Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1805.
Reference Number: 18051204
Reference Number: f18051204-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY; FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, ON WEDNESDAY, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By R. BUTTERS, 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JAMES SHAW , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE , Kt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Kt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Peter Perchard , Esq. Thomas Skinner , Esq. Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Charles Price , Bart. Thomas Rowcroft , Esq. Claudius Stephen Hunter , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Holman Lang ,

James Rose ,

David Robertson ,

George Kelson ,

Thomas Smith ,

Robert Mackglew ,

Robert Rawlins ,

Joseph Taylor ,

Richard Arnold ,

Francis Payne ,

John Wright ,

William Nixon .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Dawes ,

Richard Morby ,

John Alby ,

John Heron ,

Isaac Spurrier ,

Robert Potts ,

Jonathan Turner ,

James Redford ,

Joseph Pitts ,

Thomas Tomkinson ,

Richard Hutchinson ,

John Edmonds .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Anderson ,

William Nash ,

Thomas Davis ,

James Read ,

Stephen Dawson ,

Robert Fogg ,

George Alderson ,

Robert Hughes ,

Richard Parker ,

Robert Orchard ,

Thomas George ,

John Sharp .

Reference Number: t18051204-1

1. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of October , eleven pair of silk stockings, value 5 l. the property of Elizabeth Martin , spinster , and John Betts , privately in their shop .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney).

ELIZABETH MARTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are unmarried? - A. Yes; I carry on the business of a haberdasher in Oxford-street , in partnership with John Betts . On Saturday the 5th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came into our shop and purchased two yards of ribbon, and two yards of worsted binding.

Q. Were there any parcels of silk stockings that laid on the counter near to the place where she stood? - A. There were three parcels of white silk stockings lying on the counter in paper untied near where she stood.

Q. After she had purchased the articles, did she leave the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. While she was there, you did not miss any thing? - A. I did not.

Q. How long after she had left your shop was it before Mr. Lodge came to you? - A. Perhaps it might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. In consequence of what Mr. Lodge said to you, did you look upon your counter, and did you miss any thing? - A. I missed eleven pair of silk stockings. Mr. Lodge came to me a second time and produced a card that I have now in my hand; I knew the card by my mark upon it; that card was in the parcel of stockings that were lost.

Q. In consequence of this did you go with Mr. Lodge. - A. Yes, to the Berwick Arms public house, Castle-street, the corner of Berner's-street. I there saw the prisoner, and my stockings were in a dry tub in the yard behind the public house.

Q. Did you know them to be your stockings? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you afterwards shewn any paper that belonged to these stockings? - A. Yes, by the officer of Marlborough-street; I knew that paper to be the paper that the stockings had been wrapped up in.

Q. Were there any person in the shop besides yourself. - A. Yes, a young lady, an assistant of mine.

Mr. Knapp. Q. She is not here? - A. No.

JOSEPH PERKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a porter to Mr. Draper, a linen-draper in Oxford-street, four doors from Mrs. Martin's.

Q. On Saturday the 5th of October, were you standing at your master's door? - A. I was standing just within side of the door; a woman came along, and just as she came opposite to the door, I saw one or two silk stockings drop from her lap; she picked them up and went on; and she had scarce got two yards from the door when she dropped them the second time.

Q. What stockings were they? - A. White-silk stockings. I turned to the side of the window to look after the woman; I saw her drop them the third time, and pick them up again, and on her taking them up a third time, she dropped a card; I went out directly, and picked the card up, and she was then walking up Berner's-street.

Q. Did you point her out to Mr. Lodge afterwards? - A. Yes, I and Mr. Lodge went after her; she turned the left hand from Castle-street into Berner's-street, and there I lost sight of her; I was about fifty yards from the corner when she turned into Berner's-street; I went into the public house and in the yard, and saw nobody there.

Q. Did you go into the public house the second time? - A. I went into the public house five or six times before I found the woman.

Q. Did you see the woman in the public house at all? - A. When I went in the third time she was standing at the parlour door, but I did not know it; it was the woman; she was going out; a gentleman said, stop her; I said to the gentleman, is that the woman? he said, yes; I said, I really do not think this is the woman; she was stopped, and when she went down into the parlour, I went into the yard of the public house; I picked up a white silk stocking, which was lying by the side of the bottle-rack; I then ran home and told them what I had found; I returned back to the yard; there was nine pair of white silk stockings and an odd one found in the tub in the yard by somebody else, and I put the odd one that I had found with them that made up ten pair.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. I understood

you to say that the woman whoever it was, went into the public house; you do not mean to swear it was the prisoner at the bar? - A. I can't.

Q. You entertained doubts at that time? - A. I did, I asked the gentleman whether it was the woman or not?

Mr. Gurney. - Q. Do you mean to swear that it was not? - A. I cannot swear, she had a blue gown on then.

Court. - Do you remember what colour gown she had on when you first saw her? - A. A light gown.

- LODGE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 53, Oxford-street.

Q. On Saturday the 5th of October about twelve olock, did the last witness come to you and say anything about a woman? - A. He did.

Q. In consequence of what he said to you did you go to Berner's-street. - A. I did; he and I followed the woman; I went back for my hat; in the mean time she turned the corner of the street, and I lost sight of her.

Q. Did you go into the public house? - A. I did, and I went into the yard there; I saw the prisoner at the bar standing at the door of the privy; I desired the landlord to detain her; I believe it to be the prisoner at the bar.

Court. - How come you to desire the landlord to detain her? - A. I had suspicion that she had stole the stockings.

Mr. Gurney. - Q. Upon your desiring the landlord to detain her did you see her go into the house? - A. No, I went away directly to Mrs. Martin.

Q. Before you went away to the house of Mrs. Martin, did Parkins give you any thing? - A. He did, a card.

Q. Did you take that card and shew it Mrs. Martin? - A. Not in the first instance; the second time I went, I shewed Mrs. Martin the card.

Q. After you had shewn Mrs. Martin the card, did you return to that public house? - A. I did, with Mrs. Martin.

Q. Did you there find the prisoner whom you had desired the landlord to detain? - A. I did; I asked her how she came by the stockings; she said nothing at all about them; one of the men who was in the passage, said the stockings were in the yard in a tub; I went into the yard and saw the white silk stockings lay in a heap in the tub. I went for a constable; he came, and took the prisoner at the bar, and the stockings were given into his charge; I did not see her searched.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - I understood you that you said you went back for your hat? - A. Yes.

Q. During that time you lost sight of her? - A. I did.

Q. You believed her to be the person I understood you to say? - A. Yes, I believe the prisoner is the person that I saw when I came back from fetching Mrs. Martin; I had seen her before, at the door of the privy, and that was the only knowledge that I had of her person.

Mr. Gurney. That person that you saw in the yard before was the person that was given in charge of the constable? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. - Q. You do not mean to swear that the prisoner was the person that went by your house? - A. I do not.

JOHN WAGSTAFFE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable? were you fetched by Mr. Lodge to the Berwick Arms, Castle-street? - A. I was; in the back yard there was nine pair of white silk stockings and an odd one lying in a tub; I took them out and counted them, and some person in the yard took out an odd stocking, and gave it to me; I then took charge of the woman; she was standing in the tap-room; I took her to Marlborough-street; she was took there by Kennedy.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. - I am an officer belonging to the police-office, Marlborough-street. On Saturday the 5th of October, when the prisoner was brought to the office by Wagstaffe, I searched her, and found upon her two yards of ribbon, and two yards of worsted binding? I went to the Berwick Arms, and saw the privy searched; I saw some paper found in the privy, which I now produce.

Mr. Gurney. - Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Look at that parcel of stockings which Wagstaffe has produced; do you believe them to be the stockings that you lost on that day? - A. I am certain of it; I had mixed them; some of them are of a pink dye, and some of a blue dye, some blue tops, and some red tops; there is no mark on them.

Q. You have told us that the card which was found was in that parcel? - A. Yes, the binding and the ribbon that was found upon the prisoner was cut off these two pieces (producing them), I sold them to the prisoner myself.

Q. Now look at these two pieces of paper which Kennedy has produced. - A. They have my private mark on them, the stockings were in this paper.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately in the shop , aged 26.

SENTENCE - Two years imprisonment in the House of Correction , and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-2

2. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September a saw, value 1 s. two hand bills, value 1 s. and a hammer, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Rapley .

(The case was stated by Mr. Watson.)

THOMAS RAPLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a butcher living at Brentford . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he lived in that neighbourhood.

Q. What did you lose from this barn of your's? - A. A saw, two hand bills, and a hammer, which I found afterwards on the premises where the prisoner lodged, concealed between the ceiling and the floor, in the cellar of his father's house.

Q. Were you present at the time he was apprehended? - A. I was.

Q. Did he give any account of these articles at that time? - A. He said at Bow-street, that he had found them by my pond, where he had gone to get some water for his mother.

(Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.)

Q. When was all this done? - A. Between last December and January.

Q. When did you find them? - A. On the 30th of September last.

Q. When did you take the prisoner up? - A. On the Wednesday following.

Q. Do you mean to say, that at the time you found them the prisoner lodged in his father's house? - A. No, he had left it I believe about a fortnight or three weeks before that.

Q. Where did the prisoner live then at that time? - A. I do not know exactly; I believe he lived where his wife lived; he went backwards and forwards to the house.

Court. Where is it that his wife lived? - A. In Brentford, about a quarter of a mile from his father's house.

Q. How came you to search his father's house? - A. I had suspected him a long time of having robbed me; I applied to a gentleman for a search warrant, he advised me to let him alone and I should detect him in some fact. It went on till the 30th of September.

Q. You did take him up on a warrant, did you? - A. Yes, it was in September when I found them; he was discharged from that.

Q. And the things were found before you had that warrant? - A. Yes, but I found a hammer afterwards at his father's house: he was liberated the first time I had him taken up, through my not coming up time enough.

Mr. Hart. Q. Then, If I understand you right, the hammer was found at an interval after the first time of taking him up? - A. It was, and the magistrate desired me to indict him, which I did.

Court. Q. What is his father and mother? - A. The father is allowed something from the parish, he is a very poor infirm man, he was a labourer.

Mr. Hart. Q. Were these things found by themselves? - A. They were found among a great many other things, between the ceiling and the flooring, all were tools apparently.

Court. Q. I have not a notion of what you mean between the ceiling and the floor, you must mean between the flooring of the ground floor and the ceiling of the cellar? - A. Yes, the ceiling was broken.

Mr. Hart. Q. Do you know a man of the name of Slauter? - A. I do.

Q. Have you ever said to any body that you suspected Slauter of stealing these things? - A. Never.

Q. You said that the prisoner at his first examination said, that he found the saw and the two hand bills by the pond; at that time there was no charge made about the hammer? - A. No, not till after it was found with a search warrant.

Court. Q. As you have known the prisoner a great while, what way of life is he in: he seems to be a decent young man? - A. He is a gardener, I knew him to be a loose character.

Q. Where is the pond? - A. In one of my fields.

WILLIAM JUPP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a constable. I produce the saw and the two hand bills; I was not present when they were taken.

WILLIAM POLICOT sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. I produce this hammer, which I found in the first one pair of stairs where the father lived. It was lying in the window.

Mr. Watson. (To Prosecutor.) Are these your property? - A. They are, I kept them in my barn in one of my fields, nearly adjoining to the prisoner's father's house.

Court Q. By what particular marks do you know them to be yours? - A. By having them so long a time; and by using them a thousand times; I was in the constant habit of using these tools in the fields.

Q. How far might the barn be from the prisoner's father's house? - A. It might be about two or three hundred yards, there is only one field between.

Q. When was it you first missed these articles? - A. I think it was between January and February that the barn was broke open and very thing taken out, the lock was wrenched, and the cross bar was quite broken.

Q. How far was this pond from the barn in which the prisoner at the bar told you he found them. - A. Between the barn and his house.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOHN KING sworn - Examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I have known him for sixteen or seventeen years, he is a gardener by trade, he was gardener to Mr. Parker at the boarding-school where I went to school; he had always an excellent character.

Q. Did you know any thing with regard of these articles, the saw and the two hand bills? - A. I know about the latter end of last April, I was going up Drum-lane, on my road to New Brentford, I crossed a field called the Haunted-house field; going into the lane, I observed the prisoner with a barrow and a water-cask, he was filling this cask out of the ditch, and in the act of dipping his bucket in the ditch, I observed him pick up a rusty saw and two gardener's knives. I cannot tell what gardener's call them; one had a long handle.

Q. Look at them which have been produced, were they like them? - A. Yes, the same thing.

Q. Were they covered with water? - A. They were covered with weeds at the time he took them out of the ditch, and to the best of my recollection this saw had one rivet out of the handle, but that I cannot take upon we to swear positively to,

(Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.)

Q. Did you go there on purpose? - A. I had business that morning to come from East Sheen over Kew-bridge, and the motive that led me to come up Drum-lane, was on account of my being so many years at Grove boarding-school, which led me to see the premises again.

Court. Q. You had been familiar with those parts before? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. It was quite a chance of your going there that day? - A. Yes.

Q. You happened to come up just as the prisoner was getting this water? - A. Yes, and curiosity led me to speak to him.

Q. And curiosity led you to examine the saw about the rivet? - A. No, I did not examine it all, I took the saw up and laid it down again.

Q. You looked at the rivets you know? - A. To the best of my recollection there was a rivet out, but I cannot swear positively to it, nor can I speak to the indentity of the things.

Q. How soon afterwards were you asked to give evidence upon it? - A. The first time that I heard of it was from his sister.

Q. When was it that you first knew that your evidence would be material for the prisoner upon the subject? - A. About three weeks ago.

Q. Then from the month of April down to three weeks ago, you did not know that your evidence would be wanted? - A. I never had the least idea or suspicion that it would ever be brought into court.

Court. Where do you live? - A. No. 2, Ocean-street, Stepney; I am a wharfinger.

Q. Had you ever much acquaintance with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Only by his being labouring gardener to Mr. Parker; the person I went to school with; he lived with Mr Parker, at Brentford at the same time.

Q. So that your acquaintance with the prisoner was at Brentford? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived at Stepney? - A. About twelve months.

Q. Where did you live before? - A. At Red-lion Wharf, Upper Thames-street. I left the school about thirteen or fourteen years ago.

Q. Then you are speaking to his character about fourteen years ago, when he was a labouring gardener working for Mr. Parker. - A. Yes.

Q. You say the prisoner put down his bucket into the ditch with which he was filling a cask; was there no pond nearer for him so get the water? - A. It was a clear ditch surrounded by a hedge, in the lane leading towards New Brentfords by the Haunted House field.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Is your field near this Haunted House field? - A. There is only one field between it and my field, and there is a pond in the middle of my field. The saw is the same now as when I lost it; there is no rivet out of the saw, nor was there then.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-3

3. MARY WILSON , MARY MORGAN , and ELIZABETH WALKER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November a silk shawl, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Lloyd and George Hyde , privately in their shop .

THOMAS LLOYD sworn. - I live in Pall Mall, St. James's, Westminster , I have a partner, his name is George Hyde ; we are warehousemen , our business consists in a variety of articles, such as haberdashery and linen-drapery. On the 4th of November between the hours of twelve and four in the afternoon, the prisoners Wilson and Morgan came to my shop; they asked a young woman who had attended them some time before, whether they had an article that suited the old woman Wilson; the shop was then full of customers, they walked a little farther in the shop

and seeing a bonnet on the stand, Morgan said to the young woman who is one of my asistants in the shop, that she should like to try on that bonnet, and then she went into the interior room in the shop.

Q. Who did? - A. Morgan and Wilson together. I remained in the front part of the shop myself, and left them to the attention of the assistant, who went into the inner room with them. In about ten minutes they returned out and purchased no article. We had no suspicion whatever of their having robbed us, until one of the witnesses, who is here, his name is Briscoe, came and informed me that these women had certainly robbed us.

Q. Briscoe gave you that information, and you followed them? - A. I followed them immediately up St. James's-street, and overtook them. Walker was then in company with Wilson and Morgan, Walker had in her hand a coloured handkerchief at the time we came up with them, which was immediately taken from her by the prisoner Morgan. I brought Walker back, and the other prisoners were brought back again by two other persons. I did not see any property taken from the prisoner Morgan, it was shewed to me after she was taken up stairs; it was taken from her as she was in the act of throwing it down on the counter; the shawl was shewed to me by the witness Briscoe, he had it in his hand.

Q. All you know is seeing them in the shop. Were there any other persons in the shop? - A. There were several ladies in the shop at that time, and four or five carriages about the door of the shop.

Q. Had you sold them the shawl? - A. No, nor had I missed it.

Q. When you went up stairs, who did you find in the room? - A. I found Wilson, Morgan, and Walker; they were brought there by the persons who assisted me in bringing them back.

Q. Did Briscoe say any thing respecting the shawl in the presence of the prisoners? - A. Yes, he said that was the shawl that he had taken from them. I immediately sent for a constable; in the interim the prisoner Morgan offered, if I would let them go, to pay me any money I chose to have for the shawl, to which I replied that the daily depredations by which I suffered, I should not let them go; they said they were not guilty.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. - Walker was not in the shop at all? - A. She was not.

Q. Then you took her in custody because you found her in company with others in the street; that was your only reason? - A. Yes.

Q. When you brought her back she said she was not guilty? - A. Yes.

Mr. Hart. Yours is a large way of business? - A. It is.

Q. You have no other partner but Mr. Hyde? - A. No.

Q. How many people do you usually employ to serve in your shop? - A. Sometimes in my shop all my hands assist in the business, when business requires it. I have eight or ten assistants.

Q. You saw nothing yourself of the shawl till you saw it up stairs? - A. Not till it was taken up stairs.

Q. Briscoe produced it to you up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen the shawl in the course of that morning? - A. I had: the shawl laid in the back room where the prisoners were on the counter; I had previously shewn them to a gentlewoman, and this shawl was amongst them.

Q. If I understand you right there was a great many shawls there? - A. There were two dozen shawls upon that part of the counter.

Q. Do you mean to say that you had seen the two dozen generally, or that you had seen that one particularly? - A. These shawls were altogether on the preceding evening.

Court. Q. Do you speak to having seen that shawl precisely? - A. I do not.

Q. All that you have to say, you had shewed a number of shawls, of which you take this to be one, and you had not observed it? - A. Not sufficiently; these shawls had been all folded the preceding evening.

Q. Was that shawl marked? - A. There is my private mark on it now.

THOMAS POPE sworn - Q. Do you remember this Monday the 4th of November? - A. I do; the first part of the transaction that I am acquainted with is meeting the other witness, Briscoe, at the end of Pall Mall, near the Haymarket.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a silk mercer by trade.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About two o'clock, as near as I can recollect: In consequence of what Briscoe said to me respecting the prisoners, I was induced to return back with him to watch the prisoners; they were all three together in Pall Mall.

Q. How far might they be from Mr. Lloyd's shop? - A. They were at the other end of Pall Mall from Mr. Lloyd's shop. I joined the witness Briscoe. I saw the prisoners go into the house of Roach and Co.; the witness Briscoe, wished me to go there on purpose to see their faces, in order that I might know them at a future period.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. I had not; and he wished me to go and inform

them of the suspicion that he entertained, I went and informed them there were only two, Wilson and Morgan, that went into the shop; Walker remained in the street, I went into the shop, and saw them looking at some velvet; in a few minutes they came out of the shop without purchasing; they again joined the prisoner Walker. They walked away towards St. James's-street, and the same two, Wilson and Morgan went in to Messrs. Lloyd and Hyde's shop, and Walker staid without after they remained in there some time. The witness Briscoe and me being on the opposite side of the way, they came out, and all three joined, and they went to the corner of St. James's-street; and on going up St. James's-street they walked close together, and something appeared to be passing from the hands of the prisoner Morgan, as if she had taken it from her muff, and had given it to the prisoner Walker. I could not particularly distinguish what it was, or whether it was absolutely so or not. I said to the witness Briscoe, "return to Mr. Lloyd's house, and inform them that something of this had taken place." Briscoe went and informed Mr. Lloyd that we suspected that the prisoners had taken something from the premises. I kept in the street till he returned, and Mr Lloyd came back with him. We pursued them up St. James's-street, and overtook them; we requested them to return. On returning, the prisoner Morgan walked very fast, and Mr. Lloyd got back before me, as I walked with the prisoner Wilson, she being very infirm. We all went back to Mr. Lloyd's house. I did not see the shawl till after it was produced up stairs.

JAMES BRISCOE sworn. - Q. You was with the last witness on the 4th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you recollect on the subject? - A. These three prisoners came to the shop of Mrs. Phillips, silk-mercer, Holywell-street (I am shopman to Mrs. Phillips). They wished to look at some article, which they did. Mrs. Phillips happened to know their faces: we had suspected them for some time, and she being by herself in the shop, she rung for further assistance, accordingly I attended to the ring of the bell, and goes into the back shop where two of the prisoners were, Wilson and Morgan, Walker being on the outside; I stood at the end of the counter as a by-stander to look on, while Mrs. Phillips shewed them some black velvet; they purchased a yard of velvet, because, they said they did not like to go out of the shop without purchasing; then they went away, and I went out of the house through the court which leads into the Strand, and there I saw three of them, the prisoner Walker then joined with the rest. I followed them, they went into several places before they came to Pall Mall. At Pall Mall I met Mr. Pope; I told him I would thank him to go back with me; he went with me to assist me in watching the prisoners. Wilson and Morgan went into the shop of Roach and Co. I lodged myself in a court on the opposite side of the way, and requested Mr. Pope to go and inform them what characters they were; he came out to me, and the two women came out of the shop, and joined the other prisoner Walker. We followed them and two of them went into the house of Messrs. Lloyd and Hyde; I watched the prisoner Walker's motions, expecting them to come out of the shop every minute; and in a few minutes the other two came out of the shop; they all joined together, and went up St. James's-street; and after they had got up there, each of us saw as though something perceived to go from Morgan to Walker. While Mr. Pope kept his eye fixed on them, I went to the shop of Mr. Lloyd, I told him that I suspected that the prisoners had stolen something from the shop. Accordingly Mr. Lloyd came with me himself. Mr. Lloyd and me pursued them up St. James's-street; Pope was searching after them at the time. I being foremost, I tapped the prisoner Morgan on the shoulder, and told her that the gentleman who was coming had a word or two to say to her; Mr. Lloyd came up at the time, and requested to know which of them had the bundle. Accordingly I pointed her out to him, and he pursued her; the prisoner Morgan and we waited till the prisoner Walker returned to us; the prisoner Morgan then requested the prisoner Walker to give her the bundle, which was in a coloured handkerchief; she took the bundle, and put it into a very large muff that she had got: she hastened back to the shop as fast as she could, after she had asked where she was going. I being desirous that all might go together, rather checked her going to fast, suspecting that she had the article in question. I kept my eyes particularly on the muff, and saw her hands in motion, as though she was untangling something; she was very desirous of getting back to the shop first, and accordingly she did,

Q. This was Morgan? - A. Yes; when she got into the shop she forced herself into the back shop as fast as possible? I at the same time kept close to her; she in an instant, when she had got into the back shop, where the shawls had been opened, drawed this shawl out of her muff, and endeavoured to fling it on the counter with the rest; I kept my hand to the left hand side of her muff, and as she drew it out, I caught it in my hand.

She drew it out in an instant; the shawl went into my hand. I kept it there for that purpose, that instant Mr. Lloyd came in with the prisoner Walker. Mr. Lloyd called, out up stairs with them; I said it was a matter of no consequence, as I had got the principal, but we all went up stairs into one room; I shewed him the article that I had. Mr. Lloyd then left the room in order to send some person for an officer. I had the shawl in my possession during his absence; they all three fell down on their knees, and begged that I would not be so base and cruel to swear falsely against them, for they said that I had taken the shawl off the counter.

Q. That was not so? - A. No; I did not take it off the counter; I caught it before it was on the counter. I delivered it to the officer when he came.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. After they left your shop they went into the shop of Roach and Co? - A. Yes.

Mr. Hart. Was this bundle ever opened? - A. She untied it in her muff; I saw the bundle taken from Walker by Morgan; the prisoner Walker had the bundle in her hand; when Morgan took it from her she put it in her muff.

Q. When she was taken up stairs was the bundle examined? - A. The shawl was found down stairs.

Q. Was there any velvet in this bundle? - A. I do not know that there was; this came separately out of the muff; there was a remnant that they purchased at our house, and a short piece of velvet, which they refused to give any account of, that was found upon them.

Q. Have you always given this account of the transaction above stairs as you do now; when you was examined before the magistrate did you state this circumstance of these prisoners going down on their knees? - A. I believe I did not.

RICHARD BURTON sworn. - I am an officer, I produce the shawl I received from Mr. Lloyd in the one pair of stairs back room in the absence of the prisoners.

Q. (To Mr. Lloyd.) Is that the shawl that was taken from the prisoners? - A. Yes, here is my mark upon it.

MARY NEWTON sworn. The prisoner Mary Morgan came into our shop and asked if I had a bonnet that would suit the old woman, the prisoner Wilson, she called her nurse. I suppose a month previous to that the same people came to our house, and said they were sent by my lady to buy a bonnet; when they came on the 4th, Morgan said,

"pray ma'am have you got this bonnet that I wanted;" at the moment I did not recollect them again; I hesitated for a moment; then the old woman, the nurse as she called her, Wilson, stepped forward and said it is for me ma'am. I said we have nothing of the kind that will suit you, for we never keep old ladies bonnets that is so plain as yours; Morgan said the fact is, my lady has sent nurse (calling Wilson the nurse) in the country for these last three months with the children, which was the reason she had not been before to order the bonnet; she said the lady wished nurse to look very nice; Morgan saw a bonnet on the stand; she said will you allow me to put it on; I said will you walk up stairs; oh no, said she, I do not mind taking my hat off in the shop, so she walked into the back shop; when we got into the back shop, she took the bonnet off, and said she should like to have it lined with a different colour; she thought it was a pretty bonnet. Wilson stepped forward, and said, now, ma'am, I will give you my directions about a bonnet; she said, she should like to look at some velvet; she then said, I recollect I have got a yard of velvet that was given to me, it will make no difference if I have my own made up; she would have some tippets of me; Morgan said you have not your velvet with you, suppose you say you will call on Wednesday morning, and bring the velvet with you. They left the shop.

Q. You saw them afterwards when they were brought back? - A. Yes, I was behind the counter. Morgan, in a very great apparent fright, ran into the shop, she seemed very much agitated; she came down to the bottom of the counter where I was standing, the shawls laid at the bottom of the counter, covered with a piece of velvet that was shewn to a lady for a pelice; as she came in after she had been apprehended, she said, what have I done to you, or what have you to say to me. She threw her hand behind her, I saw the corner of the shawl as Briscoe seized the shawl from her, she then said, I have not taken any thing of yours; I said to her, I saw you throw the shawl from your hand, she said Lord Jesus Christ, man, you cannot swear that, consider my children, I have got two or three children, I believe she took hold of my hand, and requested that I would not swear it, then they were taken up stairs. On my going up stairs, when I went into the room, she repeated it again, and hoped that I would not swear that I had seen her throw the shawl from her muff; she said that she had never done me any harm. The shawl and the two pieces of velvet is all that was found upon her.

Wilson's Defence. What has been sworn by this young man and the lady, is as false as God is true. As to my going on my knees, that is wrong, I had never done them any wrong, nor any body else, if I had wronged them I should

have thought it my duty; I never asked to look at any shawl.

Morgan's Defence. That young man has sworn very false against me, he took the shawl from the counter and said that I put it there.

Walker's Defence. I met Mrs. Morgan in the street, she said she was going towards Piccadilly. I told her I was going to the further end of Piccadilly; I went with her to Pall Mall, she said she was going into that shop for a bonnet that she had ordered when she came out, she said it was not done. I never went on my knees; if that young gentleman can look me in the face and say that, there he is, he never said so before the justice.

Morgan called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Walker called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Wilson called one witness, who gave her a good character.

WILSON, GUILTY of stealing, but not privately from the shop , aged 60.

MORGAN, GUILTY , aged 30.

WALKER, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-4

4. THOMAS BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of November , forty-three quires of paper, value 30 s. the property of Charles Philip Galabin , and William John Galabin .

ANN BROWN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Galabin, a printer , in Ingram-court, Fenchurch-street . On the 23th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take the paper out of the warehouse, (he was pressman to Mr. Galabin,) I sent the boy after him; he brought him back again with the paper; the prisoner went up stairs to work again, but he absconded afterwards.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same man that you saw take the paper out of the warehouse? - A. I am quite sure.

DAVID PATERSON sworn. - I am an errand boy to Mr. Galabin; last Saturday as I was in my master's cellar, the servant called me and told me to go in pursuit of Mr. Burton.

Q. Where did you come up to him? - A. In Leadenhall market, I laid hold of his coat; he said, O lord, David did you see me take it; I said, no, Mr. Burton, our cook saw you take it; then he turned out of the market, and came back.

Q. What had he with him? - A. A bundle of paper upon his shoulder; directly he got out of the market and came into Lime-street, he wanted me to take the paper from him; I said the paper was too heavy for me, I could not carry it; then he desired me to tell my master that he stopped a man in the market, and took it from the man for me; he came home with me, and went up stairs to his work, and before I could get an opportunity to tell my master, the servant called my master down stairs, and told him. (The paper produced.)

Q. That is the paper? - A. It is the paper.

CHARLES PHILIP GALABIN sworn. That is the same paper that was brought back to our house.

Mr. Curwood. Q. (To Patterson.) Is that the very same bundle? - A. That is the same bundle that Burton took.

Q. Were there any other bundles in the warehouse like it? - A. Yes; he threw it on the ground, till one of our prentices came and took it up, and put it among the others.

Q. How do you know that that is not one of the other bundles? - A. I am sure it is not one of the others, because it is marked S T O.

Court. Q. (To Mr. Gallabin.) Is that your paper? - A. It is, I have brought a sheet of the other bundles for the jury to compare it.

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. William John Gallabin.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in any place of confinement before in my life; I never did any thing amiss before.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - aged 31.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, as his wife and relations were people of respectability .

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-5

5. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November , twelve straw hats, value 5 l. the property of Mathias Prime Lucas , John Lucas , and John Barber .

JAMES VALENTINE DUNN sworn. I am clerk to Messrs. Lucas; on the 4th of November I saw the prisoner at the bar go to the case of hats on Wiggins's lower quay, Thames-street , I saw him bundle a parcel of hats under his great coat, he came to the gates, and went up the passage between Sand's quay and Wiggins's quay; I kept my eye on him till he went into the Harp public house in Harp lane; I went into the tap-room, there I saw him sitting in the corner; I took him by the collar, and told him he was my prisoner; he said for what? I told him he had stole my hats; he replied, Mr.

Dunn, if I had known them to have been your hats, I would not have taken them; he was persuaded by some of his friends to give me the hats; he opened a cupboard, and gave me a dozen; they were the hats that were out of the case; I have no doubt of it, I produce them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. - Q. You produce these hats do you? - A. Yes.

Q. You went before the lord-mayor, did you not. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you state there that you had not seen them? - A. I stated exactly the same as I do now.

Q. What hats do you call these? - A. They go by the name of Leghorn straw hats.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hat trade? - A. I am not in the hat trade.

Q. What are called straw hats, and what are called Leghorn straw hats? are they not very different things? - A. No, they are not, they are Leghorn hats; we pay duty for these in the name of Leghorn hats.

Q. This man, when he came into the public-house, told you he had found some hats? - A. He did not tell me that he found them.

Q. That he picked them up? - A. He did not say that he picked them up? he said, Mr. Dunn, if I had known they had been your hats I would not have took them.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoner afterwards, that night? - A. No, I did not, I left him for that night.

Q. How came you to leave him? - A. I was positive I could find him when I wanted him.

Q. When he was taken the next day had you any conversation with him on this subject? - A. He sent for me to the Counter, I then told him, if he could tell me where I could get the other part of the property that was missed it might be easier for him, but he did not.

Q. Whose wharf were they on? - A. They were in Mr. Lucas's and Co's custody.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 4th of November I was working on board the craft, I was coming up Wiggin's quay from Young's quay, I saw a parcel of hats lay, one on the top of the other as they do here. I took them up to the public-house to know who was the owner of the hats; when the prosecutor came in, I said if you have lost some hats here they are, and if I had known they were yours I would have delivered them to you: he took the hats, and told me to go about my business; I went home and staid there till about six o'clock, and they came and took me. This gentleman did not come into the public-house till I had been there three or four minutes, and he swore before the Lord Mayor that he did not see me take the hats; he saw me on the quay near the case where the hats were.

GUILTY - aged 43.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-6

6. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , a brass weight, value 5 s. the property of William Cowland , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM COWLAND sworn. I am a brazier . I live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . On Monday the 4th of November, about noon, the prisoner William Roberts came into my shop, and desired me to shew him some beer cocks, he wanted to buy some he said, I shewed him some, he said they were neither of them such as he wanted; he wanted a straiter; I told him I had some up in the warehouse, I would shew him; I went up stairs to get one, leaving my man in the shop with him; when I came down I produced him one as I thought he said he wanted. I told him the price; he said the price was too great; that he must inform the person for whom he wanted it before he purchased it; he went out of the shop without purchasing one. I had no suspicion of his having robbed me. Immediately that he was gone out of the shop, a young lad whom I had no knowledge of before, his name is George Culliver , came in my shop; in consequence of what he said, I went out to pursue the man; he had got about 200 yards from my shop when I overtook him, the lad went along with me; I desired the prisoner to come back into my shop, I did not make any charge upon him at that time, nor till he came into my shop; I then desired that he would hear the charge that this lad made, because I had no knowledge of his having robbed me myself, the lad having mentioned the part where he saw him take something away. I immediately looked and said I have missed a four pound brass weight: he denied having taken any: after a little while I sent the lad to fetch a police officer. When the lad was gone I saw by his manner there where evident marks of guilt about him. I came close to him and put my hand to the side of his pocket and there I felt the very weight that was missing; a workman of mine happened at that time to come through the shop, I desired him to assist in taking care of him till the officer came: he assisted, and the prisoner took the weight out of his pocket and threw it on the ground. I am sure it is my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner, Mr. Cowland. - A. None.

GEORGE GULLIVER sworn. I am shop-man to Mr. Lawrence an ironmonger; he lives in White-cross-street; I was coming by Mr. Cowland's shop, I saw the prisoner go into his shop; I suspected him, and I watched him through the window; I saw him take something from behind the counter, I could not see what it was; I waited till the prisoner came out and, then informed Mr. Cowland of it; upon which Mr. Cowland sent me out to stop him; I stopped him and we all came back together, then Mr. Cowland sent me for a police officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You saw him take it did you? - A. I saw him take it, but I did not know what it was.

HENRY BAINS sworn. I am a brazier: I was coming through my master's shop about half after eleven o'clock; my master ordered me to stop in the shop, and during the time this man seemed to shift himself; his coat went on one side, upon which my master felt a weight; he ordered me to take it out of his pocket; I endeavoured to do it and it fell to the ground.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. I produce the weight.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Is that your weight? - A. That is my weight; it it a brass four pound weight; it is worth about five shillings.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel. Called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately, in the shop - aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18051204-7

7. MARY STACK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of November , eight yards of woolen cloth, value 50 s. and twenty waistcoat pieces, value 50 s. the property of William Loddon , in the dwelling house of John Woodward .

WILLIAM LODDON sworn. I am a hawker of cloth blankets, and waistcoat pieces ; I live at the Angel and Crown in Wood-street.

Q. Where were those things that were lost? - A. They were at the Crown and Can, in St. John-street, Clerkenwell .

Q. Who keeps the house? - A. Mr. Woodward. I went into the tap, and asked the gentlemen that were in company, if they wanted any cloth or waistcoat pieces; it is a week ago last Tuesday night; I was coming out when this Mary Stack was buying two pennyworth of brandy; she said she would buy a pair of blankets, if we could agree with the price; I went back, and clapped one of the bundles on the bench, and opened my blankets on the ground; I shewed her a pair; she said she did not like them; I shewed her another pair, and I sold them her for a pound; when I had sold her the pair for a pound, she said she would not have them unless she might have them for sixteen shillings. I told her I would not let her have them for sixteen shillings, but I would oblige her to have them for a pound, what I had agreed with her to sell them for; I took hold of her, and the servant girl came to me, and desired me to let her go about her business; I pinned my blankets up again; I threw my bundle on my back, and went to the bench where my other bundle was, and it was gone. The landlady sent the servant girl with me to her house; I asked her if she had them; she denied having them; the servant girl stopped a bit with her while I went and fetched an officer. The officer came with me and searched the house, and we could not find them. The officer took her with us to the house where I lost the goods, and then the officer says we must go back again, they are somewhere about the house; we went back, and found one piece of woollen cloth there, which I can swear to be mine; I found it between the bed and the mattress.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes, as sober as I am at this time. She had got her bundle under her cloak as I was shewing her the blankets

Q. Was she sober? - A. She was sober to look at.

SARAH JOSLING sworn. The prisoner came in on Tuesday week in the evening; she had two pennyworth of brandy at the bar; after she had drank the brandy, she went and bargained for a pair of blankets with the man; she looked at one pair, they did not suit her, she looked at another pair, and bid him a pound for them; the man said she should have them, and then the prisoner would not give any more than sixteen shillings; he insisted on her having them at the pound; I pushed her away from him, I was afraid of their making a noise.

Q. What people were in the house at that time? - A. Nobody was in the house but her and him.

Q. Who keeps the house? - A. Mr. Woodward.

Q. The hawker did not leave the goods in the care of your master? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Where was the bundle? - A. He laid it on the bench while he opened his bundle.

Q. Was there any body in the house besides the woman? - A. Yes, there were more, but they never moved from their seats.

Prisoner's Q. (to Prosecutor) Did not you come in ten minutes time to my house? - A. I did.

Prisoner's Defence. She stopped at my house. Mr. White came up stairs. She and this young man followed me to my house. What

should I do with the bundle, I never took it.

Q. How came you by this cloth? - A. I bought it six months ago.

Q. Then you prove where you bought it? - I would if I had time; my husband is very bad, he had not time to go where I bought it. He swears to that cloth, when I can get the man that sold it to me.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. I am an officer.

Q. You went and examined this place? - A. I did. I did not find any thing upon the first watch; I said to the prosecutor that I forgot to open the bed; I returned to her room and opened the bed, and between the sacking and the mattress I found this cloth; she denied having any thing of this sort; I knew her to be a bad character.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) How do you know it to be your property? - A. I know it by the colour and by the selvage; I knew it as soon as I saw it.

Q. Were the cloth and waiscoat pieces in one bundle? - A. They were; and they were laid very close together; it did not take up much room; I never found the waiscoat pieces, only the eight yards of cloth. I am sure they all went together when they were taken away.

GUILTY - of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-8

9. ANN CONNOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , twenty-seven pair of women's leather gloves, value 3 l. 12 s. and three pair of mits, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Burford , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL BURFORD sworn. - I live at No. 99 Oxford-street ; I am a haberdasher and hosier . On Saturday the 16th of November, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop with another woman; the prisoner asked to see some flannels at a shilling a yard; I shewed her a whole piece; another customer came in; I left her looking at it; my back was then turned from her, and while I was serving the other customer, I turned round, and the prisoner and the other woman that came in with her was gone; by their going out in that manner, I suspected they had taken something from off the counter; I left the person I was then serving; I saw the prisoner and the other that was with her just crossing over the way; they had just got upon the curb; I went after them, and took them at the corner of the street opposite; I laid hold of the prisoner, and asked her if she had not got something that did not belong to her; she immediately dropped the parcel upon an iron railing of an area; I held the window fast while I tapped at the window for a light; they gave a light under the area; I picked up the gloves there; I took the prisoner, and gave her to the officer at Marlborough-street; the other woman escaped; I could not hold them both.

Q. Were there any other persons serving in the shop besides you? - A. There was a boy in the shop who was then serving a lady with a pair of gloves.

Q. Is that boy here? - A. No. She was searched at Marlborough-street; she had no money in her pockets to purchase any thing.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. I am an officer of Marlborough-street; I produce the gloves I had of Mr. Burford.

Q. (To Prosecutor). Look at these gloves? - A. There were 27 pair of gloves and three pair of mits, and my private mark is on the paper; I saw the gloves just before the prisoner came in; the prisoner is the person that threw them on the railing of the area; and the prisoner is the woman that wanted the flannel.

Prisoner's Defence. I had half a crown and a few halfpence in my hand, which I got from my husband; he pulled me about and chucked the half crown out of my hand when he came after me. I went into this man's shop to buy a piece of flannel; I saw two ladies there and a little boy; as Christ Lord may hear me, I am with child with the thirteenth child; I wish I may drop down dead if it is not the truth that I had a hole in my pocket; I had half a crown in my hand; I told him I would give him that money for the flannel that I wanted; he said to me, you shall have it, with that this woman ran out, and he ran after her; he says I am robbed. I being foolish and innocent, I ran out; he got hold of the other woman, but she being very strong, got away from him. O says he, damn you, and then he laid hold of me, saying, you are my prisoner; I said I will go along with you, only be easy; he dragged me down to this office; I said do not use me ill; I told him where I lived; I am sure that he gave me punishment enough.

GUILTY - of stealing, but not privately in the shop , aged 32.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-9

10. WILLIAM AXFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of November , a pair of boots, value 28 s. and three pair of shoes,

value 15 s. value lasts, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Willey .

