Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th September 1805.
Reference Number: 18050918
Reference Number: f18050918-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 18th of SEPTEMBER, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; JOHN HEATH , Esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir THOMAS MANNERS SUTTON, Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN, Bart. Sir CHARLES PRICE , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; CHARLES FLOWER , Esq. and RICHARD LEA , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Pitchet ,

William Hylett ,

Thomas Lister ,

William Hobson ,

James Houghton ,

William Drake ,

James Crofts ,

Thomas Brass ,

Thomas Kidar ,

James Ashley ,

Stephen Walby ,

Richard Simons .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Christie ,

William Farmer ,

Thomas Nash ,

John Adamson ,

Joseph Richmond ,

John Middleton ,

Joseph Sargeant ,

William Harvey ,

William Alnutt ,

Peter Charman ,

William Holland ,

John Greenwood ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Biggs ,

Morgan-Lloyd Gibbon ,

Charles Cole ,

John Godsmon ,

William Deare ,

Henry Farm ,

Luke Flood ,

Henry Favour ,

Charles Walk ,

Francis Hall ,

John Bennington ,

Alexander Mackenzie .

Reference Number: t18050918-1

522. MARY-ANN SKELTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , ten yards of ribbon, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of James Heycock .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

JAMES HEYCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 64, Broad-street, St. Giles's , I keep a haberdasher's shop : On the 4th of this month, about half past nine in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, accompanied with a man, and asked to see some ribbon; we were shutting up shop; my young man served her; she purchased a yard and a half, which came to a shilling; she went out of the shop, and my young man pursued her, and in consequence of information I followed close after him.

JAMES HAWSIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I served the prisoner with the ribbon; I saw her take up two pieces, one she secreted in her handkerchief, and the other she threw into the box; the man paid for the ribbon, and they both went away; I immediately pursued her into Drury-lane; she instantly took the ribbon, and threw it away; I picked it up; I produce it, it has my master's mark, it is his property.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know any thing about the crime laid to my charge, I was in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-2

523. RICHARD LAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , two pounds ten ounces weight of bark, value 1 l. 6 s. the property of Thomas Jackson , Edward Manley , and William Eldridge .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE MONKHOUSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you live with the prosecutors? - A. Yes; they are druggists , in Pater-noster-row.

Q. What are the Christian names of the prosecutors? - A. Thomas Jackson , Edward Manley , and William Eldridge ; the prisoner was their porter .

Q. Had the prosecutor any other warehouse than that in Paternoster-row? - A. Yes, in Ivy-lane: On Monday, the 5th of last August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I sent the prisoner to that warehouse to bring some senna; he went to this warehouse in Ivy-lane , and I went after him; I did not go into the warehouse, but into an adjoining house.

Court. Q. Could you see over the warehouse? - A. No; I could see when the prisoner came out.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Was there any bark kept in that warehouse? - A. Yes, in the two pair of stairs.

Q. Was that room locked or opened? - A. Locked; the key of that room was tied to the others; he took the keys when he went to the warehouse, and when he came out from the warehouse, I observed his pockets filled with something bulky; when he got to Paternoster-row, he asked me if he might take the senna I had sent him for up one pair of stairs; I told him he might, and I would go and assist him in weighing it; he went up stairs, and I went after him, and during the time he was weighing it, I perceived that his pockets were extended; he then asked me to go out for a short time; I permitted him; I told him I would answer for him during his absence; I told him to take the senna with him, and leave it on the counter.

Q. When he left the house of the prosecutors, what did you do? - A. I ran into the accompting-house, and rang a bell that goes into Mr. Manley's house; he went out, and I followed him; when he had got about fifteen yards from the door, I told him I wanted him, and he came back with me into the shop, and Mr. Manley came into the shop at the time; I told Mr. Manley that he had got something about him; a constable was sent for, and he was searched, and there was found on him one pound four ounces of Peruvian bark in his pocket, and one pound six ounces in his breeches, wrapped up in a piece of cloth, which he took out himself.

Q. Had you told the prisoner that day to get any bark? - A. No.

Q. Was it a part of the prisoner's duty to go into the bark-room? - A. No; the charge of the bark-room was given to another man by Mr. Manley.

Court. Q. Have you distinct servants for bark and senna? - A. Not for senna; one man goes for bark only by Mr. Manley's order.

Mr. Bolland. Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. He said he was very sorry for it, he was guilty, and he had some bark in his lodgings; we went to his lodgings, and there we found twenty-five pounds of bark.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long has he lived in the service of the prosecutors? - A. About eight or ten months.

- HUGHES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I produce the bark I got from the prisoner.

(The bark identified by Mr. Manley.)

Q. How much a week had this man? - A. About eighteen shillings a week.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of that bark? - A.About eleven shillings a pound.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-3

524. SARAH ROVERAY and JOSEPH ROVERAY were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , two pinafores, value 2 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. three half handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a tea-pot, value 6 d. one knife, value 2 d. one tea cup and saucer, value 6 d. three tippets, value 6 d. and one child's frock, value 5 s. the property of William-Raymond Deykin ; and the other for feloniously receiving on the same day, two pinafores, value 2 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. three half handkerchiefs, value 3 s. one tea cup and saucer, value 6 d. a knife, value 2 d. and three tippets, value 6 d. he knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was stated by Mr. Myers.)

It appeared in evidence that the prisoner, Sarah Roveray , said the articles in the indictment were given to her by her mistress, and the prosecutrix not appearing in Court, the prisoners were

Both ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-4

525. MARY TEMPLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , one guinea , the property of Michael Lemon , sen. and Michael Lemon , jun.

ELIZABETH JACKSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lemon, he is a French bread-baker , No. 15, Threadneedle-street : The prisoner came into my master's shop on the 18th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon; she asked for two loaves, and wanted change for a guinea; I gave her in change a half guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and two shillings and sixpence in silver; she refused the seven-shilling piece, as she thought it was a bad one; I then told her I could not give her change without the seven-shilling piece; I took the change back, and returned her the guinea; then she said, if I would warrant the seven-shilling piece to be a good one, she would take it. I returned her the same change again, and she put down the guinea; I did not miss the guinea till Mr. Wood, a grocer living opposite, came in, not many minutes after she was gone; he asked me what change I had given the woman that was gone out; I told him for a guinea; he asked me if it was a good one; I looked for it, and it was gone.

Q. Had any body else been in the shop? - A. There had been several people in the shop; I went out after the woman, and asked her for the guinea; she told me that she had not got it; Mr. Webb came up, and she delivered the guinea into his hands.

Q. Did you know the guinea again? - A. No; I know it was a good looking guinea, I cannot say it was the same guinea again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you sure that nobody had been near the counter to take that guinea? - A. There were several people in the shop, but I never saw the guinea afterwards.

Q. There had been several people in the shop at the counter? - A. Yes.

Q. Any one of them might have taken the guinea for what you know? - A. They had not gone out of the shop before Mr. Wood came in.

- WEBB sworn. - I was in conversation with a friend nearly opposite the prosecutor's; I live in Threadneedle-street; I saw the last witness running as if she was pursuing of a woman; I did not know her at the moment, I followed to see what it was.

Q. What distance had she got? - A. About fifty or sixty yards.

Q. Was the prisoner running? - A. No, walking very quietly; I came up to her when the last witness taxed her with the fraud; she denied it, and I told her for certain I should take her back to the shop: going back, after we had gone about ten yards, she said she hoped she had not made a mistake; she put her hand into her pocket, and seemed as though she felt herself very much astonished, and gave me the guinea.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say, she was walking very gently? - A. Yes, and she went back very readily with me.

NAHUM WOOD sworn. - I suspected the prisoner, and I went over to Mr. Lemon's to inform them.

Prisoner's defence. I have a large family, and my husband is serving the King.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-5

526. CATHARINE CRAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , four tippets, value 6 l. the property of Christopher-Lebrett Quelle .

CHRISTOPHER-LEBRETT QUELLE sworn. - I am a furrier , I live on Ludgate-hill; this woman was taken up, having these goods with her; I can only speak to the property that they are mine.

WILLIAM BRIGGS sworn. - I am a publican, in Newgate-street: The prisoner came into my house, and requested the favour to leave the basket till Monday; she said she was going to take it into the country to a town called Kent, to a lady; she said, a lady in Fleet-market gave them to her; I put my hand in the basket, and saw four fur

tippets; the constable searched, and found who the property belonged to; I detained her and the property.

- sworn. - I am a constable; I went into four or five shops to find the owner of the property; the prosecutor came, and owned the tippets directly.

Prosecutor. The person whom I suspected to have robbed me of them, I think the woman by some means or other got them from him; I had some suspicions of my porter, that he had stolen them from me, and gave her the basket, it is my porter's basket; they, between them, wanted to make money on them; they are my property, they have my shop-mark on them.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Fleet-market, and I met this woman; she asked me if I wanted a job; I said, yes, and thank you too; she told me where to carry it; I went on, and forgot the place; I left the basket; I wanted to see if I could meet her again; this man looked at the basket, and had me taken up.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-6

527. ANN GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a silver watch, value 40 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. two seven-shilling pieces, and two sixpences , the property of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS sworn. - I am a brewer's servant at Messrs. Daltons, Chelsea: On the 28th of July, I fell asleep on the common, I was very drunk; I did not know that I had lost my property till the patrol awoke me.

- HAYES sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 28th of June, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I was on Chelsea-common on my duty; I perceived the prisoner at the bar making her escape, I believe she saw me coming; when I came up to her, I found she had got a bundle of clothes, which contained a shirt, two pair of stockings (there is only one pair in the indictment), one pair of shoes, and a handkerchief; I asked her where she got these things; she replied, they belonged to a sailor, he was gone round the paper factory, which is close against Chelsea-common; I not being inclined to believe her, put her into the hands of another man who was with me; I went to the hay-ricks, and there I found the prosecutor laying fast asleep, and with some difficulty I awoke him; when he awoke, he began to look for his property; I told him I believed his clothes were perfectly safe; he said he had lost his watch; I asked him if he had his watch when he came there; he said he had. I then said to the prisoner, give me the man's watch, I believe you have got it; she denied it; on searching her, I found the watch under her right arm, which I then took into my own possession; I then said to the prosecutor, have you lost any thing else; he said, I have lost two seven-shilling pieces and some silver, but to what amount I cannot say; I found them in the prisoner's possession, I produce the property. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Had you been with the woman at all? - A. Yes, I had been with the woman under the hay-stack.

Q. Then your watch might have dropped out of your pocket? - A. No, it could not have dropped out of my pocket.

Prisoner's defence. On the 28th of July, I met the prosecutor on the common about nine o'clock in the evening; he asked me where I was going; I told him, home; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him I would have something to eat; he asked me if I would take him somewhere to sleep, he said he was so drunk he could not go home; he then said to me, stop a bit, have you got my watch; no, says I, I did not know that you had got a watch; I beg your pardon, says he. I did not think that you would have taken it. He then asked me again to take him any where to lye down till the morning, he did not care where it was to be safe; I took him where there was some new hay, and then he gave me two bundles, and I covered them all over with the hay; he fell fast asleep, and I fell asleep likewise. After I had been asleep, I felt the hay move; there was a sailor there that had dragged the bundles from under my head; I then jumped up, and found the bundles on the ground; the sailor picked them up, and the bag with the seven-shilling pieces, and ran round the factory; I told him the things belonged to the young man that was asleep; I was standing close to the gate when that man came and took me with the property.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-7

528. WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 30th of August , in and upon Mary Smart , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Mary Smart, he feloniously and against her will did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-8

529. HANNAH HINDES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , sixteen guineas, the property of Catharine Burn , in the dwelling-house of Francis Calder .

CATHARINE BURN sworn. - I live in Nottingham-court, Roper's-alley ; I live in the kitchen.

Q. Did you lose any money at any time? - A. Sixteen guineas; I lost them about the beginning of this month, they were sewed up in my stays.

Q. Where were you when the money was lost? - A. I was at church, being Sunday; I had left my stays at home in the bed, I live in Nottingham-court, Roper's-alley; the prisoner had lodged with me, and slept in the same bed with me for two years.

Q. When did you sew this money up in the stays? - A Julia Sulivan sewed the money in my stays four years ago; the prisoner knew I had the money in my stays; I unsewed them, I wanted to take the money out to put it into the hands of the banker, and there were only sixteen halfpence, instead of the sixteen guineas; she had sewed them up with black thread, such as she sews the carpets with, and the guineas were sewed up with white thread.

Q. Is that your only reason for suspecting her, because of the thread; did she abscond or leave your lodging? - A. No, she slept with me every night till I had her taken up; I suspected her, because of the thread.

JULIA SULIVAN sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing more, excepting that you assisted her in sewing up the money in her stays? - A. No, I know nothing of her loss.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-9

530. DANIEL FERGUSON and RICHARD READ were indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain field and open place in the King's highway, on the 10th of August , upon Michael Branmarl , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 2 l. a metal chain and key, value 6 d. a glass seal, value 2 d. a tobacco box, value 2 d. a hat, value 5 s. a jacket, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. three guineas, and one half guinea , the property of the said Michael Branmarl .

MICHAEL BRANMARL sworn. - I am a Prussian: On the 10th of August, I was in company with the prisoners at the sign of the Amsterdam Arms; there were about thirty-five of us sailors; we were waiting for a gentleman to put our names down for a ship. We went into that public-house a little after four o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoners asked me if I would take a walk with them, which I did, at about half after four in the afternoon; we went from the Amsterdam Arms to the half-way house; I went in, and asked for a pot of beer, and these two men and I drank together there.

Q. When did you go out of that house? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock, and then both the prisoners came out of the house with me.

Q. Did you know these men before? - A. No, I never did; they both of them went with me into Stepney fields ; they both of them left me about two minutes before I was robbed, and then they met me; Read asked me if I would go into the field to ease myself; I told him, no, I did not want; then he asked me if I would stop while he went and eased himself; I stood there waiting for him, and a man came and gave me a knock of the head, and knocked me down with his fist.

Q. Where was Ferguson at the time, while Read was easing himself? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know who that man was that gave you a knock on the head, and knocked you down? - A. I cannot know.

Q. Where was Ferguson at that time? - A. He was in the fields easing himself; the man that knocked me down said, you b - r what do you do in these green fields; he said, strip; I said, for what shall I strip; Read and Ferguson left me for about two or three minutes before I was knocked down; the man that knocked me down took every thing from me, and left me the same as I was born of my mother; he told me to take my clothes off; I told him I would not; a man took hold of me, and took my clothes off.

Q. Was there a second man that came up? - A. I cannot know that, I think it was the man with the black hair.

Q. Did you observe the man that knocked you down? - A. No, I did not; I had not so much time.

Q. If you did not see him, and had not time to look at him, what reason have you to think it was the man in the black hair? - A. That is the man that was with him.

Q. Did you take notice of him at the time you were knocked down, so as to recollect he was with the man? - A. No, I was senseless.

Q. How long were you senseless? - A. I cannot say, I was knocked down as a butcher knocks down an ox.

Q. Do you recollect their taking your jacket off? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know whether there was more than one man - did you observe or see any thing at the time? - A. I saw nothing more than two men that were with him at the time; they took all my clothes off, and ran away.

Q. After your clothes were taken off, and you were stripped, did you see any body go away? - A. I was almost out of my senses; they left me in the water in the ditch; I did not see who ran away, I got up, and went to the half-way house.

Q. What things were taken from you? - A. A jacket, a waistcoat, a shirt, a pair of trowsers, shoes, stockings, and hat, my protection box, with my protection in it, three guineas and a half in gold, and a silver watch; I have seen my shirt, jacket, and trowsers, since, at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was as sober as I am now; I had only a pot of beer the whole day, and in the half-way house they forced me to have some gin, but I threw it away.

Q. Do you remember whether it was dark or light? - A. After I was stripped in the fields it was moon-light, it was then about nine o'clock.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were at two public-houses - remember what you said this moment, you were as sober as you are now; you were in the public-house all day? - A. Yes, I was; I was waiting for a gentleman to put my name down.

Q. You drank no more than a pot of beer; I ask you whether you were not the person that paid for the gin? - A. Yes; I did not drink any of the gin, I threw it away.

Q. Do you buy gin for the purpose of throwing it away; why, if you had not liked to have drank it, your messmates would have liked it? - A. They are no messmates of mine.

Q. You are a sailor, and they are sailors; were not you three and a great many more hired to go to Southampton to bring up a ship into the river? - A. There were some people there that I knew, but not these two men.

Q. Do not you know that they were to be messmates with you when you got to Southampton? - A. Yes, that I was told; they put their names down as well as me.

Q. On the next day these two men were found at the public-house? - A. No, it was on the third day; they were found at the sign of the Amsterdam Arms.

Q. That was the house to which you regularly put up, all of you, to go to Southampton? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore these men going there were sure to be found by you? - A. Yes.

Q. Since you have been robbed, you have been in company with Mr. Rogers; had you any conversation with him about the two prisoners? - A No, he called me out of my house, and took me to the office.

Q. Did not Rogers say to you he would shew you the two men that robbed you? - A. No; he asked me if I should know them when I saw their faces.

Q.Nothing was found belonging to you upon either of the prisoners? - A. No.

Q.Did not you say at the office that the man that knocked you down had a white jacket on? - A. Yes.

Q. You never got your watch again? - A. No.

Q. Were you present when the prisoners were searched? - A. Yes, and Read took a knife out of his pocket, and said, d - n my soul, I will cut that b - r's throat.

Q. Have you ever heard any thing about a reward - did not Mr. Rogers tell you there would be a reward of forty pounds, in case you convicted these men? - A. Mr. Rogers told me nothing; I do not know there is a forty pounds reward.

Court. Q. You say the man that knocked you down had a white jacket on - did you see that man that knocked you down? - A. Yes, that is the man with the black hair, Ferguson.

Q. What coloured jacket had he on? - A. A white looking jacket.

Q. At the time you had been drinking with the prisoners at the public-house, had you observed what coloured jacket Ferguson had on? - A. He had a blue jacket on then, and when he returned after he had left me, he had a white one.

Q. That is your conjecture? - A. Yes.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer of Shadwell: From information, on Sunday, the 11th of August, I went, in company with Brown and Oliver, in pursuit of the persons that were supposed to have committed this robbery, and by the description that the prosecutor gave me of the two men (Ferguson, he said, had very large whiskers at the time he committed the robbery,) I went to the Amsterdam Arms on the Monday, as we were informed that there were to be about twenty-six men to sail to Guernsey, and then the two prisoners were in company with from twenty-five to thirty men in the room; Ferguson was sitting at the upper end of the room; I desired him to be very cautious to pick none but correct men; he instantly pointed out to Ferguson; we secured him, and on his looking about the room he pointed out the other man; I searched them, but found nothing on them; Ferguson had large whiskers on then; I went to the pawnbroker's on Monday, and found his clothes.

JAMES VINCENT sworn. - I am a waiter at the George, called the half-way house, Stepney-fields.

Q. Do you remember the Prussian being in your house on Saturday night, the 10th of August? - A. Yes, he came in about half past eight; there were two sailors with him, I cannot say they were the prisoners at the bar; they came to the bar, and had a glass of gin a-piece; the two men that were with him drank their glass a-piece, and the Prussian threw his away; they went out of the house about nine o'clock, all three together, and in about twenty minutes past nine I saw the Prussian come in; he was stripped naked, I put him to bed.

Q.Was the Prussian, Branmarl, in liquor, or sober? - A. He was not in liquor, as I could perceive.

ELIZABETH WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect the night that Branmarl was robbed? - A. I do not know him.

Q. Do you know either of the two prisoners at the bar? - A. I know them both.

Q. When did you see either of the two prisoners? - A. On Saturday night, the 10th of August, between nine and ten o'clock; I was going to Mr. Curtis's, the Bee Hive, in Nightingale-lane, to look after a young man; I saw the two prisoners there drinking together.

Q. Did you talk to them? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. Yes; they live in the same court where I live.

Q. How long did you stay at that public-house? - A. I did not stay there two minutes; they came out singing, having hold of one another's arm, at the same time as I did; they went down Sun-yard, and then they parted, and one went up Star-court, and the other went into the Seven Stars public-house; I was in the Seven Stars public-house, and Richard Read asked me if I would have any oysters; I went and had a pennyworth of oysters with him; then he went one way, and I went into the Seven Stars again; I saw no more of either of them; I know it was on the 10th of August when I saw them, because it was my birth-day.

MARIA MANNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 9, Sun-yard.

Q. Do you know either of the two prisoners? - A. I know Daniel, by living two years in the neighbourhood.

Q. Did both of them lodge in Star-court? - A. Only one of them, Ferguson; I only saw Read about three times.

Q. Do you remember the time when you heard of their being taken up upon this charge? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect having seen the two prisoners, or either of them, on Saturday night, the 10th of August? - A. Yes; on that night Elizabeth Wood and Richard Read came and said, give me two pennyworth of oysters; that was about half past ten o'clock, as nigh as I can recollect.

Q. Are you sure that Read, the prisoner, came with Wood to you, and had the oysters? - A. Yes, and he was very much in liquor, and would not pay me, and I went to Ferguson's house to enquire for him; Ferguson was at home at the time sitting with the woman that he lives with; he told me he dare say he should see him in the morning, and if he did not pay me then, he would pass his word for it.

JAMES WATTS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker, in East Smithfield; I produce a jacket, a waistcoat, a pair of trowsers, and one cotton shirt, pledged for one pound, in the name of A. Wilkinson; I do not know whether it was pledged by a man or a woman. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Ferguson's defence. I never was in his company at all after I left the Amsterdam-house; I was intoxicated and went home to bed.

Read's defence. According to agreement I went along with this man to the Half-way-house: the prosecutor came into the room and picked upon this gentleman, and I went to him to give him some money, I having a few shillings: seeing some blood on my waistcoat, he said, that is the man; at the same time he had been along the room and never offered to take me up: Mr. Rogers said he took me for striking Kit Duff.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-10

531. MARGARET WEAVER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Judith Godfrey , with intent to steal, about the hour of eleven at night, on the 6th of August , and burglariously stealing therein six yards of calico, value 2 s. 9 d. six yards of calimanco, value 6 s. one pair of stockings, value 20 d. and one yard and a half of ribbon, value 10 1/2 d. the property of Judith Godfrey .

JUDITH GODFREY sworn. - I live in Catherine-wheel-alley, Whitechapel ; I am a lodger, the whole house is let out in lodgings; Mary Harrison and I took the room between us, I paid her 1 s. 6 d. a week for lodging with her: Mrs. Howard is the landlady, she lives in Spitalfields.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same house with you? - A. Yes, in the lower room. On the 6th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I asked her to have a bit of supper with me.

Q. Did you shew her any property that you had? - A. Yes, I shewed her what I had bought; all the articles in the indictment I had bought that day: when she came up to sup with me I went out to buy a candle, and Mary Harrison and the prisoner went with me.

Q. Before you went out did you secure the door? - A. Yes, I locked the door; the prisoner went away from me at the top of the street; I returned home to my room with Mary Harrison at eleven o'clock, and the door was broken open, and I was not left a pennyworth of what I had shewed her; I missed it as soon as I went into the room: between two and three o'clock in the morning I found the prisoner, and the calimanco and the new cotton stockings she had with her; I never found the calico; she then wanted to give them to me, but the watchman would not let me take them from her.

MARY HARRISON sworn. - Q. Were you present with Godfrey when the prisoner was there? - A. Yes, I saw her shew these things to the prisoner, and we all went out together: afterwards the prisoner left us, and I returned with Godfrey and found the door open; I had locked the door

myself; I looked after the property and it was gone.

ROBERT COOMBES sworn. - I am an officer: I searched the prisoner and found upon her the calimanco; it was in her pocket, and the stockings were in her bosom; she told me she bought them in Houndsditch; I produce the stockings and the calimanco.

- DOWNES sworn. - I am a watchman; I was present when Godfrey charged the prisoner with having robbed her, and then she wanted to give it to her, I said do not do so. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. She has swore false; that six yards of calimanco I bought, and the stockings, in Houndsditch that same evening; she had only come out of gaol last Monday herself.

GUILTY, aged 34, of stealing only .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-11

532. ANN BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , seven lace caps, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. a cloak value 2 s. 6 d. and a seven-shilling piece , the property of William Richards .

MARGARET RICHARDS sworn. - I am the wife of William Richards, I live at No. 3, Moor's-yard ? I went up stairs about one o'clock at noon; I found the prisoner in the closet, I saw her gown sticking out; I asked her how she came there; she was so intoxicated she did not know what she did; my cloak was hanging out of her pocket; I put her in my lower room and told her to empty her pocket, she told me she would not; I sent for a constable, and she dropped six of the caps out of her pocket, and my black cloak she flung to the other side of the room; the constable came and took charge of her.

Q. How did she come into your house? - A. The door was open; she had a seven-shilling piece of mine in her pocket, wrapped up in a bit of paper; I can swear to the paper.

JAMES COMLEY sworn. I am beadle of Queenhithe ward: On Saturday, the 3d of August, I went to Mrs. Richards's at one o'clock at noon to take charge of the prisoner; the moment I looked at the prisoner she dropped two caps out of her right hand pocket; I searched the pocket and found one cap in it, I asked the prosecutrix if that was her property; her reply was, she would swear to it; she then shewed me the caps and the cloak which the prisoner had given up: I asked the prosecutrix if she had lost any thing else; she went up stairs to look; when she returned she said she had a seven-shilling piece in her possession up stairs, and it was gone: I told the prisoner I must search her further; she said, I will not give you the trouble, and she pulled out a seven-shilling piece folded up in a piece of paper. I produce the articles. (The articles identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor and not capable of knowing what I was doing.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-12

533. JOHN OBEE was indicted for that he, being employed in the capacity of clerk to Robert Fisher , jun. did receive and take into his possession one pound eleven shillings and sixpence, for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count. For like offence, only laying it to be the property of John Topham .

JOHN TOPHAM sworn. - I am a warehouseman : On Saturday, the 29th of June, I paid the prisoner one guinea and a half on account to Mr. Fisher.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He was in the capacity of clerk to Mr. Fisher.

ROBERT FISHER sworn. - I am a solicitor , I live at my chambers in Furnival's-inn, Holborn. Mr. Topham informed me that he paid John Obee a guinea and a half on the 29th of June.

Q. Was he an articled clerk? - A. No, he was an hackney writer; he had a yearly salary; I paid him monthly.

Q. Did you entrust him to receive money for you? - A. I do not know that I entrusted him, he took upon him to do it.

Q. Did you employ him and entrust him to receive money from your clients? - A. I cannot say that: I sent him sometimes to clients to receive money for me.

Q. Was it part of his duty to receive money for you? - A. Not generally to go collecting.

Q. Did you in this particular instance? - A. I did not know of Mr. Topham's calling to pay it.

Q. How long did he live with you? - A. About eight or nine months; I rather suspected, at times, that he purloined.

Q.(To Mr. Topham.) You went and paid him the sum of 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you a receipt? - A. No: I paid him, always finding him at the Office; I said it was rather inconvenient for me to call, so I entrusted him with it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-13

534. PAUL BERRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , one book, value 10 s. the property of Walter Rowe .

WALTER ROWE sworn. - I am a bookseller ; I live in Great Marlborough-street .

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - I am a smith and a constable: On the 21st of August, between four and five in the afternoon, I passed the door of Mr. Rowe; I saw the prisoner at the bar standing there; I went home and stopped in doors about a minute, and when I came out, I saw the prisoner walking before me with a book under his arm; I followed him until he turned into a pawnbroker's. Having a suspicion that he stole the book, I sent for Mr. Rowe, while he was in at the pawnbroker's; Mr. Rowe I found was not at home; the prisoner returned out of the pawnbroker's with the book, I stopped him and told him he had not been buying that book; he said, yes, he had bought it in Oxford-street: I endeavoured to keep him in conversation till Mr. Rowe came; he not coming, I questioned him further; he said, so help me God I bought it, but you may have it if you like; and after he offered me the book he threw it into a kind of crib bedstead which stood by the door, and attempted to run away, upon which I seized him.

Q. What book is it? - A. It is the History of the Church and State of Scotland. I produce the book. (The book identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was in distress at the time.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-14

535. JOHN BURROWES was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order for payment of 30 l. 5 s. 4 d. with intention to defraud Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co.

Second Count. For uttering a like forged order for payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Two other Counts. For like offence, with intention to defraud Edward Littledale and George Foy .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Const)

CHARLES ELLIOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you a clerk in Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co's. banking-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is their banking-house situated? - A. In Mansion-house-street, No. 5.

Q. Do you know the names of the partners? - A. Yes.

Q. Repeat them. - A. Westgarth Snaith , William Sikes , John Watson , and Henry Sikes .

Q. Were Messrs. Littledale and Foy customers of yours? - A. Yes.

Q. Look round and tell me whether you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I believe it to be the same young man.

Q. When did you see him? - A. On the 22d of June.

Q. What time was it that you saw him? - A. About eleven o'clock.

Q. He came to Snaith and Co's? - A. Yes, I believe it was him.

Q. What past when he came? - A. He came and asked for a check for Mr. Littledale, and said that he was at a neighbouring coffee-house; I was going to give him a bundle of checks, they contain about twenty-one in number; he said, he did not want that, but merely a single check, which I gave him; he then went away.

Q. Did you see him again? - A. Some little time afterwards, on the same day, a person, whom I believe to be the same, came back, and that person I believe to be the prisoner, came back, and said he had made a mistake, that Mr. Littledale wanted a bundle of checks; we have two sorts of checks, one that is in slips, and one that is in sheets; I gave him two of the sheets.

Q. Which contained how many checks? - A. I do not know, several; they should and generally do contain about an hundred, but they sometimes fall short; I gave him two sheets, and then he went away.

CHARLES LIALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Snaith, Sikes, and Co.? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember a porter, of the name of John Burrows , coming to your house on the 22d of June? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. What did he come to the shop for? - A. He came with this check on purpose to receive payment for it; this is the check that I have now in my hand, and he presented it for payment.

Q. Did you look at it? - A. I did; as soon as I saw it, I suspected the hand-writing of the check.

Q. Do you mean the signature, or the body? - A. The signature; I asked him who he received it from, he said Mr. Foy.

Court. Q. You suspected the signature? - A. Yes; I then took and compared this check, which was in my hand, with some others in the house which we had paid, I was then satisfied it was a forgery.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you shewed it to Mr. Watson, one of the partners? - A. I did; then Mr. Watson came round and asked the person where he received it, and he said he received it from a person at the coffee-house.

Mr. Alley. I object to your saying one word what he said.

Court. Q. In point of fact, that was the man that gave you the check? - A. Yes, he went out, and he returned with the prisoner in about a quarter of an hour; the check I gave to Mr. Watson.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did Mr. Watson afterwards return it to you? - A. He did.

Q. Was that the same check, that Mr. Watson

returned to you, that you received from the porter? - A. I have no doubt of it, I marked it.

Q. You say the person that presented the check and the prisoner came in afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. In what distance of time? - A. In about fifteen minutes afterwards the porter and the prisoner came in, they then went into the back office, and what past then was not in my hearing, and Mr. Watson went with the porter and the prisoner.

Q. You still remain of the opinion, as you were at first, that is not the hand-writing of Mr. Littledale? - A.Exactly so.

Q.Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Messrs. Littledale and Foy? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen them write? - A. Yes, frequently

Q. You having an opportunity of knowing both their hand-writing, having seen them write frequently, are you of opinion that it is not the handwriting of either Mr. Littledale or Mr. Foy? - A. I am perfectly of the opinion that it is not the hand-writing of either.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you are perfectly satisfied that it is not his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not perfectly satisfied at first that it was not their hand-writing? - A. Yes I was perfectly sure, else I should have paid it.

Q. Did you not say that you compared it with other checks? - A. Yes.

Q. Why should you have compared it if you were of the opinion before that it was not their hand-writing? - A There was no doubt in my own mind when I compared it.

Q. One would think when a man was satisfied he would not have compared it - do you mean to say you were perfectly satisfied when you first saw it? - A. Yes, I would not have paid it if I was not perfectly satisfied.

Q. You say this check was out of your hands, did you mark it? - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say you marked it after you got it from Mr. Watson? - A. I did.

Court. Q. You received it back from Mr. Watson, and you marked it then? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q.Then after Mr. Watson tendered it you, in order that you should know it at a future time, you put a mark on it, you put no mark on it before? - A. No.

Q. How can you undertake to swear to it unless you had marked it before, you only know that Mr. Watson told you it was the same check? - A. I will swear that I am perfectly satisfied in my own mind that it is the same check.

Court. Q. You have said that you were quite satisfied that the signature of that check was not the hand-writing of Littledale and Foy - are there any other persons in that house authorised to sign checks? - A. No.

JOHN WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are partner in the house of Littledale and Co. I find, Mr. Watson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Liall putting into your hand a draft that he received from the porter? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards returned it to Mr. Liall? - A. Yes, in about twenty minutes.

Q. Whether the draft that you returned to him was, to your knowledge, the same that you received from him? - A. Yes, I am sure it was; it was never out of my sight till I returned it to him to make a mark on it.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing of Messrs. Foy and Littledale? - A. I do. (The note handed to the witness.)

Q. Is that the hand-writing of either of them? - A. It is not the hand-writing of either of them, to the best of my belief.

Q. You are not authorised to pay to any other signature in their name than their own? - A. No.

JOHN BURROWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a porter? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going with a draft on the 22d of June to the banking-house of Messrs. Sikes and Co? - A. Yes.

Q. From whom did you receive that draft? - A. From a person whom I believe to be the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Where did he deliver it to you? - A. In Cornhill, facing of the Royal Exchange.

Q. What instructions did he give you with it? - A. To go and receive it, and bring it to him at Garraway's, the amount of the draft.

Q.Is that all he said, did he give you any name? - A. I asked him what name I was to receive it in, he said in the name of Foy.

Q. You accordingly went to the banking-house? - A. Yes.

Q. You went to see for the person to whom you were to deliver the money to? - A. Yes.

Q. All the rest we pass over - did you find the person who gave you the check? - A. I met him in Change-alley.

Q. You were going to Garraway's? - A. Yes.

Q. Distinctly state all that past between you till you returned to the banking-house? - A. He met me, and asked me if I had got the money; I told him, no; he asked me for why; I told him it was a bad check; says he, I will go along with you to the banking-house; and as we were going along, he said the gentleman that wrote the check, and gave it to him, was in at Garraway's, and he said I will go in and find him; we went both together to the coffee-house (at Garraway's) and the gentleman was not there; he then asked me which was the Hambro' coffee-house; I went and shewed him the Hambro' coffee-house; he went in, and came out, and said the gentleman was not there, and he went

into the John and Turkey coffee-house, I did not go in with him.

Q. Which door did you go to? - A. The back door; I waited at the back door while he went in; he came out, and said the gentleman was there writing a letter, and he would be with me in a few minutes; he went into the coffee-house, leaving me at the door.

Q. You waited a few minutes, and the prisoner did not return? - A. Yes; then I went to the front door of the coffee-house, and there I saw the prisoner running away.

Q. Where was he running? - A. Running up Cornhill; he was in the street, I ran after him, and cried out stop him; he turned round, and came up to me; he asked me what I meant by calling after him; I asked him what he meant by running away; he said, he was going to Bishopsgate-street; I said, I would go with him to Bishopsgate-street; when we came to Bishopsgate-street, I asked him where he was going; he said, to Winchester-street; I told him that was not his way to Winchester-street; then I told him if he did not submit to go with me to the banking-house, that I should call for assistance; then I laid hold of his arm, and brought him to the banking-house, and then I delivered him into the hands of the gentlemen of the banking-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean to swear positively that that young man is the young man from whom you had the draft? - A. No, I cannot swear positively.

Q. Have you not said to many and many again that you cannot swear to him? - A. I have.

Q. Did you see any other young man like him in the coffee-houses? - A. I did not go with him into the coffee-houses, I only went into Garraway's.

Q. Did not you see there any other young man like him? - A. I do know that I did.

Q. You will not swear that he is the man? - A. No, I do not.

Mr. Const. Q. When you went from the banking-house to fetch the person who gave you the draft, you say you met this gentleman in the street? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the man you met in the street the prisoner? - A. I believe it to be the person.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt of it? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q. That person that you so met, that you are now giving account of, you believe that was the man that gave you the draft? - A. Yes.

Q. And that person you accompanied to Garraway's? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not quit that person, but you went to the Hambro' coffee-house together? - A. Yes.

Q. That was the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. You went with him all the way till you came to the John and Turkey coffee-house? - A. Yes, him and I went to the door of the John and Turkey coffee-house.

Q. It was the same person that came out and told you the gentleman was writing a letter - he was the same person that went with you to the John and Turkey coffee-house, have you any doubt about that? - A. No doubt.

Q. And you have no doubt of the person that came out of the coffee-house, and told you the gentleman was writing a letter, was the same person you brought back to the banking-house - is that so? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt whether the person you saw running away up Cornhill was the same person that went with you to the John and Turkey coffee-house? - A. No.

Q. You have no doubt? - A. No.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt at all that the person you met in the street, when you returned from the banking-house, was the same person that went with you to the different coffee-houses, and to Bishopsgate-street, and whom you afterwards carried to the banking-house, have you any doubt of it? - A. No.

Q. Your doubt is, whether that was the same person that delivered the draft to you? - A. That is the doubt. (The draft read in Court.)

"No. 5, Mansion-house-street, London, 22d of June, 1805. - Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Comp. Pay to Mr. Rice or bearer the sum of thirty pounds five shillings and fourpence.

LITTLEDALE".

30 5 4.

FRANCIS NALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Marshals of this City? - A. I am.

Q. Were you sent for in June last to the banking-house of Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co.? - A. I was.

Q. What time in the day did you go to Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co.? - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. I did, in the back accompting-house.

Q. Was the prisoner given to you in charge? - A. He was.

Q. Tell us what conversation took place between the prisoner and any body you heard? -

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No.

Mr. Nalder. Mr. Watson informed me, in the presence of the prisoner, that the young man, meaning the prisoner, had been guilty of a forgery; he told me to stay a little while, for he had sent for one of his partners who had signed the check; I remained there for some little space of time, and presently the gentleman who is in Court came.

Q. Mr. Littledale then presently came? - A. Yes; and at the time the conversation took place between Mr. Littledale and Mr. Watson, the prisoner

was not present; Mr. Watson came back to me in the presence of the prisoner, and said that I must take him into custody, and said that he was satisfied that he was guilty of the forgery; I immediately went to search him, and in his pocket I found these checks.

Q. How many sheets are there? - A. Here are two, (they are termed quires,) and one half sheet; they appear to be checks of Messrs. Snaith, Sikes, and Co. I took him into custody.

Q. Did he say what he had done with the other checks? - A. He told me that Wilmott had the other checks, and he was the person who had drawn the draft.

Q. That was before you found them on him? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. He told you before the search that Wilmott had the checks? - A. He did so.

Q. How came he to state that Wilmott had the checks? - A. Mr. Watson asked him what became of the other checks.

Mr. Const. Q. And then afterwards you searched and found the checks which you now produce? - A. Yes.

Q. Which he said Wilmott had? - A. Yes, he said Wilmott had the rest of the checks, and in the origin of the business I understood from him that he had the draft in question from a man of the name of Wilmott.

Court. Q. You say that he stated to you, or that you understood, that he had the check from a person of the name of Wilmott? - A. He did, when I asked him the question how he came by the checks, he repeated that he had the checks in question of a man of the name of Wilmott.

Mr. Knapp. (To Elliott.) Q. Do they appear to be checks from your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe them to be the same checks that you gave to the prisoner? - A. I delivered some checks of the same description as these to the prisoner, I believe; they seem to be the same quantity of checks, I gave him two quires.

Q. How many are there? - A. Here seems to be two quires, excepting the half sheet.

Mr. Const. (To Mr. Watson.) Q. What conversation had you with the prisoner respecting the check? - A. When the porter came back with the prisoner, I desired them both to walk into the back accompting-house.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you say it would be better for him to tell? - A. I said nothing at all about it; I then asked the prisoner where he had got that check; he said he had got it from Mr. Foy, who was at John's coffee-house; I thought it right to send a person immediately to John's coffee-house to see; he did not appear to be there, and after some time I sent to Mr. Littledale to satisfy myself; I questioned the prisoner again; he then said he had it of a Mr. Wilmott, or some name like that, who lived in Goodman's fields; I then enquired of him about the quires of checks that were supposed he had taken in the morning; he said he had given those to Mr. Wilmott; the City-marshal found them, as he has stated.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called ten witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 16.

Of uttering, knowing it to be forged, but not of the forgery.

The Jury recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of his youth and good character.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-15

536. JOHN CROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , three pounds weight of coffee, value 3 s. and one pound weight of sugar, value 3 d. the property of the West-India Dock Directors .

And three other Counts for like offence, only laying it to be the property of different persons.

It appearing to the Court that it had not been proved that the property belonged to the persons charged in the indictment, he was

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-16

537. JOHN NELSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Nichols , no person being therein, about the hour of six in the afternoon, on the 28th of July , and stealing therein six silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. one dollar, value 5 s. ten guineas, two crown-pieces, two shillings, two sixpences, one Bank-note, value 2 l. and seven other Bank-notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Samuel Nichols .

SAMUEL NICHOLS sworn. - I live at No. 3, Collier-street, Pentonville, in the parish of Clerkenwell : On the 28th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I went out, and all my family; I double-locked my door, and locked the gate before my house with a padlock; I came home with my wife about eight o'clock in the evening, I found the gate open, and the padlock off, lying on the ground; the staple had been forced out, and I found the front door of my house on the single lock, it was a spring lock, I opened it with the key; when I went into the house, I found two drawers that I had in the shop under the counter taken out, and left upon the counter; one box contained memorandum

books, which they had taken out, and thrown some on the counter, and some on the floor; the other drawer contained some silver, and among the rest a dollar, the silver was all taken out, and I believe some of the halfpence, but they were not all gone; I then went up stairs, and found that my double chest of drawers were all open, and when I went out they were all in, and none locked but one, and that was tried to be forced; I missed a box that was taken out containing seven one-pound notes and one two-pound note; then there was a screw-box containing ten guineas in gold, two crown-pieces, and two or three shillings in silver, they were gone; I found the box on the floor, I came down stairs, and missed half a dozen silver tea-spoons, five of them were marked S. L. N. and one was an odd one.

Q. Did you find any of these things again? - A Never.

Q. You yourself do not know any thing of the prisoner? - A. No, I never saw him before the evening he was taken.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What business are you? - A. I am a journeyman carpenter, and I keep a chandler's shop .

MARY TURFORD sworn. - Q. Do you live near the prosecutor? - A. Almost opposite: On the 28th of July, between six and seven o'clock, I was going up stairs, I looked out of the window, I saw two men at the gate trying to open it, and one said to the other, cannot you open it, and the other presently said, hang it, it is broke; in about ten minutes after I looked through the window again, I saw the prisoner at the bar, (he was one of the two men I had seen before,) he was then by himself, leaning on his arm, looking over his left shoulder, at the one pair of stairs window in Nichols's house; the window was open, and when he saw me he drew back; I made no alarm, not knowing the family were out. About four o'clock I was going for a pint of beer, I saw the prisoner at the bar and another man walking together up and down the street before Nichols's gate; I saw them as I went for the beer, and as I came back.

Q. Was the prisoner a person that you had ever seen before? - A. No, I never saw him before that day; I am positive I saw him in the house, and I am positive that he is the person I saw walking with the other.

Q. Did you see Nichols when he came home, or did you afterwards see the gate open? - A. I saw a crowd about the house, and the alarm was given that the house had been robbed.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner again? - A. On the next day, when he was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. At the first time you saw, or you supposed you saw, the prisoner, his back was towards you - was it not? - A. Yes, his back was towards me.

Court. Q. Was that when you were going for the beer? - A. The first time I saw him was when I was going for the beer, I saw his face then perfectly, that was about four o'clock.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When you saw him at the gate, his back was towards you? - A. Yes, but he turned his face about.

Q. To give you an opportunity of knowing him - have you heard any thing like a reward, and that you will be entitled to a share if this person is convicted? - A. No, I never heard of a reward.

LUCY HARVEY sworn. - Q. Do you live in the neighbourhood of Pentonville? - A. Yes, I live at the Marquis Cornwallis public-house, about five minutes walk from Mr. Nichols's house.

Q. Do you recollect the day Mr. Nichols's house was broke open, and whether you had been by that house in the course of the afternoon? - A. Yes, I passed it between five and six in the afternoon; I spoke to Mrs. Nichols and her husband before they went out. In the course of an hour I passed the house again, I saw then two young men standing at the gate, one something shorter than the other, they were trying to open the padlock at the gate.

Q. Did you take notice of either of them so as to know them again? - A. Yes, the tall one is the prisoner at the bar; I was going to tell them nobody was at home.

Q. You had not seen the prisoner before to your knowledge, had you? - A. I do not think I had.

Q. How soon after this did you see the prisoner again? - A. I saw him the next evening, when he was taken up, I told him then I knew him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am sure you have heard of the forty pounds reward? - A. I should be sorry to do any thing of the kind for money.

Q. You were very busy at this time? - A. Yes, we were at home, but I saw him at the gate both as I passed by and as I came back; I saw him taken in the fields, I then said that is the person I saw standing at the gate.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer; I had information of this house being broke open on the 29th of July; I went in company with Stanton, I went to the prosecutor's house, there I found in the lock of the house door a piece of a skeleton-key, and the staple of the padlock at the gate had been wrenched out; and from the information I received from the two last witnesses, I was convinced I should know the prisoner if I saw him. In the evening I went to the Belvidere, there I saw the prisoner at the bar in the bowling-green, and a person of the name of Gale was with him; Goodall, who is a witness, said, that is the man I saw in the street; when he saw me, he walked out, and when he got to a turning that goes to White Conduit House, he walked as fast as he could, and seeing Stanton come up to me, he ran into the

fields; we pursued, and took him; Stanton knows no more than I do.

WILLIAM GOODALL sworn. - I live nearly opposite Mr. Nichols's: On the 28th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going from home, and as I came to the corner of the street I met three persons, one I knew, and I had some suspicion that they were about no good: the prisoner was one of the three; I knew him before.

Q. Did you watch them? - A. No, they turned the corner and went up Collyer-street towards Mr. Nichols's house: I went another way. I pointed the prisoner out at the Belvidere.

WILLIAM BREEZE , sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - I am a carpenter: I live at Limehouse.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have known him a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on Sunday, the 28th of July last? - A. I was in company with him at the George on Snow-hill about three o'clock in the afternoon, as nigh as I can recollect: I was in his company there till near five o'clock: I left him there with Dennison; my son was with me at the time: I am certain of it, because I made a minute of the time to meet my friend Mr. Dennison.

Q. When did you make the minute that you were going to meet Mr. Dennison? - A. I made a memorandum when I was to meet him, and it happened to be on that day I saw the prisoner.

Q. Did you make this memorandum in your pocket-book? - A. No, I only chalked it on a board about a fortnight before.

Q. What business is the prisoner? - A. He is a plane-maker, he lives somewhere about Islington.

Q. You are not much acquainted with him, are you? - A. I have worked at the same shop pretty nigh a twelvemonth.

Q.Then it was by accident that you saw him at the George, at Snow-hill? - A. I did not know of meeting him at all.

WILLIAM BREEZE , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the son of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember going to the George on Snow-hill, on Sunday, the 28th of July? - A. Yes, I went there about three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you and your father continue in his company? - A. Till a few minutes before five o'clock.

Q. Who did you leave the prisoner in the company of? - A. Mr. Dennison.

Q.Did you and your father go away together? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes.

Q. What led you to that part of the town on Sunday? - A. My father had some business with Mr. Dennison that day.

Q. Then how came you to go the George public-house? - A. We met Mr. Dennison a little before we came to his house, and he told us to go to the George and we should find Mr. Nelson there.

Q. Had your father any business there with Nelson? - A. Not that I know of: Dennison came there in about a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Q. Did you know Nelson before? - A. Yes, I worked with him before that day at Mr. Lowndes's, Blackfriars-road.

Q. What were you doing there from three o'clock to five? - A. I believe Mr. Nelson, Mr. Dennison, and my father had a pot and a pint of beer together.

Q. Who went away first? - A. My father and me went away first; we left them in the taproom.

JAMES DENNISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an ivory-turner.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Breeze and his son? - A. Yes.

Q. Had there been any appointment by Mr. Breeze to meet you on Sunday, the 28th of July? - A. Mr. Breeze said he would call on me that day: I met him in West-street, where I live, near three o'clock; when I met him I told him to go to the George, that Nelson was there; I went there in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, when I believe it was near a quarter after three: I found Nelson sitting there, Breeze, and his son; I staid there with Nelson till half after six o'clock.

Q. How long did Breeze stay? - A. Till near about five o'clock, they went away, leaving me and Nelson there.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-17

538. NATHANIEL RAVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a man's hat, value 6 s. the property of John Spyley , privately in his shop .

- sworn. - Q. What age are you? - A. I am near 15; I am shop-boy to Mr. Spyley, hatter , No. 4, Broad-street, Bloomsbury .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into your master's shop? - A. Yes; my mistress asked me what he wanted (I did not see him in the shop); I ran to the door and saw him a few doors off, and I halloaed out stop thief: we missed the hat from the shop; I had seen the hat not five minutes before

the prisoner was taken, and then he threw the hat on the ground. I produce the hat; it is marked with my master's private mark.

