. On the morning of the 26th of March, did any person call upon you. - A. On the morning of the 26th, the prisoner, Hemmings, came to Sackville-street, I was shewn in to him in a back parlour, he produced to me this red leather purse, he said to me, this is the purse that you gave to the gentleman's servant, the night before last, in the strand; I opened the purse, and said where is the draft, he replied, you know you gave that to Jones.

Q. His words were to Jones. - A. I mean Smith, to enjoin secrecy; I said look in my face, and before you know me; he looked up, and said I know you very well, I have often seen you about town, and could swear to you any where; I am the person who advised you to pay the money to settle the business; I said then you are a Bow-street officer, he said yes I am; after a short time I asked him the same question, he said I am not now, but I was two months ago; he then said you could not have got away from these men in the Strand without my assistance; I then went to the door, and told the servant to fetch a constable; before the constable came he said it was very hard that he should be detained (I gave the order to the servant in his hearing), he was a total stranger to the man, and was passing by accidentally at the time, and he said, you know you offered me a seven shilling piece to take your part, which I refused; when he gave me the purse, he said the gentleman's servant to whom you gave it the night before last in the Strand, desired I would return it to you.

Q. Were the papers, which are now in the purse, the same that were in it when he delivered it to you. - A. They were when I delivered it into your hands; it is sealed up.

Q. It appears to have been cut and sewed up was it so when be delivered it to you. - A. It was in the same state when he delivered it to me exactly.

JOSEPH HODGES sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You are a servant to Mr. Orde, and live at No. 22, Sackville-street. - A. I did at the time.

Q. Do you recollect on the evening of the 25th of March, either of the prisoners calling at the house. - A. The prisoner Hemmings called, he asked if the reverend Mr. Orde was at home, I told him he was not; he called on the following morning, and I introduced him into the back parlour, to the reverend Dr. Norman Orde .

Q. Did you hear any conversation that passed between the reverend Dr. Norman Orde and the prisoner. - A. Some of it. I heard the prisoner Hemmings say when he got into the parlour, that that was Mrs. Orde's purse.

Q. Did you hear any thing about a Bow-street officer. - A. Mr. Orde mentioned a Bow-street officer, he said I am, Mr. Orde asked him again a second time, he said he was not then, but he was two months ago.

JOSEPH LUPTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a butler to Mr. Orde, residing in Lincolns-inn Fields. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember a person calling there on the evening of the 25th of March. - A. I do.

Q. Look at the prisoner Hemmings, and tell me whether you do believe, on do not believe, that he is the person that called. - A. I think he is the person.

Court. Q. Do you speak positively to him; or only believe. - A. I cannot speak positively.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did he produce to you that purse, or a like purse - A. It was a red leather purse, like that.

Q. What did he say to you. - A. He said that was mine, after tendering the purse to me, to the best of my recollection that was the first thing that he said.

Court. Q. Did you come to the door to him. - A. I did not, I was called to him.

Q. What answer did you give to him. - A. I said

it was not; he asked for the butler as I was informed by the servant, he again said it is yours, I said it certainly is not; I asked him where he got it, he said it was left at the Adelphi coffee-house: he then wished me to open the purse, I made an attempt, but was not able to open it then.

Q. Did he open it. - A. I am not certain whether it was opened by him or me, it was opened.

Q. Did you find any papers in it. - A. I did.

Q. Look at these papers that are in it now, and see whether these are the papers that you then saw. - A. I believe these to be the papers, but I do not state any further; I then told him that they belonged to nobody at that house, but I would inform him where he would find the owner.

Q. Who did you tell him was the owner. - A. I am not certain whether I told him the owner of it, but I told him at No. 22, Sackville-street, he would find the owner of it

Q. Do you remember whether you did not mention the name. - A. I do not know, I was busy at the time, there was company in the house, and I had so little time to spare.

Q. You gave the purse back again to the man. - A. I did.

JOHN RIVETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have been an officer of Bow-street a long time. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner Hemmings, and tell me whether he has ever been an officer at that office. - A. Certainly not, he never was an officer at the public office at Bow-street, during my time.

Q. Is he as far as you know, a police officer to any other office any where. - A. I have not the least reason to believe that he is.

Q. (to Henry Craven Orde ) Have the goodness to look at that bill, which has been produced, and tell me whether that is the bill that was in your purse the night that you was robbed. - A. Not in its present state.

Q. Without the acceptance, that is the identical paper that was in the purse. - A. It is.

Court. It was not then accepted, nor had the name on the back of it; you had it of your brother. - A. I had.

Mr. Gurney. Tell me whether that is the purse that you lost. - A. It was a purse of that kind.

Q. If that be your purse, it is not in the same state as when you lost it, or is it in a different state. - A. It is in a different state, the sewing was not on it when it was in my possession; it appears to have been cut and sewed up again.

Q. Look at the papers that are in, and see whether these are the papers that were in it when you lost it. - A. Yes, one is a bill that I had to pay, that is my own hand writing.

Court. Your purse had the steel on it in this way, had it. - A. Yes.

(The draft and papers read in court.)

L. M. Fogous, Messrs. Drummond.

March 24, 1806.

Please to pay the rev. H. C. Orde, eighteen pounds, for your humble servant

J. N. Orde.

£18 0 0

Received of the rev. H. C. Orde, £4 5 0 for Henry Clay .

Rev. Mr. Orde, bought of James Powell , at his original trunk manufactory.

Hemmings's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I was going up a street near the Adelphi, about half past nine o'clock, on Monday the 24th of March, I heard a noise in the street, and I saw a parcel of people together, there were two tall gentlemen had hold of this gentleman, who is here; one of the two men was a servant in livery, I asked them what they were ill using the gentleman for, they told me I had nothing to do with it, for they were officers, or if they was not, they knew well what they were about; the gentleman pulled a pocket book out and had it in his hand, one of them snatched the purse, and directly after that they all ran away, the whole of them, after they were gone I picked up the purse, and I took it the next day to a public house; I could not read myself, I shewed it to a gentleman that was in the house, I asked him if he could tell me who it belonged to, he said yes, if I enquired at Mr. Orde's, in Lincoln's Inn Fields, he believed there I should find the owner; I went to Mr. Orde's, in Lincoln's Inn Fields, I asked the butler if that purse did not belong to him, he took it and opened it, and said it did not, but he could inform me who it belonged to; he did not tell me the gentleman's name, but told me to inquire at No. 22, Sackville-street, and there I should find the owner; I called there that evening, Mr. Orde was not at home, the servant told me if I would call the next day at ten o'clock, I should see him; I called the next day at ten o'clock with the purse, I saw one of these gentlemen, I asked him if that purse did not belong to him, he said yes, it certainly did; he asked me how I came by it, I told him that I believed he lost it in a scuffle on the Monday night; he asked me whether I was there at the time, I told him yes, that I was coming by; he asked me if I was an officer, I told him no, I was not, but the two other men who had hold of him said they were; the next day I met with a traveller, after I had found the pocket book, I went with him to the Hit and Miss, the corner of Swallow-street; I bought a pair of stockings and a handkerchief of him; coming out I met with Bevan, Bevan asked this traveller how he did, would he have any thing to drink; Bevan, and me, and this traveller went back into the public house to have something to drink, he asked me if I knew any tradesman in town.

Court. Who asked you. - A. Muir.

Q. You mean the traveller. - A. Yes, he asked me if I knew any tradesman in town, I told him, I did not; he asked Bevan if he did, Bevan said yes, he knew a taylor that made clothes for him; he said he took a check in the country, he would be glad to get it exchanged, he wanted the ready cash to buy more goods; Bevan told him he might get it exchanged by laying out a pound or two for what clothes he wanted; Muir asked Bevan what clothes he wanted, he would pay for them with the check, and he might pay him again, then he should be able to get his note exchanged; Bevan told him he would have a great coat; he then asked me if I wanted any thing, I told him no, I did not particular want any thing at present, but I did not mind having a waistcoat and breeches; he asked Bevan if he

would put his name to the note, for he said he could not write himself; Bevan put his name to the note; and said to Mr. Lingham, I beg you would inspect into the note to see whether it was good or not.

Q. Where do you mean to say this conversation passed of his putting his name to the note. - A. This was at Mr. Lingham's.

Q. You have not said any thing of your going to Mr. Lingham's yet, where was it that Muir asked you if you wanted any thing. - A. That was at the Hit and Miss in Swallow street.

Q. Was it before you went to Mr. Lingham that the traveller asked Bevan to put his name to the note. - A. That was before.

Q. Do you mean to say that you went to Mr. Lingham's. - A. Yes, I had a waistcoat and breeches which I paid for to Muir; then I left him, and did not fee any thing more of him.

Bevan's Defence. I was at Bath last December with a paralytic complaint in my arm; I saw Muir at Bath as a pedlar, he used the Lamb; by that means I became acquainted with him by going to see the papers of a day; on the latter end of December, or January I should say, I left Bath; I never saw Muir again till the 25th of March I met him in company with Hemmings at the Hit and Miss the corner of Swallow-street.

Q. When you say Hemmings you mean the prisoner. - A. Yes, he asked me to have something to drink; we returned into the Hit and Miss, and when we come out of there he presented the draft to me, which I took to Mr. Lingham's; he asked me if I knew any tradesman that would discount it for him, I said I knew Mr. Lingham, whom I had bought clothes of, and that I should tell him that it was not my draft, that it was his, that it should be left for inspection for an hour or an hour and an half; Muir said he had no objection to that, but as he could not write, he begged I would put my name to it, and he said that he had taken it in trade; he agreed that we should leave the note at Mr. Lingham's for an hour or an hour and a half, that Mr. Lingham might see it was right, at which time we should go again to get the balance. Muir ordered a great coat to be done that evening, as he was going out of town; he asked me if I wanted a great coat, I said I should like to have one of the same cloth that he had, but that at present I could not afford to pay for it; he owned me a pound note for being at Bath, he lent me another, and two pound I took out of my pocket and gave him, as he insisted to pay for the things out of his draft; I told Mr. Lingham a few days hence would do for my coat; on Friday evening I sent my wife for my coat; I have not seen Muir since, nor did I know that the note had been obtained in a fraudulent manner, nor I should not have presented it at a place where I was so well known, if I had meaned any fraud.

HEMMINGS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

BEVAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-28

239. EDWARD GRAHAM and ANN GRACE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Flinn about the hour of eight at night on the 9th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, a shirt, value 1 s. a cap, value 2 s. a pair of stays, value 3 s. six aprons, value 5 s. a cloak, value 2 s. four pair of shoes, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 6 d. and a hare skin, value 6 d. the property of William Flinn .

WILLIAM FLINN sworn. I live at No. 7, Grey-court, Great Peter-street, Westminster . On the 9th of April I went out of my house, I returned home in the afternoon with my goods, and put them under my window; at half after eight I had occasion to go into my yard, and when I returned I found my sash window open, and my bag and all my clothes gone, it might be rather better than a minute or two that I was gone.

Q. Your window was lifted up, what did you miss when you came back. - A. The property that was in the bag was one blue coat, one pair of stays, one shirt, one hare skin, one pair of old boots, six white aprons, five handkerchiefs, five pair of men's shoes, two petticoats, and there were four hats; I have not mentioned them all in the indictment.

Q. Have you seen any of these things yourself. - A. Yes, part of the property is in court.

ELIZABETH FLINN sworn. Q. Do you remember seeing either of the prisoners the day after your husband lost the things out of his house. - A. Yes, I had my daughter Catherine Richards with me; I saw Ann Grace in Strutton Ground, I followed her into the Park, there this man and four other men came up to her, I followed her into Church-court, St. Martin's-lane, then the man prisoner pulled out a pair of old boots from his apron, he went into an old shoe shop and offered them for sale, he asked twelve shillings for them; my daughter said, Oh, mother, they are my father's boots, I rather think the prisoners heard us, they all went away very quick together, I lost them, there are a great many passages leading into Round-court, I laid hold of the young woman, I told her I suspected she had some of my property, I called to a young man that was standing by, and asked him to tell me where an officer lived, he told me, I took the young woman back to the officer, with the things in her lap; the officer found the things in her lap.

CATHERINE RICHARDS sworn. Q. You are the daughter of Elizabeth Flinn ; did you see the two prisoners go into the shop. - A. I saw the man (Graham) go in, he offered a pair of boots for twelve shillings, I said to my mother I suspected they were my father's property, seeing him with the boots it overcame me, I fainted away.

SAMUEL TAUNTON sworn. I took Graham in custody on the 10th of April last between nine and ten at night, in Old Pye-street, Westminster, he was in the street, I took him to Tothill Fields prison for that night, I went and searched his lodgings in company with Smith, No. 16, Duck-lane, we found nothing there; on the following morning we went to Tothil Fields prison, and hearing the prisoner Graham had changed a shirt with a prisoner there of the name of Parker, they were both in a cell together, I asked Parker his reason for changing with the prisoner Graham, Parker replied that the prisoner at the bar was to be treated with a breakfast for so doing; I asked Graham his motive for changing

his shirt with Parker, he told me that when they went to bed at night they pulled off their shirts, and on the following morning they put on each others shirt in a mistake; Parker pulled off Graham's shirt, I produce it.

- LOCKE sworn. I am a constable, I searched the prisoner Grace, I found these articles I produce. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Graham's Defence. I never saw the man in my life, nor where he lives, I do not know any thing about him; I happened of the boots in the night time, a wooden legged man gave me the boots, he said he could not wear them, he was an old pensioner like myself; the other things I found in a cart, I gave them to this young woman to carry, I did not know what was in them; going through the Park I met a young man that I knew, a shoemaker, I asked him to come with me, I went to a shop where I sell my boots and shoes, I said, my friend, if you will stop, we will have half a pint of beer together, I went into the shop, and asked the man if he would buy the boots, he would not buy them, he said they were not worth two pence, they were tore in the leg; I met with this young woman by accident, I know nothing of her, I gave her the things to carry.

Grace's Defence. This here man met me, and gave me these things to carry, I did not know what things were in the bundle.

GRAHAM - GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

GRACE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-29

240. DENNIS SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a basket, value 1 d. and fifty pound weight of raisins, value 17 s. the property of John Cousins , William Cousins , and Charles Sayer .

SAMUEL WILSON sworn. I am carman to Messrs. Cousins and Sayer. On the 26th of March, a little after eight in the evening, I drove my waggon into the Minories to Mr. Thompson's shop door, I just went within the door to deliver the bill, and when I came to the waggon, I missed one basket of raisins, I looked round the waggon tail, and I saw a a man with the basket on his shoulder, I made up to the man and asked him what he did with that on his shoulder; he replied I am an officer, carman, you must come along with me; I went with him to the watchhouse, and there I saw the man he had got in hold.

Q. The officer had got the prisoner in custody had he. - A. Yes.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. I am an officer On the 26th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking down the Minories, and while the carman was unloading at the shop out of the waggon, the prisoner at the bar took this basket of Malaga raisins out of the waggon, I let him go with it about forty yards; as he was going down a turning I stopped him, we had a struggle together, and he threw it away; I asked him how he came by it, he told me he found it; I gave him into the custody of another person, and I went and took care of the fruit; I saw the waggoner, I said this is what you are looking for, come along with me.

Q. You saw him take it out of the waggon. - A. Yes, he was taken to the watchhouse; I produce the basket of raisins. (The property identified by Wilson.)

Prisoner's Defence. I would with to know if there is any mark or number on it that they could swear to.

Court. It is very immaterial whether they could or not, they saw you take it out of the waggon.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-30

241. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , a firkin, value 4 d. and fifty-six pounds weight of butter, value 15 s. the property of William Fields and Francis Rawlins .

JOHN BARGE sworn. I am porter to William Fields and Francis Rawlins , cheesemonger s, No. 109, Upper Thames-street . On the 16th of April, about half past two in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar go into the warehouse, he said there about two minutes, and then come out with a firkin of butter on his back; I followed the prisoner down a passage, and spoke to him; he then let the firkin fall; I followed the prisoner till I had him taken, he was out of my sight ten or fifteen yards.

Q. Can you take upon you to swear that he is the man. - A. Yes.

(The firkin produced, and identified by the witness.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-31

242. WILLIAM ASHLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , three pair of boots, value 6 l. and ten pair of shoes, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Charles Wood .

CHARLES WOOD sworn. I am a boot and shoemaker , I live in Cornhill . On Saturday evening the 1st of March, at half past ten o'clock at night, there were eight pair of boots on the counter, I went up stairs, and left the prisoner there with two other men; when I come down I found one pair gone, they were black in the sole, and the others were not. On Monday morning I asked the prisoner how many pair of boots he took with him on Saturday evening; he said seven pair, four pair to one woman, and three pair to another, to get them corded; on Tuesday morning I went and got a search warrant, I took the officer with me, and in his apartment we found three pair of boots, and ten pair of shoes; I knew them all to be my property, I came back, and had him taken up at my own house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. The prisoner was at work at your shop at the time that you searched his lodgings. - A. Of course.

Q. Did you ever see him in these lodgings. - A. I do not recollect that ever I did, his name was on the door; most certainly it was his lodgings.

Q. You may have a very firm conviction of it, but how do you know it. - A. This man is employed by me as a weekly servant, I give him several things

to do after his hours of his being with me; we found six pair of Hessian legs in his room (when we found these other things) that I had given him to work at home; he had earned eighteen shillings this week at home, besides the guinea I gave him.

Court. Is he a married man. - A. Yes, and he has got a child; I have seen his wife at my shop, and she was at the lodgings, and she was in custody for one night.

- HARPER sworn. I am an officer of Worship-street; on the 3d of March, the prosecutor came to our office, and took out a search warrant; I went with him to execute that search warrant in Paul-street, Shoreditch, and there I found the property which the prosecutor said were his, three pair of boots, and ten pair of shoes; I produce them. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-32

243. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 20 s. the property of Richard Iles .

ELIZABETH SKINNER sworn. I live in Skinner-street, with Mr. Iles, a laceman ; on the 29th of March, between eleven and twelve at noon, the prisoner came in and asked to look at some lace, I shewed her some, and she fixed on a remnant which I told her I would let her have for half a crown; she asked me if I could give her the whole of the change in silver, I told her I could not without a seven shilling piece; she said that would not do, she would go into the cheesemonger's shop just by, and call for the lace; as soon as she went out of the shop, I was going to take half a piece of ribbon from the counter, I found it was gone, I then sent into the cheesemonger's shop, she was not there; I saw her in about half an hour afterwards.

Q. Was there any other person in the shop when this young woman was there. - A. Not a customer, there was one of the family in the house.

Q. Is she here. - A. No, she serves in the shop, and was behind the counter.

Q. Then she might see what passed. - A. Yes.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden; on the 29th of March, the prisoner was brought by a parish constable to our office, upon two different charges of felony; I searched her, and found upon her a letter directed to Mr. Iles, of Skinner-street, Snow Hill, and a piece of ribbon rolled up in paper, wrote upon it Richard Iles ; I went to Mr. Iles's shop, and asked them if they had lost any thing, Mrs Skinner came and identified the prisoner and the property; I produce the property, (The letter and property identified by the witness.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not go to take it up; it was taken up in my child's coat.

Q. Mrs. Skinner, are you sure she is the woman. - A. I am quite sure.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-33

244. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , fifty pound weight of nails, value 30 s. the property of His Majesty ; and

Several other Counts, for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES EVANS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Thames police constable.

Q. On the 13th of March last, were you by the Victualling-office. - A. I was, about a quarter past three in the afternoon in Thames-street , very near the Victualling-office; I saw the prisoner at the bar coming out of the gate, carrying this bundle under his arm; a few paces from the gateway I stopped him, and asked him what he had got, the prisoner made no answer, I told him I should take him back into the yard where he came from; he begged I would let him go, he said it was the first time he had done any thing of the sort; I took him into the yard and then into the counting house to the clerk, there the clerk recognised him to be one of their labourer s.

Q. What did the clerk say to him. - A. He said that he never suspected him to do any thing of the sort before, they had frequently lost nails; I opened the handkerchief, and found they were new nails.

Q. Is there any mark on the bag. - A. There is part of a mark, which has the appearance of the King's mark.

THOMAS LONG sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman cooper of the Army Victualling-office; the prisoner has been employed in this warehouse between three and four years.

Q. Now look at that property, and tell me whether you know that property to belong to the Victualling-office. - A. They are similar nails as are used at the Victualling-office, and on the bag there seems to be a part of the King's mark.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. The nails were not kept under your custody. - A. They were, it was impossible for any body to get at them without they had a key.

Q. Other people use such nails at these. - A. Exactly so.

JAMES COCK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk of the Victualling-office; we have similar nails to these.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. How long has this person worked in the yard. - A. Between three and four years; the man was perfectly sober, we always found him a good labourer.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and during that time to be publicly whipped one hundred yards near the Victualling-office .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-34

245. EDWARD GRAHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Walter , about the hour of nine at

night, on the 10th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two blankets, value 8 s. a counterpane, value 8 s. and a looking glass, value 10 s. the property of George Walter .

SUSANNAH WALTER sworn Q. You are a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband's name is George Walter . On Thursday evening, the 10th of April, about nine o'clock at night, I went up stairs to put my children to bed, it was dark, I left a bit of candle with them as I usually do, and I came down stairs, and having occasion to go up stairs to unlock a room door for a young man that sleeps in the house, I found my room door open.

Q. What state was the outer door in. - A. When I went up stairs I shut the door, when I came down again I found the front door open.

Q. You found the street door open, and your chamber door open. - A. Yes, and my two children were laying on the bed with only a sheet over them.

Q. What age were they. - A. One four and the other two years old: I missed two blankets and a patch work quilt, one sheet was laying at the foot of the bed.

Q. When did you see any of the things again. - A. They are in court now; I never saw the prisoner till I went to Bow-street office.

SAMUEL TAUNTON sworn. I am an officer.

Q. Where did you find these things. - A. In a two pair of stairs front room in Duck-lane.

Q. Who lodges there. - A. The prisoner, I understood; I apprehended the prisoner in Old Pye-street, between nine and ten o'clock on Thursday evening; we took the prisoner to Tothil-fields, and then went to search his lodgings, at Mrs. Wilkinson's, No. 16, Duck-lane; these articles were found in that room, a looking glass, two blankets, and a quilt.

FRANCIS CANNON sworn. Q. What do you know of this business. - A. I saw the prisoner go up stairs about nine o'clock at night, I live in the same house, and a girl that he was with lived in the same house, her name is Ann Grace ; on Thursday night he turned up stairs very quick, and as soon as he came on the stairs he put the candle out; they went into the room and staid about ten minutes, and then they went out of doors, there was another man with him, that had a red coat on, the same as he has now.

Q. That was about nine o'clock at night. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any things that he had. - A. No, I had not opened the door soon enough for that.

Q. Did Ann Grace go out with him. - A. No, she was in Bridewell at that time; when the constable came to me, he asked me to give him a light, I gave him a light, and shewed him the room; I was with him when he found the things.

Prisoner. (to witness.) Are you sure that I lived with the girl or not. - A. You lived with her as much as ever my husband lived with me.

MARY WILKINSON sworn. Q. Do you keep this house where Grace lodged. - A. Yes, I let the room to Ann Grace .

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner there. - A. Yes, I have seen him walking about the room three or four times, and once I see him sitting on the bed stead, as if he had been in bed. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it, nor I did not see her all that evening; it is a house that girls of the town lives in; they have many men coming backward and forward to it; I had it not in my power to live with any woman of the fort; I have only one hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-35

246. JOHN HOLMES and JOSEPH EASTMEAD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , a piece of silk handkerchiefs, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Coates , privately in his shop .

THOMAS COATES sworn. On the 12th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, two soldier s, in rather dirty regimentals, came into my shop, they asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, I was at the far end of the shop serving, and my brother shewed them some.

Q. Did you observe them go out. - A. I did not myself.

RICHARD COATES sworn. Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes, I remember them coming into my brother's shop; after they had been there I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs, that had been shewed them.

Q. Did they leave the shop. - A. Yes, Eastmead went out first, the prisoner Holmes stopped a few minutes afterwards; I missed it when Holmes was going out, we pursued Holmes and brought him back; Eastmead was not taken till the following morning.

Q. (to Thomas Coates.) Did you search him. - A. No, I did not suppose that he had the goods, as the other went out first.

Q. Did you question the prisoners about it. - A. They both denied it.

Q. What sort of handkerchiefs were they. - A. Belcher handkerchiefs; I am positive they must have taken them, we examined the wrapper at the moment we missed them; Eastmead's lodgings was searched, but nothing was found.

Holmes's Defence. I went into the shop with my comrade, he wanted to buy a handkerchief or two, he asked me to pass my opinion upon them, and the only piece of handkerchiefs that I touched was a chocolate colour; I told him it was the best colour I thought; I did not see any Belcher handkerchiefs.

Eastmead's Defence. I went along with my comrade for a handkerchief, there was some handkerchiefs shewn us, but none of them were Belcher's, they were chocolate ones, I did not approve of them, I went out; I did not know but he was coming after me.

Holmes called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-36

247. JOHN STRANGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of March , two heifers, value 15 l. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK sworn. Q. Where do you live

- A. I live at Finchley ; I had two heifers for seven or eight months; on Sunday, the 30th of March, my lad fed them, and turned them out, being open fine weather, with the other cows, on the common of Finchley.

Q. When did you miss them. - A. The next morning, because they always come home regular; I made use of all means I possibly could, both myself and my servant, for ten miles round the country to find them, at last I heard that they were tied up in Smithfield Market, on Monday morning the 31st of March, about two o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you ever see them again. - A. I saw them last Saturday, in East Ham Marsh , in the possession of Mr. Strong, who lives by Newington Green, he went down with me, to shew them me.

Q. Are you sure that these two heifers that you saw are the same that you lost. - A. I am certain of that, they were burnt in the horn, I described them before I saw them.

THOMAS NORTH sworn. I am a butcher, I live in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch.

Q. What do you know about these heifers. - A. On Monday the 31st of March about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw them tied up to a rail in Smithfield; I asked the price and bought them of the prisoner at the bar, I gave him twelve pound all but half a crown for the two.

Q. I suppose you did not ask him his name. - A. No.

Q. What did you do with them after you purchased them. - A. I took them to Rumford-market, and sold them there.

Q. What day did you take them to Rumford-market. - A. Last Wednesday week.

Q. What day did you do with them between the 31st of March, and the time you took them to Rumford-market. - A. They were locked up a week in the Bear and Ragged Staff yard, Smithfield, and the man was taken up on suspicion of stealing them the same day as I bought them.

Q. How came they to let him go again. - A. Mr. Nalder can explain it all to you; I took them home on the Saturday to my house, and on Wednesday morning I took them to Rumford.

Q. Are you sure they are the same heifers that you bought at Smithfield-market, that you sold at Rumford-market. - A. Yes, I sold them there to one Mr. Strong, of Newington Green, for fifteen pound ten shillings.

Prisoner. Did not I tell you that I was sent there by my master, and that I must not sell them before seven o'clock. - A. You said you expected your master there at seven o'clock, and if he did not come there you was to sell them.

Q. Did he tell you who his master was. - A. Yes, one William Smith , of Roystone, in Leicestershire, between Northampton and Leicester.

Q. Did his master ever come. - A. No, I never see his master.

Q. How long did they remain in the market. - A. Till between ten and eleven o'clock, before they were locked up, no master ever come.

Q. You paid him the money. - A. No, I paid Mr. Nalder the money on the Saturday.

WILLIAM COLLINS sworn. I am a salesman in Smithfield-market; after this young man bought these cattle, he came and asked me whether he was to pay the money for them or not; I told him not to pay for them by no means, because they were worth more money than he asked for them by three or four pound, I told him to apply to an officer, he applied to Mr. Nalder; I told Mr. Nalder the best way would be to lock the heifers up, and the man too; I have seen the heifers since, and they are the same that Mr. Strong bought.

Q. Are you sure that them heifers that you saw since, are the same heifers that this man bought of the prisoner. - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

FRANCIS NALDER sworn. Q. You are a city marshall. - A. I am; on Monday the 31st of March, about nine o'clock, I went into Smithfield, I had been in the market but a few minutes, I was applied to by two or three people, saying, that there was a man in the market who had offered these two beasts to sell, and that they had no doubt but he had stole them; I went up to the prisoner, and asked him how he came in possession of these heifers; his answer was they were the property of Smith, who lived between Leicester and Northampton and as Northampton fair was on Tuesday he had sent him on with them to Smithfield-market; he was to sell them for twelve pound, or as near twelve pound as he could get, his master was going back to Northampton; he said that on Sunday morning, he met his master at Whetstone, who had about a score of the same cattle, and had sold all but them two. I then asked him what his master was, he told me that he was a jobber in cattle; I immediately told him that his master, as a jobber in cattle, knew better where to sell them than Smithfield-market, they being lean, I suppose one would calve in about three weeks; he gave no answer to that, but he had obeyed his master's orders; I told him I was so far dissatisfied with the account thas he gave me, that I should certainly take him into custody; I took him into custody, and secured the cattle, he was examined at Guildhall; I took him in custody, and he remained in custody till the Saturday, he was then liberated by the order of alderman Boydell, he pleaded poverty, and out of the money I received for the cattle, I was ordered to give him fifteen shillings, to convey him back to Northampton; on the Thursday following the prosecutor waited on me, hearing that I had the man in custody the week before, I gave him then an account of the man; I received information that he was seen working in the brick-field, at the lower part of Hoxton; I went to the lower part of Hoxton, and there I met with him; he has since had an opportunity of writing to his master, and they have wrote to Northampton, by the order of Mr. Kirby, and no man has come forward; I took him last Friday, this very day week, in the brick-field; the heifers were delivered by the alderman to Young North ; I have never seen them since.

Prisoner's Defence. My master is a man that deals in cattle in general, of different kinds, some good and some indifferent; I met him at Whetstone, he ordered me to go on with him, when we got partly out of the Heath, he says, I am a good mind to go to Northampton, you go to Smithfield, and if I am not there by seven o'clock, you sell them; so I came

on, and put them in the pound, I asked one of the drovers to bring them down and tie them up; that gentleman asked me the price first, I told him I was not to sell them till seven o'clock, if my master is not here at seven o'clock I may sell them at the price he told me; I stood by the beasts till eleven or twelve o'clock to take care of my master's property; if I had known it was wrong, I had plenty of opportunity of escaping.

Q. If you lived with a jobber that comes to town, when you was discharged why did not you go down to him instead of going to work in the brick field. - A. I wished to be here, as I expected him coming up; it was my intention to be near in town, if in case my master come he would come forward, so I got work in the brick field.

The prisoner called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-37

248. JOSEPH WILLIAM DANIEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , eighteen silver tea spoons, value 4 l. 6 s. fourteen silver salt spoons, value 2 l. 13 s. four silver mustard ladles, value 15 s. three pair of silver sugar tongs, value 3 l. 15 s. and forty-two ounces weight of silver, value 11 l. 9 s. the property of William Eaton in his dwelling house .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM EATON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a working silversmith . - A. I am, I live in Addle-street .

Q. The prisoner I believe has been some time past in your employ as a clerk . - A. Yes.

Q. Have you observed during his service that there were any deficiency in your silver. - A. Yes, I had spoken to him many a time on that subject, his answer was that it was very strange that there was not more silver come out of the shop.

Q. That was the top shop. - A. That was the shop that I did not keep any account against; there was one shop that I did and one that I did not.

Q. Who had the care of that shop. - A. No one particular, no farther than I trusted the prisoner to look after the silver when I was absent.

Q. Had he mentioned any thing respecting any other person looking after the melting pot. - A. My son attended the melting pot, I used to find it very deficient.

Q. On the 10th of March had the prisoner been out on your business. - A. Yes.

Q. On his return, did he bring you home four silver spoons wrapped up in paper. - A. Yes, he brought them from a shop for orders.

Q. On your opening that paper in which the spoons were, did you find any thing. - Q. Yes, some silver filings; when I found the filings it rather alarmed me, I asked the prisoner how these filings came in the paper, he said he could not tell exactly, except it was from the workmen, which he was in the habit of going several times to the workmen to take the silver in and out, and bringing the silver in his pocket, he said that might be the case; I said it could not be so, for I had never met with such an accident since I had been in business; I askked him what he had in his pocket, he then pulled out some silver filings.

Q. Was that the same paper from which he had taken out the spoons. - A. No.

Q. What quantity might it be. - A. It might be worth about four pence.

Q. Was that before the constable came. - A. Yes, I went for a constable, the constable came and searched him, and in his right hand pocket he pulled out a pocket book, and in the pocket book were more silver filings; my son stood by, he immediately asked him to go up stairs, he went up stairs with my son, and in the prisoner's hearing, my son said the prisoner had confessed of taking the things away, and if I would forgive him he would bring all the things back; I said I shall say nothing to that, I must first have what you have taken.

Q. Did you go with the constable to his lodgings. A. Yes, I there found eighteen silver tea spoons, fourteen silver salt spoons, four silver mustard ladles, three pair of silver sugar tongs, and forty-two ounces weight of silver filings; they were wrapped up in different papers.