THOMAS WILLEY sworn. I live at No. 385 in the Strand ; I am a boot and shoemaker . On the 25th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, an officer from Hatton Garden informed me that the prisoner was in custody; I went to the office, and there I found the man in custody.

Q. Do you know how you lost them? - A. No; nor when I lost them.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. I am a pawnbroker in Liquorpond-street. On the twenty-fifth of November, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop and offered to pledge a pair of boots and two pair of shoes; I asked him what his name was; he said John Simkins , and that he lived at No. 83 St. John's-street, at that end towards Smithfield; I told him that I believed he was wrong; I thought that the numbers begun at the other end; he then said that he meant the other end; I then asked him who he made the shoes for; he said he was a shoemaker, and he made them for a gentleman in Lambeth; I asked him the gentleman's name; he could not tell; I told him there was a name in the shoes; I supposed that was the name; I asked him who he made the boots for; he could not tell that; I then told him I suspected that he had stole the boots and shoes from some shop that he worked for, and I should be under the necessity of detaining him; I sent for an officer and took him into custody; I produce the boots and shoes; I have had them eversince.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden. I was sent for by Mr. Page, to take the prisoner into custody.

Q. How did you find the prosecutor? - A. The prisoner confessed at last where he lived; I went to see whether he was right; I found that he worked for Mr. Willey, in the Strand; Mr. Willey had been to his house, and found some other boot legs, and I found one pair more of shoes, which Mr. Willey has sworn to be his property, and nine lasts and some pieces of leather; he lodged at No. 16 Exeter-street in the Strand.

Prosecutor. They are my property, both the boots and the shoes. He was my shopman .

Q. How long had he worked for you? - A. He has been with me since the month of April last.

Q. How did he behave himself? - A. Very well; he was a sober industrious man; his wife was very ill at the time that this was committed; I have no doubt but this is the first offence; I have made every enquiry concerning his former conduct; I found nothing in his former conduct that makes in the least against him.

GUILTY - of stealing only , aged 38.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-10

11. ANN HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of December , a silver watch, value 30 s, the property of Jacob Swanstone , privately from his person .

JACOB SWANSTONE sworn. - I am a Swede; I went last Monday night to the Royalty Theatre with the prisoner; I met with this girl at a public house; she asked me to take her to the play; I said yes to her, and we both went.

Q. Before you went to the play what had you to drink with this girl? - A. We drank half a pint of gin together; when I was at the play house, after setting there a little while, I fell asleep, when I awoke I felt my watch was gone, and the girl was gone away; I went out to look for her, but could not find her, I went up to the play house again; I asked the young man that was sitting there if he would go with me in pursuit of the prisoner; me went into several public houses; at last we found her in a public house at eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Did you find your watch again? - A. Yes. As soon as I came into the public house, I asked the girl for the watch, and she then went out, I went out after her, and told her that she should give it me; she told me that she had not got it.

Q. You was in liquor? - A. I was a little so.

Q. You was so much so that you fell fast asleep? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CLIFF sworn. - I was sitting in the seat behind this young man in the sixpenny gallery of the Royalty Theatre; I saw the prisoner's face at the play-house, the prosecutor laid fast asleep in the prisoner's lap; I knew her again when we saw her again at the public house, she there put her hand on the bench where she sat, and the sailor that sat on the same bench opposite to her, took the watch from her and put it in his left hand pocket; she asked me what I wanted with her husband; when I spoke to her about the watch, I said I wanted nothing with her husband; she seized me by the collar, and the sailor that had the watch then says, come along with me to the Blue Anchor. He took the watch then from out of his left hand pocket and put it under his arm-pit; I then said, here is the watch, give it to the young man; when they came to the corner of Well-street, he put his hand to the waistband of his breeches, and took out the watch and gave it again to the prisoner. I said the woman had

got the watch; a great many people came up, the prisoner denied having the watch, the officer who was standing by, said he would search her, at last she put her right hand into her pocket and gave the watch to the watchman, and the watchman gave it to the officer.

- sworn. I am headborough of Whitechapel; I heard them opposite to my own door; I went out and asked them what was the matter; the sailor said that the woman had got his watch; she denied it; I said if you do not give it up I will search you; she put her hand into her pocket, and gave it to the watchman, and he gave it to me. I produce the watch.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. He treated me to the play; after I got to the play-house, he gave me his watch to take care of; he said take care of it till I awake; he laid his head down on my lap, and his hat fell down; I picked up his hat; after that I put his head in my lap again. A man asked me to go round and have some drink; I went, and in the mean while I went out to drink he charged me with his watch.

GUILTY - of stealing but not privately from the person .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-11

12. WILLIAM LOMAX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of November , a sheet value 5 s. the property of Sarah Ellison .

SARAH ELLISON sworn. I am a single woman , I live at Kilburn , my mother is a laundress. On the 11th of November last, between nine and ten in the morning, I hung some sheets upon the hedge to dry; I received information that one was stolen away a little after 3 o'clock.

MARY STEED sworn. I live at Kilburn, near Mrs. Ellison; I was up two pair of stairs, and from the window, a little after 3 o'clock, I saw a man come up to the hedge; he looked to see if any body saw him, he went back again; seeing nobody, he took the furthermost sheet off the hedge; I went down stairs and asked my fellow servant Francis Sawyer , if he would go and tell the woman that there was a man that had taken her sheet from the hedge; he went.

Q. Do you know who the man was? - A. I do not.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. To the best of my knowledge I believe him to be the man, but I will not be positive; I had not seen him before.

FRANCIS SAWYER sworn. From information that I received from my fellow servant, I went up stairs and saw the man go from the meadow; I went and pursued him, and at last overtook him, after following for above a mile, with the bundle under his arm tied up in a chock handkerchief. I called to him two or three times; he would nor stop nor answer me.

Q. Was he running? - A. Yes, I followed him across two or three fields, he got over two hedges, I got over after him, he ran two or three fields further, and flung the bundle into a ditch of water; then he ran two or three fields further, I pursued him still, he went to a gateway, and there he sat down on a bank, and I went up to him; he laid down his stick before him; I took it up, and took him into custody.

Q. He did not offer to strike you with it? - A. No, he told me to come and take him into custody.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man that threw the bundle away? - A. I am; I never lost sight of him; two girls came running down the meadow, and asked me where the bundle was; I went with them, and got the bundle out of the ditch.

THOMAS HALMS sworn. I am a constable; I produce the sheet and the stick, they were delivered into my custody.

Q. (To Mrs. Ellison.) Look at that sheet? - A. There is L P in black letters on the sheet, I know the sheet to be mine.

Prisoner. I am not the person that took the property; I know nothing of the property nor the person, I was not pursued in the least, I was sitting down when they came and took me.

Q. (To Sawyer.) Are you sure that you never lost sight of him after you pursued him? - A. I am sure.

Q. You saw him fling the bundle away? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-12

13. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. a pair of plated buckles, value 6 d. and a pair of shoes value 1 s. the property of Edward Gunnel , in the dwelling-house of William Hart .

EDWARD GUNNEL sworn. Q. Where did you lodge on the 17th of March last? - A. In James-street near Old-street ; on the first night I lodged there, I lost my property.

Q. You slept by yourself? - A. The prisoner might come to bed, but I did not know it, I only paid for half a bed.

Q. When you went to bed had you your watch? - A. Yes, it was a silver watch with one seal and a ribbon; I went to bed between 9 and 10 o'clock.

Q. When you went to bed, where did you put your watch? - A. I pulled my stockings off, and laid them on the table, and put my watch on them; I awoke about 6 o'clock in the morning, I found nobody in bed with me.

Q. Was there any mark of any body having been in bed with you? - A. No.

Q. Did you see your watch? - A. No, I never saw it after I pulled it out of my pocket.

Q. Your watch did not lay upon your stockings? - A. No, it was gone, and my stockings and my shoes and buckles.

Q. What do you think might be the value of your watch? - A. Three guineas, I gave for it when I bought it of one of my brother's who enlisted in the Scotch Greys, I bought it three months before I came to town.

Q. What were your stockings worth? - A. Two shillings and six-pence.

Q. What do you thing your shoes and buckles might be worth? - A. About 9 s. I never found my stockings nor shoes again.

ELIZABETH HART sworn. - I live at No. 19 James's-street, Old-street, in the parish of St. Luke's; my husband's name is William Hart , he is a brewer's servant.

Q. You remember that poor young man coming to lodge in your house? - A. Yes, he came on the 16th of March, and slept there on that night; he was to have half a bed, he was to have William James to sleep with him.

Q. Look at William James the prisoner at the bar; had he ever slept at your house? - A. Yes, he had lodged three weeks with me before.

Q. Do you know in point of fact whether he ever slept with Gunnell? - A. We came home after twelve o'clock at night; he told me he could not pay his lodging that night, he would pay me the next week; I gave him a light, and he went up stairs into his bed room.

Q. Did you see him go into his bed room? - A. I slept in the room under him; I heard him go into the bed room; I locked the door and fastened it with two bolts, and went up to bed; my husband was in bed before he came home.

Q. In the morning who was the first up in the house? - A. William Gunnel came down about six o'clock to our room door, and asked if any body had slept with him; I told my husband James had come home; we got up, and we all came down stairs and found the door only on the spring lock, it was not bolted; I am sure that I had bolted it on the over night; I had only put the spring lock too, I had not put the key in.

Q. James did not pay you of course; how many nights did he owe you for his lodging? - A. One week. I did not hear of him till the 8th of November, and on the 9th of November I saw him at the Worship-street office; he was then in custody. I produce a pair of old shoes and a waistcoat which were left in the room; Gunnell wore the shoes to his brother's house in the morning he missed his shoes, which is a few doors off, and then he returned them to me; I have had them ever since Gunnel found them in his room..

Q. (To Gunnel.) When you got up in the morning did you find any shoes in the room? - A. I found this pair of shoes, they had some pieces which had been torn off the red waistcoat in them for socks; I put them on to go to my brother's, having lost my own shoes; when I returned I gave them to Mrs. Hart, I found them at the foot of the bed that morning.

Q. (To Hart.) Can you say who them shoes belonged to? - A. They belonged either to Gunnel or the prisoner. There was no other person in the room; they are not my husband's shoes I am sure. The socks that are in the shoes are pieces that were torn off this red waistcoat, which James the prisoner wore when he first lodged with me; I found the waistcoat in James's room.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very innocent of all this laid against me; I know nothing of the affair.

GUILTY - of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-13

14. JOHN IVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , five sacks, value 10 s. and eleven bushels of wheat, value 3 l. the property of John Shephard Killock .

JOHN STEARNE sworn. - Q. Do you know Mr. Killock? - A. No, I am a sworn metre; I loaded a certain quantity of corn in the barge inside of Iron Gate, Tower Hill.

Q. How much corn did you put in the barge? - A. Thirty-three quarters and four bushels of wheat. At Horslydown I put in the barge forty-two quarters, and two bushels, which I delivered into the care of the bargemen Simon Brown , and another; I am not certain of the prisoner at the bar, it was to Simon Brown and another, I delivered the corn on the 24th of October.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a sworn metre.

Q. Do you remember helping to load this barge? - A. I put eight quarters of wheat in for Mr. Killock; I delivered the corn in the barge on the 25th.

JOHN SHEPHARD KILLOCK sworn. - Q. You have heard of the delivery of these parcels of wheat? - A. I purchased it of Messrs Stonard and Ryland, and of Messrs Giles and Hinnings.

Q. You did not see it put on board the barge? - A. No, I keep a barge to bring it from the River Thames to Hackney Mills. I employed Simon Brown and John Ives , the prisoner at the bar, and this boy, they were in the barge.

Q. Where was this corn to be delivered to you? - A. At Hackney Mills, Lee Bridge.

Q. When did your barge come up to your house? - A. It should have come up on Friday night the 25th.

Q. It comes by Bow Creek, does it? - A. It comes up sometimes by Bow Creek, and sometimes Limehouse way, there are two ways.

Q. Do you know the course the bargemen took at this time? - A. I believe it was by Bow Creek; they ought to have come to me on the 25th, but they did not come till between 9 and 10 o'clock on the 26th.

Q. Was any of the corn delivered out of the barge at your house? - A. The corn was unloaded from the barge.

Q. I suppose the corn is usually lodged in the hull of the barge, and the cabin is for other purposes? - A. The cabin is for the purpose of lying down in, and for them to dine in.

Q. When they arrived the corn was delivered to you, was it? - A. I was not present the whole time, I was at home; I placed my young man William Barnes to attend the delivery.

WILLIAM BARNES sworn. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Killock at Hackney Mills? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 26th of October last, do you remember the delivery of some corn at your master's. - A. I was present when it was delivered from the barge.

Q. How much was delivered? - A. One hundred and eighty-three quarters and six bushels, according to the metre's bills, and that was the quantity that we expected.

Q. In point of fact how much was delivered? - A. I told the sacks, and the sacks were right according to the complement; to the best of my belief and knowledge they were right.

Q. Of course you did not measure the contents of each sack? - A. I did not.

Q. How many sacks there was you cannot tell? - A. Two sacks make a quarter; double of that number were in sacks.

Q. Did you perceive any missing at that time? - A. No.

Q. Was it ever measured afterwards? - A. Some of the sacks were in my presence, they were not deficient.

Q. How did you find out that there was a deficiency in the whole? - A. I did not find out that there was any deficiency.

Q. How did you find out that the whole was not delivered? - A. I cannot swear that they were not delivered; twenty people may come on the stage and I not see them; and while the bargemen were coming up and down, they might have replaced sacks without my seeing it, there are so many.

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge that there was any deficiency? - A. No.

Q. (To John Shephard Killock .) You expected one hundred and eighty-three quarters and six bushels? - A. I did.

Q. Did you know yourself what was delivered to you? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How did you find out that there was any deficiency? - A. On the day the barge was unloaded, I had sent my barge to his Majesty's yard at Deptford. On searching the cabin, the sacks were found in the cabin.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you see it yourself? - A. I did not.

Court. The fact is so.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. Q. You was employed with Ives and a person of the name of Brown? - A. Yes.

Q. Brown was a relation of yours, was not he? - A. Yes, my uncle; I was at Horslydown when I saw him take it in; we went from Horslydown to Bow Creek, and at night we went to Upper Homerton , and stopped there all night.

Q. Was it usual for you to stop at Homerton. - A. I frequently used to stop there. We got up in the morning, and then went to Mr. Killock's mill.

Q. Did you see the corn in the barge in the sacks? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see either Brown or Ives take either of these sacks? - A. I saw them take two, and put them in the cabin.

Q. Who did you see do it? - A. My uncle William Brown and the prisoner at the bar; I did not see them do any thing else but put them in the cabin; they took them out of the middle of the barge.

Q. Did you see them pour the corn from one sack to the other? - A. I did not.

Q. What did they do with them sacks that they carried into the cabin. - A. They put them into the bed place; they then put the boards and the bed over them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. I believe you was taken into custody before you gave any account? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been in the house of correction a good length of time yourself? - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. Our testimony rested upon this

boy; he was not committed; he has had an extra allowance; he was only put there that he might not be put out of the way.

Q. (To Brown.) When the officer came to the barge, you and your uncle were the only persons that were there? - A. Yes.

Q. Has any person been threatening to beat you if you do not give evidence upon this occasion? - A. No.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am a police officer: On the 26th of October I was applied to by Mr. Killock; in consequence of that I went to the dock, where I had information that an empty barge was going to Deptford to take in empty casks there. I went to Limehouse in company with Joseph Sheekenan , Mr. Killock's foreman, and from thence proceded to Deptford; about 8 o'clock at night we found the barge at Deptford, near the Victualling Office; we went with a view to apprehend Ives and Brown only; we did not expect to meet with any thing, we went on board, and Simon Brown began to converse with Mr. Killock's man.

Q. Was Ives there? - A. No he was just gone on shore. Mr. Killock's man went into the bed place and searched for Ives; we went there to take him; during the time we were searching for Ives, Simon Brown made off by means of another barge; it being dark, we could not get hold of him there. We found eleven bushels of wheat and six sacks; and five of the sacks has Mr. Killock's name on them; we detained the boy, and put him and the wheat and the sacks into our boat; I went instantly and apprehended Ives, where he was on shore, and put him in the boat also; he had left word where he was, the boy went with us and shewed us where he was. The boy instantly told me the same story as he has your lordship.

Q. This going to Deptford was not in course upon Mr. Killock's business? - A. Yes, it was, he supplies the Victualling Office with flour. I produce the sacks and a sample of the wheat.

(The sacks indentified by the Prosecutor.)

Q. (To Prosecutor.) It is the river Lee, whether you pass by Bow Creek or Limehouse; is it a navigable river that your barge came along the cut from Upper Homerton; Did your barge come along that cut? - A. There is no other way, that is the only navigable part.

Q. (To Brown.) Where did you see your uncle convey these sacks into the bed place? - A. Opposite Homerton.

Q. (To Prosecutor) How do you account that the whole quantity that you expected should be delivered at your house, and yet they should have these sacks? - A. My people not having suspicions of these bargemen, being in the habit of coming up and down every day, they might have placed them there.

Q. What is the value of these six sacks of wheat? - A. Between three and four pounds.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - of stealing to the value of 39 s. aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-14

15. JAMES BOWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d. of October two sacks, value 4 s. the property of John Shephard Killock .

GEORGE HARRIS sworn. - I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 22d of October last I had information that he had some stolen property in his premises, and found eight sacks in the cellar; we took the sacks to Shadwell Office; two of the sacks proved to be Mr. Killock's. On Friday the 25th we apprehended him and took him before the magistrate.

Q. Did he say any thing how he came by them? - A. No.

Q. How did you find that these two sacks belodged to Mr. Killock? - A. There was a person with us that knew Mr. Killock and knew them to be his property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. This man keeps a chandler's shop, and deals in corn ? - A. Not that I know.

Prisoner. I do, I sell by commission.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Do you know when you lost these sacks? - A. I cannot tell.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing about these sacks? - A. I know no more than that he had one sack on Sunday.

Q. Who had? - A. Bowler had one sack; it is a long time ago.

Q. Do you know how he came by it? - A. Simon Brown carried it out of the barge.

Q. You remember seeing Simon Brown take a sack of corn, did not he? - A. Yes, it is some weeks ago, he carried it into a cart.

Q. Into whose cart? - A. I do not know whose cart it was.

Q. Did you see Bowler there? - A. Yes, Bowler was standing against the horse.

Q. Where did Browne take the sack from? - A. Out of Mr. Killock's barge at the New Cut, Limehouse .

Q. Do you recollect how long it was ago? A. No.

Q. Was it a month or five weeks ago? - A. Longer.

Q. Was it three months ago? - A. I believe it was.

Q. How far was Bowler standing from the horse? - A. Five or six yards.

Q. Who helped Simon to put it in the cart? - A. Ives.

Q. Did Bowler help him? - A. No.

Q. When it was put in the cart what was done with the cart? - A. It went on.

Q. Who drove the cart? - A. Bowler I believe.

Q. Ives and Brown went back to the barge, did not they? - A. Yes.

Q. Then I suppose if Bowler did not drive the cart away, there was nobody with the cart; did you see any body drive the cart away but him? - A. No.

Q. The cart drove away out of sight did it? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where Bowler lived? - A. - A. No.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Q. When was these sacks first shewn to Mr. Killock? - A. The next day after we seized them, I wrote a letter to Mr. Killock, and told him, that we had found such sacks. Mr. Killock came the next day to the office.

Q. When you shewed him the sacks he knew them immediately? - A. Yes, and Mr. Killock's man also swore to them.

(The sacks produced and identified by Mr. Killock.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing one sack, aged 45. -

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-15

16. SARAH POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of November , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of James Campbell .

JAMES CAMPBELL sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a journeyman tailor .

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know her? - A. I remember meeting with her at the end of Panton-street in the Haymarket , on the morning of the 17th of November, about a quarter past one.

Q. You had been drinking, I suppose? - A. I had been working very late that night; I had been drinking a little that night at a public-house.

Q. How much had you drank. - A. I might have drank three or four glasses of spirits, and a pint or two of porter; it took a little effect of me.

Q. Did you say two pints of porter, or only one? - A. Two, I believe, I cannot exactly say.

Q. You met this girl in the street; where did you go? - A. I was not talking with this girl, I was talking with two other women; she picked me up; she catched hold of my arm just as I was wishing these women good night; they were all three strangers to me; she told me to come away from these girls, for they only wanted to rob me of my bundle which I had.

Q. What did your bundle contain? - A. There was this great-coat, and a new flannel waiscoat belonging to my master Mr. Bagg.

Q. How was this great coat delivered into your care; did you take it away from your master, or did he give you charge of it? - A. I was to take it home and repair it for him at my lodgings, because we had not time to repair it on Saturday night; after I had repaired it, I was to take it to a gentleman who owned it, Mr. Kenoll, a gentleman in Poland-street.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-16

17. FRANCIS BELL was indicted for feloloniously stealing on the 3d of November , a silver table spoon value 10 s, a silver desert spoon value 5 s, and a table cloth value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Ferdinand Medina .

JAMES BELL sworn. I live with Mr. Medina, Woburn Place . On the 3d of November, about 7 o'clock, I was cleaning my plate in the pantry adjoining the kitchen; the housemaid, who was in the front parlour, heard a noise in the street; she looked out of the window and saw a boy going up the steps; it was the prisoner at the bar. She asked me if I saw any body come in; I said I did not; I had seen the desert spoon a few minutes before, I looked for it and it was missing; I ran after the prisoner at the bar as fast as I could; he went into Russel-square; I called out Stop Thief; he was stopped by a young man, he threw the desert spoon down first, and the table spoon and the table cloth next; I came up to him and took him; I produce them; they are the property of my master, Mr. Ferdinand Medina.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys in Russel-square coming along; one of them that cried Stop Thief, chucked the property behind me, and that gentleman took me; now he says he saw me chuck them away myself.

GUILTY - aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-17

18. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of November , two cheeses, value 12 s. the property of William Hudson .

WILLIAM MAN sworn. I am a servant of

William Hudson , a cheesemonger , No. 17, Castle-street, Leicester-fields .

Q. Did you loose any cheeses at any time? - A. Yes, on the 13th of November, about 8 o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that day? - A. I saw him take the cheese out of the shop.

Q. Had you seen him about the shop before? - A. Yes, I had moved them away four different times, as he had tried to get them four different times; they were about a yard and a quarter within side of the door; when he took them, I pursued him, I overtook him in about twenty yards, and took him with the cheese; I produce the cheese; they are worth 12 s. He was a servant in livery when I took him.

GUILTY - aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-18

19. ELIZABETH DIXON, alias O'HARA , was indicted for feloniously and privily stealing from the person of John Tickell , on the 6th of November , a guinea, four shillings, and a six-pence, two Bank of England notes, value 40 l. each, a Bank note value 30 l. a Bank note value 20 l. a Bank note value 10, two Bank notes value 2 l each, and twelve notes value 1 l each, the property of the said John Tickell .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

JOHN TICKELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I am a warehouseman , I live in Wood-street. On the 6th of November I was going from town to Islington; I overtook the prisoner, she was going slowly; I asked which way she was going; she said she was going to Holborn? I told her that was not the road to go, I would shew her the way.

Q. What time of the night was this? - A. Between 8 and 9 o'clock.

Q. At the time you met the prisoner what money had you about you? - A. I had 156 l. in Bank of England notes, one guinea, some silver, and Sadler's Wells admission tickets.

Q. When you said you would shew her the way, where did you go? - A. She seemed to be cold; I asked her if she would drink any thing with me; we then went to the door way of the public house, at the sign of the Lady Owen's Head or Arms, at the upper end of Goswell-street road near to Islington; I just stood in the door way.

Q. What did you drink there? - A. A quartern of gin; I just sipped and tasted it; she drank the whole; after she came out of the house, she said I will take you to a nice place; she took me across the end of the City Road , from thence we went a little way into a field by the river side, near three new-built houses; she took me down by the side of the wall, some distance; she sat herself down, and laid hold of my coat, and in some measure pulled me down.

Q. Did she set down on the ground? - A. - Yes.

Q. Was she at all in liquor? - A. I could not discern that.

Q. Were you in liquor? - A. I was a little in liquor. After she laid hold of my coat, she pulled me down; in consequence of that I fell on my backside on the side of the bank, and when I was down she threw her body over me, and there, when I was laying on my back, and she upon me, she undid my small-clothes and robbed me.

Q. Did you feel her rob you? - A. I did.

Q. What do you mean by undoing your small clothes? - A. The whole part of my small clothes was undone by her.

Q. When had you last felt the money and notes in your pocket? - A. When I went into the public house.

Q. Was all the money in one pocket? - No, I put the Bank notes in my right hand fob, and the guinea and silver and tickets in my left hand pocket.

Q. Did you loose the guinea? - A. I did.

Q. In short she picked every pocket? - A. No, not every pocket.

Q. Every pocket where there was money? - A. Yes.

Q. Were your Bank notes in a purse? - A. No, they were folded up in a lump.

Q. Were they your own? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do upon discovering that she had robbed you? - A. I got up that instant and seized her, and told her that she had robbed me, she denied it, struggled, and wanted to get away.

Q. I believe you afterwards took her to the watchhouse? - A. Yes, there was a very slight search; she resisted very much, and would not be searched; a woman was called in, but she would not search her, nor did not search her. After which, I went into the place where she committed the robbery, with one or two of the watchmen, and a constable or a patrole; I do not know which it was.

Q. You found nothing upon her there? - A. No, we searched the place where the robbery was committed, and one six-pence was laying on the spot.

Q. I believe you attended again the next morning? - A. Yes, I was dissatisfied with that search; I got Carter the constable, and she was searched again, but nothing was found upon her but some trifle.

Q. Were there any thing found upon her at all belonging to you? - A. No.

Q. Did you find any of the cash or bank notes upon her? - A. No.

Q. You said you was intoxicated; where had you dined that day? - A. At the White-hart, St. Anne's-lane. We had three bottles of wine and some brandy and water; after I had returned from searching the field, during the time I was in the watch-house, I had put into my pocket this identical packet; they are Sadler's Wells tickets, and some bills I had besides.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. You had never seen this girl before this night when you had gone in the field with her? - A. No.

Q. After you had been on the ground you called a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you call a watchman and desire the woman to walk before you? - A. Yes; I was very particular to see that she did not throw any thing away, being confident that she had the property.

Q. Did not she walk before you by the light of a watchman's lanthorn, because she should not throw any thing away? - A. I cannot tell the motive; generally speaking, I made use of every observation.

Q. Did not the woman carry the lanthorn a part of the way? - A. I did not see any thing of the kind.

Q. There was a watchman with her carrying a lanthorn? - A. Yes, the woman refused to be searched at the watch-house.

Q. How many watchmen were there at the watch-house? - A. There were several.

Q. I should have thought the more she refused the more you would have been for searching her; did not they take up her petticoats? - A. The next morning that was.

Q. I take it for granted that she was not at the watch-house all night? - I cannot say, I was not there? - Q. You left her in the custody of the watchman, when you went to the field? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came back, you found her in the same custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Were her pockets searched on the first search? - A. Yes, that was all that was searched.

Q. Nothing that belonged to you was discovered at that time? - A. Nothing but the tickets.

Q. Nothing discovered but these tickets, which you found in your left coat pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you positively say that the tickets (they are cards you know) were not in your coat pocket in the course of the day? - A. No, I will swear that they were in my left-hand breeches pocket.

Q. They are clumsy things to carry in that pocket. I will positively swear that they were in my left-hand breeches pocket.

Q. When you returned from the field did not you find several watchmen there as well as the the girl? - A. I do not know.

Q. There was Franklin there? - A. Yes.

Q. And Carter was there? - A. I do not know that Carter was or was not.

THOMAS FRANKLIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you are head-borough of Islington parish? - A. Yes. On the 6th of November two watchmen and Mr. Tickell brought the prisoner to the watch-house; Mr. Tickell said she had robbed him of banknotes to the amount of 150 l. and upwards; I took the prisoner's pelisse and gown off, and turned them inside out; I took the clothes all off but her shift; Mr. Tickell wanted to have her searched so as I did not chose to do it; a woman was sent for, and she refused to do it. The prosecutor still insisted to have her searched in that manner.

Q. What manner? - A. By searching her private parts; he wanted to do it himself; she said if he offered to do such a thing she would knock him down; but if it must be so, she said I seemed to be a good kind of a man, I might do it, and I did do it. I pulled her shoes and stockings off, I found nothing in them.

Q. Did not you search her as you do all people when you are searching for property? - A. Upon my word I searched her as though it was for my own property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-19

20. HARRIOT TODD and ELIZABETH TODD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of November a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Morris , in the dwelling house of Mary Webb .

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - Q. What are you? - Q. I have been to sea for this twelve years.

Q. In what capacity? - A. As ship's steward ; the last two years in the East India service: On the 7th of November I was returning from Harley-street to my lodging in Bethnal-green; at the bottom of Oxford-street I met a young woman.

Q. Look at the prisoners; is it either of them? - A. I do not know either of the prisoners, I met a young woman, I agreed to stop with her all night; she took me to No. 35, Dyot-street, St. Giles's ; when I went into the house, I asked for a bed, I was shewn to a room by Mrs. Webb, the mistress of the house; I went to bed with this young woman that I picked up; I put my my watch on the table with my clothes.

Q. What sort of a watch was it? - A. A silver watch, it was made for me with my name on it.

Q. What may be the value of it? - A. Five guineas I gave to the maker of it about Christmas last; I went to sleep with the young woman, I got up to see what o'clock it was. I found by the light of the moon that came to the window it was five o'clock.

Q. When you went to bed, you was not at all in liquor? A. - I was not, I was returning from a friend in Harley-street, I am certain he would not let me go out of the house in liquor; after this I went to bed again.

Q. Was the girl in bed? - A. The girl was in bed with me, I slept till day light; I went to get my watch to look what o'clock it was, my watch was gone, the girl was still in bed.

Q. I want to know when you went to bed how you fastened the room? - A. When I had undressed myself, and put my clothes on the table, I went in order to fasten the door, finding there was no lock to the door I took the precaution of fastening the door with my garters.

Q. This girl was still in bed when you got up in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the bed room door opened? A. When I got up and missed my watch, the garters were cut, they might have been cut on the outside because the door did not shut exactly close; when I found I had lost my watch, I called for the mistress of the house, I told her that I had lost my watch between the hours of five and seven in the morning; this was on Friday the 8th of November: On the Monday I came again to the house where I had lost my watch; I asked Mrs. Webb, if she had heard any thing of my watch; in consequence of her information, I went to Bow-street; on Tuesday I saw the watch at Hatton-garden office, where the prisoners were committed.

Q. You know it to be your watch? - A. It is my own, I am sure of it.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Liquorpond-street; I produce the watch. On the 8th of November, the prisoner Harriet Todd , came to my shop a little after eight o'clock in the morning, as soon as the shop was opened, she offered to pledge this watch; I asked her whose it was and how she came by it, she told me that it was her brother's watch, that he was on board the Zealand, a King's ship, lying at the Nore, that she received it on the night before from a shipmate of her brother's of the name of James Ford , that she was to pledge it to buy her some necessaries, that she wanted to go down to see him; I asked her where she lived, she said she lived at No. 8, Gray's Inn-lane. I told her that I thought she had got it in some dishonest way. that I should go into the next shop to see if I could find if it was advertised; I went out and got an officer to take her into custody.

Q. You got an officer, and took both into custody? - A. I did; when I went to the officer, I observed Elizabeth Todd , she was standing about the window. I supposed from seeing her in that situation that she belonged to the person inside of my shop; I told the officer whom I supposed had stole the watch, and that there was another person lurking about the door; I desired him to lay hold of her and bring her into the shop; he did as I desired him, he brought her in; I put Harriet Todd on one side by the street door, and Elizabeth on the other; I asked her whether she knew any thing of that person, she said it was her sister; I asked her if she lived with her sister, she said she did; I asked her where they lodged, she said No. 11, the other had said No. 8; I asked her if she knew any thing about this watch, she said it was her brother's watch, and it was given to her sister last night, by a young man, that came from her brother; I thought it prudent to take them in custody.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Where does the ship lay that you belong to? - A. At Deptford.

Q. Do you remember seeing any other young woman in the house while you was there? - A. I did not see a person besides Mrs. Webb and the girl that slept with me.

Q. Had your ship lain at the Nore any time? - A. No.

- WEBB sworn. Q. You keep the lodging-house in Dyot-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the two prisoners at the bar, do you know them? - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 7th of September last, did they sleep at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. They are sisters? - A. Yes, as they told me.

Q. Where did they sleep in your house? - A. In the adjoining room to where this gentleman slept; I slept in the room with them myself in another bed.

Q. What other lodgers had you in your house that night? - A. I believe I had three women in the house.

Q. Any man besides Morris? - A. I am certain there was not.

Q. What time did you go to bed? - A. The house was not shut up all night.

Q. Do you mean that your street-door was open all night long? - A. Yes; but there was a woman up all night long to watch it. I went to bed at three o'clock.

Q. When you went to bed there was only

you, and the women which I have described, and Morris? - A. No.

Q. If lodgers came in, did the woman let them sleep in the house, or were you called up? - A. I am called up.

Q. Are you a single woman? - A. I am a widow.

Q. You was not that night called up after three o'clock in the morning? - A. I was not till I was awakened by the alarm of this gentleman's watch.

Q. You did not get up till then? - A. No.

Q. You did not hear the prisoners get up? - A. I did; I heard Elizabeth first get up; as near as I can tell, it was half past six o'clock, it was just growing light.

Q. How came you to hear her get up? - A. I had been very ill all night; I asked her to bring me some water up stairs, which she did.

Q. Having been ill all night you hardly slept did you. - A. Very little.

Q. If any body had got up in the night you must have heard them? - A. I am sure I must. On her returning with the water, she said it rained; she said she could not go out.

Q. Harriet the other girl was still in bed then? - A. Yes; when she said it rained so hard that she could not go out, she whispered to her sister; the other immediately got up; she said she would go where she knew she could get some money; Harriet said that.

Q. Was Harriet awake when Elizabeth came up to you? - A. Yes, she got up and went out; Elizabeth stopped; I being tired, fell asleep; I then heard nor saw any more of them; when I awoke they were both gone; I heard nothing more till I was alarmed by this gentleman.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Harriet Todd 's Defence. I left Mrs. Webb between the hours of six and seven o'clock in the morning; going down Dyot-street, I met with a young man; he asked me if I had a place I could take him to; I told him I had not; I mentioned to him about my brother's being on board a ship; he said he knew it very well; he gave me this watch to pledge, and I was to meet him at the corner of Gray's-inn gate; going into Mr. Page's, the watch was taken from me.

Q. Was this young man a sailor? - A. I suppose so; he mentioned the name of my brother's ship.

Q. What was the name? - A. The Zealand.

Elizabeth Todd 's Defence. I know nothing about it further than my sister told me to stop at the pawnbroker's till she come out, and Mr. Page took me up.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character.

HARRIET TODD , aged 21.

ELIZABETH TODD , aged 17.

GUILTY - of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Reference Number: t18051204-20

21. WILLIAM GROSS and WILLIAM SMITH GROSS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , one sheet value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Riggs the elder ; eight shirts, value 50 s. 7 handkerchiefs, value 7 s. a pair of silk stockings value 6 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. the property of John Riggs the younger , a gown value 2 s. petticoat, value 1 s. and a cloak, value 2 s. the property of Ann Eastess , in the dwelling house of John Riggs the elder .

JOHN RIGGS jun. - Q. You know the boy William Smith Gross ? - A. Yes, he lived with me at different times from seven to nine years; I am a shoemaker , he was not my apprentice; William Gross is his father. The father had lodged at my house, but not at the present time.

Q. On the 20th of November last do you remember having a box in your custody? - A. Yes, it stood by the side of my bed upon another box above stairs, I had seen it in the morning when I got up.

Q. Tell me the contents of it? - A. There was eight linen shirts, value 2 l. 10 s, four muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. they are half neck handkerchiefs, three coloured handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. and one pair of black silk stockings, value 6 s. and two white pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; that property belonged to me.

Q. What other property were there? - A. There was a sheet of my father's worth two shillings and six pence, a gown of Ann Eastless , two shillings, a petticoat, one shillling, and a silk cloak, two shillings.

Q. When do you say he took this box. - A. Between 6 and 7 o'clock in the evening on the 20th of November.

Q. Was William Smith Gross in your service at that time? - A. No, about a month before he was.

Q. Upon missing your box what did you do? - A. I went to all the pawnbrokers down Shoreditch, till I came to Mr. Davison the pawnbroker.

Q. Whereabouts is your house? - A. 144, Shoreditch.

Q. How far is that from your house? - A. It may be three quarters of a mile.

Q. Did you hear of any of your goods. - A. I saw the foreman in the shop folding up my shirts.

Q. Did you see any other of your property there? - A. Yes, another shirt and a cotton

handkerchief. I told the pawnbroker that was my property; he said the lad had just run out of the door that brought it in; Mr. Martin and me run out of the door after him; he had not pawned it, he had offered it to sell. When the lad saw me come in the shop, I suppose he ran out. Martin took the boy, but he was rescued from me by three women; I followed behind and took the prisoner William Gross, the father, with a bundle upon him of mine, tied up in a coloured handkerchief; I laid hold of him by the collar, and asked him what he had got there; he said it was his own property; I looked the man in the face and I knew him, and he trembled a great deal; then I said let me look at the bundle; he said you may, but it is my property; I looked at it, and saw that it was part of the property that I had lost; I took him back to Mr. Davidson's the pawnbroker, and gave charge of him to an officer.

MOSES MARTIN sworn. I occupy the front shop of Mr. Riggs, and an apartment up stairs.

Q. On the 20th of November last who was in that shop in the course of the day? - A. My wife and servant; I was out some part of that day.

Q. You know this bed-room where this box was taken? - A. Yes, the one pair of stairs; I sleep in the second pair of stairs, there is a passage to go up stairs; my shop is partitioned off.

Q. So that any body may go up stairs without being perceived by any body in the shop? - A. They might if there were nobody looking after them.

Q. Were you at home when this box was missed? - A. Yes, I had come in about five minutes after the box was missing; I went out with Mr. Riggs to the several pawnbrokers, and at last we came to Davidson's; Mr. Riggs went in there first, I followed him, and from what passed, I followed the boy William Smith Gross , and caught him; he was running on the pavement, and I run on the curb, because I would not be stopped by the people; when I called Stop Thief, then he walked; I overtook him; this was rather better than twenty minutes past eight; it was quite dark; I took him by the collar; says I, you are the thief, and you shall come along with me; the lad was coming very quietly, there was some women caught me by the neck behind, while two men stood in the front of me; they rescued him from me; the women almost choaked me, so that I could hardly see out of my eyes; the boy went off.

Q. How was the boy taken? - A. He was taken the same night; I saw him in custody in Spital-fields watch-house.

JOHN RIGGS senior, sworn. Q. Do you rent the house? - A. Yes, my son and I both live in one house.

Q. Do you remember this night, the 20th of November, when this box was missing? - A. I do, I went after the boy, I knew where he and his father lived; I watched about the place, I saw the boy as I thought going towards his father's house, but instead of going in he went past; I called out Stop thief, and he was taken, and I lodged him in the watch-house.

JOHN JUPP sworn. I am servant to Mr. Davidson, pawnbroker, Bishopsgate-street: On the night of the 20th of November, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock at night a boy came into our shop with two shirts, done up in an handkerchief, he asked me to lend him twelve shillings on them; I had opened one of the shirts and looked at it, Riggs the younger came in, and while I was looking at the shirt, he took hold of it and said it was his shirt.

Q. At that moment what became of the boy? - A. While I was speaking to him, he was gone. I do not know either of the prisoners at the bar. Riggs ran out of the shop after the boy; I saw Martin afterwards.

Q. (To Martin.) Did you see the shirts yourself? - A. I saw one as it was held up? I saw the boy run out of the shop as Riggs and Jupp were speaking together; I never lost sight of him till I took him.

ANN EASTESS sworn. Q. You live with Mr. Riggs? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of this box? - A. The box was there in the afternoon in the bed-room, I saw it between the hours of four and five.

HENRY PAAS sworn. I am servant to Mr. Clarke, Bishopsgate-street, a pawnbroker.

Q. Look at the prisoners, do you know their persons? - A. I think I do, I should not wish to swear positively to the lad; on the evening of the 20th of November, a few minutes before eight o'clock, a lad brought me two shirts to pledge, he told me they were his father's, and his father lived at No. 7, Duke-street.

Q. (To Riggs.) Does Gross the father keep a house in Dean-street? - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Where is the house you saw the boy? - A. Flower and Dean-street; it is near it.

Paas. I then lent him eleven shillings on them; I have had them in my custody ever since; I produce them. The prisoner William Smith Gross very much resembles the lad, he was very clean then, and more fresh-coloured in the face.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable. I apprehended Gross the father; on searching him, I found a watch, three half guineas, a seven-shilling piece, and two shillings; I returned the watch back to the prisoner, by the desire of the magistrate; I received the bundle I produce, from Mr. Riggs the younger; I have two shirts that I received from Mr. Jupp, Mr. Davidson's foreman.