Q. Is that the same hat you missed? - A. Yes, the very same. (The hat identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 44,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-18

539. WILLIAM DANIEL O'BRIEN was indicted for feloniously making an assault on John Mahony in the dwelling-house of Daniel Plank , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, two half-crowns , the property of the said John Mahony .

It appearing from the evidence of the prosecutor, that the prisoner obtained the money from him by pretending there was an information laid against him for deserting from a man of war, and that if the prosecutor would advance him a sum of money he would get the warrant done away, the Court were of opinion it was no robbery, but merely a trick or cheat, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-19

540. MARY CARTY , ANN LEISTED , MARY SOWDEN , ALICE SWINNS , SARAH WELCH , JANE CURTIS , and JOHN PRICE , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Hannah Welch , widow , no person being in the dwelling-house, about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 8th of August, and feloniously stealing a shawl, value 4 s. 6 d. a table-cloth, value 2 s. and 20 l. in money , the property of the said Hannah Welch .

HANNAH WELCH sworn. - Q. In what parish did you live in August last? - A. In St. Giles's .

Q. Did you, in August last lose any property? - A. Yes, I lost 20 l. in money: four of the prisoners were lodgers in my house, their names were Nance Jones , Kit Lowrin (but now they have changed their names, you see), and Jenny Curtis , and Mary Carty : I left them in care of my house; I promised Mary M'Cape one night's lodging free for putting two pieces on a broken sheet.

Q. Who is Mary M'Cape? - A. Mary Sowden : I left my house in the care of Mary Carty , Ann Leisted , Mary Sowden , and Jane Curtis , and promised them a night's lodging free; they were enticing me for two days to go and see a particular friend of mine, and they promised to take care of my house. On the 8th of August I went out at one o'clock, and I did not return till nine o'clock at night, and when I came home I found my door double-locked, as I left it; but the ceiling was broken before and behind; I did not see it that night, I went to bed and slept until the Hatton-garden officers came and awoke me; they told me to get up and look if there was any thing amiss; I did, and found my chest half open, the box broken, and nothing in it but a parcel of bad halfpence.

Q. What had you left in the chest? - A. There were ten bundles, with two pounds in each bundle, in silver and copper; the officers told me to dress myself and get up, they had got them snug enough. I had seen my chest on the 8th of August, the very instant I had dressed myself, just before I went out, because there were four shillings in the corner of it which I took out and locked the chest again, and all the money was there then.

Q. Did you see the parcels in it? - A. Yes, and counted them. They had cut the string of my keys and kept two of them; every week I lost something or other since they lodged with me, which has been a quarter of a year, and Jack Price is the chief man of them all: I lost 30 s. in caps and sheets and linen, but I took care of the money because I looked at that every day: I am a poor desolate widow.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - A. I lost a shawl that I had bought in Oxford-road, from the head of my bed, and they took a night-cap with my name on it and stop thief in full length.

Q. Have you found any of your things again? A. Only the money which is here (they have spent the rest), the shawl, and the cap, they were at the Justice's.

Q. When you returned home were any of the prisoners at your house? - A. No.

Q. Were the four persons you have described lodgers at your house at that time? - A. Yes, they were, and they were lodgers off and on for this half-year.

Q. Did they come home that night? - A. No, they were taken that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mrs. Welch, where did you live then? - A. In Philips-yard, Diot-street.

Q. What are you? - A. I am an old woman.

Q. How do you get your living? - A. By letting out a few old beds.

Q. Who they are, and what they are, you do not make enquiry about that? - A. No.

Q. How many lodgers had you in the house besides these? - A. No person at all in my apartments but these.

Q. How many apartments have you? - A. I have a back and a front room.

Q. Had you no more than two rooms? - A. These were particular to myself; they used to sleep in the front room, all four in two beds.

Q. Where did Price sleep? - A. He rented a

little room of me, and he pretended he had lost the key; his room was within a yard and a half of my place.

Q. Was it adjoining the front room? - A. No.

Q. Had you more than these three rooms? - A. Yes.

Q. How many rooms had you altogether? - A. I have nine or ten both large and small; there is a room here and a room there, in a gallery over stables in a coach-yard, they broke through the ceiling of my chamber to get into my room.

Q. I ask you how many lodgers you had there at that time in the other apartments, besides these five? - A. They were all out; I had locked the rooms up; they walk out by day and come home at night.

Q. Had you any hope of getting any reward by indicting as you have done? - A. I am both stupid and ignorant.

Q. I want to see how far this stupidity and ignorance goes. - Have you not indicted them as you have done that you might get a reward? - A. I do not know whether I would or not.

Q. Do you not hope you would? - A. I hope in God I would.

Q. How much do you hope you would get? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You can reckon how much seven times forty would amount to: You know seven times forty pounds would amount to a great deal of money? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you hope to get that? - A. That lies to the gentlemen, but not to me.

Q. Do not you hope to get forty pounds a-piece for all the seven? - A. No, no: I would not wish to get it.

Q. You just now said you hoped in God you would? - A. I beg your pardon, I thought it was my own money.

Q. Upon your oath, had not you the hope of getting forty pounds a-piece? - A. I would not wish it.

Q.You would not take it if it was offered you? - A.These are cross questions to pass to an ignorant old woman.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: I produce the money which I found in Little Bell-alley, at the house of one Mr. Henry or Mrs. Henry: previous to my finding the money, I had information that there was coining going forward in the house; I took three of my brother officers with me and went to No. 4, Little Bell-alley; after we had searched the lower apartment, we went up one pair of stairs, the room-door we forced, and we found the prisoners at the bar in the room, all of them; it was about half past seven in the evening, on the 8th of August. I found a quantity of money in the room; this parcel was in a man's hat, to the amount of one pound, wanting a farthing, in penny pieces, halfpence, and farthings; and this parcel I found tied up in a canvas apron, amounting to one pound one, they are penny pieces, halfpence, and farthings; in this handkerchief I found, in good silver, two pounds sixteen shillings and sixpence, and two and sixpence in bad silver; one of the shillings the prosecutrix says she can speak to; upon the prisoner, Alice Swinns , I found a number of duplicates and 19 s. 1 d. in money, in silver and copper: I did not find any money on any of the parties excepting on Swinns the nineteen shillings and a housewife: The parcels of money were separated in different parcels about the room; there is also an halfpenny which she can speak to: we took them into custody to the Office: We went to Hannah Welch in the morning, and told her that she had been robbed (Price desired to speak privately to the Magistrate, but he was not admitted an evidence). When I went to Hannah Welch 's house I observed the ceiling had been broke directly over the head of the bed.

Price (To Hancock.) Q. Who was the person that sent you to Mrs. Welch to let her know that she had lost her property? - A. It is very plain that we could find it out, when her name was on the cloth that some of the money was wrapped up in.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - Q. You were present when Hancock was making this search in Bell-alley? - A. I was: We broke the door open to enter the room; I searched the prisoner, Mary Sowden ; I found in her pocket sixteen pence in penny pieces and halfpence, and some silver; I cannot say how much it was, because it was mixed; afterwards I searched her body, and I found a shawl stuffed under the hind part of her gown; I then moved her from where she stood, and there I found 4 l. 12 s. laying on the ground, where she stood, in silver.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I was present with Wood and Hancock at the search in Bell-alley; we found the door fastened, and we forced it and found all the prisoners in the room; I found 3 l. and 7 d. in a cloth in a chair between the two tables, counted up in sixpences; I put the money in the table-cloth while Wood and Hancock searched the prisoners. (The shawl, cap, tablecloth, and a halfpenny with a hole in it, were identified by the prosecutrix.)

Price's defence. There are two of these girls who are standing here as prisoners who know nothing of this robbery. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the Court.

Mary Carty 's defence. I know nothing about this robbery, and these two young women are innocent of the robbery. (Pointing to them.)

Mary Sowden's defence. Alice Swinns and Sarah Welch know nothing about it.

Jane Curtis 's defence. I know nothing about it whatever.

Curtis called two witnesses, and Leisted called witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Carty, GUILTY, aged 19.

Sowden, GUILTY, aged 18.

Curtis, GUILTY, aged 20.

Price, GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Leisted, GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing only .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Swinns, NOT GUILTY .

Welch, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-20

541. WILLIAM SCRIVEN was indicted for that he, on the 13th of August , being moved by the instigation of the devil, in and upon Elizabeth Hubbard , spinster , a woman child under the age of ten years (to wit, of nine years and upwards), feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Elizabeth Hubbard , he wickedly, unlawfully, and feloniously, did carnally know and abuse .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-21

542. WILLIAM SCRIVEN was again indicted for like assault, on the 28th of June , in and upon the said Elizabeth Hubbard .

Mr. Knapp, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-22

543. GEORGE LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , five brass circles, value 6 d. thirteen indexes, value 7 s. 6 d. sixteen spray collars, value 8 s. 2 d. thirteen quadrant-nuts, value 1 s. 2 d. seven buttons, value 3 1/2 d. three spray uprights, value 7 s. two nuts for uprights, value 2 d. five spray loop screws, value 2 d. and three globe-rings, value 10 s. 10 d. the property of Thomas Marriott Bardin .

THOMAS MARRIOT BARDIN sworn. - Q. What are you, Mr. Bardin? - A. I am a globemaker ; I live in Salisbury-square, Fleet-street . On the 15th of July, I received information that a workman in my house, George Lane, was in custody, for having offered some brass for sale. In consequence of this information, I went to No. 7, West-street, Seven-dials, and I there saw the property which is stated in the indictment, and which is my property.

Q. Can you say you have lost these from your premises? - A. I have no doubt of it, because there are few in the trade, and each in the trade have their own patterns, and the person who makes the patterns is here.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. He has lived with me six years; he is a servant of mine.

Q. What wages did you give him? - A. He could earn in six days 3 l. 9 s. his wife was an apprentice to me, and is a most deserving woman; she is in the habit of earning about a guinea a week.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These are of a particular sort: Do not you know Mr. Newton; does he not use the same patterns? - A. There are one or two patterns that he may use, but I have no doubt of the whole of it being my property.

- DAVIS sworn. - My husband is a brass-founder, No 7, West-street, Seven-dials. On the 15th of August last, about ten in the morning, the prisoner at the bar brought some brass to sell as old brass, I weighed the brass, it weighed eighteen pounds and a half, it came to one pound and a half-penny: I called Mr. Saunders from the work-shop to give me a one-pound note, and he gave me a two-pound note; I went out to get change, and Mr. Saunders saw the brass laying in the shop, and he supposed it to be stolen; when I came in, I gave the prisoner a one-pound note; Mr. Saunders asked the prisoner to let him indorse it, and directly Mr. Davis came in. This is the brass, and I am sure the prisoner is the man that brought it.

WILLIAM GARLAND sworn. - I went with Mr. Bardin to the house where the brass was sold, and he asked me if I knew it; I told him I did know it.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a mathematical instrument-maker: I am the workman that work it up for Mr. Bardin.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that that is the brass-work that belongs to Mr. Bardin? - A. I should consider it to be Mr. Bardin's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not cast it? - A. No, I only work it up: I know that the greatest part of it is Mr. Bardin's.

Q. You do not know what quantity of work the man that casts it makes? - A. I do not.

ROGER DEVEY sworn. - Q. What are you, Mr. Devey? - A. I am a brass-founder: I conceive that every bit of work, nearly, that is there was cast at my house; I have looked it over.

Q. Has Mr. Bardin a pattern for his work different from other people? - A. Yes, there are four persons who make globes, three of whom I cast for, and there is a difference in their patterns except some trifling articles.

- sworn. - I am the workman that cast the work; I know they are Mr. Bardin's.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Have you any doubt yourself about it? - A. None at all.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

[The prosecutor very feelingly recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account of his deserving partner.]

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-23

544. EDWARD EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , one tierce, value 5 s. the property of George Winter and Isaac Hughes .

ISAAC HUGHES sworn. - I am a grocer , No. 51, Newgate-street.

Q. What day did you lose this tierce of your's? - A. The 16th of July, in the afternoon; I lost it from Panyer-alley , adjoining our warehouse; it stood at the door of the warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. - . Q. Do you recollect any person asking the price of that tierce? - A. I understood from some of our servants that the price was asked.

Q. You have seen the prisoner before? - A. Yes, he was a porter in our house about ten years ago.

WILLIAM YOUNG sworn. - I am a cooper, I live in Old Fish-street-hill.

Q. What do you know about this tierce? - A. The prisoner brought it to Mr. Hopkins's shop, and offered to sell it, on the 16th of July last, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon; he said, he brought a tierce to sell, he asked for Mr. Hopkins; I asked him what he wanted for it; he said, four shillings: I told him I would give him three shillings and sixpence for it; he left it with me, Mr. Hughes came the next day, I shewed it him.

Q. Are you sure it is the same tierce that you bought of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the same man that sold it you? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mr. Hughes.) The tierce that that man shewed to you, are you sure it is your own tierce? - A. I am sure of it, I marked it.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-24

545. ANN BARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , three silver tablespoons, value 20 s. the property of Edward Linde .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZABETH SEALY sworn. - Q. You, I believe, was the chair-woman? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Ann Barr ? - A. Yes, she was Mr. Linde's servant ; she always came to fetch me, and when the house-keeper died I was sent for to clean the beds.

Q. Were you there on the 20th of July? - A. Yes, she came to fetch me to Mr. Linde's house; when she came to fetch me, she was in a great perspiration.

Q. When you got to Mr. Linde's house, did she tell you what she wanted you for? - A. Yes, she gave me three table-spoons wrapped up in a bit of a newspaper; she told me to pledge them for twenty-two shillings, in order to redeem some curtains and a counterpane that had been pledged for money before.

Q. Had you been the person who had pledged the curtains and the counterpane? - A. I had.

Q. Did you, in consequence of her directions, take these three table-spoons any where? - A. Yes, when she ordered me, I took them to Mr. Fleming's, pawnbroker, in Newgate-street.

Court. Q. What day did you take them there? - A. On the 20th of July, the day she gave them me.

Q. Before you left Mr. Linde's house, did you know where you were to pledge them? - A. No, she told me to pledge them where I could.

Q. What did they give you upon the spoons? - A. Twenty-two shillings; I then went to Mr. Peart, in Knight-Rider-street, to redeem the counterpane and curtains to carry home, which I had pledged before by Ann Barr 's directions, and a black gown, that she has on her back now.

Q. Had the black gown been pledged by you at Mr. Peart's? - A. Yes, it had; she said, she wanted money; I gave the counterpane, curtains, and the black gown, to Ann Barr after I had redeemed them, and gave her four shillings and sixpence, the residue of the money I received for the spoons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mrs. Sealy, what did you do with the duplicate of the spoons? - A. I kept it, because she would not take it.

Q. Where do you come from now? - A. I came from Giltspur-street Compter now.

Q. What! have they took you into the Compter? - A. I have been there nine weeks, I resigned myself up.

Q. Were not you taken into custody by some officer? - A. Yes, I was taken as I was going to fetch some things to carry home to my mistress.

Q. How many times have you been in Mr. Linde's house? - A. I cannot tell exactly; I never went at any time in my life, but the girl always fetched me.

Q. You yourself went and pawned these spoons, where is the duplicate? - A. I do not know; I had the duplicate, it was lost out of my pocket.

Q. The duplicate was in your pocket just before you were taken by the officer? - A. Yes, about an hour or two before.

Q. And when you were taken, the duplicate was

not in your pocket? - A. I did not make away with it.

Q. No, no, I dare say not - pray when was it that you first accused that young woman of giving you the spoons? - A. When I was taken up.

Q. When were you taken up? - A. On the 24th of June last, on the Wednesday following.

Q. Had you ever told any person whatever of it, or charged the prisoner with giving you these spoons, till you yourself were in custody for robbing Mr. Linde? - A. No, never.

Q. Then when you were in custody for robbing Mr. Linde, you thought you might get into harm for robbing Mr. Linde? - A. Yes.

Q.And then, for the first time, you charged the prisoner with having given them to you? - A. Yes.

JOHN STONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Fleming.

Q. Do you know the last witness, Mrs. Sealy? - A. I do not.

Q. On the 20th of July, did you receive of any woman any spoons? - A. I did.

Q. What did you lend her upon them? - A. Twenty-two shillings on three silver table-spoons; she gave me the name of Elizabeth Barlow , No. 17, St. Martin's-le-Grand; I know they are the spoons.

EDWARD LINDE sworn. - Examined by Mr. - . Q. Upon looking over your property, you found you had lost some silver spoons? - A. Yes, on the 20th of July, I found I had lost three.

Q. Be so good as to look at these, and tell me whether these are the spoons that you lost? - A. Yes, these are my spoons.

Q. Ann Barr was your servant, was she not? - A. Yes, she had lived with me almost three years; she had the care of my things, and among the rest these spoons.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Sealy? - A. Yes, she worked at our house as chair-woman.

Q. You have no doubt these are your spoons? - A. I have no doubt but these are my spoons.

Q. Do you know what the value of them are? - A. I value them at twenty-five shillings and sixpence; I had them valued.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mrs. Sealy was the woman that was employed as chair-woman when a chair-woman was wanting? - A. Yes, and she might have been there lately without my knowing it.

Q. A chair-woman coming to your house might have an opportunity of taking your spoons without your knowing it? - A. She might.

Q. How long had Ann Barr lived in your service? - A. About three years and a half; she was a good servant, and a person that I placed confidence in.

- VAUGHAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. - . Q. Were you present at the examination of Ann Barr and Mrs. Sealy before the Magistrate? - A. I was.

Q. Were either of the examinations taken down in writing? - A. I think they were both.

Q. Do you recollect any thing passing after the examination? - A. Yes, it was an altercation that took place.

Mr. Gurney. Q. While the prisoner, Ann Barr , was speaking, was not the clerk there writing? - A. I did not observe that circumstance, because I attended to the words Ann Barr said.

Mr. FITZPATRICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the clerk of the Sitting Alderman at Guildhall? - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner, Ann Barr ? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the prisoner? - A. Upon my word I cannot recollect, there are so many come there.

Q. Did you take down any thing that she said? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you a distinct memory all of a sudden that you can now say you did not take any thing down in your book that the prisoner said? - A. I never take any thing down as a confession, without it is to be returned.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Vaughan.) Q. What was it the prisoner said? - A. An altercation took place between the prisoner at the bar and Mrs. Sealy, and I heard the prisoner make use of the following words, or words to that effect, that Mrs. Sealy had taught her to drink, and had persuaded her first to pawn her own clothes, and afterwards to pawn her master's things.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent; Mrs. Sealy took the things.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-25

546. THOMAS DIXON was indicted for that he, on the 11th of October, 1795, at the parish-church of St. Peter the Apostle, in the town of Sandwich, in the county of Kent, did marry and take to wife one Sarah Lawrence , spinster ; and that he afterwards, on the 27th of April , 1805, at the parish-church of St. Botolph Without Aldgate , feloniously did marry one Elizabeth Lawson , widow , his former wife, Sarah, being then alive .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE TEMPLE , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at the port of Sandwich, in the county of Kent.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dixon, the prisoner? - A. Yes, he lived in Sandwich.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Sarah Lawrence ? - A. Yes; I was present at the marriage of this man and Sarah Lawrence , at the parish-church of St. Peter's, Sandwich; I saw her the day before yesterday alive.

Q. Do you know whether he had any children

by that marriage? - A. He has two or three, I believe; he is a carpenter .

Court. Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes, I am quite sure, he lived in our town.

Q. Did she leave him, or he her? - A. I do not know; they lived a year or two together; I was not much acquainted with him.

RICHARD DAVID sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the sextons of St. Botolph Without Aldgate? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Dixon, the prisoner? - A. I saw him at Aldgate church, when he was married to Elizabeth Lawson , the latter end of last April.

Prisoner's defence. I resign myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-26

547. WILLIAM THOMPSON and JOSEPH PERKINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Nichols .

THOMAS NICHOLS sworn. - I am an ironmonger , I live in Cow-lane: On the 8th of August I was informed by Robert Hardy that my pocket had been picked of a silk handkerchief; I immediately felt in my pocket, and missed it; he said he followed the men all up Chick-lane , and he saw one of them take it out of my pocket, and that he knew the house they used on Saffron-hill, and if I would get an officer he would point them out to me; in Hatton-garden I felt the handkerchief in my pocket, and between Hatton-garden and Cow-lane I lost it.

Q. Did you ever find your handkerchief again? - A. No, not at all.

ROBERT HARDY sworn. - I am a shoe-maker, I live on Saffron-hill; I saw these two men follow the gentleman from the corner of Shoe-lane into St. John's-court, just by Holborn, in the way to Cow-lane.

Q. Did you know them before? - A. I have seen them at the Distillers Arms public-house just facing where I live; I saw Perkins put his hand into the gentleman's right hand pocket, and take out his handkerchief; Thompson was along with him at the time; when Perkins had taken the gentleman's handkerchief out of his pocket, he put it in his bosom, and they both ran away down St. John's-court into Chick-lane.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men? - A. Yes, I am certain of it, and I informed the gentleman of it; as I was going home I saw Thompson go down Field-lane; he went into a shop, and offered the handkerchief for sale.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: On the 8th of August, from information, I went to the Distillers Arms, Saffron-hill; the prisoners were pointed out to me; I did not find any thing on them; when I handcuffed them, they said, if ever they got their liberty, they would take away the boy's life.

Perkins's defence. I belong to the Tower-hamlets; I had just come from my regiment, and finding nobody at home I went up to the Distillers Arms to get a pint of beer; the boy first pointed out another man; I was then in the yard, and the boy pointed out me afterwards, and said, that is him.

White. He made his escape through the back window into the privy when he saw us.

Thompson's defence. I am totally innocent of the crime; I am very well informed that Mr. White bribed the boy, and promised to buy him a hat if he would swear the same at the Old-Bailey; he gave him sixpence then.

White. I gave him sixpence to buy him some bread and cheese; the boy was hungry, and had no money: I never promised him any thing.

Thompson, GUILTY, aged 28.

Perkins, GUILTY, aged 24.

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-27

548. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Charles Jennings .

CHARLES JENNINGS sworn. - I live at St. Pancras: On Monday, the 2d of September, I was standing before the Bank , during which time the Bank Volunteers were coming out of the Bank; I felt some person's hand in my pocket; turning round, I saw the prisoner put my handkerchief under his jacket; I immediately took him over to the Magistrate, and left him in custody; when I saw the handkerchief I was clear it was my own property.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-28

549. MARY PRICE , alias ANN PRICE, was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , twenty-one yards of cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Greenwell .

JOHN GREENWELL sworn. - I live at No. 55, Bishopsgate Without , I am a linen-draper : On Thursday, the 8th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I had several customers in the shop; the prisoner said as we were in a hurry, she would wait till I served them; after serving of them, I served her; I thought she had something about her that did not belong to her, and as she was going out of the door I followed her till she

had got about forty yards up the street; I then stopped her, and told her I was sorry to say I was afraid that she had some of my property about her; she denied it, and being close to a public-house I told her to come in, and I would speak to her; as I took her into the house, she dropped the piece behind the door. (The cotton produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I humbly implore your Lordship's mercy and the Gentlemen of the Jury; it was poverty and distress that drove me to it.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-29

550. SAMUEL CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , four faggots, value 10 d. the property of John Lucas .

JOHN LUCAS sworn. - I live at Bow's farm, in the parish of Edmonton ; this man is a labourer , he lives in the parish.

Q. What have you to say against this man? - A. We caught him with four faggots.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not catch him - did you lose any faggots? - A. Yes, four out of the rick-yard, on the 9th of July, in the morning about four o'clock.

- HAYCOCK sworn. - I am a carpenter: On Monday night, the 8th of July, I was out for the purpose of looking after depredators; on Tuesday morning, near two o'clock, we met this man with these four faggots on his back tied up with a cord of his own.

Q. How far from Mr. Lucas's farm? - A. Not quite half a mile; I stopped him till seven or eight more came up of our party, and then we took them away from him, and hid them till the morning; we knew the man perfectly well, so we set him at liberty; we asked him where he had them from; he said he had them from Muswell-hill.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. This man has a wife, and how many children? - A. A great number; he lives about a hundred yards from the spot where I took him. (The faggots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-30

551. WILLIAM MOSS was indicted for the wilful murder of Benjamin Aris , on the 11th of September .

(The case was stated by Mr. Const.)

ROBERT HARDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are house surgeon of St. Bartholomew's hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 11th of September, this month, a person being brought in there to be examined by you? - A. On the 12th of September, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, when I was called to the man, he was dead; he had a great many bruises upon his face, and a small wound on the left side of his head, and a little cut on his upper lip.

Q. Did you open the head? - A. I did; there was nothing unusual in the appearance of the head; I examined his head, belly, chest, and neck.

Q. What do you apprehend was the cause of his death? - A. I cannot speak positively; I should suppose he died from these blows.

Q. Did the blows occasion his death? - A.I cannot say; people sometimes immediately die after receiving blows, and nothing is to be seen on the body but the blows.

Q. Would he have died otherwise, if he had not received these blows? - A. I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. Can you more particularly describe the effect of the blows? - A. The bruises were no more than a person might or do get in boxing; I cannot speak of what they were capable of producing; they might produce nothing in some persons.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. We understand from you, sir, that you found some bruises on the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. Were any of those bruises of that nature to produce death? - A. That is a very difficult question for me to answer, yes or no.

Court. Q. A man shoved down might be under some particular circumstance so affected as to occasion death? - A. Truly.

Q. Whether these bruises would ordinarily occasion a man's death? - A. I cannot tell with what violence these blows might have been struck.

Q. I mean by those appearances that were to be seen? - A. They appeared like nothing but common bruises; I feel it difficult to answer positively, I cannot say positively what was the cause of his death.

Q. When you find a wound, you are able to state some connection between that wound and the cause of death? - A. Not always, most commonly we are.

Q. Were these bruises of the nature likely to produce death? - A. One was from a blow on the head.

Q. A blow on the head might or might not produce death? - A. Certainly.

Q. You cannot state whether they did or not? - A. No.

Q. Do not cases occur of sudden death, where, upon examination of the body, you cannot find out the cause? - A. Certainly.

THOMAS OWEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at No. 2, Weston's-park, Lincoln's Inn-fields.

Q. How old are you? - A. I am sixteen, the 19th of next December.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular happening in that court on the 11th or 12th of September? - A. Yes; I was standing about eleven o'clock in the evening facing the Red Lion public-house in Weston-park; I observed William Moss come to Feathers-court.

Q. Did you know William Moss ? - A. I knew him by sight; William Moss came from Feathers-court, and passed me, and stood next door to the Red Lion, in Weston-park; he returned back, after he had stood there for about a minute; he then turned his back to me in the street, and went to Elizabeth Rimes 's window, pulled off his jacket, or smock-frock, I cannot say which, and he peeped into Elizabeth Rimes 's window; I, seeing him pull off his smock-frock or jacket in Feathers-court, immediately followed him, and lost sight of him.

Q. Might not he go into Elizabeth Rimes 's house? - A. I cannot say, he might, the door was open, I should think he did; I went up to the top of the court into Holborn, and returned back again immediately; I then, seeing him come down the court, went and stood where I was first standing, facing the Red Lion; just after that I thought of going in doors; after that I heard some violent blows; I went to the end of Feathers-court, where I saw William Moss striking the deceased several blows.

Q. Before you go on, how was the man, was he standing, or lying, or how? - A. I perceived that William Moss was holding him up by one hand, and striking him with the other.

Q. How did he strike him? - A. With his fist.

Q. Did he make any opposition or resistance? - A. No; I heard no voice, nor words, only the blows, and being held up.

Q.Was he laying along when he held him up - how much of his body was up, or how much was on the ground? - A. The man was on his legs.

Q. He stood upon his feet? - A. Yes, he was holding him up by the back, and striking him with the other hand; I could not see distinctly any more; the prisoner ran away, and the deceased fell down and groaned.

Court. Q. How long was this that you heard the blows, and heard the beating? - A. I cannot say exactly altogether, a very short time, about a minute or two.

GUILTY

Of manslaughter .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-31

552. JOHN, alias ROBERT SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , six silver desert spoons, value 3 l. the property of William-Dredge Taunton .

WILLIAM-DREDGE TAUNTON sworn. - I am an attorney living in Essex-street; the prisoner at the bar was my footman ; on the 17th of August I went into the City, on my return I found the prisoner in the custody of the clerk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What time of the day was it when you returned? - A. It might be about three or four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. The prisoner remained in your custody until he went to Bow-street at seven o'clock in the evening? - A. Yes, I kept him in custody; I loaded my pistols and gave them to my clerk to keep him in custody.

WILLIAM STUBBING sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Edwards, a pawnbroker, in Clare-street, Clare-market. On the 17th of August in the forenoon, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he came to our shop and offered six desert-spoons to pledge; he asked 18 s. on them; I was positive he had stole them, and looked at them some time; the prisoner said, if you do not like them, give me them back and take my watch; I told him that I should not do that, I suspected that he had come dishonestly by them: he hesitated for some time, and then he told me they were his master's, and that he was going to lay the money out for the use of his master: I told him I knew his master had not authorised him to do any such thing: at last he told me Mr. Taunton was his master: I sent to his master. I produce the spoons; they are worth two guineas as old silver. (The spoons identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-32

553. CATHARINE RYAN was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Monoghan .

MARY COGHRAN sworn. - Q. Did you know the deceased, Elizabeth Monoghan ? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when she came by her death? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon what terms did they live before they quarrelled? - A. They were very good friends before: I was present when the quarrel arose. Elizabeth Monoghan came home from her work at half after twelve o'clock at noon; she went up stairs: she and I live in one house; I live in the one pair, and she lived in the two.

Q. How long ago? - A. About eleven weeks ago: She went up stairs from her work the same day as the blows happened.

Q. Had they been drinking together? - A. No, not then; Elizabeth Monoghan went into her apartment at that time.

Q. Did they go out together to drink? - A. They went out together to drink., and they both of them came home very much intoxicated in liquor;

they were not many minutes within doors before they began to argue about the reckoning, which was two pots of beer and a quartern of gin, by their own expressions. Elizabeth Monoghan said she paid the reckoning, and Ryan said she paid it; Elizabeth Monoghan lifted up her finger and struck Ryan on the cheek; Ryan put the child in her arms down: Ryan and Monoghan took hold of one another; they scuffled, and they were both towards the fire; Elizabeth Monoghan gave Ryan a push and threw her on the bed; Ryan kept the hold that she had till she pulled herself on the top of her; they scuffled about four or five minutes, to the best of my knowledge, the deceased being under her, till the child, that is between eleven and twelve years old, cried out, mammy, Elizabeth Monoghan is bleeding! I saw Mrs. Ryan with the poker in her hand; I catched Ryan by the arm, and wrenched the poker from her; I went between them and lifted them both up; they scuffled together, and went towards the door; Ryan took hold of a quart bottle and went behind the door and swore she would be the death of her.

Q. What became of the bottle; did you take it out of her hands? - A. No, another woman took it out of her hands; I took hold of the deceased, turned her out at the door, and put her in her own apartment, and Ryan went down stairs with the child in her arms.

Q. The deceased was well enough to go up stairs? - A. Yes, she was, and she came down stairs, and pushed the door open to go after Ryan: I washed the deceased, and cut the hair from the wound, and put her to bed. The next morning she went to work as usual.

Q. How soon after that did she die? - A. In about six weeks afterwards all but one day.

Q. How was she between the scuffling-time and the time of her death? - A. She complained about her head: I did not take particular notice of her, because she came home rather in liquor.

Q. How many times had she been in liquor between the time of the scuffle and the time of her death? - A. I cannot tell; I saw her once or twice.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. She lived six weeks after the scuffle, I understand? - A. Yes.

Q. She used to drink a good deal, I understand? - A. She got drunk once or twice after, I understand.

Q. They were both of them very drunk when they set to at first? - A. They were.

ROBERT HARDY sworn. - I am surgeon to St. Bartholomew's hospital.

Q. Did you inspect this woman at the time of her death? - A. I did; I opened the head; I found an abscess on the left side of the brain.

Q. That was the occasion of her death? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that owing to the blow? - A. I firmly believe so.

Q. Her getting drunk afterwards might contribute to it? - A. I should suppose so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is impossible for you to say, from the distance of time, that she died merely from the blows? - A. No, it is not impossible, because the wound had not healed when she was brought into the hospital, and it evidently appeared there was mischief done to the head.

Q. Suppose a person got intoxicated, might not that contribute to it? - A. It might, or it might not.

Prisoner's defence. That woman there I asked to take the deceased from my throat, which she did, and turned the deceased out of the room, and she said she would have no murder done in her room. I came down stairs after that, and she followed me down and met me in the passage: there is a woman can prove that she told me to put my child out of my arms: I said no: I was going to scour pots at a gentleman's house, I was afraid something would happen to me; I did not wish to have any more to do with her.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of manslaughter only .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-33

554. JAMES ROWE was indicted for that he, on the 9th of July , feloniously did forge and counterfeit, and caused to be forged and counterfeited, and did willingly aid and assist in forging and counterfeiting a certain order for payment of 30 l. signed William Stadden Blake , with intent to defraud Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart. Charles Mills , and Thomas Halifax .

Second Count. That he, on the same day, did utter and publish as true, the same forged order for payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with like intention.

And other Counts. For like offence, with intention to defraud different persons.

(The case was stated by Mr. Watson.)

THOMAS HALIFAX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Baronet, Charles Mills , and Thomas Halifax , of Birchin-lane. This is the paper that was presented to me for payment on the 9th of July.

Q. By whom was that presented? - A. I cannot say by whom; the shop was full of people at the time.

Q. You cannot say the prisoner was the person that presented the draft to you; but that person, whoever he was that presented that draft to you, did he remain some time in the shop? - A. Near a quarter of an hour, to the best of my recollection.

Q. When that was presented to you what did you first do? - A. I suspected it not to be Mr. Blake's writing, I requested Mr. Carter to go to Mr. Blake, in Change-alley, for the purpose of enquiring.

Q. Did Mr. Blake keep cash in your house? - A. Yes; he had cash in our house at that time.

Q. When Mr. Carter went what became of the draft you have now in your hands? - A. I do not recollect positively about that.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of Mr. Blake? - A. I am.

Q. Look at that paper whether any on the whole of it is his hand-writing? - A. I do not think any part of it is.

Q. You are familiar with his hand-writing? - A. Yes, being a customer to our house some years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What did you do with the cheque? - A. I put my initials and the day of the month that afternoon.

Q. Where did you put it when Mr. Carter went to Mr. Blake? - A. If I did not give it to Mr. Carter, I kept it in my own possession.

Q. Or perhaps you laid it down? - A. No.

Q. You cannot say whether you gave it to him or no? - A. No.

HENRY CARTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Sir Richard Carr Glyn and Co.

Q. Do you remember being applied to by the last witness on the 9th of July, in the afternoon of that day? - A. I recollect it very well: Mr. Halifax gave me the draft, which I took in my hand: I went to Mr. Blake; I found him in his shop; he returned with me to the banking-house.

Q. Just look at that paper writing, and tell me whether that is the same that he delivered over to you? - Q. This is the same piece of paper that Mr. Halifax delivered over to me: when I got back to the banking-house with Mr. Blake, after I turned round the end of the counter, Mr. Blake asked me, who was the man? He immediately went towards the door to go out.

Q. Was the prisoner at that time in the shop? - A. The man whom Mr. Halifax pointed out to me as the man that presented the draft was in the shop.

Q. Are you able to say whether that was the prisoner at the bar? - A. I cannot positively swear, I only took a superficial look at him.

Q. What did the man do that Mr. Halifax pointed out to you? - A. As Mr. Blake spoke, he turned round and made towards the door and went out; he seemed to brush out very briskly: I did not see the person again till I was summoned before the Lord Mayor.

Q. What became of Mr. Blake after that? - A. He went after the person that I pointed out, who presented the draft, immediately, crying out stop thief! I remained in the banking-house.

WILLIAM STADDEN BLAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Change-alley, Cornhill.

Q. In consequence of information that you received on the 9th of July, what did you do? - A. I went immediately with Mr. Carter to the banking-house of Sir Richard Carr Glyn; I ran to the door as fast as I could, and pursued the prisoner, and cried out stop thief! the prisoner at the bar is the same person that I pursued.

Q. Where did you first get sight of him - did you see him in Sir Richard Carr Glyn's banking-house? - A. When I went out after him, I never saw him till he was in the middle of Birchin-lane; he was running as fast as he could and I pursuing him.

Q. You had not seen him at all in the banking-house? - A. No: when I came up to him I took him by the collar; he was taken first by Mr. Elder, a sadler; I did not see him stop him.

Court. Q. Was that the same man that you had been pursuing that was stopped? - A. Yes, it was; Mr. Mellish and Mr. Elder came together with him, and I took him from them; I took him to my house, and sent for a constable; he took him into custody.

PETER ELDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. On the 9th of July, do you recollect the cry of stop thief? - A. Yes, as I was going to my master's shop, I heard the cry of stop thief in Birchin-lane; I followed the prisoner, and caught him in George-yard.

Q. Was the person you took the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have not seen him since I took him; I brought him into Birchin-lane, and delivered him to Mr. Blake.

WILLIAM MELLISH, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I was going from Cornhill up Birchin-lane, and when I had got about half way from Cornhill, I heard a cry of stop thief behind, and a man came running the same side of the way I was, and ran up an alley which leads into George-yard; at that time another man was running after him, and he got into the alley rather before me; I got time enough into George-yard to observe both the men running, and to see the last man take the prisoner at the bar.

Q. That is the last witness? - A. I cannot say it is the last witness, I have not seen him since; I am positive it was the same man that was taken in George-yard that was running in Birchin-lane; the person that was taken in George-yard is the prisoner at the bar, I saw him taken, and I saw him running in Birchin-lane; I only lost sight of him just turning the corner.

ROBERT BEECH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson.

Q. Were you at Mr. Blake's on the 9th of July? - A. I was; I am a ticket-porter. Seeing a mob at Mr. Blake's door, I went to see what was the matter, and an officer being wanted, I went and fetched one, who took charge of the prisoner, and took him to the Compter; I accompanied them both, and after the last examination I had a conversation with the prisoner; he said, if I am hanged, it is all through Hobler, the Lord-Mayor's clerk, for having committed him.

THOMAS PERKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. On the 9th of July I was fetched to Mr. Blake's house, I took the prisoner into custody to the Poultry Compter.

Mr. Watson. (To Halifax.) Q. You are familiar with the hand-writing of Mr. Blake? - A. Yes; that is not the hand-writing of Mr. Blake. (Looking at the draft.)

Q.(To Carter.) Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Blake? - A. I am; that is not the hand-writing of Mr. Blake, no part of it, to the best of my belief. (The note was read in Court.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-34

555. HANNAH FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Ibbett , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 30th of July , no person being therein, and stealing one waistcoat, value 16 s. a shawl, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Ibbett .

SAMUEL IBBETT sworn. - Q. Are you a housekeeper? - A. No; the house that I live in the landlord lets it all out in tenements, I rent an apartment there: On the 30th of July, my wife and I went out, I was the first that returned home; I found the room door open, it was a staple padlock, and the screw was wrenched out, and laid down by the door with the instrument that it was wrenched with.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen her before, her mother lodged in the same house, and she lodged with her mother; the mother is dead, she was taken up for a robbery, and died in Clerkenwell; I returned home between four and five in the afternoon; my wife can speak to the things.

SARAH IBBETT sworn. - I was the last person that left my apartment, I left it locked and secured between nine and ten in the morning.

Q. Did you lose any property? - A. Yes, I had seen it in the morning; there is a shawl and a handkerchief not found.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking these things, and breaking your lock? - A. No.

Q. When did you see any of your property again? - A. The next morning, at the pawnbroker's.

CATHERINE FIELD sworn. - I live in the same house, I saw the prisoner coming out of Ibbett's apartments about eleven o'clock on the same day they were robbed.

Q. Had she any thing with her? - A. I did not see her have any thing.

EDWARD TREADAWAY sworn. - On the 31st of July, Mrs. Ibbett came to me, and I went to the pawnbroker with Mrs. Ibbett; she described the waistcoat, and it was shewn her; I produce the part that was broken off the padlock, and the instrument that wrenched it.

JAMES JONES sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a waistcoat, I took it of the prisoner at the bar, in the name of Hannah Trueman , on the 30th of July, in the afternoon. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. It was not me that took the handkerchief, it was my mother that took it, she sent me to pawn it; they took my mother up as well as me, and my mother died in Clerkenwell.

Treadaway. That was for a robbery a fortnight before that she was committed.

- CARTER sworn - I attend here merely from humanity, and from the chance of this circumstance; I stand up to speak, hearing a woman stand up and say her name is Sarah Ibbett ; she is not the wife of the prosecutor, my sister was married to this man, her name is Sarah Ibbett .

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Are you married to Ibbett? - A. No, I am not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-35

556. THOMAS TAYLOR and ANN TAYLOR were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Green , with intent to steal, about the hour of eight at night, on the 27th of February, 1804, and burglariously stealing therein two gowns, value 40 s. four skirts, value 20 s. twenty pair of stockings, value 20 s. two flannel petticoats, value 8 s. eight shirts, value 20 s. one silk handkerchief, value 5 s. nineteen cotton handkerchiefs, value 19 s. ten shawls, value 10 s. two pair of shoes, value 10 s. a silk cloak, value 4 s. seven aprons, value 14 s. three towels, value 1 s. one pillow-case, value 4 d. and one Bank-note, value 5 l. the property of John Green.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In February, 1804, did you live in Quaker-street, Spital-fields ? - A. I did.

Q. Did you keep a house there? - A. I did.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Were the prisoners the persons that collected

your rents? - A. The woman prisoner was chiefly employed to collect the rents.

Q.Was your house broke open in February, 1804? - A. It was.

Q. Who was the last person in the house before your wife went to chapel? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. When was it, for the first time, that you found your house was broken open? - A.About a quarter after eight in the evening.

Q. What day of the month was it? - A. The 27th.

Q. How did it appear to you that the house had been broken open? - A. It appeared to me that the door had been violently strained; there were two locks on the outer door, one inside of the door, and one in the street outside of the door; they were violently wrenched open by some instrument or other.

Q. Upon this discovery of your house being broke open, you were able to find easily what person broke it open? - A. I was, my wife can testify that.

Q. Do you know any thing of a five-pound Bank-note? - A. I do.

Q. Where was that? - A. It was placed in a chest.

Q. How lately had you seen it before you missed it? - A. Two or three days before I missed it.

Q. The rest are all woman's articles? - A. Yes.

LUCY GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 27th of February, seeing the woman prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the day did you see her? - A. I saw her in the afternoon, about five o'clock.

Q. For what purpose did you see her? - A. She often came running to see me.

Q. Tell what past then? - A. When she came I was laying the clothes in the chest.

Q. You were putting your clothes into your chest? - A. Yes.

Q. What clothes? - A. My own wearing apparel.

Q. What were they? - A. Two cotton gowns, two calimanco skirts, two cotton skirts, twelve pair of cotton stockings, two flannel petticoats, eight linen shirts, a silk handkerchief, a five-pound Bank note, and two pair of shoes.

Q. You were packing them in the chest? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she say any thing at all about these things? - A. Yes; I took thirty one-pound notes out of a pair of shoes, and put them in my pocket; she said, it would be safer to leave them in the chest, but I put them in my pocket.

Q. She went out before you? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you communicated to her that you were going to chapel that evening? - A. No.

Q. Was that on Sunday? - A. No, on Monday.

Q.What, you used to go of a week-day to chapel? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner know that? - A. Yes, she did.

Q. Did you lock your chest when you went away? - A. No, I did not, I left it unlocked.

Q. Did she see that you left it unlocked? - A. She did; she went away, and I did not see any more of her till I came out of my own house to go to chapel; then I went into her house to see what o'clock it was, and it was seven; when I went in, they would have me stop, and I stopped a quarter of an hour, and then I went out to chapel.

Court. Q. It was perfectly dark then, was it not? - A. Yes, it was.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you desire them to look after your house? - A. I did; I said I was going to chapel, and I would be very much obliged to them to answer the door if any body knocked.

Q. Was the husband at home at this time? - A. He was.

Q. How far is it from your house to the chapel? - A. It is about three minutes walk; the chapel is in Grey Eagle-street, Spitalfields.

Q. When did you return from chapel? - A. I returned from chapel a little after eight o'clock; I went to my own house first after I came from chapel, and found my outer door open.

Q. Had that door been shut by you when you went to chapel? - A. Yes; I locked both the locks, and when I came back again it was wide open; I went into my house, and looked into my chest, and it was empty; then I sent for my husband.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner afterwards? - A. I sent for my husband that minute, and he, as soon as he came in, ran to the prisoners' house, but he could not find them; they came to my husband afterwards to see what had happened, my husband sent for them; they seemed to be very sorry, as though they knew nothing about it; the girl can tell you more than I can what they said.

Q. Did you tell them what you had lost? - A. Yes; I went and shewed them the chest, the same chest that I had put the things in, in the presence of the woman.

Q. Have you seen any property since, and when? - A. I did not see any thing till I saw it with a search-warrant on the 12th of August; I had information; I got a warrant, and had some things produced.

Q. What was produced to you on the 12th of August? - A. On the 13th, a gown that had been dyed, and a shirt of my husband's, a petticoat, and a calimanco skirt; the rest were found at the pawnbroker's.

Q. What was found at the pawnbroker's, were they your property? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You, I believe,

was in the habit of intimacy with the prisoner at the bar, were you not? - A. She came backwards and forwards.

Q. As a friend she came to your house, and when she saw you put the thirty one-pound notes into your pocket, she very kindly observed to you, that you had better put these notes in the chest than take them out with you in the night to Spitalfields? - A. She did not say in the night.

Q. Did not she make the observation, that you had better leave them there, that you might have your pocket picked? - A. Yes.

Q. You say, that after you came home, and found your house broke open, the prisoner and his wife came in as soon as your husband found them, and they seemed very sorry, as though they knew nothing at all about it? - A. They did.

GEORGE BRADIN sworn. - Q. You are a dyer? - A. Yes; I live at No. 40, Thomas-street, Bethnal-green.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Ann Taylor ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she come to you in May last? - A. She did not come to me at all.

Q. Were you employed to dye a gown for any body? - A. I was employed by Mrs. Taylor to dye a gown; she asked me to dye it, and she said whenever it suited me she would send it by my mother-in-law, Mary Crab .

Q. What was the colour of the gown before it was dyed? - A. A light gown; she asked me about a fortnight before she sent it to me.

Q. Was it new? - A. It was not quite new.

Q. Did Mary Crab bring you a gown? - A. Yes; I dyed it, and took it home on the 12th of June to Mrs. Taylor.

Q. What colour were you to dye it? - A. A green.

Court. Q. And you dyed it green, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. That gown you dyed green you took home? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you take it to? - A. To Mrs. Taylor.

Q. Was the husband present? - A. There was a man there, but I cannot say who he was.

Q. Had you ever dyed for her before? - A. No.

Q. You did not know Mrs. Taylor before? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever dye a gown of that sort before? - A. I have dyed different gowns before that.

Q. New ones? - A. Oh, yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe there was a stain of salmon liquor upon this gown, was there not? - A. I did not take any particular notice whether there were any stains or no; it was a flowered gown.

Q. There is nothing extraordinary in your dying a light gown green? - A. No.

Q. There was no kind of secresy in delivering this gown to you? - A. None at all; she sent it by my mother-in-law; she said when it suited me she would send the gown.

MARY CRAB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are mother-in-law to Bradin? - A. Yes; the prisoner at the bar herself gave me this gown.

Q. When did she give it to you? - A. I cannot tell the day of the month exactly, it was in June, and it came home on the 12th of June.

Q. Were you present when it was brought home? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dyed green, we understand? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you see when it was brought home? - A. Both the prisoners and myself were at breakfast.

Q. Did you make any observation about the gown when it went to be dyed? - A. I took great observation of it before it was dyed.

Q. What observation did you make about it? - A. It was almost a new gown, it had not a soiled finger upon it, and it was very much admired, being so new.

Q. What did you say about it? - A. We said it was a great pity such a gown should be dyed, it was so much admired; I came home and told the prisoner herself it was a pity it should be dyed.

Q. Was the man present then? - A. No; she made answer and said, it was only to wear every day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe there is nothing very wonderful of a woman that wanted a gown dyed, of her having it dyed dark? -

Court. That is all argument.

Q.(To the witness.) Did you ever see Mrs. Taylor wear that gown before she sent it to be dyed? - A. No; she wore it afterwards.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers belonging to Worship-street; you produce a green gown? - A. Yes; I got it from the prisoner's house.

Q. Was the woman prisoner at home when you got it? - A. Yes; she asked for a green gown, she took it out of a basket, and produced it in a moment; the prosecutor and his wife saw it, and they both said it was their gown.

Q. Were the prisoners at home at that time? - A. No.

Q. What did she say about it? - A. She said she bought them and another gown in Rosemary-lane, Monmouth-street.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. Yes; the first thing that we found was this calimanco skirt; it was laying on the table, as if she had been at work at it; then we found this shirt, which the woman said was her husband's; she said she knew it by the patch, it was her own work; and these coarse cloths we found, and a duplicate; we asked

her if she had any more, and she said she had no more; on a further search, Mr. Armstrong and Mr. Kennedy found about twenty more duplicates.

