Old Bailey Proceedings, 24th April 1805.
Reference Number: 18050424
Reference Number: f18050424-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 24th of APRIL, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY. AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Edward Lord ELLENBOROUGH , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq. Sir WILLIAM CURTIS , Bart. HARVEY-CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; JAMES SHAW , Esq. THOMAS SMITH , Esq. and Sir MATTHEW BLOXAM , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

John Freeman ,

Joseph Peacock ,

John Morgan ,

William Day ,

John Birch ,

Joseph Ashton ,

Luke Severn ,

James Wiseman ,

Thomas Weston ,

John Meek ,

John Lake ,

John Luffman .

First Middlesex Jury.

Frederick Francis ,

William Byfield ,

Nicholas Neale ,

William Hazlewood ,

Edward Harland ,

William Wright ,

Lewis Chapman ,

William Wapshot ,

Michael Foster ,

William Cock ,

William Crick ,

Thomas Smith .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Philip Green ,

Samuel Stretchley ,

Jacob Schinmer ,

Robert Whitlock ,

William Grimsdale ,

William Wheeler ,

Edward Jenkins ,

William Page ,

James Wood ,

William Lingar ,

James Wilson ,

George Cloake .

Reference Number: t18050424-1

220. JAMES NEAGLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , five pounds weight of pewter, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Yates and James-Edward Yates .

JAMES- EDWARD YATES sworn. - I am a pewterer ; my partner's name is Richard Yates ; the prisoner had worked for us, as a journeyman pewterer , about eight or nine years; I suspected the prisoner, and set a man to watch him.

HENRY STRINGER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Yates, No. 20, Shoreditch; my master set me to watch the prisoner on Wednesday, the 20th of March; about one o'clock I saw him take a piece of metal from a hole under his work-bench in the shop, and take it towards the privy; I went and told my master.

Q. Was that hole made on purpose or by accident? - A. By accident; it is left so.

JOSEPH FRANCIS sworn. - I am journeyman to Messrs. Yates; when the prisoner was brought back, after he had been out of my master's house, I searched him, and took the pewter out of his breeches.

Q. Do you know whose metal it is? - A. I believe it is my master's.

Q.(To Stringer.) Look at that piece of metal; Is that the piece of metal you saw the prisoner take? - A. It is like the same piece of metal.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Do you know the piece of metal? - A. I never saw it before I saw it come out of the prisoner's breeches; it is the same that we have melted, and I believe it to be the same sort that another man was casting in the same kind of a mould, and this was what remained.

Prisoner's defence. I went to the hole to put some tobacco in; the hole is open to every one; the piece of metal was given me by another man in the shop to cast, and it was not good enough, I did not cast it; I was going out to dinner; the door was locked; I waited till the door was unlocked and then went out, and my master hauled me in and insisted upon searching of me; I opened my waistcoat and my breeches; my breeches were broke, both between my legs and both my knees, and when I sat down I picked this piece of metal up; I did not have it when I went out.

Prosecutor. I took him out in the street, and saw the metal taken from his breeches after I had followed him out into the street.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-2

221. CAIN MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a Banknote, value 1 l. the property of James Taylor .

JAMES TAYLOR sworn. - I live at No. 25, Brewer-street, Golden-square : On Saturday, the 6th of April, about half past nine at night, I had occasion to send Elizabeth Birch out, with a Bank of England one pound note, to pay some of the work people.

Q. Do you know the number of the note? - A. I have not the least recollection of the number. While the girl was out, I heard an alarm, and I saw a Mr. Allison, who had stopped the prisoner; and he produced to me a one pound note that he had picked up from the ground, where the prisoner had stood at the time he apprehended him.

ELIZABETH BIRCH sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Ten years old.

Q. Is it a good thing or is it wicked to tell lies? - A. Wicked.

Q. What becomes of wicked people when they die, in another world? - A. They are cast into hell.

Q. Who do you live with? - A. Mr. Taylor; I am servant to him.

Q. Did you receive any Bank-note from your master? - A. Yes, I was to get it changed; it was a one pound Bank-note; I went into the public-house; they told me they could not give me change, and when I came out of the public-house I had the note in my hand; a man then came to me, and said, my dear, your master says you must give me the note; I am to go and get it changed; he then snatched it from me and ran across the road, and ran down Glass-house-street; I holloaed out, stop him, I heard a person say he had got him, and I then went home.

Q. Did you afterwards see any body that had stopped him? - A. Yes, he was brought into the shop by Mr. Allison, a neighbour; a person had told him it was my note.

Q. Can you say whether the man that Mr. Allison brought back to the shop was the man that snatched the note from you? - A. I am not sure it was the same man, but he had a brown jacket on when he snatched the note from me, and so had the man that was brought back to the shop.

JOHN ALLISON sworn. - I live at No. 11, Glass-house-street: On the 6th of April, about half past ten o'clock at night, I heard a cry of stop thief; I was then in my own house, and the alarm seemed to come from Brewer-street; I live about twenty doors from Mr. Taylor's house; I looked

out of my door and I saw the prisoner running; he crossed to the same side of the way that I live on, and as he was passing my door, I caught hold of his collar, and told him that I should not let him go; he said he was not the person; I told him it was of no use to make any resistance (because he struggled very much), I would not let him go. I heard a voice saying that he had got the child's note; I asked Mr. Maynard, my opposite neighbour, to hold him while I looked for the note; Mr. Maynard took hold of him and I looked on the ground and saw a piece of paper; I went to my own window, where I perceived it was a one pound note.

Q. Whereabouts was it that you found this one pound note? - A. Exactly where I stopped the man; I told Mr. Taylor's people, that came down, that I had got the note, and I begged of them that they would not let the man go; the prisoner was taken to Mr. Taylor, and I asked him if he had lost a note; he said, yes, he had sent his little girl out to get it changed; the prisoner was taken to the watch-house. I produce the note; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Had you any mark on the note by which you could know it again? - A. No, not the least in the world.

Prisoner's defence. The charge that is alledged against me I am innocent of.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18050424-3

222. JAMES ROTHWELL and ELIZABETH PAGETT were indicted for that they, on the 17th of February , one piece of base coin, resembling the current coin of this kingdom, called a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did colour, with materials producing the colour of silver, against their allegiance, and against the form of the statute .

Second Count. For that they, on the same day, and in the same place, one round blank of base metal, of fit size and figure to be coined into milled money, resembling the current coin of this kingdom, called a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously, did colour, with materials producing the colour of silver.

Third Count. In like manner stood charged with colouring, producing the colour of silver, one piece of base coin, and round blank of base metal, of fit size and figure to be coined into sixpences.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case (was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Police-officers belonging to Worship-street Office? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information, did you go any where on Sunday, the 17th of February? - A. In consequence of this warrant, I went to the apartment of the prisoners, in Caroline-court, Saffron-hill , in the county of Middlesex; between the hours of twelve and one.

Q. Who went with you? - A. Vickery, Mason, Kennedy, and one Bolt.

Q. Did you know the prisoners before this time? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you all went to this Caroline-court? - A. Yes; the bottom door of the house was open, and I went up two pair of stairs and found the two pair of stairs room door open, where the prisoners were; when I came into the room, the prisoner Pagett was sweeping the room with a broom; the prisoner James Rothwell was standing by the side of the table; I went to read my warrant; Mrs. Pagett said, warrant or no warrant, you are welcome to search; the man being by, we searched him, but found nothing on him; I then proceeded to search the woman's pocket, and on her person I found nothing but good monies. In a place by the side of the window, I found this cannister, which I opened, and I found this bag, which I have in my hand, in the cannister.

Q. Did you look at the contents of the bag? - A. I did, it contained some file-dust and six iron punches; this I found by the fire-side; I found another bag; it is a leather bag, like a powder-bag which a hair-dresser uses.

Q. You found these in the presence of both the prisoners and the officers? - A. Yes.

Q. What is that which you took out of that bag? - A. It is a quantity of counterfeited blanks.

Q. They were in that paper then which you now produce, and in that last bag? - A. They were.

Q. How many counterfeited blanks were there in that leather bag? - A. There were fifty-nine counterfeited blanks; they were not coloured.

Q. If coloured, they would be called shillings; they were round blanks, not coloured; they were the size of a shilling? - A. Yes, they were small round blanks which would in time be coloured into shillings.

Court. Q. Which might be in course of time? - A. Yes: in the same leather bag was a small quantity of waste, or sissil; it has had these holes punched in them; this we found in an arm chair by the fire side; I found these two pair of pliers, a piece of cork, and some sand paper; this sandpaper has been used which I now produce.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did it appear to have been recently used? - A. I could not discern that.

Q. You produce the piece of cork, is there any observations that you can make from that cork? - A. It is an article that I have found at such places.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular respecting the seat of the arm chair? - A. We lifted up the seat of the arm chair (as a great number do), and

there I found the articles I have before described; these I secured in the presence of the prisoners and the officers, and I took them away; they are all which I found.

Q. You have been an officer for a great many years? - A. I have.

Q. You have attended upon the examination of coiners a great many years; do you know the use of the different articles? - A. The sand-paper is used to rub the metal; the sissil remains as it appears now, after the punch has struck out the blank from that sissil.

Q. How many blanks appear to have been struck out of that sissil? - A. There are four or five appear to have been struck out of this.

Q. What metal is that sissil? - A. It is a composition with some silver in it.

Q. The cork is usually used - A. The cork is, I believe, used to smooth the blanks.

Q. There is a quantity of file dust you produce? - A. That is from the edges of those blanks, I presume.

Q. The pliers for what purpose are they used? - A. I should believe it is to hold them (to hold them this way) to rub them with either sand-paper or cork.

Q. Do they appear to have been used? - A. I believe they have been used, by the brightness.

Q. Have you got a punch? - A. There are six.

Q. There is one I would wish you to notice? - A. Here is one with the letter S.

Q. You say there was a considerable number of blanks? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the letter S found on those blanks? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. That does not correspond with those you now produce? - A. Not with my blanks.

Q. Have you seen any blanks that your brother officers have, that correspond with that letter? - A. I believe they have some.

Q. Do you produce any cup? - A. I have a cup; I cannot tell in what part I found it in the apartment, nor I cannot recollect whether I found it.

Q. You saw it in the apartment of Rothwell and Pagett? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew them before? - A. I did.

Q. How did you come acquainted that this was their apartment? - A. I heard Mrs. Pagett say, take care of my goods; I believe those were the words; that was after we had made the search; I think Rothwell said he was unlucky that he had just come up.

Q. When was it that Rothwell said that? - A. During the time we were in the room; the man and woman knew me, and I knew them; they were very civil; there was not the least hindrance of our search.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The place where you found this, the house is kept by a woman of the name of Bromage? - A. Yes.

Q. You found the door open below stairs, and the door up stairs also? - A. Yes.

Q. No communication whatever appeared to you that they had been at work? - A. No.

Q. You examined her hands, you found no marks of aqua fortis on her hands? - A. No, I only examined the woman.

Q. You did not find any aqua fortis? - A. No.

Q. Without aqua fortis they cannot extract the silver out of the metal to the surface? - A. No, they cannot.

Q. That, therefore, is an indisputable ingredient in the process of colouring? - A. Yes.

Q. I find you do not produce any files? - A. No.

Q. Are not files also a necessary instrument - a file is exceedingly necessary, that the instruments should be complete for the purpose of preparing these blanks? - A. The edges have been smoothed in a lathing wheel; the plate itself is sufficiently smooth; there was none there that I found.

Mr. Knapp. Of course in the process of colouring, a file would not be necessary.

Court. It would be necessary to render the edges smooth, for the purpose of circulation? - A. That is what Mr. Alley means.

Mr. Alley. To be sure.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are an officer; you went with Armstrong to this house? - A. I did.

Q. Tell me what you did there? - A Armstrong proceeded to read his warrant, after we went into the house; the first thing that I found was seven sixpences in the window.

Court. Q. Are they finished? - A.There were either three or four, at the time I took them, that were fit for circulation, and I believe they are now; I do not exactly know whether they were in this piece of paper; they were in a tea caddie in the window, in a piece of paper, but I believe I took them out of that piece of paper; after I had searched different parts of the room, I went to a little table that stood at the left hand side of the fire place; on that table stood an old looking glass, and in the frame was this little drawer: I took it out and found it contained a different quantity of bad coin; there were thirteen counterfeit half guineas and fifty two seven-shilling pieces; I think there were three counterfeit half crowns, two counterfeit dollars, and ten counterfeit shillings.

Q. In what state were the counterfeit shillings? - A. Some of them were fit for circulation and quite finished, as I supposed; in the same drawer were seven counterfeited sixpences.

Q. Are they fit for circulation? - A. Some of them are; that is all that I found.

Q. That was all that you found in that drawer; did you find any thing else at the prisoner's lodgings? - A. No, the other things were found by my brother officer; all the things that we found were shewn to the prisoners.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the officers that went on this occasion to the prisoner's apartments? - A. I am.

Q. And you are one of the officers of Worship-street? - A. I am.

Q. Tell us whether you found any thing, and where? - A. On searching the shelf adjoining the room door, I found this vial, containing vitriol; on this same shelf I also found this saucer, with blacking in it, and a pair of pliers; on the ground, under that shelf, I found this vial, covered with rags.

Q. What was the contents of that vial? - A. Aqua fortis.

Court. Q. Is there any in it now? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon finding it, what then? - A. Under those rags was a great deal of dust and ashes, and upon all was a washing-tub containing dirty water; I shewed the bottle to the prisoner Pagett, and she said it was a medicine from the doctor; Rothwell tried to lay hold of the bottle; he put his hand out, and tried to take it out of my hands.

Q. Did he express any thing when he put his hands out? - A. He did; he said, let me look at it, which I would not; that is all that I found.

Q. On your refusing to let him look at it, did he do any thing? - A. He made an attempt to come towards me, once or twice; I told him I would not suffer it.

Q. Was that attempt made for the purpose of getting it from you? - A. I think it was; I refused to let him have it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are not a chemist? - A. No, I served my time to a dyer.

Q. Do you undertake to swear positively that it is aqua fortis in that bottle? - A. Yes, I have been in the habit of using it for ten years.

Q. You do not produce any files? - A. I do not; there were none found.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You are acquainted with aqua fortis perfectly? - A. Yes, I have tasted it, and the vitriol I have tasted; I know it to be vitriol.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are another officer of Worship-street? - A. I am; I went with them on this occasion; I produce a block I found in the room, on the left hand side of the window.

Q. What else did you find? - A. Nothing else.

Q. Is there any particular appearance upon that block? - A. Yes, there is, the corners are all worn, I presume, by the filing.

Q. Have you ever been present at the apprehension of coiners before? - A. Never.

(To Armstrong.) Q. That is a block? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose is it used? - A. I should believe that the metal is held on it by pliers, and worked with either sand-paper or cork, or any thing as they please, in rubbing that way (describing the manner.)

Q. Look at that produced by the other witness, the aqua fortis; is that aqua fortis? - A. I have no doubt but that is aqua fortis.

Q. Would aqua fortis be a necessary ingredient for colouring? - A. Aqua fortis is what brings the silver out of the metal to the surface.

Q. And without which the purpose of colouring could not be effected? - A. I should believe not.

Q. There is some vitriol found likewise; is vitriol an ingredient necessary to be used in that case? - A. In that case, I do not know that it is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have not made any experiment upon those blanks? - A. No.

Q. Therefore it is not possible for you to say, whether by a repitition of this vitriol and aqua fortis any thing could be produced, so as to give them the colour and appearance of silver? - A. I have not made any experiment with aqua fortis upon these blanks.

Q. Whether these blanks, by the assistance of aqua fortis could have produced on them the colour of silver you cannot tell, as you have not tried? - A. I should be afraid to dare practise that without permission of the Court or the master of the mint, because I might bring a crime on myself.

CALEB- EDWARD POWEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Burnham, the solicitor of the mint? - A. I am.

Q. You have been so many years? - A. I have.

Q. Have you made any experiment, with respect to any of this money that has been produced? - A. I have on two of the blanks which I received from Armstrong, I have tried an experiment, and I found that there is a considerable portion of silver in the metal, and that aqua fortis alone will give them the appearance of silver.

Court. Q. You have tried them with aqua fortis? - A. I did; these are the two blanks (producing them.)

Mr. Knapp. Q. Are these two you have put into my hands fit for circulation? - A. I did not not take pains to finish them, but merely to see whether aqua fortis would produce the effect; the files are not necessary in this case, the edges of the blanks, in the present instance, are turned with a lathe.

Court. Q. That is in your judgment? - A. I have no doubt of it; nor would files be necessary

for preparing the surface for colouring.

Court. Q. Why? - A. Because the metal is sufficiently smooth, by the operation of the flatting mill, in flatting the metal, from which the blanks are cut; the sand-paper and cork would be alone sufficient for the smoothing of the surface.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you made an experiment, and you found that aqua fortis produced this colour; you did not do it with the aqua fortis found at the prisoner's lodgings, but with some you got elsewhere? - A. Yes.

Q. Aqua fortis by itself, without a particular preparation, will not have the effect? - A. It is too strong without being diluted with a little water.

Q. Do you mean nothing else but water? - A. Nothing else; it would be too strong of itself.

Q. Are you sure that cream of tartar is not necessary in raising the colour of silver on the surface? - A. Cream of tartar is often used in rubbing it to take off the blackness which is on the blank.

Q. Without the assistance of cream of tartar or blacking, it would be impossible to give it the appearance of silver, so as to deceive the public? - A. It might be done with common salt only. I produce the two shillings.

RICHARD FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You, sir, are the monier of the mint, will you be so good as to look at the money that is produced? - A. I am now speaking of the silver and gold (looking at them) that is produced here; they are all counterfeits, I will not speak any thing of the dollar.

Q. That metal has a quantity of silver in it? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I find that these shillings you have been speaking to are very bad indeed? - A. Yes.

Q. It is impossible that any man that has eyesight to take them for good shillings? - A. Certainly not.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say it is impossible to be deceived by them? - A. They might take them.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say any man in his senses would take them? - A. Not if he looked at them.

Court. Q. The question is whether a person might not take them without examining them? - A. They might.

ELEANOR BROMAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding, Q. Did you let this apartment to the prisoners? - A. I let it to her and another woman.

Q. To whom? - A. To Elizabeth Pagett, and I believe the other person's name was Brown,

Q. How often have you seen that man there? - A. I have seen the man there, and other men there with him.

Q.Every day? - A. No: I had not seen him there for a month or six weeks before.

Q. How long ago is it that you first let the lodgings to her? - A. I cannot say; it might be eight or nine months.

Q. Was he with her at the time of her hiring the lodging of you? - A. He was not, he came soon after I believe.

Q. Shortly after you saw him, he was not with her then? - A. No, it was only her and another woman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. She worked in the box making line? - A. Yes.

Q. He did not live there, he only came there to see her? - A. He came there; she was often out; I have seen him there at times when she was at home; I know nothing of the man living there; the room was taken by that woman.

Mr. Knapp. Q.(To Armstrong.) Produce the fifty-nine shillings? - A. There are fifty seven there, and two Mr. Powel had.

Vickery. I produce this one I hold in my hand; it has the letter S upon it, and I have got the punch.

Court. Q. Which are the shillings that has been coloured? - A. Those three, they only want the blacking.

Q. You say you found seven sixpences, and three of them finished? - A. There are the three finished sixpences, they were with the other blank sixpences.

Mr. Knapp. (To the Jury.) These, gentlemen, appear to have been coloured.

Vickery. They all looked much better when taken than now they have been handled by the officers.

Mr. Knapp. I propose to shew the Jury the two shillings where the experiment has been made by Mr. Powel.

Court. These two shillings were two of the shillings taken from the blanks, which have been coloured with aqua fortis; that is to shew you that aqua fortis will produce that colour of silver; not with the aqua fortis found in the lodging, but with aqua fortis of his own producing. (The whole of the articles found in the prisoner's lodgings produced in Court.)

Rothwell's defence. I know nothing of the charge, I am innocent, I did not cohabit with the woman in that place.

Pagett's defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

Rothwell, NOT GUILTY .

Pagett, GUILTY , Death , aged 50.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-4

223. MARY SMITH , SUSANNAH COXEN , CHARLOTTE HARTLEY , and HARRIET ENGLISH , were indicted for feloniously

assaulting George Field , in the King's highway, on the 10th of April , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person a gold watch, value 6 l. a gold watch-key, value 10 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of George Field .

GEORGE FIELD sworn. - I live in Clifford's inn: On Wednesday, the 10th of April, between the hours of eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was going to a small house I had at that time at Chelsea, where I usually went at night.

Q. How far had you proceeded before any thing happened? - A. Near Charles court, in the Strand , I was surrounded by some women; I had been to the Globe tavern, and after that I went to Clare-market; I was not perfectly sober when the women surrounded me, and from what I can collect, they pushed me into the One Tun passage; I found that they had rifled me near the One Tun passage, which is the next turning from Charles-court.

Q. When they surrounded you, do you recollect what they did, or what they said? - A. No, only that some women surrounded me, and soon after I missed every thing; I lost a parcel of Banknotes which I had in my pocket (they are not all mentioned in the indictment), and a gold French watch, a gold key, a gold mourning ring, a silk handkerchief, a pair of gloves, a silver snuff-box, and a gold broach. I pursued after the women into Charles-court; I thought they went into a house with a large passage; I saw no more of them that night; I went in the morning to Bow-street, and to Queen-square: and there I heard my gold watch had been stopped by Mr. Courtney, shop-man to Mr. Wright, a pawnbroker; I went with Hobbs and Donaldson, the officers, to a public-house, the corner of Seymour-court, Chandois-street, and while Donaldson was gone to make inquiry three women came into the liquor-shop to have some gin; one of them had a silk handkerchief in her hand; she said it was going to be mangled, her name is English; I said immediately that that was my handkerchief; I desired Hobbs to take it from her, and look at it, and he would see the initial letters of my name.

Q. Were the initial letters of your name found in the corner? - A. They were, and the number; Hobbs asked her where she got that handkerchief; she said she got it from her landlady, Mrs. Hartley; we detained her; there was another woman in company with her, and we went immediately down to English's lodgings, to the apartments of Mrs. Hartley.

Q. Whose house is that apartment in? - A. Mrs. Murphy's; we left Hobbs with English and Hartley: we searched the apartments and then searched her; in the pocket of Hartley was a pair of men's gloves; she said she had had them a fortnight in the house; I told the officer they were my gloves, for they were of a particular manufactory; they were made for my partner; they were too large; his name is Brown and on the inside was written Brown; Hartley said she had picked up the handkerchief at the door of her lodging the night before; she admitted that she had given it to English.

Q. Are you sure that you had your watch, gloves, and handkerchief with you, when you met these women? - A. I had my gloves on; I am sure I had my watch and handkerchief, for I looked at my watch when I came out of the Blackjack at Clare-market.

Q. Are you sure that you put it in your pocket again? - A. I am sure of that; they took a gold ring off my finger, and my gloves from my hands; I believe English had no concern with the robbery from what she said at the time.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker: On Thursday morning, the 11th of April, the prisoner Coxen, between eleven and twelve, in company with Smith, came to Mr. Wright's shop, Tothill-street, Westminster, to pledge this watch; she said that she wanted forty shillings on it; she said she would redeem it on Saturday night, it was her watch; I knew her before; I went to Queen-square, and brought an officer up; we kept her there under pretence of writing a ticket, Smith was in the passage; I mentioned to Hobbs that that was the person that was along with Coxen, and he took them both to Queen-square; I have kept the watch in my possession ever since.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I apprehended the prisoners Coxen and Smith, at Mr. Wright's; we went afterwards with Mr. Field to this liquor-shop, in the afternoon of the same day; English came in with two other women, they had some gin together; English had this handkerchief in her hand; she said that she was going to the mangler's with it; Mr. Field immediately said to me, that is my handkerchief, it is marked at the corner with G. F. 4; I think it was; I took it out of her hand, and she said she had it of Mrs. Hartley; she was going to take it to be mangled (it appeared to have been washed), and after that she was going to take it to the pawnbroker's; I detained her there about five minutes, till Donaldson came in; when he came in, then I, Donaldson, and Mr. Field, went to Hartley's apartments; I asked Mrs. Hartley whether she gave this handkerchief to English; she said, yes, she did; she said she found it in the evening, in Union-street, it was very dirty, she had washed it out, and had sent English to get it mangled, and to get it pledged; I have had the handkerchief and the gloves in my possession ever since.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I went with Hobbs and Mr. Field to Hartley's lodgings; Hobbs

searched Hartley, and in her right hand pocket he pulled out a pair of gloves; Mr. Field said they were his gloves.

(The gloves, handkerchief, and watch, produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Hartley's defence. I found the handkerchief, but the reason that I did not own to the gloves was, I have frequently gloves left in my room, and whether the gloves were in the room before, or I had found them, I could not tell.

The other prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

The prisoner Coxen called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Coxen, GUILTY , aged 42,

Hartley, GUILTY , aged 34,

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

Smith, NOT GUILTY .

English, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-5

224. JOHN DODSON was indicted for returning from transportation, before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

EDWARD KIRBY sworn. - Q. You were clerk at this time to Mr. Kirby? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got a copy of the record? - A. I produce a copy of the conviction.

Q. I suppose you examined the copy of that record? - A. The record was examined in the Office.

(The record read by the clerk of the Court.)