RICHARD PHILIP HYAM sworn. - I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet, a silk cloak, a dark cotton gown, and a pocket handkerchief. On the 20th of November, between the hours of seven and eight o'clock, I received them of a lad.

Q. Was it the lad, the prisoner at the bar? - A. I am not positive; I asked him who they belonged to, he said they belonged to his father, who was a lodger in Bishopsgate-street.

JOHN FRENCH sworn. - I produce three shirts, and four handkerchiefs; they were brought to me on Wednesday evening, the 20th of Nov. by the senior prisoner, between six and seven o'clock, he asked me twenty-five shillings for these articles; he said they were his wife's brother, he had sent him with them, and they were marked with the initials of Thomas Reid , the person, he said they belonged to; I advanced him seventeen shillings and sixpence on them; they have been in my custody ever since. (The property identified by Mr. Riggs the elder. and the younger, and Ann Eastess .

William Gross the elder's Defence. On the 20th of November, between six and seven o'clock my lad left work, he was gone about an hour out; I was at tea; when he came back again I was up in the garret at work; he came up to me with a bundle, and told me he had found it; I questioned him several times where he had found it, he told me he found it down Whitechapel Road; and I thought the lad having found it, I could claim it as my property, I untied the bundle, I looked at the contents; one part I pledged, and the other I had in my hand when I was taken.

William Smith Gross the younger's Defence. I found them.

William Gross the elder called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

WILLIAM GROSS - NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMITH GROSS - GUILTY

of stealing to the value of 39 s. aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-21

22. JOHN LEONARD WHITE and JOHN RICHARDSON were indicted for, that they on the 23d of September , about the hour of two at night, unlawfully did break open and force from the hinges the window shutters fixed to the dwelling house of No. 36, Lamb's Conduit-street , with intent burglariously the goods and chattels, to steal and carry away, and the indictment further stated that the said John Leonard White and John Richardson , did then and there on the 23d of September at the same hour feloniously, willfully, and maliciously did make an assault upon William Randell , a subject of our Lord the King, in due execution of his duty; and that they with a certain sharp instrument did strike, cut, and wound him in and upon his head, with intent so doing, and by means thereof, to obstruct and resist the lawful apprehension and detaining of the said Leonard White and John Richardson ; for which afore-said offence, they were liable by law to be apprehended, imprisoned, and detained ; and several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

ELIZA RUSSEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are servant at No. 36 Lamb's Conduit-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you cook? - A. I am.

Q. Did you secure the shutters of the kitchen windows on the night of the 23d of September? - A. I will take my oath I did.

Q. They were secured below stairs in the area? - A. They were.

Q. At what time did you secure them. - A. It was rather later that evening than usual, it was about nine o'clock.

Q. At what time in the night was you alarmed? - A. About half past two o'clock.

Q. On your being alarmed did you go into the area with the watchman? - A. I went into the area.

Q. Was one man with you or more? - A. Three men went with me.

Q. How did you find the kitchen stairs? - A. One window shutter was entirely off, the sash was thrown up, and the shutter that was entirely off was leaning against the wall.

Q. The inside shutters were not open? - A. No, they were not.

Q. Did you look about the area, and did you find any thing there? - A. Not in the area I did not, but in the coal-cellar I found a dark lanthorn and a gimblet; the coal-cellar is in the area.

Q. You gave them to the watchman, I believe? - A. I did.

JOHN JACOBS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a watchman; you

was stationed at the time at the corner of Great Ormond-street? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 24th of September, did you hear any noise? - A. I heard a noise below me, at No. 36.

Q. At what hour? - A. Between two and three; it was half past two or more.

Q. Did you go to No. 36, upon hearing this noise? - A. I did.

Q. Did you look down the area? - A. I looked down the area; I observed the shutter wrenched, but the window shutter was then up.

Q. Did you call? - A. I called several times, but no answer was given; I called who is below, no reply was made.

Q. Upon that what did you do? - A. I stood towards the door, and then I sprang the rattle; I saw then a man was coming out of the area; upon my springing the rattle, he was striving to get over the rails, and I immediately tried to strike at him with my staff.

Q. Did you see more than that one man. - A. I saw another, there were two.

Q. At the time that you saw two, where did you see the other? - A. In the area, as the first was getting up.

Q. Did either of them say any thing? - A. They threatened to shoot me.

Q. Do not say they; what did either of them say? - A. They said shoot.

Q. Who did he really appear to you to be speaking to; did that person that said shoot appear to be speaking to the person that was getting out? - A. I believe so.

Q. Did the one who was getting over the rails first, and when you gave him a blow, did he get over the rails? - A. Yes, I tried to give him a stroke, and the stick slipped out of my hand, and he ran down New Ormond-street.

Q. Could you observe when they were both in the area, whether that one that got out and you pursued to New Ormond-street, was the tall one or the short one? - A. He was the shortest.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. It was the short man that got out; I cannot particularly swear to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. I believe at New Ormond-street you lost sight of him? - A. I did, as he turned down New Ormond-street.

Court. I suppose he ran away as fast as he could? - A. Yes, he ran away as fast as he could; I called after him Stop thief to the other watchman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. When did you first see the prisoner Richardson? - A. When I saw Richardson he was taken into custody by the other watchman.

Q. And how long was that after? - A. In a very few minutes.

Q. You say very honestly; you cannot say he is the man? - A. I cannot, it was extremely dark.

Court. Where was it that you saw him in custody. - A. I saw him just by No. 36; he was brought back to the house.

THOMAS LOVETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a bill sticker.

Q. You happened to be passing on the morning of the 24th of September last between the hours of two and three in the morning; did you observe the watchman at No. 36? - A. I heard him spring his rattle and call out for assistance; being near the opposite house, I ran over to his assistance as fast as I could.

Q. Did you observe any person besides the watchman? - A. I observed Richardson, the shortest of the two; I heard one person say, shoot him, as to Richarson; I never lost sight of him till he was apprehended.

Q. How near was he to No. 36, when you first saw him? - A. He was just going from the rails.

Q. Was there any person there besides? - A. I saw the watchman; there was only Jacobs the watchman and him; I heard the expression, Shoot him, shoot him, twice; I cannot say from whom it came.

Q. Did you pursue that man? - A. I ran after the watchman; the prisoner was first, the watchman was pursuing him; the prisoner made up towards a door about three or four doors on the right hand side, the watchman ran past him.

Q. Had you him in sight the whole time? - A. The whole time; the prisoner made a sharp turn round, and made towards Lamb's Conduit street again; I followed him into Lamb's Conduit street, and there I saw a watchman running from Red Lion street way towards me; his name is Morris; I called out to Morris to stop that man, that a house was broken open.

Q. You still saw that man? - A. He was never out of my sight; Morris was nearer to the prisoner Richardson than I was, he laid hold of him when I called out to him. Then I went and laid hold of the prisoner likewise, and he was secured.

Q. You are quite sure that the man Morris and you secured, was the man that run from the rails? - A. Yes, I never lost sight of him till I secured him; we took him to the door of the house No. 36 in Lamb's Conduit street where the rumour was that the house

was broken open, there I searched the man, and found this knife, some halfpence, and some tobacco.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. How near was Richardson taken from this No. 36? - A. As near as I can guess about forty or fifty yards.

Q. When you first came to No. 36 did you see one man or two? - A. I only saw Richardson, he ran from the rails, I never saw the other prisoner till I saw him at the Foundling watch-house, when the watchman was bleeding in a dreadful manner.

Q. You heard a cry of stop him, whence did that appear to come from? - A. It appeared to come from the area I thought, I cannot say it was from the outside of the area or within, I was then on the other side of the way, within four or five doors opposite.

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a watchman in Lamb's Conduit-street, the corner of Theobald's Road.

Q. Were you at Lamb's Conduit-street at the time the last witness has been speaking? - A. I apprehended him, and took him two doors within New Ormond-street, in Lamb's Conduit street; he was taken to the watch-house.

Q. After that did you look from No. 36 down towards the Foundling, and did you find any thing? - A. Yes, when I went and left John Richardson at the watch house.

Q. In consequence of what any person said, did you go and make search from the door, No. 36, down towards the Foundling. - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find? - A. This iron crow (witness shewing it); it laid in a puddle of water, and this part, (the bent part) was so much out of water in the channel.

Q. Any appearance of blood upon it, at the time you found it? - A. I did not look at it at the time I took it to the watchhouse. I did not think it a proper thing to carry about.

Q. Did you afterwards find any thing upon it? - A. Not till the next day, when it was brought before the magistrate.

Q. You left it with Mr. Spriggs? - A. I did. Here is a green bag I afterwards picked up.

Court. Did you perceive any thing upon the iron crow when you picked it up? - A. I have no recollection that I did in my mind; the next day the magistrate saw some blood on it, and I saw some blood on it; and there is the appearance of blood on it now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. Who did you deliver it to? - A. To Mr. Spriggs the watch-house keeper.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are watch-house keeper? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that crow delivered into your keeping by the last witness? - A. It was shortly after it was brought in: it was delivered by Morris to me; soon after the prisoner was brought in, I told him to go and make his observations.

Q. You sent him out to search? - A. I did.

Q. Did you take it the next day before the magistrate? - A. No, did not, I gave it to Lee the watchman, at the time he came off duty the next morning; it was in my keeping till I gave it to him; I did not observe any blood on it that night, I did the next day.

Q. Was it delivered to him in the same state as it was to you? - A. It was; prior to that I gave it to Lee the watchman, to see whether it fitted the marks on the shutters or windows.

EDWARD LEE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you receive that crow from the last witness? - A. I received the crow first from Morris in the morning; when he found it I took it the next morning, Mr. Spriggs gave it me.

Q. Did you find it fit any of the places that were broken there? - A. I found it exactly fitted, there was one shutter quite wrenched off.

Court. Q. You found it fitted exactly? - A. I put the shutter in the place as it should be, and then shut the other shutter too; it was a square hinge; I clapped the crow to the mark, under the lower part of the hinge, it fitted exactly both places; the frame of the window and the shutters; the crooked part fitted the place where the bolt was; it appeared to me that that was the instrument that went into it.

Q. After you had fitted it, what did you do with the crow? - A. I took the crow up to the magistrate at Hatton Garden.

Q. Did you take it in the same condition as it was given to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the blood was discovered upon it. - A. No, I took it to the magistrate the same as I had it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. Now all the time that you had it, did you discover any blood on it? - No, I did not observe it then.

Q. You had it a long time in day light to try it; have you seen many iron crows? - A. I never had seen one before of that sort, most of our country crows are long and straight.

Court. You say first of all you received the crow from Morris, and then you received it again of Spriggs? - A. I first received it about five o'clock of Morris, he found it then.

Q. When you received it of Morris about five o'clock, you returned it to him again? - A. Yes, I gave it to him, and told him he had better take it to the watch-house.

Q. (To Morris.) After you found the crow did you take it to the watch-house? - A. I did, I shewed it to Lee, and took it immediately from his hands, and carried it to Mr. Spriggs.

WILLIAM RANDELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a watchman at the corner of Caroline Place, Guildford-street? - A. Yes, it is near the bottom of Lamb's Conduit Street; it joins the Foundling wall, and it goes out from Gray's Inn lane road.

Q. At the time that the witnesses have been speaking of, did you hear the springing of the rattle from the watchman in Lamb's Conduit street? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon hearing of the rattle, did you go to No. 36? - A. I went strait away to No. 36.; I there saw John Leonard White coming over the area.

Q. The prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you speak to him? - A. Yes, I said, halloo, my friend, what are you about now? he said he was going to take a walk in the morning before the family was up, by that he jumped off the iron palisades, and gave me a blow on the head.

Q. Before he struck you on the head had you laid hold of him? - A. Yes, I had; with that we had a tustle, and the prisoner Leonard White drawed his hand behind him, and with that jumped up and cut me down; he lifted his arm violently up, and cut me down in this fashion. (Witness describing the manner.)

Q. Where did he strike you? - A. He cut me across my head.

Q. Had you that hat on which you now produce? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that cut through? - A. Yes, here is my shirt which I have got in my pocket, the hat was cut through, and my head was cut.

Court. Q. Was you knocked down? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did that produce an effusion of blood? - A. Yes, a great quantity.

Q. By knocking you down did he make his escape from you? - A. Yes he got from me and went from me a few yards, as far as Long-yard in Lamb's Conduit-street, going down towards the Foundling Hospital; he crossed from there over to the other side of the way, and there made a bit of a stop, but whether he dropped any thing, I cannot tell.

Q. Where was this that he made a bit of a stop; where this iron crow was found? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the iron crow found? - A. I saw John Morris pick it up.

Q. That was before he crossed to the Foundling side, was it? - A. Yes.

Q. Then after he made that bit of a stop, when he was the other side of the way, what did he do then? - A. He came back again to the same side of the way, towards the Foundling, and leaned against a post.

Q. How near was the post to the Foundling? - A. The post lay towards the end of the street.

Q. Then after he made a bit of a stop he crossed strait again to a post, and leaned over that post? - A. He did.

Q. Did you call to any person at that time? - A. Then I hallooed out Stop Thief, seeing some man coming.

Q. Did any person take him? - A. Yes, he might take him as he crossed over strait towards the Foundling.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him? - A. No more than I loose sight of you now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. Did this blow take your senses away and stun you. - A. No, it did not quite take it all away.

Court. Q. The blow did not take your senses away? - A. It did not.

Mr. Hart. Q. You fell, however, from the blow? - A. Yes, and the mark of the blow is on my head now.

Q. How far was this post that he was leaning over from No. 36, when he was apprehended? - A. About eight doors.

Q. Then White had got only to eight doors off; he had plenty of time to make his escape? - A. He had plenty of time, if he had a mind to it.

Q. Was it dark at this time? - A. It was not very dark, I could see him between the lights of the lamps, and the light of the morning.

Q. Did you know White before? - A. I never saw him before in my life.

Q. You received two blows? - A. Yes, the first blow was on the side of my head with his fist, the other was not.

Q. Did you see any thing that he had? - A. I cannot say that I did, there were something that came and cut me through my hat, which I felt was very heavy.

Q. That you did not see; did you hear any thing? - A. No, not particularly, what he had he drew from his pocket.

Q. Where you saw him stoop, how far was that? - A. About seven doors the contrary side of the way.

Q. He went first on the other side of the

way, and stooped, and then came back again, and leaned over a post, and there he was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I suppose the watchmen were coming from all quarters? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you see Hamet? - A. He was coming down Guildford-street, underneath the Foundling Wall.

Q. Had you ever represented that the blow did stun you? - A. It never did rightly stun me.

Q. My question is did you ever say so; did you ever give that account of it? - A. No.

HENRY HAMET sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Your stand is in Guildford-street? - A. Yes, at the corner of Landsdowne place in Guildford-street.

Q. At the time that the last witness has been speaking of, in consequence of hearing the springing of the rattle, did you come towards Lamb's Conduit street? - A. I fled under the shade of the Foundling wall.

Q. Did you observe Randell? - A. I did not, I observed hearing a man run, and then I observed him making a stop; before that I heard Randell halloo, Stop thief.

Court. Q. You had your lanthorn with you had not you? - A. No, I had not; I heard somebody running, and I heard Randell say, Stop thief; I stooped myself down to see what I could see between the lights of the lamps in the street; by that I saw Randell was coming up, and Leonard White came on the road in a sort of dog-trot, he came under the Foundling wall; I says, my friend, what does that man say over there. I saw him as I was under the Foundling wall.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you see him first of all leaning over the post? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you saw him after that coming towards the Foundling wall? - A. Yes.

Court. And then he came towards you? - A. Yes, and I said to him, my friend, what does that man say; the prisoner Leonard White said, he halloos Stop thief, and says he, there he runs over there; I took hold of him by the collar by the left hand, and I said here he runs, here he runs.

Q. You secured him? - A. Yes, at the same time Randell came up; Randell said that is the man that cut me I will swear; he took hold of him by the tail of the coat, and we led him away to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart.

Q. Do you know this house, No. 36.? - A. I know nothing at all about it.

Q. Do you know Lamb's Conduit-street? - A. Yes, but I have no business with it. I was under the Foundling wall and no other place.

Q. You stopped him when he came near you from the post? - A. Yes.

Q. Your stand is near that wall? - A. My stand is only across from the Foundling wall at Lansdowne place.

Q. White made no resistance to you, did he? - A. He twisted about and would have got away if he had it in his power; he says to me, why do you lay hold of me so fast, I am not the person; I says, if you be not guilty it will be so much the better for you; his twisting so to get from me, made me hold the faster: the man never resisted me any more than he would have got away if he could.

CHARLES DELARIDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a surgeon? - A. Yes?

Q. Was you called upon to attend this poor man, the watchman, on the morning of the 24th of September; and did you examine his head? - A. I did.

Q. And what did you find to be the state of his head? - A. He had a cut between two and three inches long on the left pericranium bone.

Q. Did it appear to be done by a sharp instrument? - A. It might have been a sharp instrument.

Q. Look at that crow, was that a sort of an instrument by which that wound might be inflicted? - A. Most assuredly.

Q. What penetration did it make? - A. It cut entirely into the scull, as near as possible through the integumentum of the head; the periosteum, I believe, was not penetrated.

Q. I believe I need not ask you, whether in wounds of the head, the hat would been a considerable protection? - A. Most assuredly the hat might have saved his life.

Court. Q. That depends entirely on the constitution of the person? - A. Most assuredly it depends on the constitution of the person at the time.

Richardson left his defence to his counsel.

White's Defence. My Lord, on the night before this happened, and on the following morning, I had been to Gray's Inn-lane smoaking a pipe and drinking ale; coming up Guildford-street, (it was a very dark night) I heard a cry of Stop Thief; a few minutes a man came running before me as I was leaning against the post; I looked round the other way, I saw a man whom I supposed to be a watchman, I called out watchman, he says halloo; I says there he goes; he says I shall stop you, I am entirely innocent of the charge.

WHITE - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 49.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-22

23. JOSEPH EASTWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of August , a silver table spoon, value 14 s. and three silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. the property of John Wiffin .

JOHN WIFFIN sworn. - I live at No. 39 Hertford-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 1st of August I was reading the newspaper at the Northumberland Arms, Grafton-street, Tottenham-court-road; during the time I was reading the paper the prisoner came in he asked me what news; I told him; with that we exchanged a few words together; he told me that he was a lieutenant in the navy; we drank together; I liked the appearance of him at that time; I asked him if he would come over and lunch with me: it being rather too late when he came, he dined with me; he came the next day and dined with me also; he gave me an invitation to come to the Aurora; he told me at that time that he was commandant and lieutenant of the Aurora which lay at Deptford; I promised him that I would do myself the honour of going and seeing him on board, that was the next day; I asked him to come and breakfast with me, previous to my going on board, he came and breakfasted with me.

Q. What day of the month was that? - A. I believe it was the 4th of August he breakfasted with me, and told me the cutter would be at Hungerford Stairs in the Strand, at such a time; we were rather too soon for the tide, and we went and took a walk; during the time that we were walking, he said we should have a very pleasant day to-day I dare say; he said I have been appointed to the Aurora, I am rather short, have you any plate you can lend me; I told the prisoner that I had one silver tablespoon and three silver tea-spoons, he should be welcome to them, and if they were not enough I could get more at my sister's.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a midshipman in the navy . He said that would be plenty; when we came to my apartments he began to think it was pretty near time that the cutter would be up, and the flood was pretty near done; he said he would go down by the ebb; I sent for some porter; I just went up stairs to put on a shirt and a coat, and came down again, in about five minutes afterwards the prisoner was absconded.

Q. Did he take any thing with him? - A. It struck me a little immediately of the impropriety of my inviting a stranger home; but previous to that I referred to the cupboard, and when I went to the cupboard the spoons were gone; three silver tea-spoons and a silver tablespoon.

Q. The table spoon and the three tea-spoons that you told him you would lend him? - A. Yes, but he took them without my lending them to him.

Q. How long was it before he went away that you had seen them? - A. About three-quarters of an hour; I had seen him while he was in the room, and can swear that they were in the room when I left him in the room alone. I goes down to Hungerford stairs to see if I could see or hear any thing of the Aurora cutter; when I got down there I was partly convinced she had never been there; I enquired of the watermen, they said the cutter had not been there, they knew nothing about her; then I gave it up. Last Monday week I was reading the paper at the Bromley Arms, and while I was sitting reading the paper, who should come in but the prisoner at the bar, with a woman, about eleven o'clock in the morning; he comes in; he was rather struck with astonishment; I says to him, how are you; pretty well, I thank you, says he; he leaves the woman that came into the room with him, and goes out into the passage, telling me he wanted to speak with me; well, he says to me, how have you been; I says, pretty well; how have you been, where is the spoons; come, says I, let us walk into the parlour; we went into the parlour again, both together; I just came out of the parlour to go to the bar to get the landlord to assist me in taking him to Bow-street; I had hardly got to the bar, he got hold of the parlour door, he was off in a minute; I asked the woman that followed him, if she knew any thing of that man; she said, what did I want with him; I said he is a thief, I dare say she is the same; I concluded in my own mind that he might hang out in the neighbourhood. On the 29th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, when I was going up Southampton place, I happened to see him in the middle of the road, I laid hold of him by the arm; I says to him you are a damned thief, with that I had him taken to Bow-street. When I laid hold of him he begged and prayed that I would mitigate the matter, and not take him to Bow-street; he said he had a mother that was not capable of getting her livelihood, that he was the whole support of her. I immediately replies, do you support her by going about robbing; he says no, then says I, are not you ashamed to abscond out of my room without bidding me good bye, and taking my spoons with you; he says, I am; I told him it did not signify for him to endeavour to prevail upon

me by what he was saying, I was determined to have him to Bow-street. I had him there before Mr. Bond; he was asked whether he was a lieutenant in the navy ; he said that he had been, but that he had been a smuggling lately.

Q. Have you ever found out who or what he was? - A. I understand that he has been a lieutenant five or six years ago.

Prisoner. I am on the list of lieutenants at this present moment; I commanded the Wolf gun-vessel, I could not pass my accounts; and the cause of my getting acquainted with this young man, he desired me to try to get the R off his name, which I did; I wrote to Mr. Mears for the express purpose of getting the R off his name; he is a runaway mishipman.

Court. Q. (To Prosecutor.) Is that true? - A. It is not, I belong to a gun-brig.

Prisoner's defence. After the first two meetings he asked me to come to his sister's house, which I did; he requested me to write to Mr. Mears, to get the R off his name; I wrote to Mr. Ramsden. I know no one single thing of the spoons. When I met him I asked him the charge he apprehended me for, he then told me that the R was taken off, and he was a midshipman to the Zealand at the Nore. It strikes me now that the R is not taken off his name, that he is a runaway midshipman. I am innocent.

Court. Q. (To Prosecutor.) Whether any part of the prisoner's story is true? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Is all the story that you have been telling true? - A. It is true every word.

GUILTY - aged 43.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-23

24. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November , a blanket, value 9 s. the property of Mary Robinson .

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. I am an officer of the Hatton Garden office. On the 9th of November, about half past six in the evening, I was going up Saffron Hill, I observed the prisoner on the opposite side of the street; me and my brother officer that was with me crossed the street; I asked the prisoner what he had got under his coat; what is that to you the answer was; I told him that we were officers, and we insisted on knowing; we felt under his coat, and found this blanket, which I produce; I asked him how he came by it; he said it was a comrade of his that gave it to him to sell; he had brought it from the continent; I then asked him where he was quartered; he told me that he was quartered at the prosecutrix's house in Charter-house-lane. I locked him up at our office, and then I went to the prosecutrix house to enquire about him. I asked him for the key of the door, but he did not give me the key of the door; I broke the door open, the door of his lodgings; the lady saw that the blanket was taken off her bed. When she came to the office, she swore to the blanket.

Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Is that your blanket? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; the prisoner was quartered at our house, it is one of the blankets that was on his bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very ill for very near a fortnight, and I was obliged to give all my pay to a soldier to do my duty. I did only take it to get a shilling or two till I got my pay. I did not mean to defraud her of it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - aged 25.

Confined One month in Newgate , and fined One Shillings .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Gross.

Reference Number: t18051204-24

25. WILLIAM MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of November , a wooden box, value 6 d. and 112 pounds of waste paper, value 2 l. the property of Richard Buttery .

RICHARD BUTTERY sworn. I keep the Black Bear inn, Picadilly .

1 Q. On the 19th of November last you had some goods at your door, and a chest that was going to Henly upon Thames to go by the waggon that evening; did you miss any of the parcels there? - A. The chest was taken away about seven o'clock at night. I had seen it at the door about a quarter of an hour before.

Q. What did it contain? - A. Waste paper.

Q. What might be the value of it? - A. Two pounds two shillings. I was informed that the chest was taken away, and my bookkeeper went after the prisoner.

JEREMIAH DEAN sworn. - Q. You are bookkeeper to Mr. Buttery? - A. I am; as I was attending to my business in the office, a lad that was standing at the door with a cart, ran into the office, and said, bookkeeper there is two men run away with the chest: I immediately pursued them.

Q. Did you see them? - A. Yes, I saw them carrying the chest.

Q. Were two or one man carrying it? - A. two, the prisoner at the bar and another man: I overtook them; I took the prisoner at the bar with the chest in his hand; he was carrying it with one hand on the side of the chest, and the other man on the other side. It was nearly opposite a public house in Piccadilly; I put the man and the chest in this public house, and I sent for my master, I kept the chest in this public house, till the constable came, and then I gave it him.

Q. You took the prisoner into custody I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the chest that you took from him? - A. Yes, I know it by my own name, that I wrote on if before I gave it to the constable.

Q. That chest was under your master's care, was it? - A. It was; it was booked at my masters warehouse, to go by Cook's Henly waggon.

Q. It was not put into the waggon? - A. no; the waggon was not come up to the door, we expected it every moment, it was put there for the purpose of being loaded in the waggon.

Prisoner. Q. I should like to know how long it was before the lad gave any information where the chest was taken away? - A. Immediately as you took it away the boy came in; it could not be above half a minute.

Q. At the time that I was fully committed, he said he apprehended me at the distance of about sixty yards? - A. I apprehended you on the pavement exactly opposite the public house.

Q. The box was placed in the public house passage; if the landlord was here he could testify; I pushed it as I was going in the door? - A. I took you as you was carrying it in your hand; it was not placed in the passage, I took you opposite, then I pushed you into the passage

Q. This chest was positively placed in the passage by two persons, they run away? - A. There was only one run away; you were carrying the chest with your left hand.

Court. Q. You are positive that you saw the prisoner at the bar actually with his hand upon carrying it? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. He says the distance was only sixty yards where I was apprehended, it was scarcely possible that he could see me carrying it, he being in the office when the boy run in and informed him.

Q. How far was it from where the boy told you that some body run away with it? - A. About sixty yards, I believe.

Prisoner. In the mean time he fell down by the way.

Q. Did you fall down? - A. I did fall down in pursuing him; I saw the prisoner at the bar before I fell down.

Prisoner. He made use of this expression, that he fell down and nearly split himself; he was all over mud.

Witness. I did fall down; I saw him before I fell down, and after I got up.

Prisoner. It was a foggy night, you could not see.

Witness. It was not foggy at all.

Court. Q. Whether foggy or not foggy, you are sure you saw the prisoner carrying the chest? - A. I am quite clear of that.

- LOVETT sworn. - I received the box the next morning of Mr. Dean; I have had it ever since.

NATHANIEL TERRY sworn. - I live at No. 3 in Tyler-street; I know that package very well; I packed it up and sent it by my fellow servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through Piccadilly, by the White Horse Cellar, I looked at this public house to see what time of night it was, this box was in the passage, and this box obstructed my way in; I believe the person that first told him, said it was a person in a drab coat, and that is why he laid hold of me.

GUILTY - aged 48.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-25

26. GEORGE NEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November , a pelisse trimmed with fur, value 30 s. the property of James Macock .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JAMES MACOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 64, Broad St. Giles .

Q. You keep a shop and carry on business on your own account? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, on the 30th of November, I saw him about a quarter before six, he came into my shop as I was standing at the further end, he looked round, when he had done so he went out and stood at one of my windows a minute, he returned again and laid hold of a pelisse, he gave it a severe pull, it did not come down the first pull, he instantaneously gave it another hard pull, it came down then, and he ran out of the shop with it.

Q. You gave the alarm? - A. My servant pursued him; I called out Stop thief; he was taken.

Q. You afterwards went to Bow-street that night? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the pelisse there? - A. I did, it was my pelisse.

Court. Q. Where abouts was this pelisse? - A. About a yard just within side of the door; it hung on a brass wire.

JAMES HEWSON sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley Q. Were you in the shop at the time the prisoner came in? - A. I was.

Q. Did you see him take the pelisse? - A. I did not.

Q. In consequence of an alarm from your master, did you pursue him? - A. I did, I overtook him about eight doors down Drury-lane; I had my eye on him all the while; I law him drop the pelisse; I took him to the

watch-house, and afterwards to Bow-street. I produce the pelisse, I have had it in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. It has my mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no reason to doubt what the gentleman says at all, I was intoxicated, I did not know what I was about, I had only come from the shop, and was going again. I have been the best part of my life at sea. I am very little acquainted with the town.

GUILTY - aged 24.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gross.

Reference Number: t18051204-26

27. JAMES CROWDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of November , a polishing mill, value 14 s. the property of John Meek ; and THOMAS WHITFIELD , for feloniously receiving the same mill on the same day .

JOHN MEEK sworn. I am a lipidary , I live in New Round-court in the Strand .

Q. Did you loose one of your polishing mill? - A. Yes, out of my shop; I missed it on the 17th of last month; I have not seen it since.

TIMOTHY STERNE sworn. I keep the Coach-maker's Arms, New Round-court in the Strand.

Q. What do you know about the polishing mill? - A. Mr. Meek came to me on Sunday morning, and told me that he had missed his polishing mill. On the same morning Meek and the constable went with me to the prisoner's father's house; I asked Young Crowder concerning taking a great coat and this polishing mill, he confessed to both; I told him if he would confess where the mill was I would redeem it; he told me the polishing mill was at Mr. Whitfield's, Crown-street, St. Giles. We went to Mr. Whitfield's shop, the constable asked him where the polishing mill was, he denied knowing any thing at all about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. I understood you to say that Whitfield's house was searched and nothing at all was found? - A. Nothing at all was found.

RICHARD LEWIS sworn. I am a constable.

Q. Do you remember going on Sunday morning to Crowder's father's? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the young man telling you where this mill was? - A. I do.

Q. You took him into custody, did you? - A. I did.

Q. Did you ever find the mill? - A. I never did.

Q. Nor nobody knows any thing of the mill? - A. No, only the witness for the crown.

JOHN MEANE sworn. I am a coach-maker's apprentice.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar Crowder? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent to prison? - A. No.

Q. What do you know about this polishing mill; you must tell every thing that you know? - A. I saw James Crowder have this polishing mill on Friday night the 15th of November.

Q. Did he tell you how he got it? - A. Yes, he said it was Mr. Meek's; we went to Mr. Whitfield's in Crown-street on the same night, and Crowder took the mill into Whitfield's house.

Q. How far is his house from Mr. Meek's? - A. About three quarters of a mile.

Q. What did you do with it there when you carried it to Whitfield's? - A. I did not go in, Crowder did.

Q. Crowder went in with the mill? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the mill of course? - A. Yes.

Q. It was such as he could carry himself? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he the mill with him when he came out again? - A. No.

Q. What did he say he had done with the mill? - A. He said he had sold it to Mr. Whitfield for three shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Of course what he said about Whitfield purchasing the mill, was not in the hearing of Whitfield? - A. No.

Court. Nor you did not see Whitfield? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. If I was to ask you whether you took the mill or he - now which of you took the mill, did you not take it from the prosecutor yourself, and carry it to Crowder, who was not there to a given place? - A. No, Crowder and I were together.

Q. When was it that you took it? - A. On Friday night.

Q. When did you go to him about selling it? - A. I waited in Crown-street.

Q. Did you go the same evening that you took it? - A. Yes, we took it both together.

Court. Q. (To Meek.) What might be the value of the polishing mill? - A. Fourteen shillings.

Q. There is no person that saw this mill on the premises of Whitfield? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Whitfield was admitted to bail by the magistrate, and surrendered to take his trial did not he? - A. Yes.

CROWDER, GUILTY - aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

WHITFIELD, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-27

28. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November , a goose, value 4 s. the property of George Allwright .

GEORGE ALLWRIGHT sworn. - I am a cheesemonger and poulterer . Last Saturday, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, took up a goose, and immediately went out; my boy saw her take the goose, I did not; I saw her come in and go out; she was brought back then; she had my goose in a basket, she acknowledged to having it, and begged me to let her go.

Q. Did she say how she came to take it? - A. She said she was very much in distress.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Holborn.

JOHN WEBB sworn. Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, did you ever see her before? - A. Yes, in my master's shop; I saw her last Saturday; she came in, and looked at a goose, and after having turned them over, she put one under her cloak, and went out of the shop with it, and went up a court, and put it in a basket; I followed her and brought her back to my master's shop; she wanted to beg pardon.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I was going up Holborn; I do not know whether I was coming by that shop or no; this young man followed me, and asked me what I had in my basket; I told him I had nothing at all belonging to him; I went back to his master's shop; his master could not swear to it; if I had been guilty I would not have gone back.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to the goose, I had so many; my boy saw her take it.

GUILTY - aged 57.

Whipped in gaol and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-28

29. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of November , a petticoat, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Burford .

WILLIAM POOLEY sworn. As I was crossing Oxford-street , I was coming from Portland Road, I saw the prisoner and another at Mr. Mr. Burford's shop.

Q. At what time of the night? - A. About half past five. I heard one say to the other, these things stand very easy to be taken away, now is the time to take them; the prisoner then jumped upon the thing at the door, and got the petticoat from the place where it hung; it hung in the door-way. I pursued the prisoner, took him, and then conveyed him and the petticoat to Marlborough-street office.

SAMUEL BURFORD sworn. Q. You look at that petticoat? - A. It is my petticoat, I know it by the similarity with the two others that were left; there were three only that hung up; this was taken when I went to the back shop.

Prisoner. I was going along Oxford-street; seeing these things hang out at the door, and being much distressed, I took it.

Q. Who was the other man that was with you? - A. He was a sea-faring man too; I was going on board the Winchelsea; this is the first time that ever I was brought in a court.

GUILTY - aged 26.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in goal .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-29

30. THOMAS SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October , an iron vice, value 5 s. a brass stamp, value 10 s. and seven pound weight of pewter, value 5 s. the property of John Elliot .

JOHN ELLIOT sworn. I am a jeweller ; I live in Wilderness Row, Goswell Street , the prisoner was journeyman to me.

Q. How long had he been journeyman to you? - A. About three weeks or a month; in the beginning of November I missed a cake of pewter, about seven or eight pounds weight? the prisoner went away from his work at that time; when he came I told him that we had missed the pewter, we had not missed the stamp till the morning he come to work; I asked him if he knew any thing of it, he said nothing; I told him I should send for an officer; I did; Thomas White came, he searched him, but found none of my property on him; he was taken before the magistrate at Hatton Garden; in the mean time I sent after these articles. I have not found the brass stamp nor the cake of pewter; I did not know I had missed the vice till it was produced by Mr. Hill the pawnbroker. I knew it to be mine.

THOMAS HILL sworn. I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 64, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell; I produce a vice, I took it in pawn of the prisoner at the bar; on the 24th of October.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. I am an officer of Hatton Garden; I was sent for by Mr. Elliot to take the prisoner in custody. He confessed before the magistrate that he had stole the vice, and he hoped the prosecutor would forgive him.

Mr. Elliot. It is my vice, I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had that vice in my possession four years.

GUILTY - aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-30

31. JANE BUTT, alias JANE BURT , was indicted that she, on the 8th of January, in the the thirty-eight year of his majesty's reign, at the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, did take to husband one John Butt , and to him was married, and that she afterwards, on the 25th of November, in the forty-fifth year of his majesty's reign , in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields , by the name of Jane Burt , and feloniously did take to husband one Jesse Kay , her former husband being then living .

The case was stated by Mr. Watson.

WILLIAM BUTT sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Mr. Watson of the Temple.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I am sorry to say I do.

Q. Were you present at the solemnizing of any marriage between John Butt and the prisoner? - A. On the 8th of January, 1798, I attended at St. George's church, Hanover Square. and saw them married solemnly. I witnessed the marriage.

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar the same person? - A. She is, she went by the name of Jane Russage .

Q. At that time she was married to John Butt ? - A. She was, they were married by banns.

- STANYAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Just turn to the register of 1798? - A. It appears that on the 8th of January 1798, that John Butt and Jane Russage , both of this parish, were married by one Thomas Joshua Crott . This marriage was solemnised in the presence of Sarah Butt and William Butt .

Q. You are clerk of St. George's, Hanover Square? - A. I am.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at any marriage of her's. - A. Yes, at St. Martin's in the Fields, St. Martin's Lane, in November 1804.

Court. Q. Do you know what day? - A. I do not.

Q. You are sure she is the same person? - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q. To whom was she married to? - A. To Jesse Kay .

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. How long have you known her before that marriage? - A. About six or seven years.

Q. Then you understood as well as she that her former husband was dead? - A. Yes.

Q. It was so reported in the neighbourhood, and so believed in the neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q. Did you know the former husband? - A. Yes, I knew John Butt .

Q. Did you know where he was living at the time he was married to her, and did you know her to be his wife? - A. No.

Q. Did you afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not know down to the present period to which she married the second time, that he lived as clerk to an attorney, and was in the same place as when at first you knew him? - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you know that he continued to live throughout in the same place, and in the same service? - A. I did not.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are a clerk to St. Martin's Church: you produce the register book; turn to the entry of November, 1804? - A. Jesse Kay and Jane Burt , both of this parish, were married by banns, the 25th of November, 1804.

Q. (To Butt.) You have seen John Butt to day? - A. Yes, he has never quitted his residence; they lived together four years.

Mr. Gurney. Q. And then they parted? - A. Yes.

Q. About three or four years ago? - A. I I believe so, next January.

GUILTY - aged 29.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-31

32. ANNE HALWARD alias HOLWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November three hundred and forty yards of ribbon value, 6 l. thirty-three pair of leather gloves value, 2 l. 15 s. eight pair of silk gloves, value 1 l. 3 s. five pair of silk hose, value 2 l. 16 s. fifteen pair of cotton hose value, 2 l. 14 s. one fur tippet value 1 l. 18 s. thirteen yards of black lace, value 5 l. 5 s. sixteen yards of white lace, value 6 l. 10 s. a lace cap crown, value 2 s, five yards of black sarsenet, value 1 l. 6 s. six handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 13 s. five yards of leno trimmings, value 5 s. twelve yards and a half of velveteen, value 30 s. two fans, value, 6 s. two silk purses, value 3 s. three cotton night caps, value 5 s. two girdles, value 5 s. two dozen silk cords, value 5 s. six gross of shirt buttons, value 19 s. two pound and half weight of pins, value 6 s. seven papers of pins, value 3 s. thirty-five pieces of tape value 1 l. eleven pieces of bobin value 3 s. three pound weight of thread,

value 2 l. 5 s. eight balls of cotton, value 1 s. a stifner, value 6 d. five pair of garters, value 1 s. 6 d. two ounces of black silk, value 3 s. one shirt, value 4 s. a cravat. value 2 s. and two pocket handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Bell and Thomas Parker , in their dwelling house , and CATHERINE LAWRENCE, alias JONES, alias REEVE , for receiving the same goods knowing them to be stolen .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM BELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a haberdasher in Bridge Street Westminster ; have you a partner? - A. Yes, Thomas Parker .

Q. Had the prisoner Halward been any time in your service? - A. She had lived servant with me four or five years.

Q. In the course of last autumn you had been having made a new front to your shop? - A. We had.

Q. Did that occasion the goods in your shop to be less secure that they were? - A. Yes, we were without sliding shutters in the shop at that time.

Q. On Friday the 8th of November did you go to the house of Mrs. Reeve? A. Yes, in Gardener's lane, King-street, Westminster ; she keeps a chandlers shop .

Q. Did you see her? - A. Yes, I asked her if she had any thing belonging to Ann: she knew me; she said no, I asked her if she had any box belonging to her; she said no; I asked her if she had not been there; she said she had not seen her for some time; I then asked her if she had any box belonging to Ann Halward , that was going into the country; she said she had not, she said she had not seen Ann Halward no more than two or three times for this last twelve months.

Q. Did she state why? - A. She said they had fell out about that time, and she had called no more than two or three times for letters. I left then the house and came away.

Q. The next morning did your brother the constable come to your house? - A. He did.

Q. Did you call up the prisoner Ann Halward into the room with you and him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she go out with your brother? - A. She did, and she came back with my brother.

Q. How long were they gone? - A. I believe about half an hour; they brought a box back with them, directed to Mr. William Burton , Dean street, Birmingham.

Q. Did you open the box before she went away? - A My brother did: I found it contained lace, ribbons, gloves, silk stockings, cotton stockings, tippets, and threads and other articles, in separate parcels, all packed up.

Q. Was there any inventory in the box with them? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you let her go out of the house at that time you sent her away? - A. I did.

Q. This was Saturday, was it not? - A. Yes,

Q. On that night did you see Mrs. Reeves again? - A. Yes, I called on my return from Bow-street.

Q. Then the prisoner Ann Halward was taken up that night, and taken to Bow-street? - A. Yes, I saw her at Bow-street that night.