Q. Have you the duplicates? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Did the prosecutor or his wife describe the gown which they had lost, before you went to the prisoner's house? - A. No.

Q. Immediately that you applied to the woman prisoner she produced the gown? - A. The prosecutor asked her for it, and she immediately produced it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Then immediately upon her producing the green gown, they said it was theirs, without any examination? - A. Yes; they just took it into their hands.

SARAH SANDERSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a mantua-maker; look at that gown, and tell me whether you know it - did you make it? - A. Yes, I made it for Mrs. Green very near two years since.

Q. What colour was it when you made it? - A. This is the pattern. (Shewing it.)

Q. And you swear to it from your own work? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Braden.) Take that pattern in your hand, and tell me whether that was the pattern of the gown that Mrs. Taylor delivered to you to be dyed? - A. It was.

Q.(To Crab.) Look at it, is that the pattern of the gown? - A. That is the pattern of the gown before it was dyed.

- KENNEDY sworn. - Q. I believe you are a constable; did you find a duplicate at the prisoners? - A. I found one duplicate, and Mr. Armstrong found a bundle of duplicates.

Q. Shew us the one that you found, and tell us what it is for? - A. A petticoat, on the 12th of August, pawned at Mr. Cotton's, in Shoreditch.

Q. You saw the other duplicates found by Mr. Armstrong? - A. Yes, these are them, (produces them;) that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Before you went to search this house, did the prosecutor or prosecutrix tell you any thing about the colour of the gown what you were to search for? - A. No, they never mentioned it.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I know no more than has been related by my brother officers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Do you know of any quarrel between these people, and their having cross warrants? - A. I do not.

WILLIAM POPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I assist Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, No. 42, Shoreditch; I produce two petticoats and a pillowcase.

Q. Who did you get these petticoats and pillowcase from? - A. From Ann Taylor , on the 6th of June last.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. When the woman prisoner came to your house, did you know her? - A. Yes, personally.

Mr. Knapp. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. Tell me whether these things are your husband's property? - A. They are all mine.

Court. Q. Did you lose them at the time your house was broke open? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the cotton gowns? - A. Forty shillings; the two skirts, fifteen shillings; the two cotton skirts, ten shillings; twelve pair of cotton stockings, twelve shillings; the flannel petticoat, two shillings; the shirt is worth a shilling.

Q. The Bank-notes you never found? - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Q. First take up the shirt, and point to me what you know it by? - A. I tore it myself, and darned it myself, and this is the patch I put on; it is my own work.

Q. We understand that at the time of this robbery you and she were very good friends; since then has there not been a quarrel between you and cross warrants? - A. I have been abused many times by the prisoner.

Q. That does not answer my question; she may have been abused by you also - was there any cross complaints between you, you complaining of them, and they of you, at Worship-street? - A. Yes, there was.

JANE HINDMASH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at that petticoat, do you know that petticoat? - A. I made Mrs. Green such a petticoat as that, and I believe that to be the petticoat; there are very few that have such a binding as that; I never saw the binding of a petticoat bound as Mrs. Green chooses to have it; she has it done in a particular manner; it is a very short skirt, I made her two like this.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You do not mean to say that many ladies do not wear so broad a binding as that? - A. There are some of course, but very few.

Court. (To the prosecutrix.) Was there any quarrel between you and either of the prisoners before you searched their house? - A. Yes, but it was a good while before.

Mr. Bolland. Q. How long before? - A. It was four or five months, or half a year.

Q. Upon what terms did you live for these last three or four months? - A. I was never near them, nor they near me; I had nothing at all to do with them.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You had left the neighbourhood, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. How near did you live to them after you had left the neighbourhood? - A. About five minutes walk.

Ann Taylor 's defence. I have got the fellow shirt to that which is produced. (having the shirt on her arm,) and there is nothing but the scissars that parted the cloth that made the two shirts, if you will have the goodness to look at it; there is a witness in Court saw me pay sixpence for hemming the bottom of that petticoat, I had half a dozen of these shirts for my boy and my husband; my husband is innocent, he knows no more than a baby my buying any thing; I leave the rest to my Counsel.

AMY DUTTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. I live in Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Taylor? - A. I saw Mrs. Taylor once.

Q. Were you present when Mrs. Taylor purchased any duplicates? - A. I was with Mrs. Jones, in Webb-square, Shoreditch.

Q. Where is Mrs. Jones now? - A. She is dead; she died a week before Whitsuntide.

Q. What time was it you were with her at Mrs. Jones's? - A. In the beginning of last October.

Q. What did you see pass there about duplicates? - A.A woman came in, and asked Mrs. Jones if she would buy any duplicates.

Q. What was Mrs. Jones? - A. She kept a clothes shop; she asked five shillings for the duplicates; Mrs. Taylor was there buying a roller for her husband's knee, Mrs. Taylor gave five shillings, and there were among the duplicates two white dimity petticoats, a green stuff petticoat, and a lilac gown.

Q. Did Mrs. Taylor or not purchase the duplicates? - A. Yes, she purchased the duplicates for a crown-piece; she said they were pawned in Gravel-lane for twenty-seven or twenty-eight shillings, she did not know which.

Q. You did not, I believe, see these articles, did you? - A. Never; I know no more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you never saw the articles at all? - A. No.

Q. Where do you live yourself? - A. In Castle-street, Whitechapel, No. 6; I go out to cleaning, and work at tailoring.

Q. You never saw the prisoner but once before? - A. No, never in my life.

Q. This was in the beginning of October last? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it that you first had information that you must come here? - A. I never knew any thing about it till yesterday morning.

Q. Have you not been in Newgate to the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Never? - A. No.

Q. Have you never seen her since she was confined in any place? - A. No.

Q. You were subpoenaed to come here? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a good while ago? - A. Yes, last October, I lived with Mrs. Jones, and I lived with her all the time she was sick; she died a week before Whitsuntide last.

Q. Therefore there was from October down to the present time, and you recollect all about buying the duplicates? - A. I remember the words very well, Mrs. Taylor asked if it was her own property; she said, that the person that sold the duplicates was in distress, her husband was pressed, she had three small children.

Q. Mrs. Jones is unfortunately dead? - A. She is.

Mr. Bolland. Q. You are very certain it was Mrs. Taylor that bought them? - A. Yes.

- Cox sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You know Mrs. Taylor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever work for her? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you look at a shirt that lies there - did she ever send you that shirt, and when, to mend? - A. Mrs. Upton did it, but it was done at my house; there was just a piece of calico run across the back.

Q. Look at the patch in the front of the shirt under the left shoulder, did Mrs. Upton, in your presence, put in that patch? - A. I cannot say to that; nothing but the sleeves and the bits on the shoulder were not felled on the inside; they are not new neck-bits, but old neck-bits.

Q. Did Mrs. Upton put in these old neck-bits? - A. They were in before; Mrs Upton put in new shoulder-straps and new wristbands, as near as I can guess, about six months ago; Mrs. Upton will be a better judge than me about the time.

- UPTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You know the last witness, Mrs. Cox? - A. Yes, she employed me to work for her.

Q. Look at the shoulder strap, do you remember working at that shirt? - A. Yes, I was ordered to put new neck-bits, but I did not; I put new shoulder-straps, collar, and wristbands.

Q. How long ago? - A. About six months ago.

Q. Now look at the patch under the left arm? - - A. There is no felling, and I did not fell it.

Q. Look at the patch - did you put in that patch on that shirt? - A. I did, I am positive of it.

Q. Was there any patch there before you put it on? - A. None.

Q. That you swear positively? - A. Yes, I should be sorry to speak any untruth; there was no patch there before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How lately had you been applied to to speak to this fact - have you seen the prisoner since she has been in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Where? - A. Not in Newgate; I saw her in this yard, in the underneath place.

Q. Then you talked about these things, did not you? - A. No.

Q. No conversation with the prisoner, nor any one else? - A. No.

Q. Never talked about the shirt to no one? - A. No, only I was asked by Mrs. Cox; she came to

my daughter when they were in Hog-lane, and asked me to go, but I was not examined.

Q. You were asked whether there was a patch under the left shoulder - you did not know before my learned friend put the question to you what you were come to prove? - A. No, I mended the shirt, and made the other about a week afterwards.

Q. You did not know that you were come to prove that there was a patch under the left shoulder - you did not expect to be asked any thing about that? - A.Nothing at all; I expected to be asked whether I knew the shirt, and this is positively the shirt that I mended for Mrs. Taylor.

Q. This is about six months ago? - A. Yes.

Q.And this is an old shirt - had you ever mended any other shirt for Mrs. Taylor? - A. Never; was an old shirt.

Q.Had it any other patch about it? - A. I had the same patches that it has now, all but that just under the left shoulder; I put new wristbands in these sleeves, and I was ordered to put in new neck-bits, I would not, I thought it was not necessary.

Q.Where do you live? - A. No. 8, George's-court; I live with my son and daughter, I have a trifle coming in, about eight shillings a month.

Q.What is your son? - A. He is a master jeweller, and keeps three apprentices.

Q. You say you have had no conversation with any body but with Mrs. Cox? - A. No.

Q.When you were first applied to to give evidence on behalf of the prisoner, you refused to come? - A. Yes, I refused to come; my son and daughter were not willing that I should come, they thought it was such a mean thing.

The prisoners called one witness, who gave them a good character.

Ann Taylor,

GUILTY , Death , aged 47.

Thomas Taylor, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-36

557. JOHN SCAPE , alias EDWIN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Marshall , privily from his person .

JOHN MARSHALL sworn. - Q. You are a surgeon ? - A. Yes, in High-street, Bloomsbury: On the 27th of July, I was walking down Chancery-lane, about six o'clock in the afternoon, I overtook the prisoner at the bar, in company with two other persons, near the middle of Chancery-lane, by Cursitor-street ; I passed him twenty steps, and I heard a cry of several persons, saying, Sir, you are robbed, there goes the thief. On looking back, I saw the prisoner at the bar, who had just passed walking from me, in a different direction to which I was then going; he was walking behind me, about three or four steps from me; I called out stop thief, and I called out again, and he rather mended his pace, and then ran away; I pursued him; he ran up Duke's-court into Cursitor-street, from thence into Castle-street; I got up to him about the middle of that street, he was stopped there by some person.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all? - A. I lost sight of him in Cursitor-street; I saw him the whole of Duke's-court and Chancery-lane.

Q. You pursued him into Cursitor-street and Castle-street, and he was stopped by a person there before you got up to him? - A. Yes, I lost sight of him in Cursitor-street, in consequence of the number of people that were running after him; immediately upon my coming up to him, there was some one gave me the handkerchief, and the prisoner immediately went down on his knees, and begged my pardon, and hoped I would forgive him, and he repeated it several times, in a very suppliant manner, that he hoped I would forgive him, as I had regained my property; I told him I could not think of doing that, in consequence of his robbing at that time of the day, at six o'clock in the afternoon; we took him into Norwich-court, leading into Fetter-lane, there he made a great attempt to get away, and afterwards he made another attempt.

Q. In your way to Hatton-garden from Fetter-lane, he made two attempts to get away? - A. He did, and in turning into Hatton-garden particularly he made an attempt to get away; I took him into Hatton-garden, and there I left him in custody of the Police officers, and the handkerchief I left in the custody of Stanton, one of the officers.

Q. You say there were three persons walking together, of whom the prisoner was one? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you happen to know at the time you saw the three persons that you had got the handkerchief in your pocket? - A. I have no doubt of it, I felt for it.

Q. Did you perceive any body at your pocket? - A. No.

Q. You were not aware of your loss till somebody called out? - A. I was wholly unconscious of it; they called out, there were several voices.

Q. What was become of the other two persons at that time? - A. I do not know; in consequence of my running after him I lost sight of them.

Q. In turning about after you were informed you were robbed, were the other two persons with him? - A. No, he was alone.

Q. Who was the person they pointed out when they called out you had been robbed, did they point to the prisoner? - A. Yes, they pointed to the prisoner at the bar as the person that robbed me.

Q. When they pointed him out to you the other two persons were not with him, were they? - A. No, they were not then.

Q. Then you do not know which of the three persons it might be that took the handkerchief from your pocket? - A. No.

Q. You only know that the prisoner is the man by the persons that apprized you of it that he was

the thief? - A. Yes, I recollected the moment that I looked back, that it was the man that I had just passed, in company with two others.

Prisoner. Q. I ask him, whether he saw me take the handkerchief out of his pocket, or whether he found it on me? - A. The moment he was stopped in Castle-street, he threw the handkerchief away; here is a gentleman who saw him do it.

JOHN DARLEY sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I live with my father, No. 31, Castle-street, Holborn; on the 27th of July, about six o'clock in the afternoon, as I was looking out of the front room of my father's house, I heard a cry of stop thief, and on my looking out of the window, I saw the prisoner running up the street closely pursued; when he arrived at the house No. 4, nearly opposite to ours, he threw a handkerchief over the rails that covered the kitchen windows of the house; I think he took it from his bosom, or a side-pocket, I cannot tell which; I came out into the street and saw him collared by a great many persons who were round about him, I saw him go on his knees, and heard him ask Mr. Marshall to forgive him, as he had got his property.

Q. Did you see any body pick up the handkerchief? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you look to the rails to see whether the handkerchief was there? - A. I saw it in his hand when he threw it away, Mr. Marshall's handkerchief is a red and yellow handkerchief; I went to Hatton-garden Office with Mr. Marshall when he was in custody, we walked behind him, and sometimes before him; I saw him make a desperate attempt to get free, and there appeared to be some companions of his in Holborn, who endeavoured to rescue him; the prisoner hung back and made the people lift him and carry him a little way, at last he walked after they pushed him along.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. - I produce the handkerchief: on the evening of the 27th of July I was standing at Hatton-garden Office, a lad came into the Office and said there was an Officer wanted, a gentleman had got a thief and he was endeavouring to get away; I went down to the gentleman; I begged him to let him go, I said, he will go with me, I know, and the handkerchief was given to me; he solicited Mr. Marshall to let him go; Mr. Marshall said it was such a daring thing he could not think of doing it.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Is that handkerchief your's? - A. It is my handkerchief, there are my initials upon it, I. M. and this is the handkerchief that was returned to me in Castle-street.

Q. What is the value of the handkerchief? - A. It cost me seven shillings about three or four months ago.

Q. What is the worth of it now? - A. I suppose four shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I was drinking in a public-house in Sweet's-alley, on the day this affair happened; I was very much intoxicated, and when I was coming down Chancery-lane, there was no one with me but a young woman whom I met coming out of the public-house, and when I was coming down Chancery-lane I heard a singing out stop thief, and several persons ran before I ran, to the amount of twenty or more; on my running down Cursitor-street, I stumbled, and the handkerchief was six doors a-head from where I fell down, and when I got up again, Mr. Marshall swore that I was the person that picked his pocket; I know no more of the handkerchief than any gentleman in Court knows.

GUILTY , Death , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-37

558. JAMES EELLES was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050918-38

559. EDWARD ROBBERTS , alias SQUIRES , and JOHN-RICHMOND ORANGE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Bell , a silver watch, value 40 s. a tobacco box, value 6 d. six shillings, and fourteen one-pound notes , the property of Richard Dix .

RICHARD DIX sworn. - I am a journeyman baker , out of place, I was at Joseph Bell 's, the Unicorn, at Hoxton , when I lost my property, on the 30th of August; I cannot say the time of the day, I was in liquor, the property was in my pocket before; I lost it on that day, I had fourteen pounds in one-pound notes, a tobacco box, some odd silver, and a silver watch; I had seen them that morning.

Q. When did you miss them? - A. I did not miss them; I had been to sleep in the tap-room, at the Unicorn, at Hoxton, about eight or nine o'clock, I went in there.

Q. Were you sober enough to recollect the time that you awoke? - A. No.

Q. Was it in the middle of the night? - A. No, it was about eleven o'clock when I awoke, as nigh as I can recollect.

Q. Did you find any of your property then? - A. No, it was all gone.

Q. Before you went to sleep, had you seen either of the prisoners at any part of the day? - A Yes, I had seen Edward Roberts , he was a journeyman baker out of place; he had been drinking with me.

Q. Was he as much in liquor as you were? - A. He might, I cannot say; he was in the room when I went to sleep.

Q. What do you know of the other prisoner, Orange? - A. We all went into the tap-room together, he was a stranger to me; we had all been drinking together before at the Ivy-house.

Q. When you missed these things at eleven at night, were your two companions in the taproom when you awoke? - A. Edward Roberts was.

Q. Did you ever find any of your property? - A. Ten pounds in one-pound notes were found on the floor in the tap-room; when I awoke, they asked me for my reckoning; I felt for my money, I found I had got none; I fell in a great passion, seeing I had lost my money; they said, search every man in the room; they searched two; after that, in the course of time, they found some property down on the floor.

Q. Was any of your property found on them? - A. No, every one was searched.

Q. How soon did you find out any thing against either of the prisoners? - A. I know nothing against either of the prisoners; my watch I never saw again.

BARNARD PYE sworn. - I am a shoe-maker.

Q. Were you at the Unicorn, at Hoxton, the night when Dix was there? - A. Yes, I saw the two prisoners there; I was accidentally in their company, I know neither of them.

Q. At the time this supposed theft was committed, were they sitting on each side of the prosecutor? - Yes, and the prosecutor fell asleep; I first met with them at the Ivy-house, I called in there for a pint of beer, and they wanted me to make up the side; I agreed to make one of them; after eight o'clock, they said they would go to Mr. Bell's, the Unicorn, and have a pot of beer; going along Ivy-lane to the Unicorn, the two prisoners conversed together, one of them asked the other if he (Dix) had any property about him; I do not know what answer was made to that question; Roberts said, another pint of beer will do him fast asleep; Orange said, beer is of no use, let us give him brandy; then we went into the Unicorn, a pot of beer was ordered, and one of the prisoners, I believe it was Roberts, ordered brandy, and the prosecutor drank a glass of brandy; we had one glass of brandy all round; he ordered the prosecutor to have another.

Q. Which of them ordered it? - A. I cannot speak to one or the other, I believe both the prisoners ordered him another; I interfered, and said I thought he had enough, and the prosecutor refused; after that he fell asleep, and they sat then one on each side of him, and sometime after that they got away from him, and sat at different parts, but previous to the reckoning being called, the prisoner Orange was gone; this man went to put his hand into his pocket, and it was turned inside out; he got up in a very great passion, he stormed about his property, and the people in the room laughed at him; I told the landlord I thought he had a watch, I told the landlord to fasten the door, and we would all stand search; the prisoner Roberts began to strip himself in the box, he took his coat, waistcoat, and neck handkerchief, off in the box; the landlord told him to come out into the middle of the room, and said, I should like to see what paper that was you put behind you; I loosed Roberts's neck of his shirt, and a person sitting there said, let us look where he was standing; we looked there, and found ten one-pound notes.

ANDREW GOVEY sworn. - I was at the Unicorn when they all came in, I was in another room; I went into the tap-room between nine and ten o'clock, I was standing with my back towards the fire-place, and my face towards the prisoners; I saw the prisoner Roberts put his hand into the prosecutor's right-hand breeches pocket, the prosecutor was fast asleep; the prisoner Orange sat at the left, I saw his hand under his jacket, as though he was rifling his other pocket; I was fully convinced that Roberts was taking his things out of his pocket, though I did not say any thing about it; I concluded it might be a joke, I went out of the room.

JOSEPH BELL sworn. - Q. You keep the Unicorn public-house? - A. Yes, Dix and the prisoners came into my house about six o'clock in the evening; the first thing they called for was a glass of brandy, they insisted upon the prosecutor having two glasses of brandy; I refused it, seeing him a little intoxicated; they insisted upon his having it, saying, he had a pain in his bowels; he drank two glasses, and I saw no more of him, he went fast asleep. About eleven o'clock I shut up my shutters, and persuading this man to pay his reckoning, he felt in his pocket, and he had got no money; he was in a very great rage; this gentleman said he was confident he was robbed; he said, Mr. Bell, bolt the door, and we will all stand search.

Q. At that time were these two prisoners in the room, or only one? - A. Only one, Orange was gone; as soon as the word search was spoken, I perceived something in the prisoner Roberts's hand, he tried to conceal it in his neck handkerchief; I saw something in his hand apparently to me fine paper, and while I was searching the one, he stripped in the box.

Q. Where was he at the time you saw him with the paper in his hand? - A. In the box, putting his hand behind him.

Q. There were others sitting in the box with him? - A. Yes, they came out of the box to be searched, and when I was searching one, he was stripping himself in the box; I wished to search him the next, I told him to come out of the box, and I would search him.

Q. Did you find any thing on him? - A. No.

Q.Did you see any thing picked up? - A. Yes. they were delivered to me; a gentleman in the room picked them up.

Mr. Alley. Q. I think you said Orange was gone away? - A. Yes.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. - I am an officer.

produce the notes, Mr. Bell gave them me; Orange surrendered himself at the Office the next morning.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Are there any marks by which you know these notes? - A. I know them by keeping them by me, and looking at them; there is a particular old note, with red at the back of it; I am sure I had such a one; the notes were all wrapped up in paper, and were in my right-hand pocket, and so was my money; I had nothing in my left-hand pocket, my watch was in my right-hand fob.

Roberts. (To Bell.) Q. Landlord, was any part of the reckoning paid before this search? - A. Yes, Orange paid a shilling, his share, and went away.

Roberts did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Orange left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Roberts, GUILTY, aged 27

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Orange, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-39

560. SARAH PAPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , three silver spoons, value 20 s. and a knife and fork, value 5 s. the property of David Windsor .

DAVID WINDSOR sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , I live in the Minories.

Q. Was this woman a servant of your's? - A. Yes, she had lived with me upwards of three years: On the 23d of August, I had reason to suppose she had robbed me; I sent for a constable, who searched her, and found several duplicates on her.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY sworn. - I am a constable, I searched the prisoner; in her right-hand pocket I found four duplicates, which led to the discovery of the property.

JONATHAN BAKER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in Brick-lane, Whitechapel: On the 13th of August, I took in one tea-spoon for two shillings; I have not the least knowledge of the prisoner.

THOMAS LAMBLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burne, pawnbroker, East-Smithfield; I produce a carving-knife and fork, pledged by the prisoner, on the 10th of July, for five shillings, and two table-spoons.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do, she is the same woman.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-40

561. WILLIAM GALE and JAMES KEENAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , two Bank-notes, value 6 l. the property of William Hennesey .

(The Case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM HENNESEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have been, I believe, a servant - on the 19th of July did you go to the Repository for the purpose of buying a horse? - A. I did; I had put two ten-pound Bank-notes in my pocket, and some small notes.

Q. Did you, in the yard at the Repository in Barbican, meet the prisoner Keenan? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known him before? - A. I had some knowledge of his person, but I was not acquainted with him; he was a groom to a gentleman; he addressed himself to me, asking me how I did.

Q. Did he invite you into a public-house to drink? - A. Yes, and I went with him, and while we were drinking in the public-house, Gale, the other prisoner, came in; he asked us whether we would toss for a pot of porter; I declined; I said, I did not come in for the purpose of tossing, what I called for I would wish to pay for, and not to toss.

Q. Did you see a person in the public-house of the name of Tims? - A. He came in as a companion of Keenan's, towards the first he stood at the door; Tims wished me to toss with Gale.

Q. Were you at last induced to toss up? - A. Yes, at last; upon which I won the first toss of Gale; Tims took a halfpenny of mine, and said he would toss; he hid a halfpenny of mine under my hat; upon which Gale won three times running; I desired Gale to call, and three times running he called right.

Q. In the course of this conversation did Gale say who and what he was? - A. After that toss was decided, Gale said he was a respectable farmer's son, and that we were a parcel of shabby stable grooms and coachmen; he said his aunt had left him fifteen hundred pounds, he was able to spend a great deal of money, and he wanted to toss for more, and we declined.

Q. Did he afterwards leave this house? - A. Yes; he said he was going to the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, in order to take a place in the coach to go to Salisbury, where his father lived, and kept a farm.

Q. Did you, Keenan, and Tims, go with him to the Saracen's Head? - A. We did, it was in my way home, and Tims said if I would go with him to the Saracen's Head, he would win back what I had lost, which was two pounds thirteen shillings.

Q. Did you all go together to the Saracen's Head? - A. We did; Keenan procured a room; Gale went into the book-keeper's office, under pretence of taking his place to go to Salisbury; after

that we all went into a back room, and Gale and Keenan wished to play at cards for some money; Gale asked me if I would play with him; Keenan called for a bottle of wine, and got me to toss up a halfpenny for him with Gale who should pay for the pack of cards; Gale lost, and he sent Tims for the cards.

Q. Did Tims return with a pack of cards? - A. He did, and we all four set down to play; they proposed to play for a bottle of wine; Keenan was my partner against Gale and Tims; Keenan won the first odd trick, the next was Gale's deal; he gave me a very good hand indeed. I said, I never held so good a hand with such good cards as I played with; Gale said he would bet me ten or twenty pounds that he would win the odd trick; I declined the wager; Keenan urged me to bet him, he d - d my eyes, and said why would not I bet him. I then consented to bet him for ten pounds; I pulled out the two ten-pound notes I had in my pocket before them, to put down ten pounds; then Gale said he would make it twenty. Keenan urged me, he said he would see it all right; I then consented to bet twenty pounds, and put down the two ten-pounds notes.

Q. Did Gale pull out any notes? - A. He pulled out a parcel of paper like silver paper; I said, will you be so good as to let me see your notes; Keenan said they were very good, and he would see that they were all good and right.

Q. Did he open them for you to see what they were? - A. He did not; he took them, and put them under a pot, and said he would take care of them; then we played a hand.

Q. How many tricks did you get? - A. Six, and the other got six.

Q. Who won the odd trick? - A. I laid down the king of spades, to which Gale said, that is mine; I had four honours in my hand, and two trumps, I had played them all out; I won the odd trick with the ace of spades, and he played his king.

Q. You laid down your queen however? - A. Yes; upon which Gale said, that is mine; I said, it cannot be your's; he made a grasp for the money.

Q. Did he play his card first? - A. Yes, he threw it on the table, I do not know what it was.

Court. Q. You played the ace of spades, the king, and two trumps besides? - A. Yes.

Q. Then Gale threw down his card, and laid hold of the money? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you attempt to pursue him? - A. Yes, but Keenan caught hold of me by the coat, and kept me back; in the mean time Gale got away; Keenan got before me, and Tims behind me, and stopped me some minutes; then I got out into the street to pursue Gale; I could not see him any where.

Q. Did you then detain Keenan or Tims? - A. No; I told them I thought they were a parcel of rascals, and had an intention in colleague to rob me; Tims said, oh, no, he would do no such a thing, he was a man that had plenty of money; the next evening I had Gale apprehended at the Coach and Horses, Dover-street, and the following Tuesday Keenan was taken.

Q. Tims you have never taken? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you have been a servant in place as a valet? - A. Yes.

Q. Have been, perhaps means some years ago; let us know how long ago it is since you have been in place? - A. I have been in place about five months ago with Surgeon Gore , till he went abroad with Lord Cornwallis; I lived with him six months.

Q. Who had you lived with before? - A. The Earl of Dover.

Q. And you have been five months out of place - what have you been doing with yourself? - A. I was extremely ill great part of the time, not able to take a situation.

Q. You know what revoking is? - A. I do.

Q. How do you know there was no revoke during the game? - A. That I cannot say.

Q. How do you know but there might be a revoke, and that the last card that Gale played was a trump? - A. I cannot say whether it was or not.

Q. If it had been a trump, would not Gale have won the trick, and would have been entitled to the money? - A. Yes, but to the best of my recollection it was not a trump, but I will not venture to swear it was not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was there any talk about playing any other game? - A No, there was not.

Q. When they won the money they went away - you thought you beat them? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a creditable house, the Saracen's Head - did you make any complaint to the men of the house; did you tell any body at that time that you were cheated, after it was over? - A. No, I did not, I thought they could not redress me.

Q. How long after this was it that you saw Keenan again? - A. The next Sunday after that; I told him that I had taken Gale, and I would take him.

Q. Did not he tell you where his master's lodgings were? - A. He did; I went to his master's house, and found him there.

Q. Did not you tell him all you wanted was the twenty pounds that you were cheated of? - A. I did not.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, whether you did not tell him that you only wanted to get the twenty pounds, out of which you were cheated? - A. The man's friends came to me, and asked me to take the money; I told them I could not with propriety, if I could I would, but I found I must not take it.

Q. Whether you have not gone to any Gentleman, and told him, if he would give you twenty pounds, you would cause the bill to be thrown out by the Grand Jury; I am speaking of Mr. Gillman, a gentleman, in the City? - A. The man's wife came to me several times crying; I took compassion on her; I did go to Mr. Gillman, and the reason of my going was on account of her lamenting so much; Keenan's wife wished me very much to see Mr. Gillman, to see if any thing could be done to make it up; Mr. Gillman told me that Mr. Murphy had stated to him, that if a little sum would do, he would come forward; I told him I would not take five hundred pounds of him without consulting my attorney.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, did not you go to Mr. Gillman's, and say to this effect, that you would procure the bill to be thrown out, provided he would give you fifty pounds? - A. No.

Q. Nor nothing to that effect? - A. I did not know that I could do any such thing.

Q. How often had you been to Mr. Gillman's? - A. Twice.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, man, the first time you went to Mr. Gillman's, did not Mr Gillman say he would not give you one single farthing? - A. Mr. Gillman said he would not give me above thirteen or fourteen pounds; I went by the desire of his wife, seeing her distress; I told her I would not spare my own trouble, I did not want to do any more than the law obliged me to do, and what the law obliged me to do I would do.

Court. Q. How came not you to apply to the landlord at the Saracen's Head - why did not you call out when they stopped you, it is a creditable house? - A. I ought to have done it, but I was too much confused; I went out into the street, I wished to find Gale again.

Q. Why did not you keep the other two - did you know any thing of Gale? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever complain to the landlord of the Saracen's Head? - A. Keenan wished me not to make a noise.

Q. I should have thought that was the very reason that you should have made a noise.

MICHAEL- ARTHUR GILLMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a merchant living in Broad-street.

Q. Do you recollect the last witness calling at your house? - A. Yes, he called more than twice; when he called, he said he came to get the matter made up; he said he had lost twenty-two pounds, and if he could receive his money, he would get the bill thrown out.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, are you sure those were the words that he said? - A. Yes; he said then he would not appear before the Grand Jury, or some expression to that purport; I am sure he called three times, if not four.

Q. Have you known Keenan formerly? - A. Yes, he lived with a friend of mine, he bore the best of characters.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you any correspondence with Mr. Murphy? - A. I had not; he wrote to me, but I did not answer; he is a gentleman of considerable property; Mr. Murphy had given me a commission to pay some money, in case that Keenan was not brought to trial; I told the prosecutor so.

Court. Q. Did he tell you, that if you would procure him twenty-two pounds, he would get the bill thrown out? - A. He did, and to pay the forfeit of forty pounds.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Gale, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Keenan, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-41

562. HOLLAND READY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , six ounces weight of silver, value 30 s , the property of George Smith .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

GEORGE SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 16, Hosier-lane ; I am a silver spoon-maker , the prisoner was my journeyman : On the 10th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my cellar moving some lumber; there I found some silver under a brick; I marked it, and left it there. On the Tuesday evening following I saw him go to the place where the silver was deposited, and take it and put it into his pocket; I saw him go out of the house with it; I and William Edwards followed him, and stopped him in Hosier-lane; we brought him back; I told him I was convinced that he had robbed me, as I saw him in the cellar; he put his hand to the fob of his breeches, and pulled out three pieces of silver, and one of them was the piece that was concealed in the cellar.

Q. What did he say? - A. He said, what must be must.

Q. On Tuesday had you weighed the silver to give out to the man to work? - A. I had, and in the evening there were three ounces two penny-weights missing.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn. - Q. You were in company with the prosecutor at the time the prisoner was brought back to his house? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard what he said, was it true? - A. Yes. (The silver produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I hope for mercy of your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury; I was never guilty of any crime before.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-42

563. WILLIAM CUBITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a gold box, value 10 l. the property of the Right Honourable William Earl of Mansfield , in his dwelling house .

COUNTESS OF MANSFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did your Ladyship receive from the Earl of Mansfield, at any time, a snuffbox? - A. I did.

Q. Of what description? - A. A gold box, with blue enamelled border, set with diamonds, very richly worked, with a picture of the Emperor Joseph on the lid.

Q. Where did your Ladyship deposit that snuffbox? - A. I kept it in the cabinet in the organ-room, in Lord Mansfield's house in Portland-place .

Q. What parish is that in? - A. In the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

Q. How late does your Ladyship recollect having seen that snuff-box? - A. I recollect having looked at it in the spring, but at what time I do not know.

Q. Did your Ladyship remove it into the country subsequent to that time, or where was it when you last saw it? - A. I think it was in that cabinet; I have not looked at it a good while; it was in the cabinet when last I saw it.

Q. When did you leave town to go to Caen Wood for the summer? - A. On the sixth of June.

Q. How late before that was it when you saw it? - A. I believe about the latter end of May.

Q. In what situation was the prisoner in your Ladyship's house? - A.Chiefly in my service as groom of the chamber .

Q. When did he leave your service? - A. I cannot positively say the day he was discharged; he was discharged between the 26th and the 31st of July; I discharged him by Lord Mansfield's direction's who was then at Ramsgate.

Q. When the prisoner was in your service, was he entrusted in your apartment? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he then an opportunity of knowing where the snuff-box was deposited? - A. Of course his employment let him know where this box was kept; I believe he knew it as well as I did; he was often with me in that room, and any thing that I wanted I got him to hand it me.

Q. When had your Ladyship first occasion to know that that box was missing? - A. Not till I received the Magistrate's letter.

Q. Where was your Ladyship at that time? - A. I was at Caen Wood.

Q. Upon your Ladyship's return to town did you look in the place where the box was kept? - A. I did not, having seen the parts of the box in this broken state since I returned to town.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How long has the prisoner been in your service? - A. Six years.

Q. And I think your Ladyship has said he was entirely entrusted by you? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Your Ladyship has not looked in the cabinet, having seen part of the box? - A. I have not.

JOSEPH DOBREE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live in Oxford-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar and tell me whether, at any time, you saw him at your shop? - A. Yes, on the 15th of August last the prisoner came to my shop.

Q. For what purpose? - A. To purchase a gold chain.

Q. Did you produce him any chain? - A. Yes, the man in the shop shewed him a chain; I was not there when he first shewed him the chain.

Q. When you came in had the prisoner at the bar come into your shop about any thing? - A. Yes, he was in my shop looking at a chain.

Q. Did you agree with him about the price of the chain? - A. Yes, when we agreed for the price, he asked me if it was customary to take old gold in exchange for new articles; I told him it was; upon which he pulled out some bits of gold, which I have now in my hand.

Q. When he gave it to you did you make any observation about it? - A. I immediately suspected him; the pieces of gold were apparently fragments of a snuff-box of curious workmanship; I sent for our journeyman to come out, and I conversed with him aside.

Q. When the journeyman came out did you speak to the prisoner? - A. I asked the prisoner, how he came by the gold; he told me he had it from a servant; I told him that it was no servant's property; he said it was, upon which I told him I thought he had stole it.

Q. Where was the gold lying at the time of this conversation? - A. On the counter; I told him he should not go away until he had given me an account of it.

Q. And when you had told him the whole of the story he seemed to try to collect it in his hands? - A. I went to fetch my hat to go with him to Marlborough-street.

Q. Did you tell him that you were going to take him to Marlborough-street? - A. I did.

Q. When you went for your hat, what became of him? - A. I observed him make a snatch at the gold on my returning with my hat.

Q. Did he succeed in getting any? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any remain behind? - A. Yes, he took a part, and left the remaining part behind.

Q. What became of the chain? - A. We lost that.

Q. You never saw the chain any more? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner stay or go away? - A. He made a snatch at the box, and immediately ran out at the door.

Q. When you stated the box you meant the pieces of gold that are there? - A. Yes; I pursued him; he had gone about fifty or sixty yards before I overtook him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all? - A. I believe I did.

Q. Have you the least doubt that the prisoner is the man? - A. None in the least.

Q. I believe he was afterwards taken to Marlborough-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when he was searched? - A. No; when I overtook him, I immediately collared him, he said, do not collar me, for I am no thief; I told him he had given me every reason to suppose to the contrary, and he must go with me to Marlborough-street, and I took him; I attended the search-warrant.

Q. When you were at Marlborough-street did you learn from the prisoner where his lodgings were? - A. Yes, I think it was No. 21, Bolsover-street.

Q. What apartment in that house did you search? - A. The garret.

Q. And underneath the grate in his apartment? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you search any chest of drawers there? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find? - A. A part of the box, a piece of gold and some diamonds.

Q. How many diamonds? - A. Twelve and a miniature picture was found in the ashes, and in the chest was found twelve diamonds and a piece of gold.

Q. Did you search under the grate? - A. I did, and found part of a miniature picture; they are in the possession of the officer.

Q. What time of the day was it when he came to your house? - A. It was about six o'clock in the afternoon when he came to my house.

JOHN FOY sworn. - Examined by Mr. - . I am an officer of Marlborough-street.

Q. In consequence of having learned where the prisoner lodged, did you search his lodgings? - A. Yes, on the 16th, the next day, in the morning, and in a drawer in his room we found some pieces of gold, and under the grate I found a miniature picture; it was in the ashes; it had been burnt, and part of it burnt away; I found in his pocket, when he was searched, a piece of gold, at the Office.

Q. Where did you find the glass? - A. I found the glass likewise in the drawer which belonged to the miniature picture; the diamonds were found in the drawer by Lovett; I saw him find them.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a Police officer of Marlborough-street.

Q. You searched the garret? - A. I searched the prisoner's room; I found this case in a drawer; in this case are some trinkets and twelve diamonds.

CATHERINE LUFFMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. - . Q. You are, I believe, in the service of the Earl of Mansfield? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know when the prisoner quitted the service of the Earl of Mansfield? - A. On the 29th of July.

Q. When did he come, after that, to the Earl of Mansfield's house in town? - A. To the best of my recollection on the 2d of August, to the Earl of Mansfield's house in Portland-place.

Q. For what purpose did he come? - A. He came for his cloaths.

Q. Who let him in? - A. I let him in.

Q. Having let him in, what became of him? - A. In the first place he took off his shoes, and then went up stairs.

Q. Had you ever, upon any former occasion, seen him take off his shoes? - A. I do not recollect I ever did.

Q. Did you make any observation to him? - A. He looked very warm when he came up the stone steps, I told him I thought it was not necessary for him to take his shoes off; he said he did not know how how we stood, meaning whether it was clean or not; when he came in, I went and sat in the little library-room.

Q. How is the room called the little library situated with respect to the organ-room? - A. The organ-room is not quite over it; it stands in a circular room over it.

Q. You say it is not quite over it - is it so situated that a person moving in the organ-room might be heard? - A. If they had their shoes on, but not if they had their shoes off.

Q. Did the prisoner desire you to get any thing for him? - A. Yes, two mugs, his own property.

Q. Where did he say these things were? - A. He said in his closet, at the bottom of the house in my own care.

Q. Did you fetch them? - A. I went and fetched them myself.

Q. How long did the prisoner remain up stairs? - A. Ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; he brought down two or three bundles of portmanteaus and other things, which he said were his own cloaths.

Q. In the organ-room there was no organ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you open it? - A. No.

Q. Whether the cabinet-lock and the organ-lock are alike - whether one key unlocks both, have you seen it tried? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you happen to know at the time that the prisoner came to the house, whether the key was in the organ? - A. I cannot positively speak to that, it was generally left in the organ.

Q. Had you taken it out? - A. I do not know that I had.

Q. Have you upon any subsequent occasion looked in the cabinet for this box? - A. Yes.

Q. When? - A. On the 29th of July.

Q. How came you to look for this box? -

Mr. Alley. Q. Recollect yourself, you are speaking to dates? - A. On the 19th of August I examined the cabinet for the box by Lady Mansfield's orders.

Q. Did you find the box there? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. These clothes were up stairs at the top of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. You say he pulled his shoes off before he went up - you did not go with him? - A. No.

Q. When you searched the cabinet, what key did you make use of? - A. The key that I always make use of.

Q. That is the cabinet-key? - A. Yes.

Q. As to the organ-key, you do not know where it was at that time? - A. No.

Q. You did not find the cabinet at all injured? - A. Not in the least.

Q. Had you ever tried the key of the organ before this day? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. Have you tried it since? - A. Yes.

EARL MANSFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What is your Lordship's Christian name? - A. William.

Q. Will your Lordship have the goodness to look at all these things now produced - are you certain that they belonged to and that they were part of a box that was in your possession when your Lordship went into the country? - A. Yes, it is part of a gold box I then had.

Q. There are some brilliants, will your Lordship look at them? - A. I had some of a similar sort that encircled the box I lost, and it had such a case as that which is found, and I know the miniature.

Q. In whose immediate custody was this, in Lady Mansfield's or your's? - A. In Lady Mansfield's.

Q. Had the box been in your family any length of time? - A. The box came from the Emperor of Austria, Joseph the Second, to my father, on his leaving Vienna.

Q.What is the value you set upon that box? - A. I should imagine, I cannot speak with accuracy, two hundred guineas, the value of the box and the brilliants.

Q. You have no doubt of its being worth ten pounds? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Just shew me one or two pieces of the box that you speak to? - A. I speak to the chasing; the form of the box and the rim of this box are different from any other box I ever saw; on the miniature there is the lower part of the face to be seen, and the breast, with the Austrian orders.

Mr. Alley. (To Lady Mansfield.) Q. Has your Ladyship seen part of the box since you have come to town? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the result of that observation? - A. That they are part of the box.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 31.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050918-43

564. MARY LORD , jun. and MARY LORD , sen. were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , twenty-seven pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Henry Smith , fixed to his dwelling-house ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

HENRY SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 31, Princes-street, Westminster : On the 5th of August I let to Mary Lord the elder my back garret; in the morning before she came in, I went on the roof through a trap-door to put a bit of glass on the sky-light that lighted the stair-case, as it was broke; I then perceived my lead was dirty with the mortar, and I swept it clean; my lead was then all safe; they came in on the 5th, and on the 19th of the same month they quitted my room. After they had taken all their things out of the room, they left me the key; when I went into the room, I found it all a flood with water; I got out of the trap-door, and found my lead gone that was round the chimney by the gutter.

Q. Did the young woman lodge with the old one? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any character with them? - A. Yes; my wife went after their character, they gave them a good character; my wife went to them after they were gone, and asked them how they could give them such a good character; they said they gave it them to get rid of them.

- ELDRIDGE sworn. - I am a painter; I saw the youngest of the prisoners giving the lead to Mary Lord the elder on or near the 16th of last month.

Q. Where did she give it from? - A. In at the trap-door which leads into the room, and the mother put it into a canvas bag, and took it out, and returned without it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say Mary Lord the younger put this lead through the trap-door, you do not know what became of it - where were you when this was done? - A. I was in the room with them.

Q. You visited the two prisoners at the bar often at times, and you visited them often enough to keep the young woman company? - A. That was her fault, it was not mine.

Q. You were received into the family as a visitor,

and as a person they put confidence in - pray how often used you to be there in a week? - A. Sometimes not at all.

Q. Sometimes how often? - A. Sometimes twice a week.

Q. Sometimes more - do you mean to swear that you were never left in the room when neither of them were there? - A. I do.

Q.When was it that you first took upon you to charge them with stealing this lead? - A. When they were taken into custody.

Q. You were not taken into custody, were you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were taken into custody on suspicion of stealing the lead - have you come here in custody? - A. I do not know.

Q. I am sure, if you do not know, I do not know; you have good luck if you do not - As you say you do not know, I will tell you: when you were taken into custody for stealing the lead, then you accused that young woman of stealing the lead? - A. I did not accuse her.

Q. You told the same story then as you have done now? - A. I told the truth then.

Q. And not till then, you said she was the person that stole the lead? - A. I said she was the person that gave the lead in at the trap-door.

Q. How far is this to climb up? - A. It is not above this height from the floor (about four or five feet,) it is a slanting gutter.

Q. Pray how long after the lead was lost was it before you accused this young woman of stealing it? - A. About a week.

Q. By your own account you are a good honest lad - How long had you been in custody before you told this? - A. Not an hour in custody.

Q. Did not you charge that young woman, to clear yourself? - A. By no means.

Q. You had no hope of that kind? - A. I was not guilty.

Q. No man is guilty by his own account - You did not charge her at all, to discharge yourself? - A. Not at all.

Q. Upon your oath did not you charge her in hopes of clearing yourself? - A. I did, because I knew myself innocent.

Q. You did it then in hopes of clearing yourself? - A. I did.

Mr. Gurney. That is enough to answer my purpose.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am the son of Henry Smith ; I saw the lead safe when they came into the room; I went up to the room, and took the dirt from my father when he had swept it, and on the 19th I saw it was gone; I saw the young man, as he was standing with them, at the corner of Berkley-square, I challenged him with it; he said he knew it, they were taken to the watch-house after they had been to my father's house first.

Q. Did you ever find your lead? - A. No; Mary Lord the elder went down to the place where she said she sold it, but we could not find any thing of it.

Q. What quantity of lead was it? - A. They owned to twenty-seven pounds, and that they sold it for six shillings.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-44

565. GEORGE COOPER , alias THOMAS COBBY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a copper, value 20 s. the property of William Webb , fixed to his dwelling-house .

It appearing in evidence the house was under repair, and the prosecutor was answerable for the property, but at the time of the robbery it never having been his dwelling-house, and the indictment not stating it to be fixed to a certain building, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-45

566. DANIEL BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a petticoat, value 4 s. the property of George Slater .

JANE SLATER sworn. - I am the wife of George Slater , my husband is a book-binder ; he lives in Leicester-street ; I can only speak to the property.

SUSANNAH QUENBY sworn. - I took in the petticoat myself from the line up at the two pair of stairs window; it hung there on a pole which is for the accommodation of the lodgers; I placed it on the bannisters; I saw the prisoner go up stairs, I thought he was a strange man, and being a washing I watched him; I saw him take the petticoat from off the bannisters; I was afraid to stop him at my own apartment, there being no one with me, for fear he should knock me down.

Q. Did he come down stairs with it? - A. Yes; I followed him into the passage; I asked him who he wanted, and passed him, and shut the door to, and shut him in the passage; I then returned, and asked him again who he wanted; he told me he wanted Mrs. O'Hara.

Q. Was there any Mrs. O'Hara in the house? - A. There was such a person, but I did not know her name, she had been in the house a fortnight; I told him he had property about him that did not belong to him; I put my hand to his breast, and took the petticoat from under his coat; he bid me not be foolish, and let him go; I told him I would not be foolish, and let the petticoat go; he was secured, and I delivered the petticoat to Mr. Gregory.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a single

woman, are you? - A. No, I am a married woman, my husband's name is Robert Quenby .

Q. The poor man came into the house, and said he wanted Mrs. O'Hara? - A. He did not say so till after he had stole the petticoat.

Q. Did he not say that his wife slept in the house with Mrs. O'Hara - she had left him, he thought it was her's, and he took the petticoat to punish her? - A. He said so at Marlborough-street.

Court. Q. Was the petticoat wet? - A. It was a little.

- GREGORY sworn. - I am a constable, I was sent for to take him into custody; I took the petticoat, and I searched him; I found three duplicates on him, one a pledge for a watch; I asked him how he came to take the petticoat; he said, he meant no harm, he should have delivered it to the landlady; I took him to Marlborough-street, I went to the different shops where the duplicates mentioned, they told me he dealt in watches, and pledged many things.

Prisoner's defence. On the 7th of August, when I came home from my work, my wife and I had some words; my wife went out, and I staid at home; the next morning I got up, the children told me their mother was gone to Mrs. O'Hara's; I went to No. 3, Leicester-street, to desire the mother to come home; I had sent my little boy before there, he not returning I was afraid he had lost himself; I went up stairs to Mrs. O'Hara's room, nobody answered me; coming down stairs I took the petticoat, I thought it was my wife's or Mrs. O'Hara's; when the gentlewoman followed me down stairs, she said, young man, you have got my petticoat; I said, is it your's, then take it; she said, stop there a minute; she went out, and brought an officer; I stopped till she came back with him.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-46

567. DENNIS DILLON was indicted for the wilful murder of Patrick alias Michael Lennard .

JAMES HUGHES sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a journeyman tailor.

Q. What was the deceased? - A. A journeyman tailor , and the prisoner at the bar is a journeyman tailor ; the prisoner and the deceased were shop-mates.

Q. On Sunday last was there a battle between them? - A. Yes, they fought with their fists behind the Jew's Harp-house for an hour and forty-three minutes, by the account that the time-keeper gave.

Q. Before they began fighting there was conversation, was there not? - A. Yes, there was.

Q. Did the deceased offer to make it up, or any thing of that sort? - A. There were some of the party that wished them to make it up, and the deceased said he was willing to fight, or to make it up; Mr. Dillon said, he was challenged to fight for half-a-guinea, and he would fight it out.

Q. Which of them gave in? - A. The deceased gave in; he never spoke a word after the last round, he fell down, I was not near enough to tell whether his fall was occasioned by a blow.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The last blow the deceased fell uppermost? - A. Some of them that were near said so; I cannot say which were uppermost.

MICHAEL HALEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you see the fighting? - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the deceased fall the last time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner or the deceased fall uppermost? - A. They both fell alongside each other the last round; the deceased fell on his head, the ground was very wet, I could not perceive any blow that was the occasion of his falling.