Q. Did he state to you whether they were yours. A. Yes, when he went up into the room he unlocked the box and took out the different articles, and said they were my property; he gave them to me, I laid them on the table, they were delivered to the constable.

WILLIAM PAUL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable. - A. Yes, I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodgings, I produce the property.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Mr. Alley. Q. (to prosecutor) You have no partner. - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-38

249. JOSEPH WILLIAM DANIEL was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , two silver table spoons, value 1 l. eighty-two dollars, value 19 l. 5 s. one hundred ounces of silver, value 20 l. six dozen of silver tea spoons, value 15 l. seven dozen of silver salt spoons, value 12 l. one dozen of silver table spoons, value 10 l. and six silver tea spoons, value 1 l. 2 s. the property of William Eaton , in his dwelling house .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was from this charge

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-39

250. JAMES PHILIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February , forty pound weight of beef, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Pitt .

Second Count for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Edward Cock .

SAMUEL PITT sworn. I am a butcher , I live in Anchor-street, Bethnal Green. One Tuesday the 25th of February, about six o'clock in the

morning, I went to Leadenhall market . I missed a piece of beef from off Mr. Hunt's stand in the wholesale market; from information I received, I went to the Mansion house, there I saw the beef and the prisoner, I am sure it was the same beef, it was a buttock and an aitchbone together, I had taken it to Leadenhall to sell.

EDWARD COCK sworn. I am a watchman ; my stand is in the wholesale part of Leadenhall market; I know I had a piece of beef of that description under my charge that belonged to Samuel Pitt .

JAMES LANGFORD sworn. I am a watchman of Portsoken ward in the Minories. On the 25th of February, about half after three in the morning, I stopped the prisoner with a piece of beef wrapped up in a great coat, the prisoner was in the Minories; I asked him what he had got, he said a farmer gave it him.

Q. Did he tell you what it was. - A. No, I took him to the watchhouse; the very same piece of beef I took from the prisoner, Mr. Pitt swore before the lord mayor that it was his property.

WILLIAM COX sworn. I was constable of the night; I asked the prisoner what he had got under his coat, he said he did not know, it was given him by a farmer; I opened his coat, and found it was an aitchbone and a buttock of beef.

Q. You produced it before the lord mayor. - A. Yes, and Mr. Pitt swore to it.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me what it was, I told him it was beef; I found it at the Five Lamps, at Aldgate.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-40

251. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , a gold watch, value 20 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. and a gold watch chain, value 1 l. the property of Henry Scoons .

HENRY SCOONS sworn. I am a seaman . On the 20th of March last, coming up from Gravesend in a post chaise, I stopped in New Bridge-street, Blackfriers , I got out of the chaise into a hackney coach, to proceed to my lodgings in the Cloisters, Bartholomew's hospital; immediately on getting into the house I recollected leaving my watch behind me in the post chaise; I immediately got a servant to find out the chaise.

Q. Where was you drove from. - A. From Dartford; the man succeeded in finding out the chaise, but the watch was not in the chaise, I made application to the public office at Hatton Garden; the officer has taken up the hackney-coachman .

Q. Why do you accuse him of it. - A. Because the postboy denied having taken it, and it being found in a part of London afterwards.

Q. Are you sure that this is the coachman that drove you. I can only say to the best of my knowledge, he took the things out of the postchaise, the watch was under the portmanteau, and there is a witness that says he saw him drop the watch.

WILLIAM WELLSPRING sworn. I am an apprentice to John Davis , No. 15, Hatton Wall. On the 20th of March, about half, past three o'clock I was in New Bridge-street, Blackfriers, I saw the Dartford post chaise come full speed down Blackfrier's Bridge; seeing it stop at the last coach in the rank, I stopped, I saw the coachman get off his box, he opened the door, and likewise opened the chaise door, took out the luggage and put it into the coach; on seeing him turn round from the chaise I observed him drop a yellow coloured watch, he picked it up, and put it into his right hand coat pocket, got on his box, and drove away towards Ludgate Hill.

Q. Do you know the coachman. - A. Yes, that is him, the prisoner at the bar, I am sure of it, I have seen him before.

Q. Do you know the gentleman that got out of the chaise. - A. Yes, that is the gentleman. (pointing to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. That is the gentleman that offered a reward of ten guineas for the person that convicted the prisoner of stealing the watch; what way of life are you in. - A. I am a bedstead maker's apprentice.

Q. Were you out with a bedstead then. - A. Yes.

Q. You were standing in the street, instead of going about your master's business; you never spoke to the coachman before in your life. - A. I have seen him before.

Q. You may have seen a great many other men; what the colour of the horses were, you cannot tell me. - A. One was a dark one.

Q. You do not know the number of the coach. - A. No.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you heard of a reward. - A. I never heard of it at all.

Q. Who was it that applied to you to come forward. - A. Trott, the officer.

Q. How came Trott to find you out. - A. My master went to the office.

Q. Why did not you go to the gentlemen when he got into the coach, if you thought the prisoner was doing a wrong thing; you heard of the reward, and so you thought you would go then. - A. I saw the prosecutor get out of the chaise into the coach.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 25th of March, I received information from the last witness and his master, that induced me to apprehend the prisoner the next morning; he had been driving a coach exactly of the description which the last witness gave me; I saw the coach standing in Turnmill-street, near Mr. Fox, his master's, gateway; the last witness informed me where he lodged; Wellspring went into the tap, and saw him sitting by the fire, he came out and informed me, I went in and took him into custody, and searched him, nothing was found on him that led to a discovery of the watch; he denied any knowledge of it whatever; I took him to the office, and locked him up, being early in the morning; I received information that a person had been to take out some gold watch cases, which had been sent to Mr. Cox, a refiner, in the city, for six pounds eleven shillings and sixpence; I went immediately to the house of one Watson, in Clerkenwell, I saw Mrs. Watson, I challenged her of knowing something of

a gold watch that had been described to be found near the Old Bailey, her answer was, that her husband was out with it.

Q. Did you ever find the watch cases. - A. Yes, these are the cases. (producing them, and the inside of the watch separate.) After this conversation, she said she had some part of it up stairs; she went up stairs, I went up stairs after her, and there I found it, and the gold chain, which is broke; the capping of the watch answers to the advertisement.

Q. You found the watch chain and the inside part of the watch. - A. Yes; I took her into custody, and she then took me to Mr. Henshaw, he said he had sent his wife to Mr. Cox's to take them out; he afterwards brought them to the office.

JANE FOX sworn. Q. Do you keep coaches, or your husband. - A. My husband, certainly.

Q. How many numbers do you keep. - A. Three.

Q. Do you recollect what numbers they are. - A. One is 410, 151, 830.

Q. Now which number did the prisoner drive on the 20th. - A. I do not know, we never keep an account of the numbers the men drive, sometimes my husband drives morning man, and he drives night man; he has drove for us a fortnight.

Q. Do you know any thing more about this. - A. No more than he said he had lost a watch the Saturday before this.

Q. (to Wellspring.) What kind of a coach was it the man drove. - A. A dark bodied coach.

Mrs. Fox. We have got three dark bodied coaches; I cannot say whether he had the orange coloured one out, or the dark one.

MARY WATSON sworn. I live at No. 4, Allen's Buildings, Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell. On the 20th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, my husband came home, he said he had found the remains of a gold watch in going from dinner, about half past two he found it.

Q. Was that the watch that you afterwards gave the inside of to Trott. - A. Yes, I told Trott my husband found it; I gave the cases to Mr. Henshaw to sell, and the chain; he returned the chain to me, he said it was not pure gold.

Q. Was it a complete watch when you first saw it. - A. No, it was very much shattered, the works were in one paper, and the case in another; as soon as I heard it was advertised, I went to Mr. Henshaw's to get them back again, he said he would endeavour get them if the cases were not melted; he went to get them back.

JOSEPH WATSON sworn. I am a journeyman cabinet maker; I have worked for Mr. Beecham, in St Paul's Church Yard, twenty-three years. In returning from dinner to work, on Thursday, the 20th of March, about half past two o'clock, going along Giltspur-street, I crossed the road where I saw something lye, which appeared to me to be a bit of metal.

Q. Laying where. - A. In the road, in the coachway between Cock-lane and St. Sepulchre's Church, when I picked it up, I found it to be the outward case of a watch very much bruised, and defaced; I put it in my pocket and then looked further to see if I could find any other part of it; at some distance, it might be a yard or two, I then found the inner case, that appeared as if a cart or a coach wheel had gone over it, the chain and seal were attached to it; the seal was bruised, and whatever stone had been in it was not then remaining in it, and several links of the chain were broken; I then took up that, and when I had it in my hand, in the act of going to put it in my pocket, a man whom I do not know, that was going along the foot pavement, I presume by way of joke, called out halves, I not knowing it to be gold made answer I did not know it was worth picking up; I kept it in my hand, it was very dirty, I put my hand in my coat pocket, when I arrived at Mr. Beecham's shop, our porter and the house maid were both in the front shop, near the door, I said I had picked up the fragments of a watch.

Q. That is all you found. - A. Yes, I found first the outward case, then the inner case with the works in it.

Q. You had not said any thing at all about the works being in it. - A. If I made a mistake, I ask your pardon; I found the inner case with the works in it.

Q. Do you suppose that any man alive believes a word that you have spoke. - A. I have spoke nothing but the truth.

Q. Why the very thing contradicts you to your face. (his Lordship to the Jury.) Gentlemen, look at the cap of that watch: you see the cap of the watch which has been bruised, and you see the other things, they have been pulled to pieces, the marks of the bruises on the cap and the case, are in separate places, and the inside works are not bruised at all.

Jury. They are bruised each in a separate place.

- HENSHAW sworn. I am a watch and clock maker. On the 24th of March Mrs. Watson called at my house, I not being at home, she called the next day.

Q. Did you receive a watch from her. - A. Yes, in the same state that you see it now, she said that it was found by a friend who had come to her to dispose of it; I weighed them, and gave her a direction to go to Mr. Cox the refiner, as they had not been advertised; I asked her that, she said if I was going into the city, she would be glad if I would call, I did.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge about this watch. - A. No. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-41

252. RICHARD FAIRWEATHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of April , a silver tea-kettle lid, value 30 s. the property of his grace, the duke of Northumberland .

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Raine.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are butler, I believe, to his grace the duke of Northumberland. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner. - A. I do, she came into his grace's service about six weeks before this happened, he was junior footman . In consequence of information on the 7th of April, I went to the house of Mr. Wildman in Newport-street, there I saw the prisoner at the bar, and

Mr. Wildman produced a piece of plate, the top of a tea-kettle, which belonged to his grace the duke of Northumberland.

Q. Was it under your care. - A. It was.

Q. The prisoner at the bar had access to it. - A. He had.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Other servants had access to it. - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons had access to this plate as well as he. - A. Twenty or thirty.

CHRISTOPHER WILDMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Raine. Q. You are a silversmith residing in Newport-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 3d of April the prisoner at the bar coming to your house. - A. Yes, he produced to me part of a table spoon, which I bought of him.

Q. What did he produce to you when he come again. - A. On Monday the 7th of April he produced the top of a tea-kettle, he asked me if it was silver, I told him it was, and I weighed it; I told him I should not purchase it without he gave me satisfaction where he had it from, I should detain him and send to Bow-street for an officer; he readily told me he came from his grace; Mr. Thomas came up, I delivered the kettle lid to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I think you told me that he very readily told you where he came from. - A. He told me that he was a servant of the duke's, and if I would give it him back he would put it where he took it from.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, call-four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-42

253. ANN PHILIPS and ELIZABETH GROWKET were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Elizabeth the wife of John Newman , on the 9th of March , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person 5 s. the property of John Newman .

ELIZABETH NEWMAN sworn. Q. Where did you live at the time this happened. - A. In Field-lane; I am a mantua-maker , my husband is a watch-maker . On Sunday the 9th of March, between six and seven in the morning, I had been to 'squire Mellish's in Gray's Inn on business, coming back I went into the Distillers' Arms in Saffron Hill , I had a glass of peppermint.

Q. What at this time in the morning. - A. Yes, I had no more than one glass; I had five shillings and six pence in my pocket, tied up in the corner of my handkerchief.

Q. Had you tied it there in the morning before you went out. - A. After I came out, I had been home with some work, and six-pence I took out of the handkerchief to pay for the peppermint at the bar; these two girls came out of the tap-room, and Growket asked me to treat them.

Q. Did you know them before. - A. Yes, they lived in Chick-lane; I told Growket I could not afford to treat her, she then gave me a push by the arm, while the other prisoner picked my pocket; I felt her hand in my pocket, and saw her take the handkerchief out of my pocket, I endeavoured to take it from her, but she pulled the handkerchief with great force, and tore the corner of it with the money in it, then they both crossed over the way, and ran away laughing; I followed them into Brewers' Yard, Chick-lane, I went up stairs and asked them for the money, they refused giving it me, and Ann Philips struck me several times; there was a man in the room with them of the name of Golding and his wife, I told them that I must seek for an officer provided they did not give me the money; they both said that the officer and I might be d - d. The man pushed me down stairs, I fetched an officer immediately, I went with him to Brewer's Yard, they were both in bed then; I think the officer got four shillings and six pence of them.

Q. How do you know it is your money. - A. I cannot swear to money, he took it out of Growket's pocket.

Philips. We were all three unfortunate women alike, and we used to go out of a night together. - A. I never saw you till you picked my pocket, I knew Growket before.

Growket. Mrs. Newman, you know that I was out with you all night. - A. I never was out with you on any night, we never could agree; when she had been to prison before she brought up my name, I was not with her at that time.

JOHN MARTIN sworn. Q. You keep this public house, do you remember the Sunday morning this happened. - A. Perfectly well; the prisoners at the bar came in between the hours of six and seven in the morning, they called for a pint of purl and gin, which they had, Newman came in during the time they were sitting by the fire, and called for a glass of peppermint; the prisoners went up to her, and asked her to treat them, she made answer I cannot afford it; one of them catched hold of her arm, I cannot say which, I thought it was out of a joke, they all went out of the house together, that is all that I saw.

Q. Then they appeared to you to be acquainted together. - A. Exactly so.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On sunday morning the 9th of March the prosecutrix came to my house, and informed me she had been robbed; I went with her to Brewers' Yard, Chick-lane, to the apartment of one Golding, when I went into the room the two prisoners were both undressed, and in Golding's bed; in looking about the room I saw a pocket which Philips said belonged to her, containing a shilling, a penny, and a farthing, Golding and I I with difficulty found Growket's pocket, there I found two shillings, three sixpences, and three half pence, I then took them away; in walking along, Growket burst out crying, she asked me where I was going to take her to, I told her to New Prison, she then said she did not do it, but Philips did rob the girl, and she would not be hung for Philips; the next day the prosecutrix produced the handkerchief, the knot is in the handkerchief now, it is torn away from the knot; I produce it.

Philips's Defence. On Saturday night between the hours of eleven and twelve, I and Growket and Elizabeth Newman were at the watering-house,

house, Holborn; we treated Elizabeth Newman with a glass of rum, she said she had no money, and wanted a lodging, she asked us if we would let her go home with us; we said, oh dear no, they would not let her come there, for they had kicked her out of the door one day before; we left her at that time, and we went to see the fire in Shoreditch; when we returned she met us, and said she had got no money, she had walked the street all night; we said that is what we have done, we have been foolish enough to stay out all night at the fire. At half after four o'clock I met a gentleman, he gave me a shilling, he said he was very sorry to see so many unfortunate creatures in the street; we came to the Distillers' Arms, and called for a pint of purl and gin, after we had been out in the wet and cold; Elizabeth Newman came in, and we asked her to treat us, she said I am rather doubtful that you have been along with my young man that I keep, we said we had not, she said I will pick a crow with you before the day is out; we went immediately up to Mrs. Golding's and went to bed; in about two hours afterwards she came up with a man, we thought that she had brought up this young man that she keeps to play some tricks with us; we were together the best part of the night and drank together, we treated her, but she would not treat us again, as to her money, we had got none.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Did you ever see that woman before. - A. I never saw Philips before in my life; I had been with Growket, I was not at the fire.

BOTH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-43

254. MARY WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a looking-glass, value 5 s. the property of Henry Scambler , privately in his shop .

HENRY SCAMBLER sworn. I live in Oxford-Market . On the 26th of March between twelve and one, I went to get my dinner in the kitchen, I had scarcely sat down before my wife said somebody had gone out of the shop, I looked up at the same time through the grating, I saw the petticoats of a woman, she was stepping over the iron rails of my kitchen, I ran up and followed her, she had got this glass in question; with part of her apron thrown over it; I produce the glass, it is my glass.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY, aged 55.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings and sixpence .

Confined Six Months, in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-44

255. SAMUEL STONE was indicted for burburglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Neale, about the hour of eight at night on the 23d of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a plated milk pot, value 17 s. the property of William Neale .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-45

256. GEORGE RICHARD WALKER , CHRISTOPHER DODDS , THOMAS ROCHESTER , and RICHARD WALKER , were indicted for that they on the 18th of August, in the 44th year of his Majesty's reign , did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and caused and procured to be falsely made and counterfeited, a certain will and testament in writing, purporting to be the last will and testament of Richard Hockings , with intention to defraud Thomas Hockings .

Second Count, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged will, with the same intention; and

Several other Counts, for like offence with like intention.

The indictment was read by Mr. Arabin, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM SWINDLE sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Humphries, you served notices upon the four prisoners. - A. I did.

Q. Are these true copies. - A. They are.

(The notices read in Court.

ROBERT OLDERSHAW sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. You are a proctor, you attended in Doctors' Commons . - A. I did.

Q. You was there at the time, you produce the papers of a will. - A. There are several papers that I have brought.

Q. When was the will brought in. - A. On or about the 5th of December, 1804.

Q. Is there an affidavit annexed to that will. - A. Yes, signed by George Richard Walker Q. By whom was that brought in. - A. By Mr. Carr.

Q. Is the affidavit and the will in the same state as when they were brought in. - A. I believe they are nearly.

Court. What do you mean by nearly. - A. It has been torn a little.

Mr. Knapp. Nothing has been written on it. - A. No.

MR. THOMAS CARR sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Will you look at that will, which is produced by Mr. Oldershaw, and state to the court from where you got it. - A. This was the will that was delivered at my office; it was sent to me from the house of Richard Vanheythusen and Carr.

Q. What did you do with that will. - A. In consequence of instructions given to me for taking out a process.

Q Did you receive any instructions, and from whom were the instructions given. - A. I did from my assistant Mr. Buckton.

THOMAS BUCKTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Look at the papers; when did you first see it. - A. Sometime in the latter end of August, in September I believe it was, in the year 1804; I received it from Mr. Vanheythusen's own hand.

Q. Look at the affidavit, by whom is that affidavit made, signed, George Richard Walker . - A. I cannot say it was made by him, I believe it was made by him; I saw his name to it, I presume it is his.

Q. You was not by when he signed it. - A. No, not to my recollection.

Q. Have you seen George Richard Walker upon the subject of this will. - A. Many times.

Q. In what character has he come. - A. He was

first introduced to me in consequence of a letter from Mr. Carr.

Q. In what character. - A. He was introduced by a letter from Mr. Carr.

Q. Has he had various interviews with you, and in what character. - A. As the executor of that will.

Q. Have you seen any other of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I have seen Mr. Dodds, and I think I have once seen Richard Walker .

Q. In what character did they appear. - A. As the subscribing witnesses.

Q. Did you see Richard Walker attend once. - A. I remember seeing him.

Q. Did you see him sign the affidavit of that will. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever see him write. - A. No.

Q. Did you see him make any affidavit. - A. No.

Q. Have you two letters. - A. Yes.

Q. Produce them. (the witness produced them) From whom did you receive those letters. - A. I believe from George Richard Walker .

Q. Look at the allegations; did you prepare these allegations. - A. I in some measure prepared them.

Q. From whose instructions did you prepare them. - A. The instructions of course came through the means of Mr. Walker.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. Do not give us the argument, tell us matter of facts. - A. The instructions were furnished by Mr. Walker.

Q. Did George Richard Walker furnish you with any fact upon which these were grounded. - A. Certainly, he gave some instructions that were verbal, and some that were written.

Q. Have you the written instructions here. - A. I have.

Q. Produce them. - A. These are the instructions (producing them) I received from Mr. Walker; I should apprehend one to be the hand writing of Rochester, one to be the hand writing of Richard Walker , and one to be the hand writing of Dodds.

Q. You received them from Walker. - A. I cannot recollect whether I received them from Walker or not; it was a case upon which I considered it necessary to be cautious in drawing the plea, I thought it necessary that the subscribing witnesses should produce to me the nature of the transactions; I cannot say whether they were given to me from Walker.

Mr. Arabin. Who do you believe you received them from. - A. From Walker.

Court. Do you mean to say you received them all from Walker. - A. It is impossible for me to say, it is a year and a half ago, whether I received them from him or no, I remember a wish to be particular in the instructions, in order to draw the plea.

Q. To whom did you communicate that. - A. To Mr. Walker.

Q. That you wished to be particular in the instructions, in order to draw the plea. - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Did you ever shew these instructions to Mr. Walker; did he ever see them. - A. I do not remember that I did; after Mr. Walker came to England, a draft of the allegation was shewn to Mr. Walker.

Q. Did he approve of it. - A. Certainly, he did.

RICHARD VANHEYTHUSEN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a partner with Mr. Carr; do you know any of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I have seen George Richard Walker , and I have seen Dodds once.

Q. Did you at any time receive any papers, purporting to be the will of major Hockings. - A. It was left at the office, under cover, unopened, and was opened on the 30th of August.

Q. What was the directions upon that will. - A. Directed to Thomas Carr , by favor of Mr. Smith.

Q. Did Mr. George Richard Walker ever make any application to you respecting that parcel. - A. He did.

Q. When did he make application. - A. On the 30th of August he came to the office; on the 31st of August I attended by appointment Mr. Walker, on the subject of the will, in John-street, Bedford-row, I explained to him what necessary steps must be taken.

Q. Did Mr. Walker give you any instructions to proceed in the Commons. - A. No.

Q. Did he at any time afterwards give you any instructions. - A. Not with me.

Q. Is that the will which was produced. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Walker and you read that will over together. - A. A part of it.

Q. Did he make any remarks on the subject of that will. - A. Not a word.

Q. Did he ever give you any instructions after that particular legacy. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. You and your partner have been engaged in some business for Mr. George Richard Walker . - A. Yes.

Q. His proper place of residence is at Guernsey. A. It was.

Q. And when he was absent letters were left at your office for him continually, the papers in question were left there one day. - A. Left there for several days, for a considerable length of time.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Walker. - A. About two years.

Q. He is a man of respectable characters - A. As far as I know of.

Q. He has the misfortune to be dreadfully deaf, so deaf that he does not hear one word that passes here. - A. Most certain.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (to Mr. Carr) You are a partner with Mr. Richard Vanheythusen . - A. Yes.

Q. You know the prisoner George Richard Walker . - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you first see this will. - A. In September 1804 I was at Little Hampton, in Sussex, where I usually go at that time of the year, in the beginning of that month, about the second or third, the will which is now the subject of this trial, was sent to me, with other papers, from the office.

Q. I believe at that time you had no personal communication with Mr. Walker. - A. No.

Q. How soon did you see Mr. Walker after you received the will. - A. I think it must be the latter end of October.

Q. Look at these two letters, Mrs. Browning's letters, did Mr. Walker shew you or send you either of these letters. - A. He sent to me a copy of these letters.

Q. Did you ever see him on the subject of these letters. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see him on the subject of the will. A. The will was in Doctors' Commons.

Q. Were you in town in the month of August. - A. I left town on the 31st.

Q. Do you know whose hand writing that is (banding the witness a paper). - A. I think it is the writing of the clerk in my office at that time, his name is Holmes, he has gone from us some time, he lives at Mr. Philips's, Charing Cross.

Q. Is that your hand writing Mr. Carr (another paper). - A. No.

Q. Did you see Mr. Walker in the month of August. - A. I do not recollect I did.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Bethell calling upon you, do you remember giving Mrs. Bethell any papers on the subject of this will. - A. I think she called the latter end of October at the office, and in the month of August.

HENRY STEPHENS sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. You are a proctor in Doctors' Commons. - A. Yes.

Q. This is the administration of Mr. Thomas Hockings , the brother of the deceased major Hockings, when was it granted. - A. The 16th day of June, 1804.

Q. Did you see the prisoners then in Doctors' Commons, in support of this will. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the affidavit of that will, did you see Dodds, Rochester, and Richard Walker . - A. I saw all except George Richard Walker .

Q. Look at the name, whose hand writing is that signature of George Richard Walker. - A. I was not present.

Mr. Gurney. (to Mr. Carr) Look at the signature of George Richard Walker , is that his signature. - A. I never saw George Richard Walker write in my life, not even a letter.

Q. (to Buckton) Is that the signature of George Richard Walker . - A. I was not present when Mr. Walker made the application.

MR. JENNINGS sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. What situation do you hold in this court. - A. I am proctor.

Q. Was that will shewn to the prisoner. - A. It was.

Court. What was the business that was going on, what business was you occupying. - A. I had the will with me, and took their evidence.

Q. Did you address any language to them, immediately they put their deposition what did they say. - A. I took off the writing, and they were sworn, I read the story of the plea or allegations, and they gave the answer.

Q. Do you speak to the identity of the prisoners Dodds, Rochester, and Richard Walker , as being the three persons that you are now saying gave their evidence. - A. Yes.

MAJOR ROWLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. You I believe are an officer in the royal corps of Engineers. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you intimately acquainted with the late major Richard Hockings . - A. Yes.

Q. What was his rank in the corps of Engineers. A. Captain:

Q. What was his rank in the army, as he was captain of the Engineers. - A. He was major in the army.

Q. Do you know at what time he quitted England for Trinidad. - A. He embarked the 5th of April 1803.

Q. At what time had you the official report of his death. - A. He died July 1, 1803.

Q. You received that report in the month of September. - A. On the 7th of September.

Q. In October did you go, accompanied by his nephew lieutenant Hockings, to Mrs. Bethell, in Paradise-row, Lambeth. - A. I did.

Q. Was that the house in which major Hockings had lived before he quitted England. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and lieutenant Hockings make diligent search amongst his papers for a will and testament, did you find any. - A. None.

Q. In the month of August 1804 did you receive a letter from the prisoner Mr. Walker. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known Mr. Walker before in the island of Guernsey. - A. I had seen him in Jersey.

Q. Is that the letter you received. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive it about the time it bears date. A. I received it, I should suppose, the same day.

Q. Have you ever seen Mr. Walker write or corresponded with him, so as to know his hand writing. - A. Never.

Q. Did you see Mr. Walker at that time at all. - A. No.

Q. When was the first time that you heard of the existence of any will of major Hockings. - A. I first heard of it from an information by Mrs. Bethell, about the middle of 1804, before August.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with major Hockings. - A. I have known him from the year 1787.

Q. Have you lived in habits of great intimacy and friendship. - A. I have been very intimate with him as an officer of the corps, more particular from his last situation.

Q. Do you know that he had a brother Mr. Thomas Hockings . - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that his two nephews were lieutenants in the army and navy. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing from himself upon what terms he lived with that brother, and these nephews. - A. I understood from him always that they were upon good terms, and he interested himself very much for the lieutenant in the army, the gentleman who is here.

Q. From all that you know of him had you any reason to believe that his affection remained at the time of his leaving England. - A. I have every reason to think so.

Q. Have you frequently seen the late major Hockings write. - A. Yes.

Q. You are well acquainted therefore with his hand writing. - A. Perfectly so.

Q. Was he a careless or an accurate man. - A. He was an accurate man to a degree.

Q. Was he much or little accustomed to use his pen. - A. I never saw a paper signed by him but the whole of it was his own writing, whether official reports or otherwise, I have often blamed him for doing what the clerk might have done.

Q. Have the goodness, sir, to look at that paper, purporting to be his will, first of all look at that signature;

do you or do you not believe that signature to be the hand writing of the late major Hockings. - A. I do not believe it.

Q. Have you the least doubt upon that subject. - A. None at all.

Q. (to Mr. Buckton) Have you the envelope. - A. I have the outer envelope, but not the inner.

Q. Let me see the one you have got (the witness produced it.)

Q. (to major Rowley) You have seen the will before. - A. I have.

Q. Have you read it. - A. I have.

Q. Is there any such rank in the corps of Engineers as major. - A. None.

Q. What is the stile of the corps. - A. The corps of royal Engineers.

Q. You have told me that major Hockings was always a man of singular accuracy. - A. Remarkably so.

Q. Whether he knew as well as you that there was no such rank as major in the corps of Engineers. - A. Certainly.

Q. Do you know whether he was ever acquainted with any such person as is related there, as Elizabeth Hinde . - A. No, I never heard of such a person as that.

Q. Did you ever know of his being with any person of the name of Mr. and Mrs. Browning. - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether major Hockings was acquainted with Mr. Walker, the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do not know that he was acquainted with him.

Q. I believe major Hockings was some years ago stationed at Jersey. - A. He was stationed at Jersey from December 1793 to 1798, four years I believe.

Q. You was living with him there in the habits of intimacy. - A. Yes, I had seen him at Jersey.

Q. Do you happen to know whether he was acquainted with Mr. Walker, you was yourself acquainted with Mr. Walker at Jersey. - A. I had seen Mr. Walker before that time at Jersey, I met him in a family I was acquainted with at Jersey.

Q. He was an inhabitant of Guernsey. - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Then Mr. Walker was a person you had seen at Jersey. - A. Yes.

Q. Whether he was acquainted with major Hockings that you do not know. - A. I cannot say.

Q. We have heard something about a captain of Engineers being a major in the army, that is so. - A. Yes.

Q. And if you were to be speaking of a captain of the Engineers, he being a major in the army, you would speak of him being a major. - A. Certainly, being a higher rank in the army.

Q. And if you were writing to the person, you would write to major Hockings. - A. Yes, upon all occasions.

Q. Now look at that will, do you say there is no resemblance at all of the hand writing of major Hockings. - A. There is some resemblance, but it is not his hand writing.

Q. There is such a resemblance there as would stagger an opinion whether it was or was not his hand writing. - A. To persons that were not well acquainted, myself being well acquainted with his hand writing, I think it is not; the moment I saw it at Doctors' Commons I was convinced it was not his hand writing.

Mr. Gurney. You was stating that in this rank he would be complimented as major. - A. Yes.

Q. Could he as an officer state himself to be a major of Engineers in his writing. - A. No.

GENERAL ROBERT MORSE sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I believe general Morse you are the commander of the corps of Engineers. - A. I was, and am at this present time.

Q. At what time did major Hockings go to Trinidad. - A. In April 1803.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with major Hockings. - A. I have known him as an officer in the corps twenty-five years.

Q. Were you intimate with him. - A. Not very intimate, I saw him at my house two or three times, I have been in the constant habit of knowing him as an officer.

Q. Look at the signature of that will and tell me whether you believe it to be the hand writing of major Hockings. - A. I do not believe it to be his hand writing.

Q. Have you during these twenty-five years frequently had an opportunity of seeing his hand writing. - A. I have occasionally.

Q. During some years you have been in the constant habit of knowing him, and seeing his hand writing occasionally, was he an accurate man or not. A. Remarkably so.

Q. Is the body of that paper his hand writing. - A. There does not purport to be a resemblance.

Q. Tell me whether you saw either of the prisoners or how many of them. - A. I have seen them all at the Thames police-office, except Richard Walker , whom I have seen at my house.

Q. Was any communication made to you, and by whom, respecting major Hockings' will. - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner Richard Walker ever come to you respecting the will. - A. He was brought to me by a man of the name of Eddington.

Q. Was the first application, and when, made to you in writing or verbally. - A. Verbally, to the best of my recollection, about Christmas 1803.

Q. Did you receive from Eddington any letter. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any of these letters now in court. - A. I believe I have.

Q. State to the court any that came from Richard Walker, or any that came from Eddington. - A. Very little was said, no more than this; he came there for the purpose of making disclosures, he himself protected that he came there for that purpose; he said here I am to answer such questions as you shall put, I put very few questions to him, I asked him if he was the subscribing witness to major Hockings' will, he said he was; this was in January 1804.

Q. Did you make any further appointment after that time by letter. - A. Yes.

Q. Did they come to that appointment. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Walker came to your house accompanied by Eddington, staid there a short time, and went away. A. Yes.

GENERAL - sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Did you know major Hockings. - A. Almost

forty-four years, nineteen of which we have been together, I knew him intimately, I have seen him write a thousand times.

Q. Was major Hockings an irregular man, or very concise and accurate. - A. A very regular and accurate man.

Q. Have you examined that paper. - A. I have seen it before, that is the will.

Q. Seeing it before and seeing it now, do you believe it to be major Hockings hand writing. - A. I do verily believe it is not his hand writing.

Q. You have said that you was very intimate with him, do you happen to know whether he was on affectionate terms with his brother and his brother's children. - A. Very affectionate, I know that he put the two nephews to school and paid for them.

Q. Did you ever hear of any interruption of that friendship. - A. Never.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are also an officer in this corps. - A. I was.