Q. Did you call on Mrs. Reeves? - A. Yes, I told her that I was certain that she had some more of our property.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Tell us whether you said any thing else to her? - A. Not at the time.

Court. Q. Did you say any thing to her to induce her to confess? - A. I told her I would not hurt her if she would confess.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You or your brother opened a drawer in Mrs. Reeves's back parlour, and found a black fur tippet; did you know that to be your property? - A. I can swear to it; between eleven and twelve the same night I received some black lace, black velvet, and some gloves, from her son, together with a pair of cotton stockings, a straw hat; shortly after I received them from her son; she said she was very sorry for what had happened, and was also sorry that she had not told the night before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understood you that the box was brought back from Mrs. Reeves's house to your house? - A. It was.

Q. Was that box directed, as you say, to Mr. Burton, and was it locked? - A. It was nailed up.

Q. After the boy had brought the things, Mrs. Reeves with great anxiety brought all the things, and said that she was very sorry that she had not given them you at first; had you known Mrs. Reeves before? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you knew of your servant going to Mrs. Reeves? - A. Not till the day before.

Court. Q. How came you to know Mrs. Reeves? - A. Her husband was a carpenter; he had done jobs for us, and she had bought threads of us.

Q. The box that was brought back was nailed and directed? - A. It was.

EDWARD KERNEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are in the service of Messrs. Bell and Parker? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Ann Halward ? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever gone for her with messages to Mrs. Reeves? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Do you remember going there the day before she was turned away? - A. Yes.

Q. What message did she send you with? -

A. She sent me to see if a note was left there for her; she said that if there was a note there for her the box was to go to Birmingham, and if there were no note the box was not to go.

Q. Have you ever gone at any prior time. for her to Mrs. Reeves? - A. Several times.

Q. Did you deliver that message to Mrs. Reeves? - A. I gave it to John Reynolds . I saw him there.

- BELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the brother of the prosecutor, and high constable of Westminster? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with Ann Halward to Mrs. Reeves? - A. Yes, on Saturday the 9th of November, Ann Halward asked Mrs. Reeves for a box, Mrs. Reeves called the young man to fetch it. She said, that Mr. Bell had been there the day before enquiring about the box, and she thought it safest to send it out of the way. Ann and me sat down while the young man fetched the box; when the box was brought, I took it home to my brothers. The box was opened, and an inventory of the things laid upon the top of the things in the box: my brother settled with Ann, and let her go about her business.

Q. Did you ask her who wrote that inventory? - A. I did not.

Q. That evening did you go to Mrs. Reeves's house? - A. Yes, about half past six o'clock. I had been there about ten in the morning; in the evening I enquired of Mrs. Reeves whether Ann Halward was in the house; at first she said she was not; I told her that I was convinced that she was there; that she had better let me see her; then Mrs. Reeves went up and fetched her down, then I took Ann to Bow-street.

Q. Were you present when the black fur tippet was found in Mrs. Reeves's drawer? - A. Yes, she said that belonged to Ann, it did not belong to her, and that the fur tippet was every thing that belonged to Ann.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. How long did she live with your brother? - A. Between four and five years.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not Mrs. Reeves say that all these things were left in the house by Ann, she did not lay any claim to them herself? - A. No.

SOPHIA HARDING sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a servant out of place? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of this you lodged at Mrs. Reeves's? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen any of the contents of that box that has been broken off? - A. When Ann came backwards and forwards she called me into the place; she came sometimes two or three times in a day.

Q. At the time that she was there did you ever see any articles of haderdashery? - A. Yes, Ann called me into the back room to show me.

Q. Did you ever see any of those articles in the presence of Mrs. Reeves? - A. Mrs. Reeves came out from her at that time.

Q. Were they there then visible? - A. Yes.

Q. When Mrs. Reeves came out? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any person of the name of Shaw seeing any of these things? - A. Mrs. Shaw was there at the time.

Q. Did Mrs. Reeves say any thing to you upon the subject of Mrs. Shaw? - A. She did. Anne shewed me some velvets. Mrs. Shaw was in the back room. Mrs. Reeves said that Mrs. Shaw's damned tongue would blab it about. I know nothing more than the things were brought by Ann. Ann said she had taken three or four year's wages of her master, and that she had bought these things in order to go into the mantua-making and millinery line, as she could buy them cheaper in town than she could in the country.

JOHN REYNOLDS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a soldier in the guards. You are acquainted with the prisoner Ann Halward? - A. I am.

Q. Were you in the habit of meeting her at Mrs. Reeves's, in Gardner's-lane? - A. Yes.

Question (to Mr. Bell). Produce the box; show him the inventory? (the box produced). - A. That is the inventory I found in the box.

Q. (to Reynolds). Look at that inventory; whose hand writing is that? - A. Mine, I made it by the desire of Ann Halward, at Mrs. Reeve's, I believe on the fifth of November, before I was taken up.

Q. Who was present? - A. No person but Ann.

Q. How long was you employed in packing up these parcels, and making that inventory? - A. From five o'clock till nine in the evening; there was no person present, except during the latter part, and then Mrs. Reeves was present.

Q. Was Mr. Reeves there too? - A. He came into the room several times.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Mr. Reeves was there the latter part of the evening? - A. He was.

Q. Mrs. Reeves conducts the chandler's shop. - A. I believe she does.

Q. While you was doing this good-natured-work, Mrs. Reeves came to the cupboard; Reeve was there a great while; perhaps he assisted? - A. He nailed the box up.

Q. Mrs. Reeves was in the shop at that time? - A. I believe she was in the room at that time.

Mr. Alley. You are a soldier in the guards; I see you have arrived to the honour of corporal; how long have you been in that regiment? - A. Two or three years.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About eight or nine years ago.

Q. You know that she was a servant of the prosecutor's? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in the habits of coming backwards and forwards to the house? - A. I did on a Sunday.

Q. I suppose that you knew that she did not come honestly by these articles? - A. She told me that she had purchased them.

Q. You knew that she was a poor servant? - A. She always told me that she had great wages.

Q. Did you happen yourself to be taken into custody for this offence? - A. I was.

Q. How was it contrived that you fortunately got your escape? - A. I do not know.

Q. How long was you in confinement? - A. A week.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (To Mr. Bell.) Will you have the goodness to look to the articles? - A. I believe the whole of them to be my property; most of the stockings have our mark on them; I know the black fur tippet. I bought it of Mr. Nicholy. I recollect having lace of that quality; the velvet I can swear to, and the silk stocking have our mark.

AUGUSTUS NICHOLY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a furrier? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that fur tippet; did you sell that tippet to Mr. Bell? - A. I did, there is my mark on it.

Halward's Defence. I leave my defence to my counsel. This woman is innocent of what she is brought here for, she knew nothing of my concern, nor what I brought into the house

Lawrence's Defence. The prisoner will declare my innocence, and of my not knowing them to have been stolen. I never received but one quarter and a half of velvet, and one ribbon, and that I lost the day I come to be tried out of my pocket; I never knew of one thing but what she bought it, and paid for it; my children slept in the room, and I went to put them to bed, when she packed them up.

Halward called no witnesses to her character.

Lawrence called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

HALWARD - GUILTY of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

LAURENCE - GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-32

33. JOHN ISBISTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November , five pounds weight of copper nails, value 5 s. the property of Thomas and John Meadows .

THOMAS ANDERSON sworn. I am foreman to Messrs. Thomas and John Meadows ; the ship Scorpion was in repair at the dock.

Q. Who does the ship belong to? - A. To Mr. Cromley and Co.; I perceived this boy come from the bottom of the dock at the time the men were putting the copper sheathing on; when he came to the top of the dock I stopped him; I asked him what he had got there; he fell a crying, and said he hoped I would forgive him; I sent for an officer; the officer came, and took the nails from him.

Q. What quantity did they find? - A. A little better than five pound weight.

Q. Was he at work there? - A. No, I saw him the day before there, I know nothing of the boy.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. I am an officer; I took the prisoner in custody; on searching him I found in one of his jacket pockets same nails, and round the other part of his jacket, between the lining and the outside, I found a quantity of nails, they all weighed together, five pounds and upwards.

Q. Did you know the boy before? - A. I have known him some time, his father lives in the neighbourhood, he is a shoemaker.

Q. (To Anderson.) Look at these nails, are they copper? - A. It is a composition.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up these nails out of some dirt that was thrown away, I did not know it was any harm.

GUILTY - aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-33

34. SAMUEL THRELKALD was indicted for feloniously stealing an the 30th of November , a pound weight of hog's bristles, value 3 s. the property of James Watts .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JAMES WATTS sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I live in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square ; the prisoner was my journeyman; he engaged himself in the capacity of a hair or bristle sorter ; about the 1st of November I delivered 114 pounds weight of hairs or bristles to him to sort; on the 20th of November I weighed the bristles he was about. I found they weighed three pounds, good weight; that was about one o'clock, when he had gone to his dinner; he returned between one and two o'clock, and worked about a quarter of an hour, and then went out.

Q. Did you then weigh the bristles that was

left? - A. I saw them weighed, and there were only two pounds, there was a pound gone when he returned to work; I took him into custody.

JOHN TANE sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. On the 20th did you accompany your master when the prisoner was gone to weigh the bristles? - A. Yes we found three pounds, and then he came home and finished them, and there was only two pounds.

JAAMES SLADE sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. I am an officer. In consequence of information, I went to Frossel's house in King-street, Golden-square.

Q. What trade is Frossel? - A. He is a bricklayer and plaisterer.

Q. Did the prisoner accompany you there? - A. Yes, when we came to Frossel's house the prisoner asked for the money for the bristles, she said her husband was not at home, but she would return him the bristles, which she did. I produce the bristles.

SARAH FROSSEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not.

Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 90, King-street, Golden-square.

Q. Now mind the questions that are put to you, and remember you are upon your oath; what is your husband? - A. A bricklayer.

Q. On the 20th of November, did you give any bristles to the last witness? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you get them? A. From a man that came to the door, he wanted me to pay for them, and I would not.

Q. Did that man come in company with the constable? - A. Not the first time; he afterwards came with the constable.

Q. Now look at that man at the bar, is not that the man? - A. I could not swear to him.

Q. (To Slade.) That is the man? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. (To Sarah Frossel .) Have you any doubt he was the man that brought them? - A. I do not doubt but he was the man.

Q. You returned them to the constable in his presence? - A. Yes.

GEORGE FROSSEL sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I saw him two or three days before he left the hairs at my house; he asked me if I did not use plaisterer's hairs, I said certainly I do; he said I should have a pound for three shillings.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Are them bristles the same that he was at work upon? - A. They are the same sort, as far as I can judge; he told me that he had sold them to a person in King-street; but he did not tell me his name.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Watts promised me if I would confess, he would not proceed in law against me; I acknowledged it to take off the guilt from my fellow servants.

GUILTY - aged 47.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-34

35. THOMAS NEWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , two pounds weight of bacon, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Thomas Brown .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Brown , cheesemonger , 156, Shoreditch . I can only speak to the bacon; it is my master's bacon.

GEORGE MARTIN sworn. On Wednesday the 20th of November, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the bacon from the shop window of Mr. Brown; I followed him and took him with the bacon; I brought him back to Mr. Brown's shop, and Davis took it from him.

Q. The window was up, and this was in the window? - A. Yes, and many pieces besides.

- KENNEDY sworn. I produce the bacon. I was sent for to take charge of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and going along I was hungry, I took it.

GUILTY - aged 15.

Whipped in Goal , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-35

36. CHARLES MOSELY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of November , two pewter quart pots, value 2 s, and ten pewter pint pots, value 6 s. the property of George Sage and David Sage .

Second Count. For like offence, laying them to be the property of George Sage only.

GEORGE SAGE sworn. I am a victualler , I live at the Angel and Crown, opposite Whitechapel church . From information I went up Osborne-street to a butcher's shop, there I saw the prisoner with my string of pots in his hand; I took the pots out of his hand and took hold of him by the collar, and took him to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Was he drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be sober when I took hold of him by the collar; he has been in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to my house for these two years; when I collared him he said, Sage I did not take them with intent to make any property of them; I told him I did not suppose that he had any more than any other man; they had taken fifty pint pots of mine in two years.

- HERRIMAN sworn. I am a victualler. From information I found this man in possession of these pots; I asked him to let me look at the name on them; he said they belonged to Mr. Hanbury.

Mr. Knapp. Did he appear to be quite sober? - A. He did.

- MOSS sworn. On the 22d of November between five and six o'clock in the evening I happened to go into Osborne-street. I saw the prisoner at the bar have a string of pots I said to him, where are you going with them pots, he said what is that to you; a person there says I saw him take them up while the boy was collecting his pots; I said to the prisoner, I must insist upon yout going back to the place where you took them from; I then took him to a butcher's shop: I looked at the pots, and by the name I found I was just by the back door of the prosecutors'.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. How was he carrying the pots? - A. In his hand by the strap.

JOHN PARTRIDGE sworn. I am headborough. On the 22d of November I was coming along, I saw a crowd; accordingly I unlocked the watchhouse door, and took the pots and the prisoner into the watchhouse. I produce the pots.

Prosecutor. They are every one of them my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I have to say my lord, in my defence, I used Mr. Sage's house on and off upwards of two years; I have sufficient witness to prove that I was intoxicated, that I came from Deptford, where I had drank too freely. At Wapping I parted with Mr. Jones, endeavouring to make the best of my way home. Coming through Osborne street, I saw these pots, and in the heat of liquor I took the pots up, and brandished the pots, asking who they belonged to. I did not know they were Mr. Sage's; I went into Mr. Sage's, feeling myself so much in liquor, I came out again, knowing that part of the company would make a comment on me. I was determined to go to some other house in the neighbourhood, or to Mrs. Smith's; meanwhile a person overtook me, and asked me whose pots they were; I told him they were the property of Hanbury and Co. meaning the brewer, who had most of the houses there; being asked who I was, I gave my name Charles Mosely , No. 2. East-street; I meant no embezzlement, but merely to take them to some house to ascertain the property, and to make the landlord forfeit. When I was brought back, I was surprised to see Mr. Sage; I still held them in my hand, and one of the pots was held up to the light at the butcher's, there he saw they were his property; I was then taken to the watchhouse, and I was for two hours before some recollection; I then offered respectable housekeepers, who would answer for my appearance; it was denied; I was taken before the magistrate; I am perfectly innocent of the charge; I support myself and aged and afflicted mother (who is now in court) by my industry.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a tailor; I live in Red-Cross square, Great Tower-street; I have known the prisoner thirteen years; I never heard a blemish in his character till this time; he called upon me the day this affair happened; I was with him at Wapping; I observed that he had been drinking; I advised him to return home with me; he said he would if I would indulge him to go into a public-house. We went into a house; we got a pipe; as he was sitting with it, he rather fell on one side; I went into the yard, and when I returned he was gone; I never heard of him after, till I heard he was in confinement; I advised him not to cross the water upon account of the state of intoxication he was in; we had only one pint of porter, I was thirsty, I drank the greater part of it.

Q. Where does he live? - A. No. 2, East-street Spital-fields; he takes care of an aged mother.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-36

37. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , a cotton gown value 12 s. a cloak value 10 s. a frock value 10 s. and an apron value 1 s. the property of William Bond .

HANNAH BOND sworn. I live at No. 54, St. John-street, Bethnal Green ; the prisoner was a weekly servant with me. On the 27th of last month I was up at my work, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, Elizabeth Harris called to me, and says, come down Mrs. Bond, you have been robbed. When I came down I saw this cloak on the bed, and my cotton gown in Elizabeth Harris 's hands. I said to Elizabeth King , how could you injure me so, to go to distress me, knowing I have three small children. I looked down by the side of her, and there I saw my white apron and my child's frock, they had fallen down under her petticoats. I says to her, go along about your business, if you do not I will charge an officer with you; she said so you

may, she would not go. I run up stairs and fetched my brother-in-law down; he insisted upon charging an officer with her; an officer came, and she was put into Bethnal-green watch-house.

ELIZABETH HARRIS sworn. Elizabeth King was out all the afternoon drinking, she came home in the evening, and after stopping a little she wanted me to go of an errand for her; she said if I would not go she would go herself; to save her from going out again I went, and when I returned, she was going out with a large bundle under her petticoats, I stopped her; she said it was not my work; I said you shall not take it out of the place; I took hold of the cloak and flung it on the bed; I called Mrs. Bond; she came down and saw other things dropt from under her petticoats. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix). The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-37

38. JOHN BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of November a copper tea kettle , the property of Martha Watson .

MARTHA WATSON sworn. I live at No. 14, Long-alley ; I keep a little room, I hired this man to move my little affairs out of this room into another; he had moved them all but a small bundle of sticks, which I had to kindle my fire, and a copper tea kettle, full of water; he comes up for the wood, he says is there any more things to go; I said there is no more to go, I shall take this kettle in my hand; no, says he, I will take it; he stooped down and took the kettle up.

Q. What became of the kettle? - A. I cannot tell you, no more I saw of my kettle; he took my kettle down stairs. The next morning I went to his wife, I asked her where my kettle was? his wife gave me several words of ill language. I came down stairs and asked him for my kettle; he says, what do I know about your kettle.

HANNAH YARDLEY sworn. I saw the prisoner take the kettle out of the house.

Mr. Alley. Q. He carried it along with the other things? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-38

39. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of Nov . a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and a pint pewter pot, value 1 s. the property of Mary Clark .

MICHAEL CONNER sworn. As I was drinking a pint of of beer in a public-house, in Paul-street, Finsbury square , on the 18th of November, this man came and sat in the same box, he took a pint pot off the table and put it behind his coat, and a quart pot he put in his pocket; after staying about ten minutes he went out with them; I says to the boy, Jem, he has got the pot in his pocket, go out after him; he went after him, and brought him in with the pot in his pocket.

JAMES GOODWIN sworn. As I was in the parlour, Michael Conner told me he had got the pot in his pocket; I went after him and took a quart pot out of his pocket, and a pint pot out of his hand, and brought him into the tap-room again.

Q. What did he say? - A. He said he was coming back presently. (The pots produced, and identified by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. I went in and called for a pint of beer, and sat in the box were there were two gentlemen drinking out of this quart pot; they walked out of the house, and left it half full of beer; I took the pot and pint and put it on the bench, to see whether they returned. I sat there half an hour, and was rather fresh; I had another pint. I took it home with me in order that my family might have the beer; that Saturday I took half a pint of gin home from that house, excepting a glass I took out for my comrade. One pot of beer is worth a dozen pot to me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-39

40. MARY MOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a sheet, value 5 s. a shift, value 3 s. and an apron, value 2 s. the property of James Thirlkill .

ANN THIRLKILL sworn. I live in Bowling-lane, Westminster ; my husband, James Thirlkill , is a brass-founder , the prisoner was a lodger of mine. On the 8th of November she stole a sheet, a shift, and an apron, I had washed the day before, and had hung them up in the wash-house to dry, and just as I got up she took them. The bell was ringing a quarter before seven o'clock.

Q. Did you ever find them again? - A. Yes. I met a woman, she told me I might find them at the cook's-shop, the person is here, where the prisoner had taken my things to dry.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn. I am a pawnbroker; I live in Strutton Ground; on the 19th of November, about half past eight in the morning, this shift was brought to me to pledge for half a crown; I produce it.

- sworn. I am an officer of Queen's-square. I produce the sheet and apron which Mrs.

Thirikill took from the cook's shop, up one pair of stairs.

ANN HUTCHINSON sworn. I live at the cook's shop, Tothill-street. A quarter before seven o'clock on the 8th of November, the prisoner brought a sheet, a shift, and a coloured apron; she asked me to let her hang them in my room, as her own was so small she had no convenience. I told her she might and welcome; she hung them up, and they remained there till Saturday twelve o'clock, excepting the shift, which the prisoner took away with her. Mrs. Thirlkill came to my room, and asked me if I had such things; I told her I had; she took the sheet and apron off the line.

Prisoner's Defence. I washed on Thursday, I hung my things up to dry in the kitchen under where I live; I went out early in the morning and took the things with me; I asked the evidence to let me hang the things in her room till I took them away myself; they hung there from the time I took them till Saturday, when the prosecutor went and took them off the line. I wanted some money, so I pledged the shift.

GUILTY - aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-40

40. GEORGE RAINSFORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , a coat, value 1 l. 9 s. and two pair of stays, value 1 s. the property of Simon Emanuel .

SIMON EMANUEL sworn. I keep a sale shop , No. 10, Marybone-lane, the corner of Wigmore-street .

Q. Did you at any time lose a coat and two pair of stays? - A. Yes, on the 21st of November, about ten in the morning; I had seen them at the door about ten minutes before. At twelve o'clock the same day I went to Marlborough-street; I saw the property there, and the prisoner in custody; I knew them to be mine, when I saw them.

- sworn. I am a carpenter; on the 21st of November I was passing by Emanuel's shop, I saw the prisoner stand at his door; I crossed over the way, and then I turned myself round, I saw the prisoner take a coat and two pair of stays from the outside of the door; he rolled them up, and then he ran two hundred yards before he stopped; I followed him close, and never lost sight of him; he stopped and rolled them up tighter, and put them under his arm, and then he walked a considerable distance before I spoke to him; I said to him, my friend, you have soon bargained for your lot; he said he had, did I see him; I told him I did; he asked me if I would go halves with him; I asked him where he was going with them; he said he did not know, he never did the like before; I asked him to stop; he did not seem to like to stop with me; I collared him and took him to the office.

Q. Did he make any resistance? - A. He only struggled with me; he made no other resistance, he behaved very civil.

JOHN WARREN sworn. I produce the things; they have been in my custody ever since they were delivered to me by the last witness.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of a situation, and quite distressed.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sarjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-41

41. WILLIAM STEWART was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of November , a copper pot, value 2 s. and 6 d. the property of Ralph Heath .

RALPH HEATH sworn. I am a publican ; I keep the Horshoe, St. Giles's . On the 22nd of November last, I lost a copper pot out of the tap-room; Steward was in the house, having half a pint of beer.

Q. You did not see him take it? - A. No, my wife gave me the information.

Q. Where was the pot placed? - A. Over the fire place, for the use of every one that came into the house. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, but I could not find him. I saw the pot on the Tuesday following at the office in Hatton-Garden, and the prisoner he was there in custody.

Q. Did the prisoner pay for what he had? - A. He paid a penny, and left a farthing, which he said he would pay when he called again.

Prisoner's Q. Did you see me that day in your house that you say you lost your pot? - A. I did.

Prisoner. I was not in your house.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. I am an officer belonging to the Hatton-Garden office. On the 22nd of November I was walking up Holborn; I saw the prisoner at the bar with something under his jacket; he looked at me; I thought he had some knowledge of me; I questioned him with what he had got; he seemed very unwilling to tell me; at last he said only his working tools; I asked him what trade he was, he said he was a watchmaker; I told him they were large implements for a watchmaker. I found this pot and this bag containing

tools, he told me that he received the pot from a publican at Wapping to repair.

Q. What time of the day was it when you took him? - A. Between the hours of one and two; not being satisfied with his account, I took him to the office.

Prisoner. I bought the pot and gave two shillings for it.

Prosecutor. This is my pot, I will swear to it.

GUILTY - aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sarjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-42

42. WILLIAM SEAMAN and JOHN HARRYMAM were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of December , a cloth box coat, value 50 s. the property of George Hill Esq .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

SOLOMON COOPER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am coachman to Mr. Sarjeant Hill.

Q. On Monday the 2d of December had you been out with the carriage; and at what time did you return? - A. I returned about a quarter before two o'clock, I put up the coach in King's Head-yard, Duke-street, Bloomsbury ; I left the coat on the box of the chariot, and went with my horses in the stable.

Q. Did you leave the coach-house door open? - A. Yes, After I had been in the stable about twenty-five minutes, I returned to the coach-house, and found my coat was missing.

Q. This was Monday afternoon, how soon afterwards did you see the coat again? - A. About seven o'clock that same evening I saw it in the possession of the constable.

HENRY HARRIS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are a salesman? - A. Yes, I live at No. 69 Davis-street, Oxford-road.

Q. On yesterday week did you see either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, Seaman, he came into my shop with a blue box coat on his arm about a quarter before five o'clock, he offered me the coat to sell, he asked me a guinea for it; I asked him if it was his coat, he said no, he said it belonged to Mr. Thompson's coachman, in Berkley-square, he employed me to sell it; I told him I made it a rule never to buy any thing except of the owner, and if he would fetch the owner of it I would buy it of him; he went away and said he would fetch the owner immediately, but he was sure the owner would not take less than a guinea; I told him to let the owner come, I was sure we should not disagree; I never saw any thing of him till after six o'clock, then Mr. Wolfe came to me.

Q. Did Mr. Wolfe shew you any coat? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the coat which Mr. Wolfe brought the same coat which Seaman had brought to you? - A. Yes.

ABRAHAM WOLFE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a salesman, likewise? - A. Yes, in James-street, Grovesnor-square, just by the last witness.

Q. Yesterday week did any person bring any coat to your house? - A. Yes, about a quarter before six o'clock, the tall man at the bar (Seaman) brought a blue box coat to me, he offered me the coat to sell, I asked him the price, he asked twenty-five shillings.

Q. What in your opinion was the worth of the coat for you to buy? - A. I knew the coat was worth double the money, so I took the coat out of his hand and threw it behind the counter, on the ground; I told him he should not have it any more out of my hands: I then asked him where he lived, he said at Mr. Thompson's in Grovesnor-square; I knew their livery was drab box-coat; I went round the counter to lay hold of him; I said are you the owner, he said, no, I am not the owner, I will fetch the owner; he went off in an instant.

Q. After that you went to Mr. Harris's the last witness? - A. I did.

Q. How soon after that did you you see Seaman? - A. About an hour after that I saw Seaman again.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. He came back to my shop again and brought Harryman.

Q. Did you see him? - A. My boy saw him.

Q. I asked you where did you next see him yourself? - A. I met him and the other man coming from the public house, I gave the officer charge of him, and delivered up the coat to the officer.

ABRAHAM WOLFE jun. sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are the son of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. After your father was gone out to Mr. Harris did any person come to your shop? - A. Yes, the two prisoners at the bar, they both came together; Harryman says to my mother, how came you to stop my box coat, I hope it is safe, my mother said yes it was safe; they both went out of the shop, I ran to tell my father what had passed.

SAMUEL SLATT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable.

Q. On the evening of yesterday week was

you called upon by Mr. Wolfe? - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoners in James-street, Oxford street, they were coming out of a public house, previous to that the coat was given into my custody.

Q. Did you tell them what you took them for? - A. I told them on suspicion of stealing a box-coat. Harryman very much wished to get away; he asked me what I took him for; I told him he must go back to Mr. Wolfe's shop; Seaman said the coat was his property, and Harryman said he was innocent, I took them to St. George's watchhouse, and the next morning before a magistrate; Harryman protested his innocence as we were going to the magistrate, and said he was tempted to go and say the coat was his by Seaman's desire, and Seaman said it was so. He (Seaman) said that he stole the coat from a coachhouse in Bedford-square Mews.

Q. (To Cooper.) Is that your master's box coat? - A. It is.

Seaman's Defence. I have been on board a man of war; I was starving for a bit of bread.

Harryman's Defence: I am quite innocent; I know nothing at all of the coat.

SEAMAN, GUILTY - aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

HARRYMAN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose

Reference Number: t18051204-43

43. THOMAS PRICE and THOMAS WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of November , thirty-five pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. and a copper, value 20 s. the property of Elizabeth Harvey , fixed to a certain building of hers called a bake house .

Second Count for like offence, fixed to a certain building of Elizabeth Harvey .

(The Indictment was read by Mr. - and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

HANNAH FIGGETT sworn. Examined by Mr. - . Q. You live with Mrs. Harvey? - A. She lives at Acton ; I am dairy maid; the dairy is a little distance from the house.

Q. Do you recollect what time you went in the dairy on that day? - A. About seven o'clock at night.

Q. Were you also in the bakehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know in what state you left the things in the bakehouse? - A. The copper was in the same place as usual, it was set, and the lead work was round it.

Court. Q. How was the copper set? - A. In brick-work; it was a copper for scalding milk; it held four pails.

Q. When you went there in the morning, did you find the copper there? - A. When I went there in the morning the dairy door was open.

Q. Had you locked the dairy door on the night before? - A. I generally go in at the bakehouse door, I am sure I locked the bake-house door. I put the key in my pocket. and when I went there in the morning I found the bakehouse door locked. I missed some butter from the dairy, and when I came into the bakehouse I missed the copper; the place was pulled down where the copper was fixed, and some of the lead was taken off. On the same morning I saw the copper brought back again by some of the men that took them, and it was put in the same place that it was taken from.

Q. Was it the same copper? - A. I believe it to be the same copper, it fitted the place exactly.

Q. The lead, did you see that fitted? - A. It was fitted on, and it corresponded with the remaining lead.

Q. Is Mrs. Harvey a single lady? - A. She is a widow lady.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. You believe it to be the same copper because it fitted the place where they put it to? - A. Yes.

JOHN HIGGINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live at Acton.

Q. On Tuesday the 19th of November, had you been out in company with Mr. Tyler? - A. Yes.

Q. In your return home did you get into the high road between Acton and Willsden? - A. Yes.

Q. In about what hour did you arrive there? - A. About a quarter before twelve at night.

Q. In your way from thence did you meet with any thing? - A. Yes, we met two men with a horse and cart.

Q. Were they going towards Willsden? - A. Yes.

Q. After you had come by them, did you and your comrade stop? - A. Yes, we considered to ourselves.

Q. After considering together, what did you do? - A. We went away to Acton, and got ourselves armed, and come back again.

Q. How soon did you see or hear a cart come? - A. In about a quarter of an hour.

Q. How far beyond Acton? - A. About half a mile, we heard a cart coming.

Court. Q. Was it coming to Acton? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you meet it at the spot where you had saw a cart before? - A. Yes.

Q. Then if it was the same cart and had gone on it had come back again? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Upon hearing the cart, what did you and Tyler do? - A. We got over a gate into Mr. Briggs's field, a field adjoining the road.

Q. Did you hear any thing then of the persons in that cart? - A. Yes, they made up towards the gate that we got over; I heard one say to the other let us put in here.

Q. What did they do next after you heard that? - A. They made away for the next gate; we heard them open the gate and put the cart in the field.

Q. What time do you suppose that was? - A. It might be about a quarter past twelve.

Q. What did you see or hear next? - A. We staid there in that same place till the clock struck two.

Q. During the whole of that time did the cart remain still in the adjoining field to that where you was? - A. Yes.

Q. When the clock struck two, did Tyler and you go into the field where the cart first came? - A. We got over the adjoining field and went up to the cart.

Court. Q. The cart stood all the while in the field? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How did you find the horse and the cart? - A. The horse was out of the cart, he was unharnessed and tied to the shafts; we got under the hedge about a quarter of an hour longer, and then we went away to Acton, and called Thomas Soare , Charles Soare , and Thomas Nash , to our assistance.

Q. When you came back did you find the cart in the same place as when you left it? - A. Yes, we all went to it, and there was nothing in it but one basket, the same that was in before.

Q. What time was this? - A. About ten minutes past three.

Q. Then I believe you continued watching till about half after five? - A. Yes, we divided ourselves into three companies.

Q. At about half past five did you see any person come over the gates? - A. Yes, I saw two persons come over the gate into the field.

Q. As soon as they came into the field did you follow them close? - A. I followed them close to the cart, and saw them both lay their loading down.

Q. You were the nearest to these men of all the party? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your seeing them lay the loading down, did you halloo out to your comrades? - A. Yes, directly, they came up directly both ways and took them.

Q. What was done with the cart when you took them both? - A. One of the men in our company, and one of the men that belonged to the cart, harnessed the horse.

Q. Were the prisoners the two men you took into custody? - A. Yes, they were never out of my sight; they harnessed the horse while the other held up the cart.

Q. Did you feel about to look for the parcels? - A. Yes, I and William Tyler groped about, and we could not find them at first.

Court. Q. You did not say that you saw them carrying off anything; how was they carrying their load? - A. They had it on their shoulders.

Q. Then, though it was dark, you could perceive that they had a load on their shoulders? - A. I could perceive it when they got over the gate. I saw them both lay their loads down.

Mr. Gurney. Q. While they were putting the horse in the cart, did you and Tyler grope about to find anything? - A. We found a bundle of hay, which I see one of the men put down, which was one of the two loads that I saw put down.

Q. I believe you did not at that time find the other? - A. We could not then find the other it was so dark.

Q. Did you then take away the two prisoners to Acton, and the horse and the cart? - A. Yes, directly.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and your comrades and the prisoner, in the way? - A. We got some way on; one of the prisoners wanted to know what we wanted with them; whether we wanted to kill them.

Court. Q. Which of the prisoners was that? - A. Thomas White ; I told him to go quietly along, and we should not hurt them, or else we would shoot them.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you conveyed them both to the Anchor public house at Acton? - A. Yes.

Q. When you had left them safe at the Anchor, did you and Thomas Soare return to the spot where you had taken them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search on the spot from which the cart had been removed? - A. Yes, on the spot where he had taken the cart from; there stood the copper.

Q. How near was it to the spot where you had seen one of the loads put down? - A. It might be about two or three yards.

Q. What did you find besides the copper? - A. An old bag and a hatchet; we took them away with us to the Anchor.

Q. After you had conveyed the prisoners to the Anchor public-house did you find any thing over the spot on which they had walked? - A. A bunch of keys.

Q. In the morning you heard of Mrs. Harvey's house being robbed? - A. Yes, we took the copper to Mrs. Harvey's and tried it; it fitted exactly the setting of the brick work; this was about half past seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you find any lead? - A. No, a young man found some lead; he brought that to me; it is such lead as is spread over a copper; I saw it fitted on the copper with the remaining lead, it fitted exactly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. This was a dark night. The first time you met the men was in the Acton road? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going one way and the cart another? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you return again? - A. We got back in about a quarter of an hour.

Q. When you saw the first cart, how far distant were you from the first cart? - A. We met it in the road; we were obliged to go out of the way to let the wheels of the cart pass.

Q. You met the cart the second time? - A. No; we waited for it coming along the road; it was the same cart; we got then out of the way.

Q. You do not mean to say that the cart that you met and the cart that returned were the same cart? - A. That I cannot say; we met a cart with two men; one leading the horse, and the other walking behind the cart.

Q. When you got into the field how far was this cart from you? - A. About an 100 yards.

Q. Was these men intoxicated at all? - A. They did not appear so.

THOMAS SOARE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I was called up by the last witness; we prepared ourselves with fire arms, and went into Mr. Briggs's field; there was nothing but an empty basket in the cart; it was quite a dark and misty night; we separated into three parts, I continued with Tyler; I assisted in taking them; we secured them in the public house; I returned with Higgins back again to the field; we found a copper just on the spot where we had taken the cart from.

Q. What became of the copper afterwards? - A. We picked up a copper and a hatchet, and a little bag; we took them all to the Anchor. I saw the copper taken to Mrs. Harvey's, it fitted exactly as though it was the same.

Q. Did you see the pieces of lead that remained, and these pieces fitted? - A. Yes, it just matched one with the other.

JOHN MASON sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are in the service of Mr. Young, a butcher at Acton? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of Wednesday the 20th of November, were you sent into the fields of your master for the beasts? - A. Yes, at about half seven o'clock in the morning, on returning home, as I was in the road, I saw something through the gate in Mr. Briggs's field, I got over the gate, I found a bag, and under that bag was three pieces of lead.

Q. Did any thing strike you respecting the edges of the lead, did they appear fresh cut? - A. The edges were shining. I opened the bag and found a white pocket handkerchief, in the handkerchief were several flats of butter, the handkerchief was marked with F.

Q. Did you take all these things to Mrs. Harvey, and deliver them to Hannah Figgett ? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Higgins). Was it in the way in which the two men would have come from Mrs, Harvey's house? - A. Yes, they were dropped in their way from Mrs. Harvey's house, about the midway from where we apprehended them.

CHARLES OLIVER sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable of Acton, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. On Wednesday morning the 20th of November, were you sent for to the Anchor to take charge of the prisoners? - A. Yes, about seven o'clock, I took the copper to Mrs. Harvey's; I saw it fit exactly. The next day I saw the pieces of lead fitted on the outside, and it tallied with the remaining pieces of lead. I produce the pieces of lead, the copper, and the hatchet.

ANTHONY GRENAWAY sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the servant of Mrs. Harvey? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you brought with you the remainder of the lead which was not taken away when the bakehouse was robbed? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you fitted it with the other? - A. Yes, and it fitted exactly.

Price's Defence. We went down to Uxbridge with some fish, and met with a man that we knew. We drank with him at the George, and got intoxicated in liquor. We lost our way in the dark; I was leading the horse, and being dark we put the cart and horse in this field and went and laid down to sleep, and when we returned to the field these men secured us, and told us we must go with them. I brought the bundle of hay from the house where we had been drinking, and where we laid down to sleep. They went out about seven o'clock and brought this copper into the public-house. I never saw the copper before in my life.

White's Defence. I have nothing further to say than we had been to Uxbridge; we missed our way and overset the cart, it being dark and foggy, we put the cart into the field.

PRICE - GUILTY , aged 33.

WHITE - GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18051204-44

44. ELIZABETH WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of October , 300 lb. weight of lead, value 30 s. belonging to the most noble George Duke of Marlborough , fixed to a certain building of his, called a cart-house .

Second Count for stealing the like lead, only fixed to a certain building of the said Duke, and several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

(The Case was stated by Mr. Gleed.)

THOMAS NICHOLS sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are a watchman to the Duke of Marlborough, he lives at Sion-hill, in the parish of Isleworth ? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 31st of October was you going your rounds? - A. I was.

Q. What time of the night was this? - A. Seven minutes after eleven. I looked at my watch at the present time I found her in the cart.

Q. What time did you observe the gates to be fastened? - A. The gates were fastened before the clock struck ten.

Q. After eleven o'clock you came to the cart-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that a cart-house that is occupied by his grace the Duke of Marlborough? - A. It is. I observed in the cart the prisoner at the bar, she was covered over with one sack, and two were under her, and a pair of shoes and a pocket handkerchief were in one of the bags. I asked the prisoner were she came from, she said she was just come out of the country, and she was going to London to get into service. I then asked her how she got there, she said she got over the fence.

Q. How high may this fence be? - A. About a foot higher than I am, about seven feet high, and a ditch very near a yard deep before the fence, between the road and the fence. I told her it was impossible for her to get over the pales by herself, she said, she did. I asked her whether there were any body else belonging to her, she said there was not. I insisted upon her getting out of the cart, and took her to the cow-house and bolted her in, and then I returned to the cart-house, where I took her from; after I went round every place and searched. I put up a ladder against the cart-house; as soon as I put the ladder up, I heard a rumbling at the top; I went up the ladder as fast as possible, and when I got upon the top, I observed two men at the further end of the gutter; I says, halloo! damn you, if you do not speak I'll blow your brains out. Before I got round they tumbled off the further end.

Q. Did you examine the lead? - A. Yes, it was all removed from the place where it had been at the top of the cart-house.

Q. In what way did you find it removed? - A. It was cut in small pieces, excepting one piece which was six feet long; the tiles were also removed from their place in order to take the lead off.

Q. The tiles being removed, there was such an opening that persons being above might put the lead into the cart below, supposing there was a person below ready to receive it? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. You came away and brought the lead with you; you have the lead here? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was the cart the Duke of Marlborough's cart? - A. Yes, it was in his cart-house.

Q. None of the lead was carried away? - A. No, it was only cut and removed from the place where it had been, they had not an opportunity of taking it away.

Q. You had never seen the prisoner above the premises before? - A. No.

CHARLES ROSE sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you? - A. I am under-gardener to his grace, I was called up by the watchman to take these people into custody, if we met with them. In consequence of which I took the woman into my custody and locked her up.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner? - A. I had, from about five o'clock in the morning till nine. I asked her how she came there; she told me she had been to see her friends at some village below Uxbridge, that she lived in London, and got her living by washing and mangling. I said, you have got very much out of the way, what time did you get into these premises? she told me at ten o'clock, and she was helped over by a game-keeper. Then I said to her, my friend, you must certainly know of the people being over your head when you was in the cart-house, you being so near them; she openly confessed that she heard them, but did not consider that they were doing any harm.

Q. Could the woman by herself, from the road, have got over the paling? - A. I think it impossible for a woman to do it without some assistance.

RICHARD WHITMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. I believe you examined the premises? - A. Yes, I am very certain the place was safe in the afternoon; the paling is six feet oak, and there is some water in the ditch. At day-light I measured the place. I

found a great length of the gutter had been removed, and a part of it cut in pieces; they must have got over very near that place, because near the orchard there are spikes on the pales.

Q. Was it a place so that the prisoner might have got over without assistance? - A. I cannot think it possible.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are gamekeeper at Osterley-park? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 31st of October did you see the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear to the prisoner; just before the clock struck ten, I saw a woman sit down under a tree, by a pale, over the ditch at the outside of the duke's paling; she had a bundle and a little dog with her; I asked her whether she was distressed; she would not give me any answer; it was quite moon light; I told her if she was in distress I would give her a shilling to go to Brentford and get a lodging; I thought it was a pity that she should lay there; I said I shall not hurt you; she then said, no, no. A man came over the duke's paling immediately over the woman's head, where she was sitting; he took the bundle out of her hand, and helped her over the ditch; they had some discourse together; I wished them good night, and they wished me good night; they stopped talking together till I was out of sight.