Q. And he fell upon his head? - A. He did so.

- sworn. - I am a surgeon, I examined the body very minutely; I found no appearance of injury upon any part of his body whatever to which I could attribute his death, I opened the head, the abdomen, and the chest.

Q. Did you open the thorax? - A. No: there was no extravasated blood as I could perceive.

Q. Might it come from exertion or agitation of the mind? - A. It might; most probably the fall was the occasion of his death.

Q. That is all conjecture? - A. Entirely; there was no appearance of injury.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-47

568. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , thirty glass bottles, filled with wine, value 4 l. 10 s. two pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. three pair of stockings, value 10 s. and a powder flask, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Lewis , in his dwelling-house .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You live in Bedford-row ? - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner at the bar been in your service? - A. Yes, he came into my service on the 27th of June last.

Q. At what time did you leave town? - A. I left town about the 6th of August last.

Q. What parish are you in? - A. In the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Q. When you left town on the 6th of August, I believe you left the prisoner at the bar and the

cook at your house - in what situation was the prisoner in your house? - A. He was a butler.

Q. Without livery? - A. Yes.

Q. In your absence did you give orders to bottle the two pipes of wine? - A. I did.

Court. Q. Had you a good character with him? - A. Yes, I took him with a written character.

THOMAS BOWEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are servant to Mr. Beldom, the wine-cooper? - A. I am.

Q. Did you go to the house of Mr. Lewis, of Bedford-row, on purpose to bottle some wine? - A. I went first to wash the bottles.

Q.Did you hear the prisoner at the bar mention any thing either at your washing the bottles or at bottling off the wine? - A. He mentioned the name of three D's to me; I told him I did not understand what he meant; he asked me if I knew the three D's again; I told him I did not; I did not understand what he meant.

Q. Did he say any thing more? - A. He asked me if I knew the Dictionary; I told him I neither did know, nor wished to know; he then asked me if I should come and bottle the wine; I told him I did not know.

Court. Q. What day was it you went to bottle off the wine? - A. I do not know; it was on Friday, about a week afterwards.

ANN HANCOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are Mr. Lewis's cook? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you and the prisoner at the bar left in the care of Mr. Lewis's house when he went out of town? - A. We were.

Q. How long was it after the last witness came to wash the bottles that he bottled off the wine? - A. Either three or four days, or a week.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner address any conversation to the wine-cooper? - A. I did.

Q. What did you ever hear him say? - A. I overheard him say, how many may be made three D.

Q. Made of what? - A. There was no conversation of wine, I cannot tell rightly.

Q. What answer did the wine-cooper make? - A. I could not understand.

Q. You gave some information to Mr. John Lewis , your master's brother? - A. I did.

Q. Were you present when Mr. John Lewis came and discharged him? - A. I was called.

Q. On what day was it when Mr. John Lewis came and discharged him? - A. On the 30th of August Mr. John Lewis came and discharged him.

Q. Were you called by Mr. John Lewis into the prisoner's room? - A. I was, and in the prisoner's room there were fifteen bottles of wine found in his cupboard, locked up.

Q. He had the key of it? - A. He had, and there were several articles of my master's wearing apparel there.

Q. What were they? - A.Pantaloons.

Q. How many? - A. I did not observe; I thought there was a pair of breeches, three pair of stockings, and a powder flask.

Q. All these were in the cupboard in the pantry in the house? - A. They were.

Q. Was that the place where your master kept his wearing apparel, in the prisoner's room? - A. No.

Q. What part of the prisoner's room were these things in? - A.They were in the pantry.

Q. Were there any more bottles of wine found than these fifteen bottles? - A. One day it happened I went and shut up the bed in the prisoner's pantry, and there I found seven more, and on the 2d of September I went to scour a dresser down, and under the cupboard I found eight more, making altogether thirty bottles of wine.

Q. From the time that the prisoner was taken into custody, on the 30th of August, when you found fifteen bottles of wine and the articles of wearing apparel, to the two different times you found the seven and eight bottles of wine, had any person been in the pantry? - A. They had not.

Prisoner. (To Hancock.) Q. I wish to ask you about the pantaloons; did I not tell you that I had a written order from Mrs. Lewis to send all my master's wearing apparel down into the country, and when I had sent my master's razors, and some other things, my master reprimanded me, and said, I had no right to send any thing down till I had orders from him; these were some of the things, and that was the reason they were down stairs? -

Court. Q. Do you know any thing of an order his mistress sent? - A. They were sent according to order.

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the brother of the prosecutor? - A. I am.

Q. On the 30th of August, did you go to your brother's house for the purpose of discharging the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. Did you go into his pantry before you sent him out of the house for the purpose of seeing whether he had any thing that he ought not to have? - A. Yes, for that purpose; I went into the pantry, I requested him to give me the key belonging to the pantry; I went down into his pantry, he opened two cupboards, and the first thing I saw were these pantaloons of his master's, they were uppermost, and under that there were eight bottles of wine; I particularly asked him whose property that was; he said, it was his master's property.

Q. Under that you found eight bottles of wine? - A. Yes, and a powder flask; in another cupboard were seven bottles of wine.

Q. Who had the key of that cupboard? - A. The prisoner.

Q. What wine was it? - A. Port wine.

Court. Q. What did he say about the wine? - A. I asked him particularly why he put the wine there, and why he secreted it in that manner; he said that he was a very distressed man; he was very sorry for it, he hoped I would have mercy on him.

Q. After that an officer was sent for, and he was taken before a Magistrate? - A. Yes; I requested my brother's cook to make search about the pantry, to see if any thing more was there, and in his trunk were found, two files, a pair of pincers, a turn-screw, and a bunch of keys.

Prisoner. (To witness.) Q. Were not these pincers about the shelf, and the two files in the top cupboard; you looked and found the pantaloons in the housekeeper's drawer in the house-keeper's room? - A.No, they were in your cupboard.

Court. Were there two pipes of port? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it port wine found in all the thirty bottles? - A. Twenty-nine of red, and one of white.

WILLIAM TUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you assist in bottling off this wine? - A. I did.

Q. It was removed to Russel-square, to Mr. Lewis's new house? - A. Yes; I found a deficiency immediately that I had done bottling it; I found only fifty-one dozen and two bottles, which I conceived to be deficient.

Q. When you counted the other pipe, what was that? - A. Fifty-three dozen and one.

Court. Q. After you had reckoned them, you found a deficiency? - A. Yes; I am certain of the quantity, it was put into baskets which hold fifty-six bottles; the prisoner at the bar had been with me all the time, and when I counted it out first, I found it fifty-two, and the other ran fifty-three.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you able to know there was a deficiency afterwards? - A. I did not reckon it before I had done bottling the pipe, it was taken away before I had done bottling it; I was in the cellar, and they went out of my sight with it into the wash-house adjoining the wine-cellar; I make no doubt but it is part of the wine, by the freshness of the corks, and they being wet when Cook called me, and the bottle of sherry, I have no doubt of it, it was sealed; there were no more than six bottles of sherry in Mr. Lewis's cellar.

Prisoner. (To Bowen.) Q. Whether I was not sent into the street at the time this wine was sent out to stand by the cart; I went out to the baker's for bread, and I went for beef-steaks? - A. You were not sent away the first pipe that was counted and found deficient.

Q. Did you see me go into the pantry with any wine, or any other place? - A. I could not see him; Mr. Tuck walked backwards and forwards after the first pipe was bottled.

Mr. Gurney. (To prosecutor.) Q. What is the value of a bottle of this wine? - A. Three shillings a bottle.

Prisoner's defence. I had not moved the wine there at all; I can prove that those cupboards in the pantry were all the whole day open; Mr. Tuck and his man breakfasted with me in the housekeeper's room, after which we went into the kitchen; I fetched the newspaper for Mr. Tuck to read in the housekeeper's room; I fetched water and rolls; at this time the wine was laying about, in a manner, all over the place; from the first pipe till a considerable time after breakfast, there were two sash windows open, one in the pantry, the other in the room adjoining, in the yard, while I was going to answer the street-door.

Prisoner (To Tuck.) Q. Whether Mr. Tuck did not say to Mr. Lewis, that pipes run commonly so short? - A. I said to Mr. Lewis, that the pipe did run short; in such cases as these we must say something to gentlemen (I had a hint from Mr. Lewis); it wanted a gallon when it went into the house, and it was in as good condition when I bottled it off, as when it came in; I had the whole care of it when it went into the house, and I attended the bottling of it; there was no leakage; I have one thing to say - the prisoner made an observation to me, that he never admitted any body into his room, not even the housekeeper, and wherever he had lived, he never associated with any of the servants when the family were in town.

Prisoner. Mr. Tuck observed that the pipe was not filled up; the pipe was not guaged before it was drawn off; he said it was a very common thing for them to waste, standing so long a time.

Mr. Tuck. It had been a twelvemonth in the house.

Mr. Gurney. Q. It did not leak at all? - A. No; and the two pipes both came in at one time, and the other ran that quantity.

Jury (To Tuck.) Q. Had the pipe of wine been a twelvemonth in the cellar after it was guaged, or guaged previous to its being bottled off? - A. It was guaged a twelvemonth previous to its being bottled off.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-48

509. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , three shirts, value 3 s. the property of Ann Carrol , two sheets, value 10 s. three pillow-cases, value 7 s. three napkins, value 4 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 4 s. two shifts, value 4 s. three gowns, value 12 s. six shirts, value 12 s. a table-cloth, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Stafford , a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 3 s. the property of Christopher Hampton , in the dwelling-house of Ann Carrol .

ANN CARROL sworn. - I am a widow , I live in King-street, St. James's, No. 20: The prisoner was a lodger of mine; I rent two rooms in the house, and let out one; Mrs. Collyer rents the house and lives in it.

Q. Had you any property in that room? - A. I had three shirts in a box by his bed's head, it was unlocked that day.

Q. Do you know whether there was any thing else in that box besides the shirts that belonged to you? - A. Yes, three pair of small-cloaths, that belonged to a fellow lodger of his, who was out of town; he had left them there, and some articles: I cannot swear to them.

Q. What do you know against the prisoner as having taken these things? - A. I missed all that was in the box the minute he went out of the room on the 21st of July, about ten o'clock at night; I had seen them in the box the night before.

Q. Had he slept in the same room the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had he continued there that day? - A. He came in after eight at night, and was there till about ten, and then he went away; he never returned nor discharged his lodging; there was another woman's things in that room (Mary Stafford), I did not miss the things out of that till Monday night.

THOMAS STEWARD sworn. - I am a watchman in King-street: On Monday night, as I was crying the hour of ten, I believe it was on the 21st of July, Mr. Davis informed me that he had a thief; he gave me charge of the prisoner; the prisoner was sitting in his tap-room; I went out and called my brother watchman; I took the prisoner into custody to the watch-house; they searched him, and on his person they found a knife and a few halfpence; he had a bundle with him, which he put down as soon as he went into the watch-house; Mrs. Carrol was in the Golden Lion tap when I took him into custody, and she went with him to the watch-house; she saw the bundle opened.

Q.(To Ann Carrol.) Did you go on Friday evening to the Golden Lion? - A. I did, at Mr. Davis's very near ten o'clock at night; I saw the prisoner go in, and I followed in after him; he had nothing of mine with him, it was only a small bundle in his hand; I saw the bundle opened at the watch-house, there were two napkins, a pocket-handkerchief, and a pair of silk stockings.

- GREGORY sworn. - I am constable: I produce the bundle delivered to me by the beadle of St. James's, at the watch-house; I searched the prisoner, and this waistcoat I took from off his back, and this duplicate he gave me out of his breeches pocket when I was going to search him.

- UNDERHILL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in High-street, Mary-le-bone: I produce a shift pledged for two shillings; I do not recollect the person.

MARY STAFFORD sworn. - I am a married woman; my husband's name is Thomas Stafford.

Q. Had you any property belonging to you at Ann Carrol 's? - A. Yes, my things were in a box, and the box was locked.

Q. Look at that shift the pawnbroker has produced? - A. It is my shift, I know it by the mark.

Prisoner's defence. I lodged at Mrs. Carrol's; I rose at seven o'clock, and I went to Mr. Wells's; he told me he had got me a place at Lady Sullivan's; and as I was going to get a pair of leather breeches made, I met a man who asked me to have a share of a pint of beer with him; the man had no money; he said he had a small parcel; he told me to get three shillings on it; I was having a pint of beer when Mrs. Carrol came in and challenged me

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing the shift .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-49

570. JANE NORRIS and MARY ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of Charles King , privily from his person .

CHARLES KING sworn. - On the 23d of July I was walking up Holborn in company with Groves, about ten o'clock at night.

Q. Were you sober or intoxicated? - A. I was rather in liquor: I went into the house of Mary Roberts , Charles-street, Drury-lane , with Jane Norris (Groves and Roberts were not with me then), after staying there about half an hour, I retired to a public-house in Charles-street, Hatton-garden, till three o'clock the next day; it rained very hard; we could not go to work, and when it was fine, I wanted to see what o'clock it was, I missed my watch; I did not go in search of it that afternoon: On Thursday I found it pledged at Mrs. Payne's, Bow-street, Bloomsbury, for a guinea.

FRANCES GIBBS sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Payne, pawnbroker; I produce a silver watch pledged by the two prisoners, on the 23d of July, for a guinea. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To prosecutor.) I did not ask you what you went to that young woman's lodgings for, but I believe every body understands it? - A. Yes.

Jane Norris 's defence. He left the watch for me to pledge for the money he was to give me.

Prosecutor. That is not true: they did me out of

a seven-shilling piece; I had only threepence halfpenny when I left them.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-50

571. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two pocket-books, value 1 s. five pair of stockings, value 5 s. eleven handkerchiefs, value 5 s. 6 d. two bonnets, value 2 s. two pair of pockets, value 2 s. two caps, value 1 s. a night-cap, value 2 d. two bed-gowns, value 2 s. two gowns, value 40 s. a child's frock, value 4 s. two cloaks, value 15 s. one spencer, value 1 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 2 s. one pair of trowsers, value 1 s. one waistcoat, value 1 s. and two Tunbridge-ware boxes, value 4 d. the property of William Broxup .

WILLIAM BROXUP sworn. - I am a tailor ; I live at No. 13, Exeter-place, Knightsbridge.

Q. Were you returning with the waggon towards town? - A. Yes; on the 5th of August last, I and my wife were in the waggon with a box of wearing apparel; about nine or ten o'clock at night, the prisoner at the bar came into the waggon at Maidenhead in Berkshire ; he came in and out twice on the road to London; he took all the things out of the box when he was in the waggon; we missed the contents of the box when we got to Knightsbridge; the prisoner sat at the other end of the waggon to where we were.

Q. Do you know where the property was found? - A. It was found in Clerkenwell; I heard of it by advertisement.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer of the Public Office, Hatton-garden; I know the prisoner very well, he lived in Steward's-court, Clerkenwell-green.

Q. Did you search his lodgings? A. Yes; on the 15th of August, I and Stanton, between ten and eleven at night, found the things that are in the indictment, and now produced; we entered the room, the prisoner was in bed, pretending that he was ill, his wife told me that he was so deaf that he could not hear, and she hoped that we were not come to fetch him or her away; I answered, I did not know that; what have you got under this blanket on the table; I pulled the blanket off the table, and there I saw a quantity of linen of different descriptions; I tied it up, and begged Stanton to get the man out of bed; he pretended he was so ill he could not get out of bed; we forced him out, and when we pulled the clothes off the bed, we saw he had some of his clothes on; Stanton pulled him up and saw another bundle and two pocket-books; we took them both into custody.

Prisoner. I have lost my hearing and part of my sight.

Q.(To Trott.) Has he lost his hearing? - A. There is always something the matter with him when he is taken up; I believe he can hear as well as I can.

- STANTON sworn. - I produce a duplicate of a gown, I found it in Bishop's apartment, in a drawer in the table.

JOHN ROBERTSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a gown pledged by the wife of the prisoner, on the 15th of August. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I know myself guilty.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-51

572. MARY, alias ANN PRICE , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , eight yards and three quarters of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of David Williams .

DAVID WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , I live in Shoreditch : On the 8th of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop to buy herself a gown; she did not take the gown away, she left two shillings on it, and gave the name of Ann Long ; I gave her a bill of the shop, and put down so much for the gown, and so much to pay; then she went away.

Q. Did you miss any thing after she was gone? - A. Not just then; I did not miss it till Mr. Greenwell came to me in the evening; he produced to me the same bill that I had given to the prisoner.

Q. Did you find any thing belonging to you any where? - A. Yes, at Mr. Clarke's, a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street, and at Mr. Perkins's.

Q. Who was in your shop at the time when the prisoner was in your shop bargaining for these things? - A. There was a customer in the shop, and a young man serving; he is not here.

RICHARD PHILIP HYAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Clark, Bishopsgate-street, pawnbroker: On the 8th of August, about five or six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar brought two yards and three quarters of cotton to pledge for 3 s. I gave her the duplicate, and I have seen it again; I am confident she is the person that pledged it in the name of Mary Simonds .

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. I produce the print; I had the prisoner in custody for another offence, on the 8th of August; I found two duplicates on her person; I produce the duplicates.

HENRY PASLEY sworn. - I produce a piece of cotton, and that is the duplicate I gave her, she pledged it in the name of Mary Grove .

Prosecutor. The piece of cotton has been cut in two; I can only speak to one piece where it is

marked; it was in one piece when it was in my shop, and I had shewn her that piece.

Q. What is the value of them? - A. Twelve shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up those two tickets in Bishopsgate-street; I know nothing at all about them.

GUILTY, aged 56,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-52

573. SARAH SLATER , alias MORGAN , was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Elizabeth Cummings, on the 21st of August , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, two waistcoats, value 20 s. two shirts, value 20 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. five neck handkerchiefs, value 10 s. and one pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of James Cummings .

Second Count. For the same offence, only laying part of the goods to be the property of James Bayley , and the other part to be the property of William Ingle .

ELIZABETH CUMMINGS sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I was nine years old last January.

Q. Have you learned your catechism? - A. Some of it.

Q. Have you learned any prayers? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that it is a wrong thing to tell a lie? - A. Yes.

Q. Suppose you were to tell a lie is that a bad thing? - A. Yes.

Q. What do you think will happen to you if you are sworn, and say that which is not true? - A. Go to hell.

Q. Were you carrying any thing near Shoreditch a little while ago? - A. I was taking two bundles home from a gentleman in Shoreditch, on a Wednesday, about a month ago as nigh as I can guess, about four o'clock.

Q. You did not know what were in the bundles, did you? - A. No.

Q. Did any body say any thing to you as you were going along? - A. Yes, Sir; she that stands at the bar took them out of my hand. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Was she meeting you, or did she overtake you? - A. I met her by Shoreditch-church ; she took the two bundles out of my hand, and then gave them to a man.

Q. Did the man go away with them? - A. Yes; she took me up a nasty place.

Q. That was after the bundles were taken away from you, and given to the man? - A. Yes, and she said if I did not hold my tongue, she would chuck me in the ditch.

Q. The man was gone with the bundles then, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body come by at the time? - A. Yes, Mr. Durmaine came by.

Q. You were crying, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you sure that it was the woman that is at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Durmaine stop her? - A. Yes.

Q. Were the bundles brought back? - A. No.

Prisoner. I never saw the child, I was never near Shoreditch-church.

- DURMAINE sworn. - The woman had followed the child from Shoreditch-church to the City-road; she took the bundles from the child in the City-road; I saw the child crying as she was coming and running out of a passage in the City-road ; I enquired what was the matter; she pointed to a woman in the City-road, and gave me information near by the gate-house; I called out to the woman, and she turned down the first turning which turns down to Peerless-pool; I ran after her, and desired the child to follow; I overtook her, and asked her what she had done with the child's clothes; she replied she had never seen the child; I asked her what she did down the passage with the child, and the child said she had taken the clothes; she then said she had seen the child down the passage, she took her there to stand before her while she made water.

WILLIAM BAYLEY sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of that little girl? - A. Yes: On the 21st of August I gave her one bundle of clothes to take home to her mother to be washed; the things have never been found.

WILLIAM INGLE sworn. Q. Had you given any bundle to that child? - A. Yes, I had given my things to her to take home to her mother; she washed for me.

Q.(To the child.) Are these the two persons from whom you received the bundles? - A. Yes.

Q. And they were the same bundles that you received from these men, that the woman at the bar took away from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman who took the bundle out of your hand? - A. Yes, it was that woman.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the child; I was coming along the City-road, and that gentleman called to me; I heard him say to the child, you say that is the woman that stopped you; he said so, and the Magistrate reprimanded him for it; I had never been near Shoreditch-church at that time; what that gentleman says, is as false as God is true.

GUILTY, aged 36,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-53

574. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , seven yards and a half of quilting, value 2 l. the property of Richard Dixon .

RICHARD DIXON sworn. - I live at No. 14, May's-buildings, St. Martin's-lane : About six o'clock in the evening I was in my accompting-house at the back part of the shop; I observed the prisoner in the shop taking a piece of goods out; it was inside the window for shew.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. I never saw the prisoner before I saw him in the shop.

Q. What did he take? - A. Seven yards and a half of quilting; there was no person in the shop but myself; I pursued him till he threw the piece down; he was brought back by Jones. When I got out of the shop to pursue him, he was about a hundred yards off, he had the piece of quilting then; I saw him throw it down, I have no doubt of his person.

- JONES sworn. - I heard the cry of stop thief on Thursday evening, the 5th of September; I observed a man running by my shop; soon after I observed Mr. Dixon passing by, calling out, stop thief; in consequence of a winning in the court, he passed through, and I lost sight of him for about a minute; the prisoner was walking towards me when I took him.

Q. You do not know it was the same man? - A. I can only say he was the man that I took, in consequence of being told he was the man that was running away.

Prisoner. (To the prosecutor.) Q. I wish to ask you whether you ever saw me before I was brought back to your shop? - A. Certainly I saw you in the shop when you took the piece of goods.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up Bedford-street when that gentleman took me into custody; it is not a likely thing, if I had been guilty of the crime, that I should be walking towards the place.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath

Reference Number: t18050918-54

575. CHARLES FITZHUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , eight pounds weight of ham, value 6 s. the property of Robert Murrill .

It appearing in evidence that the prosecutor kept a cook's shop in the Fleet , and that the prisoner, who was also in the Fleet, came to the prosecutor for some ham, which was served him by the prosecutor, the prisoner at the time saying, I will pay you to-morrow, and that a scuffle ensued, the prosecutor taking hold of the plate, insisting he should not have it unless he paid on delivery, by means of which the ham was thrown on the ground, and that the prisoner in his passion then took the ham-bone, and, flourishing it at the prosecutor, made use of bad expressions, the Court were of opinion that it was only a dispute whether the ham which was thrown down should be paid for on the next day, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-55

576. THOMAS ANDREWS was indicted for that he, on the 16th of August , being employed in the capacity of servant to Thomas Barnjum , did by virtue of that employment, receive and take into his possession one Bank-note, value 1 l. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did fraudulently secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner, who was a carman to the prosecutor, went with his master's cart and three horses with a load to Watford by his master's directions, and after unloading there he took up a small load of walnut-tree to bring to Rosemary-lane, London, for which he received a one-pound note, and had not accounted for the same to his master, the prosecutor acknowledging that he charged for the load going to Watford and coming back empty, the Court were of opinion that this was not an offence that came strictly within the meaning of the Act of Parliament upon which the indictment was framed, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-56

577. WILLIAM HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , two sheets, value 12 s. the property of William Clinch and John Clinch .

CECILIA STEVENS sworn. I am chambermaid to the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street : the prisoner at the bar came on Thursday morning about three o'clock for a bed.

Q. Did he sleep there? A. Yes; about half past nine in the morning he got up; he made the best of his way down stairs without paying for his bed.

Q. What did the bed come to? - A. One shilling; I immediately pursued after him down the yard into the street, and caught him by the coat near the end of Abchurch-lane; I said, young man, you have not paid for the lodging; he asked how much it was; I told him, and he gave me the shilling; I told him he must come back with me to see that all was safe; he came back with me into Lombard-street, and there he told me if I would not say any thing he would tell me; he said he had got the sheets; I told him I would not say any thing to any one in the street, if he would come quietly; he came back with me to the chamber-maid's room; he there drew them from his small clothes; I produce the sheets.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-57

578. JOHN HIDER and GEORGE HENSHAW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a pair of boots, value 25 s. the property of John Wimpory .

It appearing from the evidence of Charles Davis that the prosecutor's Christian name was Jonathan (the witness producing some shop bills of Mr. Wimpory's), the prisoners were

ACQUITTED

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-58

579. JOHN HARRYMAN, alias WILLIAM WALKER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , 10 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Hale .

It appearing from the evidence of Mrs. Hale that the prisoner obtained the money from her by artifice, telling her he had sold a pair of wheels to her husband, who was a hackney coachman, and he had given him five shillings, and that he was to call upon her for the half guinea, the Court were of opinion it was a fraud, and not a felony, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-59

580. JOHN HARRYMAN, alias WILLIAM WALKER , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , two Bank-notes, value 2 l. the property of Robert Burke .

It appeared from the evidence of the prosecutor the prisoner obtained two one-pound notes from him on the 14th of October, 1804, under the pretence he would get his man released from Clerkenwell Prison, and settle the business, he being confined there for a quarrel, and the prisoner only paid fifteen shillings, the Court were of opinion this case was like the last, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-60

581. JOHN SAVORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , two pounds weight and a half of tobacco, value 5 s. 6 d. and one ounce weight of snuff, value 2 d. the property of Alexander Gordon .

ALEXANDER GORDON sworn. - I am a tobacco manufacturer , I live at No. 7, Wild-street, the prisoner was a workman of mine, I had received information that the prisoner had been robbing me: On the 30th of August, about one o'clock, I ordered a bag from the bottom part of the warehouse to be drawn up, and I weighed it; I weighed fifteen pounds one ounce, gross weight; I took it down stairs, and placed it in the same place where I took it from, and I twisted the mouth of the bag; while the other man was gone to dinner, the prisoner eat his dinner in the warehouse, and when he went up stairs from his dinner, I weighed the bag again, there was one pound and a quarter deficient. In the evening, when the prisoner was going home from his work, I told him I must search him; I found in his two waistcoat pockets one pound and half an ounce, and three quarters of a pound wrapped up in paper in his breeches; this bag he had taken up stairs to grind some snuff, he tore this bag up to put part of the tobacco in the paper; I know it to be mine positively, by my hand-writing on it.

Q. How long had he lived with you? - A. Two months and one day; I have not the least doubt but the tobacco is mine, I have compared it with the other; the officer found some more on him.

JOHN DORRINGTON sworn. - At the time described by Gordon I took the prisoner into custody; I found two parcels of snuff in his waistcoat pockets, and some snuff in his breeches.

Prisoner's defence. I never brought any of the property out of the house.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-61

582. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

EDWARD CROCKER sworn - I produce the certificate of the conviction of Thomas Watkins. (The conviction read in Court.)

"Middlesex. - These are to certify, that at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden at Justice-Hall, Old-Bailey, in the City of London, and in the county of Middlesex, on the 20th of April, in the forty-third year of His Majesty's reign, before His Majesty's Justices then present, Thomas Watkins was tried and convicted of a larceny, for feloniously stealing a roll of carpeting, value thirty shillings, the goods of George Osborn , and was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years. Dated 15th August, 1805. Signed Thomas Shelton ."

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am keeper of the Poultry Compter.

Q. Were you present at the gaol delivery on the 20th of April, in the forty-third year of His Majesty's reign? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a person of the name of Thomas Watkins being tried? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the prisoner at the bar? - A.Yes, it is the same person.

Q. Did you after that see him any where? - A. I delivered him on board the Portland hulk at Langston Harbour .

Q. Pursuant to his sentence? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you after that see him any where? - A. Not till after he was apprehended; Crocker apprehended him.

Q.(To Crocker.) Did you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When and where? - A. On the 29th of July last, in the afternoon; I was in Newton-street, Holborn, in the parish of St. Giles, I saw the prisoner coming up the street with two women; having had previous information that he had been transported and got away, I apprehended him; I then went to Mr. Kirby, who came to our Office, and identified him; Mr. Bond asked him how he got away; he said, he had a conditional pardon to serve in the Navy, and he was put on board the Princess Royal.

Q. Was this taken in writing? - A. I believe the account is at the back of the information; it was taken in writing.

Prisoner's defence. On the 12th of last January was a twelvemonth, I was ordered to go on board his Majesty's ship; I was taken to St. Helen's, on board the Princess Royal, of 98 guns; I served in that ship sixteen months; we came into Portsmouth harbour in great distress, I had liberty to come on shore, I staid too long, I was afraid to go back; there were ninety-eight of us put on board the Princess Royal.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-62

583. RICHARD HARDING was indicted for that he, on the 24th of May , feloniously did forge, counterfeit, and resemble, on the spotted side on one of the cards in a certain parcel of playing cards, the impression of a certain mark used and denoted on the spotted side of playing cards, with intention to defraud the duty charged on playing cards .

Second Count. For feloniously vending and selling, on the same day, certain playing cards, with counterfeit impressions of certain marks used and denoted upon playing cards, he at the time knowing the said marks to be counterfeited. And

Thirteen other Counts for like offence, only charging them in a different manner.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Dampier.)

Mr. Attorney General. - Gentlemen, This prosecution, we all understand, is against the prisoner for an offence which he has committed against the stamp laws, and the indictment charges him with having counterfeited the impression of stamps authorised by the Commissioners for the purpose of denoting the duty on playing cards; it charges him likewise of vending and selling cards with these counterfeited impressions, knowing it to be so done.

Gentlemen, The act under which the prisoner is prosecuted makes it a capital offence for either counterfeiting, vending, or selling cards with counterfeited stamps, the person so acting having a guilty knowledge thereof.

Gentlemen, Having stated these circumstances to you, I conceive I must do more, in order to apprise you of the serious and important business in which we are now engaged. The prisoner at the bar is a licensed card-maker, having two licensed shops, the one situated in Hereford-street, Oxford-street, and the other in North-row, Grosvenor-square; I shall shew you that in these two places he carried on the manufacturing and selling of playing cards. There was another place the prisoner had, which was even unknown even to the servants that were employed in either of these manufactories, in which almost all the infamous part was transacted by the prisoner himself alone.

Gentlemen, The extensive manner in which he carried on this business, compared with the small demand he made at the Stamp office for stamps to have legally carried it on, was one of the first circumstances that appeared against the prisoner, and that a fraudulent fabrication were made and vended, to a large extent, in lieu of the legal one, there was not the least doubt. And in consequence of this, and likewise from some other circumstances, it came sufficiently to the knowledge of the persons employed at the Stamp-office that there must be some illegal practice carried on. It was thought expedient to employ one Hockey, who is the printer of the legal ace of spades at the Stamp-office, in order to see if they could detect him in the improper practice he was carrying on, and this employment of Mr. Hockey has led to the discovery for which the prisoner is now brought here. It was in the month of May, I think the 14th, that Mr. Hockey made the first purchase; he called at his house, and asked for six packs of playing cards, Mr. Harding was not at home, but a servant furnished him with the six packs of playing cards; the charge that was made for them was about a guinea, nothing at all under what would be the trade price bought at a regular manufactory; Mr. Hockey having purchased these six packs of cards, he found that they contained all the marks and impressions of forged stamps, and he was satisfied in his own mind that they were undoubtedly forged. He was not contented with making this purchase, he went on the 16th, and purchased six packs more; Mr. Harding then was at home, and served him himself. On the 21st he made another purchase, when the same servant furnished him with six packs more, and on the 24th of May he purchased a dozen packs; the cards in this dozen were furnished him by the prisoner himself. On the 27th, he went again to the shop, and ordered five dozen to be sent to No. 74, Edgware-road; these cards were sent accordingly, and the person that carried them will be called; he will tell you (he was in the habit of giving receipts not in his master's name;) he asked his master in what name he should give the receipt, his master told him to give the receipt in any name he pleased; he was instructed where to carry them, and he gave the receipt in the name of Bates. When he returned he told his master, and his master was very well satisfied with it.

Gentlemen, This circumstance was in order to prevent the easy communication of tracing back these packs of cards; for all these and every one of those different packs of cards which were purchased on those specific days, in the month of May, contained the forged impressions of these counterfeited stamps, and the prosecution against the prisoner was supposed to be complete by these various instances of selling these counterfeited impressions. In consequence of that, it was thought fit to apprehend him, and to make a seizure from which information

might be collected from the circumstances of the manner in which it was carried on. He was apprehended, and several of his servants were likewise laid hold of at the time; and from this remarkable circumstance it is evident that the prisoner must have become acquainted previously, that there was that suspicion ripened against him, that it was likely that he should be the subject of apprehension; for upon the seizure of the stock there was not one single forged impression found, although down to the twenty-fourth of May he had, wherever the sale had been made, sold cards with these counterfeited impressions; they were all removed before the apprehension and seizure; that unquestionably by some means or other the prisoner must have been apprised thereof. After the apprehension of the prisoner, the persons that assisted him in carrying on this nefarious business, who were taken at the same time, became the subjects of examination, and the connection and acquaintance of the prisoner were discovered; and that a person of the name of Leadbetter was the engraver that was employed by the prisoner, and a person of the name of Skelton was one that had considerable dealings with him; that they were frequently employed in carrying cards to Mr. Skelton, who lived somewhere near Grosvenor-square. I shall shew to you the manner in which the prisoner at the bar first seduced Leadbetter, and the manner in which Leadbetter seduced Bunning - I can hardly say seduced, employed Bunning. That the prisoner at the bar actually paid for Leadbetter's instruction in the art of engraving on copper-plates, he being a stone seal-engraver; and after the prisoner had actually paid for the instruction of Leadbetter, he was anxious to know whether he could execute a plate for him. Leadbetter attempted not only to touch up a plate, but also to engrave others for him; but in consequence of his not being able to do it for him, he was desirous of getting it done for him; he employed a man of the name of Bunning, who was himself an engraver in this line. Leadbetter led him to believe that he was acquainted with a drunken engraver who worked for the Stamp-office, who would lose his business if he did not get some able hand to do them for him. These are the outlines of the case, in which, if the facts are brought home to him, I am sure you will not entertain a doubt of the propriety of the prosecution against the prisoner, Mr. Harding.

Gentlemen, I shall first state to you what it is we have to prove against him; I shall then state what is necessary to prove against the prisoner by the detail already applied to the facts. The first thing to be proved against him is vending these articles, knowing them to be counterfeited - for vending these packs of cards with the counterfeited impressions of the stamps, he knowing them to be counterfeited, rather than the actual counterfeiting of the impressions of that stamp. I shall shew to you that at the early stage of the business evident proof of his having vended these articles in considerable quantities to a person of the name of Hockey, and that Hockey will shew to you, beyond all possibility of a doubt, that he sold these cards with the counterfeited impressions on them; and to establish that fact, that he knew they were counterfeited, I shall here state the manner in which the duty stamps are carried on at the Stamp-office. This will of itself make it next to impossibility that any trader carrying on the business as this man did, could possibly sell or vend cards without knowing they were false. The duty on playing cards is upon the whole two shillings and sixpence; there is a duty of sixpence on the wrapper; and with respect to the ace of spades particularly, the Office makes a plate for every dealer, and upon that plate for every dealer they put the dealer's name. Every dealer, therefore, must know, that in order to get a legal ace of spades, he must have the ace of spades that is furnished by the Stamp-office themselves; he cannot get it from any other quarter. If any dealer is furnished with any other ace of spades, he must know that they were forged; for on looking upon the legal impression of the duty ace, there is charged sixpence upon the top, and sixpence on each side, and then there is the name of Harding, or of the dealer, that is, the card-maker, at the bottom; and any card-maker getting it from any other quarter, must know that he has got a false impression.

Gentlemen, This case will by no means rest here; but I shall shew to you the actual employment of the prisoner, and who it was that made the fabricated plate. I shall shew you by one of his servants that he had a plate in his possession of the ace of spades, and that he saw him polish the impression that is made on the label fabricated stamp, to give it that gloss which the legal stamp does, in order to meet the eye, and to be less liable of detection. You will find from his servants that, for several weeks before the time that he was apprehended, he had taken upon himself entirely the whole management of that part of the business which consisted of making the aces of spades. The legal aces of spades have twenty impressions upon a sheet of paper of a large size at the Stamp-office; they are cut in shape, and put on one side of the cards by the card-maker; they are progressively numbered from one to twenty. The plate that the prisoner procured to be fabricated, only contained four of these impressions, and when you come to examine the particulars of the plate, you will find that some of them are not correct with the original of which they were intended; for I think they have got an R instead of the E in the word Dieu. In this instance it points out, beyond all possibility of a doubt, that it is a forgery.

Gentlemen, You will find that he kept this part of the business to himself for six months before he was apprehended; that he cut these out, and pasted them on the cards; that he delivered the aces of spades, which were to be included in these packs, himself; and I apprehend from this circumstance of Leadbetter being actually employed and engaged by the prisoner to acquire that knowledge by which he was to fabricate the legal stamps, will make it beyond all doubt that he knew they were forged. I have pointed out these other circumstances, independent of the proof of Leadbetter, and particularly independent of the proof which will be given on the part of Skelton, because both Lead-better and Skelton will come before you as men who are more or less implicated in the guilt of the prisoner himself. With respect to Leadbetter, there is no doubt but he must know what these stamps were; and with respect to Skelton, there can be but little doubt, if any, but that he must have known the iniquitous purpose of these stamps. He will tell you that he knew the

prisoner many years; that he let him part of his premises in a back yard behind his house, and that in these premises the prisoner carried on this nefarious business; he had often seen him, and often heard him make use of the instrument for forging these stamps. I say I will desire the keeping the case, as much as I can, without the assistance of these accomplices, because I think, without their assistance, there would be very near, if not quite, sufficient to prove the case against the prisoner. At Mr. Skelton's, and at the house of a person of the name of Shinglear, were found not less than two thousand aces that had been made by Harding, the prisoner, he having removed them from his premises the very night before his apprehension to elude every means of indicating the forged business being carried on by him.

Gentlemen, Some of the plates were found in the garden at Skelton's, and two were found in the possession of Leadbetter, to whom they had been returned by Harding, for the purpose of his secreting them. You will find that there is abundant proof against the prisoner at the bar, even if you were to put out the evidence of Skelton, or of Leadbetter, they being persons that were accomplices. You will be directed to give a very anxious attention to their evidence, and to be watchful whether their evidence is confirmed, and if it is confirmed, you may give the same reliance to that as to any other evidence. In this case you will give attention to the whole of it - how far the evidence supports the facts, and how far upon the whole these facts make out the case of guilt against the prisoner. In my mind it seems to be a case in which there will not be a possibility of a doubt, but it will be for you to determine.

JOHN HOCKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. What are you? - A. I am printer of the ace of spades at the Stamp-office.

Q. Did you at any time, in consequence of any information, apply to the prisoner for the purpose of purchasing cards? - A. Yes, on the 14th of May.

Q. Where did you apply for them? - A. In Hereford-street, Oxford-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner himself on the first application, or from whom did you receive these cards? - A. I received them from a lad, a person of the name of Field.

Q. What quantity did you purchase of the person of the name of Field? - A. Six packs.

Q. When did you apply again? - A. On the sixteenth.

Q. Did you see the prisoner then? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. What dealings had you with him on the sixteenth? - A. I bought of him six packs, and paid him one pound one shilling; I applied to him again on the 21st.

Q. Did you then see the prisoner himself? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. On the 24th; I purchased twelve packs then.

Q. What quantity did you purchase before? - A. Twelve packs; I paid him forty-one shillings.

Q. Had you any further dealings with him? - A. Not with him, I ordered some others afterwards; I directed five dozen to be sent to No. 7 Edgware-road.

Q. Were they sent there? - A. They were sent there on the 30th of May.

Q. Do you know the person that brought them? - A. Yes, I have been told of the person that brought them.

Q. Was that a person of the name of Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home when they were brought? - A. No, I was not; I ordered them to be sent there, and they were sent; I paid ten pounds five shillings for them.

Q. Now look at these several parcels, and tell me which are the parcels that were sent? - A. These are the first parcels that I purchased there, and which I bought of the lad on the 14th of May.

Q. That in your hand now is the second purchase? - A. Yes, these were purchased on the 16th; these I bought of Mr. Harding himself.

Q. Look at these two parcels, and tell me whether these are the two parcels that you purchased of the prisoner on the 24th? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. You marked them yourself so as to be able to swear positively to them? - A. I did.

Q. As you are the printer of the legal ace of spades that are distributed by the Stamp Office to the different card-makers, I take it for granted you are acquainted with them? - A. I have seen a great many.

Q. Will you open one of these packs, and tell me, according to the best of your judgment, what you believe them to be? How many years have you printed them? - A. Thirteen years.

Q. I take it for granted you inspect them, to see if they are fit for circulation? - A. Yes, I look at them.

Q.Looking at that accurately, do you believe that to be printed from the legal Stamp Office press? - A. I do not believe it to be printed from the Stamp Office press, because it has a wrong letter, there is an R instead of an E, in the motto, in number one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. These packs that you speak of, the 24th, you received at the prisoner's house, not from him? - A. Yes, I received them from him, these that I am now speaking of.

VINCENT JACKSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. I am.

Q. Were you acquainted with him in May last? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you lodge at that time? - A. I lodged in North-row.

Q. Were you acquainted with him at that time intimately or not? - A. Very intimately.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of May, carrying any cards to Edgware-road? - A. I do.

Q. What day of the month was it? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Was it in the beginning, middle, or end? - A. Between the 20th and 30th.

Q. What did you carry from Mr. Harding, the prisoner, to Edgware-road? - A. A parcel, which I believe were cards.

Q. How were they wrapped up at that time? - A. In brown paper.

Q. Did you leave the parcel in the Edgware-road in the same condition as you took it from Mr. Harding's shop? - A. Exactly.

Q. When you came to Edgware-road, to whom did you deliver it? - A. To a female; I had previously a receipt from Mr. Harding for five dozen of packs.

Q. That is the receipt that Mr. Hockey had in his hand, you wrote it by the desire of Mr. Harding - what name did he desire you to write? - A. A fictitious one.

Q. Why a fictitious one? - A. Because Mr. Harding ordered me.

Q. What is the name? - A. B. A. Bates.

Q. That is the receipt you left with the parcel from Mr. Harding's? - A. Yes. (Looking at it.)

Q.(To Mr. Hockey.) Is that the receipt you found with the parcel? - A. It is. (The receipt read in Court.)

"30th May, 1805. - Received of Mr. Hockey

"the sum of ten pounds five shillings, for goods

"delivered.

(Signed)

"B. A. BATES."

STEPHEN LEPINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were apprentice to the prisoner, Mr. Harding? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been his apprentice? - A. Two years the 8th of this month.

Q. Where did Mr. Harding live? - A. No. 2, in Hereford-street, Oxford-street.

Q. He was a card-maker there? - A. Yes.

Q. He carried on business as a card-maker there? - A, Yes.

Q. Have you seen him engaged in making of cards, or pasting the wrappers? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him in the act of pasting the wrappers? - A. In pasting the labels on the wrappers I have.

Q. How did he put the paste on the labels? - A. With a little brush and a little board with the paste.

Q. What did he do with it after he put the paste on it? - A. He dryed it.

Q. What else? - A. Nothing else as I saw him do.

Q. Did he do any thing with the stamp or the label? - A. Not after they were sealed; before they were sealed I saw him putting something out of a bottle on the other side on the stamp.

Q. For what purpose was that done? - A. To give it a gloss.

Q. Did you ever see any plates in the possession of Mr. Harding? - A. Yes, one plate, I saw nothing more.

Q. You saw a copper-plate in his possession? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember delivering some cards to Jackson by Harding's direction; six packs of cards, and he selling them to Mr. Hockey; when was that? - A. I cannot tell exactly.

Q. In May, was it not? - A. Yes, I believe it was.

Q. Do you know any thing more of the plate than seeing it in Mr. Harding's possession? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Leadbetter? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Leadbetter frequently with your master? - A. Not very frequently.

Q. Do you know whether he was employed by your master as an engraver? - A. Yes, to engrave card-plates and bills of parcels.

Q. Do you know any other place in which Mr. Harding carried on his business of card-making, except Hereford-street, and North-row.? - A. No.

Q. Did you hear of any other place that he carried on the business of card-making? - A. No, not till after his apprehension.

HUGH LEADBETTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 65, in Wells-street, Oxford-street.

Q. What are you by trade? - A. A stone seal engraver.

Q. Do you know Mr. Harding? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About three years.

Q. Do you remember at one time dining with him on Sunday? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How long ago was that? - A. Near two years; I cannot exactly say.

Mr. Dampier. Q. After dinner did any thing pass between you? - A. Some little time after dinner he called me on one side and said, I shall be glad to speak to you; and after that I went up stairs with him, and he said, Leadbetter, can you, or do you engrave on copper: I said, no, I could not, it was quite out of my profession; I replied that I knew a young man of the name of White, who was an engraver in that line, and I supposed he would do what he wanted to get done; Mr. Harding paused a little time, and he returned back and said, White you have mentioned, do you think this White can be depended on; or can I, or may I depend on you: To that reply I told him, I would do my endeavour to get what he might want done.

Q. Did he tell you what? - A. No; I told him I had known White from a lad, even from an apprentice.

Q. What Did Mr. Harding say upon that? - A. He said he would call upon me in the course of the next week; then he went away.

Q. How soon afterwards was it that you saw Mr. Harding? - A. About three weeks.

Q. Where was that? - A. He came to my lodgings, which were, at that time, No. 3, Greek-street.

Q. Had he any thing with him when he came? - A. He brought with him four duty aces of spades with the name of Harding cut off.

Q. You can only tell a name was cut off; what did he say to you? - A. He told me to take that to Mr. White and tell him to copy it as close as he could, and if he should ask any questions, to tell him it was for a foreigner at Hambro'; he then went away.

Q. Did you carry these to White? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did any conversation pass between you and White? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell him what passed between you and White? - A. Yes, I had some difficulty to find him; I met him in Long-acre, and he took me into some shops; I asked him to call at my lodgings, which he did; I asked him to engrave me a plate and to call on me to-morrow; when he came, he said, Leadbetter, for God's sake, do you know what you are doing of? I told him I did not; he then said, he could engrave these aces, but if he did, he must give them into the hands of a Magistrate, for he had asked a question of his friend, who was a card-maker, and he told him that.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Harding? - A. The next day he came to me.

Q. Now then at that time did you inform Harding of what you have told us, of what White said to you? - A. Yes.

Q. What did Harding say to that? - A. He still persisted it was no such thing; I told him that White told me it was a forgery; he insisted it was no such thing, he said he was a poor fool, and knew no better.

Q. What further did he say? - A. He told me to go to White again, and to tell him that no harm should come to him if he would do it, and more than that, whatever money he wanted or asked he should have, and that he should have the money first.

Q. Did you see White afterwards, to inform him of that? - A. I did.

Q. Would White do them? - A. He told me that he would have nothing to do in it, for he thought that I knew who they were for.

Q. After that, I believe, you never saw White? - A. No.

Q. Did you see Harding soon afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come to you, or did you go to him? - A. I think I went and told him what White had said.

Q. What did he say to that? - A. There was nothing more passed after that; he never took any more notice about engraving for six or seven months.

Q. I think you lodged, then, in Greek-street? - A. Yes.

Q. After that you lodged in Titchfield-street, No. 42? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you there see Mr. Harding? - A. Yes, about six or seven months after the time I was speaking of, he came to my lodgings in Titchfield-street, he asked me and said, do you think in your own mind, you could learn to engrave on copper: I then told him I did not know, but I thought I might; upon which he said, if you will get some one to instruct you, I will pay for your instruction: upon which I applied to several people, and I was recommended to Mr. Woodthorpe, in Fetter-lane, to whom I went; he told me to call again on the next day, when I went to him, and he would give me an answer; he did afterwards do it.

Q. Did he undertake to instruct you afterwards? - A. He did.

Q. For what sum was he to instruct you? - A. For twenty pounds or guineas, I think guineas.

Q. Who paid that money? - A. Mr. Harding, he furnished me with that money to pay Mr. Woodthorpe.

Q. After you had been with Mr. Woodthorpe a competent time, did he come to you to see how you improved? - A. He asked me if I had practised enough to touch up a plate for him; I then asked him what that plate was; he told me it was a plate of the aces of spades; and he said that the poor old man - the poor old Baronet that did it for him was dead.

Q. Did you endeavour to do it? - A. I told him I could not.

Q. After that did he come to you again? - A. Yes.

Q. How long afterwards was it, a week or a month? - A. It might be a month.

Q. Did he come to you again? - A. He came to me again, and asked me how I came on with Woodthorpe; I told him very well.

Q. Did he then shew you any thing? - A. Yes.

Q. What was it? - A. He came and shewed me a plate of four duty aces of spades.

Q. What did he say he wanted to be done with it? - A. He said he wanted it to be touched up;

and then we walked to the other end of the room, and said, had I better touch it up here, or come to his house to do it; I told him to do as he pleased; he then said, come to my house; I went and dined there, it was on a Sunday, and after dinner he shut me into a room, and gave me some gravers, and told me to do the best I could with them.

Q. How did he shut you in the room? - A. He locked the door; I tried to do it, but finding I could not do it, I left off; he came into the room about the dusk of the evening, he said, Leadbetter, what have you done? I told him I had done a little, I did not know whether it would do or no; with that he said, never mind it now, I will try to do it myself.