"London. These are to certify, that at the general Sessions, on the King's commission of the peace and goal delivery of Newgate, holden for the City of London and County of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, in London aforesaid, on Wednesday, the 1st of July, in the 41st year of our Sovereign Lord George the Third, of the United Kingdom of Great-Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, before the Right Hon. Sir William Staines , Knt. Lord-Mayor of the City of London, Sir Giles Rooke , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas, Sir Soulden Lawrence, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench, John Boydell , Esq. Brook Watson, Esq. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John William Rose, Knt. Recorder of the said City; Charles Price , Esq. and other Aldermen of the said City; John Sylvester , Esq. Common Serjeant of the said City, Justices of our Lord the King, John Dodson was in due form of law tried, for that he, on the 12th day of June, in the 41st year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third, by the Grace of God, King, Defender of the Faith, with force and arms at London, that is to say, at the parish of Saint Bennet Fink, in London aforesaid, one pocket-book, value 2 s. the goods and chattels of one Thomas Comber , privily from the person of the said Thomas Comber , then and there feloniously did steal and carry away; and the said John Dodson , by a Jury of the county, was duly tried and convicted of feloniously stealing and carrying away the said goods and chattels, but not privily from the person of the said Thomas Comber , and thereupon he was ordered to be transported for the term of seven years, to such place as his Majesty in council should think fit to declare and appoint. - Signed Thomas Shelton , 18th of April, 1805."

Q.(To Mr. Kirby.) Do you know the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes, that is the man; he was tried and convicted; I saw him delivered.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On Saturday, the 6th of April last, I with four others of my fellow servants, and a City constable, apprehended the prisoner in the neighbourhood of Angel-alley, in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate Without; I think it was in Read's court where he was taken.

Q. You did not take him up on another charge? - A. Yes, we took him on another charge; I had received information that he had come from Botany-bay.

Prisoner's defence. I had my pardon to go on board a man of war; I was salivated on board that man of war, and lost all my teeth and my lower jaw; the captain told me to go on shore about my business, when the ship lay at Cawsand-bay; they put me on shore at Plymouth.

Q. Has any officer seen him before? - A.(Armstrong) I did; I saw him about a month before this time, and I left him in the care of the Compter; he was discharged for that offence.

Vickery. I heard of this offence, and took him into custody; I had seen him before that morning, when I went to get two others.

Q.(To the prisoner.) Have you got any witness? - A. I wrote a letter down to the ship.

Q. That is not an answer; how came you to run away? - A. I did not run away.

Q. You walked off? - A.They put me on shore; I lost my lower jaw and my teeth.

GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-6

225. JANE COLLIS , JOSEPH JESSOP , and HANNAH COLLIS , were indicted, the two first for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bruin , about the hour of one at night, on the 31st of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a bed, value 5 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 5 s. and two blankets, value 5 s. the property of the said James Bruin ; and the other for feloniously

receiving the said goods on the 1st of April , she well knowing them to be stolen .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, but their confession before the Magistrate, which was taken in writing, but not returned to the Court, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-7

226. JANE COLLIS and HANNAH COLLIS were again indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a pail, value 1 s. two saucepans, value 2 s. a tin kettle, value 1 s. 6 d. and two earthen dishes, value 6 d. the property of James Bruin ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, only as in the former case, they were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-8

227. MARY TOMLIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Fenning , about the hour of eleven o'clock at night, on the 30th of March , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two coats, value 3 s. a quilt, value 3 s. one blanket, value 2 s. one skirt, value 1 s. two shifts, value 4 s. and two aprons, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Fenning .

MARGARET FENNING sworn. - I live in Grey Eagle-street, Spital-fields : I met the prisoner coming from Spital-fields market at eleven o'clock at night; she asked me if I was going home; I said I was; I only know her by lodging over the way about a fortnight with a man; she came home with me; she asked me to let her have a light; I told her I generally went to bed in the dark; she desired leave to stop in my place; I told her I never gave leave to any body to stop in my place at night; she had a little fire pot in her hand; then she asked me to let her leave it there till the morning; I turned myself to the table to put some things which I had bought at the market; she bid me good night, and I thought she was going; I turned and bolted the door, thinking she was gone, and went to bed; at twelve or one o'clock, when I awoke, I felt the cold; I put out my hand, and felt my bed-clothes gone; I then put my hand to where the clothes were hanging up on the line, and found they were all gone; and when I went to the door, I found it half open; I went out, and alarmed the watchman.

Q. Did you bolt the door yourself? - A. Yes, I am sure I bolted it; I missed all the articles in the indictment; I laid my padlock on the table, she took that; she robbed me on Saturday night, and was taken on the Friday following.

Q. Did you ever hear of your things again? - Yes, at the pawnbroker's, they had her taken.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch; I produce two shifts and a handkerchief, I took them in pledge of the prisoner on the 1st of August for a shilling; I have known her these six years.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce two coats pledged on the 1st of April, I cannot be positive to the prisoner; the duplicates are in the name of Sarah Collins .

JOHN ROBERTS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hill, a pawnbroker, in Turnmill-street; I produce a black skirt, and two aprons, pledged in the name of Mary Collins ; I am not certain to the person of the prisoner.

RICHARD PERRIN sworn. - I went with the prisoner to her lodgings; she took five duplicates out of a middling hole in the floor, they are the duplicates belonging to the different articles.

JAMES WELLINGS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a blanket and quilt, they are pledged in the prisoner's name.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I met this woman in Bishopsgate-street, and she asked me if I would go and see her home; I went home with her, and she made me stop there till it grew late, and stopping there I happened with a misfortune; I am very sorry that I was ever guilty of any thing of the kind; being in great distress altogether made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 50,

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-9

228. JAMES TOMKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , five gallons and two quarts of rum, value 4 l. a quart of shrub, value 2 s. a quart of gin, value 2 s. two wooden casks, value 2 s. two stone bottles, value 2 s. two glass bottles, value 4 d. a tap-tub, value 1 s. and forty-two pounds weight of sugar, value 2 l. the property of Marmaduke Langdale and Thomas-Ralph Langdale .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS-RALPH LANGDALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You and your partner are distillers , living in Holborn ; what was the prisoner at the bar? - A. The prisoner at the bar had been in our service, I believe, eight years, as horse-keeper : In consequence of information I went to the loft of our stable with two of our clerks, and the first thing that we found was an empty sugar hogshead, a whole lump of sugar, and two pieces.

Q. Had you purchased any sugar lately, previous to the time of finding this? - A. We had purchased a ton of sugar on the Tuesday previous.

Q. Did it turn out to be a part of that which was sold to you on Tuesday? - A. It did; we found

it hid in some clover-hay in the lost; two two-gallon casks of rum, a stone bottle of rum, and several other bottles with shrub, and others with gin, and a tap-tub, were covered over with some rubbish.

Q. The prisoner had the controul and the key of the stable? - A. He had the key of the stable, and there was no other key, except one that was locked up in my desk.

Q. Upon finding this, I presume you apprehended the prisoner? - A. I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him.

Q. Did any thing pass then? - A. Nothing but his saying he was not guilty.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This man has lived with you so long a period as eight years? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you had a good character with him, from the master that he lived with before? - A. I had a good character so far that he was a good horseman.

Q. The assistant had access to the stable the same as he had? - A. He was sent by the clerk to forward his horses to the time to go out.

JAMES TOMLINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Langdale? - A. Yes.

Q. You were present when the things were found? - A. I was; I know the two-gallon casks to be Messrs. Langdale's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where was the sugar kept? - A. In that part of the warehouse where the foreign goods are kept, about twenty or thirty yards from the stable.

Q. It was your business to let him in of a morning? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has he had an assistant? - A. Three or four months, they generally came in together; the assistant had to work in the stable only of a morning, as he drove one team; the carman only had occasion to go into the stable when they put the harness on the horses; when the prisoner went out, he generally took the key with him.

- LYNARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Messrs. Langdales'; I was present at the time of finding these things; I know the cask very well.

Q. Do you know any other part of the property? - A. I cannot say I do.

JOHN HILLAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have the care of Messrs. Langdale's casks - have you seen some casks produced by the constable? - A. I have, they are Messrs. Langdale's.

THOMAS FLETCHER sworn. - I am ward-beadle and constable of St. Andrew's; I produce some casks, sugar, glass and stone bottles, a tap-tub, a tunnel, and a cooper's tool; the casks are full of liquor, I have had them ever since.

- TOMLINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at these casks, do you know them? - A. They are Messrs. Langdale's, and I know the sugar, it appears to be a lump of the last ton.

Court. Q. What do the casks contain? - A. They are both full of rum.

- HUBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Gibson and Co. they are sugar-refiners; had you furnished Messrs. Langdale with any sugar, and when was it sent home? - A. On a Tuesday in this month; the number and the quality of the sugar are the same that I delivered to them.

Court. Is it numbered? - A. It is.

LAWRENCE SHIRLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am carman to Messrs. Langdale.

Q. How long have you lived with them? - A. About two months.

Q. During that time, have you ever been in the lost of the stable? - A. Never, till last Thursday week.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know whether the stable-door was left open any hours in the day? - A. I never found it locked in the course of the day.

Q. Then if a man found his way into the stable, he might easily find his way into the loft? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a carman to Messrs. Langdale? - A. I am, rather better than a twelvemonth.

Q. Were you ever in this loft between the 5th and 10th of this month? - A. Not to my knowledge, no more than some way up the steps.

Q. Were you ever in the loft? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. You know the prisoner is upon trial for things that were found in the loft, therefore he will not go above half way up.

- CLARKE sworn. - I am a carman to Messrs. Langdale; I was never in the loft in my life.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You do not know who else went in? - A. No.

WILLIAM MITCHELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a cooper to Messrs. Langdale? - A. Yes; I have not been in the loft for this year and a half, to my knowledge.

MARMADUKE LANGDALE sworn. - Knowing that we had lost a much larger quantity than we found in the hay-lost, on the 12th I went into the prisoner's lodgings with a warrant, and while the constable was searching the lodgings, I occasionally put my hand upon the sugar-bason, and found these two pieces of sugar, which I am as confident, as I am standing here, was part of the parcel that was taken away. (The two pieces produced.)

Mr. Knapp. (To Hubert.) Q. Will you have the goodness to look at these two pieces? - A. I believe them both to be the sugar that we sold to Messrs. Langdale.

Mr. Gurney. Q. By what sugar-baker was it baked? - A. By Gibson and Co.

Q. Has Gibson and Co. a patent to bake sugar different from all other sugar-bakers? are there no sugar-bakers that have sugar of the same quality? supposing that you had heard nothing at all of this charge, and I had met you any where, and I had shewed you this lump of sugar, should you have been able to say that they were of the parcel of sugar that was stolen from Messrs. Langdale? - A. Only by comparing them with the same sugar we had sold to Messrs. Langdale.

Q. Is that the first sugar whatever made of that quality? - A. I believe it to be the same.

Q. Have you not sold from Gibson and Co. sugar of the same quality with that in your hand? - A. I have.

Q. Does not every sugar-baker in London bake sugar of the same quality? - A. It is likely.

Court. Q. From the quality and the mode of baking it, you believe it to be the same? - A. I do.

Mr. Langdale. With respect to the key of the stable, I, on the Monday had occasion to go to look at the horses; the man was at his dinner; I could not get in, I have had an hundred quarrels with him for taking the key of the stable with him to dinner.

Mr. Gurney. The evidence has said it was generally open in the day time.

Mr. Langdale. With respect to the rum, I have tried them, they are of the same quality with that in the cask.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the affair; my master has a key of the stable, and I have a key; sometimes the stable door is locked, and sometimes open.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-10

229. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , fifty-six yards of calico, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of George Hall , Joseph Osbaldiston , and Richard Jones .

Second Count. For like offence in the dwelling-house of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES sworn. - I live in Castle-court, Lawrence-lane , at a Manchester warehouse ; I was servant to the firm at the time this happened.

Q. Who had the business then? - A. George Hall , Joseph Osbaldiston , and Richard Jones ; two of them lived at Manchester, and one at Bethnal-green; I was the only person that kept the house: On the 18th of March last, about half past six, I was just come from my tea, the accompting-house is up one pair of stairs, I was about to go down stairs to shut the street door; I heard a gentle rustling of the straw in the passage, I suspected that somebody was at the packs, which stood in the passage; I came gently about half way down stairs, and saw the prisoner at the bar with his hands upon a pack of goods: I quickened my steps, and he turned from me and went towards the door; as I went down I perceived lying upon this pack, two white pieces of calico; I immediately ran and seized the prisoner; I asked him what he had been doing, he said he had been inquiring for a situation, I told him he had been cutting open that pack; I called for assistance to a person in the court; I returned to the pack, and found it had been cut open, out of which the two pieces before-mentioned had been taken, and a third piece was about half way out of the pack; I of course concluded that the prisoner was the man who had cut open the pack, and meant to take them away; I sent for a constable, and had the man immediately taken up.

Q. Do you mean to say that they were removed from the place where they actually were? - A. The pack was cut open with a knife, and these things were taken from the inside, and laid upon the outside wrapper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At the time this transaction took place you were not a partner in the house? - A. No, I had no interest in the house.

Q. When the prisoner saw you, he told you he wanted a place? - A. He asked me for a place; I said, I have got a place for you, and took him by the collar.

Q. Do you mean to say that the goods were separated from the rest of the parcel? - A. The bale was really open, and these two pieces were separated from the rest, and a third piece was partly out.

- sworn. - I am a constable: I produce two pieces of calico; I saw these two pieces lying at the top of the pack, on the outside of the pack, and another piece was half out of the pack; I took him into custody and searched him, and in his left hand pocket I found that knife.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You found that knife in his pocket, so you might in any other man's pocket? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Jones.) Q. Did you contribute towards paying the rent at that time? - A. No, except by my service.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-11

230. JOHN BURROUGHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a pound and four ounces of indigo, value 4 s. the property of the East India Company .

Second Count, For the like offence, the property of persons unknown.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE- WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a labourer belonging to the East India Company's warehouse, in Billiter-lane, in the city of London ? - A. I am: On Thursday, the 18th of April, I saw the prisoner at the bar in the warehouse; I was on the same floor, shewing a gentleman some indigo, and perceiving the prisoner frequently putting his hand into his pocket, and putting something into his breeches, under his apron, I communicated it to George Grace , and he communicated the same to William Mould , the commodore.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The men, who work in the East India warehouse, expect to be rubbed down before they get out of the warehouse? - A. Yes.

JAMES MOULD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you in the Company's warehouse in Billiter-lane? - A. I am commodore: In consequence of information, I informed the assistant elder, and I was directed to keep my eyes upon him; I saw the prisoner in the act of unbuttoning his breeches; there was a noise of something falling on the floor, and I immediately stepped up to the prisoner, and said to him, I am very sorry for what I see, but it is too late now; he turned and seemed very much affected, and began crying; I picked up the indigo; there was some on the floor occasioned by his letting the bag fall; I gave the bag with the indigo to the assistant elder, William Stinton. He was then taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You, who are a very honest man, I take it for granted, would be very much affected if you were accused of a robbery; the place where you found this indigo was very dark? - A. Rather dark.

Q. It often happens that pieces are thrown out of the cask on the ground; does it happen so? - A. It does.

Q. Was there a number of people there while the prisoner was there? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. If indigo drops on the ground, they do not generally drop it in bags? - A. No.

Q. This man dropped it in a bag? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM STINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see the prisoner on this occasion? - A. I did, when Mould informed me; I had the bag from Mould, and Mould had it from the prisoner; I asked him what he meant by it; he fell a crying, and said he was sorry for it. He said he could not see what possessed him to do it.

- RIGG sworn. - I produce the indigo: I received it from Stinton.

Q.(To Stinton.) Is that the indigo? - A. Yes, the same sort and quality; indigo is about sixteen shillings a pound; the prisoner had three shillings a day for working in the indigo from eight in the morning till two in the afternoon.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-12

231. EDMUND GARDNER and PETER RAWLINS were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , thirty pounds weight of cheese, value 1 l. the property of William Smith the elder , William Smith the younger , and Thomas Smith , and the latter for feloniously receiving the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You, I believe, are a city constable? - A. Yes: On the evening of the 15th of March, about ten minutes before nine, I met the prisoner going up Fish-street-hill; he was coming away from Thames-street, with a cheese under his right arm, supported by his smock frock; I tapped him on his shoulder, and said, my friend, what have you there; he looked at me, and seemed a little struck at first; he said he had a Cheshire cheese; I told him I saw it was a Cheshire cheese; I said, you must excuse me asking and stopping you, but I must know how you came by it; he said he was going up Fish-street-hill with it, he did not know where he was taking it to, but a man gave it him to carry; I asked him if he should know the man again; I said you must find the man that gave it you, or I shall not let you go, nor the cheese; he said he could find him; he then took me to Mr. Smith's, the prosecutor's shop, and either he or I knocked at the door and went into the house; there was nobody at home but the servant maid; I went then with the prisoner to his master, an orange-merchant just by.

Q. Did he tell you that was his master? - A. Yes. In about five or six minutes I went again to Mr. Smith's, Gardner was at home, and Mr. Smith had just come in, he immediately saw Gardner, and I said, where is the man that gave you the Cheshire cheese; he said, here, that is the man that gave me the cheese? he saw him sooner than I did; Gardner was then coming down the stairs; I said, Gardner, was it you that gave this man the cheese; yes, he replied, I sold it to him for eight-pence a pound; Mr. Smith said what did the cheese weigh; I asked him that too; he said, 28 lb. Mr. Smith said, are you sure of it, he said, I am sure of it, Mr. Smith then asked him how he came to sell it; he looked round, and said, because he was a fool; I then took him into custody. I have had the cheese ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Then immediately when you went back to Gardner, and you

asked where was the man that sold the cheese, there was no hesitation that he had sold it to the other prisoner? - A. He said he had sold it, and for eightpence a pound.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is the firm of your house; - A.William Smith, sen. William Smith , jun. and Thomas Smith .

Q. How long has the prisoner lived with you? - A. Full nine years; he was a porter and in-door servant .

Q. At what time do you shut up the warehouse where you keep the cheese? - A. At eight o'clock.

Q. Could any person after you had locked it up, get at any cheese? - A. No, I had a partition erected for that purpose.

Q. Do you recollect the constable bringing any person to your house? - A. My father sent for me, I was at my house; I know no farther of my own knowledge; then the prisoner Gardner said, when I came to the warehouse, will you take the money, sir; I refused.

Q. Do you know the cheese to be your property? - A. Yes.

Q. There is no mark on it; what is the value of it? - A. About eightpence a pound.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Then eight-pence would be the regular price that you would sell it for? - A. Yes.

Q. Gardner was the person who regularly served as porter? - A. He has sold cheese; he had no right to sell any thing of that kind at that time of the night.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is there any entry in your book of any cheese sold that day? - A. No; there was a cheese on that day sent to the Lord Mayor; that was thirty pounds.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have said, that he has sold cheese during the time of business, and he has accounted for it to you? - A. Yes, he always was to leave the money to another to take; he had no authority to put it in the till; when I came in and he was in custody, he offered me the money but I would not take it then; he had no right to sell at that time.

Gardner's defence. On the 15th of March, about half past eight o'clock at night, Rawlins called at my master's warehouse, and said he wanted to buy a cheese, and there being two cheeses left under the counter, where the cheese stands in the day for sale, I weighed him one, which weighed thirty pounds; after I had weighed it, he said he had not got the money he would call the day following; I knowing the man, and where he worked, let him have it; I was not afraid of the money; I have been used to sell cheese, and firkins of butter, and sides of bacon, upwards of seven years, for Mr. Smith, and never had any fault found; if he was out of the way, I gave him an account of it when he came in, and if it was not paid for, he book'd it, or otherwise I gave him the money; it was not a customary thing to sell cheese so late at night as that, but sometimes I have sold cheese later than that by half an hour, when customers have called in, and never had any fault found about it.

Gardner called one witness who gave him a good character.

Rawlins did not say any thing in his defence, not called any witness to character.

Gardner, NOT GUILTY .

Rawlins, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-13

232. EDMUND GARDNER was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , seven pounds weight of cheese, value 4 s. the property of William Smith , sen . William Smith, jun . and Thomas Smith .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the evening of the 15th of March, when you were at Messrs. Smith's, did you search the prisoner's box? - A. I did on the following day; I broke it open and found about eight bottles of wine and liquor together, and this cheese; there are two pieces of cheese, which weigh about seven pounds; the prisoner was not present; I found receipts for Bank Annuity, in the name of Edmund Gardner ; I believe there were eighteen or nineteen, all in his name, to the amount of eight or nine hundred pounds.

WILLIAM SMITH , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner was in your employ; were you present when the prisoner's box was opened and the cheese found? - A. I was.

Q. Do you know that cheese? - A. It has our mark; I took the officer down into the warehouse, to shew him the mark of the same dairy.

Q. Have you sold any cheese of the same dairy with that mark on it? - A. None but what was shipped in the country to Kent and different parts.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How many persons do you keep serving in your shop? - A. Only my partners, myself, and Gardner.

Q. Therefore, whether your partners had sold it to the prisoner you cannot tell us; it is single Gloucester? - A. It is.

Q. What quantity of cheese of the same dairy had you left? - A. I do not know.

Q. Had the prisoner been ill just at this time? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. He had made no application to you for any cheese? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did he board in the family? - A. Yes; he had the same cheese and the same joint of meat as the family had.

Court. Q. You have no private mark on that cheese? - A. It is marked with our factor's mark

which we can prove; it is marked with W. S. No. 2.

Court. Q. That other people may have as well as you? - A. There are no other people have cheese with our initials; our factor's name is Groom.

Jury. I can vouch that Groom does not mark any other person's cheese with W. S.

Prisoner's defence. I have been, for several winters past, troubled with a bad cough; on the 26th of February last I complained to my young master, Thomas, of the cheese that I eat; it was strong old Cheshire cheese; it made my cough much worse; I used to eat cheese twice a day, and on that day he cut that cheese, and gave me that which is now produced, and said, put it by, let nobody see it, and you can have a slice when you please.

Court. Q. Is he here? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-14

233. JOHN NUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , five wine-glasses, value 20 d. five tumblers, value 20 d. two milk-pots, value 2 s. 6 d. one mug, value 1 d. eight mugs, value 1 s. five milk pots, value 15 d. nine wine-glasses, value 4 s. 6 d. six egg-cups, value 2 s. two pepper-boxes, value 1 s. two tumblers, value 7 d. a lemonade-can, value 6 d. one decanter, value 1 s. twelve plates, value 3 s. 6 d. twelve cups, value 2 s. 3 d. fourteen saucers, value 2 s. 6 d. a butter-pot, value 2 s. one tea-pot, value 6 d. four bowls, value 1 s. three patty-pans, value 1 s. two basons, value 6 d. and two tea-trays, value 6 s. the goods of Thomas and Joseph Burn .

JOSEPH BURN sworn. - I live in Barbican ; I am partner with my brother, Thomas Burn ; we keep a Staffordshire warehouse ; the prisoner was a porter with us near three months: On the 10th of this month, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner was going to breakfast; we had some reason to suspect him, and I followed him into the street, and said, Nunn; he made no answer; I asked him if he had any thing about him; he said he had; I took him by the collar, and took him to the warehouse; then I went in pursuit of an officer, and on searching him we found some things that are laid in the indictment, part in his breeches and part in his pockets; I asked him where his lodgings were; he refused to tell me for some time; afterwards, he told me his lodgings were in Swan-alley, Bishopsgate-street; while we were in pursuit of his lodgings in Bishopsgate-street and could not find it, his wife came to see why he did not come to breakfast; she told us that they lodged in Blue-anchor alley, Bunhill-row, we went there and found the remaining part that is in the indictment; these mugs and these tumblers we found in his pocket and breeches. (Produces them.)

Q. What did you find in his lodgings? - A. All these things. (Produced.)

Q. Do you know the tray to be your's? - A. This tray I can swear to; we convicted a man last sessions for stealing this very tray.

Prisoner's defence. These things in the basket, and the two tea-trays, have been sworn to by my prosecutor; I married on the 1st of April; Mr. Burn gave me leave to go out, and the wife that I married, her former husband was a tea-tray maker; he made these trays now in question; he has said he found these things about me; he only found three wine-glasses; he took the milk-pot off the desk, and then he put a private mark on them, and said he could swear to them, after he had put a private mark on them; they were on the desk.

Mr. Burn. Mr. Clark is in Court, and never lost sight of him from the time they were taken out of his breeches to the time the constable came.

- CLARK sworn. - I took this man into custody, and had these things delivered to me at Mr. Burn's, and these things were found at his lodgings.

Prisoner. He has said he found these things at my lodgings; they were not my property before I married this woman; her husband made them; he was sent on board a ship, and they were left in my wife's possession.

Court. Q. How do you account for those found in your breeches? - A. I acknowledge the three wine-glasses, but the others I do not; I had only sixteen shillings a week, and I was obliged -

Court. Q. What, to rob your master?

GUILTY , aged 34

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18050424-15

234. JANE LEMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a shift, value 2 s. the property of Wilkes Jones .

SARAH JONES sworn. - I am the wife of Wilkes Jones: a month before Christmas I was brewing, I left this woman in the care of my place in my absence; I went up stairs to my tea as soon as the brewing was over; after we had done tea, she came up and said that a shift was gone; the yard was full of linen, which she and I had put out; when we began to take the linen in, the first thing that we hung out she said was gone, which was a shift; I desired her not to be in a hurry, and to wait till we had looked the things over, and when we looked them over the shift was gone; she said she knew nothing of it, nobody had been in the yard but the landlady and herself: I found it afterwards at a pawnbroker's, the corner of Long-alley, Moorfields.

Q. How long afterwards? - A. A great time afterwards.

ROBERT HADENBERRY sworn. - I live at No. 1, Crown-street, Finsbury-square, adjoining Sun-street: I produce a shift that was pledged the 2d of February, in the name of Jane Lemon , apparently to me the woman at the bar; she has been in the neighbourhood for years, and has used our shop; I lent her half a crown upon it.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer: On Monday, the 25th of March, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I searched her, and found a duplicate, dated the 2d of February, for a shift, 2 s. 6 d. pledged in the name of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. The day that she said the shift was lost in the evening, she asked me to get on as fast as I could with the ironing; I was never out of the house from the morning to the evening; Mrs. Jones said, there were four shifts, and you have taken in only three; she has sworn to that shift which I had last July, when I had a bad leg; I saw only three.