Q. You do not speak to the person of the woman, but whoever she was she had a bundle with her and a little dog? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Nicholas) Did you see that little dog? - A. Yes, the dog was along with the woman in the cart; I took the dog and the woman out of the cart.

(The lead produced by WHITMAN, who said it was the lead belonging to the cart-house.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the men; I am innocent of it.

GUILTY - aged 21.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-45

45. STEPHEN SAZONOFF, alias JAMES SCHMIDT , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Sarah Wengler , about the hour of nine at night on the 20th of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a promissory note value 15 l. the property of Pierre Calbiac .

Mr. Knapp (counsel for the prosecution) under the direction of the Court, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-46

46. WILLIAM ANDREW was indicted for that he being a person employed in certain business relating to the Post-office, that is to say in examining the directions of the different letters and packages for the purpose of being sent from London to Bath; and that he, on the 21st of November, in the 45th year of his Majesty's reign , at the General Post-office at the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth, London , a certain letter lately brought to the General Post-office, to be conveyed from London to Bath, to one Catherine Blundle , containing four Bank notes, where of three Bank notes were of the value of 50 l. each, and one Bank note, value 30 l. came into his hands and possession, he being such person and so employed as aforesaid; that he afterwards, to wit, on the same day, having the said letter in his hands, and possession, feloniously did secrete the said letter, then containing the said Bank notes, the said Bank notes at the time of committing the felony, being the property of Richard Devin .

And several other counts of like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Row, and the case stated by Mr. Attorney General.)

WILLIAM DODD sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. I believe you are in the house of Mr. Hoare Fleet-street? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the transaction of the 20th November paying a draft of Mrs. Catherine Blundle of Bath, to Mr. Evans? - A. I do not remember the individual transaction any further than by reference to our books.

Q. Have you your books here? - A. I have.

Q. Does it appear upon the books that a draft of Mrs. Blundle of Bath, was paid to any body, or to whom? - A. That it was a draft that was paid that day it is clear, of 380 l. on the 20th of November, we do not pay any attention to whom it was paid.

Q. Read the entry? - A. The entry states that there was 380 l. paid to a draft of C. Blundle, the lady's name is Catherine Blundle ; we have only put C. Blundle.

Q. Does it appear in what Bank notes the bill was paid? - A. It does.

Q. First of all the number of the Bank notes altogether? - A. Eight I suppose.

Q. Eight Bank notes, look to the numbers? - A. No. 2589, 50 l. 5th of November, 2587 that is another 50 l, 2586, 50 l, 4478, 50 l, 644, 50 l, 1519, 50 l. and 8652, 30 l.

Q. You yourself have no recollection of the person of Mr. Devin to whom these Bank notes were paid? - A. I have not.

Q. I believe Mr. Barry, another clerk at your office, entered the dates and likewise the numbers? - A. He did.

RICHARD DEVIN sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Have you any recollection of the clerk at the office who paid you the notes? - A. I have not.

RICHARD BARRY sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are in Mr. Hoare's house, do you remember, by referring to the book, whether you made a memorandum of the dates of the notes? - A. Yes, I put it down.

Q. What were the dates of the notes? - A. 2586, a 50 l.

Court. Q. I have no such number? - A. That number is in a list of Millenuies.

Mr. Fielding. Q. First of all, the date of the bank note in question, 2588? - A. 2588 is dated the 5th of November, 1804.

Q. I do not know whether you have any recollection of the person of Mr. Devin, who is the person to whom the notes were paid? - A. I have not; the note 8652, 30 l. is dated the third of November.

Court. Q. (to Mr. Dodd). I do not find the number right, you did not mention No. 2586, look in the book again? - A. It is not in this book at all; it is a note which came in our possession, and with which we paid the draft, in consequence of which, it did not come in that book at all.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (to Barry) I understood you to say Mr. Barry, it is along with the list of Millenuies, you have no knowledge of Mr. Devin at all? - A. No.

Q. This forms a part of the general list? - A. Yes.

Q. Does that transaction from which you are enabled to speak from, and which you say is a list of notes paid, does it also form in part a list of notes taken? - A. It does.

Q. You have no other correspondent with the name of Blundle? - A. Yes, we have; Mr. Blundle has two accounts with us.

Q. Do you mean to say that there are no other person of the name of Blundle that keeps cash with you? - A. Yes, we have a gentleman of the name of Philip Blundle , that keeps cash with us.

Q. Upon the draft the lady has signed C. Blundle? - A. Yes, in our books is only Blundle.

Q. Upon the notes there were only Blundle, so that upon the notes it could not appear whether it was a man or a woman. Are you quite sure that there were no check made to Mr. Blundle on that day? - A. I am quite sure.

Q. Have you looked at the books? - A. I have.

Mr. Fielding. Q. (to Richard Devin ). Be so good as to look at that note? - A. That is the note that came to me from Mrs. Blundle. I received it enclosed in a letter; it is a draft.

Q. (to Mr. Devin). Will you have the goodness to look at that letter? - A. That is the letter which contained the draft from Mrs. Blundle.

Q. Do you remember applying to Mr. Hoare, in order to get payment of that draft on the 20th of November? - A. I did.

Q. Are you certain as to the day? - A. I am certain as to the day.

Q. How many bank notes did you receive at Mr. Hoare's house? - A. Eight bank notes, seven fiftys, and one thirty.

Q. I was asking you if you took the memorandum of the notes in the shop of Mr. Hoare, or not? - A. Not in the shop.

Q. What became afterwards of these bank notes? - A. I sent four bank notes of 50 l. each, in a letter directed to Mrs. Blundle, on the same day I received them.

Q. That was on the 20th of November, 1804? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you keep any account of the number of these notes that you enlosed in that letter? - A. I took account of all the notes that I received, but particularly the four notes that I put in the letters, but I cannot take upon me now to say what they were.

Q. There were four notes left in your possession? - A. Yes. I am employed in the customs, and being obliged to go out very early, I spoke to my daughter, and desired them to enclose the remaining four notes, and to send them in a letter on the 21st.

Q. Tell me which of your daughters that you spoke to particularly? - A. My three daughters were together. I spoke generally.

Q. Did you give them the notes? - A. I gave them the four notes, after taking the numbers of them on a paper, I put it in my pocket.

Q. The memorandum you took from your daughters? - A. No, I took it from the paper which had the whole, that is the memorandum.

Court. Q. Of all the notes? - A. No, the four that was delivered to my daughters, (the memorandum handed to the Court). On the 24th Mrs. Blundle wrote to me, she acknowledged to the receipt of my letter on the 20th; she acknowledged the receipt of the first remittance, and she had waited for the second remittance before she had sent the letter, but she had not received it.

Q. She never got the second remittance? - A. She had not, therefore she waited to answer the letter till the 24th.

Mr. Fielding. Q. In consequence of discovering that she had never got the letter, I suppose you went to the bank? - A. I made

every enquiry before I went to the bank.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. This paper that you put in is a copy of an original, which you say has been destroyed? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it an exact copy of that original? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it destroyed? - Q. I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. Do you remember whether you had made the original before or after you had put them in the post? - A. The same day.

Q. Do you remember the hour you sent them by the post? - A. I do not, my servant took them.

Q. I suppose you sat down and took a list? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you made a separate list of each four? - A. I made a separate list of these four.

Q. Whether you made a separate list of these four after you sent the others? - A. That I cannot say.

ELIZABETH SELINA DEVINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Abbot. Q. You are the daughter of Mr. Devins. - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Do you remember, on the 24th of November, making any memorandums of any bank notes, that you were sending to Bath? - A. Yes, of four.

Court. Q. You mean the 20th of November, 1804, when the four bank notes were sent. Is that your memorandum you have in your hand? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbot. Q. That is made upon receiving Mrs. Blundle's letters? - A. Yes.

Q. The memorandum is made upon Mrs. Blundle's letter that she wrote to her father. (the memorandum read in Court). 4478, 50 l. 2586, 50 l. 644, 50 l. and 2589, a 50 l.

SUSANNAH DEVINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Abbot. Q. You are another daughter of Mr. Devins, the gentleman that was examined just now? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your father delivering to you any bank notes on the evening of the 20th of November? - A. I do.

Court. Q. I suppose the same year 1804? - A. Yes.

Mr. Abbot. Q. How many bank notes? - A. Four.

Q. Do you recollect the amount and value of the whole together? - A. Yes, 180 l.

Q. For what purpose were they delivered to you? - A. To be sent by the next post to Mrs. Blundle.

Court. Q. Where does Mrs. Blundle live at? - A. At Bath.

Mr. Abbot Q. The next post was the 21st of November? - A. It was.

Q. Did you, on the 21st on the next morning deliver these notes to any person in order to take any account of them? - A. Yes.

Q. To whom? - A. To my sister Mrs. Wade.

Q. After Mrs. Wade had taken an account of the notes, did she return them to you? - A. Yes, she did.

Q. What did you then do with them? - A. About an hour and a half after receiving them back from my sister, I enclosed them in a letter.

Q. In a letter, to whom? - A. To Mrs. Blundle, at Bath.

Q. Where had you kept them during that hour and a half? - A. I am not certain whether I might place them in a drawer, or whether they lay in the room where I was sitting.

Court. Q. You are sure they are the same bank notes that you received, that you put in that letter? - A. Yes.

Q. You sealed the letter? - A. I suppose I did.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. I could not say positively.

Q. To whom did you deliver the letter? - A. To my father's servant, Richard Freeman , to be put into the post-office.

Mr. Abbot. Q. Had you occasion afterwards to refer to the memorandum that Mrs. Wade, had made of these notes? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon afterwards? - A. Three or four days.

Q. That was, I presume, in consequence of a letter from Mrs. Blundle, saying they had not been received? - A. Yes.

Q. What is become of the memorandum that Mrs. Wade had made? - A. I tore that among some papers.

Q. Previous to your tearing it, had you examined it? - A. I had, it was incorrect.

Q. As to which note was it incorrect? - A. To the 30 l.

Q. In what respect in the 30 l. was it incorrect, as to the sums? - A. It was put down a 50 l.

Q. Did you make any copy of the memorandum before it was destroyed? - A. I did.

Q. Have you that copy? - A. I do not believe this is the original.

Q. Have you one that you believe is like it? - A. Yes, this is a copy intended for an advertisement (producing it).

Q. Are you sure that this agrees with the other that was destroyed, with respect to the number and the date of the notes? - A. I made this out, partly from the copy that Mrs. Wade had made, and partly from the copy she requested of her father.

Q. The mistake is corrected, here, it is 30 l

is that the only respect in which it differed from Mrs. Wade's copy? - A. The only respect.

FRANCIS WADE sworn. Examined by Mr. Abbot. Q. Do you recollect receiving of your sister Susannah some bank notes to take account of? - A. I received them from my sister who was last examined.

Q. How many were there of them? - A Four.

Q. Did you take account of them? - A. I did.

Q. Having that account what did you do with them? - A. I left them on the table where my sister was writing, my sister was present then.

Q. You wrote the account at the same table, perhaps? - A. I did.

Q. The papers that you had written, we understand, were destroyed? - A. I was not present then, I was out of town.

Q. Did you see the notes put in this letter? - A. I do not exactly recollect.

Mr. Abbot. Your Lordship will find by this advertisement that all the numbers are correct, (read in Court.) No. 1719, 50 l. dated the first of November 1804, and signed Thomas Wragg . No. 2587, dated 5th of November, 50 l. signed J. Still; No. 2588, 5th of November, 50 l. J. Still; No. 8652, third of November, 30 l. signed J. Longman; these are the four.

Court. Q. The note in question, is 2588? - Mr. Abbot. Yes, 2588.

RICHARD FREEMAN sworn. Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. I believe you was a servant with Mr. Devins, November 21, 1804. Do you recollect a letter on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect to whom that letter was directed? - A. To Mrs. Blundle, Bath.

Q. What did you do with the letter? - A. I put it into Rouse's receiving-office, Wigmore-street.

WILLIAM ROUSE sworn. Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. You were receiver-general of post-office letters on the 21st of November, 1804? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with all the letters that were left at your receiving-office on that day? - A. We took all the letters out of the letter box and put them into a bag, and sealed them up, and sent them to the post-office.

Q. Did you pursue the usual method on that evening? - A. Yes, the very same that we always do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you know whether you was at home on that evening or not? - A. I was.

Q. You are quite sure of that? - A. I am quite sure of it, because of the waste book that we keep.

Q. That book is not here - A. No, I looked to see whether I was, and I was.

Q. Therefore you have no personal knowledge of it; are you always present when the bag is sealed up? - A. In general; when I am at home I always seal them.

Q. So I thought; if you were always at home you seal them, but in your absence? - A. Then my wife seals them.

Q. Is your wife here? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any recollection in your memory of that particular day, any more than any other particular day? - A. No.

Court. Q. By his book he finds that he was at home.

Mr. Myers. Q. Have you any doubt? - A. No,

Q. What are you? - A. I am a grocer.

Court. Q. In the book it stands that you was at home yourself? - A. Yes.

JAMES FADD sworn. Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. In November 1804, I believe you was employed in carrying the bag from Wimpole-street to the General Post Office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect whether you was employed in carrying the bag from Wimpole-street to the General Post Office, on the evening of the 21st of November in the usual manner? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Do you now particularly recollect on that particular day any more than any other day? - A. I have no more recollection than my signing my name to the book.

Q. That book is not here you know? - A. It is in the other room.

THOMAS PARRY sworn. Examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. In what situation were you employed in the General Post Office on the 21st of November, 1804? - A. On that day I was employed in receiving the receiver's bag at the General Post Office.

Q. Do you recollect having on that night received the bag from Wimpole-street? - A. Yes.

Q. You received it in the usual manner? - A. Yes.

Q. And delivered it over as usual? - A. I delivered it over to James Fadd again.

Q. (To Selina Devins .) Q. Do you recollect your sister having done any thing to the letter? - A. She fastened it at both ends.

Court. Q. Sealed it, I suppose? - A. I do not know whether it was with sealing-wax, or with a wafer; I interlined the direction Seymour-street or Seymour-place.

Mr. Abbot. Q. The original direction was Bath generally; Mrs. Blundle's abode was at Seymour-street, Bath? - A. Yes.

PHILIP ABSALOM sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. Q. Do you remember packing the Bath letters on the 21st of November 1804, at the Post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they made up in the usual way on that day? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Who is the person that brings them into the office? - A. They are brought by the messenger Fadd.

Q. Into whose hands would they go from Fadd's? - A. Into the hands of Terry.

Q. Then Terry delivers them to Fadd? - A. Yes, then Fadd brings them; the bag is opened, and they are thrown out upon the table.

Q. Then I apprehend the facers got them? - A. Yes.

Q. And from the facers they go to the stampers? - A. Yes.

Q. Then they go from the stampers to the sorters? - A. Yes.

Q. And all this is done in a large room from one table to another? - A. Yes.

Q. A great number of persons employed of course? - A. A great many.

Q. How many? - A. I cannot justly say; from fifty to sixty or more.

Q. They go from the stampers to the sorters? - A. Yes, and from the sorters a messenger collects them for the taxing clerk.

Q. Were you a taxing clerk for the Bath letters? - A. I was.

Q. Were you the taxing clerk on that night; are you every night or every other night? - A. Every other night.

Q. Do you remember whether you was on that night? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you made out an account of the money to the Bath post? - A. I merely taxed and selected the Bath letters.

Q. That is by putting on Four-pence, or so on? - A. They went from me to Mr. Jephther.

Q. Then it would be Mr. Jepther's business to make up that charge against the Bath postmaster? - A. Yes.

Q. From Mr. Jepther's, where would they go? - A. From Mr. Jepther they would be carried by the secret messenger into the West India office.

Q. But before that messenger would take them Mr. Jepther would make out that charge to the post-master? - A. They are taken over in separate parcels.

Q. How are they taken; in a box or how? - A. They are taken in an open box.

Mr. Rowe. Q. Do you receive them? - A. No; I received them from the collecting messenger.

THOMAS JEPTHER sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. Q. In what situation are you? - A. I then acted as an assistant on the 21st of November 1804, at the third division.

Q. Was that the division in which the last witness, Absalom was employed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive from him the Bath letters? - A. I did.

Q. What was it your business to do with them? - A. I told the amount of them.

Q. The amount of the postage? - A. I told up the amount of the postage, and left them to be taken into the West India room.

Q. You left them in the usual course, to be taken into the West India room? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You took the amount of the postages? - A. I did.

Q. I think you say you left them? - A. I put them in a box where they were to be carried in the regular course of duty.

Q. Do you know that they were to be received in that regular instance; you have no memory of that night? - A. I have not.

Q. You were never asked about it till nine months afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Therefore you have no recollection of that any more than any other night? - A. I have not.

Mr. Rowe Q. You put them in a box in the regular and usual manner? - A. I did.

CHARLES TUCKNESS sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. Q. Were you in the employ of the General Post Office, on the 21st of November 1804. - A. Yes, as a teller, in the same division where the two last witnesses were.

Q. Do you remember receiving the Bath box that evening? - A. No, I had nothing to do with the Bath box that night whatever.

EDWARD WILLIAMS sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. Q. Were you in the employ of the General Post Office on the 21st of November 1804? - A. Yes, in the forepart of the evening to stamp unpaid letters, and after that to attend the clerk on the confidential duty.

Q. In the course of that duty do you remember taking any measure with the Bath box? - A. I took in all letters that evening, but having no memorandums to refer to I cannot say whether I took the Bath box or not

Q. Did you go into the West India room? - A. Yes.

Q. Would it not have been your duty that evening to go into the West India room or not? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you remember perfectly well going into that room? - A. Yes.

JOHN PRICE sworn. Examined by Mr. Attorney-General. Q. I believe you are post-master at Bath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving any letters that came from London on the 21st, and arrived at Bath on the 22d? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the receipt of the bag that came from London on the 21st.? - A. I told the letters of that bag; this is my entry. (producing it.)

Q. The bag came in the usual way sealed? - A. Just so to the best of my recollection.

Q. You have no recollection of any thing particular? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. You took the amount of the postage? - A. Yes.

Q. And that entry recollects you to speak to it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. I see by this entry the result was, the letters that came to you amounted to eightpence more postage than they were charged to you? - A. The letters amounted to 18 l. 2 s. 1 d. but the real amount was 18 l. 2 s. 9 d.

Court. Then there was more on the real amount than there was charged to you? - A. Yes.

Q. That is an accident that sometimes happens? - A. Very often more or less, seldom right.

Q. Perhaps you can tell us how it happens? - A. Perhaps from the hurry of business; I do not think it is intentional; I believe it is unavoidable.

Mr. Attorney-General. Q. I believe the Post Office takes your account in preference to theirs? - A. I believe so.

CATHERINE BLUNDLE sworn. Examined by Mr. Attorney-General. Q. Mrs. Blundle, I believe Mr. Philip Blundle is your husband, is he not? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you live at Bath? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect receiving any letter from Mr. Devins on the 21st of November last year, 1804, containing bank notes? - A. I do.

Q. I believe they were four 50 l. notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any occasion to expect another remittance from him? - A. I had, for he had mentioned in his letter, by the next post he would send the remainder.

Q. Did that letter or remittance arrive? - A. No.

Q. You never received it? - A. No.

JOHN MOSS sworn. Examined by Mr. Attorney-General. Q. I believe you are clerk in the bank? - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive that note any time? - A. It came into my hands as soon as it was paid; I did not pay it.

Q. That bank note has been in your custody as a paid bank note at the bank? - A. Yes, it has.

Q. Do you happen to recollect the day it came? - A. It came on the 11th of September 1805.

Q. Just read the number and the date (the note read in court). No. 2588, 5th of November 1804, 50 l. J. Still.

Q. Look at that J. Still, there has been something torn off; it was originally J. Still? - A. It is torn off, it has been cancelled.

Q. Do you know who the hand-writing of J. Still is? - A. It is my hand-writing, I wrote it myself, there is quite enough to know it.

Court. In what way do you cancel the notes? - A. By tearing off the cashier's name.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Whatever bank notes are paid, come into your hands? - A. Yes, all above two pounds.

Q. Then any other fifty pound note that had been paid, would have come into your hands as well as this? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore a fifty pound note had come to the bank, which had been paid; of course you have a great many others that come into your hands? - A. All issued above two pounds come into my hands.

Q. How many have you come into your hands? - A. A great many millions.

Q. Does it never happen that two bank notes of the same value have the same number? - A. It very rarely happens; I have known such a thing, but it is a very rare circumstance.

Q. Still it does happen that two notes have the same number and the same value equally? - A. Yes.

Mr. Attorney-General. Q. Did you ever know that occur with the same cashier's name? - A. I never knew that occur, it goes through a number of hands on purpose to detect it.

JOHN OAKES sworn. Examined by Mr. Attorney-General. Q. I believe you are a clerk to Mr. Bish, he keeps a lottery-office in Cornhill? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you clerk to him on the 3d of September in this year? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect selling a lottery-ticket on that day, No. 1257? - A. I cannot recollect selling the exact number, I have no doubt but I did sell it.

Q. Have you got your book here? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any means by looking at your books to know whether you did sell that lottery ticket on that day? - A. Yes, if it is correct, it is duly entered.

Court. You say if it is correct by the entry of that book, what appears? - A. By the entry of this book it appears that 1257, was sold on the 3d of September.

Q. What? - A. A lottery ticket.

Mr. Attorney-General. Q. That is your own hand writing? - A. It was made by myself at the time, most likely; our regular way is to do it immediately.

Q. Have you any doubt but that you made it in the ordinary way? - A. Not the least doubt of it.

Q. Have the goodness to look at that Bank note, and see whether you know it? - A. I see the figures in my own hand writing 1257 on the back of it.

Court. Q. What is the number of that note? - A. 2588.

Mr. Attorney-General. Q. You observe upon the back of it 1257 in your own hand writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Are there any letters besides this number in your own hand-writing? - A. Yes, tick, signifying ticket.

Q. These letters and figures were written by yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose did you write them? - A. In case the note should be a bad one, that we might have an opportunity of stopping the ticket.

Q. Are you then able to say from that circumstance, that you received that note for that ticket? - A. To the best of my belief.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. No doubt.

Q. You tell me that it was made for that express purpose that that ticket should be stopped if that Bank note should be bad? - A. It was for that purpose; and that ticket was bought by that Bank note.

Q. You are certain of it? - A. I might make a mistake in the figure; I have no doubt but I did it at the time.

Q. Did you deliver it to any other person to look at at the time? - A. I cannot recollect delivering it at the time; It appears there is a memorandum of Mr. Brookes's upon it, done at that time.

Q. Mr. Brookes is Mr. Bish's nephew, a clerk in the same office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect whether it was a day in which a great deal of business was done? - A. It does not appear by our books that it was a busy day.

Q. Do you recollect how many tickets you sold in that day? - A. Two whole tickets.

Q. Which of these tickets were this, the first or the last? - A. The last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I observed you to speak with a great deal of caution; Mr. Bish does as much business in the lottery way as any gentleman in London? - A. He does.

Q. A great number of persons employed, I take it for granted? - A. Five or six, or upwards.

Q. I observed you to say that, that book refreshed your recollection? - A. It does.

Q. Without the assistance of that book you would not be able to recollect so long back? - A. No.

Q. But that figure I took it you said, you might be mistaken? - A. I did say so.

Q. In the course of the hurry of your business your book is sometimes incorrect with respect to a figure? - A. I have known that fault attach to myself frequently.

Q. It has happened to you frequently, and I suppose may happen to any other person, when you are particularly busy? - A. It might.

Q. This is the third of September you are speaking to? - A. Yes.

Q. When did the lottery begin drawing? - A. I do not exactly recollect the day, I think was the 30th.

Q. Therefore this was bought in the month that the lottery was drawing? - A. It was.

Q. With respect to the memorandum that you made, I think that you said you most likely made the memorandum at the time, you do not mean to be accurate, whether you did make that memorandum at that particular time or not? - A. I will not swear it.

Q. I take it for granted, in proportion as your business or other things call your attention, you sometimes do not? - A. It is our general mode of doing it directly, I never knew an instance of not doing it at the time.

Q. You will not swear whether you did or not? - A. I will not.

Q. Do you know at all the person that bought the ticket? - A. I do not.

Mr. Attorney-General. What was the number of the other ticket that you sold on that one day, you say you sold but two? - A. It appears by the entry to be 17,109.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I suppose the same accident might happen to figures of that number as to the one I have been speaking about? - A. It is possible.

JOHN CHARLES BROOKE sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are in your uncle's lottery-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 3d of September, being there with the last witness, Mr. Oakes? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that Bank note; now looking at the note, does there appear any thing that brings to your mind, or any thing to your recollection? - A. There is the date of the note in my hand writing, 3d of September, 1805, on the back of the note, under the word tick, made by Mr. Oakes.

Q. Do you know how that note came to you, that you might put the date on it? - A. I cannot suppose no other way than it was given me at the shop to look at; they always ask me or my uncle whether they shall take them or not.

Q. Do you recollect being in the office that day? - A. Yes; it is my writing under his writing; it came into my hands that day.

Q. Have you any recollection whether it was a day of hurry or not? - A. It appears not by the book.

Q. How many tickets were sold on that day; look in the book? - A. That I cannot say, I have not the book here?

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I understand you to say that you do not know only by the reference of the book; you do not know how you came by that note you hold in your hand? - A. Only it was taken for a ticket.

Court. (To Oakes) Were you the only person that sold tickets on that day? - A. Not the only one.

Q. Was that gentleman, Mr. Brookes? - A. No, two other clerks.

Q. Whether you remember on that day selling any tickets for two ten pounds or a twenty pounds? - A. I cannot tell, we make no memorandums of the notes we take.

Q. You made a memorandum of the note you took? - A. I did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. (to Mr. Brookes) How many clerks were there on that day selling tickets? - A. Either three or four; three I believe.

Q. You have been shewn that note which you have in your hand, and you are enabled to speak to that memorandum you have made of the date, from which you have imagined that that was paid for the purchase of a lottery-ticket, but you cannot tell from whom on that particular day? - A. No.

THOMAS RICHARDS sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are a messenger in the post-office? - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as to look at this unfortunate young man at the bar, do you know him? - A. Yes.

Q. You was in the post-office on the 30th of October last? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he send you on any message to Mr. Bish's office on that day? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About half after two o'clock.

Q. What did he say to you at that time? - A. He said that he was very unfortunate that morning; that one of his numbers was within one of the one thousand pounds prize; he asked me if I would be so good as to enquire if such a number was drawn, giving me the memorandum of 3; I went accordingly to oblige him, and made an inquiry if they were drawn; the gentleman that attended at Mr. Bish's office that day, said two of the three were drawn blanks, and marked B to each number; the other number he took no account of; upon this one I asked him if he would oblige me with the information whether that was a prize or blank.

Q. I do not ask you what passed between you and the clerk in the office; when you had made the inquiry, did you return to Mr. Andrew? - A. Yes, directly; I delivered the paper into Mr. Andrews's own hands.

Q. What did you then say to Mr. Andrew? - A. I told Mr. Andrew I could not conceive why they were so very inquisitive at the office, so particular in asking me if they were my own tickets; I had told them they were not my own.

Q. You told Mr. Andrew that you had said at the office, that they were not my own; what did Mr. Andrew say to this? - A. He smiled, and said never mind.

Court. Q. Did he say never mind? - A. Yes. and smiled; I said, sir, I do not know what they mean at the office in asking if they were my own numbers; the prisoner said never mind; but the words he said immediately after, I cannot say.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What became of Mr. Andrew at that time? - A. At that time I left him at the office.

Q. How soon after this was it when any clerk came and pointed out you, and you gave the account that Mr. Andrew was the man that had sent you? - A. No other person than Mr. Stow called me.

Q. A person came from Mr. Bish's office and pointed out you as the man that had made the enquiry, you pointed to Mr. Andrew as the person that had sent you on the message for the enquiry of the numbers? - A. Yes.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are the messenger that was employed

to go and enquire about the numbers at Bish's office? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been a messenger in the post-office? - A. About four years next July.

Q. How long has Mr. Andrews been there? - A. A longer time to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Pray, did you see a letter having on it September lottery, 1257. If this ticket should be in the hands of any office-keeper, he is desired to give notice, or to be registered, or any enquiry, to stop the party until the secretary shall be applied to; did you ever see that? - A. Never, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You never heard of it? - A. I will not say I never heard of it, but to the best of my knowledge I never did.

Q. Then you did not know that there was such a paper circulated in order to get at that note? - A. I did not.

Q. Whether Mr. Andrew directed you to go to Mr. Bish's? - A. Yes, particularly.

Q. Were there any thing that you was to keep secret at all about it, in going to Mr. Bish's or any other place? - A. None at all.

Q. If you had gone to any other lottery-office, you could have known the fate of the ticket? - A. Yes, he gave me the information where Mr. Bish was, as I had said I did not know where it was.

Q. When you returned from there, after having made the enquiry, you went to Mr. Andrew? - A. I did.

Q. You told him they were rather inquisitive about it? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Andrew smiled? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Andrew knew of this publication at this time? - A. I do not know.

Q. You was not present at the time Mr. Andrew was apprehended? - A. Yes, I was present.

Q. He was in the post-office yard then; he was not gone away? - A. No, he had not.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You have no recollection of the number you were to enquire for? - A. No.

THOMAS BISH sworn. Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. How soon was it in the course of the day, upon the 30th of October, that you had any enquiry made about that ticket? - A. As soon as I came home from the Bank they told me a person had been to examine it. I immediately gave information to the post-office.

Q. What was the number? - A. 1257.

Q. Had you given directions at your office that if enquiry should be made about that ticket to notice it? - A. I had marked it in our numerical book - stop the party who enquires after this, and give notice to the post-office.

Q. What made you give these directions to your clerks? - A. I had an application made from Mr. Parkin, at the Post-office, if I could gain any information how I came by the bank note.

Q. In consequence of some information that had from the post-office, you had ordered this gentleman's name to be in the books? - A. I had wrote to stop the party.

Q. And in consequence of information that you received from your clerks, you went to the post-office on this day? - A. I did.

Q. And did you communicate with Mr. Stow? - A. I went to Mr. Parkin's office, and communicated to him.

Q. Did you see Mr. Stow? - A. I did not.

Q. Whether on the 30th October the very next number was drawn a prize? - A. I sold the whole sheet of tickets; the next number to that was drawn a prize; 1258 was a thousand-pound prize, drawn the day of drawing before.

Q. Then having conveyed your information to the Post Office, you left it? - A. I took no farther steps about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I presume, whether it was a prize or no, you do not know, only from the number in your book? - A. There is a list every day of the prizes; - I can send for the book if you please.

Mr. Fielding. This ticket is a blank, 1257? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. That you only know from your book? - A. Yes.

DANIEL STOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. What is your situation in the Post Office? - A. A superintending president to the inland letter office, at the General Post Office in London.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Andrew? - A. I do.

Q. Had he any situation in the Post Office? - A. He was a sorter in the inland office, and chief clerk in my office also.

Q. Did he hold these situations in October, 1804? - A. He did.

Q. How long had he been in the Post Office? - A. About ten years.

Q. What was the amount of his salary in the year 1804? - A. Two-hundred and ten pounds a-year.

Q. In November, 1804, was he employed in any confidential business, as to examining letters? - A. He was.

Q. Was any other person also employed upon similar business? - A. Mr. Faulkener.

Q. Did they execute that business together, or on alternate nights? - A. Alternate nights.

Q. What was the particular duty in November 1804? - A. To look over several post towns.

Q. You mean looking over the directions of letters to several post towns? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that one of the post towns? - A. It was.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge which of them executed that duty on the 21st of November? - A. I believe Mr. Andrew.

Q. It is usual in your office to take account of letters and notes that have been miscarried? - A. Upon information being given to that effect it is.

Q. Are the entry made of such losses in a book? - A. They are made in a book at my office.

Mr. Abbot. Have you any account of the miscarriage of a letter intended for Mrs. Blundle at Bath? - A. Yes.

Q. I will trouble you for the entry; had the prisoner access to that book? - A. Yes, he had, in common with the other clerks at my office.

Q. We will trouble you to read the entry?

Mr. Knapp. Who made the entry? - A. Mr. Colebatch.

Q. Is he here? - A. He is.

Court. What book is that entry in? - A. In the missing letter book.

Mr. Abbot. First the date if you please. (the entry read in Court.) Application was made on the 3d of December, 1804, by Mr. Norris, from the secretary's office to the Post office, for a letter.

Q. Read it exactly as it stands? - A. For a letter addressed to Mrs. Blundle, Seymour-street, Bath, containing Bank notes to the value of 180 l.

Mr. Abbot. I bid you to read what is written there? - A. I am.

Q. You are not, you are explaining it.

(The entry read by Mr. Shelton.)

Third of December, receiving-house, Wigmore-street; 21st of November, Mrs. Blundle, Seymour-street, Bath, 180; then in another column, Query, &c. what the sums are, in red ink, that is the answer to query; writer, blank.

Q. (To Mr. Stow.) Do you know when the figures in red ink were made? - A. I do not.

Q. We have heard that there has been a hand bill sent to different lottery-offices, did you know that? - A. I did not.

Q. Was that circumstance known in your office? - A. I do not believe it was.

Q. To stop the ticket? - A. Yes.

Q. You told me the prisoner Mr. Andrew and Mr. Faulkener were employed to examine these letters? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they to be employed in a private room by themselves? - A. Yes.

Court. Have you ever seen them examine at all? - A. I have occasionally.

Q. Do they examine them by a prodigious large candle, so as they may be able to see? - A. They do with taxing letters, not with these particular letters.

Q. What I want to know is, whether if they wanted to discover and see what were the contents of letters in that post? - A. They had that opportunity if they were so inclined.

Q. Is there any regulation with respect to the clerks employed in the Post Office, by which they are required to take notice of Bank notes when they receive them? - A. There is an order of the post master's for that purpose.

Q. It is required of all of them that they should do so? - A. It is a minute of the board.

Q. Is that a minute that is universally known? A. Yes, to all persons taking any money or revenue.

Mr. Knapp. That is contained in the minute, is it? - A. I think it is to all persons in the receipt of revenue, they are directed to write their names across each Bank note they so take.

Mr. Abbot. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar on the 30th of October last? - A. I do.

Q. Did you ask him any questions as to the inquiry that had been made at Mr. Bish's office, about a lottery ticket? - A. I did, on the 30th October, Mr. Freeling, the secretary at the Post Office, sent to me.

Q. In consequence of Mr. Freeling's message, did you speak to Mr. Andrew? - A. I did.

Q. Now relate what past between you and Mr. Andrew?

Court. We do not want any conversation between you and a third person in the absence of the prisoner? - A. I asked Mr. Andrew if he had sent any person to Mr. Bish's office, to inquire the rate of a lottery ticket, he told me that he had, and that the ticket was his own, he then gave me the ticket from his pocket.

Mr. Abbot. This is the ticket? - A. Yes, I did not open the ticket at the time he delivered it me, till I went up stairs to Mr. Freeling; I delivered it to Mr. Freeling, he took it into another room to compare it with the other letter? Mr. Freeling sent for me and compared it in my presence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Was Mr. Andrew present at that time? - A. No.

Q. Is that the ticket? - A. It is the ticket, No. 1257.

Mr. Abbot. When the prisoner had delivered the ticket, did you make any inquiry of him

as to where he got it? - A. I did, he told me that he bought it at Mr. Bish's and that he gave for it either a 20 l. Bank note, or two 10 l. but he could not recollect which.

Q. Did you inquire of him when he bought it? - A. I did, he told me about a week before the drawing of the lottery, I think to the best of my recollection.

Q. Did you make any inquiry of him as to the 20 l. or 10 l. notes that he said he had paid for them? - A. I asked him if he could recollect the number of these notes? He said he could not.

Q. Did you enquire of him from whom he had received these notes? - A. I think I did, I am not quite certain.

Q. Did not he say he could not tell? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did he say any thing to you as to the state of Mr. Bish's office at the time when he bought it? - A. He said that the office was nearly full at the time he bought the ticket.

Q. I believe you went with him to Mr. Parkin's house, who is the solicitor to the post-office? - A. I did.

Q. Were the same inquiries made to him again at Mr. Parkin's? - A. They were.

Q. Did he then give any account of the two tens or the twenty that he supposed he had paid for the ticket? - A. He did not.

Q. Do you recollect whether he said then by whom he received them? - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. Do you recollect whether Mr. Parkin said any thing as to the importance of his endeavouring to recollect from whom he took these notes? - A. Mr. Parkin told him it was of the utmost consequence for him to recollect from whom he had received these notes.

Q. What answer did he make to that? - A. I think he said he could not recollect.

Q. Was any thing then said to the prisoner as to searching his house? - A. Yes.

Q. What was said upon that subject? - A. Mr. Parkin told him that it was necessary to search his house; Mr. Parkin and I accompanied the prisoner to his house, and searched it.

Q. You did not take an officer with you? - A. No, we did not.

Q. That was for the purpose of doing it in the least manner that should be unpleasant? - A. I believe that was it.

Q. Upon searching, there was nothing found which threw a light upon this subject? - A. There was nothing found but a duplicate, which Mr. Parkin took away.

Q. After the search, was he informed that he must be put into some custody? - A. He was.

Q. Did you return with him to the post-office for that purpose? - A. I did.

Q. Do you recollect whether in your way to the post-office you said any thing to urge him to recollect where he got these notes? - A. I did, I impressed it strongly on his mind the necessity of so doing, where he got the two tens and the twenty; I saw him again next morning.

Q. Was Mr. Parkin present then? - A. He was; he was then asked if he could recollect where he had them notes; Mr. Parkin I think put it very strongly to him then.

Q. Was the prisoner at any time asked by Mr. Parkin whether he was on the confidential duty on the 21st of November? - A. He was asked by Mr. Parkin if he was on the confidential duty on the 21st of November; on a reference to the office-book he admitted that he was on duty that night.

Q. He referred to the office-book, and he found it so? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there an entry in the book upon which every person is put down? - A. There is an entry on which every persons name is put, except those persons who are on secret duty.

Q. How was the reference of the book to be? - A. Because he saw Mr. Faulkener's name on the regular duty, and his name was not; therefore he must be on the regular duty, and Andrew upon the not regular.

Q. This examination duty has been for a long time? - A. Yes, before, and continued a long time after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. I believe you have known the young man at the bar ever since he came to the post-office? - A. Yes.

Q. He remained in the service of the post-office till the day he was apprehended? - A. He has.

Q. In all the questions that were put to him, except in the two tens and the twenty, was his story consistent at all times? - A. Perfectly so.

Q. Was it the book in which was entered the notes of Mrs. Blundle that had been lost, was that book opened to the inspection of any other person in that office? - Q. Yes. in general.

Q. Then he had the opportunity of seeing what was in this book, the book giving intelligence that 180 l. was lost? - A. Just so.

Q. That was in December the very month after the letter was sent? - A. On Dec. 3. after November 21.

Q. He still continued in the post office, notwithstanding what he had seen in that book,

down to the time of his apprehension? - A. Yes, down to the time of apprehension.

Q. Did he seem to try to recollect that which Mr. Stow and Mr. Parkin very humanely impressed him to remember, the number of the 20 l. and the two 10 l. notes; did he try to recollect as much as was in his power? - A. I think he did.

Q. Did it appear to you that in consequence of the questions that were put to him, that he endeavoured to recollect before he made an answer to the questions? - A. I think he did; he seemed to consider; and as far as I could judge, that he could not recollect the thing.

Q. After he had endeavoured at different times to recollect, it was then proposed to search his house, and through the kindness of the prosecutors, no officer but you and Mr. Parkin were to make the search. Did he make the least objection to your searching the house? - A. None in the least.

Q. On Mr. Bish sending to you at the office, were there any hesitation on his part to the questions he was asked? - A. On the contrary, perfectly free.

Q. You say you have known him for the space of ten years? - A. I have known him ever since he has been at the office.

Q. He has been at the office for ten years: has he always remained in this office? - A. He was removed to this confidential duty on account of his excellent character.

Q. How long had he been in this last confidential situation? - A. About three years.

Q. Had you occasion during the three years, when he was more particularly under your care, of observing his conduct and demeanor? - A. Very often, indeed.

Q. Having had that opportunity for the space of three years and more, your immediate attention being paid to it, what is your opinion of him? - A. My opinion of him was, that he was one of the most correct men that I ever met with in my life, strictly honest, and of the greatest integrity.

Q. That opinion that you thus formed of him, was from the opportunity that you had given you of watching his conduct narrowly? - A. Of course.

Q. Did the connection that was between you, he being a clerk in that particular department, produce any intimacy between you? - A. I had a great regard for him, through his being in that confidential duty.

Q. I would ask you whether you had the means of knowing whether he was an extravagant man or economical? - A. I always thought him economical in every respect.

Q. From the whole of your observations of his conduct and character, would it ever have entered your mind to have suspected him to be guilty of an offence of this sort? - A. The last man that I should have thought.

Q. His salary, I understand, is about 210 l. a year. Do you know of his having any other means of subsistence beside that? - A. He lets lodgings, by which I understand he got about 70 l. a year.

