Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th July 1805.
Reference Number: 18050710
Reference Number: f18050710-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 10th of JULY, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-street Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knt. One of His Majesty's Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. Sir JOHN-WILLIAM ANDERSON , Bart. and Sir JOHN EAMER , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; JOHN ANSLEY , Esq. and JOSHUA-JONATHAN SMITH , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justice of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury

Joseph Hudson ,

Alexander Jardine

William Scholey ,

Daniel Wingfield ,

Thomas Arnott ,

Thomas Smithers ,

Charles Mann ,

John Warren ,

John Carlisle ,

Robert Snell ,

George Grove ,

Richard Clark .

First Middlesex Jury

William Thompson ,

Richard Rusbridger ,

Abednego Hundlebee ,

Thomas Taylor ,

John Tennant ,

John Luntley ,

James Tarbuck ,

Thomas Boot ,

Peter Homan ,

John Smith ,

Henry Bootey ,

William Smitham

Second Middlesex Jury

John Taylor ,

John Tibbott ,

William Steadman,

Robert Young ,

William Simpson ,

David Kincade ,

Thomas Price ,

Joseph Blackford ,

Nathaniel Bennett ,

Thomas Sells ,

John Roberts ,

John Brooks

Reference Number: t18050710-1

432. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Octavius Bradley , about the hour of eleven at night, on the 21st of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a coat, value 20 s. a waistcoat, value 12 s. a pair of breeches, value 40 s. a piece of woollen cloth, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Wells , a coat, value 12 s. the property of William Lake , a pair of boots, value 30 s. the property of John Hookamfreer .

Second Count, For like burglary, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of John Wells .

JOHN WELLS sworn. - I live at No. 7, Newcastle-court, in the Strand ; I keep a shop and dwelling under Lincoln's Inn gateway .

Q. Who sleeps there? - A. My apprentice used to sleep there; the person that occupies a part of the house is a brace-maker , his name is Octavius Bradley ; I rent the whole of the premises.

Q. Did any person sleep on the premises belonging to you on the night of the 21st of June? - A. No.

Q. How is that part of the premises separated that belongs to you from the part that belongs to Bradley? - A. By a slight partition; there is a door out of my shop into his shop.

Q. Bradley has no business at all with that part of your house where you lost this property? - A. No, it is a twelvemonth ago since my apprentice slept there.

Q. What was the name of your apprentice ? - A. Thomas Harris , the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Your apartment was not slept in either by you or any other person at that time? - A. No.

Q. How does Bradley enter his premises? - A. By the door under the gateway, the same way as I do.

Q. This was on the 21st of July? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Was the prisoner in your shop on that day? - A. Yes, he was; I left him there on that evening, at better than half past eight o'clock; I returned no more that night; I left him in charge of the shop; he had one key and I the other; on the 22d, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I went again to the shop; I then found the door a little a-jar, I had not been in the shop five minutes before he came in; I had perceived a great many things were gone; I could not recollect what exactly at the time; I said to him, Tom, you left the door open last night; said he, I did not, I double locked it, I took particular notice of that; and he said, he came by betwixt ten and eleven o'clock that evening, on the 21st, he thought the door to be fast but he did not try it. I found afterwards a suit of mourning missing, which ought to have gone home at that time, but not being quite finished I thought to let them go home on the Saturday morning; they belonged to me at that time; I missed a pair of boots, and a brown coat; the boots belonged to the Right Hon . John Hookamfreer , they were in my possession, and left with me by the servant, in order to take them to the Minories to get them stretched. I went round to the different pawnbrokers, but could get no intelligence; on returning home, I saw William Lake , and from his information I authorized him to get a warrant; in consequence of that he was taken in my shop between two and three. He told me that they had taken off the scutcheon of the door. I went afterwards to No. 11, Shire-lane, to a chandler's-shop, and there I saw his box; I desired the officer to bring the box to the shop, that I might see the things.

Q. Did he actually lodge in this place in Shire-lane? - A. Yes, one night he had slept there I believe: I found all the articles in the box that I had lost, the suit of mourning, a piece of cloth, which a few days before I had cut a coat from the same piece; the boots and the brown coat and a bundle handkerchief, and a patent cord pair of breeches.

Q. How long has the prisoner been with you? - A. On and off for five years, he had not been continually with me; there was no dependance upon him.

WILLIAM LAKE sworn. --I am servant to Mr. Fraser, in Lincoln's-Inn: On the night of the 21st of June, I had occasion to go from my master's house to his chambers; I saw the prisoner at the bar standing in the road-way, facing No. 5 in the New-square; I called to him, but he made me no answer; I went up to him to see whether I was right or wrong, and when I came up to him I said, holloa Tom, is it you; he said, yes; I said, you are here very late to night; he said, I am waiting for a person; I staid some minutes with him, but no farther conversation passed; I wished him good night, and went away from him, I went as far as No. 3, by Lincoln's Inn gateway, and then returned to my master's house, and staid there some time.

Q. Where is your master's house? --A. No. 2, Searle-street; I went back again to the same No. 3 the second time, which was about a quarter there before eleven o'clock, and then I saw the prisoner at

the bar stand facing No. 5, where I formerly had left him; I did not speak to him the second time; I saw no more of him that night; I went home to my wife and family; I did not observe that he had any thing at all about him. On Saturday morning, the 22d, at half past seven, I called at Mr. Wells's shop; he informed me that he had been robbed, and that they had taken away a coat belonging to me, and a pair of boots belonging to the Right Hon. Mr. Hookamfreer; I had left them there till such time I took them into the Minories to get them stretched.

JOHN STANTIFORD sworn. - On the 21st of June, I was watching at Lincoln's-inn for one of the porters there; I was doing his duty from ten o'clock till near a quarter before eleven o'clock.

Q. Do you know whether the door was fast at that time? - A. I believe it was fast; I stood against the door all the time, I was there talking to some persons that were moving some goods into Mr. Fraser's chambers; I did not try the door, the shutters were all up.

JOHN DAY sworn. - I am a locksmith; Mr. Wells bought the lock of me; I sent my man on Saturday, June the 22d, to take the lock off, and upon examining it I found it not damaged in the least; it is what they call a full warded lock, they could not open it with a picklock without breaking the wards; it must have been opened by a skeleton key, or a key that fitted the wards of the lock.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Hatton-garden: I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday, the 22d of June, at his master's shop, as he was sitting at work on the shop-board; I searched him; he was very unwilling to have his left hand breeches pocket searched; I directed my brother officer to hold his hands while I searched him, and pulled out this key; it is the key of his master's door, as I understand; he used to have one, and his master the other; I asked him what he had got else; he said, nothing else material to me; I put my hand into the same pocket, and there I found the scutcheon belonging to the door that had been broken open.

Q. Did he give any account of that scutcheon? - A. Yes, he said he picked it up against the door as he came in on the morning, or some part of the day, I cannot take upon me to say exactly; I searched him the same day; he said he picked it up, and I think it was the morning; I found a little key in the same pocket; I asked him how he came by that key; he said it was a trifling thing, I might throw it away, he had picked it up in the street at the same time; I told him I would not throw it away, it might be of service hereafter; I took him into custody; he told me he lodged with his mother, I think the place is called Ship-yard; I went there with him, and enquired of the mother if he lodged there; the mother said, yes, he did; I thought he did not from some circumstance that occurred; I searched the house, and found nothing there; I then took him to the Office, and he was committed for re-examination on Wednesday. On Tuesday morning, I received information from the prosecutor and another witness that there was a box at a house in Great Shire-lane belonging to the prisoner; I went there, and saw it, at No. 14 I believe; I tried this small key I had found on him, and it fitted the lock of this box, and all these things were in the box; the prosecutor and Stantiford were present with me; and as a convincing proof that this box belonged to the prisoner, I have had him in custody before, and the master agreed that he should be sent on board the Tender, and the master, instead of doing what was proper, kept the indentures; he should have cancelled them; and here is his discharge from on board of the ship.

Q. Who keeps the house where you made this search? - A. I do not know the person's name, it is a chandler's shop; the woman behaved very civil indeed; she shewed me the box, and said, if she had known that he was such a kind of a person, he should not have come there to lodge.

Q. What kind of a lock has that box? - A. It appears to be a common one by the key, it is very strong.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Look at these articles, and see which is your's - do you know these articles? - A. The clothes and boots were in my possession; the clothes I swear to be my property.

Q. (To Lake.) Look at these boots? - A. I can take my oath they are Mr. Hookamfreer's property, I was to take them to the Minories to be stretched; I am servant to Mr. Fraser, but my sister-in-law and brother live with Mr. Hookamfreer; the boots are perfectly new, and his name is inside of them, and there is not one boot in a hundred that has such a strap, it is a brown webb strap; they generally have a white one, but this was made for strength, as I was informed.

Q. Have you any doubt that you left them at Mr. Wells's shop? - A. I have no doubt.

Prisoner's defence. It is my first crime that I have committed, and I hope you will have a little mercy.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-2

433. JAMES POWNCENBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , two saws, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Robinson .

THOMAS ROBINSON sworn. - I am a carpenter ; I was working at a house in Princes-street, Ratcliff-highway ; on the 13th of June, between nine and ten o'clock; I left the tools on the bench,

while I stepped across the street to get a light to make a fire to heat my glue-pot; when I returned I found the prisoner in the custody of the witness Hardy.

JAMES HARDY sworn. - I am a carpenter; I work in the same neighbourhood; I had occasion to go to my master that I work for for some nails; as I was going past where the prosecutor was at work, I saw the prisoner at the bar go into the house; I knew him to be a suspicious character for years; I went a little way up the street, and made a stop; I kept my head towards him; I saw him come out of the house with the saws concealed under his coat, the handles were rather sticking out; I let him pass me, and then I ran into the house to see if any body was in the room where I saw him go into; seeing nobody in the room, I pursued him, and stopped him, and took the two saws from him, and brought him back to the house; an officer at the time was coming past, he was given in charge to the officer, but he would not take him in charge; he wanted us to use him ill and let him go about his business. I produce the saws, I have had them in my possession ever since. (The saws identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-3

434. JOSEPH DELAFORCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , five guineas , the property of William Stadden Blake .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM STADDEN BLAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. In 'Change-alley .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Has he for some time past visited an apprentice of your's? - A. Joseph Delaforce used to come to see a young man, my apprentice; his name is John Row .

Q. In consequence of any suspicion that you entertained did you mark any guineas? - A. I marked sixteen and put them in a drawer, in my parlour, in the front of the house; the ground floor consists of the shop, the parlour, and an accompting-house; I saw the lock of the drawer fastened on the Saturday night.

Court. Q. At what time on Saturday night? - A. About eleven o'clock when I went to bed.

Q. In what manner did you number the guineas? - A. From one, two, so on regularly to sixteen; the first eight I put in a purse, and the other eight loose in the drawer, on Saturday the eighth of June.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That was last Saturday month? - A. Yes.

Q. Has any other gentleman an accompting-house adjoining that parlour? - A. Mr. Turner; it is separated by a partition only.

Q. He has a clerk of the name of Tagg? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you desire Mr. Tagg to take a view of what was doing in your accompting-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Could any person, by making a hole in that partition, see what was doing in your parlour? - A. Yes, the back of the person would be towards the hole, if they were doing any thing at the drawers.

Q. The drawers were on the opposite side from that hole? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon the next morning did you receive any information that induced you to come down stairs? - A. About a quarter before eight on the Sunday morning.

Q. When you came down, you found the prisoner in the custody of the constable? - A. I did.

Court. Q. You desired Mr. Turner's clerk to watch that room on the Sunday morning? - A. I did.

Q. You found the prisoner in the custody of the constable when you came down? - A. I did.

Q. Did you look in the drawer for the purpose of seeing what money was there? - A. I did.

Q. In the first place, did you find the lock of the drawer safe? - A. No, I believe it was wrenched open.

Q. Was it open when you went to it? - A. It was not fastened so completely as it was before.

Q. Did it appear to have been forced open by a crow? - A. I could not tell, the lock had been forced.

Q. Did you find any of the money gone? - A. I found there were five guineas gone; I have got the remainder of the guineas here.

Q. What were the numbers that were gone? - A. The numbers that he took were, one, five, seven, eight, and fifteen.

Q. Of course the others were left? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you found the other eleven guineas quite right? - A. Yes, four was taken out of the purse, and one from the loose parcel in the drawer.

Q. At the time when you came down, and you searched the drawer and found the five wanting - were the five guineas shewn you by the constable in the presence of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Were those, which were so shewn you by the constable in the presence of the prisoner, five of those which were in the drawer the preceding night? - A. Yes.

Q. And were in the drawer with the other eleven you have now in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. What parish is your dwelling-house in? -

A. The parlour is in St. Edmund the King, and the other part is in St. Mary Woolnoth.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is the whole of the parlour in St. Edmund the King? - A. The whole of the window is in St. Edmund the King, and it runs off to a narrow point at the other end of the room.

Court. Q. Is that part where the drawers stand in St. Edmund the King? - A. I am sure it is.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

WILLIAM TAGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Turner, of 'Change-alley? - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of any information from Mr. Blake, did you look through any hole? - A. Yes; previous to that I heard this young man come to Mr. Blake's door, it was then about a quarter before eight; I was standing behind the wainscot of the shop, in Mr. Turner's accompting-house, and heard the prisoner ask for John Row, the apprentice of Mr. Blake's; the boy answered that he was up stairs; the prisoner at the bar desired him to call him, he said he wanted to speak to him; I heard the lad go up stairs; then I immediately applied my eyes to the hole which we had prepared for the purpose of perceiving the prisoner's motions, which commanded a full view of the drawers.

Q. Did you perceive the prisoner do any thing? - A. I saw the prisoner in the parlour; I immediately applied my eye to the hole; he appeared to have come from the shop to the parlour at the moment I put my eye to the hole.

Court. Q. He could not have got into the parlour but by the shop? - A. No other way; I saw him take something out of his pocket (his back was towards me,) with that he got the drawer open, either by wrenching or picking, I do not know which; he took something out of the drawer, in doing which he dropped a paper that was in the drawer; he put something in his pocket; then he stooped, and picked up the paper, and replaced it in the drawer; then he immediately shut the drawer too, and returned momentarily into the shop.

Q. How long do you think this took up? - A. I do not think it was more than five minutes, he went into the shop before the lad came down again; immediately upon the prisoner leaving the parlour, I went out of the accompting-house to meet the lad who called the apprentice, and sent that lad for a constable in a slow whisper; the boy went immediately.

Q. Where did you speak to Mr. Blake's boy? - A. At the bottom of the stairs; there is a communication from my accompting-house to Mr. Blake's shop.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Had Row come down by this time? - A. He had; the constable was some time before he came, I suppose near a quarter of an hour; the prisoner was at that time in conversation with Row. In consequence of the lad being so long gone, I was fearful; I went out, and met them; I told the constable the circumstance, and I came back to the house with the constable, the prisoner was then in the shop; the constable went in before me; I communicated to the constable what had happened; I saw him searched, he found nothing upon him; I said I saw him go to the drawer, and take something out, in the prisoner's hearing; upon which Mr. Blake replied, you saw him go to the drawer, did you - if you are pretty clear, I will go and see what he has taken out; Mr. Blake went immediately in the presence of the prisoner, the constable, and myself; he said he had taken five guineas only now, the time before he took four; the prisoner did not say any thing. The constable then said to the prisoner, it is of no use denying it, come here, I will strip you, for you must have money about you; the constable stripped him to his shirt, but found nothing upon him; the constable then looked round the counter, and found five guineas, and said, here are the guineas; they were upon the shop work-board.

Q. Upon their being found, what did the prisoner say? - A. He requested that Mr. Blake would not be hard or harsh, it was in a slow tone, I am not sure which; he did not say any thing more; but cried.

Q. Did you look at the five guineas? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find that they were marked? - A. I did not, because it required a magnifying glass; I took down the numbers that were missing when Mr. Blake counted them; that was all that passed.

HENRY CHURCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a City constable? - A. Yes: On Sunday, the 9th of June, I was sent for to Mr. Blake's; I went there, and found the prisoner at the bar in the shop talking with the apprentice, John Row . The moment I went into the shop, he turned round, and said to the other apprentice, good morning, John, I will bid you good by; I said, stop, you are not going yet; I took him by the arm, and turned him round towards the shop-board, and said, I must know what you have got; I waited a few moments before I searched him, till Mr. Blake came and gave me charge of him; I proceeded to search him, but found nothing.

Q. Before you searched him, had you observed him to do any thing? - A. I observed him to go to his master's shop-board, and put his hand to a dirty cloth that was there; I did not hear any thing jink.

Q. After you had searched him, did you go and look under that dirty cloth? - A. I did, and found five guineas there under the same dirty cloth which I had observed him put his hand on.

Q. You took possession of them - have you kept them ever since? - A. I have; they were examined

in the prisoner's presence; he did not say any thing all the time he was there till I was going to take him to the Compter; he begged for mercy of his master; I produce the five guineas, they are the same; I have had them in my possession ever since.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) You have examined those five guineas with the magnifying glass? - A. Yes; there are three of them visible without a magnifying glass on, No. 8, 5, and 15.

Jury. Q. What age is this young man? - A. I believe now he is near twenty-two.

Q. You are the person that pays the rent for this house? - A. I am the householder.

Prisoner's defence. On the constable coming into the shop, I immediately bid my fellow-apprentice good morning, on account, as I thought, that the constable was come on business; he immediately said, you cannot go; he turned round to me, and said, I shall want you, let me see what you have got in your pocket; I said, you are very welcome to see what I have got in my pocket; he took from my side pocket a pocket-book, which contained the copy of my freedom; he went to the shop-board to look over the pocket-book; I then followed him to the shop-board, and said, be so good as to take care of the things that are in there; O yes, said he, they shall be taken care of. By that time Mr. Blake came down stairs, and after he came to the place where I stood, Mr. Tagg said that he saw me go to the drawer; the constable turned round to my master, and said, I have searched him, and he has got nothing in his pockets; then he said I must strip myself; immediately I pulled off my clothes, one by one, and stripped myself properly; he searched my clothes, and found nothing upon me; he said to Mr. Blake, there is nothing upon him; Mr. Tagg said, I do not care what there is upon him, he has got it; then they searched about the shop, and in the course of a little time they found the money on the shop-board, near the place where Mr. Blake was.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor, on account of his youth and former good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-4

435. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a metal watch, value 20 s. the property of Richard Mason .

RICHARD MASON sworn. - I am a serjeant of the 11th regiment of Light Dragoons : On the 4th of July, about a quarter before twelve at night, as I was walking in the Strand , opposite St. Clement's church, I fell into discourse with the prisoner; accordingly we went up a court; I was with her there about five minutes, when instantly she said there was some person coming, and she ran down the court; I felt for my watch, and missed it; I went round the neighbourhood to look after her, and could not see any thing of her; on the next morning I made it known to the recruiting party round St. James's, and on Monday the 8th, serjeant Johnson gave me some information; accordingly I went up to St. Pancras watch-house, and there I saw this said girl; she told me that she had got my watch.

CHARLES CHINERY sworn. - I am constable and watch-house keeper of St. Pancras: On Sunday morning a person brought this woman to me, on charge of suspicion of stealing a watch; she told me that it belonged to a serjeant in the 15th Light Dragoons, quartered at the One Tun, Charing-cross; it getting towards the evening, I could not go myself; I sent to inquire if that serjeant had lost a watch; that serjeant had not lost a watch, but he knew a man that had lost it, and the prosecutor came and claimed the watch on the Monday; he said he had not had it long, and the hour-hand was broke; I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. That is my watch; I described it before I saw it; I know it to be mine, I bought it the same day; the hour-hand is broke.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through the Strand, just by the back of the New-church: this man passed me, and put his hand on my shoulder, and asked me where I was going; I told him I was going home; he told me I should go with him to his rendezvous; he pushed me up a court; I had told him I would not go up the court; he told me he would give me his watch if I would, and he did. On Sunday morning, I was going up Oxford-street, I had the watch in my hand, and a gentleman said that I had stole the watch; he immediately charged me with a constable, and they took me on suspicion; I kept the watch, and never offered to make away with it; I said to the serjeant, when he came to me at the watch-house, I have got your watch.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Were you perfectly sober? - A. I had been drinking a little liquor I do not deny.

Q. Perhaps you were in such a situation that you could not feel it taken - how long had you been up the court with her? - A. Not above five minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-5

436. BRIDGET DUNN and MARGARET DUNN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a cotton bed-gown, value 1 s. 6 d. two dollars, value 9 s. ten guineas, two crown pieces, value 10 s. and six sixpences , the property of Bryan Crean ; and the other for feloniously receiving on the same day a cotton bed-gown, value 1 s. 6 d. she knowing it to be stolen

CATHERINE CREAN sworn. - My husband's name is Bryan Crean ; he keeps the Broad Arrow public-house, Grub-street ; the prisoner, Bridget Dunn , was my servant ; I lost the money out of a large deal chest, in the two pair of stairs back room, where she and my niece slept.

Q. Was the chest locked? - A. Yes, and the money was in a bag in that chest; there were thirteen guineas and a half, seventeen dollars, and a great many new shillings and sixpences.

Q. When was it that you found the chest broke open? - A. Between five and six o'clock on Friday evening, the 24th of May; about three o'clock on that day, she asked me to let her go to her mother's and fetch a bundle; I gave her leave, and told her not to be long gone; while she was gone, I had occasion to go up into that room where she slept: I could not find the key of that room any where; I went into my own room, and I saw her unlock that door with a bundle in her apron; in consequence of information from my niece, I went into the room immediately; I saw the screws of the lock of the chest had been forced; I opened the chest and looked at the bag which contained my money: I found the string put carelessly round the bag, but not tied in the manner which I used to do; as soon as I opened the bag, I knew something had been taken out, I missed ten guineas, two English crowns, two Spanish dollars not stamped, and several shillings and sixpences; I cannot tell how many; I locked the door, and came down stairs, and went after an officer; I came back again and could not get one; as soon as she found that I had discovered the robbery, she went to the front door.

Q. How do you know that she discovered it? - A. She seemed very much frightened and was going away without having any tea, and I suspected she was going to her mother, as she put down the pots she was washing of, and went out; I followed her as far as Mr. Whitbread's brewhouse, Chiswell-street; I told her to stop; she asked me what I wanted; I told her, I would tell her when she came back; I told her I had been robbed; she told me, she knew nothing at all about it; at seven o'clock, Mr. Ray, the officer came, he searched her, but found nothing on her that belonged to me; he took her into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. The box which contained this money was in the prisoner's bed-room? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it locked? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was the key kept? - A. In the bar.

Q. Had you any other lodgers in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Could not they get the key as well as this girl? - A. If they came into the bar they could; I did not let any of them come into the bar.

- sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Ravenhill, linen-draper, Beech-street, Barbican.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know them very well by sight; they both came to Mr. Ravenhill's shop, on the 24th of May, in the afternoon, to purchase some check gingham for a gown and a shawl; the younger one paid me for them, she gave me a guinea and I gave her a shilling; they came to twenty shillings exactly.

Q. Did Bridget Dunn say any thing about the guinea? - A. She said, her brother was very good, he had made her a present of a gown; she did not say any thing about the money.

FRANCIS SIMS sworn. - I live at No. 13, Redcross-street; I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners by sight? - A. I have known both of them by sight for two or three years.

Q. When was the last time that they came into your shop? - A. On the 24th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, they both came in together to take out articles of wearing apparel, which chiefly belonged to the mother, to the amount of about two pounds, the mother gave me a guinea in gold, two Spanish dollars, a seven-shilling piece, and the rest in shillings and sixpences; they tried to pay me without the guinea.

Q. What was the change that they offered to give you? - A. The mother said she had new shillings and sixpences; there appeared to be four or five new shillings and sixpences together with other silver, but she had not enough.

Q. What were the articles pledged? - A. A gown, a petticoat, and a shift, which I returned to them.

DAVID WILLIAMS sworn. - I live with Mr. Pearson, linen-draper, No. 23, Beech-street, Barbican.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know the young woman by sight, Bridget Dunn : On the 24th of May last, I saw her in my master's shop in the afternoon; she purchased a piece of green plaid for a gown, she offered me two dollars which were not passable; she went away then and came again the same afternoon, and brought with her a guinea, and paid for the gown.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Did you lose a cotton bed-gown? - A. Yes, it is a trifling thing, it was found at her mother's apartments when it was searched.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street: On the 24th of May, I took the prisoner, Bridget Dunn , into custody, at the Broad Arrow, in Grub-street; I asked her where her mother lived; she would not inform me; the niece belonging to the prosecutor knew partly where the mother lived; I went up stairs, and saw the chest had been broken open.

Q. How did it appear to have been broken

open? - A. By a small chisel, or something of that kind, or a turnscrew.

Q. Did it appear to have been lately broken open? - A. It did, it appeared quite fresh; I went to the mother's in Golden-lane, in company with the prosecutor and the niece; I searched a box there, and found a number of new articles; I produce them, and a child's bed-gown, which was on a chair-back in the prisoner's room; this turnscrew was delivered to me by the prosecutor, which exactly fitted the mark in the box where it had been wrenched.

BRYAN CREAN sworn. - I am the husband of the first witness; I produce the things found in the box that was broken open at the time that the officer Ray, went with me.

Q. (To the pawnbroker.) Look at these things, and tell me whether these things were taken out of pawn by the two prisoners? - A. I recollect the pattern of the gown; I cannot be positive to any thing else; the gown was taken out by the two prisoners.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) After they were in custody had you any opportunity of hearing any conversation between them? - A. I had; Mr. Ray took me up to where they were to hearken to their discourse in the Irish language; I understand that language, they could not see me; I saw the mother once; she said to the daughter, I hope you have not owned any thing; the daughter answered, no; that is right, said the mother, stick to what I told you; the daughter said to the mother, have they found any thing upon you; the mother answered, no, they have only found half a crown; if you do not stick to what I told you, they will hang us both; the daughter asked the mother where the rest of the money was; the mother answered, never mind, they have only found half a crown, the rest is safe.

Q. Was any thing said about any boy? - A. Yes; the daughter said to the mother, I told you to put those other things away, they will hurt that poor boy; the mother said do not tell where he lives, they cannot hurt him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Why all this conversation might have related to any other money as well as your's? - A. It might.

Q. You do not mean to say that it was your money that they were talking about? - A. I cannot; she was in custody at this time, and it was after her examination.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Look at that bed-gown? - A. It is my little girl's.

Q. In that state so much worn? - A. Yes, she is about fourteen.

Q. Had you missed it? - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-6

437. JOHN MEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, the property of William Stennett , privily from his person .

WILLIAM STENNETT sworn. - I am a victualler , I live in Goodman's-yard, in the Minories; on Friday, the 7th of June, I went to Bow fair .

Q. Did you lose any thing out of your pocket while you were there? - A. Yes, a handkerchief; I was in the crowd where they performed the pantomime, about seven o'clock in the evening; I had my son with-me, he is about fifteen years old; we went into the country about four or five miles, and spent an agreeable day; I was tapped on the shoulder, and asked if I had not lost an handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and found it was gone; I do not know when it was taken from me; the handkerchief was shewn to me, and I perceived it to be mine; it is a broad check red cotton handkerchief.

JOHN CROSWELL sworn. - I am a patrol attached to Worship-street Office; I was at Bow fair on Friday, the 7th of June, and about seven o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner at the bar in the crowd there; I saw him make several attempts on different gentlemen, I saw him draw a handkerchief out of Mr. Stennett's pocket, and after he had done it, I immediately took hold of him by the collar, and took the handkerchief out of his hand; I secured the handkerchief and the prisoner, and brought the prisoner to town with me. After I had took hold of the prisoner, I touched Mr. Stennett on the shoulder, and asked him if he had lost a handkerchief; he put his hand in his pocket, and replied he had; I produce the handkerchief. (The handkerchief identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going through Bow fair, and that handkerchief laid on the ground; that gentleman took me up, and said I had picked the gentleman's pocket.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-7

438. MARY GLOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , six silver spoons, value 1 l. 16 s. the goods of William Walton .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

HUGH DORAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are servant to Mr. William Walton ? - A. Yes, at Girdler's Hall, Basinghall-street .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A.

Yes, she was a pot-girl at the White Bear, in Basinghall-street.

Q. Do you remember on the day laid in the indictment missing a desert spoon from your dresser? - A. Yes, I had seen it on the dresser about nine o'clock in the morning; in about twenty minutes afterwards the prisoner came in to take the pots away that she had brought the night before; in about half an hour after she was gone, I missed the spoons.

Q. Had any stranger been in the house in that interval? - A. Not any person that I saw but herself.

Court. Q. How many spoons did you miss? - A. One spoon; I suspected her, and informed my master; he ordered me to go and have her searched; I went to the White Bear, and sent for a constable, and had her searched; she said she had not taken it; the constable found nothing on her but a five-shilling piece.

JOHN SALMON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went to Doran, at the White Bear? - A. I did; I searched the prisoner, and found a number of halfpence and a thimble; I questioned her concerning the table-spoon; I told her I would take her into custody if she did not own it; I found a five-shilling dollar in her shoe; afterwards I took her to Crouch, a pawnbroker, and there I found a desert spoon.

Q. Did you see that desert spoon shewn to Doran? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Doran.) Did you see that spoon? - A. Yes, it is one of my master's spoons.

JACOB RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live with Mr. Crouch, a pawnbroker, in Fore-street, Cripplegate.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I have seen her; she pledged the last spoon on the 31st of May; she pledged them in the name of Mary Robinson .

Q. Have you got the spoon? - A. I have.

Q. Perhaps you can pull them out of your pocket? - A. I produce the spoon.

Q. Put down the other spoons, and give me that one - did she say any thing at the time she pledged them? - A. I asked her name; she said her name was Mary Robinson , and that she lived in Basinghall-street; I asked her if she brought it from any body; she said from her mistress.

Q. Did you ask her her mistress's name? - A. No, I did not.

Court. Q. Now look at the prisoner - are you sure that is the person? - A. I am certain of it.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon.

Q. What did you lend her on it? - A. Six shillings; it is worth about eight shillings and sixpence.

Mr. Knapp. (To Doran.) Q. Is that one single spoon your master's property? - A. Yes, and these four are my master's property.

- FLETCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are another person employed by Mr. Crouch? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know her person? - A. I have no recollection of her; I produce one table-spoon, for which I lent seven shillings, pledged in the name of Ann Robinson .

Q. (To Doran.) Have the goodness to look at that? - A. It is my master's property.

Court. (To the prisoner.) Q. How old are you? - A. Fifteen.

Q. Have you no father, or mother, or relations at all, here? - A No.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of her youth .

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-8

439. JOHN DOVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a box, value 1 s. five gowns, value 10 s. two petticoats, value 2 s. a skirt, value 6 d. a frock, value 6 d. a great coat, value 6 d. two bonnets, value 6 d. a silver spoon, value 4 s. two razors, value 1 s. eighty-seven penny pieces, 204 halfpence, and fifteen farthings , the property of William Tunnicliffe .

WILLIAM TUNNICLIFFE sworn. - I am a periwig-maker , I live at Lambeth ; I lost this box from my house at Lambeth, on the 18th of June; the prisoner is an apprentice of mine.

Q. How long has he served you? - A. He has got fourteen months to serve, he was a turn-over to me, he had been with me about eleven months; about five o'clock in the afternoon he asked me to let him go down stairs to fetch a pair of bellows up to blow the fire in the shop; I told him, no, he should not go down stairs; in the course of a quarter of an hour after that I missed him.

Q. Why did you not let him go down stairs? - A. I did not like him to go down into the kitchen by himself; I looked in the shop, and found his two hats, he had gone out without a hat; I went down stairs, I did not miss any thing; I did not miss the box till my wife came home; he took two razors with him that were not in the box; his indentures were in the box; they were taken out of his breeches pocket when he was taken prisoner.

Q. Have you seen any of your property since? - A. Two gowns; the pawnbroker has got them; I found one razor out of the two.

SARAH TUNNICLIFFE sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 18th of June, I went out between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and returned about seven; when I went out, I left

the box locked, and put it under the bed again, where I took it from; I had taken this petticoat out of the box that I have now on, before I went out.

Q. What did it contain? - A. It contained five gowns, one quilted silk petticoat, one dimity petticoat, one table spoon, one little bag of George the First's halfpence, and a great many twopenny and penny pieces, and new halfpence; when I came home they were all gone.

THOMAS COTTERILL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in Shoe-lane: On the 19th of June the prisoner brought two gowns to my house to pledge, saying that they were his mother's; he pawned them in the name of Pearson, he said that was his mother's name; I lent him ten shillings on them; at the time he pawned them I took such a particular description of the person, that I know he is the same person that pawned these gowns with me; I produce the gowns.

GEORGE GARDNER sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street: On the 26th of June, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, at the King's Arms, in the Kent road; I found a razor in his left hand pocket; while I was searching of him, he gave his master's indenture out of his right hand waistcoat pocket; I found a great quantity of copper in his pocket, and in the bundle; before Mr. Graham he owned that he took them from his master's box; I produce sixteen shillings and three farthings in halfpence and farthings, which I took from him, and two old table-cloths, four pair of stockings, half a bottle of port, and half a bottle of rum; I could not find the owner of them. (The gowns identified by the prosecutrix, and the razor identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-9

440. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Levy Solomon , about the hour of eight in the afternoon, on the 27th of June , the said Levy Solomon and other of his family being therein, and feloniously stealing a blanket, value 7 s. a pair of sheets, value 15 s. and a counterpane, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Thomas Rusby .

JANE RUSBY sworn. - I live at No. 9, Gloster-place , my husband is a paper-hanger ; I went out on the 27th of June, about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, and when I returned the clock struck eight; I went up stairs, and to my surprize my door was open.

Q. What part of the house have you? - A. Only the one pair back room.

Q. Whose house is it? - A. Levy Solomon 's; he is a pencil-maker ; when I went in, I found the counterpane removed from the bed, and lying on the chair with the blanket, and the prisoner with a sheet wrapped up in his hand; when I went in, he held up his hand, and said, hush, hush; he dropped down the sheet, and I took hold of him by the collar, and held him for the space of five minutes, till we struggled to the top of the stairs; then I was obliged to leave hold of him, left I should go from the top of the stairs to the bottom; I called out, stop thief, all the time as loud as I could, and my landlord caught hold of him at the bottom of the stairs, and from there my landlord took him to the Office at Hatton-garden; I went with him, I never lost sight of him all the time; I had padlocked the door when I went out, and when I came in, I found the door about an inch open, and the padlock lying on the bed.

Q. Did you see any instrument that he could break the door open with? - A. No; the padlock was strained, nothing was taken away.

Q. Where was the counterpane when you left it? - A. On the bed, and the sheets too; the blanket was not.

Q. Are you sure that you padlocked that door? - A. I am certain of it.

Q. Does your husband live with you? - A. He is at Richmond at work.

Q. Are you positive that you locked this door? - A. I am positive that I locked it once, it double locks; I had not been gone above ten yards, only to the next door.

Q. Had you ever seen this man before? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Did he say any thing to you when you laid hold of him? - A. Only, hush, twice, holding his hand up.

LEVY SOLOMON sworn. - I live at No. 9, Glocester-place, Holborn, I am a pencil-maker: On the 27th of June, I came home just at eight o'clock; I was not at home above a minute or two, when I heard the alarm of murder, fire, and thieves; I immediately rushed out of my parlour-door, and saw Mrs. Rusby and the prisoner scuffling together; she immediately said to me, he has been robbing the place; I laid hold of him immediately, and asked him what business he had there; he scuffled very hard to get away from me, till we both fell down; he made me no answer at all till we got out of the passage into the court; then he said, let me go, for God's sake; I took him down to Hatton-garden Office myself, not being able to get a constable, and then I delivered him into the hands of Mr. White, the officer.

Prisoner. There was another woman that was with her that told me where to come to; I had been drinking with her all the evening; it is well known that nothing else than girls of the town live in the court.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - The prisoner was brought down to the Office by the witness; I took

him into custody, and on searching him I found this skeleton key; I have tried a number of locks with it, and it has opened twenty out of twenty-four; the staple was wrenched off the door, and I found the lock lying on the furniture of the bed when I went into the room. He said he was very sorry for what he had done; he wished me to let him go; I went and searched his box, and I found that letter which I have delivered to you.

Jury. Q. What state was the padlock in when you saw it? - A. It had been knocked off the door, it was bruised at the side, as though it had been hit with a hammer; he got the padlock off by drawing the staple; the staple was put in again; I found the staple quite loose.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I very much in liquor? - A. You were at the time you were brought to me.

Jury. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. Are you married? - A. I am.

Prisoner. She told that gentleman that her husband was working in Tottenham Court-road.

Prosecutrix. He works for Messrs. Haines and Roberts, in Piccadilly; he has been at Richmond for this month.

Court. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. What family has Mr. Solomon? - A. His wife, two children, and her sister.

Jury. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. Whether you have any knowledge of that woman the prisoner speaks of? - A. She is a cousin of mine; her brother is a sheriff's officer, his name is Holmes; she had not been out two minutes when I saw this man standing with her; I sent that woman to a tailor with a pair of breeches, and when I came home she was behind me with the breeches in her apron.

Q. Did your cousin appear against the prisoner on his examination? - A. She was at Guildhall, but she was not asked any questions.

Court. The worthy Alderman is here; he does not remember any questions being asked of that person.

GUILTY, aged 55,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-10

441. THOMAS HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , fourteen pounds weight of copper, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of George Pengree , George Grenfell , and George Granville .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT GARLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Pengree, Grenfell, and Granville? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you for some time past known the prisoner at the bar? - A. About a twelvemonth past.

Q. What business is he? - A. A brazier , I believe.

Q. Has he come to Messrs. Pengree and Grenfell for this last twelvemonth past? - A. Yes, he has been in the habit of coming there about four times a week.

Court. Q. To purchase copper? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you remember his coming there on Saturday, the 15th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any thing you had before observed, did you conceal yourself that day for the purpose of watching him? - A. I did.

Q. Did you conceal yourself in a place where he did not see you? - A. It is possible that he might have seen my head.

Q. You took good care he should not see you? - A. I did; I saw him go to the shelf upon which some copper was placed, and take as much as he could grasp in his hand, and put it underneath his waistcoat.

Q. Was any person by to observe him at that time? - A. There was a man in the warehouse, he was employed; the prisoner's back was towards him; he was watching him as well as me.

Q. Was the person so employed that the prisoner had reason to believe he was not observing him at the time? - A. Yes; on perceiving this, I went and fetched a constable, his name is Cummins; when I came back with Cummins, the prisoner was in the warehouse; he had got four pounds of copper, which he had looked out by way of purchasing it; I gave charge of him to Cummins; I told him that I had seen him steal the copper, he had it then under his waistcoat.

Q. Did the constable search him? - A. He did not give him leave; the prisoner directly put his hands under his waistcoat, and hauled out the copper; he appeared very much agitated; he said it was the first time, and begged that we would forgive him; the copper was put into the hands of the constable.

Prisoner. Q. Were not you at your desk in the warehouse at the time I came in? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. As to your attempting to say you concealed yourself is a falsity? - A. Immediately upon his entering the warehouse, I left it, and went into the place of concealment.

Jury. Q. How did you conceal yourself? - A. On the top of the stairs leading to the floor above; I looked over.

Court. Q. It is possible he might have seen you? - A. I do not think he did.

Jury. Q. Had you any reason to think he had robbed you before? - A. I think he had.

Court. That is a tender question to ask.

- CUMMINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On Saturday, the 15th of June, were you sent by Garland to take the prisoner into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him take any thing out of his waistcoat? - A. Yes, that copper; I produce it.

Q. (To Garland.) Are these the pieces of copper you saw him put under his waistcoat? - A. These are the pieces of copper that he put under his waistcoat; they are saucepan bottoms, they are worth twenty-eight shillings.

Q. They are the property of Messrs. Pengree and Grenfell? - A. They are.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in the habit of coming to that warehouse upwards of a twelvemonth; I have purchased a great many bottoms exactly as them, and amongst some of them are the bottoms that I have purchased.

Court. Q. Prove it - were they purchased that day? - A. No, that day I had not.

Q. You heard what the witnesses said - you were seen to take it, and put it under your waistcoat, and the constable saw you take it from under your waistcoat? - A. I have been in the habit of buying at that warehouse a great while; there has been a ton weight sold at that warehouse of pieces of copper, both in shape and size of them.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-11

442. THOMAS VOSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , twelve pair of stockings, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Robert Ireland , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT IRELAND sworn. - I am a hosier , I live at No. 78, Holborn-bridge .

Q. What day was it you lost your stockings? - A. On the 20th of June, in the evening, I lost them out of the shop; the prisoner had been in my employ for two or three months.

Q. In what capacity? - A. As a general servant, a porter, and he worked in the frame in making of stockings .

Q. Is he a soldier? - A. Yes, I knew he was a soldier; on the 20th of June he was employed in cleaning windows and taking down the beds; in the evening, about eight o'clock, Mrs. Ireland took up his hat, which was lying on a secretary in the first floor, and found it was very heavy; she asked me whose hat it was; I said it was the prisoner's; the lining was drawn close up; I opened the lining, and found three pair of stockings contained in it. I then went out, and fetched a constable on purpose to search him, he was then cleaning the outside of the first floor windows; I took the constable up stairs, and called the prisoner, Voss, in; the first question I asked him was to inform me how the stockings came in his hat; he replied he did not know; I observed to him, they could not walk in, they must be put in by somebody or other; I called the constable to come forward, who was then standing on the stairs, to search him; I asked him if he had any thing else about him; he said, no; I saw the constable take the other stockings from him.

SAMUEL TURNER sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, and found three pair of stockings concealed in his hat crown; eight pair I took from him between his shirt and his skin, on the right side of him, and one pair I took from the waistband of his breeches; these are the dozen pair of stockings; I produce them.

Prosecutor. (Looking at the stockings.) They are ladies' stockings, they are my property, they have my mark on them.

Prisoner's defence. May it please you, my Lord - My mistress was one that liked a little liquor, and she sent me out several times of the day to get it; she wished me to treat; I told her it did not lay in my power to stand treat, I had a wife and child to support, I could not afford it.

Court. Q. To treat your mistress? - A. Yes, I went out several times in the day to get liquor for her; she told me if I liked to take some stockings to pledge I might; she told me to take them.

Q. Did she bid you to put them in your hat? - A. No, I was to take them unknown to my master.

Q. Have you any witness to prove that - have you any witnesses of any kind? - A. I can get witnesses where I fetched the liquor.

Q. Are they here? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Did you ever pledge any stockings before for her for liquor? - A. Never in my life.

Turner. On searching him, I found two shillings in halfpence in his pocket, which he said his mistress gave him; his mistress had paid him that, it was his day's wages, he said.

Court. Q. What had he to say for himself? - A. He never made that defence at the time, nor did he call his mistress; in taking him to the Compter, he attempted to make his escape from me in Newgate-street.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-12

443. SARAH LEA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a silver milk-pot, value 20 s. three silver tea-spoons, value 3 s. and a pair of sugar tongs, value 10 d. the property of Richard White .

EDWARD DUBBLE sworn. - I am a bookseller: On the 25th of June, when I first saw the prisoner, she was tying the milk-pot between her legs with her garter; she was in company with a man; I asked her where she got it, seeing it about her leg, and she swore at me.