Q. How came you to pawn it? - A. I bought that shift above ten weeks before I left Mrs. Jones.

Prosecutrix. I know it by the stain; I had it to wash for a woman who had a bad leg and died; and the stain would not come out.

Prisoner. Mrs. Jones agreed to settle the business with me for a pound, for her husband's loss of time and her's.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Is that true? - A. No such thing; there never was a word of that kind mentioned.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18050424-16

235. ESTHER MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , two shoes, value 5 s. the property of William-Bew Shrubsall .

WILLIAM-BEW SHRUBSALL sworn. - I am a boot and shoe maker , and live at No. 81, Norton-Falgate : Last Thursday, after I had my dinner, I had occasion to go into the yard; I had not been there above a minute when I heard my boy calling me; I went into the shop, and the prisoner began to beg me to let her off, but when I considered that she had been in the day before, and I had lost a great deal I sent for a constable.

Q. Do you know any thing of her parents? - A. No; they live somewhere in Rosemary-lane; I do not know what they are.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Shrubsall: The girl came in for a pair of shoes for her sister; I was taking down the shoes for her sister to put on.

Q. What age is her sister? - A. About seven; and while her sister was trying them, I saw her put these two shoes under her apron; I took the shoes from her, and called my master. (The shoes produced.)

Q.(To Prisoner.) How old are you? - A. Going of my ten years old. (The shoes identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. A girl sent me in and said she would give me sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 9.

The Jury recommended her to mercy on account of her tender years.

Whipped in jail and delivered to her mother .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-17

236. WILLIAM KILBEAUMONT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a pound weight of chocolate, value 2 s. four pounds weight of sugar, value 2 s. and four castor-bottles, value 2 s. the property of James Findley .

Second Count. For the like offence, laying them to be the property of John Macklean .

Third Count. The property of James Anderson and Alexander Anderson .

Fourth Count. The property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JAMES FINDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the mate of the ship Anderson ; was she, in the month of February last, discharged of her cargo at Blackwall ? - A. She was: the master died before that time, and then I had the order of the ship: he died about the beginning of February. After the cargo was discharged, I locked her up.

Q. To whom did you give the key? - A. To Captain John Macklean : I gave him the whole of the keys, and amongst the keys there was the key of the cabin.

Q. Had you occasion to go on board again on the 3d of March? - A. I had; the vessel then was in the dock; I unlocked the door of the cabin, and I found the prisoner at the bar standing in one of the lockers, that holds bottles for wine and other things: I seized him, and told him to come up; I took him out of the place where he was in and came upon deck; I let the prisoner go, as I was certain he would be stopped; seeing some persons at the Dock head, I called to them to stop him, which they did; I saw him searched, and there were sugar, chocolate, and some castors found upon him.

Q. Were there such things as sugar and chocolate in the cabin? - A. Yes, they had been left in the cabin adjoining to where I found him.

Q. Do you know the castors - were they the castors of the ship? - A. I have no doubt in the least, but that they were.

Q. After you had been to the Office you went back to the ship; did you know whether the castor-glasses

had been taken out of the cabin? - A. I did, and found there were four taken out.

Q. Who are the owners of the ship? - A. John and Alexander Anderson .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The castors are none of the furniture of the ship; they belong to the captain? - A. No, the ship-owners.

Q. How long before you saw the prisoner had you seen the castors there? - A. About the month of February; I had been on board since, but not in the cabin.

Q. Did you know any thing of this unfortunate man before? - A. No.

Q. You do not know that he was a captain of a ship himself? - A. I heard so.

JOHN MACKLEAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You superintend Mr. Anderson's ship-business? - A. I do; I had the care of the ship, from the time of her being unladen, in the beginning of February, to the 3d of March. All the keys of the ship were in my possession from that time.

Q. Had any person, except by false keys, any access to that cabin? - A. None by these keys.

JONATHAN YARDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are constable of the West India Dock? - A. Yes: on the 3d of March, I took the prisoner into custody within the Dock gates; I heard some person call out, stop thief; I being inside of the gates saw the prisoner; he seemed to be in a hurry to get out; I said, what have you been doing of; his reply to me was, I am very sorry for what I have done; I took him into an office inside of the gates, and searched him; I found four pounds of sugar, one pound of chocolate, and four small castors. (Produces them.)

Findley. I produce the stand, the castors belong to this stand.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you find any sugar or chocolate missing from the locker of the cabin? - A. A double quantity.

Q. Was it such sugar and chocolate as that? A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Was it part of the ship's cargo? - A. No, ship stores; it belonged to the shipowners.

Prisoner's defence. At the time I might have committed this I was in a state of insanity, which respectable people will come and prove. I have been commander of a ship these twenty years. Had I been in my proper senses, had it laid in the street, I should not have stooped to pick it up. I have a wife and children. Here are people who will prove that I have laid violent hands upon myself. It is a thing that I despise more than any thing in the world. I hope you will have compassion on me.

The prisoner called three witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

The Jury recommended him to mercy, on account of his good character.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-18

237. HANNAH BAKER and SARAH ARCHESTONE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , a bed, value 2 l. a blanket, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 4 s. a cotton gown, value 4 s. and a skirt, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 36, Peter-street, Westminster ; I rent the house: On the 21st of March, between seven and eight at night, I was standing in the front room, with my wife and a little boy; my wife went out into the yard to get a pail of water, and when she came in she took a candle, and went into the room down stairs, and missed the bed and bedding. The bed was found again at No. 33, Great St. Ann's lane.

- SMITH sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Smith: On Thursday evening, the 21st of March, I was sitting with my husband in the front room; I had occasion to go into the yard to get a pail of water; I turned and saw the back window open; I knew the window was fastened down with a nail before; we very seldom had it up; I went into the room and saw the bed was gone; the street door was standing open; they must have come in that way; I had left the street door shut, but not locked.

Q. You did not find any person that night? - A. No; on my return into the room again, we looked to know what other things were gone: we missed the blanket, a pair of sheets, a cotton gown, and a black skirt.

Q. Were the blanket and the sheets on the bed? - A. They were when the bed was turned up; we found the bedstead turned down; the skirt and gown were in a little box in the window.

Q. Then you heard nothing all the time of this transaction, and you were in the front room? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any part of your property the next morning? - A. Yes; I left a pattern of the gown at a pawnbroker's, and I had not been home above half an hour before I received information from Mr. Clareson, the pawnbroker; I went to his shop, and there I saw the gown, and knew it to be mine.

Q. Did you see any person at the pawnbroker's? - A. Yes, Sarah Archestone; she told me that it was another person that gave it to her to pledge and she would take me to the place; I went with

her and Hobbs, the officer, to Hannah Baker 's room, No. 33, Great St. Ann's lane; she was sitting in the room; the officer asked Hannah Baker how she came by the gown; she answered that it was some strange person that left it; I told her that the gown that I had seen at the pawnbroker's was my property. The officer put down the bedstead to see for the bed, and my bed was there in her room, upon her bed; I know it was my bed by two pieces that I put on myself, and which I can swear to by those pieces.

Q. Was any thing said then about the bed? - A.She said it was a strange person that brought the bed; the blanket was there likewise, and the skirt; the blanket was on the bed, the skirt was at the side of the bed; she said that Thomas Brown , a strange man, had left them there, but she did not mention the time when they were brought: the officer took the bed and the other things to the Office in Queen-square, and the prisoners were secured. They are all here but the sheets; they were never found.

Q. Your front door was not locked or bolted? - A. No; I sell a little milk; the door is generally open in the day, but generally shut in the evening.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The window of this room you found open; it would have been difficult for any woman to have got over the paling of the yard; whether any man got over you do not know? - A. I do not think that any man could get over.

Q. When you saw the prisoner Baker, after Archestone had got the gown, she told you she had got it, together with a bed, from a man of the name of Brown; not that he was a stranger altogether to her, but that his place of residence she was a stranger to. Is your bed a heavy one? - A. It is rather heavy, a woman was seen with it.

SAMUEL CLEARSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant, in King-street, Westminster: In consequence of Mrs. Smith's information, and she leaving a pattern of a gown, about a quarter of an hour afterwards, when the prisoner Archestone came to our shop, with a gown to pledge for eighteen pence, I compared the pattern of the gown with it, and it matched exactly; I then sent to Mrs. Smith, and detained Archestone; she said she was sent with it by another person; she did not say who the person was then; Mrs. Smith came and owned the gown; Hobbs came in a little while afterwards; I kept the gown, and he took Archestone into custody.

- HOBBS sworn. - I am an officer: Smith gave me information the evening before: between eleven and twelve o'clock the next morning, I received information that a woman was stopped with the gown, at Mrs. Barry's, in King-street; I ran down and Archestone was in the shop; I asked her how she came by that gown; she said that a person had given it to her to bring it there to pledge; I asked her who the person was; she said she would not tell me who the person was, but she could take me to the woman; I and Mrs. Smith went with her to No. 33, Great St. Ann's lane, Westminster, up two pair of stairs, in a back-room, and Baker was sitting in the room; she said to Baker, I am stopped with your gown that you sent me with, to which Baker made no answer; I asked Baker how she came by that gown; she said it was brought there last night by a man; that is all she said at that time; I began to search the room, and pulled down the bed; it was a turn-up bedstead, and I found the bed and blanket.

Q. Were there more than one bed on the bedstead? - A. There were two beds on the bedstead, this lay uppermost; I found the skirt by the side of the bed on the floor; I asked her what became of the pair of sheets; she said she did not know any thing at all about the sheets; I asked her how she came by the bed; she said they were brought there by a man last night; I asked her what man it was; she said it was a stranger; I told her it was very unlikely that she would take a bed in of a stranger; she said she had seen him a few times, but not very often; he had called there sometimes to see her; I asked her where he lived; she said she did not know; she had heard him talk that he lived somewhere about the Bun-house, Chelsea. I took them both into custody.

Q. Did she mention his name to you then? - A. Not then, she did afterwards at the Office, before the Magistrate. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel

Baker, GUILTY , aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Archestone, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18050424-19

238. JAMES GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , four waistcoats, value 8 s. the goods of William Thompson , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - I live at No. 112, Rosemary-lane : On Thursday evening before Good Friday, the prisoner at the bar came into my shop, and asked to buy a second-hand pair of breeches; he was shewn a pair; he tried them on, and left two shillings earnest; he was to give seven shillings for them; he left the breeches, and was to call again; he went out, and the moment he went out, my wife said she missed a waistcoat; I pursued him and brought him back, and Samuel Wolf searched him, and there were four waistcoats taken from out of his breeches.

SAMUEL WOLF sworn. - I keep a house facing

Mr. Thompson; I searched the prisoner and took two of the waistcoats from him, and two were taken by a witness who is not here. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. When the gentleman went into the public-house, his wife sent for him; she told him she had seen me put something in my breeches: now he says she missed them.

GUILTY of stealing only .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-20

239. SARAH BRISCOE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a cloak, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. three shifts, value 5 s. a sheet, value 4 s. and a pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Charlotte Mordaunt .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

CHARLOTTE MORDAUNT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 11, St. Agnes-crescent, Old-street-road ; I am a single lady , the prisoner lived with me as a servant , and quitted my service on the 1st of April; I lost the articles in the indictment, and being confined through illness, it was some time afterwards, that I went and gave information to Ray, the officer, and on the Friday, after I had given Ray the information, I saw the property at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner, at an eating-house, in Finch-lane, Corn-hill; I told her the reason of my apprehending her, and the prosecutrix's name; I asked her if she did not live with Miss Melville, in Old-street road; she positively denied that she ever did, or ever had lived in the neighbourhood of Old-street.

Court. Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Is your name Melville or Mordaunt? - A. Mordaunt.

Q. Have you ever been married? - A.No.

Ray. On coming along, she acknowledged that she had lived with Mrs. Mordaunt, but she had never robbed her of any articles; I took her to the prosecutrix, and she said that was the person that had robbed her; on Monday I went with the prosecutrix, and there the things were found.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, residing in Tabernacle-row; I produce a black silk cloak, sheets, stockings, petticoats, and three child's shifts; they were pledged by the prisoner at the bar. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. That lady knew of these things six weeks before I left this house, and she offered me money to take them out of pledge, and I was to work them out, but, through a quarrel with her sister, I was turned out at twelve o'clock at night.

Jury. Q.(To the Prosecutrix.) What day did you discharge this servant? - A. On the first of April.

Q.(To Walker.) What day did you receive these things in pledge? - A. The 29th of December a sheet, and the 6th of January the three shifts.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-21

240. ANN NEWTON, alias BALLARD , and MARY ARNOLD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , ten yards of cambric, value 55 s. the property of James Smith and William Jones , privately in their shop .

It appearing in evidence that it was not the sole property of James Smith and William Jones , but the property of James Smith , William Jones , and John Field , the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-22

241. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , three metal bells, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Mears .

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - I am an officer; on the 7th of December I had occasion to search the prisoner, and found three bells in his pocket, which I produce; I asked him how he came by them; he said he found them in the street; I asked him what street; he said that made no odds to me, I might keep the bells, he was sure I should find no owner for them; I locked him up, and took the bells to Mr. Mears.

THOMAS MEARS sworn. Q. Look at those bells; do you know them? - A They are mine; I had seen them four days before; I have the person here that cast them; they are marked 2, 3, 5, in the octave, for a particular use

JOHN WHITBY sworn. - I cast these bells, they are Mr. Mears's property.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Had you sold these bells? - A. No.

Prisoner's, defence. I know nothing about the bells; I never stole them; I got them of a boy in the street.

GUILTY , aged 83.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-23

242. THOMAS WILKINSON and JOSEPH BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a great coat, value 39 s. the property of James Dell .

JAMES DELL sworn. - On the morning of the 7th of April, a little before eight, I went into my house to breakfast, by the side door that I have in Cumberland court ; I saw my great coat hanging up; the servant was washing the steps of the front door; Mr. Morris, a neighbour, came and asked

the maid if she had lent my great coat to any man; she said, no; he gave her some information that two men had the coat; I went out, and he pointed out the prisoner Brown; he said, that is him that stood at the door, while the other went into the passage; he had nothing about him then; I followed him as far as Lewkner's lane, Drury-lane, and he went into a public-house; when he came out of the public-house he went down Lewkner's-lane into a house there, and, in about five minutes after he had been in that house, the other prisoner came up to him in the street; then I had suspicion of them both, that they were concerned in taking the coat; they both then went into this public-house, where I had followed Brown to; when I saw them go into that public-house, I ran immediately to Bow-street and got an officer, and he went and took charge of them, I never found the coat.

MARTHA CARTER sworn. - I was cleaning the door, between seven and eight o'clock, and saw the two prisoners at the bar standing loitering about the opposite side of the way; I saw them four or five minutes; I am sure of their persons; I had occasion to go down stairs for a pail of water, and might be four or five minutes down stairs getting the water; when I came back to the door, Mr. Morris, the baker, informed me that two men had stole it; he pointed the men out to me, and one had my master's great coat under his arm; they were both together at that time.

Q. How far might he be from you then? - A. About twice as far as I am from him now; I am sure that the men that he pointed out to me, were the men that I had seen loitering about.

WILLIAM MORRIS sworn. - On the morning of the 7th of April, I saw the two prisoners the other side of the street; they were talking together; I live next door to Mr. Dell; I could see them very well looking out of my window; and having a great deal of bread in my window; I watched them; I saw the prisoner Wilkinson go into Mr. Dell's; he had nothing in his hand, because I took particular notice of him; when he went in, he brought out a great coat with him; I might have took him if I liked, but I did not know whether he had stolen it; I called to the maid, to know whether she had lent her master's great coat; she said, no; then I said the man has stolen it; I pointed out the man to her; they both walked very gently away, Wilkinson having the coat under his arm; Mr. Dell came out, and I pointed out to him, Brown, as Wilkinson then had got off with it, Mr. Dell pursued Brown.

Q. The two prisoners were both together before you saw Wilkinson come out of Dell's with the coat? - A. Yes, they went up the passage of the court together, after they had got the coat, and Brown stood still at the door, while Wilkinson went in and took the coat.

Wilkinson's defence. I work for Mr. Slade, of Oxford-street; he told me to carry a chaise axle-tree to Mr. Thorp's, in Holborn; after that, I went into this public-house, and Robert Brown was sitting there; he asked me to have a pint of beer, and before the beer came into the tap-room, Dell and this man came in, and said I was one of their prisoners. I know no more of the charge than the child unborn.

Brown's defence. I had not been out of my bed ten minutes; I went to this house, where I usually use, and I never saw the man before that time we met accidentally at this public-house.

Q.(To Morris.) You have not the least doubt about their persons? - A. No. not in the least.

Wilkinson, GUILTY , aged 30.

Brown, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-24

243. FRANCIS, alias FREDERIC SOLOMON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , fifty pounds weight of lead pipe, value 12 s. and a brass cock, value 4 d. the property of John Butcher , fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN BUTCHER sworn. - I lived in Flower-de-luce-street, Spital-fields , at the time of this transaction: On the 1st of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed the leaden pipe that went round the cistern in the inside of the kitchen, when I went to wash my hands; it was there on the preceding evening at seven o'clock, I washed my hands there then, and it was safe.

Q. Is the door of your house left open? - A. Yes, the door is generally kept open till ten o'clock at night, I kept a pork-shop ; I had a painter at a job at my house, and he went to the Office about it.

Q. Did you see any pipe brought to your house? - A. Yes, on the next morning, Harper, the officer, brought it, and it matched with what was left.

Q. Did you know any thing about the prisoner? - A. No; I knew the pipe again by one joint that came out in the yard, it had been cut off before by a person unknown; I took a hammer, and beat it up, I know it by that; it matched with the cistern, and with the hole where the pipe had been beat up; I have no doubt in the least it is mine.

- HARPER sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street: On Friday, the 1st of March, I was walking about Shoreditch, at half past eight o'clock at night; I came up to the prisoner at the bar, and saw that he had something under his arm very heavy; he was walking from Norton-falgate to a house that buys all so its of goods; I took him

under the gateway of that house; before I took him, I saw the ends of the lead sticking out, wrapped up in a bag. When I stopped him under the gateway, I asked him what it was, though I saw it before; he gave me no answer about it at first, but at last he made answer that it was lead, and that I knew; he said that he bought it of some man, and gave eight shillings for it.

Q. Did he mention the name of the man? - A. No; I think he said he had bought it that evening on Saffron-hill, I am not sure; I took him and the lead to the watch-house that night, and he was taken before the Magistrate the next morning; there were six pieces of lead pipe, and the cock fixed to one of them.

Q. Did it appear to have been recently broke, or cut? - A. It appeared to have been fresh done.

Q. How did you happen to inquire about this lead? - A. There was a dispute about the lead between the prosecutor and the painter; the prosecutor suspected the painter. The painter came to the Office to clear his character, and then he heard of the man being taken with the lead; he sent the prosecutor to the Office, and soon after the prosecutor came to the Office; he said it was his property.

Q. Did you at any time go to Butcher's with the lead? - A. I did, and the prosecutor compared the lead before my face.

Q. From that comparing, did it appear to have been taken from his cistern? - A. It did, to the best of my knowledge; it weighed fifty-six or fifty-seven pounds, the lead and cock altogether.

Q. How far was it, when you first saw it, from the prosecutor's house? - A. About two hundred yards, and within fifty yards of the old iron shop, where they buy it; I produce the lead.

Prosecutor. I have not the least doubt in the world but it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Harper took me with this lead, as I was coming from the other end of the town; when I was coming home, I met with a man that had an ass, and a pair of panniers on its back; I had some broken glass that I purchased on my back, I purchase old metal and other things; I put down my glass on the ground, on the man saying to me, Jew, do you know where to sell any lead; I told him I did know where to sell it, and if in case he had any to dispose of, I would purchase it, if it was honestly come by; he told me that he purchased it in the country. He took it out of his panniers, and I looked at it, there were two different parcels of it; accordingly I asked him what he asked for it a pound, and he said, twopence farthing a pound; I told him I would give twopence; he told me he thought it was rather too little, but the person he used to deal with was dead, and he did not know where to sell it at that present time; I asked him what quantity there was of it; he said, to the best of his knowledge there were fifty-one or fifty-two pounds of it. I then told him I could not give more than twopence a pound for it; he said, you shall have it; I made answer, it is the best job we can do to get it weighed; he told me that it was not convenient in any shop to get it weighed, as they would not be troubled with it; I took the lead in my hand, I thought there was the quantity; accordingly I paid him 8 s. 6 d. for it; I paid him for the odd pound, and fifty-one pounds I paid him for; it was tied in several parcels. I took them, with my bag under my arm, as far as one Mr. Smith's, a china and glass shop, in Clare-market; I took the glass there, and disposed of my glass; I took this lead, I did not conceal it in my bag, and put it outside of the bag, not knowing that it was come dishonestly by, or was stolen by any body; if in case that had entered into my mind, I certainly should have concealed it inside of the bag. I made the best of my journey from Clare-market, to Mr. Revell, in Shoreditch, where I sold copper and brass; I am a man that was never before a Justice, nor any gentleman or constable; no man has seen any harm of me; at the time I was taken up I had only been in London three weeks; I came from Bristol, where I had lived twenty-one years; I am as innocent of the charge that is laid against me as the child from its mother; you may depend upon it that I really am; it is a thing that I was never guilty of in my life.

Q.(To Harper.) Fix (as nigh as you can) the hour you saw the prisoner? - A. About half an hour after eight, not ten minutes over or under. He told me at the time that his father or people belonging to him lived at Bethnal-green.

Prisoner. I have got an old father and mother in London; they are very old; my father is 92, and my mother is 72.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) When did you wash your hands last at this cock? - A. About seven o'clock; a gentleman came to me, and I looked at my watch to see what o'clock it was; it was as nigh seven as possible.

Jury. Q.(To Harper.) When he was walking with the lead, was his direction from Clare-market? - A. He was walking the way as if he was coming from the prosecutor's house, and going to the house to sell the lead; that is the direction exactly.

Court. It could not be that the lead had been to Clare-market and back again; the lead was safe at near seven o'clock, and at the time it is found on the prisoner it is half-past eight; when he is met at that distance from Clare-market, at Shoreditch. you know what a way that is from Clare-market,

if it had been any way about Lincoln's Inn fields, he could not have come from Clare-market with it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-25

244. STEPHEN BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , nine candlesticks, value 10 s. a coffee-pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and two copper-lids, value 4 s. the property of John Day .

JOSEPH SHALLARD sworn. - I am cowkeeper to Mr. Biggs, Mile End: On the 23d of March last I saw a man in a field; we were walking to meet each other; when I got to the bank, I saw a heap of things lay where he was; he took some of them and left some.

Q. What did he seem to be doing when you first saw him? - A. He was moving the mould about; he was either hiding or taking out, I cannot say which; I stopped him, and found seven candlesticks on him, and two copper-lids for little saucepans; he said he was going to his master's with them; I told him he should go down the road with them, and when I got down into the road with him, the officer took charge of him and the things; I went back to the place where I first saw him, and there I found two candlesticks and a coffee-pot, which I gave to the officer.

RICHARD MORGAN sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner and the things. (Produces them.) I am constable of Mile End.

JOHN DAY sworn. - I kept the Bell, at Mile End , at that time.

Q. Do you know these things? - A. Yes, I know them all to be mine; they were taken out of my back yard; they were put there to be cleaned.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home from dinner to my work, and saw these things lying; I just took them up, and he said, what are you going to do with them; I said, if I find the owner of them, he shall have them. It is all done out of spite.

Q.(To Shallard.) Did he tell you he had found them? - A. No, he said he was going to his master's.

Q. Did you know the man before? - A. I have known him for these twenty years.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-26

245. MARY STANYON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a dimity frock, value 6 d. and a cotton frock, value 2 s. the property of Daniel Parker .

DANIEL PARKER sworn. - I am warehouse-man at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street; On the 19th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was informed by one of my children that her brother was lost; I went home, and my wife told me that she saw the child at five o'clock; I live in Dagger's-court, Moorfields ; I went about, and inquired for this child that was lost in the neighbourhood; I was in search of the child from eight till eleven o'clock at night; I had the cryer to cry it, and I went in a number of different directions, and coming home a little before eleven o'clock I saw two watchmen before my house; I asked them if they had found the child; they told me that he was in Swan-yard watch-house; I went there, and there I found my child in the possession of a neighbour; I believe the prisoner at the bar was standing in the watch-house at the time; the child informed me of its being stripped; I found the child in a brown Holland pinafore; my wife swore to the articles in the indictment before the Magistrate; she is not here, she is in bed.

Q. Had any part of the clothes been taken from it? - A. Yes, a white dimity petticoat, and a red check frock; these things he had on when lost, but not when he was found.

SARAH BALL sworn. - I live at the sign of the City of Carlisle, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch; the prisoner came in on the 19th, about nine o'clock, and called for a pint of beer, with a child in her arms, and the other walking by the side of her; she had then the same child in her arms as she has now; she stopped about an hour and a half with the children; the little child in her arms cried very much; I went to her, and said, mistress, why do not you take your two dear children home; when the little child that sat by the side of her said, it is not my mamma, my mamma lives at No. 12, Dagger's court, Moorfields; I said, do not you know this woman, my dear; he said, no. I immediately ordered the watchman to be called, and I gave charge of her, and I went to the watch-house; I was there when the father came and owned the child.

Q. Was there any part of the clothes that belonged to the child in possession of the prisoner at the time she was at your house? - A. I did not see any clothes at all.

Q. Had the woman any clothes in her hand? - A. She had a white petticoat in her hand; our soldier that is quartered upon us saw it taken from her.

JAMES WARSTEAD sworn. - I am a private in the 2d regiment of Tower Hamlets Militia: I saw the woman and the children at Mrs. Ball's; I asked the woman whether this little boy was her child; she said, yes; I then asked the child if that was its mammy; he said, no; the child said its name was Tommy Parker , he belonged to Mr. Parker, of Dagger's-court, Moorfields; I then asked the child whether he ever saw the woman or knew

her before; he said, no; he said the woman has got my cloathes; she had a white dimity petticoat in her hands at the time.