Q. How long were you acquainted with major Hockings. - A. From the year 1762, about forty years, to the time he was going to Trinidad, I have seen him write a thousand times.

Q. Were you very well acquainted with his hand writing. - A. Perfectly.

Q. Have the goodness to look at the signature of that paper, and tell me whether you believe it to be or not to be his hand writing. - A. I do not think it is.

Q. You saw it in the Commons. - A. I did.

Q. Is that an opinion that you have formed now in consequence of what you have heard upon the indictment, or was it the opinion that you formed there. - A. I did not think it was his hand writing then.

WILLIAM TEST , ESQ. sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Are you an officer of the ordnance in the Tower. - A. I am the chief royal military surveyor.

Q. Did you know major Hockings. - A. I did, when he first came to England to be examined for his commission; when he first came from Gibraltar, in the year 1776, I was acquainted with him by occasionally meeting with him.

Court. Were you well acquainted with him. - A. I was.

Mr. Arabin. Were you well acquainted with his hand writing. - A. I have frequently seen his signature; I have got many of his signatures by me now.

Q. Look at the will, sir, have you seen it before. - A. I have.

Q. Having seen it before, and seeing it now, do you believe it to be his hand writing. - A. I do not believe it to be his hand writing, there is some part of it that does not correspond with his hand writing.

RICHARD HOCKINGS sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you are the nephew of the deceased Mr. Hockings. - A. I am.

Q. What did the family of major Hockings consist of. - A. He had a woman that he lived with, and a child that he had by her.

Q. What other relations had major Hockings. - A. He had a brother, my father, my oldest brother, a lieutenant in the naay, and myself, two sisters, and a younger brother, a lieutenant in the army, also since dead.

Q. Upon what terms did the family live. - A. In good nature, and the most affectionate intimacy.

Q. In what time did your uncle go to Trinidad. - A. Some time in April, 1803.

Q. At what period were you acquainted with the death of your uncle. - A. Some time in October the same year.

Q. Have you had the opportunity of seeing your uncle write. - A. Frequently, I have sat up with him whole nights writing.

Q. Look at that signature, and state to the court whether that is your uncle's hand writing. - A. The will is not, nor the signature, it has the resemblance, but I can swear that it is not his hand writing; I have seen the will in the Commons before; I verily believe it is not his hand writing.

Q. Look at the body of the will, and tell me whether you ever knew of a person of the name of Elizabeth Hindes . - A. I never heard him mention the name.

Q. Do you know whether your uncle was acquainted with the executor of that will, George Richard Walker . - A. I never heard him mention that name.

Q. Did you ever hear him mention having any acquaintance with a person of the name of Browning. - A. Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You did not accompany your uncle in all his journies. - A. No, I was absent from him when I was at school, and absent for my country.

DR. PARSONS sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Look at that will, do you see the signature of George Richard Walker . - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the signature of the prisoner, George Richard Walker . - A. I do not know George Richard Walker from either of the prisoners at the bar; I know this is my writing; I merely know that a person was sworn before me, who said his name was George Richard Walker .

Q. Was any body with you. - A. Mr. Stone, the proctor.

ROBERT EDDINGTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know the prisoner, George Richard Walker. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you frequently seen him write. - A. I have.

Q. Look at that signature to that affidavit, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing. - A. I believe it to be.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Richard Walker. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen him write. - A. I never saw him write but once, that was when I saw him make a signature.

Q. Look at that signature, and tell me whether that is his signature - A. I cannot say.

Q. Have you ever seen Rochester write. - A. I have.

Q. Have you ever corresponded with him. - A. I have.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you believe that to be Rochester's hand writing. - A. It has the

appearance of it, I think it is.

Q. Have you seen Dodds' writing. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is the hand writing of Dodds. - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. There is written on the will, R. Hockings, major of the royal corps of engineers, executor, George Richard Walker , esq. Guernsey.

Q. (to major Rowley) Do you know whether that is major Hocking's hand writing. - A. It does not appear to be a resemblance of his hand writing.

(The will read in court.)

The Affidavit of George Richard Walker , was read, and the Allegation of Dodds, Rochester, and Richard Walker , in support of the Will, at the Commons, were also read in court, and Mrs. M. G. Browning's two letters likewise to George Richard Walker , informing him of the death of major Hockings, and that he had left his will with her, under cover directed to George Richard Walker, Guernsey.

Mr. Gurney. (to Mr. Carr.) Have you ever seen the person described as Mr. and Mrs. Browning. - A. I have not.

Q. Did the prisoner, Mr. Walker, ever inform you who Mr. and Mrs. Browning were. - A. Never, as I recollect.

Q. Have you ever made any enquiry after Elizabeth Hinde. - A. Never.

Q. You have never seen any such person. - A. Never.

Q. I believe Mr. Carr, though you have never seen Mr. George Richard Walker write, you have corresponded with him frequently. - A. Frequently.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand writing so as to know the letters came from him. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the signature of that affidavit, and tell me whether you believe it to be Mr. Walker's hand writing. - A. I certainly think it is.

Q. Be so good Mr. Carr, as to look at the letter to major Rowley, do you believe that to be Mr. Walker's hand writing, likewise. - A. Certainly,

(The letter read in court.)

ELIZABETH SCIDDER sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Where do you live. - A. I live in Dartmouth-street, Westminster, I have kept that house five years.

Q. Look at the prisoners, and tell me whether you have seen either of them before. - A. I have seen three of them before.

Q. Did you ever see one of them in Dartmouth-street. - A. I saw one, Mr. Brown, or Browning, there.

Q. Which of them is it you call Brown, or Browning. - A. The gentleman in black, George Richard Walker .

Q. When did you know him by the name of Brown, or Browning. - A. In the year 1803, he lodged in my house, and passed by that name.

Q. Him and his wife were the two persons who lodged in your house, by the name of Brown or Browning; he was deaf. - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Was it only partial deafness, or was he very deaf. - A. He was deaf, I do not know whether he was very deaf.

Q. Did he use a trumpet. - A. Yes, he lodged with me six or seven weeks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. When did the person that you suppose to be him, first come to lodge in your house. - A. About July, I did not keep any account; it was in June or July, 1803.

Q. Can you fix upon the time; do you speak with so much uncertainty as that it might be August. - A. I look upon it it might be July to the best of my knowledge, they were there but six or seven weeks.

Q. Do you think he is the person. - A. Yes.

Q. I understood you do not mean to swear with any certainty. - A. He looks very much like him.

Q. Were you shewn him at the police office. - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps you saw him in prison. - A. I thought he was the person.

Q. At the time that you saw him at the police office, he was under the charge of some crime, it was thought material that you should prove that he lodged at your house. - A. Yes.

Q. You have endeavoured since to be more certain of the time. - A. No, I cannot recollect the particular time, I was not in the habit of seeing them frequently.

Q. You do not know that he is the person. - A. I think he is the person.

Q. You cannot speak to the time. - A. I cannot speak to the time.

Q. Nor to the person with a certainty. - A. Not with a certainty, but it is very much like him; I think he had black hair then.

Q. Had you any servant at that time. - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Do you believe that he is the man. - A. It is like him.

Court. Had you any other lodgers of the name of Brown, or Browning. - A. No, at no other time.

MARY WOODFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Where do you live. - A. At No. 21, Brook-street, New Road, near Fitzroy-square.

Q. Did you live there in the year 1804. - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of the prisoners at the bar lodge at your house. - A. The further prisoner is a great likeness of the person (pointing to George Richard Walker ).

Q. Was the person who lodged with you very deaf. - A. He was.

Q. Did you ever see him use a trumpet. - A. I have once.

Q. Was there any woman lodged with him. - A. There was, she took my apartment in the name of Browning, they had been some months there by that name.

Q. Did that woman that took your apartment in the name of Browning, live with that man that is deaf, and used a trumpet, as his wife - A. I believe so.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Eddington. - A. Yes.

Q. Look round and see whether you saw either of the other prisoners there. - A. Neither of them; I was not in that house, I lived at the next door, I let that house out in separate tenements.

Mr. Gurney. Did a person of the name of Hindes lodge there at the same time. - A. Yes, in the parlour.

Court. On your looking again at the man does it.

duce you to believe that to be the man. - A. I can hardly say, I never spoke to the man, nor never was nearer to him than I am at this present time, except when I went to the prison; I was sent there by Mr. Kinnaird, to see him.

- HINDES sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Did you ever lodge at Mrs. Woodford's, No. 21, Brookes'-street, Fitzroy-square, - A. Yes, I went into the house in the year 1803, about Michaelmas.

Q. How long did you continue there. - A. About three quarters of a year.

Q. During the time you lodged there did you ever see either of the prisoners at the bar there. - A. Yes that gentleman in black, (pointing to George Richard Walker) he came there four or five months after Mrs. Brown.

Q. Were you acquainted with him. - A. Not so much as I was with Mrs. Brown.

Q. Were you so particularly acquainted with him as to know by what name he went by. - A. When he came there he went by the name of Walker, and while he was there he went by the name of Walker.

Q. Did they live together as man and wife. - A. I suppose they did, for they slept in the same room.

ROBERT EDDINGTON . Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have told me before that for many years past you have known George Richard Walker . - A. Yes.

Q. He is an inhabitant of the island of Guernsey. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed there under him for some years. - A. For one year.

Q. What was Mr. Walker. - A. He had the charge of purchasing coals for his Majesty's barracks; I had the charge of going into the North, and making the purchase and sending of them.

Q. Had he any business besides. - A. No.

Q. About the month of July, 1804, did you receive that letter from the prisoner Rochester. - A. That is the letter, I think it is his hand writing, I dare say it is; at the time I was taken to the Court House, on the last examination, I had Mr. Walker arrested for forty-six pounds, and from the cruelty I have undergone, I have been in irons, and under great agitations of mind, therefore, I beg I may be understood; I have had time to consider, and have considered every thing that I positively know, and if there should be any part of what I now relate should not exactly correspond with what I have related before, I humbly hope it may be attributed to the agitation of my mind at that time.

Q. In consequence of a note from Rochester, did you call upon him at his house in Welclose-square. - A. I did.

Q. Did he, when you so called, give you a note for another person. - A. There was a note inclosed to that which I had, and a message was left, begging I would give the inclosed to Mr. Walker, at No. 22, Brookes'-street.

(The letters read in court.)

Q. Did you take the letter so enclosed to No. 22, Brook-street, Fitzroy-square. - A. I did, I delivered it to a lady who came to the door.

Q. Have you seen that lady in company with Mr. Walker. - A. I have.

Q. Did she live with him as his wife. - A. Yes, I believe she did.

Q. Did that lady in return give you a letter to give to Rochester. - A. She did, I took it back.

Q. Did you then see Rochester. - A. I did not; I think it was the morning following I saw him, I had a cup of tea with him, and then the conversation began; he said that he had a note from Mr. Walker's that a worthy and particular friend of Mr. Walker's was dead, and left a will (he mentioned the name of major Hockings), but unfortunately, there was only one subscribing witness, of the name of Mrs. Browning, and unfortunately for him, he understood Mrs. Browning had left the country, and was gone to America.

Court. When was this. - A. July, 1804; I am not certain whether it was July, or the forepart of August; in all probability there would be some altercation in the Commons in proving the will, as she had left the country, and notwithstanding she had left the country, he believed it was a good will, but it would be necessary to have one or more witnesses to it; he said it was a good will, it was sufficient with her alone, if she had not left the country; that he, Mr. Rochester, had known me long, he had no objection of subscribing for one witness, if I would join in with him for the other, which I refused.

Mr. Gurney. Was any appointment then made for you to meet any other person. - A. I think he asked me if I would call there the next morning; going by I called, he was more freer, we had some conversation, he said it was a good will, he did not see that I was under any apprehension of danger to keep me from not signing the will, the conversation was that morning merely the same as before.

Q. Was any appointment made by you and him, for you to meet any other person - A. He gave me a note, and desired me that I would meet Mr. Walker, either on the following day, or the day after, at twelve o'clock, at the Circus tavern, St. George's Fields, on the time appointed; I went to the Circus tavern, and found Mr. Gadson and Mr. Walker sitting together; Mr. Gadson had formerly been a clerk to Mr. Walker.

Q. Did you have any conversation with Mr. Walker at that time. - A. None publickly, but by writing.

Q. Has Mr. Walker his hearing well. - A. No, he is very deaf.

Q. Did he at that time use any thing to assist his hearing. - A. No, he frequently used a trumpet, but I did not see one that day.

Q. In what manner did you and he converse. - A. He called for a sheet of paper, he wrote upon slips; and I answered the same way.

Q. Was all the pieces of paper with which you held the conversation burnt. - A. They were.

Q. What room were you in. - A. The coffee room.

Q. Tell us what passed between you and him. - A. What was I afraid of, he assured me it was a good will; he asked me if I had any objection to join with Mr. Rochester in signing the will, he assured me it was a good will.

Q. How long do you think that you conversed together. - A. We occasionally read the newspaper, I suppose we sat for an hour; he told me that he

was going to dine with Mr. Rochester at Wellclose-square; I cannot positively say whether it was the day after, or two days after, at two o'clock, he invited me to call and dine there also.

Q. Did you on the day appointed called on Rochester. - A. I called about three o'clock, dinner was done, I was ushered into the dining room, Mr. Walker, Mr. Rochester, and his brother, and another whom I did not know, were there, Mr. Rochester gave me a nudge, and I walked up stairs with him into a lodging room, he there put the question to me, he put into my hand a sheet of paper; on the left hand of it was the signature of Hockings, and the signature of Browning; upon looking at it I smiled, and I said to him that it was newly wrote, it was not dry; the whole of it appeared to be newly written, perhaps not half an hour; I asked him whom the signature of Browning was, he said, laughing, he did not know any other than the woman who lived with Mr. Walker; Mr. Rochester says he has offered me 300 l. and he says he will give you five guineas, and 100 l. when it is finished; at the same time I would beg to be understood when Mr. Rochester mentioned that, he said it in a laughing manner; on which I shall relate something on that subject.

Q. Did you and him return to the company. - A. I believe I went in and took a glass of grog; on the next morning I saw Mr. Rochester, he began talking on the same subject, I asked him what he meant by asking me to sign that paper, being so newly wrote, he said he hoped that I did not go away with the idea that that was the will, it was only a copy.

Q. Did you on the day after meet Dodds. - A. I did, in Clare market; Mr. Dodds being a countryman of mine, we went into a house and had a pot of porter, in drinking the porter I broke open the subject to Mr. Dodds, says he, sir, if you will introduce me to the parties I shall be able at the first sight to know whether it is a good will or not, he had known many instances of good wills, but he had found great difficulty in having them proved in the Commons, when there were not sufficient subscribing witnesses to them.

Q. How soon after did you see Mr. Rochester again. - A. About a day or two afterwards.

Q. Did you apprise him of what you had said to Dodds. - A. I did, he said he would mention it to Mr. Walker.

Q. Did you then see Dodds again. - A. I did not see Dodds till after I had seen both Rochester and Walker together; the only conversation then was, that Rochester had told Mr. Walker of Dodds, and that they should all dine at the Saracen's head at two o'clock, and they should be glad if I would come and dine with them.

Q. Who said that. - A. Mr. Walker and Mr. Rochester both together, I saw Mr. Dodds and Dick Walker .

Q. Had you mentioned to him that there was any other person besides Mr. Dodds. - A. Yes, the first time I saw Rochester, Dodds told me at the public house if he saw it was a good will, he should find no difficulty in getting another person.

Q. When Walker and Rochester made the appointment for you to meet them at the Saracen's head, were you to appoint Dodds and any other person. - A. Dodds was to bring Dick Walker .

Q. When you saw Mr. Dodds before you went to the Saracen's head, did you know the name of Dick Walker . - A. I did, he had told me.

Q. Did you meet Mr. Walker and Mr. Rochester at the Saracen's head, Snow-hill. - A. I did, Mr. Walker called for a sheet of paper, we conversed upon paper the same as usual.

Q. How was Rochester employed. - A. I think he was reading the paper.

Q. What became of the paper upon which you and he conversed. - A. I think Mr. Walker threw them in the fire place, he tore them to pieces on coming away, I think the first and second piece he wrote to me was, I am sorry to find that you run away with a vague idea that what Mr. Rochester had shewed me I should suppose to be the will, it was no more than a copy; with respect to his having 300 l. that was also vague, it was nothing but his own mode of jesting with me, and as to Mrs. Browning, he knew she was a very respectable woman, he verily believed she had quitted the country and was gone to America, as to his living with Mrs. Browning the subscribing witness, was all false, he knew captain Browning her husband many years before, she was a very respectable woman; then Mr. Walker asked me what was my objection, that I would not join in with Rochester, Mr. Rochester got into violence with me because I would not join in with him, I owned him some money, he said I had deserted him, and he would arrest me.

Q. Did you stay and dine with them. - A. I did not, I went off instantly, I called at a public house before you come to the Saracen's head upon Dodds and Dick Walker , I told them there was an end to the business.

Q. How long was it after that before you saw Mr. Walker. - A. I think twelve or sixteen days afterwards, then I saw him at his lodgings, No. 22, Brookes-street, then he said that he sent for me, he was very to sorry to find that Mr. Rochester and I should have parted such bad friends, but that if I could forget and forgive what he had said, he would be happy to serve me in any thing in his power, what he wanted was to give him those two people's address, meaning Dick Walker and Mr. Dodds; I did not know where Mr. Dodds lodged, I think I met him a day or two afterwards in Fleet-street, Dodds then said if you can give me Mr. Walker's address I will go to him; after that Dodds called upon me, and I went with him to Mr. Walker; Mr. Walker shewed what I supposed to be the will.

Q. Was that which Mr. Walker shewed him, like that which Rochester shewed you. - A. I do not think it was.

Q. When Walker shewed it to Dodds, did Dodds do any thing with it. - A. He did, he took it to the window and held it up to the light and examined it, Mr. Walker asked him what he was looking at there, he said to Mr. Walker few people have had more experience in proving wills than I have, I have seen wills to be proved that the water mark on the paper was a year or two after the date of the will, but in that it is very good.

Court. The water mark corresponded with the date of the will. - A. Yes, he examined it in every particular, he said, Mr. Walker, this will has every

appearance of being a good will, and I do not know whether or no it is not sufficient with Mrs. Brownings signing only, at the same time Mr. Walker, I have no objection to get another to myself, and I think we shall find no difficulty in doing it.

Q. Was any thing said about money. - A. Upon Mr. Dodds being satisfied with the will, Mr. Walker said I have promised Eddington five guineas, and a hundred pound for him to sign it, Mr. Dodds said he had no objection to make the same bargain; Mr. Dodds was to see Mr. Walker the next day, and he was to see the other person that night, whom I think was Dick Walker ; the next day in the evening Mr. Dodds called at my room, he said he had been spending the afternoon with Mr. Walker, that Mr. Walker talked of leaving London to go to Guernsey, and to let the will be till he returned, otherwise they might see the hand writing, that it was newly done; two days afterwards I found that Dick Walker was to go the next day; they appointed the Saturday following to do the business.

Q. Did you meet with Dick Walker and Dodds on the Saturday following. - A. They called at my house, I think it was on the 18th of August, they asked me to go with them, I objected, but I did go with them to Mr. Walker's lodgings, No. 22, Brookes-street, I saw Mr. Walker there, I was introduced into the dining room up stairs, I went in, the will was laid upon the table, and Mr. Dodds very particularly examined it again, and I think there was a little objection between Mr. Dodds and Dick Walker ; Dick Walker objected signing first, he said he would be guided by Mr. Dodds, he being a man well acquainted with the law; Mr. Dodds said it was a good will, he had no objection to sign first, I was standing close by them, I saw Dodds sign, and I saw Dick Walker sign it afterwards; Mr. Walker gave Dodds some bank notes, which Walker said was ten pounds, I think I saw Dodds give Walker three pounds; Mr. Walker after this said to Dodds I shall like to see you again. At the latter end of the year Dodds one day came to my house, he took out a paper, and said it was gone or it was going, to Doctors' Commons, it was Dodds' own hand writing what I saw; he said it was a copy of something that was going on, I think the subject of it was describing what sort of a man major Hockings was, his age and complexion, and the same of Mr. and Mrs. Browning, and I think something of Dick Walker , that captain Browning had frequently called at Dick Walker 's shop, and that he had occasion of taking the razors home that day to captain Browning; Dick Walker was to say, or had said so, that captain Browning said to him, Mr. Walker, an old friend of mine is making a will in the parlour, will you have the goodness to witness it; Mr. Dodds, I understood, was well acquainted with major Hockings, and when they went into the room Mrs. Browning was coming out, the major says I am going away, and perhaps never may return again, will you have the goodness, gentlemen, to put your signatures to it; this was to be Dick Walker 's and Dodds' story; I think he (Dodds) said, major, though the writing is not dry, I did not see you sign it, he said, Mr. Dodds if you are scrupulous of this I will run my hand over it again.

Q. Did Dodds call upon you at any time after that. - A. Yes, two or three times after that at the latter part of the year.

Q. Did he ever mention to you any other name than those you have mentioned, when he called upon you afterwards. - A. I think he said he saw Mrs. Bethell, she gave him a bit of writing of major Hockings, as I understood; Mr. Dodds shewing it to me, said, do you not think that is the same hand writing as the will; I certainly did think it was like it.

Q. What was that paper. - A. He said when they were parting at Westminster, the deceased said when Mr. Dodds was quitting the room, there is my address, I shall be happy to see you at my lodgings as long as I remain in town.

Q. About this time did you see Dick Walker . - A. At the close of the year I did.

Q. You are now speaking of 1804, did any thing pass between you and Dick Walker on the subject of money. - A. I remember his speaking to me that Mr. Dodds had only given him three pounds, whereas the agreement was five pounds.

Q. How soon did you see Rochester after you saw him at the Saracen's head. - A. In December 1804, I saw him in the Bench.

Q. In consequence of any thing that passed between Mr. Walker and Rochester, did you look over any papers at Rochester's. - A. I did by Rochester's desire.

Q. Did you see Mr. Walker after you had so seen these papers. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Walker afterwards tell you what was to become of these papers. - A. I understood he had been up to the Bench to Rochester, and said that all the papers I had there seen were destroyed, among which was one letter of Mr. Walker to Thomas Boucher , who was formerly a clerk to Mr. Walker; in this letter, which Mr. Walker wrote from Guernsey, saying, Boucher such and such bills are coming to you for acceptance, which you will accept as on my account, and before the bills become due, you will go to some other part of the town, that when they go to Westminster neither you nor Browning will be able to be found; after Mr. Rochester writes to me you must assist in what you can in getting me a witness or two, if there are not witnesses sufficient; this was in December 1804, or January 1805.

Q. Did you call on general Morse. - A. I did, I called there two or three times, before I went there with Dick Walker .

Q. After you had been with general Morse by yourself, did any conversation take place between you and Dick Walker . - A. I think there was; I remember that he called at my lodgings one night before Twelfth-cake day, he said that he was a little uneasy in his mind, and understood there was going to be some altercation now about the will, and if he had known there would have been so much work as there was likely to be, he would not have done it for a thousand pound; he said he wished I could introduce him to general Morse.

Q. Had you told him that you had called on the general. - A. I had.

Q. Did you tell Dick Walker for what purpose you had called on general Morse. - A. I do not know

that I did, he and I went the next morning to general Morse; we afterwards received a letter from general Morse, and in consequence of that letter, I went to general Morse, Dick Walker did not; after that Dodds called upon me, I think he told me that Dick Walker told him I had received a letter from general Morse, and that I was getting Dick Walker to conspire against him, and to say it was a false thing of the parties, or words to that effect; he was very much in liquor, he said why not take me instead of Dick Walker , if you had taken me before him, I would have made something of the general.

Q. After that did you see Mr. George Richard Walker . - A. Yes, he said I was going to the general to infuse an idea that it was a false and forged will; I shewed him general Morse's letter.

Q. Did any thing pass before you shewed it him. - A. Yes, he asked me to let him have it, and said to convince you that I want to take no advantage of you, give me the letter, and I will give you a copy of it, and give you a two pound note.

Q. Is that the signature of George Richard Walker, to the attestation of its being a true copy. - A. It is.

(The Attestation read in court, January 28, 1805. and the copy of general Morse's letter, signed George Richard Walker .

Q. Do you remember signing any instrument or paper. - A. No.

Q. Do you remember is being produced to you. - A. Mr. Walker threatened to prosecute me for what I had said to general Morse, unless I would give it under my hand in writing, that it was not a false will.

Q. Did you consent to sign any instrument. - A. Never.

Q. Did you in the course of that spring or summer call upon Mr. Buckton the proctor. - A. Yes, sometime in the month of July, and in the month of August or September.

Q. After this did you go to Newcastle. - A. I did, by Mr. Walker's desire, to purchase coals for the barracks of Jersey, Guernsey, &c. for government.

Q. Did he shew you any papers from which you copied that (a paper handed the witness). - A. Yes, I copied that from a paper he shewed me (the letter read in court).

Q. In consequence of that, did you go down to Newcastle for him to enquire the price and purchase coals. - A. I did; the first two or three days I was there I made enquires and sent him word.

Q. In answer to any letter that you wrote to him, did you receive this letter. - A. I did (the letter read in court).

Q. Do you believe that to be his hand writing. - A. I do.

Q. As soon as you found there was no business to go on with did you return to London. - A. I was arrested there some time in the forepart of September; I think I wrote two or three letters first.

Q. At whose suit where you arrested. - A. At Mr. Dodds.

Q. When did you get released from that arrest. - A. In the latter end of November, and then I came off to London, I took the first ship I could get.

Q. When were you taken up by a warrant, and taken to the police office. - A. It was the very day after I arrested Mr. Walker; I claimed money of him, I had seen him several times.

Q. And he not paying you you arrested him. - A. Yes.

Q. That was in January. - A. Yes.

Q. On or about the day that he was arrested, were you taken up and examined at the police office. - A. I was.

Q. Before you were examined, had you said any thing about this business to a person of the name of Potter. - A. I do not recollect that I did; I said something to Mr. Rochester.

Q. In your dealings with Mr. Walker, had you ever given him that promissory note. - A. Yes.

Q. How did you get it back again. - A. I was determined to arrest Mr. Walker for the whole bill.

Q. From whom did you receive that blank. - A. From Mr. Walker, it is placed to my account.

Q. Are you speaking of the person that you saw at Brookes'-street. - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as to look at that letter, and tell me whether you received that letter on that day; look on the direction, is that Mr. Walker's hand writing. - A. Yes. (Directed to Mr. Robert Eddington , Pitt-street, Tottenham Court Road, October, 1804.) The letter read in court; another letter of Mr. Walker's to witness, read in court, dated 14th of February, 1805.

Q. Is tha[Text unreadable in original.] Mr. Walker's hand writing. - A It is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. In your stating of this transaction, you have said that you have been taken to the police office, that you were then in a state of agitation, and that possibly what you now said might not correspond with what you had said upon former occasions. - A. Yes.

Q. I think, according to my observations, you have been speaking about a couple of hours, have you been speaking from minutes, or from memory. - A. From memory, I should have been more particular if I had known any thing of this sort would have happened.

Q. I cannot find any thing from this long detail of your transactions with Mr. Walker, excepting one year you was employed by Mr. Walker in buying coals. - A. That is all.

Q. Sometimes it is useful to become more acquainted with persons, and I should by the manner of your expressing yourself, suppose you are a native of the North. - A. I am.

Q. Have you ever been engaged in any business in the North. - A. I was brought up in the coal and colliery business all my life.

Q. And carried on business on your own account. - A. I have.

Q. What alone, or in partnership. - A. In partnership.

Q. I wonder whether you are the Mr. Eddington that was in partnership with Mr. Champney. - A. I am.

Q. Then I am right in my conjecture. - A. I do not know but you are, we had once a concern together.

Q. Was it a profitable concern, so that you were enabled to retire. - A. It was a loosing concern.

Q. Did it end in a bankruptcy. - A. No.

Q. A composition. - A. It did not; Mr. Champney and I parted friendly, in consequence of the money that I gave him.

Q. There was no dispute. - A. Mr. Champney was not with me above two months, he was under the necessity of declining.

Q. So he retired, and you parted very friendly. - A. I know nothing to the contrary.

Q. He being not able to stand his ground, you made him a compensation, and you parted very friendly. - A. I know nothing to the contrary.

Q. Did you still continue to carry on that business. - A. Some while I did.

Q. Did you afterwards, for your profit, or for your health, get any where towards the West of England. - A. Never to the West of England, I have only been ten years from the North; I have been agent sometimes at Portsmouth, Gosport, and Southampton.

Q. And sometimes at Plymouth. - A. No.

Q. Every thing was going on smoothly, and every body with whom you was connected were feeling their obligations to you I take it for granted. - A. Yes.

Q. We have now got to Portsmouth; in the course of your travels did you happen to be acquainted with a clergyman of the name of Dr. Scott. - A. Yes.

Q. When you was down collecting of tythes about two years ago, by the order of Mr. Pearson, you had no dispute with Dr. Scott, the rector. - A. Certainly there was, I do not know any person that did business with him, but what had a dispute with him.

Q. Did it ever happen at any part of your time that you ever had any concern with naval stores - A. I have attended the dock yard since, and purchased quantities since.

Q. You did not deal in naval stores. - A. Never.

Q. You used to attend the dock to purchase stores; where did you principally employ your capital, in purchasing naval stores. - A. I do not mean that I never bought any particular for any body, I have bought particularly to fit out one or two vessels.

Q. That was about nine or ten years ago at Portsmouth. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there no interruption to that business, I do not know how to call it a business, as you did not deal in it, were there no interruption to that amusement or way of employing your money. - A. None whatever.

Q. Had you ever occasion to be a witness in a court of justice on the subject of naval stores. - A. No, I was never a witness in a court before to day.

Q. You never was a witness upon any subject before to day. - A. I cannot charge my memory with it, I do not remember of being one.

Q. Then I may take it down that you never was a witness upon any trial till to day - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Try; if any person was to ask me how often I had been witness, I certainly could tell; do not you recollect that you ever was at any place in an aukward situation respecting of naval stores. - A. No.

Q. After this you went to Harwich, did not you. - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you at Harwich. - A. About two years; I went there under Mr. Davidson to purchase coals for the various barracks on the coasts.

Q. He was the contractor for government. - A. He was not the contractor, he found the money to purchase the coals.

Q. He purchased upon commission to furnish the government with coals in the barrack department; you had a good deal to do in that department. - A. None but what I had to do for him and Mr. Walker.

Q. Had you ever a dispute with either of them. - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You speak that rather doubtfully. - A. I had some with Mr. Davidson, and look every day to be admitted an evidence against him.

Q. You had some disputes with Mr. Walker upon the same subject. - A. I had.

Q. And I believe you expressed yourself what mankind in general would think in a remarkable way, that you would hang Mr. Davidson, and Mr. Walker, and some other gentlemen. - A. I never made use of such an expression.

Q. That you are positive sure of it. - A. I am confident of it.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Sinquagh. - A. Yes.

Q. You never made use of any such expression against Mr. Sinquagh. - A. I am certain I would not to any man.

Q. Attend deliberately, did you ever make use of this expression, That you could hang Mr. Walker, and Mr. Davidson, and the whole barrack corps, but you would swear for them that would pay you best. - A. No, I solemnly protest against it.

Q. Then to be sure that we make no mistake, you assert that you never made use of any expression, that you would do for, or hang Mr. Walker. - A. I might have been exasperated at Mr. Walker's conduct in owing me the money, and he would not pay me; I certainly was exasperated.

Q. When one arrests a man for a debt, we suppose the law will make him pay it; did you ever make use of such an expression at any time. - A. I never did make use of such an expression on any day, that I would hang Mr. Walker, I never said nothing of the kind to any person, I might in my own mind.

Q. But nobody but God and your own conscience were acquainted with that; do you mean to have it distinctly understood that to no man or woman you ever expressed yourself in terms of exasperation against Mr. Walker. - A. Never.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Dua. - A. I know a person of that name at Guernsey.

Q. You never made use of any such expression to him. - A. By no means, I do not think him an object worth my notice.

Q. Did you ever write any letter to any of the officers of the barracks board upon the subject of the accusation that you intended to make against him. -

A. I believe I did, I think it might be to general - , it is a long while ago.

Q. To be sure you said truly, it is a long while ago, in the course of a long life a man might forget. A. I think I did write a letter or two, I am not certain.

Q. Have you any doubt of it. - A. I have no doubt.

Q. How long is that ago. - A. About three years ago.

Q. What were these letters to general - A. On the subject of repeated frauds.

Q. The charge against general - was, that he had connived at these frauds, and this you communicated to him for the pious purity of teaching him to be upon his guard. - A. So far from that, I published a book of the whole.

Q. Did you give him any hint that he might redeem himself from these charges. - A. No, but he did me.

Q. When did the public loose such a valuable servant as you, when were you dismissed. - A. Yes, I was discharged by Mr. Davidson, I believe it is now better than three years.

Q. I think the account that you have given us is, that your first acquaintance of the subject of this will of major Hockings was on your meeting Mr. Rochester - A. Yes.