Q. Any other source? - A. An estate that was sold at Mansfield in Nottinghamshire; I understood that he received some money there on account of his mother and sister.

Mr. Abbot. Q. Not for his own use? - A. Not for his own use.

Q. You stated that he received some money from the sale of his house, on account of his mother and sister, not for his own use; when was it? - A. In the year 1802.

Q. You mentioned, that in your opinion he was quite economical? - A. I always thought so.

Q. Were you aware that he was a purchaser of whole or parts of lottery tickets? - A. I was not.

Q. Where is his house? - A. In Ely Place, Holborn.

Q. Do you know the amount of it? - A. I think 80 l. a year.

Q. When the particulars of lost notes are given at the Post-office, is it usual to enter the particulars in that book? - A. It is whenever they are given.

Q. And not to put query? - A. No.

Q. Then those words query, and what, would lead a clerk to suppose that the particulars were unknown? - A. It would.

THOMAS COLEBATCH sworn. Examined by Mr. Myers. Q. You have the the register book of last year? - A. Yes, I produce it.

Q. Look at the date, the 3d of December, 1804, in whose hand writing is that? - A. In mine.

Q. Had the prisoner at the bar access to this book? - A. He had.

Q. There are some figures in red ink; are they written by you? - A. They are not.

Q. Do you know who they are written by? - A. I do not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know when they were written? - A. I do not.

GEORGE FAULKENER sworn. Examined by Mr. Rowe. Q. You belong to the superintendant's office, at the General Post-office? - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember a secret examination of Bath letters in November, 1804? - A. Yes.

Q. You was one of the persons employed on that duty? - A. I was.

Q. With whom were you so employed? - A. With Mr. Andrew.

Q. How did you settle the duty between you? - A. He did it one night, I did it of the other.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to state who did it on the 20th of November? - A. I did it on the 20th.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What paper is that you have got in your hand? - A. It is the date that I did it.

Q. When did you put it down? - A. A week back.

Mr. Rowe. Q. Have you a certain rule that you can ascertain that you were not on that duty on the 21st of November, 1804? - A. Yes, I never knew any one besides him and me do it.

Q. Therefore, if the witness was not there, it must have been the prisoner Andrew? - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of that duty, would a letter that came in the Bath bag, have come to his hands? - A. It would, if it had not been taken away before, it must have gone into his hands.

Q. Then look into the lost-letter book, and see who those figures in red, in the entry, was made by? - A. These figures in red were made by me.

Q. Read this entry? - A. Fifty, Fifty, Fifty, and a Thirty, the answer to the query of 180 l.

Q. Is that the whole of the entry in red ink? - A. I have wrote the word lost in red ink.

Q. Can you take upon you to state when you wrote this, was it subsequent to the query? - A. Oh! Yes, a long time after, to the best of my recollection, after the prisoner was taken up.

Q. So that query remained in black ink, up to the time that the prisoner was taken up? - A. Exactly so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. In the course of the duty that he had on the 21st, the Bath bag would have found its way before him? - A. Exactly so.

Q. I thought you added, of course if it had been taken out before, it would not have found its way there? - A. Certainly.

FRANCIS FREELING sworn. Examined by Mr. Abbot. Q. You are the secretary of the Post-office? - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect receiving from Mr. Stow a lottery ticket? - A. I do.

Q. I will trouble you, Sir, to look at the ticket. Is that the ticket? - A. It is.

Court. Q. What number is it? - A. 1257.

Q. The other paper you hold in your hand, was a hand bill? - A. It was.

Q. Was that sent to the lottery-offices about town? - A. It was.

Q. Was the fact of that hand-bill being sent, made known at Mr. Stow's office? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Nor to any other office except to your own? - A. Solely to my own.

Q. Is it usual to make such communications known at Mr. Stow's office? - A. Certainly.

Q. Upon this occasion this practice was departed from? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You say that the hand-bill proceeded from your immediate office? - A Certainly.

Q. To how many was it made known to in your office? - A. To three or four.

Q. And to those confidentially? - A. Perfectly so.

Q. How long have you known this person at the bar? - A. I have known him ever since he was a boy.

Q. Do you remember his coming into the office? - A. Most certainly.

Q. In course he came recommended very strongly; I believe my Lord Chesterfield recommended him? - A. Exactly so.

Q. What value was the place when he first came into the office? - A. I believe about 40 l. a-year

Q. Low salary. How soon was it increased? - A. It was increased in consequence of his good behaviour; I cannot tell exactly when it was.

Q. Did he fill any other situation till he enjoyed the present one? - A. Yes

Q. Do you know what salary he had at the time of apprehension? - A. I do not know.

Q. We have been told that he has been in the present situation for about three years from the first time that he came into the office, and from one situation to another, what was his conduct in the office? - A. I always thought him much above suspicion.

Q. Was it not always highly respectable, and an honest character? - A. So it was always represented to me.

ANTHONY PARKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Abbot. You have heard the account that Mr. Stow has given of the conversation of the prisoner, and that in your presence? - A. I have.

Q. Is his account correct? - A. Is is.

Q. Have you any share of a ticket or tickets that you received from the prisoner at the bar? - A. I asked the prisoner if he had any Bank notes in his possession, upon which he produced

two one-pound notes and two shares of lottery tickets in September lottery 1805, one an eighth share and the other a sixteenth share; he also produced a ticket in Bowyer's History of England lottery. The bank-notes I returned to him; the shares of tickets I kept.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I can say no more to you than I have already stated to Mr. Parkin and the gentlemen of the Post-Office. It is most certainly true that I bought the ticket at Mr. Bish's, at the time the office was full: that, instead of giving a fifty-pound note, I paid either a twenty or a smaller one. This is my case, together with the good character I have hitherto had. I therefore leave my case to your lordship and the gentlemen of the jury.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 32.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-47

47. EDWARD NELSON was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar: do you know his person? A. I do: I produce a certificate of the indictment upon which he was convicted in this place.

Q. From whom did you receive it? A. From Mr. Shelton: I saw him sign it.

(The certificate read in court.)

"Middlesex. These are to certify that at the general sessions of the peace and delivery of the king's gaol of Newgate, holden at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, that on Wednesday the 1st of December, in the 43d year of his present majesty's reign, before his majesty's justices then present, Edward Nelson , labourer, was in due form of law tried and convicted for that he on the 22d of November aforesaid, with force and arms, in the king's highway, in and upon one Robert Bartlett , a subject of our lord the king, feloniously did make an assault, putting him in fear of his life; one steel watch-chain value one shilling, and three metal seals value one shilling, from the person and against the will of the said Robert Bartlett , in the king's highway aforesaid, then and there feloniously did steal and carry away, against the statute and against the king's peace. He, the said Edward Nelson , was thereupon ordered to be hanged by the neck till he was dead: but his majesty having been graciously pleased to extend his royal mercy to him, on condition that he should be transported to New South Wales for and during the term of his natural life; which being in due form of writing signified and signed by one of his majesty's principal secretaries of state, he the said Edward Nelson was ordered to be transported for and during the term of his natural life. 14th of November 1805.

Signed Thomas Shelton .

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. I was in court at the time the prisoner received sentence for this very offence.

Q. For this highway robbery? A. Yes.

Q. You had the charge to forward him to transportation? A. I delivered him on board the Portland Hulk at Langstone Harbour near Portsmouth.

Q. Did you go with him all the way? A. Yes, with others, in May 1803.

Q. You are perfectly sure of his person? A. Yes.

Q. You delivered him there to those appointed by government to receive him? A. Yes.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. I belong to Bow Street Office. I apprehended the prisoner at the bar. I went to St. Giles's watchhouse on the morning of the 9th of November last: I saw the prisoner there: he was brought in there upon a charge of beating a woman the over night. I went and informed Mr. Bond of it (I knew the prisoner very well). Mr. Bond gave me a letter, and I went and brought him and the woman who was at the watchhouse down to Mr. Bond.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-48

48. MARY TILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Cantley , a dollar value five shillings, and two shillings in silver, a two-pound bank-note, and a one-pound bank-note, the property of Joseph Cantley .

JOSEPH CANTLEY sworn. I am a publican : I live at the King's Head, Church Street, Bethnal Green .

Q. What was the prisoner?

A. She was a lodger of mine: her husband is a broad-velvet weaver. On the tenth of last month, being Sunday, they were both out. At night, when they came home, it was about ten o'clock. They wanted some porter before they went to bed: accordingly there was some brought to them: it was going on then towards eleven o'clock. I had nobody then in the house but what slept in the house. My wife desired me to shut up: I shut up and went to bed. My wife brought up the young child, and put it to bed to me. She told me

she would go below and get the rest up to bed. I had the misfortune about four months ago to lose forty-five pounds out of my wife's pocket; and while I lay there I thought I heard somebody in the room. Not being satisfied, I threw off the clothes; I arose up in bed; I saw the prisoner taking the notes and cash out of my breeches pocket. When she had got them all out, she was on her right knee, she must have crawled on all-fours to have got in the room; and the moment she saw me she rose up, and she appeared quite confused. She had then the property in her hand and did not know where to put it. She exclaimed to me, Cantley, get my husband up to bed. I made no reply: I instantly got out of bed, keeping my eye on the prisoner: she stooped down and put the money in the breeches pocket. Before I went to bed the notes and cash were in separate pockets, and when I got up they were all in one, except two shillings, which were laying on the carpet. By this time she got outside of the door upon the landing-place. Instead of calling her husband as she desired me, I called my wife. I shut to the door, and put the bar down. I went to my breeches, and examined them to see whether every thing was safe.

Q. You locked her out? A. Yes I found the notes were returned again, but the quantity of silver I cannot say: there was a dollar and some few shillings.

Q. You found the notes and the money in the breeches was right? A. Yes, except two shillings.

Q. Which pocket had it been removed from? A. The notes were in the right-hand pocket and the silver was in the left. We found the silver and the notes in the right-hand pocket. I saw the notes in her hand.

Q. How do you know that; was there a candle in the room? A. Yes.

Q. Then she might see you as well as you saw her? A. No, she could not exactly see me: she did not know that I was in bed. The moment that she saw me she was confused enough. She took them both out of my pockets: I saw them in her hand.

Q. You say the cash was found among your notes: how much silver? A. A dollar and a few shillings: exactly to one or two I cannot say.

Q. We will say four? A. Four or five: I cannot say to one or two shillings.

Q. Do you know what you found? A. I did not count it.

Q. You certainly could tell us what you found, if you did not know what you lost? A. I did not count the shillings to see how many there were: there was two shillings on the ground.

Q. How much silver had you when you went to bed? A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you mean that there were three or four or five shillings in the whole? A. I cannot say exactly to one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Did you say you are a publican? A. Yes.

Q. A married man? A. Yes.

Q. Your wife has got a child too. I suppose your wife is apt to be jealous, is not she? A. I can say she is one of the best women in the world.

Q. Upon your oath is she not a little jealous of you now and then? A. For what? she has no occasion to be jealous.

Q. So I might say of my wife if she was jealous of me, that she had no occasion; you say your wife brought up your child to you: you was gone to bed first? A. Yes.

Q. You shut up the house: you was polite enough to leave her up to take up your child? A. She advised me to go to bed as the lodgers were all in: I left them all in the tap-room when I went to bed.

Q. How long had the poor woman at the bar and her husband lodged in your house? A. Two years and a quarter.

Q. She knew that you burned a light in your room? A. I dare say she did.

Q. Before your wife went to bed this woman was in your room (I do not ask you to discover secrets)? Knowing that there was light burning in your room she came in to pick your pocket? A. She came in and did pick it.

Q. Upon your oath did you ever make any attempt to charge this woman till your wife was half way up stairs, and the woman's husband half way up after her? Not you: not till the morning? A. I did not: I thought I would let the case rest till morning. My wife is a delicate woman, and I would not apprehend her that night, because the least thing in the world puts her in a flurry.

Q. And she is very apt to be jealous I am told. Did you not drink with that woman's husband and the two soldiers that were quartered at your house? A. I was in bed, with my breeches: my wife came to the bed side: I said to her, they shall go to bed: I will tell you by and by: let it rest till the morning. My wife went out instantly and fetched half a pint of gin, to make all things peaceable. The prisoner insisted upon having some gin. It was not on my request: I told her not.

Q. This woman is tried for a capital offence: it is no joke: attend to me, sir. Did your wife only bring up one half pint of gin, as you say? Were not two half pints of gin brought

into your bed room? and you, to make all things easy and comfortable, drank with them out of the two half pints of gin? A. I said no.

Q. Did you or did you not drink, for the purpose of accommodating all matters, and to settle that business? A. I did it because she was so urgent, and with a deal of persuasion; to make all things quiet I took a glass for the present time.

Court. Q. What kind of a light did you burn? A. A rush-light stood down on the stove in a tin candlestick.

Q. What size room is your room? A. It is a good sizeable room. My breeches were close by the fire-place, where the rush-light was burning.

Q. You leave your breeches on the ground, do you? A. I always do every night, to be handy to put on in the morning.

Q. What notes were there in your breeches pocket? A. A one-pound note and a two-pound note.

Q. So then in fact you lost nothing? A. She took them out of my pocket and put them in again.

Q. That is not an answer to my question: your answer should have been, no, I lost nothing? A. I do not know that I did.

Q. You know that you did not? A. I cannot say what quantity of shillings I had: there is no doubt but what it was returned too likewise.

CATHARINE CANTLEY sworn.

Q. You are the wife of the last witness? A. Yes. All that I know, when I had left the child up stairs in bed, I shut up the bar. Mrs. Tiley, the prisoner, asked me if my husband was gone to bed? I told her that he was gone to bed.

Q. How long was this after he was gone to bed? A. About four or five minutes. Soon after she took her child up to bed.

Q. How long after? A. Four or five minutes. She left her husband in the tap-room. I saw no more of her, only in the landing-place, when my husband called me up.

Q. How long was that? A. From the first to the last it was no more than a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley.

Q. Your husband could scarcely have gone to sleep? A. He had gone up to bed, and she went up after him.

Q. Was he quite sober? A. Yes.

- sworn. I am a taylor. On the 10th of November, Mrs. Tiley, the prisoner at the bar, came into Mrs. Cantley's house: it might be past ten o'clock. We had a pot of beer or two together. Soon after Mr. Cantley shut up the shutters: he went up to bed. Soon after that I went to bed: then I met the prisoner on the stairs; she was coming down stairs. She asked me if I would be a quartern of gin to her quartern? I said yes. We went up stairs. Mrs. Cantley went up stairs afterwards to Mr. Cantley. The prisoner said she would go into their bed-room to drink it, and she did go into Mr. Cantley's room. After that was out, they said they would have another half-pint. Cantley said we should not have any more. We said, Mrs. Cantley we must have another half-pint.

Q. Did Mr. Cantley drink with you? A. He did at last, after having refused. We had another half-pint, but Cantley drank none of that.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-49

49. JAMES WARWICK and JOHN STEVENS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Kirby , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seventy-two shirts, value 3 l. fifty-one bed gowns, value 2 l. and seventy-five pair of stockings, value 3 l. 5 s. the property of Thomas Kirby .

THOMAS KIRBY sworn. I live in Baron-lane, Finchley . I have a wife and seven children: we all live together.

Q. Your wife takes in washing, does she? A. Yes.

Q. Particularly for a boarding school in that neighbourhood? A. Yes.

Q. On the 4th or 5th of December had your wife fetched linen from this school? A. Yes; boys' shirts and other linen.

Q. On the 5th of December who was up last in your family? A. Myself.

Q. What time did you go to bed? A. At eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you fasten the door and the windows? A. Yes.

Q. Who got up first in the morning? A. A lodger of mine.

Q. Is that lodger here? A. No; he is only a boy that rides the twopenny post mail horse.

Q. Did he go out of the door before you got up? A. He and I were on the stairs at the same time, only he had got the start of me.

Q. What time in the morning was this? A. About seven o'clock.

Q. When he went down first did he discover any thing? A. He exclaimed that the street door was open.

Q. You went down and looked, did you? A. Immediately.

Q. You found it was so? A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe any marks of breaking about the door? A. None at all: it was unbolted. I locked it at night, and hung the key up inside of the door, and bolted it within.

Q. Then of course whoever came into the house must have come in some other way, not at the door? A. I found they came in at the window at the back of the house.

Q. What marks of violence did you see there? A. I saw at the bottom part of the window the wood work broken away; the window was partly open, and the sash was shoved on one side: it is a little sash, only three squares. It is a wooden house; the window was shoved within the partition - it was shoved within the wood work of one side.

Q. So that the window was only secured by a sliding frame? A. Yes.

Q. And that frame was shoved of one side? A. It lay on the ground a part of it; and the other part was on the frame. It was only a kind of a bead, which confined the window from going out of the groove.

Q. There was a bead on the internal and on the external - the external was broken off and fell on the ground; in consequence of this the window was shoved of one side? A. Yes.

Q. So as to admit a man's hand? A. Yes.

Q. It was not taken out of the frame then? A. No.

Q. How was this window secured? A. I never knew it would open before; I thought it had been made so.

Q. So that the window was always fast, - you never was in the habit of opening it? A. Never was in the habit of opening it.

Q. But the wood being taken off part of the bead, they were able to shove the window of one side? A. Yes.

Q. Did they shove it in the groove? A. Yes, there is three squares, they shoved it in a square and a half.

Q. You are perfectly sure the window was completely close when you went to bed? A. Perfectly so.

Q. Then there was room enough for a little man to get through? A. There was quite sufficient room for any body to get through.

Q. When you found this was the case, I suppose you examined the house? A. Yes.

Q. And many things were missing? A. Yes.

Q. What were missing? A. About eighty shirts.

Q. Is your wife here? A. No.

Q. This was a numerous school, there was a many children there, was there? A. Yes, upwards of seventy boys.

Q. Had you seen this linen the over night? A. Yes, all of it: there was about sixty boys' calico night shirts.

Q. Boys' bed gowns? A. Yes; and about fifty brown holland pinafores: and several other articles of my own property, that I could not swear to even if I were to see them.

Q. They were all gone? A. All gone.

Q. Was the whole house ransacked? A. No, there was a number of pairs of stockings that were left.

Q. You heard no alarm in the night? A. Before I went to bed the dog ran to the door and barked, and that made me be very careful of fastening the house up.

Q. Is your house in a village or in a street? A. We have got a neighbour that lives under the same roof, my door goes into his house; the two houses are together.

Q. Did you make any inquiry after your things? A. I immediately set out to Bow-street, on the 6th in the morning, and gave information there.

CHARLES BACON sworn. I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. Do you remember Kirby calling at the office? A. Not to my knowledge. I knew nothing of his information at all.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? A. I know them well.

Q. When was it that you discovered the prisoners? A. On the 6th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in company with Loyd and Crouch, my fellow-officers, at the lower part of Islington, by the back of Scott's-place, going to Ball's-pond.

Q. Was it near the old Thatched-house? A. It is below the old Thatched-house. As I was going towards Ball's-pond I met the prisoners. I stopped Warwick, the tall man, and asked him what he had got? He had this bundle (they both had bundles). Warwick told me it was working clothes. I asked him what they consisted of? He told me there was some shirts and his working clothes. I asked him where he brought them from? He told me from Northamptonshire. I told him I thought that was a great way to bring such a load as that. I was not satisfied with what he told me: I took him into the Rose, in Frog-lane.

Q. Did you take him or them? A. We took them both.

Q. You were three of you? A. Yes.

Q. You took both to the public-house? A. Yes, to the sign of the Rose, in Frog-lane, and examined them both there; and I found a great many things, quite contrary to what he told me.

Q. You examined both bundles, of course?

A. Yes: after having them there I opened Warwick's waistcoat, and found some shirts wrapped round his body; the waistcoat was buttoned over it.

Q. You took these shirts with the bundles, and took the prisoners before a magistrate? A. I did, at Bow-street.

Q. Did you search the other man? A. William Crouch searched him. I told him to be particular in searching him, and to keep the prisoners apart.

Q. The bundles you secured, and you have had them in your custody ever since. A. Yes, all the things: I have had them in my possession ever since.

Q. As you were taking them to Bow-street, did either of them say any thing how they came by the property? A. Before I brought them out of the Rose, I asked Warwick where he got them, as I was sure he did not come by them honestly. After some time he told me he got them at Finchley.

Q. Was Stevens by when he said so? A. Yes.

Q. Did Warwick say that he got them from Finchley, or that we got them at Finchley? A. I believe they both answered that we got them from Finchley.

Q. I wish you to be sure of that. You are quite sure that Warwick said that he got them at Finchley. Did he say by himself, or in company with the other? A. They both consented to it, I am clear of.

Q. Did they mention particularly about the house where they took them from? A. I asked them where it was? They told me it was at the further part of Finchley; they could not say exactly. I then asked them what night it was they got them? They told me it was between the hours of one and two, on Thursday the 6th of December. I asked them where they had been all that time with them? They told me that they had concealed them.

Q. I wish you to be accurate whether it was they or he? A. Warwick told me, Stevens was by, that they had concealed them in Hornsey Wood. That was all that happened then.

Q. Did they say that they had fetched them from Hornsey Wood that night? A. They said they had fetched them from Hornsey. I will not swear whether it was day or night. They fetched them from Hornsey Wood that evening. (I produce the property). I then ordered a coach, and put them and the things in a coach. Then I asked them where the things lay in the house at Finchley? Warwick said, in a cradle, I asked him what he had done with the cradle? He told me that he had left it on Finchley Common.

THOMAS LOYD sworn. I am a Bow-street officer. I was with Bacon when he stopped them.

Q. Were you present when Warwick told him the story that we have just heard? Is it true in all circumstances? And the answer that the prisoners made, are they all true? A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when Warwick said that he brought them from Finchley? Did Stevens say any thing? A. Yes, they were both in company: Stevens said that they broke open the house at Finchley between one and two in the morning.

WILLIAM CROUCH sworn. Q. You have heard the account given by your fellow-officers: that account is true? A. Yes.

Q. (to Prosecutor). Look at the different articles produced - do you know them? A. This article is my own daughter's frock. This is another frock.

Q. These shirts, can you swear to them? A. My sister will swear to them; she gave them into my possession. I have fourteen odd stockings: I have since found the fourteen fellow stockings to match them.

Q. Then the robbers, whoever they were, carried off odd stockings, not pairs? A. Yes.

MARY COWZENS sworn. Q. Can you swear to these articles? A. I can.

Q. The children were under your care, and you put these articles to your brother's to wash? A. Yes.

Warwick's defence. It is my first time, and I hope you will show me mercy.

Steven's defence. The same.

WARWICK - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

STEVENS - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-50

50. JOHN RAYDEN and GEO. RAYDEN were indicted for feloniously and sacrilegiously stealing, on the 23d of July , five hundred weight of lead, value 50 s. the property of the Rev. Dr. Wright , rector of the parish of St. Mary Matfellon, otherwise Whitechapel ; and several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them; and WILLIAM NOBLE for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Alley, and the case was stated by Mr. Pooley).

THOMAS SADLER sworn. (Examined by Mr. Alley). Q. Were you surveyor of the church of Whitechapel? A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed to survey the lead-work

of that church? A. I was; it is as far back as the month of May last.

Q. For what purpose did you survey it? A. For the purpose of ascertaining the amount of the expence of repairing the church.

Q. Tell me whether you was able to make any fair calculation for the expence of the lead of that church? A. I calculated the old lead at 14 ton.

Q. Was the church to undergo a repair? A. The church was to undergo a thorough repair.

Q. Who was to do the lead work of it? A. Mr. Noble, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you superintend the stripping off the lead from the church? A. It was done under my directions. Mr. Crosskey was the person appointed by me to see the lead taken off.

Q. When the lead was taken off from the church, where was it deposited? A. In a closet in the church porch.

Q. Whereabouts is that closet? A. Under the south-west gallery stairs.

Q. Who was to keep the key of that closet after the lead was deposited there? A. Crosskey.

Q. Was any other person entrusted with the key but Crosskey? A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You say that you know Noble was employed to do the lead work: was he to have the old lead? A. He was to have all the old lead; but there was no specific agreement in the contract when he was to have this old lead.

Q. Did you see this executed? (A paper handed to the witness). A. That is my writing. I saw this contract executed.

JOHN SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you see the execution of that with the other party. A. I did.

Court. Q. With what other party? Mr. Alley, A. On the part of the contractors and the other party.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Just read that part whether he was to have the old lead, and how he was to have it.

(That part of the contract read in Court). All the old lead and new lead which may be taken out or brought in shall be weighed in the presence of the surveyor, or any other person to be appointed for that purpose; he shall regularly take an account of the same. No lead shall be taken out of the premises, nor any lead brought in, but what has been previously weighed and the account taken by the surveyor, under any pretence whatever.

Mr. Alley. Q. (to Sadler). Was it permitted to Noble to take any lead otherwise than in that contract? A. It never was.

Q. Be so good as to describe the manner under the contract in which it was taken away? A. The lead was generally taken out of this closet under the south-west staircase, and put into the scales in my presence and weighed, and in the presence of Noble also. When it was weighed, it was taken out of the scale and shot into the porch, and taken away by Mr. Noble immediately in a truck.

Q. It was not left on the premises for Mr. Noble to come and take it away afterwards? A. It was not in any instance that I recollect. It was taken away through the west gate of the church-yard.

Q. Did Mr. Noble render to you any account after the lead was taken away from the church? A. Yes.

Q. Just show the account. A. This is it, (producing it).

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Is that the original account? A. It is the original account in his own hand-writing.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did he deliver it to you? A. He delivered it to me.

Q. Tell us the quantity of old lead which Mr. Noble gives credit to? A. Two hundred one ton weight and twenty-five pounds; but there is a mistake in that account of twenty-five pounds, which Mr. Noble readily admitted, which made it altogether two hundred one ton weight one quarter and seventeen pounds.

Q. On looking on that account are you satisfied that that was all the quantity of lead that was on that church? A. I am not satisfied that it was all the lead: It was all the lead that was weighed. I stated the deficiency at that period. I was satisfied at that period that there was a deficiency of three or four tons of old lead.

Q. How was it that you made your calculation of the lead upon the church? A. By admeasurement, upon an average, the old lead at seven pound a foot. I was satisfied that the lead weighed heavier upon an average. On cutting a foot from some parts of it, I was clearly convinced that the lead weighed heavier than seven pound a foot; some pieces weighed as high as eight pound a foot.

Q. So that when you take it at seven pound a foot you are satisfied that two foot must be fourteen pound? A. I was.

Q. What is the difference between the account that he gave and your calculation? A. The difference between Mr. Noble's account and my calculation, I perceived there was a deficiency of between three and four ton, putting it in a fair calculation.

Q. The lead that was stripped off was replaced by new lead? A. It was.

Q. Did you take the weight of the new lead? A. Generally. The weight of the new lead

used about the church was of different weights: that weight generally run about seven or eight pound a foot: some was more and some less, taking the whole upon an average: the hips and ridges were less.

Q. Having made a calculation of the old and new lead, do you think the weight of the old lead would have been sufficient for the new lead? A. I do not, because there were several places covered with new lead which were never covered before.

Q. What do you think that additional weight would be? A. The additional lead would have been about two ton: I do not take upon me to state accurately.

Q. How much new lead was charged in addition by the prisoner? A. I cannot take upon me to say what quantity is charged for the extra work: it is all charged together in the gross sum along with the other lead.

Court. Q. How many tons in all of new lead are charged by Mr. Noble the prisoner? A. Sixteen tons seven hundred and twenty-seven pound weight. On the 12th of September the deficiency missing of the old lead must be upon the most moderate calculation between three and four tons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best.

Q. All this deficiency depends upon the accuracy of your calculation and your judgement entirely? A. Yes.

Q. Do you call yourself a surveyor? A. I do.

Q. How long have you been a surveyer. A. I cannot take upon me to say the number of years.

Q. Was you ever surveyor before this job? A. I never measured a church before in my life.

Q. You are a carpenter? A. I am by profession.

Q. Your father is one of the church-wardens of this parish? A. He is.

Q. In consequence of that you have very properly told us that you never measured a church before in your life? A. I never measured the bulk of a church for the brick work and all the work of that church.

Q. From that argument did you ever measure a chuch before? A. Never before. This I measured myself.

Q. Talking to a man who understands figures, the least mistake in a figure will make all the difference? A. There is no doubt of that.

Q. Whether Mr. Noble was the first contractor - I believe there were two persons of the name of Brown and Lewington, who had first contracted for that work? A. They were the first contractors of this work. They gave up this job: they would not comply with one of the conditions.

Q. Did not Lewington and Brown begin the work? A. They did do a part of the work, but not in the contract.

Q. Did not they strip lead? A. They did not strip lead to my knowledge: they were stopping holes principally.

Q. Upon your oath were not they employed about the lead work of this church? A. They were employed about the lead work of the steeple, but that had nothing to do with the contract.

Q. Did you make one contract for the steeple and another for the church? Was it not a part of the lead work of the church that Lewington and Brown did? A. Their work was stopping holes in the turret.

Q. Is not the lead of the steeple part of that contract? A. A part of the lead of the steeple is in that contract, but not that part of the lead which Lewington and Brown were performing.

Q. While these men were employed about the steeple, they had access to the steeple of the church I take it for granted? A. There is not the least doubt of it.

Q. You were not with them the whole time? A. Nor a quarter of the time.

Q. Nor with Noble's men the whole time? You have a vast number of occupations to attend to: of course you come now and then? A. Of course.

Q. They were unwatched by you? A. I was not placed there as a watchman: there was a person employed by me to watch them, and to superintend over them?

Q. Had you ever occasion, in the course of your life, to make a calculation of this sort before for the roof of a church? A. Never.

Q. You did not watch Noble's men yourself? A. I did not.

Q. How many men had Noble employed about the church? A. I believe generally from two to three or four men.

Q. You did not watch them: you knew that Noble was not constantly with them? A. He should have been there frequently.

Q. He was a man of considerable business, was he not? A. I cannot take upon me to say what business he has to do in Whitechapel.

Q. You weighed this lead: you have told us that the highest was eight pound a foot the old lead? A. To the best of my recollection that was the highest that I ever recollect weighing. I did not take minutes at the time of weighing this lead, consequently I take it from my recollection only.

Q. You made no minutes at the time: was not there some so low as five pound a foot? A. Upon my oath, no: I do not recollect there was any so low.

Q. What was the lowest? A. I cannot take upon me to say what was the lowest: I have weighed none, to my knowledge, under seven pound.

Q. Will you swear there was none under seven? A. No.

Q. Nor under six? A. I never have weighed any, to my recollection, lower than seven pound.

Q. There was a great deal of dirt upon the lead? A. Yes, but there was an allowance for this dirt: the dirt was generally swept off by the plumber previous to the weighing.

Q. I have no doubt but you in your judgement think that there was an allowance? A. Upon my judgement I formed opinion that four pounds was sufficient allowance for the dirt: it was a provision in the contract.

Q. As it was a matter of judgement, was not there a great deal more done by Mr. Noble than was in the old contract? A. There was about two ton, including this account, on the 12th of September.

Court. Q. There was a great deal more done than was covered with old lead before? A. There was a great deal more covered with new lead than was covered with old lead before: there were five large dormars that were covered with new lead, that was not covered before.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. In the first place, will you take upon you to say that these five large dormars did not require two tons? A. I will take upon me to swear, from the best calculations that I could make, that the five dormars did not take above two tons.

Q. Did you measure them? A. I measured them as near as I could get at them: the tiling stood upon them.

Q. Then you did not make an accurate admeasurement? A. I could not make an accurate admeasurement.

Q. Must it not depend in a great measure upon guess? A. Of course, if it is not an accurate admeasurement it must be part guess.

Q. There were four large gables: what were they? A. They were gables running up in the form of an A: the same as putting up rafters together.

Q. Had you an opportunity of measuring them accurately? A. I measured them as accurate as I could standing on the roof.

Q. Then that is a rough calculation? A. I do not say it is an accurate calculation.

Q. Now, sir, with respect to the gutters: the lead upon some of the gutters was considerably-wider than it was before? A. In some places wider, and in some places narrower.

Q. I ask you, as you go upon averages, whether you can take upon you to swear that in the whole there was not, upon an average, in the new ones, more than a foot wider? A. There were four short new gutters, which laid up against these gables: the lead was put a foot wider, perhaps less than a foot; I will not say a foot; and the remainder of the gutters ran narrower than they were before: generally speaking, they were narrower than they were before.

Q. Now I perceive you do not understand my question: my question is, whether, taking the whole together, upon an average, it was not wider than before? A. I do not take upon me to say, upon an average of the gutters, one way or the other; but, generally speaking, some were narrower and some were wider.

Q. Taking them together, were they not altogether wider than they were before? A. I do not conceive that they were.

Q. Can you swear that they were not? A. I am now stating to the best of my judgement; there is no man's judgement but what may be erroneous.

Q. Now, sir, the mode and manner in which you ascertained the quantity of lead used for the whole church is by the admeasurement? A. Yes.

Q. Could you measure the whole church? A. I could measure the best part of the church; that is, so far as the gables: I could not have measured the gables unless I had applied the ladder.

Q. Did you apply the ladder? A. I did not.

Q. Then is not a part of it guess-work? A. I measured every part of the church that I could get at.

Q. Was it possible to get at the whole? A. It was possible to get at the whole.

Q. Did you do it? A. It was possible.

Q. Did you or did you not get at the whole of the lead, so as to measure it? A. The whole of the lead was to be seen: consequently I could get at it.

Q. Good God, if the whole was to be seen, did you do it? A. I did not: I could not get at it.

Q. Did you measure the whole of the lead? A. I did.

Q. You measured the whole of the lead, though there were parts that you could not get at without a ladder, and you did not have a ladder: is not the admeasurement of the whole church, from your calculation, founded upon supposed accurate admeasurement of the church, or did an accurate admeasurement take place?

- A. It did.

Q. How did you measure it? - A. I measured it with a five-foot rod.

Q. Do you mean to say every inch of it? - A. I do not.

Q. Then how came you to answer in the way that you have answered; did you measure the whole? - A. I mean to say that I could not measure it accurately, as many parts were covered with tiles. I could form an opinion.

Q. I am not blaming you; you recollect that it is swearing where a man's life is concerned. Did you admeasure the whole length of the church that was covered with lead? - A. I measured it as accurately as the state of the church would admit.

Q. Did the state of the church permit you to measure it accurately? - A. It did not: it was in many parts covered with tiles; when I stated to the quantity from three to four tons, it might be something more or less than the deficiency of three or four tons.

Q. The work of Lewington and Brown was not in your calculation? - A. It was not: that was stopping of holes.

Q. That was in no calculation of the lead work, neither new nor old? - A. It was not.

Q. Did Lewington and Brown take any lead from the church? - A. They did not, as I know of; they had no authority at all to take it away.

Q. I would ask you this: was any lead taken off from the church before the prisoner Noble was employed to do the work? - A. None: after he was employed, Lewington and Brown's men never came there at all; not to my knowledge, after Noble took the contract.

Q. You told my Lord that there were some places covered with lead that were not covered before, and you make it two tons to cover that place? - A. Yes; that was so, according to the best of my knowledge.

Q. There were some places, a few inches, that you could not get at; have you made any allowance for that? - A. I will not take upon me to say what allowance I have made; I did it to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you make any allowance beyond your actual admeasurement? - A. I did; beyond the covering of the clock-case to the steeple, for which I could not get at.

- CROSSKEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You are a clerk under Mr. Sadler? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you there at the time when Mr. Noble first began the work of taking off the lead? - A. I was there at the first beginning of it.

Q. From what part of the church did he or his men take off the lead? - A. From the south-west gutter.

Q. Was the first lead that was taken up any part in which Noble and his men were working, and you were not present? was there any lead taken from that gutter in your absence? - A. Not from that gutter; there was some taken up in the middle gutter, north-west, and the valley gutter, north-east; no other part that ever I missed but was taken up when I was present.

Q. When was it that you missed that? - A. As to the day I cannot say.

Q. Was it before Mr. Noble and his men began to work? - A. No; afterwards.

Q. Then before Mr. Noble and his men began working, did you miss any lead from the premises? - A. No, none.

Q. Before Noble and his men began working, was the whole roof covered with lead? - A. Yes, before they began.

Q. Then the two places that you have just mentioned were taken off after they began; were you present when they began and after constantly? - A. Yes.

Q. As the lead was taken from the roof of the church, where was it put? - A. It was chucked down in the church-yard, and carried by Mr. Noble's men and deposited in the closet under the south-west stair-case of the church.

Q. How soon after they had done cutting it off, and they had thrown it in the church-yard, was it put in the porch? - A. Immediately.

Q. That is, before they went away? - A. Yes.

Q. Who had the key of that closet? - A. I had myself.

Q. Did you keep that closet locked of a night? - A. Always.

Q. Was all the old lead as it came off the church afterwards conveyed into that porch? - - A. It was all of it conveyed into that porch.

Q. When was that lead delivered to Mr. Noble? - A. At convenient opportunities, at divers times, it was delivered to Mr. Noble from the cupboard of the staircase.

Q. Was it always weighed when it was delivered to him? - A. Yes, in the church-porch it was weighed and delivered immediately.

Q. Was he ever permitted to take any of the lead before it was weighed? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. If any lead had been taken out of the porch and delivered to him not weighed, must it not have been done without your having been privy? - A. Without my knowledge.

Q. At what time of the morning was it usual to deliver the lead to him. Did you ever weigh any to him before six o'clock in the morning? - A. No, nor after six at night.

Q. Was it weighed in Noble's presence? - A. It was weighed in his presence and in the surveyor's presence.

Q. That is, the last witness Mr. Sadler? - A. Yes, and in my presence.

Q. When it was weighed and delivered to him, how did he carry it away? - A. In a truck always.

Q. About how much could he carry away in a truck? - A. About 4 or 5 hundred pound weight.

Q. When it was put in the truck which way did they carry it our from the church? - A. Out of the West entrance gate that leads into Church-lane, nearly opposite to High street, Whitechapel.

Q. Whenever any was weighed and delivered to him, was it left for him to take away at another time? - A. That which was weighed was taken away immediately.

Q. Do you know whether any lead of that description, after it was weighed, was ever carried to Rayden's house? - A. Not to my knowledge, it was always carried out of the West gate.

Q. You can tell us whether Rayden is the sexton of the parish? - A. Yes.

Q. How many doors are there to the church? - A. There is a West entrance door, a South door, a door leading out of the back East and West, and two doors in the North front.

Q. Who had the keys of those doors? - A. The North door had a key, and the West entrance door had a key, the East door in the back of the church had a key likewise, and the other two doors had bolts.

Q. Do you mean that those doors that had a key that they might be entered on the outside with a key? - A. Yes with a key.

Q. Who had the key of those doors? - A. The key of the North door was generally in the West.

Q. Locked up? - A. No, generally in the door, the key of the West door I delivered to Mr. Rayden, sen. every night after I left the place.

Q. Who had the key of the porch? - A. John Rayden , the sexton, had that

Q. Was the front vestry locked up? - A. Yes, John Rayden , the father, kept the key of that.

Q. Could any person, having the key of the porch, on their coming into the porch, open that closet door? - A. Not without it was forced.

Q. The keys that Rayden had in his possession, could he get into that part of the church where the lead was? - A. Exactly so.

Q. How were the gates of the church-yard at the time that you left off work? - A. At times they were locked, and at times they were not.

Q. Was there any communication from Rayden's house into the church-yard? - A. The back door of his house came into the church-yard.

Q. Did you at any time weigh any of the old lead which was taken off the top of the church to ascertain how many pound there was in a foot? - A. I saw one foot weighed, which weighed ten pound.

Q. How came you to weigh that single foot? - A. Mr. Noble cut it out to ascertain the weight of it, because we found it very thick.

Q. Have you been employed about buildings? - A. I am a carpenter.

Q. Could you form any opinion how much a foot the lead would weigh upon an average? - A. Upon an average I look upon it the lead would weigh seven pounds a foot, or near eight.

Q. From what you saw, and you saw some part of it that weighed ten pound, some was thick and some was thinner; putting together that which was thick and that which was thin, you take it upon an average it weighed between seven and eight pound a foot; upon your oath do you believe that? - A. Upon my oath I believe that.

Q. Did you ever make any observations upon the door that is in the porch on the 22d? - A. I took notice in particular of the cupboard door.

Q. How soon did you take the lead off the church? - A. This is a memorandum that I kept of the work while it was going on. On the 11th of July I delivered old lead to Mr. Noble, thirty-eight hundred, two quarters, nineteen pound gross; that was the first lead that was delivered.

Q. Up to the 22nd of July did you continue to take off old lead? - A. We continued to take off old lead frequently in the same manner.

Q. There was mortar sticking to this lead for which there was an allowance? - A. For which we took off four pounds to the hundred for the dirt.

Q. Therefore the less dirt there was on, the better the purchase would be; did they in general when they were taking it off sweep it clean? - A. Not always, when we were taking the gutters up there was a great deal of wet; we could not take the mortar off; if we used the broom some would stick.

Q. Where did young Rayden live? - A. Along with his father.

Q. Did he live along with his father in the month of July? - A. Yes.

Q. Is this church-yard a thoroughfare? - A. None at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are not Sexton yet of Whitechapel? - A. I do not put myself up a candidate for it.

Q. Do you know Mr. Brown and Lewington? - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember their being employed about this church? - A. No.