Q. Do you recollect at all what the number were? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was one, two, six, and seven.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it at your lodgings that he came again? - A. Yes, he came to my lodgings.

Q. Did he ask you any further questions? - A. He said, he did not mind telling me what he wanted.

Q. What did he want? - A. He asked me if I could engrave on brass with my own machine; I told him, I could not.

Mr. Dampier. The witness is a stone engraver.

Q. He asked you if you could engrave on brass? - A. I told him I could not, my tools were made of the softest iron I could get.

Q. Did he afterwards ask you of your progress with Mr. Woodthorpe? - A. He came again, and asked me how I came on with Mr. Woodthorpe; I told him as before, very well. He brought me a plate under his coat, and gave me a sheet of aces of spades.

Q. Containing the number of twenty? - A. Yes.

Q. Such a one as this? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say to you? - A. He told me that he would be glad if I would copy fourteen, fifteen, nineteen, and twenty, and do them as close as possible I could, he was so distressed he did not know what to do; I then told him I would. Finding I was not capable of doing it, I employed a man of the name of Bunning.

Q. Did you communicate to Harding that you had employed Bunning? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you give Bunning the plate, and did Bunning do the plate? - A. He did.

Q. Did you give the plate so done by Bunning to Harding? - A. I did.

Q. When you gave it to him, what did he say to it? - A. He said it was not a proper thing to be done; Bunning said that.

Q. Now, when you gave the plate to Harding which Bunning had worked upon, did Harding make any observation upon it? - A. He looked at it, and said it was very neatly done.

Q. What did he do upon that - did he give you any other plate? - A. He came a very short time afterwards, and told me that he liked that plate very well that I had done, and he would be obliged to me to do another, and put the name of Blanchard in; he gave me an exportation ace, a sheet of the same size as one of them; I gave it to Bunning with his directions, and got it done.

Q. Did you give that to Harding? - A. I did.

Q. Some time after that did he come to you again? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say to you? - A. He asked me if I had done the plates; I told him, yes; he said he would be obliged to me if I would do one or two more, with the name of Harding, duty aces not for exportation; I did two Blanchards, and then he came again for me to do a Harding, because he said he should be found out working on one number.

Q. Did you give that to Bunning? - A. I did.

Q. Was that done by Bunning? - A. Yes.

Q. And afterwards given by you to Harding? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see him again with one of the Blanchard plates? - A. Yes, he came to me again to see if I would take out the palm-branch; the exportation aces are with palm-branches, and the duty aces are with leaves on them; I was to take out the palm-branch, and to put in the leaves; I was to make some alteration that they should not be exactly to pattern; it was taken out, but the alteration was not made, I had not time.

Q. Do you remember the bustle there was about Lee and Hardy? - A. Yes.

Q. About that time Blacklin was prosecuted, and Lee ran away? - A. Yes, he came to me, and said, for God sake, help me to bury the plates; for, said he, they have been searching my house; upon which I did.

Q. Did he give you any directions? - A. He told me to bury them; then he came again, and said, let me have them; he took the plates, and brought them again in the course of a day or two, and I buried them.

Q. Did he tell you what you were to do if you were asked about them? - A. Yes; he said if they came to me, and asked me any thing about it, to to say I knew nothing of any such thing.

Q. Do you remember the time you were apprehended? - A. I think it was the 25th of June.

Q. At that time were there any of these plates at your house? - A. Two.

Q. Who had brought them there? - A. Mr. Harding.

Q. What were they brought there for? - A. For me to bury them till he wanted them to print off.

Q. Was any paper brought? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was it brought by? - A. Himself.

Q. And these were in your house at the time you were taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were taken up on the 25th of June? - A. I was.

Q. And there were found in your house two forged plates? - A. Yes.

Q. And you had employed a lad of the name of Bunning to forge others to engrave them? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever told that poor lad, Bunning, that they were done for the Commissioners of the Stamps? - A. Yes, I told him they were for Mr. Shephard, that belongs to the Stamp-office.

Q. How many times were you examined yourself after you were taken up? - A. Three times, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. With some little apprehension to your neck, you knew you were in danger? - A. Certainly; I had not a little apprehension, I knew I was in danger if I was not admitted an evidence for the crown.

Q. That is true - pray how many different accounts have you given before you had given this to-day? - A. To the best of my knowledge there was one.

Q. Were there not three? - A. I cannot exactly say there were not three.

Q. Do you not remember, at the conclusion of your last examination, your saying that the account you then gave you would stick by, and that your former accounts were not true? - A. I cannot understand you.

Q. Do not you remember being asked, upon the conclusion of the last account that you gave, whether the account of that day was true, or the account of former examinations - you said, the account I give to-day is true, and the former accounts are not; the former accounts were destroyed because they were false? - A. They were false in parts.

Q. Then you have given three different accounts - have you given three different accounts or two? - A. There were two.

Q. And given before the same Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Mr. Dampier. Q. These are the plates and the paper that were delivered to you by Mr. Harding? - A. Yes.

Mr. Dampier. One of them has the R instead of the E, on one of the plates is Diru instead of Dieu.

- BUNNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. Are you acquainted with the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. What business are you? - A. I am a writing engraver.

Q. Were you employed by the last witness to engrave any thing for him? - A. I was employed by him to engrave the aces and different things, such as card-plates, and to do his business such as he had to do.

Q. Look at that plate, and see whether that is one of the plates that you did for him? - A. Yes, that is one.

Q. How came you to be employed by him to do this? - A. He told me they were done for Mr. Shephard, the engraver, at the Stamp-office.

Q. You executed them for him? - A. Yes.

Q. And you delivered them when you had executed them to him? - A. Yes, these are the two that I did for him.

Q. Did you do some of the exportation aces? - A. I did, and some in the name of Blanchard, and some in the name of Harding.

Q. How many plates in the name of Blanchard? - A. I fancy there were two; there were more than two I did in the name of Harding.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you been acquainted with this man? - A. About November, he came to me at Mr. Woodthorpe's.

Q. When he came to you did not he represent himself as one employed in the Stamp-office? - A. He said he was employed by a Mr. Shephard, who was the engraver employed by the Stamp-office.

Q. He asked you whether you could engrave what he wanted? - A. Yes.

Q. Telling you what it was, what answer did you give him? - A. I told him I did not think I was capable, it was entirely out of my line.

Q. In order to induce you to do so, did not he tell you he would give you something, and teach you music also? - A. Yes.

Q. When you told him you must tell your master, he said you must not do that, because the Stamp-office will find it out - he told you that he had great influence at the Stamp-office, there was no harm in what you were doing of, and he could do any thing for you? - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say you took it for granted you were doing nothing wrong, you were only doing it for the service of this man? - A. Yes.

JOHN SKELTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. I believe you are a grocer, living in Queen-street, Grosvenor-square? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Harding? - A. I believe about thirteen years.

Q. Did he, at any time, apply to you for the use of any part of your premises? - A. He did.

Q. How long ago is that? - A. I cannot tell exactly the time, I think it is about two years ago.

Q. What part of your premises? - A. It was the back part of my own house in the court, but there is a way into it from my house; the house belongs to the court.

Q. However it is laid to your premises, and you let it to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Who used to keep the key of that room that

you let him have? - A. Mr. Harding himself; sometimes he would leave it, but generally he had it.

Q. What use did he make of that room? - A. In doing of cards.

Q. What do you mean by doing of cards? - A. Printing of the aces.

Q. Have you seen him in the act of printing the aces? - A. Once I have.

Q. What apparatus was there in that place for the purpose of doing this? - A. A press.

Q. Any thing else? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. No? - A. There was an iron thing that I did not know the use of.

Q. Was it what they call a fly-press? - A. I never knew the name till they told me at Bow-street.

Q. It is an instrument with two arms? - A. Yes.

Q. How often did the prisoner resort to your premises to work in that room? - A. I cannot tell, because I was mostly out in the day-time about my business.

Q. As near as you can form a judgment? - A. Generally once or twice or so in a day, and some days not at all.

Q. When he came there, and you happened to be at home, did he usually work there? - A. He went into that room; I cannot say he was always at work.

Q. I ask you whether, when he was there and you at home, he was generally employed in something in that room? - A. I believe he was.

Q. How long did he continue at a time in that room? - A. Sometimes half an hour, and at other times an hour, but I cannot speak exactly.

Q. How did he come to your house with respect to his dress? - A. In the dress of a tradesman; sometimes very clean, and sometimes dirtier.

Q. Not in a working dress? - A. No.

Q. Was there any working dress in that room? - A. I think there was a flannel jacket, I cannot exactly recollect.

Q. At the time you saw him working, printing the aces of spades, what had he on? - A. He generally had an apron on.

Q. In his coat or jacket when you saw him? - A. Sometimes in his coat, and sometimes without it.

Q. Had you and he any dealing in trade together? - A. He used to have his goods of me - rum, brandy, spirits, and grocery.

Q. How were you paid by him? - A. They went on in account.

Q. Against waste paper - waste paper was the commodity that you were furnished with from him? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the shape and condition of the waste paper that you were furnished with from him? - A. Packs of cards.

Q. But the name of it was waste paper? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had been the nature of this dealing with him and you, you furnishing him with spirits and grocery, and receiving in return waste paper in the shape of packs of cards? - A. Ever since he took my room, and sometime before.

Q. Who kept the account between you? - A. I did not; I lost a wife upon this occasion. (Witness shedding tears.)

Q. Your wife is dead since your house was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. As that is a distressing subject we will drop it - The nature of your dealing had continued ever since and for sometime before he took your room? - A. Yes; I do not wish to say more or less than is true.

Q. Certainly not, nobody accuses you of it - How many packs of cards did you receive at a time? - A. According as I wanted, sometimes a dozen, sometimes five or six dozen.

Q. At what price per pack, or by the gross? - A. I forget; I think it was sometimes seventeen shillings and sixpence for a dozen packs of waste paper, and sometimes lower.

Q. Be so good as to look at this account, and tell me where that used to be kept? - A. At Mr. Harding's; it is what he made out.

Q. The account was kept between your wife and him? - A. Yes, it was; I never saw the statement but that day they came to search my house; it was brought the day before.

Q. Who brought it to your house the day before? - A. Mr. Harding himself.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about it? - A. Nothing particular.

Q. What did he say when he brought it? - A. Take care of this.

Q. You never saw that before? - A. No.

Q. You are sure it is your wife's reckoning? - A. She kept the account.

Q. You say he brought it the day before your house was searched? - A. Yes.

Q. And he desired you to take care of it? - A. Yes.

Q. It was in the same state then as it was when found by the officers? - A. It was.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Harding's hand-writing? - A. I cannot say particularly.

Q. Have you become acquainted with the usual mode of his hand-writing? - A. Yes; he wrote variable like all other men, sometimes better and sometimes worse.

Q. Did you become generally acquainted with his hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath whose hand-writing do you believe that to be? - A. I cannot say, I did not see it written.

Q. I did not ask you whether you saw it wrote,

but whose writing you believe it to be in your conscience? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Whose hand-writing do you believe that to be? - A. I cannot swear to it.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you are not acquainted with any hand-writing of any person that so much resembles that? A It resembles very near his hand.

Q. Very near whose hand? - A. Mr. Harding's.

Court. Q. Do you believe it to be his? - A. I cannot say, it resembles it.

Q. Do not talk of resemblance - suppose you had received a note of his hand-writing ordering goods, should you have so believed it to be his, that you would have executed his order, for instance - Mr. Skelton send to me two gallons of rum; should you have executed that order? - A. He never wrote to me, he generally came and ordered.

Q. Do you believe it to be his hand-writing? - A. I believe some of it is his.

Q. Point out some that you believe - now there is the name of R. Harding, shew me something particular that appears to be more like it than another? - A. I do not think that I can any where make out, excepting here.

Q. Be so good as to read to me that? - A.12th of March.

Q. What is that 12th? - A. I dare not say.

Q. Is that the debtor's side - is that giving you credit, or giving him credit? - A. Giving me credit.

Q. Read the entry, or shew it me, and I will read it to you, and ask you what it means - March the 10th, goods twelve pounds; is that his handwriting? - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Is it goods furnished by you to him? - A. No.

Q. Is it goods sent into the country by you to his friends? - A. Yes.

Q. According to your best belief, whose handwriting are the various balances? - A. I really cannot tell.

Q. Whose do you believe them to be? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Have you no belief about it? - A. I have a belief that it is an account against me.

Q. Upon the first page whose writing do you believe the word Richard Harding to be, upon your oath? - A. I cannot say it is, nor I cannot say it is not.

Q. Whose do you believe it to be? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You have told us that you had pretty large dealings in this article of waste paper - in what manner did you receive it? - A. It was made up in packs, containing the whole fifty-two.

Q. Cards? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they made up in sealed wrappers like these? - A. Some were, and some were not

Q. How were the rest made up? - A. In white paper.

Q. All in separate packs? - A. All.

Q. And bought by you to sell again? - A. Yes.

Q. And by you sold again at a profit? - A. I did.

Q. When Mr. Harding gave you this book, and desired you to take care of it, did he give you any reason? - A. Not a word; he said, take care of that; I cannot tell whether he said it was the account of it.

Q. I had not asked you that, it was very proper of you to mention that - the very next day the officers came to your house to search you - that was the same day as they were searching his premises? - A. I think it was.

Q. Were you present when they searched your premises? - A. I certainly was.

Q. Did you see a flannel jacket found? - A. I have told you before.

Q. I did not ask you whether there was a flannel jacket; I ask you whether there was not a flannel jacket found? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose was it? - A. It was not mine; it laid down on the floor; I supposed it to be Mr. Harding's.

Q. Did any body else use that room? - A. No.

Q. Is that the flannel jacket that he worked in? - A. I believe it was.

Q. Were these tools, the press, and the iron instrument that were found there, Mr. Harding's? - A. They were.

Q. Did you see a large number of aces of spades in the room, amounting to about three thousand? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Cecilia Shinglear ? - A. She is my daughter.

Q. Did you at any time convey any articles to Mrs. Shinglear to take care of? - A. One night Mr. Harding brought me up a roll of paper; I took it, I did not know what it was.

Q. One night Mr. Harding brought you a roll wrapped round with paper, which you believe contained papers; you put it under your arm, and carried it to Mrs. Shinglear - you are sensible you had it from Mr. Harding? - A. I am sure of it.

Q. Do you know when that was delivered to you? - A. The day before my house was searched.

Q. What did Mr. Harding say to you when he gave it to you? - A. Mr. Harding said, take care of this paper.

Q. Why did you not take care of the roll of paper, and keep it at home as you did the other - how came you to carry it to Mrs. Shinglear? - A. I was desired to put it out of the way, I did not know what it was.

Q. Who desired you? - A. Mr. Harding himself desired me to put it out of the way.

Q. What did he say about putting it out of the way? - A. He desired me to put it out of the way, and to take care of it.

Q. Therefore you deposited it with your daughter? - A. I did, but she did not know what it was.

Q. When the officers came to your house, Mr. Skelton, did they dig any where - what did they take up when they came first? - A. Nothing; I do not recollect whether they did or no.

Q. Do not you recollect their finding some plates? - A. Yes, they found them near the necessary, under ground.

Q. Who directed them where to dig? - A. Myself.

Q. And near the necessary they dug and found these plates? - A. Yes.

Q. Who brought these plates? - A. Mr. Harding, I suppose: I can tell you that he told me they were there.

Q. Did you see any thing found in your dust-hole? - A. I do not know that ever they looked there.

Q. But they found some plates where you told them to dig? - A. Yes.

Q.Sometime after they found some things in your privy - did you know there was any thing in your privy before that search? - A. No, I never knew there was any thing there at all.

Q. Had any other person there any card-making business, excepting the prisoner Harding? - A. No, nobody.

Q. Had you ever done any thing relating to card-making? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You said you knew Mr. Harding some years - what situation was he in when you first knew him? - A. He was my shopman.

Q. You knew him sometime in that capacity? - A. Yes, he was at that time.

Q. And the time during he was your shopman did you deal in cards? - A. Yes.

Q. You dealt in cards before he was in business at all? - A. Yes.

Q. Afterwards he became a card-maker - you told the Counsel just now that these plates were found in your yard? - A. They were.

Q. Did you point out the place where they were? - A. I told the officers he found them; they were there.

Q. You knew where they were? - A. I was told by Mr. Harding.

Q. Of course it was from Mr. Harding's information only? - A. Yes.

Q. That is from your credit; and all the utensils you were talking of were found in your premises? - A. Yes.

Q. You said that Mr. Harding kept the key of that place? - A. In general, I did not say always.

Q. I want to know if any other person was there? - A. No.

Q. When the officers went there, had he the key? - A. No, I had it; it hung up in my parlour; he left it there.

Q. Of course he left it. It was in your possession - I fancy that was not the only time it hung in your parlour? - A. Sometimes I asked him for the key, because I had goods in that room; I used to ask him for it, and he let me have it.

Q. I do not know whether I was correct in what I thought I heard you say: that once you saw him print an ace of spades - can you tell when that was? - A. I cannot tell, I think my memory to be very imperfect.

Q. Does your memory serve you to recollect what you swore at Bow-street upon that occasion? - A. I will tell you what it was: I said I never saw him print an ace of spades but once.

Q. That was read over to you? - A. I am certain of it.

Q. That you stated the first time you were examined? - A. I cannot recollect; any of the Gentlemen that examined me can state it to you; I cannot.

Q. You cannot recollect whether you gave that evidence the first time? - A. I think I did not; I recollect being asked, but I do not recollect what answer I gave the first time, I never took any minute of it.

Q. You have been in the habit of dealing in cards from the first time of his becoming a servant to you, down to the day of his being taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you at liberty now, or in custody? - A. I am out on bail.

Mr. Garrow. We may as well give your Lordship the fact of this book, Harding on one side, and Skelton on the other; the charge against Skelton is of this nature: twenty new, one pound fifteen; twenty-eight only, old and new; and then waste, one dozen and sixteen and eight; upon the whole it appears to be one hundred and forty pounds; one hundred and eighty-six, with the exemptions of a few articles in cash; they all appear to be waste paper, up to the amount of between three and four hundred pounds.

EDWARD STONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Were you a servant of the prisoner Harding, the card-maker, in May last? - A. Yes.

Q. Now tell me first, whether for six months before May you did any thing with the aces of spades in your shop? - A. Yes, I cut a few duty aces about once a month.

Q. What sort of paper was it which you used to cut your duty aces from the Stamp-office, with twenty on a sheet? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any duty aces in your shop except the Stamp-office duty aces? - A. No.

Q. In May and April did you do any thing of that sort? - A. Before May.

Q. Did you ever work up any of the aces of spades for the last two months? - A. Yes, some few.

Q. How many packs of cards were generally worked up at his shop by the month or week, upon an average, in the year? - A. Five works a month; there are about five gross eight dozen in five works.

Court. Q. What time was it when you worked a few? - A. We generally cut a few once a month; I had cut some few the last two months.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Was that sufficient for the different packs of cards that were from his shop? - A. I do not know what works went from his shop.

Q. Would it do for the whole work? - A. No, it would not.

Q. Who worked up the other aces of spades that would do for the whole work? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you happen to be there when the visitor of the Stamp-office visited the shop? - A. I was generally there.

Q. Did your master ever tell you any thing after they were gone? - A. Yes, once; and the work was taken from North-row to Hereford-street to be worked up, after the inspections of the proper officers.

Q. Who was the servant when you were there? - A.Jesse West.

Court. Q. Who was the officer that visited? A. Mr. Wolley, James Burton , and Edward - was another.

JESSE WEST sworn. Examined by Mr. Knapp Q. You are one of the servants of Mr. Harding? A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how many shops he had? - A. No others than two, in Hereford-street and North-row.

Q.Has Mr. Harding done as much business for six months before he was taken up, as he had done previous? - A. No.

Q. What quantity was done during the last six months? - A. I cannot say; I chiefly pasted blanks for that time, I may say three months in particular.

Q.Then you did not know of any other place used by Mr. Harding than these two places you have described? - A. No.

JANE BURTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. You worked with Mr. Harding for the last six months before he was taken up? - A. I worked for him two years.

Q. How many places had he? - A. Two, North-row and Hereford-street.

Q. You know nothing of any other place? - A. No.

Q. Who used to make the aces of spades and put them up in general? - A. I do not know.

Q. You do not? - A. No.

Q. What was your particular business? - A. I was employed in making blanks, and sometimes sorting of playing-cards.

Q. Had you any aces of spades in what you sorted? - A. I used to make them in packs all but the aces, and I carried them to Mr Harding.

JOHN RIVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. Do you recollect going to the prisoner's house? - A. On the 25th of June, I went with Carpmeal and Miller to Hereford-street. Mr. Harding was in the shop when I went in; I apprehended him; I made a search in his house at that time; I found a large quantity of cards, and all of them with good stamps; they were all good aces of spades found there.

Q. Did you apprehend any others? - A. The last witness was there and the apprentice; we went to Leadbetter's and found in the kitchen, upon the top of his rolling-press, these two plates in paper, done up in this way. (Witness describing the manner.)

Q. Did you go to Skelton's house? - A. We did, on the same day.

Q. Was Skelton at home? - A. He was.

Q. What part of the premises did you search? - A. I searched the room at the bottom of the yard.

Q. What were the articles that you found there in that room? - A. There were two rollers; it had the appearance of a press being taken down.

Q. Were there any other articles there? - A. There was an iron fly-press that was in the room, and a flannel working jacket, and some flannel, likewise a printing-ball; the flannel has the appearance of red ink, and shews that some work has been carried on, by the red appearance; here is the marble slab it has been worked upon, the rolling-press was compleat; at a distant place we found the remainder of the press which had been taken down.

Q. Then both in the room and the other place you found a compleat press? - A. We did: on the 27th we went to Mr. Skelton's, and at the bottom of the yard, about a foot under the earth, we found these other plates.

Q. What are they the plates of? - A. They are four plates of aces of spades; in the room there were cards packed up, a large quantity; I saw no aces of spades in those I looked at; I looked in one, and some loose cards were in the room; on the 9th of July I went to Skelton's and made a subsequent search, and in the privy we found these four other plates; they are aces of spades.

Q. Was Skelton on the premises when they were found? - A. At the first time he was.

Q. Did you, in consequence of what you heard

from Skelton, search another place? - A. I went to Mr. Senor's house in King-street, Grosvenor-square; I found, in the back-room, which was occupied by Mr. Shinglear, this parcel.

Court. Q. Is it a roll? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any wrappers to it? - A. Yes, it was done up in this blue paper.

Q. What were they? - A. A quantity of aces of spades; these are all aces of spades.

Q. Do you know the number of them? - A. I do not.

Q. Was the door fastened? - A. No. it was not when I went in.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you accompany Rivett on this search? - A. I did not to Shinglear's, I went to Harding's and Skelton's.

Q. Did you attend to the account that he has stated; has he stated it correct? - A. Yes, he has.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - Q. Did you accompany Rivett on this search; has he stated it correct? - A. Yes, he has.

CECILIA SHINGLEAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you the daughter of Mr. Skelton? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he at any time deliver any thing to you with any directions? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before the officers found it at your house? - A. The night before the officers searched my house.

Q. They have produced a parcel that appears to be a number of aces of spades wrapped up in dark blue paper - Is that the paper you received from your father? - A. I do not know what it was; I put them in a box.

Q. With what? - A. The box contained foul linen.

Q. Did you open the parcel before you put it in? - A. No, I put it in exactly as I received it from my father; it was exactly in the same state when the officers found it.

Q. Did you put it in the box of foul linen wrapped up in blue paper? - A. I did.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. Have you counted these aces of spades? - A. They were counted in my presence, and there were more than two thousand found.

THOMAS LINDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. I believe you are supervisor of the stamps? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any book wherein the dies of the wrappers of the cards are directed before the forty-fourth, the last Act in operation? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, also, that before that time, with respect to the duty aces of spades, orders were given that they should be circulated as before, and printed as before? - A. Yes.

Mr Gurney. Q. Was this order in writing? - A. No.

Q. You received these orders from the Commissioners, and they were verbal? - A. Yes.

NATHANAEL MERCHANT sworn - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are the engraver employed by the Commissioners of the Stamp-office? - A. I am.

Q. Have you examined a certain quantity of duty aces that have been produced to you? - A. I have examined them.

Q. We will shew you one or two that were purchased by Hockey, the first purchase of the prisoner, and on the 24th; looking at that ace of spades, are you able to say whether that is or not the stamp authorised by the Commissioners, or whether it is a forgery? - A. It is certainly a forgery.

Q. Is there any particular circumstance that makes it out of all possible doubt? - A. The letter R is imposed where the letter E ought to be.

Q. That where the letter R is cannot be printed from one of the plates of the Stamp Office? - A. No, it cannot be.

Q. Have you looked over all the aces of that bundle sold on the 24th? - A. They are all a forgery.

Q. All those that you looked over at Mr Estcourt's were a forgery? - A. They were.

- ESTCOURT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you shew to the last witness all the aces of spades that were first purchased of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And all the others that were purchased at the prisoner's, and all these he said were forged? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mr. Merchant.) Have you looked at them found at Shinglear's? - A.(Looking at them.) They are all a forgery.

Q. I shall trouble you with another question with regard to the wrappers - look at one of them purchased on the 24th of June; does that appear to be a genuine stamp from the Stamp Office, or a forgery? - A. It appears to be a forgery.

Q.(To Mr. Estcourt.) Did you shew to Mr. Merchant any but such as were bought of the prisoner, or were bought at his shop, or were found at the other places? - A. No.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. Tell my Lord and the Gentlemen of the Jury in what way the stamps are delivered out at the Office? - A. All the legal stamps are delivered out with the name of the card-maker on them, upon a receipt of the card-maker or his servant; the plate is kept at the Office, or, by the directions of the Commissioner, the manufacturer provides the paper; it is stamped, at the Stamp Office, and is to be re-delivered to the card-maker.

Q. How many in a sheet? - A. Twenty, never less (Witness looking at those purchased at Harding's.)

These never came from the Office; with respect to the stamp on the wrapper called the label, they are delivered in the same quantity as the aces, and no otherwise; the label is pasted on by the card-maker.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-63

584. ELIZABETH DOWNING and ANN PRICE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August ; one metal watch, value 40 s. and three one-pound Bank notes , the property of James Fuller .

JAMES FULLER sworn. - Q. You are now a soldier in the Guards? - A. Yes, I was not on the 24th of August; I was then loading a cart of dung in Pye-street , the prisoners came by, and asked me to come up into their room; I went up, and sent for some beer, and staid there awhile, and spent what I had; Elizabeth Downing took the watch out of my pocket, she said she wanted to see what o'clock it was.

Q. What did she say she would do with it? - A. She said she would pawn it; I said she should not, she did pawn it.

Q. When you saw her take the watch out of your pocket, did you take it from her? - A. No, she went out of doors with it.

Q. Did you run after her? - A. No, I did not think she would pawn it.

Q. Did she bring you back the money? - A. No, I never saw a farthing of the money; she came back again, and I left the room.

Q. Did you ask her what she had done with your watch? - A. Yes; she said she had pawned it for ten shillings.

Q. You were all pretty good friends? - A. Yes; I went and got the money for some straw that I had sold, and was going home; I was quite sober when I went into their room, and I was quite drunk when I came out, and went to Mr. Randell's, Dean street, Westminster.

Q. Did you receive your money? - A. Yes, of Mr. Randell, in Dean-street, Westminster; he paid me three pounds sixteen shillings and sixpence; he gave me fifteen shillings in halfpence, one shilling and sixpence in silver, and three one-pound notes.

Q. Having received that you went on home? - A. Yes, and the girls overtook me in Tothill-street, they went a little way along the Park with me; after they parted from me, I missed the money out of the crown of my hat; then I looked after them, and they were gone out of my sight.

Q. Did you feel any body touch your hat while you were with the girls? - A. No.

- CREEDLAND sworn. - I am a constable.

Q. On the 25th of August, did you search the prisoners? - A.Yes; I found nothing but a duplicate of the watch. (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Downing's defence. The prosecutor was unloading a cart of straw, he asked me if I would come down and let him in, as I was looking out of my window; I said, yes, if he would give me some money; I came down and let him in, he sent for both beer and gin; he stopped and spent what money he had in his pocket, he said he should like to have something more to eat and drink; he asked me to pawn his watch; I said I would, if he would give me leave; he gave it me to pawn, saying, get me two pounds on it, I said, it will not fetch one quarter of the money; I pawned it for ten shillings, I told the pawnbroker that the person that belonged to it would fetch it out again; I took the prosecutor the duplicate and the money; he gave me some of it, and staid and spent the remainder. He went his way to go home, this young woman and I were going to St. James's market, we lit of him again; we told him, as far as we were going, we would accompany him. We left him and went through Spring-garden gate, and he went towards Kensington; I never saw any more of him till Sunday morning, he came to us then, and said where is my watch? I told him I had pawned it for him; I said, here is the ticket; he said, as you pawned it, I will leave the duplicate with you till I get the money, I shall come to Mr. Randell's before long, and you shall fetch it out; I never saw any thing of the money that he said he lost.

Price did not say any thing in her defence

Both NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton

Reference Number: t18050918-64

585. JOSEPH STRINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a Banknote, value 30 l. the property of John Handy .

JOHN HANDY sworn - I am a groom , I live with Mr. Thomas Warren , Stafford-place ; I lost a thirty-pound Bank-note out of a box in my room over the stable, I left the key in the box.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do, he is a soldier in the Foot Guards ; I left him in the care of my room one night when I went out of town.

Q. Before you went out of town, did you see that your property was safe? - A. Yes, and when I returned it was gone; after I returned he called upon me at the stable, I did not mention any thing of the kind then to him, I had no suspicion of him.

Q. What reason have you to charge him now? - A. Because I stopped the payment of that note at the Bank, and in about six weeks afterwards it came to the banker's.

Q.Whose note was it originally - who gave you the note? - A. I had it from Thomas Wicks , a servant of Mr. Charles Baggett ; he put it into my hands for me to put it into the stocks for him, the Bank at that time being shut up, I could not; I did not exactly know the number of the note, I went to Templars and Co's banking-house to know the number; I went to the prisoner, and charged him with it; he confessed it, he said he did not know what possessed him to do it.

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - I am a clerk in the Bank; I produce the note, it was paid into the Bank by Mrs. Hoare, No. 48, Leadenhall-street, on the 24th of June.

JAMES FERGUSON sworn. - Q. Look at that note - had you ever that note in your possession? - A. Yes, I endorsed it when I changed it.

Q. What are the words? - A. Stringer, First Guards, Serjeant Needham; I changed it for the prisoner.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Is that your note? - A. Yes, I know it by the number of it.

Q. You said you did not know the number, you went to Templars to find out the number? - A. I knew there was a 6 and a 9 in it; I did not exactly know what the number was.

Q. Had you seen it before you went out of town? - A. Yes, two or three days before.

Prisoner's defence. John Handy came to me one morning, he told me if I would own to it, he would take so much a week, for the serjeant to stop it from my pay; after that he wanted to turn me out to the military law, and they would have nothing to do with it; he got me to be put in the Guard-room three days, he sent a letter to my friends, and having no letter returned, he fetched two constables.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-65

586. WILLIAM BARRETT and ISABELLA STANFORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , two cotton shirts, value 3 s. and one pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. the property of John-Christain Patie .

JOHN STURGEON sworn. - I am an officer of the Thames Police: On the 29th of July, I was at the Rose and Crown, Wapping-street , two foreigners came in, one had a bundle with him; the foreigner with the bundle went out, and left the bundle on the bench, and told the other to take care of it. About eleven o'clock I shut up the shutters, I lived there, I asked who was going home, or who was going to-bed; (the foreigners had asked for a lodging:) while I was holding the door in my hand, Barrett and Stanford rushed out of the door together; under Barrett's jacket I saw some striped cotton shirts, I instantly ran to the bundle, and perceiving it slack to what it was when it came in, I ran out, and catched Barrett just at the end of the shutters outside of the house; I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing; I just felt him, I found nothing; I overtook the woman, I said to her, Bella, what have you got? she said, nothing; I brought her back into the house, and took it out of her apron: there were two cotton shirts, and a pair of new cotton stockings; she told me that Barrett had given them to her at the door; Barrett was in the tap-room, he asked me to forgive him, I told him it was out of my power; the shirts were delivered to the foreigner by the Magistrate's order, the ship sailed before the trial came on; the foreigner, John- Christian Patie , identified them before the Magistrate.

Barrett's defence. I know nothing at all about the things, I never saw the things; the constable came out of the door as I was making water, and asked me what I had got; he found nothing about me; he said, I was the thief that took the things out of the bundle; I was rather intoxicated in liquor at the time.

Stanford did not say any thing in her defence.

Barrett, GUILTY , aged 26.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Stanford, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-66

587. MARY WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a cloak, value 15 s. a sheet, value 5 s. and an apron, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Lewis .

CATHERINE LEWIS sworn. - I live at No. 21, King-street, Drury-lane ; the prisoner at the bar lodged with me for a month all but three days, she robbed me while I was out working hard for my living; I found nothing but my cloak, at Mr. Page's, the pawnbroker's; my name is on the cloak, I have it on my back now.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Liquorpond-street; the prisoner pledged the cloak on the 11th of July, in the name of Mary Walker , for ten shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did any body come and claim it afterwards? - A. The same day, or the day following, the prosecutrix came; I let her have it. On the Saturday night the prisoner came to the shop again to pledge something else, I had her taken into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I took it in distress, I told the pawnbroker so.

Mr. Page. She told me it was her mother's.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-67

588. WILLIAM WYATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , two yards of corduroy cloth, value 4 s. half a yard of

kerseymere, value 10 s. three-quarters of a yard of other corduroy cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. and half a yard of cloth, value 1 s. the property of John-Frederick Wettig and Frederick Wettig .

FREDERICK WETTIG sworn. - I live in Duke-street, Portland-place : On the 13th of August I came out of the cutting-room into the shop; we are tailors ; I saw the prisoner with the articles under his arm; they were laying on the shelf in the shop; I had seen them about three minutes before.

Q. Upon your coming out and seeing him, what did he do? - A. He immediately dropped them; I stopped him; he was rather impertinent, he asked me whether he had them in his hand, or under his arm; he said, that would make a great difference; I said I should leave it to a Justice to settle; while I went to get an officer, he made his escape; I ran after him when I came back, and took him; I am sure he is the same man.

Prisoner's defence. I came in to buy an article that I had in my hand; I offered the prosecutor money for what I asked for.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-68

589. MARGARET SULIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a child's gown, value 6 s. and a child's frock, value 3 s. the property of Edward Bennet .

RACHAEL BENNET sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have seen her once; she came to my house on the day I lost my things, I cannot justly say the day; it was about one o'clock at noon; she came with an acquaintance of mine, and staid till about three or four o'clock, and we all went out together.

Q. Did you observe that she had any thing with her when she went out? - A. No, nothing at all.

Q. Were you together in the same room all the time she staid with you? - A. Yes; I came home about seven o'clock, and missed my children's clothes that same evening - a gown and a frock; they were hanging on the bannisters of the stairs in my house.

Q. Did you leave them there when you went out? - A. No, my children had put them there when they came from school at five o'clock.

Q. When you went out they were on your children's backs, who were at school, so that when you came home you did not know any thing more than what your children told you - Did you see this gown and frock afterwards? - A. Not till I saw them in Court.

ELEANOR MULLIN sworn. - About three weeks back I met the prisoner in the street; she told me that she was in great distress, and that she had a duplicate to sell. I gave her a shilling for the duplicate of two children's frocks; she told me they were pawned in the name of Connelly.

Q.Did she say who had pawned them? - A. Yes, she said she pawned them for five shillings and sixpence; I went and took them out at Mr. Edwards's; I saw they would not suit me; I went to Mr. Page to put them in again; he got me taken up.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - Q. Do you recollect the last witness bringing you any thing to pawn? - A. She brought this gown and frock to pledge at my shop; the prosecutrix had left the patterns of the child's gown and frock at my shop; I produce the gown and frock; she acknowledged before the Magistrate that she sold the duplicate to Mullin. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I never sold a duplicate in my life; I never saw the things before I saw them at the Justice's.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn. - On the 13th of August the prisoner pledged a frock and a gown at our shop, in the name of Connelly, for five shillings and sixpence; I do not know the person that took them out.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-69

590. ELEANOR TOWNSHEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. the property of William Balsdon .

SARAH BALSDON sworn. - My husband's name is William Balsdon : On the 28th of July, about noon, the prisoner came to my room to borrow some money of me, and while I went down stairs she stole my husband's shoes.

Q. You went down stairs and left her in the room - on your return were the shoes missing, or were they there? - A. I did not look for them till the evening; then I missed them.

JOHN SEULTER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Cherry-street, Bethnal-green: On Monday, the 29th of July, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop, and pawned this pair of shoes for two shillings and sixpence, in the name of Ann Townsend . (The shoes identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-70

591. BARTLEY SHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , five planes, value 5 s. an oil-stone, value 1 s. and a trying-square, value 1 s. the property of Jonathan Miller .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but his

own confession extorted by a promise of forgiveness, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-71

592. BARTLEY SHELL was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , six planes, value 6 s. four chisels, value 1 s. two squares, value 1 s. two gouges, value 1 s. a draw-board, value 6 d. a hammer, value 6 d. a pair of nippers, value 4 d. a striking knife, value 2 d. and a rule, value 6 d. the property of John Tingay .

JOHN TINGAY sworn. - I left my tools in a lower room in Mr. Gervaise's building; they were found afterwards in Mr. Richardson's field.

Q. Do you know who took them? - A. I know no more than he confessed to me himself.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess, or worse if he did not? - A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen him before the things were stole? - A. He came in on the 9th of September; he said he was ashamed to be seen lurking about, and he sat on the stool; at four o'clock I left work, and the prisoner went out and sat upon some bricks, and he drank part of half a gallon of beer with me; on Tuesday morning, when I went to work, the tools were gone.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-72

593. JOHN PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , two waistcoats, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS sworn. - I live at No. 6, Elder-walk, Islington ; the prisoner lodged with me in the same room; about the middle of the month I had a misunderstanding with him; I had an officer, who searched him, and there were two duplicates found on him respecting of these two waistcoats; I had missed them early in last month; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the articles.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am an officer; I produce two duplicates I found on the prisoner on the 17th of August.

GEORGE BERCHER sworn. - I produce two waistcoats, one pledged for four shillings on the 7th of January, and the other for two shillings on the 26th of February; they were pledged in the name of John Smith .

Prosecutor. I lost two waistcoats like these; I should be exceeding sorry to swear to them; there is no particular mark on them.

Q. Had you and he been on those friendly terms that he had liberty to wear your things? - A. Yes.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-73

594. MARY MAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a gown, value 12 s. the property of William Usher .

WILLIAM USHER sworn. - Q. Did you at any time lose a gown? - A. On the 27th of August I went out with my children, and on my return on the 28th my gown was missing; the prisoner at the bar was a lodger in my house at the time.

- sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Corder, in Green-street, Leicester-square; the prisoner at the bar pledged this gown at our shop for seven shillings, in the name of Mary Carter , on the 27th of August; I produce it. (The gown identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-74

595. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , four pounds weight of starch, value 4 s. 6 d. and two pounds and a quarter weight of soap, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Downes .

WILLIAM DOWNES sworn. - I am brother to Samuel Downes ; the prisoner came into the shop for an ounce of tea; there were customers in the shop which I was serving; she went from the counter to the door where I had piled up the soap, and took a cake of it, and put it between her knees under her cloak; I had suspicion; I went and took it from her; I asked her what she was going to do with it; she said she was going to buy it of me; in moving her legs a paper of starch fell from under her clothes with our mark on the paper, and there was a paper of starch missing out of the window.

Q. What is the value of the paper of starch? - - A. Four shillings and sixpence, and the weight of the soap is two pounds and a quarter, value 1 s. 6 d. my brother keeps the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I have got a family of small children; I am a dealer in old clothes; I went and sold my work; I went into that man's house for a quarter of a pound of tea; I felt something under my feet; I stooped down to see what it was; before I could pick it up, he came round the counter, and took it up; he said I wanted to steal this soap; he dragged me away, and took me to the watch-house; the next morning he took me out, and as we were going out of the watch-house, he said, if you will own to taking of this piece of soap, I will forgive you, as to the starch, my shop being full of people, it might drop down.

Witness. I never said such a word.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-75

596. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a coat, value 20 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of George Lucy .

GEORGE LUCY sworn. - I live in Little St. James's street , I am a fishmonger : I was standing in the street looking towards my shop on the 18th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw a man go into my shop; he not returning so quick as I expected, I went to see what he was doing there; when I came in sight of the shop-door, I perceived a man passing out of the parlour into the passage; he got out before I came up; I went into the parlour, and missed the coat and waistcoat that were hanging on the line; I pursued him, and in Bury-street I found him with my coat and waistcoat on his arm; I cannot swear to the man's face, I did not see it till I stopped him in Bury-street; I told him he had got my coat and waistcoat; he signified to me that some man had given them to him; I brought him back, and took the clothes from him, and then took him to the watch-house. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court; the things were dropped in Bury-street; I picked them up, I never took the goods out of any body's house.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-76

597. GEORGE HENSHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a pair of boots, value 2 l. the property of John Laird .

WILLIAM DONALDSON sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Laird; he lives at No. 5, Great Cumberland-street ; the prisoner called at our house, I believe, on the 19th of July; he said he came from Mr. Goatley, a shoemaker, to bring back the boots; they were not finished.

Q. Did you know whether a pair of boots were sent home, or no? - A. No; I went to the back parlour, and I found a pair of boots were there; I immediately brought them to him; he shewed me where; the boots were not finished; he said they wanted a stiffening at the heel; I said, the gentleman is in the parlour, you must go and shew him what they want; he went into the parlour; I took the boots in my hand, and I left them on the table, where the gentleman, Mr. Laird, my master's brother, was sitting at the time; the prisoner put his hand down the boot, and turned it down, and said it wanted a stiffening at the heel. Mr. Laird said, take the boots, and asked how long he should keep them; he said he would bring the boots back in two hours.

Q. And then he took away the boots? - A. Yes, I let him out.

Q. You say he took them away, saying he would bring them back again in two hours - in two hours time he brought them back, did he? - A. No, he never brought them back.

Q. You were in the room when this passed between him and your master's brother - did you know the man at all? - A. No; I had seen him in the street very often before.

Q. You did not know whether he was Mr. Goatley's man or no? - A. No.

Q. You have never seen the boots again? - A. No.

- LEMING sworn. - Q. Are you servant to Mr. Goatley, shoemaker? - A. Yes, I am man of the shop.

Q. Did your master make a pair of boots for Mr. James Laird? - A. Yes, I delivered them at the house; they were quite finished.

Q. Did you send any body afterwards to fetch them back? - A. No, I carried them home the same day, two hours before the prisoner had them; I do not know the prisoner, he is no workman to Mr. Goatley.

Prisoner's defence. I am tried for stealing the boots, and he says his master gave them to me.

GUILTY , aged 10,

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-77

598. REBECCA PIPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of George Oliver .

LEWIS LEWIS sworn. Q. Are you in the employ of George Oliver ? - A. I am; he is a linen-draper in Skinner-street, Snow-hill; this was stole from a shop of his, in Old-street-road .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? I have seen her before this fact was committed.

Q. Was it in consequence of information that you received, that you went out of the shop and saw the prisoner with a piece of printed cotton under her arm, and part of it hanging down under her cloak? - A. Yes, I stopped her; it was the property of Mr. Oliver.

Q. How long was it that you had seen it before it was taken? - A. About half an hour before it was hanging out at the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Has the prosecutor any partner? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I never was in the shop at all.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in gaol .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-78

599. GABRIEL GUIGNARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , two brass knockers, value 4 s. the property of Andrew Weddersbourne , Esq. fixed to his dwelling-house

ANN COOPER sworn. - Q. You are servant to Mr. Weddersbourne? - A. Yes; about ten minutes after six in the morning, I was looking out of the window; I saw the prisoner at the bar go up to the door and twist one of the knockers off; then he came from the door and looked up at the houses, he went up to the street-door again and twisted the other knocker off; I was down stairs then; I opened the hall-door, and followed him up the street, hollowing out to him; he got to the corner of the street in Park-lane; there were two gentlemen coming round the corner; I told them to stop that man, he had been breaking the knockers off the door; when he was stopped, one knocker was in his hand and the other fell from the knee of his breeches.

Q. Was there any violence used by the prisoner to get the knocker off? - A. I heard a loud crash.

Q. Do you happen to know what parish Mr. Weddersbourne's house is in? - A. St. George's Hanover-square .

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - On the 24th of July I was coming down Park-lane, this young woman was running after the prisoner, crying, stop him; I stopped him, and held him till she came up; she said he had stole two knockers, one was in his hand and the other fell out from the knees of his breeches; he delivered them to me; I produce them.

WILLIAM FELTON sworn. - These are Mr. Weddersbourne's knockers; they are worth two shillings as they are now; attached to the plates they are worth twelve shillings.

GUILTY , aged 64,

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-79

600. MARY BRADSHAW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christiana Smith , about the hour of three at night, on the 14th of September , with intent burglariously to steal .

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I live at the Marquis of Granby, Iron-gate, Tower-hill .

Q. Who is the tenant of the house? - A. My mother, Christiana Smith .

Q. Do you remember on the 14th of September any thing particular happening? - A. Me and a person of the name of Henry Treayer sat up on the stairs all night at my mother's house, in consequence of having suspicions of the till being robbed three nights before.

Q. In what state did you leave the door and windows of the house when you were sitting on the stairs? - A. The street door was locked and fastened with a bar, and the back door likewise; and there is a back window which looks out into the yard which is fastened by a hook.

Q. Was that window whole or broken? - A. There was one square of glass broke in the window.

Q. That window was fastened, you say, in the usual manner by a hook? - A. It was.

Q. Did you, at any time of the night, hear or perceive any thing? - A. About the hour of half-past three in the morning I heard a noise at the window, and I heard the back window open, and I also heard a person get in at this window, and walk along the tap-room and open the bar door; I then pushed the person that was sitting up with me, and rushed down stairs and opened the bar-door; I had a pistol in my hand, suspecting it to be a man; I called out, if any one offered to stir he is a dead man; I called out for a light, in the mean while they were bringing the light, I felt about the bar in the dark, and I caught hold of the prisoner's wrist; a light was brought, and I perceived it to be the prisoner, Mary Bradshaw ; my mother went out and fetched the watchman; the prisoner was taken to the watch-house.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. She was a lodger in the house at that time; the house had been two houses; the lower part is in connection with each other, the lower part and the first pair are not separated, but the second pair of stairs there is a pair of stairs to go up to that separate by itself.

Q. Was there any door to them from the street? - A. There was to that part of the house.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the garret? - A.Yes.

Q. Is there any communication between the lower part of the house and the garret? - A. Yes, this door goes into the yard which communicates to both houses.

Q. You say the garret and the two pair of stairs have a private door in the street to go out of? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore that pair of stairs is open to every part of the house? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Just describe it. - A. You must go through the yard, and go through a back door to go into these two stories; there is no communication from the tap-room to the two pair of stairs and the garret.

Q. You took her up and she was carried before a Magistrate? - A. Yes, at Lambeth-street.

Q. Where you present at the examination? - A. Yes, the examination was taken in writing.

Q. She could not get to where you saw her, from the garret where she lodged, any other way than through the yard or the street? - A. No way else.

CHRISTIANA SMITH sworn. - Q. What is the house you keep? - A. The Marquis of Granby, in the precinct of St. Catherine's; I am a widow , and I am the landlady of the house.

Q. What do you know of this matter? - A. I know no farther than I had my till robbed three nights, and I wished to find out the parties; I was sitting up stairs with a light ready in case any body called me, and when they called out to me I came down stairs with the light, and went out of doors, and fetched the watchman; she was taken to the watch-house.

Q. You know where the prisoner was taken by your son? - A. I do, I was there present.

Q. Tell me whether she could have got to that place from her own room without going out of the house? - A. The lower part of that house is taken into our house, and the upper part I have partitions that it should not come into our house without coming into the yard.

HENRY TREAYER sworn. - Q. You sat up with the other witness? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. And you heard the account he has given? - A. Yes, it is the same exactly.

Q. That is all correct and true? - A. Very true.

- MACKRACKEN sworn. - I heard the alarm, I went with Mrs Smith into the bar, the prisoner was in the bar without her stockings; I took charge of her, and took her to the watch-house.

Q.(To James Smith .) In what state was Mary Bradshaw as to her dress? - A. She only had her petticoat on and her shift; she had not her gown on.

Q. Had she her shoes on? - A. That I cannot recollect.

Prisoner's defence. I was very ill, and I was obliged to go down into the yard: I heard a noise in the house, I pulled the window, and I went in; I wanted something to drink for my bowels, I had been extraordinary bad for several days.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Did she make that excuse at that time when she was in the bar? - A. No, she said she only came to take a few halfpence.

GUILTY , Death , aged 50.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-80

601. SUSANNAH DAVISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a blanket, value 4 s. and five pawnbroker's tickets, value 1 s. the property of Susannah Cameron .

SUSANNAH CAMERON sworn. - I am a widow , my husband died on the 12th of June last; I engaged the prisoner to nurse me in my lying-in, she stopped with me two days, and then she went away on the second night without speaking a word to me.