Q. She had pulled up her petticoats, and tied it about her leg? - A. Yes; I followed her as far as Portland-street; I then saw Mr. Haywood, and I told him of it, and he cut it off from her leg, and took her to the watch-house.

Q. What became of the man that was with her? - A. He ran away.

Q. Did he go away before the woman was apprehended, or after? - A. Before she was apprehended.

Prisoner. He saw the man with me that gave me the things.

THOMAS HAYWOOD sworn. - I am a butcher; I live with Mr. Davis, in Newgate-market, he is a salesman: On Tuesday evening, the 25th of June, about seven o'clock, I was going from Newgate-market to Clare-market, and there, outside of the watch-house door, I saw a large body of people; I supposed there was somebody in the stocks opposite the watch-house door; the prisoner at the bar was leaning over the rails, she was three parts intoxicated in liquor; when I went up, the other witness that has just gone down told me that the prisoner had got a mug hanging between her legs; I put my hand down, but could not feel it; I lifted her petticoats half way up, and this mug was hanging between her legs.

Q. I understood him that it was hanging about her leg? - A. I cannot be positive; it was hanging before her tied with a blue ribbon; I laid hold of it, and cut it off with a pair of scissars, and put her into the watch-house; I fetched a constable, and gave charge of her to him; he came in, and searched her afterwards, and found a pair of sugar tongs upon her, and two duplicates - one for two spoons, and the other for one, and some silver and halfpence she had in her bosom.

Q. Did she say any thing? - A. She was very much in liquor; it was a very hard matter to get any thing from her; I produce the milk-pot.

EDWARD KING sworn. - I am a constable; I searched the prisoner, I found on her this silver sugar tongs, which I produce, I found two duplicates, a half crown, and two shillings; I produce one duplicate of one spoon which the pawnbroker has got.

WILLIAM STUBBING sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a tea-spoon pledged for half a crown, on the 25th of June, by the prisoner; I know her person.

RICHARD WHITE sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of this woman? - A. I never saw her before she was brought to Bow-street; on the 30th, I think, I went to Bow-street; on the 25th day of June, very near five in the afternoon, I was coming up stairs to my chambers in the Temple , I saw a great coat left on the outside of the door, and on looking at it, I found it was my own; I went in and looked at the plate, where we usually keep it, and missed these articles; I thought no more of it; I went out of town, on my arrival, I heard of this plate being found; this plate I saw by mere accident, perhaps half an hour before it was taken.

Q. What time of the day was that? - A. I think it must be taken near half past four in the afternoon.

Q. Now look at it - Do you know it to be your's? - A. I have not the least doubt of all the articles; my name is on the tea-tongs, the spoon, and the cream-pot.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through Covent-garden market, I met with a young man; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him, I did not care; I walked on a little, while he felt in his pocket, and said, he had no money; he pulled out a spoon, and I went and pledged it; he said, it was the third spoon he had pledged that day; we walked on a great way, and he took this milk-pot out from under his jacket, and the sugar-tongs, he asked me to take them home, as he had got to go to Blackwall that night.

Q. How came you to conceal it between your legs? - A. The constable knew I had got no pockets, and I carried it in my hands a great way, and then I tied it to my garter.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-13

444. SAMUEL SIMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , in the dwelling-house of Richard Duce , a coat, value 3 s. a pocket handkerchief, value 4 d. a memorandum-book, value 1 d. an iron key, value 4 d. and a pocket-book, value 4 d. a bill of exchange, value 16 l. 17 s. 6 d. a bill of exchange, value 43 l. 5 s. 4 d. a bill of exchange, value 37 l. 1 s. 6 d. and a bill of exchange, value 180 l. 9 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Duce , the said sums of money, for the said bills of exchange being payable then, and unsatisfied to him .

RICHARD DUCE sworn. - I live at No. 6, Lambeth-street, Goodman's-fields, in the parish of Whitechapel ; I keep the house; I am a gun-lock filer : On the 10th of June, when I went to drink my tea in a room on the ground floor, I took off my coat, and put it on a chair; I had in one of the pockets of that coat, a pocket-book, containing memorandums, and four bills of exchange; in about an hour afterwards, I went up stairs to my work, in the room over it; I came down stairs in about an hour afterwards, and missed my coat; I went about to the different people that the bills were payable to, and stopped payment of them.

Q. In consequence of your having stopped payment, had you any notice given you of any of these bills being stopped? - A. Yes, on the 12th of June; two days afterwards one of the bills was

stopped at Mr. Gray's, in Billiter-square, that was for 180 l. 9 s. 6 d. that bill is here; and there was one stopped at Mr. Capper's, in Houndsditch.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar in your house? - A. No.

Q. How was the door and the window of this room? - A. I believe my wife had left the outer door open for a little air.

Q. Do you know yourself about it? - A. No.

JAMES STEVENS sworn. - I live with Mr. Gray, in Billiter-square.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether he came to Mr. Gray's, on the twelfth of last month? - A. Yes, he came on the twelfth of last month, and he brought a bill of exchange, and asked if Mr. Gray was in the way.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes, many years; I answered, no; then he produced this bill, and asked me if I would take it in payment of some goods.

Q. What became of that bill? - A. I have it; I produce it. (The bill read in Court.)

"25th of March, 1805. Two months after date pay to my order, 180 l. 9 s. 6 d. value received, as advised by your humble servant, John Duce . - Messrs. Blundell and Fox. - Accepted F. Blundell and Fox."

Q. When he produced it to you and asked you if you would take it for some goods, what said you? - A. I did not know the drawer nor the accepter; I gave him no answer, and Mr. Gray not being in the way, I could not immediately send to know if the bill was good; I told him, if he could leave it till four o'clock, I could give him an answer; which he very readily did; I stopped the bill by some directions I received.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You say you have known the prisoner some time? - A. Yes, I dare say eighteen years.

Q. What is his business? - A. An engraver .

Q. What is Mr. Gray? - A. An hardware-man and jeweller.

Q. What is the prisoner's character? - A. I never knew any harm of him.

Q. You say, he came with a bill and offered to purchase some goods, he very readily left the bill with you? - A. Yes, he did; he observed, if I would take it in goods, he would bring the man that he had it from, to look out the goods to that amount; he called again that day when I was out.

CORNELIUS JACKSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Capper, he is a wholesale hardware-man and jeweller, No. 55, Houndsditch.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, very well. On Wednesday, the 12th of June, he brought a bill for 43 l. 5 s. 4 d. and asked for Mr. Capper; I told him he was out of town; I told him to leave the bill, I would make enquiry if it was a good bill; he took it away then, and returned in a few minutes and left it; I told him, if he would call at four o'clock he should have an answer; I went with the bill and understood payment was stopped.

Q. What became of the bill? - A. Mr. Rogers came to me, by the direction of Mr. Duce, at Mr. Capper's, to wait there till the party came; I gave the bill to Mr. Rogers at our warehouse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Mr. Capper is also a hardware-man and silversmith? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - A. Between six and seven years.

Q. He is an engraver? - A. Yes, he is, I believe.

Q. What has been his character during the time that you have known him? - A. I never knew any bad character of him.

Q. You told him to come at four o'clock - did he call again at four? - A. Yes, with another man.

Q. When Rogers was in the warehouse, what passed when the other man was there? - A. I have stated what passed; the prisoner at the bar asked if I had been with the bill; I said, yes; he then said, was it a good one; I said, there is a person there will tell you, pointing to Mr. Rogers; he then said to the prisoner, the bill is stolen.

WILLIAM ROGERS sworn. - Q. Have you got the bill of 43 l. 5 s. 4 d. which the last witness Jackson, gave you? - A. Yes; I produce it. (The bill read in Court.)

" April 25th, 1805. Two months after date pay to order, 43 l. 5 s. 4 d. value received, as advised by your humble servant, John Duce , directed to Mr. J. Lee, No. 10, George-yard, Tower-hill. - Accepted J. Lee, and endorsed John Duce ."

Q. You happened to be at Mr. Lee's at the time the bill was brought there by the last witness Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of you understanding it was stolen, you went with him to Mr. Capper's? - A. Yes, I had not been there many minutes, before the prisoner at the bar came in company with another man, the prisoner asked Mr. Capper's man, what answer to the bill; he informed him, that there was a gentleman, pointing to me, would inform him respecting the bill; I then addressed myself to the prisoner, and asked him how he came by the bill; he told me that he had it of the other person that was with him, I asked the other person how he had obtained it; he informed me, that he found it; I asked him if he found it singly; he answered me, no, he found it in a pocket-book, in Bow-common fields; he pulled these two books from his pocket together, which I produce.

Q. That was the other man? - A. Yes; I then asked him, where the bills of exchange were; he told me, in the book; I turned round to look in

the book, and he took the advantage of that, and whipped out of the shop in an instant.

Q. Did you go after him? - A. I went to the door after him, but quite lost sight of him; I saw him no more.

Q. Then the prisoner was apprehended? - A. I came in and found the bill for 180 l. was wanting; I asked him what became of it; he told me that it was at Mr. Gray's, in Billiter-square; I asked him to go with me to Mr. Gray's; he consented very readily to go with me; he went with me then and I found the bill there; and Mr. Duce followed me with an officer, and he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. The other man that delivered the pocket-book ran out of the shop; I believe the reason why you did not take him was, that some of the Royal Family were going to the India-house, and he got into the crowd? - A. Yes.

Q. You then asked him where the other bill was, the 180 l. and he very readily told you, and he went with you to Mr. Gray's? - A. Yes, he did.

Court. Q. (To the prosecutor.) That pocket-book that you lost was in your coat pocket? - A. Yes, and here are my letters in it, and this is a memorandum-book, they were both in my pocket.

Q. (To Jackson.) Look at that bill for 180 l. is that the bill? - A. This is the bill, I have no doubt of it; Mr. Blundell is the accepter of it; I believe it to be his hand-writing; it is signed John Duce .

Q. Look at this bill for 43 l. 5 s. 4 d. is that drawn by John Duce ? - A. Yes; and accepted by Mr. Lee; I believe it to be his hand-writing; I have seen him write.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Where you at Mr. Gray's when the prisoner came to Mr. Gray's, with Roger's? - A. I was just going into Mr. Capper's, Rogers and some of the people told me he was there.

Q. I believe that every thing that the prisoner stated with respect to the bills turned out to be true? - A. So far as ever I heard.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I met a man, and he told me he had four bills; and he told me, he wanted to buy various articles, and he would give me something handsome for my trouble, if I would assist him in buying the articles that he wanted; I went first to Mr. Gray's, and next to Mr. Capper's; I did not know that the notes had been lost or stolen; and the last time I went to Mr. Capper's, the man was with me, he had the two other notes in his pocket-book, and he delivered them up to Mr. Capper's man; I have a large family, and I thought I should get something by it, perhaps a shilling in the pound, or so on.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-14

445. JAMES MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July, in the 44th year of his Majesty's reign , a chesnut gelding, value 20 l. the property of John Lucking .

JOHN LUCKING sworn. - I live in the parish of Writtal, in Essex .

Q. Were you in possession of a chesnut horse? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you keep it? - A. It was in a stable on the 29th of December, or otherwise on the morning of the 30th; I missed it on Friday the 30th of December.

Q. When did you yourself see that gelding there? - A. In the evening of the 29th of December; the horse has a white blaze down his face, a flaxen mane, and a long flaxen tail; I did not get any intelligence of him till the 20th of last June, 1805, I found him at Mr. Brown's livery stables.

Q. Has the horse undergone any alteration since you lost him? - A. Yes, he has had his tail cut.

Q. Is there any thing particular about his eyes? - A. Part of his off eye-lid is bit or torn off.

Q. Are you sure that this horse you saw at the livery stables is your horse? - A. Yes, I bred him, he is rising seven years old.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You found the horse at Mr. Brown's livery stables? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you tell Mr. Brown that the horse was not the object - you did not want to punish him for stealing the horse but to get him out of the way as he was to be a witness for the Crown against Mr. Dallat? - A. I never said such a word.

Q. Did your friend Corder say so? - A. No, nor I never heard him say any thing to Mr. Brown about it.

THOMAS LUCKING sworn. - Q. You are brother to the last witness? - A. I am.

Q. Did you know the chesnut horse with the flaxen mane and tail that belonged to your brother? - A. Yes, I knew him from a foal, he had his eye-lid cut off, he had a long tail when he was lost but now it is cut.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that the horse you saw at the livery stable is the same horse that your brother lost? - A. I can say that I am positive it is, I have no doubt at all.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I keep a livery stable, in Clipstone-street, Marylebone; and in Ogle-court.

Q. Did you ever buy a horse of the prisoner? - A. Yes, on the 3d of July, 1804.

Q. Was that the same horse that the two Mr. Luckings looked at in your stables afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. Was his tail then off or on? - A. His tail is now as it was when I bought him, it was off then and he had a hog mane; I gave the prisoner 20 l.

for him; I have the receipt. (The receipt shewn to the Court.)

Q. Did you see him put his name to this? - A. I did; John Staples first proposed to me to make this purchase; he went with me to Morgan's house, near Walham Green, where I saw the horse; the prisoner not being at home, I left word with his wife, if he brought the horse to London, I might purchase it of him; in consequence of which the prisoner came the same afternoon, or on the next day, I am not positive which.

Q. Were there any witnesses when the bargain was made? - A. A great many; it was at a public-house, the Half Moon, in Clipstone-street.

Q. How long did you keep him as your own? - A. I kept him as my own about six weeks or two months; I then sold him to Dr. Hayes; he has stood at livery with me till he was claimed, excepting three weeks he was out on a journey.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When the prosecutor came to you about the horse, did he not say to you, it was not the object of the horse, but to get him out of the way? - A. This prosecutor did not.

Q. Did either of the witnesses who is to be called? - A. Yes.

HENRY CARPENTER sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Dallat, of Putney; they are soap-makers.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen the chesnut gelding that stood in Brown's livery stables? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen that in the possession of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he came to Messrs. Dallat frequently with it; I believe it to be the same horse. The first time that I saw the horse was in the beginning of April or May, I think it is about a twelvemonth back; he used to come to our house with it in a cart to buy goods there; I noticed to him that he had a good horse; his mane was not hogged then, but he had a short tail the first time I saw him; he said he had bought it cheap, for he had given only ten pounds for it; he said he should alter the horse, he did not like to be much about with him for fear of being known; whether it was on account of his being a private soap-maker, I cannot say.

Q. Are you sure that the horse which you saw in his cart is the same horse that you saw at Mr. Brown's? - A. I have every reason to think so from his general appearance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Dallat, they live at Putney? - A. Yes.

Q. They had a manufactory in Back-lane, Clapham? - A. Not as a soap manufactory.

Q. Were you employed there as clerk, or at Putney? - A. At Putney; Mrs. Dallat is a tallow-chandler, she has a manufactory in Back-lane, Clapham.

Q. Do you recollect any seizure having been made of five hundred pounds weight of soap some little time ago? - A. I do.

Q. How long after the seizure was made was it that you charged the prisoner at the bar with stealing this horse - was not he taken up the very same day? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you do not know when he was taken up? - A. No, I do not.

Q. When did you first attend the Police-office, in Worship-street? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you recollect the day the seizure was made? - A. No.

Q. You will not recollect? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. You say you do not recollect your taking up a man for horse-stealing - that is a remarkable occurrence, and you not to recollect the day? - A. I cannot tell the day.

Q. Do you recollect when he was to be a witness, and attend at the Court of Exchequer as a witness? - A. I heard he was there.

Q. Did not you see him there - look at this gentleman, do you not know him? (pointing to Mr. Bentley.) - A. Yes, I know him.

Q. Upon your oath did not you see that man and speak to him at the Court of Exchequer? - A. I do not recollect seeing him there.

Q. You have known the man a long time? - A. Yes.

Q. He had been a long time in the service of Mr. Dallat? - A. I never knew him as a servant, I do not think he was a servant.

Q. How long have you been a clerk to Mr. Dallat? - A. I believe near five years.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you do not know that he was employed in any capacity for the last year and a half? - A. I believe he was not, I have delivered goods to him.

Q. A person carrying on a soap manufactory and a shop-keeper in the country, very frequently use carts and horses - Mr. Dallat has a cart? - A. Yes, he has.

Q. I suppose you know your master's handwriting? - A. I have seen him write.

Q. Do you know where Mr. Dallat is - is he in Putney now? - A. He has lived there.

Q. Do you know where he is? - A. I do not know.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is his hand-writing? - A. That looks like his hand-writing, I take it to be his hand-writing.

Q. Now I ask you, sir, whether Mr. Dallat did instruct the prisoner at the bar to buy a horse for their use? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you ever see him pay fourteen pounds

for a horse which the prisoner said he had purchased for him? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner used to be riding along the road with this horse in the cart? - A. Yes, I have seen him with this horse in the cart, I think, from April to June.

Q. Have you always said that the prisoner told you he paid ten pounds for the horse? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Dr. Hayes - did not you ever tell him that he gave four pounds for the horse? - A. When I found that the horse was in the hands of Dr. Hayes, I said that Morgan told me that he gave ten pounds for the horse, and Jackson told me that he gave but four pounds; I believe that such a conversation passed between me and Mr. Brown, and there was a conversation passed between me and Dr. Hayes.

Q. Did you say to Mr. Brown that he gave four pounds? - A. I do not recollect but there might such a conversation pass between him and me.

Q. Did not you go to Mr. Brown, in whose possession the horse was found? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you tell Brown it was not the horse that was the object, but it was the getting the prisoner out of the way, who was to be a witness on the part of the Crown? - A. I do not recollect saying that; there was a discourse about the horse, he was charged with coming dishonestly by the horse.

Q. My question is, whether the horse was not the object, but that you wanted to get this man out of the way, who was to be a witness for the Crown? - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. Can you recollect how long ago it is since you were at Mr. Brown's? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Will you swear that you did not say that? - A. No, because in conversation it might have passed, but I do not think that any such conversation passed between me and Mr. Brown.

Court. Q. Do you recollect that expression, that he was to be a witness for the Crown against Mr. Dallat? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to go to Brown at all? - A. On the 27th of last April, Mr. Dallat had a horse owned belonging to Mr. Heale, a quaker.

Q. Did you go at all to Brown about this business? - A. Yes; Mr. Corder, a quaker, came, and said it was a stolen horse; we were summoned up to Worship-street to give evidence against Staples about that horse; Mr. Corder told us there were nineteen horses missing round Chelmsford, and counting over the horses he mentioned a horse like that which Morgan had; from that the inquiry was made, and it was proved to be the horse, and from that Morgan was apprehended.

Q. Was he apprehended at the instance of yourself and Mr. Dallat? - A. I believe Mr. Corder was the principal man at Springfield.

Q. Then this horse being mentioned was merely accidental? - A. Yes; I was there upon another business concerning a horse that was stolen from Mrs. Dallat's.

RICHARD HARRIS sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, I knew him in the year 1803.

Q. Are you in any business now? - A. No.

Q. What was your business? - A. A gardener.

Q. Do you know any thing of a chesnut horse that the prisoner had? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know when he got that chesnut horse? - A. After Christmas.

Q. Can you speak pretty near as to the time when you first saw that horse? - A. About February, 1804; he told me that he bought it.

Q. Did he ever employ you to work it in any way? - A. Yes, to cart with it, and he has often told me not to stop with it on the road, but to take care of the horse, and let nobody see it.

Q. Did you see the horse in Brown's stables? - A. I saw the horse at Worship-street.

Q. Can you speak with certainty that that is the same horse? - A. Yes, his mane was taken off, but I knew him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have been employed by the prisoner, and you have frequently gone out with the horse and cart in the night-time, as well as the day? - A. Never but once at night, and that was with Morgan.

Q. Who paid you your hire when you went out? - A. Morgan; I first took the place for half a guinea; he never paid me more than fifteen shillings.

Q. Have you never said you would go to Mr. Dallat, and ask him if he did not allow the prisoner a guinea a week to pay you? - A. I am sure I never said that; Morgan paid me; I do not know who I was employed for; he employed me in Parson's Green-lane.

Q. Do not you know that that place belonged to the Dallats - how often have you seen the Dallats there - were they not there two or three times in a day or night? - A. I never saw him there of a night, and whenever the Dallats came there I absconded.

Q. For what purpose did you go away? - A. I know nothing at all about the business.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Friday, the 21st of June, I, Bishop, and Vickery, executed this warrant on the prisoner; he was then at work at shoe-making, in King-street, Golden-square; we took him to the Office, and the horse was produced at the Office by Mr. Brown.

Prisoner's defence. Harris is wrong in what he says; he has worked in the place, and has gone backwards and forwards to Dallats' manufactory, so has Carpenter; Carpenter took the soap from the private works, and took it to Clapham; Carpenter was sent by Dallat to me, and shewed me

the place, and he has gone in the road in the cart frequently. He says in the month of May the horse was brought to him, whereas I took it home to Mr. Dallat in the beginning of January to get my money which I paid Richards for it; Richards in the mean time went over to Dallat for the money, he being a man that Dallat had employed; he had bought horses for him before. I took the horse to Mr. Dallat; he said he would give me fourteen pounds to pay Richards; he met me at Richard's, and there he received the fourteen pounds; he gave a seven pound note, a two pound note, and a five pound note, to pay for the horse. At that time the horse was at work, and after the seizure took place I kept the horse for a matter of a fortnight; I asked Dallat what I was to do with this horse; I said, I have no money, I cannot keep the horse any longer, do you mean to keep it, or to sell it; he said cash was short, I might sell it; Staples came over to me, and said he had got a man to buy it, and he would bring him to me; I was out when Mr. Brown came, as Mr. Brown says; I took the horse to Mr. Brown, and there I sold him.

Mr. Alley. (To Brown.) Q. Tell us what it was that Carpenter said to you (the witness that has been examined,) when he was speaking about the horse? - A. It was on Friday, the 14th of June, that Carpenter came along with another man; he went into my stable to see this chesnut gelding; he would have taken the horse out of the stable, saying it was a stolen horse, had it not been for my servant saying he was not at home; the next day three of them came, Mr. Carpenter, Mr. Corder, a quaker, and Mr. Dring.

Q. What is Mr. Dring? - A. He is a tallow-chandler and dealer in soap; I had shifted the horse, thinking I would not give him up except they gave me a description of him; I understood from them that it was the quaker's brother that had lost the horse, and that he was a bay horse; I told them that description would not answer; they told me that I had no occasion to let them see the horse, for the horse was not the object, - that neither I nor Dr. Hayes should be any loser, or be disturbed, or to that purpose, for the person that I bought him of was Morgan, who was a principal evidence in the Court of Exchequer, and they believed that he had bought him of a man of the name of Richards for four pounds, who was implicated with the evidence in the Exchequer. This conversation was about the brown horse, and when I came to shew them this horse, it was not the horse that Morgan had in his possession; after that Mr. Corder found an owner for the horse, and it was from that partly that this horse was claimed.

WILLIAM BENTLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a surveyor of the Excise? - A. I am.

Q. Did you attend as a witness last week at the Court of Exchequer? - A. I attended the Court of Exchequer by order of the Court of Excise, but not as a witness.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar there? - A. I did, he was attending as a witness.

Court. Q. When was this? - A. On the 9th instant, the day before yesterday.

Q. Did you see the witness, Carpenter, there? - A. I did, he was very near to him; the prisoner passed very near to him, twice I am certain of; the prisoner passed Carpenter in custody of the turnkey of this prison in his way to be locked up, where the witnesses are generally locked up.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing whether they made any observations one with another? - A. It was my particular business to do that; I was to keep the witnesses apart by order of the solicitor.

Q. Whether the witness took any notice of the prisoner? - A. I observed him to look very hard at the prisoner more than once or twice, and at his wife and children; I am certain that he saw him, he looked extremely hard at him.

Q. Can you tell me when the seizure of the soap was made at Clapham - was it before or after this man was taken up for horse-stealing? - A. Before the prisoner was taken up, I should imagine, four or five days.

JOSEPH HAYES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I am a surgeon and apothecary.

Q. You bought a horse of the witness, Brown, which turns out to be a stolen horse - do you recollect having any conversation with the witness, Carpenter, about the horse? - A. He told me that the horse was certainly stolen, that, in fact, Morgan had given him to understand so.

Q. Morgan was not present at this time? - A. No; Mr. Brown was present; he said then that Morgan gave but four pounds for the horse; he added that I might judge from that whether the horse was honestly come by or not.

Q. Did he ever tell you that ten pounds were given for the horse? - A. No; Mr. Brown produced a receipt which was signed by Brown, shewing that he purchased the horse, and observed that it was a very hard thing to lose the money; Mr. Carpenter replied that neither Mr. Dallat, nor Mr. Corder (whom I afterwards saw, who is one of the people called quakers,) would desire Mr. Brown or me to be a sufferer, because Morgan was an important witness in a trial impending, and that it was material to remove him on account of his evidence; he afterwards said there had been an information laid against the Dallats.

Q. He used the term in the plural number then - there had been an information against the Dallats? - A. Yes, and they were likely to be fined

to a heavy amount; this is all that passed on that particular topic.

Q. You could not mistake what passed, you are certain to the conversation? - A. I am certain of it, that he said, that Morgan gave four pounds for the horse, while we were in Worship-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-15

446. JAMES MORGAN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August, in the 43d year of his Majesty's reign , a brown gelding, value 7 l. the property of John Ellis , sen.

(The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.)

JOHN ELLIS sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Where do you live? - A. In the Isle of Sheerness.

Q. You are an inn-keeper ? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in possession of a brown gelding? - A. I was in possession of a bay gelding prior to the 27th of July, 1803.

Q. Where did you keep him? - A. At Langley, near Maidstone ; I was at Chelsea at the time that the horse was stolen; my father-in-law wrote to me that the horse was stolen.

Q. Who had the horse? - A. My father-in-law, Tilby.

Q. How did he keep it, in the field or stable? - A. Sometimes in the field, and sometimes in the stable.

Q. When you returned into Kent you found your gelding gone? - A. Prior to my return, I had five hundred hand-bills printed at Canterbury, and distributed during the race business, I had it advertised in the Kentish Gazette, and in the Maidstone Journal, and in the Hue and Cry; on the 13th of January, 1804, I saw this horse again at Chelsea, as the Chelsea stage came up to me, he was the off horse in the Chelsea stage.

Q. You in consequence of that applied to Mr. Maslin, the owner? - A. I found the horse on the 13th of January, 1804; I went before the Magistrate and swore the horse to be my property, and in consequence of that the horse was restored to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had a brother at Chelsea that kept a public-house there? - A. He did in January, 1803.

Q. Before you lost your horse, in consequence of your executorship, you had often occasion to go to Chelsea? - A. Yes, that called me to Chelsea.

Q. How often have you been at Chelsea? - A. I cannot say; I have been there as much as five and six weeks at a time; I had never seen the horse before that day.

WILLIAM TILBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live at Langley.

Q. Upon the prosecutor's farm, at Langley? - A. Yes, near Maidstone.

Q. Had Mr. Ellis a horse in July 1803, and what kind of a horse? - A. He had a bay gelding, he was a bay horse with a broken knee, and blind in one eye.

Q. When did you see that horse last? - A. On the 27th of July last.

Q. Did you go into the field for him the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find him there? - A. No; he was missing.

Q. Have you seen this horse since at any time? - A. I have seen him to-day.

Q. It is the same horse, is it? - A. Yes, it is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. So the horse was blind in one eye, and had a broken knee? - A. Yes.

JOHN ELLIS , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you are son to Mr. Ellis the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you reside, Mr. Ellis? - A. At Langley.

Q. When did you see the horse? - A. In July, 1803, I saw him the day before he was lost; I cannot recollect the day of the month; it was missing in the morning.

Q. Did you make any inquiry about him in the neighbourhood? - A. Yes, I went about after him in the neighbourhood.

Q. I believe he had very good legs, and had a very fast trot? - A. Yes.

JOHN MASLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. I believe you are a coach-master at Chelsea? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of something that passed between one of your servants and the prosecutor, he made a claim of a gelding that you had? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you state to the Court how you came in possession of that gelding? - A. Mr. White, who keeps the White Horse inn at Chelsea, informed me that there was a brown gelding for sale, in the possession of Mr. Salmon, for trial.

Court. It is a brown gelding in the indictment, and the other witness has stated it to be a bay gelding.

Mr. Bolland. Q. The horse is a very old horse? A. Yes; I purchased the horse of the prisoner at the bar on the 5th of August, 1803.

Q. Are you sure that you purchased it of the prisoner? - A. I am sure of it, I paid him the money myself, and had a receipt from him.

Q. Look at that receipt? - A. That is the receipt.

Q. What did the prisoner state to you when you purchased the horse? - A. He gave it a good character; he said it belonged to a person in the country, a friend of his, who was in the smuggling line, and the poor man was so unlucky, he was turned up. The same horse was sent to me for sale, which Mr. Salmon had on trial; it would

not suit him, he thought it would not be heavy enough for him in winter; the horse was sent down to my stable, and I agreed with Mr. Morgan for the horse.

Q. What did you give him for it? - A. Seven guineas, and he gave me the receipt; I did not see him write it, he gave it me out of his own hand. After that I set the horse to work once a day; he never went into any other hands after I had him; I put him regularly to work, day after day, till owned by Mr. Ellis on the 13th of January, 1804.

Q. Are you sure that that is the same horse that you bought of the prisoner? - A. I am sure it is the same horse.

Q. I believe the prisoner was afterwards taken up, and you appeared about this horse? - A. Yes, at Worship-street.

Q. You stated there what you have stated today? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There was a man of the name of Salmon that had this horse - whose horse did he state it to be? - A. The prisoner's.

Q. For sale; and the prisoner said he had it from a man that was turned up - The man that he bought it of was a man that was sent on board the hulks, did he not tell you so? - A. No, he did not say that, nothing of that passed.

Q. This horse you worked from the time you got him to the time the owner owned him, half a dozen times a day, as business required? - A. No, only once a day.

Q. He was always exposed on the road? - A. Always.

Q. There was no concealment of him? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - A. I never knew him till he owned the horse.

Q. The horse was worked publicly in the road while you had him, so as to be seen by any body that passed? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to tell me that a brown horse is a bay horse? - A. There is a very little difference between a dark bay and a brown horse.

Q. Is not a brown horse different from a bay horse? - A. A brown horse is merely similar to a dark bay.

Q. You would not call a brown horse a bay? - A. It is a dark bay, and nearly brown.

Q. You know more about horses than I do, what do you call it? - A. I call it a dark bay horse, and another person might call it a brown horse.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Do not horses change their colour very much? - A. Yes, this is a very old horse.

Court. Q. A dark bay and a brown are of very little difference, one person might call it a dark bay, and another person a brown horse.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You apprehended the prisoner - do you know Mr. Yardley's hand-writing, the chief clerk at the Office? (shewing the witness a paper) - A. This is Mr. Chamber's writing, and Mr. Yardley's is underneath.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That is not evidence - you were at Bow-street, and Messrs. Dallat's attorney attended there to manage the business? - A. I never saw that gentleman before at any Public-office, I do not know him.

Court. (To Maslin.) Q. You are sure that the horse that you purchased of the prisoner is the same horse that the prosecutor claimed? - A. Yes, I am.

Prisoner's defence. This horse, when I bought him, was a bright bay, and full of saddle-marks, and from a blow on the off eye he had got the skin quite over the off eye; I do not know whether he is quite blind, he has been grazed on one knee, and there is a knot on it.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say that the horse was a broken knee'd horse? - A. When I sold him to Mr. Maslin, I do not say it was a broken knee then; the hair was only a little rubbed off.

Maslin. I did not perceive that any was rubbed off when I bought him first.

Court. (To Maslin:) Q. You do not call him a broken knee'd horse, unless the skin is broken? - A. No.

Prisoner. I had this horse; I was employed by Dallats' people to get a horse for a poor relation of theirs that wanted one to go in an errand cart, that used to go to the fishmongers at Billingsgate to Chelsea. The first time I saw this horse was in a cart, and the name of Rickets was on the cart; I wanted to deal with the man for the horse, and the man would not sell me the horse at that time; I looked at the horse a good while, and we were joking with the man a good while, seeing the white marks down his withers; the man said he was a good old servant, and a better horse there never was. I saw the horse afterwards two or three times, more or less; I saw the horse, I suppose, for a fortnight or three weeks after that; the man came to me one day, and said he had met with a misfortune; the words were never expressed by me as Mr. Maslin has said; he says that I said he was seized upon by smuggling; he asked me if my friends were suited, and I said they were not; he brought the horse the next day to me at eleven o'clock, and I took it over to Mr. Dallat's, and they told me they did not want it, - they had either furnished themselves with a horse, or a friend had. I was in the habit of going to Mr. White, and I was telling him that I had such a horse, and that I was disappointed with the person that wanted it, and that I must take it to Smithfield; he said to me, Mrs. Salmon wants a horse to go in her cart;

I said, it would suit her very well; he then said he was going out to-morrow, and he would inform her; I was to give six pounds six shillings for the horse to the man; he said to me, make what you can, I don't care so as I have my own money; I wanted to part with the horse, he had eat near a truss of hay; Mr. White informed Mrs. Salmon of it; and the first time I saw the horse after that was in Mrs. Salmon's cart; we could not agree about the price, and Mr. White said she should not have it; I did not see the horse again till I saw it in Mr. Maslin's stage; Mr. White went up to Mr. Maslin to know if he liked the horse, and the answer was that he liked it. I was one night at Mr. Knight's, and Mr. Maslin was there; he said, Morgan, I may as well pay you for that horse; I said, if you please: he asked me into the parlour, I do not think there was any body present but Mr. White; Mr. White said we should spend a shilling a piece, or half a crown, and Mr. Maslin paid me seven guineas for the horse.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 41.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-16

447. MARTHA BURNHAM was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Brown , Mary Brooks , and Elizabeth Brooks , and some other persons being therein, about the hour of seven in the afternoon, on the 5th of June , and feloniously stealing therein, two gowns, value 9 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a shift, value 3 s. three half handkerchiefs, value 1 s 6 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a shawl, value 4 s. a table-cloth, value 2 s. two pillow-cases, value 1 s. two caps, value 2 s. a sheet, value 2 s. half a yard of cotton, value 6 d. two aprons, value 4 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a counterpane, value 12 s. and a shirt, value 2 s. the property of William Brown .

SARAH BROWN sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes; my husband's name is William Brown , he is a sea-faring man , he has been at sea two years last May; I live at No. 19, Well-street, in the parish of Whitechapel ; Mrs. Brooks is the landlady of the house, she lives there.

Q. Did you go to Guy's hospital to attend any sister there? - A. Yes, I went there almost every day.

Q. Do you remember going to her on some Saturday, and not coming home till the Wednesday following? - A. Yes, that was on Wednesday, the 5th of June that I came from there to my lodging, I had been attending my sister, I went to Guy's hospital on the Saturday preceding the Wednesday.

Q. When you went to Guy's hospital, in what state did you leave your room? - A. I locked the door, and I had a padlock on the door also, and I locked the padlock too, and I took the keys in my pocket.

Q. On your return in what state did you find your room? - A. When I came home on the Wednesday following the Saturday I went, I came home to get some clean linen for my sister; and when I came into the house, Mrs. Brooks told me my door had been broken open; when I went up stairs, my room door was wide open, the padlock was lying down by the side of the door.

Q. How did it appear to have been opened? - A. I thought it had the appearance as if it had been opened by another key, there was no appearance of violence at all about it as I could see.

Q. What did you miss when you went into your room? - A. I had a chest standing by the fireplace, and the lid of the chest stood wide open against the wainscot; I missed all the articles in the indictment, they were all in the chest when I went to the hospital, excepting the counterpane, a shirt, a shift, and two caps, the counterpane was on the bed and the bedstead was turned up; the shirt and shift were hanging on the bedstead.

Q. Did you ever recover any of these things? - A. One cloth white apron that I left on the chair when I went out, that is the only thing that I have recovered.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar live in the house? - A. Yes, in the two pair of stairs back-room, I live in the one pair back-room.

THOMAS HUBBARD sworn. - I am headborough of the precinct of Wellclose-square.

Q. Did you at any time take the prisoner at the bar into your charge? - A. Yes, on the 5th of June, I took her into custody in her own apartment.

Q. Did you search her at the time, to see whether she had any thing about her, to know if she had stole these things from the prosecutrix? - A. Yes, I found this one duplicate in her pocket amongst other duplicates; I tried the key of her padlock and it opened it; the duplicate is for a white apron, pledged at Mrs. Gibson's; the other duplicates were not for the prosecutrix's property.

ELIZABETH GIBSON sworn. - I live at No. 80, East-Smithfield, I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; she pledged with me a white apron for a shilling, in the name of Mary Solomon , on the 5th of June last. I produce the apron. (The apron identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up this white apron on the stairs, I carried it to Mrs. Gibson's and pawned it for a shilling; I never touched that woman's things, nor ever was in her room I declare to God; and as God is my Judge and Saviour this moment, I had only this apron, and being distressed

I pawned it for a shilling, as I wanted a breakfast.

GUILTY, aged 54,

Of stealing the apron only .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-17

448. MARY LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a cloak, value 1 l. a gown, value 12 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. two shawls, value 4 s. three aprons, value 4 s. four handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a table-cloth, value 1 s. a piece of white lace, value 2 s. two hat-bands, value 7 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a pair of pillow-cases, value 1 s. 6 d. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. a lace cap, value 3 s. and a dimity petticoat, value 10 s. the property of William Cantell .

WILLIAM CANTELL sworn. - I live at the corner of Little Green-street, Kentish-town , I am a carpenter ; my wife being dead, I hired the prisoner at two shillings a week; I gave her, while she was with me, half a crown a week, as I thought two shillings was too little.

Q. When did you hire her? - A. I believe it is about six or seven weeks back; I knew nothing of the robbery till Friday the 28th of June.

Q. How did you find out the robbery? - A. I was very ill in bed, and did not get up from the 17th to the 28th; I was forced to keep my bed eleven days; on the 28th my daughter came up to me, and said, father, I am sorry to see you so bad; says she, you want some clean sheets; I said, you will find some in the drawer; on her searching, she found that every drawer besides one, and every box in the room, there were some things gone out of; I had seen my things in my boxes and in my drawers before the 17th.

Q. Where were your drawers, in your bedroom? - A. No, in a private room where my wife died; I always keep the keys under my pillow; while I was so ill, I lost my senses, and I could not tell what became of the keys; I did not suffer any one to go into that room.

Q. While you were ill, you were light-headed? - A. I used to have one or two fits of a day, but, thank God, I have not had any for this fortnight; I was not able to get up on the Friday, but on the Monday following I got up, and went and got two search-warrants to search two houses, and the first house that was searched they found more than one half of the things that were stolen; on Tuesday they searched the other house, and found what they could not find in the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long is it since your wife died? - A. She died on the 3d of March, five minutes before five o'clock in the morning.

Q. Had you been acquainted with the prisoner before the decease of your wife? - A. She never slept in my house, she only came backwards and forwards as a chair-woman.

Q. Did not you intrust the prisoner with the keys? - A. I would not trust even my own daughter with them.

Q. I am sorry you should have suspicion of your own daughter - in point of fact, the question is whether you intrusted the keys with the prisoner? - A. I never missed the keys.

Q. I ask you whether you ever intrusted her with the keys? - A. Never in my life, nor no person in the world.

Q. Perhaps you gave your wife leave to dispose of her property? - A. No, I mean to keep it as long as I live, except I want to make away with it.

Q. It had not been given to your daughter? - - A. No; I gave her my wife's wedding-ring, and what she died in; I would not trust my daughter with the keys, except somebody went with her.

ELIZABETH HARTLEY sworn. - Q. You are daughter to William Cantell , you are married? - Yes; my husband's name is Richard Hartley : On the 28th of June, I went to my father, I went to look out the sheets, and I missed them.

Q. Had you been there between the 17th and the 28th? - A. I had been there on the Monday before, I went to get the sheets; I told my father I could not find them; he said, look further; I looked further, and then I missed a gown; I went into this back room where my mother died, and found all these articles gone; they were taken out of the drawers and out of two boxes.

Q. Had you been in there before since your mother died? - A. Yes, I had been in on the Monday evening; my father sent me in to get my mother's ring; I took it out, I only opened one drawer.

Q. Who gave you then the keys of the room? - A. My father.

Q. And you returned them to him? - A. Yes; on the Monday following, the 1st of July, my father and I went to Bow-street to get two search-warrants, because there were two houses, the daughter of the prisoner lived in one, and the prisoner lived in the other.

Q. Where were these houses? - A. One is in Little Green-street, the son and daughter lived there, and the other is in College-lane (they are both in Kentish-town,) the mother lived there.

Q. Tell us what you found first at Little Green-street? - A. I went in company with Mr. Blackman and Doyle; I found there a pair of pillowcases and an apron, they are all here.

Q. You did not live with your father? - A. No; there is his apprentice lives with him, he has no lodgers.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: On the 1st of July,

I went to execute two search-warrants in company with Doyle, first to No. 4, Little Green-street, Kentish-town, and there I saw the prisoner at the bar; I told her I came upon a disagreeable circumstance to search her house to find some property of Mr. Cantell's; she said, very well. In the house I found two pillow-cases, and a white apron; her daughter came in, and I told Doyle to stop her, as she wanted to go out of the house, till I had searched the house all through; Mrs. Hartley could not swear to the pillow-cases, the marks being taken out; then I said, I shall by no means take them; I said to the mother and daughter, you have got another house.

Q. What did you do with the pillow-case? - A. I left them and the apron, because she could not positively swear to them; then the prisoner at the bar, Mrs. Hartley, I, and Doyle, went to her house in College-lane; I followed them up stairs, and the prisoner at the bar and Mrs. Hartley went into a back room; I heard the prisoner, as I stood and listened at the door, desire Mrs. Hartley to shut the door, and not to let me in, and she would give up the property; I forced myself into the room; she was then taking the property out of a cupboard on the left hand going into the room, and I took it out of her hand. I produce a tablecloth, a white silk hat-band, a piece of lace, and a pair of sheets, that is what I took out of her hand; I took her into custody, and took her to Bow-street. Sir Richard Ford desired me to keep her in the watch-house till I could find the rest of the property; I went the next morning to No. 4, Green-street, and there I took the two pillow-cases which I had left, and one pair of stockings and a shift; I found that the next morning; here is some more of the property which the prisoner's daughter returned to Mr. Cantell the next day - a cap, a pocket, two pair of stockings, and a handkerchief; he produced them to me the next morning. (The property identified by Mrs. Hartley.)

Q. (To the prosecutor.) What may be the value of these things? - A. Between three and four pounds.

Mr. Alley. Q. The house is your own, you pay the rent and taxes? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Cantell gave me all these things out of his own hands from his drawers.

Court. Q. We will ask him that question - Cantell, did you give her all these things? - A. Never, as true as God is in heaven; I never gave her any more than paid her for her labour, I did not know that they were gone till I missed them.

GUILTY, aged 53,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-18

449. MARTHA LUKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a frock, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a spelling-book, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Lockyer .

ELIZABETH LOCKYER sworn. - Q. What is your husband's name? - A. Thomas Lockyer , he is a coachman to George Sohan , Esq. I sent my little girl to school on the 21st of June, about half past nine in the morning; I sent her to school in Pitt-street, I live in Upper Gower-mews.

Q. What age is she? - A. She is about five years and a half old.

Q. You sent your child to school? - A. Yes; she was found in the fields stripped, and brought home; she went from me about half past nine, and was brought home at near twelve o'clock; she was stripped of her frock, handkerchief, and spelling-book.