Q. And he represented that that will was the genuine will of the major, but he had left it deficient in point of attestation, and then he and you not agreeing to become the subscribing witnesses, you were so good as to mention it to Mr. Dodds. - A. I have told you already that I did mention it to Mr. Dodds.

Q. You never told any magistrate until you was taken into custody. - A. No.

Q. And at this time Mr. Walker, against whom you had a demand, refused to pay you that demand. A. Mr. Walker did not refuse to pay me, if I would have given him a letter under my hand that I had spoke falsely against him.

Q. He would have paid you your civil debt for work done, if you had done that, how much was this debt you demanded against him. - A. Forty-six pounds.

Q. He is not a pauper, he is a man passing in the world as having some substance. - A. He is.

Q. He knowing that you had been present at the attestation of that will, refused paying you your debt unless you gave a certificate under your hand. A. He did offer to pay me if I would, but I would not.

Q. And Mr. Dodds had the hardiness to arrest you. - A. Yes, for twelve pounds.

Q. And the other refused to pay you forty-six pounds, unless you certified that you had traduced his character; Mr. Rochester is introduced into this indictment, have you never said that he was an innocent man, and if there was any thing wrong in this transaction, that you did not think he knew any thing of it. - A. No, I never saw Mr. Rochester after what had transpired, he went to the Baltic; he shewed me the copy, I am confident it was no more, I saw him in the month of December, even then he declared he was innocent.

Q. Did not you go to the Saracen's head and the Circus to meet Mr. Walker, and the manner of your correspondence was on slips of paper, which were burnt, they were put in the fire. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that they were put into the fire, or was a candle called for. - A. They were thrown into the fire place, I do not know whether there was a fire or no, I said so before.

Q. You have always said so, do you mean to swear that till I pointed out to you of a candle being called for, you had not represented it so. - A. I do not know but I did, I cannot charge my memory at this moment but they were thrown into the fire place.

Q. Before the magistrate did you not represent that they were immediately burnt. - A. If I did, I must have erred in that, because I do not recollect that.

Q. It seems to me that you have told me that you have been speaking merely from memory and not from minutes. - A. Yes.

Q. Then I was right that you speak merely from memory, not from minutes. - A. I do.

Q. So that you never did make any minutes of these interviews. - A. No more than when I was doing business for Mr. Walker.

Q. I am speaking of memorandums of those interviews respecting major Hockings' will, respecting that you never made any minutes. - A. Never.

Q. You say you not only have not any minutes, but you never had any minutes of the transaction of the will. - A. No.

Q. Certainly not; then if you ever said that you ever had any minutes, that is not true. - A. I tell you when I did business for him I did make minutes.

Q. I am not talking about that, but concerning major Hockings' will. - A. I did not think it was necessary.

Q. Then I should think Mr. Eddington that there was some other man of your name examined at the police office, did it not then occur to you that you could not speak from memory, but that you had notes at home, which if you were allowed to consult, you might speak more correct. - A. This was some of the minutes that I had at home about the business of Mr. Walker, it lead to that.

Q. Then it cannot be possibly true Mr. Eddington that the magistrate adjourned the examination in order that you might go home and consult them, and still less true that on the adjournment examination you brought them, or that you spoke from them. - A. I did not bring any such minutes.

Q. You never stated that you had any. - A. I never did.

Q. You are quite sure of that. - A. Quite positive of that.

Q. Did not you say in the presence of several persons at that meeting, you could not then speak accurately, you had minutes at home, which if you consulted you might, they adjourned their meeting, and on the next examination you said you had consulted them. - A. With humble submission I would beg leave to state that they gave me leave to go home to search my minutes, that they might lead me more into the business, and I searched every paper that I had; I saw Mr. Humphries a few days afterwards,

I told him that I had found nothing.

Q. Then you never represented that you had consulted these minutes, and could speak more accurately. - A. If I did, I did wrong, from the agitation of my mind at that time, it was impossible that I could recollect every thing that I did.

Q. When was you first examined. - A. I think it was two or three days after I was first taken.

Q. Give us the day you was taken. - A. The 14th or 15th of January last.

Q. Is your memory so constituted that you forget things that happen three or four months ago, and remember things of much later date, do you mean to swear that you did not say at your first examination that you had memorandums at home on the subject of your then examination, that examination was adjourned, and at the next you did not produce the minutes. - A. No, they gave me leave to go home to see if I could find papers that lead to it, but I could not find any.

Q. You did not bring any. - A. No.

Q. Then, sir, I am to understand you that you did not at the second meeting produce any thing that you represented to be your minutes of the transaction that took place. - A. I do not recollect that I did, I have thought of it very serious since I have been in custody, I find I might have said more than I would be this day able to substantiate.

Q. Have you put pen to paper at all about it since your examination, as you were apprehensive that you had said more than you could substantiate. - A. I have.

Q. Will you give it me. - A. I have it not here.

Q. Have you been making minutes of all this and left it at home. - A. What was the use of my bringing the minutes when I must not take a book in my hand.

Q. Then you have some minutes have you. - A. I do not know that I have.

Q. As you had been making no minutes before you went to the magistrate, perhaps you have been making a book of minutes afterwards. - A. I recollected every thing as well as my memory would aid me, and I might make a little extract.

Q. Then you did make a little extract upon paper, from what your memory told you. - A. Exactly so, it was a serious point to me.

Q. I should very much like to see these minutes, could you fetch them. - A. No, I do not know whether I have any.

Q. You do not know whether you have or have not been making little extracts upon paper, a very singular expression, it is such a one that since the world began was never made use of before, did not you say you had been making little extracts on paper. - A. I certainly have, I drew all the extracts as far as my memory would help me, from what happened at the police office, and from what I thought in my conscience I had said and done, and what perhaps I had said wrong at the police office.

Q. What extent might this little extract make, half a sheet. - A. Five or six sheets or more.

Q. For what purpose. - A. Perhaps I wanted to take a counsel's opinion upon it, as all persons had counsel, but I had none, I had an idea of employing a counsel.

Q. Therefore this little extract you made for your counsel, I only want to understand this, nothing is more common; then this is not a matter of conjecture or surmise, but you now remember that you wrote this. - A. To the best of my knowledge I had made some notes.

Q. You have no objection to my seeing them. - A. I have it not.

Q. A man seldom burns any thing that he makes with so much care. - A. I do not know that it is burnt.

Q. How long is it ago. - A. Why sir, what is this to do in it.

Q. As your memory is so treacherous, I should have liked to have seen it on paper much better, how long ago is it since you made it. - A. Perhaps a fortnight ago, I sent it by my wife to a certain person to take opinion upon it.

Q. Then you prepared it as a brief to instruct some person who is a counsel for you to day; did you ever in your travels meet with Mr. Crawford. A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever any dealings with him. - A. Yes, in a colliery.

Q. How long ago. - A. About thirteen or fourteen years ago.

Q. Did you find the money, or did he find all the money that went into the colliery. - A. It so far ended, that it ended in my ruin, else I had no occasion to be here.

Q. There is nothing that you know against his character. - A. I have nothing to say against his character.

Q. You are still in custody. - A. I was till this morning.

Q. Then you are not discharged. - A. No.

Q. Potter gave an information against you. - A. Potter was wicked enough to swear it, Potter is the last man that I pay any regard to.

Q. You was taken into custody before you stated any thing to the magistrate, and still remain in custody now. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gleed. The first time that you had conversation with any person respecting the will, you were conversing of a thing that then existed. - A. Yes.

Q. And to that there was one signature. - A. Yes.

Q. And you had afterwards the opportunity of seeing this will. - A. Do you mean at Mr. Rochester's.

Q. Yes. - A. When Mr. Rochester shewed it me, I did not see it above half a minute.

Q. At that time it was an instrument that was executed, and to which there was a signature of a witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Now you say Dodds was to produce a person, supposing the will to be a good one. - A. Yes.

Q. He had the opportunity of viewing the will before Walker appeared. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that Walker appeared, was not the will examined, and the object of the examination, according to the account that you have given of it, was to satisfy Dick Walker 's mind that the will was a good one. - A. Yes.

Q. It was for the purpose of satisfying Dick Walker 's mind that the will to which he was to affix his signature, was a good and valid will - A. Yes.

Q. And that his signature was a mere matter of form. - A. It was so stated.

Q. That it was mere matter of form, and frequently done - A. Yes.

Court. Who stated that. - A. Mr. Dodds, where wills were deficient of witnesses.

Mr. Gleed. I think, if I understand you right, Dodds is a professional man. - A. Yes.

Q. Walker, I believe, is only a hair dresser. - A. No.

Q. He is not a person at all conversant with things of this kind. - A. I dare say he is not.

Q. Dick Walker was only present at that time. - A. No.

Q. As soon as Dick Walker affixed his signature he went away. - A. Yes.

Q. Dick Walker in the presence of the other parties received no money, and the only money that he received was the sum of three pound, paid by Dodds. - A. Exactly so.

Q. And that he at no time was to receive a larger sum than five pound. - A. No.

Q. As soon as there was any subject matter of conversation respecting this will, Dick Walker was anxious to go to general Morse. - A. He was.

Q. General Morse was a person that was known by major Hockings, and he himself was anxious to go to the general. - A. He was.

Q. You accompanied Dick Walker to the general at the request of Dick Walker . - A. I did.

ANN EDDINGTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I know all four, I have known Mr. George Richard Walker some years, Mr. Dodds I have only known for these last two years.

Q. Where did you live with your husband in the year 1804, do you recollect living in Pitt-street. - A. Yes.

Q. When you lived in Pitt-street do you recollect Mr. Walker calling upon you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever hear Mr. Walker say any thing to your husband upon the subject of a will. - A. Never.

Q. Did you ever hear Mr. Dodds and your husband conversing together upon the subject of a will. - A. I have heard Mr. Dodds and my husband frequently converse about a will, I always heard him reflect upon Mr. Eddington for speaking in such a light of that will, he said he always took it to be a good will, he said he was very sorry Mr. Eddington should represent it as any thing else.

Q. Did you ever hear him say any thing about general Morse. - A. I heard Dick Walker say he very much wished to call upon general Morse, it was the day after Twelfth cake day.

Q. Did Dick Walker say why he wished to call upon general Morse. - A. He said he felt himself very uneasy, he was sorry for his situation; I know nothing but their going to general Morse, I know nothing what transpired; Mr. Dodds told Mr. Eddington if he meant to make this business public, why not make him acquainted with it, he wished that he had waited upon him and let him have known of the business, he understood it to be a good will, otherwise a thing of this kind might ruin the whole.

Q. Was there ever any conversation about any money. - A. I think Mr. Dodds mentioned something of that kind once, I did not take much notice, he said he would have made money of them all if they had taken him by the hand.

Q. Did he state any sum of money. - A. I cannot charge my mind with it.

Q. Did Dick Walker ever call again. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Now recollect Mrs. Eddington, you have recollected it before. - A. Upon my word I cannot recollect it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. Dodds and Dick Walker is mentioned here as calling upon your husband; Dodds said it was always represented to him as a good will, they always complained to your husband when they called, he having represented it otherwise. - A. Yes, I do remember now Dick Walker called again, he said then, so help me God, I would not have signed the will for a thousand pounds, but I always thought it was a good will, afterwards he seemed to feel himself uneasy on account of Mr. Eddington spreading it abroad that it was a bad one.

Q. Your husband is a good writer, he writes a great deal. - A. He does write a great deal.

Q. You probably was not at the magistrate's when Potter had him taken up, when he said at the first examination he had not his minutes with him. - A. I have heard him talk a great deal about it.

Q. And then the magistrate was so good as to let him go, and the next meeting he had his minutes with him. - A. He had a vast number of papers with him, but what they were I cannot tell.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Were you in the office when he was examined. - A. No, I knew no more than he come home for his papers, he told me so.

LAMBETH WOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Did you in the year 1804, live in Pitt-street, Tottenham Court Road. - A. I did.

Q. In the summer of that year did Eddington and his wife lodge in that house. - A. They came to lodge there on the 1st of March, 1804, and to the best of my recollection they went away on the 2d of January, 1805.

Q. Will you look at the prisoner, and say whether you saw any of them there. - A. The person of Mr. Dodds, I have a personal recollection of him, the gentleman who is called Mr. Walker, I think he had dark hair then when he came to my house; there was one person came twice of the name of Walker, I am not certain whether that is the person or the other that called at my house, one left a memorandum in writing, afterwards a person named Walker came and asked for Eddington, he went to a different part of the house to where he was directed to, for which he apologised.

THOMAS GADSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you formerly a clerk to Mr. Walker, in the island of Guernsey. - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember in the summer 1804 being with Mr. Walker at the Circus coffee house, St. George's-fields. - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember Eddington meeting Mr. Walker there. - A. I do.

Q. Did they converse together. - A. Yes, on paper.

Q. What became of the paper that was written on. - A. It was torn I believe.

Q. In the spring of 1805, were you employed by Mr. Walker to collect any evidence respecting the will in March 1805, did you receive any direction from him to go to Dartmouth-street, Westminster, to enquire for any person of the name of Browning. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the paper which he gave you for the purpose of making the enquiry. - A. It is, he gave it me himself, and I suppose it to be his hand writing, it is dated March, 1803, it must be 1805.

(The letter of George Richard Walker to witness, dated March, 1803, the letter dated 6th of May, 1805, and the letter dated 8th of May, 1805, were read in court.)

WILLIAM VASEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar. - A. I do, Mr. Walker of Guernsey Mr. Rochester, and Mr. Dodds.

Q. Did you ever see them at the Saracen's Head, Snow Hill, in August 1804. - A. Yes, on the 14th I came to town, it must be after that time.

Q. Was any body in company with them. - A. Mr. Eddington.

Q. Do you mean that they were all there on that day. - A. I saw Eddington, Rochester, and Mr. Walker there that day.

Q. Did they and you converse together. - A. I talked to them a little, I had seen them a little while before that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. You have known Mr. George Richard Walker before, I ask you whether he is not a respectable character. - A. Perfectly so with respect to my transaction with him, and all those whom I am concerned with, his character is perfectly correct and honourable.

SIR BROOK WATSON , sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. I believe, sir, you are commissary general. - A. I was.

Q. Is that a copy of a letter that you wrote or authorised to be written to the prisoner at the bar, Mr. George Richard Walker . - A. It is not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. I take it for granted that you register all transactions, and any letter written at that period would have been copied and registered. - A. No such business whatever was transacted at my office, I never had any coals to ship from Newcastle, and if I had, I must have applied to the transport board to have found me ships.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Examined by Mr Bolland. Q. Do you know the prisoner, Richard Walker. - A. I do, I have known him for three or four years altogether.

Q. What has been his business. - A. He was an hair dresser on Snow Hill.

Q. What sort of a shop is it. - A. It was a shop that did a deal of business, it was what they call a penny shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Garrow.

Q. I am told that some genteel people liked to go to this shop. - A. It might be so.

Mr. Gurney. (to Mr. Carr) That paper was written by you, and given to Mrs. Bethell. - A. It was.

Q. From whose information did you receive those transactions in that letter. - A. I think that I mentioned in my former examination from Mr. Walker.

Q. Did Mr. Walker ever represent to you where that will was executed. - A. I do not know that ever he did.

Q. (to Gadson) You was in Mr. Walker's employ several years. - A. I was.

Q. Do you know who this Elizabeth Hindes is. - A. No.

Q. Do you know of any person in Mr. Walker's house or family of that name. - A. There was a female of the name of Hindes, I believe she was a niece, it is many years ago that I saw her, she is since dead.

Q. Did you ever hear from Mr. Walker what his mother's original name was. - A. No.

Q. That you are quite sure of. - A. I am sure of that.

Q. (to lieutenant Hockings) What is the amount of the property of your uncle Hockings. - A. Five thousand one hundred pounds stock in the three per cent. consols.

Q. Had he no other property than that. - Q. None whatever.

George Richard Walker left his defence to his counsel, and said, not having been able to hear the evidence, it is impossible for me to make any satisfactory answer.

Dodds left his defence to his counsel.

Richard Walker 's Defence. I was always given to understand that it was a good will, particularly by Dodds who was a man of the profession, and I signed it accordingly.

Rochester left his defence to his counsel.

DAVID CRAWFORD sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. What is your situation in life. - A. I am in the coal trade, and I am concerned in shipping.

Q. Are you acquainted with a person that was here, of the name of Eddington. - A. I am sorry to say that I am, I have known him twenty-eight years.

Q. Had you the misfortune to be concerned in any business with him. - A. I have.

Q. He has represented here that he brought part of the capital in that business, it failed, that you being a man of fortune in the business, he was ruined. - A. To the best of my knowledge he never advanced sixpence in the concern; I have lost a great deal of money through his failure; I would not take his word or his oath upon the most trivial occasion.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you. - A. I am a merchant, living in Newcastle.

Q. Have you been acquainted with the witness that has been examined to-day, Eddington. - A. Yes, twenty-five years.

Q. From your knowledge of him, and that for twenty-five years, is he a man that you would believe upon his oath. - A. No.

JOHN RASTRICK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a civil engineer.

Q. Have you known the witness Eddington. - A.

Yes, ever since the year 1798; I am sorry that a man in his situation is at large; upon no consideration he is not to be believed upon oath.

- DUA sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I believe now you live at Southampton. - A. Yes, I formerly lived at Guernsey.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Eddington. - A. I knew him while he lived at Guernsey.

Q. He was some time in the employment of George Richard Walker , who is a merchant at Guernsey. - A. I believe he was for a few months.

Q. Did you ever hear him make use of any expression respecting Mr. Walker. - A. I did, in the year 1779, at the latter end of October or November; one evening when I was at tea at his house, he told me that he would hang Mr. Walker if he could, and he said that the gentlemen at the barrack office were all rascals, and a few days afterwards he repeated the expressions to me at the North Pier in Guernsey, he d - d and cursed them all as a set of villains and rascals, including Mr. Walker.

A. I do not know whether you have been much acquainted with the moral character of Mr. Eddington. - A. No more than during the space of three or four months he was on the island; he caused a great deal of disturbance while he was on the island among the people then in the barrack office, for which he was obliged to ask pardon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Mr. Dua, what are you. - A. I am in a manufactory in Southampton.

Q. Are you in any concern with Mr. Walker. - A. Not at present, I have been a clerk to Mr. Walker for upwards of six years, we closed our transactions in 1804.

Q. Since that time you have been a mineral water maker in Southampton. - A. Yes.

Q. Has he any part in that. - A. No.

Q. Now you recollect the time exactly that this conversation passed, it was in the year 1799. - A. Yes, I cannot say to the day, as he was but a short time there.

Q. This is seven years ago what you are speaking about and the disturbance that he made in the barrack department was a fraudulent delivery of coals. A. Yes, something of that nature.

Q. Do you know from Mr. Walker of he having employed Mr. Eddington since that. - A. No.

Q. Of course you made no great secret of his making use of these sort of threats. - A. I made no secret of it at all.

Q. Mr. Walker must have heard of it. - A. I believe he did.

Q. Do you believe that you mentioned it to him at about the time it took place. - A. I believe I did.

Q. You have heard of the name of Hinde being mentioned in the will. - A. I have.

Q. Do you know what was the maiden name of Mr. Walker's mother. - A. I believe her maiden name was Elizabeth Hinde .

Q. Do you know whether she was a native of Guernsey. - She was an English woman, I believe she came from the West.

Q. Have you ever heard from Mr. Walker that she was the person that so much money was left to by major Hockings. - A. Never.

Q. Nor that she was benefited by major Hockings' will. - A. Never.

Mr. Garrow. As you had been with Mr. Walker six years and upwards, you had an opportunity of knowing what was his character, did not he bear the character of a most respectable man - A. Always.

Court. Do you know any other Elizabeth Hinde than the mother of this Mr. Walker. - A. I do not.

- STANBECK sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have a situation in the barrack office. - A. I am accountant.

Q. Do you know the witness Eddington. - A. Yes, since the year 1802; from what I have seen of him I conceive him to be a very dangerous man.

DR. SCOTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a clergyman of the church of England. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you known the witness Eddington that we have had a witness here to day. - A. He was my servant in the year 1793, he was my steward to collect my rents and my tythes.

Q. How long did you employ him. - A. A very few months.

Q. From the opportunity you have had of knowing him, is he a man that could be at all relied on. - A. I should not think that the least credit should be given to him for what he said or swore.

COLONEL MACKENZIE sworn. Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. How long have you known Eddington. - A. Since the year 1802.

Q. During the whole time that you have known him, is the result of your opinion that he is a man that may be safely trusted on his oath or otherwise. A. I think not.

Q. If you had any occasion to take a solemn act on his testimony, should you think it was safe to rely on his testimony. - A. Upon my oath I should think not by no means.

GEORGE DUNN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I believe you live at Newcastle. - A. I do, I am a ship and insurance broker, I have known Eddington near thirty years.

Q. From the opportunity you have had of knowing him for so long a course of years, is he a man that you would believe upon his oath. - A. I think I would not, his character is so bad in the country where I come from, that I would not believe a word that he said.

George Richard Walker called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Rochester called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoners Dodds and Richard Walker called no witnesses to character.

GEORGE RICHARD WALKER - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 40.

CHRISTOPHER DODDS - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 55.

THOMAS ROCHESTER - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD WALKER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18060416-46

257. JOHN DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , eight pound

weight of pork, value 4 s. the property of William Cuff .

JOHN BERRY sworn. I am servant to Mr. Cuff, East Smithfield ; the prisoner came into the shop on the 5th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, he took up the pork out of the tub, and looked at it, and put it down again, he took it up again, and put it under his jacket, and walked out of the shop; I was behind the counter, I pursued him and took him about a dozen yards from our house, I laid hold of him by the collar, and he dropped the pork from under his jacket.

Q. Was he sober at the time. - A. I do not know, he had no appearance of being in liquor; I alarmed my master, he came, and picked up the pork.

Q. What was the value of the pork. - A. Six shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past the door, a man dropped something as I came by, that gentleman came and seized me by the neck directly, and took me to the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-47

258. WILLIAM LOVETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , three pair of shoes, value 20 s. the property of Mary Molloy , privately in her shop .

MARY MOLLOY sworn. I am a widow , I live in High-street, St. Giles's , I keep a shoemaker's shop . On Saturday the 5th of April, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came and tried on a great many pair of shoes, he said none of them fitted; he was going out of the shop, I went round the counter, and missed a pair of shoes that were on a box before he came in; there was another young man in the shop before the prisoner came in, and when the prisoner came in he went out without buying, I looked when he went out, and saw him leave the shoes that he had been trying on on the box, and when the prisoner was going out I asked him for the shoes, he said they were on the counter, I said they were not, I took hold of him by the collar, and said that he had some shoes; he came in again, and took three pair of shoes out of his pocket, and threw them on a chair, I talked loud, which gave an alarm, a neighbour came up (Mr. Cooper), he secured the prisoner, and took him to Marlborough-street, I took the shoes at the same time, the magistrate was not then sitting, I brought the shoes home again, the prisoner was put backwards at the office, I attended there again at night by the magistrate's order; I gave the shoes to John Warren the officer. (The shoes produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy these shoes to take into the country with me, I was bargaining with her for the price of them, she said you have got three pair, no, I said, I have got four pair, I mean to give you so much money for them, she said I wanted to rob her, I said I did not, she immediately collared me, and struck me over the eye with one pair of them, I directly took the shoes out of my pocket; there were two women in the shop, one of them took my hat away, and then they sent for an officer.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Who was in the shop. A. None but myself serving in the shop, only two women came in while he was there to buy some shoes, and two of my children.

Q. Had he bargained with you for these shoes. - A. No.

Q. Did you see him take these shoes. - A. No.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-48

259. MARGARET WELDON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of April , four gowns, value 40 s. four petticoats, value 20 s. a bible, value 12 s. three aprons, value 3 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Rebecca Simpson , in the dwelling house of Thomas Whitley .

REBECCA SIMPSON sworn. I live in St. Paul's Church Yard, I am servant to Mr. Tinkler; I left my property in the care of the prisoner at the bar in Mr. Whitley's house, Summers-street, near Cold Bath Fields ; I had lodged with her before I went to Mr. Tinkler's, I had occasion to go and fetch some things, I found my box open, I missed every thing of my wearing apparel, I asked the prisoner what I could do, as every thing of my wearing apparel was gone, she said she knew nothing about it; I have seen some of the things again at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner. (to prosecutrix) I wish to know whether you did not give me the liberty of pledging any thing that I choosed for my own benefit. - A. I did not.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Baldwin's Gardens; I produce a bible, a gown, and a pair of stockings, they were pledged by the prisoner on the 26th of December.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Liquorpond-street; I produce a gown pledged for six shillings in December last, in the name of Mary Jones , and two petticoats; we have every reason to believe that a person of that name pledged them.

JOSEPH BAKER sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of this month, I took from her all the duplicates that I found of these things.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, let me beg leave to lay my case before you. The prosecutrix and me having lived together in habits of intimacy for several years; my mother died; leaving me a legacy to be paid at a future period, which the prosecutrix knows, she living at my mother's when she died, and afterwards with me; she having occasion to leave my lodgings, left her box with me, and knowing that I was subject to fits, gave me leave to pledge some of her articles, which were to be restored when I got my legacy; a difference taking place between us, she thought proper to bring me before the justice at Hatton Garden, and the said prosecutrix there promised to take the duplicates, and I should pay her the money by instalments, but instead of taking the duplicates she appeared at Bow-street.

Q. (to prosecutrix) At whose house did you lodge in - A. At Weldon's mother's room.

Q. Do you know of any legacy. - A. She had something left in a gentleman's hands.

Q. Did you give her leave to pledge there things for her or you. - A. Never in my life, I had left them in the same room for three or four years, and I had the key of the trunk with me.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-49

260. JAMES SAUNDERS, alias BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of February , a table clock, value 3 l. the property of William Roberts privately in his shop .

Second Count for like offence, only stating it to be in the dwelling house of William Roberts .

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. I am a watchmaker , I live in St. James's-market , I lost the clock on the 21st of February last, between the hours of six and seven in the evening; a person came in at that time about having something done to a watch; (I cannot say the prisoner was the person), I looked at the watch and observed that it wanted cleaning, he said he wished me to change the glass, I told him I had no time then, he might have it done altogether, he went out unobserved by me, and about two hours afterwards I missed a clock; I sent to a number of different pawnbroker's, at last I received a note from Mr. Turner, saying, that he believed that he had the clock, (the clock produced) this is the clock.

Q. Could a man carry that out of your shop without your perceiving it. - A. He might, I had not the least idea of any person taking the clock away, it was standing about six inches to the left where I was sitting, I was very busy at the time.

- TURNER sworn. I am a pawnbroker at No. 1, Lower John-street Golden-square; on the 21st or 22d of February, I believe I received that clock from the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Are you sure that he is the man. - A. I am, I bought the clock of him, I gave him five pound for it.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. I never saw him before; in about a fortnight after the prisoner came again, to know if I would purchase a clock that he had in pledge, I told him that I was busy, if he would call again the next day I might, I wished to have time to take him in custody; he came the next evening, I took him into custody.

Q. (to prosecutor.) Are you sure that clock is yours - A. I have known it these thirty years.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is charged against me. On February last, I was in a public house, a genteel man came in and asked me to pawn this clock, upon which I went.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine Shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-50

261. JAMES SAUNDERS was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a table clock, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Bishop , privately in his shop .

Second Count for like offence, only charging it to be in the dwelling house of Samuel Bishop .

SAMUEL BISHOP sworn. On the 13th of February, about half after three o'clock, I lost a clock, the prisoner was the last person I saw in the shop before I lost the clock.

Q. Did you ever find your clock. - A. Yes, it was found at Mr. Lightfoot's the pawnbrokers.

- LIGHTFOOT sworn. This clock was pawned at our house on the 13th of February, for 3 l. by the prisoner, he came again in March, and borrowed another pound on it, I was present both times, and made out the ticket.

Q. Are you sure that he is the same man. - A. I am positive that he is the man.

GEORGE TURNER sworn. On the 12th of March, as I stated before, the prisoner applied to me to know if I would buy a clock at Mr. Lightfoot's, I had every reason to believe that he had got this clock as he had the other; I went round to several clock makers to know if they had lost such a thing, I heard Mr. Bishop had lost it; I had the prisoner apprehended.

(The clock produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-51

262. WILLIAM BOWEN and WILLIAM TOOLS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Wilcox , about the hour of three at night, on the 31st of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, thirty six pair of leather boot legs, value 9 l. the property of George Wilcox .

GEORGE WILCOX sworn. I live at No. 62, Cable-street, St. George's .

Q. You have a house there. - A. Yes, I am a currier .

Q. What night was this when this happened - A. On the 31st of March.

Q. Who went to bed last when this happened. - Myself, I believe.

Q. What security did you leave your house in - A. It was fastened as we always do, the shop window was fastened by a bar on the outside, and inside with a key.

Q. Then the shutters were up. - A. Yes.

Q. Yours is a shop with a front. - A. Yes.

Q. You had secured the shutter of the shop with a bar, and the pin that went inside was secured with a key. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you go to bed. - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. In the course of the night did you meet with any alarm. - A. John Wood alarmed me, he sleeps in the house.

Q. Did you yourself upon that alarm being given, hear any thing before you came down stairs. - A. I did not.

Q. You got up and came down. - A. Yes.

Q. About what time was it when you came down. - A. Past three.

Q. Did you hear any thing when you came down. - A. I heard a noise of pulling out of glass at the

shop window, and I saw a man with a handkerchief tied over his head; I was then in the shop.

Q. Was the shutter up or down. - A. Down.

Q. Down all, or how. - A. One.

Q. Was that one of the shutters that you had secured the over night. - A. That was secured the over night.

Q. You say one shutter was down, and you saw a man with a handkerchief tied about his head, had he his hat on. - A. He had, the handkerchief was under his hat.

Q. Was it light enough for you to distinguish that. - A. It was moonlight, and the morning was very light besides that.

Q. Did you observe the state of the window at that time. - A. The pane was cracked, and he was pulling the glass out to make the hole bigger.

Q. Was the pane of glass cracked when you put the shutters up. - A. It was not.

Q. Did you distinguish the person of the man so as to know him again, as he was standing at the window and doing of this. - A. Yes.

Q. Which one is it. - A. The tall one with the dark hair, his name is William Tools .

Q. Did you see any body else at the house at that time. - A. Not at that time, when I went out the back way into the street, I did.

Q. You could not go through the front door then. - A. No.

Q. How long did you stay in the shop before you went out. - A About a minute or two.

Q. Did the man who was at work at the window see you. - A. No, I suppose he did not, because the shop was high, and the man stood low at the window in the street; I saw the man's face plain, as plain as I see your's.

Q. When you got into the street, what did you do. - A. I stood several minutes.

Q. How near was you to the window when you stood in the street. - A. About three houses off.

Q. How came they not to see you when you was in the street. - A. They did not suppose me or any body else coming out that way.

Q. What was there to hinder them from seeing of you. - A. Nothing.

Q. And you were very near to them. - A. I was within three houses of them.

Q. When you was outside did you see more than one man. - A. I saw a man stand against the door, and the other continued against the window.

Q. You had not seen that man standing against the door when you was in your shop. - A. I could not.

Q. Who was the man that was standing at the window when you was in the street. - A. Tools, the same that I had seen in the shop.

Q. Who was the man that was standing at the door by him. - A. It proved to be Bowen, I walked by him and knocked down Tools with a stick that I had in my hand.

Q. Tools was at the window, and Bowen was at the door; how far is the door from where Tools was standing. - A. Only a shutter apart.

Q. On your knocking Tools down, what became of the other man. - A. The other walked across the street, John Wood opened the front door and catched him immediately.

Q. Who was that man. - A. Bowen, when I passed him there was no man in the street besides him, not for a great many yards.

Q. You are sure as to Tools after having knocked him down. - A. Yes.

Q. What boot legs had you laying near the window - A. Three or four dozen laid on a shelf close against that part of the window where it was broken.

Q. Nothing was taken out of your shop. - A. Nothing was taken out.

Q. Were you present when either of them was searched. - A. I was not.

Q. What did you do after you had secured one of them, and your son-in-law the other. - A. We took them to the watchhouse.

Bowen. (to prosecutor) Whether you did not pass me before you came to your premises. - A. I saw you at the door when I first went into the street, just before I came to him; he was about four or five yards from the door when I struck Tools.

Court. You have told me that when you struck Tools the man ran away, did he go away before you struck Tools. - A. After I struck Tools.

Q. Where was he standing when you struck Tools. - A. About four or five yards from the door.

Q. Had he moved his position. - A. When I first saw him when I came into the street, he was standing against the door.

Q. How near was he to Tools when he was standing at the door. - A. About a yard or two from him.

Q. When was it that he moved. - A. While I was standing he walked about three or four yards the same side of the way nearer to me.

Q. That was before you struck Tools. - A. It was; I stood still four or five minutes before, I went and knocked Tools down; he stood still till I knocked Tools down.