Q. What did you miss? - A. I missed a blanket and some duplicates, I cannot tell how many; when I went up into her room, she was burning of them; the blanket I took from the prisoner's bed; I took as many of the duplicates from off the fire as were not burned.

Q. When did you go to her room? - A The day after I was churched; she lodged in Butcher-row, she said she had bought the blanket of a woman.

Q. Did she mention the woman's name? - A. No; I told her if she would bring the woman to me, I should like to know how it came out of my house.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer; I was sent for on the 16th of August to Butcher-row, I searched the prisoner, and found five tickets, which the prosecutrix swore to be her property; I produce them.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) I thought you said she put them in the fire? - A. Yes, I have got the remainder of them in my pocket; these are what Mr. Rogers found, they are my duplicates, I knew the blanket to be mine, it had a mark on it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-81

602. SARAH DUKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a feather bolster, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 12 s. a pair of pillow-cases, value 2 s. a blanket, value 2 s. an iron shovel, value 1 s. a cotton quilt, value 2 s. 6 d. a pair of iron tongs, value 1 s. and one copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Unnice .

ELIZABETH UNNICE sworn. - I am the wife of John Unnice; the prisoner at the bar rented a two-pair of stairs ready-furnished room with us; I let her the lodging in August, 1804.

Q. Did you, at any time, miss any of your furniture out of the room? - A. She left the lodgings about the latter end of July; she gave no notice, but sent the rent weekly; I broke open the room, and found all the articles mentioned in the indictment were gone out of the room.

Q. Have you ever seen any of your property since? - A. Yes, the officer found them, they were pledged. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not go away from my lodgings, I have some property there at this time; my husband is gone to sea, he promised to send me some money; I hope you will shew me as much mercy as your Lordship can.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-82

603. GEORGE SPIKES was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

WILLIAM HOMAN sworn. - Q. From whom had you this certificate? - A. From Mr. Shelton's office. (The certificate read in Court.)

"Middlesex. - These are to certify, that at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden at Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Wednesday, the 24th of April, in the forty-fifth year of His Majesty's reign, before His Majesty's Justices then present, George Spikes was tried for that he, on the 9th of March, in the year aforesaid, with force and arms, thirty yards of blue baize, value three pounds, in the shop of William Busby , privately and feloniously did steal and carry away, he was thereupon, by the Jurors between our Lord the King and the prisoner, found guilty of feloniously stealing, but not privately, in the shop of the said William Busby ; and the said George Spikes was ordered and adjudged to be transported for the term of seven years to such parts or places beyond the seas as his Majesty, in Privy Council, should think fit to appoint and declare. August 15th, 1805, Thomas Shelton ."

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when he was tried? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he tried here? - A. Yes, three or four times I have known him tried.

Q. You know nothing more than seeing him at large? - A. When he was brought to the Office at Bow-street, then I knew that he was ordered to be transported.

WILLIAM HAYES sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner in Bryanstone-street, on the 26th of July, for stealing a great coat.

Prisoner's defence. When I left the goal, I was sworn into His Majesty's service at the Office, in Queen-square; I was to have five guineas bounty, but four pounds eighteen shillings and sixpence of the said sum went to pay the goal-fees, and your prisoner received the overplus, thinking to serve His Majesty, your prisoner was disappointed, the serjeant of the Marines knew me to be a deserter, and directly went and informed the Colonel that there was a deserter; the Colonel asked Serjeant Taylor, of the Brown Bear , Bow-street, who enlisted us, what we were; Serjeant Taylor said, we were all prisoners, and had received His Majesty's pardon; the Colonel-Major replied, you are all thieves, and reprimanded the serjeant for not shewing the copy of our pardon; the Colonel asked us what we were there for; your prisoner was the first he asked; I told him it was for a slight offence, I was sworn to be a person that stole a roll of cloth; I was ordered to the Guardroom, and was to have been tried by a Court-Martial at Chatham barracks, but the Court-Martial did not take place; they detained us, and called us thieves, which made our lives miserable, but my companions were fortunate, and your prisoner was rejected; the Colonel was exasperated at my not having shewn the things that our bounty would have purchased; he would have nothing to do with me. I leave it to the mercy of the Court, I am an unfortunate person; I was guilty of being charged with a felony in April Sessions, and I have suffered by the civil law.

GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-83

604. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , three frocks, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 6 d. a gown, value 5 s. and a cap, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Gaterby .

The prosecutor's name being Gatenby, and the indictment stating it to be Gaterby, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-84

605. THOMAS CAMP was indicted for that he, being servant to Philip Eldridge and Co. did receive and take into his possession the sum of 4 s. 9 d. for and on account of his said masters, and feloniously did secrete, embezzle, and steal the same .

Second Count. For like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS PEARSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Eldridge and Co. - what are their names? - A. Philip Eldridge, John Swam , and John Fell , brewers , living in Holborn.

Q. Was Mr. Paas a customer of your's? - A. He has been a customer of ours for these five or six months, he lives at the end of Surry-square, Walworth.

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that fell upon the prisoner, did you make any application to Mr. Paas? - A. I did.

Q. In consequence of having made application to Mr. Paas, do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming home on the 27th of August? - A. Perfectly well; when he came home I booked his load with the name of the customers whom he had served in the course of the day.

Q. Did it appear that Mr. Paas was one of the customers on that day? - A. No, it was not among them.

Q. Had you delivered any beer to him to deliver to Mr. Paas on that day? - A. We do not deliver them beer for particular customers without there is

a specific order brought home; they call upon their customers when they go by to see who wants.

Q. When he came at night, what did you say to him? - A. I merely took his account, I have the book here; he gave me no account of any beer delivered to Mr. Paas, there is no entry by me on that day; we did not charge him with it at that time; on the following day, or the day after, we consulted with the partners, and he was taken up.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing before the Magistrate? - A. He said he had booked the load right.

Q. Did you afterwards go to Mr. Paas for the purpose of making enquiry whether he had delivered any beer? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When the prisoner came home to you at night, he gave you the account, and you booked it - how many barrels were booked on that day? - A. Twenty-two of beer and two of ale.

Q. He reported all these names from memory? - A. From his own book, he carries a memorandum-book with him.

Q. You asked him whether he had delivered any beer to Mr. Paas on that day? - A. I did not.

Q. You were afraid to remind him, perhaps - did you or did you not abstain from asking him about Mr. Paas for the present? - A. I did abstain, we were satisfied.

Q. Did not you purposely omit to remind him? - A I cannot tell exactly.

Court. Q. You said you refrained? - A. It was not usual to ask them.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it for granted that you take an account, when the dray goes out, of what quantity of beer it carries - did you compare that quantity that went out with the account he gave you at night - was there any deficiency? - A. No deficiency whatever in the load; we found out afterwards who he booked it to.

Court. Q. Was the prisoner intrusted to receive money? - A. Always.

Q. You did not ask him to be on his guard, to give a correct account, or whether he accounted for all the money he had received? - A. He did not account for any money whatever from any person; we took his receipts, every one back, as he went out with; he said nobody had paid him.

- PAAS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp Q. You live at Walworth, and you bought beer of Messrs. Eldridge and Co.? - A. Yes, for five or six months I have.

Q. Did you purchase any beer of the prisoner on the 27th? - A. One small cask; I paid him 4 s. 9 d. for it on account of his master, thinking he paid it to him.

Q. Did you take any receipt of him for it? - A. I asked him before I had that cask if he had got a printed receipt; he said it was of no consequence' as I paid on delivery.

Q. Whether it was not his duty to give receipts for every sum of money he received, whether ready money customers or not? A. Always.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-85

606. ANN MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Craig .

JAMES HODGES sworn. - Q. Do you remember walking, on the 13th of July, in the neighbourhood of Holborn ? - A. Yes, about seven o'clock in the evening; I took particular notice of Ann Mason, who had a long brown cloak on, standing opposite Mr. Craig's, the linen-draper ; I was about twenty yards from the spot. Seeing a number of pieces of linen or cotton, I had the curiosity to observe her; I saw her stoop down, and pick up this piece of cotton print; she wrapped it up under her cloak, and walked away with it towards me; I met her about six or eight yards from Mr. Craig's shop; I asked her what she had got; she said, nothing; I told her she had got more than was her property; I immediately took her into custody, and she dropped the cotton from under her cloak; I have kept the linen in my custody ever since.

- sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Craig, a linen-draper.

Q. Look at that piece of printed cotton do you know whose it is? - A. Yes, I laid it out of the door, near the shop, about a quarter after six in the evening, on the 13th of July; I am sure it is Joseph Craig 's property.

Prisoner's defence. I did not pick it up. I had it not in my hand at all.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton

Reference Number: t18050918-86

607. JANE MUGGERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , two gowns, value 20 s. a bonnet, value 6 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. the property of William Adams .

SARAH ADAMS sworn. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I am the wife of William Adams : The prisoner met me on the 7th of this month; she told me her husband had turned her out and used her very ill; she said she did not know where to go to; I took her home with me; I was obliged, being Saturday, to leave her in my place from between seven and eight o'clock till between ten and eleven; she took these

things from me at that time; I left her in my room, because she should not be in the street, with the children.

Q. When did you last see these things before they were stolen? - A. That very evening she was there; I returned home a little before eleven; she did not stop till I sat down; I missed them on Monday morning.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you never lent her any of your gowns to wear or to make use of? - A. No.

JAMES SLADE sworn. - I am an officer, I took her; I found a duplicate of a gown and a gown-piece pawned for seven shillings. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and during that time to be privately whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-87

608. JOHN HIGGINS , CHARLES CLARK , WILLIAM DOE , and MARY DOE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John-Walker Topham , about the hour of two at night on the 11th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, 380 yards of dimity, value 28 l. 860 yards of printed cotton, value 60 l. 30 yards of nankeen, value 2 l. 160 yards of corduroy, value 18 l. 16 s. 100 yards of flannel, value 15 l. 476 yards of calico, value 20 l. 120 yards of marseilles quilting, value 30 l. and five hempen wrappers, value 5 s. the property of William Smith .

Second and Third Counts. For like offence, only charging it to be the property of different persons.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney)

JAMES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the brother of Mr. William Smith ? - A. I am.

Q. Your brother has a warehouse situated at No. 10, Basing-lane, in the City of London ? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he, Sir, on the 11th of July last? - A. He had.

Q. On the 11th of July were you at that warehouse? - A. I was.

Q. Were there any goods deposited at that warehouse? - A. There were.

Q. Did you make any observations on them? - A. I did.

Q. What time did you leave the warehouse? - - A. I accompanied Mr. Bligh there, and with Mr. Bligh I left the warehouse about half after eight in the evening.

Q. How did you leave your warehouse with respect to security? - A. I locked it up myself; I gave the keys, when I locked it, to the porter, Isaac Young , and Isaac Young accompanied me to my house, and gave me the keys again; the same keys were in my possession till the next morning.

Q. In consequence of some information, the next day at twelve o'clock you went to this warehouse again? - A. I did.

Q. How did you find the goods of the warehouse when you arrived there? - A. The greater part of the goods that I had seen the night before I found missing; I saw them afterwards at Worship-street Police-office.

Q. Pray how is this warehouse situated with respect to the dwelling-house of Mr. Topham? - A. When my brother took the warehouse, the door out of the passage was open; there is a door from the passage into the warehouse from the passage of the private house.

Q. That is Mr. Topham's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean inside of the outward door of the private house? - A. Yes.

Q. At the front of the passage is the street-door - at the further end of the passage is there any direct communication into the house of Mr. Topham? - A. There was by this door; but after my brother took this warehouse, Mr. Topham requested he would fasten it up; there is a lock on the inside, and a bolt on the outside.

Q. So that no one of the house could come into the warehouse, nor your brother could not go into Mr. Topham's house without each other's consent? - A. No, and separate doors into the street.

Q. At this time your brother was absent? - A. He was not at the warehouse.

Q. Was the warehouse entrusted into your care? - A. It was the request of my brother that the keys should be left at my house, and that I would call at the warehouse to see all was right; my brother was not in town when this robbery was committed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Your brother had the misfortune since that time to become a bankrupt? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time this happened at the warehouse, did you join in paying the rent for the warehouse? - A. I did not.

Q. Had you any interest in any part of the goods that were in the warehouse? - A. My brother and I had been in partnership, but our partnership ended the last day of the year 1804.

Q. Were all your goods sold previous to the dissolution of your partnership? - A. There were about four hundred pounds worth of goods left, which my brother took himself.

Q. Was that expressed in your dissolution? - A. It was between my brother and me.

Q. Were there any part of the goods at this time when it was broke open and robbed, that were part of the stock in partnership? - A. None.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively? - A. I

believe there were none; I say to the best of my knowledge, because I had not the direction of his business; I believe he had none left, I believe I can safely swear it.

Q. How came he to send the key to you? - A. It was a request of my brother when he went to Manchester, he asked me to take care of the goods.

Q. Upon your oath, was not the key left with you to protect your property as well as your brother's? - A. No, I had no property there at all.

Mr. Alley. Q. Upon the oath that you have taken, are not you and your brother in partnership now? - A. No, we have not been in partnership since we parted in any way whatever.

ISAAC YOUNG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you the porter that was in the service of Mr. William Smith ? - A. Yes.

Q. You were in July? - A. I was, at the warehouse, in Basing-lane.

Q. On the night of the 11th of July, did you lock up the warehouse? - A. My master, James Smith, locked it up.

Q. Did you go to the warehouse afterwards? - A. No.

Q. On the next morning when did you go to the warehouse? - A. A little after nine.

Q. In what condition did you find the door of the warehouse? - A. I found the door all of a litter, the door was on the single lock.

Q. Was that the state in which you had left it the night before? - A. No.

Q. That was not the same as it ought to be? - A. No.

Q.When you opened the door, did you find any part of the property that you left there? - A. It was very near all gone, except a lot of flannels, that laid in the remaining litter of the packing up, just within the door.

Q. Had you, before this time, known the prisoner at the bar, Clark? - A. Yes, I suppose I have known him for eight or nine years.

Q. Did you, at any time, see the prisoner Clark at the door of your warehouse, in Basing-lane? - A. I was standing at the door, he was passing by; he stopped and talked with me.

Q.Did he after that call on you again? - A. He called upon me a fortnight previous to the warehouse being robbed on the Thursday.

Q.On the Tuesday prior to that Thursday, did Clark call upon you again? - A. Yes, and brought Higgins; I went and fetched a pot of porter.

Q.Did you leave them in the warehouse? - A. I did; after they had drank the beer they went away.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. I observed you to say, my master, Mr. James Smith ? - A. The reason why I called him my master, I have served him as well as my master, Mr. William Smith ; the word came inadvertently out of my mouth.

Q. He had been your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he your master at that time? - A. No, I swear that positively.

Q. You knew Clark before that, you had a good opinion of him? - A. I had.

Q. It was by your invitation that Clark came into the warehouse? - A. He was passing by, and I asked him in, knowing of him.

Q. You drank some beer with him, and he came again as you had asked him - he worked in the neighbourhood, did not he? - A. I never knew where he worked then, at the time when I knew where he worked, it was at the printing office in Ave Maria-lane.

Q. You having known Clark some time, it was nothing extraordinary his coming to you? - A. I have met him in the street; I did ask him in, to be sure,

Mr. Alley. Q. When Higgins came, that was the second time? - A. That was the third time: Higgins was only once there.

ROBERT BLACKWELL sworn - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 66, Noble-street, Goswell-street.

Q. Did either of the prisoners at the bar live in your street? - A. Yes, the prisoner Doe.

Court. Q. How far is Noble-street from Basing-lane? - A. I cannot say, I do not know that I know it.

Q. Mr. Gurney. Q. How far from your house does Doe live? - A. About eight or ten doors.

Q. On the morning of the 12th of July what time were you up? - A.About a quarter after four.

Q. Did you look out into the street? - A. I generally look out into the street of a morning to see what o'clock it is to go to my work; I looked out into the street that morning; I saw a coach standing at Doe's door.

Q. What kind of a coach? - A. A hackney coach, the coachman was standing at the horses' heads; and then he went down to the end of the street, making answers to them, saying, go on; and some man that stood by the coach door, began to take parcels out of the coach, and chucked them into the passage.

Q. I believe you do not know who that person was that was chucking them into the passage? - A. No: the parcels were in a coarse bag, and were like them.

Q.What might be the size of them? - A. It might be the same size as they are (pointing to the packages that were then produced); they were large packages.

Q. What became of the packages? - A. They chucked them on the house stairs.

Q. Was there more than one person employed in this? - A. There was one person employed in

taking them out of the coach and chucking them on the stairs.

Q. Did you see or hear any more? - A. I was not near enough.

Q.After the packages were taken out of the coach what became of the coachman? - A. The coachman got on the box and backed the coach towards Aldersgate-street.

Q.How was Doe's street door? - A. I did not particularly notice that; I think, to the best of my knowledge, as soon as the parcels were taken in they shut the door directly, and the coach, within a few minutes afterwards, went away; when the coach was gone away, two persons came out of Doe's and went towards Aldersgate-street.

Q. After you observed two men come out of Doe's house where did you go to? - A. Then I went out and knocked at my mother's door; I saw, when I went past Doe's door, somebody come out of Doe's, and they asked him how long he should be; he made answer about an hour.

Q. I believe you are not able to speak to the person, whether it was a man or a woman? - A. I cannot tell; in a few minutes afterwards I saw Doe come out of his own house, and walk towards Old-street; he had not been gone many minutes before I followed him; I met him returning from the corner of Gee-street; he then went up stairs again at his own house; I then watched him, and he came down stairs again with a bottle in his hand.

Q. You watched him from Gee-street to his own house - when he went up stairs how long was it before he came down again? - A. About five or ten minutes; then I saw him come out of his own house, and I watched him out; he had not been gone ten minutes, time enough to get to his dye-house, when he came back again; I saw then, some time afterwards (it might be half an hour), Higgins and another man at the end of the street, who had on a blue coat and a swansdown waistcoat.

Q. What time was that? - A. About six o'clock, or nigh upon it; Higgins walked several times by me.

Q. What persons did you see next? - A. I saw two men come out of Mr. Doe's place, one of them had on a brown great coat; they walked towards Old-street; the other had on a blue coat; they crossed over each other before they got to Old-street, this was Higgins and the other man, one turned down Old-street, and the other kept down Aldersgate-street; I followed him as far as I work, which is at No. 101; I then went to my work, I saw no more of them till I came back to breakfast, which was about a quarter or twenty minutes after eight; then I saw Higgins walking up the other side of the way to Mr. Doe's house.

Q. When you were returning home, where did you see Higgins first, in what street? - A. He was in Goswell-street, about two or three doors from Doe's house, but he was of the other side of the way, he walked on towards Compton-street.

Q. What became of you? - A. I went and told Mr. Armstrong, and Mr. Armstrong called after him, and stopped him.

Q. You immediately gave information to Armstrong? - A. Yes, he followed him, and called out stop thief.

Q. Did you hear Armstrong call out stop thief A. Yes.

Q. What became of Higgins then? - A. He ran away up Compton-street.

Q. Are you sure that the person that ran away was the prisoner Higgins - did you see him? - A. Yes, I saw him so many times passing before that I took notice of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say this was about six o'clock? - A. Yes, I saw him before that, about two hours before he was apprehended.

Mr. Gleed. Q. When was the first time in the morning that you first saw Higgins? - A. I cannot pretend to say which, it was in the morning that he went down Old-street or Aldersgate-street, I saw him then.

Court. Q. You saw Higgins at six o'clock, was that the same man you had seen before walking backwards and forwards? - A. It was.

Mr. Reynolds. Q. The first time that you saw Doe was when you saw him come out of his own house? - A. Yes, going towards Old-street.

Q. He had time enough to go to Old street once, you said he had a bottle in his hand, and you thought he was going to his work? - A. Yes.

Q. He is an early man? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whereabouts this house of Doe's is situated - is it in Middlesex or London? - A. In Middlesex.

Mr. Gleed Q. When you first saw Doe, it was about half after four? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his usual time of getting up? - A.About six o'clock.

JOSEPH BLACKWELL sworn. Examined by Mr. Gurney Q. On the morning of the 11th of July, did you watch Doe's house? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you see any person go into that house? - A. Yes, just before eight o'clock I saw a person go in.

Q. Who was that person? - A. The prisoner Clark; he went into Doe's house with an empty bag.

Q. How long did he remain in Doe's house? - A. No longer than they filled the bag; two women brought it down full, and he came out of the house with it full.

Q. Did you watch him to see where he carried that full bag to - to what place did he carry it to?

- A. He carried it to a tobacconist's in Golden-lane.

Q. Was that Cable's? - A. I believe that was the name.

Q. How long did he stay in Cable's house? - A. About a minute or two; when he came out, he had no bag, as I saw then, at all, and in about ten minutes he returned to Doe's house; then I saw he had a bag in his hand when he came to Doe's house.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing when he came to Doe's house? - A. He said, I have brought your bag, Mrs. Doe, and when he came out again he had a large parcel; I watched him; he took that to Golden-lane to the same place.

Q. In his way to Golden-lane did he meet with any body? - A. When you go from Noble-street to Golden-lane you have to cross Old-street, and when he came as far as Golden-lane, Higgins came to the side of him, and said something to him, which I could not hear.

Q. What did Clark do immediately after Higgins said something that you could not hear? - A. He went on, and Higgins went alongside of him till they came to the tobacconist's shop; Higgins crossed over, and Clark took that into Cable's likewise; then Armstrong came sometime after that.

Q. Armstrong was fetched by the order of your mother? - A.Yes. first of all to Noble-street; he went into Mr. Doe's house.

Q. Did you go in with him? - A. No; I saw him come out, and then I went with him to the tobacconist's shop.

Q. Did you see him take Higgins? - A. No.

Q. Was that the shop in which you had seen Clark take the parcels? - A. Yes; we went into the shop; we asked if any thing had been left in the shop, and while we were there Clark came in, and I pointed out Clark to Mr. Armstrong; Clark said he came in for half an ounce of tobacco; Mr. Armstrong took him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What you have been speaking of now, relates to the 12th of July? - A. Yes.

Q. With respect to what passed on the 11th of July, you know nothing at all of? - A. No.

Q. Therefore all that you saw pass was at Doe's house, which is in the country of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw Clark go into the house, he had an empty bag - you saw him bring things out, but did not see him take any thing in the bag? - A. No, only an empty bag.

Q. Had you ever seen Clark before this time in your life? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively to the person of a man that you had never seen before? - A. I saw him walk up and down; I knew him again, I can swear to him.

Q. Have you had any conversation upon this business with Mr. Armstrong? - A. No.

Q. You never heard that there is a forty pounds reward? - A. Never in my life.

SUSANNAH BLACKWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You are the wife of Robert Blackwell , the first witness? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 12th of July, did you look into the street? - A. Yes, as soon as I had dressed myself.

Q. When you looked into the street, what did you observe? - A. I saw nothing extraordinary at Mrs. Doe's door then, but some straw at the door.

Q. Did you afterwards see Mrs. or Mr. Doe? - A. I saw Mr. Doe come out with some bread and butter and a bottle in his hand; he was eating, and after Mr. Doe went out, Mrs. Doe came down stairs and swept the door; she swept it into the kennel.

Q. What became of the straw? - A. The remains of the straw laid in the kennel; she swept it from her door a good way down the street; I saw Clark come up about five o'clock, or after, he was alone with Mrs. Doe; they came out of Doe's house together, and went to the wine-vaults at the corner, and returned together, and they stood in the street talking together as they came out of the door; I was as close to them, and closer, than I am to you: I heard Clark say he would see her husband at breakfast time, at nine o'clock; I saw Clark come back again with a man very much like a Jew about half an hour afterwards; he went up stairs. I went and told Mr. Geary, and when I came back I saw Mr. Higgins and another man standing at the bottom of Noble-street; Higgins kept looking up the street; I passed him, and looked him full in the face, I am positive it was him; I went up to my own door; I saw Clark go up stairs; I did not see him come down at that time. After that, in about half an hour, Higgins returned home; after that I saw Clark turning out of Noble-street with a bag at his back full of something, and go up Gee-street.

Q. Is that the way to Golden-lane? - A. Yes, you can turn down there to Golden-lane, and I saw a man with him, and when he saw me he drew his head back.

Q. Who was that man? - A. Higgins; I saw no more of Higgins till I saw Mr. Armstrong.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. In consequence of information on the 12th of July, in the morning, did you go to Doe's house in Noble-street? - A. About eight o'clock, or a quarter after, when I went to Doe's house, Mrs. Doe was sitting at the bottom of the stairs (that goes up from the one pair of stairs to the two

pair) with a child in her arms. I then asked her if she had any goods brought in there that morning; she said she did not know; I said, do you let any place out; she said she let a room out to a decent man, and I believe his name is Brown; I then passed her, and I went up two pair of stairs, and these goods that are here now were all lying on the floor with the packages open, and the padlock of that door was lying in the window, and no person in that room.

Q. Did you ask her how these goods came? - A. I asked her if they were her own; she said, no, she knew nothing about them; I then sent for a coach, and we were putting a number of packages in the coach, leaving an officer up stairs, another with Mrs. Doe, and another with the coach; I received information from Blackwell.

Q. In consequence of what Blackwell told you, did you go towards Goswell-street? - A. Yes, I was crossing it, when I saw a person standing at the end of Compton-street; I was not near enough to know the face of that man at that time.

Q. The end of Compton-street is opposite to Noble-street? - A. It is not opposite, it is in that direction; that person, as I crossed over the road, saw I was walking fast towards him; I could perceive his eye caught me; he turned round, and began a fast trot at first; I called out, stop thief; then he ran, and I ran after him. When I turned into Compton-street, I saw Higgins walking, I dare say he was twenty-five yards before me down the street; I said, Higgins, I want you.

Q. And you took him? - A. I did.

Q. Are you able to say whether that person that ran from the corner was Higgins or not? - A. I should believe that it was, it had every appearance of him except the face, which I did not see at that time. Then I brought Higgins to where the coach was and the other officers, and I turned him round and said, look at the back of this man's coat; the back of his coat was covered all over with flew; his coat had that sort of flew on it which would have come on a coat if a person had been carrying parcels of that kind; I put him in the coach with Mrs. Doe and the officers, and the coachman drove the coach, I walking by the side of that coach to the end of Golden-lane.

Q. Did you then, in consequence of information that you received from Joseph Blackwell , go to Cable's? - A. Joseph Blackwell , Mason, and I, went to the house of Cable, in Golden-lane; he is an headborough of St. Luke's, we went in there.

Q. Did you find there any other goods? - A. I did, I produce them; these were under the counter in the shop, (shewing them,) and these were up one pair of stairs; I found two parcels at Cable's, they are Manchester goods, cottons, and corduroys. While I was there, the prisoner Clark came in; I said to Mason, secure him; I turned him round, and shewed his coat to Mason, his coat was just like Higgins's; then I took them and the goods to the Office; I have had the care of them ever since, they have been under my lock and key.

Q. When was Doe taken up? - A. He was taken up the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understood you that Cable was headborough, and Clark came there, did he not come in for some tobacco; Cable keeps a tobacconist's shop? - A. He did come in, and I believe he might say something about tobacco.

Mr. Reynolds. Q. Mrs. Doe told you that a man lived there of the name of Brown, did not she tell you that was his apartment where the goods were found? - A. She told me that she knew nothing about them.

Q. You have every reason to think that this apartment was Brown's? -

Court. Q. You know nothing but what she said? - A. Nothing else.

Jury. Q. Was there any thing in the room that appeared like furniture? - A. Yes, very poor furniture; there was a chain or two, and a bedstead shut up, and a bed that no person could lie on.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are an officer? - A. I am.

Q. Did you search the house of Doe? - A. I did, on Saturday, the 30th of July, between two and three o'clock, in company with Armstrong, Mason, and the prisoner Doe.

Q. Doe at that time was in custody? - A. He was; we went up into his apartment.

Q. Into what part of the house did you go to? - A. The one pair of stairs; we went into the room where they lived, we were searching the drawers, Doe standing by, and this print, which I produce, was in the drawers, one gown piece; Doe wanted to secrete something that was on the side of it, another gown piece; here are two gown pieces that were found in the drawer in that room; the prisoner Doe seemed very much alarmed, he wanted to go towards a chest that was in that room; I went to the chest, I found it locked; I asked where the key was, Doe looked round, took it off a nail, and gave it me; in the chest I found this quilting; when I took it out, I was proceeding to search further; he said, you have no occasion to give yourself further trouble, you have got all; he begged to take some money out of the chest.

Q. What was contained in the chest besides? - A.Wearing apparel; and when the box was going to be shut down, he said, there is some money at the bottom, he might as well take that with him.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know any thing more than Armstrong? - A. No, I was present all the time of the search.

JOHN RICHARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Gurney. Q. Are you the warehouseman in the service of Mr. Smith? - A. I was at that time.

Q. In the first place, look at that gown piece, and the other pieces, and the quilting? - A. These are the same patterns that were in Mr. Smith's warehouse.

Q. Do you know them at all to be taken from Mr. Smith's warehouse? - A. We compared them at the Public Office, they had been torn at Mr. Smith's warehouse, they were in whole pieces.

Q. Then all you know they were whole pieces at the time they were taken away from the warehouse? - A. Yes, and they were found part in one place and part in another; there was no marks on any of the goods except the dimities.

Q. Did you lose goods corresponding to all the goods that are produced here? - A. We did; I had taken an inventory a few days before.

Q. When you looked over the goods, did you find them to be all that were taken from there? - A. They took about twenty-four pounds more.

Court. Q. Have these dimities your mark on them? - A.They have my marks, No. 1, 2, and 3; they were lost from our warehouse that night.

Armstrong. They were all found at Doe's.

Mr. Gurney. (To Richards.) Independant of these you had marked, you lost all these articles? - A. Yes.

Q. Had any of them been purchased of Mr. Pritchard? - A. Yes, the goods found at Doe's, they were part of the invoice.

Mr. Knapp. (To Richards.) Q. Did you attend the Commissioners of Bankrupts at the time the assignees were examined - do you remember Mr. James Smith laying claim to the goods before the Commissioners? - A. I was not before the Commissioners with Mr. Smith, I was below stairs in the coffee-room.

Q. What has become of Mr. William Smith ? - A. I cannot say; he is gone abroad, I believe.

Court. Q. He became a bankrupt, and has not appeared to his commission? - A. No.

Q. How long before he absconded? - A. I cannot say; Mr. James Smith , the brother, was continually backwards and forwards at this warehouse.

Q. Do you know that they were concerned together at this warehouse? - A. Never, in my hearing.

CHARLES BLYTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. On the evening of the 11th, you were at this warehouse? - A. I was.

Q. Did you look over the goods in the warehouse? - A. Not particularly on that evening; I observed the marseilles quilting was in that warehouse, they were my goods; I sold them to Mr. Smith, here is my mark upon it.

Q.(To Mr. James Smith .) Is there any of this property you can speak to as having seen in your brother's warehouse the night before the robbery? - A. I saw the wrapper, which contains part of the goods, in my brother's warehouse; I can swear to it, it has W. S. L. there was part of the wrapper taken and the other part left, they had cut it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your oath, did not you say before the Magistrate that you were interested, and claimed a part of these goods? - A. I did not.

Armstrong. That marseilles quilting was found at Cable's.

JOHN PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you sold any goods to Mr. William Smith shortly before this robbery? - A. I had; I can speak to the printed calicoes, they have got my name on them; I had frequently seen them at his warehouse after I had sold them.

Armstrong. They were all found at Doe's.

Q.(To Mr. James Smith .) You are the person who locked the warehouse door? - A. Yes, I double-locked it; it had a catch besides, which fastened of itself.

Q.(To Young.) In the morning in what state did you find the catch? - A.The catch was fastened up with a piece of wood.

Q.(To Richards.) Were these goods in the warehouse the night before the robbery? - A. They were, I am sure of it, because I had taken an inventory of them; they were not there the morning after the robbery.

Mr. Reynolds. There is not sufficient evidence to go to the Jury with respect to Doe and his wife.

Court. With respect to Doe, it will be evidence to go to the Jury; and respecting the wife, how far she is implicated in any thing without the presence of her husband, we shall see; probably that may be the result upon looking over the evidence.

Clark's defence. I am conscious of my innocency, I have been always honestly employed; I have called upon Young, the porter, several times; he knew me, and that I was in a respectable situation; I called on him out of friendship, I work for Messrs. Wynne and Ayres. There is no proof whatever that I committed the robbery, I was going to work when I called into Mr. Cable's, and asked for half an ounce of tobacco.

Higgins's defence. As to what Mr. Armstrong has been saying about my coat, it was a coat that I used to wear of a morning, and used to go up and down there in that street two or three times of a day.

Doe left his defence to his Counsel.

Higgins, GUILTY, aged 34

Clark, GUILTY, aged 32,

William Doe , GUILTY, aged 35,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Mary Doe ,

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-88

609. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , in the dwelling-house of Mary Lindsley , a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a guinea, three half guineas, six seven-shilling pieces, a dollar, and a Bank-note, value 1 l. the property of William Johnson .

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - On the 17th of September, about one o'clock at night, I was accosted by the prisoner, and I went home to her lodgings, in Marigold-court, St. Martin's in the Fields Being very tired, I stripped myself, and went to-bed, and went to sleep; I awoke about five o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner sitting at the far end of the room; I got up and searched my pockets, I found I had lost that which is mentioned in the indictment; there was another woman at the far end of the room with the prisoner, I told them I had been robbed, they then ran away; then I gave information to the officer in Bow-street, who apprehended the prisoner and found great part of my property upon her.

THOMAS HART sworn. - I am a patrol of Bow-street.

Q. Did you search this prisoner? - A. Yes; I found upon her five seven-shilling pieces, half-a-guinea, two dollars, three-and-sixpence in silver, and some halfpence, and a handkerchief. (One of the seven-shilling pieces and the handkerchief identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I never saw a halfpenny of that man's money; that money that was found on me I picked up off the ground; I had had several gentlemen with me in the room; the handkerchief I picked up at the foot of the bed.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing only .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-89

610. JOHN WALTERS and JAMES BOYD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a silver watch value 50 s. the property of Joseph Cooper .

JOSEPH COOPER sworn. - I live at Blackwall ; I am a labourer : I lost a silver watch out of my dwelling-house on the 4th of July; I missed it at six o'clock in the afternoon; it was in the lower room hanging over the fire-place; I had seen it at one; I was out nearly all the afternoon.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. No.

NICHOLAS DAVISON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 8, Bird-row, Ratcliffe-cross; I produce a watch pledged by the prisoner, John Walters , the boy, on the 4th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What account did he give how he came by it? - A. He said he brought it from James Atkins ; he had been in the habit of coming to the shop and pawning things for his mother; the mother of the boy came and said the watch belonged to her, and said she wanted more money on it.

Q. What did he pawn it for? - A. One pound. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Walters said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

Boyd was not put on his defence.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-90

611. ELIZABETH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of September , a silver watch, value 5 l. the property of William Hunton , privily from his person .

WILLIAM HUNTON sworn. - On the 1st of September I was at the sign of the Anchor, Clare-market , between nine and ten at night I went into the yard.

Q. Had you your watch when you went into the yard? - A. Yes; I was making water in the yard, and the prisoner came and clasped her arms around me, and gave me a shove down, and clapped her hand against my watch-chain.

Q. Did you see her lay hold of your chain? - A. Yes, I felt her lay hold of my watch-chain with one hand, and with the other hand she had hold of my collar.

Q. Did you lose your watch at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fall down? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes

Q. What did she do, did she stay with you? A. Her cap and bonnet slipped off; she got them up, and ran out into the street.

Q. Was she in the house before you went out into the yard? - A. Yes, she was standing in the same room, but not with me; I am sure of her person.

JAMES SELBY sworn. - Q. What do you know about this business? - A. Nothing further than that the woman was in the house before this young man came in; I observed him go backwards into the yard.

Q. Did you remain in the tap-room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner stay in the tap-room, or go out? - A. She went directly out after him out at the back door; they had not been out but a few minutes before the door burst open, and she ran through instantly, in a minute's time, into the street; I followed her down Clement's-lane, and found her there; I asked her concerning the watch, she positively denied knowing any thing about it; she came back to the house with me without any force.

Q. The watch has not been found? - A. No.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober? - A. So far as I know he was not the least the worse for liquor.

Prisoner's defence. I went into this house to have half a pint of beer; I came out, and the sailor told me the young man had lost a watch; I told him I would go back any where. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing only.

Confined six months in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc

Reference Number: t18050918-91

612. THOMAS CUNNINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , one pair of boots, value 5 s. the property of John Barker , privately in his shop .

JOHN BARKER sworn. - I am a shoemaker ; I live at Islington : On the 1st of August, between twelve and one o'clock, I went out; I returned in the course of half an hour; I missed a pair of boots, and my wife informed me that there had been two men in the shop, and that they went towards Holloway; I pursued them; I overtook them by Middlesex hospital; the prisoner at the bar had the boots under his arm; he said the other man gave them him to hold while the other man went in to see a woman in the hospital; the other man ran away directly he saw us.

Q. Whose boots are they? - A. They are mine; they were in my shop hanging on a nail for sale; my wife really believes the other man took them.

JAMES BARKER sworn. - Q. Were you at home when your father went out? - A. Yes; I saw the two men come into the shop.

Q. Did you see them do any thing? - A. No; I did not see him take them away; they came in to buy a pair of shoes; my mother thinks it was the other man that took the boots.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-92

613. MARGARET RILEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, upon Richard Atkinson , on the 9th of Septer , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of Richard Atkinson .

RICHARD ATKINSON sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter : A little after eleven o'clock I was in High-Street, Bloomsbury ; the prisoner at the bar spoke to me, I pushed her away again; she came again and walked ten yards with me, and I gave her sixpence to get rid of her; she stopped a little while by me, and she snatched the watch out of my fob and ran away; I pursued her; she was taken by James Fitzpatrick ; I never lost sight of her.

JAMES FITZPATRICK sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner; I heard the cry of watch.

Q. Did you see the prisoner running? - A. No, she was walking gently along.

- FREEMAN sworn. - I was standing at the door where I work; the came by me running; as she turned the corner she offered the watch to two girls, and neither of them would take it; when Fitzpatrick took the prisoner and brought her across the road, he brought her upto the gentleman, and she put the watch into his left coat pocket; I informed Fitzpatrick of it.

Fitzpatrick. I found the watch in his own coat pocket, according to the information of the last witness, about a quarter of an hour afterwards; I produce it (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going along Broad St. Giles's, the prosecutor staggered against me; I told him not to shove me down; he put his arm round my neck; I walked along with him; he gave me sixpence; I told him I would not go with any gentleman for sixpence; I put the sixpence in my pocket and left him; I was not gone five or six minutes before I was stopped; I never saw any watch.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-93

614. ANN DUFF and MARY NORTON were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Domingo Charles , on the 14th of September , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a Bank note, value ten pounds , the property of Domingo Charles .

DOMINGO CHARLES sworn. - Q. Where did you see the two prisoners? - A. In Nightingale-lane ; when I came out of Mr. Beckham's house I had a ten-pound note in my pocket; Norton asked me to give her something to drink; she took hold of my hand; I saw her put her hand in her pocket, and I lost my money; when she asked me to give her something to drink, I said no, I want to buy my clothes.

GEORGE BECKHAM , jun. sworn. - Q. Do you know the first witness, Charles? - A. Yes, he lodged at my father's; between nine and ten o'clock in the morning he asked for eleven pounds (my father had money of his in his hands); my mother gave him a ten pound note, and as he was going up Nightingale-lane he stopped with some of his shipmates; Ann Duff and Mary Norton came up to him: I was with Charles at the time; and as we were going by the Blue Anchor, Mary Norton asked Domingo Charles to treat her; he said he would not; he went on towards Queen-street, to the slopseller's; he put his hand in his pocket to feel for the money to buy his cloaths, and he missed the ten-pound note; I did not see the woman do

any more than lay hold of his hand with one of her hands.

Q. You did not see what she did with the other hand? - A. No.

Norton. (To witness.) Q. Did you see any more freedom with me than laying hold of his hand? - A. No.

Duff. Q. Did I ever speak to him as he was coming by? - A. No.

Norton's defence. It was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning when I went from home; the black man and George Beckham were standing at the dock; Mrs. Duff says to him, will you give me something to drink; George says, ask Mungo to treat you; I said to Domingo Charles , the black man, will you give me something to drink; he said, no, I will see what I have by and by; and in about twenty minutes George Beckham came back; he says to Mrs. Duff, have you seen any thing of Domingo's note; no, says Mrs. Duff, I have not; the young man came in, and abused me very much; I told him, I had nothing of his property; I turned out my pockets; they sent for an officer and searched me; I never made any more freedom than laying hold of his hand.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-94

615. MARY TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , in the dwelling-house of Joshua Gadd , two one-pound Banknotes , the property of Joshua Gadd .

JOSHUA GADD sworn. - I live in White's-alley, Chancery-lane ; I keep an eating-house : On the 25th of July, about half-past four, I went to my bar and counted the notes that had been taken in the course of the day, and I counted six one-pound notes; they were in a bowl in the bar; I left them there in the charge of the servant who had the care of taking the money, her name is Hale; the prisoner at the bar was a waiter ; in about ten minutes afterwards there were two one-pound notes missing.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was searched? - A. Yes.

ANN HALES sworn. - Mrs. Gadd being ill, I took her place at that time in taking the money; I was a waiter there.

Q. Do you remember, on the 25th of July, how many notes you took in the course of the day? - A. There were six one-pound notes taken in the course of that day belonging to Mr. Gadd; I had put them in a bowl in the bar.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing in the course of the day? - A. I saw her take two notes out of the bowl on the 25th of July, about half past four in the afternoon; I was coming across the shop at the time; I saw her take them from the bowl and put them in her bosom.

Q. How do you know they were two notes? - A. I saw them separate in her hands; I immediately asked Mr. Gadd how many notes he had left in the bowl, he said six; I said Mary must have taken two; then she was called in; at first she denied having taken any; I did not see her searched.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Did you give any account before the Magistrate of having seen her take these notes? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You say you saw her take distinctly two notes; you then asked your master how many there were, in order to ascertain how many were gone; he said six, then you said Mary must have taken two? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you put any mark to these notes? - A. No; I cannot swear to them.

- BLUNDLE sworn. - I am a constable: In consequence of information that I received from Mr. Gadd, about a quarter before five in the afternoon, on the 25th of July, I searched the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Before you searched her did you question her? - A. I asked her if she had the notes; she said no; I told her, if she had, to give them up; I then proceeded to search her; she resisted; at last we conducted her to her bed room, and I searched her as narrowly as I could, and between her stocking and her shoe I found a one-pound note (I produce it); I then supposed that I had searched her every where; I took the note to Mr. Gadd; I went up again to search her, and as I got upon the last stair, the nurse called out, I observe something chewing in her mouth; I went to her, but I could not perceive what it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. She objected to your searching her, you said; whether that objection was not arising from modesty? - A. I told her, in the first place, I was a family man; she seemed intoxicated in liquor.

ELIZABETH WATSON sworn. - Were you pre sent when the prisoner at the bar was searched by Blundle? - A. I was; I saw him find a one-pound note in her shoe; when he came up stairs again, he said there was another missing; I told him that I fancied she had it in her mouth; Mr. Blundle came and examined; she had a lump in her cheek; I did not see what it was, nor what became of it.

Prisoner's defence. There has been a great many false words said.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing a one-pound note .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-95

616. JOSEPH NETTLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a metal watch, value 9 l. a gold seal, value 2 l. and a

gold key, value 10 s. the property of Griffin Andrews , in his dwelling-house .

GRIFFIN ANDREWS sworn. - Q. Are you a house-keeper? - A. Yes; I live at No. 36, Greek-street, Soho .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, that is the man; I employed Mr. Miller to paint my house; the prisoner was a painter ; he was employed by Mr. Miller in painting my house.

Q. Did you at any time lose a metal watch, a gold seal, and a gold key? - A. Yes, on the 11th of July.

Q. What hour of the day had you last seen your watch? - A. Seven o'clock in the morning was the last time I saw it; it was in my bed room, I left it there.

Q. When had you occasion to go up to your bed-room? - A. At ten o'clock in the morning, and my watch was not there; I wanted to put it in my fob, as I used to do of a morning.

Q. Had it, at the time it was in your bed-room, the gold seal and gold key to it? - A. Yes, fastened on a string; on the seal were my initials, G. A.

Q. Did you observe whether the prisoner was at work between the hours of seven and ten? - A. There were two men come to the house between six and seven; they both went to breakfast at eight o'clock; Joseph Nettleton was the only man that returned after eight o'clock; the watch was there at nine, my servant took it in her hand.

Q. How early had you seen the prisoner in your house in the morning? - A. Between six and seven, I let him in in the morning myself; upon my missing the watch about ten o'clock, I made no enquiry about it at that time; sometimes my wife takes it down stairs herself; I went into the City upon business; returning home about one o'clock, I made enquiry about it.

Q. In consequence of your enquiry about it, did you afterwards find your watch? - A. I saw my watch between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; it was brought to me by Mr. Miller, the prisoner's master.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner having taken your watch of your own knowledge? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever speak to the prisoner about it? - A. I did, as I was asking my wife about it, when I returned to my business out of the City; I asked my wife if she had brought the watch down stairs; she said, no; I immediately ran up stairs, and looked for the watch; I said, it is not there; I went and fetched the constable, and had him taken up.

Q. What did you say to the prisoner when you brought the constable? - A. I told him that he had got my watch; he declared he knew nothing of it; I asked him several times, and he denied that he had got it.

Q. Had you told him it would be better for him to tell you? - A. I did.

Q. Then we must not hear what he said - Do you know any thing more of this business? - A. I asked the servant-maid, in the prisoner's hearing, if he had been up stairs; she said he had

Q. What did the prisoner say to that? - A. He did not deny it.

Q. What was the value of this watch? - A. Nine pounds; it was a metal watch capped and jewelled, it cost me nine guineas, exclusive of the seal; the seal cost me two pounds eighteen shillings, and the key cost me either half a guinea, or twelve shillings.

Q. Was it a gold seal? - A. It was, with my own initials.

Q. When the watch was brought you back, have you kept it ever since? - A. No, I give it to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say, in the morning there were two men at work - were you gone out before they went to breakfast? - A. No, and I know there was only this one man come back.

Q. What time was it that the other man went to breakfast? - A. About eight o'clock.

Q. The prisoner, you say, went up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. It was his business to go up stairs? - A. Yes; that was when the other man was with him, before breakfast, it was not afterwards; it was finished at the top of the house when the other man went away.

Court. Q. The whole house was painted? - A. No, only a little of the back part of the house, in a gutter at the top of the house.

Q. In what part of the house was this watch left? - A. In the two pair of stairs

Mr. Alley. Q. Was the two pair of stairs painted at all? - A. It was not.

Q. Are you sure the gutter was finished before the other man went away? - A. Yes.

- sworn. - Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Andrews? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen your master's watch the day it was taken? - A. Yes, at a little after nine o'clock.

Q. Where was it when you saw it last? - A. It hung on my master's curtains in his bed-room, as it usually did.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at your house painting? - A. Yes, he came between six and seven o'clock in the morning along with another man.

Q. Did you see him at any time of the day in the two pair of stairs room? - A. No, I did not see him in the room.

Q. Did you see him up on the two pair of stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was that? - A.A little after ten o'clock I saw him on the two pair of

stairs; he told me he went up to finish the skylight; I saw him go up the first flight of stairs; he took some stuff out of the garden, and told me he wanted to finish the sky-light that looks down on the stairs going into the shop.

Q. Where he was going up, could he get at that sky-light? - A. He could not, without getting out into the yard, and getting on the top of the house, and that he had no business to do; it was finished before breakfast; he asked me if he might have the steps in the garden; I told him he might have them; I was then coming out of the little parlour; he told me somebody called me before he went up stairs.

Q. Did any body want you at that time? - A.No, my mistress and master were both in the shop; I told him, nobody called me, after I had been to see; he then said he heard somebody call me two or three times; he was then stuffing some putty in the holes of the cupboard before he painted it.

Q. Did you see what time he came down stairs? - A. Yes, he was not up stairs three minutes.

Q. Did you see whether he went as high as the two pair of stairs? - A. I did not watch him, I had not the least suspicion when he told me and insisted that somebody called me; I told him there was not; he went up stairs, and came down again, and finished painting of the yard-door.

Q. You are sure that your master went up stairs after the prisoner had been up stairs? - A. Yes; and in the mean time my master went up stairs the prisoner left his work; he took up his painting-pot, and left the house; I asked him whether he had finished; he said he had not, he was going with his painting-pot, and should return again; that was while my master went up stairs to clean himself. I never saw him afterwards till he returned at dinner-time, and my master came in at the time; he missed his watch, and my master charged my mistress with having the watch; she said she had not got it; he asked me whether I had seen the watch; I told my master I had no occasion to go up that morning after nine o'clock. My master then sent for a constable, and the prisoner made a good many oaths that he had never seen the watch in any part of the house, nor had he passed the door of the two pair of stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have been talking a good deal of sky-lights, I am told that there was no sky-light, only the trap-door - might not he go up to paint the trap-door? - A. No, that was finished; I know it was finished, because the old man said it was finished when he went away to breakfast.