Q. (To Mary Lockyer , the child.) You go to school, do you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how old you are? - A. Five years and a half.

Q. You cannot read? - A. Yes, a little in the Testament.

Q. Have you learned your Catechism and Commandments? - A. Yes, I say them twice a week, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Q. Is it a good thing to tell a lie, or a bad one? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Suppose you were to tell a lie, what would your governess do to you? - A. She would whip me.

Q. It is a bad thing to tell a lie - do you know if you are sworn to call God to witness that you would speak the truth, and if you tell a lie you would not only be punished severely in this world, but if you were to die you would be punished severely in the next? - A. Yes.

MARY LOCKYER sworn. - Q. You have called God to witness that you will tell me nothing but what is true - if you tell me a lie you will be punished very severely in this world, and after you are dead you will be punished, do you understand me? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me how it happened - you were sent to school? - A. Yes, I went first with her to Chapel-street, and then she bought me some cherries, and she asked me to go with her for a walk all through Tottenham-court-road to the cow-field, and then she took off my things - this frock and handkerchief, and when she had done it, she went up a very high hill, and I never saw her any more.

Q. Look round, which is that woman? - A. That woman over there. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Q. Are you sure that is the woman? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - Q. I am an officer; the prisoner, having been described, was taken on the 21st of last month, about seven in the evening; I searched her, and found two children's

handkerchiefs, one on her neck, and the other wrapped about her arm; this handkerchief I produce was claimed by the prosecutrix. (The handkerchief identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. This pocket handkerchief I bought in Oxford-road, I gave two shillings and fourpence for it; I sold one half of it.

Q. Have you any witness to prove that? - A. There was no one with me when I bought the handkerchief; I came from Islington that afternoon, I was taken up in the evening.

Q. You have somebody to prove that? - A. No, I cannot say I have any body to prove that; I was with no one person at all; I was going to Newington, but I was robbed, so I returned.

ELIZABETH HILLIER sworn. - I keep a mangle, No. 29, York-street, Commercial-road, Mile-end Old-town; I lived with the prisoner four years, twelve years ago, at Mr. Packer's, one of the partners in Gifford's brewhouse; she has had two children, and she and her husband have parted, but I cannot tell the reason why they parted; the first child died; she brought one child away before they parted on the Sunday, and on the Monday week he took the other away; he would not permit her to see the child, and through trouble she took to drinking, and when she had money she would get liquor, and then she does not know what she is about; she had been at Islington four months at Mrs. M'Kenzie's; her husband paid seven shillings a week to farm her there; I never knew any thing dishonest by her, I was the person that wished her to be confined.

GUILTY.

The Jury-recommended her to mercy, on account of her good character .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-19

450. MARTHA LUKE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a frock, value 5 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Crow .

- CROW sworn. - My husband is a coachman , he lives with Mrs. Lang, Upper Gower-street; I live in Upper Cheney-mews.

Q. What age is your child? - A. Three years; I sent her to school with the other girl, little Lockyer; she was to take care of her; she was brought home to me a little before twelve o'clock, stripped of her frock and handkerchief; the handkerchief was found on the prisoner, with the other girl's handkerchief, the same evening.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - This handkerchief I found on her neck, it was claimed by Mrs. Crow; I produce the handkerchief. (The handkerchief identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY .

Whipped in jail , and ordered to be confined .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-20

451. MARTHA LUKE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a frock, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. a skirt, value 6 d. and a pair of shoes, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Woodford .

It appearing in evidence, that the prisoner had only got two or three doors with the child from the prosecutor's house, when the mother of the child took her away from her, and the person that saw her decoy the child, not appearing in Court, and the prisoner not having stripped the child of any of its cloaths, she was from this charge

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-21

452. MARY PARNELL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 9th of March , a certain Bank of England note, value 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count, For feloniously uttering, disposing of, and putting away a like forged note, with like intention.

And several other Counts of like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet; and the case was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are journeyman to Mr. Charles Baddeley , a shoemaker, residing at No. 86, in the Strand? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on Saturday, the 9th of March last, seeing the prisoner at the bar? - A. I cannot recollect the prisoner exactly.

Q. Do you recollect the day? - A. Yes, on the 9th of March, Saturday evening, about half past nine, a woman came to buy two pair of shoes; I served her with the shoes; she said, she had nothing less than a five pound note.

Q. What were the shoes to come to? - A. Twelve shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did she produce to you a five pound Banknote? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with that Bank-note that she tendered to you? - A. I took it into the parlour where Mr. Baddeley was; Mr. Baddeley told me to go back to the woman in the shop who had brought me the note, to desire her to write her name upon it; she said, she could not write.

Q. Upon that what did you do with the note? - A. On receiving that answer, I took it back into the parlour to Mr. Baddeley.

Q. Did Mr. Baddeley and you return back into the shop? - A. He looked at the note and compared it with another.

Q. Then Mr. Baddeley came to the prisoner and you with him? - A. Yes; he asked her where she took that note; she said, she could not tell.

Q. What then? - A. Mr. Baddeley told her,

he did not think it was a good note; then she gave him another which was a good one.

Q. What did he do with the note that she first gave to you? - A. He kept that in his hands.

Q. Upon the other being tendered by the woman what then? - A. He returned that, the good one, and with respect to the bad one, he said he should keep that.

Q. Take that Bank-note in your hand and tell whether that is the note? - A. It is the note.

Q. Are you quite sure of that? - A. Yes, I am quite certain of it.

Q. You know it to be the note that you received? - A. I wrote the name upon it.

Q. That is all you know, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her afterwards at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you write the name upon it? - A. When she stood in the shop.

Q. Upon Mr. Baddeley saying that he should keep that note, the bad one, what was said more to the woman? - A. He told her, he would enquire if it was a good one, and for her to call again on Monday, and for me to write my name upon it, that we might know it was the same.

Q. Did she come again on Monday morning. -

Court. Q. She was to come again on Monday to have the note? - A Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. She never did call on Monday? - A. No, not at all.

Q. Did you observe any thing during the time that she was in the shop - Did you observe any thing with respect to the manner of her conduct? - A. She was very joking, and seemed as if she was rather in liquor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have said very honestly you do not know the prisoner? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What do you think? - A. I believe it is her, I will not swear it.

CHARLES BADDELEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a shoe-maker living in the Strand? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the last witness Smith, the journeyman, bringing you a Bank-note, on the 9th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that Bank-note - Is that the Banknote that was brought to you by Smith? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go into your shop, and see any woman in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Look round to the prisoner at the bar, and tell my Lord and the Jury whether that is the woman? - A. I have no doubt at all about it.

Q. When you came into the shop did you keep possession of that Bank-note? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any particular reasons that caused you to be more positive to speak to the identity of the prisoner, from any thing that had happened to any part of her? - A. Her hand; I saw as she held her pocket-book in it, had one of her fingers cut across, I saw it as she opened the pocketbook.

Court. Q. It was not cut by opening of it? - A. No, it was an old sore.

Mr. Knapp. Q. She took this other Bank-note out of her pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon her taking the other Bank-note out of her pocket-book, which was a good one, you looked at it? - A. Yes, I thought it was a good one.

Q. Upon the tendering of the good Bank-note, did you give her the good one back again? - A. Yes, I told her, I would keep the bad one and take it to Bow-street or the Bank, on Monday morning.

Q. Did you desire her to come again on Monday morning? - A. I only told her, she should have either the note or the change on Monday morning when I got the answer.

Q. Did she come on the Monday morning? - A. She did not.

Q. Did you ever see her again till you saw her at Bow-street? - A. No.

Q. At Bow-street when you did see her again, did you observe the cut on her finger which you have described? - A. I did.

Q. How soon after she was at your shop was it that you saw her at Bow-street? - A. I cannot say; it was when I was sent for by Mr. Bliss, about a month or two after she had been at the shop.

Q. You observed at Bow-street that cut in her finger which you have described? - A. I did.

Q. When she was desired to stand up, had you any doubt from that circumstance or from the whole appearance of her that she was the person that came to your shop? - A. No doubt, not any doubt at all.

Court. Q. No doubt then? - A. I had no doubt.

Mr. Knapp. Q. After you saw the cut on the finger, was it from that cut that you were positive it was the prisoner? - A. I knew her face, I had observed her features.

Q. The whole of her person and features satisfied you that she was the same person, and removed all doubt if ever you had any? - A. I had not the least doubt.

Q. Did you desire the last witness, Smith, to put his name on the back of that note? - A. I did.

Q. I think I shewed you the note(the note handed to the witness)? - A. That is the note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was in the early part of March that the woman was in your shop? - A. It was on the 9th.

Q. You have said it was about two months after that you saw her at Bow-street? - A. I cannot rightly tell you.

Q. Then I can tell you, it was on the 7th of June, that is three months after the time that you say a person came into your shop; she was then in custody; you say you had been always positive about her - did not you express some doubt at Bow-street, which induced the Magistrate to point out the hand to you? - A. I was going to tell Mr. Carpmeal I knew her by her face and by the cut on her finger, and when I came out I had the additional evidence there was a cut on her finger.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Should you have had a doubt if you had not seen the finger? - A. Not any.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are also a journeyman to Mr. Baddeley? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being at Mr. Baddeley's house on Saturday, the 9th of March? - A. I do, very well.

Q. Look round and tell us which is the person that produced a note at Mr. Baddeley's? - A. (Pointing to the prisoner.) That is the person that Mr. Baddeley accused of the note.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Have you any doubt of her person? - A. None at all.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was that note shewn to you and you put your name upon it? - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that she was the person? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. She had been a stranger to you, you had never known her before? - A. Yes, she was a stranger.

Q. How long might you be in the shop? - A. I was in the shop about three or four minutes

Q. When did you see her again? - A. When I saw her at Bow-street.

Q. That was three months afterwards, you had never seen her before that time, and yet you take upon you to swear to her person? - A. I would not do it unless it was just.

Court. Q. Were you at your master's shop on the Monday following? - A. No, I was not.

Q. Whether the prisoner called on the Monday you do not know? - A. No, I do not.

Q. What persons were in the shop at the time you were there? - A. There was nobody in the shop but the prisoner, me, Mr. Smith, Mr. Baddeley, and an apprentice, I suppose it is.

WILLIAM WILMOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You are a foreman to Mr. Baggett, shoe-maker, No. 7, Cranbourn-alley, Leicester-fields? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a woman coming to your master's shop in the month of March? - A. Yes.

Q. What day of the month was it? - A. On the 9th of March, about eleven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Have you any recollection of the person who came to your master's shop - Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, to me much like that person but in one circumstance, she seemed then to have been painted or to have a colour arising from being intoxicated with liquor.

Q. Are you able to say that she is the person that came to your master's shop? - A. No further than I have related to you.

Court. Q. You cannot be positive? - A. No; she resembles every way else.

Mr. Bosanquet. Q. What did she ask for? - A. Two pair of shoes, one pair of double soles, and one pair of single.

Q. Did you serve her with them? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the price? - A. Eleven shillings and sixpence; she tendered me a five pound Bank of England note, it had no name whatever on it, it was quite new.

Q. Did she take this note from her pocketbook, or from her pocket? - A. She drew it from a little red pocket-book; she seemed to be confused while she was doing this, and she appeared to have more notes in the pocket-book.

Q. Were you able to give her change? - A. No, Mr. Baggett was not in at the time, after the till was searched we found there was not change enough; I went to Mr. Perkins's, a linen-draper, next door, they being shut up, I knocked at the door and asked for change.

Q. Was the note ever out of your possession before you delivered it to Mr. Perkins? - A. No, it was not.

Q. Did you get the change of him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give the change to the prisoner? - A. No, Mr. Baggett had come in, I gave it to him and he gave the prisoner the change.

Q. She took the change and the shoes and went away? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. That person had a very high complexion, whether it was from paint or heat you cannot tell? - A. No.

Q. She had a very high complexion? - A. Yes.

Q. The 9th of March was on Saturday? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe Saturday evening is the busiest evening in the week with you is it not? - A. Not at that hour.

Q. You had other customers in the shop? - A. Yes, there was.

Q. How many persons serving in the shop besides yourself? - A. There was Mrs. Baggett and me.

Q. Your attention was taken up with other customers at that time? - A. No, Mr. Baggett came in at the time and told me to go and get change.

WILLIAM PERKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You are a linen-draper, and live next door to Mr. Baggett? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving a five-pound

Bank-note from the last witness on the 9th of March last? - A. Very well.

Q. Will you be so good as to look at this note and see whether that is it? - A. Yes, that is the note that I received, I wrote the name of Baggett on it and my own initials.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose that note has been out of your possession? - A. Yes, it has.

Q. Did you put any date on it? - A. No, I did not.

Q. I suppose you have received many five-pound notes from Mr. Baggett's house? - A. Yes, in the course of a few days I saw it again.

Q. You had parted with that note? - A. Yes.

Q. Between the time that you received that note, and the time you saw it again, had you received no other five pound note? - A. I did not receive one.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. - I am a Bow-street patrol: I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found this pair of shoes, I shewed them to Wilmot, he said they were the shoes that he sold to the prisoner.

Court. Q. How do you know that these lodgings that you searched, were the prisoner's? - A. It was where she was apprehended.

Q. Did you speak to the prisoner about those shoes? - A. No, I never did speak to her about them.

Q. Has the prisoner at the bar seen them since? - A. Yes, she says, they are her own.

Q. (To Wilmott.) Look at these shoes, do you know that these shoes were sold out of your master's shop? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. These shoes have been a deal worn? - A. Yes; there is a mark always upon Mr. Baggett's shoes; I cannot pretend to say whether these are the same shoes that the woman bought, they are of the same size and description that I sold the person; they are of the same description every way, one pair was double soles, and these are double soles.

ANN LEVERMORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Tell us where you live, you keep a public-house? - A. I keep the Pewter Platter, St. John-street, West-Smithfield.

Q. Look at that young woman at the bar, do you know her? - A. Yes.

Q. In March, I think it was when she came to your house? - A. It was either on the 20th, the 22nd, or the 23d of March.

Court. Q. Had you known her before? - A. No.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What time in the evening was it when she came? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. What did she want at your house? - A. A quart of brandy.

Q. You served her with the quart of brandy? - A. I did.

Q. Did she pay for it, and how much was it to be? - A. She asked the price of it, and then I told her six shillings.

Q. What passed then? - A. I went into the cellar to draw it to get her the best, she said if she liked it she would become a customer; I gave her the brandy; she said she had nothing smaller than a five-pound note.

Q. Did she tender or give you a five-pound note? - A. She gave me a five-pound note out of her own pocket-book.

Q. What did you do with this five-pound note? - A. I examined the note and thought it to be a good one, and accordingly I went up stairs to get her change.

Q. Did you bring down the change? - A. I did.

Q. Did you leave the note behind you up stairs? - A. I did.

Q. You brought down the change, and I suppose you gave it to her? - A. I did.

Court. Q. How did you leave the note? - A. In a box up stairs.

Q. Open or locked up? - A. Locked up.

Q. You had no more notes in that box? - A. Never a five-pound note except that one.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You locked up the note yourself, did you bring the key away with you? - A. I did; I gave her the change; and she asked me the price of the bottle; I told her three pence.

Q. What took place then? - A. She told me to take sixpence for the bottle; I asked her if I should send it home for her, she said, no; she only lived in Old-street; a friend of mine who was sitting in the bar, saw her very much agitated.

Q. Something or or other induced you to look at the note? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you went up stairs again to look at the note? - A. Yes.

Q. Now be so good as to look over this note and see if there is any mark on it that you know it by? - A. This is the note; I left the note up stairs in the box.

Q. When did you part with it out of your possession? - A. I gave it to Mr. Harris, the collecter of Mr. Hanbury, the brewer.

Q. The man to whom you paid this note, he happening to be a quaker, therefore we cannot call him here, a quaker will not swear - You know very well this is the note? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have not written any thing on the note to know it by? - A. No, I know it by the four on the note and the eight, and the paleness of the Britannia.

Mr. Fielding. If your Lordship will have the goodness to look at the note, she speaks of a particular four and eight and of the paleness of the Britannia.

Mr. Alley. (To the witness.) Q. Tell my Lord what four? - A. The four and the eight are the particular marks that I noticed, and the pale Britannia.

Court. Q. What do you particularly allude to in the four? - A. The four being particularly large.

Q. Do you mean all of them? - A. No, the four and eight being particularly large.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You were speaking of another circumstance, of the Britannia being pale, and the four and eight being large; these are the two circumstances that you noticed, by which you know this is the same note? - A. I know it is the same note.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean this four and eight? (shewing the note to the witness.) - A. Yes, I took particular notice of this four and eight.

Q. You mean to swear to it? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it in your possession? - A. I took it on Tuesday night, and paid it away on Wednesday.

Q. How long afterwards was it before you saw the note that is now produced here? - A. The Monday following.

Court. Q. You observed the paleness of the Britannia, and the four and the eight endorsed on the back of the note - nothing but that you took notice of? - A. Yes, it was.

Mr. Alley. Q. The note you got from the woman you paid to a quaker? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you cannot write? - A. I cannot.

Q. You did not make any mark on it? - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Fielding. The force of my evidence is to shew, that when she saw the note, she knew it to be the note that she received from the prisoner.

Mr. Alley. (To the witness.) Q. This note came to you from the Bank of England? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Who is the person that was with you? - A. Elizabeth Walter .

ELIZABETH WALTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Were you at the house of Mrs. Levermore on the night that she has mentioned? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the person? - A. That is the very same person.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take particular notice of her at the time? - A. I did.

Q. Now will you have the goodness to tell what you observed of her when she came into the shop where Mrs. Levermore was? - A. While Mrs. Levermore was gone to get the change for the five-pound note, I observed the prisoner was very much agitated.

Q. You made that observation? - A. Yes; and when the prisoner was going out, I desired her to send her little girl out to watch where she went to, I was afraid it was a bad one.

Q. You observed her agitation, and you had no doubt it was a bad one? - A. No doubt at all; I saw her take the five-pound note, and give it to Mrs. Levermore, and I saw Mrs. Levermore give her the change.

Q. The whole and the substance of your observation was to get Mrs. Levermore to have her watched? - A. Yes.

JAMES COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. (This is another note, my Lord.) Q. You are an apothecary residing in Bridge-road, Surry - Do you remember in the middle of April seeing the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. In your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What did she come to purchase there? - A. A bottle of Gowland's lotion.

Q. What was the price of the lotion? - A. Eight shillings and sixpence.

Q. How did she attempt to pay for it? - A. She offered a five-pound note.

Q. A Bank-note? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do upon her offering you that note? - A. I observed to her that I was not able to give change.

Q. Upon which, you not having change, did you give any directions to your boy? - A. I directed Robert Goodyer to go, giving him the note, and telling him to get change.

Q. And he went for the purpose of getting change - During the time that the boy was gone, was there any thing that struck you, with respect to the conduct of the prisoner? - A. Yes, she appeared agitated.

Q. Did she say any thing? - A. She seemed anxious for the boy's return, and wished to get out to see where he was gone; she was afraid the boy had lost the note.

Court. Q. How long had the boy been out that time? - A. About five or ten minutes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. When the boy returned, did he bring you any change? - A. Yes, I think that she took the change herself.

Q. He gave her the remainder of the change of the five-pound note? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe her gown that she had on? - A. Yes.

Q. Describe what sort of a gown it was? - A It was a white gown, and a chocolate coloured spot; I believe it is called a white ground, and a chocolate spot.

Q. Have you seen any gown since that Crocker, the officer, shewed to you - did you look at that which was produced by him? - A. Yes.

ROBERT GOODYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Twelve, next October.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Some of it.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing to tell a lie, or not? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Do you know where those people go to if they tell a lie? - A. They never go to God Almighty.

Q. You are a shop-boy to Mr. Cook, an apothecary? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving in the middle of April a Bank-note from him to get it changed? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You can read? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. To whom did you go with that Bank-note to get change? - A. I was sent next door; the next door was shut up, and I went to Mr. Gower.

Q. He keeps the Red Lion, in Globe-place? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get change there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you bring the change back to Mr. Cook? - A. I brought the change back, and laid it on the counter.

Q. Was that note that your master gave you, that you parted with to Mr. Gower, ever out of your possession till you gave it to Mr. Gower? - A. No.

WILLIAM GOWER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. We have heard that you keep the Red-Lion, in Globe-place - do you remember receiving any note from the last witness, little Goodyer? - A. That little boy brought me a five-pound note to change.

Q. Did you put Mr. Cook's name on that note? - A. I endorsed his name upon it; I told the boy I would put his master's name upon it.

Q. He brought a note, and you told the boy that you should put Mr. Cook's name on it? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When? - A. Momentary, at the time.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at that note, and tell me whether that was the note? - A. It is the note.

Q. Are you quite sure of it? - A. I am positive of it.

Q. There appears to be in your hand-writing, Mr. Cook, Globe-place? - A. That I wrote in the boy's presence, and that is the very note.

Court. Q. Have you written on any other note that you received from Mr. Cook? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you ever cash any other five-pound note for him? - A. No.

MARY-ANN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Cook - were you present when the prisoner at the bar came into your husband's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Look round and point out the person? - A. That is the person. (Pointing to the prisoner.)

Court. Q. Mrs. Cook, how long was it afterwards before you saw her again? - A. I did not see her afterwards till she was brought to Bow-street.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the person? - A. I am sure that she is the person; I took particular notice of her, because she was some time in the shop; she waited there till the boy brought the change, I have no doubt in my own mind of her being the person.

Q. I believe you remarked a ring? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. I will not ask the question.

JOHN WILLATTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You live in the Poultry, you are a cutler? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a person coming to you on the 3d of May last, in the evening? - A. Yes, a woman.

Q. Look round, and tell us if you see the woman? - A. I believe the prisoner to be the woman.

Q. At what time of the evening was it when she came to you? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock, she came to purchase some knives; she purchased a dozen knives and forks, the price was three and thirty shillings.

Q. What did she offer in payment? - A. A five-pound note.

Q. Did you ask her name? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. What name did she give you? - A. Ann Brown , 67, Wood-street.

Q. Be so good as to look at this note, and see whether you can speak to that note, that it is the note that she gave you? - A. It is.

Q. Did you make that endorsement? - A. That is my writing.

Q. Was the place that she told you No. 37? - A. I wrote, Ann Brown , 37, Wood-street.

Q. Is that the name and the number of the place that she told you? - A. Yes; I said 67, instead of 37; that is my writing, and it is what she told me.

Court. Q. At the time she gave you the note? - A. Yes; she told me, and I wrote it at the time; that is the note she paid me.

Q. Can you speak to her being the person? - A. I can, I have no doubt but she is the person; I was on one side of the counter, and she was on the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The business was done in a short time? - A. I have no doubt of her being the person.

Q. Are you certain she was? - A. I swear that. Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Can you swear positive that it is her? - A. I can swear positive that it is her.

STEPHEN WALKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live at No. 37, Wood-street, Cheapside.

Q. Does any person of the name of Brown live there? - A. Not since I have lived there.

Q. How long have you lived there? - A. Two years.

Q. Does the prisoner at the bar lived there? - A. She does not.

Q. Neither did she on the 3d of May last? - A. She never did since I have lived there.

- BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an inspector of Bank-notes of the Bank of England? - A. I am.

Q. It is your duty to examine notes? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Tell me, now you are looking at that note, whether it is a genuine note or a forged note? - A. It is a forged note.

Court. Q. Which note are you looking at now? - A. At Baddeley's, the whole of it is forged; it is not from the Bank plate, it is not Bank paper, nor is it any writing of the clerks of the Bank of England.

Q. Is there any such entering clerk in the Bank of the name of Clare? - A. No, nor is there any person of the name of Hill that signs notes as cashier.

Q. You do not know whose hand-writing this name is? - A. I do not.

Q. The dates and figures, do you know the hand-writing of these? - A. No; the whole of them is a forgery. (The note read in Court.)

"No. 7609. No. 7609. - Bank, 1804. 545 Dec. - I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland , or bearer, the sum of five pounds, London, the same day of Dec. 1804, for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England." - Signed J. Hill - Entered T. B. Clare.

Court. In the abstract it is December, without any thing of the day of the month.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This is Bagget's after Baddeley's - look at that, Mr. Bliss, what do you say to that? - A. That is a forgery also.

Q. That appears to be a forgery of the same manufacture? - A. Exactly from the same plate.

Q. And the same filling up? - A. No, it is differently filled up, but with names that do not exist in the Bank as cashiers.

Court. Q. Is there any such an entering clerk? - A. We have no persons that sign notes with these names.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Now look at Mrs. Levermore's? - A. This is a forged note, and from the same plate, but of different names; we have no such name as Keene, as cashier in the Bank; it is from the same plate, and the entering name J. Burt, I know no such name.

Q. I am now giving you Mrs. Cook's, what do you say to that? - A. This is a forged note of the same texture, and a fac simile of the others, and from the same plate; it is like the other notes I saw before; we have no such entering clerks nor cashiers in the Bank.

Q. Now I shew the last to you, Mr. Willats's, what do you say to that - Is that one from the same plate, and of the same manufacture? - A. The whole of this is forged, and the cashier's name here is Hill, the same as one of the other's, and no such name as we have in the Bank; the whole of them are a forgery.

GARNET TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are engraver to the Bank? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Look at Baddeley's, the one in question - is that a genuine Bank-note of the Bank of England? - A. It is not, it is a forgery.

Q. It is from no Bank plate? - A. It is not, nor paper, nor ink, nor any part of the materials used for making or printing Bank-notes.

Q. Now first look at every one of them, and I will put a general question to you - having looked at them all now, and you have seen them before, are they a forgery, every one? - A. They are every one of them a forgery.

Q. That is, in plate, in paper, in figure, in ink, and every thing else? - A. Justly so; they are from the same plate, every one of them.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You are one of the Bow-street patrols? - A. I am.

Q. Did you search the prisoner's lodgings in company with Mr. Bliss? - A. Yes, I searched, in company with Mr. Bliss, the prisoner's lodgings, No. 9, Tower-street, Westminster-road; I found this gown there.

Q. Has the prisoner seen that gown since you found it? - A. She has, she acknowledged it to be her's; this bottle of lotion was in the cupboard; Mr. Bliss took it, and gave it to me; I produce them.

Q. (To Mr. Cook.) Is that the gown, and is that the bottle? - A. It is one like it, and such a gown as that the woman wore.

Court. Q. What you mean to say is, that the gown resembled that, it was such a sort of a gown? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. The same sort of lotion you sold to other people, you have no mark of your own on the bottle? - A. No.

Mr. Fielding. That is the case on the part of the prosecution.

Court. (To the prisoner.) You have heard the evidence that has been given against you; your Counsel can examine your witnesses if you have any; he cannot make any speech for you, therefore if you wish to say any thing you must say it yourself.

Prisoner's defence. I am a very remarkable person, it is very odd they cannot give a description of me; I have a particular cut on my hand, as well as on my finger; in the next place I have but one eye; that has not been observed by any of the witnesses, and as for the Gowland's lotion, a gentleman made me a present of it, and the shawl; I am an unfortunate girl.

GUILTY , Death , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-22

453. MARGARET BROFFEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , four yards of linen cloth, value 5 s. the property of Edward Aslewood .

HENRY THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Aslewood, linen-draper , Beauchamp-street, Brook's market ; two young women came in on the 7th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and asked for something for a lining for a gown; I shewed them what they asked for; they bid me less than I could afford to take; as the prisoner was going out of the shop, she put a parcel under her apron.

Q. You saw her? - A. I cannot say that I saw her; I missed the article, and immediately I missed it, I ran outside of the door, and asked her what she had got under her apron; she began to be rather sharp; I just lifted up the side of her apron, and there I saw this piece of black holland.

Q. Where was it? - A. On the left hand side of the shop near the door, placed upon another piece of goods.

Q. Are you sure it is your master's property? - A. I am sure it is.

Q. Has he any partner? - A. No.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I took the prisoner as she was running very fast down Brook's-street; I took her back to the shop; he said she was the person that had got away; I took her to Hatton-garden Office.

Q. (To Thomas.) I did not understand from you that she ran away? - A. I took down her name and direction; I cannot tell whether it is the real direction; I was persuaded so to do.

Q. You are very easily persuaded, are you sure that it is the woman? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. Are you sure that you took it from her? - A. I am sure of that.

Prisoner's defence. I am a poor girl, I work very hard for my living; I want to know whether he saw me take it.

Court. He did not say that he saw you take it; he says, you were rather cross with him, and when he lifted up your apron, he took it from you.

Prisoner. As I was coming out of his shop the tail of my gown caught hold of it, and I stooped to put it on the parcel where it fell from.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and the Jury, believing it to be her first offence .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-23

454. JAMES POWELL, alias JAMES SPARKES , was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street.

Q. Have you looked at the copy of conviction of this man? - A. I have; Vickery has got the copy.

- VICKERY sworn. - Q. You are an officer of Worship street? - A. I am.

Q. Have you a copy of conviction of a person of the name of James Powell , otherwise Sparkes? - A. I have; I had it from Harry Edgar , he is clerk of the Assizes for the county of Suffolk; he delivered it to me.

Q. Did you compare it with the record yourself? - A. Yes, I heard it read word for word the same, and I saw him sign it afterwards.

(The record read in Court.) Certifying that at the General Sessions of the Peace for the liberty of Bury St. Edmunds, in the county of Suffolk, on the 19th of March, in the 41st year of his Majesty's reign, the prisoner, James Powell , was in due form of law tried, and was convicted, before Sir Nash Grose , Knt. of one sheep, value 30 s. feloniously stealing and taking away, and thereupon received sentence of death; and that he afterwards, pursuant to his Majesty's pleasure, by one of his Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, was ordered to be transported to the eastern coast of New South Wales for and during the term of his natural life. - Signed 13th June, 1805; Harry Edgar , clerk of the Assizes of the county of Suffolk.

Q. (To Vickery.) You were not present at the trial of James Powell ? - A. No, I was not.

Q. What do you know respecting the prisoner at the bar - when did you apprehended him? - A. We apprehended him outside of the Court here one day.

Q. Who was with you? - A. Ray was with me.

Q. What day was it? - A. I have got a memorandum made on the same day; it was on the 3d of June, last month; we apprehended him just outside of the Court.

Q. What was he doing of at that time? - A. He came out from that door (pointing to the door that the prisoners are brought in,) from that side of the Court.

Mr. Knapp. He was discharged in consequence of a bill being thrown out against him, and these officers were waiting to take him after the discharge.

Court. Q. Did you ever see him before that time since he was ordered to be transported? - A. I saw him at the Office in Worship-street, he was taken up for stealing some unfinished mahogany goods.

Q. The bill was thrown out against him - how long before the 3d of June was it that he was taken up? - A. I think a fortnight; some time in May I think it was.

Q. You knew nothing of him before that time? - A. Nothing at all before that time.

Q. You are certain this is the same man? - A. This is the same man I saw brought to the Office by Ray.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Vickery, the Gentlemen of the Jury have heard that the prisoner was taken up upon a charge of stealing some mahogany, and that afterwards the bill was preferred against him, and upon that charge the Grand Jury threw out the bill? - A. I certainly understood it so at the door of the Court.

Q. When this man was about to be discharged on the regular call over day of the Sessions, you were waiting to take him up upon this charge? - A. Yes, upon information that we received.

Q. And that was of being at large - he coming out of this Court to go into the yard to be discharged, you took him? - A. That was all certainly.

Q. Upon this conviction perhaps you know there is a twenty pounds reward? - A. Certainly I do.

Q. You know you will be entitled to a share, if the Jury should be of opinion that the man was convicted? - A. Certainly I do.

Court. (To Ray.) Q. You know nothing more of this business than you were with Vickery at the time he apprehended this man? - A. I apprehended him on Saturday, the 18th of May, first; I found him then in Banner-street, St. Luke's.

Q. How came you to apprehend him then? - A. For robbing his master; he was imprisoned and discharged.

Q. What was his master's name? - A. Darge, a cabinet-maker.

Q. Who brought the charge against him? - A. Darge.

Q. Darge lived in Banner-street, did he? - A. He did, and does now I believe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know where the prisoner lodged at that time? - A. I did not till I apprehended him, I went in company with his master.

Q. Where did you find his lodging to be - what was he? - A. He kept a chandler's shop in Old-street-road; I took him from his master's house.

Q. And then he shewed you the place where he lived? - A. Yes, and there he attempted to make his escape; I followed him about two hundred yards, and then I took him again.

JOHN OLIVES sworn. - Q. You keep the goal at Bury St. Edmunds? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the person of that man at the bar? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know whether he was ever tried for any offence? - A. I do.

Q. Was he in your custody before he was tried? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was he in your custody before he was tried at Bury St. Edmunds? - A. Two or three months I believe, I do not speak accurate as to the exact time.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What is that paper you have got in your hand? - A. The clerk of the Assizes Calendar, merely to refresh my memory.

Court. Q. Did you conduct him to the Court when he was tried? - A. I did.

Q. Were you present when he was tried? - A. Yes, I certainly was.

Q. Was he convicted or acquitted? - A. He was convicted of sheep stealing.

Q. Did you take him back after he had been convicted? - A. I did, into my goal.

Q. What became of him after that? - A. He was reprieved, and ordered to be transported for life, and under an order from the Secretary of State, he was put on board the prison-ship, at Portsmouth-harbour, on the 5th of May following, I delivered him myself in execution of the sentence.

Q. I suppose you know nothing what became of him after that of your own knowledge - Did you ever see him before the 18th of May? - A. I did not see him before I was sent for by the Magistrate at Worship-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Who was the Judge before whom the prisoner was tried? - A. It is there stated in the calendar.

Q. Do you recollect yourself? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you recollect Lord Ellenborough being there? - A. I do not recollect the Judge, there is the conviction there.

Q. Was not he a young man? - A. He was a young accomplice in the hands of old ones, I think he was upwards of twenty-one when he was tried, from information I then received.

Q. Was he a native of Suffolk? - A. He came from a place called Mildenhall, I believe him to be a native of Suffolk; it is a distance of twelve miles.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-24

455. JOSEPH OSLAND and EDWARD MOLTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a half-guinea, a piece of foreign coin, value 2 s. 3 d. and a shilling , the monies of Richard Taylor and John Taylor .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a printer ; my father is in partnership with me; I live in Shoe-lane, Fleet-street, the printing-office is at the back of the house, in Eagle and child alley .

Q. In consequence of information that you received, had you occasion to put in your accompting-house any marked money? - A. Yes, I put some half-guineas and seven-shilling pieces, and some silver.

Q. Do you know how many of each? - A. I do not recollect the quantity; I put then in the till-box in the drawer in my desk, where I usually keep all my money.

Q. Did you mark all of them the same? - A. No, there were different marks.

Q. Was that accompting-house in Eagle and child alley? - A. Yes, it is a room in the printing-office, it does not join the dwelling-house.

Q. When was it you put the marked money there? - A. About a week before the 20th of June, when I first received the information; on the 21st of June, at five o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by one of my apprentices; I got up immediately, and went into my accompting-house, I found the only four drawers that had locks taken out, the locks had been forced, the till-box on the floor, and all the money gone, and the papers that were in the drawers scattered about.

Q. Had you any trunk there? - A. Yes, that was broken open, the staple was broken in two; it contained books and papers.

Q. In consequence of finding this what did you do? - A. I went to Trott.

Court. Q. To what amount was the money in the till? - A. Somewhere between one and two pound were gone, I am sure there was more than 1 l.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Where was Trott? - A. He was at his lodgings in Hatton-wall.

Q. You gave information to Trott, and went with him to Stanton, the other officer, what then? - A. Then Trott and Stanton went into a cellar at Brooke's-market, Holborn; I waited in the street about two minutes, and then I went into the cellar, and there I saw Osland; I waited while they searched the cellar; the cellar did not seem to communicate with the house; I saw them find some crows and some picklock-keys and two papers of bad money; there was a woman and a man and a girl about eight or ten years old, all in the cellar.

Q. Did you afterwards go with Osland to the watch-house with the officers? - A. I went with the officers to the office, at Hatton-garden, and there they lodged Osland, and the man and woman too in custody.

Q. What became of the little girl? - A. They left her in the cellar to do as she pleased. We then went to a court in the neighbourhood of Mutton-hill; I waited in the court, and the officers went in a door at the end of the court; in about two minutes one of them put his head out of the window, and said, that he had taken Molton; I then went in and saw Molton and the woman dressing, and a little boy, and the girl that we had left in Osland's cellar.

Q. How long was the space of time, between the time that you had left the little girl in Osland's cellar, and the time that you were at Molton's? - A. Half an hour, I am not quite sure; they took Molton, the girl, and the boy, in custody to the Police-office.

Q. Did you see any thing that was found there? - A. One of the officers shewed me a crow.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you did not know the prisoners before? - A. No.

Q. They had not been in your house nor about it? - A. No.

Q. In what part of the office did you deposit the marked money? - A. In the accompting-house, on the first floor.

Q. You marked your money - I suppose you suspected some of your workmen? - A. No, I had information.

Q. You suspected somebody from information that you received from the officers? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How late before this morning when you found your accompting-house had been broken open, had you seen any of this marked money? - A. I saw it every night before for a week to the best of my recollection, I am sure I saw it the night before, on the 20th.

Mr. Alley. Q. How many half-guineas had you marked? - A. I had marked more than one half-guinea, I had marked some silver, and there was one shilling marked; I left the accompting-house on the 20th, about nine at night; I examined the money before I went, and locked the accompting-room myself.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp, I am an officer belonging to Hatton garden Office.

Q. Did you give any information to Mr. Taylor previous to this robbery being committed? - A. Yes, about a week before; Mr. Taylor came to me about half past five in the morning, on the 21st, I then proceeded with Stanton to Brooke's-market, to Osland's cellar.

Court. Q. Where is that cellar? - A. The corner of Brook-street.

Q. Is that a cellar that is used for a habitation? - A. It is a habitation; when I unbolted the door in the cellar that communicated to the house, I knew some of the people in the house to be honest people.

Q. Did you know Osland before, whom you had found there? - A. I had seen Osland several times before.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Tell us exactly what past when you got to this cellar? - A. I saw Osland in bed with a woman, in the cellar, and a little girl in the same bed, and an old man sitting on the side

of the bed; I told Osland, he must get up and dress himself, we were officers, and were come to take him into custody; he got up, and I tied his hands; I then struck a light, there was no light in the cellar only from the door; while I was looking about one part of the room, I saw the woman get out of the bed, and go towards a rabbit-hutch, she was stooping down, I asked her what she was going to do; she said, she was going to feed the rabbits; I pulled her away; sometime after I saw Stanton pick up a bag, I looked at it, and saw two iron crows, and several skeleton keys in the bag; I searched all the house, and every person in the cellar, and found nothing that was suspected to be Mr. Taylor's property. I asked Osland how the iron crows, and keys came there; he said, a young man that was gone to sea left them there sometime back, I searched Osland, I found nothing on him; I found a great quantity of bad money that had not long been in that state; he said, the same young man had left those sixpences there; we took them all to the Office, but the little girl, and locked them up.

Q. Did you search the old man? - A. Yes, I searched them all and found nothing on them; then we went to a court in Vine-street-hill, near Mutton-hill; I went to a house up one pair of stairs, and I met Molton on the top of the stairs without his stockings and shoes; Stanton was close behind me, I told him to return into the room, I was going to take him into custody; I saw him come out of the one pair of stairs room, he begged I would let him put on his shoes and stockings; I told him, by all means; I found his shoes and stockings were in that room, I then searched him, and in his watch-pocket I found a half-guinea, a French half-crown, and I think there were four shillings altogether, one of which is marked, the half-guinea and the half-crown are marked; he said, oh dear, do not take my money away, it belongs to my wife; I told him if it did belong to his wife, I should take it; there was a little boy in this room, and his wife, the boy was laying on a box on the left hand side of the bed; I turned my head round and saw Osland's little girl sitting on one side of the room with a bonnet on, knowing her, I told my brother officer not to let her go down stairs, till I had searched the room further; I sadly wanted the woman to get out of bed, she was very unwilling, she put on her under petticoat, and sat on the bed: I saw her doing something with one of her hands between the bed and the sacking; I went and pulled up the bed and there lay this crow wrapped up in this cloth; I then locked them up after I had taken them to the Office.

Q. Did you ever go to Mr. Taylor's house with this crow? - A. No, Stanton took the others, they were broken open with the other crows.

Q. When you saw the little girl at the other place did you take her into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you produce to Mr. Taylor that money you now produce? - A. I did, as being found on Molton: I have had them in my possession ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You found nothing at Osland's but crows? - A. Nothing but crows and skeleton keys.

ROBERT STANTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went with Osland to this cellar? - A. I did; I produce the crows and the skeleton keys I found in this bag, very near a rabbit-hutch in this cellar.

Q. Did you see the woman near the rabbit-hutch? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. These two crows appear to be fitter for drawers than doors? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. They appear to be fit for the inside of the house? - A. Yes.

Q. You found some keys in the cellar? - A. I found all in that bag. (The keys handed to the Court.)

Court. Q. These keys are for the inside of a house not for doors? - A. They are; I tried these small crows to Mr. Taylor's drawers in the accompting-house, three or four days after the prisoners were taken into custody; they were broke open with an instrument of a like width, they corresponded with the dents, Mr. Taylor was present when I tried these crows.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did they fit with the dents in your judgment when the officer tried them? - A. They did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was that one of the half-guineas that you saw the night before in the till-box? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the half-crown and the shilling? - A. These were also part of the marked money that I had put in the till-box; the shilling and the French half-crown and the half-guinea I am sure of, (the money shewn to the Jury) the half-crown is marked on the edge with a waved line, the half-guinea has the dot between the C and F cut off, the shilling has J P on both sides and a fleur de lis, those are the marks I observed on the shilling the night before, and the nights preceding, since I had the information; there were marks on the drawer of a large crow as well as the small ones.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you parted with any of that money that you had marked? - A. No.

- GUNNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an apprentice to Mr. Taylor; I came out of the dwelling-house about a quarter before five o'clock in the morning; I unlocked the office, and went into the accompting-house, and I observed the drawers were broken open.

Q. Did you observe whether the sash had been up? - A. Yes it was up, it is on the one pair of stairs.

Q. Could any body get in there but through the assistance of a ladder? - A. I do not think they could; the workmen had been at work, and the ladder and scaffolding were about the premises.

Osland's defence. All that I can say, I went to-bed that night between ten and eleven o'clock, and in the morning, about seven, Mr. Trott and Stanton came and called me out of bed; I got up, and went with them; they took that bag, and those things which were left with me (I do not disown) by a man that went on board a ship; they took me and the woman, and the man that came out of the hospital the day before; he met me; I asked him to come home with me, he had broken ribs; they took the mother of the girl, the girl did not belong to me; the girl did not know where to go, and as this boy and girl went to school together, she went there, as far as I know, to Molton's.

Molton's defence. I have got to say, as I came home from work in the evening, I purchased a couple of mackerel; I had no change; I gave a one-pound note, and that is the way I came by the money; I know no further about it.

Osland, GUILTY , aged 33.

Molton, GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-25

456. DANIEL BUCKLEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William M'Donald , in the King's highway, on the 6th of July , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a dollar, value 5 s. three shillings, and two Bank-notes, value 1 l. each, the property of the said William M'Donald .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM M'DONALD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a watchman in the employ of the East-India Dock Company .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him well.