Q. Is that the white dimity petticoat that is here? - A. To the best of my opinion it is the same.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Is that your child's petticoat? - A. I believe it to be the same that I saw that night.

Warstead. At the time this was produced at the watch-house, I asked the woman if this was her property; she said it was; I asked the woman whether she could call the child by its name; if she was the mother of it, she could; she was confused; the child telling me where it lived I proceeded to the parent's house; I went to the house, and the watchman asked me whether I had found the child, I told him yes, and where it was. I saw the constable search her, and find a duplicate in her pocket.

WILLIAM LOCKLEY sworn. - I am a constable, I was on duty that evening at the watch-house; I searched the prisoner and found that duplicate and nine more; she sat opposite to me in the watch-house, with her hand seemingly in her pocket; I said, good woman, what have you got in your pocket, and the first thing I saw was this duplicate of the frock, for 2 s. pawned on the 19th of March; when she was brought to the watch-house, she had this child's petticoat tied up in this coarse cloth; I took it from her, and saw it contained a child's petticoat; when I took her to the office, I was informed that she had been imprisoned for child-stealing, but not stripping them; before the Magistrate, the child said the woman came into the court and got it away, saying she would buy it some cakes.

JAMES KING sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce the frock, pawned for 2 s; I believe the prisoner to be the person that pawned it.

(The frock and skirt identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated with liquor, and till the next day morning I did not know what my prosecutor had against me.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-27

246. JAMES CAMPBELL and JAMES CORSER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a plate-warmer, value 25 s. the property of Owen Stratton .

THOMAS BAYLEY sworn. - I live with Mr. Owen Stratton , a furnishing ironmonger , the corner of Catherine-street, in the Strand : On the 19th of March I saw Campbell take the plate-warmer from the door, the other prisoner was with him; I followed them immediately up Catherine-street; they turned up Angel-court both together, and went into the Strand, and then up Swan-yard; I was behind them all the time; at the top of Swan-yard I saw the beadle, and I told him what they had got; the beadle followed and took hold of Campbell by the collar, he had the plate-warmer with him then.

Q. What became of Corser? - A. He went away; the beadle gave me the plate-warmer and I carried it home.

Q. Are you sure the two prisoners are the men? - A. Yes.

JAMES GOLDING sworn. - I work opposite to Mr. Stratton's shop up three pair of stairs; I saw Campbell take up the plate-warmer and there was another person with him at that time, with a soldier's jacket on; after he had taken it from within the door, he looked at it and set it down again, and when I looked again he had it in his hand, shewing it to the postman; he turned from the postman with it, and went up Catherine-street with it, and the other man with him; I saw him about ten minutes after, when he was brought back to Mr. Stratton's.

JOHN WOOTTAN sworn. - I am beadle of St. Mary's, in the Strand: On the 19th of March, about five o'clock in the evening, when I came into Swan-yard, I asked the boy what was the matter; he told me; I then saw Campbell with the plate-warmer in his hand, and a man with him in a red jacket, not trimmed; I pursued Campbell and took him by the collar; I asked him where he had got that plate-warmer; he told me there was a person in the street that gave it to him; I told him he must go back with me to the place, or else I should take him to Bow-street; I took him to Mr. Stratton's shop, and Bayley went with me.

Q. What became of the other prisoner? - A. I cannot say who was the other man that was with Campbell at the time.

Campbell left his defence to his counsel.

Corser's defence. I came home from work that afternoon, and heard that some of our soldiers were confined for something; I went to see, and when I came there I knew the person belonged to our regiment; I went of an errand for him, and came back again. I was stopped after going out with two messages.

The prisoner Corser called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Campbell, GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Corser, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-28

247. THOMAS BALDWYN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , one thermometer, value 5 s. the property of John-Geer Cockerill .

GEORGE JOHNSON sworn. - I am gardener to Mr. Cockerill: The thermometer was taken out of the hot-house; I saw it there about the first of March; I did not miss it till the 19th; I was very ill during that time; the prisoner called to see me the same evening in March; I saw it again on the 19th, after it was delivered up to the constable.

DAVID TROTMAN sworn. - I was charged with the prisoner by Johnson: He accused him of the thermometer; he took it out of a glass book-case in his house, and delivered it to me. I produce it.

Q.(To Johnson.) Do you know that thermometer? - A. Yes, it is Mr. Cockerill's.

Prisoner's defence. The thermometer which Mr. Johnson has sworn to was in my father's house before he died, and when he died I became possessed of every thing that was in his house.

Jury. Q. How long has your father been dead? - A. Six months.

Johnson. I know it by three marks, and likewise by the brass being broken at the bottom; I have seen it in the hot-house since his father has been dead; here are three marks that I cut off the degrees. I am sure it is Mr. Cockerill's.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-29

248. GEORGE GRIFFIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a counterpane, value 8 s. the property of John Gill .

JOHN GILL sworn. - On Wednesday, the 10th of April, about eight in the evening, my wife hung out a counterpane on a pulley-line near the window, where I was sitting; she desired me to sit to watch it a little time, as it was a fine moonlight evening; I saw the pole rise the line; the line was fixed to each side of the window; I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the counterpane; I knew his person before; I was not above three yards from his head; I got the patrol to go with me to his house (he lives about three or four doors off), and we took the prisoner to the watch-house that night; in the morning his wife brought the counterpane back to me; this is the counterpane his wife brought back to me, and it is the counterpane he took off the line.

Prisoner. He did not see me do it; I am not the man; I am a poor hard working fellow; I was never in such a place as this before in my born days.

Prosecutor. I saw him take it.

WILLIAM COX sworn. - I saw him take it; I was standing on the steps, and he ran past me.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-30

249. WILLIAM MYOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a pot of honey, value 25 s. the property of George Jackson .

GEORGE JACKSON sworn. - I live at No. 27, Tottenham-Court road ; I am an oilman : On the 15th of March, about half-past six in the evening, as I was serving a customer, a neighbour gave me some information of the pot of honey; I ran into Steven-street, and soon arrived at Grace's street, and turning the elbow or bend in the middle of the street, I saw the prisoner and another man; and on the prisoner I perceived something of a bulky appearance, resting on his left arm, partly covered; I made towards him, supposing that he had got my property; as I advanced near him, I saw the pot: I then sprang upon him, and with my own hands secured him and the pot. Inquiring how he came by my property, he looked at me, and replied, your property! and violently struck at me with his fist; I then raised a hue and cry of stop him, or stop thief; I then got on my feet and ran and took him.

Q. You never lost sight from the time that he run till you took him? - A. No, I am sure that he is the person that had the pot and struck me. I produce the pot. I can only swear to the pot by a certain inscription that is upon the cover: No. 10. and James Read , No. 60, Titchfield-street, Cavendish-square, where I had it from.

Q. Can you tell where No. 10 was deposited? - A. It was deposited, with four or five more, on the outside of the front of the house.

Q. How lately had you been at the outside of the house before you received any alarm? - A. Within half an hour.

Q. Was it a pot that you had opened before? - A. No, it had never been opened nor sold out of; I missed the pot from the door; there being a pile of three at the bottom and two on the top, when I came out of the door I missed one from the top; I may say I am confident it is my pot; I know the hand-writing of Mr. Read.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home, and coming along I saw something lie in the road; I saw a man going from it; I went and picked it up; I had hardly got it in my hand, when that gentleman came and told me it was his; I said, if it is your's, take it; immediately I gave it to him, he collared me, and tore my shirt; I have a wife and three children.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-31

250. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , ten pounds weight of coffee, value 20 s. the property of his Majesty's Commissioners of Excise.

RICHARD HUDSON was also indicted for the like offence, in company with the said John Anderson .

Second, Third, and Fourth Count, The same as the former, only varying the manner of charging.

And Fifth Count, The property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Curwood; and the case stated by Mr. Fielding.)

WILLIAM WISDOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an Excise locker? - A. Yes.

Q. This coffee was under the charge of the Excise? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is the warehouse situated? - A. Galley-quay : On Saturday, the 6th of April, about a quarter after two, I was on my duty on the quay and saw John Anderson and another man; I had suspicion that they were doing something they should not do; I was on the watch, and saw them go up Galley-quay that leads to the warehouse.

Q. Did you know the other man at that time? - A. No; about the middle of the gateway, on the left hand side, there are steps that go into the warehouse; there is a side-rope, and the man that was with Anderson took hold of that rope and pulled it three or four times - whether it was a signal to any body inside I cannot tell; he then went up the gateway, and I saw no more of him; John Anderson , the prisoner, placed himself nearly opposite to the loop-hole, at a cellar-window, nearly opposite to where the coffee came out; in a few minutes afterwards I saw this coffee in a bag thrown out of the loop-hole; Anderson then got from his station, where he was placed, and took the coffee up immediately.

Q. Was Anderson so placed that he could see any body in the loop-hole? - A. Yes, and the man at the loop-hole could see any person facing it, and you could not see him where I was; Anderson was in a manner waiting for it; then I followed him immediately, and he turned on the right hand into Thames-street; he passed one gateway, and went down Brewer's quay gateway; he went to the water side and made a turn round, and came back and went to a jigger, or a capstan bar of a vessel; I stopped him in the crook of the lighter, and asked him where he got that coffee; he said out of a lighter; I told him he did not, and if he would go with me, I would shew him some more of the same sort, which he refused to do; after some little altercation, I persuaded him to go with me into the gateway; I desired him to put the coffee down, and compare it with the coffee on the ground, as the apron it had been tied up in had spilled some on the ground; I compared it, and the comparison was exactly alike; he would not give up the coffee to me, nor would he go away from the place; I then told him I should detain both him and the coffee, until I could get another officer to relieve me; in a few minutes a Custom-house officer of the name of Harding came, and I gave the prisoner in charge to him, the coffee lying then on the ground; I gave both to him, and remained on the quays watching; when Mr. Deer came from dinner I informed him of the circumstance, and he agreed to make a general search; it might be near half an hour before we made the search.

Court. Q. Did any body come out of the warehouse at that time? - A. No, I was the person that locked it up; I stopped there to guard the warehouse; I watched it all the time I was there; I stood on the stairs; nobody could come out, and when it was unlocked I unlocked it.

Prisoner Anderson. Q. Pray, Mr. Wisdom, could you see the loop-hole from where you stood at the time the coffee came out? - A. I cannot say I could exactly.

Court. Q. Was there any place that it could come from but that loop-hole? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him from the time you saw him pick up this coffee to the time you apprehended him? - A. No.

Prisoner Anderson. Q. I went down Chester-quay gate with it? - A. No such thing, you passed Chester-quay.

Q. I went to the lighter and picked it up - Did you find the coffee on me? - A. Certainly I did.

Q. All the coffee that is in that bag? - A. That will be brought to light by the next witness.

RICHARD HARDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you given in charge of the prisoner Anderson? - A. I took him in charge and the coffee, and lodged it in the King's warehouse till the Commissioners were gone; after that I have had it in possession ever since.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing at the time when you apprehended him? - A. He told me that he would enter an action against me for his apron, and when I lodged the coffee in the King's warehouse he ordered me to put his name to it, as part of his seizure; I told him to go about his business; I said, you rascal, you are not worthy to come into such a place as this; I went into the warehouse, and I took charge of the prisoner myself.

Court. When you took charge of him you told him to go.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You took charge of the coffee and discharged him? - A. I did not discharge him, he followed me with the coffee.

Court. Q. He might have gone away with the coffee if he pleased? - A. No, he could not do that, because I took the coffee from him.

Q. What did you do with the man that you had with the coffee? - A. He stood on a lighter.

Q. You did not keep him in custody? - A. No, I wanted to find out the right of it.

Q. How could you find out the right of it to let the man go; I hope they will not keep you in the Custom-house any longer - At the time you did not keep the prisoner in custody, he remained on the quays? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You went up into the warehouse with Mr. Deer? - A. I did; when Mr. Deer opened the warehouse, he said, their he lies.

Q. That was Hudson - Did you take him into custody? - A. Yes; he was lying on a kind of shelf, that had some tiles over it, facing the roof in the warehouse; I kept him there while Mr. Deer searched to see if he could find any picklock keys; I told Hudson that Peg-leg (Anderson has a wooden leg) had the coffee, and it was in my possession; he said he would give him a good basting for it; Mr. Deer came and said to Hudson, my good fellow, how did you get up into this warehouse; he said he walked up; Mr. Deer said, you had better tell the truth; then he said, Peg-leg told me, if I came up here, I should find some coffee; I brought him down stairs, and hand-cuffed him, and took him to the Compter.

Court. Q. You have not told us when you took Anderson? - A. In about half an hour afterwards; I knew him perfectly; he was what we call a scuffle-hunter.

Court. Q. A frequenter of the Quays? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you took him afterwards on the Quays, on Mr. Deer desiring you to do it? - A. Yes.

- DEER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am warehouse-keeper of Galley-quay; I went up into the warehouse and the officer followed me, and in the first room I searched I saw Richard Hudson , laying all along, with his head on a beam; I said, there lies the man; I went to the man, and said, come down; he made no reply; I had a stick in my hand, and I struck the prisoner Hudson on the side; he did not move; I took hold of him, and pulled him down; he did not then speak; I said to him, do not sham it any longer, come forward, I took him by the collar, and said, lay hold of him; he did; we dragg'd him along the warehouse: Harding found a knife, and after we had taken the man, I found this pick-lock exactly where he laid; I believe it will open all my locks.

Q. Did you notice any of the bags? - A. I found that a bag was cut; I have every reason to believe that the coffee came out of that bag.

Court. Q. You found a bag cut and some coffee taken out? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose warehouse is that? - A. Robbin, James, and Edward Curling's warehouse.

Q. Under the Excise custom locks, in the warehouse of Messrs. Curling? - A. Yes; my locks are likewise in the warehouse.

Hudson's defence. I was in liquor, and strolled up there; I did not know where I was when Mr. Deer took me.

Anderson did not say any thing in his defence.

Anderson, GUILTY , aged 35.

Hudson, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-32

251. BARTHOLEMEW WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two boards, value 12 s. the property of Joseph Deaves .

JOSEPH DEAVES sworn. - I am a carpenter , I live in White-street, Cripplegate ; the prisoner at the bar worked for me about eleven weeks; soon after he had discharged himself from me, I found my yard oftentimes robbed, particularly after Christmas last; I was confined to my room through illness near three months, and put the care of my yard to a workman that I could trust: on the 5th of March my man came to my bed-room door, and informed me, that my yard had been robbed that morning of two deals, what we call two and ahalf yellow deals. In consequence of the robbery committed, on the 7th there were several yards searched, and in the yard of a person of the name of Brown these deals were found; he said he had bought the two deals of the prisoner.

JOHN KEY sworn. - I am a sawyer; I work for Mr. Deaves: On Tuesday the 5th of March, I went into the yard in the morning and missed two twelve foot two and a-half yellow deals; Thursday morning I came sooner than the usual time, and came by the end of North-street leading into Finsbury-street; as I stood at the corner-house, I saw the deals being moved in our yard from where I put them the over night; I run back again and came down Butler's-alley, to the corner of the yard, where I saw the prisoner take two deals from where I saw him before, and carry them to the further side of the yard, the same as I saw the others; he put them over the pales into the next yard, and from that yard into White's ruins; he took the five inch board, and the five and a-half, and put them on his shoulder, and went away with them; I followed him till he came into Ropemakers-street, then I went up to him; he said, master King; yes, I said, it is, master West; do you know these, he said; I said, I do, and well; he said, pray do not say any thing; God bless you, do not; if you will not say any thing, I will carry them back again, and I will put them in their place; he fell down upon his knees to me, and said, if I would not say any thing, he would give me a guinea; I told him that our yard had been robbed a great many times this winter, and many an innocent man

bore the blame; I took him by the collar to my master's house; I knocked at the door; he got out of my hands, and ran away; I took him again in Basinghall-street, and Mr. Smith, the constable, took him in charge to my master, and then to the Compter; I then went and searched afterwards his lodgings; there I saw four inch boards and one inch and a-half; they were twelve foot; I went and searched afterwards, and found in Mr. Brown's yard, Fore-street, the two two-and-a-half twelve foot deals.

THOMAS PERRY sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker; the prisoner came to me on the morning these twelve foot two and a-half deals were lost, saying he was going to move, and he had two deals to sell; I asked him what he asked for them; he said I offered him 8 s.; he took it, and brought them to me; I let them lie in the street all day; the next morning I took them to Mr. Brown's yard; Mr. King came the next morning, and asked me whether I had bought any deals of the prisoner; I told him I had; he went to Mr. Brown's yard and took them.

Q. These deals that King saw in Brown's yard, were the deals that you bought of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I produce the deals.

King. There is a mark on them; I can swear to them.

Prisoner's defence. I bought these deals myself; I gave the man nine shillings for them; I had no where to put them; they stood in the street; I bought them of John Smith ; I do not know where he lives, I know his person very well; I was going to move my lodgings, and so I sold them.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-33

252. JOSEPH MAXWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , fourteen pennyweights of gold filings, value 2 l. 10 s. two penny weights of gold solder, value 4 s. and half a firkin of melting-pots, value 5 l. the property of Joseph Newcomb .

JOSEPH NEWCOMB sworn. - I am a gold seal maker ; I live in Little New-street, Shoe-lane ; the prisoner was a journeyman of mine: I entertained a suspicion of him for some time, and was determined (if possible) to detect him; I had observed it was usual for him, before he went to dinner, to be very busy sweeping his filings out that were in a tray under him; I had every reason to suppose that was the time that he committed the depredation; immediately after he was so busy he got up and went to a corner of the shop, that we have convenient to the men; there he stood longer than we supposed necessary; I told my son and my apprentice to take particular notice, at the time he did get up, and to watch his motions; I likewise marked the gold solder that was used; I always found a deficiency when it was used by him, and I told my apprentice to mark it. On the following day I had a constable in the house, at the usual time, in order to search him; I saw on that day the same proceedings as before, respecting his sweeping his filings; I went down just before he came down to dinner into my parlour; I told the constable I had no doubt but he had committed the same depredation as before, and as he was going out to dinner, I desired him to walk into my parlour, I wanted to speak to him; I told the constable to search him, which he did; in the first place he found in his waistcoat pocket a dirty rag, containing about two pennyweights of gold filings and gold solder together, part of which I had marked; in his great coat pocket was found a small old melting-pot, with some pieces; there are certain particles of gold, in old melting-pots, which are more valuable than new; we took him to the Sitting Alderman, and he remanded him till the next day; in the interim we searched his lodgings, there we found, in a dirty piece of paper, in a closet in his room, about fourteen pennyweights of gold filings and a firkin, nearly half full of old melting-pots.

Q. How long did the prisoner live with you? - A. Near fifteen months.

JOSEPH NEWCOMB , jun. sworn. - Between the hours of twelve and one I saw him file a piece of metal, then I saw him make two partitions in his tray; one of gold filings and the other the metal; he seemed very busy in sweeping the gold filings; I got up immediately, and saw him sweep it into his hand, then he went to this place that my father spoke of, with his hand clenched and the filings in it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You observed him do this - what distance were you from him? - A. I sat next to him.

JOHN WORCESTER sworn. - I only know that the gold solder that the officer found in Maxwell's pocket is my master's property, I had marked it.

JOHN POLLARD sworn. - I am an officer: On the 15th of March the prosecutor called upon me and requested me to be at his house a quarter before one; I went, and when Maxwell came down to go to dinner, he called him in, and said he wanted to speak to him; I then searched him, and in his waistcoat pocket I found a little parcel of gold filings, which I produce, and a piece of gold solder; in his coat pocket I found a melting-pot; I took him before the Alderman, and from thence I went to Hatton-garden Office.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: I produce some gold filings, gold solder, and about half a firkin of old melting-pots, found at the prisoner's lodgings.

Prosecutor. The solder I can swear to from a

mark that we ran through the centre; it is my property, and some of the melting-pots I will swear to.

Prisoner's defence. During the time I was in Mr. Newcomb's employ, I was in the habit of working at home, doing jobs and likewise new work; I have taken gold as part of payment, and I have bought gold of the refiners. In regard to that cloth found in my pocket, I had brought it from home, with intent to go to the flatting-mills with it, not having fire enough at home. I suppose some of Mr. Newcomb's men had a little spite against me, and they had said something to Mr. Newcomb that made him search me, and finding these things about me, he might think them his own. As to Mr. Newcomb's, jun. seeing me file metal into the tray, it is very common, we use metal in our work.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-34

253. TRYPHENA HAMLYN, alias KERWOOD, alias LYONS , was indicted for feloniously intermarrying William Kerwood , her former husband, John Hamlyn , being then living .

(The case was stated by Mr. Alley.)

JONATHAN NEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect ever being present at any church where she was married? - A. Yes, on the 4th of October, 1799, at St. George's in the East, I was witness to the marriage of a man of the name of Hamlyn, and the prisoner at the bar.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long is it since you have seen Hamlyn? - A. I saw him to day.

Court. Q. How were they married? - A. They were married by licence.

Q. Is she an English woman? - A. I believe she is; I saw her married to that man; I believe you will find my name in the book.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Where did you come from now - You have just come from the New Inn? - A. No, nor the Old Inn.

Q. You have been a little in the sun? - A. I have not seen the sun-shine.

Q. You are as sober as ever you were? - A. I believe I am.

Q. It is a great many years ago? - A. Not quite seven I believe.

Court. Q. How came you to recollect the time - You do not know what this woman was? - A. No.

Q. What was Hamlyn? - A. He was a baker by trade, and is now, I suppose.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How came you to recollect the year and the day? - A. Sometimes one makes a memorandum of these things.

Q. Upon your oath, did you make a memorandum of the day and the year that this woman was married? - A. It is at home, I suppose; I have not got it here; I can recollect such a thing as that.

Court. Q. I am afraid you have been drinking; I will not have any flippance in witnesses - How came you to recollect the day? - A. Very well, your Worship; likewise I have it in the register, in my own name; I have a memorandum somewhere, if I have not lost it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When were you applied to, to become a witness? - A. On Tuesday night last, between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Had you seen the woman, from the year 1799 to the Tuesday night after she was in custody? - A. I have seen her for three or four years since.

Q. You might have seen this memorandum since Tuesday last, or how came you to recollect the day? - A. No.

Court. Q. Because that would refresh your memory? - A. I have said all that I can say.

Q. The reason that you recollect it at all is, you had made a memorandum of it; you were not applied to till Tuesday last; how did you know when you were applied to on Tuesday last what day it was; did you look for the memorandum? - A. I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How came you to refer to the memorandum in the first outset of the business? - A. I recollect it very well.

Mr. Alley. We have no doubt at all that she is the woman that was married to the man at that time.

JOHN BARROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you got there the register? - A. Yes, this is the register book of the marriages; there is the marriage of one Hamlyn here; (read in Court.)

4th of October, 1799, John Hamlyn , of this parish, batchelor, and Tryphena Bartlett, widow, of the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, were married in this church by licence, by me, Thomas White , minister, in the presence of Jonathan Neale and Thomas Hancock .

Q.(To Neale.) Is that your hand-writing? - A. It is.

Court. Q. Do you know Hamlyn? - A. Yes, I knew him a few times before that.

Q. Have you known him since? - A. Yes, I am very sure it is the same man.

WILLIAM KERWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have been a sailor in the last war? - A. Yes, I am a shoe-maker now.

Q. What time did you return from sea in the last war? - A. On the 12th of May, 1802.

Q. Did you happen upon any occasion to go to

Somerset-house - did you see the prisoner at the bar near there? - A. Yes, and I procured a licence by her order; she told me she was a widow.

Q. And you believing her to be a widow, went and swore so, and got a licence? - A. Yes, and we were married at Cripplegate church .

Q. Was any body present at the time? - A. Yes, the clerk is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long is it ago since you were married to this woman? - A. About three years ago the 19th of May.

Q. When did you see her before you saw her to take her into custody? - A. She heard of it, and she called at our house.

Q. Did she call on you? - A. No, only where I live.

Q. What do you mean by saying only, are you married to another? - A. I said only at our house; she did not come into my room, because I cohabit with another.

Q. Then you indicted her for marrying another, and you cohabit with another yourself? - A. She married another.

Q. Who pays the expences of this prosecution? - A. The first husband, I believe.

Q. How much does he pay you? - A. He pays me nothing; I come of my own free will; he applied to me to prosecute; he found out where I lived.

Q. Or else you would not have prosecuted? - A. I do not know that I should.

Q. Your wife has left you, and you are living with another woman, that is the history, is it? - A. Yes.

Q. A very pretty history too; when did you come from sea last? - A. In November about two years ago.

Q. You were married in the year 1802? - A. I was married about three or four days after I came from sea.

Q. You had not known her before? - A. No, never saw her before with my eyes.

Court. Q. Did you meet her by accident? - A. Yes, through another ship-mate; she was with him.

Q. Did she ever live with him? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you persuade her or she you? - A. She persuaded me as much as I did her; it is so long ago I cannot hardly say.

Q. How long did you live together before you were married? - A. Not at all.

Q. Did you inquire about it, whether she was single or married? - A. I never inquired about it.

Q. Did you live a long time together? - A. Six months.

Q. You were not married before? - A. No, nor since.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You say you have never received any money from Hamlyn? - A. Never.

Q. You have never said so to Mrs. Senor, that you have received so much as five shillings a day? - A. That I can swear I have not; I have said that I supposed I should get that.

Q. To whom? - A. To Mrs. Senor.

Q. From whom do you expect to get that? - A. From Mr. Hamlyn, to pay my expences for attending here, and neglecting my work.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-35

254. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted for that he, on the 19th of March , one piece of base coin, resembling the current coin of this kingdom, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did colour, with materials producing the colour of silver, against his allegiance, and against the form of the statute .