Q. They gave in a contract about it; were their men never there? - A. They never did any work there.

Q. Neither on the roof or steeple, or any part? - A. They did not.

Q. Nor Mr. Wildman? - A. Mr. Wildman's men were stopping some creeks on the turret, while I was at work there.

Q. Who is Mr. Wildman? - A. A plumber down the road.

Q. How came Mr. Wildman's men to be there when Lewington and Brown had the contract? - A. It strikes me that the contract was not performed then.

Q. How many men were employed there then? - A. Two.

Q. How many men were employed after Mr. Noble had the contract? - A. Sometimes two, sometimes three, and sometimes four.

Q. I suppose Mr. Noble's duty would not call him there the whole day? - A. He was generally there most part of the time.

Q. Not the whole time, of course? - A. No.

Q. There was lead missed, that was not contained in the closet? - A. There was none missed but what I mentioned out of the gutter, that was after Mr. Noble's men began the work.

Q. That was never carried to the closet? - A. No.

Q. What quantity was that in the middle gutter North-West? - A. There was about fifty pounds missing. The valley gutter, North East, there was about forty pound likewise missed, which was never carried to the closet. The front gate was sometimes unlocked; I spoke to Mr. Rayden about it, he said, never mind it, the watchman will soon be on.

ELIZABETH CROSBEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am servant to Mr. Allen.

Q. In the month of July last you were servant to Mr. Allen; where is Mr. Allen's house? - A. Opposite Church Lane.

Q. Do you know where Rayden's house is? - A. The first house on the left hand in Church Lane, adjoining to the watchhouse.

Q. Can you from Mr. Allen's house see to Mr. Rayden's? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 23d of July did you happen to get up very early? - A. Yes, between four and five o'clock, I looked out of my window, and I saw a man run from Spread Eagle Alley to Rayden's house, he stopped there for a few minutes; I thought he was trying Mr. Rayden's window shutters.

Q. In consequence of that did you continue to look? - A. I did.

Q. Did you afterwards discover who that man was? - A. Yes, I saw it was Mr. Noble; I then saw a boy with a truck turn by Mr. Barkin's house, which is the corner house, and stop at Mr. Rayden's house; I again saw Mr. Noble load his truck with lead out of Rayden's house.

Q. Who was the boy? - A. George Rayden , the son of Rayden the prisoner; after it was loaded the boy went to pull the truck from the gutter, it erset; I then saw Mr. Noble and Mr. Rayden place the lead upon the truck, and after the truck was loaded, I saw a plumber's man come and get hold of it; he and George Rayden dragged the truck, and Noble pushed it behind. It went home to Mr. Noble's house, and the lead was taken out of the truck.

Q. In the passage of the truck from Mr. Rayden's house to Mr. Noble's, how near did it come to your house? - A. Right opposite.

Q. Could you then discover what sort of lead it was? - A. It was old flatted lead; the truck returned back again to Rayden's; the boy returned with it to his father, and with the assistance of his father, he put it in the church-yard against the watchhouse. I then saw Mr. Rayden come out with a birch broom and sweep the mortar and the dirt right across the road, right opposite our house; he was at his own door; he swept it right across to the corner of Spread Eagle Alley.

Q. Was it a fine morning or a wet morning? - A. A fine morning, the road was clean.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. What room was you in? - A. Up in the two pair of stairs.

Q. I take it for granted that the persons, whoever they were that were engaged, had their hats on? - A. They had their hats on.

Q. You being so much above them, could you see their faces? - A. I could.

Q. From your house to Mr. Rayden's is forty or fifty yards? - A. It is across Whitechapel-road.

Q. Did you know it was lead? - A. No, not till it was taken into Mr. Noble's house.

Q. Was you ever examined before this? - A. I was examined before the magistrate about a fortnight or three weeks ago; I was examined at the vestry I believe about two months ago.

Q. After you were examined about it in the vestry in September, Mr. Noble went on and finished his job, and Mr. Rayden continued to live in the house? - A. I believe they did.

Q. You saw Mr. Noble occasionally after it? - A. I did.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say you was examined before the vestry; did Mr. Noble hear the evidence that you gave before the vestry? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did Mr. Rayden hear? - A. No.

Q. Notwithstanding these people had their hats on, had you any doubt of their person? - A. No doubt at all; I had known Mr. Noble ever since I had been in the neighbourhood.

Mr. Pooley. Q. (to Crosskey). What is the value of five hundred pound weight of old lead. - A. Five hundred pound of old lead is worth ten pounds, and five hundred pound weight is a truck load.

Q. Do you know how much he was to give a hundred for it? - A. I do not.

JOHN SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. You are vestry clerk of that parish? - A. I am.

Q. Who is the rector? - A. The reverend Dr. Robert Wright .

Q. Who are the church-wardens? - A. John Wildman , John Bridgeman , and William Sadler . Dr. Wright has been rector ever since Christmas last; he does duty there, and lives in the house.

John Rayden 's Defence. I am not guilty of the crime laid to my charge. It was my own property.

George Rayden said nothing in his defence.

Noble's Defence. I have nothing more to say than Mr. Rayden told me that he had a cistern and a sink to dispose of, which I bought and gave a fair price for, and some leaden pipes which he said was his property, and I thought it was at the time, or else I should not have bought it.

JAMES HIGGINS sworn. Examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. What are you? - A. I am a school-master; I live at Whitechapel school-house.

Q. Did you at any time, and when, sell any lead to the prisoner Rayden? - A. I sold a cistern.

Q. And any pipe? - A. I cannot answer to a pipe; there was a waste pipe that carried the water away.

Q. It was old lead? - A. It was; I sold it him five years last March, it was delivered to him with some other fixtures.

Q. It was a fixture in the house, was it? - A. It was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley.

Q. What was the size of the cistern? - A. It stood in an angle at the corner as you went in, it was in a wooden frame; a dentist had it fixed there for the purpose of washing hands after people had their teeth drawn, it held about four or five pails of water.

Noble called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Rayden called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOHN RAYDEN , GUILTY of stealing, but not sacrilegiously. Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE RAYDEN - NOT GUILTY .

NOBLE, GUILTY of receiving, knowing it to be stolen. Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-51

51. WILLIAM NOBLE and GEORGE RAYDEN were indicted for sacrilegiously stealing on the 9th of August , at the same parish, one hundred and fifty pounds weight of lead, value 30 s. the property of the rector of the said parish , and three other counts the same as the former, only varying in the manner of charging them.

Mr. Pooley (counsel for the prosecution) declining to offer any evidence, they were both

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18051204-52

52. WILLIAM NOBLE and GEORGE RAYDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , in the same parish, one hundred and fifty pound weight of lead, value 30 s. the property of the persons aforesaid . And

Another indictment for stealing, on the 23d of July , five hundred pounds weight of lead, value 5 l. the property of the persons abovementioned .

Mr. Alley (counsel for the prosecution) declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were from these charges

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-53

53. GEORGE FORDHAM , SARAH JONES , and MARY CAMPLIN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kallyn , about the hour of nine at night, on the 7th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein eight hats, value 50 s. and thirteen guineas, the property of John Kallyn .

JOHN KALLYN sworn. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 4, Maidenhead-court, Whitechapel ; I am a hatter .

Q. On the 7th of November last you were taken up for an assault and two bastard children; the assault was upon Mary Middleton ? - A. Yes, and for want of security I was taken up for having two bastard children by her.

Q. I think she lived with you as a wife, how long? - A. Six years she lived with me as a servant.

Q. Did not she live with you as a wife? - A. No.

Q. You had these two children by her, had not you? - A. Yes, I had in my own house.

Q. You turned her out of doors, did you not? - A. I did not, she went away of her own accord, and took the two children along with her.

Q. You had taken Mary Camplin into your house, had not you? - A. I had known her for some time back.

Q. She was with child by you too, was not she? - A. No, she never was.

Q. She is with child at this moment? - A. I am confident that she is not, with any person.

Q. I ask you upon your oath whether you had not been as familiar with her as with Mary Middleton ? - A. I could not place a confidence in her as I did in Mary Middleton .

Q. You have known her familiarly, so that she might have been with child by you? - A. I am confident that she is not.

Q. You have known her familiarly as a woman? - A. I have.

Q. How long? - A. Since the 21st of July last.

Q. When did she come into your house? - A. Upon the day that I was sent to prison.

Q. Upon the 7th of Nov. you went to prison because you could not get any body to be bail for you, was that so? - A. It was.

Q. You took this young woman, the prisoner at the bar, as a servant ? - A. I did.

Q. Look at the prisoner Fordham; he is a neighbour, is not he? - A. To the best of my knowledge he has been in the neighbourhood some time, and Sarah Jones is a neighbour.

Q. When you took up these people for a burglary, you found them all at their several homes, did not you? - A. I did not, Sarah Jones was in her own house when she was taken up, and Fordham, I believe, was at work. I met Camplin inadvertently in the street.

Q. You said that you had taken her into your house the 7th of November, you did not turn her out? - A. The morning that I was taken into custody I did not like to have her any longer. I saw her not sufficient for my use. I was rather dubious. I told her to go about her business.

Q. What prison was you taken to? - A. To Cold-bath fields, about eight in the evening.

Q. When the constable took you from your house how did you leave your house? - A. I secured both the windows, and locked the door, and the key I put in my pocket, and came away with the officer.

Q. When did you get out of prison? - A. On the 14th.

Q. What did you leave in your house? - A. One hundred and three guineas in one draw, and two pound odd in another.

Q. How was that hundred and three guineas packed? - A. Ninety-three guineas were packed in the leg of a stocking, and ten guineas were loose in the same drawer, and the two pounds were in another drawer, and I am confident that I lost more than eight hats, but I will only say eight. I will make them as low as I can.

Q. When you returned you found your gold safe in your stocking? - A. No, on the eleventh of the month, Mary Middleton came to me, I delivered her the key. I told her to take the money out of the drawer, and give it to Mr. Pedder.

Q. Did you get no more of your money than ninety guineas? - A. No more.

MARY MIDDLETON sworn. - Q. We understand that you lived with this man for several years? - A. I did for six years.

Q. You had two children by him had you? - A. Yes.

Q. You are pregnant by him now are you? - A. I am.

Q. He turned you out of the house a short time before the 7th of November? - A. Yes, he ill used me, and I went to ask a little support of him, he refused it and I went and swore the two children to him.

Q. He beat you did he? - A. Yes.

Q. And you took out a warrant against him, now look at Camplin, do you know her? - A. Yes, I saw her at his house when I came to ask him for some support for my children.

Q. How long might that be before the seventh? - A. It was five or six days before the seventh.

Q. You do not know whether the young woman is with child or no? - A. I do not know, she was in his house about seven or eight days before the seventh.

Q. Then Camplin, up to the night of the seventh, constantly slept in his house? - A. She was one day in the house along with me, before I came away, as a servant to him; I do not know how long she slept in the house.

Q. Was her coming in the cause of your quiting the house? - A. It was not.

Q. What do you know about the burglary; on the seventh in the evening, did you go to his house? - A. No, but on the ninth I passed Mrs. Jones's house, and she called me in, and there I saw two hats. I asked them how they came by them, they told me they were Kallyn's property; they said they had sold one for fifteen shillings.

Q. Who said that? - A. Camplin said that, she said that Mrs. Jones and Camplin held up the chair on the sill of the window, while George Fordham got in at the upper window, and he came down and opened the door and let Camplin in.

Q. Did not Camplin tell you that she lived there, and that she wanted to get in that night? - A. She did not say any thing about that.

Q. What did she say about this hat, speak the truth? - A. She said no more than I told you.

Q. Did not she say that she sold the hat by permission of Kallyn? - A. No, she told me that she sold one hat before for fifteen shillings.

Q. If you recollect, you said upon a former occasion, that Kallyn told her to sell some hats in order to get some money for him; do you know while Kallyn was in prison how she was to live? - A. I do not know, I was not with him.

Q. What time of night was it that they got into the house? - A. They did not say what time of night they got in.

Q. Did not they say it was very near eight o'clock? - A. It must be very near nine, because she was with him in the lock-up place at eight o'clock.

Q. So that you do not know what time of night this was that they robbed the house? - A. Upon my word I cannot tell.

Q. You saw these three people together at Jones's house, this was on the ninth, they had never shifted their situation? - A. I never saw Camplin before at Mrs. Jones's.

Q. Do you know where Camplin was from the seventh to the ninth? - A. I do not know.

Q. Mrs. Jones keeps a little house there does she? - A. Yes.

Q. What account did Fordham give on that occasion? - A. Fordham sat eating his dinner, he did not say any thing.

Q. Did Camplin say that on the night she was let in the house by Fordham, that she slept in the house that night? - A. She did.

Q. In consequence of this you went to Kallyn, did you? - A. Yes. On the eleventh I went to him in prison, he told me to take the key of his drawers and of his door, and deliver up what property there was to Mr. Pedder. Mr. Pedder went with me to Mr. Kallyn's house. I found in a drawer, that was broken open, ninety guineas, which I delivered up to Mr. Pedder. Mr. Pedder and I were only present when the money was found in a stocking, in the drawer. Mr. Dodd came in when Mr. Pedder was counting the money.

Q. When you went into the house you did not find any of the hats in disorder? - A. The hats were in the shop as usual, and none of the furniture was hurt, as I perceived.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-54

54. CORNELIUS NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November , an iron pestle, value 1 s. and an iron mortar, value 1s. the property of Alexander Bishop .

ALEXANDER BISHOP sworn. I am a broker , I live at No. 23, Windmill-street, Tottenham-court Road .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes. On Wednesday the 13th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him lurking about my door, I went in with some things, my son was assisting me; I heard a noise of something drop, my son ran out, and saw the prisoner take away this pestle and mortar, he pursued the prisoner, and I followed after, he threw the pestle and mortar at my son when he came to the corner of Windmill-street. He was stopped in Bedford-street by a man, the pestle and mortar were found in the channel by the people.

Q. Did you come up and see them? - A. Yes, my son came up and saw them in possession of the tallow-chandler's-shop people.

Q. Do you know any thing of the lad? - A. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. Did he say any thing when you overtook him? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of the pestle and mortar? - A. Two shillings and sixpence.

ALEXANDER BISHOP , jun. sworn. Q. You are the son of the last witness? - A. Yes. I was helping my father in with a few things, I came out before my father, having heard a noise, I saw this lad take the pestle and mortar from off the window.

Q. You mean the lad now at the bar? - A. Yes, he ran to the corner of the street to the tallow-chandlers, I was following of him, he chucked the things at me.

Q. Where did you overtake him? - A. In Bedford-street, there he turned round to fight me; then he went down the Mews, I went after him, and a gentleman stopped him at the bottom of the Mews till my father came up to him.

Q. Did you see the pestle and mortar afterwards? - A. I did, at Mr. Anderson's, a tallow-chandler, the corner of Windmill-street, they delivered them to me.

Q. Do you know that the pestle and mortar, which he delivered to you, was the same pestle and mortar that was in your father's window? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know the lad before? - A. No. I am sure he is the lad that took the pestle and mortar, I never lost sight of him.

CHARLES CHINERY sworn. I produce the pestle and mortar.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY - aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-55

55. EDWARD CROSS & JOSEPH WEST , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the sixth of November a bundle of rod iron, value 10 s. twelve rods of iron, value 8 s. four dozen of harness buckles, value 10 s. four gross of wood screws, value 7 s. eleven chaise joints, value 7 s. and one screw winch, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Glover and Benjamin Glover , and WILLIAM HAMBLETON alias HAMERTON , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

(The Case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM OLIVER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a journeyman smith employed by Mr. Glover. On the sixth of November, between eight and nine at night I was going up the staircase of my master's back premises, I clapped my hand on the prisoner Cross's head; not knowing who he was, I asked who was there, he made no answer. The people that lived over-head, on that staircase, were coming up the yard, a girl called to her mother; directly Cross got up, I heard him pull his hand out of the shop from between the boards that parted the staircase from the shop; when he got up, he asked me whether I wanted to hurt him; I replied no, I

did not want to hurt him, but I should not suffer it, as I had seen him concealed in a place where I thought he had no business; he directly called me out of the yard, and by the public-house door he begged and prayed that I would not hurt him, nor say any thing to the master; I made answer, I could say no more to him; I advised him to go home to his apartment; I made my way to the front of the house and left him; I knocked at the door, and asked if the master was at home, I found he was not; I got a candle and went to the back part of the shop where I had seen the prisoner, and there I found on the wainscoating a board pushed or forced out at one end, about nine or ten inches.

Q. Could a person from there take any thing out of the shop? - A. Very easily; he could reach the iron, or any article that had been placed there.

Q. Had he been at work there near about that time? - A. About half an hour before that time; his hour to leave the shop was eight o'clock. Cross came to me the next morning when I first came to work, he asked me if I had said any thing to the master about it; I told him I had nothing to say to him; I dare say the master knew it before this time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. It was so dark that you could not see the man nor the hand? - A. No, I did not see him, but I knew the man by his voice.

Q. How long was it after you was on the staircase that you had the conversation with him? - A. Upwards of five minutes afterwards.

JOSEPH GLOVER sworn. Q. You are a partner with Mr. Benjamin Glover , you are coach-smith s? - A. Yes.

Q. The back part of the warehouse extends to Charles-street, and the front to King-street ? - A. The shop does not join the house, there is a communication from one to the other across a little yard.

Q. You know the prisoner Cross? - A. He was my porter , he had been with me very near three years.

Q. In consequence of the information that you received, did you send for Cross after his breakfast time? - A. I did. After I first came into the shop Oliver came to me.

Q. From that information did you afterwards miss any of your property? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss the articles contained in the indictment, the screws, rods, and all of them? - A. I could not miss the rods, I have so many.

Q. Did you observe the hole at the staircase, at the back of your warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any appearance at the hole of any thing having gone through there? - A. Not through there; underneath the door there was the appearance of something having been drawn through; there was a hole underneath the door, about six inches in length, quite down to the ground, it appeared as if a bundle of rod iron had been drawn through the hole by the ground being disturbed, and the hole was very much scratched. I waited for two hours after breakfast-time to see if he came; he did not come; I sent my clerk for him and he came immediately. When he came in the began to cry, saying, he hoped I would forgive him, for he had taken nothing away, he had only made an attempt; I told him I was sure that there must be some iron gone, for I had seen that the ground had been disturbed, it must have been dragged under the door; the prisoner said, if I would forgive him, he would tell me where he had sold it, and what he had taken; I told him I would, if he told me the truth, but if I found one article more than he told me, I would prosecute him. He told me that he took one bundle of iron, and two dozen of large size stump joints.

Q. Were these taken at one, or at different time? - A. I believe at different time.

Court. Q. Now your counsel will tell you that you must confine yourself to one single fact, of taking at one time.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I will take the bundle of iron. - You are to confine yourself to the bundle of rod iron. Did you afterwards go with Cross to Hamerton's and find the bundle of rods? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did he tell you where he took the bundle of iron rods to? - A. Yes. He told me he took the bundle of iron rods to Hamerton, before Oliver catched him on the same night.

Q. Did you see the bundle found? - A. No, my brother did.

Q. Was the bundle that was produced, and found there in the cellar your property? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was; he found that and other property.

Q. Then I suppose the prisoner was taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Hamerton taken into custody? - A. No, Hamerton was not at home at this time; his wife was.

SAMUEL GLOVER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am brother of Joseph and Benjamin Glover .

Q. Did you go with your brother and the prisoner Cross to Hamerton's? - A. I did, I went down into the cellar, I saw one rod of iron stand that had been cut in pieces, there was a man in the cellar; I said this looks like my brother's iron; Cross was with me; I

asked the man how it came here, he-said he would go up stairs and fetch his master; he came down again into the cellar, and we found the remainder of the rods in the cellar; Cross stepped a step or two further in a dark place in the cellar, and found another bundle; this is the bundle he said he took on the over night; I asked him what he was to have for it, he said five shillings, but he was not paid for it.

Q. Was five shillings the price that it would have sold for? - A. It was worth about fourteen shillings.

Q. What was Hamerton? - A. He keeps a smith's shop and an iron shop together; there was a forge in the cellar; we went up stairs; Cross asked Mrs. Hamerton where the things were that he had bought the over night; she said that she knew nothing at all about it, but she would go and find her husband; she came back again and said she could not find her husband. We sent for an officer, and immediately took them away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. When you first went to Hamerton's house Hamerton was not at home? - A. No.

Q. When Cross and you came up together out of the cellar, Cross asked Mrs. Hamerton where the things was, addressing himself to Mrs. Hamerton? - A. He did.

MICHAEL BUCKLEY sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Are you a constable? - A. I went to Hamerton's house; I had several things delivered to me by the prisoner Cross pointing them out; I produce them.

Q. (To Samuel Glover .) Have you the least doubt of these iron rods being your brother's property? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Mr. Gleed. Suppose you had found them in Berkshire or Oxfordshire, would you have known them? - A. No.

Q. You have no other proof than the man saying they were your brother's? - A. No other proof than Cross shewing them to me.

Q. Supposing you had been in Berkshire, and you had seen it in the market place, should you have known it? - A. No.

Court. Does the recollection of the rods that you had seen in your brother's possession confirm that what Cross says is true? - A. I believe what Cross says to be true; he found it in the dark place; he said he had put it there.

Q. (To Buckley.) You apprehended Hamerton? - A. I did, about nine o'clock the same night in his one pair of stairs room, after searching for him in different places.

Q. What passed between him and you? - A. Nothing very material; he seemed to know very little about the business at first, but after a time he said he heard of it about three or four hours ago; he seemed to be sorry for his wife; because not finding him, I took the wife to the watchhouse; I told him he was very wrong that he did not come forward, as she then might be liberated.

Cross's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Went and Hamerton were not put on their defence.

CROSS - Guilty , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

WENT - Not Guilty .

HAMERTON - Not Guilty .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-56

56. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , a great coat, value 20 s. and a hat, value 2 s. the property of Henry Chissom .

HENRY CHISSOM sworn. I lodge at No. 23, West-street, West Smithfield ; I went out about six o'clock; the great coat and hat were then hanging in the passage between the front room and the stairs; I left them there hanging on the pegs; I know nothing of the prisoner taking it.

CATHERINE BURRIDGE sworn. Q. You know the person of the prisoner at the bar, do not you? - A. Yes, on the 16th of November, about a quarter after six o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour, I thought I heard a coach go by in the street, plainer than I usually do, I got up to see if the street door was open; I saw the prisoner at the bar just going out of the door; the street door was open, I took hold of her, I asked her where she was going, she said nowhere, I perceived that she had got a great coat under her cloak, I called to my brother, she dropped the great coat, and kept the hat still under her arm.

Q. You saw her drop the coat? - A. Yes.

Q. You got the hat from her? - A. Yes, my brother took the coat up.

- BURRIDGE sworn. Q. You took up the coat and sent for the constable? - A. Yes, I gave it to the constable.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. I am a constable; I produce the great coat and the hat.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the passage. I know nothing further of it than I come a great many miles that day; I set myself down at the step of this door; while I was sitting down, a man came out with a smock frock; he said, good woman you seem tired; I said, I am very tired, I looks round, and there lay the hat and coat, under the sill of the

door; I took it up in my hand, I do not know whether that man left it there or no.

GUILTY - aged 58.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-57

57. WILLIAM ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , three-hundred pounds weight of lead, value 6 l. the property of David Alsten , jun. affixed to a certain house of his ; and three other counts of like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM CLARK sworn. You are a servant belonging to Mr. Alsten? - A. Yes, I am a carpenter, I work for him, he is building some of the houses in Russel-square.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he is a plasterer's labourer , he was employed on the work. On the 4th of November, I slept in Mr. Alsten's house, No. 18, Russel-square , on purpose to take care of it, and one Boyd slept in the two pair of stairs.

Q. On the 4th of September in the course of that night was you called up? - A. I heard a noise and called Boyd up, and both of us came down stairs.

Q. When you came down stairs did you search the house? - A. I did; we found the prisoner concealed in a dry well in the back part of the house; the well was covered over with some boards, and we found several pieces of lead lying in the passage, by the kitchen stairs, which had been cut from the pipe that run from the kitchen up to the two pair of stairs floor.

Q. In what form was the lead? - A. It was pipe lead. I saw the pipe fixed on Sunday afternoon, about four o'clock, and this was Monday morning, a quarter before two.

Q. Have you got that lead here? - A. Yes, I have matched it with the pipe where it was cut away, and corresponded exactly in length and in size.

Q. You apprehended the prisoner; did you search him? - A. We did at the watchouse, we found nothing on him then.

JAMES BOYD sworn. I slept in the house with the last witness.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. After you got him in your custody, did you search him? - A. After we had apprehended him, Clark said what must we do with him; Clark went away I called the watchman for a light, the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and I heard something rattle, he pulled his knife out of his pocket, I catched hold of his arm; I says, are you going to stab me. This is the knife that he drawed at me. (Producing it.) I took the knife from him.

Q. Whether that lead pipe could be cut with that knife? - A. Yes it could.

Q. (To Clark.) Produce the lead. Did you fit it with the remainder of the pipe? - A. Yes, it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking all day on Sunday till some time of the night. I could not get in my lodging, and working on the premises, I made bold to go and lye down; which way I come there, I do not know; as to my knowing about this lead being cut, I declare I do not.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-58

58. SUSANNAH HUSBAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , two sheets, value 18 s. the property of Letitia Tomkins , widow .

LETITIA TOMKINS sworn. You live I believe in Guildford-street, No. 6 ? - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of October last the prisoner offered herself to you as a servant? - A. She did; she stated to me that she had not been in service before.

Q. You took her as a servant from some written character or other? - A. I did; she came into my service on the 30th of October; on the 16th of November, she requested to go out and get a pair of shoes, I believe it was between eight and nine in the evening.

Q. She was your housekeeper? - A. She was; she had the care of the whole of my linen; she did not return any more; between eleven and twelve o'clock on the same night, Mr. Edwards called on me, he brought with him a sheet that I knew to be mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. She came to you recommended I believe? - A. She did by a written character.

Q. Have you made any enquiry, and did you not learn that she has had the misfortune to have her husband desert her? - A. I have been since informed that she is a married woman and parted from her husband.

Q. I understand that you have sworn to this sheet; is there any particular mark, by which you know this sheet? - A. I know the mark on the sheet; it was not my sheet originally; there is printed on it March, and the C is left out in March, the name of the month, and the C is put at the top; it belonged to my father-in-law, and there is a T on the other.

WILLIAM JOEL EDWARDS sworn. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 6, Portpool-lane. On the 16th of November the prisoner at the bar came to my shop between the hours of nine and eleven; she produced a pair of sheets to pledge, and asked me eighteen or twenty-eight shillings, I am not certain which; I looked at them to see what mark was on them; the prisoner I had known by pledging goods before in the name of Wilkinson; looking at the sheets, I found there was one letter T on one sheet, and on the other was March, with a C on it; it did not strike me that it was March; I goes to her and says, Mrs. Wilkinson, what are the marks on these sheets, and whose sheets are they.

Q. Did she answer to the name of Wilkinson? - A. Yes, she said they were her sheets; I asked her where she lived; she answered me, you know me very well, I said I know you very well by the name of Wilkinson, but I find these sheets marked different; I said what is the name that is on the sheet in full length, she said there was no name on them; I said there is a name on them, and I shall certainly know what name there is on them before I lend money on them, and if they are your's you know; I asked her again where she lived, she seemed confused, after some time she said at Battle-bridge; I told her Battle-bridge was no direction; I must know the house, as I must go or send to know if she lived there; she said she could not recollect the name of the place, it went down by the Small-pox Hospital; I said you are a housekeeper in some family, she then seemed a good deal hurt, and said, me a housekeeper or a servant, that can come out at all hours; her making use of that expression made me look upon her with a greater degree of suspicion; I said I must trouble you to walk backwards; the shop being full, I made her come into my back parlour, and called my maid servant to attend to her.

Q. In point of fact, you found out from her where she lived? - A. Yes; I said to her I am sure the sheets are not your own, she then says I will tell you all about it if you will not tell any body, nor take any notice about it; she wept bitterly; I told her, I could not make any promises, she was now detained against her will, and I must answer for it, and I should send for an officer for her, which I did.

Q. She told you that they were Mrs. Tomkins's? - A. Yes.

GUILTY . - aged 40.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined One Shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18051204-59

59. ROBERT BRIDGEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of November , seven yards of canvas, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Daker .

JOHN RAY sworn. I am an officer of Worship-street. On Thursday the 7th of November, I was in company with Armstrong and other officers, in Spitalfields; about seven o'clock in the evening, as we were going up Raven-row, I observed the prisoner go into an old iron-shop, I immediately followed him in; I heard the man in the shop say, how many pieces have you got now; I at that time was behind the prisoner; the man that keeps the shop looked of one side and observed me, he said I will have nothing at all to do with them; I immediately laid hold of the prisoner, and the pieces of canvas that was in his apron, and delivered the prisoner into the care of Bishop, and the canvas likewise; Bishop took them to the office, as I was going on other business.

Prisoner. It was not seven o'clock, it was about half after five.

Ray. It must be later than that, in was near seven o'clock.

- BISHOP sworn. I was in company with Ray on the 7th of September, I asked him where he got the canvas, he said he got it from Mr. Daker, buckram stiffner, in White-cross-street, that he took it out of some of the pieces, it was his master's property, he wanted to make a little money of it.

Prisoner. I did not say it was my master's property.

Bishop. He did say it was his master's property. I produce it.

JOSEPH DAKER sworn. The stamp that is at the end of it has the apperance, that it has been in my possession. I cannot swear to linen.

Q. You had no reason to suppose that he had taken any thing? - A. I had no reason to suppose so, he was a quiet, sober, inoffensive man.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my master's employment on the 7th of November; as I passed through the yard, I wished three of the men good-night; I went home to get my tea, my wife was not at home, I had my tea with the children, a woman was at work in the room that I was in. I had nothing with me when I went in the room, nor when I came out. I was going down Grub-street to turn up Butler's-alley, I saw the bundle laying before me. I put it in my apron; when I came to Peter-street the person was not at home where I expected to find my wife; I then went to

Long-alley; I asked at a shop there, if they bought any such things as them, they said no, there was a shop in Raven-row, where they bought such cloths. I went to Raven-row, I asked the man if they bought them, he said, how many have you got, I said there is four remnants: there are other dyers that work for the same houses as my master does.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18051204-60

60. WILLIAM MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of December , a pound and a half of brass, value 1 s. the property of George Penton .

GEORGE PENTON sworn. I am a brass-founder . I had frequent intimation of the prisoner going to old iron shops. On the 4th of December I had him taken up; I saw him at the watch-house after he was taken up, and the brass found on him.

Q. There is no mark on the brass? - A. I cannot swear to it. When I asked him at the watch-house to produce the brass which belonged to me, which he had about him, he produced it; he said he hoped I would have mercy on him. He is a workman of mine, and was working for me that night till nine o'clock.

THOMAS SHEARS sworn. Q. you work for Mr. Penton? - A. Yes. In consequence of information from Mr. Penton I watched the prisoner; at about a quarter after nine o'clock, in Golden-lane, I was walking to and fro, by an old iron shop; there I saw William Miller step up the steps to go into this old iron shop; I said Miller what brought you this way this evening, he answered me he was taking a bit of a round. I laid hold of his arm, and requested him to walk back with me, and when we came to St. Bride's watch-house, Mr. Penton gave charge of him. Mr. Penton asked for the brass in the watch-house, he produced it.

JOHN FOSTER sworn. I was the constable of the night; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, on the fourth of December. I produce the pieces of brass.

Q. (To prosecutor.) Do you remember these pieces of brass being in your shop? - A. I have no doubt of their being my property.

Prisoner's Defence. From nine years old I have been able to get my bread with honesty; I have never been guilty of any thing before. When work has been short with me, I never was against volunteering in his Majesty's navy; till the fourth time of my going on board, I had a very bad wound in my right eye, I worked with that with honesty to maintain myself until this present period. I have nothing further to say at present, I lay myself on the mercy of the Court and that injured gentleman, my prosecutor.

GUILTY - aged 38.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-61

61. FRANCIS WARD , WILLIAM LEWIS , and WILLIAM TAYLOR , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Knight , and Richard Richards , about the hour of six in the evening, on the eleventh of September , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein thirty-six dozen of buttons, value 17 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Knight and Richard Richards .

RICHARD RICHARDS sworn. I live in Drury-lane , I am a button seller ; on the evening of the eleventh of September, about six o'clock, I was in my counting-house, one of my young men called me out, saying, that some boys had taken some articles out of the shop window; on my going into the shop I saw the prisoner Ward, being brought into my shop, I was informed he was caught with some of the property about him.

Q. Do you know any thing of them? - A. Lewis and Taylor are chimney sweeper s, Ward is not.

ROBERT GILL sworn. I am servant to Messrs. Knight and Richards, button-sellers; on the eleventh of November I was at the back part of the shop, I was alarmed by seeing the shop window open, and one of the prisoner's arms under the sash; I went and examined, and saw some goods that were laying in the window. I pursued the prisoners, and first caught Lewis, he got away; I then secured Ward and took him into my master's shop, and took one bag of buttons from him; he said that the other two boys that were gone, had two parcels more. I produce the buttons that I took from him.

Q. Do you know them to be your master's buttons? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the window was down? - A. Yes, I am confident they must have thrown the sash up. I was at the window ten minutes before, it was not up then.

Q. How high did they throw this sash up? - A. Just enough to put the hand in and take these parcels out.

JOSEPH TOWNSHEND sworn. I am one of the patroles belonging to Bow-street; on Tuesday the 12th of November, I went in company with Armfield, to a chimney-sweepers, in Bow-street, Westminster, and there we apprehended

the prisoners Lewis and Taylor; they were both together; I told them they must go with me to Bow-street; Lewis said he would tell me the truth; he said that the buttons that Taylor gave to him was down in the cellar in the soot. Taylor denied it.

THOMAS ARMFIELD sworn. I am a Bow-street patrole; on the 12th of November I went in company with Townshend to a chimney-sweeper's in Bow-street, Westminster, where we apprehended the prisoners Lewis and Taylor. I asked Lewis what he had done with the buttons, he said they were down in the cellar, he ran down to the cellar, and I followed him; he produced the buttons from under the soot, they were in a paper parcel. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are the same we had in our shop, the private mark is defaced by being in the soot.

Q. (to Gill.) You are sure you saw the three prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you swear to their different persons? - A. Two of them were black, being chimney-sweepers, and the other was very dirty.

Q. Was the one that you stopped a chimney-sweeper? - A. No, the other two were.

Lewis's Defence. I was going with this lad, (Ward, he wanted to be a sweep,) to Leather-lane; I was going to take him to a sweep there, he ran away from me; he came back to me, and says, I have found this. Taylor says, I will give you one as you are going home; he told me he had found it; I says, I hope you did not take it; he said no, he found them.

Ward's Defence. I did find them, Taylor saw me find them, and another gentleman saw me find them; I gave Taylor two, he gave the sweep one, and one I kept myself.

Taylor's Defence. They gave me one pack; Lewis told me to give it to him to carry home, and I gave it him.

Lewis called one witness who gave him a good character.

Taylor called one witness who gave him a good character.

Ward called no witness to character.

WARD - GUILTY, DEATH . - aged 13.

LEWIS and TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

The Jury and Prosecutor recommended Ward to mercy, on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-62

62. WILLIAM HAMBLETON, alias WILKES, alias FISHER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , ninety bushels of coals, value 4 l. the property of John Truman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury ; and three other counts, only varying the manner of charging them.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Alley, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ISAAC BRIANT sworn. Q. Are you a partner in the house of Briant and Co's.? - A. Yes. The firm is John Briant , Isaac Briant , myself, and James Back .

Q. On the 14th of May, in the present year, had you been employed in delivering any coals to Messrs. Truman and Hanbury, brewer s? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he was driving one of our teams on that day.

Q. You are a coal-merchant, where do you carry on your business? - A. Near the Hermitage, Wapping.

Q. Do you know of any coals being delivered to him to be delivered at Messss. Truman and Hanbury's? - A. Yes, he had the waggon loaded at the wharf with the coals.

Q. Had he been employed on that day to deliver any coals to any other person than Messrs. Truman and Hanbury? - A. None other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About twenty-one years; he has wored for me about four or five years off and on; he was then working while another man was bad at that time.

Q. We have heard that the prisoner absconded, I ask you this; the day after the prisoner is charged of having left his place; did not you know that some accident happened to him? - A. I was not at home at the time.

Q. He fought with a man and broke his ribs? - A. I did not see it.

Q. Did not he go to the hospital? - A. I heard so.

Q. Did not you apply to get him in the hospital? - A. I did not, he was applied for at the hospital, and they found he was gone.

Q. Did he work on your wharf on the fifteenth - A. No, I never saw him afterwards.

JOHN TODD . Examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. What are you? - A. I keep a cart and horse to carry things from market, and such sort of things.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 14th of May? - A. I saw him coming over the New Bridge, called Hermitage Dock, he was about an hundred yards from Mr. Briant's Wharf, near London; he had got a waggon loaded with coals belonging to Mr. Briant. I was bid to follow the load of coals, and I did. It went up the Minories, Jerry Crew , the pull-back met him in the Minories; the pull-back

came to me and shewed me the ticket. I followed the load of coals till I saw it shot in a cellar, belonging to the French Horn public-house, Crutched Friars. I then returned back to Mr. Turnbridge, who had ordered me to follow the waggon, and gave information of what I had seen.

Q. After the waggon had shot the coals, did you look to see what sort of coals they were?

- A. I did, they were very small.

Q. Are you acquainted with coals so as to know what particular persons are served with large coals and with small coals? - A. The small coals are served to great consumers, the large goes to the housekeepers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland.

Q. Now, let me have a pull-back too. You know Mr. Briant, and you saw his name on the cart; why did you not go to Mr. Briant's? - A. I did not think it worth my while.

Q. You keep a horse and cart that you employ in bringing things from market and such sort of things. Did you ever employ this horse and cart in fetching fish from a gentleman's pond, or any thing of that sort? - A. No.

Court. Q. Are you are at all intimate with Crew? - A. Yes, he lodged with me at this time.

Q. Do you know where Hanbury's brewhouse is? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Crutched Friars in the way to Hanbury's brewhouse from Hermitage Bridge? - A. It was a good deal out of the way.

JERRY CREW sworn. Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are what they call a pull-back? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 14th of May were you employed to carry any coals to Hanbury's? - A. Yes.

Q. Who employed you? - A. The waggoners of Mr. Briant's.

Q. How many waggon loads were there to be delivered that day? - A. Eight. After the sixth load, I thought they staid a long while, I went to look after them.

Court. Q. What name did you know the prisoner by? - A. Bill Wilkes , he has so many names, I cannot tell what name he went by.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you meet him in the Minories? - A. Yes, and a waggon load of coals with him, he said he was going to Crutched Friars; I saw him turn down John-street, where he went with the coals I cannot say. On the next day I met the prisoner in Ratcliff Highway, with one chaldron of coals; after I unloaded the chaldron of coals, he gave me a seven shilling piece, and he asked me whether I had put the ticket in safe with the others, I said I had.

Q. What do you mean by putting the tickets where the other tickets were put? - A. The tickets of the coals are put in the lobby, where they clean boots in the yard. He gave me a ticket on the 14th, when I met him in the Minories, and desired me to put it in the brewhouse.

Q. Then the coals belonging to that ticket were not delivered? - A. No, all the rest were on that day delivered except that ticket.

Cross-Examined by Mr. Bolland.

Q. What business had you in the Minories? - A. They stopped so long, I thought they might have gone somewhere else.

Court. Q. Did the other six waggons come up the Minories? - A. No, up Well-street.

Q. How came you to be looking up the Minories for him, when Well-street was the way they ought to come? - A. He told me there ought to be five chaldron go to Crutched Friars.

Mr. Bolland. Q. As you was the pull-back, why was not you to go to Crutched Friars? - A. I asked him, he told me it was an easy job, he told me he could do it himself.

Mr. Alley. Q. (to Mr. Briant.) Had you any customer that you supplied with coals at the French Horn, Crutched Friars? - A. None.

Mr. Bolland. Q. (to Mr. Briant.) How long have you known Crew. - A. Thirty years.

Court. Q. (to Crew.) You expected that eight waggons were to go to Hanbury's, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever tell any body of this seventh waggon going to Crutched Friars? - A. I did. I told it to John Todd the same day I shewed him the ticket. I said it was a shame that such a job should be done by an odd man.

Q. How much did you receive as pull-back on that day? - A. I received nothing but seven shillings on the next day. I should have had three shillings and four-pence for the eight loads, I received seven shillings.

THOMAS BUTTS AVELING sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. A. You are the principal clerk at Messrs. Hanbury's? - A. I am.

Q. Will you have the goodness to describe the names of that firm? - A. John Truman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Worship-street. In consequence of information that you received in May last, did you endeavour to apprehend the prisoner? - A. I did. I could not find him. I went to the infirmary, he was stated to be so ill that it would not be prudent to take him. I took him at Chatham. My warrant is dated in May. I went to the London Infirmary, in Whitechapel.

Q. You found him at Chatham in the name of Fisher? - A. I did, and I read the warrant to him, he said he knew nothing of the charge. I brought him up to town.