Q. Has he been in the same employ with yourself? - A. He was sometimes watchman, and sometimes worked day work , and sometimes he watched where I was; he borrowed eighteen-pence of me last Thursday fortnight.

Q. How much did he borrow? - A. Eighteen-pence, and he came and paid me again on Saturday night.

Q. Was that the same Saturday night that he robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean last Saturday week? - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the evening was it that he paid you? - A. I believe about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. When he paid you, did you take out any purse? - A. Yes, I did; I had two Bank-notes of one pound each, a dollar, and a bad sixpence; when I put the money back, he saw the money in my purse.

Q. How came the prisoner to see the notes? - A. Because I had them in the purse.

Q. What sort of a purse was it? - A. Made of cotton, like a bag.

Q. How did he see the notes, did you take them out of the bag? - A. Yes, I did, and put them in again after I had given him change for the dollar, and then I put in the dollar.

Court. Q. You had taken the notes out, had you? - A. Yes, and put them in again.

Q. I did not ask you if you put them in again - where were they when you took them out in the watch-box - I want to know whether you held them in your hand? - A. Oh, he saw them, I had them in my hand.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Where was he when you had them in your hand? - A. He was standing aside me all the time.

Q. Was it the time you were giving him the change for the dollar that you held them in your hand? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Where is your watch-box? - A. Near the Orchard House, at the end of the dock.

Q. That is in Blackwall ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any thing happen to you that night, or what happened to you that night, while you were in the watch-box? - A. He came a few minutes before twelve to me.

Court. Q. Do you mean the prisoner? - A. Yes; he came a few minutes before twelve; he took hold of me by the shirt collar, and put his hand to get the money.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Where? - A. To my pocket.

Court. Q. Where did he put his hand to get your money? - A. To my pocket; I tried to get away.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What did you do? - A. I struggled to keep it from him as much as I could do; then he pulled me from the box, and put his knee on my throat; he kicked me on my face; I called for assistance.

Court. Q. Upon your neck - where was it, upon your neck, or upon the side of your head? - A. Upon the side of my head.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What next? - A. Then he put me down in a gutter, and put his hand in my pocket, and took out the purse with the money and the Bank-notes.

Court. Q. Were the notes in the purse then? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. What were there in the purse besides the notes? - A. A dollar, three shillings, and a bad sixpence, and the key of my chest; when he had got it from me he ran away.

Q. In the course of the struggle, did you see his face at all? - A. Yes, I did; I saw his face, and felt his hand.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What did you feel respecting his hand? - A. The two fore-fingers were off the left hand.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - A. A very fine night indeed.

Q. When he had got your money, what did he do? - A. He made off as fast as he could.

Q. Do not speak any more than you know - are you quite sure the prisoner is the man? - A. I am quite sure.

Q. I believe you went directly to the engine-house, and made your complaint there? - A. I did immediately.

Q. Was there any moon, you say it was a very fine night? - A. There was no moon.

Court. Q. Old gentleman, was there no moon that night? - A. It was moonlight.

Q. You just now told me there was no moon? - A. I felt his hand.

Q. I did not ask you what you felt, I ask you whether there was any moon? - A. Yes, there was.

Q. What o'clock at night was it? - A. A very few minutes before twelve.

Q. This was last Saturday week? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to tell the Magistrate before whom the prisoner was taken (Mr. Storey,) that you knew the prisoner's face? - A. I know him well.

Q. That is no answer to my question - when you were before the Magistrate, it does not appear that you said any thing about the man's face? - A. Oh, I knew him by his face.

Q. Why did not you tell the Magistrate so? - A. I knew him by his face, and his smock-frock, and every thing.

Q. How came not you to acquaint the Magistrate? - A. I told him, as far as I could, the truth.

Q. I ask you, when you were examined by the Magistrate, did you tell him you knew the prisoner's face? - A. I knew his face very well.

Q. That is no answer to the question; why did you not tell the Magistrate so; I have got your examination before me, you did not say a word about the prisoner's face then, only of having felt his hand and he wanted two fingers, why did you not tell Mr. Storey so, that you knew the prisoner's face as you have been telling me now? - A. I know it well.

Q. I do not ask you what you know, why did not you tell Mr. Storey? - A. I am telling the truth before God and man.

Q. I ask you what reason you had to know him - did you see the prisoner's face so as to know his face? - A. I did, indeed.

Q. You did not tell Mr. Storey that you saw the man's face, or any thing like it; I want to know how it is that you came to mend your evidence now; state when it was that you felt his fingers were missing? - A. I felt his fingers were missing when he took hold of me first in the watch-box.

Q. What did you feel it with? - A. I felt it with my hands, and saw it too.

Q. Did you see the place where they were wanting; this is further too, did you feel it with your hand, or on the side of your throat? - A. I felt it with my hand and on my throat, I felt it every way; he never spoke a word.

Q. Do you mean to say that you could see the place where the fingers were wanting? - A. Yes, I could see and feel them.

Q. Do you mean to swear that at the time you were pulled out of the box, whoever it was that pulled you out, that you saw that that man wanted two of his fingers? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you light enough to see that? - A. Yes, I always felt it.

Q. I do not ask you what you always felt, I ask you what you saw - Do you mean to swear, that at the time you were pulled out of the box, that you could see there were two fingers wanting on the man's hand that pulled you out of the box? - A. Yes, the moon shined.

JAMES HEADGEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are the engineer to the East-India Docks? - A. Yes.

Q. How far from the engine-house is the watch-box of M'Donald's? - A. About fifty yards.

Q. On the night of last Saturday week did M'Donald come to the engine-house? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. At about what time? - A. A little before 12.

Q. In what condition did he appear to be in? - A. His face was all over blood, and blood came out of one of his ears; I asked him what was the matter with him.

Q. Never mind what he said - Did he complain that any body had robbed him? - A. Yes.

Q. We see his arm is in a sling, was that hurt likewise? - A. He complained of his shoulder being hurt.

Q. In consequence of any thing he said, no matter what, did you go in search of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you go immediately in search of the prisoner? - A. I went in about a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not succeed that night in taking of him? - A. No.

Q. You have known the prisoner at the bar in the employ of that Company? - A. Yes, by seeing him at work about the premises.

Q. Do you know that he had an accident on one of his hands? - A. He had two fingers off his left hand; they caught in the machine as it was working.

Prisoner. I do not know any thing about him.

ELIZABETH RODWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the night of last Saturday week, did you see the prisoner at the bar, or on the Sunday morning? - A. Yes, at one o'clock on that morning.

Q. Where did you meet with him? - A. On the top of Old Gravel-lane, I met him on Sunday morning at one o'clock.

Court. Q. Do you mean last Saturday week? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That is in Ratcliffe-highway? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the prisoner there? - A. Yes, and he enquired of me for a lodging.

Q. (To Headgey.) Can you tell me how far Old Gravel-lane is from this place? - A. About two miles and a half.

Q. (To Rodway.) When you first saw him, what condition did you see him in? - A. He appeared to have been running.

Q. Did you observe any thing else respecting him? - A. No; he asked me for a lodging.

Q. He asked you for a lodging, did you take him any where? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you say he asked you for a lodging? - A. Yes, he asked me for a lodging.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Where is your lodging? - A. No. 45, Penton-street, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. When you got there, did he give you any thing? - A. He gave me five shillings and sixpence in silver, and a shilling to get a shillingsworth of spirits, and when he gave it me, I saw him take it out of a purse.

Q. What sort of a purse was it? - A. A dirty looking purse.

Q. What did it appear to be made of? - A. Apparently it seemed as though it was made of cotton.

Court. Q. Had you it in your hand? - A. No.

Q. Then how can you say it was cotton more than linen - what made you think it was cotton? - A. It drew with a string.

Q. So it might if it was made of linen or of leather - I want to know how you know it was made of cotton? - A. By the look of it; it looked something like stocking, only darker and dirty.

Q. What do you mean? - A. It did not look like cloth at all, nor yet like silk.

Q. Do you mean that it was wove in the same way that stockings are? - A. Yes.

Q. As if it was wove in a stocking-frame? - A. Justly so.

Q. What shape was it - the shape of this purse, or a different shape? - A. A different shape.

Q. What shape was it? - A. It was like a small bag

Q. You say he took five shillings and sixpence, which he gave you, and a shilling for spirits? - A. Yes, and the sixpence was bad.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When he took out this purse, and gave you the money out of it, did you see what was in the purse besides? - A. I saw some Bank-notes, apparently, in it, a dollar, and two or three shillings, besides what he gave me.

Court. Q. What opportunity had you of seeing the notes? - A. When he took out the silver, he took the notes out in his hand.

Q. How do you know they were notes? - A. By seeing them; I could not tell what the amount of them were; I had the light just by.

Q. What part of the note did you see? - A. I saw the Bank of England on one of them.

Q. Can you read? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you read writing? - A. Not writing.

Q. Whereabouts was it that you saw Bank of England? - A. About the middle of the note.

Q. There is a note, shew me where the Bank of England is? - A. There. (The witness pointing to the place.)

Q. You saw the Bank of England in that part of the note, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. How was the prisoner dressed? - A. In a smock-frock.

Q. How long did he stay in your lodgings? - A. Till near six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Then he left you? - A. Then he left me.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? - A. No.

Prisoner. I had not any note at all.

Court. (To Rodway.) Q. Are you sure that he had a note? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. When she met me in the highway I was quite drunk; she took me down to her lodgings.

Q. (To Rodway.) Are you sure, woman, that there were notes in his hand? - A. Yes.

Q. How came they to be open, so as you saw there was Bank of England on them? - A. He took them out in this manner (shewing how,) and drew them up to give me the silver.

Q. What induced him to do it? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did he say any thing about the notes? - A. He said he did not want for money, he had got a pound or two with him; he said he should be there with me the whole day.

Q. He said he did not want for money? - A. Yes; he was to have ham and peas for dinner.

Q. Was it when he was talking about staying the whole day, that he talked of having ham and green peas? - A. Yes; when I went out to get the spirits he had them in his hand; he took them from under his head in the morning when he got up.

Q. What was the colour of this purse? - A. It looked quite dirty.

Q. Though it was dirty, you could form some opinion what the colour might be? - A. I could not form any opinion what it might be.

Q. Whether it was white, or dark brown? - A. It was very dirty.

Q. Was the purse in your hand? - A. No

Q. Had you any dollar in your hand? - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that it was a dollar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not a crown-piece? - A. No, a dollar.

Q. Which side did you see? - A. The side the woman is on.

Q. Was there a figure of a woman on it? - A Yes; it goes for a five-shilling dollar.

Q. Do you mean to say that you saw a figure of a woman on the back of the dollar? - A. Yes.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) What was the colour of your purse? - A. A brown colour, and white spots on it.

Q. What was the materials it was made with - a cotton cloth, or what? - A. Made of cotton.

Q. Was it wove like a stocking? - A. It was not wove like a stocking at all; it was such sort of cotton as women's gowns are; it was made like a bag and a string.

Q. I understand you a brown cotton, and the same sort of cotton as women's gowns are made of, not like a stocking? - A. No, no.

Jury. Q. You say it was a brown colour, with some spots on it - were they plain to be seen, or were they dirty? - A. Yes, the white spots were plain to be seen; the other was brown.

Court. Q. Was the purse very dirty? - A. It was not very dirty, but it was dark.

RICHARD TUCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable of Poplar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go on Sunday week to take the prisoner? - A. Yes, I was sent for to go down to an eating-house at Blackwall; I found M'Donald there, he said he had been robbed.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner? - A. In the course of a few minutes afterwards; I went with M'Donald to the prisoner to the Captain Man of War public-house; he was going into the house.

Q. Did M'Donald say any thing in the presence of the prisoner? - A. He said that that was the man that had robbed him, and had murdered him.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. I told him it was a very serious charge, was he very sure he was the person; he said he was.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. Nothing at all; I told him he must go with me.

Q. You did not search him, I believe? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you deliver him into the custody of Brown? - A. I did.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Shadwell; the prisoner was given into my custody on the Sunday afternoon; I searched him, I found a smock-frock on him.

Q. Produce the smock-frock? - A. This is it, here is some blood on it.

Q. What part is it on? - A. The cuff.

Court. Q. He wore that at the time? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Was the blood on the cuff? - A. Yes, it is on the risband of the smock-frock.

Q. Was there blood on any where else? - A. I do not know that there was.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you find any money on him? - A. I searched him, and found three seven-shilling pieces, a half guinea, four shillings, and two sixpences, and a duplicate for a pair of shoes pledged on the 3d of July.

Q. For how much money? - A. Three shillings.

Q. In his own name? - A. In his own name; and a quantity of halfpence; I asked him how he came by the money; he said that some friends had gathered it for him some months ago.

Q. When is that duplicate? - A. The 3d of July

Mr. Gurney. That is three days before.

Court. The 6th of July the watchman swore he was robbed.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you at the Captain Man of War at Poplar on the night the watchman was robbed? - A. I was.

Q. How much did he receive? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. Did he pay you any money out of what he received? - A. He did.

Q. How much did he pay you out of it? - A. Nineteen shillings and three halfpence.

Q. What was that for? - A. For victuals and beer which he had in the course of a fortnight.

Q. Your son keeps the public-house? - A. Yes, he does; I carry it on for him as he is not able to carry it on himself.

Q. How came he not to pay you as he went on? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. What time did he leave the house? - A. At eleven o'clock.

Q. Did he usually sleep there? - A. He never slept there at all.

Q. What time did he receive the money? - A. In the evening, I cannot say exactly.

Q. Whether it was ten or eleven o'clock? - A. It might be eight or nine o'clock; the person that paid him is in Court, his name is Darnell.

Q. How far, Mr. Smith, is your house from what is called the Orchard House - Do you know the spot where the prosecutor's watch-box was? - A. Yes, about ten minutes walk, not more than that.

Q. You know that place? - A. Yes, I do.

JAMES DARNELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you in the employ of the East-India Dock Company? - A. I am.

Q. On the night of Saturday, the 6th of July,

did you pay the prisoner his wages? - A. I did; thirty shillings for one fortnight's wages.

Q. What time of the evening? - A. I believe it might be about half past seven.

Q. Had you any opportunity of knowing whether he had any other money at that time? - A. No, I had not; I paid him at the Captain Man of War, at Mr. Broker's house, where Mr. Smith takes care of.

Prisoner's defence. I worked hard for some of that money; when I got paid I gave Mr. Smith all that I owed him, which was nineteen shillings and three halfpence for victuals and drink; I stopped till about eleven o'clock, and then I went out of there to go home, and in the way I met this woman, she took me to her house, and I slept there all night, and when I heard of this, I went to the Captain Man of War public-house, and gave myself up, as they said it was done by a man with two of his fingers off; I do not know any thing at all about this man's money.

Q. (To Brown.) Did you see M'Donald sign the examination when he was examined? - A. I was not by when he signed it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-26

457. THOMAS FISHER was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann his wife .

SUSANNAH BERLEYSAN sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 13, Mount-pleasant, Cold-bath-fields, near Gray's-inn-lane .

Q. Did the prisoner, Thomas Fisher , live in that house? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his business? - A. A gun-lock smith .

Q. Did you know the deceased, Ann Fisher ? - A. Yes; she was his wife.

Q. Were you a lodger in the house? - A. Yes, Mr. Fisher was master of the house.

Q. In the beginning of June last, do you remember being with Mrs. Fisher, drinking tea with her? - A. Yes, it was on the 3d of June, on Whit-Monday, I was drinking tea with Mrs. Fisher in the front parlour, it was about five o'clock when I first sat down.

Q. The prisoner Fisher was not with you? - A. No.

Q. Did he come at the time that you were drinking tea? - A. Yes, as I supposed it to be him, I did not see him, he came to the front parlour-window, the shutter of which was put to to keep the sun from her; I saw one of the shutters pulled back, when instantly was broke a small pane of glass, we supposed it to be Mr. Fisher that did it; I did not see him. The deceased, Ann Fisher , had bolted the door of the shop; Mr. Fisher, as I supposed came to the parlour-door and asked for the key of the shop; I knew his voice; Mrs. Fisher just opened the door enough to give it him, she shut the door and bolted it again; I heard the person go out into the yard and go up stairs, then he came down stairs to the parlour-door again, and said, will not you let me in.

Q. Who was it that said that? - A. Mr. Fisher: she answered, no; then the deceased stood against the door, he tried to force the door open, and instantly he went from the door, I heard the back window go up; Mrs. Fisher, the deceased, then went from the door into the back parlour to prevent him from shoving the window up; I only saw her leave the door, she said, he should not come in; I heard fire-arms go off instantly.

Q. Did you hear any thing said? - A. No, not a word.

Q. Upon hearing fire-arms go off what did you do? - A. I instantly called her three times, and no answer was made me; I then thought she might have hid herself under one of the beds or in one of the beds; I looked inside of the room and saw the blood flowing down on the floor.

Q. Did you see the woman? - A. No, I never saw the woman after she left me and went out of the room, I instantly got out of the front parlour-window and went into the adjoining house, to call assistance, and nobody came to my assistance; I fetched the doctor afterwards; that is all I know of the affair.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I wish you would try and recollect yourself - Do not you recollect that she made use of some expression in the course of the afternoon, that she would have no devils in there? - A. That is what she said during the afternoon, not at that present moment; I looked upon it that she meant the prisoner, I took her meaning as such, and that was her expression.

Q. Then you heard her say that she did not mean to have any devils in there - You had been lodging there sometime? - A. About sixteen months as near as I can say.

Q. Can you give us any reason why she used the word devils? - A. He had been seen apparently deranged at times.

Q. Did it happen frequent? - A. Yes; frequent in the dead of the night, I have seen different transactions going forward.

Q. How long had you observed that before this fatal accident took place? - A. About a fortnight before this took place.

Court. Q. What took place about a fortnight ago? - A. He went up and down stairs in the dead of the night, singing and tearing.

Q. What do you mean by tearing? - A. Going about singing and going into the rooms and tearing the lines down.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did the conduct that you have been talking about, namely, singing in the night, continue during the whole of the fortnight? - A.

Sometimes it was once or twice a week, and sometimes it was two or three times a week.

Q. Then from the whole of your observations with respect to his conduct at different periods, it did not appear to you that he had the right possession of his mind? - A. I do not suppose that he had.

Jury. Q. Was his general conduct sober? - A. I cannot say any thing with regard to that, I never noticed whether he was sober or not.

Court. Q. You say you looked in the back-room, was there any smoke in the room at the time you heard the report of fire-arms? - A. The place was full of smoke apparently, which I took to be from the fire-arms that went off.

Q. Did it smell of gunpowder? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD sworn. - I live at No. 7, Pool's-buildings, Cold-bath-fields.

Q. How far is that from where the prisoner lives? - A. About thirty yards; on Whit-Monday, I was alarmed by a child that Mrs. Fisher had been killed; I went to Fisher's house, I saw the prisoner sitting in the corner of the front parlour; I then went to the back-room, where lay the deceased, the wife of the prisoner, about two yards from the window; her left eye was forced out of the socket and laying upon the left temple, and a great quantity of blood had issued from her head; she appeared to be apparently dead. I went a little way from the prisoner's house, where I met Mr. Rice, an officer, whom I informed that Mr. Fisher had shot his wife; he requested me to go back with him, and he would take the prisoner into custody; I went back with him, the prisoner was then sitting in the same chair as before; I then went to the back-room and saw the deceased, and came to the front room and asked which was Fisher; upon being informed, he was requested to stand up to be searched: I then went afterwards to the back shop to look for the pistols.

Q. Was he searched? - A. Yes, he was; and a large knife and a small one was found on him; a man of the name of Lagan, said, Fisher, I never thought you would have done this; the prisoner replied, he had done it; I then went to the back shop to look for the pistols and could not find them, I was coming from the back shop and I met Mr. Wood the officer, I went back with him again, and on the second search, Mr. Wood found two pistols at the further end of the shop, in a barrel of scraps of old iron; one was apparently discharged, the other was not, it appeared to be damp, and it was black at the muzzle and there was some blood on the pistol.

Q. Was Fisher sober at the time? - A. He appeared very much agitated, his eyes were darting from one subject to another in the room; he looked very wild, he did not appear to be intoxicated.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Hatton-garden.

Q. In consequence of your being informed of the prisoner's wife having been killed, you went to the prisoner's house? - A. I did; when I got there I saw a great mob about the door; I went in company with Wood.

Q. Do you mean the last witness Underwood? - A. No, Wood an officer belonging to Hatton-garden-office; when I went in I found the prisoner sitting in the front parlour, I secured him with a pair of handcuffs, and then went backwards and saw the deceased lying upon her back; she was quite dead, and a great quantity of blood all round her head; I then came back and stopped with the prisoner till Wood went and searched for the pistols, which I believe he found.

Q. Did you examine and see where the wound was? - A. Yes, the ball had entered in at the left eye apparently. In taking the prisoner to Hatton-garden, I asked him why he was guilty of such a rash act; he said, it was done through the heat of passion.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I went with the last witness to secure the prisoner, understanding his wife was killed; after the prisoner was secured, I went into the shop to look for the pistols; I searched the shop all round, at last I found them in a corner of the shop, in an old barrel with some old iron, just behind the forge where he worked, they lay on the top of the iron; they were all over blood both of them, (I produce the pistols) this pistol appeared to have been just discharged, it was quite damp and black in the mouth.

Q. Was the other loaded? - A. Yes; I opened the pan, I will not be positive whether it was primed or not, or whether the priming fell out at the time I opened the pan; they seem not to be finished pistols, they are not stocked.

Q. Did you see the other examined before the Magistrate? - A. I drew the charge before the Coroner, it was loaded with this ball (producing it.)

ROBERT RICE sworn. - I live at No. 13, Pool's buildings, Mount-pleasant.

Q. In consequence of an alarm that Mrs. Fisher had been shot did you go to this house on Whit-Monday? - A. Yes; I went into the back parlour and saw the deceased lying on the ground, I viewed the body and perceived that she was wounded in the left eye, and a vast quantity of blood lying about her; I then asked which was the prisoner; they told me in the front room; I found him sitting with his right hand bleeding; I then asked him to stand up and desired one of the men who stood by to hold his hands while I searched him; I was endeavouring to know if he had any pistol about him; I took two knives from him and a pair

of spectacles; I asked him how he could be guilty of such a rash act, and where he had put the pistols; he at last answered me, that he did not know; I asked him two or three times how he could be guilty of such a horrid crime; he said, it was aggravation; two officers of Hatton-garden came in and White put the handcuffs on him and took him to Hatton-Garden.

SARAH BLUNDLE sworn. - I am a neighbour of the deceased; I went into the back parlour and saw her laying with the blood about her near the door where she died; the prisoner was sitting in a chair in the front parlour; I asked him why he had done such a thing; he made me no answer at all; I staid till the surgeon came.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known this man? - A. I have lived in the neighbourhood nine or ten years; I have known him as a neighbour.

Q. From the observations that you have made of his conduct did he appear to be a man in his mind or not in his mind? - A. I cannot say much about that.

Q. What you can say about it I should like to know? - A. He has been at times not as if he was right, that I do think.

Q. Has that been once or twice or frequent? - A. Very frequent indeed within this five or six months back he has not been so clever as usual; I have heard his wife say when I have been in the house that she could bring twenty people that would bear witness that he was a madman; that I have heard her say with my own ears; I only know from what I have heard his wife say.

Jury. Q. How did he appear to be that day? - A. He appeared to be very much agitated for what he had done I suppose.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. - I was sent for by the Overseer to go to the prisoner's house; I was in the room at the time the shot was found that was the cause of her death.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have known the prisoner? - A. He has been at our watch-house a great many years since.

Q. Do you know any thing of the state of his mind? - A. I have often thought that he talked like a deranged man at the time he was there; he talked very much at random, and sometimes very sensible; I think this was about eight or ten years ago, I have seen him at different times since.

Court. Q. How lately have you seen him previous to his wife being shot? - A. I think it must be six months before.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Mariner, a surgeon; on Monday evening, the 3d of June, on my arrival at the house of the prisoner, I was taken into the back parlour, where the deceased laid on her back, surrounded with blood; I perceived the left eye was lacerated in the socket by a ball or some such thing; I perceived that it was a ball which had entered the inner angle of the left eye; I then put my hand to the back part of the head, and felt the bone at the back part of the head was fractured between the skull; I took hold of the hand of the deceased and felt there was no pulse, she was perfectly dead; I then stated to the persons who were in the front parlour, that Mrs. Fisher was dead, and desired them to come in to assist me in raising the body.

Q. Did you open her head? - A. Not at that time, I did on Wednesday morning, at the request of the Coroner; I discovered no more than the back part of her head was fractured; a ball had entered the inner angle of the left eye and had fractured the bone, and that was the cause of her death.

Q. Did the ball pass the brain? - A. It did.

Prisoner's defence. Through my sons and my wife frequently I have been past my senses by their ill usage; she has put me in prison; we had a separation, she would not let me go one way or the other, my wife got me to take my two eldest sons into partnership; that would not do, she would have the agreement made, that they should have part of the tools, part of the stock, and part of the houshold furniture, and the lease of the house, and all the book debts outstanding to have an equal share; I agreed to all these considerations, and yet it would not do; they then wanted to separate from me, and take that part to themselves; the agreement was not strong enough, I always considered the business was to be done at No. 13, Mount-pleasant, and no where else, in consequence of which she wished them to go away from me and likewise herself, and because I would not agree to that, they were always upon me, which drove me beyond my senses at times.

GEORGE BARCLAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a smith.

Q. You now live at Woolwich? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever an apprentice to the prisoner? - A. Yes; I was bound to him in the year 1783, I continued with him ten years.

Q. When you first went to him was he a quiet inoffensive good master? - A. Yes; quite so far as I know.

Q. After you had been with him when did you discover any difference in his conduct? - A. Not till such time he received a blow with the sledge hammer on his head, which was about five or six years after I had been with him; Plumley was making a plug for the barrel, as we call it, Mr. Fisher was standing at the work stooping, and the man was striking above him on the tool, it was done by accident, the hammer struck him so violent on the head as to fell him to the ground; he was laid up for two or three days.

Q. Tell what you observed of his conduct after

he received this injury? - A. He used to go through the shop and give orders, and after that come and ask what I was about, who gave me the orders; I told him he had; he would contradict it, and tell me to do other work; that sort of conduct continued down to the time I left him.

Q. Have you seen him since you left him? - A. Yes, about two years ago, and then his discourse varied very much; he did not appear to have a found mind.

THOMAS CONSTABLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a gun-founder? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you served your apprenticeship to the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did; I was with him about fourteen years altogether, at different times; I have observed him to work hard of a morning, from six o'clock till nine at breakfast-time, and then I have seen him walking for two or three hours together, not speaking a word, and he has started up at times and looked wild; he has let the heats be in the fire till they were spoiled; I thought he was really out of his mind; sometimes he was singing, and sometimes talking of Moses and Aaron and Jacob, and then he would look as wild as could be.

Q. Have you seen him do any thing respecting money? - A. Yes; once when he had a bill to a large amount to take, I went to look for him up at Piccadilly; he had been to a master that he worked for there; coming home, I met him in the King's Road, he was standing at a post with a great many guineas in his shoes; I went up to him, he knew me, and he said to me, Tom, is that you, do you want any money; I said, no; I put on his shoes time after time; he at last took the guineas home in his shoes.

Q. During the whole of the time that you have known him, have you considered him as a man in his right mind? - A. I have not.

Jury. Q. At the time that the money was in his shoes, was he drunk or sober? - A. He was in liquor then.

Court. Q. How soon after you came to be his apprentice did you observe that he acted in this extraordinary way? - A. It might be a twelvemonth.

Q. Did he continue so to act at times during the remaining six years of your apprenticeship? - A. He did, and for the remaining time that I was with him at different times.

Q. Who took orders for the business, and made out the accounts? - A. He generally took orders himself; I believe he chiefly carried on the business, so far as I know.

JOHN PATRICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am hammerman to the prisoner.

Q. Did you work with your master from Easter to Whitsuntide? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell whether you observed any thing with respect to his mind? - A. I always thought that he was a real madman; when we took a heat out, (that is a piece of iron out of the fire to make it into what we wanted it for,) he would turn away, and talk as hard as ever he could, and let the iron cool, and stare as bold, quite like a madman; on the Monday that I left him, he made me draw a ball, which was two men's work to do; it was horse-nail stubs drawn into iron, and when it was done, he threw it down, and went away.

Jury. Q. Was he sober? - A. He was as sober as ever a Judge in the world was; I never saw him disguised in liquor but three times, all the time I worked with him.

Court. Q. You say he made you draw a ball, which was two men's work to do - what ought to have been done with it? - A. Instead of putting in the iron again to make it hot, to make it fit for what he wanted, he threw it down, and went away.

Q. Do you know where he went to? - A. No, I kept in the shop.

Q. Did you see him that day when he came back? - A. Yes, I parted with him at a public-house between two and three o'clock, and we had no more than two pints of beer - him, me, and my wife; I did not see him after that till after five or six o'clock, it was all settled at the Office then.

MARGARET KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - A. Four years, I live next door to him; I have had an opportunity of frequently seeing him, and if ever a person was insane Mr. Fisher is; my wash-house faces his work-shop; I have seen him standing and talking to himself, and singing, and muttering, when no one has been in the shop.

Q. Was he an industrious man when he was perfectly right? - A. Perfectly so, indeed.

Q. I believe you saw him a very short time before this unhappy offence? - A. I did; he came to my lodger twice for a candle, about half after four in the afternoon; my lodger was out; he came to me, and said his wife would not let him have one; I said, I am sure she would; he looked in a deranged state, in a cross manner, which he had looked before, when he was in a deranged state.

Court. Q. What do you mean by saying he looked in a cross manner, as he had before when he was in a deranged state - Did you ever know him confined on account of insanity? - A. Never; it was my opinion that at times when he has been in a cross refractory way that he was in a deranged state.

Q. Do you know that he was not right in his mind? - A. I cannot say he was not right in his mind.

Q. You know nothing more than having heard him mutter in the shop, and of his being cross and refractory, that is the only ground that you have for saying that he was in a deranged state? - A. Just so.

WILLIAM SLATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were an apprentice to the prisoner? - A. Yes, it is six years next November since I left him.

Q. During the time that you lived with him, did you observe what his conduct was? - A. I thought at times that he was not in his senses by the manner of his behaviour to his men and his apprentices; when the men were at work in the shop, he would go and throw their heats back, and order them out of the shop; and when he and I were at work together, he would take the heats up, and walk up and down the shop like a man that was out of his senses, and would walk up and down the shop with his arms folded; he was always muttering; he would be up and down the house all night sometimes, and call me down to help move the things out of their places in the middle of the night; this conduct continued on him at different times till I left him.

Q. Have you seen him after you were his apprentice? - A. Not till Saturday previous to the Whit-Monday; I went then, and knocked at the door, and a little girl answered the door; I told her I wanted her uncle; he came, and I asked him if he wanted any body to work for him; he said he did not know, he had work enough.

Q. Did he appear to be in his senses at that time? - A. No; he sat himself down in the chair, and folded his arms up for two or three minutes before he made any reply again; he then got up, and said he must go into the shop, and bid me good by; he was then just the same as when I left him, like a man out of his senses.

ELIZABETH GRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You keep the Cheshire Cheese public-house, near the prisoner's residence? - A. Yes; I have known the prisoner for nineteen years.

Q. Do you remember his having the misfortune of receiving a blow on his head? - A. I have heard talk about it; he has been in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to our house; I never saw him sit steady, he was roaring and singing; I never thought he was in his right mind, he generally went by the name of Mad Fisher.

JOHN SHAWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known Fisher? - A. About eighteen years; my general opinion of him was, that he was labouring under mental derangement.

FRANCIS LOWNDES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I am a medical gentleman, I knew the prisoner about seven or eight years ago; this man forged the iron work for me belonging to a medical apparatus; the business was done principally with his wife; he occasionally called; he talked perfectly incoherent; I never could make any thing at all with him, he talked so frantic, he was running out of one thing into another, fancying that he had made a gun superior to all in the world.

WILLIAM BARTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a gunlock-filer; I have known the prisoner upwards of thirty years, I have been in the habits of intimacy with him for these last three years; I have seen him stand at the hearth, when he has come to work, with his hands up to his mouth, looking at no particular object, and talking to himself; I have asked him a question concerning the work, and he has given me no answer, but kept muttering and talking to himself.

GEORGE GROVESNOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. From the year 1790; I always thought he was a crazy man, he usually went by the appellation of Mad Tom Fisher .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have known him about sixteen years; I always conceived he was a man very much out of his mind, as he was frequently talking to himself, and making songs out of his own head that were nonsensical and disagreeable to hear.

ELEANOR COTTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Gray's Inn-lane; I have known the prisoner seventeen or eighteen years.

Q. During the whole of the time that you have known him, in what state of mind has he been? - A. Like a mad bullock more than any thing else.

Court. Q. That expression conveys nothing distinct, in which the Jury can go by - What has been his manner and deportment? - A. I have seen him frequently run up and down the street where I live in that mad state; the last time I saw him run past my house, he roared out, and bit his lips till they bled; I always fastened the door when he ran past, I was afraid of him; he was always called Mad Tom Fisher ; I was very intimate with his wife; I have seen him firing pistols out at the window with nothing, I believe, but powder.

MARTHA WELLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Twelve years; my husband is dead, he was a barber; I carry on the business; the prisoner has been a quarterly customer to me for these twelve years; he never paid the quarterage himself, his wife paid it; the prisoner often came backwards on a Sunday at my house; my husband died in the same delirious way, which made me very much frightened at him; the prisoner would sing, rattle, and roar, in much the same way as my husband did in his madness.

Q. Did you ever hear of a blow that he received

on his head? - A. I have lived thirty-six years in one house, I remember hearing of it.

NOT GUILTY,

On the ground of insanity .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-27

458. EDMUND NASH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , one Banknote, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Taylor .

And other Counts in like manner, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Fielding, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-28

459. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a coat, value 3 l. the property of John Thompson ; a coat, value 7 s. the property of Oliver Wilson ; a coat, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Schofield ; a coat, value 10 s. the property of James Hooper ; a coat, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Chant , and a coat, value 10 s. the property of William Sutton .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

MARTHA THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe you are appointed to take care of a room, in which the gentlemen's coats were deposited in the Stock-exchange on the 7th of June? - A. On the 7th of June, between nine and ten o'clock, I left the room with a number of men's coats hanging there; when I returned to the room, I saw the prisoner there with a bag in his hand; I stepped back, and locked the door, and locked him in, and called for assistance. The prisoner broke a square of glass, put his hand through, unlocked the door, and ran out into the court; he was brought back, and taken into custody; he left the bag behind; I asked him if the bag was his; he said it was; there were five coats in the bag belonging to different gentlemen, and a coat belonging to my son; he had unlocked the door, and went in, and when I left the room the coats were all hanging up.

GEORGE CRIPPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In consequence of an alarm made by the last witness, do you recollect pursuing the prisoner? - A. Yes, on the 7th of June I pursued him, and took him about a hundred and fifty yards from the Stock-exchange; I brought him back; I asked him if it was his bag; he said, yes; the coats were all in the bag at that time; he said he had put them in.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you a coat hanging up at the Stock-exchange? - A. I was informed there was; the coat was sent home on the 6th of June.

OLIVER WILSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you a coat hanging in this place? - A. I had. (The coats produced and identified by the owners.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not wish to give the Court any trouble; it was really through want that I did it, I was a long way from my parish.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-29

460. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for that he, on the 10th of July , in the King's highway, feloniously did make an assault upon Isaac Gold , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, half a yard of ribbon, value 4 d. a seal, value 4 d. and a key, value 3 d. the property of the said Isaac Gold .

ISAAC GOLD sworn. - I am clerk to a merchant in Hatton-garden: On Wednesday evening last, a little after eleven o'clock at night, as I was coming very near Bread-street , the prisoner at the bar and another young man, taller than himself, were in company; they pushed me up against the shutters of one of the shops, and the prisoner at the bar took hold of me by the elbow; the other young man said, this is Jack, I am sure it is. I told them to keep their distance, and I passed on as far as the pastry-cook's in St. Paul's Church-yard, when they both came up again; by the light of the window I saw them distinctly. I made stop when I saw them; they said nothing to me then, but passed on, and when I got on Ludgate-hill, I was turning up Sun Tavern-court; I mostly go up there, and take half a pint of porter; there was a loose woman (as I supposed her to be) at the corner; she pushed me on the back, and said, aye, wicked, and left me directly. Then the prisoner at the bar, and another young man with him, seized me; the other man seized me by the arm, and the prisoner at the bar made an attempt to take my watch; when I found that he had snatched, as I supposed, my watch, I pursued him, and about twenty yards down the Old-Bailey I seized him by the flap of his coat; when I seized him, he said, pray let me go; and he dropped my ribbon and my seal, and said, here is your watch; the watchman took him in charge to the watch-house; I was asked if I had lost my watch; a gentleman who saw the circumstance said, it was only my ribbon; I being in a perspiration the watch was left in the fob, he had snatched the string and the pendant from the case, by the violence of the pull.

Q. Did he offer to strike you? - A. He did not.

Q. Did you see him drop it? - A. I did not; I heard him say, here is your watch.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes; I

have seen him and the other young man parading Cheapside.

THOMAS HOTHAM sworn. - On Wednesday last I was coming up Ludgate-hill, hearing the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner at the bar running, and Mr. Gold coming down very swift after him, they turned up the Old-Bailey, and just as I came up to them Mr. Gold had seized him by the coat flap; upon which the prisoner said, here is your watch, here is your watch; I thought he had dropped something; it was dark, and the watchman came up with a light, I looked where he had been standing, and found the ribbon, key, and seal. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the affair: can it be possible that I should say, sir, here is your watch, when he had it in his pocket when he came to the watch-house.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-30

561. THOMAS BRAY was indicted for that he, on the 15th of June , ten pieces of false and counterfeited milled money and coin, each and every one of them made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of money called half a crown, the said false and counterfeited pieces of milled money, not either of them being cut in pieces, feloniously and unlawfully did put off to William Coleman at a lower rate than they were counterfeited for, that is to say, for 10 s.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a wire-drawer .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, very well.

Q. Did you give any information to Rogers and other officers against the prisoner? - A. Yes; on the 12th of June I informed them of it, and on the 13th I went to make a purchase.

Q. Where did you go to? - A. I went to the Jacob's Well, Barbican; the prisoner lived in Paul's Alley, Cripplegate .

Q. Did you find the prisoner at home? - A. Not when I first went in, his wife then said he would be in in a few minutes; I found him at home on Thursday morning the 13th of June, about nine o'clock; I asked him if he had got any of these things; he knew what I meant; he asked me whether I wanted any half bulls, as he called them.

Q. You knew what half bulls meant? - A. Yes, bad half crowns; he asked me how many I wanted; I told him I had only cash for a couple at present, which is two shillings worth; I asked him if I could have any more if I called the next day; he said I might have what I liked; I appointed to meet him on Friday the 14th, at two o'clock; I went, and he was not at home, his wife told me if I came at three o'clock I should find him at home.

Q. Where did you go to the next morning? - A. I went and communicated this to the officers; and we appointed to meet at the Castle at Moorgate the next morning, the 15th, between eight and nine o'clock; there Mr. Rogers gave me half a guinea, it was in a seven shilling piece, and 3 s. 6 d. in silver; Mr. Rogers marked them in the presence of me, Brown, Oliver, and Mr. Clark; he gave them me, and I put them in my pocket, I had no more money about me; then I went to Bray's in Paul's alley, about nine o'clock, the officers waited at the bottom of the alley; I went into Bray's, he asked me how many I wanted, I told him I would have half a score, with that I gave him a 7 s. piece and 3 s. for them; he pulled them out of his left hand breeches pocket, they were wrapped up in paper with a great many more, but how many I could not tell.

Court. Q. There were many more than what you bought? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. After he had given you the ten bad half crowns, what did he do with the remainder? - A. He wrapped them up, and put them into his pocket again; then when I had done that, I came out; I was to give a signal to the officers, which I did, and we returned into the house immediately; I went in first to make some apology, and Brown came in directly, and laid hold of Bray, the other officers came in, and they searched him and the house.

Q. What became of the ten half crowns that you had bought? - A. The City Marshal found them in my hand, and took them from me in Bray's house; I told him that I had them from that man pointing to Bray.

Q. When you were bargaining with the prisoner, was there any other man in the shop? - A. There was a man a stranger to me.

Q. Was there any conversation about that man? - A. I told him, when he was getting the things for me, that that man took notice; he said, never mind, he is up, meaning that he knew what business he carried on.

Q. You told us that Clark took the half crowns from you, what became of the marked sixpence? - A. I had it then in my pocket, they searched me, and I believe Mr. Rogers, one of the officers, took it from me.

Jury. Q. What shop does the prisoner keep? - A. It is a kind of a chandler's shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is it not a green grocer's shop? - A. No; they do not sell greens, they sell bread and butter, and things of that kind.

Q. Your name is Coleman; the prisoner keeps this chandler's shop - how long have you been acquainted

with Bray? - A. About a twelvemonth or more.

Q. I suppose, entirely for the sake of public justice, you went to make this purchase, you had no other motive in view, you meant to discover his abomination? - A. Yes.

Q. What are you? - A. A wire-drawer.

Q. They tell me that is a very good trade? - A. Yes, but when it is flat.

Q. You mean now it is a bad business with you, I call this wire-drawing; you never served your apprenticeship to wire-drawing? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When have you worked at this trade? - A. A good many years ago.

Q. Have you worked at wire-drawing within a month past? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 1, Steward's rents, Drury-lane.

Q. Who was the master that employed you in the month past? - A. Mr. Brown, in Love-lane.

Q. He has the misfortune to have your assistance in the wire-drawing way - how long have you got your livelihood by working for him? - A. I do not get my livelihood by working for him; as I am a working man, I work at what I can get, sometimes I work at my own country business making of lace.

Q. How long since you yourself were taken up for smashing, for putting off bad money? - A. I was once taken up about a month ago.

Q. How long since you were taken up before this? - A. Never in my life.

Q. You mean to get out of prison because of this prosecution? - A. I was ashamed entirely of it.

Q. You thought it was doing the public more justice in this way? - A. I thought it was a blackguard and scandalous thing; I got out of prison without this.

Q. You have been in prison for smashing? - A. I have.

Q. You have said there was a person in the shop at the time you were buying this bad money? - A. There was, and I asked him if he had any of those things, he knew very well what I meant, he said I might have what I liked.

Q. You paid him how much? - A. Ten shillings.

Q. And that person was a stranger to you? - A. He came to me on one side of the shop and asked me in a whispering manner.

Q. Why did you not tell us that when my friend asked the question: then he was attracted by your pretty face, he came round the counter and spoke to you, and then you asked him for those things, you are sure that was your expression; now attend to me, sir, I ask you, upon your oath, did you not ask him for those things which you had left with him yesterday? - A. No.

Q. I caution you, upon your oath did not you say to the prisoner, I will thank you to give me those things I left here yesterday? - A. It is wrong.

Q. You mean to persist in that answer? - A. Yes.

Q. You had been to the man's shop the day before? - A. I had.

Q. You had bought the two half bulls the day before? - A. Yes.

Q. He had committed an offence the day before, why was it necessary to lead him into another offence the next day, if you wanted to do it for the benefit of the public? - A. I was but one, and that was not sufficient evidence.