Q. Then you said nothing to him, as you passed him to go to Tools. - A. No, when I knocked Tools down, he went over the way, John Wood opened the door immediately and and run over after him.

Q. Was he running away when your son-in-law came out of the door and ran after him. - A. I believe he was standing still then, it was only a little way across the street.

JOHN WOOD sworn. Q. You are the son-in-law of Wilcox. - A. I am, I live in the house.

Q. In the night between the 31st of March and the 1st of April, did you hear any thing in the night. - A. I did.

Q. In what part of the house do you sleep. - A. In the first floor, above the shop in the front.

Q. What time do you say it was when you heard any thing. - A. About three o'clock.

A. What sort of a noise did you hear. - A. A rattling of glass, it appeared to me to come from the shop window.

Q. On hearing this noise did you get out of bed. - A. I did, I went to the front window and threw up the sash, I saw two men cross the street, one with a wooden leg.

Q. Could you distinguish at that time that one had a wooden leg. - A. I could, it was quite moon light when they crossed from the house; they made a stop about half a minute, by that time the watchman was coming along, crying the hour of past three; one ran off a few yards, and the other walked very fast.

Q. When the watchman came near the door, did they run and walk the same way. - A. Yes.

Q. This throwing up the sash would have alarmed them one would have thought. - A. No, I threw up the sash very quietly, I put my head out of the window, and I at first supposed they saw me, I supposed afterwards they did not, because they came back to the window again; I alarmed Mr. Wilcox, and he came down.

Q. How long had the watchman gone by before Wilcox came down. - A. Not above two or three minutes.

Q. Did you go with Wilcox into the shop. - A. Wilcox came down into my room first, where I slept; he instantly went down stairs, and I followed him, he then went into the shop after four or five minutes.

Q. How came he to stay so long. - A. There was a door backwards that we unbolted, that we might go back wards.

Q. On going into the shop what did you observe. A. I saw a man at the window, pulling the glass out, with a handkerchief on his head under his hat; I perceived the hand in the hole of the window, the hand was moving the goods that lay against the window.

Q. Was Wilcox in the shop at that time. - A. I believe he was in the back room, I desired him to go out to them, otherwise the goods would be taken out.

Q. When Wilcox was gone into the back room you saw the hand in at the window. - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us correctly what you saw. - A. I saw the hand in when I came back into the shop, still seeing the man standing at the window.

Q. Had you seen the hand in at the window before you desired. Wilcox to go round. - A. Yes, and saw the goods move likewise.

Q. You observed a man with a handkerchief round his head, pulling the glass out of the window, did Wilcox go out of the shop into the little room before you. - A. I believe he went out before me.

Q. Was that after he was gone that you perceived this hand in at the window. - A. It was after he was in the little room.

Q. Whose hand it was you cannot tell. - A. It was the hand of the man that had the handkerchief on his head, standing at the window.

Q. You saw him then standing at the window, as you had done before, - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Say what you saw done to the goods. - A. I saw the goods move once or twice that lay across the window.

Q. What goods were they. - A. Cordovan boot legs, I saw the hand move them as they were upon the shelf, I expected them every minute to tumble.

Q. Was the hole large enough to have drawn out these boot legs. - A. I do not think it was large enough without taking the whole of it out.

Q. Then in fact none of them was drawn off the shelf. - A. None, they were moved two inches from the place where they lay, but still on the shelf.

Q. Having seen this what did you do. - A. I laid hold of the door to pull it open (as I expected the man standing at the window would be knocked down, Mr. Wilcox was gone round with an intent to do it), and with two sudden pulls at the door I opened it, I found it tied on the outside the first pull, I gave it a harder pull the second time, and broke the string, and then I went into the street, I ran across the street and seized the prisoner Bowen right opposite, he was standing still.

Q. Did you see any thing of Tools at that time.

A. Yes, he was in the custody of Mr. Wilcox.

Q. Are you sure that Tools was the man that was standing at the window. - A. Yes, it was not half a minute from my pulling open the door that he was in the custody of Mr. Wilcox.

Q. Can you say whether Bowen, the man that you laid hold of, that you had seen him out of the window. - A. I saw a wooden legged man and another man, but I cannot swear to them.

Q. Which is the wooden legged man. - A. Tools.

Q. Were you present when either of the prisoners were searched. - A. I was, I am not certain from which of their pockets the instruments were taken; a person brought an iron crow, but where it came from I do not know; I tried the impression made on the place, and it fitted exactly the marks on the shutters.

JOHN THOMAS sworn. I am a watchman.

Q. Were you on duty on the morning that this house was attempted to be entered. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you cry the hour of three. - A. No, I belong to the precinct of Wellclose Square, the other watchman belongs to St. George's.

Q. You had not observed any thing about the house. - A. No, my beat does not come so far as his house.

Q. Was the prisoner delivered into your care. - A. I heard somebody call out Watch, I ran up to where the noise was, I met the prisoner Bowen just in the custody of Wood.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner Tools. - A. Yes, he was with Mr. Wilcox, they were both brought to the watchhouse together.

Q. Were you present when they were searched. - A. Yes, I saw a black cloth bag, a flannel jacket, and a gimblet.

Q. Who had that bag. - A Bowen had the bag in his pocket, there was a gimblet found in Bowen's pocket, and a gimblet in Tools' pocket, and a little saw was found in Bowen's pocket; they were delivered to the officer of the night.

Bowen. Q. (to witness) Did you take a gimblet out of my pocket. - A. No, from Tools' pocket, the other gimblet came from Mr. Wilcox's door, where they tied the cord to.

Court. You said the gimblet was found in Tools' pocket and in Bowen's, that is not so. - A. No, only in Tools; I am sure the little saw was found in Bowen's pocket, I saw it taken out.

WILLIAM WALE sworn. I am the officer of the night, of the precinct of Wellclose, I arrived at the watchhouse about five minutes after the prisoners were brought in; Thomas delivered these things to

me, I produce a gimblet, a flannel jacket, and a black bag, and there was a little saw, which I have had the misfortune to drop as I was coming along yesterday; there I understood were taken from the pocket of Tools, and this gimblet I understood was taken from the door, there was a mark of a gimblet on the post of the door.

Prosecutor. I found the gimblet, it was bored in the post of the window, I pulled it out, and carried it to the watchhouse.

Q. (to Thomas) Did you receive a gimblet from any body. - A. Yes, from the prosecutor.

Q. (to Wood) Do you undertake to say that you saw any of these boot legs moved up from the shelf. - A. Only being moved on the shelf, I saw his hand at the legs, the legs laid so close to the window, he could not put his hand in without shoving them.

Q. Did you see him lift them up at all. - A. I saw them move from him, I saw the end of one half dozen move round, I expected that they would be taken out when I went to Mr. Wilcox.

Q. What size are the legs. - A. The legs are about eighteen inches long, and as the legs lay across the window, one half dozen was turned round from the rest, just at the time the hand was taken from the window, and the blow was given by Wilcox.

Q. My question is whether you saw them lifted up from the place where they were. - A. They moved, I did not see them lifted up, only a drawing on, a little moving round.

Bowen's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am accused of.

Tools' Defence. I am totally ignorant of what is alledged against me.

Bowen called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tools called no witnesses to character.

BOWEN, aged 20.

TOOLS, aged 26.

BOTH, GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-52

263. ANN PEARCE, alias SMITH, alias JORDAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on on the 9th of March , in the dwelling house of William Gee , two cloaks, value 4 l. and four one pound bank notes, the property of William Gee .

WILLIAM GEE sworn. I am a publican , I live at the Golden Horse, Aldersgate-street ; the prisoner at the bar was my servant . On the 9th of March I missed the property; the key of the room where the property was taken from, was taken out of the bar, and a strange key hung up in its place; about four o'clock in the afternoon the door was unlocked, the property was taken out, and the door was locked again; about eight o'clock in the evening she absconded; we did not suspect her to be the person that had taken it, till a person at whose house she was said she had robbed her of her things; my mistress went up stairs and missed the property.

Q. That was on the 10th when Mrs. Gee missed the property. - A. Yes; I never saw any more of her till the 18th when I found her in a public house in Long Lane, with one of my wife's cloaks on; I left her in the custody of two men, while I went down to Hatton Garden office for an officer; when I came back again she had hid the cloak in the privy, then she was taken to our house, and from there she was taken to the office.

Prisoner. Q. (to prosecutor) Mr. Gee, in the first place you recollect you gave me a guinea on Sunday morning in the cellar, and after that you gave me two pound notes.

Q. What did I give it you for. - A. That is best known to yourself; you asked me several Sundays if you should take an apartment for me and keep me, and that very Sunday morning you made a noise about the key, you broke open your room door, and you said to Mrs. Gee that Mr. Davis's boy had taken the key out of mistake; with that you says to me, will you have a great coat or a cloak, I told you I never wore a great coat in my life; you went up stairs and brought me down the cloak, you know very well you would never let me alone when I was down in the cellar, every one knows your character, your wife, and there she is, has told me that she suffered shipwreck by your goings on; if I had taken your advice you would not have done as you have.

Prosecutor. I never spoke a word to you about what you have been saying, I solemnly declare to God.

Court. Now Mr. Gee, upon the oath that you have taken, did you ever give her the cloak. - A. Upon my oath I did not, if it was the last word that I breathed out of my body I never gave her a farthing.

Q. When you came back the cloak was hid in the necessary. - A. It was.

SARAH GEE sworn. I am the wife of the last witness; I know no further than on Monday after the things were lost, I went up stairs and missed the property; the prisoner was a married woman as I thought, I let her and her husband both lodge in my house; the landlady that she lodged with, came and told me that she had robbed her of all the things out of the room; I missed the cloaks directly as the woman told me she had robbed her.

Q. Are both the cloaks yours. - A. One is, the other is not.

ANN RUBERY sworn. I keep a public house in Long-lane. On the 18th of March, the prisoner came in with two men, they called for a pot of beer. I went back into the kitchen, and one of the men called out landlady, I went to see what they wanted, she asked to go to the privy, I went to the back door and shewed her where to go across the yard, and she went, she had the cloak on when she went to the privy, I did not see what she did there, she went by herself.

Q. Did you see the cloak found afterwards. - A. Yes, it was found in a place that was broken in the ceiling of the privy, she must have stood upon the seat of the privy, and have put it into that hole.

Q. Was that hole there before. - A. Yes.

JOHN CHAPMAN sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden, on Tuesday the 18th of March, Mr. Gee came to me to take the prisoner into custody, when he saw her he asked her where the cloak was that she had on when he left her, her answer was that it was not hers, the right owner had got it, I asked the landlady where she had been, she said she

had been in the privy; I asked her for a light and so shew me the way to it, we went together, and when I came there, I saw footmarks upon the seat of the privy, I got up and put my hand about, and found this cloak through the hole of the ceiling.

Q. (to prosecutrix) Look at that cloak. - A. This is my cloak; here is a lodger that heard her unlock the door and go into the room.

ELIZEBETH HARLEY sworn. Q. Are you a married woman. - A. Yes, my husband is a taylor; there is only a partition that parts Mrs. Gee's bed room and mine, her little girl was in my room and heard the door open, she says that is my mother, I said it is not Mrs. Gee's cough nor her foot; I heard a person in there, it was not Mrs. Gee.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never inside of the door, when Mr. Gee went up to clean himself between three and four o'clock, he broke the door open, Mr. Gee gave me the cloak; there was nothing freer than a gift.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-53

264. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 6 d. three aprons, value 6 s. three childrens frocks, value 3 s. two bed gowns, value 2 s. a boy's dress, value 6 s. four pin cloths, value 18 d. five caps, value 7 s. five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. a child's shirt, value 6 d. a pillow case, value 6 d. a tablecloth, value 1 s. three napkins, value 1 s. 6 d. two flannel petticoats, value 6 d. and a tippet, value 2 d. the property of John Adkins , in his dwelling house .

JOHN ADKINS sworn. I am a publican , I live at the old Windsor Castle, High Holborn ; the prisoner came to my house on Thursday the 6th of March, he asked for a glass of gin at the bar, and to go backwards, he went backwards and continued there about four minutes, and then he packed up the things in the indictment; he came back with a bag in his hand, which he put upon the bench in the tap room, he then turned to go to the bar, and said he would pay for the gin, while he was paying my wife for the gin she observed an apron of hers sticking out of his small clothes, she called to me, and said the prisoner had robbed her, at the same time she was drawing a pinafore out of his breeches and an apron; I then laid hold of the prisoner, I asked him what he had got in his bag, he made no reply; I looked in the bag, and found all the things contained in the indictment.

MARY ADKINS sworn. I am the wife of the last witness. On Thursday the 6th of March, the prisoner came in for a glass of gin, and asked to go backwards, we gave him leave, we watched him into the yard; the things were in the back kitchen half washed.

Q. You did not observe him go there did you. - A. No.

Q. The first thing that attracted your notice was your apron that he had in his breeches. - A. Yes, I called my husband, I had got the apron, and the pin cloth; I asked my husband to lay hold of him; the other things were all wet, he had put them in this bag which he brought in with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a fit of intoxication; I do not recollect what I did.

GUILTY, aged 42.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-54

265. ROBERT WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , a coat, value 15 s. pair of boots, value 15 s. pair of breeches, value 15 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of William Brooks ; two coats, value 20 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. two shirts, value 5 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of William Passmore , in the dwelling house of Francis Coke .

WILLIAM BROOKS sworn. I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 3, Castle-street, Oxford Market ; I was sent for home from where I was at work on Tuesday the 15th of April, between the hours of two and five, I saw the prisoner in the room when I came home, and the clothes laying about the room.

Q. What clothes. - A. Mine; a great coat and a pair of boots were on the table, and a pair of stockings in Passmore's pocket; I had left them hanging up in the room.

Q. Did you know the young man before. - A. No.

Q. What did he say to you. - A. He never said any thing, he was in this position. (The witness putting his hand to his head.)

WILLIAM PASSMORE sworn. I am a carpenter , I lodge in the same room with Brooks; the landlord came down to where I was at work, saying that the room had been robbed, and he found the prisoner in the room; I came home and found my clothes taken out of the box, and some laid on the table and some on the chair.

SARAH COKE sworn. I keep the house, my husband is a carpenter; I went up stairs and found the prisoner in the room last Tuesday; the prisoner had got on him a pair of stockings, a neck handkerchief, and a shirt, the property of William Passmore , and a pair of breeches, the property of William Brooks , and a pair of boots and a great coat rolled up under his arm, the property of William Brooks . He made no resistance when I went into the room nor broke no locks; I asked him what he did there, he begged for mercy, I turned out of the room and shut the door after me, and I called for the second floor lodger, and had him secured.

Q. Did you know any thing of him before. - A. Nothing at all.

Q. What did he do with his own clothes. - A. He had these over his own clothes. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutors.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings . Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-55

266. EDMUND JOHNSON was indicted for

returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported

- STEVENS sworn. I am turnkey of Maidstone prison; in the county of Kent.

Q. Was you present when this man was tried. - A. No; I remember him perfectly well being in the prison; he came to Maidstone prison on the 18th of January, in the year 1803; he was committed as a felon; he was very ill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Do you know upon your oath, that he was ever at the bar. - A. I do, I took him from, Maidstone and put him on board the bulk on the 2d of May, 1803.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. I am an officer, I produce the certificate of the conviction of Edmund Johnson , I saw Mr. Knapp write it, and I saw him sign it.

Q. When was he tried. - A. The 14th of March, 1803; he was ordered to be transported for seven years

Q. You was not present when the man was tried. - A. I was not; Brown and I apprehended the man at the Hampshire Hog, Rosemary-lane, in the parish of Whitechapel .

ROBERT BROWN sworn. I am an officer of Shadwell office; I know no more than we received information that he was returned from transportation; I and Rogers apprehended him on the 22d of March last.

WILLIAM CUTBUSH sworn. I am county smith for the country of Kent.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Very well.

Q. Were you at Maidstone in the year 1803. - A. Yes, I was at the assizes, I saw the prisoner at the bar tried, he was tried by the name of Edmund Johnson; I have got a calender that I made a memorandum at the same time; I assisted Mr. Watson on account of his being ill.

Q. You have no doubt of his being the man that was tried and convicted. - A. No, I went with Stevens to Portsmouth with him, he was delivered on board the Captivity hulk, the receipt that Mr. Stevens had brought here, I saw the captain sign it.

Q. The only question is, whether he is the same man - A. I am sure of that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You say you are county smith, is that a new appointed place or a place of old description - A. Old, my father was before me, to make the chains and every thing that they want, it is appointed by the justices.

Q. We learn something every day; then besides your office of county smith you was assisting the keeper of that prison. - A. Yes, on account of Mr. Watson being ill.

Q. You have positively sworn to the prisoner at the bar being the man, do you mean to persist in it. - A. I do.

Q. When was you called upon to be a witness upon this trial. - A. On Tuesday.

Q. Can you tell how long the prisoner at the bar was in custody at Maidstone. - A. No, he was removed from this prison a day or two before the assizes came on.

Q. You never come the first day to the assize, did you attend the goal. - A. I never attend the goal no more than to do my work there.

Q. Then all the observations that you have made was at the trial. - A. Yes, and afterwards going down to Portsmouth with him.

Q. You know there is a reward of twenty pound upon conviction. - A. I do not know nothing of the reward.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know there is a reward. - A. I know there is a reward.

Q. What did you mean by saying that you did not know. - A. I did not say so.

Jury. You did say so.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been on board a ship, I have served in many actions; I was along with admiral Jervis seven years ago.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-56

267. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of March , four silver tea spoons, value 6 s. and a pair of sugar tongs , the property of Daniel Chilvers .

DANIEL CHILVERS sworn. I am a publican , I live at the sign of the Coach and Horses, North-street, Grovesnor-square . On the 20th, or 21st of March I had my first floor painted, the prisoner forced himself into my bed room, to paint the outside of the window, as another man was to do that; when he had done he locked the door, and brought the key down; on the 6th of April I missed the spoons, I had no suspicion of any one but the prisoner, as I never admit any person into my room, either to make the bed or to sweep it but my wife and myself.

Q. Did you find the spoons again. - A. Yes, at Mr. Hinckesman's I found the spoons and the sugar tongs; I took the prisoner up, I knew he lived in Dyot-street.

JOHN HINCKESMAN sworn. I am a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, St. Giles's; I produce four silver tea spoons, and a pair of sugar tonges, I bought them from whom I cannot exactly say; I think the person was taller than the prisoner.

JOHN WARREN sworn. On the 8th of April I apprehended the prisoner; I searched him and I found no duplicates about him.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please you, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury, you will understand Mr. Chilvers is wrong in the first place, in a few words that he has spoken, he informed you that I lived in Dyot-street, St. Giles's, I live in Ivey-street, Lawrence lane, Mr. Walker is my landlord; I acknowledge that I was the only workman that was in the room, out as to Mr. Chilvers' saying I forced myself into the room, it is no such thing, Mrs. Chilvers wanted me to clean the outside of the window, I accordingly did so, during the time I was at work there I had occasion to come down twice, once for some turpentine; at each time I came down stairs I pulled the door to, and left the key on the outside; Mr. Chilvers' house is a large house and full of lodgers; afterwards, I locked the door and returned Mr. Chilvers the key, I was not in there above half an

hour.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-57

268. JEREMIAH COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of March a scaffold board, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Misset .

THOMAS MISSET sworn. I am a plaisterer , I live at No. 23 Steven-street, Grosvenor Square . On the 22d of March I was desired to attend Marlborough-street; when I came there I found a board with my mark on it; I can swear to the mark by my own iron, it has my name on it in full length, T. Missett.

HENRY STURDY sworn. I am a wood cutter; on Saturday between twelve and one o'clock the prisoner brought a board and set it up against the wall in the street, as nigh as possible to my house, he asked me if I would buy it, I says, did you come honestly by it, as I never bought stolen property in all my life; he says three times over it was his own property; I gave him a shilling in part, he was to come again on Sunday morning for the other shilling; when he came again for the other shilling he brought another board, I was not at home, my wife took it in, he desired her to let him leave it there.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man. - A. I am certain of it. (The board produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street, I am sixty-seven years of age.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-58

269. JEREMIAH COLLINS was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of March , a board, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Slade .

JOHN EATON sworn. I am foreman to Mr. Slade, he is a builder ; Mr. Sturdy came and gave information that this board was brought to his house on Sunday morning.

HENRY STURDY sworn. Q. This board was brought on Sunday morning to you. - A. I was not at home.

MARGARET STURDY sworn. I am the wife of the last witness. On Sunday morning a knock came to the door, the prisoner at the bar said that he had brought a board, and he asked if master was at home, I said no, he asked me to let him leave it, which I did, he asked me for a shilling, and I gave it him; I asked him what I should say when master came home, he said half a crown, and he would call again; he called on Monday morning, and Mr. Sturdy took him to Marlborough-street. (The board produced.)

Q. Is that the same board. - A. It is.

Q. (to Sturdy) On the Monday when he came you took him to Marlborough-street. - A. Yes, I went to a neighbour of mine and asked him what was to be done, as I believed they were stolen goods, he advised me and said he would assist me in taking him to Marlborough-street, accordingly we took him there; that is the second-board that he left at my house, I should have taken him on Sunday if I had been at home.

Q. (to Eaton) Whose board is that. - A. It is the property of Mr. Slade.

Q. What is the worth of them. - A. We valued it at half a crown; Mr. Slade at Marlborough-street said he would give three shillings and nine pence a-piece for a hundred of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-59

270. JOHN TUCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April, three pounds and a half weight of coffee, value 12 s. the property of the London Dock company .

Second Count for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Serjeant Best.

JOHN SPENCER sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. In what situation are you belonging to the London Dock. - A. I am principal warehousekeeper to No. 3.

Q. Is the property of that warehouse under your care. - A. It is, I am answerable to the company for it.

Q. On the 9th of April was the prisoner employed in that warehouse. - A. He was.

Q. There was a great quantity of raw coffee loose and in bags also in that warehouse, it was in such a situation as he could get at it. - A. Yes.

Q. And in the course of his employment he went in and out of that warehouse any time he pleased. - A. Yes.

Q. In the evening of the 7th of April, when he was coming out of the Dock premises, was he searched in your presence. - A. He was searched by Mr. Mac Donald in my presence, I saw a little bag of coffee taken out of his breeches, and one taken out of his hat, which contained more raw coffee; we had nothing else in that warehouse but raw coffee; I went along with the officer to the house where he lodged, the officer searched it, I saw a quantity of coffee found in a little back room under the bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to be the warehousekeeper; the quantity of coffee that is contained in that warehouse I should think that it is impossible for you to state that you lost this. - A. We have too large a quantity to swear that we lost that.

Q. I think there are a vast number of warehouses that have articles of this description. - A. Not in the Dock, out of the Dock there is raw coffee in a great many warehouses.

Q. How many persons were employed in this warehouse as well as him. - A. I suppose fifty.

Q. How much does this quantity amount to altogether that was found upon him. - A. Between three and four pounds.

Q. Was it found upon his going out of the warehouse. - A. Yes, he was within a hundred yards of it, but he was not gone out of the great gate.

- MAC DONALD sworn. Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. I was on duty at the west gate of the Dock.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there. - A. I saw him when he was coming out, I searched him, I found two bags of coffee, one concealed in his breeches, the other concealed in his hat, it is raw coffee; I said to

him, Tuck, you ought to be ashamed of yourself to do such things; upon my word, says he, I was led into it by others, he said he was very sorry for it.

Court. How long has the man been employed by the London Dock company. - A. Between five and six months.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and during that time to be publicly Whipped at the West Gate of the London Dock .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-60

271. CHARLOTTE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of James Archer .

JAMES ARCHER sworn. I am a gentleman's servant out of place. On the 25th of March about twelve at night, I met the prisoner coming down Holborn, she asked me to go home with her, being late at night I thought it was better to go home with her than to be out of my lodgings.

Q. Of course you went with her, where did she take you. - A. No. 41, Charles-street, Drury-lane , and early in the morning I missed my watch.

Q. Did you ever find it again. - A. When I asked her about it she said she had never seen it.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that you had the watch when you went to bed. - A. I am, I missed it about five or six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Had she been out of the room. - A. Not to my knowledge, I searched the room but could not find it.

Q. Was it afterwards found by Bartlett. - A. Yes.

GEORGE BARTLETT sworn. I am servant to Mr. Newport at the New Prison. On Wednesday the 26th of March the woman was brought into our custody; it is a usual thing when they are brought into custody, to demand their bonnet, accordingly I asked for hers, she denied it, and the only reason was, there was so many men present she did not like to take her bonnet off before them: I took her to the women's side, then I asked her again, she rather refused, I was under the necessity of taking it, she put her hand up to the top of her head, and took the watch from the top of her bonnet; I immediately took it from her, and related the circumstance to the governor; he told me to take it to the sitting magistrate at Hatton Garden. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Q. (to prosecutor) You took her up immediately, and took her to Hatton Garden. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not they search her. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the watch when he got into my room, he told me he had no money, he told me he would pledge the watch and give me some; in the morning I asked to let me go with him to pledge the watch, he refused, and I refused giving him the watch; I never had a single farthing of him.

Prosecutor. I gave her two shillings, and I had fourteen shillings and six pence remaining; I did not give her the watch, the watch was taken out of my breeches pocket when I was asleep.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-61

272. JOHN MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of February , a sheet, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Robins , in a lodging room .

MARY ROBINS sworn. I live in Shoreditch , I am the wife of Thomas Robins . The prisoner had a lodging at our house a week, he was to pay half a crown a week for it; he slept in a little room with a bed and bedclothes, and a chair in it; he lett the lodgings on the 27th of February, and took one sheet off the bed, which he pawned.

Q. How soon after did you apprehend him: - A. On the Monday following, and the officer searched him; the duplicate was found on him, he said he was sorry he had taken it.

ROBERT SAMUEL HUDSON sworn. I am an apprentice to Mrs. Read, a pawnbroker, Red Cross-street, Cripplegate. On Thursday the 27th of February, about nine o'clock, the prisoner offered this sheet to pawn for five shillings; I produce it.

JOSEPH PRINCE sworn. I am an officer of the parish of St. Lukes's; I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of March, I searched him and found some duplicates, one was the duplicate of the sheet. (The sheet identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was induced from the extremity of distress to commit that crime, I had wanted food for three days, I meant to restore it again; as far as is consistent with the ends of justice, I throw myself upon the lenity of the court.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-62

273. ISAAC SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of March , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of William Adsar .

WILLIAM ADSAR sworn. I am a muffin baker , I live at Watford in Hertfordshire; I lost the watch in a privy at the Cranes in Edgware , I laid it down and forgot it.

Q. When was it. - A. It was on a Sunday, about nine or ten weeks ago, I am sure I left it in the privy.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner Smith of taking it. - A. I went home to Watford, and after I had been home about three hours, I missed my watch, I returned to the Cranes, and asked the ostler if he had found a watch that I had left in the privy.

Q. Was the prisoner ostler there. - A. He was helper in the yard ; the ostler asked the prisoner (he was laying in a manger in the stable at the time), if he had picked up my watch in the privy, he made answer he had not been there all day; I never heard any thing of the watch till this gentleman stopped the watch in town.

HENRY BATES sworn. I am a victualler, I live at the Cape of Good Hope, Devonshire-street, Portland-place. On the 16th of March, the prisoner came into my house, about nine o'clock in the evening; after sitting some time, he offered the watch for

sale, he said he had been very ill, and was very much reduced, would be glad if somebody would buy it of him, he at first asked three guineas and a half, he came down at last to twenty-five shillings; the man came and asked me my opinion whether he should buy it, I advised him not to buy it; as he was coming by the bar, he wished me to lend him half a crown upon it; I took the watch away from him, and gave him in charge of the watchman. On seeing him bring the watch in his hand I thought he had stole it, I do not think he had any pocket to put it in. I wrote to the man who cleaned the watch at Edgware, and on Tuesday morning the prosecutor came to me, (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the necessary, I kept it, I thought it would be cryed.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-63

274. HENRY WILLIAM WYATT was indicted for, that he being a person of wicked mind, feloniously did intend to poison, kill, and murder, one James Goldsmith, and Maria, his wife , and Louisa Goldsmith, spinster , on the 6th of April , with force and arms, feloniously, and unlawfully, did administer to the said James Goldsmith , Maria Goldsmith , and Louisa Goldsmith , and caused to be administered, and taken by them a certain deadly poison, to wit, white arsenic, intending thereby, to kill and murder them , against the statute, and against the king's peace; and

Three other Counts for like offence, with like intention.

JAMES GOLDSMITH sworn. I am a watch wheel finisher , I live at No. 9, Pear Tree-street, Goswell-street ; the prisoner was my apprentice , he had been with me about nine months.

Q. How old is he. - A. He is near fifteen years old.

Q. Had you done any thing to him. - A. There was nothing to affront him as I know of.

Q. What happened to you yesterday se'nnight. - A. On yesterday se'nnight, I sat down on that Sunday morning, as I usually do, to breakfast with some coffee.

Q. Had you sent the prisoner out. - A. I was not at home, my wife had.

Q. How many does your family consist of. - A. My wife and three children.

Q. What is your wife's name. - A. Maria.

Q. Is your daughter's name Louisa. - A. Yes, she is four years old.

Q. You drank your coffee, did you find yourself very ill afterwards. - A. I found myself very ill afterwards, after the first cup that I drank.

Q. Did you see the prisoner drink any coffee. - A. I did not, my wife did, he was down stairs.

Q. Did you drink any more afterwards. - A. I drank two cups afterwards; I began to complain after I drank the first cup of my inside being very bad and my head.

Q. Your wife went out. - A. Yes, she went out to fetch some spinach, just before church time.

Q. What time did she go out. - A. Near eleven o'clock.

Q. What time did you breakfast. - A. A little after ten o'clock.

Q. Your wife returned again. - A. Yes; while she was gone I was taken very sick, and when she returned, she was taken very sick.

Q. Was either of your little children ill. - A. My little girl said she was very sick indeed, she said, daddy, daddy, I then said to my wife, I suppose the child is sick.

Q. On seeing her sick, do you know whether there was any thing in the coffee. - A. I went over the way to the chandler's shop where we have the coffee.

Q. Did you examine the coffee pot. - A. I examined it, and took it to the doctor's, in Wilderness-row; I saw two or three white specks at the bottom of the saucers.

Q. Did you find any thing at the bottom of the coffee pot. - A. Yes, I took out all I could find with a knife, and carried it to Mr. Field, the apothecary.

Q. You did not carry the coffee pot to Mr. Field, - A. No.

Q. What did you find at the bottom of the coffee pot. - A. White arsenic; I knew it was arsenic, because I had some in my shop myself; my shop was about ten yards from my house, at the bottom of the garden.

Q. Was it locked up. - A. No, the arsenic was in a drawer where I am always using things for my business.

Q. Was your shop locked up then. - A. Yes, on Sunday morning it was locked up, but if any person got into the shop, they could get at the drawer, where the arsenic was; the drawer was not locked, but I forewarned him of it, when he first came apprentice to me, and my errand boy and all, I told them it was poison, and never to touch it; it was what I had to kill rats.

Q. Did you perceive any difference in this arsenic, it was in a lump. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any part of it gone when you looked at it. - A. Yes, one third of it nearly.

Q. How big was the piece of arsenic, have you got it here. - A. Yes, (witness producing it).

Q. There had been a piece taken from this. - A. Yes, I had it in my shop for two or three years.

Q. How long was it since you had seen it before. - A. I had not looked at it since I told the two boys of it, that is near nine months ago.

Q. So that when it was broken off you cannot tell. - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. How many boys have you in the house. - A. Two, this little boy has been with me the same time as the other.

Q. You say it was nine months since you saw the arsenic. - A. Yes.

Q. The boy went home to his mother, he did not come to you the next day. - A. No.

Q. Did you see the boy sick. - A. He told me he was sick; I did not see him sick.

MARIA GOLDSMITH sworn. Q. You are the wife of James Goldsmith . - A. Yes.

Q. You drank of the coffee, so did your daughter Louisa. - A. Yes, I was taken ill.

Q. Did the prisoner drink any. - A. About half a cup, or rather better, of a middling sized cup.

Q. Did he drink it at the same time that you did. - A. Afterwards.

Q. Was it after you was taken ill. - A. Before I was taken ill.

Q. Your husband was taken ill immediately. - A. He was taken ill while I was gone for some spinach for dinner.

Q. Your boy was not ill with you, but after he left you. - A. Yes.

Q. Was your daughter taken ill before the prisoner drank. - A. No, after.

Q. Then the boy was not aware that any of you were ill when he drank it. - A. No, he drank the bottom of the coffee, what was left, I put some more water in it, and boiled it up.

Q. Did he drink as much as usual. - A. He never drank as much as one cup.

Q. Did he drink as much as you poured out. - A. No, he left about a quarter of it.

Q. That quarter that he left there was a great deal of grounds in. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he drink as much as might be expected leaving the grouts. - A. No, he left a little coffee in with the grouts.

Q. A midling sized cup, you say. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the boy taken ill. - A. Yes.

Q. How soon. - A. He went down stairs, my husband called me up, when I went down again, he said he had been exceeding sick.