Second Count, For that he, on the same day, and in the same place, one other round blank of base metal, of fit size and figure, to be coined into milled money, resembling the current coin of this kingdom, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did colour, with materials producing the colour of silver.

Third and Fourth Counts, For like offence.

And Fifth and Sixth Counts, For falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously colouring with materials, one other round blank, of fit size and figure, resembling a sixpence.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

CHARLES WARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a tool-maker to Messrs. Bateman; they are silversmiths in Bunhill-row? - A. Yes.

Q. Does the back part of your house look towards Twister's-alley ? - A. The shop where I work, looks towards Twister's-alley.

Q. Did you observe any thing, and what? - A. I believe it was the 12th of March, on Tuesday; I was looking out of the back window which looks to the North, I was looking there two or three minutes, turning aside from my board; there was something attracted my sight; I returned back, and turned my head again, and looked more steadfastly towards the window, and by the reflection of the sun I could see some round pieces, but I could not tell what they were; the window where I saw this was in the one pair of stairs, and I was in the two pair of stairs.

Q. You did not know who lived there at that time? - A. I did not; I turned my head, and saw that, and I made it my business to look more minutely into it, and I saw several pieces lying on

the table, but I could not distinguish what colour they were, but apparently they were white; the window was very dirty; that was the first day, about half past twelve; the business was carried on between eleven and one. On Wednesday I happened to look again, as I had suspicion, and I saw the same business going on; the different pieces apparently were shillings and sixpences.

Q. Where was these shillings, as you supposed them to be? - A. Laying on the table.

Q. Was any body with them? - A. The prisoner at the bar; he was sitting at the side of the table; I saw him rubbing them with something, but I could not tell what; he appeared to be rubbing these pieces.

Court. Q. Did you see him on the 12th and 13th, so as to see he was employed? - A. Yes, each time I saw him, and every time after he had done he washed himself, and scoured his hands a great deal indeed. On Thursday I saw the same process again, and rubbing and washing his hands, and two basons and a phial stood upon the table, and also the pieces were on the table.

Q. Was he rubbing then? - A. Yes, I saw him rub them between his finger and thumb, and after that I saw him shaking the pieces in something, but I could not tell what; I saw the phial on the table, and I saw him pour part of the contents of it into a bason that stood on the table.

Q. What did he do with the pieces? - A. They were put into a bason, and shook about; they were after that taken out of the bason, and put into a cloth, and they were shook about.

Q. Were they shook about in the bason, or in the cloth only? - A. In the cloth only; this was on the Thursday, and I think it was on that day that he washed himself very minutely, I believe all over.

Q. Could you observe at all the colour of his hands? - A. No; I could see the soap on his hands when he was getting the dirt off; on the Friday there was much the same process, and he engaged in the same way, and on Saturday likewise. On the Saturday I communicated to my master what I had seen.

Q. After that, did you communicate what you had seen to any Office? - A. I did, to Mr. Moser, the Magistrate, in Worship-street.

Q. In consequence of that communication, did you go with the officer afterwards? - A. The officer appointed a house to meet me afterwards, and Ray was with me at my own shop.

Q. What day was this that Ray was with you at your shop? - A. On Monday, I took Ray up with me to my shop.

Q. Did you see on Monday the same as you saw before? - A. I did; the business then did not begin till past one o'clock; I saw it after Mr. Ray went; on Tuesday, Mr. Ray came up into the shop, and he was satisfied.

Q. On Tuesday did you see with Ray what you had seen before? - A. Yes.

Q. Ray was satisfied with what he had seen? - A. Yes; then the officers went; I was in the room just after the prisoner was apprehended.

Q. You shewed them where to go? - A. Yes, they went backwards, over the premises of my employer; two of them did.

Court. Q. You have said there was some dirt about the window; was there enough to prevent you from seeing the colour of the pieces? - A. Sometimes the window was open; then I could see distinctly the white pieces of some substance or other.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On Tuesday, the 19th of March, the information I had from the last witness led me there; about half past eleven o'clock in the day, I went into the work-shop with the last witness, Ware; I was looking out of the window up two pair of stairs, and I had a full view of the prisoner's room, which is only one pair of stairs from the ground; the first sight that I had of the prisoner was on his coming to the window with a bason, and something in it, which he threw out of the window, and then pulled down the window, and he went by the side of a table, I saw that very plain; I then saw him with something in a coarse towel, which he was shaking backwards and forwards; sometimes I saw him put it down on the table, and it seemed to me like round pieces of metal; he opened the cloth, and looked at them, and what was in the cloth appeared to me like round pieces, resembling shillings; he then put them in the cloth again, and kept on shaking them backwards and forwards.

Court. Q. How long might this last? - A. About four or five minutes; when I saw that the second time, I was satisfied; Armstrong, Vickery, Mason, Bishop, and Kennedy, were in waiting very near to the prisoner's apartment.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you point out to them what you had seen? - A. I went and communicated to them what I had seen, and they immediately repaired, some to the front of the house, and I and Bishop went through the back of Mr. Bateman's place, to the back of the prisoner's house, and we got over the place; Armstrong had got into the front before we got into the back part of the premises; the prisoner was secured, and then the other officers proceeded to search; I secured the prisoner.

Q. Was there any thing took place on securing the prisoner? - A. That the other officers will explain.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was there any other person in the house? - A. Not in that room; in the house there was a shoe-maker, at the bottom part of the

house, at work; I am positive of the man, I knew him before.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I and Vickery went up one pair of stairs, and I put my shoulder to the door, and opened it; I believe Vickery had his foot in the room before me; when I got into the room, the prisoner stood with his back rather sideways; I went round, and caught hold of his hand, and said, Mr. Field, is it you, and I secured thirty counterfeit shillings and nineteen sixpences in his hand only. When I called him Field, his hand opened, and some of them dropped, and I picked them up, I have them here; I then put them on the table, and wiped them, they being wet, in the presence of the prisoner and the officers; they seemed as if they had just come out of liquid.

Q. Did you observe of what nature the liquid was? - A. I could not; I then desired the officers to look particularly to his hands, and I did so too.

Q. What was the appearance of his hands? - Exactly in that state as if he had been using aqua-fortis; it colours the fingers ends; the nails will turn yellow, and the flesh will turn black.

Q. You have seen hands at first after using aqua-fortis, so that you know it produces black on the flesh, and yellow on the nails; had it that appearance? - A. Yes; I then looked to the fireplace, and by the fire there was a pitcher of cold water; by the side of that laid a phial, which had been recently broken, some of the pieces laying on the hearth, and some on the fire-place; I then went, and searched the other parts of the room; the prisoner said, Armstrong, you have got all; he made no resistance.

Q. Did you attempt to see what liquor it was that was spilt? - A. I did not.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You went with Armstrong to the front of the house? - A. Yes, I was the first in the room, the door was on the latch; I believe the prisoner was standing with his hands behind him, and with his back to the fire; Armstrong caught hold of him by the left hand; he looked in his face; I took him by the right hand; and when he said, Field, at that time five of the blanks dropped on the floor, directly he let his hand go; Armstrong called him by name, and he took this money from him; he had nothing in his right hand. I proceeded to search, and I found this piece of rag, it has been opened; here is a bit of woollen cloth, and a quantity of base metal that was in it, twelve counterfeit shillings and four counterfeit sixpences; three of these shillings appear to have been quite finished for circulation; on a shelf close to the back of the prisoner was this piece.

Q. That is a shilling of another kind? - A. It is entirely brass, it is a blank; upon the same shelf I found another shilling in this piece of paper; it appears to be finished for circulation; in another part of the room, from behind a picture, this dollar fell; this has been recently finished.

Court. Q. It is a counterfeit dollar; is that coloured in the same way? - A. Yes, by the same process; this apron he had on, with the wet marks on it; it is mouldy now, but it had white places on it, as if he had been using cream of tartar.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. Yes, this cloth was laying, part in a pail and part out, close to where the prisoner was standing, and there were visible marks, where blanks had been shaken in this bag with cream of tartar; there were places that was quite wet, of a whitish colour; there was a phial that had been broken by a fall, and there were some pieces laying on the ground, and I saw one piece by the fire, that was the neck of the phial; I saw Bishop stoop, and taste that on the fire, where there were parts of the broken phial, and by the side of the fire stood a large stone pitcher of water, and a bason of water on the table, which tasted saltish; it was either salt water, or salt used in it. After we had secured the prisoner, he begged that his landlord might be sent for, and the landlord was sent for to come up into his room; he desired Armstrong to take his keys out of his pocket, and to take half-a-crown out of his chest.

Q. Who was the landlord? - A. I believe his name is Sword; he said that we had got all; he was perfectly civil, and did not make the least resistance in the world.

DANIEL BISHOP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. When I went into the room, I observed a phial had been broken on the hearth; I put my finger to it, and tasted it, and I found it was aqua-fortis; I took up a little bit of glass likewise, and tasted that, and that was the same, it was a strong acid; the prisoner said it was only a gin-bottle that had been broken there; I know aqua-fortis both by taste and smell, I have no doubt of it; on the shelf I found this horn, which contained some blacking; in the cupboard I found a punch, with the impression of a star; in the same cupboard I found this sand-paper, or scouring-paper, and a piece of cork; in a little box in the cupboard, I found two papers, each containing cream of tartar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not bring any part of this before the Magistrate, to prove that it was aqua-fortis? - A. No.

Q.(To Armstrong.) Look at the sand-paper? - A. It is a thing that is always found under these circumstances; cork, blacking, and cream tartar, is always used; the aqua-fortis always brings the white colour first; the cream of tartar is used after the aqua-fortis and the blacking; they are all such things as I have found in these places

JOHN SWORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are the landlord of the prisoner; you kept the house, you let him the room, and he paid you the rent? - A. Yes; he had been with me six weeks.

RICHARD FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp, Q. Will you look at these three shillings produced by Vickery, and proved to be taken from the prisoner's apartment; you are the monier of the mint; are these counterfeit shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that one? - A. This is the same.

Q. These three shillings, and that one shilling, are in a fit state for circulation? - A. They are.

Court. Q. When you say in a fit state for circulation, am I to understand you that they are in a fit state to deceive persons? - A. Certainly they are, (witness looking at the whole of the money found at the prisoner's lodging); they are all counterfeit base metal.

CALEB- EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. We have already heard that you have been assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint for a great many years? - A. I have.

Q. What is the use of aqua-fortis; what does the operation of aqua-fortis produce upon the blanks? - A. It destroys the base metal, leaving the silver particles on the surface, and it is that by which the colour of silver is produced.

Q. Can you tell us what is the use of cream of tartar? - A. In cases of this fort it removes the blackness which remains, and the acid of the cream of tartar takes off the aqua-fortis that is left there, and fixes the colour.

Court. Q. What is performed by rubbing them in a cloth? - A. That is to dry them, after they have been immersed in this sort of pickle; after they have been coloured, they are put in cold water, and after the aqua-fortis has done its office, they remove what is left by washing.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of what is alledged against me.

GUILTY , Death , aged 39.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-36

255. JAMES SLADE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Job-Arnold Glover , on the 26th of February , about the hour of eleven o'clock at night, with intent the goods therein feloniously and burglariously to steal .

JOB-ARNOLD GLOVER sworn. - I live at Uxbridge , in the county of Middlesex: On the 26th of February last, near eleven o'clock in the evening, I went down into my cellar, with an intent to draw half a pint of beer, and when I got there, I saw one of the tubs out of its place; I went a little farther, seeing the tub was moved out of its place, and there I saw the leg of a man hanging across the beer-stand, and only the leg. Then I took my lighted candle, and stooped behind the tub, and there I saw James Slade ; I knew him, and I called out with a loud voice, what do you do here; I knew him before; then I drew back; he arose in a posture of defence, and I had nothing but a tin-pot in one hand, and a candlestick in the other; I drew back, and called John, who was a servant of mine; I called John Walton near twenty times, and as I was calling him, the prisoner got up the cellar-window; he got out the same way he got in; he had wrenched the bar before, very near an inch and a quarter up with an iron thing.

Q. When had you seen your cellar - do you know what state it was in? - A. I saw it every day and every evening of my life; I saw it an hour and a half before that, and it was all safe, and perfectly right.

Q. Had you looked for that purpose? - A. I look every night of my life, I never miss; after he had made his escape through the window, I turned into the kitchen; there is an entry into the street; I went into the street, and desired somebody to run and fetch the peace-officer directly, there being a number of people about the door.

Q. Did you look and see if there was any thing left there? - A. Yes; there was a kind of an old lantern, a bag, and a chisel.

Q. Were they there when you were in your cellar before? - A. No, no such thing.

Q. Did you miss any thing out of your cellar? - A. I cannot say, there were such a number of things; the moment I got up, I sent for a peace-officer, and the moment the peace-officer came, I desired some of them to go and search his house.

JOHN WALTON sworn. - Q. You are servant to Mr. Glover? - A. Yes.

Q. He called to you when he saw the prisoner in the cellar? - A. Yes, and I came to him.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. No, he was gone.

Q. Do you know any thing about the prisoner? - A. He went out.

Q. Did you go to the house of the prisoner? - Yes, with Mr. Reddington.

Q. Did you find any thing? - A. Nothing at all.

WILLIAM REDDINGTON sworn. - Q. You went to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, and searched it, but we did not find any thing.

CHARLES MURRAY sworn. - I am constable of Uxbridge; there was a warrant to apprehend this man; the next day, on the 27th, I searched for him all that day, and could find nothing of him; I went to the Post-office to stop any letter that should come to his wife, and they stopped this letter at the Post-office, and brought it to me; I took it before the Magistrate, and he broke it open, which led to the discovery, and finding the prisoner I took him; I produce what was found in

the cellar; it was put in my possession to keep; Mr. Glover found it.

Q. Do you know who it belonged to? - A. No.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Is that the lantern that was found in the cellar? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any mark on that bag to tell whose it is? - A. There is no mark on it.

Q. Is there any mark on the chisel? - A. No, there is mortar on it.

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent of the charge.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) You say you knew this man before; did he work for you? - A. He has at different times about a year ago.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-37

256. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , two back-bands, value 5 s. two pair of harness-chains, value 15 s. and one leather brace, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Strong .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

PHILIP GREGORY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Strong; he is a farmer living at Stoke-Newington : On the 21st of March I came home, and left all the harness safe in the stable; I shut the door and latched it; the next morning I returned to the stable, and found some of the harness was cut and lying in the stable, and other parts of it were taken away; there were three chains gone and the back-bands; I told my master.

Q. Did you see part of the harness, the back-bands, produced by your master, about the middle of the day after? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you compare them with the piece remaining in the stable? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt that they were part of your master's property? - A. No.

Q. You never found the chains? - A. No.

THOMAS STRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. In consequence of information I received of Gregory, of the stable having been broke open, I was walking round my farm the next day, about twelve o'clock, and heard a noise in the mill; I went and opened the door, and there I found the prisoner at the bar with a basket in his hand; I asked him what he was doing there; he said he was getting some chips; he said that the workmen had gone from the mill, and they had given him leave; he said he had a basket full of chips; I said, the workmen cannot have given you leave, because there have been no workmen here for these six months; then he took his basket, and was going out.

Q. How did he get in; was the door locked? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was locked; I had been round before, and I did not see it was broke open, and when I came there this day, it appeared to have been broke open, but the door was put to. I saw in his basket the handle of a a tool; I said, Smith, you have got some tools as well as chips; I must search your basket, and see what you have got; he said I should not, and resisted me; I pulled the basket from him, and turned out a large axe concealed among the wood; on my examining it, he took up the basket and was going off; I said to him, I shall see the bottom of it; he said there was nothing in it but some wood; on turning out what was at the bottom of the basket, I found four pieces of leather; I said it was very much like my harness that was stolen last night, you shall go with me, and we will compare it with that which is left; he said he would not, and we had a scuffle; he kicked, and tried all he could to get away from me; he said he had got a wife and six children, and begged I would not detain him; I took him by the collar, and brought him home by force, and examined the pieces; they tallied with what was left in the stable, and I have no doubt but they are part of the same harness.

Prisoner's defence. I came from Rumford at almost half an hour after six o'clock, and was going round the premises, when I was told to take the bits of wood up, and among the rest I took these bits of leather, which the man gave to me.

Court. Q. Where is that man? - A. I never saw that man before; he appeared to be a carpenter.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined one week in Newgate , and during that time publicly whipped 100 yards in Stoke Newington .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-38

257. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for that he, with divers other persons to the Jurors unknown, to the number of three persons and more, being armed with fire-arms, guns, pistols, pikes, swords, and large stones, unlawfully did assemble themselves together, aiding, abetting, assisting, rescuing, and taking away from William Parry , an officer of our Lord the King , a thousand gallons of brandy, rum, and geneva, and five hundred pounds weight of tobacco, being respectively uncustomed goods, after the seizure of the said goods .

Second Count, For that he, with divers other persons, together, on the same day, and in the same place, being armed with fire-arms aforesaid, in order to be aiding, abetting, assisting, and rescuing and carrying away, the like goods, being uncustomed goods, which had not been paid, and liable to be seized and secured.

(The indictment read by Mr. Jackson, and the case stated by Mr. Solicitor General)

WILLIAM PARRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You were mate of the Resolution , Capt. Stoneham? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 10th of February you observed the Maria cutter, and afterwards you went on shore? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Wren, another officer, commanded another boat? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going in the execution of your duty, to search for the supposed cargo of the Maria? - A. I did, and when I went on shore, I heard several musquets fired; there were not any shots in the musquets; I did not hear any shots whistle.

Q. Could you perceive from whence the firing came? - A. Yes, from the village.

Q. Was it near the place where you found the casks piled up? - A. Close to it.

Q. How many reports of pieces were there? - A. About half a dozen or more.

Q. Fired at once or successively? - A. At different times, and several stones were thrown at me and my crew just after we landed.

Q. When the stones were thrown at you what number of people were there? - A. I could not see many of them just at that time; they all ran away, and went behind hedges or corners of houses; there might be half a dozen or more.

Q. The stones were thrown at you, and some of your men were hurt by the stones at that time? - A. I ordered my men to return the fire, to clear the beech.

Q. In order to intimidate and clear the place, your men fired? - A. Yes; I made a seizure of one hundred ankers that lay on the beech, below high-water mark, very near where I landed first, and after that I found out three hundred ankers on the quay.

Q. How far from where you made the seizure of the first hundred were the other three hundred on the quay? - A. Not a stone's throw.

Q. At the removal of the one hundred towards the three hundred what took place; where you interrupted? - A. No.

Q. Then they were altogether afterwards; how-many of your men might there be about the four hundred that surrounded the quay at this time? - A. I had thirteen men and myself.

Q. What hour was it when you secured the hundred to the other three hundred? - A. About eight o'clock in the evening, on the 10th of January last.

Q. What sort of an evening? - A. It was rather a close evening but a very good moon-light.

Q. Therefore it was not totally dark? - A. It was not.

Q. What took place when you were there? - A. After I secured the seizure, I hauled my boats up, as there was a great deal of sea running on the shore, to secure them from the surge.

Q. Then you returned of course to protect the seizure? - A. Yes; in the course of the evening there were several men came down that appeared to be smugglers, while I was taking care of the seizure, one of which was a tall man, of five feet ten, with a whip in his hand, a great coat, and boots; he insinuated to me to give up half the seizure.

Q. That you refused to do? - A. Yes; Joseph George and his wife came down frequently, and informed me that the smugglers intended to attack me, and rescue the goods.

Q. Did his wife come down with him the first time? - A. No.

Q. Then Joseph George came down to apprize you of their intention? - A. Yes; the smugglers came down often from eight o'clock in the evening till one o'clock in the morning; about one o'clock in the morning they began to attack us with firearms and stones in great numbers.

Q. How many fire-arms might be discharged? - A. A vast number; I suppose thirty or forty musquets, distinct musquets, and several discharges.

Q. Were any of your men hurt with the discharge of the first firing? - A. The very first fire of the musquets one of my men was wounded in the head.

Q. In consequence of having received their fire, what was done by you and your men? - A. Then we returned the fire as fast as we could; they were behind the boats; we could not get at them, only when they came down in numbers upon us.

Q. So that they fired upon you from sheltered places, from behind the boats and houses - How long might this sort of work continue? - A. Upwards of an hour.

Q. Was there a constant firing kept up by you for the course of an hour? - A. Yes, we fired upon them the whole time.

Q. In what manner did they first come on upon you? - A. They came upon us in a large number, huzzaing.

Q. During this were any more of your men hurt than you have described? - A. Four more wounded, three dangerously.

Q. Joseph George continued with you during this time? - A. He did.

Q. Had you an opportunity during this time, of observing any other persons, so as to be able to identify them? - A. Not very well; Joseph George was in the place, and knew most of the men who were there. In better than an hour the firing ceased.

Q. Did any of them make any approach to you after one o'clock? - A. Yes, and they halloaed out, leave the goods.

Q. Did any of them throw any stones at your men? - A. They kept throwing stones the whole of the time; I suppose there were twenty barrels of stones in a heap that were thrown; they were ragged rough stones.

Q. What became of Joseph George after one o'clock; did he remain with you, or go at any time towards them? - A. He did go after one o'clock, at the conclusion of the skirmish.

Q. For what did you send him towards them; with any instructions? - A. I did it in order to intimidate them, if he could, to secure the seizure, and if it had not been for him we should have lost the seizure, and been fairly beat; he contributed very much to our help.

Q. How long was he absent - Was his wife near you at the time? - A. She was.

Q. When was it that his wife went with him? - A. Just after the skirmish.

Q. Did Joseph George come backwards and forwards, between you and the smugglers? - A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. George likewise? - A. She did.

Q. Did you observe any other woman in the course of the night, that there seemed to have been amongst the parties? - A. There was a pike brought down called one of the fencible pikes.

Q. Who brought that? - A. Mrs. George brought that to me.

Q. Was there any offence committed upon you at that time? - A. No.

Q. In the morning you seized the goods and carried them off? - A. I did.

Q. I do not know whether you had an opportunity of making any observations on the prisoner at the bar (look at him) prior to the skirmish? - A. I saw him there; he solicited me to give up his boat, which was seized some months prior to the 10th of January.

Q. Had you seized any boat of his some months before? - A. Yes.

Q. And he applied to you on this occasion for the return of the boat? - A. I told him I could not do any such thing; he might ask Capt. Stoneham in the morning, if he pleased.

Q. Did he appear satisfied or not with this answer? - A. Not perfectly, I thought.

Q. Did he continue or stop talking with you? - A. Some little time, and then he went away; I do not know where he went.

Q. You cannot identify his person as being one of those who assaulted you and Mr. Wren, who are commissioned officers of the Excise? - A. Mr. Wren is not a commissioned officer; he is a cutter's mate.

Court. Q. That is conferred on him by the Excise? - A. Yes, he is one of the crew of our cutter.

Q. There were more than three people at the time this firing was? - A. I could not see the musquets, they were out of my sight.

Q. Did you hear their explosion, so as to be satisfied there were more than three people at that time? - A. Certainly there were.

Q. Could you form a judgment of the number that were there that fired? - A. I cannot tell that.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Just tell the number of reports there might be? - A. Half a dozen.

Court. Q. Did you ever see three men at a time that were there? - A. No.

Q. Do you think the firing was such, that it was impossible that all that firing came from one or two musquets, successively used? - A. There might be more than two.

Q. So that the whole firing could not proceed from two musquets? - A. I think not.

Q. Can you form a judgment of the number of people that were collected at the time the firing ceased? - A. About fifty; they come down with a party of twenty or thirty men with stones, and the firing lasted at intervals for an hour; at one o'clock it began, and continued for an hour, and then it ceased.

Prisoner. He employed me the next morning to get a boat, to assist to carry the goods off on board the cutter.

Mr. Parry. I did, at seven o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. Captain Stoneham paid me two guineas for carrying forty one ankers on board.

Mr. Parry. He was paid.

Court. Q.(To Mr. Parry.) At that time, did you know that he was a person, or believe that he was a person, that resisted the seizure? - A. No, I did not have any suspicions.

JOHN PILE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were a seaman on board the Resolution on the 10th of January last? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent by any body in a boat, with Wren and others? - A. Yes.

Q. Who were you sent by? - A. Captain Stoneham , with Edward Wren , Edward Passmoor , and David Morris .

Q. Where were you sent to? - A. To assist Mr. Parry; by the signal that we had, we thought he was on shore; we pulled within a mile and a half of the shore, and we met Mr. Parry in a boat; we went from Mr. Parry, and pulled round the bay, to see if we could find any thing, and then we pulled back again to Selin Cove ; and then we saw flashes from the shore.

Q. What do you mean by flashes from the shore? - A. From arms, or from musquets or pistols, we could not tell which; we hailed the shore, and some person answered, which we took to be Mr. Parry, and from that we pulled on to the shore.

Q. Before you went on shore, had you observed

any thing? - A. No; when we came on shore, the first thing we saw was about an hundred ankers, as nigh as we could guess; Mr. Parry ordered us to carry those goods on the quay; we carried them upon the quay, and after we had done that, we hauled our boats up, and form that we stationed ourselves (by Mr. Parry's orders) each side of the goods, keeping guard over them; the people came down, sometimes ten or twelve, and sometimes three or four at a time, from eight o'clock till one in the morning; they came in different numbers, at different times.

Q. What people do you mean? - A. Men came down; they had nothing with them as we saw; they kept coming down from that time to I suppose about a quarter before one; there was a good many came down and shook hands with several of us, and said, if you behave civil to us, we shall behave civil to you, and then walked away, and one of them said; d - n him who turns Judas, and walked up to the mob, and whether that man was the first that spoke to us I cannot say; they then said, one and all; they gave three cheers and fired one musquet, or something was fired, and by our officers orders, we returned the same and the cheers also, and so it continued, with heavy firing, with stones between, for ten minutes.