Q. That is, you mean to say your evidence nobody would believe? - A. I had no marked money to correspond.

Q. Have not you been in prison? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been dismissed from prison? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you dismissed from prison before you charged the prisoner with this, and before you charged two women? - A Yes.

Q. Before you gave information of any body else? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you at large now? - A. There was no bill found against me.

Q. How often have you been in prison? - A. Never but that once in my life.

Q. That was for smashing, and that was the only time you have been charged by any body; do you know Mr. Turner? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever taken up upon any charge of robbing him - whether you have not been in custody before you have said you have not; I ask you, were you not in prison upon a charge of robbing Mr. Turner of Little-Britain? - A. I was a month.

- BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Shadwell.

Q. Were you present when the money was marked? - A. I was at the Castle at Moorgate; I saw Mr. Rogers mark the money, he gave it to Coleman; upon Coleman giving the signal, I followed him immediately; I saw Bray behind the counter in his shirt sleeves, I immediately laid hold of him by both of his arms; Mr. Clark came in immediately after me, and when Mr. Rogers came in, I brought him from behind the counter, and Mr. Rogers searched him; I saw him find in his breeches pocket twenty-four counterfeit half-crowns in paper, and in his waistcoat pocket he found a counterfeit half-crown and a counterfeit dollar; he found a seven shilling piece marked on Bray, and three marked shillings; Mr. Clark searched Coleman, and he found ten counterfeit half-crowns; Mr. Rogers searched Coleman further, and took from him the marked sixpence which had been given to him before; then Mr. Bray mentioned some circumstance, and said the old b - r had done him.

Prisoner. I hope this conspiracy will come out before you go out of Court.

Court. Yes.

Brown. We then sent Oliver away with Coleman; Mr. Clarke, Rogers, and I went with Bray to the Compter, and as we were going in the coach, Bray said, that old rascal knew where he had them from as well as he did; that they came from Birmingham, and the value of them was no more than threepence a-piece, but before he would tell who it was, he would be hanged himself; I searched Bray's house, and upon one of the shelves I found this melting-pot.

Prisoner. You might find more very often.

Court. Q. That is a crucible? - A. (Brown.) Yes, he said he did a little in that. It is plate melted; I fancy that he meant he was a fence.

Mr. Knapp. Q. A fence is a cant term for receiving stolen property? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner said he had done a little in that way, you have given us the interpretation, that he was a receiver of stolen things; who was in the coach with you? - A. Mr. Clark and the other officers.

Q. The prisoner was foolish enough or led away by your appearance, to tell you that he did a little in that, meaning, that he was a receiver of stolen goods; and that they came from Birmingham, and he would be hanged before he would tell who the person was he had them from? - A. Yes.

Q. And this was all voluntary on his part? - A. Yes; and he said he could not have more than a twelvemonth for it; he knew his punishment.

- CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of the City - Did you go with the other officers to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes; I searched Coleman, I took from him ten half-crowns and a sixpence; I produce them; I saw Rogers take the money from Bray.

Q. Did you go with the last witness Brown, with Bray to the Compter? - A. I did; he said he had purchased these articles from Birmingham, and he had charged a shilling a-piece to Coleman.

Q. Do you recollect any thing else that Bray said? - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I have the same opinion of you as I always had - You do not mean to put any false colouring upon this business; I understood you to say you never heard him say he would lose his life before he would tell who was the manufacturer? - A. I do not recollect it.

Q. You heard Brown swear it by wholesale? - A. He did say so.

Q. Then now you and I a little differ - You recollect it now I put it in your mouth? - A. I did not recollect it before.

Q. Had you that coat on when you took him in custody? - A. No; if I came after you I should not have it on; I knew him twenty years ago.

- ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer; I marked a seven-shilling piece, three shillings in silver and sixpence, at the Castle, in Moorgate; upon the signal being given by Coleman, I went into Bray's house; Brown was close by Bray.

Q. Did you know Bray before? - A. I had heard of him; I searched Bray's pocket, I found, I think, twenty-four pieces resembling the half-crowns that Coleman had shewed me before, they were folded up in paper so as not to work off the colour; I found this dollar; he said, it is good; I think it is counterfeit, and this sixpence which I believe is good; when I made further search, I found a seven-shilling piece, and three shillings of the money in his pocket which I had actually marked at the Castle, at Moorgate; I said to Coleman, you have not given me all the marked money; said he, I have not given you the sixpence; I told him to give it to Mr. Clark; I looked at it and found it was the same sixpence.

Q. Did you hear Bray say any thing? - A. Bray said, the old b - y rogue had done him; I went into the coach with him to the Compter, and Oliver went with Bray; I produce the whole of the counterfeit money and the marked money; I marked the money in the presence of all the officers; (the marked money identified by Rogers, and shewn to the Jury.)

Mr. PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You, sir, are employed by the Mint; I will give you first the ten half-crowns that were found on Coleman - Are they all counterfeit? - A. They are.

Q. Do they correspond with each other? - A. They are of two dies, six of one die and four of another, they certainly correspond with each other.

Q. Now have the goodness to look at these, these are the twenty-four that were found on Bray, and the dollar? - A. These half-crowns are all counterfeit.

Q. How many are there of them? - A. Thirty half crowns, they are all counterfeit, of the same dies as the other, and the dollar is a bad one.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 100 l.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-31

462. ELIZABETH FORSTER was indicted for that she, on the 6th of July , did knowingly, and designedly, by false pretence to Harriot Ford , a servant of Elizabeth Hatton , did produce an order from Thomas White , meaning James White steward of St. Bartholemew's hospital, for a city patient, meaning a patient of the said hospital, that she was sent for clothing for the said patient, and that she, by means of such false pretence, did then and there unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, obtain of the said Harriot Ford a coat, value 5 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. and a pair of

breeches, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Hatton , with intent to cheat and defraud her thereof .

There being no evidence against the prisoner she was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-32

463. JAMES CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a copper bolt, value 23 s. the property of his Majesty .

Second Count, For like offence, laying them to be the property of John Wells , jun. William Wells , jun. John Perry , jun. Philip Perry , jun. and George Green .

The indictment was read by Mr. Gurney and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

- Cox sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

Q. Were you employed in the yard of Messrs. Perrys, Blackwall, on the 8th of July? - A. I was; I am store-keeper.

Q. Is his Majesty's ship, the Powerful , of seventy-four guns under repair in that yard? - A. Yes; in the stern of the double dock.

Q. In the repairing of her, when bolts are pulled out, if they are found serviceable are they made use of again? - A. If they are fit to be drove in again they are used.

Q. If they are unserviceable they are returned to Government - had any copper bolt been drove out of the ship for the purpose of repair? - A. Yes.

Q. Had the prisoner been for some time employed as a shipwright in that yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he employed on the Powerful? - A. He had been, but not at the time of this transaction.

Q. On last Monday evening, in consequence of any information, did you watch the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did; a little after seven in the evening, I was walking round the Powerful of seventy-four guns, I observed his brother and him at the stern of the Powerful; I walked towards the head of the ship; soon after I saw the prisoner go on board the seventy-four.

Q. Had he any business to go on board of her? - A. None at all; I immediately went to the gate.

Q. That is the gate out of which the prisoner must go to get out of the yard? - A. Yes; I stoped at the gate to watch and to stop him; I stopped there a very few minutes; I saw the prisoner at the bar coming towards the gate, and as soon as he saw me, he ran back again; I made towards him, and ordered him to be stopped; immediately he pulled out a bolt from his breast and put it down a cellar window; he kept on; I desired the other people to stop him, he being still in the dock-yard, he was stopped; I saw Mr. Willis pick up the bolt, and I immediately returned and took the bolt from him.

Q. Are you certain that the bolt you saw Mr. Willis pick up was the bolt that the prisoner threw down? - A. Yes; I took the prisoner before Mr. Wells; he asked him, what he was going to do with the bolt; he answered, that the people had not paid him his wages for the last month and he had taken this bolt to make up his money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. His Majesty's ship the Powerful is under repair in Mr. Welis's yard - What is the name of the firm? - A. John Wells , jun. William Wells , jun. John Perry , jun. Philip Perry , jun. and George Green .

Q. The prisoner had been employed as a shipwright in that yard, he had been employed on board that ship - How far distant were you from him when he dropped the copper bolt; were you one hundred yards? - A. I suppose it might be one hundred yards.

JOHN WILLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a shipwright belonging to the King's Dock-yard, at Woolwich? - A. Yes, and I superintend the Quebec frigate in Mr. Perry's yard; I saw the prisoner when he was pursued by Mr. Cox shove the bolt down a cellar window; I picked it up; I found the Broad Arrow upon it, it is one of the King's bolts.

- HOLBROOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I produce the copper; it has the Broad Arrow upon it. (The bolt identified by the witnesses.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-33

464. THOMAS NUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , thirty pounds of soap, value 20 s. the property of William Slater .

WILLIAM SLATER sworn. - I live at Bethnal-green ; I am a tallow-chandler and melter ; the prisoner was my carman : On the 26th of June, I found a cake of soap was left in the stable after he had gone to Brentford with his cart; I applied to the Police-office, and Mr. Ray attended at my house; and two of my servants I placed in the loft, where they had a full view of the window where the soap must be taken from; on the 28th, at three o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the yard; I was up at my window and saw him, about four I saw my loft-door thrown open, and about a quarter of a truss of hay thrown out; a little while after the prisoner took the hay on his back, he had more than hay; I said, he was heavy loaded; I saw him throw the hay on the cart on one side, and he went round on the other side and put a sack in the cart; he got up in the cart and replaced the

sack between some firkins of grease in the middle of the cart; we immediately came down stairs and followed the cart; Ray went up to him and got the sack and opened it; there were fourteen cakes of yellow soap in it.

JAMES SKINNER sworn. - On the 28th of June I was set to watch the prisoner for Mr. Slater.

Q. Could you, from the place where you were set to watch, see the prisoner and the place where the soap was put? - A. Yes; at three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come to his work, he went into the stable, he came out and went into the warehouse through the window; he stopped there about five or six minutes, and then he put a sack through the window, and carried it into the stable, he kept the sack in the stable about three quarters of an hour, he came out with the sack and a little bundle of hay, and his great coat, then he put it in the cart and drove out of the yard.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I was at the two pair back window and had a full sight of the premises; I observed the prisoner come in about three o'clock and go into the stable; a little before four, he went up to the loft window and threw out some hay, he took the same hay on his shoulder, I saw him put the hay and a sack into the cart and then drive out of the yard; I followed him about four or five hundred yards, I stopped the cart and I asked him what he had got in the cart besides grease; he seemed very much alarmed; he said, he had got some soap; I got up into the cart just where I saw him put it, and there I found this sack, and this soap was in it which I produce; it is marked at both ends with pieces of the prosecutor's cards.

(The soap identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

The Jury recommended him to mercy believing he had been led away .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-34

465. JOHN LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Brine .

ROBERT BRINE sworn. - I live at No. 3, Bury-street, St. Mary axe; I was at Bow-fair on the 8th of June; I detected the prisoner putting his hand into my pocket.

Q. You were in a crowd you know? - A. Yes; I am confident I felt some person's hand in my pocket; I immediately turned round and caught hold of the handkerchief; I accused the prisoner of it, he put his hand behind his coat and denied it, after the handkerchief was dropped; Croswell, the officer was by, he heard me accuse the prisoner; he picked the handkerchief up.

Q. Are you sure that the handkerchief the officer picked up was the handkerchief that you had in your pocket? - A. Yes; it is a very remarkable silk handkerchief.

BARNARD GLEED sworn. - On Saturday, the 8th of June, I had been at Bow-fair, going round the fair I saw Mr. Brine take the prisoner by the collar; he charged him with picking his pocket; I searched the prisoner, he had no handkerchief about him but this; he said, it was his own; it is almost a new one; he held it in his hand; Croswell got a light from one of the gingerbread-stalls, and on the ground I picked up this handkerchief; it is a silk handkerchief; Mr. Brine said he would swear it was his; I then took the prisoner to the watch-house; and coming to town with him, I asked him if this cotton handkerchief was marked; he said, he did not know whether it was or not; I then asked him, if it was marked what the marks should be; his reply was, if it was his father's handkerchief, it would be marked P. L. and if it was his own J. L. this handkerchief is marked T. H. Birch, No. 3. in full length. (The silk handkerchief produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

- CROSWELL sworn. - In going through the fair on Saturday evening, with Gleed, I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner by the collar, saying, he would take his oath that he had picked his pocket; I called for a light, I saw Gleed pick up the silk handkerchief.

Q. How far was that from where the prosecutor stood? - A. About a foot and a-half.

Prisoner's defence. I was standing at the corner of the gingerbread-stalls; this gentleman came up to me and asked me if I had seen his handkerchief; I said, no; he said, I had picked his pocket; there was a mob of people about; he came up and collar'd me; they looked on the ground and found a handkerchief, and he said it was me that took it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-35

466. JOHN MIDGELEY was indicted for burglariously and sacrilegiously breaking and entering the parish-church of Willsden, in the county of Middlesex , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 27th of May , and burglariously and sacrilegiously stealing therein, a bible, value 20 s. two prayer-books, value 20 s. and ten keys, value 10 d. the property of the parishioners of the said parish .

Second Count, For like offence, the property of Thomas Evans and William Nicholls .

WILLIAM TWYFORD sworn. - I live at Willsden, I am the parish-clerk: On Sunday, the 26th of May, I locked up the church, and left it as I usually do; I left a bible and a prayer-book on the Minister's desk, and a prayer-book on my own desk.

Q. Were they left there when you locked the

church up? - A. Yes, I locked the church up at one o'clock at noon on Sunday; on Tuesday morning I was called up at five o'clock, and when I got to the church, I found the door was open, it was unbolted, and the window was broke by the side of the door.

Q. That was not the door that you locked? - A. It was not; that door was at the chancel, at the north end of the church, and the door that unlocked was the south door.

Q. What sort of a window was this by the side of the chancel-door? - A. A casement, with two upright and two cross iron bars.

Q. Was this door bolted when you left the church? - A. Yes, I bolted it myself.

Q. Was the window whole or broken when you left the church? - A. The window was whole, and the bars were all in their places; when I saw it on Tuesday morning, one of the upright bars was drawn out of its place, and one of the cross bars was bent to the bottom, so as to admit any person in, and the glass of the window was pushed into the church; I went into the church, and missed the Minister's bible and prayer-book, and my prayer-book; I did not miss the keys then; I missed several other prayer-books.

JAMES LEVERMORE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. I live in the parish of Hendon.

Q. Did you at any time in May last see the prisoner at the bar in that neighbourhood? - A. Yes, on Monday, the 27th of May, about half past five o'clock in the afternoon, he was walking by the side of Willsden church, in the church-yard, against the window under the wall; I saw him, and a woman at a distance from him under the hedge.

Q. Did you see him do any thing afterwards? - A. I saw him turn back; he turned back to the north door, and he peeped into the window under his hat, which he held to keep the fun from his eyes; he came to me while I was putting some hay in a cart, and asked me the way to Harrow, after he had looked into the church; I told him I did not rightly know; I shewed him the church at a distance. Then he asked me if there was any public-house near; I told him there was; I directed him to the Six Bells at Willsden; he had a bundle under his arm in a green curtain, or something that was green.

EDWARD RICH sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time buy any prayer-books or bible of him? - A. On Tuesday, the 28th of May last, about twelve o'clock, he came to my lodgings at No. 12, Broad-street, Bloomsbury; he asked me if I would purchase some books; I asked him where they were; he told me at his lodgings. I accordingly went with him to a court in Chick-lane (Wright's-alley, I think it is,) and there he shewed me two folio prayer-books, and one folio bible; I agreed to give him one pound seven shillings for them; I took some books with me at the time; he asked me to purchase them; I told him I had not money enough to spare, and he said he would take some books in exchange; I took with me as many books as came to thirteen shillings and sixpence, and I gave him three shillings in silver, and I promised to give him the half-guinea more in the afternoon, if he called on me for it. He called, and I told him to call in the evening again, as it did not suit me to pay him at that time; I had suspicion that these books had not been come honestly by; I had dealt with him six months before; he said he would call again; in the mean time I went to the Magistrate, and enquired; he came to me in the evening, I was not at home, I was at Bow-street; and the Magistrate ordered two officers to go with me to his lodgings; I left the books at Bow-street; I went with the officers to his lodgings about half past ten o'clock on Tuesday evening.

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I produce a bible and two prayer-books, I received them at Bow-street: On the 28th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I went with the last witness to the prisoner's lodgings; in searching his lodgings, I found this bunch of keys lying under his wife, between the mattress and the bed, he was in bed with her; his lodging is in some court in Chick-lane, I believe the name of it is not Wright's-buildings; I went by the order of Mr. Bond to Willsden, to try the different locks in the church, and they all fitted the locks on the different pews; there was a particular lock on one pew, and this key opens it.

Q. (To Rich.) Are these the books that you took of the prisoner, and took to Bow-street? - A. They are the books that I agreed to give twenty-seven shillings for; I left them at Bow-street.

(The bible and prayer-books identified by Twyford.)

Prisoner's defence. May it please you my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. - I am a stranger here, I am a Yorkshire man born, and a cloth-worker by trade; our trade, by the war and the blockade of Hamburgh, grew very slack; we were about eighteen hundred of us employed in Leeds, in Yorkshire. I, having a little money before hand, came up to London to see if the trade was any better here; finding it not so, I laid my money out in publications, and for the last two years I made a practice of travelling from fair to fair, coming to London in order to buy publications that would suit the country. Coming up this time, I lit of a man in High Holborn as I was going to see my mother-in-law in Oxford-market, his name was Daniel Blackhall ; I first saw him on March 9, 1805, and for nine days I met him at No. 185, High Holborn, at a pawnbroker's shop, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; we called

to mind each other, I had seen him at Bristol fair; he asked me how I did; I returned to him I was in good health, I hoped he was the same; he said, are you in the habit of buying books; I said, yes; he said, I have a few; he let me look at them, there were two prayer-books, and a bible, a pair of leather breeches, and a pair of striped stockings, accordingly he went down with me to my lodgings in Chick-lane, at John Burr 's, near Smithfield; I had been there about six weeks; I paid him two pounds in notes, and ten shillings in money for them; I went out to get a pot of beer, and in the mean time I was out, my wife said he gave her these keys to take care of them till he returned; I never saw them, this is the truth, and nothing else but the truth. Accordingly, when we parted, I went to Mr. Rich, between eleven and twelve o'clock; he was not at home; his good wife had been lying in; she told me that he would be in in about half an hour, and when he came in, said I to Mr. Rich, you were speaking to me about a bible, I have purchased one of a man that lives near Uxbridge; he told me he was short of money, but he would go down with me to my apartment; I said he should have the bible at one pound four shillings, the new prayer-book at eighteen shillings, and the other at eight shillings, provided he would let me have publications for return of money; he said he could not do that; as we were in a friendly habit of buying I should let him have it at about a pound or so, a guinea or so on, and he would let me have books to make a return: I told him I could not afford them at all at that price; he then stated to me, he would give me books worth 13 s. 6 d. they were new just as they came from the press, and 3 s. 6 d. he paid me in money; some of the books were twelve shillings which he let me have at two; accordingly, he said, if I would go to his house he would give me the remainder; I went to his house about four o'clock, he asked me to come again at six; I went about seven to his house, his wife and the good lady who had taken care of her in her lying in, said, he was not at home, I must call on the day following and they would pay me the money, accordingly I went home and went to bed with my wife, and between ten and eleven o'clock, up comes Mr. Rich; he said, Midgeley, I said, what do you come so late for; I want you, he said; I said, is it necessary to get up; no, he said, it will do in the morning; there were four men laying in the room; one of the officers went to another bed; Mr. Rich said, this is the man that sold me the books; the officer tied my hands; I came along with them to Bow-street with the greatest pleasure; Mr. Rich said, you have brought me into a hobble; I did not know what they took me for; I had no suspicion at all about these books: they put me in a place all night; in the morning they took me to Fulham, and these books along with them; there was a church broken open there; they did not know me or these books to be their property. I came back to Bow-street, then they heard another church was broken open at Willsden; and they sent the books there; I knew nothing of the robbery; I asked them to let me go along with them, they would not give me the opportunity; I have no one to speak in vindication of my cause but myself.

GUILTY of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-36

467. JOHN MIDGELEY was again indicted for burglariously and sacrilegiously breaking and entering the parish church of Kingsbury, in the county of Middlesex , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 25th of May , and burglariously and sacrilegiously stealing therein, a bible, value 20 s. the property of the parishioners of the said parish .

Second Count, For like offence, the property of William Evans , and Edward Sayer .

There being no evidence of the offence being committed in the night time, the Court were of opinion it was unnecessary to proceed any further, the prisoner was from this charge

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-37

468. SARAH DIXON was indicted for the wilful murder of her own female infant .

WILLIAM CLARK sworn. - I am a labourer in the East India Company's warehouses, and a watchman in Vintry-ward.

Q. Did you at any time find the body of an infant when you were upon the watch? - A. Yes: on the seventh of June last, as I was going down Three-Crane-lane belonging to that ward, about twenty minutes to eleven at night, I saw a bundle lying on the sill of a window belonging to the Union-warehouse, between five and six foot from the ground; I went up to it, and took it down and went to the watch-house with it immediately, there were several other watchmen there when I unpinned it.

Q. What sort of a cover was it? - A. A piece of black bombazeen, it appeared to be something of a skirt; I produce it.

Q. What did you find wrapped up in that cover? - A. A female child.

Q. Was the body warm or cold at that time? - A. I did not touch it.

Q. Did it appear to you to be full grown or not? - A. A full grown child, a very fine child.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you perceive any marks of violence upon it? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Could you observe any navel string of the

child? - A. I observed it hanging some distance from its body, it was not tied.

Q. Were you present when the surgeon came? - A. I was.

Q. Had any alteration been made before the surgeon came? - A. Not any.

ELIZABETH PELLATT sworn. - I live at No. 47, Watling-street ; I am the wife of Richard Pellett .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; she lived servant with me; I took her into my service in the beginning of March last, she continued in my service till this misfortune happened; I took her with a character of being far advanced in pregnancy, and she was represented to me as a single woman, that was at the last place.

Q. Were you told so before you hired her? - A. Yes, by her mistress that she had lived with.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner herself of her being with child? - A. I told her, I had only one objection to her character, and that was on account of her mistress saying she was pregnant; she told me, that the mistress stated that circumstance to prevent her going into any other situation as she wished to keep her herself; she denied being with child; I told her, I would not engage her in my service without she suffered the doctor, that attended my family, to examine her, she said, she had no objection whatever, provided I would take her; I hired her without having her examined.

Q. What was your reason for doing that? - A. I meant to have it done some time after she had been in my service if she encreased in size; she being willing to be examined it removed my suspicion; as such I took her into my service, and she continued with me about two months, during which time, she appeared to have encreased very much in the size of her person; I questioned her concerning it, she constantly denied it; I told her, if she would make me her confident and friend I would do all in my power about it.

Q. Was this during the period of the two months or at the end of the two months? - A. During the period of two months; in requesting of her to make me her confident and friend, she at last said, she could not say to the contrary to me that she was not with child; I then made enquiry of her who the father of it was; she said, he resided at Highgate, at Parson-hill, he was a waiter; I told her I would try and get her a letter for the hospital, and after I consulted my friends about it, they thought I had better decline it; I told her if she would go to the parish, I would take her into my service after she got well, and I would do what I could for her: she made me answer, that she had lain in there once before, and she would never do it again if she lay in in the street; at the expiration of two months I was very unwell myself, and the doctor attended me; I begged him to examine her, and I asked his opinion of her.

Q. Who was the doctor? - A. Mr. Bailey of Salisbury-square; I then called her into the room, he examined her no further than putting his hand on her stomach; I was present, he said that was sufficient; I told her what the doctor's opinion was after he was gone, that she was at least five or six months gone; she said he knew nothing at all about it; she was considerably further gone than that. On Tuesday night, the beginning of June, she was very ill the whole of the day, (she had complained to the people in the house, I knew nothing of it till afterwards); the next morning when she got up, she was very bad indeed, and appeared very languid; at nine on the Wednesday morning I saw her, I told her from her looks I apprehended that there was something more than common the matter with her; she told me she had been very bad all night, she had gone through a great deal; I told her that she appeared very different in her person, and hoped she would not deceive me, but tell me candidly if any thing had happened; she said, no, certainly, there had not, and she certainly was not with-child.

Q. You told her that she appeared very different in her person? - A. Yes; and she answered she was very much reduced in her size, so far that she could slip through her stays; I then told her that I was certain something particular had happened to her; she begged that I would not disturb myself on that account, for there was nothing particular had happened to her; she continued poorly the whole of the week, and on the Thursday morning I went up into the attic story, there I saw she had washed some sheets, they were hanging in a room on the same floor where we are accustomed to dry in. I asked her what was the reason that she washed her own bed linen, when she knew it was always put out; she made no reply whatever.

Q. Did you observe any more on that day? - A. I observed her bed not in a very proper state; it appeared as if some one had been in labour.

Q. Did you examine the beds to see if they were the proper sheets? - A. I did not look any further, it was not very pleasant to look at, I only turned down the cloaths. On Friday night, about half after eleven o'clock, she went out, I did not see her go out, but in ten minutes after that I heard the street door bell ring, and I rung the parlour bell to enquire who went out, and no one answered; I repeated the ringing of the bell, and asked who it was that rung the street-door bell, she answered it was herself; I desired her to come in to tell me where she had been out to; she would not come in, she said she had been out for some beer; with that I reprimanded her, and told her it was

not a usual thing in my house for a servant to go out of a night without acquainting me with it, nor would I suffer it; this was on the Friday night; on the Saturday morning she was so bad that she could not get up, at eight o'clock she desired the apprentice to come and tell me; he brought me word that Sarah was very bad, and could not get up. I was very certain that she had been in labour; and as soon as I arose, I went to the prisoner, she was very bad in bed; I then asked her what was the matter with her; she said she was swelled to that degree, that she could not move; I looked at her, she threw the bed-cloaths off from her bosom, and her arms were quite extended, her breasts were quite up to the top of her neck, with the milk that was in her breasts; I told her I was very certain that she had been delivered; she spoke rather impertinent to me, and said, she was quite surprized at my suspicions; with that she removed the bed cloaths, and asked me if I saw a child there. I told her I did not, but I was very certain that she was not delivered on the Saturday; it was on the Tuesday night that she was delivered, I knew the time from the appearance of the things; I then told her she must have murdered the baby, and concealed it. I insisted upon immediately knowing; she answered me there was no one saw her do it, and no one could sware that she did it. I then told her I should send for a medical person, he should be satisfied respecting the delivery, as well as myself; with that she got up, and wanted to go out of the house, we detained her; I sent for Mr. - , he examined her, and said there was every appearance of her being delivered.

THOMAS LUCOCK sworn. - Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Pellett, the husband of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar in your master's service at the same time with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of her going out on a Friday night early in June? - A. Yes; she had a bundle with her, she went out from the one pair of stairs room, the kitchen, I was in the kitchen at the time.

Q. About what time in the evening was it that she went out? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Did she tell you what she was going for? - A. She told me she was going to the chandler's shop in Queen-street; she did not say what for.

Q. Did you remain in the kitchen till she returned? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was she out? - A. Between five and ten minutes.

Q. Did you see whether she had brought any thing in with her from the chandler's shop? - A. No; I went down to open the door, and she came up with me into the kitchen.

Q. Do you know any thing more? - A. She went up stairs before she went out, after she told me she was going out; she pulled the kitchen door after her when she went up stairs; I did not see her till she returned.

JOHN WESTON sworn. - I am a surgeon: On Friday the 10th of last June, about a few minutes after eleven o'clock in the evening, a watchman came to my house, upon which I immediately went to the watch-house.

Q. Did you proceed to examine the body? - A. I did.

Q. Was there any warmth in the body at that time? - A. None.

Q. From the appearance of the child could you judge whether it was a full grown child or no? - A. It appeared to me to be of its full growth; there were no marks of violence upon the body of the child as I could discover.

Q. Could you judge from appearance that the child had been born alive? - A. It had every appearance of being born alive.

Q. Did you examine the state of the lungs? - A. No, I did not conceive it necessary, my attention was drawn entirely to the navel string; I observed the navel string had not been tied as is usual, but that it had been divided by some instrument or other, about four inches from the body of the child; from that I infer, that there might have been an hemorrhage from thence; the extremities of the child were covered with blood, but whether it proceeded from the child or the mother it is not possible for me to say.

Q. To what do you impute the cause of the child's death? - A. If the child was born alive, there is no doubt but the child got it's death from the navel string.

Q. Can you take upon you to say the child was born alive? - A. The child might have died in its birth very probably; death may and does happen by leaving the navel string untied; the child must inevitably have lost a great deal of blood, but whether it died through that, it depends greatly upon the quantity of blood which the child lost, because the hemorrhage might have stopped before the child bled to death.

Q. Would it not have been an easy thing to have tied up the navel string by a person in her situation? - A. She might do it, but it would not be very convenient.

Q. Persons in that situation are very frequently in so debilitated a state, and the mind so far affected as to render them incapable of doing it without assistance? - A. True.

Q. Is there not a sort of delirium attends labour sometimes? - A. It is the case most frequently after the delivery.

Q. Immediately afterwards? - A. No; the child had the appearance as though it had lain in one position for some time; I do not think that the

tying up the child these things, for a short time, would make it have the appearance that it had; I conceive that the mother might not be conscious that it would produce death to the child by dividing the tunica.

Prisoner's defence. I was with child, I was only three or four months gone; I was taken very ill, I was sitting on the water-closet, and something came from me of a great substance.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY of the murder, but of the concealing the birth .

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-38

469. JAMES LOFT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Mutter , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 4th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, an axe, value 2 s. a pair of sugar nippers, value 2 d. a hand-saw, value 2 s. the property of the said George .

GEORGE MUTTER sworn. - I am a clergyman; I am the son of George Mutter , he lives at Little Stanmore : On the 22d of June my father's house was broken open, I live with him.

Q. How was it broken open? - A. It was entered by a pane of glass, which was partly broke in the sash window.

Q. In what room? - A. In a room attached to the house, a lower room were we kept sundry articles, carpenter's tools, and other things that we had use for; the room was built against the end of the house, it had no internal communication with the house, it was used occasionally for the parlour. On the 4th of July I was sitting up late, I heard some person come past the house between eleven and twelve at night; I heard the gate open, which had been previously bolted, I immediately ran out, and heard footsteps, my sister ran out, and being alarmed by her noise, I could not hear the steps so as to pursue the person it being dark. The next morning the prisoner was brought to our house by a person who is present, with the articles in a cart.

Q. On the 3d of July had you been in the room? - A. On the 3d of July I had been in the garden adjoining this back room about three o'clock in the afternoon; I then looked in the window, and saw it was shut to.

- BEGG sworn. - I am a farmer, I live at Hendon: On the 4th of July, about five o'clock in the morning, as I was going into my yard, I saw the prisoner; he had a basket, and a quantity of tools; I stopped him, and took him into my house for about two hours, and his brother came, I sent him down with the tools to Mr. Mutter's, in care of his brother.

(The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY of stealing only .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-39

470. JAMES LOFT was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Mutter , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 22d of June , and burglariously stealing therein, an axe, value 1 s. a screw winch, value 1 s. a nail drawer, value 1 s. three squares, value 3 s. four planes, value 4 s. a rule, value 6 d. a pair of sheep shears, value 6 d. a broken saw, value 2 d. a padlock, value 3 d. a basket, value 4 d. a saddle cloth, value 6 d. a piece of rug, value 6 d. and two pistols, value 30 s. the property of George Mutter .

GEORGE MUTTER sworn. - I live with my father, he keeps a house at Little Stanmore ; the articles were stolen on the 22d of June: from the circumstance of the window being entered, I presume the door must have been fastened, as the door was fastened in the morning at nine o'clock when I first saw it on that day; they had removed the sash to take the articles out. This man was taken up on the 5th of July, he told me he had taken them, and if I would go with him, he would go and shew me where he had deposited them; he then led me up the lane, and took the pistols from a hedge; from there he took me to a dunghill, and scratching it about a foot deep he produced a great number of articles in two sacks; I then asked him for the screw-winch, he took me two fields from our house, and took it from a hedge; I asked him the meaning of depositing them in so many places; says he, I was overloaded, and I intended, when I had got sufficient, to have gone to London, and brought a cart and took them all away. I asked him where he lodged, he said in Chapel-street, Tottenham-court-road; I went there and found an axe, which is a different axe to the other, and this saw, they were in his workshop; I found these duplicates on a shelf under a stone in his workshop. I am sure the whole of the property is my father's.

THOMAS WOODMAN sworn. - I produce a rule and three squares pledged on the 2d of July by the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's defence. One of the squares does not belong to the gentleman, I made it myself, I could make another like it, if I had the tools; and that plane belongs to Charles Ham , a carpenter at Edgware.

GUILTY

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-40

500. MARY CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a table cloth, value 3 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 6 d. two blankets, value 2 s. a pillow-case,

value 2 s. two frocks, value 1 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 d. and a pair of sheets, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of David Sydie .

DAVID SYDIE sworn. - I live at No. 55, Chamber's-street, Goodman's-fields ; I keep the house, I am a labouring man ; having lost my wife, I hired the prisoner as a servant about the 11th or 12th of December last, she continued there till the 28th or 29th of March; about the 6th or 8th of March, I missed some articles of wearing apparel; she confessed that she had pledged them, and when I found she had left me, I applied for a warrant; I heard nothing of her till the 4th of June; I applied to the pawnbroker's and found some of the articles; I lost more articles than are in the indictment.

DANIEL HILL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Cable-street, Rosemary-lane; I produce two blankets and a table-cloth; I can only swear to one of the duplicates, the rest are not my writing; I took the table-cloth on the 27th of March, of the prisoner, in the name of Mary Clark .

- BOWMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce two sheets, a shirt, and a handkerchief pledged by the prisoner; I am sure of the person of the prisoner.

EDWARD CUMBER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Shadwell: On June the 4th, David Sydie came to me, and told me, that a woman had robbed him; I took the woman in charge; I found all these duplicates upon her; here is a table-spoon it was taken from the prisoner. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. This man took me in to look after his family; with that, I lived with him as a wife; he did not allow sufficient for his children; I pledged these things to support them.

(Prosecutor.) It is quite the reverse; I never knew they were pawned; I am not that sort of a person.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-41

472. SARAH GLASGOW and ELIZABETH TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a purse, value 1 d. a gold ring, value 10 s. a dollar, value 5 s. a seven-shilling piece, and five shillings, the property of Thomas Ekelso , privily from the person of Elizabeth his wife .

ELIZABETH EKELSO sworn. - My husband's name is Thomas Ekelso ; he is a wine-cooper ; I live at No. 16, Artillery-street ; I met the prisoners in the street, six or seven doors from my house between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; she came up to me, and said, my petticoat was loose.

Q. Who was that? - A. The eldest, Taylor, she said, my petticoat was loose and she would pin it up for me; I looked, and said it was not down; she was all the time pulling my gown and petticoat pretending to pin it up; I put my hand on the side and found it was not untied; I told her if it was down, to let it be down; and I went on, I went into Bishopsgate-street, to Mr. Duffield's, the grocer, for tea and sugar, and there I missed my purse, I was very much alarmed about it, I told the young man, I had not my purse, I would look in again; I went out of the shop and informed my husband, and he found them. Taylor had her arm round Glasgow's neck as they were walking.

Q. Did you stop? - A. I stopped for them to pin it as I thought.

Q. Did you perceive what they were about? - A. I thought they were pinning my petticoat; they said, it was dragging on the ground; I said, it did not, and if it was down it might be down.

Q. What age are they? - A. Taylor seems turned of fourteen, and Glasgow is twelve.

THOMAS EKELSO sworn. - On the 5th of July, my wife came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon; I am a peace officer of the Old Artillery-ground; I learnt who the prisoners were; I took Glasgow in the Old Artillery passage, between nine and ten o'clock that night, between six and seven the next morning I took Taylor, and they were both taken to Worship-street, and searched by Mr. Ferris, an officer, and on Taylor was found several pieces of money; one piece of which my wife declared to be her's.

- GEARY sworn. - On Saturday, the 6th of July, I was at the Public-office, in Worship-street; while the prisoners were at the bar, I observed the prisoner Taylor take a purse out of her stocking or shoe, I will not be positive which, I informed the Magistrate, and Mr. Ferris and I searched her; I found a red-leather purse containing a seven-shilling piece, one shilling, and two sixpences.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street; I searched both the prisoners there, and while I was searching Taylor, her shoe came off, and this leather purse fell out of her shoe, containing a seven-shilling piece, one shilling, and two sixpences, the prosecutrix knew the shilling and one of the sixpences; I produce them.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Is that your money? - A. I will swear to that shilling by that particular mark on the edge, and the cross at the side, I put that particular shilling by for a particular use. They were both together, one held up the gown, while the other was going to pin it.

Taylor called three witness who gave her a good character.

Glasgow called one witness who gave her a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-42

473. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , privily from the person of Mary, the wife of William Monk , a pocket-book, value 6 d. a half-guinea, two seven-shilling pieces, a sixpence, and a Bank-note, value 1 l. the property of William Monk .

MARY MONK sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes; my husband's name is William Monk ; he is at sea; he is a weaver by trade: On the 28th of November last, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the High-street, Shoreditch ; Taylor stopped me.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. Never; she told me my petticoat was hanging down; she asked me if she should pin it up for me; I told her, it would do very well while I got home; I had my child in my arms and a bundle in my hand; she insisted upon pinning my petticoat up; I said, hold my bundle while I change the child into my other arm; when I had got my child on my arm I looked round, and saw her hand was in my pocket-hole; I put my own hand down to feel in my pocket, she pushed my hand away; I put my hand down again into my pocket, and I missed my pocket-book directly; I told her she had got my pocket-book; she said, she had not; she pulled several other pocket-books and tobacco pouches out of her pocket to satisfy me that she had not got mine; she said, that she had not got mine about her; I asked her where she lived; she told me, she lived at No. 1, Cock-alley; I went up there after her to No. 1, and there was no such person lived there.

Q. She went away and left you did she? - A. Yes, she went up the alley and I went after her, but there was no such a person lived there.

Q. What name did she go by then? - A. Taylor; she did not tell me any name at all.

Q. Did you ever see your pocket-book again? - A. No, nor my money; I had my pocket-book in my pocket that very minute; I saw her hand in my pocket, she pushed my hand away, and said, she was not going to take any thing away from me.

Prisoner. At that time I was in St. Clement's workhouse; Mr. Alcock let me out and let me in again; I had only been out to buy a pennyworth of tea.

- GEARY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the parish of St. Luke's; I heard the prisoner confess at the Office, that she had been along with Mrs. Monk on that day; she acknowledged that Mrs. Monk had accused her on that day, but that she had not taken her money.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty of either; my father came up and asked Mr. Latham if I had been out; he said, somebody had enquired about me; Mr. Alcock said, I had not been out above five minutes; Mrs. Monk said, she would come up to me; and the next day my father met her in the street, she said then, she would not mind it.

Q. Where is your father? - A. My mother is here.

Q. (To Mrs. Taylor.) Are you the mother of this prisoner? - A. I am.

Q. Why is not her father here? - A. I left him at home at work; we live at No. 1, New-court, Quaker-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Have you, or any of your family been in the workhouse lately? - A. No; I have four childeren; I have got none in the parish.

Q. Do you know Mr. Alcock? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here? - A. I do not know.

Q. Have you ever sent any of the children to the workhouse? - A. That big girl, she is fourteen, she was in the workhouse last November.

Q. How could you send a big girl like that to the workhouse, she is able to get her bread - what business is your husband? - A. A Shoemaker; her father has learnt her to close shoes lately.

Q. Do you know when Mrs. Monk was robbed? - A. A woman came up to my house about six weeks before Christmas, she asked me if my girl was at home.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Did you ever see this woman before? - A. Yes, on the 28th of November I went up to her house, I found it out that night after I had been to Cock-alley, I went to see the girl, I wanted to know whether she was the same girl or no, but she was not there.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privily from her person .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-43

474. JOHN BUCKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a chesnut gelding, value 10 l. the property of Sarah Crawley .

SARAH CRAWLEY sworn. - I live at Stoke Newington ; I am in the butchering line; I am a widow .

Q. Did you lose a horse at any time? - A. Yes, I lost a white chesnut horse between the 11th and 12th of last month, I missed him on the 12th out of 'squire Budgeon's fields, about a quarter of a mile from my house; I bought him on the 13th of December last, he was very poor when I bought him, and I turned him out to grass.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge how

it was taken - A. No; I owned the horse when I saw him at the livery-stable, at Worship-street.

JOHN WILSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Budgeon; the last time I saw the horse in the fields, was on the 8th of June.

Q. Is Mrs. Crawley's horse a light chesnut horse? - A. Yes; with a flaxen mane and tail; on Saturday, the 8th of June, I saw this horse in the fields; I was going to take one horse out of the fields and turn another in; I was not at home on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, I was in town.

Q. Have you seen the horse since? - A. I have seen him at Worship-street since.

AARON GREAVES sworn. - I am apprentice to Mrs. Crawley; I saw the horse on Sunday, the 9th of June, in Mr. Budgeon's fields.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On Tuesday night, the 11th of June, me and Bishop went out on duty in the streets; we were in Shoreditch about two o'clock in the morning returning home; on Wednesday morning, the 12th, as we were coming just past the turnpike-bar, within about thirty yards of the bar, I saw the prisoner riding this said horse, it is a bay or a chesnut, I am not a judge of the colours of horses, it was a gelding; he was riding it without a saddle, with this cloth buckled on it, it is a piece of an old horse rug, with an old sirsingle, made of a piece of leather belonging to a coach bridle; he got up to the turnpike-gate, and the bar was shut; I then with Bishop went up to him, I asked him where he was going with that horse; he said he was going to take it into the Borough; I asked him whereabouts there; he said, to Mr. Huggins, at the Catherine Wheel inn; I asked him where he had brought it from; he said, from Kensington; I then asked him from whom at Kensington; he said he could not tell; I told him he must come four miles out of his road to come from Kensington through Shoreditch to the Borough; he said he did not know; I asked him which way he had come; he could not tell, he pointed out some different roads that I did not know the names of; I then asked him if he had any turnpike-tickets that he had passed through to come from there; he said he had, he produced me this ticket; on this ticket is Old Road toll, Ball's Pond, No. 619, with a one on it; one penny it appears to be.

Q. Is that the direct road, supposing he came from Stoke Newington? - A. It is the direct road from the field into town from where these people have told you, and within about four hundred yards distance from the field, and this gate is but a little more than a quarter of a mile from the field. I then told him, without he gave me a better account of it, I must detain him; I then took him to the watch-house; I took the horse to a livery-stable right facing the Office, and left it in the care of the head ostler there. On the next morning I took the prisoner before the Magistrate, and before he was brought to the Office I saw him in the public-house adjoining; I said to him then, Buckman, have you any better account to give of this horse to-day; Bishop was then standing by me; he said, I will now tell you the truth, I met a man at the Catherine-Wheel inn, in the Borough, last night about five o'clock, (meaning on the Tuesday night, this was on Wednesday morning I was asking him,) and the man desired him to go to the Queen's Head, in the Green-lane; he went there, and waited till eleven o'clock; the man did not come while he was waiting, but as he was coming from the house, at a small distance, the man met him, and the man desired him to wait in the road, and he would go and fetch him a horse; he went away from him a little while, and returned to him with this horse, and desired him to take it to the Catherine Wheel inn, in the Borough, to Mr. Huggins.