Q. Did he not go to fasten the trap-door? - A. There was no occasion for that.

Q. When he returned he went to work in the yard, and continued till about eleven or twelve o'clock? - A. He did.

Q. Your master then returned, and he went away? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he been out of the house before that? - A. Yes, he went home with his painting-pot about ten o'clock, while my master was gone up to clean himself.

Q. What time did he come from breakfast? - A. At nine o'clock.

Q. How long after that was it before he went home with his painting-pot when your master went up stairs? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. Then he had been an hour and a half in the house - he might have gone away before your master returned? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not another man return after breakfast? - A. He did not.

Q. I am told the other man returned with the painting-pot? - A. No, he did not; the other man did not return all the day.

Q. Did not the other man return to fetch a pot of colour from your house? - A. No, he did not.

Q. You know as well as I do that he came, and certainly did bring a pot of colour with him? - A. He did not.

THOMAS MILLER sworn. - Q. Were you the employer of this prisoner? - A. Yes: On Thursday, the 11th of July, I sent this man with another man to Mr. Andrews's to paint some trunks at the back part of the house; in the morning I sent two men, because it was an awkward part to get at at the top part of the house; when that was done, there was no necessity for any more than one man. These men remained there till eight o'clock; the other man came to the shop, and I sent this man back to finish the lower part of the house, which he could do himself. I never saw nor heard any thing of him till half after ten o'clock; then he rung the shop-bell; I went down, and let him in; he brought two paint-pots in with him: I said, Joseph, have you done; he said, yes, Sir, I have done all but the trunk that runs along the skylight, Mr. Andrews wishes to have it painted, but it is very full of dirt and wet. He took his paint-pots up stairs, and brought a ladder, and he left the shop-door open; I was surprised to see the shop-door left open; I went into the accompting-house, I did not say any thing to him; in about a quarter of an hour I saw him come out of the privy, and he went out. I never heard any more about this business till after twelve: Mr. Andrews came and said, your man has stole my watch; good God, says I, is it possible; he said he had. Mr. Andrews's shop-door is constructed in this kind of way: there is no private door at all to the house; every person must go through the shop to go into the house. Mr. Andrews said, I wish you would come down and hold him in conversation while I go for a constable; I went, and the prisoner was

coming through the parlour; I kept him in conversation; he told me he had finished, and just as I was making him a reply, Mr. Andrews came in with the constable. When they came into the parlour, I said, Mr. Andrews accuses you of stealing his watch; me! says he, I know nothing at all of the watch. They took him to Marlborough-street, I did not attend that day; I should have gone to Marlborough-street, but I had not done with the Grand Jury, and that day I did not return home till ten o'clock at night. During the time the prisoner came in with the paint-pots at my house, I was called to another part of the house; when I came back again I met this man coming out of the privy which is made for the men of the shop; it struck me, when I came home at night, that it might be concealed in this privy; I found the watch in the privy where I saw the prisoner come out; I should not have had suspicion to have looked there, had not I have seen him come out when he came from Mr. Andrews's with the paint-pots. When I found the watch I took it down to Mr. Andrews's between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I gave it to Mr. Andrews, and he gave it to the constable himself.

Q. Did you have a character with this man? - A. In my profession we cannot take characters, it is not like a servant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Several hours afterwards the watch was found in your privy? - A. Yes.

Q. All your men have access to that place? - A. They could not before the next day, they could not return home till the next morning.

Q. They might have gone if they had been in the shop - am I to understand you that none of your men were at home? - A. Yes; there were none there.

Q. Do you mean to say that none of them were at home? - A. There were two men came home at dinner-time, I was with them; they did not go into the privy; I was at home till half after four o'clock, and there was no man came home till after their day's work was done.

Q. Your men came home in the evening? - A. Yes, then there were some of my family in the way.

Q. You went out at half after four o'clock, and staid till ten? - A. I was.

Q. Your men came home in the evening - they might or might not have gone unknown to you? - A. Not unknown to my family.

Court. Q. You say you sent only two men, of which the prisoner was one - the other person returned to you before nine o'clock, and never went afterwards? - A. No, he did not.

Q. And after nine o'clock the prisoner was the only person employed in painting this house? - A. He was.

- HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable of St. Ann's, Soho; I took the prisoner into custody, and at night, between eleven and twelve, the watch was brought to me; I have had it ever since, I produce the watch.

Q.(To Prosecutor) What parish is your house in? - A. St. Ann's, Soho

Q. Look at that watch, seal, and key, are they all your's? - A.They are.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-96

617. FANNY WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a Banknote, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Cormick , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS CORMICK sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a rope-maker . in Mile-End New Town ; the prisoner at the bar was a servant to my brother, John Cormick .

Q. What do you accuse her of? - A. She took the two-pound note out of my small clothes pocket, they were in a drawer; I live in the house with my brother John.

Q. Did you see her take it? - A. No.

Q. Was it loose? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you lose it? - A. I lost it on the 19th of August.

Q. Had you taken off your breeches on that day, and put them in a drawer? - A. No.

Q. When had you seen it the last time before it was stole? - A. In a week before, I dare say I had.

Q.Have you seen it since it has been stole? A. Yes.

Q. How do you know it is your's? - A. By my name being on the back of it.

Q. What do you know of the prisoner taking of it? - A.It was found in her possession, in a box of her's, which was at another woman's room; I went to that woman's room, and saw the note in the box; we found the note on Monday, the 21st of August.

Q. In whose possession was the box? - A. In the possession of Sarah Spriggs .

Q. Is the note here? - A. Yes

Q. The prisoner at the bar was a servant to your brother, was she? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had put your breeches by in the drawer, or had any body put them by for you? - A. I had put them by myself a week before this Monday.

Q. You put by this two-pound note with them? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lock this drawer? - A. No.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and her - do you remember that she was questioned about this subject? - A. She was not questioned about my note.

Q. Nothing was said about your giving her the note? - A. No, I never gave her any note.

Q. How long had you had it in your possession? - A. Two or three weeks.

Q. Do you know the number of it? - A. No.

Q. Was your name on the back of this note written by yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in the habit of writing your name on all the notes you take? - A. No, but I did write my name on that, and two or three other two-pound notes.

Q. But the number of this you did not take? - - A. No.

Q. Did you make any charge of this before the Magistrate when she was taken up there? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When was it that you first charged her with taking this note? - A. I took the note from the woman's house that she put it in.

Q. That was before this young woman was taken before the Magistrate - you did not go before any Magistrate to make any charge? - A. No.

SARAH SPRIGGS sworn. - Q. Were you employed by Mr. Cormick? - A. No.

Q. How came you by the two-pound note that you gave to the last witness? - A. He came and took it out of her box, it was left in the prisoner's box, she put all her goods and box into my place.

Q. Into your room I suppose you mean? - A. Yes.

Q. And Mr. Thomas Cormick came and took it out? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had that box been in your possession before Thomas Cormick came and took the note out? - A. Three weeks.

Q. Did the prisoner come from time to time to her box? - A. Only once.

Q. How long before Thomas Cormick came did the prisoner come to her box the last time? - A. About a week.

Q. Was the box locked or open? - A. Open.

Q. Did you ever look into the box before Thomas Cormick came? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the note there? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first see that note there? - A. I went and looked after I heard she was taken up, then I saw the note.

Q. Can you read? - A. No.

Q. You saw some paper then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give information of it to Thomas Cormick ? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live, Mrs. Spriggs? - A. In Mile-End New Town.

Q. How near to Mr. Cormick? - A.Not two minutes walk off.

Q. Were you ever at Mr. Cormick's house? - A. Never but once.

Q. How lately before this? - A. About three days before this I was there.

Q. As a chair-woman? - A. No, I only went there.

Q. Did you stay there any time? - A. I only went to take a cup of tea.

Q. And that was three days before Mr. Cormick came to your house, and found a note? - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner's box was at your house without any lock or security whatever? - A. It was not locked.

JOHN CORMICK sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of this matter? - A. The only circumstance that I know is, the tearing off the corner of the note.

THOMAS SKIDMORE sworn. - A. On the 22d of August they missed the note, and sent to me; I found the note in the box at Sarah Spriggs 's; I produce the note.

Q.(To Thomas Cormick .) Is your name upon it, look at it? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Is that the note that you lost? - A. Yes.

Q.(To John Cormick .) Look at it? - A. All that I can point out is tearing this bit from the corner, I cannot say that is the same.

Q. Do you believe it is? - A. I had it in my fob, it was sticking out this way, (witness shewing how;) I laid hold of it as I was taking my watch out, and tore the corner off; I cannot pretend to say it is the same note.

Q. How long ago is it that you tore the corner off? - A. It might be a fortnight before the note was found.

Q.(To Thomas Cormick .) Can you distinguish this note from any other note that you had got by any thing else than the name? - A. I know it by a piece being torn out of the corner; it was torn out of the corner when my brother gave it me.

Q. Were you in the habit of writing your name upon many notes? - A. No.

Q. How many notes have you been in the habit of writing your name on? - A. A very few.

Q. Perhaps not above five or six? - A. Not so many.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

The prosecutor recommended her to mercy, on account of her conduct, being perfectly good before this unfortunate affair happened; and the Jury recommended her to mercy, on account of her good character.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050918-97

618. THOMAS TAGO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of William Aldridge , privily from his person .

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE sworn. - I am a baker ; I live in Queen Ann-street East: On the 1st of September, at half past twelve o'clock at night, I was sitting at the step of a door in Little Chapel-street .

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was sober; I had a friend with me; he was very much in liquor.

Q. And you went to take care of him; you fell asleep? - A. Yes; I slept till a man came to me; I felt him take my watch out of my pocket; he ran away, and I ran after him, calling out stop thief; he was stopped by a constable a little way further off, in the same street; I was not far behind him when he was taken; the witness that took him was shutting up his shop.

Q. What became of your watch? - A. The witness had it afterwards; he found it on him.

Q. Then all you know is, that you fell fast asleep; you felt a man take your watch out of your pocket; you ran after him, and cried out stop thief? - A. Exactly so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am a baker.

Q. You were quite drunk? - A. I was sober.

Q. I should think no sober man would fall fast asleep in the street - what time of the night was it? - A. Half past twelve.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. I am not.

Q. You have got a lodging, I suppose? - A. I live with my master; I sat down with my friend.

Q. He was drunk, and you were not sober? - A. I had been drinking with him, but I was not drunk.

- CAPFORD sworn. - I keep a soup-shop; I live in Little Chapel-street; I am a constable.

Q. You heard the cry of stop thief? - A. Yes. I immediately pursued him; there was no one running in the street but him; I caught him just by his own door where he lives.

Q. What is he? - A. A hackney-coachman; he drives for a master; when I took hold of him, he immediately said, I live here, let me lay my key down; there was a place withinside the palisades, where he pretended to lay the key down, and it fell out to be the watch; I desired the watchman to pick it up while I held him; he did, and gave it to me when we got to the watch-house. I produce the watch. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.).

Mr. Alley. (To Capford. Q. You were the officer of the night? - A. I was parish constable.

Q. You had got a companion with you; you did not see the man till the dog caught hold of him? - A. I did not know that the dog laid hold of him at all.

Q. I was told that there were two or three other men running at the same time? - A. There was no one running at the same time but the watchman and me.

Q. You did not pick up the watch; you took him to the watch-house first, before you saw the watch? - A. No; I saw him lay it down, and here is the watchman that picked it up; he broke the glass of the watch in laying it down.

Prisoner's defence. I left my yard a quarter before eleven, and I went home a quarter before twelve o'clock; I was at my own door by twelve o'clock.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-98

619. CHARLOTTE POWER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , one pair of silk stockings, value 9 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Pearson , privately in his shop .

HENRY PEARSON sworn. - I am a hosier ; I live at No. 63, Oxford-street ; I have no partner.

THOMAS LEECH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Pearson: On the 14th of September, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop to look at some black silk stockings; I shewed her some embroidered ones; the paper contained ten pair; she wished to see some lace clocks; I shewed her a paper containing fourteen pair; she offered me twelve shillings for a pair of lace clocks; I told her, I could not take less than thirteen and sixpence; then she wished to see some broader lace clocks than what I had shewed her; I told her they would come higher, they would be fourteen shillings; she said, that was higher than she intended to give, she thought she could get them cheaper elsewhere: At that time there was one pair of embroidered clocks which laid by the side of the lace clocks on the counter; I turned my head to see if I had any that might suit her, and turning my head back again, I found a pair of embroidered was gone.

Q. You saw something move? - A. I did not; I found the embroidered pair was gone; I turned over the lace clocks to make myself positive, thinking perhaps she might have put them amongst them; not finding them there, I was thoroughly convinced that she must have taken them; the prisoner said, if I would not take her money, she must go elsewhere, she immediately got up, and went out: I went after her, and told her I was sorry to lay under the disagreeable necessity of detaining her for taking a pair of stockings, which she denied: I told her, if she looked in the tail of her gown, where she put them, she would find them.

Q. Where were they? - A. I took hold of her and opened her hand, and in the tail of her gown,

which the had been holding in her hand, were the stockings; I brought her into the shop and sent for a constable; I gave charge of her, and I gave the constable the stockings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Who else was in the shop? - A. There was a young lady and Mrs. Pearson.

Q. You said you told her when she went out of the shop, that she had got them in the tail of her gown - therefore you suspected that she had got them in the tail of her gown? - A. I did.

Q. Had she any thing else in her hand? - A. Yes, a parasol.

Q. She had the parasol and the tail of her gown in her hand, and the stockings in the tail of her gown? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively, you having suspected and told her she would find them in the tail of her gown, that it was not by accident? - A. It could not be by accident.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do.

Q. Was it a muslin gown? - A. I cannot say; it was a white gown; I have not been able to ascertain whether it was muslin or no.

Q. It was a white gown and a long train? - A. I cannot answer whether it was a long train or a short one.

Q. The lady had it in her hand when she came into the shop and when she went out; I should suppose if a lady's train was not long, she would not hold it up? - A. I cannot say.

Q. When you stopped her what did she say? - A. She denied having them.

Q. What did she say when you found them? - A. She said, good God! so I have! She seemed very much confused.

Q. I should think so too - upon your oath was that all she said? - A. I believe that was all she said; I was as much confused as she was.

Q. Does Mrs. Pearson serve in the shop? - A. Occasionally; she was not then serving in the shop, Mrs. Pearson and her friends were in the back shop; a young lady stood at the side of me while I was serving the prisoner.

Court. Q. There was a young woman in the shop standing by the side of you - was she a shop-woman? - A. As occasion requires she assists in the shop; she did not see her take the stockings.

Mr. Knapp. Q. She should have been here to tell us herself, because she stood next to you, and therefore she might have seen it, if her head was not turned on one side. - A. Certainly it is possible she might.

Court. Q. She was near enough to see it? - A. She was close by the side of me.

- STONEHOUSE sworn. - Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes; I produce the stockings. (The stockings identified by Leech.)

Prisoner's defence. If you think proper I will state the circumstance as it happened, if it will be any satisfaction to your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury: When I went to buy the stockings, this is the gown I had on at the time (shewing the gown), it was a nice dress gown; I held it up a great deal, and when I went into Mr. Pearson's shop, it was about six o'clock in the afternoon, I asked him to let me see some black silk stockings, which he brought; I told him I did not like them, they were not so good as I wanted them, I wished to see others; he brought another parcel, they were not the clock that I wanted; I wanted to see open lace gores; these stockings lay on the counter; I then looked at the open lace ones, and they were striped down the gore; I told him I wanted them as good as I could get them, and as rich; I would thank him to let me have a pair of clear lace gores; he looked, and found a parcel of this description, he said; and when I examined them, I made him sensible that the description of stockings that I wanted, the gore ran broader at the bottom; he made me answer, the reason he did not shew me them was because they were of too large a size for me; I said I believed he was right, but if he would look out a short size of that pattern, I would be obliged to him; he then found a pair, which I looked at; he told me the price was thirteen shillings, I told him I would give him twelve shillings, he said he would not take less than thirteen shillings; I said to him, you have been always in the habit of asking thirteen and taking twelve, take the twelve and I will have these stockings, if you will not, you will oblige me to go elsewhere; he said, I cannot help it, I will not take less than thirteen; with that I took up my train off the counter (the young woman came out of the parlour), I held my train up and took my parasol, and bid them good evening; and when I was going some way from the door, he came after me; he said you have got something that does not belong to you: I returned back with him; he said, if you look in your gown tail, you will find the stockings; I said, good God Almighty! you astonish me! I let my gown tail fall, and, to my utter astonishment, as well as the young man's, I saw the stockings. I am an innocent woman, I never knew they were there.

Mr. Knapp. (To Stonehouse.) Q. You found some money on her? - A. I found two half guineas and twelve and sixpence in silver in her pocket.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-99

620. JOHN GREEN was indicted for that he, on the 30th of August , feloniously, and without lawful cause, was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN SUTER sworn. - I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of John Green. (The record read in Court.)

Q. Were you present when he was tried? - A. I was turnkey of the county gaol of Surry when he was tried.

Q. You heard him tried? - A. Yes, in January sessions 1804.

Q. You are sure it is the same person? - A. I am perfectly well acquainted with the person, and I am sure it is the person.

Prisoner. I had a pardon at the time, I was ordered to be transported as such to serve His Majesty at sea.

Q. Have you got it here? - A. I believe this gentleman knows that I received a pardon.

Suter. I know no more of it than by hearsay; I have no doubt but he had a pardon to go to sea, but I cannot say so.

WILLIAM HOMAN sworn. - I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street; I heard that he had been transported at the Surrey assizes, and seeing he was at large I took him into custody to Bow-street; I saw him at large on the 30th of August , between ten and eleven in the middle of the day, in Windmill-street, near Finsbury-square, in the parish of St. Luke's .

Q. The only reason of your apprehending him was because he was a transport? - A. No other reason.

Q. Now prisoner, if you have any pardon, or any order for your discharge, you must produce it? - A. I have a letter which I had wrote for since I was taken, which I received from the ship (the letter handed to the Court); Mr. Homan knows that I received this letter; I was ruptured by a fall from the fore-top-yard; I was sent on shore as a disabled man, they would not have me any longer; after that, where was I to come but to my wife and family; I am both fractured and ruptured.

Q. Who is Mr. Hawker? - A. A navy agent at Plymouth.

Q. These are not the proper documents; certainly when you were discharged they ought to have given you your discharge? - A. There were more than twenty sent on shore, and they never gave a man of them a discharge; I begged hard, and asked them for it particularly, telling them I was a convict; they considered me being a convict that I had no right to it; Mr. Kirby knows that I had my pardon.

Q. Have you any body to prove that fact? - A. Mr. Kirby could if he was here.

Q. If you were disabled they would have granted you a certificate of that? - A. They considered my being a convict that I had no right to any thing of the kind; they even told me they would slog me if I came on board again; they told me I was not fit for the service, as I had a fracture on my skull; they sent me on shore on account of it.

Q. When did you light of this accident? - A. About four months before I left the ship.

Q. Have you any evidence that I can state to the Jury on your behalf, or any witness of any kind? - A. I have no witness to come forward to state any thing.

GUILTY , Death , aged 36.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-100

621. MICHAEL DROUT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a coat, value 2 l. two waistcoats, value 30 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. a shirt, value 10 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Daniel , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Gill .

THOMAS DANIEL sworn. - I am a book-binder , I live at No. 27, St. Ann's-court, Dean-street, Soho .

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. A baker : On the 5th of September, (this man lodged in the same room that I did,) he got up earlier than usual, he took his bundle that had been in the room the night before, and went down stairs; I knew that he had not paid his lodgings, I ran after him, and he taking his bag away, I wished to know what he had got in his bag; he said, he was going to his washer-woman; I told him I had lost my things the night before, and I wished to see what he had in his bag; he said, certainly; I desired him to walk in, which he did, to the end of the stairs, and the first thing he took out of the bag was my coat, and then all my things that I lost; he said, he was distressed, and thought of making free with my things.

Q. Are they here? - A. No, I have brought only my coat, (produces it;) the coat is mine, and I am sure the other things are mine.

Prisoner's defence. There were four men lodged in the same room; as I was going out in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I did not know there was any thing in the bundle but my own, he followed me down stairs, saying, he had lost some things the over night; I said, you may search, I do not know that there are any more things than my own, I am going to the washerwoman's; I am a stranger in town.

GUILTY, aged 36,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-101

622. GEORGE SUDDERY , THOMAS TAPP , JOHN JACKSON , and MARGARET MARTIN , were indicted, the three first, for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , two hundred

and eighty pounds weight of lead, value 3 l. the property of the Trustees of Lincoln's Inn ; and the latter, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Second Count. For like offence, only charging it to be the property of Joseph Edwards .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOSEPH EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a plumber , and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you employed by the Society of Lincoln's Inn as their plumber? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 2d of August, were the three prisoners at the bar in your service? - A. Yes, the three men were employed in cutting up the lead from the reservoir under the privy at Lincoln's Inn ; they were to take it to my house by order of Mr. Lane, the Steward of that Society; they were at work there on the 2d of August from about half past six in the morning till twelve; I watched them cutting the lead up, and, to the best of my knowledge, I thought they had got all the lead home; there was only one load.

Q. In consequence of any information, did you go to the house of Mrs. Martin? - A. I did; her house is in Princes-court, Drury-lane; she was at home.

Q. Did you find any lead which corresponded in appearance with the lead that you had in this place? - A. Yes, it appeared by the smell to come from a place of that description; Mr. Lane asked Mrs. Martin how she came by it; she said, that Mr. Edwards's men had left it there to exchange for patent pipe.

Q. Had you authorised your men to leave it there? - A. No such thing; she was taken up, and the lead was taken away.

Q. Did it correspond so as to make you partly sure that it was part of that lead? - A. It did; the two angles at the bottom corresponded where it had been cut off, the solder of the lead in one had been cut from the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understood you, that, in Mrs. Martin's place, you found the lead - she is a plumber? - A. Her husband was.

Q. When you have done your work, you take what old materials there are, and allow for them? - A. Yes.

Q. This has never been delivered to you, nor has ever been in your possession, of course you would never allow for that which you never received? - A. No, I would not allow for what I never had.

Mr. Alley. Q. You watched the men the whole time they were at work? - A. The principal time, not all the time.

Q. Did not you give your son instructions to attend the cart? - A. He was instructed; I was not there then.

ROBERT HENALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a porter in Lincoln's Inn? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 2d of August, between twelve and one o'clock, were you in Lincoln's Inn? - A. I was in the Inn; I saw the cart, and saw the lead taken from the privy loaded in the cart by the three men at the bar.

Q. Did you see the cart drive away? - A. I did not, but I saw the cart after I had got out of the Inn in Lincoln's-Inn-fields; I knew it, because it was the same cart, and the three prisoners at the bar were with it.

Q. Did you see the cart nearly facing the bottom of Portugal-street? - A. Yes, between that and Bear-yard, and there were two pieces of lead stood against the post out of the cart; I knew them by the make up, and by the soil on them.

Q. Where was the cart? - A. The cart was standing a few yards from the post where the lead was, the cart did not stop long; as soon as they went away with the pieces of lead, the cart went on; Jackson and Suddery took each of them a piece of the lead on their shoulder that had stood against the post, the carman drove the cart up Little Queen-street; I followed them some way, but I could not walk fast enough to keep up with them; they went along Duke-street, which leads to Drury-lane from Lincoln's-Inn-fields.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you saw two of the prisoners stand near a post where some lead was? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to say that you saw the lead in a cart, it was near a cart - it was in Lincoln's-Inn-fields you saw the cart, you were a good way from the cart? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your eye-sight very good? - A. Rather-bad.

Q. Then if you were a considerable distance from the cart, how do you know it was the same cart? - A. I knew it.

Mr. Gurney. I recollect he said he knew it, because it was the same cart.

Q. Did you also see the prosecutor's son with the cart in Lincoln's-Inn-fields? - A. Yes, I know his person, but I do not recollect seeing him when the lead stood against the post.

EDWARD TREADAWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an officer of Bow-street - did you go on the 3d of August with Mr. Edwards to search the house of Margaret Martin ? - A. I did, and I found the lead; she said what we have heard.

Q. Did you take the lead to Mr. Edwards, and compare it with the other lead? - A. Yes, and it corresponded with it.

Court. Q. Shew the two parts that correspond to the Jury? - A. This is the same piece we found at Martin's.

JOSEPH EDWARDS , Jun. sworn. - Examined by

Mr. Gurney. Q. How old are you? - A. I was twelve the last day of February.

Q. You are the son of Mr. Edwards? - A. Yes, I accompanied the cart from Lincoln's Inn; I walked close behind it, on the 2d of August, between twelve and one.

Q. Did you stop at all? - A. No, not at all; we came out of Lincoln's Inn into Chancery-lane, into Carey-street, and into Lincoln's-Inn-fields, from there into Little Queen-street; two of the prisoners were with the truck, and one walked by the cart.

Q. Was there any thing upon the truck? - A. No.

Q. Did they all three go home with you all the way? - A. Partly; I lost sight of these two prisoners in Great Queen-street.

Q. Had they any thing with them? - A. Nothing at all; we went down Little Queen-street.

Q. Had they any thing with them when they went down Great Queen-street? - A. No; Jackson and I went with the carman and the cart.

All Four NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-102

623. JOHN LEMONT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , forty yards of printed calico, value 36 s. the property of Abel Richards .

JAMES LANE sworn. - On the 17th of August, a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, I was going up Oxford-road, I saw the prisoner take the piece of calico from the form which stood at the door; I was some distance from him, I went after him immediately, and asked him what he was about; he answered me, what is that to you.

Q. Were you near enough to be sure the prisoner was the man? - A. Yes, I caught hold of him by the collar, and he dropped the piece of calico on the pavement; I took it up, and took the prisoner and the calico into the shop; I produce the property.

JOHN OWEN sworn. - I live with Mr. Abel Richards , he is a linen-draper , No. 363, Oxford-street .

Q. Do you remember the last witness, Lane, bringing any man into your shop? - A. Yes, he brought the prisoner at the bar into the shop and the calico; the calico is Mr. Richards's property, I know it by the mark and the pattern; I had seen it there ten minutes before I missed it.

SARAH FERM sworn. - Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner on this day they are speaking of? - A. Yes, I was looking out of the garret window of the house, I saw the prisoner take this yellow piece of calico, and put it under his apron.

Prisoner's defence. I never stood near that yellow piece, I only took the other piece to look at, and that man came and took me by the arm, and pulled me away; I turned back, and put the piece on the bench; I asked him what he did that for; he told me in fun, and the other man came and took hold of me, and said I took it; I looked at the other bit, and meant to buy it if I could, to make a gown for my wife, but the yellow piece I never touched it, if I am to die this minute.

GUILTY , aged 72.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050918-103

624. MARTHA LUKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a hat, value 2 s. a frock, value 2 s. and a petticoat, value 1 s. the property of William Watts .

GRACE WATTS sworn. - I am the wife of William Watts ; I have two children, William and Henry.

Q. How old is William? - A. Eight years next November; the baby in my arms is Henry, he is nine months this month.

Q. Do you remember, on the 3d of August, having your children playing about any where? - A. Yes, in Lincoln's-Inn-fields ; I sent William with the baby, and a little boy of the name of Thomas Baxter .

Q. How was little Henry dressed? - A. In a buff frock, a cambrick top petticoat, and a calico under one, and an old beaver hat.

Q. About twelve o'clock did you find any of your children returning? - A. No, it was half past one that my son came to me, then I was at Mr. Balis's chambers; he told me that a woman took Henry from him, I went to Hatton-garden Office, and gave information.

Q. When was it that you recovered your child? - A. About eleven o'clock the same evening; I found the child in St. Ann's, Soho, workhouse.

Q. How was the child dressed when you found it at the workhouse? - A. In a bed-gown and light petticoat, what the gentlewoman of the workhouse had lent him; the child was stripped of his hat and petticoat; his shoes and shirt, and under petticoat, were not taken from him.

ELIZABETH FARR sworn. - Q. Do you remember on Saturday, the 3d of August, passing through Lincoln's-Inn-square? - A. Yes, about half past eleven; I saw these two children (pointing to them) walking with little Henry; I saw the prisoner at the bar having hold of little Henry's left hand with her right hand.

Q. Did you know these children before? - A. No, I said to the prisoner, poor little fellow, he can hardly walk alone; she said, no, Madam, he can but just walk; I took no further notice of the prisoner, I went to my employ. About half past one I heard of a little child being lost; I ran down stairs upon their saying it was with a little boy in a brown coat, and I said I saw a woman take

a child away in Lincoln's-Inn-fields. On the Tuesday after that I saw her sitting on Mr. Wood's steps, in Chancery-lane, and there I said she was the person that took the child away.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the woman that you saw with these three little children in Lincoln's-inn-square? - A. I am positive of it; she had on, then, a coarse black bombazeen gown, and a velvet bonnet; I am sure it is the same woman though she is not in the same dress.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer: On Saturday, the 3d of August, the prosecutrix came to me at the Office in Hatton-garden, and brought the little boy with her; I asked him if she had a black bombazeen gown on; he said she had, and a black velvet bonnet on; on the Tuesday following, when she was apprehended, she was delivered into my charge; I searched her and found a duplicate of a black bombazeen gown, pledged on the 5th of August; the prisoner was tried last Sessions on three indictments of the same kind; I believe that Mrs. Farr can speak to the gown, that she had it on at the time.

Farr. This is the very dress that I saw her in.

Court. Q. That is the sort of a gown? - A. Yes.

JOHN FRENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce a black bombazeen gown pledged by the prisoner.

WILLIAM CURRIE sworn. - On Saturday, the 3d of August, about five o'clock, at the corner of Sutton-street, in Soho-square, I saw the child, Henry Watts , that is now with his mother, behind the door of a passage in Mr. Carol's house, it had nothing on but a shirt and an old pair of shoes, and a calico petticoat.

Q. Was it crying? - A. No, it was amusing itself; I took it up into my arms, and took it into a public-house close by there; I was going to take it home to my own apartment, they persuaded me to fetch the beadle to see who it belonged to; accordingly I met the beadle, and he took the child from me.

- sworn. - I am beadle of the parish of St. Ann's, Soho: I received the child from the last witness at the public-house; the child had on a little calico petticoat, a shirt, and an old pair of red shoes.

JAMES ALEXANDER sworn. - You are the master of St. Ann's workhouse? - A. Yes; I received the child on Saturday, about five o'clock in the evening, it had on a shirt, a petticoat, and a pair of shoes, nothing else.

Q.(To prosecutrix.) You never found your cloaths again? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. At the time the gentlewoman was speaking about me, I was in the Strand, attempting to meet my husband; I was not near the place.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton .

Reference Number: t18050918-104

625. BRIDGET INNICEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Thomas .

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - I am a linen-draper at No. 25, Shoreditch : On the 23d of August last, I recollect putting the print in the doorway about ten o'clock in the morning.

JOHN CAMPION sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Thomas: I was very busy at the time a woman came past and called out, that somebody had taken our goods; I pursued the prisoner, and took her with the cotton in her apron; this is the remaining part that hung inside of the house; I produce the cotton I took from her: I overtook her in Flower-de-luce-street.

Q. You are sure it was in your shop? - A. Yes; we have matched it, and it tallies exactly, and we have measured it, and it is the same quantity.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through this court; I met a woman with a red cloak; she dropped this property, and this gentleman followed me and took me.

Campion. There were two together when I pursued; they were running; when I got hold of this one she took her hand out of her apron, then I discovered this property.

GUILTY , aged 17,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-105

626. ELIZABETH CONNER and ELEANOR MEWS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , six shirts, value 6 s. thirteen pair of worsted stockings, value 6 s. 6 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. two frocks, value 6 s. and one waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of Robert Rumford .

Second Count. For stealing the same goods, laying them to be the property of John Rumford .

SARAH RUMFORD sworn. - I am the wife of Robert Rumford ; I live in Prospect-place, St. George's in the East ; I take in washing: On the 18th of July I hung the cloaths out about seven o'clock in the evening, to dry; I do not know how they were taken away; I found them the next morning at Mrs. Conner's house; Mrs. Conner sets in the street and sells fish.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell Office: On the 19th of July I received information by Mrs. Hunt, that her neighbour had been robbed of a great deal of wet linen, and that she suspected the person right over the workhouse yard; I went into Mrs. Conner's house, No. 3, Indian-garden, St. George's in the East, and there I found her a-bed, about eleven o'clock in the morning; Mews lives over head in the one pair of stairs room, in the same house, and there I saw, in Mews's room, a quantity of wet linen and

stockings; I afterwards went into the garret, and there I saw the bed strewed all over with wet stockings, besides a large quantity of things on the line.

Q. Who did that garret belong to? - A. To Mrs. Conner; I went back into the yard; I found lines tied up there; there were three wet sheets; I then went up the one pair of stairs again, and looked out of the landing-place window into Union-street, where I received information that the property was stolen from, right across the workhouse yard: I then called out to Mrs. Hunt (seeing partly the garden from where the property was taken), for her to come and see whether any of the wet linen belonged to any of the persons she knew; she came and spoke to some of the property; I then came down to Mrs. Conner, and told her she must get up; I asked her who the garret belonged to; she said the person was gone out ever since Monday; I asked her whether she took in washing, she said a little; I told her there was a great deal of wet linen, she said there was no doubt but it was all her's; I and Mr. Rogers took her and the property to the Office, and there were other people came and spoke to the property; Mrs. Mews was taken into custody two or three days afterwards; there was a waistcoat found in her room.

Q. What property was found in Conner's room belonging to Mrs. Rumford? - A. Six check cotton shirts, and, I believe, fourteen pair of stockings, one single one, and two frocks; that was all, I believe, that was found in her room, the rest of the wet linen belonged to other neighbours; this waistcoat was found in Mews's room, Mrs. Hunt swears to that.

Conner. (To Brown,) Q. Did you find any thing in my room where I sleep? - A. No.

Conner. I know nothing of the transaction whatever.

Court. Q. Where were the shirts found? - A. In the garret.

Conner. He might find them there, but I do not know any more than the child unborn; this place I let out to endeavour to pay my rent; as to my part, I get my living by hard labour.

Conner. (To Rogers.) Q. Did you ever know any thing amiss of me than getting my living by hard labour? - A. You bear a very indifferent character.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a married woman; my husband is chief mate of a ship: Mrs. Conner asked me, on the 18th of July, to unlock her lower room door; I could not unlock it with the key she had given me; then she said she had given me the key of her garret.

MARY HALE sworn. - I am a married woman, my husband is a working man; we live in Indian-gardens: On Thursday night, the 18th of July, as I was going to my bed, about half after ten, I saw Mrs. Conner, Joseph Blair, and Eleanor Mews , in Mrs. Conner's garret; the next morning, when I was going to my work, I saw some shirts in the garret hanging over a line.

Q. Did you see them there the over night? - A. No, the next morning.

ANN HUNT sworn. - I am a labouring woman; I live at No. 15, Union-street, Shadwell: I had seven shirts, four pair of stockings, and four pair of trowsers, that I left out all night, and the next morning I lost them, and by finding of them I heard that Mrs. Rumford had been robbed, and through that, another neighbour came forward and claimed her sheets.

Q. Why do you accuse Mrs. Conner and Mews of it? - A. By a stocking being dropped in the workhouse yard, which is the direct road to Mrs. Conner's; as they carried them along they dropped a stocking; the other stocking was found in Mews's room. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Conner's defence. I am a poor lone woman; I keep this house, without a doubt; I know no more of these things than the child unborn, as I have a soul to be saved.

Mews's defence. They have taken a false oath; there was nothing found in my room; Mr. Rogers said he would let me go if I would swear against Mrs. Conner, and if I did not come forward, he would haul me forward.

Conner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Conner, GUILTY , aged 60.

Mews, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined two years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-106

627. RICHARD HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. a half pint pot, value 6 d. six pounds weight of metal, value 4 s. the property of James Yates and James Edward Yates .

JAMES YATES , jun. sworn. - I live with my father, he is a pewterer , No. 20, Shoreditch : On the 7th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I desired the prisoner to go to breakfast (he is a labourer , and works for us); he went out of the workshop, and went towards the gate, with an intention of making water; he immediately crossed to the opposite side, stooped to a hole, and, I believe, he put something in his breeches; not being quite certain he had taken any thing, I ran towards the gate, and I discovered a little hole, where I found three pieces of metal, a great quantity of tin bars, and four pieces of lead. I consulted my brother; we went and gave information at the

Office in Worship-street; we marked the metal and left it all in the hole till one o'clock; he went out to dinner as usual; I immediately followed him, and let him go as far as Hoxton, in hopes of taking the receiver as well as the thief; he got near home, and I thought there was no iron shop in the way, I immediately secured him; I brought him back, and the officer took a piece of metal from out of his breeches.

Q. How long did he live with you? - A. A twelvemonth as a labourer, he had fifteen shillings a week.

Q. Are you partner with your father? - A. No, my brother is.

JOHN VICKREY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 7th of August I was sent for to go to Mr. Yates's; I was informed they suspected some person had concealed some metal for the purpose of robbing them; I went there, and they took something out of a hole in the wall, close by the back gate; there I found this ingot and some old leaden pipe; I marked it and put it into the hole again; when the prisoner was brought to the Office, Mr. Ray searched him; I went to his lodgings in a court in Hoxton, and in a cupboard by the side of the fire-place, were these two salt-cellars; in searching further, there was a little child laying in the cradle, the mother lifted up the child, and took up the cloaths with it; we told her to put the cloaths down, and the pots-dropped from under the cloaths; one is a pint pot, and the other is a half-pint pot; they are quite new; the prisoner said at the Office, this half-pint pot was given him by the young man, and the salt-cellars were given him by his master some time ago; he said nothing about the pint pot: I produce them.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On the 7th of August I searched the prisoner; I took this ingot of tin out of his breeches. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The pint pot my young master gave the clerk orders to give me; and the salt-cellars and the half-pint pot my other master gave me; and that ingot I found outside of the gate, and I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-107

628. JOHN HOFARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , eleven pounds weight of rope, value 5 s. the property of John Shepherd Killick .

JOHN SHEPHERD KILLICK sworn. - I live at Hackney Mills, Lea Bridge: On the 18th of July I missed a quantity of rope; I found what barges went the over night, I went immediately to Bromley-lock, and in John Hofard 's barge, I found the rope concealed in the cabin; it was new rope, and cost me ten pence a pound; he had got one piece in use for his barge, for what they call a hawser; the prisoner was not on board the barge, I met him at Bromley; I asked him where his barge was; he told me at Bromley-lock; there was another man on board who absconded: afterwards the prisoner was taken into custody.

Q. How do they generally navigate these barges? - A. Generally two men.

Q.Bromley-lock is lower down the river than your part? - A. Yes, it is the entrance from Old Ford into the Thames.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you any partners, public or private? - A. None.

Q. The man that you found on board had the care of the barge? - A. He was standing there then; he let me go into the cabin; I asked him how the rope got there; he said, his master brought it there; when I returned, in about two hours afterwards, he was gone.

Q. And you have never seen him since? - A. No, he went away directly; I had the prisoner apprehended in an hour after I found the rope.

- sworn. - I am a labourer to Mr. Killick: I saw the prisoner in the stack-yard between three and four o'clock in the morning, on the 18th of July; he had got a little beer cask in his hand belonging to Mr. Killick, he said he should be glad to find a little small beer, he said he was dry; I never saw him carry any thing away; I said to him, what do you do here; he said, I am very dry; I said haymakers are always dry; how came you to think of finding small beer here.

MOSES PICKERING sworn. - I am a miller; the rope that was found is Mr. Killick's property; it is the rope that was in the stack-yard the night before, I tied the ends of it to keep it from raveling.

WILLIAM CANNON sworn. - I am a constable of Bromley; I produce the rope.

- sworn. - I am a constable of Hackney; I took the prisoner in his own house, near Lea Bridge; he was at that time in the service of Mr. Botts.

JOHN COWEY sworn. - I take the toll of Lea Bridge between three and four o'clock; at that time, that is the only barge that went through; there were different barges that went up and down, but not very near to that time.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-108

629. LUCY FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , four sheets, value 5 s. four yards of calico, value 6 d. and two aprons, value 2 s. the property of George Lockhart .

Second count. For stealing the same goods, laying

them to be the property of Edward Rawlinson .

ANN LOCKHART sworn. - I live at No. 3, Blue-cross-street, by the Haymarket ; I take in washing and mangling; the prisoner washed for me; I did not see her take the property; I had lain down to rest my head between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 15th of July; my little girl saw her take it; she is about twelve years old; I believe she was not in her proper sense when she took it; she has been married to a man that beat her.

Q. Was she in liquor? - A. I do not know.

CHARLOTTE LOCKHART sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am twelve years old.

Q. Has your mother learned you your catechism? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it is good or bad to tell a lie? - A. It is bad; if I tell a falsity I shall not go to heaven.

Q. What do you know about these bundles? - A. The prisoner at the bar told me to light the fire, and she would go out and buy some tea and sugar; I was lighting the fire, and the woman went to the basket and took the bundle out; I turned my head round; I saw her running up stairs; I halloaed out, Lucy, what have you got; she made no answer; she ran away round the corner, into Whitcomb-street; I ran after her.

Prisoner. According to the mother's desire, I took the things to Mrs. Wilson's house.

(To prosecutrix.) Q. Did you desire her to take the things? - A. I did not

ANN SAVORY sworn. - On Saturday I took the bundle to be mangled, and on Monday I saw the prisoner coming down our street with the bundle, and the child calling out, stop thief; I took the bundle from her and gave it to the child; I am sure it is the bundle I carried to be mangled.

Prisoner. That woman did not take the things from me; and as to the words, stop thief, the child never said.

- sworn. - I am a constable: I heard the cry of stop thief in Whitcomb-street: I saw the prisoner give this bundle out of her lap into the child's hands.

Prosecutrix. These are the things that I had to mangle.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of what is laid to my charge; she and I had been drinking together all day.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-109

630. EDWARD HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 6 d. the property of Solomon Handfield .

ANN HANDFIELD sworn. - My father, Solomon Handfield , keeps the Spotted Horse public-house, Holywell-street, Shoreditch : On the 17th of August, about ten minutes before three o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came in for half a pint of beer; I drew him the beer, and he payed me for it; he went with the beer into one of the tap-rooms, (there are two tap-rooms;) on the table there stood a quart, a pint, and a half pint pot; my father came in, and asked me where the half pint pot was; I told him I could not tell, I saw the prisoner put a pint pot into his pocket; my father said to him, you have some pots of mine, and immediately I caught hold of him by the collar, and took the pint pot out of his pocket; the quart pot I did not see him move, but it was moved to the opposite side of the bench.

- GAMMON sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the pots. (The pots identified by Ann Handfield .)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Shoreditch, being thirsty I called for half a pint of porter; the young woman drew it me, I paid her; I sat down, there was an elderly man sat there, he went out; I sat there three or four minutes, the landlord came up, and asked me where the pint pot was; I said, there was the pot that I was drinking out of; he said, not that, another; he insisted upon searching me, and I was turning my pockets out, he directly said he took the pint pot out of my pocket.

Q. Did he take the pint pot out of your pocket? - A. He said he did.

Ann Handfield . I took the pot out myself; my father is lame, he was not able to take it out.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-110

631. MARY HOLDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Martin Leonard .

SARAH BATTY sworn. - I live servant with Martin Leonard , he keeps a lodging-house in Church-lane : On Sunday, the 11th of August, at eleven o'clock in the day, my mistress called me to let the woman out.

Q. Did she lodge there? - A. She came to sleep there that night.

Q. Did she pay you for the lodging? - A. She paid a shilling for the bed, I desired her to stop, that I might see that all was right; when I went up stairs, the sheet was gone; I came down stairs, and she was gone; and between one and two o'clock at night I found her in Dyot-street, with the sheet tied in a pocket handkerchief under her gown; I called the watchman, and I delivered her and the property to him; I know it is my master's sheet, his name is on it.

Prisoner's defence. The sheet that she took from me I did not take out of the house; the sheet was given to me at one o'clock in the day, I was going to return it to the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-111

632 MARY-ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a pinafore, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Ewers .

JUDITH BRIAN sworn. - I am a widow; I was coming by the back of the London-Dock last Wednesday was a fortnight, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner, she was taking off Mr. Ewers' child's frock; I asked her was it her own child; she told me yes; I asked the baby whether that was her mammy; the child said no, her mammy was at home; I told her I would fetch an officer, I came along Old Gravel-lane, and she followed me, and the baby followed her; I told Sarah Brown , whom I met, that child had been stripped, and I took the child in my arms.

Q. What became of the woman? - A. Somebody in the street went and fetched an officer; I am sure this is the woman that took off the child's frock.

SARAH BROWN sworn. - I was in Old Gravel-lane, Brian told me that she saw the prisoner stripping the child, the prisoner and the child were following her; the child's clothes were loose on the child's back, I tied them on.

ABRAHAM DAVIS sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I took this pinafore out of her bosom. (The pinafore identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-112

633. THOMAS NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a tin tea-kettle, value 2 s. the property of Walter James .

WALTER JAMES sworn. - I am a smith and ironmonger , I live at No. 6, Gray's-Inn-lane : On the 13th of September, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar walking out of the shop with a tin tea-kettle; I pursued him, and caught him in the street with it; I brought him back, and sent for the beadle to take him up; I produce the kettle, I have had it my possession ever since; I cannot say where it stood in the shop, there were so many; it has my mark.

Prisoner's defence. I was never in that person's shop before I was forced in; I crave the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-113

634. MARY LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. and three pewter pint pots, value 1 s. the property of Griffith Jones .

GRIFFITH JONES sworn. - I keep a public-house in Tottenham-court-road: On the 22d of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner go with a basket under her arm from London-street to Queen-square, Bloomsbury; and going along with the basket, the cloth that was on the top slipped off one of them, and there I saw it was my pot, with my name on it; then I took her, there were three pints and one quart.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. Yes, some time, I suspected her; I produce the pots, they are mine.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-114

635. MORGAN REES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , five silk stockings, value 5 s. and a silk glove, value 1 s. the property of Francis Rixson .

ELIZABETH DOUGLAS sworn. - I work at Mrs. Rixson's; she takes in washing: On the third of August I was there to assist her in ironing; about ten o'clock the prisoner came to Mrs. Rixson's and said he was going to Somers Town to receive some money; Mrs. Rixson gave him some bread and butter, and I gave him part of a pot of porter; he went away; he did not return till five o'clock in the afternoon, and then he brought a woman with him, and he asked Mrs. Rixson to let her sit down. After they had sat awhile, the woman sent for a pot of porter, and then they had half a pint of gin; the prisoner asked Mrs. Rixson to give his friend a cup of tea; and when we were sitting down at tea, the prisoner went out, and did not return till after tea; Mrs. Rixson went into the wash-house, and I went up to my ironing again; I heard the prisoner come in; I went down stairs, and there was some argument arose between him and the woman, about some money, and the woman and he left the house; in about half an hour after they were gone, Mrs. Rixson missed some silk stockings; she said some of the women had got them; the women were all very ready to strip; I said to Mr. Rixson, I would go to the prisoner at the bar, to know where that woman lives that came in with him. I went to the prisoner to know where this woman lived; I laid hold of his coat, seeing the stocking hang out of his pocket; I told him they were the property that I wanted; the prisoner lived as far as Tothil-street; he said the woman lived over the way; we walked

back together as far as the Infirmary, then he struck me; I was going to carry the four stockings I had taken out of his pocket to Mr. Rixson's, when he drew out another stocking and a glove from his small-cloaths, I believe.

FRANCIS RIXSON sworn. - I live in Union-street, Westminster: The young woman brought the four stockings to me; I did not see her take them from him; I asked the prisoner how he came by them; he said they were given him; I came on about thirty yards, and I stopped to speak to a person; I saw the prisoner take something out of some part of his clothes, I said, that man has got more property; I halloaed out after him, stop thief; he ran away, and I ran after him, and when he got to a narrow passage, he threw the stocking and glove over the wall; I overtook him and took him to Queen-square Office.

JAMES GILMORE sworn. - I produce five stockings and a glove I received from Elizabeth Douglas . (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I was so much intoxicated that I did not know any thing of the affair; they must have been put into my pocket by a Mrs. Crauford, or a Mrs. - ; I had plenty of opportunity of making away with them, if I had known that I had them.

Douglas. He was not sober, nor was he drunk.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-115

636. MARTHA FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , five tablecloths, value 30 s. the property of John Ireson ; and two silver tea-spoons, value 2 s. the property of Martha Mann .

JOHN IRESON sworn. - I keep the Swan, at Westminster-bridge ; the prisoner at the bar was laundry-maid to me for about six weeks.

Q. Did you lose any table-cloths after she entered into your service? - A. Several; my housekeeper searched her apartment, and found the duplicates of the property, and the duplicate of two spoons.

MARTHA MANN sworn. - I am house-keeper to Mr. Ireson.

Q. How long has this young woman lived in Mr. Ireson's service? - A. Seven weeks.

Q. Did you miss any tea-spoons or any tablecloths? - A. Yes, a great many, that I had seen after she came into Mr. Ireson's service. In consequence of suspicion that I had, I searched the prisoner's apartment on the 8th of August, she was present; I opened the drawer where her things were put, she put her hand into the drawer, and took out a piece of paper, and said I might have all the rest; I told her I would have that; she said she had thrown it into the fire, and I might get it out, but I saw she had thrown it under the drawers; a lad picked it up, and gave it to me; I saw it was the same she threw down, she struggled for it very much.