Q. You turned something out of the coffee pot, and found something white. - A. No, I did not

Q. Then you did not turn out the grounds of the coffee pot. - A. No, my husband did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds.

Q. You saw the boy the next day. - A. No, his mother sent word the next day that he was very ill he could not come.

Q. He seldom drank any more than one cup. - A. No.

Q. He drank out of the same pot that you drank out off. - A. Yes.

FRANCES LEE sworn. Where do you live. - A. In Benjamin-street, I keep a chandler's shop.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come and buy coffee of you. - A. Yes, a little after nine on the Sunday morning.

Q. What did you sell him. - A. Half an ounce of coffee.

Q. You gave it him, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you grind it. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether there was any thing but coffee in it. - A. There was nothing else in it but coffee.

Q. Had you ground any other coffee at that mill that morning. - A. No. nothing before.

Q. Did you afterwards. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you grind this for the prisoner while he was in the shop. - A. Yes.

Q. And you had not used the mill before that morning. - A. No.

Q. How lately before had you used that mill. - A. On the Saturday morning.

Q. To grind what. - A. Coffee.

Q. Are you the only person that attends the shop. - A. My sister does.

Q. Is she here. - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot tell what was ground in the mill. - A. I was not out of the shop.

Q. Are you sure there was nothing ground in the mill before, on Sunday morning. - A. There was nothing on Sunday morning.

Q. Any other person in the shop. - A. My father, he never does any thing in the shop.

Q. Is he here. - A. No.

Q. Then you ground this coffee first. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you grind any thing after on that day. - A. Only some coffee for our own breakfast, that I ground at the same time.

Q. Did you find any bad effects from the coffee. - A. No.

Q. Did you drink any. - A. Four cups, and my sister drank four cups.

Q. You all breakfasted on coffee. - A. Yes.

Q. You had some left, had you. - A. Yes, in the mill.

Q. Then when this boy came for half an ounce, how came you to grind so much. - A. We wanted some for our own breakfast.

Q. You ground more than enough for that. - A. Yes, there was some in the mill afterwards.

Q. How came you to leave any in the mill. - A. We mostly do.

Q. Then when the prisoner came in the morning there might be some in the mill. - A. No, there was none at all.

Q. How came that about, you commonly leave coffee in the mill. - A. No.

Q. You tell me you do. - A. We did on the Sunday morning.

Q. Do you commonly leave it in on Sunday morning, or on every morning. - A. On Sunday morning we generally have customers come in one after another.

Q. And there was some left. - A. Yes.

THOMAS FIELD sworn. Q. You are an apothecary, living in Clerkenwell. - A. Yes.

Q. The witness brought you some coffee. - A. Yes, in the morning of the 6th of April, about half after eleven o'clock, he brought some coffee grouts mixed with a white substance.

Q. Did you examine it. - A. I examined it at the time, it was in such a situation as is unusually to be met with, it is generally in a large mass, as you may have seen it, it was irregularly powdered.

Q. What was it. - A. White arsenic, it is generally made use of in a fine powder.

Q. Mr. Goldsmith, and his wife, and child were all very ill. - A. They were all very ill and sick.

Q. What quantity of white arsenic did you see. - A. I saw six or eight grains in irregular lumps.

Q. Was the quantity that you saw sufficient to make the people sick. - A. It was more than sufficient to make them ill, that which I saw in the saucer.

Q. You tell us it is white arsenic, how do you know that. - A. I examined it on a burning iron, which is one of the best tests, it evaporates in a white same, with a strong garlic smell.

Q. Then have you any doubt of its being arsenic. - A. Not any.

Q. You impute the sickness from this arsenic to these persons. - A. To the suspending of the arsenic that they drank; when you boil arsenic up, it impregnates the water, the arsenic itself is not soluble in water.

Q. If this arsenic was boiled up again and again, it would have been the same to all the water. - A. Not if it was not suspended, held up in the water.

- sworn. I live with my mother, who lodges on the ground floor in the same house.

Q. Do you remember when the prisoner returned with the coffee. - A. Yes, I suppose then it was about half past nine o'clock, after the breakfast I met Mr. Goldsmith on the stairs, he looked very bad, I asked him if he was not well, he said no, he believed he was poisoned with the coffee, and his wife and child too; he requested me to go up stairs, which I did; I found Mrs. Goldsmith and his daughter retching very much; afterwards Mrs. Goldsmith desired me to look at the coffee, and I did, I observed a white substance.

JONATHAN THORN sworn. Q. How old are you. - A. I am twelve on the 5th of August.

Q. You are errand boy to Mr. Goldsmith. - A. Yes, I have been with him very near a year.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner asking you what was in the drawer. - A. Yes.

Q. Was that before or since he was taken ill. - A. A week almost before that.

Q. How lately were they all taken so ill. - A. Yesterday se'night.

Q. How long was it before that. - A. Three days; he said he wondered what stuff that was master called poison.

Q. Did you tell him. - A. I said I did not know what stuff he called it; he asked me what it would kill, or poison, I said it would kill rats or any thing.

Q. Is that all that passed. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the stuff in the drawer then. - A. Master shewed it us both about nine months ago, and told us never to touch it, it was poison.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath. - A. No.

Q. Were you ever examined before in a court. - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-64

278. ELIZABETH CLARK and MARY WESTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , two silver watches, value 3 l. a gold watch, value 4 l. two silver teapots, value 10 l. 10 s. five silver table spoons, value 2 l. four silver tea spoons, value 10 s. eight handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 4 s. and one shawl, value 4 s. the property of Johanna Witts , in the dwelling house of William Field and MARY WILTS , for that she on the same day feloniously did receive, harbour, and counsel the said Elizabeth Clark and Mary Weston , she then and there well knowing them to have been committing the aforesaid felony .

JOHANNA WITTS sworn. I am a widow ; when my husband died I kept a lodging-house in Water-lane, Fleet-street, I live now in a lodging in Little Drury-lane .

Q. What part of the house have you. - A. A one pair of stairs back room in Mr. Field's house, I do not know whether his name is Thomas or William.

Q. What was your husband. - A. He was a carman.

Q. How long have you lived in this Little Drury-lane. - A. About three weeks.

Q. Tell us what happened to you. - A. I went to market to buy some beef steaks, and when I came from market I had a little drop more than did me good.

Q. What day of the month was this. - A. The 18th of March.

Q. What o'clock was it when you went to market. - A. Between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. You got exceeding drunk. - A. Because I am not used to liquor; I came home about one o'clock, I laid down on the bed, they picked my pocket.

Q. That you do not know, you was drunk, you laid down on the bed and slept. - A. When I was on the bed, they took the keys out of my pocket, and unlocked the trunk.

Q. Was you awake when they did that. - A. No.

Q. Then if I understand you you was very drunk, you laid down on the bed and fell asleep. - A. I did, I awoke about three o'clock, I found they were gone and the trunk was open, I went to look for my things, I found they were gone out of the trunk.

Q. You have not explained who you mean by they. - A. Elizabeth Clarke and Mary Weston , they lived with me in the same room, and they laid with me the night before.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner Clarke. A. About four or five months, she only came to lodge with me when she had no lodgings.

Q. What is she. - A. A girl of the town, I believe.

Q. How long has Mary Weston lived with you at these lodgings. - A. She came the second day after I was there, I had been three weeks there at the time I was robbed.

Q. What is her way of life. - A. She told me that she was a bookbinder.

Q. You know that she is an unfortunate girl. - A. I believe she is, she said she had a husband, and he was gone to sea.

Q. Any body else live with you. - A. She brought a young woman to live with me that night besides herself.

Q. What is her name. - A. Susannah Blake .

Q. Who brought her. - A. Mary Weston .

Q. Then you all four laid together, she is an unfortunate girl too. - A. Yes.

Q. You drank a good deal before you went to bed. - A. Yes.

Q. Did they drink with you. - A. Three of them did.

Q. Who stood treat, did you treat them all. - A No, they treated me.

Q. What was your liquor. - A. Gin.

Q. What had you in this box. - A. I had a good many things in this box, clothes, and two silver watches, a gold watch, two silver teapots, five large table spoons, four tea spoons, eight handkerchiefs, and a shawl, they were in the box when I went out.

Q. How came you in possession of all these things. A. I had this property before I had my second husband.

Q. Which husband was that. - A. Mr. Jones, he was clerk and outrider to Mrs. Thomas of Bristol.

Q. Were all these things, this gold watch and silver things his property. - A. I had a nephew that went to France, he had this gold watch in pawn, he asked me to take it out, and when he took his wages he would redeem it.

Q. How came you to have the two silver tea pots. A. One I had a good many years, and the other I got in the lottery, I bought it with the produce of a sixteenth.

Weston. Q. (to prosecutrix) Did not you send me to pledge the tea pot in your name at a pawnbroker's in Holborn. - A. No, it is as false as God is true.

Q. The cloak that you have on I pledged for you for a guinea and a half. - A. I pawned it myself, this young woman went with me, because I was rather in liquor.

SUSANNAH BLAKE sworn. Q. What are you. - A. I lived with this old woman a fortnight before Christmas day, at her house in Water-lane.

Q. That house was a nuisance to the neighbourhood, she was obliged to quit the house in Water-lane. - A. Yes.

Q. When she quitted that house she left the ladies behind her. - A. Yes.

Q. Did Clarke and Weston live with her in Water-lane. - A. No, only me.

Q. You used to see company, did not you. - A. Sometimes.

Q. Mrs. Witts knew that, did not she. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the house indicted. - A. No, her son keeps the house now in Water-lane.

Q. When did you come to this house in Drury-lane. - A. I slept there a few nights with her.

Q. Do you know the day of the month that she went out and got so drunk. - A. I do not.

Q. There where you slept, there was Elizabeth Clarke , Mary Weston , and Mrs. Witts, you all four slept there. - A. Yes.

Q. What hour did she go to market. - A. I think it was about ten o'clock in the morning, I think she returned about twelve.

Q. When she returned was she sober. - A. No, far from it, she was very much intoxicated, Mrs. Witts went out and came home again, and then went out a second time, and left Betsey Clarke and Poll Weston; I went out with Mrs. Witts, she was going to look at another lodging; I saw Poll Weston take the keys out of her pocket as she lay asleep on the bed.

Q. When she took the keys out of her pocket what did she do with them. - A. She put them under the bed till she found an opportunity of opening the box, and then she put the keys into Mrs. Witts' pocket again; after Mrs. Witts had her nap, she got up to go out, I went with her, I returned and found them both coming down stairs with the property in their laps; I went with them to Charing Cross, and we drove to the bottom of Holborn, there the coach stopped, and Poll Weston went out and pawned two watches.

Q. Who remained in the coach. - A. Betsy Clarke , the old woman ( Mary Wilts ), and me, remained in the coach while she went and pawned them; we waited at Covent Garden while Betsy Clarke went and fetched Wilts, before we took the coach at Charing Cross; Betsy Clarke returned to Poll Weston, me, and Mrs. Wilts, and said they would lend no more than a guinea and a half upon the two watches, and she thought it a great deal too little, she asked Mrs. Wilt, whether she had not better pawn the watches, Mrs. Wilts said she had better return back and pawn the two watches, which she did; they were pawned for a guinea and a half; then we told the coachman to drive us to the top of Holborn; Poll Weston and Betsy Clarke went and pawned the tea pot for two pounds.

Q. You did not go with them. - A. I did not; we all of us went to a hatter's shop at the top of Holborn, and we bought a black beaver hat for each of us; we went to a public house near Drury-lane, Poll Weston then had the property in her apron at that time, we stopped at the public house till twelve o'clock, Betsy Clarke and I left Poll Weston with the property.

Q. Did you get drunk. - A. I did not, nor the other young woman did not; we left Mrs. Wilts with Poll Weston, I do not know what she did with the rest of the property.

Q. Now, my girl, did you see the rest of the property. - A. I saw them in her apron.

Q. What were they. - A. A silver tea pot, a gold watch, and several India silk handkerchiefs, and a silk shawl, five silver table spoons, and four silver tea spoons.

Q. Was Mrs. Witts exceeding drunk. - A. She was.

Q. She is apt to get drunk, is not she. - A. Yes.

JAMES - sworn. I live with Mr. Warner, High Holborn; the prisoner brought this tea pot in to pledge, and a girl of the name of Clarke was behind her.

Q. When was it. - A. On the 19th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I lent her two guineas on it, I am sure she is the girl, I had known her about two years.

Q. Could you take in such a pot as that without suspecting her. - A. I did suspect her, but she evaded my questions by saying her brother and she had a few words, and the name that she told me corresponded with the cypher, she was better dressed, and looked a respectable person; she only asked two guineas, she seemed to know the worth of it; it was certainly an error of judgment, I confess.

Court. I can excuse errors of judgment, but this was an error of the heart.

Weston. I pledged the tea pot with him for Mrs. Witts, he asked me my name, I told him it was Johanna Wilts, I told him he need not be under any apprehension of taking it in, I had not stole it, I knew I had not.

JOHN WHITNEY sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 78, Drury-lane. On the 20th of March, the prisoner Elizabeth Clarke brought this handkerchief to me and pledged it for two shillings and sixpence.

Clarke. That is my handkerchief, a young man that is gone to sea left it with me.

WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. I am patrole and goaler of Bow-street. On the 21st of March the prisoners Clarke and Blake were brought to the office; Blackman and I were sent with Blake and Clarke for Mrs. Wilts; I produce a black beaver bonnet, which I took from the prisoner Clarke by the order of the magistrate; she acknowledged it was bought with part of the money the property was pawned for.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. I am an officer of the public office, Bow-street. On the 21st of March Pickering and I went with Clarke and Blake to No. 4, Steward's Rents, to search for Mary Wilts ; she was not at her lodgings till about six o'clock; on the morning of the 22d, when I apprehended her, I searched about the room, and found no property.

JOHN CORDERY sworn. I am constable of the precinct of White Friers. On the 20th of March the son of the prosecutrix came to me to take Clarke into custody; I took her into custody at the house of Mrs. Witts, in Water-lane, Fleet-street. In searching of her I found seven pennyworth of halfpence, and three duplicates, one for a pair of pattens for fourpence, the other a petticoat for half a crown, and the third was the duplicate for that handkerchief which the pawnbroker has produced. (The tea pot identified by the prosecutrix.)

Clarke's Defence. That is my own hankerchief, and the hat is my own, I had fifteen shillings given me the night before, I gave thirteen shillings for the hat.

Q. (to Blake) Look at that hat. - A. This is the the same hat which we bought, each of us had one of these hats.

Weston's Defence. Mrs. Witts desired me to pledge the tea pot; I have lived with Mrs. Witts ever since I was twelve years old; she was obliged to quit her house, a gentleman lost his gold watch there, she then removed to the lodgings in Drury-lane; since I have been in trouble she was obliged to remove again to Clement's Inn.

Mary Wilts was not put on her defence.

CLARKE - GUILTY , aged 24.

WESTON - GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILTS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-65

279. JAMES BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a keg of anchovies, value 30 s. the property of William Stennett .

WILLIAM STENNETT sworn. I am agent porter to the city of London . On the 6th of March, in the afternoon, my son attended the landing of eighty barrels of anchovies; soon after they were landed I received information there were two barrels stolen, and my son received information that they would be taken to Mr. Levi's, in Goodman's-yard, Minories ; we waited at a distance from the door, for near an hour, I saw the prisoner Barnes coming towards the house with a parcel on his shoulder, we both immediately made over to the house, and seized him just upon the pavement close to the door.

Q. He had been in the house first. - A. Yes, we took him into the house, and immediately saw the package he had brought in close by the window, even to the street; I produce the barrel of anchovies.

Q. You saw him take it in. - A. Yes, I saw him take it in, and I know the prisoner by working on the quays.

BENJAMIN STENNETT sworn. You are deputy to your father. - A. Yes. On the 6th of March, I landed eighty barrels of anchovies.

Q. Do you know whether that was one of them. - A. The mark has been rubbed out, the mark was S. G. G. we missed two in the afternoon, I believe that to be one of them; from information, I and my father went and watched in Goodman's-yard; I observed the prisoner come with that parcel on his shoulder in that bag, he went into Levi's house, we stopped him as he came out, he left the parcel behind him.

Q. How long was he there. - A. He could not be a minute; we took him back to the house, and laid hold of the anchovies, which we found against the window.

Q. Who was in the house besides. - A. Mrs. Levi and another woman. The kegs were not landed on the quays but an hour; I lost two, I believe that to be one of them to the best of my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, when the gentlemen stopped me I had nothing on my shoulder.

SOPHIA LEVI sworn. Q. What is your husband's name. - A. Lion Levi , we live in Goodman's-yard, in the Minories.

Q. What business does he carry on. - A. He is a dealer and broker, he goes to sales, he deals in clothes or any thing.

Q. Do you remember this 6th of March, when this keg was brought. - A. There was a man threw something down, what it was I cannot tell, he threw it down in my entry.

Q. Was that the keg. - A. I do not know.

Q. You must know. - A. I do not.

Q. You saw a man come in. - A. I do not know I am sure.

Q. He was brought immediately back, was not he. - A. There was a man brought back immediately; I cannot say he is the same.

Q. You know you are sworn upon the bible; there was a man came into your shop. - A. There was a man came and chucked something down, what it was I cannot tell, I do not know what it was.

Q. You must know, was it a box. - A. No, it was something in a bag.

Q. Was it like that. - A. It was something like that, there was something thrown down, and he ran away.

Q. He was stopped at the threshold of your door, and brought back. - A. It was a man.

Q. What man. - A. I know it was not a woman.

Q. Did not you see the other man that took it away. - A. There was a man laid hold of something, I do not know what it was.

Q. You are perjuring yourself to all the world, because you would not be thought a receiver of stolen goods. - A. My husband is a dealer in every thing, he buys at pawnbrokers.

Q. He buys any thing that comes. - A. He goes out and buys any thing at sales.

Q. He buys watches or any thing else, silver spoons; do you keep a melting pot. - A. I never see it in my life.

Q. Who was that other woman that was with you. - A. That was a cousin of mine.

Q. Is she here. - A. No.

Q. Was your husband at home. - A. He was up stairs.

Q. Did not you think it very odd that a man should come and chuck a bundle like that in your shop. - A. There was a man came and threw something down, what it was I cannot tell.

Q. You do not know the man at all. - A. No.

Q. Did not you see him brought back two minutes afterwards. - A. I never saw him, when he was brought back I never got up from my fire side; I sat by the fire side; that was in the passage.

Q. (to prisoner) Do not you know the woman. - A. I never saw the woman before, the only time that I was in the house was when I was brought back.

Q. (to prosecutor) What quay was this. - A. Galley quay.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and to be publicly Whipped One Hundred Yards in Goodman's-yard .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-66

280. MARY CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , twenty-nine pound weight of lard, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of John Roberts , Daniel Burn , and George Brown .

JOHN ROBERTS sworn. I am a sail maker and ship chandler , I live in Broad-street, Ratcliffe ; I am in partnership with Daniel Burn and George Brown .

Q. Did you loose any lard at anytime, and when. - A. We did not discover it till the eleventh of this month from information; on the prisoner was found twenty-five pound weight of lard, and there was about four or five pound found in her house; she worked for us knotting of yarn.

JAMES FERRY sworn. I am an officer of Ratcliffe. On Wednesday the 9th of this month I received information that a woman had been several times to sell a quantity of lard; I desired the person that the next time she came, to send for me; on Friday, the 11th of this month, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, he sent for me, I went to the shop, and she had this quantity, offering to sell twenty five pound weight of hog's lard, when I took her to the watchhouse, she told me that she took it from her master; I went home to her room, and found this other piece of lard wrapped up in some old rags.

(The property produced, and identified to be the property of the prosecutor, by Robert Perry , their shopman.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by my master's back door, and I found it there when I went for my work.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-67

281. WILLIAM LAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , nine pair of women's leather shoes, value 30 s. the property of Richard Carey , John Carey , and James Carey .

JAMES CAREY sworn. I am in partnership with Richard and John Carey , I live at No. 14, Great Saffron Hill , we are shoemaker s. On Monday February 24th, Trott the officer came to our house, and asked us if we had a person of the name of Tiller or Lake that worked for us; I did not miss the shoes till I saw them; the prisoner was both shopman (commonly called a clicker) and seatsman , he worked for us at his own home and in our shop; he worked for us near eighteen years.

Q. How did he behave himself before you found him out. - A. He was the most useful man that we had, I treated him more like a brother than a journeyman, there was not a man that worked for us that had the same liberty, I believed him to be an honest man; when he was detected he fell down upon his knees, and said he was sorry for what he had done and hoped I would forgive him.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Liquorpond-street. On Monday the 24th of February, Mary Tiller brought some shoes to my house to dispose of; I have two shops adjoining each other; I was called out of one of the shops to look at them, I discovered there was some marks scratched out of the toes of the shoes, I told her they were not a kind of shoe that I wanted; I left the shop without saying any thing further, and went to Hatton Garden to give information to some officer, Trott was at the door of Hatton Garden office, and seeing me running, he to come meet me; we went up Hatton Wall, towards Leather-lane, and we saw Mary Tiller coming from my shop, we then watched her into Mr. Armstrong's, in Baldwyn's Gardens; Trott took her into custody.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. I live in Baldwyn's Garden's, Leather-lane, I am a pawnbroker. On the day mentioned, Mary Tiller brought in some shoes to sell, Trott immediately followed and took her into custody.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I am an officer. On Monday the 24th of February, as I was standing at the office door, I saw Mr. Page running towards me, I went up to him, he told me there was a woman that he suspected had got some stolen-shoes, I went with him the way he has described till we came to the pawnbroker's in Baldwyn's Gardens; I was behind Mary Tiller there, and heard her offer these shoes for sale; Mr. Page had informed me that some of the shoes had something scratched out

of the toes, that made me look at them; I asked her who made the shoes, she said her husband, but by something that fell from her conversation I found where the prisoner lived, he lived in a court in Saffron Hill, where I found a person of the name of Tiller lived, a hackney coachman, and the prisoner occupied two rooms on the ground floor; I knocked at the prisoner's door, the prisoner opened it himself, I asked him if he had any wife, he said no, I asked him if he knew a woman that went by the name of Tiller, I told him she was in custody on suspicion of stealing some women's shoes; I asked him if he had sent her with any, as she had said her husband was a shoemaker and had made them, and she was sent by him; he said that she was sent out by him, but they were his own making, and that he had done so frequently; I then left another person with the prisoner, while I went and enquired if this shoemaker worked for any one on Saffron Hill; there I found Mr. Carey almost immediately, he said this person had worked for him as foreman for eighteen years; Mr. Carey returned with me, immediately as Mr. Carey and I returned to the prisoner he seemed very much agitated, I told him I should search his apartment, we looked over the front room where we were standing and found nothing; in his back room (the bed room), there was a box, I asked him for the key, he said he had not got it, Mary Tiller had got it, I told him that was impossible, I was so particular in searching her, I begged him to get the key, but I could not persuade him, nor could I find the key till after I had broke the box open; in that box, among other shoes and new leather, I found three pair of women's shoes, I then brought him into the front room and told him he must go along with me as a prisoner; the master told him he was a bad man, he was sorry for him, he never thought he would have robbed him, he could have trusted him any where; the prisoner went down upon his knees, after bursting out a crying, and begged his master would forgive him; his master was going to speak to him, I told the master not to go near him I would not suffer it; I told the prosecutor not to make him any promise or to threaten him, but to let him alone and go to the magistrate, and let it be settled there. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor's workmen, who had made them.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has work brought in from them men regularly every day, and he sells them regularly every day; he cannot tell whether he has sold these shoes or whether he has not.

Court. There is very good evidence for the jury to say they are his property, if you bought them you must know where you purchased them.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-68

282. ALEXANDER MURRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of April , a waistcoat, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of George Lowther .

GEORGE LOWTHER sworn. I am a pawnbroker , I live in Fox court, Gray's-Inn-lane . On the 8th of April, between the hours of four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop and offered to pledge a plane, he being intoxicated in liquor, I refused to lend him any money; he left the shop. Between eight and nine of the evening of the same day, Mr. Page sent his young man to my shop to enquire if I had lost a waistcoat, that he had in his hand; I told him the waistcoat was mine, it was hanging in the shop about four o'clock for sale.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. On the 8th of this month the prisoner came to my house between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and offered a waistcoat to pledge; I observed at the corner a pin which is here now, and a little part of what I supposed it had been pinned to hanging to the pin, that gave me reason to suppose that it had been torn off from somewhere, I sent my young man round the neighbourhood to see if he could find out where it was stole from, he went to Mr. Lowther's. I took no notice to the prisoner, he had some suspicion that my young man was gone out, he went to the door, and said, Jane, why do not you come in, why do you stand in the cold; he took the opportunity of going off, I did not go after him, I knew he was well known at Hatton Garden, and therefore they knew where to find him; I am sure he is the man, his wife comes to our shop sometimes, her name is Jane. (The waistcoat produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

- STANTON sworn. I am an officer, I knew where to find the prisoner, I apprehended him, I believe he is a cabinet maker.

Q. (to Mr. Page). Did he appear to have been drinking. - A. Yes, but he knew how to run away.

Prisoner's Defence. It was the man that I had in company with me at the door that gave me this waistcoat to pledge; I went to Mr. Page's, Mr. Page went out of the door to look at the waistcoat, I says, James come in yourself, no, says he, I will not, he wished me good night, and said I had better go home; I know no more of the waistcoat than a child unborn, I can get a waistcoat without stealing one; I can earn two guineas a week.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-69

283. JOHN MUNDAY and JOHN LANDSDOWN, alias SWIFT , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , two saddles, value 30 s. three bridles, value 10 s. a martingale, value 1 s. and a cart harness, value 25 s. the property of William Moss .

WILLIAM MOSS sworn. I live at Charley Heath, near Rumford, Essex , I lost the property in the indictment on the 4th of April.

Q. Was the stable door open. - A. It had been unlocked and locked again on the Thursday night, and it was missed on the Friday when I got up; I went into the garden, I found a collar, I went to the stable and perceived these things were gone;

the next day, Saturday the 5th of April, I saw them at Griffiths's, the officer, at Hackney, I know them to be mine.

Q. Do you know any thing of these persons. - A. I have seen one of them on the road.

DAVID GRIFFITHS sworn. I am constable of Hackney. On Friday the 4th of April I was called up a little after six o'clock in the morning, by a young man who is in court, he said there were two suspicious men on the road with bags on their backs.

Q. Did you see the prisoners. - A. Yes, at Dalston, I overtook them there, I borrowed a horse of the groom and got up to them; I said to them, gentlemen I am an officer, I must see what you have got in these bags, they each dropped his bag, and the prisoner Munday struck me a blow on the mouth with his fist, I struck him with a cutlass that I had in my hand on his head, his hat came off, and they both ran, they were pursued by some witnesses that I have here; I found the bags contained two saddles, three bridles, a martingale, and harness for a chaise cart.

Q. When the prisoners were stopped, did they give any account of themselves. - A. They did not, I took them back to Hackney and had them confined; I searched Landsdown and found nothing on him; this box he threw away, another witness will explain that.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn. I am a constable of Hackney, I was called up by David Griffiths , I pursued after these men and overtook them at Dalston; I saw the two bags lay upon a hat at Dalston in the road.

Q. Who had the hat. - A. David Griffiths ; when he struck Munday, the hat fell off, they contained what my brother mentioned, my brother called me to come forward, one of the prisoners was brought back in a few minutes, I took him into a public house and searched him; on him I found two little bags, which contained these skeleton keys, which I I now produce.

Q. Are they skeleton keys. - A. Yes, they were found on Munday.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Moss the prosecutor. - A. He came on the Saturday afternoon to my brother's office and claimed the things; I found two keys amongst these skeleton keys that would unlock the stable door.

ROBERT TREBLE sworn. I am a gentleman's servant, I live at Walthamstow.

Q. Did you see these two prisoners at the five mile stone going up to Walthamstow. - A. Yes, a quarter before six o'clock in the morning; they asked me what time of the morning it was, I told them about a quarter to six, I came on and passed Lee Bridge, my brother was with me then, I passed on towards Clapton; then the man at Lee Bridge come up, he communicated something to me, I went forward and found Griffiths, and called him up; while Griffiths was getting up I went forward to see whether they were coming through Hackney, I was informed they were pursuing the Dalston road, Griffiths and and I pursued after them, I lent him one of my horses, I saw Griffiths speak to them, and I saw Munday strike him, they both run; Griffiths said I must pursue them, as he could not leave the property, I pursued after them, they had dropped their bags; the prisoners ran into a field, I went after them, one was secured at the end of the field, and the other further on; I called out to Mr. Botts, Stop thief, they were both taken; when Mr. Botts came up to them both the prisoners drawed their knives, they swore that if he attempted to touch them they would run the knife in him; Munday was going over the style at the end of the field, Mr. Botts then caught hold of his coat and pulled him back, and another man come to his assistance, who took the knife out of his hand; then I pursued after Landsdown by myself, and at the end of two fields I come up to him, he had his knife drawn in his hand then; just before I come to take hold of him I perceived that he chucked something away over some low paling of a poor person's cottage.

Q. Did you find it. - A. I picked it up after the man was secured, it turned out to be a phosphorus box, and one of the matches in it had been lighted, when I came up to him he was standing with his knife drawn at me, I kicked his heels up and threw him down, there was then nobody by but myself, he was turning on the ground, I struck him on the hand, and the knife dropped out, I got him up, I I told him his companion was taken, he struck me on the side, he was going to knock me down, when another man came up and he was secured.

BENJAMIN LAWRENCE sworn. I am the collector of Lee Bridge turnpike. About six o'clock on Friday morning two men passed the gate, they are the prisoners, they had large backs on their bags and they seemed very heavy, and they appeared very much tired; they went up the road, about a quarter of a mile, there they rested, and then went on to Clapton; I joined in the pursuit, when I overtook them the bags laid on the ground.

- BOWMAN sworn. On Thursday night I saw the stable was secured.

- BOTTS sworn. I live at Dalston. As I was passing over the fields I secured Munday, I heard the cry of Stop thief; I produce a knife, he swore he would run that knife into me if I attempted to stop him.

Munday's Defence. It is of no use for me to say any thing, there is not one of them but has false-swore himself.

Landsdown said nothing in his defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

MUNDAY - GUILTY , aged 34.

LANDSDOWN - GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-70

284. MARY MURRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a blanket, value 4 s. two sheets, value 4 s. and a pillow, value 1 s. the property of Alexander Arthur , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH ARTHUR sworn. I am the wife of Alexander Arthur , I live at No. 1, Bird-street, St. George's in the East . On the 20th of January the prisoner came to my house for a ready furnished lodging.

Q. What room was she to have, - A. A garret,

for which she was to pay three shillings a week; she took possession of the room on the 21st, I gave her warning to go away the week she came, and she was to go at the end of the second week; when she was about ten days in my house, she went away with the key, and locked the door.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion, did you break the door open to see if any thing was missing. - A. I did, I missed a pair of sheets a blanket, and a pillow; she paid me one weeks rent before she went away; she told me that she was widow of Mr. Murry, a captain of a man of war who was deceased she was married again, she was obliged to keep herself quiet for fear she should loose her salary.

Q. Have you ever found your sheets or your blanket. - A. Yes.

- BRADLEY sworn. I conduct the business for my father, No. 71, Anchor and Hope alley, St. George's in the East; the prisoner at the bar pawned one sheet on the 24th of January, and one on the 25th, and on the 26th she pawned the pillow; I gave her four shillings and three pence for them together.

Prisoner. (to Bradley) I told you they were not mine. - A. You called afterwards, and wanted to take them out, I detained them, because the prosecutrix had called, and said they were her's.

Prisoner's Defence. Last January I went to the prosecutor's house, being in little distress, I took this garret, I was to pay the rent weekly, when my week was due I asked them if they would take my money monthly, the answer was if it was sure they would; there was an old neighbour of mine that came to see me, and I was with her for three weeks; I went to the India House to receive my money, I then went to Mr. Bradley's to get the sheets, I told him they were not mine, I was going to return them to the people where I lodge, and pay my rent; Mr. Bradley said he must send for an officer, the pawnbroker knew me for many years.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Imprisoned One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-71

285. ROBERT LAW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a hat, value 4 s. a jacket, value 2 s. and a pair of overalls, value 2 s. the property of Timothy Sheldrake .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

TIMOTHY SHELDRAKE sworn Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Mount-street, Russel-square .

Q. I believe you have had your horses for some time from Mr. Gullan, a job master. - A. For more than five years.

Q. I believe it was agreed upon that you were to find the coachman with board wages, and a livery. - A. It was; in the beginning of last year the prisoner was hired by Mr. Gullan, to drive my chariot, and I found a complete coachman 's livery for him.

Q. On what day did you discharge him. - A. On the 2d of November I sent him and the horses back to Mr. Gullan; I gave him his board wages at the same time, and paid him all that was due.