Q. Did he say he walked there, or rode there, to the Green-lane? - A. His stockings were so clean, I did not think he walked there; I asked him if he had ever seen him before; he said, never till that day; I asked him if he knew where he lived, and he said, no; the horse was kept three or four days in the stable where it was first put; the officer and we were making inquiry about it, to hear if any body had lost a horse; Mrs. Crawley's foreman inquired first, and when Mrs. Crawley came, the horse was in a square stable, with eight or nine stalls in each angle; there were thirteen or fourteen, or more horses in it; she knew the horse perfectly well, although its tail had been cut considerably since she saw it, and when she called him Jack, he turned his head to her; from the appearance of the horse's tail it had been cut with a knife, by the haggled appearance. I asked the prisoner where he lived himself, and he said, at the Black Horse, at Stockwell.

Q. Did he say what he was? - A. He said he had been a post-boy; I asked him what road he had drove, and when I put that question to him, he did not answer me; he said that he came out of Kent formerly, and that he had lodged at this house two years and a half; I then told him I should go and inquire his character; I went there, and could not find him out.

Q. That was the same horse that you shewed Mrs. Crawley? - A. Yes, the very same.

- BISHOP sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing more? - A. No; I assisted Vickery in taking him into custody, I heard the conversation.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) The horse that you were shewn by Vickery, are you sure that it is your horse? - A. I am quite certain of it, I could tell it from five hundred.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel,

and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-44

475. JAMES READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of John Atkinson , on the 23d of June , a gold ring, value 20 s. a pair of gold ear-rings, value 4 s. and a Banknote, value 2 l. the property of the said John .

(The case was stated by Mr. Pollock.)

JOHN ATKINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. I live in Downing-street : On the 23d of June I went into my back parlour, and perceived my secretary open; on examining it, I found an instrument had been used; I supposed it was opened by a small crow, the private door had been cut, and the lock forced open; on examining a little drawer, I missed a two-pound Bank-note, and in looking further in my other drawers the things were tossed about, and taken out; I missed immediately a gold mourning ring and a pair of gold ear-rings.

Q. When did you see the note again? - A. On Monday, after the prisoner was examined at Marlborough-street, I made an inquiry, and traced the note to Mr. Watts's, Berwick-street, New-road.

Court. Q. What day was this? - A. The robbery was on Sunday, and on Monday I traced the note and received it of Mr. Watts, in change of another; I produce the note; I always take the number and date of the notes, and when I part with any I scratch them off; the number is 12,480, on the 9th of April; I have them all in parcels; the notes came from the Bank, I am a Treasurer in the East-India House; that note was in the secretary, and the only one that was left; when I get change I have a quantity of notes of following numbers.

Q. Are you sure that you had not disposed of this note? - A. Yes; I went to my drawer, and took three notes away - two two's and a one; I know I had not disposed of this, by its being the last of the parcel of my own list; I have the list now in my pocket, I mark them off when I pay them away; the mourning ring is a ring of a near relation of mine, it was in a drawer adjoining where the door was broken open.

ANN NEEDHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. I live in Fitzroy-place, my husband is a shoe-maker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I have known him a good while; he came to my house on Sunday morning, the 23d of June, about half past eight o'clock, and gave me a two-pound note to pay for his shoes; he told us that he brought it from Clerkenwell, it was his master's note.

Q. Did he say any thing what he was to do with it? - A. I believe he said he was to get the change for his master; I went to Mr. Watts and got it changed, and gave the prisoner the change.

Q. Did you give the same note to Mr. Watts that you received from the prisoner? - A. Yes.

ROBERT WATTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. Q. What are you? - A. I am a dealer in coals, I live in Brook-street, Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Do you remember at any time changing a two-pound note for Mrs. Needham? - A. Yes, on Sunday, the 21st of June, between nine and eleven o'clock, I gave her the full change, and I put that note in the bureau.

Q. When did you part with it? - A. On Monday the 24th, I parted with it to Mr. Atkinson; I had no other two-pound note but that; I am sure it is the same note.

JOHN LODGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. Q. You are servant to Mr. Atkinson? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect going out with the other servant on Sunday the 23d of June? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you leave home? - A. About a quarter after seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. In what state did you leave the front area-door when you went out? - A. I left it about half open and half shut.

Q. In what state was the street-door of the house when you went out? - A. It was pulled to with a spring-lock.

Q. How long were you absent from home? - A. About an hour and a quarter.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at all in your walks that morning? - A. I did, I met him in the first field from our house in Howland-street.

Q. How far is that field from your house? - A. About a quarter of a mile.

Q. Who was with you? - A. My fellow-servant and her niece.

Q. Did you speak to the prisoner? - A. I asked him if he had seen his father; he said he had seen him.

ANN WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. I am servant to Mr. Hicks, No. 20, Howland-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he lodges with Mr. Hicks in the garret.

Q. Did he sleep at home on Saturday night the 22d of June? - A. No.

Q. What time did he come home on the Sunday morning? - A. About nine o'clock, as far as I know.

Q. Was he out after that before he was taken into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time of the day was he taken into custody? - A. About eleven o'clock on the same day.

Q. When were you employed to sweep the room in which he lodged? - A. About five o'clock

in the afternoon, on Monday, I swept the room in which he slept; I found a ring and a pair of ear-rings between the skirting-board and the wall.

Q. Look at those rings and see whether they are the same? - A. They are the same that I gave to my master.

Prisoner's defence. I only say that Mr. Atkinson said he would forgive me, if I would confess what I had done.

Court. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Did you make any promise? - A. On his first apprehension I said if he would confess I would forgive him, so far as this, I would have sent him to sea.

HUMPHREY HICKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pollock. I am a publican.

Q. How long have you known this young man? - A. He lodged with me about a month, he was with me at the time he was taken; Mr. Atkinson called on the Sunday morning with a constable, and took him up in the room; Mr. Atkinson promised to forgive him before me, and desired me to speak to him to tell the truth.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. Not on that day, he did on the next, and I acquainted Mr. Atkinson where he changed the note.

Court. Q. Is that so, Mr. Atkinson? - A. I had found out the two-pound note in the neighbourhood.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-45

476. MARY HEDGE, alias BILDIN , and SARAH WADE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , twenty-two yards of Irish linen, value 50 s. the property of Thomas Powditch , privately in his shop .

EDWARD MEREDITH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Powditch, linen-draper , No. 29, Middle-row, Holborn : On the 27th of June, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into the shop together; they wanted two nails of clear muslin to put on a cap; I sold them as much as came to fivepence halfpenny, Mary Bildin paid me for it; she asked to see a remnant of shambro to make a child a bonnet; she described some particular colour; I told them I had a remnant or two, and if it suited them, I should be very happy to sell it them. I then went to a drawer at the bottom of the shop to get this remnant of shambro; I returned with it, and to my great surprise I only found one of my customers in the shop, Mary Bildin ; I jumped over the counter; Mary Bildin tried to prevent me from coming over; good God, man, says she, you will knock me down, where are you going; I got over, and ran after the other, and took her in Holborn; I found upon her a piece of Irish cloth, the property of Thomas Powditch ; I had seen it half an hour before it was on the counter; I produce the cloth.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were other persons in the shop, who are not here? - A. Yes.

Q. You had a suspicion of the prisoners, and you watched them? - A. I deny it; my suspicions arose, finding only one in the shop, I never knew it was gone till I found it upon her.

WILLIAM JAMES sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Powditch: The two women came into our shop on Thursday evening, and wanted to see some muslin; the last witness shewed them some, and they wanted a small remnant of shambro, to make a child's bonnet; he went to the drawer to look for it, and he saw one of the prisoners run round the window; I was serving another customer on the other side of the shop; the last witness got over the counter, and took her a little way from the corner.

Q. What became of the other prisoner? - A. She staid in the shop.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Hedge, GUILTY , aged 29.

Wade, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-46

477. JOHN PATMORE and JOSEPH DOBBINS were indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain field, near the King's highway, in the parish of Acton , in and upon Ann, the wife of John Bailey , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a cap, value 6 d. a neck handkerchief, value 3 d. a shawl, value 1 s. two yards of ribbon, value 6 d. a counterfeit shilling, one penny, five seven shilling pieces, and one half crown, the property of John Bailey .

There being no confirmatory evidence of the robbery, and the prosecutrix varying in giving her evidence, together with her improper conduct at the Redlion public-house at Acton, previous to her going voluntarily to the field with the prisoners, the Court were of opinion the prisoners could not be found guilty of the robbery, they were accordingly

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-47

478. GEORGE D'ARCY was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, and causing to be forged and counterfeited, a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 28 l. purporting to be drawn on Messrs. Collier and son, with intention to defraud John Baster .

The prosecutor informed the Court that he had the bill in question on Saturday last, when he attended the Court, and when he had got home, he found his pocket had been entirely cleared of all the papers; he was not

conscious of it at the time it was done, nor had he taken any steps to recover it. The prosecutor's recognizance was ordered to be estreated in the Court of Exchequer, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-48

479. JOHN ARNOLD , EPHRAIM FURMIDGE , and SARAH FURMIDGE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Warren , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 7th of June , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty pair of boots, value 20 l. and sixty pair of shoes, value 15 l. the property of Thomas Warren .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.)

THOMAS WARREN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are a shoe-maker ? - A. I am, I live in St. Martin's-lane; I had another house in the Strand, I have let it since; I carried on the business in the lower part of the house, with the assistance of my son and daughter, at No. 2, in the Strand . On the 8th of June, I heard my shop was robbed, by a man that stopped the prisoner, Arnold, in Swallow-street; I went to St. James's watch-house, and there I saw Arnold in custody; from there I went to Mr. Edgar, in Swallow-street, and there I saw eighteen odd boots. Arnold told me that Furmidge, my foreman, was the man that had robbed me; says he, I and Furmidge went into your house in the Strand, I held the bag while the other put the shoes and boots in.

Q. Was Furmidge your porter at the time? - A. Yes, and afterwards, till I took him up; I got a search warrant for Furmidge's apartments, and Donaldson, the constable, went and searched his lodgings, where we found a vast number of duplicates.

JAMES EDGAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live in Swallow-street, I keep a cloaths' shop: Arnold came to my shop on the 8th of June in the forenoon; he brought eighteen boots in a bag, he offered them me for sale; I examined the boots, and found the name of Warren on them; I asked him how he came by them; he said he had them for a debt; I told him he had never those boots for a debt; I suspected him, I had him detained, and sent for Mr. Townshend the officer; he came, and the man was taken away; I delivered the boots to Townshend.

RICHARD TOWNSHEND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am an officer; I was fetched by the last witness to take the prisoner Arnold into custody; I produce the boots, I have had them in my possession ever since. (The boots identified by the prosecutor).

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am constable of St. Martin's in the Fields; I went to No. 14, Union-street, to the prisoner Furmidge and wife's lodgings; I searched the room all over, and found a great quantity of duplicates, out of which I selected three for shoes pledged on the 7th of July. (Produces the duplicates.)

THOMAS MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. - I am a servant to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker, Long-Acre.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. I know the woman; I took these shoes I produce of the woman at the bar, on the 14th of June.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Chandos-street, I know the woman, I have seen her in the shop; I cannot recollect the day: I produce a pair of shoes pledged for two shillings.

- MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Are you sure that the woman prisoner at the bar was the person that brought the shoes that you produce? - A. I have not the least doubt of it. (The shoes identified by Robert Warren , jun).

Arnold's defence. I have had a slight acquaintance with this young man for some time; one day about three weeks before this robbery occurred, I happened to be going along St. Martin's-lane, I met him, we fell into conversation, and we had two pints of beer together; he told me, he was very glad to see me as he had got something very good in his head, and he would be very glad to see me any day, at that public-house, at his dinner hour, as he was in a hurry then; in the course of two days I called at that public-house; I found him there: he took me then almost to the shop in the Strand and appointed to meet me there about nine o'clock at night, at the time he was shutting up the shop; I went to a court near there at the time appointed to wait, and after he had shut up the shop, we joined company together, and went to a public-house and drank together; then him and me went to his home and fetched two bags, as he said, he had every thing convenient, and he was sure there was no danger; we went back to the house in the Strand, and he by the assistance of a key, went into the house, and being dark, he pulled me in, as I was to stand in the passage while he opened the shop door; there being a padlock and another lock to the shop-door; when he had proceeded so far as to open the padlock, I heard very distinctly some one or other coming down stairs, and I saw a kind of a light upon the stair-case; we both came away and went and drank together; before we parted, he said, he had left the padlock on a ledge in the passage; he hoped it would not be found out; with that, he said, call and see me soon, then I shall be able to let you know what my master says; accordingly, I called in the course of a few days at the same public-house, where I saw him

again; he told me, that things went on very well, there was no particular noise made to him as the young ladies were very ignorant and very careless, that he did not suppose they had the least suspicion about it; they were afraid of letting their father know, for fear of getting anger for being so careless in leaving the padlock off (as he imagined they thought that they had left the padlock off) if I would call again in a day or two he would try again; I did call again the next night at shutting up the shop time; we went after the shop was shut and drank together, and then we went and got the bags from his apartment, and he put the key in the door, and there appeared over the door a light, like unto a lighted candle; he pulled out the key, and we ran away and went and drank together; and I said to him, certainly those people have some suspicion, and I am very sorry I ever came to you to do any thing in it; I advised him to let it alone; I parted with him, and did not see him till the Thursday before this affair happened; I certainly called at the house to see him as usual, he told me, there was nothing particular that happened, and there was a better opportunity than ever for the lodgers in the house had gone away, and there was not a soul in the house, and one of his master's was gone out of town; by his persuasions, he advised me to meet him again at night; on the Friday night previous to this robbery, I met him at the usual time when the shop was shutting up, which was the third time, and when he had shut up the shop we went and drank together; he said, he thought it was too soon; I went home with him to his room, and we had some supper there, and we sat there till past ten o'clock; he got his bags and we both came to this house; he opened the outer-door, and the shop door; he desired me to stand where he placed me with the bag open, and receive the things from him; when the bags were pretty well full, he said, there was some money in the till, and he would be d - d but he would have that; he opened the till, and said, there was no money in there but a bad shilling, which he threw away; we went away, and took the goods to his room, he gave me one of these bags and he took the other, and we looked over the goods, there were twenty pair of boots, and fourteen or fifteen pair of shoes, I think; I staid in his room all night as he recommended me, and then he said, he should go in the morning to work as usual, left there should be any suspicion, notwithstanding, he thought it would be unsafe to leave the things in his apartment; he recommended me to take a part away and he would take another part to a friend's to sell them for him, he told me to take them where they were safe or to sell them.

Ephraim Furmidge 's defence. This man has broken open Mr. Warren's house himself, and he wants to criminate others in it; I know nothing of it.

Sarah Furmidge 's defence. I know nothing about the business.

Arnold, GUILTY, aged 60,

Ephraim Furmidge , GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Sarah Furmidge , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-49

480. EPHRAIM FURMIDGE and SARAH FURMIDGE were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Warren .

Mr. Gleed, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-50

481. ROBERT HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a hair trunk, value 24 s. the property of John Wyer .

SAMUEL STOCKS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wyer, trunk-maker , No. 369, Oxford-street : On the 22d of June, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar came into the shop, and inquired which was Newman-street; I told him it was lower down; he came in the second time to know if I knew a person of the name of Edridge about that neighbourhood; I told him, no, but if he inquired at the baker's shop three or four doors further, they were old inhabitants in the neighbourhood, they would inform him; he came in the third time, and inquired which was the baker's shop; I went out after him this third time, on seeing him turn the wrong way I had directed him; I saw him with a hair trunk under his arm, he had not gone above three yards from the place where it stood; on seeing me, he dropped it, and ran down Berwick-street, which is only two doors from our house.

Q. Did you take him? - A. No, not then; there were three or four with him; one of them came up to me with a stick half as thick as my wrist, and hustled me up against a hoard, and would not let me pursue any further; I immediately holloaed out stop thief; the second one came up, and there was a person pursued him, seeing how I was used, who had seen all the transaction.

Q. What did the other man do? - A He caught hold of me by the left side of the collar, and said, I have got him, here he is.

Q. He caught hold of you? - A. Yes, as the thief, and said, I have got him; there were two that hustled me up against the hoard of a building; this was the third man; there was another close to him, and he stood against me in case I resisted.

Q. There were four in all? - A. Yes; says I, if this is the case, let me see where the property is; then I turned back to the trunk, and the person

who crossed the way and pursued the prisoner brought him back; the prisoner is very remarkable, having his legs turned out, and being knock-knee'd; I am sure of his person.

- FINDLEY sworn. - On Saturday, the 22d of June, I was returning from Portland-street; I saw three fellows, one of them seemed very much intoxicated; they were all reeling to and fro in the street, particularly Harrison; he passed Howland-street, and came to a trunk-maker's; I saw him go into this shop; I had great suspicions of the fellow from his appearance, I took particular notice of him; he went into the shop, and came out in about a minute or two afterwards; he went on some paces to his companions, and after he had spoken to them he returned and went a second time into the shop; he went in a third time, and stepped on the threshold of the door, and when he stepped down he walked to a trunk that was out of doors; he put his right arm round it, and walked off with it; the man came out of the shop, and went after him; the fellow looked half round, he did not drop it then, but when he found the man was coming very near him, he dropped the trunk and ran down Berwick-street; he was laid hold of by somebody, and brought back.

Q. Are you certain he is the man that did it? - A. I am certain of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Oxford-street on the day that gentleman mentions, but I never went into Mr. Wyer's shop at all; I heard a hue and cry of stop thief, and I ran like the rest; in consequence of which I was laid hold of by some gentleman; I know no more of it than that gentleman does of being high priest in a Jew's synagogue.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-51

482. MICHAEL SIMONS and ESTHER SIMONS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , three yards of woollen cloth, value 2 l. three yards of patent cord, value 28 s. and two waistcoat pieces, value 8 s. the property of John Wagstaffe , in his dwelling-house .

There being no evidence against either of the prisoners having committed the felony, they were both

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-52

483. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , two pair of shoes, value 9 s. the property of William Prosser .

WILLIAM PROSSER sworn. - I am a shoemaker , I live at No. 5, Red Lion-street, Holborn ; the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, accompanied with a woman, about the 9th of this month, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; the woman asked for a pair of shoes; she bought one pair, and paid for them, and while I was serving her, the prisoner found an opportunity of putting two pair in his pockets; my niece came and told me that he had got some shoes, and one of them was hanging out of his pocket.

Q. Did you perceive any thing about him? - A. Yes; I then saw one hanging outside of his pocket under his coat; I asked him what that meant; he told me he did not know any thing about it; I then said, my good friend, as I have found one pair on you, it is necessary that I should search you farther; I felt in his right hand pocket, and there was another pair; he said they were his own.

Q. Can you swear that they are your's? - A. Yes, there is my mark on the inside of them, I had them in my hand not three minutes before; both pair were women's shoes.

Q. Where were they lying when he came into the shop? - A. They were in the glass case when he came into the shop; I had taken them from the glass case, and shewn them to the woman; they were lying on the counter when he took them.

SARAH PROSSER sworn. - On Tuesday last the prisoner came into my uncle's shop with a young woman to buy a pair of shoes.

Q. What did your uncle do upon that? - A. He brought several pair out from the glass case, and he put these two pair on the counter, they did not fit her; a woman came in for some shoes; I went round the counter to put them in the glass case, and I missed them; I looked round, and observed a shoe hanging outside of his left hand pocket; I told my uncle, and my uncle took the shoes from him.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18050710-53

484. JOHN FOUNTAIN, alias FRANKLIN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a purse, value 1 d. five guineas, six half-guineas, seven seven-shilling pieces, a crown-piece, and thirty shillings, the property of Robert Higgins , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HIGGINS sworn. - I am a grocer , I live in Sherrard-street .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he has lodged with me in a fictious name about three weeks.

Q. What name did he come with? - A. He came with the name of Franklin.

Q. How do you know which is his real name? - A. Before the Magistrate in Marlborough-street he gave the name of Fountain, and on a letter that

came to him it was addressed Fountain; I lent him two shillings to pay for the postage of that letter.

Q. Where did you take the money from? - A. Out of the till behind the counter; I left the key in the drawer, and when I let the postman out of the shop, I went to my sister to let her know that she must take care of the shop while that man was there while I was out; as I was going out, and while I went to call her, the prisoner was in the shop, and he took the money out of the till, it was in a purse.

Q. What money had you there which he took in your purse? - A. Five guineas, six half-guineas, and seven seven-shilling pieces, and thirty shillings in silver.

Q. Have you ever seen the money since? - A. No.

Q. How do you know that nobody else came into the shop in the mean time? - A. Nobody else could come in, I had bolted the door.

Q. How soon after you came into the shop did you find the purse was gone? - A. In about ten minutes, the prisoner was then in the back parlour.

Q. How long did he remain in the house after you had missed it? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you take any steps to secure him? - A. No, I was not positive it was gone, I thought I might have left it in another place; I did not think he would have the assurance to take it.

Q. Then you are not quite sure that you left the money in the till? - A. I was not at the time.

Q. How came you to be more sure of it now that you were at the time? - A. I was sure of it in a quarter of an hour afterwards that it was gone.

Q. You did not know that it was there at all? - A. Yes, I did, by taking the purse, and giving him two shillings out of it.

Q. Did you examine the purse to see what was in it, when you gave him the two shillings which you had taken out of it? - A. No, I knew what was in it before; I was certain of the money, because I had it to go and lay it out in shop goods.

Q. When had you the prisoner apprehended? - A. The Monday after.

Prisoner's defence. The day this man lost his purse I was absent; on the Monday following he had me taken up; I have lodged with him about three weeks, I was in the parlour talking to his sister at the time he went out to get the warrant to take me up; I am as innocent as the child unborn; he took me up on suspicion, he searched me, and found no money on me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18050710-54

485. MARY CLARKE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Messenger , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 29th of June , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing therein, a hat, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 d. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. a piece of check cloth, value 4 d. a flat iron, value 4 d. three caps, value 1 s. 6 d. and a piece of silk ribbon, value 1 d. the property of the said John .

MARY MESSENGER sworn. - I live at No. 23, Church-lane, Whitechapel ; my husband's name is John Messenger , he is a glass-blower by trade: The prisoner at the bar broke open my room-door on Saturday, the 29th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon; I came home, and saw a mob at the door, I went out in the morning to a day's work at half after five.

Q. What do you accuse her of? - A. Taking of three pair of stockings, a hat, a pair of shoes, an iron, two cloth caps, and a muslin cap, and a ribbon.

Q. Who did you leave at home? - A. No one; I had the key of my room in my pocket, my husband was in the country a hay-making.

Q. How did you know that she had got in? - A. A neighbour in the next room told me; she had fastened the door with this poker, and when I got in, she told me to do my best and my worst, I should find nothing on her; I found her sitting in the room with a piece of my bed-gown.

Q. Where were your things? - A. They were outside of the door on the landing-place; my neighbour rapped at the door, she would not let her in; I went to my landlord, he got in at the window, and let me in.

- COOMBES sworn. - On Saturday, the 29th of June, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was fetched to No. 22, Back Church-lane; when I went up stairs, I saw the prisoner in Messenger's room, and this bundle was on the outside of the room on the landing-place; the staple of the door had been drawn out, and it was lying loose on the floor; I took her down stairs, and searched her; she had nothing on her but this ribbon and this thread rolled together down her bosom; she said that the woman that was with her had gone away with the rest of the things; I produce the things that I found - a pair of shoes, a hat, a piece of check cloth, and a ribbon.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. About half past three o'clock, I came from Milk-street with an acquaintance; she said to me, Mrs. Clarke, will you come along with me, and have a cup of tea; I said, no, I thank you; she said, about a quarter of an hour before she went up, she should be obliged to break her door open; I said, I will not come up; she said, you may come up; I went up and sat down, and she took a piece of coarse cloth off the table, and said, I am going to buy two mackerel; she said she would not stay long, for if her husband came up, he would kill me and her; says she, he

will kick you down stairs; I staid in the room till she got down stairs; there was an alarm made, and they kept me in the room.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-55

486. MARY CLARKE was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Gray , between the hours of five and six o'clock in the evening, on the 26th of June , and feloniously stealing a bag, value 1 d. a flat iron, value 4 d. a pair of pattens, value 6 d. ten gilt edged pictures, value 2 s. 6 d. ten blue edged plates, value 2 s. 6 d. half a dozen cups and saucers, value 2 s. 6 d. a china soup tureen, value 2 s. a tea caddie, value 2 s. a tea canister, value 6 d. a pair of gloves, value 6 d. a key, value 1 d. and a thimble, value one farthing, the property of Mary Gray .

MARY GRAY sworn. - I live at No. 22, Back Church-lane, Whitechapel ; I am a single woman .

Q. Do you keep a house? - A. No, a room; my landlady lives two doors beyond: On the 26th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went to work, I am a tobacco spinner; I returned about six in the evening, and found my door broken open; I missed a canvas bag, a flat iron, a pair of pattens, ten gold edged pictures, ten blue edged plates, half a dozen cups and saucers, a tureen, a tea caddle, a canister, a pair of gloves, a key and a thimble.

Q. Did you find these things afterwards? - A. On the 29th, when she broke into the other room, the officer searched her, and found my gloves, key, and thimble, and the ticket of my flat iron; the staple was drawn from my door.

ROBERT COOMBES sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Whitechapel; on searching the prisoner on the 29th, I found a bag, a pair of gloves, a key, a thimble, and two duplicates, which the prisoner owned; one of the duplicates led to a flat iron, the property of the prosecutrix.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-56

487. ELIZABETH WAYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , in the dwelling-house of the said Elizabeth Wayland , three seven-shilling pieces, four crown-pieces, eight half-crown pieces, twenty shillings, and five Bank-notes, value 1 l. each, the property of John Lauren .

JOHN LAUREN sworn. - I am a sailor , I live at Mr. Glassmoor's in Rosemary-lane: On the 9th of July, I went into Mr. Davis's, the White Swan, Rosemary-lane , to drink a glass of liquor; I met with a girl there that wanted me to go to Mrs. Wayland's to sleep with her that night.

Q. Where does Mrs. Wayland live? - A. In a court at the back of the White Swan; I went there, and went to bed along with the girl; I had five notes of one pound each, three seven-shilling pieces, four five-shilling pieces, and two pounds in loose silver about me in my pockets; at ten o'clock I was turned out of that bed, and put into another; there was no distance between the two beds, they were both in one room; she told me, when she turned me out of the bed, that her son was coming home, and if the suffered me to be in that bed, she should suffer for it and me too.

Q. She got you to go from one bed to the other - were you sober? - A. Yes, I was perfectly sober at the time.

Q. Were you with her from four o'clock till ten? - A. Yes, I was in the other bed from four o'clock till ten; when I got into the other bed I paid her for it.

Q. What did you pay for the first bed? - A. A shilling.

Q. You paid then two shillings? - A. Yes; I was afraid of my money, and I sent her down for some liquor and beer while I put my money by.

Q. Did she dress herself? - A. She was dressed, she never went to bed.

Q. There was a young woman with you? - A. Yes, she went out of doors at the same time; I counted my money up, and put it in my waistcoat pocket, and put it under the bed; while they were gone, the woman came in, and Mrs. Wayland directly after her.

Q. What became of the girl? - A. She was along-side of me in the bed.

Q. What liquor had you? - A. Half a pint of gin and half a gallon of beer; I had a drink of beer, then I told her never to mind me, but to help herself; I laid on the bed, and Mrs. Wayland came to the bed looking for something; I asked her what she wanted; she said, never mind me, child, mind yourself; I turned to the girl alongside of me, I never had any thoughts of her taking my money till about eighteen minutes afterwards; then I started up in the bed, and looked for my waistcoat and my money, and neither could be found; I challenged her for my money, and I demanded my money of her, and no money could be found, but a deal of abuse; she went to the bed, and sat on it; I searched for my waistcoat, and my waistcoat was found where she was sitting; she sat up all this time with a great coat on; I never found my money nor my notes.

Q. Where is the young woman that was lying with you? - A. She could not take it.

Prisoner's defence. This man and Ann Hudson

slept there all night very contented till he went out and brought an officer, who came in with a warrant; this Ann Hudson was talking about losing this money the night before; he said he had missed a guinea and a half; they slept very peaceable till the morning; then he said he had lost nine pounds; I am as innocent as the child from its mother's womb.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-57

488. BENJAMIN ENDFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of John Fewroyal , on the 20th of May , fifty pounds in money, a Bank-note, value 25 l. three other Bank-notes, value 10 l. each, a Bank-notes, value 5 l. and twenty-five other Bank-notes, value 1 l. each, the property of John Fewroyal .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but from his own confession, and being a deserter, he was ordered to be delivered to his officer; from this charge he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-58

489. MARY-ANN HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a guinea, a half-guinea, and a sixpence, the property of Thomas Slegar , privily from his person .

THOMAS SLEGAR sworn. - I am an officer under Government : On the 5th of June, as I was returning from supper, about twelve o'clock in the evening, somewhere about the parish of St. Ann , I saw the prisoner standing by the side of a gateway; she laid hold of me by the side of the arm, I stood still with her, and she began to take some liberty with me, and while I was speaking to her, I found her hand in my right hand breeches pocket; I had no money in that pocket, but I knew I had in the other; I had a guinea, a half-guinea, and a sixpence, in the other breeches pocket. Finding her hand had been in the right hand pocket, I suspected that it also might have been in the left; I put my hand into my left hand pocket to see if it was gone, and she had taken it; when I put my hand there, I found what I thought to be the half-guinea and the shilling, but I did not take any notice to her; then I walked away with her, and I gave her in charge to the first watchman that I met, which was in Dean-street; he took her to St. Ann's watch-house, and she was searched, and nothing was found upon her but the bad sixpence which I had had in my pocket seven or eight days, and that which I supposed to be the half-guinea in my pocket was a bad farthing, which had not been there before.

Q. You never found the guinea nor the half-guinea? - A. No.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Perfectly sober.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have said that she took some liberty with you, I dare say you would rather have expressed it by mutual liberty? - A. I should not unless it was mutual liberty my speaking to her.

Q. You think you had a guinea and a half - how long before had you felt that guinea and a half in your pocket? - A. Not more than ten minutes before she accosted me.

Q. It is a dangerous thing going along Soho at that time of the night - You did not tell the girl that you meant to give her in charge of the watchman till you met the watchman? - A. I did not but probably she having been guilty of similar circumstances she might be aware of this.

WILLIAM PAINE sworn. - I am a constable; the watchman brought the prisoner to the watch-house about twelve o'clock at night on the 5th of June; I searched her, and among her money I found this sixpence, which the prosecutor owned as soon as he saw it.

Q. Did you find any gold? - A. No gold at all.

(The sixpence identified by the prosecutor.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-59

490. ELIZABETH WRACK was indicted for that she, on the 24th of June , in a certain public street called Vere-street , in and upon Mary Douglass , spinster , did make an assault, with intent to spoil, burn and deface, the clothes and garments of the said Mary Douglass , and that she, the said Elizabeth Wrack , in the same street, did then and there unlawfully spoil, burn and deface, a cotton gown, value 6 s. the property of the said Mary Douglass , which she had then and there in wear .

MARY DOUGLASS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am an unfortunate girl the same as the prisoner; I live at No. 1, Cross Keys-mews, Mary-le-bone-lane; the prisoner lived near me; I met her on the 4th of June, by the chapel, at the bottom of Vere-street, Oxford-road; when I met her I asked her how she did, it was about nine o'clock at night, she answered me, she was very well; I was holding my gown up when I spoke to her, and I let it down; I walked up to the top of Vere-street, and another young woman was along with me, and the prisoner was behind me; when I got to the top of Vere-street, the prisoner crossed over from me; I went to take my gown up, and it was wet; the young woman that was with me put her hand to it, and she said, it smelt like lemon; I crossed over to a light in Shepherd-street, at a shop-window; I perceived my gown was turned colour (this is the gown) it turned yellow, and afterwards it went into holes.

Q. Do you know what it was? - A. yes, it was

vitriol that was thrown over the gown: I went home and pulled it off, it was in holes; the young woman pulled her's off, and her gown was as bad; I had a suspicion that it was the prisoner that threw it over me; I went to Marlborough-street the next morning, and got a warrant, and brought the officer to where she lived; and when he searched the room, he found a bottle of vitriol; she said, she did not go to throw it over me, she meant to throw it over a gentleman and the wind blew it over me.

Q. Had you and she any quarrel? - A. No, I never had a word with her.

MARY FENWICK sworn. - As Mary Douglass and I were coming along Vere-street, we met with the prisoner; we asked her how she did; she said, she was very well; we walked up Vere-street, and the prisoner behind us, directly we got up Vere-street she crossed the way; and when Mary Douglass took her gown up, she felt it was wet; I put my hand to Mary Douglass 's gown, I said, it smelt like lemon; we crossed over to a shop-window and looked at her gown, and it was turned yellow; she supposed the prisoner had thrown vitriol over it.

Q. Why did she suppose it was the prisoner that had thrown it over her? - A. She had done it to a person where she lodged; I went home and pulled off my gown, and found it in the same manner.

Q. Was there any dispute between you and her? - A. No; we never had any miss word with her.

Q. She did not object to your walking in Vere-street or you her? - A. No, no dispute of any kind.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street, I took the prisoner into custody at her lodgings in Marylebone-lane; I searched her apartments, and found on the mantle-piece this bottle with the remains of vitriol in it, I told the prisoner the charge against her; she said, she had thrown it, she was endeavouring to throw it over a man, it might go upon these girls, but she did not intend it to go upon them; I have tried it since, it is vitriol.

Prisoner's defence. We all three lived in one house together; they said to me, they owed a young woman a spite, and they gave me the twopence to fetch the vitriol; and that is how I came by the vitriol; in fact we all three owed the girl a spite, I asked them where to get the vitriol, they gave me twopence, and they told me to get it at the doctor's; I bought the vitriol and threw it over the girl.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-60

491. JOHN LONDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a horse-collar, value 5 s. the property of William Atkinson .

WILLIAM ATKINSON sworn. - I am a collar and harness-maker ; I live at No. 8, Shadwell High-street ; on the 1st of July, between nine and ten in the morning, my apprentice and me were going through Whitechapel, I saw a horse's collar hanging over the prisoner's window, the prisoner is a collar maker.

Q. When had you last seen this collar? - A. I do not know; about the 27th of June, I lent it to Mr. Johnson for his horse, I brought it back to be finished; I never thought any more about that collar till the 1st of July, going through Whitechapel, I saw the collar and I thought it was mine.

Q. What did the prisoner say to it? - A. He said he made it; I told him he or I must be wrong; the officer asked him to go with him to Shadwell-office; he went to Shadwell-office; I produce the collar.

WILLIAM DUFFER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Atkinson; I was going along Whitechapel, I saw a collar hang up outside of the prisoner's shop; on the 1st of July, I told my master that London had one of his collars; we did not miss the collar before I took account of it there.

Q. Are you sure now that you have lost the collar? - A. I saw my master put it on one of Mr. Johnson's horses on the 22d or 24th of June; Mr. Johnson is a farmer in West-garden, Shadwell.

Q. Is that the collar? - A. Yes, I am sure of it; the man is here that made it for us; I can swear to it.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Can you swear to it? - A. By that hole there, and by two little pieces here; I know I have had the collar in my hand several times.

Q. Are there not other collars that are used that have these particular marks? - A. I have had the collar so often in my hands that I can swear to it.

THOMAS POTTER sworn. - I am a collar maker; I work for Mr. Green, Norton Falgate; I worked for Mr. Atkinson, about four months ago, I made him half a dozen or more collars of one sort, and by the workmanship and the materials I should think it might be one of them, it corresponds.

Q. The question is, whether that collar is one that you made? - A. It may be possible for another man to make such a one, by the make and the materials I should think it was one of them.

Prisoner's defence. I made that collar for one Samuel Poole , that lives at Wapping; I had the leather the rim is made of from him, because he would have it good, he brought me up leather for two collars, it is pipe leather; he came to me on the 23d of June for the collars, and as I had neglected making them so long, I promised he should have them immediately; I set to work on the 23d of June, on Sunday, being a good day, and made

that collar in the afternoon, I thought if he came that way it might satisfy him; that collar on the 24th of June, I hung up at my door, and it was hanging up at my door on the 1st of July, when Mr. Atkinson and Mr. Brown came past, Mr. Atkinson took down the collar, and said, it was his; he asked me, how I came by it; I said, I made it; he told me, and likewise the Magistrate, that no other persons had such leather to make collars with, whereof I can produce some of the same kind of leather in this Court this minute, I dare say.

SAMUEL POOLE sworn. - I am a carman.

Q. Did you ever employ the prisoner to make a collar for you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you think you should know the leather again? - A. It was pipe-leather that I gave to him, it is a thing impossible for me to swear to leather, it is leather of the same description.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-61

492. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for that he, on the 4th of January , being a servant to William Neverd , did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 19 s. and 23 s. 4 d. of Elizabeth Fielding , for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards fraudulently secreted, embezzled, and stole the same .

WILLIAM NEVERD sworn. - I am a baker ; I live in Church-place, Mile-end Old-town; the prisoner was my servant , he came to me on Christmas eve, and continued with me a few days only.

Q. Did you entrust him to receive money for the bread that was sent out? - A. Yes; and he was to account for the bread and bring me the money when he returned home.

Q. Had you a customer of the name of Elizabeth Fielding ? - A. Yes, she lives in Devonshire-place, Stepney .

Q. What time did she generally settle with you? - A. Sometimes three weeks or a month, just as she could spare the money.

Q. What day was it the prisoner left you? - A. Sometime the latter end of February.

Q. Before he left you, had you ever asked him respecting Mrs. Fielding's account? - A. Yes, repeatedly, he always said, she would pay me the next week; I had not discovered that Mrs. Fielding had paid him, till he had left me, when I applied to her about the money.

Q. When did you take this man into custody? - A. About five weeks ago; in Fenchurch-street I took him; I told him, he had wronged me and mentioned Mrs. Fielding's bill; he burst out a crying, he said, he was very sorry he had wronged me out of it, he would pay me every halfpenny of it.

ELIZABETH FIELDING sworn. - Q. Did Mr. Neverd serve you with bread? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the person that generally brought the bread? - A. The prisoner and nobody else: Mr. Neverd called on me for the payment of six bills which I had paid the prisoner, I believe, the day he went away; when Mr. Neverd called upon me, I shewed Mr. Neverd the bills; I do not recollect the time I paid, he always wrote paid; I paid him at two or three different times.

Q. Are these the bills which he wrote on paid, and which you delivered to Mr. Neverd - one is the sum of nineteen shillings, and the other is twenty-three shillings and fourpence? - A. I cannot read writing, he wrote paid on them when we settled.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Look at the word paid - do you know the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. I believe it to be his hand-writing.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY .

Confined a fortnight in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-62

493. ROBINSON M'LAURENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , 173 lbs. weight of Spanish wool, value 40 l. in a lighter, on a certain navigable river, called the River Thames .

Second Count, For like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

Mr. Knapp, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-63

494. JOHN CAREY, alias KOREY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a marble frieze, value 1 l. and a marble blocking, value 15 s. the property of John Baird .

JOHN BAIRD sworn. - I am a mason , I live in Philips's-row, New Road, St. Pancras: On the 14th of June, I took a chimney-piece, a shelf, a frieze, and a blocking to a building, called Upper Eversham-buildings ; the frieze and the two shelves were not fixed, the blocking was, on the 17th of June, when I lost them; on the 19th of June I saw the frieze and the blocking in the possession of Mr. Renshaw, and I knew it to be mine.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. I never saw the prisoner till he was in custody.

Q. What is the value of this frieze? - A. One pound.

- RENSHAW sworn. - I am a mason, I live at No. 13, Field-street, Battle-bridge: On the 18th of June the prisoner brought this frieze to me.

Q. Did you buy it of him? - A. No; he wanted me to give him seven shillings for it.

Q. Was it above or below the value of it? - A. It was not one-third of the value; I suspected him, he had offered me other things before.

Q. In consequence of that you detained the frieze? - A. Yes; I told him to come the next day for the money, I intended to let the trade know; he came the next day when I was at breakfast, and I told my wife to tell him I was not at home, he must come at eight o'clock in the evening; he came in the evening, and Mr. Baird had got an officer to lay hold of him, and the constable stopped him.

Q. What did the prisoner say - did he tell you what he was? - A. He told me that he was a labourer , he came to me for work.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am constable of St. Pancras.

Q. Were you at Mr. Renshaw's to apprehend the prisoner? - A. I was, I went with Mr. Baird; the prisoner came in about eight o'clock, and when he came out I seized him.

Q. Did he say any thing for himself when he was taken? - A. No, he seemed very much alarmed; I produce a piece of marble, I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. (To Renshaw.) Is that the frieze which this man brought to you? - A. Yes.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Is that the frieze that was taken from your house? - A. I am certain it is.

Q. Is it worth twenty shillings? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I came from my work on Tuesday afternoon, about eight or nine at night, and in Wilson-street, Somers Town, I met Thomas Oliver , a stone-mason; he asked me to have a pot of porter with him; I had worked with him before at Bow for Mr. Robbins; he asked me to take this piece of marble down to this man's place, I knew nothing of its being stole,) he told me to ask seven shillings for it; so I brought this piece of marble to this man's place, and this man told me to call again; I went to the mason that I had the marble of, he staid till I came back; he told me he was going to a job, and he told me to call again for the money, and when I went for the money I was detained; I have not seen the man since.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-64

495. WILLIAM SIMS and CHARLES WATSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , two saws, value 7 s. a rule, value 1 s. and a gimlet, value 1 d. the property of Edward Nordin and John Twybill .

EDWARD NORDIN sworn. - I am a carpenter , the prisoners both worked for me and my partner.

Q. Did you on the 2d of June lose two saws, a rule, and a gimlet? - A. We missed them, I believe, about three months since.

Q. Did you miss all at one time? - A. No, one of the saws was taken from a job in Rolls-buildings .

Q. Did you ever see that saw again? - A. Yes.

Q. Were both the prisoners at work in Rolls-buildings? - A. No, only Sims; the other saw was taken from our work-shop; we found that by a duplicate.

Q. They are two different transactions, we will take that the last - you found that by a duplicate? - A. Yes, in Sims's lodgings; we missed this saw about three months ago; we took Sims up first; on the 2d of July we took Sims at the public-house, and then I went with Chapman to search the lodgings; we found this duplicate of the saw; Sims said he was very sorry he had so many duplicates.

Q. Did any body lodge with him? - A. Yes, Watson; they both denied any knowledge of the saw when we charged them with it; I found the saw by the duplicate found in the lodging of the prisoners at the top of Hatton-wall.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was this saw your partner's property, or the property of yourself? - A. The property of my partner and myself.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden Office; I apprehended the prisoners and searched the lodging; I found the duplicate of this saw in a chest.

Q. Do you know whose chest it was? - A. Watson said it was his, and he said he was in distress at the time he took the saw, and that was the reason he took and pawned it.