Q. Did the firing proceed from more than one gun in the course of ten minutes? - A. I suppose there where two or three musquets firing.

Q. Did they appear to be firing from different musquets? - A. There was a man got between the boats, and he kept a continual firing upon us, not above a stones throw from us; he fired small shot; by the appearance it was a musquet that he had got.

Court. Q. Was he firing at the time, while the firing was going on, when you said there were two or three musquets firing? - A. Yes; one of our men presented to him, and fired at him but missed him; this man continued firing from this time a continual firing; the other part of the mob throwing stones as well; I suppose a quarter before one, I received a full charge of the slugs and shot; I had one in each hand, two in my side, and one in my head.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I observe you to be lame at this time? - A. I have one in my knee at this time, near the bone; I have the shot to shew now which was taken out; Walter Germain was wounded at the same time.

Q. How many shots had you taken out of you? - A. Three; two shots and a slug.

Q. At the time this firing was going on, are you sure that there were more than three fire-arms firing at the time? - A. I have not the least doubt that there were more than three.

THOMAS PILE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You are a seaman belonging to the Resolution? - A. Yes.

Q. You went on shore with Mr. Parry? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went on shore, did you meet with any opposition? - A. No.

Q. You saw the hundred ankers on the beach; did you see any persons with fire arms there? - A. I saw three musquets, just after we got on shore, in the hands of three different people, at the time we went on shore.

Q. Were these persons near one another, or were they at a distance from each other? - A. One was further over the quay, and one from the window of a house, and the other was further in among the mob.

Q. What sort of a house is it? - A. It is a kind of a dwelling house, but there is no person living in it; it is a store house.

Q. Was that all you saw, just three and no more? - A. I did not see any more than three.

Q. After you saw these three what did you do with yourselves? - A. We carried these goods up from the beach.

Q. Where did you carry them to? - A. Up to the other ankers.

Q. When you went there did you see any people there? - A. There were a great many at first, but they went away then.

Q. Did they continue quiet for any length of time? - A. Yes, they were very quiet for a long time; they began to molest us about one o'clock.

Q. What took place about one o'clock? - A. There was a man that came to us and shook hands with several of us, and shook hands with me in particular, and said, men, be honourable and we will be the same to you; then he went away, and said, d - n and b - r the first that turns Judas, and went up the hill to the mob, and gave three cheers, one and all, then they began heaving of stones, and fired one musquet in the first place.

Q. Any firing afterwards? - A. Yes, there was firing afterwards at different places, at a corner of a house, and then again between the boats.

Q. How many musquets were there firing at that time - did you apprehend six or eight? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you think there were more than three? - A. The firing was in three different places; there certainly must be more than three.

Q. Was there more than one gun fired off at each place? - A. There certainly must be more than one.

Q. More than one at each place do you mean? - A. Yes, I think there was.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoner in the course of that evening? - A. I recollect he came down in the night.

Q. What time was that? - A. About ten o'clock to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You know the prisoner's person - do you know his countenance? - A. I have seen him before.

ANN GEORGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Solicitor General. Q. You are the wife of Joseph George ? - A. I am.

Q. Joseph George is the person the other witness has been speaking of, as going backwards and forwards to the officers? - A. Joseph George was at Selin Cove, he had been to Penzance-market; I have every reason to believe that he had something to do with the officers; I believe it must be eight o'clock when he first went down; about nine I was sitting down, playing a game of cards, when in came a young woman; in a few minutes after that I went into the house of James Thomas , and when I came in there, the wife of James Thomas asked me whether I had heard the piece of work there was in the Cove; she said there was murder in the Cove, and one man shot; I went to the Cove and found Mr. William Parry , and thirteen more of the crew, with a large quantity of goods, and the men walking up and down with their arms and cutlasses; when I came there, I saw my husband talking with his brother the prisoner; I afterwards went down with this said John George , by the desire of Joseph George , to ask Mr. Parry whether he would make him any satisfaction for the boat that had been seized before of John George ; he asked Mr. William Parry if he could do it; he said it was more than his commission was worth to do any thing of the kind; if he would stop till the morning, and he would endeavour to help him, he would make him a generous satisfaction; he said it was very hard for him to lose his boat, and he was not in it; it was very hard upon him.

Q. Did John George go home? - A. We all went back to John George 's house again; there were four of us.

Q.Had John George any conversation with Joseph George then? - A. He called him out of doors, but what he said I do not know, and within a minute or two he returned in again; he looked angry; I thought it was something about his boat; he went into the other room, but whether he took any thing out I do not know; in less than ten minutes I went out to see for my husband; he was gone down to Mr. Parry, and going past a place that I had to go through in going from the house of John George , towards my own house, I saw a large party of men assembled together; I saw the prisoner, John George , standing in conversation with a large party assembled around with Richard Oates , and the words that I heard him express was, that, though he was his own brother, he would shoot him like a black-bird; I had every reason to think it was on his brother he then said it, who was my husband.

Q. Had he a gun then? - A. He had a gun; it was then betwixt eleven and twelve o'clock, but I do not know exactly; I had been in the Cove some time then.

Q. When he told you it was your husband he would shoot, what then? - A. He said he was gone like a rogue to inform the officers, and that he would shoot him as soon as he would shoot a black-bird.

Q. Do you remember seeing any one with a sea-fencible pike? - A. He went home and returned with a pike, and he offered it to Richard Oates , and Richard Oates would not take it; he said he would not take it, he would not have any thing to do with it; he stood close to me; I heard him say he would not have any thing to do with it, and Oates did not take any part as I saw.

Q. Did you hear any of the people huzza? - A. Yes, they gave three cheers; they said, one and all, let us kill Joseph George, and take away the goods; I heard them express that, that they would have him, and that if the goods were surrendered, it was only to go and take them away; they said they would go down in a large body, and fire upon the officers and the cutter's men, then they would retreat.

Q. Was John George by at the time? - A. He was; I saw him at the first fire, I saw him no more after that.

Court. Q. He was there when these words were uttered, the goods are surrendered; did he fire? - A. Yes, I have every reason to believe that he fired, but whether there was any thing in the gun I do not know.

Q. Did you see him fire? - A. Yes, I did see him fire.

Mr. Solicitor General. Q. You saw him present the gun? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard the firing? - A. Yes, I heard firing.

Q. Was it when you saw him present the gun, that you heard firing? - A. Yes, just at that time, there was a huzzaing and throwing of stones; I could not see both parties; immediately as soon as one party fired, the other party fired.

Q. You saw him afterwards with a gun, after the time of firing? - A. Yes.

Q. How many guns did you see? - A.Three, in the whole, that were in the men's hands, and one placed against the wall, close by a man of the name of William Pendar.

Q. You did not see what use was made of this gun? - A. It was placed to him; he said, therein is, I'll have nothing to do with it; it seemed to

me that he went to his own home; I do not know what became of the gun.

Court. Q. You have said that he had a gun in his hand, and he went back and fetched a pike; when he returned had he both the gun and the pike in his hand at one time? - A. I cannot clearly say that he had.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me bring the pike? - A. Yes, you brought the pike, and you offered it to Richard Oates , and if he was here he would answer the same.

Mr. Fielding. Q.(To Mr. Parry.) What were these goods? - A. Rum, brandy, geneva, and tobacco.

Q. What size where the casks? - A. Seven gallons.

Jury. Q.(To Ann George .) Where you and your brother-in-law upon good terms before this? - A. Yes, I never had an angry word from him in my life, nor any of his family.

Prisoner's defence. I heard Richard Oates say, in William Pendar 's house, that they had sent of 100 kegs on horses, and as soon as they came back again, they would attempt to take the goods; they came back and tapped a keg of brandy, and told the men to drink; they then began directly; a great number of men came along with these horses, and they would not do any thing till such time as these men did come; several persons came with them, some eight or ten miles, but I do not rightly know where; they came from all parts, intending to carry the goods off; as soon as ever they came they began directly; they gave three cheers; they heaved stones; I saw Francis Gardell and Robert Nicols go by the end of a house, with a musquet a piece in their hands; Nancy George was not where I was, at the time that she says she saw me with a gun.

Court. Q. Mrs. George, where were you when you saw him with a gun; in what situation was he placed? - A. He was standing near the end of William Pendar 's house.

Prisoner. Q. I would wish to ask whether the men received any damage from me.

Q.(To Thomas Pile .) Did you receive the damage from William Pendar 's house, or from among the boats? - A. From among the boats.

Q.(To John Pile .) Did you receive a shot from William Pendar 's house or among the boats? - A. I received a single shot from the end of the house, but who fired the musquet I cannot say; it struck me, but it did not go into my flesh.

Q.(To Joseph George .) When you went up to my house along with me, did you hear me say any thing about taking those goods away? - A. Not to my knowledge I did not.

Q. Did you see me when I went down there at night, or hear me say any thing concerning it when I went down to Mr. Parry? - A. I did not hear any person speak about it then, I heard about it when I was with Christopher Pollard ; there might then be about twenty or thirty men there; I went down and told Mr. Parry.

Q. Do you suppose that any thing of the like would have happened, if the - men had not come? - A. I cannot say any thing of that.

Mr. Solicitor General. Q. That is the adjoining parish? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , Death , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-39

258. JAMES REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , one gallon of raw corn spirits, value 12 s. the property of John Anderson and William Spears .

And Three other Counts, the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Jackson, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS WARRENER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Excise inspectors of the port of London? - A. I am.

Q. Were you at Hawley's wharf on the 19th of April? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at that time stationed at Hawley's wharf? - A. He was.

Q. Did you proceed in the course of your duty to examine him? - A. Yes, about half-past six in the morning, I went to him and rubbed him down; I perceived him shoving something on one side from the middle of his great coat; I perceived it was two bladders.

Q. What did the bladders contain? - A. One gallon and one pint of Scotch raw spirits.

Q. What is it worth a gallon? - A. Ten or twelve shillings; there were twenty-three casks of Scotch raw spirits there, in hogsheads and puncheons; I took him to the Excise watch-officer at St. Dunstan's hill, and after I had him and the great coat up, I heard something drop; I picked it up, and found it was a large rusty gimblet; I searched him, and found four spiles that had been used and two that had not been used, and two corks; he downed upon his knees and begged for mercy; he owned he was guilty.

Q. What was he? - A. An Excise watchman .

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-40

259. THOMAS GARLAND was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Peak , on the 11th of March , about the hour of eight at night, with intent the goods and chattels therein to steal .

THOMAS PEAK sworn. - On the 11th of March, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise, apparently in the

one pair of stairs room, which Mrs. Grace rents of me.

Q. Have you any particular reason to know that that was the precise time? - A. I know that was the time, I looked at the clock; I went up to the landing-place, and I found the door was broke open; I did not like to go any farther; I put my finger to the door, and it came open; then a man sprang from the landing-place of the two pair of stairs, and asked me if that was Mrs. Grace's; I charged him with breaking the door open, and sent for a constable and he was searched; we found nothing on him but a direction from Mrs. Inch; he said he had come from Mrs. Inch, and that was the direction from Mrs. Inch, who had been nurse to Mrs. Grace three weeks before; the prisoner said that Mrs. Inch had sent him there to call on Mrs. Grace, to make up a quarrel that had been that day between Mrs. Grace and Mrs. Inch; the padlock was found the next morning in the neighbourhood.

Q. Where was Mrs. Grace? - A. She was gone out that night.

Q. How did he come into the house? - A. My door is always open till nine o'clock, my wife being in the milk business.

Q. You do not know of the door being shut? - A. She told me so, and gave me charge; the next morning an iron crow was brought to me found on the two pair of stairs.

Q. Did you look at the clock in order to know whether it was the time of night to get the reward? - A. Far be it from me; my wife desired me to look at the clock, because I might be brought to a farther account.

- GRACE sworn. - On the 11th of March I was obliged to go between six and seven o'clock to Mrs. Gray, that I wash for; I had not been there long before I received information that my room had been broke open; when I came to the lodgings I found the prisoner in the room.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No; I know Mrs. Inch; she was sister to my husband; she was with me in the afternoon; he came with the direction; he communicated to me Mrs. Inch wished to make it up; we had quarrelled a little.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have never seen Mrs. Inch since? - A. No.

Q. You never went to enquire about Mrs. Inch? - A. No, I think she is too wicked a woman for that young man to have any connection with.

Q. What wickedness do you know of her? - A. She was very good before my husband died; after that she behaved very uncivil and cross.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds as well as the last witness? - A. I do not know the meaning of it.

WILLIAM WATSON sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for the 11th of March a little after eight o'clock; I searched the prisoner and found nothing on him; I took him to Marlborough-street, and the landlord brought these things which I produce; an iron crow, a padlock, and a staple.

Mr. Alley. Q.At the time you searched him, if he had any of these things about him you must have found them? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to see a relation of mine at Paddington; Mrs. Inch desired me to call on her sister-in-law; she told me she had had some words with her, to know if she would make it up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-41

260. CATHERINE M'MILLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , in the 44th year of his Majesty's reign, a bed, value 4 l. two pillows, value 5 s. two sheets, value 5 s. two blankets, value 6 s. a rug, value 6 s. a saucepan, value 1 s. a frying-pan, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Cox , in a lodging-room let by contract to the prisoner, to be used in and with the lodging .

There being no evidence against the prisoner she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-42

261. ROBERT MANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a shirt, value 9 s. a neckcloth, value 3 s. and ten bottles, filled with wine, value 40 s. the property of Francis-Molyneux Ommaney .

FRANCIS-MOLYNEUX OMMANEY sworn. - I live in Cecil-street ; the prisoner lived as footman with me three months: On the 3d of April, I searched the prisoner's room, and found a neck handkerchief, and ten bottles of wine; I remarked to him, you are going to live well; he said, look farther, and you will see more; I looked, and found a dirty shirt; I asked him where he got the wine; he said, from your cellar, sometimes when you are in it, at other times when the men were putting away bottles of wine; I searched again on the next day, and found a dirty shirt; they were marked with permanent ink, and he put his initials on it with common ink; I found a quantity of linen, which I imagine he had bought with the notes he had stolen from me; I had lost eighty pounds in notes.

JANE RICHARDS sworn. - My master called me that night, and shewed me that wine in his room.

MARY KNIGHT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Ommaney; I saw this wine in the young man's apartment.

Prisoner's defence. He says that I took the wine at different times; I did not.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-43

262. JOSEPH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , eight glass decanters, value 10 l. the property of George Hitter .

GEORGE HITTER sworn. - I live in Dean's-court, St. Martin's , I am a glass-cutter : On the 9th of March, before the prisoner quitted my service, the decanters were taken; I missed the articles out of a glass case in the parlour on the 12th.

Q. You do not know that they all went at one time, you have no circumstance to prove that-what are they worth? - A. Ten pounds.

- MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in the Minories; I produce eight decanters pledged by the prisoner, I am sure he is the person. (The decanters identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. These decanters I bought of a young man; I finished cutting them, and when I had finished them all, I pledged them to get some money, not being able to get a person to buy them.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-44

263. MARY DUGAN and LOUISA BURGOINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a silver watch, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and a steel chain, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Bartholomew .

THOMAS BARTHOLOMEW sworn. - I am a lighterman : On the 13th of April, I went from Shadwell to Blackfriars to see some friends, and I drank a little drop of liquor too much; about a quarter after eight o'clock I parted with them, and went towards Shadwell, and coming near Wellclose-square these two women picked me up; they took me into a house in North-east-passage, Wellclose-square .

Q. Were both the women in the room? - A. At that time they were both in the room; afterwards I missed Dugan out of the room; then I had some suspicion that I had missed my watch; I then said to Louisa Burgoine , I have lost my watch; I told her I would not depart from the place, nor she should not, till I had my watch; while I was talking to her, another woman, and a black fellow about six feet high, came in, and demanded me out of the room, they turned me out. As soon as I got out of the house, I called for assistance; a man jumped out of his house, and asked me what was the matter; I told him I was robbed of my watch; he called the watchman, and we went in search of the prisoners; we found Dugan at the next door; I saw Burgoine on Monday morning, and Dugan, at the Office.

Q.Did you ever see your watch again? - A. Yes, on Monday morning, in the possession of Mr. Matthews, a pawnbroker.

Q. Were you sober enough to be sure of the persons of these two women? - A. Yes, I am very positive to these two women, and I am sure I had my watch when I went into this house.

Prisoner Dugan. This man met me, and I asked him for some money; he gave me the watch instead of money, and told me to make money of it.

Court. Q. The question is, whether you gave her the watch instead of money? - A. You may depend upon it I did not; I had a seven-shilling piece, some silver, and a dollar.

JOHN KILLINGSWORTH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Matthews, a pawnbroker, in the Minories: On the 13th of April, in the evening, Louisa Burgoine pledged this watch for thirty-five shillings, to the best of my knowledge, in the name of Anthony Polycock ; I produce the watch.

THOMAS CUDWORTH sworn. - I am a headborough: On Sunday morning, the 14th of April, I saw both the prisoners at the watch-house; Burgoine and Dugan had some words; one accused the other of having the duplicate; I insisted upon having the duplicate, and Dugan gave it to me; I went on Monday to the pawnbroker's with the prosecutor, and there we found the watch. (The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

Dugan's defence. This man came up to me in Wellclose-square, and asked me where I lived, and I told him; he asked whether he could come home with me, and I told him he might if he liked; when he came in, Louisa Burgoine was in the room; he asked me who that was, and I told him it was an acquaintance; he said he had no money, but he would give us his watch to make money on till he returned; I took the watch, and by the time I came back he was gone; I pawned the watch for thirty-five shillings, and gave up the ticket.

Burgoine's defence. I was in the room when Mary Dugan came in with this gentleman, and I walked out; Mary Dugan called me back, and I went in again; my dear, said he, I want you, I will make you a handsome compliment; after that we asked him for the money; he searched his pockets, and not finding any, he handed the watch to Mary Dugan , and said, go and make money on that till I release it; Mary Dugan went, and I staid in the room with him some time; he then said he had lost his watch; I asked him if he had not given the watch to Mary Dugan to pawn; I saw him give it into her hands; the gentleman said

I must go down stairs, and find Mary Dugan ; Mary Dugan came back with the watch in her hands; she told me she could not get into the shop, it was so full; we went together to Mr. Matthews's, in the Minories, and pledged it for thirty-five shillings; we were going home to go to-bed, about three o'clock in the morning; the watchman said that we had stole the watch, and we were taken to the watch-house.

Dugan, GUILTY , aged 40,

Burgoine, GUILTY , aged 39,

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-45

264. WILLIAM RYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , in the 44th year of his present Majesty's reign, one trunk, value 5 s. eighty rings, value 2 l. one hundred gold pins, value 20 l. four gold neck chains, value 4 l. forty broaches, value 5 l. two hundred pair of gold ear-rings, value 20 l. ninety seals, value 3 l. eighty pair of spectacles, value 3 l. twenty-four silk purses, value 24 l. two hundred spoons, value 10 l. ninety seals, value 3 l. forty-eight watch chains, value 20 s. sixty watch-keys, value 5 s. five knives, value 20 s. and five forks, value 20 s. the property of John Aldridge ; four Bank-notes, value 40 l. twenty Bank-notes, value 40 l. sixty Bank-notes, value 60 l. sixty promissory notes of ten guineas each, ten promissory notes for the payment of ten pounds each, thirty promissory notes of 5 l. 5 s. each, one bill of exchange, value 30 l. one bill of exchange, value 15 l. and one bill of exchange, value 12 l. 6 s. the said Bank-notes, bills of exchange, and promissory notes, being then due and unsatisfied to the said John Aldridge .

Second Count, For stealing the trunk only, the property of the said John Aldridge .

There being no evidence against the prisoner for the robbery, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-46

265. ANN HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , a Bible, value 1 l. a gold ring, value 12 s. a bed-quilt, value 4 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. a velvet cap, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d two blankets, value 4 s. two aprons, value 9 d. two gowns, value 2 s. one handkerchief, value 4 d. four frocks, value 2 s. four shirts, value 6 s. and six caps, value 2 s. the goods of Elizabeth King , widow .

ELIZABETH KING sworn. - I am a widow-woman, I go out washing and charing ; the prisoner was a servant out of place when she lodged with me, she laid in the same room with me; I missed my key while I was out at work; I asked her about it, and she said that she knew nothing at all about it; the first thing that I missed was my Bible and my ring.

Q. What kind of a Bible is it? - A. It is written by the Rev. Dr. Wright; I found my ring, and five other articles; I found my Bible pawned in her own name, at Mr. Curtis's, for twelve shillings.

Q. You have not found all the articles? - A. No.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Spinkes, No. 2, Gracechurch-street; I produce five articles, exclusive of the Bible and ring, pawned by the prisoner at the bar.

THOMAS- FRANCIS BAILEY sworn. - I am a constable of Bishopsgate; the prosecutrix came to me, and informed me that she had been robbed; she said the prisoner lived at Cole's coffee-house, Ball-alley, Cornhill, she was a servant there; I took her into custody; I went to the pawnbroker's, and he produced the Bible and the ring; he said he would have nothing to do with the prosecution; I produce the Bible and the ring. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I lodged along with Mrs. King a month the first time; I went away from her into place, and was there about a fortnight; I came away from that place, and went to Mrs. King's again; she said a great many times she would have this chest opened; I never saw the key but once; she had several people in the house besides me. After I was gone to the coffee-house in Cornhill, she had it broke open, and she came to me, and said I had robbed her of these things; she knows that she sent me with them herself to pledge.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Did you ever send the woman to pawn these things? - A. Only a frock of my child's for one shilling.

Q. Did you ever send her with any of this property? - A. I never did; I never missed them till I got a whitesmith to open my chest, and the first thing I missed was my ring.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-47

266. MARY UNDERWOOD was indicted for that she, on the 3d of June, in the 39th year of his Majesty's reign, was married to John Underwood ; and that she afterwards, on the 28th of January , in the 45th year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously did take to be her husband one Henry Buckmaster , the said John Underwood being then alive .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-48

267. JAMES BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , twenty yards of oil-cloth, value 5 l. the property of Sarah Blackett .

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - I am servant to Sarah Blackett, a turner , in Aldgate : On Wednesday, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, I missed the piece of oil-cloth, it stood in the shop with four other pieces, and from information I ran out, and the prisoner was taken before I came up to him; the oil-cloth was on the ground; I took it up, and went to the watch-house with it, and the prisoner was brought in soon after.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. - On the 17th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the bar and another young man in company with him; they walked up to Mrs. Blackett's shop, and there they made a halt; they made two or three attempts to steal this said piece of oil-cloth in the course of a quarter of an hour, and the young man that was with him lifted it out of the shop, and set it on the cellar-flap; the prisoner at the bar then came and stooped down and put it on his shoulder, and crossed over the way, and I crossed over the way and met him; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said a man gave it to him to carry; I had him fast by the collar, and he threw the piece of oil-cloth on the ground; Mrs. Blackett's young man came and picked it up; I took him to the watch-house, and from thence to the Compter.

Prisoner's defence. I was passing along Aldgate, and there was a roll of oil-cloth lying under a shoemaker's window, on the pavement, and a man with it; he said, be so good as to carry it to Whitechapel, where the stages go off, and I will satisfy you for your trouble; and when I came where the stages go off, he came and apprehended me.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-49

268. ALEXANDER FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a coat, value 7 s. the property of John Hurndall and Hugh Lewis .

JOHN HURNDALL sworn. - I am a silk mercer , I live at No. 42, Holborn-hill : I was in the back part of the shop on the 1st of March, in the morning, and I saw a man take a child's coat from the door; it was hanging part in and part out of the door.

JAMES STIRLING sworn. - I am beadle of St. Andrew's, Holborn: On the 1st of March, a little before two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Ford in company with another man; he went up to the shop-door, and took the coat, and put it under his coat, and ran off with it up a court that leads into Fetter-lane; I went to meet him, and caught him just coming out of King's head-court, Fetter-lane; I asked him what he had got, and he said, nothing; I told him he had taken something from the shop of Mr. Hurndall; I took him into custody; I produce the coat. (The coat identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked it up in the street, it lay on the pavement; some people had passed it, and kicked it from where it was, when I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-50

269. JOHN RIGBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , five hundred yards of ribbon, value 4 l. twenty yards of silk cord, value 2 s. six handkerchiefs, value 1 l. six yards of sarcenet, value 6 s. one cap, value 2 s. and one box, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Wilson and William Waterhouse .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.)

JOHN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am porter to Messrs. Wilson and Waterhouse, they keep the Swan and Two Necks Inn, in Lad-lane : On the 24th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner coming out of the office-door with a box, and a parcel; the parcel fell down on the ground; I stopped him, and took the box from him; I gave the box to Edward Lee ; I had had the same box in my hand about ten minutes before, when the things were taken from the Mail.

EDWARD LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. I am book-keeper to Messrs. Wilson and Water-house.

Q. Do you know this box? - A. I saw it in John Clark 's hand; he called me two or three times before I went to him.

JOSEPH KIRBY sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the box. (The box identified by John Clark .)

Prisoner's defence. I went in about half past eight o'clock, I was never in the office before, and facing the door going in, there is a vacancy of about two yards; I saw two men go in, and I went in; the parcels were lying by the door, I fell over them; I took this box up, I did no more, and gave it to him directly.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-51

270. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , a cloak, value 10 s. the property of John Peters .

FRANCES PETERS sworn. - I live at No. 2, Fountain-court, Old Bethlem ; I am the wife of John Peters : On the 19th of April, about half past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I saw the prisoner come in at the gate, and I asked him who he wanted; he made me no answer; he was looking

at the names on the doors of persons who have accompting-houses there; he went up stairs, and made me no answer. Not hearing him knock, I stood and listened, and heard him coming down the garret stairs, (I live in the kitchen, and sleep in the garret), I ran up stairs, and met him; I went into the garret, and missed my cloak; I called out immediately to the gentlemen to stop him; I said, he has got my cloak; they stopped him, and took the cloak from his bosom.