Q. Did he and his wife sleep in a room over the coach house. - A. They did, he came on the Monday and said he was going into the country to look for work, and begged that I would let his wife remain in the room over the stable till he got a place, I gave permission; I told him to bring me back the livery, and to clear the stable of every thing that belonged to Mr. Gullan, and to let me have the key; when I ordered him to bring back the livery his answer was certainly, so, the clothes are not mine, and I should not think of keeping your property; he disappeared from the stable that day, and I could never hear of him till the beginning of this month, I then caused him to be apprehended; he acknowledged before the magistrate that he had sold them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. This man was hired and sent to you by the man whom you hired the horses of. - A. Yes.

Q. He lives over Westminster Bridge, the agreement was that you was to pay the coachman so much a-week. - A. Yes.

Q. You had only a pair of horses when he came, the third horse came the second day after the man came. - A. I did not agree with the prisoner at all, the master was answerable for the third horse, I paid Mr. Gullan for the horses.

Q. Was there not some difference between you and the prisoner about the third horse. - A. The man had asked me to give him something more, which I had refused.

Q. Had not you promised him to give him the livery for the trouble. - A. No.

Q. When you dismissed him he had the livery on him. - A. He had.

Q. Did not you give him permission to wear them clothes till he got other clothes. - A. Certainly not.

Prisoner's Defence. When first I was sent by Mr. Gullan to Mr. Sheldrake, he questioned me where I lived, I told him at Mr. Oliver's at Bath, whom I had lived with fifteen months, and if he did not approve of that, I would let him have a character of nine years I lived servant with Mr. Rutt; in consequence of that Mr. Sheldrake said I shall give you twelve shillings a week, I said I was very well satisfied with that, and Mr. Gullan's wages; I asked him respecting the clothes, he said he should try me with regard to what a coachman I was; in about a fortnight or three weeks I said to him it is time I should have my clothes, he told me to go to his tailor's, I in consequence went, and was measured for them, in a short time after, I was informed by my fellow servents that the clothes were not to be made; he said coachman, have you offended your master, I said I did not know, I went to the tailor and asked him the reason why my clothes were stopped, he told me it was the master's order; I went to my master and asked him if I had affronted him, he ordered me to go to the tailor again, to get my clothes as soon as I could, the clothes were brought home, at this time; Mr. Sheldrake gave me a guinea out of the chariot window, and on the day he ordered these horses home to Mr. Gullan he gave me my wages, I took the horses to Mr. Gullan, I asked him who was to pay me for looking after the odd horse, Mr. Gullan said I have only to pay you for the two; I went to Mr. Sheldrake on the Monday, I asked him, he looked at

me very hard in the face, and said that he had nothing to do with it, and I told him I should summons him about wearing my own clothes so long, he said what do you bother me about clothes, have not I given you clothes; I asked him to let my wife remain over the stable till she got well; I got a place to drive a stage for Mr. Nash, for one guinea per week; he ordered my wife out of the stable, although she was in a poor condition, with two scalded legs; as I was driving the Woolwich stage, I stopped at Mr. Gullan's door, I told him that I had got Mr. Sheldrake's clothes, and if he would satisfy me for taking care of the third horse, I would return them; I kept the clothes seven months in the whole, and he never troubled me; Mr. Gullan told him where I was to be found, which was the occasion of my being dragged away from my family.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-72

286. FRANCES BYHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a purse, value 1 d. a guinea, and ten shillings , the property of Robert Grundy .

ROBERT GRUNDY sworn. I am a tailor by trade, I follow the green grocery and fish trade , I live at No. 10, Little Turnstile, Holborn.

Q. When did you loose your purse. - A. On the 28th of March, at a quarter after eight in the evening, I supped, I goes over and takes some tea and sugar to my daughter at Knightsbridge, it was near ten o'clock when I left her; as I returned I went into the Brown Bear, Knightsbridge, to have something to refresh me; I left there and come forward, that was about eleven o'clock, then I went to Hyde Park Corner , and coming a little lower down I goes to the Triumphant Chariot, I thought it would be necessary to have some more refreshment, when I got into that public house it was near twelve o'clock, the house was full of people, I called for some liquor, and for fear that I should give a guinea instead of a six pence, I took the purse out of my pocket.

Q. Was you drunk then. - A. No, I had only there a pint of beer and a glass of gin; when the girl brought the change back, I put the purse into my left hand breeches pocket, I thought proper then to go home.

Q. High time. - A. I went out of doors and the prisoner followed me.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house then. - A. Yes, she followed me out; when I was about fifty or sixty yards from the house, she came up to me and asked me to give her a shilling, which I refused, I told her I knew better what to do with it.

Q. I want to know whether you and she had not drank together. - A. No more than others.

Q. Did not you give her part of your beer. - A. No.

Q. What had you. - A. A pint of beer and a quartern of gin, I drank but one glass.

Q. Who had the other. - A. I do not know, it was a soldier's treat.

Q. Had you any conversation with this girl. - A. No more to this girl than to any others.

Q. You must know, were you at all in liquor. - A. I had no more than one pint of beer, and two glasses of gin.

Q. First of all you had your supper, then you went to the Brown Bear, you staid there an hour, you could not stay there without drinking. - A. I had a quartern of gin there.

Q. Then you went to the Triumphant Chariot, and had a quartern of gin, and a pint of beer, where the prisoner followed you out, she asked you to give her a shilling, you refused her. - A. Yes, she instantly made a bit of a push at my pocket, I missed my purse immediately, I called the watchman, he was at a good distance, two women came up and rescued her.

Q. Did they rescue her. - A. They wanted to do it, but I prevented them.

Q. Was she taken in custody that night. - A. Yes, immediately to the watchhouse, she was searched but nothing was found.

Q. Was that all that passed between you and this woman. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into the public house, this man was very much in liquor, it was about half after eleven o'clock; when the landlady was turning them out, he said he would not go, the landlady turned us out all together; He wanted to go with me, I would not go with him, he immediately charged me with taking the money; I never saw a farthing of his money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-73

287. ROBERT HAGGERSTON was indicted for that he on the 28th of June was employed as clerk to Thomas Maynard and William Newbury , that he being so employed, and entrusted by them to receive money for them, did receive and take into his possession from Ann Batten , the sum of 2 l. 18 s. for on account of his said master, and, that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Court. This case is not made out in evidence, you must acquit the prisoner; the gentleman allows that he has rendered an account of it, but not paid it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

288. ROBERT HAGGERSTON was indicted for that he on the 27th of November was employed in the capacity of a clerk to the same person, did receive and take into his possession from Thomas Metcalf , the sum of 10 l. and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embazzle and secrete the same .

289. ROBERT HAGGERSTON was again indicted for that he on the 30th of November being clerk, and employed by the aforementioned persons, did receive from one William Mason , 14 l. and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete the same .

Court. The gentleman allows that he has rendered an account, but not paid it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-74

290. WILLIAM DOWNES was indicted for

feloniously stealing on the 22nd of February , twenty pantiles, value 2 s. the property of John Story .

JOHN STORY sworn. I am a builder , I live in Whitechapel Road; the prisoner was a workman of mine.

Q. From what place did you lose these pantiles. - A. From a cellar of a house in Rose-lane, Spitalfields , they were deposited there for occasional use.

JAMES BARBER sworn. I am a weaver; I saw two men, the prisoner was one of them, removing pantiles out of the cellar into the shed, the shed was about thirty feet from the cellar, I do not know what became of them afterwards; it was on Saturday in February, I believe, I did not take notice of the day of the month.

THOMAS HOUGH sworn. I am a bricklayer. On Saturday morning the 22d of February, I bought a dozen of pantiles of a man of the name of Toosen, in Petticoat-lane, it was for a job of my own that I had to do; I went to this man and asked him if he had any odds and ends of tiles.

Q. Did you see the prisoner. - A. Yes, I went down into the cellar and handed them up to him.

Q. Did you work for Mr. Story. - A. I did, but not at that time, he put them into the shed; that day I was working for myself.

Q. Whose tiles were they that he out in there. - A. Them that I had took from Petticoat-lane to there.

Q. How came you to go to Mr. Story's cellar. - A. I went and asked the prisoner for some more, the cellar was open for any one, and when I had got more I was to return them to Mr. Story.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Story that. - A. No, I did not see Mr. Story then.

Q. Did you give the prisoner any money for these tiles. - A. No, I did not say I would give him any money; in the course of about a month after that I meant to give Mr. Story half a crown for them.

Q. You did not mean to take them from Mr. Story without returning the same number. - A. No, or paying him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-75

291. DONNOUGH RAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of James Hayward .

JAMES HAYWARD sworn. I am foreman of the carpenters of the London Brewery, Golden-lane. On Saturday evening the 5th of April , between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was coming up Golden-lane, I turned up Sun-alley , I heard somebody behind me, I made a bit of a stop, and the prisoner overtook me.

Q. Did you know her before. - A. I have seen her before, but I never spoke to her; she says, I wish you would be so good as to give me a glass of gin, I says the price of a glass of gin is no object to me, I put my hand into my pocket and took out about twopence halfpenny, and gave it to her; she kept intruding and followed me, I said, my girl, I do not want any thing to do with you, my wife and family lives about here; I live at about the middle of Sun Alley in Christopher's Court, I went by there to go to Red Lion market, as I had the care of some old houses there; I most times go there to see the things are safe of a night; this girl came after, and says, Sir, I with you would be so good as to give me something for a bit of supper, I have only a few halfpence; she came very close to me, I told her to get off, she says pray give me a few halfpence for my supper, and while I was putting my hand into my waistcoat pocket, she pulled my watch out and ran off where there were two or three people standing at the Red Lion passage, I never saw the watch again; on the next morning I went out in the market, thinking very likely I might see the person; she came out of Whitecross-street with: child in her arms, I passed her on her left side, I looked over my shoulder, I saw her look over her left shoulder and smile, I watched her into the house at the corner of the market where I had seen the people standing, and there I challenged her with it; she denied it, she said that if she had my watch she would have a better pair of shoes to her feet.

Q. Where had you been so late, were you drunk or sober. - A. I was not drunk nor sober, I was what you may call a little lively, I had a little revived myself; I followed her then into the house, I told my boy to go to Philips the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man, nor was I out so late at night.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-76

292. JANE SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of March , eighteen yards of calico, value 30 s. the property of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. I am a linen draper , I live in Holborn ; I know no more than the prisoner was brought back to the shop and the calico with her.

EVAN MORGAN . I am a servant to Mr. Davis. On the 5th of March about the hour of five in the morning, I put this piece of calico out at the door and tied it to an iron rail; between twelve and one o'clock, in consequence of information, I followed her; in about one minute I saw her drop the piece and I picked it up, she was stopped by another man, I was but four or five yards off, I went up to her and brought her back to the shop; I produce the print, I know it is my master's print.

- TUCKEY. I am a constable, I secured the prisoner; the print was in Mr. Davis's shop on the counter, it was delivered to me; I produce it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-77

293. JOHN SOUTHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of April , four pieces of crop leather, value 4 s. the property of William Fell .

GEORGE FELL sworn. I am brother to William Fell , currier and leather-cutter , Broadway, Westminster . On Saturday the 5th of April the prisoner at the bar came into the shop to buy some leather, he is a shoemaker , and had been to the shop before; when I came into the shop he was at a box where

pieces of leather are kept, while he was at this box I observed him with his right hand put the leather into his left hand pocket, I waited till he was done, and then he went to the counter with three pieces of leather open in his hand, the apprentice weighed them for him, they came to four shillings and eight pence, and when he paid for them he was going; I had previously bolted the door, I told him he must not go, he had something in his pocket; the apprentice came and took four pieces of crop leather out of his pocket, he marked it F. L. that it should not be mixed with any thing else.

Q. What is the value of these four pieces. - A. Four shillings.

HENRY CLEAVER sworn. I am an apprentice to Mr. Fell. On the 15th of April the prisoner came into the shop to buy some leather, I saw him come in, I was at tea, I went to the back of the shop and called Mr. Fell's brother, I came in the shop as soon as I had my tea, he looked out some leather and I weighed it for him, it came to four shillings and eight pence, he paid me for them, he was then going away, when George Fell stopped him and told him he had got something under his coat that he had not paid for, I immediately went up to him and Mr. Fell pulled his coat of one side, and I pulled four aitch pieces of crop leather out of his pocket, the other crop aitch pieces was then in his hand which he had paid for, he then brought them back, put them on the counter, and demanded his money, which I gave him; I went for a constable, and he was secured.

THOMAS RENNEY sworn. I am constable; I took the prisoner into custody, I produce the four pieces of leather.

Prisoner's Defence. I was entrusted to work for the company I belonged to, I work in the same street under a window in a stall, my stall had been been broken open twice; ever since my shoes and leather I have carried home of a night, I had my leather in my pocket when I went into this shop, I was stooping down to pick out of this box what I wanted, my own leather in my pocket rather come forward, I put my hand to prevent it from falling out, they saw it, and charged me with taking it.

Q. (to Renney) Do you know any thing of him. - A. I have always seen him at work at the stall, he bears a good character.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-78

294. BRIDGET RUSSEL and HANNAH BURKE , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of March , eleven yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Charles Fisher Bell .

WILLIAM PERCIVAL sworn. I live with Charles Fisher Bell , linen draper , Oxford street , the corner of Newman-street. On the 22d of March last, about six o'clock in the evening, I received information that some persons had taken some print from the door, I went out and saw them about five or six yards from the door, I immediately went up to them, I saw one of them had her hand underneath her cloak, I put her cloak of one side and saw her give it to the other prisoner; the other prisoner received it, and asked me what I had to do with it, they had nothing that belonged to me; I seized them both, the girl that had the print dropped it on the ground, Mr. Bell's brother picked it up.

Q. When you saw it did you know it to be your master's property. - A. Yes, a paper was pinned to it with our private mark; the print was fastened to a rail at the door with a pin, I had seen it there ten minutes before it was taken, a constable was passing by at the time, the prisoner and the print was delivered to him.

Russel. I was never in the shop, did you find the print on me. - A. I did, I saw the property on both, I saw one give it to the other, it was Burke that had the cloak on.

RICHARD BELL sworn. I am brother to the prosecutor; I went out of the door and saw the print behind both of the prisoners; Mr. Percival brought them in, I took the print up, it had a paper pinned to it of my own hand writing, I am certain it was my brother's, I put it out myself.

WILLIAM CRAIG sworn. I am a constable; I was passing by on the opposite side of the way, I went over and took the prisoners into custody.

Q. Had it a paper pinned to it. - A. It had, I produce it.

(The print identified by Richard Bell .)

Russell's Defence. I was going down Oxford-road to order some oranges at Orange-lane; when we come to the corner of Newman-street there was a man with a top coat on at that gentleman's door, he had a young woman along with him, he came and dropped a piece of print down by the wall; that gentleman came to me and asked me what I was at, he catched hold of me and the other young woman, and said we had taken the piece of cotton, and took us into the shop.

Burke's Defence. I was going down Oxford-road, I saw a man with a great wrapper coat on with a young woman, we saw these two people looking at the cotton, and we saw him pull this piece of cotton off the rail; the gentleman came up to us and asked us what we were doing there, we said we were doing nothing, he took us into the shop and took our basket away.

Russell called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Burke called no witnesses to character.

RUSSELL - GUILTY , aged 17.

BURKE - GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-79

295. JOHN WILLIAMS, alias WALSH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , a pair of boots, value 1 l. the property of James Kitchen .

JAMES KITCHEN sworn. I am a boot maker , No. 60, Broad-street, St. Giles's . On the 28th of February about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking out of my two pair of stairs window, I saw the prisoner at the bar take a pair of Hessian boots, they hung on a hook outside of the window, I looked at him a little while, he went a few paces from our shop and then come back again and took a pair of boots from off the hooks and walked away with

them.

Q. Had you any servant in your shop. - A. Yes, Thomas Vincent ; he saw him likewise, I immediately ran down stairs, and before I had got out of the door Thomas Vincent had seized him and the boots, I went to his assistance and he was taken to Bow-street.

THOMAS VINCENT sworn. I am servant to Mr. Kitchen; I saw the prisoner come and look at the boots, he handled them and then left them, he came back again and took them, and went to the distance of about five houses before I took him, I took him and the boots altogether; I produce the boots, they are my master's property.

Q. What are they worth. - A. One pound, ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I took these boots to look at, and there came a parcel of people that shoved me about a yard from the door.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-80

296. GEORGE CALDER was indicted for feloniously forging and certifying a certain ticket, in order to receive certain prize-money due to Archibald Mac Goven, otherwise Mac Gogan , a seaman on board his Majesty's ship called the Carolina ; and

Three other Counts for like offence, with like intention.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gurney, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS GOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a navy agent. - A. I am, I reside in Stanhope-street, in the Strand .

Q. Are you the agent for the Carolina frigate, commanded by captain Page. - A. I am.

Q. Have you, sir, for some time past been in the habit of paying prize-money to persons who had served on board that frigate. - A. I have.

Q. Be so good as to produce the book that gives the account of the prize-money due to those persons serving on board (the book produced by the witness). - A. This is the distribution list.

Q. By which you, as agent for that ship, pay the ship's company. - A. Exactly so.

Q. On account of what prizes were you in the habit of paying prize-money for that ship. - A. For the Ambuscade, a French frigate, the French brig Labunamaire, the cargo of a Dutch ship the Henrietta Johanna , for a Dutch brig Diazune, and for the French ships Lafrainice and Lajucca.

Q. Does the name of Archibald Mac Goven appear in the list of names in this book as a person entitled to the whole of the prizes in this list. - A. To the whole of the prizes, Mac Goven was quartermaster's mate .

Q. Be so good as to state from this book what ship Archibald Mac Goven was entitled to receive prize-money for. - A. The Ambuscade 7 l. 1 s. 6 d. for the Labunamaire 71 l. 18 s. 6 d. for the Henrietta Johanna 121 l. 15 s. 6 d. and for the Lafrainice, there being a second distribution, 13 l. 9 s. for the Diazzune 1 l. 17 s. 6 d. a Dutch brig, for the - 2 l. 15 s. 6 d. and for the Lafrainice 4 l. 2 s. 6 d. amounting to 223 l.

Q. In the month of January last was Archibald Mac Goven entitled to that 223 l. - A. He was.

Court. As his share of the different prizes for serving on board of the Carolina. - A. Certainly.

Mr. Gurney. Do you find the name of George Calder on this list entitled to any thing. - A. Not on one of them.

Q. On the 20th of January last did any person apply to you for the prize-money of Archibald Mac Govan . - A. To me personally the prisoner Calder did.

Q. Have you the least doubt of his person. - A. None in the world.

Q. Who did he represent himself to be. - A. Archibald Mac Goven ; he produced to me that certificate, purporting to be a certificate of Mac Goven, signed by captain Page. (The certificate read in court.)

Court. There are four ships mentioned in the margin of the certificate. - A. He had the share of the proceeds of the bulks of two other ships.

Mr. Gurney. What conversation took place between you and the prisoner. - A. I interrogated him very closely as to the identity of his person, as to his being Archibald Mac Goven , and cautioned him of the great danger he was running on the event, by producing such documents, if they were not correct; he answered the several questions that I put to him with regard to the prizes in so satisfactory a manner, that I had no doubt of his being the person he pretended to be; I paid him two hundred and twenty-three pounds by a check on my bankers, Messrs. Hodsoll and Stirling, this is the check by which I paid it.

Q. Who filled up that check. - A. My clerk, the prisoner signed his name to the lists, they are on stamps, there is a preamble at the commencement of the book.

Q. Did he read it or was it read to him before he signed it. - A. There it appears that he has signed his name to all the different sums in all the several lists.

Q. You say you gave him that check on your banker. - A. Yes.

Q. That check is now produced to you by the banker's clerk. - A. Yes.

Q. Where is Archibald Mac Goven 's writing. - A. The prisoner wrote this that I might compare it with other documents of the hand writing of Mac Goven , and it appeared very strong to justify that conclusion.

Whose hand writing are the several figures on the back, to which Mac Goven was entitled to prize money. - A. My own.

Q. Therefore, you are quite sure that that is the paper that the prisoner produced for the payment of the money. - A. Perfectly sure.

Q. I believe for upwards of two months you had no suspicion that you had paid the money to a wrong person. - A. I had not.

Q. On the 24th of March last, did you send your clerk; of the name of George Clark , down to Wapping to enquire after a person of the name of Grant. - A. On the 25th of March.

Q. In consequence of an application that had been made by a person of that name. - A. Yes, by letter.

Q. And the result was that the prisoner was apprehended and taken to the Thames police office. - A. He was.

Q. Did you see him there. - A. I did.

Q. Did you know him again to be the person who represented himself to you as the person of Archibald Mac Goven . - A. Yes, the moment I saw him.

Court. How long did the prisoner stay with you while you was examining your books. - A. Nearly half an hour in the discharging the several lists and the interrogations that I had made to him.

Q. Of course you had never seen him before - A. No.

Q. That was in January, and he was taken in March, could you make those observations that enable you to swear that positively he was the man, and you cannot be mistaken. - A. Most completely.

GEORGE CLARK sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Good. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to make any application to Mr. Good. - A. I do.

Q. When was it. - A. On the 20th of January last.

Q. What did he claim as prize money, and for what ship. - A. He produced a certificate.

Q. Look at that certificate, and tell me whether that is the certificate that he produced to you for that payment. - A. It is, there is my initials on it.

Q. Mr. Good was with you at this time. - A. He was, and the sums were written by Mr. Good; Mr. Good very closely interrogated him respecting his being the person that certificate purported him to be.

A. The result of that was that Mr. Good paid him the several sums as the figures in the back denote. - A. Yes.

Q. How did he pay that. - A. By a draft on his bankers.

Q. Have the goodness to look at that draft, is that the draft that Mr. Good gave him. - A. It is, the signature is Mr. Good's, on Mr. Hodsoll and Co. payable to the bearer.

Q. He then went away, I presume. - A. He did.

Q. Before he went away did you see him sign the prize list. - A. I did.

Q. Did you witness it. - A. I did, all the prize lists.

Q. The seven different lists, did you see him sign every one. - A. I believe I gave him a pen to each one, I saw him sign every one, and I witnessed every one.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner again after that, and upon what occasion. - A. Upon Mr. Good receiving a letter; I was sent by Mr. Good to Wapping to a public house, where I saw the prisoner.

Q. Under what name did you address him then. - A. I did not address him by any name, I spoke to the landlord of the house; he was called by the name of George, and when he came I recognised him, I said your name is Mac Goven, he said, yes.

Q. Had you any doubt that the person that was described as George by the landlord, was the prisoner that you had seen the check given to. - A. I have no doubt, no more than I have of my existence.

Court. You had not at that time. - A. None in the least.

Mr. Gurney. Could you then recollect the person of the man to whom the draft was given to. - A. Yes, I asked him a number of questions respecting a letter that related to another circumstance.

Q. You went afterwards to the police office. - A. No, I did not see him again till last Tuesday, when I was called to give evidence at the Thames police office, he was then in custody.

A. Was the prisoner at the bar, whom you saw at the Thames police office, the same man that you had seen before taking the check, and also seeing him going by the name of George. - A. The very same.

Q. Have you any doubt. - A. None in the least.

Court. You only said, Your name is Mac Goven , you did not mention any Christian name. - A. No.

Q. And his answer to that was yes. - A. Yes.

GRIFFEN HENRY TODD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk of Messrs. Hodsoll and Co. bankers in the Strand. - A. Yes.

Q. You have just produced a check of Mr. Good. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pay that check. - A. I did.

Q. On what day. - A. On the 20th of January, 1806.

Q. Have you any recollection of the person to whom you paid it. - A. I cannot speak particularly to that, I paid it in the name of Mac Goven.

Q. Look at the prisoner. - A. I cannot speak particularly to that, we have so many persons come.

Q. Do you think you have any recollection of that person. - A. I think I have, I cannot speak with certainty of him receiving the money for that check, but I believe so.

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN WILLIAM PAGE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You commanded the Carolina frigate. - A. I did.

Q. Had you the command of it from November, 1802, to February, 1805. - A. I had.

Q. Do you know a person on board of your ship of the name of Archibald Mac Goven . - A. Very well, he was quarter master's mate.

Q. How long did he serve on board of that ship. - A. The whole time I was captain of it, or nearly so.

Q. You know him perfectly well. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Tell us whether you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Very well.

Q. What was his station on board the ship. - A. He was before the mast and assisted in my clerk's office.

Q. What was his name during the time he was on board the vessel. - A. George Calder .

Q. How happened it that he a foremast man should be employed in your clerk's office. - A. It is very customary for us to take a man into that situation.

Q. Why did you make a selection of him. - A. Because he wrote very well.

Q. How long was he on board your ship. - A. He came on board in Madras, May, 1804.

Q. When did he leave your ship. - A. In China, November, 1804, he left the ship by being invalided, he was sick, he could not do his duty.

Q. In your return home did you make any prizes. - A. None whatever.

Q. In your going out did you make any prizes. - A. Several.

Q. Name the captures. - A. The Ambuscade, the Labunamaire, Henrietta, the Lafreunice, and the Diazzune, and the - were all we took.

Q. At the time that these captures were made, was the prisoner on board of your ship. - A. He was not on board at any capture.

Q. Of course he not being on board at the time of any capture, he could not be entitled to any of the captures. - A. Certainly not.

Q. You say that you know Mac Goven very well. - A. He was a favourite seaman, and always about my person.

Q. Were you acquainted with his hand writing. - A. No, I was not in that habit of intimacy with him, he was merely one of my bargeman, and constantly in my cabin.

Q. Look at that certificate, and see the signature to it, whether that is your hand writing. - A. It is not.

Q. May I ask you, as knowing these two persons Calder and Mac Goven so well, is the prisoner at the bar Mac Goven, as he represented himself to be. - A. He is not.

Q. Are you quite sure that he never was on board so as to be entitled to any prize money for the captures. - A. Quite sure.

Q. What is become of Mac Goven. - A. I left him in the Carolina frigate, I came home with the admiral, he was on board that ship last August.

Court. When did you leave him. - A. I left him on the 28th of February of the last year.

Q. Is any part of that certificate your writing. - A. None at all of the certificate, it is so irregular (witness looking at the certificate). When I first saw the signature I had my doubts, I would not have so positively swore to it unless I had read it.

Mr. Gurney. You mean by that it is quite impossible that you signed that certificate from the irregularity of the body. - A. I am positive I did not sign it, and the invaliding of Mac Goven, who was never sick, but always about my person; I should not have signed the certificate which stated him being invalided; and the list of prizes are not in the order in which they were taken; if I had given him a list I should have given him a list of the prizes in the order they were taken.

Q. Do you remember giving any certificate to Mac Goven. - A. I gave every man one when I came away.

Q. It is not necessary for the captain to do so only when he leaves the ship; I observe the date of the certificate is three months before you left the ship. - A. Yes, which makes it inconsistent, when I was in Canton, it is dated where the ship was, and where I was.

JAMES JOHNSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are surgeon to the Carolina frigate. - A. I was.

Q. During the time that captain Page was commander. - A. I was, and longer, from November, 1802, to the 4th of October, 1805.

Q. You quitted the ship on the 4th of last October, where was she then. - A. At Madras.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner serving on board the Carolina. - A. I do.

Q. What was his name. - A. George Calder .

Q. In what station did he serve. - A. He was foremast man, and he assisted the captain's clerk in writing.

Q. Do you remember when he came on board. - A. I do, in May, 1804, I brought him on board at Madras myself.

Q. How long did he remain on board. - A. Till the November following, he was then invalided at China, and was sent home in one of the China ships; he was under my care a considerable time.

Q. Did you know a person on board the ship of the name of Archibald Mac Goven . - A. Perfectly well, he was a quarter-master's mate.

Q. When you quitted the Carolina last November, did you leave him on board the Corolina. - Q. Yes, I left Archibald Mac Goven on board.

Q. Are you quite sure that the prisoner at the bar is George Calder , and that he is not Archibald Mac Goven . - A. I am certain that he is the man that went by the name of George Calder , and that he is not Archibald Mac Goven .

JOHN MAC GOVEN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Parces, an army agent. - A. Yes.

Q. Are you a relation of Archibald Mac Goven . - A. He is my uncle.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him. - A. I do not.

Q. The prisoner at the bar is not Archibald Mac Goven . - A. I am very confident of that.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a surveyor of the Thames police office. - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of information at your office did you go with Smith to the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I did, on Friday the 10th of April, we took him with us to the Thames police office; in his chest at his lodgings, which we opened, we found that certificate; in that chest was a coat, in the pocket of which was a pocket book, which contained this certificate.

Q. Did you see a paper found in any part of the room. - A. It was found in the same chest by Smith.

JOHN SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Look at that paper, you was with Gotty and found this paper at that time. - A. Yes.

Q. (to captain Page, the paper handed to him) There are signatures on that paper purporting to be wrote by you. - A. They are not.

Q. Are they skilful imitations of your hand writing. - A. They are imitations, they are very much like them.

Mr. Gurney. This was found in the same chest with the certificate.

- INMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. You are a clerk of the Navy Office. - A. I am.

Q. What is the date of the last return you have of the Carolina. - A. The 31st of August, 1805.

Q. Does Archibald Mac Goven appear on that return as then serving on board that ship. - A. He does, as quarter master's mate.

Q. You have no return subsequent to that. - A. Not any.

Prisoner's Defence. I have very little to say in my defence; I find my prosecutor against me in every measure intending to take away my life; I am not allowed any evidence to come forward in my behalf.

The prisoner called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18060416-81

297. ROBERT BROWN and JAMES PINK were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of March , three pieces of jennet, value 9 l. the property of John Joblin .

Second Count for stealing the like goods, laying them to be the property of John Ferguson , and Two other Counts for like offence, only charging it to be the property of other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN JOBLIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You keep the White Horse Inn, Cripplegate . - A. I do; the prisoner Brown was my waggoner , and Pink was my porter .

Q. Your waggon was employed for the purpose of conveying goods from the Paddington canal. - A. I have a considerable deal of traffic there; it was the two prisoners daily employ there under me. (The witness produced a book.)

Q. What book have you got there. - A. The book of the delivery of the goods that were brought down that day.

Q. Did they bring any goods down with them that day consigned to Mr. Ferguson. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Is that book your hand writing. - A. It is the goods to be delivered on the 3d of March by Brown and Pink, one pack to Mr. Ferguson, Cecil-court, St. Martin's-lane.

Mr. Knapp. Did you observe that pack when it arrived. - A. I did, I saw it taken off the waggon.

Court. That waggon was accompanied by the two prisoners. - A. It was.

Mr. Knapp. Did you observe any thing with respect to the appearance of it. - A. It appeared rather loose, it did not appear to me that there was any thing gone, till Mr. Ferguson sent down to me; I have got to pay for the goods that were lost.

Q. Did these two persons convey it to Mr. Ferguson. - A. They did not, another man delivered it to Mr. Ferguson.

JOHN GASSIGN sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You belong to Messrs. Saunderson and Mason of Manchester, did you pack up any bales of jennet in February last, were they directed to Mr. Ferguson. A. Yes, in Cecil-court.

Q. How did you send them. - A. In the boat down the Grand Junction; we sent the invoice by the coach, directed to Mr. Ferguson; we delivered the bale of jennet to a carrier, and they put it in the boat.

JOHN FERGUSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live in Cecil-court. - A. I do.

Q. Did you receive an invoice from the house of Saunderson. - A. I did, by post, I have got the invoice in my pocket (producing the letter); the letter is dated the 19th of February.

Q. Does the invoice take notice of a bale of jennet. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive through the medium of Mr. Joblin any bale of jennet. - A. Yes, I discovered three pieces missing immediately I opened it.

Q. How many pieces was the bale to contain, as appears by the invoice. - A. Thirty-nine pieces of jennet and two of velveteen; the bail appeared to be loose but I did not miss the goods till it was opened, then I missed them; among the straw there were these two pieces, which corresponded with the pieces that were missing, they are the fag ends, and they are marked with the length and the number, they correspond exactly with the invoice; the value of the three pieces amounting to between eight and nine pound.

JAMES LAWSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are servant to Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker. - A. I am, he lives at No. 26, Ray-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know Brown the prisoner. - A. Yes; on Monday evening the 3d of March between seven and eight o'clock, he brought a piece of jean or jennet, he said he wanted to pledge it with me, he said he had bought it of a man in the street, it was his property, and he gave fifteen pence a-yard for it, I asked him to give me his name, he gave me the name of Thomas Brown , Bull Wharf, Thames-street, and he worked for Harding and Hill, Queenhithe, I told him I should take care of the jennet, and he might call the next morning, as my master was not at home; he said he would.