Q. What did the paper contain when it was picked up? - A. Four duplicates for five tablecloths and two tea-spoons; the five table-cloths were brought to Queen-square, and the two teaspoons, as the produce of the duplicates; I know the table-cloths to be Mr. Ireson's.

JAMES GILMORE sworn. - I am an officer, I produce the duplicates Mrs. Mann gave to me; the tea-spoons were pledged at Mrs. Barry's, in King-street; they were shewn to Mrs. Mann at the Office, she swore to them and the table-cloths.

JAMES ROBERTS sworn. - I live with Mr. Dobree, Charing-cross; I produce a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on July the 20th.

JAMES DEER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, Chamber-street; I know the person of the prisoner at the bar; on the 13th of July she pledged these two table-cloths, I advanced one pound on them.

SAMUEL PEARSON sworn. - I produce a tablecloth and two tea-spoons, pledged at Mrs. Barry's.

JOHN STANLEY sworn. - Q. Were you at Mr. Ireson's when this room was searched? - A. Yes, I saw Mrs. Mann take two table-spoons out of the drawer in her apartment; I saw the prisoner throw down a piece of paper, one of our boys picked it up, I saw the duplicates taken out of it.

(The property identified by Mrs. Mann.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am a poor servant unfortunately brought into trouble unthinkingly; when my master and mistress first accused me, they promised me both protection and liberty, and moreover agreed, that if I would pay for the things that were missing, or state the truth without even paying for them, they would forgive me, and not prosecute me. The hope of liberty, and the dread and fear of confinement, induced me to criminate myself; I hope the merciful Judge and Jury will take my case into consideration, and be as favourable as they can, as it is my first offence; thus, on my bended knees, I implore for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-116

637. JOHN HALSTON was indicted for that he, on the 13th of September , upon Thomas Derbyshire , feloniously and wilfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike, cut, and wound him in and upon his face and left shoulder, with intent in so doing feloniously and maliciously to kill and murder him .

Second Count. For like offence, to disable him.

Third Count. To do him some grievous bodily harm.

(The prisoner being put to the bar in a strait waistcoat, addressed the Court as follows:)

"My Lord, I wish to be delivered from this incumbrance, then I shall speak as a man; at present I speak as a madman. I am not mad, but can speak the words of truth and soberness."

(This request was granted him, by the Court placing a gaoler on each side of him.)

THOMAS DERBYSHIRE sworn. - I am a post-boy , I drive for Robert Read and William Hale , Carlisle Mews, Bedford-square: Last Friday was a week, the ostler of the Red Lion came and ordered a chaise and four, and one saddle horse, to go out; we took up at the Red Lion, in Tottenham-court-road; after waiting there twenty minutes for the prisoner, who came in a hackney-coach, he got into the chatle, and ordered us to drive to the Load of Hay, at Haverstock-hill, two miles and a half out of town; when we arrived there, he got out of the chaise, and went into the house.

Q.Where were you hired to go? - A. To Hounslow at first; when he came out of the house, he brought a soldier with him; he got into the chaise, and said, turn about, my lads, he ordered us to drive to Hampstead; he said to the soldier, take my stick, and thrash the rascals; the prisoner then came out of the chaise, and gave me several violent blows.

Q. Which horses did you drive? - A. I drove the leaders.

Q. Then he went to the other lad, and served him the same? - A. Yes, that is my master; he got into the chaise, and ordered us to Hampstead; I told him any where where he pleased; we went up to Mrs. White's, a stay-maker's, I believe we asked him which was the house; he said, he would stop us when we came to the house. When we came to the house, there was a young woman at the door, and when the prisoner got up to the door, she knocked first; she cried out do not let him in, he is so and so, and she ran away.

Prisoner. She said he is a madman, he is a madman.

Court. (To Witness.) What were the words the young woman said, do not let him in - what were the words that she used? - A. He wanted to take Sally, I believe she said.

Q. The young woman said, do not let him in, he is coming to take Sally away? - A. Yes; the prisoner said to the young woman, what do you mean by that? he ran after her, but could not catch her; he returned again to the door, and came up to Mr. Clarkson's servant, who was in a gig, and pulled him out; the young man got away from him, the prisoner ran after him farther than I could see. When the prisoner returned, I was standing at Mr. White's door, I asked him if he caught the young man he ran after; he made me no answer, but caught hold of my coat, and cut me in the lip with a knife; I caught hold of his two arms to defend myself, and with my struggling about he cut me on the shoulder; I called out for assistance, I said, come, master, for God's sake come, or else I shall be murdered. He came to my assistance, and defended me as well as he could, and as soon as I saw an opportunity, I put my leg under him, and threw him on the ground, and we kept him there till the constable came; he cut me about six inches across the shoulder, this is the knife.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was nothing of any wound on your shoulder that happened in the scuffle, how was your lip cut? - A. Right through to my teeth; he had the knife in his hand, but whether it was the blade of the knife, or any thing else, I cannot say.

Prisoner. Q. Whether it was before the constable came that he saw I had a knife about me? - - A. It was before.

Q. Whether I brought the soldier out of the house, or whether he said you are using that gentleman ill, at Haverstock-hill; I said, I am an old soldier, and he promised he would take care - that was after I had given you and your comrade the beating? - A. It was.

Prisoner. Then I took the trooper with me, thinking I should have some assistance against these youths; he ran away as soon as the battle came on, he was not steel to the battle, he was not a man of my heart, he was not point valiant, he did not stand by me at all.

Court. Q. What did you wish him to stand by you for? - A. He saw I was in danger of being ill used by these rascals; I will tell you my story by-and-by, only I will put them to rights now and then, when they swerve from the truth.

ROBERT READ sworn. - I am a post-master; I was driving the horses: I went to Tottenham Court-road to take this gentleman up to the sign of the Load of Hay; when he came there, he got out of the chaise; Mr. Davis, who keeps the house, asked him if he was going to give the lads something to drink; he said he would see them d - d first. Up came a soldier and interfered; I told the soldier to mind his own business, I was hired to go to Hounslow; the soldier and I had two or three rough words; the gentleman told us to go to Hampstead; I then said I had no objection, so as he paid me for it; the gentleman began beating my man with this stick; he came to serve me the same; I let him taste my whip as well, then he left off. He got into the chaise, and ordered us to drive to Hampstead; we went to Hampstead, and stopped at Mrs. White's, on the right hand side of Hampstead-hill, and there was a double knock at the door; I believe the prisoner gave it, but I was on the other side of the chaise:

I heard a woman's voice say, do not open the door, Mrs. White, for this gentleman is coming to take Sally away. I believe he drove the woman away somewhere, but that I do not know, I was on the other side of the chaise; when he returned, there was a scuffle with a servant man that was in a gig: I saw him run up the hill after him; he came back again, and I heard my man crying out for assistance - that the prisoner had a knife in his hand, and that he should be killed. I went to his assistance, we got him down at that time; he cut at me, but I did not see the knife till he was down; he struggled sometime with the constable before he could get the knife from him, the knife was open; we put him into the watch-house, and returned home.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not when I was in the house that you turned the horses' heads to London - who ordered you to do that? - A. Nobody; had not I a right to do that to go to Hounslow.

Q. Was it not Joe Davis that ordered you - did not I tell you I would take you to Hampstead? - A. No.

Prisoner. It is rather a ridiculous thing of Mr. Clarkson; he was rather desirous of Sally: she is a very pretty girl, and every body else as well as me liked her; the only objection that the mother had to my having her was, I was too old; the mother said she was a poor young thing. Mr. Clarkson was very officiating when he found I was coming after her, he said I was a madman; the father and the mother went off the bargain. I went up on foot to Mrs. White; says I, Mrs. White, I am come to offer to take Sally for my wife, and I will take you all and give you a pretty jaunt if you will go to Gretna-green, I will pay all the expence, will you let your three daughters go; she said, no; (Sally had no objection;) she said I was a blockhead for talking such nonsense; I told Sally I would take out a license, and take her to Scotland. All this was agreed to; Mr. Clarkson said I was a madman; he it was that ordered our Joe Davis to turn the horses' heads to London; I ordered them to be turned to Hampstead, they would not do it; I told them, if they would not, I would make them: the blackguard post-boy heard it, he would not stir a step till he was paid; I went into the bar; I said, how much is your demands for the chaise; he said, two pounds, and ten shillings for the horse to Hounslow; I said, there it is, and nine shillings between you; I went up to Hampstead, and Mr. Clarkson's man came driving up in the single horse-chaise, and said, do not let the man in, he is mad; I said, you say I am mad, I will let you see; he ran away, I never asked for Sally; a woman cried out, murder, murder, at the windows, this fellow is come to take Sally; those men here got me down, I did not know what they were going to do with me; I had my knife, I wrought with my fingers till I got it open, and by G - d I would kill any man that dared stop me in the King's highway: the scoundrel of a constable came up to me, and stamped upon my wrist, and got the knife out of my hand; there is the mark on my wrist now. I was brought back as a felon; they took me to the public-house, and stripped me of every thing; what I did was in my own defence, being attacked in the road. In the first place I demand that my money may be returned - the forty shillings that I paid for the chaise, they not having performed the journey; they may keep the nine shillings for the dressing I gave them; that villain (meaning the constable) stripped my pocket of every thing.

- sworn. - I am a constable of Hampstead, I heard the cry of murder.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you take his money from him, and how much? - A. Yes, a penny-piece and a shilling, that is all that ever I took out of his pocket, besides his snuff-box and twelve yards of white ribbon, which I have left at home. When I heard the cry of murder, I immediately ran up; I met a soldier, I asked him what was the matter up there; he said, I am in a hurry, I believe there is some mischief being done. I went up, and saw Mr. Halston on his back; I said, for God Almighty's sake take the knife out of his hands, he will murder me; he made a strike at me; I put my foot down on his hands, and took the knife out of his hands. I caught hold of him by the collar when he got up, and he caught hold of me by the throat; I was obliged to secure him.

Prisoner. I had something to communicate to His Majesty about Bonaparte; I have endeavoured to introduce myself to the Prince of Wales; I was denied admittance.

Court. Q. You will not be treated improperly for any thing you communicate here? - A. That is foreign to the present subject. That villain said he had delivered up all at Hatton-garden; there was a skein of silk and a twenty-shilling note I will swear he took out of my pocket.

Q. What is this you know about Bonaparte? - A. I would rather not mention it here at present, because you will possibly look upon it as the effect of a disordered brain; I am sober, I speak the words of truth: if you read in the Hebrews, you will find it written - A body hast thou prepared, O Lord; and the same thing was said of him that died at Jerusalem - he is a madman; is not this the carpenter's son. I can shew you, if you will allow me, all the marks that ever he had on him, not that ever I was at Jerusalem, but my manner of life is known to many in England, Ireland, Scotland, and America; I may be deemed mad, I am not. I can shew you what I suffered in the House of Correction, if you like to go into it, without being indecent at all; I know what I

do know, and in your presence I shall prove that I am what I am. What I have to communicate to His Majesty, I will communicate to you in private, if you please, not here. I wished to see the Prince of Wales; his insolent porter told me he would not admit a man of my description: I went in disguise, with my gun in my hand, a powder-horn, and a shot-bag; I wished to be admitted in that garb as an old soldier. He that suffered in Jerusalem suffered but little to what I suffered; these wounds (shewing them) I got in this pretty House of Correction, for me attempt of running away with Sally, who was very willing to go, whose connections are not very genteel; she is the daughter of John Bull , a curious fellow, have you never seen him; they are worth while going to see.

THOMAS WEBB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the surgeon of the House of Correction? - A. Yes; Mr. Halston was brought into the House in the most violent deranged state as ever I saw a man in my life; he has been under my care ever since.

Q. Has he been so ever since? - A. When he came in I was not only under the necessity of putting him on a strait waistcoat, but was obliged, from the Saturday to the Wednesday, to lash him down to his bed; from that time he has been more collected; there were no complaints in his legs till now; it is in consequence of his being tied, and with his violent struggling.

Q. You have no doubt of his being perfectly deranged? - A. Not the least doubt.

THOMAS WARBURTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have under your care a number of people of this description at Hoxton - you have had this gentleman in your care? - A. I knew Mr. Halston from the present time up to the year 1790. In September that year he was put under my care; he was with me about three weeks that time, he was then in a low desponding state of mind; then he was admitted into St. Luke's Hospital, upon what they call the cure establishment; he remained a year there, the usual time, and was discharged, that was in 1791; he then came under my care again, and remained so till the year 1794, when he was re-admitted into St. Luke's Hospital on the incurable establishment, for which it is necessary to give security for a year, and I became security upon that establishment; he continued in that situation till the year 1799. For that five years I had frequent opportunities of seeing him, being security, and supplying him with little comforts that he stood in need of, and during that time he was labouring under a partial mental derangement. He was, however, very earnest to be set at large; I communicated to his brother on the subject, and against the conviction of the steward of the hospital, and against my own conviction, we complied with his request, on condition that he should be placed somewhere near to myself, that I might have an opportunity of seeing him occasionally to superintend and watch over him; I placed him at my gardener's, a house close to my own; I had frequent opportunities of seeing him almost daily; he conducted himself with very great propriety, he was very calm and very honorable, which is his natural disposition when he is right; he used to go to town for me on errands, such as carrying cash to the bankers, and receiving bills; he was much better at that period, though at that time I thought there were the seeds of insanity lurking about him, and if there was any exciting cause he would become downright a deranged man. His brother, to whom he has a great affection, I believe, has returned from India, after being there twenty-six years; it was an event very likely, in my opinion, to affect him, for either a great deal of pleasure or joy on one hand, or a depression of spirits on the other, would excite the lurking seeds of insanity into action, and the joy of seeing his brother might have taken this effect on him. I never considered him as cured of the disease; he was, when right, the best disposed man I ever saw; I saw him on the day he went in the chaise, and I saw him a day or two after he was committed to the House of Correction; there I saw him completely outrageously mad, scarce a rational word to be got out of him.

Q. You were examined before the Magistrate, and told him all this? - A. I did, he was in a strait waistcoat then; he told me a long history that he had seen Bonaparte, and had conquered him and his brother Jerome; I saw Mr. Halston in the prison also, I am thoroughly satisfied, from the questions I put to him about Bonaparte, that he is labouring under mental derangement.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, you look upon him as deranged in his mind? - A. Certainly.

VERDICT. - At the time he committed the act he was insane .

There was another indictment of a similar offence against the prisoner, he was from that

ACQUITTED.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-117

638. ELEANOR ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a gown, value 1 s. a bed-gown, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 d. a waistcoat, value 6 s. an apron, value 6 d. and four handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Jeremiah Mullin .

[The prisoner standing mute, and not pleading to her indictment, the under-keeper of New Prison, Clerkenwell, was sent for, in whose custody she had been; it appearing from his evidence, though she had lately come from Ireland, she could speak and understand English as well as he could; after being admonished by the Court, the prisoner pleaded Not Guilty.]

- MULLIN sworn. - I live in Mount Pleasant , my husband is a labouring man , I carry milk, the prisoner was only at my house four days, I hired her for a shilling a day; she went away, and took the property with her.

Q. How soon after she was gone did you find her again? - A. About five days afterwards.

Q. Did you find your property? - A. Yes, they are here.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutrix was drunk, and she gave them to me.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Were you drunk? - A. No.

Q. Was she drunk? - A. No, I never saw her drink any thing; I did not give her the things.

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-118

639. WILLIAM FLETCHER was indicted for that he, on the 11th of November , in the fortieth year of His Majesty's regin, did marry and take to wife one Susannah Treadwell , and that he, on the 19th of March last, feloniously did take to wife one Sarah Welch , his former wife being alive .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you present at the marriage of the prisoner at the bar any time, and where? - A. Yes, about five or six years ago, at St. John's, Westminster; he was married to Susannah Treadwell .

Q. Is she alive? - A. For any thing I know; he told me she was alive about three months ago, they were married by licence, I went with him to the Commons to get the licence, and they were married at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster.

Court. Q. Do not you recollect the year when it was? - A. No, I cannot recollect it; I know it is about five or six years ago, I gave her away, she was a maiden body; I knew her a servant, I had known her I believe a twelvemonth, she had been servant to Squire Fenning, Pall-Mall.

Q.Had he any children by that marriage? - A. I have seen two.

Cross examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. You do not know, of your own knowledge, that she is living? - A. He told me so about three months ago.

Court. The woman may be dead for what you know.

- GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. Were you before the Magistrate when this man was examined? - A. I was.

Q. Did you see a person of the name of Susannah Treadwell ? - A. I saw a person there that said she was Fletcher's wife, she attended every examination.

JACKSON DALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am brother in-law to the young woman that the prisoner married on the 10th of March last.

Q. Do you know the first wife? - A. Yes, and I know the prisoner.

Q. When did you see the prisoner? - A. On the second day of examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. You say you saw a Susannah Treadwell - do you know her to be the same person that was married to him? - A. Only by her giving me the certificate, she then acknowledged she was his wife.

Mr. Knapp. Q. She lived with him as his wife? - A.Certainly.

Court. Q. How long did they live as man and wife? - A. They lived in that neighbourhood about six months, they lived next door to me, she went by the name of Fletcher then: I saw her on the second day of examination, she said her maiden name was Susannah Treadwell.

ABRAHAM APPLETON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are parish clerk of St. John's, Westminster? - A. Yes, I produce the book of marriages: On the 11th of November, 1799, William Fletcher , bachelor, was married to Susannah Treadwell , spinster.

Q. Who gave her away? - A. Robert Lee .

SARAH WELCH sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you married to him? - A. Yes, at St. Pancras church , on the 19th of March last.

Q. Do you know the first wife? - A. Yes, I saw her at Worship-street more than once.

Q. Did the prisoner ever say any thing to you whether he was married before? - A. Yes, he confessed to me that he was married.

Court. Q. When was that? - A. About four days after we were married; he confessed that he was married to Susannah Treadwell .

Q. In what situation of life were you? - A. I was a servant, I had lived with Mr. Dixon three years when I was married.

Q. What is he? - A. A journeyman silk handkerchief weaver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. How long did he court you? - A. About six or seven weeks, he came backwards and forwards.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How did you become acquainted with him? - A. My fellow-servant was first of all acquainted with him, he counted her before he courted me.

Prisoner's defence. I had no gains by marrying her; after I had promised to marry her fellow-servant, she seduced me, and got me to marry her.

Mr. Curwood. Q.(To Welch.) He got no fortune with you? - A. No, he got part of my clothes.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-119

640. GEORGE D'ARCY, alias HAMILTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , a pair of silk stockings, value 10 s. the property of Richard Lane .

It appearing in evidence the prisoner obtained the property by false pretences, the Court were of opinion it was not a felony, he was

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-120

641. GEORGE D'ARCY, alias HAMILTON , was again indicted for feloniously stealing a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of breeches , the property of Richard Lane .

The prisoner having told the prosecutor that his name was Hamilton, and that he was recommended to him by Colonel Pearce, of the 15th Regiment of Foot, he credited him with these goods willingly, supposing he should he paid for them; the Court were of the same opinion in this case as in the former, and the verdict was the same . The prosecutor was bound over to prosecute the prisoner the next sessions for a fraud, which he very willingly acceded to. The Court reminding the prisoner at the same time, that a Court of Justice were able to transport for a fraud as well as a felony; and that he ought not to have gone on in these practices, he having had a very narrow escape a little while ago, at a former Sessions, for a capital offence.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-121

642. CHARLES DEAKIN , alias DICKINS , was indicted for that he, on the 30th of April , twelve sacks of coals, value 2 l. the property of Isaac Briant , John Briant , and James Beck , (whereof Edward Fleet had been tried and convicted for feloniously stealing, feloniously did receive, knowing them to be stolen .

Second Count. For receiving the like goods, charging them to be the property of John-Truman Villebois , Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You produce a copy of a record? - A. Yes, I got it from Mr. Shelton, I was present when it was examined with the original record, I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. (The record read:)

"Middlesex. - These are to certify, that at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, at Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, in the City of London, holden on the 29th of May, in the 45th year of his present Majesty's reign, before His Majesty's Justices then present, Edward Fleet , late of the parish of Christ's church, was, in due form of law, tried and convicted upon a certain indictment then impending, for that he, on the 30th of April, in the forty-fifth year aforesaid, twelve sacks of coals, value 2 l. the property of John-Truman Villebois, Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury, feloniously did steal, take, and carry away. Signed, Thomas Shelton ."

ISAAC BRIANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Who are your partners? - A. John Briant and James Back .

Q. It is Beck in the first count - who did you send these coals to? - A. To Messrs. Truman, Hanbury, and Co.

Q. What day was it in April? - A. I will not be certain of the day.

Mr. Gurney. Q. There were several sendings to Truman and Hanbury's? - A. There were.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you send any by Fleet, the man that was convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Crew with him? - A. I do not know; Crew was trouncer to him.

Q. What quantity of coals did you send by Fleet and Crew the trouncer? - A. It was a waggon load, they have in general thirty sacks.

Q. Is the name of Briant, your own name, on the waggon? - A. Only John Briant on the waggon on the day we sent the coals.

Q. Do you know Deakin? - A. No, he was not a customer of ours.

Q. Where is your wharf? - A. Near the Hermitage, Wapping.

Q. Where is Messrs. Truman and Hanbury's? - A.Brick-lane, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you know Deakin's house? - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Your partners are John Briant and James Back - what part of the business do you attend to? - A. I attend to the out-door business.

Q. Did you, on the 30th of April, see them take any coals whatever from your wharf? - A. I did not see them, we were always sending them every day.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, of any being sent on the 30th? - A. No, I do not know, I was not on the wharf that day.

Q. I suppose that Fleet was employed to carry coals to other persons besides Truman and Hanbury's? - A. Yes, when he was sent.

Q. Of course I do not suppose that he carried them when he was not sent - whose department was it to see that he carried them out when he went out with a load? - A. Mr. Back's.

JAMES BACK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. We have just heard it explained that you are the person that attends to the loading? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 30th of April did you attend to the loading of coals to Messrs. Truman and Hanbury's? - A. Yes, thirty sacks of coals were put in each waggon on that day, and the care of the waggon and the coals were committed to Fleet.

Q. Do you know Deakin? - A. No, I neither know his person nor where he lived; he was not a customer of ours.

JOHN TODD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. What are you? - A. I keep a little cart and horse to do work, and I fetch home a few greens

for myself; I live in Sun-yard, Lower East Smithfield.

Q. Had you been formerly a servant to Messrs. Truman and Hanbury? - A. Yes, some years back.

Q. Do you know Messrs. Briants, coal merchants? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know their waggons? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 30th of April did you know the prisoner Deakin? - A. Yes, he was outside of the door.

Q. What is Deakin? - A. He used to keep a chandler's shop when I knew him.

Q. What sort of a chandler's shop? - A. Where they sell coals; it was not unloaded there; the coals were unloaded at the pipe-maker's shop in Rose-lane.

Q. Do you know who keeps that shop? - A. No, I did not know whether he was the landlord or no; the coals were going in there.

Q. What day? - A. It was in April last; I did not take notice of the day of the month, it was the latter end of April; I saw Mr. Briant's waggon, Ned Fleet was the driver, and Jerry Crew was the pull-back to it.

Q. Where did they stop? - A. At a pipe-maker's shop, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields, very near Spitalfields church; I saw Deakin standing there very near the horses.

Q. Do you know who keeps that shop? - A. No, I was told that Mr. Deakin was master; I have seen the woman that is the mistress pipe-maker.

Q. You said they were unloading? - A. Yes; Ned Fleet was unloading the waggon; he shot them in the house, and Jerry Crew was pulling the sacks back from the head of the waggon to the tail.

Court. Did they carry these coals into the pipe-maker's shop? - A. Yes; afterwards I shewed the house to the officer; Jerry Crew lodged in my house; I did not give information till the 14th of May.

Q. Have you ever seen Deakin since you saw the coals shot at his own house? - A. Yes, I have seen him at the pipe-maker's house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever see him at the pipe-maker's shop till after this transaction? - A. No.

Q. How long after? - A. I believe it is about a month back.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You mean to say you saw him at the time of this transaction? - A. Yes, and I have seen him once since.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How many sacks did you see them carry into the pipe-maker's shop? - A. I only saw five or six; I was going about my business, I did not stop long; Deakin was standing there all the time I was by.

Q. Did you see him speaking to the men? - A. I did not see that, I cannot say whether he did or not; the waggon was full up to the head when I went by, and they began to unload.

JEREMIAH CREW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a puller-back to Messrs. Briant? - A. Yes.

Q. Fleet was their carman, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Messrs. Hanbury and Truman were customers of your masters? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Back being present on the 30th of April, when you were loading the waggon with coals to deliver to Messrs. Truman and Hanbury? - A. Yes.

Q. Fleet was the carman and you were puller-back - were you ordered to deliver them to Truman and Hanbury's? - A. Yes, but we went to the sign of the Pipes, in Rose-lane.

Q. Who did you see at the sign of the Pipes? - A. A woman, and a man with one eye.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Deakin; look at him? - A. That is not the man that I saw.

Q. You have been out of custody since the last trial-you have not been in gaol all the time till now? - A. No.

Q. How often have you seen Deakin since the time that you delivered the coals in Rose-lane? - A. Never at all.

Q. How many sacks did you deliver in Rose-lane? - A. Thirty sacks.

Q. Had you any direction's from Briant's to deliver any sacks there at all? - A. No; we had directions to go to Truman's in Brick-lane.

Q. Did you deliver any ticket with the coals at the pipe-maker's? - A. No; I saw no ticket delivered with the coals in Rose-lane, I saw a ticket on the wharf.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar before that time, or at that time? - A. No; I never saw any other man but the one-eyed man.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know the person of the prisoner? - A. No, I never saw him before in my life, to my knowledge.

Q. You were sworn before the Justice, were not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you shoot them out of the sacks, or leave the sacks behind you? - A. We shot them out of the sacks; we only went that once to Rose-lane.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers of Lambeth-street? - A. I am.

Q. Were you in Rose-lane on the 30th of April? - A. I cannot speak to the day of the month or a week.

Q. Whenever it was did you see Todd? - A. Yes, that is a good while ago since that I saw Todd.

Q. Did you ever see any coals shot that Todd was there? - A. I am not certain that Todd was present; this man was there that gave evidence

last; I did not see them shot, I only saw them carried in; one man was carrying them in, and Crew was pulling them back.

Q.Did you see any body besides these two men that were with the waggon? - A. I cannot say; I did not see the prisoner at the bar.

Mr. Knapp. I think I must prove that it was his own house, and that he was at home at the time I understood that Deakin was present.

Court. He was standing by the side of the horses; he did not know that Deakin lived there.

Mr. Knapp. I can shew that he lived there.

THOMAS HESELTINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know this pipe-maker's house? - Mr. Gurney. Q. Tell us what you know yourself. - A. A person of the name of Edwards used to live there, he is dead; after his death the widow kept it; I have reason to suppose that Deakin keeps the house.

Court. Q. Do you know that he resided there? - A. I have seen him there.

Q. How long ago? - A. About a twelvemonth ago.

Q. Do you know that he inhabited the house at all? - A. I have reason to suppose so.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know? - A. I do not know that he is married to the woman; I have seen him in the house.

Court. Q. Do you know that that is his place of residence? - A. I have seen him there.

Court. He may keep company with a woman that carries on an illicit trade, yet not reside there.

- MATTHEWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Deakin? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Mrs. Edwards before she was married? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that Mrs. Edwards was married to him? - A. Yes, I was present at the marriage.

Q. Do you know where Deakin lived after this marriage? - A. He had two residences, one in Wentworth-street, and another in Rose-lane.

Q. Do you know the pipe-maker's? - A. Yes, Mrs. Edwards lived there before she married him; I have seen them together in that house very often.

Q. He continued to carry on his business in Wentworth-street, and she continued to carry on the pipe business in Rose-lane after they were married? - A. I have reason to suppose so.

Q. Do you know whether he carried on the pipe-making business? - A. Not as I know of.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Deakin? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know this pipe-maker's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether he lived there? - A. When I apprehended him yesterday, he desired me to go home with him to his own house, which I did.

Q. Do you know whether he lived there on the 30th of April? - A. He said he would go home there; I said, by all means; he spoke to his wife; I told him I must take him to the Office; the prisoner said, I could assist him in this business; I told him nothing belonged to me but civility, I must do my duty; he said, he had got into the mud, and if he got out of it, I should see that he never got into it again.

Q. You indicted Deakin together with Fleet and others in May Sessions? - A. I did; I searched for him, I could never find him.

Q. Have you used all diligence? - A. I have; I knew Deakin, I dare say, twenty years.

Mr. Gurney. I admit that he was out of the way.

Mr. Knapp. (To Briant.) Q. Has Messrs. Truman and Hanbury satisfied you for the coals? - A. They were not our property, we only carted them; Mr. Wright is the merchant; Messrs. Truman pays me for carting these coals, and Mr. Wright for the coals.

Q. Has he paid you for the cartage of these coals? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not mean to charge Messrs. Truman and Hanbury for the coals that your servant stole? - A. Certainly.

Mr. Gurney. They will not pay you.

THOMAS BIRD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Truman and Hanbury - be so good as to give us the names of the partners? - A. John-Truman Villebois, Henry Villebois , and Sampson Hanbury.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Are there no other partners? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Heseltine.) Q. Do you know this house of Deakin's, the chandler's shop, in Wentworth street? - A. Yes; I have collected the rents at that place, and the house was let to another person last Midsummer.

Court. (To Armstrong.) Q. Did you know that he kept a chandler's shop in Wentworth-street? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been watching in Wentworth-street as well as Rose-street? - A.Always.

Prisoner's defence. I was not at home, I know nothing at all about it; I know no more of it than either of the Gentlemen here; I can bring in two witnesses to prove that I was not there.

SAMUEL PEARCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you live with the prisoner at the sign of the Pipes in Rose-lane? - A. Yes, I lived there for fourteen years.

Q. Do you remember being there on the 30th of April, when some coals were delivered? - A. There were coals brought there, but I cannot say what day.

Q. Do you remember there being two persons that brought them? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Mr. Deakin there at the time the coals were brought? - A. He was not, that I am very positive of.

Q. What business was he carrying on at that time? - A. A chandler's shop in Wentworth-street, about a hundred yards from my mistress's shop.

Court. Q. Where were you when the coals were delivered? - A. I was in the cellar, and helped to trim them, as I always did.

Q. And there you were all the time they were delivered? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you could not see any man that was standing at the side of the horses, you being in the cellar all the time the coals were shot? - A. I was in the cellar all the time they were shot; the waggon was there a quarter of an hour before we suffered them to be delivered; my mistress said, certainly it was a mistake.

JOHN PAYNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are servant to the pipe-maker? - A. I was at that period.

Q. Do you remember being there on the 30th of April, when a waggon load of coals was carried in, when that man was there (Crew)? - A. I saw that man there.

Q. Was Mr. Deakin there when the coals were delivered, and you saw that man there? - A. He was not there; I was at work in the shop when they came to the door; I came out to carry some work into the air to dry.

Q. Were you there the whole time the coals were delivered? - A. I was not there the whole time the coals were delivered; I came up and down several times; he was not there at all, I did not see him the whole of the day.

Court. Q. You were not there during the whole time the coals were delivered - he might be there for what you know? - A. God knows, I did not see him; if he had been there, I must have seen him, because there were glass doors.

Q. He might have been at the horse's head, and you not have seen him, you were not there during the whole time - what occasion had you to come up and down so often, when coals were delivering - do you do your work as you walk up and down stairs? - A. No; when the work gets too dry, it is a great loss to a man, I came to look at it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for fourteen years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-122

643. MARGARET SHORTER and FRANCES ROSE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , seven yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of William Mardewall .

WILLIAM MARDEWALL sworn. - I am a linen-draper , I live in Tottenham Court-road : On the 3d of August, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was down in the kitchen painting; I observed Mary Shorter , and another about the size of Frances Rose , lurking about the door; they went away that time; shortly after they returned, then I suspected them. I took particular notice of Shorter; I should have known Frances Rose , but she has altered her dress, I cannot swear to her face; I was called up stairs, and coming up stairs I heard some Irish woman telling Mrs. Mardewall we were robbed of two pieces of print, and that the prisoners were gone down the road; I went down the road after them, but could not see them; on my return home through Upper Rathbone-place, I went into a pawnbroker's, and there I saw Mary Shorter standing in the shop with this piece of print; I told her she was the lass I wanted; I held out my hand for the piece of print; I brought her to my house by some means or other; an officer came, and took her into custody to Bow-street; I can swear to the print, it has my mark; the print stood upon the level of the sill of the door; I never found the other print.

- CHAPMAN sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I was twelve the 2d of last February.

Q. Is it a good or a bad thing to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing.

Q. If you call God to witness that you speak the truth, and you do not, you will call his vengeance to punish you; therefore if you do not speak the truth, you are liable to be punished both here and hereafter, do you know that? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you my dear? - A. I live at home with my father and mother; my father is a messenger's man, he lives in Plumtree-street, at No. 6. I saw both the prisoners standing at Mr. Mardewall's door, I was sitting next door to Mr. Mardewall's; I know them both again, it was on a Saturday between three and four o'clock; I saw the little one (Rose) lay hold of a piece of cotton that was at the door, and pull it down and wrap it up in her apron; I did not see the other touch any thing.

- PICKERING sworn. - I am a patrol of Bow-street, I live in the neighbourhood; the last witness came and informed me that there were some thieves at the prosecutor's door.

Q. When you came there, you found them both there? - A. Yes; the little one acknowledged to me that it was those two that did the robbery.

Shorter's defence. I was going down Rathbone-place; a woman asked me, as I was going by the pawnbroker's, to go of an errand for her; she said, I will give you sixpence to go in and pledge this new gown for me; I did; I was in the shop about five minutes before the pawnbroker could serve me; he was writing the ticket, and just as he was

going to lay hold of it to measure it, the gentleman came in, and said it was his property; when I came out the woman was gone, I know nothing of it.

Rose's defence. I was coming down Drury-lane; a young man tapped me on the shoulder, and said I was the person that he wanted; I had been doing of nothing I told him.

Shorter called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Shorter, GUILTY , aged 17.

Rose, GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-123

644. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a pair of boots, value 20 s. the property of Isaac Collins .

ISAAC COLLINS sworn. - I live at No. 10, Hyde-street, Bloomsbury , I am a carver and gilder, and picture-dealer : About half after six in the evening, on the 13th of September, a gentleman came into my shop to look at a picture he had seen in my window; I attended the gentleman; I was informed by another person that a man ran out of my private door; I ran after him, and caught him with a bundle in his hand; I asked him what he had in that bundle; he said, nothing belonging to me; I took him back to my shop, and there I found my boots in the bundle, they were almost new; I believe I had wore them once, I am sure they are mine; I produce them, they were in my parlour; I do not know whether he opened the window, or whether the window was open; the private door was open; the person that informed me pointed to the man, and said, there he is.

Prisoner's defence. I was near St. Giles's church when that gentleman overtook me; a man had passed me, and dropped these boots; I called after him, but he did not stop, I picked up the boots; after that the prosecutor came up, and said I had some property of his; I said if I had he was welcome to them; I was never in his house in my life.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-124

645. ABRAHAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 8 d. the property of Richard Green , and a pewter pint pot, value 10 d. the property of John Tindal .

JOHN TINDAL sworn. - I live at the Virginia Planter, Shadwell: On the 16th of August the Magistrate sent for me to come to Shadwell-office; I went there, and saw the prisoner and the pot; it has my name on it in full length.

RICHARD GREEN sworn. - I live at the Black Horse, High-street, Shadwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him before I saw him at the Office, and there I saw two pint pots with my name on them.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer of Shadwell: I received information of a man stealing some pots, and I received information from a little boy, which led me to the prisoner's lodgings; I found him at home, in a place they call Match-walk, Shadwell; I searched in the cupboard, and I found a quantity of pots, and in the side of the fire-place, and amongst them I found two pints of Mr. Green, and one belonging to Mr. Tindal.

Q. What did you say to him, or he to you? - A. He said he knew nothing about them.

Q. Was there any person in that room with him? - A. No, there was only a little boy in the house; he keeps the house.

Q. Any other people living in the house? - A. There is a woman that lives in the house; he was in the room where I found the pots; he made an excuse that he wanted to go up stairs to get his coat; he made a spring at the stairs, and jumped right to the bottom of the house into the cellar; he then got into the garden, and the next minute I happened to step into a pail of water. In the mean while he got over the pails, I pursued him, and in about twenty yards Mr. Bellamy caught hold of him; I am sure he is the man, I was not ten yards from him when he was taken; I only lost sight of him when he got over the paling; I found in his room four pint pots, a half pint pot, a half pint liquor measure, and a half quartern.

Prisoner's defence. At the time I attempted to make my escape I did not know that he was an officer.

Brown. He lives close to my house, he knew me.

(The pots produced and identified by the prosecutors.)

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-125

646. LUCY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a pewter half pint pot, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Cross , a pewter half pint pot, value 5 d. the property of Thomas Moss , and a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Doran .

THOMAS CROSS sworn. - I keep the sign of the George, in Shadwell High-street : I apprehended the prisoner at the bar on the 16th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I had given my family a caution of her; she called for half a pint of beer, and in consequence of information from my boy I went into my taproom, and seized her; I told her she had got some property of mine; the officer came and searched

her, and found my half pint pot and two others in her pocket; she lived along with Abraham Hall.

THOMAS MOSS sworn. - I am a publican , I keep the King's Arms, Shadwell-market; I know nothing of the woman, I can only say that is one of my pots.

THOMAS DORAN sworn. - I keep the sign of the Three Kings, Shadwell ; I saw a quart pot of mine at the Office.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I belong to Shadwell-office: I was sent for to Mr. Cross's to take charge of this woman; I searched the prisoner, and found in her left hand pocket a half pint pot belonging to Mr. Cross, another belonging to Mr. Moss, and a quart pot belonging to Mr. Doran.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to carry the pots home; they took my scissars from me; Mr. Cross took a shilling of me, and they have got all my clothes besides.

Brown. Here is a riding habit, a very handsome one; the Magistrate ordered me to keep it to see if I could find the owner, and a beaver hat, the inside of it is taken out.

Prisoner. The hat I bought at the fair, and the riding habit is my sister's.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-126

647. JOHN DILLON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , an axe, value 4 s. and a saw, value 6 s. the property of Ralph Hildrow .

RALPH HILDROW sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter : I lost an axe and a saw, on Saturday, the 27th of July, from No. 18, Essex-street, in the Strand , where I had been at work; at eight o'clock I left the house to go to breakfast, they were there then, and when I returned they were gone; on the Monday following, at the Office in Marlborough-street, I saw the duplicates.

JOHN STONE sworn. - Q. You are servant to Mr. Fleming? - A. I was, on the 27th of July; I produce an axe pawned on that day, and a bricklayer's hammer; I do not know the person that pawned them; the prosecutor claimed the axe; the hammer has not been claimed.

JOHN HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable and watch-house keeper of St. Ann's: I took the prisoner into custody on the 27th of July, about one o'clock in the middle of the day, I took him up on another charge; on searching him at the watch-house, I found the duplicate of the saw and the axe belonging to the prosecutor; I went with the duplicates to the different pawnbrokers, and the pawnbroker at Temple-bar, where the saw was pledged, delivered up the saw to the prosecutor, in consequence of my producing the duplicate. (The saw and axe produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. The axe and saw I bought of a man of the name of Kelly; I have had them almost two years.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-127

648. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Nortzell .

THOMAS NORTZELL sworn. - I live at No. 24, New-street, Fetter-lane: On the 4th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, going down Whitechapel in company with another, I felt a person picking my pocket, I turned suddenly round, and saw the prisoner, the handkerchief was in his hand, I attempted to catch hold of it and missed my aim; he immediately dropped it, and I seized him by the collar; he said it was his first offence, and begged for mercy, said he had a father with four children that he helped to support: I delivered him up into the custody of an officer.

Q. What is the value of your handkerchief? - A. I suppose one and sixpence; it is a linen handkerchief.

- WALLIS sworn. - Q. Were you in company with Mr. Nortzell in Whitechapel on the 4th of August? - A. Yes, I was walking down Whitechapel with him; I felt him all of a sudden snatch his arm from me; I immediately turned round and saw him take hold of the prisoner by the collar; the prisoner begged for mercy, and said it was his first offence.

Prisoner's defence. The witnesses have sworn all false; it is all for the sake of the reward.

Court. It cannot be for the reward; there is no reward.

GUILTY , aged 14,

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-128

649. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September a silver watch, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Nicholas Hogland .

The prosecutor acknowledging in his evidence, that after having been with the prisoner he gave her his watch to take care of it, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-129

650. ELIZABETH STENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a child's frock, value 2 s. the property of Henry Atkins .

HENRY ATKINS sworn. - Q. Did you at any time

lose a child's frock? - A. Yes, last Friday afternoon, at half-past five in the afternoon, the frock was taken from a line in the yard; I was not at home; my wife was put to bed; she informed me she had seen the frock, and as I was coming home a little child met me and told me they had got a a thief in the yard; I live in Rupert-street, Goodman's-fields .

Q. On coming in doors did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, there were two or three women charging her with taking the frock; I saw the frock.

Q. Then all you know is, you found the prisoner in custody charged with taking your frock? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know it to be your's? - A. Yes.

MARGARET CLARK sworn. - I live in Rupert-street, Goodman's-fields, in the same house with the prosecutor: I was coming through the yard; I saw the prisoner at the lines; she had got the frock off the lines; I saw her taking the pin out of the petticoat to remove that; I called out to her, she went towards the door to go out; I stopped her; she was then putting the frock in her pocket; I called out to my mother, and she was kept in the yard till Mr. Atkins came home.

Q. Do you know whose frock it was? - A. Yes, it was Mr. Atkins's child's frock.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take the frock away from me? - A. You threw it down, and I took it up. (The frock produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was just come from work, and coming down the lane my stocking came down, and I went just inside of the passage to tie it up.

GUILTY , aged 26,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-130

651. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , two cloaks, value 15 s. the property of John Edwards .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - I live in Clare-street, Clare-market ; I am a pawnbroker , and I can only speak to the property; I cannot speak to the thief; I have a witness that can: They were exposed at the door for sale, partly out and partly in.

REBECCA LAWSON sworn. - I am a married woman; I live in Wych-street: I was going by about three o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner take one cloak, and then I saw her take the second.

Q. How was that cloak fastened? - A. It was pinned to other articles that hung at the door; I saw her take them both, the second was pinned close to the other; I told a woman that went into the house, and informed Mr. Edwards's young man, who came out directly and stopped the prisoner. (The cloaks produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. As I came along I saw them lay in the street; I picked them up and put them into my apron; the Justice said, as he had his property he need not hurt me any further.

Court. I do not think he said that.

GUILTY , aged 36,

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050918-131

652. ABRAHAM JACOBS was put to the bar.

The Court being informed the witness was not in London, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-132

653. JOHN NEALE was also put to the bar. There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-133

654. THOMAS COLES was indicted for a conspiracy .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-134

655. MARY MASON was indicted for that she, on the 1st of August , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of, and as for a good sixpence, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to William Mason , she, at the time of uttering it, knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

Second Count. In like manner with uttering one

other false and counterfeited sixpence to James Barlow .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a haberdasher living in Red-cross-street, Cripplegate ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house on the 1st of August? - A. Yes, she came into the shop on the first of August, between two and three in the afternoon; she asked for a quarter of an ounce of fourpenny thread; I served her the thread, and she gave me the sixpence; I looked at the sixpence and observed it to be a bad one; I took the thread and kept the sixpence, and told her when she brought me the money she should have the thread: she said she would bring me the penny.

Q. Did she say any thing? - A. No; I watched her from the corner of Jewin-street, and I followed her; she turned down Jewin-street, and went into Mr. Barlow's, a tinman; I observed him looking at the sixpence; I went in and desired him not to give her that sixpence; he asked me whether she had been at my house; I told him yes; he said he would send for a constable, which he did, and the constable came.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing upon this before the constable came? - A. She uttered some very unpleasant expressions.

Q. The constable came, and she was delivered to the constable and the two sixpences? - A. Yes.

- BARLOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. We understand you are a tinman living in Jewin-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to you? - A. Yes, on the 1st of August, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What did she come for? - A. penny pewter tea-spoon; I gave her one, and she gave me a sixpence, as soon as I saw it I perceived it to be a bad one; she asked me to give her the sixpence again; I told her no; with that she made use of the most dreadful language that could be uttered from a woman; Mr. Mason came in at the moment; he asked me if that woman had been purchasing any article; I told him yes; he said, has she tendered any money to you; I said a bad sixpence; he desired me to keep it; I told him that I conceived her to be one of those people that went about uttering bad money; I sent for a constable; I delivered the bad sixpence I received from the prisoner, and Mr. Mason delivered his immediately.

WILLIAM HALSFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I produce the two sixpences that were delivered to me by Mr. Barlow and Mr. Mason; I searched the prisoner; I found nothing on her but ten pennyworth of good copper.

Q.(To Barlow. Look at these sixpences? - A. This is the one that was uttered to me.

Mason. This is the one uttered to me.

Q.(To Mr. Parker.) Are they good or bad? - A. They are both counterfeits; they do not appear to have been in circulation.

GUILTY , aged 29,

Confined six months in Newgate , and to find security for six months at the expiration of that time .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050918-135

656. MARY EVANS and ANN ALLEN were indicted for that they, on the 5th of August , one piece of false counterfeited milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one John Wistfhiln , they and each of them at the time they so offered this piece of false and counterfeited money, well knew it to be counterfeited; and that they afterwards, on the same day, one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to the same person, they and each of them when they uttered this last piece of false and counterfeited money, knew it to be counterfeited .

Second Court. For like offence, on the same day, to the said person.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN WISTFHILN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an Hanoverian, and I am a milkman ; I live in Flower-and-Dean-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, I served one of them with nine weeks milk, and the other with five weeks milk.

Q. In consequence of any money they gave to you, did you apply to Mr. Wood? - A. I did, and he applied to Mr. Sapwell; I used to get bad money every week of them, and I used to throw it away. Mr. Sapwell told me to keep going on with them, and take notice of the money I received of them, and to mark it. On the 5th of August, they came one after the other as usual, Ann Alen came first; I was then in Smock-alley, she gave me a shilling, she had a pennyworth of milk, and I gave her the change; a little time after, when I came into Artillery-street, she said she liked my milk so much she would have a pennyworth more; then she gave me a sixpence; then Mary Evans came and had a pennyworth of milk, and she gave me a sixpence the same morning, and I gave her the change; they both met at the distance of about thirty yards.

Q. Who was first in the afternoon? - A. That I cannot tell, both of them came about one minute after the other; Mary Evans gave me a shilling in the afternoon, and I gave her change, and the other gave me sixpence.

Q. Were they together when they came to have the milk, then? - A. They used to be together at about the distance of thirty yards.

Q. What did you do with this shilling? - A. I went to Mr. Wood's and marked them.

Q. Did you mark both of them? - A. Yes, and I put them into my pocket after I had marked them; in two or three days afterwards I delivered them to Mr. Sapwell.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers belonging to the City of London? - A. I am; I produce two shillings I received from the prosecutor.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Are these the two shillings that you received from the two women? - A. Yes; this is the one that I received from Mary Evans , and the other I took from Ann Allen .

Q.(To Sapwell.) Did you take either of the prisoners? - A. I did, Mary Evans I took her at a shop in Artillery-lane.

Q. How near is that to the spot where the prosecutor says he sold his milk? - A. Close upon the spot.

Q. Did you search her? - A. I did; in her bosom I found a sixpence, which is a very bad one, and fourpence farthing in good copper; I sent for Mr. Ray to apprehend Allen, it being out of the City where she lived.

Q. Did she say any thing at all? - A. No, nothing at all.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended Ann Allen in Petticoat-lane; I knew her perfectly well; she had a bag in her hand containing five-and-sixpence in good money; she knew me perfectly well.

- PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are employed by the Mint - are these good or bad shillings? - A. They are counterfeit, both of them are new coloured; they have not been in circulation.

Q. Look at that sixpence? - A. That is also of the same manufactory; it has not been in circulation.

Allen's defence. I went to this man and had a pennyworth of milk from him, and gave him a good shilling, it had a mark in the middle of it, he took his purse out of his pocket and put the shilling into it and looked for a sixpence and gave it me, he put his hand into his side-pocket and gave me five pennyworth of halfpence and thanked me; I went into Petticoat-lane to sell a few old cloaths; I was two hours gone; I was sitting at home, and inadvertently they came and took me prisoner, and he said, the reason why they took me prisoner was, he saw me speak to the other prisoner; I never opened my lips to this woman in my days; if he had produced that shilling he put into his purse, I should have known it, it was a good shilling; I never changed but two shillings with him in my life; he knew as well where I lived as I did myself; he did not come to me directly, but he came two hours and a half afterwards, and took me a prisoner; they distressed me and hurt me very much.

Evan's defence. I have often been to this man; I went to him on Monday afternoon, I told him I had no occasion to change a shilling; I said to him, you know if you come and have a pennyworth of apples, I need not change this shilling; I never changed with him before Monday; a woman was sick, I went for a pennyworth of milk for her, the woman that sent me gave me the money; immediately I was stopped, I had no more than sixpence and fourpence farthing, which was taken from me.

Both GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and to find security for six months at the expiration of that time .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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