- SIMPSON sworn. - I conduct the business for Mr. Page, a pawnbroker, in Liquorpond-street; I produce a saw pledged for two shillings and sixpence, in the name of John Watson , Eyre-street-hill; I do not recollect the person.

Watson's defence. He told wrong of my taking it out of the shop; when I took the saw I was working in Kentish Town; I wanted money, he never came nigh me the next day; I worked all day, I thought he would come to assist me, and he never came; I took one of the saws, I thought it proper, to get me a bit of bread; I bought myself a quartern loaf and half a pound of butter, I can take my sacrament oath on it; my wife died, and he buried her, I paid him ten shillings a week out of my wages.

Prosecutor. I always let him have money when he asked for it.

Watson, GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Sims, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant;

Reference Number: t18050710-65

496. WILLIAM CRICKWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a pewter apparatus, value 5 s. and two pewter ferrils, value 6 d. the property of Francis Gerardin .

FRANCIS GERARDIN sworn. - I am a pewterer , I live at No. 21, Poland-street ; I am a house-keeper; the prisoner was my porter , he had lived with me near four years.

Q. Did you at any time lose a pewter apparatus, a pewter ferril, and a gimlet? - A. Yes, I first missed them on the 21st of June from my workshop; I got a search warrant, and searched his lodgings; I found the pewter apparatus, the ferrils, and the gimlet, which I knew to be mine, and the prisoner acknowledged them to be mine.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street: On the 27th of June, I went to No. 33, Windmill-street, in the Haymarket, to the prisoner's lodgings; I found in a trunk this apparatus, two ferrils, and a gimlet; I afterwards apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I took those ferrils-one day, I was going out to work; he said to me, have you any ferrils in the basket; I said, no; then he said, go backwards and get some, in case we may want them; I was in a great hurry to go out, I forgot to put them into the basket, I put them in my pocket, and when I returned I forgot to take them out of my pocket; on the Sunday my child played with them, she had got them out of my pocket.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18050710-66

497. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , eleven pounds weight of lead, value 16 d. the property of Robert Sutton and William Davis .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-67

498. WILLIAM COLLETT , DAVID FREWIN , and CHRISTOPHER LANDER , were indicted, the two first for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , a chaise bridle, value 5 s. two snaffle bridles, value 10 s. a martingal, value 2 s. two stirrup irons, value 10 s. two saddles, value 2 l. and one stirrup leather, value 2 s. the property of Peter White , and a hat, value 2 s. the property of James Marcham ; and the other for feloniously receiving a chaise bridle, value 5 s. two snaffle bridles, value 10 s. a martingal, value 2 s. two saddles, value 2 l. two stirrup irons, value 10 s. and two stirrup leathers, value 2 s. the property of Peter White , he knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

HENRY SHURETY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a carter to Mr. Peter White , a farmer , at Willsden ? - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 31st of May, about four o'clock, did you go to your master's stable? - A. I did, and it appeared to have been broken open; the bolt of the door had been pushed back, and I missed a hat belonging to James Marcham ; two saddles were gone, a chaise bridle, two snaffle bridles, a martingal, two stirrup irons, and one stirrup leather; I found a hat in the stable, I remembered seeing it on Collett's head the night before; I had seen him at half past seven the night before, about half a mile from the spot.

Q. Did that lead you to look after the prisoners, Collett and Frewin? - A. Yes, on Saturday morning, I found them at the Buffalo's Head in the New Road; Spencer was with me; we were waiting outside of the house; they both came out together, and Collett had Marcham's hat on his head; on our endeavouring to take them, Frewin ran away; Spencer pursued him; I laid hold of Collett, he struggled very much and dragged me across the road; he pulled a knife out, and he stabbed at my face several times; I drew back and he stabbed me in the sleeve; I nevertheless secured him.

Q. Did he cut you at all? - A. No, he cut at me with full vengeance, I let go of him, I drew back and he ran the knife against a brick wall, and broke it; and with the assistance of Thomas Bradley I took him and brought him to Marlborough-street.

Q. In consequence of any message you received from Collett did you go to the prisoner Lander? - A. I went to Lander on the 17th of June; his father told me, he would tell me where the things were if I would go with him.

Court. There is a father coming; I do not like to introduce a father; it is not the nature of a father to go and give evidence against his son, unless he thought his son would be benefited by it; here one man makes a promise, and then that man is not a witness, and the other witness makes a confession who is a father; the prosecutor ought to produce that man who heard the original confession from the prisoner who is not a father; we will not make the father the instrument to convict his son.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Were you present when Collett was brought to Marlborough-street office, the day after he was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of what Collett said a search warrant was taken out and Lander's premises were searched? - A. Yes, and at Lander's apartments, No. 11, Compton-street, St. Giles's, I found two snaffle bridles and a chaise bridle; I asked him if he knew any thing of buying two saddles; one of the saddles was with spring stirrups, and it had got W marked on the buttons, and the other saddle

had new stirrup leathers; he said he knew nothing of any saddles; I looked over the room, it is up two pair of stairs, I suppose there were twenty saddles there; he went to Marlborough-street office with me; he was discharged that day to come the next day.

Q. Did he tell you any thing that day? - A. Yes; at the Marlborough's Head he asked me to have something to drink; he said, I shall get up in the chaise and ride with you, and as we were riding together, he said he recollected very well the saddles, he sold them to one Mr. Williams, he lodged at the Black Horse in Little Rathbone-place; he recollected buying them of a little short man.

Q. Upon that, did you go to Mr. Williams? - A. Yes, he had sold them to a gentleman's coachman; Lander went with me to him, and there I found them; the next day Lander came to the Office, and Collett was brought there.

THOMAS BRADLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On hearing the alarm of stop thief, you went and assisted the last witness in taking Collett? - A. Yes, I saw him strike with a knife several times, and at last he struck it against a brick wall, and it broke in the wall; I took it out of the wall.

THOMAS SPENCER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you went with the witness, Shurety, to apprehend the prisoner Collet? - A. Yes; and when they came out of the Buffalo's-head, Frewin ran away; I pursued and took him; he asked me what I had to do with him? - A. I told him there was some property found in possession of the person that was in company with him; he said he could prove that Collet bought the hat, and gave 6 d. for it.

JAMES MARCHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. You are a servant of Mr. White? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that hat? - A. I can swear that that is my hat.

Q. On the night of the 30th, where did you leave this hat? - A. In Mr. White's stable; I fastened up the stable about nine o'clock that night; I went in the morning a little after four, and did not find my hat there; I found the stable had been broken open, and another hat left there.

Q. Do you know whose hat that was? - No.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes; I produce the property.

Q. Was that hat delivered to you by Shurety? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with Shurety to the lodgings of Lander, and find these bridles? - A. Yes; and Shurety asked Lander if he knew any thing of the saddles; Lander said, he knew nothing of the saddles; I received the saddles from Shurety.

Q. (To Shurety). The hat that was left in the stable, did it belong to Collett? - A. This is the hat I found in the stable, I gave it to Lovett, I noticed it the night before on Collett's head; he had a sore ear, and there is on the side of it the blood that came from it. On this saddle there is W on the buttons; Lander told me he sold the saddles for 3 l. 5 s.

Q. First he told you he had bought none? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. He did not recollect it then; afterwards, instead of putting them out of the way, he produced them to you? - A. Yes; he said he recollected who he sold them to.

Jury. Q. Did you hear Lander say what he gave for the things? - A. He said he agreed to give 25 s. Collet said he never had more than five shillingsworth of halfpence for the whole lot.

Q. (To Williams). Did you buy any saddles of Lander? - A. Yes; I gave Lander 3 l. 5 s. for them, I sold them for 3 l. 15 s. I delivered them to Shurety.

Collett and Lander left their defence to their Counsel.

Frewin was not put on his defence.

Lander called five witnesses, and Collett one, who gave them a good character.

Collett, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Lander, GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for fourteen years .

Frewin, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-68

499. WILLIAM HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a pig, value 2 l. the property of John Giles .

JOHN GILES sworn. - I am a farmer , I live at Stratford : On Sunday morning, about five o'clock, I was informed that my premises had been robbed of a pig; they had secured the man.

JOHN WYAT sworn. - I am one of the patrol of Stratford: On the 6th of July, I was on my walk about three o'clock; I heard somebody in Mr. Giles's yard, I opened the gate, and saw somebody there, I was afraid to go in, thinking there might be a number of them, I was afraid of being murdered; I went the back way, I saw the prisoner come round the corner of the shed, and I saw him fasten the string round the pig's leg; he drove it before him about a mile and a half from the premises; I pursued him with my fire-lock, and took him with the property in his hand, in a corn-field; I took John. - with me to assist me in taking him; I took the pig and the man to the watch-house.

JOHN - sworn. - Q. You and this man pursued the prisoner and the pig much about a mile and a half, and then you secured the man and the pig? - A. Yes.

Q. (To the Prosecutor). Did you see the pig? - A. I saw it in the watch-house; I am sure it was my pig, it was about eight stone.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Old Ford, I saw the pig run along before me, those two gentlemen came after me, and said that I stole the pig, they took me away, and could not find the pig.

Q. How came a part of the string in your hand, and the other on his leg? - A. I was never within a mile of the place in my life.

GUILTY , aged 74.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-69

500. JOHN SMITH, alias CHARLES VITO , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , an umbrella, value 10 s. the property of William Strickland .

(It appearing to the Court that the prisoner was subject to fits, and that he had made his escape from the workhouse, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-70

501. JAMES TATNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , twenty pounds weight of bacon, value 20 s. the property of William Blake .

ANN HESTER sworn. - On the 4th of June, I was coming through Bedford-court, Bedford-street , I saw the prisoner take the bacon from off the hook, and put it on his shoulder; I cried stop thief, and he threw it off his shoulder, and ran away.

Q. Are you sure this is the man? - A. I cannot swear to the man's face.

- SAMEGAR sworn. - I saw the prisoner drop the bacon, I picked it up, I am certain he is the man.

CHARLES BELL sworn. - I took the prisoner, I stopped him.

Q. Did you see him drop the bacon? - A. No, there was a cry of stop thief, he was running, and some man gave him a trip, and down he went, I took him to Bow-street that night; I produce the bacon.

ESTHER BLAKE sworn. - Q. Being informed you had lost your bacon, what did you do? - A. I ran after him, he had not got it when I overtook him.

Q. Is that your bacon? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Samegar.) Are you sure that is the bacon he dropped? - A. Yes, I marked it.

Prisoner's defence. I do not remember seeing any thing at all of the bacon, I was going to Knights-bridge after my orders.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-71

502. EDWARD SHELDON and WILLIAM SEYMOUR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a saucepan, value 1 s. two bottles, value 1 s. and two gallons of mixed spirituous liquors, value 12 s. the property of George Perfect .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner's were not found selling the liquor, but of drinking it, they were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-72

503. CHARLES VIRCO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , three locks, value 2 s. three keys, value 2 s. a pair of hinges, value 2 s. two dozen of nails, value 2 s. and an oilstone, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Harrison .

There being no evidence against the prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-73

504. THOMAS UNDERHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , 3 s. the property of Richard Eaton .

RICHARD EATON sworn. - I am a baker ; I work for Mr. Lovelock.

Q. Where did he take that money from you? - A. He slept in the same room that I did; I suspected the prisoner; on the 2d of July, I got all my money stamped that I had in my pocket, and on Thursday night, the 3d of July, I missed three shillings, it was taken out of my pocket when I was a-bed; I desired Mr. Batty to observe the money of the soldier (the prisoner) if he came in to buy any thing.

- ATKINS sworn. - I am a waiter; the prosecutor asked me to stamp ten shillings and a half-crown for him; I stamped it.

EDWARD BATTY sworn. - I am a publican; I keep the Red Lion, at Guildford; I received a shilling of the prisoner on the 4th of July, between six and eight o'clock; I put it in a bit of paper, about five minutes afterwards I saw the prosecutor and I gave it to him.

JOHN HOLT sworn. - I produce the shilling; I had it from the prosecutor at Mr. Lovelock's. (The shilling identified by the prosecutor and by Atkins.)

Prisoner. I am as innocent as the child unborn; I had been to work all day, I got three shillings, and two shillings and sixpence I had in the morning; I paid that shilling to Mr. Batty for my reckoning.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-74

505. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , 200 pounds weight of lead, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Francis Page , Esq . fixed to a certain building .

And two other Counts, of like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

SAMUEL SELBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. I live at Oxendon farm .

Q. Who is your landlord? - A. Mr. Page.

Q. In that farm, is there a place called the gothic summer-house? - A. No; there is in a farm which I occupy about a mile further.

Q. Did you lose any lead from that building on the 9th of July? - A. Yes; we supposed that the people that took the lead could not be far off; we searched the summer-house from whence it was taken, and we searched the wood adjoining, and in the wood the prisoner and his wife were found sitting; at the time that I came up they had got the prisoner; I looked round and saw both the sacks of lead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not live at this place where the lead was lost? - A. No, Mr. Page is the owner of the summer-house, it is in his possession.

JAMES ROLLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. On the 9th of July, about half after eight o'clock at night, four of us went to the wood, we separated before we went into the wood.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at the bar and a woman sitting there? - A. Yes, the prisoner looked very hot; I asked him, what he did there, and whether he had been walking with that woman; he said, he had; I said, if he had he could not sweat so, the woman was cool sitting in the wood, he said did you never sweat so.

Q. How far is this wood from this summer-house? - A. Not a quarter of a mile, it all joins; the prisoner was sitting between two parcels of lead, one was three yards off, and the other was five yards off; I apprehended him.

Q. Do you know any thing of the knife being found there? - A. I had got the knife; it was found where I sat up all night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was a very warm day when you found the prisoner? - A. Yes, it was in the evening.

Q. You were surprized at a man being warm in walking on the 9th of June? - A. Yes.

Q. You say the woman was sitting down - had not he been carrying a bag with broom? - A. They had no bag.

Q. I am told they had - the lead was not found in his possession? - A. It was as near to him as I am to you.

Q. Did you tell him you suspected him being there? - A. No; I asked him what business he had there; he said, he was lost, he had come the wrong road; and directly my master came up.

Q. He did not attempt to run away? - A. He could not run away, I had something in my hand; I produce the lead.

JAMES PUTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. I am a plumber.

Q. Look at the lead produced by the last witness? - A. The lead was produced to me; I fitted it, and it corresponded with the place where the lead was taken off.

Q What is the weight of the lead? - A. Upwards of two hundred pounds.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-75

506. ISABELLA STAPLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , a shawl, value 9 d. a bonnet, value 6 d. a shift, value 4 d. a skirt, value 2 d. and a frock, value 1 s. the property of Stephen Haskins .

SARAH HASKINS sworn. - My husband's name is Stephen Haskins ; we live in Bermondsey-street.

Q. Do you know any thing about the prisoner? - A. I met her upon London-bridge.

Q. What day was it? - A. I believe it was the 23d of June, between the hours of twelve and one, it might be gone one when I met her.

Q. You did not know her before? - A. No; she took the child as far as Field-lane ; I went into a house there to seek for a room, and she went away with the child; she asked me to take care of the child and I gave the child to her.

Q. How old is the child? - A. Going of five months; when I came out of the house I could not find her; the witness found her in Golden-lane.

Q. So you walked with this woman you did not know and trusted your child with her? - A. I did not know her.

SARAH CLARK sworn. - I live in Bell-court, Bell-alley, Golden-lane; I saw this woman in Golden-lane, with a child, she appeared to me very much in liquor; she said, the child had neither father nor mother; I said, I hope it has; I told her I would follow her go where she would; I desired her to go with me to Field-lane; she refused; I heard the child was lost there by my child.

Q. Was the child stripped? - A. No.

Q. Did you find the mother at last? - A. The child was left with some people in Golden-lane; I found the father at half after eight o'clock at night, he worked in Shoe-lane.

ANN FIELD sworn. - The prisoner came to me with a shawl, I let her have twopence on it; she said, she did not want to sell it, she would come again in an hour or two; she said, the mother had left the child with her.

Prisoner's defence. I took nothing from the child; that shawl was not on the child, when she left me, she gave me the child to hold; I had no money to

feed the child, I went to Mrs. Field, I asked her to let me have twopence on the shawl; when I first met the woman she was very much in liquor.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) How much liquor had you? - A. A pennyworth of gin a-piece, and two pints of beer between us.

HANNAH COURTNEY sworn. - Mrs. Haskins lived in my house eighteen months; during the time, she has been a very drunken woman; on Midsummer-day she went out with her child, she came home about nine o'clock at night very much in liquor.

Q. How did the prisoner find you out? - A. I followed the prosecutrix; she is a very drunken wicked woman; when she came home she said, she would transport her; I thought it was a pity she should wrong the woman.

Q. How long have you known Mrs. Stapleton? - A. I never knew her; it was justice that brought me here; when the husband brought the child home it had on the same cloaths that it had when it went out.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-76

507. JAMES BOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , four hundred pounds weight of lead, value 3 l. the property of Francis Page and Francis Fladgate , fixed to a certain building .

And two other Counts, in like manner, only varying the manner of charging.

(The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.)

JAMES BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Curwood. I live at the Fortune, in the Parish of Harrow: I am a labourer.

Q. Do you know the gothic summer-house in Mr. Page's ground? - A. Yes; at Burn-hill, in the parish of Harrow .

Q. Who rents the farm? - A. Mr. Selby.

Q. Do you know of any lead being lost on the 16th of June last? - A. Yes; there were several pieces lost at different times; on the 16th, I searched the building all over, it had been a heavy rain in the morning; in the afternoon between one and three, I got out of the building; I followed the footsteps into the wood, and there I met with the prisoner, Bowman, at the bottom of the wood, I knew him, and he gave three whistles; there were two more men in the wood putting lead in the sacks, they climbed over the pails and got from me; I gave the prisoner into custody; I went and searched for the other men, I could not find them.

Q. Did you find any lead? - A. Yes, a large quantity; I dare say two or three hundred pounds weight of lead, we brought the lead down to the farm and locked it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This seems to be a most unfortunate building - you did not see the prisoner in company with the other men, and they were the persons that had the lead in their possession, they were putting the lead into the sacks, he was not doing any thing with the lead; they ran away; you thought you had better take somebody than nobody to bring to your master? - A. He was the man that whistled when he saw me: there was no road there at all. I produce the lead.

Q. (To James Putman .) Is that the lead that you fitted to the summer-house? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-77

508. ROSE LONG , MARY-ANN PRICE , and ANN LOW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of John M'Gowan .

JOHN M'GOWAN sworn. - I am a tailor ; I live at No. 15, Queen-square place, Westminster; On Saturday night after I left my employer, I being a little intoxicated, on returning home to my lodgings about four o'clock on the Sunday morning, coming past the Horse-guards, I fell in with Mary Ann Price , and Rose Long; I asked them, if they would go and have something to drink; they went with me to a public-house, and we stopped till six o'clock in the morning; I found myself weary for want of sleep; I asked Mary Price if she could get me a lodging; Price and Long both went with me, and got me a bed; she took me to a lodging in Duck-lane, Westminster; I immediately took off my clothes to go to bed; I put my watch on the mantle-piece, I got into bed, each of them came into bed, one on each side of me; I awaked at about half after eight o'clock, I started up and saw they were both almost dressed, I got up to dress myself, and before I put on my waistcoat, I went to take my watch and it was gone; there was another woman in the room in the morning, but I do not know her.

Q. These two women, Price and Long, were in the room when you missed the watch? - A. No; they were gone.

Q. You did not say that, you said before you got your waistcoat on the watch was gone? - A. They were gone out just before that, there was no fastening to the door.

Q. Then any body might come in? - A. Any body; before we went to bed in the morning we had a pot of beer.

Q. In that house after drinking all night in the public-house? - A. Yes; the publican came in for his pot, and he took the watch and looked at it as it lay on the mantle-piece, and laid it down again; when I missed it I went out and searched after it, expecting to find them in the public-house, or

somebody to get a little knowledge of them; I thought they might have pledged it, as I did not pay them any thing. On Sunday I heard no tidings of them; on Monday morning, Mary Price 's mother sent word up to me that she wanted to speak to me; I went and saw her at this public-house, where I had been drinking from four till six; in consequence of what she told me, I went to the place where it was detained, and they produced the watch; the constable was with me; he told the man to bring it up to the Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. You do not know any thing of Ann Low ? - A. No, I do not know Ann Low .

Q. At what time on Saturday did you leave work? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. Then you went to your friends and drank with them till four o'clock, that is seven hours? - A. I drank till three.

Q. That is six hours - at four o'clock you began again, and drank till six, and then when you went home with these two poor women you had another pot? - A. Yes.

Q. You have stated that you were very much intoxicated when you met them - when you went to bed with these two women were not you quite drunk, that I need hardly ask you? - A. I was not sober.

Q. Were you sober in the morning at eight o'clock? - A. I was refreshed by my sleep, I had slept near two hours.

Q. You say the publican looked at the watch, and the room-door was open all night? - A. It was.

ROBERT MUSTER sworn. - I keep a shop in Monmouth-street: On Sunday, the 16th of June, the prisoner, Rose Long, came into the shop, and offered me a watch for sale, about five o'clock in the afternoon; my wife took it out of her hand, and asked her what she asked for it; she said, two guineas.

Q. Were you present? - A. Yes; I asked her how she came by that watch; she said it was not her's, it belonged to a girl at the door; the girl at the door was called in.

Q. Who is that girl? - A. Mary-Ann Price ; I asked her if the watch belonged to her, and she said it did; she told me she had had it for three weeks, and she had brought it with her from Chatham. A young man that was standing in company with us told her she had stole it in the course of the night, and had picked some young man's pocket of it; her answer to that was, were you in our place you would do the same; upon that I stopped the watch, and I immediately went to one of the officers belonging to Marlborough-street, and he told me to bring it to the Office by eleven o'clock in the morning. About eight o'clock on the Monday morning, the owner of the watch came with one of the girl's mother and one of the officers of Queen-square; he owned the watch, and the mother of the girl wanted to give me five shillings, and to take the property out of my hands; I told the officer, no, I would not give it up till I gave it up before the Magistrate.

Q. You never knew any thing at all of the prisoner Low? - A. I never saw her.

JAMES GILLMOOR sworn. - I am an officer of Queen-square: I believe it was on Friday, the 21st of June, I apprehended the prisoner Price; in conveying her across the King's-mews, towards St. Martin's watch-house, the prisoner Long came up, and asked what was the matter; Price told her, it was in consequence of that watch she offered to sell in Monmoth-street; Long then said, she would go with her, she knew that she had offered the watch to sell; I then took them both into custody, and confined them in St. Martin's watch house for about an hour; I was going further, I left them there till I returned; on my return to the watch-house to take them before the Magistrate they said, there was another concerned; they said, they should not have taken the watch had not Low told them to take it; they informed me where to apprehend Low; I apprehended Low in Tothill-street, and the moment I apprehended her, she turned round to Long, and said, you know I was to have but half a guinea to shew you where to sell it; Low attempted to run away when she saw me coming down the street, before I attempted to stop her; I produce the watch. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Price called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

All three NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-78

509. CATHARINE DOBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a shirt, value 8 s. the property of Lazarus Harding .

MARY HARDING sworn. - I am the wife of Lazarus Harding , I live at No. 43, North-street, Manchester-square : On the 19th of March, I lost a shirt out of the basket in the wash-house; I had seen it in the wash-house the over night, and when I got up the next morning at five o'clock, I missed it.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. Yes, she was a lodger in the house; I lodged in the garret, and she in the two pair back room; she lived in the house till she was taken up.

Q. Have you ever seen the shirt since? - A. I saw it about a month ago, directly after she was taken up; I had paid eight shillings to the owner, John Sprags , for the shirt.

JOHN UNDERHILL sworn. - I am a servant to John Moratt , a pawnbroker, High-street, Mary-lebone; I produce a shirt pledged by the prisoner

on the 30th of last March, I am quite sure she is the person that brought it; she pawned it in the name of Thomson, I lent her four shillings on it. (The shirt identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-79

510. JANE HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of William Kent .

THOMAS COLLIS sworn. - I live in Globe-street ; I was standing opposite Mr. Kent's door on Sunday morning, and I observed the prisoner go into my house and come out again; I followed her, and she had a quart and a pint pot of Mr. Kent's about her.

HANNAH COLLIS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I only know that I put the quart and the pint pot in the passage about ten minutes before the woman came in; when my husband went after her, the two pots were gone.

Prisoner's defence. When he came up to me, the pots were on the ground; I had never touched them if I were to die; I am innocent of them. (The pots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-80

511. WILLIAM GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of Henry Addison .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

HENRY ADDISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am Lady Holland's footman , I am the owner of the watch.

Q. When did you first see the prisoner? - A. On the 24th of May, at the King's Head, at Twickenham.

Q. In consequence of any thing that passed between you and him, did he go home with you that night? - A. Yes, he slept along with my fellow-servant at Lady Holland's house; we had a dance.

Q. What time did he go out in the morning? - A. About a quarter before seven in the morning; we went then to the Horse and Groom at Twickenham , and from there we went and took a walk into Mrs. Dyner's garden; the gardener asked me what o'clock it was; I pulled out my watch, and he talked about engraving; he said he could engrave as well as any man; I said, Gardner, look at that, is that well engraved.

Court. Q. You asked him to look at the watch? - A. I will not be sure whether he asked me, or I him; he put the watch in his pocket after looking at it, it was engraved on both cases; I said to him, Gardner, what do you put it in your pocket for, why do not you give it me, it is nonsense to put it in your pocket; he said, I will give it to you, do you think I want to keep it; then we walked up the garden, and went to the Three Tuns; I called for a pint of beer, and paid for a glass of gin a-piece, it was fair-time; he got up, and said, I shall go out, I will be in again in a minute; he never returned.

Mr. Alley. Q. How long after that was it before you saw him? - A. The next morning, his master brought him to me about eleven o'clock; I said, Gardner, where is my watch; he said to me, I do not know, if I had it I lost it.

Court. Q. Did you find it again? - A. No, I have never seen it since.

Q. Were you both drunk then, or only one of you? - A. We had had only sixpennyworth of liquor in gin and porter at the Three Tuns, that would not make any body drunk.

Q. What had you at the Horse and Groom? - A. We did not drink any thing there.

Q. What time did you return to Lady Holland's house? - A. At half after two; she was out when we had the dance, and gave us leave to go out.

Q. Did you get leave of the Lady to bring home people to sleep? - A. No.

Q. You did very wrong; I think you deserve to lose your watch - whether this man is guilty, or no, that is another thing - was it a silver watch, or a gold watch? - A. A silver watch.

Prisoner. Q. When you came out of Mrs. Dyner's house, did I not give you the watch in the lane - I am conscious that I gave you the watch again? - A. No; I asked you for it at the public-house before you went out.

Q. Did not you come over to me, and say, if I would sign a paper, you would not take any further notice - you said if I would only put my own initials to pay you at six months? - A. That was when you came to me on the Sunday morning.

Mr. Alley. Q. What night was it when you had the dance? - A. On Friday night the 24th of May; on the Saturday I lost my watch.

Court. Q. Why did not you take him up when he came to you on the Sunday? - A. I did not wish to take him up.

Q. Had you known him, or were you drunk at the time? - A. No, it was on account of my fellow servant.

Q. Was the man known to any of your fellow servants? - A. I do not know that he is known by any of them, he was partner to one of the young men in the house that night.

WILLIAM MINITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am gardener to Mrs. Dyner.

Q. When you were in the garden, did you see the prosecutor's watch in his hand? - A. Yes; the prosecutor shewed him the engraving on the watch; the prisoner got it from him to look at the engraving; he said he could engrave as well as any man about the place.

JAMES SANDERSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a tailor.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about this watch? - A. On the Monday following the prisoner returned to work; he said it quite cut him up, as this young man (Addison) had lost his watch, he was very sorry for it, as he had the blame of the affair; the next day he said (whether he was joking, or no, I cannot say) that he had made away with it, and got 22 s. 6 d. for it.

Q. Did it appear to you that he said it to you in a joke? - A. I cannot say; he worked for me, and so far as I ever observed his character, he was a very honest man.

JOSEPH STRONGINARM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. The prosecutor applied to me to recover his watch on the 5th of June; I was engaged at the time, and could do nothing for him till the 10th of June; I went to his lodgings, I found him at home; the prosecutor was with me; I took him to a neighbouring public-house; we had agreed to go there to see Mr. Minitt, as the prisoner said he would agree to settle every thing as Mr. Minitt should settle the affair.

Q. Did Addison charge him with having taken the watch? - A. Yes, the prisoner denied it; he said if he had the watch, he must have lost it, - after he left the Three Tuns, he fell asleep somewhere, he did not know where. The prosecutor told him he was perfectly sober, and insisted that he had taken it away, and the prisoner insisted that he had not made away with his watch.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor called on me two or three times, and wanted me to pay for the watch, or if I would sign a bond for four pounds, he would be satisfied; I would not do it, as I knew that I had not made away with it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-81

512. CHARLES VAUGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , three petticoats, value 15 s. two gowns, value 15 s. six handkerchiefs, value 4 s. two aprons, value 2 s. two shifts, value 2 s. two caps, value 1 s. and one cloak, value 6 s. the property of Mary Duckmanton , spinster.

MARY DUCKMANTON sworn. - I am a single woman , I live in Whitechapel workhouse.

Q. Did you at any time lose the articles mentioned in the indictment? - A. Yes, on the 1st of June; the man that took them away carried my box, and I followed him; they were in my possession till I employed him to carry them home for me.

Q. Now look round - is that the man at the bar that you employed to carry your things? - A. He has got his appearance, he is not now drest in the same way he was then; it is not possible for me to say, but he is the size of that man, it may be the man.

Q. Do you believe he is the man, or is not? - - A. I cannot say; I was in search of a lodging in the dusk of the evening, and being a stranger in the neighbourhood, I asked the man if he could inform me of one; he said he would take me to his house, and he carried my trunk for me; my clothes were in a large trunk, and a great many more things in it than is expressed in the indictment.

Q. Did you apply to the man, or the man to you, seeing you with a trunk? - A. I applied to the man; he was going to take me to his house, and he carried the trunk before me.

Q. Whereabouts was it you saw the man to whom you entrusted these things - was it near the workhouse? - A. No, not very near there.

Q. How far did you go before you missed him? - A. I cannot say; I missed him at the turn of a corner, I never saw him again till I saw him at the Public-office; he did not tell me where he was going to take my trunk to; it was a week, or several days, before I saw him again at the Public-office, then he was in custody.

Q. Did you ever see any of your things again that your trunk contained? - A. Yes, some of them; I knew them when I saw them.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of those things? - A. I cannot say the value of those things; the best of my things were gone.

Q. Are they worth twelve shillings? - A. Some pounds.

Q. Did you recollect the person of the prisoner when you saw him at the Public-office - was his hair cut off them? - A. No, I could not say with certainty then; it might be the man; he has altered his dress every time that I saw him.

- PARSONS sworn. - I am a butcher, I live in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him about the neighbourhood.

Q. Do you recollect that woman? - A. Yes, I saw that woman on the Tuesday after the robbery; on Saturday night, the 1st of June, about half after ten o'clock, the watchman came to my house, and brought a large trunk with him; I told him to take it to the watch-house, and while he went there, I was passing by the door of Mr. Levi, he keeps a clothes-shop; I looked into the shop, and I saw

some clothes lying on the counter, and the prisoner standing at the counter by them.

Q. Did you attend to what was passing between the prisoner and Levi? - A. No; I went back to my wife, and told her what I had seen; she told me to go to Mrs. Levi's, and tell them not to buy them.

Q. Then you went into the shop, and cautioned Mrs. Levi not to buy them? - A. Yes, and Mrs. Levi said to the prisoner she thought he had not come honestly by the clothes.

Q. Were the clothes then lying on the counter? - A. Yes, and they were women's clothes; the prisoner answered, they were his Peg's, he sold them as he wanted to bury her decently; he was going to take them off the counter, and I prevented him, I told him if the clothes were his, and he could bring people to prove that the clothes belonged to him, he might have them, not else.

Q. Did he go away then? - A. Yes, he went out, and never came back again; the things were left at Mrs. Levi's till the prosecutrix was found out.

Q. Were you present afterwards when these things were produced before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, the prosecutrix claimed them; she said they were some of the things that were in her trunk; the Magistrate censured my conduct, as being head-borough of the parish.

Q. You behaved honestly, though you did not behave knowingly - have these things that was produced to Levi been kept separate from others? - A. (Coombes.) I have had them in my possession ever since.

Prisoner. I never mentioned those words the witness has said.

THOMAS NORRIS sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Levi, a salesman: On Saturday night, the 1st of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was standing at my master's door; the prisoner asked me if I would buy some things; I said, let me look at them; he came into the shop, and laid them on the counter; after I had looked at them I called Mrs. Levi.

Q. Did you agree about the price? - A. Yes; I went out to get change and the prisoner went with me; Parsons was passing up and down the door, he came in before we came back; when we came in (I had the change to pay the prisoner), Parsons called me back, and my mistress told me, that Mr. Parson's said, that the things were stolen; the prisoner said, he was sure they were not, they were his Peg's, his wife's.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes, by passing up and down our place; he said, she was dead, he sold the things as he wanted to bury her decent; the prisoner said he would go and fetch a witness to prove the truth of what he said.

Q. Did the prisoner ever come back? - A. No.

Q. Were these things that the prisoner produced on the counter and said were his wife's, were these things taken before the Justice and shewn the prosecutrix? - A. Yes.

Q. And they were claimed by her there? - A. Yes.

OLIVER HALEY sworn. - On Saturday, the 1st of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, I found a trunk in Saltpetre-bank, otherwise Duke-street, Rosemary-lane, it was partly empty; there was a little false hair, a bit of paper, and a pair of pattens; I took the trunk to Mr. Parsons, and afterwards to the watch-house.

ROBERT COOMBES sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street; the Magistrate desired me to take the things into my possession, I have had them in my custody ever since; the prosecutrix has been in Whitechapel workhouse ever since she was robbed, she has been ruined by it; I produce them. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday evening, the 1st of July, it might be about eight o'clock, I went to Mr. Davis's, the White Swan; I commonly go there every night when I have done my work; about half after nine o'clock a man came into the house with a bundle of clothes under his arm, apparently to me he was a soldier; he asked me whether I knew of a place where he could sell these clothes; he said, they were his wife's, she was deceased, and he had come out of the country; I told him I had lived in the neighbourhood a great many years, I was not accustomed to selling clothes, I never did sell any clothes in my life; he asked me to take them and sell them for him; I took them to Mr. Levi's, and during the time I was there, Mr. Parsons came in, and he said there was a trunk found, and that these things were stolen; I told Mr. Parsons I had them of a man who was waiting for me at Mr. Davis's; I had leave to go and fetch the man; I went back to Mr. Davis's, and brought the man out with me, and lost sight of him just by the door.

Q. (To Parsons.) Did this man, in your hearing, say that he had received them from a man to sell? - A. I never heard him say any such thing till Saturday week, when he was before the Justice; I am sure he did not say so in Levi's house.

Q. (To Norris.) Did he say at Levi's that he had got them from a man to sell? - A. He said that he came to sell them as his own deceased wife's.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-82

513. JOHN WEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , 144 halfpence , the property of David Spencer .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-83

514. SARAH COLLINS was indicted for that she, on the 12th of June , eight pieces of false and counterfeited milled money and coin made to the likeness and similitude of and for a good shilling, the same not being cut in pieces, feloniously did put off to Richard Coleman at a lower rate than they were denominated for, that is to say, for four shillings .

(The Case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you give any information against the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did to the officers at Shadwell, to Rogers, Brown, and others.

Q. In consequence of the information that you had given against the prisoner at the bar, on the 12th of June, what did you do? - A. I went to the prisoner's house on the 12th of June, in Norwich-court, Fetter-lane, under the direction of the officers; the prisoner was at home, and her husband was with her, he was cleaning his boots; he is a post-boy; I asked her if she had got any things, meaning bad money; it is the general term we use; she said I might have plenty; she asked me how many I wanted; I told her I had not got much money to purchase many now; but in the evening, if she would produce me a half piece, I would purchase them; they call half a piece twenty; and if you buy half a piece they give you twenty-one for it: I appointed to meet her in the evening at seven o'clock for the half-piece; I told her they were not for me, but they were for one of the Brentford coachmen: her husband asked me if I knew several of the Brentford coachmen; I said, yes, I told him several of their names; he then said, I know they do something in that way; I asked her if I might have them at the time, and she said I might; I left her, and then went to Mr. Rogers and the other officers, and told them what I had done; we all appointed to meet at seven in the evening. We then met at the Tweed-side-house, in Middle-row, Holborn; there we went into a private room; Mr. Rogers marked some money, which was four shillings, in the presence of Brown, Oliver, and myself; he delivered them to me; I put them into my pocket, I had no more money; he said, if I could bring her down to that house, it would be much better; I told him I thought I could; I went then to her apartment, leaving the officers at the Tweed-side public-house; she was at home by herself; then I asked her if what I came for were ready, she said they were; I asked her if she would step to a public-house just by, the person that I wanted them for was there; she said, she would, she would not put on her cloak; she went with me just as she was; we went to the Tweed-side-house, and when I went into the tap-room, I said my friend is not here, we will have a pint of beer, sit down; she sat down, and we had a pint of beer; I said, as he is not here for the half piece, I will have a few for my own use; she asked me how many I would have; I told her I had money enough for eight, which was four shillings.

Court. Q. When did you first learn what was the price of them? - A. When I first learned the trade, I knew the price of them.

Q. Had you at all agreed with her what should be the price of them? - A. Yes; I had bought of her before; sixpence a piece was the common price of them; she made some little scruple of dealing in the tap-room, because there was a person or two there; I told her they would not know our business, with that she put her hand in her pocket, and pulled out a paper under the table, and produced eight, and I gave her the four shillings.

Q. Were those the four shillings that Rogers gave you? - A. The very same; she said she could not stop, she got up to go out, because the coachman did not come; as she was getting up, Brown laid hold of her arm, and said, madam, please to walk this way; Brown saw all the transaction, he came in as a stranger, and called for a pint of beer, and did not sit ten yards off; he laid hold of her, and put her in the private room, where the other officers were, and myself along with her; there they searched her, and I saw them take more than twenty from her.

Q. Did any one search you? - A. Yes; they searched me, and found the eight I had received from this woman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose you have told all the truth, and nothing but the truth? - A. Yes; I do not know that I have said any thing wrong.

Q. I dare say you did tell the prisoner every thing but the truth, not one lie or stratagem to get hold of her? - A. If I had told her what I had come about, she would not have let me had a shilling; I told her a falsehood in the first place, the coachman did not want any, and in the next place I did not want any for myself, I only wanted to convict the woman.

Q. You told two falsehoods for one purpose, to convict the woman - what are you to get for it? - A. I do not know that I shall get any thing.

Q. Did you never get any thing for prosecuting any other person? - A. I never got any thing.

Q. Do not you expect something? - A. As I am a working man, I expect something as wages, I leave it to the generosity of those who employ me.

Q. I suppose you are to be paid as you do your work; so much if you convict, and so much if you do not; you say you do not know what you are to be paid - is that one of your truths? - A. That is the truth according to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Will you have the goodness to tell me what you are, what sort of a journeyman you are? - A. I am a wire-drawer.

Q. Do you earn any thing at all at it now? - A. At times, when there is any thing to do.

Q. You have not had any lately? - A. No.

Q. The wire-drawing business has been a slack business lately? - A. I can maintain myself by sitting at home.

Q. I wish I could do that? - A. I cannot get so much by sitting at home as I can by going abroad.

Q. I believe that is a truth - how long is it ago since you worked at the wire-drawing trade? - A. Less than a month past.

Q. I suppose you have not got your livelihood any other way? - A. I have told you.

Q. You do not suppose me to be an old acquaintance - you have come here now again to day, I ask you have you done any thing else to get a livelihood? - A. I am a thread lace-weaver.

Q. Am I to suppose that you have got your livelihood by that, or worked at it by way of amusement - who do you sell your lace to? - A. I sell it to people in the neighbourhood, and to my own acquaintance.

Q. Do not you deal with any shop-keeper? - A. The quantity is so little that I make, it is not worth the notice of any dealer.

Q. You would have us understand you got your livelihood by that? - A. I did not say that.

Q. Who do you work for in the wire-drawing business? - A. Mr. Oliver, in Love-lane, Wood-street; I could work for him to morrow if he had any to do, I worked for him less than a month past.

Q. Have you yourself been taken up for doing any thing in the smashing way? - A. I have.

Q. Tell us what the smashing way of business is, the Jury do not understand it so well as I do? - A. Buying bad money of those that make them and pass them on the public.

Q. Then you have been getting your livelihood when you were abroad in passing bad money on honest tradesmen, you are not ashamed to tell me so? - A. I am ashamed of it and determined to leave it off.

Q. How old are you? - A. I am fifty.

Q. High time to leave it off - have you been in custody for smashing? - A. I was for eight or nine days; they could find no bill against me, I had only one bad shilling against me.

Q. How many more did you accuse afterwards besides this prisoner? - A. Two more.

Q. Do you believe in God? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the 9th commandment, Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour; and the 8th, Thou shalt not steal; you knew that before you used to pass bad money? - A. Yes; I did.

Q. You knew it then when you went to this woman's house, when you told her that a coachman was the man that you wanted this half-piece for, that was not true? - A. No.

Q. Did the officers search you? - A. I do not know whether they did or not, they might rub me down, I do not think that they put their hands into my pocket.

Q. You say the money was marked in your presence, do you know for what purpose the money was marked? - A. They desired me to look as well as the others, and for all of us to be particular to know it again when it was found on the prisoner.

Q. For the purpose of giving confirmation to the evidence, do you know that the fact was so? - A. I believe it was.

Court. Q. You cannot get him to swear to a purpose of theirs? - A. I am not an officer, I do not know their business.

Mr. Alley. Q. Whether you did not give her that bad money which the officers found upon her, with a view that it should be found upon her? - A. I know nothing at all about that.

Q. So you would have me to understand you cannot ascertain what you are to have for this prosecution? - A. No.

Court. Q. Has any body promised you any precise sum towards what you have done? - A. Not a halfpenny, not a promise of any kind.

Q. You expect they will pay you? - A. Yes, for my time and trouble.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Shadwell? - A. I am.

Q. We understand that you and the other officers employed Coleman for the purpose of going to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, we did so. On the 12th of June, I, Brown, Oliver, and Coleman, all met at the Tweed-side public-house, and in the parlour there I gave Coleman four good shillings; I marked them and shewed them to all the officers and to Coleman: in order that they might be satisfied afterwards.

Q. Did you desire Coleman to go to the prisoner's house? - A. I did; and we waited at the Tweed-side house till we got further intelligence.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Coleman? - A. In a few minutes perhaps a quarter of an hour, I did not see him come back, I was in the parlour; I desired Brown, when I understood he was come, to go into the room and have a pint of beer, because he was not so much known as I was; in a very short time, Brown came to the parlour-door with the prisoner, and delivered her into my possession, and Oliver brought Coleman to me he being out of the parlour sooner than I was; I laid hold of the prisoner and I conceived there was something in her hand; in a piece of paper that was in her hand I found twenty-one pieces of bad silver; I then searched her pockets, and found in one of her pockets, two bad shillings in another piece

of paper, all resembling each other in my opinion; I searched the other pocket and found the four marked shillings which I had previously given to Coleman; I saw Brown take eight shillings from Coleman.