Q. He did not perform his promise, I suppose. - A. He did not, I told my master of it when he came home, and we went to Mr. Trott, the officer, of Hatton Garden; we then went to Bull Wharf and Queenhithe, according to Brown's directions, we could get no intelligence that night; on the Wednesday morning Mr. Trott and I went to Harding and Hills again; we got information there where he worked, he had worked for Messrs. Harding and Hill some time previous; we went to Mr. Joblin, we found he worked there, we went from there to his brother's house, White Horse-court, Wood-street.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer; in consequence of information from that young man did you go to Brown's. - A. I went exactly as he described; in tracing Brown to Mr. Joblin, I enquired of Mr. Joblin if he worked there, I found he did, and he was gone with the waggon to the Hambro' Wharf in the city; finding he lodged in White Horse Yard in Wood-street, I went there, his wife was there; I found this piece of jennet undone, and rolled up in heaps inside of a half tester bedstead which was turned up in the room, I took it away and went to the Hambro' Wharf, where I saw the prisoners Brown and a waggon; seeing so many persons there I told him his master wanted him, I took him into a public house and there I told him what I wanted

with him and what I had found at his house, he was very much alarmed, he was taken to the office, there he confessed in the yard that Pink was concerned with him and Pink had received part of the property; I then went to Mr. Joblin and waited for Pink returning home with the waggon, then I took him in custody, then Mr. Joblin, he, and I went in in a coach to search Pink's house, I forget the street's name, it is in Brick-lane, Spital Fields, we asked him if he lived there, he said he did; there we found a piece of jennet cut in the form of a child's frock, and part of it put together; Pink was taken to the office, they would not confess for two examinations, when they did it was taken in writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. These men were locked up in the yard at the police office, did you serve out any promise to them. A. I did not.

Q. What conversation had you with them. - A. Very little indeed.

Q. I should take it that you locked the prisoners up for the magistrate to examine them. - A. Surely.

Q. Did you enter into an examination of them. - A. I did not; Brown told me if I would make haste and go to a person of the name of Frost, Cole Harbour-lane, Thames-street, I should find another piece, he thought he could not have disposed of it by that time, I got a search warrant from the lord-mayor, I found this piece at Frost's.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You are now producing another piece. - A. Yes, Pink informed me that he had left a piece at his brother's, Mr. Robinson in Whitechapel; it is a dark piece with the mark of M. S. on it.

Q. Was Frost's a public house. - A. Yes, I think it is the Dyer's Arms, or Distiller's Arms, I will not be positive.

Mr. Alley. Q. You have said there were two examinations before they would confess, that expression implies an unwillingness in these men to confess. - A. It was two examinations before they would confess, Brown did confess on the second.

Q. Do you mean to swear that no one said any thing to these men in your hearing. - A. I heard a friend say to Pink, Oh! you fool, the other has turned evidence, why should you keep so many things in your breast.

Q. Had not that expression been made use of in consequence of something falling from you. - A. It had not.

Q. Had not you desired that friend to say that. - A. I had not.

Q. Then it was a good natured friend of the prisoners that induced him to say that. - A. It was.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw them sign their confession. - A. I saw the magistrate sign it, and I saw the prisoner Brown make his mark to it; I saw Pink sign his name, and the same magistrate signed it.

(The confession of Robert Brown read in court.)

JAMES ROBINSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are brother in law to Pink, did you hear any conversation between Trott and the prisoner Pink. - A. My young man did; Pink said to him I have confessed every thing, for Trott told him if he would confess he should be forgiven.

Court. Did you know what employ your brother was in. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know that he was porter to Mr. Jobling. - A. I did not know whether he drove the cart or whether he was porter; I keep a large sale room, this was brought into my room.

Q. I think you ought to be a little more cautious, where do you live, it is a subject of importance to the public whether you should not be made an object of attention. - A. No. 13, Red Lion-street, Whitechapel.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (to Ferguson) Is that your property. - A. I cannot see any mark to enable me to say; that mark which Trott has shewed me, I have no doubt of that.

Trott. That piece was found at Brown's.

Ferguson. The piece that was found at Pink's likewise, I think it is of the same quality.

Mr. Alley. That is all you can say, they are of the same quality. - A. Yes.

Q. They never were in your possession. - A. No.

Q. When these goods were taken the papers were gone, which is a material thing, and the fag had been cut off, are they jane or jennet, are they not distinct species. - A. I do not know that they are.

Court. (to Mr. Joblin) When this package came to your warehouse was the prisoner Pink in company with Brown. - A. They were both on one duty that day, they both came into the yard together.

Mr. Knapp. Somebody produced some fag ends. A. Mr. Ferguson did.

Q. (to Gassign) Are these two pieces of fag ends your marking. - A. Yes, I believe they came off this piece.

Q. Look at the piece produced by the pawnbroker. - A. This is one of the pieces that was sent to Mr. Ferguson, there is S. M. on this, it exactly corresponds with one piece missing.

Q. You believe from the inspection of all these pieces, the one that is produced by the pawnbroker, the other piece from Brown, and the piece cut out at Pink's, you believe them to be those pieces that you sent. - A. Yes.

HENRY GREVILLE sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Robinson. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at Hatton Garden at the time these men were on examination. - A. I was once.

Q. Did you hear Trott say any thing to Pink. - A. No, what I heard Mr. Trott say was not at the office; when he came to our place to take the stuff, he said that Pink had confessed, and he believed he should make an evidence of him.

Court. Are you greatly in the habits of receiving packages from porters at your sale shop. - A. Yes, they bring them from other persons.

Q. I mean from porters of waggons. - A. No, not at all.

Pink called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Brown called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BROWN - GUILTY , aged 30.

PINK - GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-82

298. WALTER SHUT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , eighty-four pound weight of pimento, value 40 s. the property of the West India Dock Company , and

Several other Counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM GRAY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a carman; on the 12th of March last were you at the West India Dock warehouse . - A. I was, I loaded three hogsheads of sugar at No. 8; as I passed by No. 7 a person looked out of the top loop hool, he asked me to take a bag to the Halfway house, he would give me a shilling, I replied I was heavy loaded, I could not; our foreman seeing me stop, said he had another cart, he would take it.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, and tell me whether the prisoner is the person that spoke to you. - A. I believe him to be the person, but I am not sure; the cart that did bring the bag overtook me in the road, we stopped both our carts at the Half way house, I pitched the bag in the Half way house, there was an officer there, he questioned me about it.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are foreman carter to the master of this last man. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember on the 12th of March being under the Dock warehouse, No. 7. - A. Yes, I went there to know the reason of Gray's stopping; a person put his head out of the loop hole, and said he would give a man a shilling to take a bag to the Half way house, I said I would send a man.

Q. Who was the man that spoke at No. 7. - A. I cannot positively say, I think he is the same man; I saw the bag just as it was lowered down in the cart, it was a fullish bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. It was not a moment that you saw him, therefore you cannot come to a conclusion whether it was him or not. - A. I cannot.

WILLIAM PREST sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a carman. - A. Yes; I was loading three hogsheads at No. 8, James Ellis came to me, and said there was a man would give me a shilling to take a bag to the Half way house; I drew up and took the bag, and a shilling was thrown down, I carried the bag to the Half way house; I do not recollect whether the prisoner is the person or is not.

LUCY CLIFT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Your husband keeps the Half way house. - A. Yes.

Q. On the 12th of March do you remember Gray bringing a bag into your house. - A. Yes, he put it down, he told me that bag was to be left there.

Q. Was a man of the name of Sturgeon there. - A. Yes, he took the bag away.

Q. In the course of the afternoon did the prisoner call upon you. - A. He did; the bag was taken away at two o'clock, and the prisoner called at five, he asked for a parcel that had been left there, I told him an officer had seized it, I told him there was a person in the house that had gone down with the officer with the parcel, he desired me to call the man, I called Wells to him.

JOHN STURGEON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a police constable. On the 12th of March I was at the Half way house, I saw Gray come in with a bag of pimento, I produce it; I seized it, it weighs eighty-four pound, I got Wells to assist me in carrying it to the police office.

Q. Did you afterwards apprehend the prisoner. - A. Yes, with Gotty; Wells went with us to the Dock to point out the man, as he had seen him the day before at Mrs. Clift's, when he came to claim the property; on the 13th we apprehended him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. He had not absconded, he was at No. 7, when you apprehended him, he was where he ought to be at work. - A. He was.

JOHN WELLS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a ropemaker. On the 12th of March in the afternoon I was at the Half way house, I assisted Sturgeon in carrying the bag to the office, I went back to the Half way house and staid there till five o'clock; that gentleman came in, he enquired of Mrs. Clift about a parcel being left there; Mrs. Clift called me, I came out, she told him that I would shew him the police office.

Q. When you came out what did the prisoner say to you. - A. He asked me whether I knew where the parcel was carried, I said I would shew him, and I told him it was a bag of pimento, and it was seized by a police officer; he said he thought he could recover it again; we went together as far as the Thames police office, I there asked him if I should go in for him, he said no, it did not signify, it was then near six o'clock, it was so late.

JOHN GOTTY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a surveyor of the Thames-police office. A. I am; I apprehended the prisoner in the warehouse No. 7; as we passed on Wells and Mrs. Clift pointed him out, he said it was a hard case upon him, he knew nothing of the matter, he said he was not the person that had called at the Half way house.

JAMES SAYER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney, I am principal warehousekeeper of the warehouse No. 7.

Q. On the 12th of March last was the prisoner foreman of that warehouse . - A. He was.

Q. Was there any pimento in a room in that warehouse. - A. There was, and he had always the custody of the key, this book was kept by him, and the entry was made by him; the pimento was landed from the ship in Atkins' name, and then transferred to Mr. Strover.

Q. Is there a bag there No. 30. - A. There is; it weighed one hundred and four pound when it was re-weighed to Mr. Strover, and that bag is lost, and cannot be found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. This man has been under your observation, and is not he a diligent officer. - A. I cannot say to the contrary.

Q. We have been talking about a transfer from Atkins to Strover, do you know it was the original property of Mr. Atkins. - A. I do suppose so.

Court. Do you know it was landed by Atkins. - A. I do not know that bag was one.

Q. Can you ascertain that this is part of that property that belonged to Strover. - A. I do only suppose so by there being a bag missing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-83

299. WILLIAM LANCEY and JAMES BRITTEN were indicted for burglariously breaking and

entering the dwelling house of Isaac Tapper , about the hour of seven at night on the 12th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein six pair of shoes, value 20 s. the property of Isaac Tapper .

ISAAC TAPPER sworn. I am a shoemaker in King-street, Covent Garden .

Q. Your apprentice gave you an alarm. - A. Yes, on Wednesday evening the 12th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it not before seven. - A. It was before seven, I should suppose in the last quarter, I think it was in the last quarter before seven; as we came in it was seven o'clock, when I sent for an officer.

Q. After you had been in pursuit of the man it was seven o'clock when you returned. - A. Yes.

Q. When you returned from the pursuit was not you gone more than a quarter of an hour. - A. No, I am confident of that.

Q. You heard your apprentice call out Stop thief. A. Yes.

Q. What kind of light was there at that time of night. - A. It must be considerably after six, else we should have no occasion to have put lights in the shop.

Q. How long had they been lighted. - A. They had not been trimmed for a great while, I suppose they had been burning nearly half an hour.

Q. When you went out was there any day light. - A. No; when I went out the first person that I saw was a woman, that directed me to pursue after the prisoner; when I got up to them they were threatening to knock my boy down for pursuing them.

Q. Where did you find them. - A. At the corner of Leg Alley, just about eight houses from the corner of Hart-street in James-street, there is a public house between my house and Hart-street.

Q. When you came up to the prisoners they were threatening to knock your boy down. - A. Yes, when I came up I asked the boy which was the man that cut the glass, he shewed me him, I went up and took Lancey directly; directly I took him he threw something from him, but what I do not know.

Q. Where did you bring Lancey back to. - A. I brought him back to my own house; as I was coming back the boy pointed out Britten to me, I was so angry I did not look after Britten much, for I had been robbed four times in a month.

Q. Are you sure that the man the boy pointed out to you was the prisoner Britten. - A. He was much the same size man, but he had a great coat on then.

Q. You brought Lancey back. - A. Yes, and placed him in my parlour, and sent my apprentice for the officer.

Q. Did you examine your shop. - A. When the officers came, we went before the magistrate, and when I came back I put up the shutters before I went to the office, I had not examined any thing of my loss.

Q. Then you went with the officer to the office. A. Yes, the magistrate particularly asked me whether I had missed any thing.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and the prisoner. - A. No, I never spoke to him.

Q. Then you came back and examined your window. - A. Yes, I found half a pane of glass cut, and pushed in; one pair of velvet shoes were missing, and six pair of boots were huddled togher.

Q. Was there room enough for a man's hand to be put in. - A. Before the officer and my boy I put my two fists in, and there was room enough for two more; I missed one pair of shoes, and about six pair of boots were huddled together and drawed up to the breach in the window.

Q. Who had the care of your window while you and your apprentice were pursuing the thief. - A. Two young women and Mrs. Tapper.

Q. They are not here. - A. No.

Q. You did not miss the shoes immediately. - A. My wife was alarmed with the boy calling out Stop thief as well as me, she went and stood at the door with these two young women till I came back, she went to the door as soon as me.

Q. How long were you absent. - A. I was not absent four minutes.

Q. You brought the man back again in four minutes after you left the house, did you. - A. Yes.

Q. You have not found the shoes again. - A. No.

JOHN NETHERCLIFF sworn. Q. How old are you. - A. I am sixteen next October, I am apprentice to Mr. Tapper; on Wednesday evening the 12th of March, about a quarter before seven.

Q. Was there any day light. - A. No.

Q. Did not you tell the justice it was about half past six. - A. No.

Q. How do you know it was a quarter before seven. - A. When we got to Bow-street I saw the clock there, it was then about half past seven.

Q. Recollect you must tell the truth, was there no day light at the time that you heard the noise at the window. - A. No.

Q. How long had you been lighted up. - A. May be half an hour.

Q. Did you see the prisoners. - A. Yes, a little before they cut the window they came by.

Q. Which of the prisoners did you observe. - A. Both of them.

Q. Are you sure as to them both. - A. I am positive sure as to both of them.

Q. What did you observe of them. - A. As they came by they made a particular remark; a little after that they both came up to the window, and Britten was on the right hand side.

Q. Did they go by your window. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you mean by making remarks. - A. They looked into the shop as they went by.

Q. How did they look in. - A. Through the glass.

Q. The door was shut was it. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see them again. - A. They both came to the window.

Q. How long after. - A. About twenty minutes or half an hour, they came to the window both together, and Britten was on the right hand side.

Q. How was Britten dressed. - A. In a soldier's great coat.

Q. What colour. - A. Grey; Lancey cut the window.

Q. Did you see him cut it. - A. Yes.

Q. What did he cut it with. - A. I do not know I am sure what he cut it with, he drawed it along in this kind of way, it went ciss.

Q. He drew something along it. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any noise. - A. Yes, I went out directly he pushed the glass in.

Q. You heard him push the glass in. - A. Yes, I drawed up to the door while he was doing it.

Q. As you went towards the door what did you perceive. - A. I perceived him standing against the window when I opened the door.

Q. Did you see the hand of either of them in the shop. - A. Yes, they pushed the glass in and they huddled the shoes together.

Q. Did you see them do that. - A. Yes, before I went to the door, when I stood at the counter I saw them do that.

Q. Did you see more than one hand in. - A. No, I did not see any more than one hand in.

Q. Whose hand was in. - A. Lancey's.

Q. How far was his hand in. - A. About as far as his wrist.

Q. One hand only. - A. I did not see but one hand.

Q. What did he do with that. - A. He huddled the shoes together, he pulled them of one side and put them towards the hole.

Q. Did you see him take any. - A. No.

Q. You only see him move them towards the hole. - A. Yes.

Q. On seeing him do that, what did you do. - A. I ran out and called Stop thief.

Q. Did you not call your master first. - A. No.

Q. Who did you see when you first went out. - A. I saw the two prisoners, I called Stop thief, and my master came out.

Q. What did the prisoners do, did they stand still. - A. No, they walked away.

Q. Did you see them run at all. - A. When they got past the corner they began to run.

A. How near is your master's house to the corner. - A. Only one house.

Q. Then your master come up to you did he. - A. Yes.

Q. You took Lancey. - A. My master did.

Q. Did you point him out to your master. - A. Yes, I said that is the man.

Q. Did you lose sight of Lancey from the time that you saw him at your shop window, and the time that your master took him. - A. No, I never lost sight of him till my master took him.

Q. Are you sure that Lancey is the man that put his hand into the shop window. - A. I am positive sure of that, and when my master had Lancey coming by the corner, I pointed out Britten, I said that is the other man that was along with him.

Q. Where was the prisoner Britten standing at the time you pointed him out. - A. I pointed him out at the corner by the public house, which is next door to our house.

Q. Was he taken up then. - A. No, my master could not take him then, as he had the other man.

Q. Have you always been positive as to Britten. - A. No, I cannot swear that was Britten, I believe it the man, but I cannot swear to him.

Q. Are you positive as to Lancey - A. Yes.

Britten. Did not you say at Bow-street before Mr. Bond, that I was not the man. - A. I said I believed you was the man.

Q. WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. I am patrole and goaler of Bow-street.

Q. Do you remember Lancey being brought to your house. - A. Yes, on Wednesday the 12th of March, it was after eight o'clock when he was given into my charge.

Q. Did any body come to him when he was locked up. - A. Yes, several people; Britten came, and a person of the name of Buckle came, they all came together; we could not keep our lights in, I went backwards, I heard some discourse in the strong room, Britten at that time having his soldier's grey great coat on his arm, I heard the other prisoner say to a fellow prisoner that was with him in the room, that Britten was the man that was with him; the next day I had occasion to go up St. Giles's, there I met Britten, and took him in custody; I asked him about the great coat, he told me it belonged to a person of the name of Buckle, who belonged to the volunteer corps, Somerset House; on Sunday morning I met Buckle, I took him into custody; I took him before the magistrate to satisfy the magistrate whether the coat belonged to Buckle or Britten.

Q. Did Britten say any thing to you. - A. No further than he said the great coat belonged to Buckle, and when he was in custody he wished me not to say that he said the coat belonged to Buckle.

- BUCKLE sworn. Q. You are a fifer in the Somerset House volunteers. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Britten. - A. Yes, I have known him about four or five months.

Q. Did you lend him any great coat on Wednesday evening. - A. No.

Q. Did you at any time lend him your regimental great coat. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever lend him a soldier's great coat. - A. No.

Q. Had you any other but your regimental great coat. - A. No.

Q. Could you get at that when you pleased. - A. No, I can only get at that when they are ordered, they are kept in Somerset House Place.

Q. Is Britten one of the volunteers of that corps, A. No.

Q. How came you to be in company with Britten and to go with him and the other men. - A. I met him in the Piazza, Covent Garden.

Q. Did you know Lancey before. - A. Yes, he asked me to go and see a young man that he heard was taken up.

Q. Did he tell you his name. - A. I cannot say that he did.

Q. Did he say whether he was an acquaintance of his. - A. He did not.

Q. Where was you to go. - A. To the Brown Bear, Bow-street.

Q. Do you mean to say that he did not name the man. - A. I do not think he did.

Q. Did you know who you was going to see till you got there. - A. I did not.

Q. How was Britten dressed at that time. - A. He had a soldier's great coat on.

Q. Does he belong to any corps. - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did he wear it when he went into the Brown Bear. - A. No, he had it on his arm there.

Q. Did you see him pull it off. - A. I did not.

Lancey's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of it.

Britten's Defence. I knew the prisoner Lancey, I

went to see him at the Brown Bear; I know nothing of the robbery.

Lancey called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LANCEY - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 18.

BRITTEN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18060416-84

300. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , two hams, value 20 s. the property of Robert Atkinson .

ROBERT ATKINSON sworn. I command a ship in the West India trade , the prisoner was one of my seamen .

Q. Did he steal any ham at any time. - A. Last Sunday week I detected it on him in the evening, I was on shore the whole of the day, when I came on deck I found the mate had him confined.

Q. The mate accused the prisoner of having taken some hams out of the ship. - A. Yes, we got a candle and lanthorn and went down below, and we found a ham under his head as a pillow in his hammock, I wished him to confess whether he had sold one, he gave evasive answers; I confined him on board that night, and the next morning I sent for a Thames police officer, who came and took him in custody; on the following day he acknowledged that he had offered the second ham for sale on shore; he offered to give me a guinea, provided I would say no more about it.

Prisoner. I did not offer him a guinea to my knowledge.

MARY BONOUS sworn. I live at Stone Stairs, Ratcliff, my husband is a victualler. About four o'clock in the afternoon on Sunday, the 13th of April, the prisoner at the bar came to my house and offered me a ham for sale, I told him I would not buy it, he went out of the door, in about a quarter of an hour he returned without the ham, with some money in his hand, I suppose he had sold it; he called for a glass of liquor, which he paid for and went away.

JOHN GILL sworn. I am a Thames police constable; the prisoner was given in my charge on the 14th of April, together with the ham, I produce the ham.

Prosecutor. That is the ham I found under his head as a pillow, I am sure it is mine, we had a good many in a crib in the gun room.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went on shore the mate and me had some words; the carpenter had offered me some provision if I would stay on board, but the sails being unbent the mate was very angry with it, with that I took my bag out of the ship; the mate should have overhauled it; when I came alongside of the ship Nancy, I found there was something in my bag that should not be, I hoved it out on the lighter, this gentleman's mate was looking at me the whole time; I found that I was trepanned by some means, I stood by the lighter till I could get a boat to give me a cast on shore; when I came on shore I took the ham along with me, and when I went on board I took it on board again, and went to sleep, not knowing there was any thing laying to my charge; about nine o'clock the mate waked me, the captain said I had stole a ham and carried it on shore; I had a ham, and carried it on shore; I had a ham that somebody put in my bag, I brought it back, it was wrapped up in a piece of printed canvas; I was seen by the people on board with the ham, if they were but here they know it, but they are out of the way; I never stole nothing in my life from a King's ship nor a merchantman, I never was detected of any thing of the kind before in no place.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-85

301. WILLIAM PECK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a glass rummer, value 6 d. and a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Coxeter .

JOHN COXETER sworn. I am a victualler , I live at the Horseshoe, Goswell-street . On Thursday evening, the 6th of March, the prisoner came into my house, and called for a pint of porter, while he was drinking of it, he asked me to lend him two shillings, I did not like to deny him in company, I told him I would; I went out of the parlour into the kitchen to write a letter; while I was writing the letter the prisoner came into the kitchen, and says, will you do that for me, Coxeter, meaning to lend him the two shillings, I told him, No, I had been done so many times; I told him I did not like to say so before the people, as I did not like to hurt his feelings; the prisoner left my house, and says Good night to you, God bless you, master; a gentleman had been drinking six pennyworth of brandy and water in the parlour where the prisoner came from; after the prisoner was gone Mr. Alexander, who has been in my house seventeen years, asked who took the glass and spoon out of the bar, the tap boy said he did not know, I said count the spoons, they counted them and there was one missing; I asked what glass was missing, they said the rummer, we had but one rummer, as I do not use rummers in general; I turned my letter upside down, and went into the tap room and asked who went into that room, they said Peck; I pursued him with my horse, knowing he lived somewhere in Shoreditch; I suspected he had taken the glass out of the box that he sat in; when I came up to him I catched hold of his arm and let my arm drop down his coat and felt nothing, he thought I was going away, he said, Good night, master; I turned round and felt the other side, I felt a glass, I took him into a public house, and sent for an officer, he was searched and the rummer and spoon were found in his pocket. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the prosecutor's house and called for a pint of porter, there were several other people in the parlour; I sat down and drank the porter, and after I drank it I got up and went out, it was put in my pocket by some unknown person; I know nothing of it, nor did I know it was there at all.

Constable. He said he did take it, and he hoped Mr. Coxeter would forgive him.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction ,

and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-86

302. LEWIS LEWIS REALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of March , three coats, value 30 s. five waistcoats, value 20 s. two pair of breeches, value 10 s. and four pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. the property of Myer Harris .

ESTHER HARRIS sworn. I am the wife of Myer Harris , he is a salesman ; I live at No. 25, Princes'-street, Westminster. On the 3d of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and looked out seven guineas worth of goods, he took out his pocket book, I thought he was going to pay me, he shut up his pocket book again, and said if I would send my little girl to the duke of Cumberland's house he would send me the money; I thought it was not fit to send a child, so I sent my brother, as my husband was not at home, my brother took the goods with him.

JOSEPH HYAMS sworn. Q. You went with the goods. - A. Yes, he brought me to the private door of the duke of Cumberland's house ; I went with him merely inside of the door, upon the step, he said give me hold of the bundle, I will go up stairs and shew the bundle to my friend whom I bought it for, you will stop a few minutes, I will bring you the money down; I stopped above half an hour, he not coming I knocked at the door, a valet came out of the duke's, he said what is your pleasure, I told him the story; I never saw him afterwards.

Q. How did he go into the house. - A. He went with me inside of the house, I saw him go up stairs, the door was open; on the 4th of March, my sister met him in the street and stopped him.

Q. How did he get out. - A. When I enquired how he came out, all the servants came about me, they said is this the man, I said no, he went up stairs one way and came down another way, he went through the hall and went off; the duke of Cumberland was coming in at the time.

Q. (to Mrs. Harris) How soon did you meet this man afterwards. - A. The very next day; I am sure it is the same man, he had all my things on almost. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's Defence. With submission, I beg leave to state my case to you: when I bought these goods of the lady she gave me me leave to take them and shew them to my friend, on the next day when she met me, she says, if you will give me seven guineas I will not prosecute you, I says you have sold me some old things for goods; I did not like to pay her, because they did not suit my friend.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-87

303. CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Ambrose Bradley .

AMBROSE BRADLEY sworn. I live in Anchor and Hope-alley, Ratcliffe Highway . On Friday the 11th of April, about half past six in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, she asked to look at some shirts, I took some out of the window to shew her; after she had looked at some she went out, we could not agree about the price; after she was gone I found one missing, I immediately pursued her and saw the shirt in her hand, under the child's frock. (The shirt produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sat this baby on the counter, she took the shirt up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-88

304. WILLIAM PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , an iron bar, value 5 s. the property of John Gregory .

SAMUEL LACK sworn. I am a smith, I live at Islington. On the 7th of March I was standing at the shop door where I work, I saw the prisoner coming with that iron bar on his shoulder, I supposed by his appearance he had stole it, I followed him to Panton-street, I asked him if he had got a bar to sell, he told me no, he was going to carry it home to paint for a gentleman at Islington; I let him go on, and followed him to a field adjoining Sadler's Wells, he went up to one side of the field and there he got a stone, and was in the act of breaking it to pieces, I saw him bend it backwards and forwards several times; when I got up to him he put it on his shoulder and walked away, I followed him and delivered him into the hands of Mr. Hancock the officer.

ROBERT KYLEY sworn. I am a coachman, I rent the premises under Mr. Gregory, I belive it to be the same bar that was taken away.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. This is the property that was put in my possession, it was taken from the prisoner; I produce it.

Q. (to Lack) Is that the bar. - A. This is the bar that I saw him carry, and I saw him in the act of breaking it to pieces; I took it home and put it to rights, it fits the window.

Kayley. I think that is the bar that belongs to my house; I rent the house of Mr. Gregory.

- GREGORY sworn. Q. You are the landlord of this house. - A. I am, that bar belongs to the house that Kyley rents of me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to a master to ask for work, as I was coming back I picked up that bar in the gutter running across the turnpike road in Islington.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-89

308. CHARLES LEWINGTON CHILDS was indicted for feloniously stealing a frock, value 3 s. two squares, value 1 s. and two planes, value 2 s. the property of Jacob Brown .

JACOB BROWN sworn I am a coachmaker , I live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell , the plane and stock I marked as my own; I cannot say when I lost them.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. I am a pawnbroker in Turnmill-street; I produce a plane pawned by the prisoner on the 27th of March, for one shilling.

JOHN JOBSON sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Briggs, 92, St. John-street. On the 7th of August I took in this stock of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. I believe that is mine, and the plane likewise.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-90

306. OLIFF LAMBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of February , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 9 d. and a pint pewter pot, value 10 d. the property of Richard Godsell .

- HARDY sworn. Q. You keep a public house High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 21st of February the prisoner came to my house and enquired at the bar window for my servant, when two strange men pushed her into my tap room, and asked whether I had lost some pots, they said they saw her take some pots up in Holborn ; I put my hand down her side, I took a quart and a pint pot from her; I sent the servant to Mr. Godsell.

Godsell. These are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I should have taken the pots home if I had not been stopped.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-91

307. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown .

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. I am a constable; on Thursday the 6th of March in Fleet-street , opposite St. Dunstan's Church, a gentleman passed me; I saw the prisoner take the gentleman's handkerchief out of his pocket, I pursued the prisoner, the gentleman picked up his handkerchief and said he is a d - d rascal, let him go; I considered as I was an officer, it was not right to let a character of that sort pass.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-92

308. EDWARD HOLDING was indicted for that he being servant to Moses Joel , on the third of March did receive and take into his possession the sum of 2 l. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

MOSES JOEL sworn. I keep a china and glass warehouse , No. 234, Shoreditch. The prisoner was employed in getting orders ; I entrusted him to receive the money, for which I was to allow him five per cent.; on the 8th of March I went to a house where he had delivered an order, and the woman told me she had paid him.

MARY HOLT sworn. I live in Charles-street, Hatton Garden ; I ordered an assortment of goods of Holding for which I paid him two pounds.

Q. (to Joel) You never received this money. - A. No, he never denied having the money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-93

309. BERNARD SWAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of March , a cake of soap, value 2 s. the property of Jesse Russell .

DAVID PUGH sworn. I am clerk to Jesse Russell ; from information I took a cake of soap out of the prisoner's cupboard; there is a room in the warehouse where every man has a cupboard; the soap was warm when I found it.

JESSE DAVIS sworn. On the 29th of March Bernard Swain was carrying soap with him into another room, be brought four cakes at a time, and one time he took five, he let one fall, he picked it up immediately and put it in his breeches, then he said he must go and get some beer; he went away.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, I had enemies around me, the clerk sent me to a public house the same time this was done.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18060416-94

310. CATHERINE CRUMP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , one purse, value 1 d. a dollar, value 5 s. four shillings, and a sixpence, and three bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of John Heckford .

JOHN HECKFORD sworn. I am a carpenter , I work for Mr. Harris and Mr. Nurse; on the 1st of March, Saturday evening, I came from West Ham, and went to my master to be paid.

Q. How much did you receive of your master. - A. Three pound in notes and fifteen shillings in silver, there was a dollar among the silver, I put them in a red Morocco purse, I went to the King of Prussia to drink along with a friend in Wych-street; we parted at the door; when we come out I looked over my shoulder, and I observed the prisoner behind us; when I returned to go home the prisoner tapped me on the shoulder, she said, John, I have not seen you for some time.

Q. Had you ever known her before. - A. No, she said she had known me a great while, I looked very steady at the person, I said that be d - d, I do not know you; I walked on, the prisoner said I knew her, she asked me to go home with her, I refused to go home, I went into Newcastle-street up a court, she still kept along side of me till I come to the corner house, when the prisoner stood before me and asked me to have to - with her, I told her I would not give her two pence, she abused me and gave some bad language, instantly she put her hand into my trowsers' pocket and took my purse, with all its contents; she ran away and said d - n your two pence, you may go to hell.

Q. She is an old woman, she could not run so fast as you. - A. There is a corner where she might hide herself at the gateway.

Q. Were you sober. - A. As sober as I am now.

Q. Did you call out at all. - A. No, I instantly pursued her, and thought I should see her in Drury-lane.

Q. Did not you talk and stand still with the woman. - A. Not two minutes, I never found my purse and money again, nor did I see the prisoner till Monday morning.

JOHN SMITH sworn. I am one of the patrole belonging to Bow-street. On Monday the 3d of March I apprehended the woman, the prosecutor

pointed her out to me, I found her at No. 5, Cross-lane, Newton-street, Holborn; there were two women in the same room, I searched the room and all of them, I found only a few halfpence on the prisoner; the prosecutor said when he went into the room that was the woman that robbed him, she said that she never saw him, the prosecutor described her as wearing a brown coat, which I found in the room on the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I know not the man, I am afflicted with a bad leg; on the Saturday that this man lays the robbery to me, I went to Guildhall to apply for a letter for the hospital, I was there from half past eleven till three in the afternoon, I had never broke my fast that day; at night I came home, I was fit to sink, I says to a young woman that was in the room, Nance, I can do better without my handkerchief than I can without my gown, that will maintain me till Monday morning, then I may get a letter; there is the ticket of my handkerchief that I pledged for three shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18060416-95

311. JAMES KILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of Patrick Butler .

PATRICK BUTLER sworn. I live in Collit's-court, Cow Cross , I work at labouring work . About five weeks ago I lost a pair of light velveteen breeches, I left them over the bed.

Q. Did any body sleep in the same room with you. A. There were six slept in the same room.

DAVID PERRYMAN sworn. I am a pawnbroker in Long-lane; I produce a pair of dark velveteen breeches pledged on the 17th of March for five shillings; I do not know the prisoner.

JOSEPH WENTWORTH sworn. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of March, and I found the duplicate on him which led to the breeches.

Prisoner's Defence. He did not find any thing on me but two shillings and six-pence, and two or three halfpence and a knife.

Prosecutor. They are my breeches.

Court. Q. (to prosecutor) You called them light breeches. - A. They are mine, I gave sixteen shillings for them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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