Prisoner's Defence. I was only entrusted with two loads, I went with one load to the stoke-hole,

and the next time I came, one of the horses threw two of his shoes, after I got in the gateway I took the horse off, and took him to Mr. Hanbury's farrier to put the shoes on; I went and searched for Jerry, but not finding him I began to unload the coals myself, at the coal-hole door. A man comes to me, and says, you must not shoot the coals here, we have left the stoke-hole to be filled. I unloaded the coals where the man ordered me; I fetched my horse, and the farrier gave me a receipt for two shillings for putting the horse's shoes on, which I gave to Mr. Back. I went with another load to the Haymarket, I met Mr. James Briant coming along the Haymarket as I was coming from my last load; how could I be in the Minories at that time. It is all a spiteful piece of business through Mr. Briant taking the wharf. Mr. Tunbridge said if he could do Mr. Briant an injury he would, if it cost him twenty guineas, therefore he has done this business to try to hurt Mr. Briant. A fellow-servant threw me against the cart and broke my ribs, that is how I went to the infirmary; I worked for Mr. Briant again on the next day, till that happened. Why did not Mr. Tunbridge apprehend me on that day. The next morning I was so bad I went to the hospital, they could only bleed me and bind me up, after they had done that I went to the door, I fainted away, the gentleman took me back, I stopped there a day and a night, then I went to a sister of mine, who lived in Dog-row, and stopped there a night. I went down to Chatham to see a friend of mine. I went to work there, at the King's work, at a guinea a week, I thought it was better than laying on my club for ten shillings a week. The way I went by the name of Fisher was, my father was drowned when I was five years old, my mother married a man of the name of Fisher. I was at Chatham till this gentleman came and asked me, if I was the person that delivered the coals at the French Horn. Todd said at the justice's he did not know me, and the man at the French Horn said that I was not the person. Am I not remarkable, think you gentlemen, would not all of you know me again.

Q. (to Todd.) You saw the waggon go from the Minories to Crutched Friars. Did you see any body else with the waggon? - A. There was a man of the name of George Harvey , at the said house, he was the pull-back, and the prisoner was the driver of the waggon.

Q. You are sure that Crew was not there? - A. No.

JAMES CHILD sworn. Examined by Mr. Bolland. I keep the French Horn, Crutched Friars.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I saw him once at Worship-street.

Q. It has been stated to us that the prisoner at the bar, on the 14th of May, delivered to you two chaldron of coals? - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Could he without your knowledge deliver the coals? - A. No, that I am certain of.

Q. Had you any coals delivered on the 14th of May? - A. Yes, I gave an order to Mr. Garford for five chaldron, I never received any more than two and a half. There was only one man that delivered the coals, he was at the tail of the cart and I was at the head.

Q. Can you say whether the prisoner at the bar was the man? - A. I cannot.

Q. You have never paid for the coals, nor has any man applied for payment? - A. No one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Have you made any application since Fleet was in custody to Mr. Briant to pay the money for the coals? - A. I believe I went to Mr. Briant, on the Coal Exchange, on the Monday following, when I heard they came by them dishonestly, I told him I would pay for them.

Q. Who is the person you deal with? - A. I deal with several.

Q. Did you ever deal with Messrs Briant's? - A. No.

Q. Do you usually receive a ticket when you buy coals? - A. Generally.

Q. Did you have a ticket when you had Garford's coals? - A. No, the man told me he would bring me two tickets together when he brought the other coals.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before? - A. No, I never saw him before nor after till I saw him in Worship-street.

Q. Then you had never employed him? - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Did the prisoner ever apply to you for any money for the coals? - A. No, I have never seen the person since that I ordered them of.

Q. Was it the prisoner that delivered them to you - A. I cannot swear whether it was or no, it is impossible, when a man comes with a black face to swear to him now. Garford had been a neighbour, he was a person employed in the India warehouse, I have bought coals of him before, they might come this way, but I do not know, he told me he had coals by contract.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-63

63. ELIJAH STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of November , a pocket-book, value 6 d. the property of William Hosier .

WILLIAM HOSIER sworn. I am porter

to Mr. Tomkins in Bread-street, Cheapside. On the 11th of November, about half after five o'clock, at dusk, I was almost by Aldgate pump ; a young man came running and told me that I had lost my pocket-book; I put my hand into my pocket, and found it was gone; I had felt it was safe in my pocket about half an hour before.

Q. Did you see the prisoner? - A. I saw the prisoner, but I did not perceive him pick my pocket.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. I am a patrole of Portsoken ward.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I saw him on the eleventh of November, about six o'clock in the evening, following of the prosecutor, and by the light of the shop windows I saw the pocket-book in his hand; I knew that he had done the business; he had the pocket-book in his hand, he put it in his coat pocket; I was in the middle of the high-road as he crossed from the pavement to the other side of the way; I met him, and seized him.

Q. Did he surrender quietly? - A. We had a bit of a scuffle; I took him into a shop, because I was afraid the book would be confisticated.

Q. Did you find the pocket-book on him? - A. No, I could not find it on his person, and not one minute had elapsed from the time when I searched him; I searched the shop as well as him, I could not find it there; from thence I took him to the watchhouse, and after I had secured him, I took a candle and lanthorn with me from the watchhouse to the spot where I first laid hold of him, and under my feet there lay the pocket-book; it was close to where I took hold of him; I sent for the prosecutor, he came, he said it was his property.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Is that the pocket-book you had on the 11th of November? - A. It is, there is a few memorandums of my own in it.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. Between five and six o'clock I was going towards Aldgate; that officer accused me of a robbery, he took me and and searched me, and found nothing on me, he took me into the watchhouse, and in about five minutes he returned with the prosecutor and the pocket-book; he asked the prosecutor if that was his pocket-book, he said yes.

GUILTY - aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-64

64. MARY CONWAY and SARAH LIONS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November , a promissory note of the Hull East Riding Bank, value 5 l. 5 s. two promissory notes of the Hull Commercial Bank, value 5 l. 5 s. each; and one promissory note of the Hull Bank, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of Robert Wright .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated. The prisoners were

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-65

65. PETER HILSON and WILLIAM VINCENT were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon Dinah Hawkins , on the 21st of November , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, six frocks, value 7 s. two cloaks, value 20 s. a gown, value 20 s. one petticoat, value 2 s. three yards of dimity, value 3 s. three pieces of flannel, value 4 s. three shifts, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. nine caps, value 9 s. five yards of cotton, value 7 s. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. two bags, value 1 s. a table cloth, value 6 d. a child's frock, value 3 s. three child's shirts, value 3 s. half a yard of cambric, value 1 s. 6 d. a habit shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of the said Dinah Hawkins .

DINAH HAWKINS sworn. I am a servant out of place; I am a widow. On Thursday, the 21st of November, I was coming from Kensington, when I came beyond the barracks I saw the lamp-lighter had began to light the lamps; and before I got out of Kensington Gardens the clock struck five, I then saw a man come out of the Park with some dead wood; it began to get a little foggy, I was very much timid, being by myself, my bundle was large, and I had a pain in my side; I could not get on so fast as I could wish, and when I came to a place where some stone-masons were at work by candle light, I saw these two men at the bar stand opposite by the trees where these men were at work; they stood before me, I passed them; their backs were to the light, I saw they were soldiers in their dishabil; I looked at them very much, and when I passed them I turned round to see if they looked at me; I saw them both look at me very hard; when I got behind the gate in Hyde Park, I heard somebody come running.

Q. Was it near Hyde Park Corner ? - A. Yes; I was at the gates when they came up to me; I stopped to hear which way I heard the running; I saw it was not before me, I looked back and sawit was those two men; they came up to me; one kept behind me, and the other came before me, and said, Blast your eyes, where are you going; the tall man called me his dear, he put his right hand over my mouth, and his other hand to my neck; he held me while the other man took my bundle; then he took his hands from me, pulled me down on my back, and ran

away after the other man that took my bundle; I then was able to get up; I was very much frightened indeed.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property? - A. Yes, on the Monday following.

Q. How came you to go from Kensington in the road instead of the Park? - A. Because they had began to light the lamps, I was going to Cumberland Place or Street, No. 7, Oxford Road.

Q. Had you your bundle under your arm? - A. I had it in my gown, it was more than I could meet with each arm together.

Q. You did not drop it? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men? - A. I am positive.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. Yes, The tall one; I observed such an oddness in his mouth when he was holding me, and his eyes turned up so, I should have known him out of all the men in the regiment.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. They beagn to light the lamps as you came into Kensington Park? - A. Yes.

Q. Soon after that the fog came on? - A. Yes, I perceived it was growing dark.

Q. That frightened you? - A. I was terrified, being by myself.

Q. When you first saw those two men, their backs were towards you? - A. Yes.

Q. Your being frightened, and they having their backs to the light, how can you undertake to swear to them? - A. After I passed them, one turned his face to me, and the other with his back to the light and his face to me, then I had a good look at them.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. I am an officer of Queen-square: On Monday the 25th of November, Mrs. Hawkins came to me at the office, and said she had been robbed by two soldiers coming across Hyde Park: we went round immediately to the pawnbrokers, and Mr. Courtney, at Mr. Wright's, said that a cloak and two shirts had been pledged there; from information I went to No. 1, New Way in the Almonry; a girl of the name of Starkey lived there: I produce the different articles I found there.

Q. All that you know is that you found the property there? - A. Yes, on the same day I apprehended Peter Hilson ; I found this towel in his knapsack, which Mrs. Hawkins said was her property.

Q. When did you apprehend Vincent? - A. On Tuesday morning; I was present when my brother officer apprehended him, and found a table cloth and a pocket handkerchief in his left hand pocket that was on him.

THOMAS RANEY sworn. Q. Where did you find this table cloth and handkerchief which you have produced? - A. On William Vincent , in his left hand great coat pocket, on Tuesday the 26th of November.

ELIZABETH STARKEY sworn. I live in Westminster, I work at the soldier's work.

Q. Where? - A. In the New Way in the Almony. I have known the tall man, William Vincent , five years; I know nothing of the short man; when they came to my room I was out, they sent a young woman after me to the house where I was, and when I came out to go to them, they both stood at the corner of Mr. Wright's passage, in the Almonry; I asked them what they wanted with me, the short man said he had got a prize for me; I went home and got a light, they both went into my room before I got the light; when I returned with the light I saw several things lay about the room; the short man asked me to pawn a black silk cloak and two shifts; I asked him how they came by them, he said they belonged to his wife, she was dead and had been buried about a fortnight, and the child also was dead and buried: I went and pawned them the cloak for Wilson at Mr. Wright's for twelve shillings; when I came back they told me to pawn two shifts: he said if Mr. Wright would not take it in he would shew him the ticket of his wife's death; I went and pawned them for five shillings, and brought the money to them; the money they divided between both; they went from my room, and I went with them to Mr. Oakes's public house, where we had two or three pots of beer; they came down to my room again on Friday, between twelve and one, and the things that they had left were laying on the table; they took them from the table and over-hauled them again; in over-hauling the things they told me that there was a bit of cambric which would serve them to make some frills for their shirts, and bid me take care of it, they both then went away; Vincent came down on Saturday by himself, I challenged him with the things, he said they met a young woman coming across the Park, he held her, while Hilson took them from her; there was an old towel on the table in my room; he put it in his hat and said it would serve him in the barracks; he took it with him, and went away; I saw him no more till Monday, when the prosecutrix came down to my room, with the pawnbroker and the officer; I delivered up the things.

SUSANNAH BARLOW sworn. I work at soldier's work, I live in the same house with Elizabeth Starkey , I was sitting in her room on the next day; the two men at the bar came on Friday.

Q. You are sure these are the two men? - A. Yes, I left them at Elizabeth Starkey 's room, when they came in and went up into my own room, I came down again into Starkey's room before they went out.

Q. What did you see there? - A. I saw the gown, and two or three little things about the table.

Q. Did you hear how they came by it? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood.

Q. They did not take you up did they? - A. Yes, and so they did the other witness.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. I am shopman to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, Tothill-street; I produce a silk cloak and two shifts: the two shifts I took in of Starkey on Thursday evening the 21st of November; I was in the shop at the time Starkey pledged the mode cloak for twelve shillings the same evening.

Q. (To Starkey.) Is that the cloak and the two shifts you pledged? - A. Yes, the prisoners at the bar had the duplicates.

Q. From whom had you the cloak and the two shifts? - A. From the two men at the bar.

Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Look at these two shifts and the cloak? - A. They are mine, and all the other things are mine, there is my mark on most of them.

Hilson's Defence. I went to a cook's shop to have a bit of supper; there was that bit of cloth and two more little pieces laying in the street; I thought it was dropped by somebody going into a rag-shop; I saw it was a little bit of new cloth. I went up stairs, and put it in my knapsack.

Prosecutrix. That bit of cloth was in my bundle.

Q. Starkey, she swears you brought them there? - A. (Prisoner Hilson.) She is a common girl of the town, she will swear any man's life away, what can you expect of her.

Vincent's Defence. I picked that handkerchief up going home, on Constitution Hill.

Q. Have you any body to prove that? - A. No.

Hilson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Vincent called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HILSON - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

VINCENT - GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-66

66. JOHN HARRING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of December fifty pound weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of John Brown , affixed to a certain house of his .

Second Count for like offence, only stating it a certain building instead of a house.

Third and Fourth Counts, charged with ripping the like lead with like intention.

JOHN BROWN sworn. I live in Perry-street, Bloomsbury , next door to the house where the lead was taken off, I am building of the house. On the 3d of December the lead was taken off the top of the house.

Q. What quantity? - A. Fifty-one pound of lead.

Q. About what time of the day do you think it was taken? - A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was the lead affixed to the house, had you seen it in the course of the day of the second of December? - A. Yes, it had been put on about a week. I saw it myself in the course of that day, just before they left work, and it was safe there, nailed down.

Q. When did you find that the house had been robbed? - A. We discovered it between six and seven o'clock, directly after it was done; we saw the prisoner on the scaffold, we alarmed the next house, they took up a light into the garret, where they saw the prisoner lying down by the window, in the gutter. I saw the prisoner when he was taken.

Q. Did you come up to him when he was taken? - A. When he was taken I was within ten yards of him. He was seen lying in a gutter; he returned back, he was catched partly on a sence wall that adjoins the building; he had left the lead in the garret of my house that I was building.

Q. Do you know any thing of this man? - A. He has worked for me these six months.

Q. What was he able to earn a week? - A. I gave him fifteen shillings the last few weeks, and eighteen shillings in summer. The lead was torn off, and the nails were drawn; I sent my son up to measure the place where it was taken from, and it measured to the place exactly.

Q. What was the value of the lead? - A. I suppose I paid about fourpence a pound for it.

JANE KELSON sworn. I live servant with Mr. Brown. There was a gentleman in the parlour with my master. I was waiting in the yard to let this gentleman out of the gate, I looked up towards the new house, I saw the prisoner pull the lead up from the new house next door to us; my master was building it. I stood for some minutes to be certain whether it was him or not.

Q. You knew his person well, did you? - A. I did.

Q. Was there any other person on the house besides himself? - A. I did not see any body else. I stood for some minutes before I called any body. I saw him pull the lead up and roll it together. I am certain the prisoner is the man, I went and told my master there was a man on the house taking the lead, and when my master came into the yard, I said it was John, I was there all the time, and saw him taken.

Q. What did he say for himself? - A. He shook

his head, and said, ch! Jenny, how could you tell your master of me.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. I am a greengrocer, I live next door to Mr. Brown.

Q. Did you assist in taking the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you see him when you was first alarmed? - A. I saw him upon the top of Mr. Brown's new building; we catched him, after we had pursued him all over the house.

Q. What did he say for himself when he was taken? - A. He said he got tipsey that day, and he got in there to sleep.

Q. Did he appear to be drunk? - A. No.

THOMAS REYNOLDS sworn. I am a carman to Mr. Brown; when I came in the yard he was about the building. I went to the bottom part of the building and took him; at last I went round the gutter at the parapet next to the party-wall, I saw this lead, I picked it up and threw it on the ground where the prisoner was. I saw the place where the lead was taken from.

Prisoner's Defence. I got drunk, I went into this building that I worked in to stretch myself for an hour. I did not go in there to steal any thing, nor had I, by and by I heard a noise that there were some thieves in the building, I jumped into my master's yard, I thought it was the safest place to go to.

Q. (to Reynolds.) Did you see any other person in this building besides this man? - A. I did not.

Q. (to Taylor.) Did you see any other person on this building? - A. I did not.

GUILTY - aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-67

67. THOMAS GOBEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November , a sack, value 2 s. 6 d. and two bushels of potatoes, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Ridge .

JOHN RIDGE sworn. The prisoner was a servant of my father Samuel Ridge .

Q. Had he directions to go and get nine sacks of potatoes? - A. He was to get some potatoes; we did not say how many; he was to take as many as he choosed to bring home.

Q. Do you remember receiving information from Mr. Higgins? - A. Yes, I asked him how many he had brought home; he said nine; I told him there was eight; he said he thought his horses would not draw nine, he had left one in the field.

Q. Would the cart have been overloaded with nine sacks? - A. It would carry twelve or more.

FRANCIS HIGGINS sworn. Q. I believe you live at Old Ford? - A. I do; on Saturday the 30th of November I was returning on horseback from the road to Old Ford; I came to the cart rather unexpectedly, I saw the prisoner take a sack out of his master's cart, it was about two-thirds filled with potatoes, he put it into a ditch where there were nettles; I took no notice of the man, I drove on, I went to Mr. Ridge's yard, I said do you know me; oh! yes, he said, that sack of potatoes that I put in the ditch, I am going to fetch them, I was over loaded. I got off from my horse, and took the prisoner by the collar, and told him he had robbed his master; he said that he did not mean to steal them, he was going to take them up. I then gave him into the custody of this young man and his father. I then returned with Mr. Cooper to the potatoes; I found them in the ditch, under the nettles. The prisoner begged for mercy, and said it was his first offence.

(The sack produced, and identified by Mr. Ridge, jun, and Mr. Higgins.)

Prisoner's Defence. My cart was overloaded with potatoes, I took one sack out, and put it in the hedge, I was thinking of returning afterwards to take it to my master's.

GUILTY - aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and to be publicly Whipped one hundred yards .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-68

68. EDMUND IRELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of November , a stock, value 5 s. and a plough, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Ghrimes .

BENJAMIN GHRIMES sworn. I am a carpenter, I live at No. 3, Lambeth halfpenny batch; on the 22d or the 23d of November, I lost a plow and a stock from No. 3, Chatham Place ; I found them on the 23d, at Mr. Page's a pawnbroker's.

JAMES RAMSEY sworn. I am a servant to Mr. Page.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, on the 23d of November, about half past eight in the morning, he brought a plow, a stock, and two planes to pledge.

Q. What did you advance on them? - A. Nine shillings. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY - aged 27.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-69

69. ESTHER MARY GAMBLE , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , a pair of woman's shoes, value 3 s. the property of Paul Payne .

The Prosecutor not appearing in court, his

recognizance was ordered to be estreated ; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-70

70. SARAH JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Evans .

JOHN EVANS sworn. I am a linen-draper .

Q. Did you lose a handkerchief at any time? - A. Yes, on the eleventh of November, between one and two o'clock, I received information; my servant pursued the prisoner into Mr. Dod's shop; I knew that the handkerchief was at the outside of my shop; I had seen it an hour before there.

JAMES DOD sworn. I am a grocer.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar on the eleventh of November? - A. I did; she came in my shop near two o'clock in the afternoon; Eleanor Hancock and Mr. Evans's man followed her; they took her to Mr. Evans. I went to shut the door; I saw a handkerchief laying behind the door; I shewed the handkerchief to Mr. Evans, he claimed it as his property.

Q. Should you know the handkerchief again? (The handkerchief produced.) A. That is the handkerchief that was thrown into my shop.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief, the prisoner had cut it from the piece, it hung down to the ground, and when I came to the door, there was one cut off. I asked her how she came to do such a barefaced thing in noon day, she said she was distressed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY - aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-71

71. THOMAS FORD and WILLIAM BENTON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December , a truss of hay, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Gardener .

WILLIAM GARDENER sworn. I am a victualler ; I live at the sign of the New Globe, Mile End : On the 5th of December, between the hours of five and six o'clock, I was at home in my bar, I saw the prisoner Ford in my tap-room; I had some suspicion; Benton was my ostler, he came home, then he and Ford went out together; my son was standing with me in the bar, I sent him to watch them, which he did; he came in to me and then pursued them and I followed him; I saw the prisoner Ford with a truss of hay on his back; I brought him back, and charged an officer with him.

Q. Where was the other prisoner? - A. When I got a constable, he came into the house; he came in at the other door; William, says I, you thief, give me the keys and I will give you in charge; I gave charge of him, he said he was very sorry for it, it was the first time.

HENRY GARDENER sworn. You are the son of the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. You were sent in the stable to watch? - A. Yes; I saw the ostler go to the stable; Ford waited at the top of the yard, being a moonlight night I thought they would know me; and when I came back Ford had got the hay on his back going across the field with it, I ran after him, and asked him where he had got that hay, he told me he bought it at the corn-chandler's; I told him he must come back with me, and shew me where he bought it; I brought the hay back; my father came and took Ford.

Q. When you saw Ford he was going from your place? - A. Yes, he was going towards his own house with the hay.

Q. When he came back what did he say then? - A. He said he bought it.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Ford called ten witnesses who gave him a good character.

Benton called no witnesses to character.

FORD - GUILTY , aged 42.

BENTON - GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18051204-72

72. JOHN SMITH alias GADALIAH PHILLIPS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

(The Case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL BOUNE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Collet and Cox, Cheapside.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I met him on the 6th of October in Milk-street, Cheapside; he was selling peaches, I purchased three of him, I gave him six-pence for them.

Q. What did you tender him for payment of these? - A. A shilling; he said that he could not give me a sixpence; I saw he had plenty of silver in his hand; I asked if he could give change for a seven shilling piece by giving half a crown with it; he said he could give change

for the two seven shilling pieces which I had in my hand, by giving me half a guinea and three shillings; I looked at the silver, I did not particularly look at the half guinea, the silver I thought looked very well, I put it all in my pocket; when I got to the top of Milk-street, Cheapside , I examined the money, I found it was bad; I immediately went back, the prisoner was gone; in the evening I informed Mr. Hemmit of the circumstance.

Q. In consequence of that was you determined to find out the prisoner? - A. I was.

Q. Did you for that purpose mark a seven shilling piece? - A. The seven shilling piece was not marked any more than it was crooked; Mr. Hemmit informed me on Friday that he was in Wood-street, with peaches; I went to him again and agreed for six-pennyworth more of peaches, and offered him the crooked seven shilling piece that I had of Hemmit; he took the seven shilling piece in his hand, and with the other hand he took out the silver from his pocket, and made an excuse that he could not give change; at the same time he conveyed my seven shilling piece I do not know where, and dropped a bad seven shilling piece out of his mouth into his hand; I observed what he was going to do; I believe I then gave him a shilling, and he gave me a six-pence; I told him I could do without changing the seven shilling piece; I demanded my seven shilling piece back again, he gave me a bad one, it was a flat one, quite new; I am sure that the one I gave him was a crooked one, and an old one; I told him that was not the seven shilling piece that I gave him, he said it was; I told him I had now detected him, and he should go before a magistrate; he then told me, for God's sake not to say a word, he would give me my seven shilling piece again; I told him he had cheated me before; he said he would give me the whole of it; he would give me the seven shilling piece and the whole of the money I had taken of him the first time, if I would not say a word about it; at the same time he had the seven shilling piece in his hand which I gave him, ready to give me (the crooked one); I beckoned to my friend Hemmit, who was on the other side of the way, he came and laid hold of the hand in which my good seven shilling piece was, and enclosed it; I laid hold of the other hand, we walked with him towards Guildhall; in Cateaton-street we met two constables, Phillips and Pope, we delivered him up to them.

Q. What became of the seven shilling piece which was in his hand? - A. When we delivered him up one of the officers took it out of his hand; then they conducted him to the Castle-tavern, till the alderman came, they searched him there; I saw what was found upon him; I have got the bad seven shilling piece, I have kept it ever since; I produce it, and here is the half guinea and the three shillings.

Q. The half guinea and the three shillings is the first transaction in Milk-street; who gave them to you? - A. The prisoner on the 6th of October:

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. There was no particular mark on the seven shilling piece, only it was crooked; you have seen a thousand others crooked? - A. To be sure I have seen others.

Q. You received a seven shilling piece of him that day; what was the number of seven shilling pieces that he had in his hand? - A. I did not see any other, he had this seven shilling piece in his hand, which he dropped out of his mouth, I believe.

Q. Oh! you believe; are you sure? - A. It was done very quickly.

Q. You produce half a guinea here to day, how many hands has that half guinea been in? - A. It was never out of my sight.

Q. Did you never part with it when there were thirteen or fourteen more persons in company? - A. I shewed it to people, it was never out of my sight; it was never shewn to more people than when we took him to the Castle tavern.

Q. Might there not be five or six more people when it was shewed about? - A. There might be?

Mr. Knapp. Are you sure that it is the same half guinea that you received from him? - A. I am.

- HEMMIT sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live with Mr. Thomas in Wood-street, he is a furrier.

Q. You are a friend of Mr. Boune's? - A. Yes.

Q. He communicated something that occurred in October, and described the person of the prisoner to you? - A. He did, on the 11th of October I saw the prisoner in Wood-street.

Court. Did you know the prisoner by his description? - A. I had dealt often with the prisoner before.

Q. In consequence of your seeing him, you communicated it to Boune? - A. I did.

Q. You gave Boune a seven shilling piece to offer? - A. I did.

Q. Boune went up to the prisoner, and after a little time did he call you to him? - A. He did. When I came up to him he was tendering money to Boune, and telling him to take money, for whatever he liked. I immediately took hold of his hand and proceeded towards.

Cateaton-street, from whence the officer took him.

Q. Look at that seven shilling piece, and tell me whether that is the seven shilling piece that, you tendered to Mr. Boune that day? - A. No, that is not, it is quite strait.

Q. Did you see the officer search him? - A. I did.

Court. Did you say it was a crooked one that you gave to Boune? - A. It was a crooked one.

Mr. Knapp. Did you hear what the prisoner said as relative to the money that he had given to Boune on the sixth, and on the eleventh of October? - A. He said that he did not remember that he had given him any, but if there was any bad he would change it.

JOHN POPE sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes; on the eleventh of October, after taking the prisoner into custody, I searched him; I took this seven shilling piece out of his hands (producing it.) I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. (To Hemmit.) Is that crooked seven shilling piece which Pope has produced the seven shilling piece that you gave to your friend? - A. I cannot say, I gave him a crooked seven shilling piece, it was something like it.

Q. (To Boune.) Look at that seven shilling piece? - A. It looks like it, I believe it is the same.

CHARLES PHILIPS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable.

Q. On the eleventh of October, did you search the prisoner? - A. Yes, we searched him in the public house; we found him in the public-house; we found this counterfeit money in his possession, I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. Whereabouts did you find this bad money; was it mixed with good money, or how? A. The bad money was wrapped up in paper, and the good money was loose; I believe it was all in one pocket.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know what the bad money consisted of? - A. There was one guinea, two half guineas, two seven shilling pieces, five half crowns, and thirteen shillings, all bad.

Q. How much good money had he? - A. There were five seven shilling pieces, one dollar, five half crowns, seventeen shillings, and two six-pences.

Q. What became of the good money that was found upon him? - A. It was delivered to him, all but thirteen shillings and six-pence, that was deducted on account of what he had taken of the gentleman on the sixth of October.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed.

Q. Were you present at the time the crooked seven shilling piece was taken from him? - A. I was.

Q. How many seven shilling pieces were in his hand at that time? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. (To Pope.) When you took the seven shilling piece out of the hand of the prisoner, had he any other seven shilling piece in his hand at the time? - A. No.

Mr. PARKER sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I believe you are employed by the Mint on these occasions; you are very well acquainted with the coin of this kingdom, and the counterfeits? - A. I am.

Q. First of all look at the flat seven shilling piece produced by Boune? - A. That is a counterfeited one, it is perfectly new.

Q. Now look at the crooked seven shilling piece which Pope took out out of the prisoner's hand? - A. That is a good one.

Q. Now look at the money that was found on his person? - A. The guinea is a counterfeited one, the two two half guineas and the two seven shilling pieces, they are all bad, the shillings and half crowns are all counterfetis.

Mr. Gleed addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and to find security for two years good behaviour at the expiration of that time .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18051204-73

73. THOMAS NEWSHAM and ROBERT PATERSON were indicted for a conspiracy .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Arabin, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

BENJAMIN ROLFE sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Were you in the month of April last in the employment of Mr. Bourne's, a pawnbroker in East Smithfield? - A. I was.

Q. Were either of the prisoners acquainted with Mr. Bourne? - A. Mr. Newsham visited there frequently at the time that I was there.

Q. In consequence of that you became intimately acquainted with him? - A. Exactly so.

Q. Do you recollect any conversation with him relative to your situation in life? - A. I do; it was in the latter end of April or the beginning of May he first introduced the conversation to me; first of all he asked me if I had got a situation; I told him in what a situation I was then in; he said he had a brother in law in the Drawing Room in the Ordnance office; he asked me whether my friends could raise 130 l. or 120 l.; I told him I thought it was very probable that they would; he said he had so much interest with general Moss, and this brother-in-law

would resign in my favour, if I could advance that sum of money.

Q. Did he say what the emolument would be? - A. Yes, twenty-eight shillings a week for the first half year, after that it was to be doubled, and after three years it was to be doubled again.

Q. In consequence of this, I believe you met the same evening at the Blue-boar Coffee-house, Aldgate? - A. Yes, he then wrote a letter to my grandfather; (the letter read in Court,) addressed to Mr. Rolf, Wimbeach, May 1st, 1804.

SIR,

Having in an occasional visit to a friend, met the young gentleman who is the bearer of this and hearing of his situation, it has been in my power to assist him, and to place him in an office under government, whereas, I know, will be the making of him, and for particulars of which I refer you to him; yet it cannot be complete without some assistance from you or some other friend. But I have no doubt but you will use your utmost endeavours to so laudable a purpose.

(Signed)

T. NEWSHAM.

Q. Did you take this letter in the country? - A. The next morning, May 2d, I took that letter to my grandfather, in the parish of Wimbeach, Essex. I returned on the third or fourth. I met Newsham on the Monday following, he asked me how I succeeded, I told him that I believed my grandfather would send the money, and on Tuesday I received a letter from my father, which inclosed a draft for one hundred pound. Newsham wanted me to advance twenty pound, in order to bind an agreement that he was going to make between an upholsterer and his brother. On the same afternoon I advanced him twenty pound.

Q. Did you advacce it yourself, or authorise any body else to advance it? - A. Mr. Bourne said he would advance it, if I would deposit my draft in his hands.

Q. Did you ever learn from the prisoner that that twenty pound was paid to him by Mr. Bourne? - A. Afterwards I learned that Newsham never had it.

Q. Do you recollect the day that you went to Chelsea? - A. I do not exactly, but before I went to Chelsea I paid him the twenty pound.

Q. Did he ever shew you any parchment or any writing before you went to Chelsea? - A. He did.

THOMAS WEST sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Did you serve a copy of this notice upon Mr. Newsham? - A. I did on the sixth of November.

Q. I believe you likewise served the notice on Mr. Patterson, on the twelfth of August? - A. I did, I tendered it to him personally.

(The notice read in Court.)

Rolfe against Thomas Newsham and Thomas Paterson .

Take notice, you are required to produce at the next general sessions at the Old Bailey, a certain parchment writing, produced and shewn to him by you, of your brother-in-law's place in the ordnance office, in the Tower of London, and also a certain other parchment writing, produced and shewn to him in the month of May last, to appoint him to the same place in the office, and also in the month of June last, a certain paper writing, stating the said, swearing him in, and all letters and writings whatsoever relating to the charge against you, by him, addressed to Thomas Newsham .

JOHN SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. Q. Did you serve a copy of that on Paterson? - A. I did, personally, on Wednesday last.

Q. Have you read the copy of the notice to Paterson? - A. It is the same as the former.

Q. (to plaintiff.) Were you ever shewn a paper which purported to be resignation of his brother? - A. Before I went to Chelsea.

Court. We do not know when you went to Chelsea? - A. A day or two afterwards he met me accidentally in the street, between the Crown and Magpie and the Blue Boar, Aldgate, he shewed me this, he said it was his brother-in-law's resignation. It was directed to the honourable board of ordnance, and signed at the bottom, Edward Barnard Metcalfe . After he had shewn me this resignation, he said I must go with him to Chelsea, and I must take some money with me.

Q. Did he say what you must go there for? - A. To get the appointment from General Moss for himself to the office.

Q. Did he mention who General Moss was? - A. He said he was Deputy Master General of the Ordinance. I went with him to Chelsea, to a house close by the water-side; Newsham left me there some time, on his return he shewed me a parchment sealed and signed, and over the seal was D. G. M. O. he said that purported to be Master General of the Ordnance.

Q. To whom was that directed? - A. To R. H. Crew, secretary to the board of ordnance; he said he must, or I must, make General Moss a compliment of a certain sum of money. I gave him ten pounds for that purpose.

Q. Did he say the amount of the present? - A. No, he did not. After I had delivered this money to him he left me for a considerable time; when he returned we went to Westminster

bridge to Ireson's hotel. He went out a while, I was there and bought a stamp, he wrote a promissory note for ten pounds, he got me to sign the same note accepted by myself, he then put it in his pocket. He after that went with me to Langbourne coffee-house in Fenchurch-street, he there said he had done my business now, as he had got my appointment, consequently he demanded the money according to the agreement. I gave him then a 50 l. note, and ten or fifteen pounds besides, I do not know which, in small bank notes. After that he made an appointment for me to go to Westminster hall to make an affidavit that I was a protestant, and of my birth. We went there, Newsham and me, about a week afterwards; before we went to Westminster hall we went to Ireson's hotel again, we stopped there a little while, and Newsham brought me the affidavit written out.

Q. Is that the affidavit? - A. It is the same, I signed it (the affidavit read in court). I went to Westminster hall after I had signed it with Mr. Newsham, as he told me to take my appointment, and to have my affidavit filed in the Exchequer; he said I should meet the secretary of the board of ordnance there, Mr. Crew. Paterson was going up the steps into the Exchequer; Newsham said he was the secretary that was going up the steps, he did not mention his name. When we got into the Exchequer; Newsham gave me the affidavit, he desired me to give it to that gentleman, meaning Paterson.

Court. Did you give it to Paterson? - A. I did; he looked it over, the judges were all present, he desired one of the clerks to come forward and swear me, I was sworn to it; after that Newsham desired me to go in the country, to get the certificate of my birth. After I had been in the country about eight or nine days, I was desired to be at the Parliament coffee-house in Parliament-street; I waited there a considerable time, he did not come. I met him on Westminster bridge the same day; we then went to the Parliament coffee-house, and Newsham and me remained there about ten minutes; Paterson came up in a hackney-coach, I saw him through the window, Newsham went out to him, he brought to me the oath of allegiance, he desired me to read it over, it was on stamped paper.

Q. Is that the certificate? - A. It is, I signed it there. After that I went with Newsham to the court of Common Pleas; Paterson was there; Newsham gave Paterson the oath; I was sworn there the same as at the court of Exchequer, but it was not signed. Paterson said I must get a fresh certificate, and Newsham wrote to the clergyman for it; I got a fresh certificate; in about a week afterwards I saw Paterson in a coach as you go into the back door of the Common Pleas. I addressed him as though he was Mr. Crew, I asked when I should be employed in the office, which he was pretending to get me in; he said he believed it might be on the Monday following, he said I could not be sworn on that day, he never knew them so damned difficult, but it was on account of the catholic petition being in the house of commons. He further stated that he had belonged to the office for thirty years, he never knew them so difficult.

Q. What office? - A. I suppose the ordnance office. I asked him in what department I was to be employed in, he said I was to be employed in the commissaries department; he then said that this certificate would do that he had got, but I must first of all swear that this certificate was true, before one of the aldermen at Guildhall.

Q. Did you after that make any appointment to meet at any coffee-house? - A. Before I swore to the affidavit I met Newsham at the Guildhall coffee-house, as I supposed to take the oath of allegiance; I went twice, the second time Paterson was with him; he shook his head at me, and told me it was too late for it he was afraid.

Q. On that day or any other day were you sworn to any affidavit before any alderman? - That day Paterson handed me the certificate, and said it must be sworn before the alderman.

Q. Did you give any money? - A. I did, to Paterson; Newsham called me to the middle of the room and said, that we must make the secretary a recompence, as he had been at a great deal of expence and trouble in going about for me; I gave to Paterson a pound note with a shilling wrapt up in the middle of the note; he thanked me for it and put it in his pocket.

Q. Did you on the next day make that affidavit (another affidavit handed to the witness)? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards meet Paterson and Newsham at the Exchequer? - A. Yes, in two or three days afterwards, and there Paterson took another oath of allegiance, which was drawn up in the same form as the first, he delivered it to me, and I read it over, I was sworn to it, and just before we parted, as we were going out of the Exchequer, he said he believed there would be a board next Tuesday, and he believed he should be able to get me my appointment on the Wednesday.

Q. Did you after this receive any letter? - A. I received a letter dated the 30th of June.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Look at this? - A. That is the first letter I received, and this is another

I received them both on the same days they are dated.

Q. Have you ever seen Newsham write? - A. I have seen him write frequently, it is his own hand writing, June 12th, 1805, addressed to Mr. Rolf, No. 8, Wilson Place, Lambeth Road.

Dear Sir,

I left Mr. C. at twelve last night, he has for reasons, which you cannot but approve, and think yourself highly obliged by him appointed, that you may see him at twelve o'clock this day, without fail, where I shall be with a friend of Mr. C's. Keep this to yourself, and if you want a months pay beforehand you may have it.

Q. Is that Newsham's hand-writing likewise? - A. It is addressed to Mr. Rolf.

Dear Sir,

By a letter from the old gentleman, he says he saw you yesterday on his way to Woolwich, to attend the examination of the persons suspected of setting fire to the arsenal. As I am going out of town until Saturday evening, on a fishing party, I shall not have an opportunity of seeing you till the Sunday.

T. NEWSHAM.

On Tuesday the second of July, the day before I received this letter, Paterson called on me in Wilson Place, Lambeth; he said he was very sorry the business at Westminster was put off, as he was going to Woolwich on the examination of the persons suspected of setting fire to the royal arsenal at Woolwich; he said they had got two persons in custody, that he was in hopes they should discover the whole of it. He was afraid he should not be back in time to dispatch my business, if he was, he would meet me in a coach, if not, I was to meet him to-morrow, at the same time he called on me that day.

Q. Did you after that go to Newsham's house? - A. After that, on the third of July, I went to Newsham's house; the letter was directed to me on the second.

Q. You did not find Newsham at his house, I believe? - A. I did not, I pursued him. after going to York-street, by the Commercial Road, in company with an officer; we overtook him at Rugley, in the county of Essex, we took him in custody, and brought him with us in a stage; he made his escape from me. We charged him with defrauding me out of several sums of money, he said he had not defrauded me of any sum of money, the business was very right and correct, and we should be obliged to ask him pardon for falsely accusing him.

JOHN MURRANT sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer: I apprehended Newsham on the 5th of July, in the evening, at the Dundee Arms, Wapping.

Q. After that, in consequence of any information did you go down to South End, to apprehend Paterson? - A. I did on Monday the 8th; we got to South End about a quarter before eleven at night, we found him at the Ship Hotel in bed, we apprehended him.

Q. Did you find any trunks there? - A. Two, and a seal upon him; I have compared it with the seal on these letters, they correspond.

ELIZABETH WRIGHT sworn. Examined by Mr. Arabin. You live at No. 16, Great New-street, Fetter-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner Paterson lodge with you? - A. He did; he came in December, and staid till July, he went away; Newsham came there pretty often.

JOHN SMITH sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer.

Q. Did you go to the house of the last witness for the purpose of making a search? - A. I did; I found a quantity of papers in Paterson's room; I found three affidavits that were sworn to at the Exchequer, and one sworn before Mr. Alderman Le Mesurier; and these papers I found in that book.

Q. (To Plaintiff) Have the goodness to look at them, and tell me whether you believe them to be the hand writing of Newsham? - A. Every one of them, they are three letters from Newsham to Paterson.

EDWARD BARNARD METCALF sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are brother-in-law to the prisoner? - A. I am.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a cadet in the drawing room in the Ordnance Office in the Tower.

Q. Who presented you to that situation? - A. General Moss.

Q. What is your salary? - A. Two shillings a day.

Q. Did you ever authorise Newsham or Paterson to dispose of your situation? - A. Never.

Q. You did not concieve it could be disposed of? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever sign any parchment certifying it to be a resignation of that place? - A. I never did.

ROBERT HAWGOOD CREW sworn. examined by Mr. Gurney. I believe you are secretary to the Board of Ordnance? - A. I am.

Q. Look at Robert Paterson , and tell me whether you have any knowledge of him? - A. I never saw him till after he was in custody.

Q. I scarce need ask you whether he belonged

to the Board of Ordnance? - A. Cerainly not.

Q. Was it possible to sell a place of this kind in the Ordnance Office? - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant Paterson; and called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NEWSHAM - GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling, being under Sentence of Transportation .

PATERSON - GUILTY .

Confined Two Years in Newgate , to stand in the Pillory twice , and fined One Shilling .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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