Q. Did you know any thing of him before? - A. No.

- SURMUDO sworn. - I heard Mrs. Peters call out, stop him, he has got my cloak; I immediately jumped from my desk, and asked the prisoner what he wanted, I saw that he had a bundle; he turned round, and was walking down stairs; I laid hold of him, and pulled out the cloak from his breast.

(The cloak produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, with permission I will make bold to speak, to acquaint your Lordship that an old ship mate of mine told me there was a merchant lived there, who wanted a cook to go out with him; I will tell you my Lord, that I went into the gateway, there was a woman coming out, and I saw that bundle lay on one side of the door; accordingly I picked it up, but never opened it; I went up stairs, and came down again; I do not know whether that is the woman, or not, but a woman halloaed out, they have got it; I picked it up at the door. I am a seaman bred and born; I have been in his Majesty's navy fifty-four years, and have received several wounds in his Majesty's navy; in the wars I have stood in my blood, and lost my flesh, and lost the use of my arms; I have failed round the globe, and have been in every action at sea almost for fifty-five years; I could not go before the mast now, but I would endeavour to go as cook, as old as I am; I was seventy-seven years of age last Christmas-day; I am not able now to hand a top-sail, or reef a top-mast, but I could cook for all hands; I have spilt my blood against all usurpers and tyrants, like Buonaparte; I was at the Nile with Admiral Nelson, when he took, sunk, and destroyed the French; I call God to witness that is the way I came by it; I found it at the door.

Q.(To Mrs. Peters.) Was your cloak down stairs at all? - A. No, it was up in the three pair of stairs room; I found the drawer open when I went up stairs.

GUILTY , aged 77.

Fined 1 s. and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-52

271. JOHN JOHNSON , alias JOHN ROBINSON JOHNSON was indicted for that he, on the 22d of December , being a servant employed by Joseph-Dalton Dewick , printer , as a compositor , and being employed by him as such servant, did, by virtue of such employment, receive into, and have in his possession, one hundred and forty pounds weight of printing type, value 20 l. one hundred and forty pounds weight of printer's metal, value 20 l. one hundred and forty pounds weight of letters formed for printing, value 20 l. one hundred and forty pounds weight of types formed for printing, value 20 l. and one hundred and forty pounds weight of old metal, value 20 l. the goods of the said Joseph-Dalton Dewick , that he afterwards, on the same day, fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and make away with the same . And

Two other Counts, For the like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH-DALTON DEWICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a printer, living in Aldersgate-street ; the prisoner was a person employed by you in the capacity of a compositor? - A. Yes, he has been with me about five years.

Q. During the last fifteen months had you suffered any loss in your property? - A. Within these two years I have to the amount of three or four hundred pounds, but we never could find out the person that took them; they were printing-types that I lost.

Q. In consequence of information that you received from Benjamin Clark , your foreman, was Mrs. Thompson desired to come to your house, and when? - A. Yes; in consequence of this information, I went to Mr. Thompson on Easter-Sunday; there I saw a quantity of printing type letters to the amount of one hundred and forty pounds, that was the property that belonged to me, which I could swear to.

Q. Mr. Thompson shewed it you willingly and readily? - A. Most certainly; I then requested Mrs. or Mr. Thompson to call upon me the next morning, to identify the person of the prisoner; Mrs. Thompson called on me the next morning about ten o'clock; I called the prisoner down stairs, and immediately upon his seeing Mrs. Thompson, he scarcely replied to my question; he equivocated very much, and turned his back immediately to Mrs. Thompson, and went away up stairs; I called him down the second time, and asked her whether that was the person that sold the letters to her husband (the prisoner was present in the room) under the name of John Robinson ; Mrs. Thompson replied he was the person, and she would swear to it; I said, Johnson, you are conscious of having robbed me to a considerable amount, have you any recollection of having sold metal at this lady's house; he acknowledged the circumstance, and said he knew he had, but it was not my property; I then gave him in charge

of the constable, who took him before the Sitting Alderman.

Q. Was there any receipt produced before the Sitting Alderman? - A. There was a receipt produced before the Sitting Alderman by Mr. Thompson; a receipt of the said John Robinson ; there are a variety of circumstances attending it; I can swear to the property.

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a letter-founder: I live at No. 62, Grubb-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him at my house twice; on the 8th and 22d of December last.

Q. What did he come to your house for? - A. To sell some old metal as he stiled it; I asked him by what means he came by it; he replied, it was the property of one Mr. Simpson, now deceased, and he sold it on account of his widow; I asked him by what means he came to me, seeing I was not much known among printers; he replied that Mr. Clark recommended him; I asked him if it was Benjamin Clark , the overseer at Mr. Dewick's; he replied, yes; I told him, under those circumstances I would buy it, and as he sold it on account of a widow, I would give him nearly the price in money which we usually take it for in exchange; I gave him threepence halfpenny a pound; I purchased one hundred and forty pounds for seven pounds.

Q. After you had bought this property did Mr. Dewick call at your house? - A. Yes, in consequence of the suspicions that he had when Mr. Clark told him that he had not recommended any person to me, which was in consequence of my thanking Mr. Clark for sending a person to me, which he said he had not.

Q. Is there any thing in those receipts which you have in your hand, that is important with respect to the prisoner's signature? - A. When Mr. Dewick came to examine one of them, he observed that he had begun to write the name that he goes by there, but here he signed his name John Robinson .

BENJAMIN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are overseer to Mr. Dewick, of course you know the prisoner's name? - A. I always understood his name was Johnson; I did not know that he assumed any other.

Q. Did you ever recommend the prisoner to sell any property to Mr. Thompson? - A. Never. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I carried these articles to the house of Mr. Thompson, for the behalf of the widow of one Simpson. This Simpson had the same access to this property as I had, provided it is Mr. Dewick's property; he was employed by Mr. Dewick to melt a quantity of old metal, and to cast them into types of different descriptions; Mr. Dewick has delivered a vast quantity to him at various times; there are a great many of these that are used in printing-offices in town; there is no private mark can be on them; how can Mr. Dewick swear that it is his property.

Court. Q. Where is the widow? - A. She is gone home to her native country; she is a native of North Britain.

Dewick. A man of the name of Simpson worked in my house for two or three days; I never sold him a single letter or metal of any description; that is two years ago; here are letters in this box that have been cast for me since the death of Simpson; he died in May, 1804; this property was sold in December, 1804. He never occupied any thing but a garret; it was not likely he should have this property.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-53

272. DAVID GREVILLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a purse, value 6 d. two half-guineas, and a seven-shilling piece , the property of Thomas Reddington .

THOMAS REDDINGTON sworn. - On Sunday, the 17th of March, near one o'clock at noon, I had been to St. Patrick's chapel, at St. Pancras , and just as I was coming out of the chapel, a young lad told me that my pocket was picked, and here, says he, is the man that picked it.

Q. What did you lose? - A. Two half-guineas and a seven-shilling piece; Major Bird , my acquaintance, being with me; he was younger and stronger and more athletic than me; the boy shewed him the man; he took hold of him by the collar and seized him; a woman cried out, whoever has lost a purse, I have it; she gave me the purse, and I knew it to be my purse.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were a great concourse of people? - A. There were.

Q. It was impossible for you to tell who might have taken your purse or who might not? - A. I did not perceive it.

Q. The woman that had got the purse is not here? - A. No.

- VAUGHAN sworn. - I live with my brother; he is a shoemaker at Charing-cross: On that day I was standing at the chapel door; I took notice of the transaction; the prisoner was walking quite close to Mr. Reddington; I did not see him exactly put his hand into his pocket, I saw him as he drew the purse out, and snatched it; I said to Mr. Reddington, you have got your pocket picked; I said, that is him; he was trying to make off. (The purse produced.)

Prosecutor. I really believe it is my purse.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-54

273. HENRY SKOOLER was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 14th of March , a Bank note, for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count. For uttering as true a forged Bank note with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. A promissory note of one pound, with the like intention. And

Four other Counts. With the like offence, to defraud Joseph Scott .

Again indicted for that he, on the 14th of March, feloniously, knowingly, and wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in his possession and custody one other forged Bank note, for the payment of 1 l. he knowing it at the time to be forged .

The prisoner having pleaded GUILTY of having in his possession a forged one pound note , Mr. Garrow, Counsel for the prosecution, declined to offer any evidence on the first indictment, the prisoner was therefore acquited from the capital charge .

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-55

274. MARGARET MANNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , nine pounds weight of bacon, value 7 s. the property of Joseph Butler , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM WHITBREAD sworn. - I am superintendant of Mr. Butler's shop; he is a cheese-monger , near Wellclose-square : On the 9th of March, between eight and nine in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar standing at the block in our shop, where the bacon laid on; I turned my eyes to a customer one moment, and she had turned her back towards me, and was proceeding towards the door; I called her back repeatedly, saying to her, young woman, what do you want; she gave me no answer, but went towards the door; after she got from the threshold of the door, she turned round sideways, stooping and putting something down; I could not see positively what it was, but it appeared to me like bacon; she came back and said she only wanted a quartern of cheese; I immediately ran round the counter, to the step of the door, where she stooped, and there I found the piece of bacon.

Q. When you brought her back, what did she say? - A. She said she never did a wrong thing in her life before; I am not quite sure whether she used the word before. I sent for the headborough.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Between eight and nine is a very busy time? - A. Yes. we had a number of customers in the shop.

Q. How far might your position be from the shop door? - A. Three yards and a half.

Q. Persons standing at the door, you could not see when they were stooping, at that distance, what they were doing; you were busy; it might be an act of picking up, instead of putting something down; had you any steps? - A. Two steps to go down.

Q. Therefore of course from the descent you could not see the level of the street? - A. No.

THOMAS COLE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Butler: I saw her as though she was putting something down, when she was going out of the shop.

Q. Did you see her take it? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent indeed; as I went into the shop I saw a woman coming out; the shop was full of people; there were as many as eight or ten people, and they said I was not the woman; there were hundreds of people round the watch-house, crying out, shame on him, and said they would come if they were wanted.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-56

275. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Lane , about the hour of eight at night, and burglariously stealing therein, three calf-skins, value 20 s. the property of Edward Lane .

EDWARD LANE sworn. - At six o'clock in the evening, on the 3d of March , I went to a place of worship. and before the worship was ended, there came a woman to me and informed me that my shop was broke open, and when I came home there were about two hundred people about the door. The prisoner was secured in the passage.

JOHN BAD sworn. - On Sunday evening the 3d of March, about eight o'clock, I was passing the house of Mr. Lane, with an apprentice of mine, I observed the shutter down and the sash up on the ground floor; I saw two men standing about ten yards from the spot, and in a minute the tall man ran down the street, and the short one got into the window.

Q. How near were you to the person? - A. About twice the length of my stick; seeing him go in, I shut the window down immediately; the man in the inside shoved the window up and got out; in getting out his head hit against the shutter and knocked it down, and it fell betwixt him and me; I was not able to hold him, and he got off and run away; I called out, stop thief; a man standing opposite pursued after him and took him.

Q. Did you see him with any thing when he

came out of the room? - A. No, he had not been in long enough; he had no goods with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18050424-57

276. WILLIAM WESTWOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Tillett , on the 7th of April , about the hour of nine at night, and burglariously stealing therein a tea-chest, value 2 s. a bank-note, value 5 l. a bank-note, value 2 l. and six bank-notes, value 6 l. the property of George Tillett .

GEORGE TILLETT sworn. - I am a publican : I keep the White Lion, in White Lion-street, Whitechapel .

Q. Do you know the prisoner; did he lodge at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had he lodged there? - A. About ten days.

Q. When did this happen? - A. Sunday, the seventh of April.

Q. What was his way of life? - A. He came to town to learn the art of shoemaking .

Q. On Sunday, the seventh of April, had you fastened your bed-room door? - A. Yes, I was the last person that was in it; we have our candles in a large box, in that same room.

Q. You did not go to bed then? - A. No it was before bed time.

Q. What time did you fasten the door? - A. Between the hours of seven and eight, then I fastened the door; I had a candle in my hand.

Q. It was hardly dark then? - A. It was very near; I had a candle in my hand; that was not the door that was broke open, there were two doors that went into the room; that one was nailed up which was broke open.

Q. It was not the door by which you usually go into the room that was broke open? - A. No.

Q. When had you seen that door that was nailed up, so as to see that it was safe? - A. When I went up stairs to fetch the candles, I shut the door and locked it, and I saw after that all was safe myself.

Q. Was the prisoner in his lodgings at that time? - A. He was in the tap-room at that time.

Q. When did you find the bed-room door open? - A. About eight o'clock, or some time after, the prisoner asked me for a candle to go to bed, and went up stairs; between that and nine he came down again, and brought the candle down in his hand, and said to a lodger of mine he would go and see Mr. Staggs, meaning the man who was learning him to make shoes; he went out and stopped till between ten and eleven; he returned with Staggs and another man, and had two shillings worth of gin and water; then Staggs said he would go home and go to bed, and get up early in the morning; he had some work to finish to go home to shop; the prisoner said he would take a walk with him; I persuaded him not to go out any more that night, if he did, he would be locked out; Staggs said he thought he had better go to bed; with that I reached a candle off the table and the prisoner and I went up stairs together; Staggs went away, and the other man; I and the prisoner went up to bed; I staid in his room till he went to bed; when he had nearly undressed himself, he unlocked his box, he shoved down a canvass bag, with a quantity of penny-pieces and new halfpence, which gave me suspicion that he had done something that he ought not to have done; going down stairs I saw my room door broke open that was nailed up; I went down to the bar, and got the key of the door, by which we used to go into the room; and when I went in I missed my tea-chest off the table.

Q. Where was the tea-chest placed there? - A. On the table in the bed-room; I went down stairs on missing it, and asked Mrs. Tillett if she had moved it; she said, no; I then went into the adjoining room, and there I saw most part of the tea-chest, it was broke open; I found some in one place and some in the other.

Q. What was the lid broken off? - A. Yes, it was broken into pieces very much; I went into the adjoining room up two pair of stairs, adjoining to where he slept, and there I found the prisoner's knife and one part of the tea-chest, and a small old chopper

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner's knife? - A. I really believe it to be so, for I saw that one, or one like that, in his possession, on Sunday morning; I then went down stairs, and said to Mrs. Tillett, I will go to Lambeth-street, and fetch an officer; she said, pray do not go out now, you had better stop, and let the watchman go; I called the watchman in, and asked him if he could take the man up; he said he could, as well as any officer in England, and I gave the prisoner in charge of the watchman; when he got up, I said to him, what do you do with that nightcap; he pulled it off, and threw it between the head of his bed and his box; we took him to the watch-house and searched him, and nothing was found upon him.

Q. You returned and came back with the watchman to the room; how long were you absent from the room? - A. I look upon it about half an hour; we searched the box first, and found eleven shillings and nine pence in penny-pieces and new halfpence, in a canvass bag; then I picked up the night-cap, and in the night-cap we found a 5 l. note, a 2 l. note, and six 1 l. notes.

Q. Did you know either of these notes? - A. Two of them, the five and one of the ones, by the names that were on them.

Q. Do you know how many notes there were in this tea-chest? - A. I cannot take upon me to say how many there were.

Q. Who had the care of this tea-chest; who put them in? - A. Sometimes I put them in, and sometimes Mrs. Tillett, just as it happened.

Q. Had the prisoner ever any opportunity of seeing you open that tea-chest and take a note out? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing when you took him? - A. Yes, he asked me what was the matter, and where he was going; I said you will not go far; he said, if I am to stay out all night, I'll put my gaiters on. On the Monday morning the prisoner sent to me at the watch-house; I had not an opportunity of going to the watch-house; I went to the office in Lambeth-street, and saw him in the lock-up room; he there begged of me very much to send him to sea; said that it was the first offence that ever he had committed, and he hoped I would forgive him; I told him that I had given him up into the hands of justice, and I could not think of doing any such a thing. I then asked him what he had done with the remaining part of the notes in the chest; he said, how many have you got; I said, I have only got thirteen pounds; he said, if I was to die, there were no more than fourteen pounds at the time I broke it open, and one I changed at Mr. Miller's; I asked him what notes there were in the chest; he told me there was a five, a two, and seven ones.

Prisoner. Q. You know I went up stairs with one of the lodgers; you have said I went up to bed? - A. You were gone near an hour.

Q. I went up stairs to light Mr. Maynard to bed, he being drunk; I was not above a quarter of an hour up; the night-cap was not mine? - A. I can take an oath that it was on your head.

Q. You have taken an oath of it, therefore I cannot help myself.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL sworn. - Q. You are a watchman, you took charge of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. You were with Mr. Tillett when he searched the night-cap? - A. I was.

Q. What was found there? - A. Six one pound notes, a two pound, and a five pound note; I saw him pull off the night-cap, and throw it on the ground, and it laid on the same spot where he threw it, when Mr. Tillett took it up.

Prisoner. I deny the night-cap; it was not mine; it is very hard that I am to be accused of these things; there are other lodgers in the house

Jury. Q.(To Campbell.) Was this night-cap picked up before you went to the watch-house or after? - A. After.

Q. Then there was an interval of half an hour between? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I should be more satisfied about it if they had examined me before I went out of the room; the next day they said they found the notes in my night-cap; it was not my night-cap.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the police-officers belonging to Lambeth-street Office: On Monday morning, when the prisoner was brought there, he was put in the lock-up room, he said he wanted to speak to Mr. Tillett; I told Mr. Tillett, and he asked me if I would have the goodness to step in with him into the lock-up room, which I did; he begged very hard of Mr. Tillett to forgive him, saying it was the first thing that he ever did; Mr. Tillett said, no, he could not think of any such thing, for he should bring him before the Magistrate, and they might do as they thought proper; Mr. Tillett said, what have you done with the rest of the notes, I have lost more of the notes than I have got; he said, if I was to die for it, I had only fourteen pound in notes, one five, one two, and seven ones; and one of the ones I changed at Mr. Miller's.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Were there other lodgers in the house? - A. Yes, there was one lodger, who was asleep when I took the prisoner, and when I came back I awoke him.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-58

277. RICHARD GEGG was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Crosby , about the hour of twelve at night on the 31st of March, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, sixty dozen pair of gloves, value 40 l. and thirty pair of leather breeches, value 60 l. a coat, value 3 l. and five dozen braces, value 3 l. and forty skins, value 20 l. the property of Joseph Rolls and Thomas Clutterham .

Second Count, The same as the former, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of Joseph Rolls and Thomas Clutterham .

JOSEPH ROLLS sworn. - I am a breeches maker and glover .

Q. Have you any partner? - A. Yes, Thomas Clutterham : I live at No. 3, Pear-street, Manchester-square .

Q. Is the shop that you have there a part of your house? - A. No, Mr. Crosby is the landlord of the house, and he lets us a part of the shop; I sleep in the shop.

Q. How is your entrance into the shop? - A. By a door out into the street.

Q. Does Mr. Crosby or his family enter by the same door? - A. No, the shop is separate from Mr. Crosby's house; it was once one shop, now it is parted into two; there is no door out of our shop into any part of his house; On Sunday night, the 31st of March, about three in the afternoon, I

went out, and locked the door after me, and carried the key in my pocket.

Q. How is your shop-window? - A. There is one window in Pear-street, and another in Charles-street, Manchester-square, it is a corner shop; I did not return till about half past ten o'clock at night, and when I returned I took the key out of my pocket; I had that in one hand, and a candle and lantern in the other, and when I was stooping to put the key in the key-hole, I found the door a little open.

Q. Are you sure that you had left it locked? - A. Yes, and finding the door a little open, I directly looked behind, to see if there was any body there to knock me down; I did not see any body in the shop, the windows were all safe; afterwards I put the key into the key-hole, and the key went very free; I thought it had been done with a pick-lock key.

Q. Did you miss any thing at that time? - A. I looked round, and saw there was above an hundred and fifty pounds worth of goods gone.

Q. What sort of goods? - A. Three shelves of gloves intirely stripped, and all the gloves in the window were gone, excepting some coarse tanned leather; they had taken all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Are you sure you had these articles in your shop when you left it? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you inhabited this shop? - A. Six years, on the 1st of September last.

Q. And slept in it all that time? - A. No, I have been ill part of the time; then my partner slept in it.

Q. Did you, after this, see any part of the property that you so lost, and when? - A. On Saturday last, at Messrs. Chrees and Lord's, wholesale glovers, in Newgate-street; I saw there fifteen doe-skins, and the butts of two doe-skins; that is all I have seen of any of the property that I have lost; we lost about forty buck and doe-skins together.

Q. Had you any means of knowing that the articles which you saw at Messrs. Chrees and Lord's, were your property? - A. Yes; one of the skins I had wrote upon, and two skins my partner had wrote upon.

- CHREES sworn. - I live at No. 133, Newgate-street, I am in partnership with John Lord ; I have known the prisoner several weeks, he was a porter to Mr. Row, a linen-draper, in Queen-street: On the 19th of this month he came to inquire of me if it was in my way to purchase buckskins, and I told him it was not in my way; I then asked him if he had any to sell; he said, no, but he knew a person that had; I asked him if he could procure me a sample of these buck-skins; he said he could, and he did; he went and fetched a sample in about ten or fifteen minutes; he brought one skin, and I felt it, and it felt very stout, (witness being blind); I found it a very good skin; I then inquired what the person asked for them, and how many there were; he said, there were seventeen, and the person asked six shillings a skin; I then asked him, if I purchased them, how much he should expect for his trouble, and he told me, a shilling a skin; I then questioned him if he was certain they were come honestly by, and he said, he had no doubt of that, for he had them of a respectable man; he had not purchased them himself, for he did not know the value of them; I told him I had a friend in the leather trade, and if he would bring me the whole lot, I could very easily know what they were worth; he then went, and fetched the skins; he brought sixteen, besides the one that he had brought; I felt them, and found there were more skins, I did not count them; I had been out for about an hour; I did not see him bring them; my people informed me.

Q. What did you do with those skins that you understood he had left? - A. I then sent to the house of Messrs. Croft and Newman, leather-sellers, in Bartholomew-close.

Q. Were the skins brought back again? - A. They were, in less, I dare say, than a quarter of an hour, I felt them when they were brought back; Mr. Croft said he would call in ten minutes.

Q. Did he call in the prisoner's absence? - A. The prisoner called in the afternoon, after Mr. Croft was gone; I then told him that I had sent the skins to the house of Croft and Newman, and that Mr. Croft had said the property was stolen; he replied, he was very sorry for it, he was sure that he came honestly by it, and that he had the skins of a respectable man, and a house-keeper in the neighbourhood, the master of the Swan public-house, in Skinner-street, and his name was Couling; he said he would go out, and fetch him to me. He then went out, as I expected, to fetch Mr. Couling, this was about three o'clock in the afternoon; he returned again, and told me that he could not meet with him; he left word, as I understood, that he would come again the next morning, and about twelve o'clock he came; I was in my accompting-house; I had understood that the house of Rolls and Clutterham had been robbed, and I had a letter written to them, to inform them that some skins were at my house, and requesting their attendance to identify them; Mr. Rolls came the next morning, and I inquired of him if he had lost any buck-skins, and if he had any marks by which he could identify these skins, if he saw them, and he described the marks.

Q. Was the prisoner there when Mr. Rolls came? - A. Mr. Rolls came first, and looked at the skins, and said he would swear to some of them; by this time Mr. Croft came, and then the

prisoner came; Mr. Rolls sent for a constable, and took him into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. After you told the prisoner the goods were stolen, he came to you several times? - A. Yes; there was a hand-bill left at my house, saying that the shop had been broke open

Q. It was publicly, and in open day, when he brought these skins to you, when several of your servants were in your house? - A. I believe it was about ten o'clock in the day.

Q. I ask you whether he was not consistent in every part of the story he told you, in the course of this transaction he had with you? - A. Yes.

- CROFT sworn. - On the 19th of April, I had fifteen skins sent to me - bucks and does, and two butts from Mr. Chrees, to be examined; I suppose there were ten of them that I would give fifteen shillings a skin for; there were several private marks on them, that breeches-makers do not know themselves; there were two marked with the letter M on the neck; I have no doubt but some of the skins cost the breeches-maker twenty-two or twenty-three shillings a-piece; I tied them up, and told Mr. Chrees's young man that I would be there in ten minutes, and he took the skins.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Chrees? - A. I did, and I saw Mr. Chrees and his partner.

Q. Were you there when the prisoner came on the next morning? - A. I was there before he came, and Rolls was there before me; when the prisoner came, I took upon me to ask him some questions respecting the skins; I asked him how he came by them, and he told me that he had them from Couling, at the Swan public-house; I asked him if we should send for Mr. Couling; he left it for us to do as we pleased; Freeman, the constable, was there, and he said we had better take Gegg to the counter, and the skins were left at Mr. Chrees' house till the constable returned, and then the constable had the charge of them; Mr. Freeman went and told Couling what charge had been given against him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley Q. When you saw the prisoner, and asked him how he came by those skins, he told you he had them from Couling? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Couling taken into custody? - A. The constable and I went and told Couling, and Couling said he would come down.

Q. You did not take charge of him? - A. No.

Q. You would not let him go away? - A. I must say that I looked after him, I did not wish him to go away.

ROBERT COULING sworn. - I am a victualler; I keep the Swan in Skinner-street, late Snow-hill.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About five or six months.

Q. What has he been during the time you have known him? - A. A trafficker, a trader; I have seen him in my house as a porter, and with a parcel under his arm.

Q. Did he frequent your house then? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you to say respecting the present matter of the prisoner at the bar? - A. On Sunday, the 14th of April, the prisoner, in company with another man, whom I have seen with him in my house -

Q. Had you seen him with him before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the name of the other man? - A. No, I do not. About the hour of eleven o'clock they had a pint of ale, and after being in conversation about ten minutes, they came up to me together, I was at the bar, and the other man who is absent, said, landlord, I shall leave a parcel in a few days, which you will give to Gegg when he calls for it.