Q. They were bad shillings were they? - A. Yes; I asked Coleman how he came by it, in the hearing of the woman; he told me, that he received them from that woman; I asked her was it true, she said, all the money she had she received from Coleman, good, bad, and indifferent; she spoke generally; she said, I received all from that man; I then asked her particularly respecting the marked money; she said, the four shillings as well as the other money she had from Coleman; I asked Coleman if he got the eight shillings which Brown took from him of the prisoner; he said, he had; I asked her if that was true; she gave me no answer; we then took her to the Office; I produce the money, I have kept them all separate in paper, and marked the papers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This fellow, Coleman, you have known for some time? - A. No, very shortly; he was no acquaintance of mine.

Q. I am very glad of it - you did not search him? - A. Indeed I did not think it was necessary, he had no money about him.

Q. You were not in the tap-room at the time this woman was there? - A. No; Brown was; I found the twenty-one shillings in her hand; she said, she had it from Coleman just before.

Q. You found the money in her hand which might have come from Coleman, it was not found in her pocket? - A. I cannot say any thing to it.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are likewise an officer of Shadwell? - A. I am; I remained at the Tweed-side house till Coleman returned with the prisoner.

Q. How far were you from them while they sat in the tap-room? - A. Something closer than I am to you; I was in a different box and sitting right facing of them, just within the door.

Q. The box was very near them? - A. Yes; just room enough for one person to pass; I saw the prisoner at the bar and Coleman having some conversation together; I called for a pint of porter while I sat there; I observed Coleman and she had passed something between them at the edge of the table.

Court. Q. Was it at the edge of the table or under the table? - A. Rather under the table.

Mr. Knapp. Q. At that time you could not tell what they were passing? - A. I could not; I saw Coleman take his hand from her, and he clasp it up in this way; Coleman got up and she likewise, they both came out from between the boxes, and as she was coming out I took hold of her hand and called for Rogers, and Oliver to come; I took her to the parlour-door and gave her to Mr. Rogers: Coleman stood close to me, I took hold of his hand and these are the eight shillings I took from him; I said to Coleman, when I took hold of his hand, what have you got there; Coleman answered, that is the money I got from that woman; the woman said, that she knew nothing about it.

Court. Q. At the first, when Coleman said the money he had got, he got from the woman, what was the answer that she made? - A. At that time she made no answer; she said afterwards, that that man gave her all the money that she had.

Q. Before she was searched by Rogers, you say she gave some answer, do correct yourself and let us know what passed? - A. The words that passed were these, when I took the money out of Coleman's hand, I asked Coleman how he came by it: he said, that he had it from that woman.

Q. What did the woman say if she did say any thing? - A. She did not say any thing.

Q. When Rogers searched her did she say any thing then? - A. She said, she had the four shillings that Mr. Rogers found upon her from Coleman.

Q. Before she said any thing to Rogers, did she say any thing else? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. She described that she had all the counterfeit money from Coleman, and the four shillings marked money? - A. She did; we took her in a coach and brought her away to Shadwell-office; I have had these eight shillings in my custody ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Mr. Brown, who employed you in this scheme? - A. Mr. Coleman came to me, he gave the first information.

Q. And you concerted the plan with Coleman and the other officers? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. May I ask you what you get in cases of this sort? - A. I have nothing to the best of my knowledge; I have not received any thing.

Q. What do you expect? - A. I do not expect any thing but what they please to allow me.

- PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been employed by the Mint for a great number of years - look at these eight shillings that were brought with the four? - A. They are all counterfeit.

Q. Do they appear to be of the same manufactory? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Q. Look at the twenty-one which were taken out of the hand of the prisoner? - A. They are all counterfeit, and all of the same manufactory, and these two are of the same description which were taken out of the woman's pocket. (The money shewn to the Jury.)

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman asked me to take part of a pint of beer; he give me the money and told me to take care of it till he came back; I said, I would go out; and he gave me this parcel

to hold, and then this gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-84

515. MARY EDMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , twenty-eight yards of printed calico, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Coates .

THOMAS KEARN sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Coates, linen-draper , No. 136, Oxford-street ; on the 6th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon the calico was brought into the shop by a neighbour, and the prisoner was brought in by Collins and charged with the theft; it was hanging in the door-way; I had seen it half an hour before the string had been cut.

JOHN COLLINS sworn. - I am a soldier in the 1st regiment of Foot-guards; on the 6th of June, a gentleman told me, that the prisoner at the bar had stole something, and desired me to run after her; I went after her and overtook her just as she got round Cavendish-square, she had a piece of print under her arm covered over with her apron; I asked her, what she had got there; she said, she had only got a bit of print, her sister gave it her; I told her, she must come and shew me where she had it from; I brought her into Oxford-street and took her into the first shop, it did not belong there, I took her into the second shop, and they owned it; the print and the prisoner were delivered into the custody of Bates.

- BATES sworn. - I produce the print; the prisoner was brought into the watch-house that morning. (The print identified by Kearn.)

Prisoner's defence. I was out of place, and two young women met me and asked me to hold this print, it was wrapped up in a coloured apron; I did not know what it was, I got it in the square from them; the gentleman ran after me and stopped me; he asked me what I had got; I looked at it, and told him it was a piece of print; he said, will you come along with me; I said, there are the two young women that gave it me, he did not offer to take the young women but he took me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-85

516. HANNAH CAMEL was indicted for that she, on the 13th of June , two pieces of false and counterfeited milled money, each of them made to the likeness of a good shilling, and eight pieces of false and counterfeited milled money, each of them made to the likeness of a good sixpence, the same counterfeit pieces of milled money not being then cut, feloniously did put off to one Richard Coleman at a lower rate than they were denominated for, that is to say, for three shillings .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RICHARD COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you employed by Rogers and the other officers on the 13th of June at the Red-Lion, to go to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Rogers, or any of them mark any money and give you any money? - A. Yes; they marked five shillings in my presence at the Red-Lion, Red Lion-street, Whitechapel; Rogers, Oliver, and Brown, were there; I went to the prisoner's house in Old Castle-yard, Whitechapel, or Old Castle-street , I am not sure which; I knew her before; she was not at home the first time I called, it was about two o'clock in the afternoon; a little girl attends generally in her absence; I was desired to call again in an hour's time, I did not call again till between five and six in the afternoon.

Q. Did the officers go with you? - A. Yes, to the door, as near as they possibly could, without being perceived.

Q. Did you see the prisoner then? - A. Yes, she was at home, and her servant, who is somewhere about thirteen or fourteen years old; I asked her if she had got any goods; she said, yes; this was in the back room, she keeps a chandler's shop, but she has not opened it yet.

Q. Goods is a cant term for shillings and sixpences? - A. She knew what I meant perfectly; she asked me how many I wanted; I told her; she then asked me if I had seen any of her crooks, meaning sixpences; shillings she called shans.

Q. Then you knew crooks meant sixpences? - A. Yes, I knew what she meant; she pulled a great quantity of sixpences, which were in paper, out of her pocket; I told her I would have eight crooks; she said they were threepence a-piece; I told her I would have two shans.

Court. Q. Did she deliver you six sixpences and two shillings? - A. Yes, and I gave her three shillings for them.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Were these three shillings a part of the five that Rogers had given you? - A. They were; I had no other money about me than the five shillings that Rogers had given me; when I was coming away, she asked me if I did not want any seven-shilling pieces, (they call them spangles); I told her I did not; she said they were very good ones, they would come as high as four shillings a-piece, they were such as nobody would refuse; I asked her then, if I called to-morrow, if she should have any more; she said she should.

Q. You knew you had not bought all her stock then? - A. No, only she had so many customers; I came out then to the officers who were waiting in the court.

Q. Did you give any signal to them? - A. Yes, I returned back, and Brown followed me in immediately, and the rest of the officers; Brown ran

up to her, and laid hold of her hand in my presence, and asked her what she was about; he began to search her.

Q. Did she say any thing? - A. She gave no answer to Brown's question; I do not justly know what passed then; they searched me, and found eight bad sixpences and two bad shillings, and the two marked shillings that were left.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I had your character last night - I think you told me that you was a wire-drawer, a lace-maker, and a smasher? - A. Yes.

Q. You went to the prisoner's house for the purpose of buying bad money - had you been acquainted with the prisoner's husband? - A. I had not seen him above once or twice.

Q. You had seen him often enough to get into his debt? - A. No.

Q. Did you not purchase a table-cloth of him? - A. I never bought any thing of him in my life.

Q. Take care, Mr. Coleman, did you never buy a table-cloth of the prisoner nor her husband? - A. I never saw one in the possession of them, only when the house was searched.

Q. Did they search the house when they searched the prisoner? - A. Yes, and they found a tablecloth; I do not know that I should know the husband, if I met him in the street; I never saw the husband above twice, that was when they lived in Rosemary-lane; I have seen the woman several times.

Q. When you came to her house the first time, she was not at home? - A. No.

Q. When you went the second time, how many persons did you see there? - A. A little girl and her.

Q. Was that Mary Cannon or Mary Doyle ? - A. I am not sure what her name is.

Q. It was on the ground-floor adjoining the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. It is altogether a little place, so that you can hear what is said in the shop or the parlour? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between five and six in the evening, it was quite light; I cannot say there was not any body else there, but I did not see any other woman there.

Q. You cannot see very well, I suppose - will you swear that there were not two women in the shop at the time? - A. There was not a soul in the shop or the parlour as I saw but the prisoner, the girl, and me; the shop-door was a-jar.

Q. When you go to people to buy articles of this sort, as you are acquainted with the trade, do you generally deal in public or in private - you, I should suppose, wish no person to be present? - A. Except it is some in the trade, and they do not care if there is half a dozen.

Q. Do you ever buy articles of this sort before servants? - A. Yes, because they are privy to it all.

Q. Then the servants are as bad as the mistress? - A. The girl saw what passed.

Q. Then openly before the servant this woman, you would have me to understand, exposed herself to the danger you brought her into? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not ask the woman to keep a parcel for you, and you would call again, and give her three shillings as part in payment, and give her all the bad money in the paper? - A. I know nothing at all of it.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Shadwell.

Q. You, together with Brown and Oliver, went to this Red Lion public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mark any money, and give it to Coleman? - A. I did, five shillings, in the presence of the officers; I shewed the marks to the officers and to him.

Q. Did you afterwards go and station yourselves about the house of the prisoner? - A. I stood at a distance; the other officers went nearer the house than me.

Q. After you had stationed yourselves about the house, how long afterwards was it that Coleman gave you a signal? - A. Not many minutes; Brown went in first, and when I went in, Brown had hold of the prisoner's hands; I desired him to search what she had in her lap; he searched her apron and her pockets, and he gave me the marked money which I had before given to Coleman; I desired him to take care of the bad money.

Court. Q. Had he taken any bad money from the prisoner? - A. Yes, at that time he had taken a great deal of bad money himself from her; he kept the bad money; I then applied to Coleman; I said, what have you done with the remaining part of the five shillings; said he, I have got them in my pocket; he gave them to me immediately, these are them, and these are the three marked shillings that Brown took from the prisoner, (producing them); Oliver took some counterfeit money from Coleman; I asked him where he got that from; he said, I got it from that woman, Mrs. Camel; I then said, do you hear what that man says; she did not immediately answer me; I again said, Mrs. Camel, you see I have got some money here from Mr. Brown, where did you get that money; she said she got it from Coleman; I asked her where she got all the counterfeit money, and she made the same reply.

Q. Did you ask her where she got the marked money? - A. Yes; then she replied generally she got all the money from Coleman.

Q. Did you say to her, where did you get all that counterfeit money? - A. Yes, and then she said she got it all from Coleman.

Q. Was there a girl by at the time? - A. Yes; I took her into custody.

Q. Did she say any thing in the presence of the prisoner about the money? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Are you sure that the girl did not say any thing? - A. She might have laid something to the other officers.

Q. Did you hear her say that Coleman gave the prisoner all the bad money? - A. She did not say so in the house, nor I did not hear her say so afterwards.

Q. Did the girl say any thing of that sort any time in your hearing? - A. Yes, before the Magistrate, but she never said so before, nor at the time she was in custody, till she was before the Magistrate.

Q. The girl and the woman were confined together? - A. No, we kept them separate; the girl was discharged on the second hearing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you took these two people into custody, you kept them separate, so as they could have no communication together? - A. I did.

Q. And when they were brought before the Magistrate, the girl said the money was given to the woman by Coleman? - A. She did say so before the Magistrate, but not before.

Court. Q. Was the girl present when the prisoner said that Coleman gave her the money? - A. Yes, she heard the woman say that.

Mr. Alley. Q. It was about two o'clock when you gave Coleman the marked money, and then he had the marked money in his possession before he got into the house where the woman was? - A. Yes.

Q. You searched him at the time you gave him the marked money? - A. I did not, I knew he had no other.

Q. From that time till six o'clock he had an opportunity of doing what he pleased with it? - A. No, he was in our company constantly; he had no opportunity, we were watching him.

Q. Did you follow him to that house the first time he went? - A. Mr. Brown followed him.

Q. As soon as he told you the trap was set, you jumped in and caught the mouse? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You never let him be out of your view, the first time, nor the second time? - A. No.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer of Shadwell; we have understood how Coleman was employed - you went into the house first? - A. I did; as soon as I went into the house, I saw Camel sitting in a chair; I immediately took hold of both her arms, the girl was then in the shop, almost close to the door; there was nobody else there then but the girl and Mrs. Camel; I saw that Mrs. Camel had a quantity of money in her apron; I took hold of her apron, and in it there was a hundred counterfeit sixpences; they were done up in paper, and in each paper there were twenty sixpences, and likewise there were forty-four counterfeit shillings in her apron; I searched each of her pockets, and found one other counterfeit shilling, with a quantity of good money, and among the rest I found the three marked shillings, part of the five that Rogers had given him in our presence; I knew they were the marked shillings from my own recollection; I picked them out from all the rest.

Court. How much good money did you find in that pocket? - A. I cannot say exactly; I believe it was half a guinea, a seven-shilling piece, some silver and halfpence, to the amount of a pound or more; I immediately took my knife out of my pocket, and put a second mark on the three marked shillings, and I gave them to Mr. Rogers; I then asked Mrs. Camel how she came in possession of this counterfeited money found in her lap; she told me that she had picked it up in Whitechapel; I asked her how she came by the marked money; she said then that she had it from Coleman, pointing to the person of the name of Coleman; afterwards she said that she had it all from Coleman. I saw Oliver take from Coleman eight sixpences and two shillings, all counterfeited; I then saw Mr. Rogers take from Coleman the other two marked shillings; Coleman said that the counterfeit sixpences and shillings he had, he took of the prisoner; that was after the prisoner said she had all the money from Coleman.

Q. Did the prisoner make any answer to that? - A. None at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner told you she picked up the money in Whitechapel? - A. She did.

Q. That you are sure of, you heard that distinctly? - A. I did.

Q. When the woman said that she had it from Coleman, what was it that the girl said? - A. When I went in, the girl sat close to the shop-door.

Q. When you went into the shop, who was there with the girl? - A. There was nobody in the shop but the girl; the girl ran out of the house immediately when I took hold of Mrs. Camel.

Q. I ask you what she said? - A. She did not say any thing, but ran away.

Q. Where was she taken at? - A. She came back afterwards, and another woman with the child; in about two or three minutes she were taken.

Q. What did she say? - A. We did not ask her any questions.

Q. She did not say, as the woman said, that she had it from Coleman? - A. No.

Q. She never said that, to your knowledge, at any time, or any where? - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. Then the girl was taken into custody, and

you did not ask her one single syllable? - A. We considered her as a child.

Q. Did you attend the examination before the Magistrate? - A. I did.

Q. How many examinations were there? - A. A. Two.

Q. You attended upon both examinations as a witness - upon the oath you have taken, did not the girl say before the Magistrate that the woman had the money from Coleman? - A. She did say so.

Q. How came you not to say so when I asked you whether she said so at any time -

Mr. Knapp. Q. She said the same as the woman said before the Magistrate - did she hear the woman alledge that she had it from Coleman? - A. Yes, before the Magistrate.

Court. Q. When the woman was taken, did the girl hear the woman say that she had it from Coleman? - A. No, the girl was out at the time; I produce the money.

DANIEL OLIVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were one of the officers on this occasion - have you any thing to produce? - A. I produce eight counterfeit sixpences and two counterfeit shillings, which I took in the prisoner's house from the left hand of Coleman, and a bad shilling I found in a chair, and a bad sixpence on the floor.

- PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Will you have the goodness to take these into your hand - these are the eight sixpences and the two shillings? - A. They are all counterfeit; they seem to be of the same manufactory, they have never been in circulation.

Q. Now I will put in your hand the sixpence and the shilling which the last witness found on a chair and on the floor? - A. They are both counterfeits, they have got the mark of the blacking upon them.

Q. Now here are the 144 shillings and sixpences found in paper in the prisoner's apron? - A. They are all counterfeit, they have the mark of the blacking upon them, they have never been in circulation since they have been coloured.

Q. (To Rogers.) Tell me whether those are the same three shillings, and the two that you delivered to Coleman? - A. They are the same marked shillings that I delivered to Coleman.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050710-86

517. HANNAH COLCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Mark Yelph .

MARK YELPH sworn. - I am a boot and shoemaker , No. 146, Oxford-street ; On the 11th of June, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop with another person; this one did not come on purpose for the shoes, but she appeared very troublesome, and found fault with several pair of shoes that the other fixed on, which gave me some suspicion; after the other person had fixed upon a pair of shoes which she purchased, I pretended to miss some shoes; I called to my wife, and asked her if she had taken some shoes; the prisoner then appeared confused, and said, there is somebody passed the shop, they will be gone; she ran out, and beckoned to them; I seeing this, and she going out of the shop to beckon to somebody, I imagined she had taken something; when she got to the door, she said, I'll leave my pattens for a minute, I am afraid the person will be gone; I followed her out of the shop to the corner of the street, and there she beckoned, as though she wanted a person to come to her, and on my looking up the street, there was no person there but a woman that was going quite the contrary way; she directly turned back, as I supposed to come to my house again, instead of which she went into the next shop to mine, a milliner's; she saw me follow her; my wife came to the door, and brought her in, and she had thrown a pair of shoes in the next shop; I asked her what could induce her to take a pair of shoes; I asked her whether it was through want, or what was the reason; she said, no, she had friends very well to do that belonged to her, and she believed it was the devil that possessed her; then I said she was the less inexcusable, I was afraid that she belonged to a party in that neighbourhood, as I continually lost shoes.

- COLSTOCK sworn. - I live at the milliner's shop next door: On the 11th of June, a woman came into the shop, I did not see her face; she stooped down, and went out; she enquired the price of some of the articles in the window; I did not give her any answer; I got up, and a little further in the shop from where I sat, I saw a pair of shoes lying on the floor; I went to the next door to enquire if they had lost any, and if they had, to come in for them. (The shoes produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-87

518. CATHERINE WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a silver watch, value 40 s. seven shillings, and sixpence, the property of Jenkin Griffiths .

JENKIN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a blacksmith , I live in the parish of Rotherhithe: On the

4th of June last, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I was intoxicated with liquor; I happened to go into an entry in Old Gravel-lane , where I met the prisoner at the bar, and she enticed me into her room; and then I went on the bed in another room up one pair of stairs, where she took my watch out of my pocket with one hand, and handed it to the other over my shoulder.

Q. Did you feel her take it? - A. No.

Q. You must perceive her take it? - A. Yes; I went down stairs and demanded my watch; she took a knife in her hand and threatened to stab me if I did not go out of the house.

Q. Did you ever get your watch? - A. No; I put my hand into my waistcoat pocket and missed seven shillings and sixpence.

Q. Had you given her change? - A. No; I paid her one shilling to have some gin, and another I made her a present of; I went in search of an officer and I met with Mr. Rogers; he took her into custody and searched her, and one shilling was found upon her, it was one of the seven shillings, I had it in change of half a guinea that morning.

Q. You know you were very drunk? - A. Not so that I did not know myself full well, though I was deluded.

Prisoner. Q. Did you never see me before? - A. Only once in my life.

Court. Q. Are you sure that is the woman? - A. That is the very person.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am an officer; on the 4th of June, the prosecutor came to me, he was intoxicated in liquor but he had recollection enough to bring me to the place where he had been; I saw the prisoner there and there was a woman in bed below stairs; I asked her what she had done with the man's watch; she said, she knew nothing about it; I searched her, and in her pocket I found a shilling; and he instantly claimed it to be part of the money he had lost.

Prisoner's defence. I knew this man several different times; I never knew him to have a watch all the time; I have known him better than a dozen times; he told me that he belonged to Woolwich-college; when I met him I was going to buy a mackerel; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him I would not, I was in a hurry to go home; he came home with me, and then he sent for half a pint of gin; he followed me up stairs and said, I have got no more money than a shilling; I accepted the shilling; he laid down on the bed as long as he liked; he stepped out of doors for for fourteen minutes, he came in and said, young woman, I have lost a watch; I said, you are very welcome to look; I have not seen it; he went out again, and came in again and said, I have lost it but I do not know whether you are the woman that I was in company with, with that he went out; I sat on my landlady's bed and never had any notion of that man coming any more; she and I were there with the fish when Mr. Rogers came in with him; he said, search the woman; and he searched me in a most scandalous manner, and found only the one shilling that he gave me in my pocket; Mr. Rogers said, is this the bed that you have laid upon; I said no; I took Mr. Rogers up stairs; when he first came in he made an apology and said, I have only got one shilling; I will go to where I will get more money, and I will stop all night with you.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-88

519. JOHN RUMNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. and a hat, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Dean .

It appearing in evidence, that the articles in the indictment were the property of Mrs. Wilson, the prisoner having been a seafaring man was pressed into the service of the Royal Navy at the time he was coachman to the lady, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-89

520. MURTOUGH RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , thirty pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 15 s. the property of Richard Wormington .

RICHARD WORMINGTON sworn. - I am a publican : I keep the Coach and Horses, Greek-street, Soho : On the 4th of June, I missed a quantity of pipe that was cut off from my machine in the cellar to draw up my beer; on the 5th of June, I met him coming up the stairs, I found in his pocket eight feet of pipe.

- HIDER sworn. - I am a bricklayer; I saw the prosecutor take it out of his pocket. (The pipe produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it, I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050710-90

521. CHRISTOPHER POLLARD was indicted for that he, on the 10th of January , in and upon William Parry , an officer of our Lord the King, and in the service of the Excise, being then on shore, seizing, and securing to our Lord the King, a thousand gallons of rum, brandy, and foreign geneva, and also 500 pounds weight of tobacco, which said goods were liable to be seized and secured, being then and there uncustomed goods, unlawfully, and violently did make an assault,

and did forcibly, and unlawfully, oppose, hinder, and obstruct him in his duty, he being such officer as aforesaid .

And several other Counts of like offence with like intention.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Jackson; and the case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

WILLIAM PARRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. I believe you are the mate of the Resolution cutter, in the service of the Excise, commanded by Captain Stoneham ? - A. I am.

Q. You are a commissioned officer in the Excise ? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 10th of January you saw the Maria, you searched her, and afterwards you went on shore? - A. Yes, I landed at Selin; I searched the Maria cutter lying close to the land's end at Selin Cove ; I found nothing in her; I afterwards picked up fifty-eight ankers of spirits and a case of wine, lying at anchor close a-stern of her; I then made a signal for assistance for another boat, on my returning to go on board the Resolution I met with the other boat, I ordered that boat to go in search of the Maria cutter's boat.

Q. What time was this? - A. Between six and seven o'clock, on the 10th of January.

Q. Did you secure what you had seen a-stern? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go on shore in search of smuggled goods? - A. I did.

Q. What time was it when you and your boat's crew landed? - A. Sometime after seven o'clock when I landed with the first boat's crew, which consisted of six men, and afterwards when the other boat's crew landed I had sixteen men.

Q. Upon your landing did you discover any goods? - A. I did, just below high water mark.

Q. What were these goods? - A. About an hundred ankers of brandy, rum, and gin, I saw at first.

Q. What happened upon your going to take possession of these goods? - A. There were several musquets fired.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the figure of any of the persons firing? - A. Not then.

Q. How soon was it you saw any persons? - A. It might be about ten o'clock.

Q. How many people do you suppose there were that you could see without telling who they were? - A. There were several people come down off and on in the course of the evening.

Court. Q. You said, as you approached the beach there were several musquets fired? - A. Yes, after I had made seizure of the hundred ankers about eight o'clock.

Q. You mean the hundred ankers that were lying just below high water mark? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. When you had taken possession of these did any thing else happen? - A. I went up the beach with the cutter's crew and seized the remaining part of the seizure which were piled up on the quay.

Q. When you were at this quay, having seized the first part of the goods, describe to my Lord how far distant they were from the first? - A. They were at a little distance, the quay is close to the beach.

Q. What did you find there? - A. Three hundred ankers of spirits and some tobacco; I seized them.

Q. Did any thing happen to you or the crew at the time you were taking possession of them? - A. No, nothing; we were fired on just as we were going up the beach, we cleared the beach.

Court. Q. Do you call that nothing, attend to the question and do not give such strange answers; the question is, whether any thing happened to you? - A. We were fired on, and we drove the men away.

Q. What men? - A. The smugglers.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you see any men? - A. Yes, we saw some men behind the corners of houses in the village.

Q. Did any of them come down to you then? - A. No.

Q. You having seized these two parcels of goods, when was it that any interruption happened? - A. There was no interruption happened till one o'clock in the morning after the first part of the evening.

Q. Had you any conversation with any body during the time after you had made the seizure and before the latter end of the night? - A. There was a man came down about ten o'clock after I had made the seizure on the quay.

Q. Are you able to speak positively to the person of that man? - A. Not positively.

Q. Look to the man at the bar and tell me whether you know his person or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Describe to me as particular as you can the dress, size, and appearance of the person who held this conversation with you? - A. I was standing on the wall on the quay close to the seizure, a man came up to me, I did not particularly look to his dress, but to the best of my recollection he was dressed in dark coloured clothes; I thought he had boots on and I believe he had a whip in his hand; he asked me to sell him twenty or thirty ankers of spirits or spare them, but to the best of my recollection it was to sell them, and then he would give me an order for ten more kegs; I asked him what he meant by an order; O, says he, you know very well, and then he made a kind of a laugh and jeer, or something to that purpose.

Q. Was that the only time you saw that person? - A. I will not be positive, there was another person came down, he left me; there was a man came down to me at half after twelve, he stood against the side of a door and I was on the other side, he talked with me a considerable time.

Court. Q. What door? - A. There is a house built on the quay; he came and talked to me there, the whole conversation was wanting me to give up half the seizure; he said, to give and take, or words to that effect, he insinuated with me to give up half the seizure, he said, live and let live, give and take, or words to that effect.

Q. What were the words? - A. He said you have got a good seizure, you may as well give and take, live and let live, he did not say immediately will you give me up half the seizure, he only insinuated by those words.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Now the person that held that conversation with you was it the same person that held the conversation with you at ten o'clock? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What do you believe upon that occasion, do you think that it was or that it was not? - A. I think it was, it was just such another person.

Q. Did you see any more of that person, be he whom he might, in the course of that night? - A. Not afterwards, I saw him no more.

Court. Q. What did you say to him when he said, live and let live, give and take? - A. I did not make him any answer; I told him that it was worth more than my commission to give up any part of the seizure.

Mr. Fielding. Q. What began then to be the conduct of any of the people there? - A. Soon afterwards they gave three cheers, the smugglers did I believe, it was in the village from a number of people assembled there, and there might be twenty or thirty people come down in a body immediately after the three cheers; then we were fired upon, and stones were thrown by some of these people.

Q. Was this firing all at once or repeatedly? - A. It was repeatedly for an hour or upwards.

Q. Were the stones thrown once or the whole time? - A. The stones were kept continually throwing the whole of the time the firing was, for an hour or upwards.

Q. Did any part of your crew receive any injury? - A. They did, there were five of them wounded with slugs or swan shot with the firing.

Q. How soon, tell as near as you can recollect when this sort of cheering and attack upon you was after this person left you - A. I cannot speak exactly, it was from five to ten minutes after the person left me that it began.

Q. Did you observe which way the person went when he left you? - A. Yes, he went round the corner towards where the mob were.

Q. You say this continued for upwards of an hour? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any more of that person with whom you had held that conversation after that? - A. I did not.

Q. Was a man there with the villagers, an inhabitant of that place, of the name of George? - A. There was; he had been with me, I first saw him about ten o'clock.

Q. Did he continue with you from ten till the last time of the firing? - A. No; he went up and down very frequently, he did not stop a long time with us.

Court. Q. Was George with you before the man came to you and had the conversation about the seizure? - A. He was; he came down to the place where I was and went up to the village several times.

Q. Did he go at any time to the place from whence the firing was? - A. Yes, he went away from me just before the firing.

Q. Did he go amongst them? - A. He went towards them.

Q. Had he any opportunity of seeing them? - A. I have every reason to believe he had, he went towards them.

Q. Did you see George's wife? - A. I did; I saw her before I saw her husband, before ten o'clock, to the best of my recollection, she came down just before the mob, just before the twenty or thirty that came down in a body.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you see her about at the time you were holding the conversation with the person you have described? - A. I do not recollect, I do not think that she was there, I cannot positively say.

Q. Were there among your company men of the names of, Jonathan Budd , John Pile , and Walter Germain , were they, or either of them near you at the time you were talking with the man? - A. They were.

Q. They had an opportunity of observing the man as well as you had? - A. They had.

Q. Did you secure the goods at last? - A. We secured them and kept possession of them the whole time; I did not lose a single cask.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are an officer of the Excise? - A. Yes.

Q. This firing and throwing of stones I think you say was after one o'clock? - A. About one o'clock was the exact time of the firing and throwing of stones.

Q. You have been talking of a man of the name of George whose christian name is Joseph - what is he, Mr. Parry? - A. I do not know what he is; I believe he keeps a public-house in the village.

Q. So I have heard - you have seen him a good many times, now you can tell me what he is; if I were to ask you in Cornwall perhaps you would tell me he is a smuggler - you swore it was one o'clock at a former trial? - A. Yes; I did, I had a watch in my pocket.

Court. Q. Did you examine your watch at the time of the firing? - A. I looked at it at different times of the night; I cannot say I looked at it momentarily; I believe it was about one o'clock.

JONATHAN BUDD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were one of the crew of the Resolution? - A. Yes.

Q. You being one of the crew of the Resolution cutter, do you remember coming on shore on the beach? - A. Yes, on the 10th of January, about seven in the evening we first landed at Selin Cove; I saw there liquor and tobacco before I got out of the boat, I believe they were about five or six yards from the water-side; there were about fifty casks of liquor and about ten bags of tobacco.

Q. Did you hear any firing upon your landing? - A. I heard before I landed, a firing and huzzaing, it came from among the houses in the Cove; when I came on shore I ran among the people, thinking it was our people from the jolly boat; and then there was firing in every direction.

Q. Who was there when you came up to them? - A. They all fled; there was huzzaing; I turned round to come back again.

Q. You said they all fled, at the time they fled were they making any noise at that time? - A. Yes; when I got up to the top of the quay they all fled; I called to Mr. Wren, the officer of the jolly boat, I could not find him; I turned back and I walked down towards Mr. Parry; then there was a man fired a musquet over my head; he said d - n me, this will scare all the cutter's men to hell flames; I saw the musquet in his hand.

Q. Who that person was you do not know? - A. No.

Court. Q. Was that before you got back to Mr. Parry? - A. Yes, a long time.

Q. How near was the man to you when he fired the musquet over your head? - A. About nine or ten yards; Thomas Pile and me went to Mr. Parry; and Mr. Parry told us to get our arms; we got them; before I could get my cartouch-box on, stones were heaved at us from the high quay, by whom I cannot say, there were a great number of people there, there were not above five or six that heaved stones, there was about that quantity of stones came at a time; I sung out to Bill Stevens to fire and I would second him as soon as I could load my musquet; Bill Stevens fired, and as soon as I had loaded my musquet I could not see any one to fire at; I run towards the man that fired over my head, and could not see the men there; I then run to the high quay where the stones came from, I saw there, I dare say, 20 or 30 people.

Q. Did you know any of these people? - A. Not one.

Q. Were any of these people armed? - A. They all fled as I came up, they were not armed as I saw, I sung out, d - n you, I am not afraid of you, I fired my musquet over them as they fled, to frighten them. In this quay, were these people were, there were near three hundred kegs, and some tobacco. Mr. Parry sung out, young men, come here; I sung out to Mr. Parry, that there were three or four hundred kegs there, and Mr. Parry immediately came up and placed sentrys at each place, and told us that we should flash; the people of the jolly boat came to us, then we were fourteen in number; we then carried the goods that were on the beach up to the quay, and hauled our boats up out of the way of the surge, and kept sentrys over them.

Q. Did you see any body there having any conversation with Mr. Parry? - A. I did; there was a man there about ten o'clock, he had a blue coat on, and a whip in his hand, he was a middle-sized man.

Q. Did you see Joseph George ? - A. Yes; we were not there so soon as this man.

Q. Where was this man at the time he was talking to Mr. Parry? - A. He was by the door of the house, on the quay; I saw a man talking with Mr. Parry as he was standing on the wall, and I saw him by the door.

Court. Q Where was the man at ten o'clock? - A. The man was standing on the wall with a blue coat on.

Q. You saw him afterwards, the same man and Mr. Parry talking together? - A. I cannot say it was the same man; to all appearance it was the same man, he had a blue coat on; I saw him the first time about ten o'clock, I saw him again in about half an hour afterwards talking with Mr. Parry at the door.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you remember seeing Joseph George , and what time in the evening did you see him? - A. I saw him about eleven o'clock, or between ten and eleven, I cannot say which, I had no watch, I saw George come down, and I saw him speaking with Mr. Parry.

Court. Q. While Mr. Parry and the man in the blue coat were talking together at the door, did you see George? - A. Yes; when Joseph George came down the last time, I saw him.

Q. After George came down the second time, did you see what became of the man in the blue coat? - A. Joseph George told us the smugglers were coming to take the goods away; the man was talking with Mr. Parry, and when George came down the man went away, he turned about and went to the side of the house, I followed behind him about the distance of the length of my musket, till he began to shake hands with one or two of our people, who were standing at the corner of the house, then he shook hands with me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When he shook hands with you, did you observe his person at that time? - A. No, I did not, there was such confusion I had not time to be certain of the man's features.

Q. Did that man say any thing to you? - A. He

said, good night, men, mind and take care of yourselves; he said, good speed to you, and I said, good speed to him; then I saw that man shake hands with some more of the people, and went eight or ten fathoms, and I saw him stoop, as though he wanted to pick up a stone, but I cannot say I saw him pick up a stone, nor can I say I saw him heave any; he sung out, d - n the first man that turns Judas; then the people huzzaed the mob that was above us.

Court. Q. Did they huzza upon the man stooping down? - A. Yes; and I heard a voice sing out, d - n Joseph George , we'll kill you, then the firing took place, and throwing of stones.

Q. Did that man that spoke to you, and that made those expressions, did he go to the people that were huzzaing? - A. Yes, the stones were thrown before he joined them, in two or three different places from over the tops of houses, and from behind the boats.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you able to distinguish how many persons there were before he joined them? - A. I cannot say any number, there might be forty or fifty people before he joined them, it looked like a large body of people.

Q. Are you able to say how many muskets were fired? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were there more than two or three? - A. I think there were more than five or six during the firing, besides what we fired.

Q. Did you receive any wound? - A. I was wounded in my head, my arm, and thigh, with small shot.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had no watch about you to know what time it was, you said it was ten o'clock when you first saw the man; you did not know it was ten o'clock? - A. I cannot say it was ten o'clock exactly, it was as nigh as I could guess.

Q. The man, whoever he was, that was in conversation with Mr. Parry, assembled to the mob above? - A. Yes.

Q. There were other people about you? - A. Not in a blue coat.

Q. Are you certain that the same man that had conversation with Mr. Parry, that you saw him pick up a stone? - A. I did not see him pick up a stone, I saw him stoop.

Q. You did not see that man throw any stone? - A. No.

Q. He got among the mob, and then you did not see him afterwards? - A. I did not.

Q. Was the blue coat a great coat, or like one the prisoner has on now? - A. It was a blue surtout coat.

JOHN PILE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You are one of the crew of the Resolution cutter - were you on shore on the 10th of January, at Selin Cove, with Mr. Parry? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you meet with any obstruction on landing? - A. No; I was in the second boat, the goods were seized by Mr. Parry before we came to the quay.

Q. Do you recollect any person being in conversation with Mr. Parry? - A. I saw a man talking with Mr. Parry several times, it might be ten o'clock the first time I saw him; he was dressed in a dark coat with white buttons; he had a whip under his arm, and he might continue talking with Mr. Parry five or ten minutes, or it might not be so long; I did not hear what passed.

Q. When did you see him again? - A. It might be in the course of an hour, or it might not be so long; I saw him come down, and walk about, and go up again.

Court. Q. What place did he come from? - A. From Selin Cove, to the end of the house on the quay where the goods were lying; and just before the smugglers began to rise upon us, this same man was talking with Mr. Parry; he came round, and shook hands with me and several of the crew; he said, if you behave well to us, we will behave well to you; he walked away back, and sung out, d - n him who turns Judas, and then immediately joined the mob; they sung out, one and all, and gave three cheers, and one piece was fired at the same time by one in the mob.

Q. Are you sure that the man that sung out, d - n him who turns Judas, was the man whom you shook hands with? - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing his countenance? - A. No, I had not; to the best of my recollection he was a dark man with a blackish beard.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. I cannot say.

WALTER GERMAIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Attorney General. Q. Were you a part of Mr. Parry's crew that made the seizure at Selin Cove in January last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any man coming to speak to Mr. Parry? - A. Yes; I do not recollect what time it was when the man came down the first time; when I saw him the last time, I think it was nigh one o'clock; he was a stout man, he had a blue surtout coat on, he had a dark beard high up, and I thought he had a stick or a whip in his hand.

Q. Was there any man in a dark blue coat that spoke to you? - A. Yes, he shook hands with me as he walked off.

Court. Q. Was that the same man that stood with Mr. Parry? - A. I am not certain it was the same man; it was about one o'clock, he shook hands with me; he said to me, men, be honourable; I said to him again, if you behave honourable, we shall; with that he walked off; he had not gone a great distance before he sung out, one and all, d - n him who turns Judas.

Q. Are you sure that the man that made use of that expression was the man that shook hands with you? - A. I am sure of that; he then went towards the mob of people, and they gave three huzzas, and they began to heave stones; I only saw him go towards them, I could not see him join them.

JOSEPH GEORGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live at Selin; I keep the Bell at Church Town, close to the Cove.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. I know him very well, I have known him sometime.

Q. On the 10th of January, in the evening, when Mr. Parry made a seizure, did you see the prisoner on that evening? - A. I did.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He professes farming, he lives about seven miles and a half from that spot, near a place called Creeve, or whether he lives in Creeve, I do not know exactly.

Q. About what time did you see him there at night? - A. To the best of my knowledge I saw him there first about nine o'clock at night; he was close to the landing-place in the Cove, he was with the other men.

Q. How many men might there be with him? - A. Three or four; Mr. Parry had seized the goods at that time.

Q. How far was he then from the place where Mr. Parry had seized the goods? - A. About thirty yards; the second time I saw him was when my brother was speaking to me; at that time there were about thirty or forty people.

Q. You are speaking of your brother, that poor unfortunate man? - A. Yes.

Q. How far were they all from where Mr. Parry was? - A. They were not further than twenty or thirty yards at that time, and close to William Pender 's house.

Q. John George was there with him - was he near to John George ? - A. He was.

Q. Was any thing said to you, either by him or John George ? - A. Not by him, by John George , (the prisoner was close to him,) he asked me whether I would join them to take away the goods from Mr. Parry; I told my brother I would not be shot for him, nor any person else; I asked him who would maintain my family if I was shot; the prisoner was closer to me than I am to you, he had a blue coat on with blue buttons, and a round hat.

Q. Did you observe whether he had a stick or a whip in his hand? - A. I did not observe.

Q. Do you know any more of the people that were standing there? - A. I know Patrick Perry ; there were twenty or thirty people standing there, I know no more.

Q. Did you see any other man that was dressed like the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not recollect that I did.

Q. Was there any thing the matter with his eyes? - A. He is blind with one eye; I went down to Mr. Parry, and told him the country were going to rise upon him; then I saw the prisoner leaning his arm against the north-east side of the door, and Mr. Parry was close by him; the man called away Mr. Parry to speak to me, and then the prisoner turned his back; he went away from that place, and went northward and eastward to the places where the people were.

Court. Q. What time of the night might that be? - A. To the best of my knowledge between eleven and twelve, I did not look at the clock.

Q. The first time you saw him was about nine o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing when he went away? - A. I did not.

Q. Did he go towards where there were any other people assembled? - A. Yes, he went away to where the rest of the mob were.

Q. How soon after that he went away towards them was there any disturbance? - A. Instantly three huzzas were made, and stones were thrown; I did not see the prisoner reach the men; they immediately took me as a prisoner; I did not see any thing more of the prisoner that night.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Your wife likewise was there? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew him before, have you any doubt? - A. I have no doubt, I am certain of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did Mr. Parry take you as a prisoner? - A Yes.

Q. Surely he did not make such a mistake as to take you as a smuggler? - A. Perhaps he thought so at that time.

Q. You were quite astonished that he thought so of you? - A. No, I was not.

Q. He took you as a prisoner - why how near to the beach is your public-house? - A. About three quarters of a mile from Selin Cove.

Q. Pray how soon afterwards was it that you for the first time mentioned that Mr. Pollard was among the smugglers? - A. That night, to the best of my recollection; I spoke of it directly afterwards to many people; I told Mr. Arndle of it a few days afterwards, and I told Mr. Parry of it that night.

Q. You told Mr. Parry that while you were a prisoner? - A. No, before I was a prisoner.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Explain that? - A. Mr. Parry thought I was one of the combined parties of the mob; he kept me to tell who the people were, he thought I knew all the people that were there.

ANN GEORGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am the wife of Joseph George.

Q. Did you go down and see Mr. Parry or his men on the 10th of January? - A. Yes, to the best of my recollection, between nine and ten in the evening.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him? - A. I do; he has a misfortune in his eye, I have known him almost from my first going into the country; I have been in the country these three years.

Q. What time on that evening was it that you saw him first? - A. I do not remember seeing him more than once that evening, and that once I saw him it might be about twelve o'clock, but whether it might be before or after I cannot tell, I had no watch; he was then standing with his face towards William Pender 's house, and his back towards the sea, he was within a stones throw from the place where William Parry and his men were with the goods; I did not see him do any thing, he stood with a whip as I thought, he had a dark great coat on, I cannot describe the colour whether it was blue or black.

Q. Did you see any other person among the number that might be there that was dressed like him? - A. No person to my recollection; I saw this Mr. Pollard standing there; they gave three huzzas, and the words expressed were, kill Joseph George , and take away the goods; and within five minutes after, I heard the firing of guns and throwing of stones.

Q. Did you see stones thrown yourself? - A. I saw them thrown repeatedly in the street; I went round the corner of the houses to get out of their way; I saw them stoop and take them up and throw them.

Mr. Gurney addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Solicitor General replied.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence


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