Q. Then you knew the name of the prisoner? - A. Yes, Gegg was with me at the time at the bar; I told him, very well, I would take care of it, and on Thursday morning following, the other man then in company brought the parcel.

Q. Was Gegg with him at that time? - A. No; he told me to take care of it, and give it to Gegg as soon as he called for it; I told him I would, and on the Friday morning, Gegg, the prisoner, called and asked if a parcel had been left for him; I told him, yes, and gave it to him.

Q. How was the parcel wrapped up? - A. In a green bag apparently.

Q. When it was in your possession, could you form any judgment what that bag contained? - A. It appeared to me to be leather.

Q. Where did you keep it till you delivered it to him? - A. In the two pair of stairs front room; I generally keep the small parcel below stairs, but this being a large one, I took it up stairs; I have generally fifteen or twenty parcels left at my house in a week, being near an inn.

Q. What time of the Friday morning was it when you delivered it to the prisoner? - A. About nine o'clock.

Q. After you delivered it to the prisoner, did you see any thing more of the prisoner in the course of that day? - A. No.

Q. The next day did you see any thing of him? - A. Yes, about the same time, I saw him the next day in my own tap-room; he asked me if that person was there that left the parcel for him; I told him, no, and that he would not be there; I saw no more of him till he was in custody.

Q. So that all you had to do with the parcel was to receive it from one man, and to keep it till the other man called for it? - A. Yes.

Q. And that was on Friday morning, and it appeared to you to be leather in a green bag? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have told my Lord you keep a public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you kept that public-house? - A. Fifteen months.

Q. I suppose you have a good many servants about the house? - A. I have.

Q. Are you a married man, or single? - A. Married.

Q. Your wife is generally in the bar, is she here to-day? - A. She is not.

Q. Which of your servants is here to-day? - A. Not any.

Q. What way of life have you been in before this? - A. A Custom-house porter, and in the employ of a merchant.

Q. Have you ever kept a shop? - A. Never.

Q. Were you never possessed of any article for sale as a broker? - A. I have bought and sold for profit; I have bought a few handkerchiefs, and I have sold them.

Q. Have you bought and sold any thing else - do you know Freeman, the constable? - A. Yes, I have offered some lace to Mr. Freeman to sell, it was my employers, and since I have been a publican, I never offered any lace to sell.

Q. There is not one individual person of your house here to-day, but yourself? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner's name you knew very well? - A. I knew his name was Gegg.

Q. How often might the other man, that you understood to be in his company, be at your house? - A. I recollect him to have been there three or four times, or half a dozen.

Q. You did not know his name? - A. I did not.

Q. I think you said it was about eleven o'clock in the morning? - A. I said, about nine, about breakfast time.

Q. That is the time a good many people come to your house to be refreshed? - A. Yes.

Q. Your wife was assisting you? - A. My wife was not up; she is never up till a little before eleven, she sits up the last person of an evening.

Q. Your servants were there, they might see the person as well as you? - A. They might, or might not, they were about their business.

Q. How long was it after this that you went before the Magistrate? - A. The bundle was left with me on Thursday morning, and on Friday morning I delivered it, and on Saturday morning Mr. Croft and the constable informed me that they had stopped the man.

Q. Then on Monday you went before the Magistrate? - A. I attended all day on Saturday, and on Monday I went again.

Q. Why did not you make any inquiry with your servants - did you bring any one of them before the Magistrates? - A. I did not.

Q. You attended as a witness against the prisoner? - A. I attended to give an account of it.

Q. Did you happen to employ a solicitor to attend for you? - A. I did.

Q. You, going to be a witness, employed an attorney? - A. When I heard the charge that was against me, I thought it necessary to have a gentleman of the profession; I was recommended by Mr. Kirby, who knew me well; he said that it was very necessary that I should have somebody with me.

Q. Is there any individual here to-day, which saw you give the bundle to the prisoner? - A. Not any body at all.

Q. You said it was a large bundle, what was it covered with? - A. A green bag.

Q. I suppose you had not the curiosity to look into the bag to see what was in it? - A. I could see what was in it, because it was in such a state that it did not cover it.

Q. You are sure it was leather, because the bag did not cover it - do you recollect that you said you thought it was leather, now you say you saw it plainly, because the bag did not completely cover it - you knew that this man was a porter to a linen-draper, in Queen-street, Cheapside? - A. I only know that he had lodgings in a street near Cheapside.

Q. Did you not think it an extraordinary thing, that a man should bring a bundle in a bag to be given to a man that was a servant to a merchant in the City? - A. No, because I am in the habit of receiving so many parcels.

Q. I dare say you are - did you put it in your bed-room? - A. No, in the front room, up two pair of stairs.

Q. The reason you tell us is, because it was a very large bundle, and not very well packed - the prisoner did not say when he was to call for it, nor the man that left it did not tell you when the man would call for it? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner was in your house every day? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take it up stairs, because you thought he would not call for it directly? - A. I did.

Q. How long after the prisoner had the parcel from you was it, when the prisoner told you that he suspected it was not come honestly by? - A. He asked me whether the person was there who left the parcel.

Q. Did he not tell you that that parcel which he got of you was not come honestly by? - A. No.

Q. How long did you stay in the house after he had been there? - A. I staid the whole of the day, I only went to market.

Q. Directly after, or any time after he went out? - A. A short time after.

Q. Did you happen, after he was there, to take a small parcel out of the house? - A. No.

Q. When you went out of the house, directly after the prisoner was there, did you not take a bundle out with you? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. What day? - A. Saturday morning.

Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose that if I was to ask you whether you said to the prisoner that, as he had mentioned your name, you would deny ever having given it to him? - A. I did not.

RICHARD FREEMAN sworn. - I am a constable, I was sent for to Mr. Chrees, in Newgate-street.

Q. Who did you find at Mr. Chrees's? - A. Mr. Chrees, Mr. Croft, and the prisoner, and the bundle was there.

Q. The prisoner was secured, we understand? - A. Yes; I produce the skins.

Q.(To Rolls.) Look at these skins, and see whether there are any that you can identify? - A. This skin has my own hand-writing on it, which I made when I bought it, it is marked G and R. I have had this skin above two years; the other is my partner's hand-writing, and this white skin is a particular skin, it is watery in the inside; I know it by these water marks, there is a stamp with the letter L. I bought that skin of Mr. Law, he stamps them with that letter; here is another with my own mark, and here are likewise two butts; I cut a pair of breeches from them myself.

ELIZABETH - sworn. - I heard a noise in the shop the time this robbery was committed, about half past nine, on Sunday, the 31st of March; I rent the kitchen of Mr. Crosby, it is under the shop; I said to my husband, Mr. Rolls is going to-bed early to-night, it being rather an earlier hour than he usually went to-bed.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Couling offered me some skins to sell for him; he asked me if I was a judge of skins, for he expected some in the course of a day or two; I told him I was not a judge of them myself, but I would take them to a gentleman that I thought was a judge; he told me the price would be six shillings a piece; I took them to Mr. Chrees, and that gentleman asked me what I expected profit on them, and I told him, a shilling a piece; I took a sample of them, and he desired me, if I could get the whole of them, to bring them, and he would send them to a gentleman that was a judge of them, and I took the whole of them; I called again afterwards to know what they said about them, and when I called, Mr. Chrees said, they were stopped; then I went to Mr. Couling's, but he was not at home; I went back again to Messrs. Chrees and Lord, and told them he was not at home, and likewise I called again on Mr. Couling, and then he was out; I went back again to Messrs. Chrees and Lord, and I left word I would call again; I called at Mr. Couling's on the next morning first; he said, you have not given my name, he said if I had, he would deny ever having them, and immediately he went up stairs, and took a bundle out with him, and said, if I came back again there, I should be transported.

JAMES ROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a warehouseman, at No. 10, Queen-street.

Q. Did the prisoner ever live as a servant with you? - A. Yes, as a porter.

Q. What has been his character for honesty? - A. I had a good character with him, and in my own opinion he is as honest a man as any living.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 31st of March, where the prisoner was in the evening? - A. Perfectly well; I went out to take a walk from my house, between five and six in the evening, and I returned about five minutes before eight; I had with me my two brothers, who live shopmen with Mr. Roberts, a grocer, in Fore-street; they are obliged to be home on a Sunday evening by nine o'clock, they supped with me; we supped at eight o'clock, on purpose to accommodate them; the prisoner waited at table, and removed the cloth also, and was in my house the whole of the evening, and never went out.

Q. What is your reason for thinking so? - A. Because I saw him; soon after supper I went tobed myself.

Q. What time was that? - A. About ten o'clock; I have one of the gentlemen who dined that day and supped with me here; if he had not have borne a good character, I should not have took him.

Q. Did you ever know him guilty of falsehoods? - A. No; I would take him again with pleasure.

Court. Q. What time do you suppose the supper took up? - A. About half an hour.

Q. You had no occasion to inquire for him, from the time of removing the cloth to the time you went to-bed? - A. Yes; I suppose about nine o'clock we wanted some hot water to make some brandy and water; then I saw him, and I saw him just before I went to-bed; I have every reason to believe that he slept in my house that night; I have asked my servants, and they say he did.

RICHARD TAGWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You dined with the last witness upon the day we have been speaking of? - A. I did, and I supped with him somewhere after eight o'clock.

Q. Did you see the prisoner? - A. I did; I left the house about half past nine o'clock, and the prisoner shewed me a light when I went out of the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-59

278. GEORGE FREAK and JAMES BATTERS were indicted for feloniously assaulting

William Jaggers , on the King's highway, on the 8th of April , putting him in fear, and forcibly taking from his person and against his will a hat, value 2 s. and 6 s. 6 d. the property of William Jaggers .

WILLIAM JAGGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a sawyer .

Q. When was this you were attacked by any person? - A. The 8th of April, about half-past one o'clock in the night.

Q. That was on the morning of the ninth? - A. Yes; I was coming from Long Acre , and as I was crossing the road, I went into a court.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was sober.

Q. Had you been drinking? - A. I had two pints of beer; I had the share of seven pints of beer with my mate and another man; I was sensible of every transaction that happened.

Q. Were you at all intoxicated by liquor? - A. By no means.

Q. Were you coming alone? - A. Yes; as I came out of the end of the court, there came four or five men and seized hold of me, and threw me flat on my back; they thrust their hands into my left hand pocket, and took six shillings and sixpence out of my pocket.

Q. In what part of your clothes? - A. My breeches, which they tore in taking the money out.

Q. Do you know either of the men - Were these two men at the bar either of them? - A. Batters held me by the collar, and endeavoured to hold me down by one hand, and with the other he held my mouth and throat. I with my right hand several times drew his hand from my mouth, and called out for assistance; I called out, watch, and I called out, murder; Freak, the other prisoner at the bar, was endeavouring to take this watch out of my pocket that I hold now.

Q. You mean the shorter man of the two? - A. Yes; he endeavoured to take the watch out of my pocket, and in trying to take it out he tore my breeches at the right hand side.

Q. Did he take it out? - A. He did not.

Q. Did you lay hold of either of them? - A. I laid hold of that gentleman there with the blue coat, and held him fast till such time as Kelly, the watchman, came up to me; I did not loose him before I asked Kelly twice if he had got him safe.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner? - A. Yes, by endeavouring to take the watch out of my pocket; while I was endeavouring to give Batters up to the watchman, I cannot say what became of him, but I saw him the next day at the watch-house.

Q. Are you sure that he is the man? - A. I am positively sure.

Q. Did Freak offer you any money the next morning? - A. Yes, he offered me the money that was taken from me.

Q. What did he offer it you for? - A. If I would not say any thing before the Justice.

Q. What made you take it? - A. I took it in fear, because I was rather afraid of them.

Q. Then you were all in custody of the peace-officer at that time - What did he offer you? - A. A seven-shilling piece.

Q. And you took it? - A. I took the seven-shilling piece into my hand, and gave it into the man's hand at the watch-house, and he gave change for it.

Q. You took 6 s. 6 d. and gave Freak the sixpence? - A. Yes.

Q. And your reason for doing this was because you were afraid? - A. Yes, it was.

Batters. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate, when we were first examined, that we were all drinking together? - A. I did not.

Q. And when we were coming out of the public-house, we began fighting one with another, and the watchman came and took us altogether? - A. No such thing, I did not.

Q. You did; then the Magistrate said he would put us all three back till he inquired into our characters, and then you said you would tell the truth? - A. It is false.

Court. Q. Had you known them before? - A. I never saw the men before in my life, to my knowledge.

ROBERT KELLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a watchman of the watch-house at St. Giles's? - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember hearing any body crying out? - A. Yes, I heard somebody crying murder; I was in my box; it was just by St. Giles's pound, opposite, in the back passage.

Q.With that what did you do? - A. I was not in a hurry; it was some time before I went, being in a different parish, and thinking it was some of the bad girls (the girls of the town) because they kick up a cry among themselves; I did not go till I heard the voice get slower and lower; then immediately I made my appearance, to make out what it was, and when I had got out of my box, I met with Butler, a watchman of St. Ann's watch-house; I asked him to go, and he went along with me; I took the lead of him and came up first.

Q. When you came up to where the voice directed you, what did you observe? - A. I caught Batters over the head and shoulders of the prosecutor.

Q. How was the prosecutor situated? - A. He laid upon his back between the men, and Batters was on his head and shoulder; they were busy about his small clothes, but what they did I cannot say; I was in a flurry, as well as him; the other man made a start to run away, but Butler popped on him, before he could get away.

Q. What was Freak doing of before he made a

start to get away? - A. I cannot tell; I had hold of Batters; he was there.

Q. Did you see Freak over Jaggers? - A. Yes, he was over him all the time.

Q. It was Butler that took Freak? - A. Yes.

Q. When you got them into custody you took them to the watch-house - You are sure these two men are the men that you took? - A. I never left them, they were never a yard out of my sight; there were two more, but they ran away when they saw the lantern come with me; they could not see me till I popped upon them and smashed them.

Q. Did you see a hat? - A. The hat I know nothing of; Butler is the man that knows about that.

WILLIAM BUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a watchman of St. Ann's; I saw Jaggers on the ground on his back, and Batters at the prosecutor's head with his hands over him; what he was doing of I cannot tell; it appeared to me that he was holding him down while Freak was rifling his breeches pocket; Freak seeing me coming up made a start, or else he turned to see whether we were in pursuit of him; he had two hats in his possession, one on his head and the other in his hand; I said to the prisoner Freak, whose hat is that you have got in your hand; I do not know, said he, it is not mine, and threw it on the ground; I then went to where the prosecutor laid on the ground; by this time he was got upon his feet; I asked the prosecutor whose hat that was; he said it was his hat.

JOHN WYGATE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am watch-house keeper.

Q. Do you remember the prisoners being brought into the watch-house by the watchmen? - A. I do.

Q. Was there a hat brought in that night? - A. The man said he was robbed of a hat and six shillings and sixpence; it was impossible for me to get at the rights of it, there was such a bustle and noise; I left it to be adjusted at Marlborough-street the next day.

Q. Did you take possession of that hat? - A. Yes, last Monday was a week.

Q.(To Jaggers.) Look at that hat - Is that the hat you wore that night? - A. Yes, I will swear to it.

Wygate. That is the hat; Jaggers changed hats with me on Monday at the attorney's office.

Jaggers. The hat that I lost I picked up from the ground; I heard the watchman say, whose hat is that; I picked up that hat the same night.

Q. And the same night that the watchman pointed out to you the hat, then on the ground, you knew it to be your hat - Was that the hat you wore till you went to the attorney's office? - A. Yes.

Q. And the hat that you picked up at the time this happened to you you wore till last Monday? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Wygate.) The hat you now produce is the hat you received from Jaggers at the attorney's office? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Butler.) Q. What happened about the hat - You have said, after you stopped him, I saw one hat on his head and one in his hand, and the other in his hand which he held, you asked him whose hat that was, Freak said, I do not know, it is not mine, and immediately threw it down - Did you see what became of that hat? - A. I did not.

Batters's defence. I had been to my uncle, and was coming home to Cumberland-street, Tottenham-court-road; I heard a noise, and saw three or four men together; I had not come up two minutes before the watchman came up, and laid hold of me by the collar.

Freak's defence. I had been to Paddington to supper, and coming back down Tottenham-court-road, there were some people knocked my hat off, I cannot tell by whom; I was taken into custody by that man who stands there; I went to the watch-house very civilly.

Batters, GUILTY , Death , aged 37.

Freak, GUILTY , Death , aged 31.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-60

279. ROSETTA HAWES was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Sarah Martin , on the 15th of April , a Bank note, value 5 l. the property of Hugh Devine .

HUGH DEVINE sworn. - I am a sailor ; I have been discharged from the Zealand, at the Nore, five weeks; I have been acquainted with the prisoner before this happened ten days; she took the money from me between nine and ten o'clock at night the 15th of this month; I caught her in about ten minutes afterwards, and charged her with the watchman.

Q. About nine or ten o'clock at night did you go any where? - A. Yes, we went to a cook's shop, No. 18, Butcher-row, East-Smithfield; we had a bason of soup each of us; I put my hand into my pocket to haul out my money, and I hauled out a five-pound note; I laid it on the table to get at the silver; they were both in my waistcoat pocket, the note was uppermost.

Q. Was it a Bank of England note? - A. Yes, I had received it as a Bank note at Somerset-house.

Q. What became of it when you laid it on the table? - A. It dropped on the ground by my putting my arm on the table; the prisoner at the bar stooped down and whipped it up, and ran out of the door; I called to her to stop, but she would not: I called to the landlady of the house, and told her that she went away with a five-pound note of

mine; I ordered another bason of soup, but did not wait to eat it; I thought if I stopped she would be out of the way; I found her at Mr. Houghton's, the Golden Anchor; I tapped her on the shoulder, and I said, Rosey, give me that five-pound note which you ran away with from me; she said she had no five-pound note.

Q. Was she searched? - A. Not then; I gave her in charge of the watchman; she was searched in the watch-house and nothing found upon her; I gave her in charge of the officer of the night, and he discharged her in a few minutes; she was taken again the next morning about eight o'clock; I rapped at the door where she lived, and she lifted up the sash and looked out; I told her she had better give me up the note before I would go and have her taken up; she said she had no note, nor never took any from me; then I went to the Flying Horse, Lambeth-street, to Mr. Griffiths, and he came and took her up before the Magistrate, and she was committed.

Q. Had you more than one Bank note in that pocket? - A. I had four ones; they were by themselves.

Q. You are very sure that the one you put on the table, was the five-pound note? - A. I opened it, and looked at it before I laid it on the table, and saw it was a five pound note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a scholar? - A. Not much.

Q. Can you read so as to know whether a note is from one bank or another? - A. No.

Q. You only supposed that this was a five pound note because you received it from Somerset house? - A. Yes.

Q. You had been from sea five weeks, how long might you have kept company with this girl? - A. About ten days; I lived with her.

Q. Did any little pet, a little jealousy, take place between you and her; there was a young man along with her? - A. Yes.

Q. And in consequence of a young man being along with her, did not she and you quarrel; she charged the watch with you? - A. Yes, and I charged the watch with her.

Q. In consequence of this, your friendly intimacy ceased; you separated from her? - A. Not then, we slept together till she took the note from me at the soup-house.

Q. Were you sober or drunk at the time? - A. I was as sober as I am at this time, I had drank nothing to do me any hurt.

Q. Did not you desire the landlady of the house to look for it? - A. No, I told her of it; I said there, the note dropped down at the end of the table.

Q. Did not you assist the landlady in searching the place for the note, after the woman had gone away? - A. I took the candle in my hand; she asked me where it dropped, she looked round, I said it is of no use to look; I saw her take the note away.

Q. Have you not seen her since she has been committed by the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not told her, if she would come and live with you, you would not prosecute her? - A. No.

Q. Have you not been to Newgate to see her? - A. I did not go to see her; she came in the place; I told her to keep away; I said to her, I do not want to have any thing to say to you.

Q. If I was to ask you whether you saluted her there, and put your arms around her neck, do you mean to say you pushed her off; did not you drink with her? - A. She drank out of the same pot.

Q. Do not you call that drinking together? - A. Of course it was drinking together; I did not give it her to drink.

Q. You say you did not go to see her there, were you unlucky enough to have another acquaintance in prison? - A. I went with a woman of the name of Neave.

Q. She is an acquaintance of this girl; she went to see this girl? - A. I cannot say whether she did or not.

SARAH MARTIN sworn. - I live at No. 18, Butcher-row; I keep a cook-shop: On the 15th of April, between the hours of nine and ten at night, the prosecutor called for two basons of soup; the prisoner at the bar went out; I heard the prosecutor call, Rosey, come back; she did not return; he called for another bason of soup; when I brought it him he had four one pound notes on the table; he had been looking under the table with a candle, to see if he could see the five pound note.

Q. Did you see him look? - A. I did not, my partner did; she is not here; he had the candle in his hand when I served him the second bason of soup; he asked me to look for it; he said he had lost a five pound note, and the girl had gone out with it; I looked for it, and I shook the tablecloth.

Q. Did the prosecutor appear to be sober? - A. As far as I saw he did.

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent.

Court. Q.(To Prosecutor.) You told us just now that you received this note, and you knew it to be a five pound note, having received it at Somerset house as part of your pay? - A. Yes, I received two five pound Bank-notes, and I had changed one.

GUILTY

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-61

280. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for

feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , one hundred and seven pounds weight of pimento, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Barnjum .

JAMES WALE sworn. - I am a carman to Mr. Barnjum; I took up some pimento in Tabernacle-walk to carry to James Myers, Leadenhall-street; and when I got into Mr. Myers's yard I had lost one of the bags; I went out to see if I could find any thing of the bag, and a man informed me he saw a man with a bag; I pursued after the man, and before I got up to him, he let the bag fall from his shoulder and run away.

Q. Where did you overtake him? - A. At Little St. Helen's; I halloaed out stop thief; he was taken, the other man that was with him got away from me; I am sure the prisoner is the man that had got the bag.

- WARE sworn. - I am a carpenter, I live at No. 25, Willow-walk, Curtain-road, Shoreditch: On the 8th of March, about a quarter before one, I was coming from my master's shop, in St. Mary axe; I was tired with my boards, I set them down to rest myself, and a man came by with a bag on his back, he ran down Great St. Helen's; as soon as he turned down there, the carter came by and asked me if I had seen any man with a bag; I told him, yes, (there were two men with him); I went with him, the prisoner is not the man that came by me with the bag at St. Mary Axe, but he had the bag on his shoulder then, and he threw the bag down, seeing we were in pursuit of them, and run away from it.

Q. Was any thing said to him before he threw the bag down? - A. No, the other two men that were with him saw the carter and me running after them, and then he threw the bag down.

Q. Are you sure that this is the man that you pursued, and that had the bundle on his shoulder? - A. Yes, he is the man that we pursued from the Flower-pot, in Bishopsgate-street , to St. Helen's; I never lost sight of him as we pursued him; he threw the bag down and run back from St. Helen's to the Flower-pot, and then to St. Helen's again.

Prisoner. Q. You say I was not the man that passed by you with the bag? - A. No, he was a stouter man than you.

Q. Do you think that he was the man that threw the bag from his shoulder or me? - A. It was you.

Court. Q.(To Wale.) Is that the bag that was taken out of your cart? - A. Yes, I loaded them; I know the mark.

Prisoner's defence. On the 18th of March I was going down Bishopsgate-street to the East-India-house, to get a ship; as I was going along there was a mob of people running on the other side of the way; I ran to see what was the matter, and there was a man they said had stole something, but what I could not tell; presently afterwards a gentleman said he was a constable, and stopped me; I was taken into a public-house, and the next day to the Mansion-house; I never saw the bag before I saw it at the Mansion-house.

Q. Did not you feel it.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-62

281. JOSEPH EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a pocketbook, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Capel .

The prosecutor not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-63

282. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , two veils, value 40 s. the property of Henry-John Chappell .

HENRY-JOHN CHAPPELL sworn. - I live at No. 8, Greville-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner had lived with me before, she begged to come in again, and she had been with us about two months: On the 6th of April, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, she came to me for the key of the cupboard, she wanted to get some large dishes; she went to the cupboard, I was looking in my looking-glass; while the prisoner was at the cupboard, which stood in the passage, I saw her take some candles out of the box; my wife searched her box, I went down stairs, hearing the noise of her wishing to conceal something; I found the prisoner had been tucking something up her clothes, which she did not wish any body to see; one of the girls took these two veils from her while my wife searched her, she was rather intoxicated at the time.

ROBERT HISSER sworn. - I am an officer, I produce the veils. (The veils identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not consider myself as kept by charity, I went to work at my needle for him, and consequently I took a few candles for the use of the kitchen, there might be four or five; I took them because there was always an altercation about the candles.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-64

283. GEORGE SOWDEN alias WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , seven yards of cotton check, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Horne , privately in his shop .

JOHN SURRAGE sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Horne, linen-draper , No. 27, Oxford-street : On the 23d of February, in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I received information of

a neighbour that some person had stole a print from the door; I ran out, but it was too late; on the Monday I was informed it was at Bates's, the constable.

THOMAS WILMOTT sworn. - I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker: On Saturday night, the 23d of February, a quarter before eight o'clock, I had just paid all my men but one cabinet-maker, he observed two ill-looking chaps lurking about the place; with that this one came up to the door, I went out to see who this man was, he was peeping with his head round the corner of the street, as if he was watching who came out of the shop; I immediately went to observe what he was doing of, and he went from the corner of the street and made to my house directly; I went out immediately, I came up to him, I collared him, says I, I dare say you are the thief that has robbed me before; he wanted to know what I wanted with him; I told him I should soon let him know, I would take him down to Marlborough-street; I was going to Marlborough-street with him, a gentleman came up, and said, what is the matter? I made answer, here is a thief, and I will take him to Marlborough-street. Finding I was determined to take him, I observed him taking something from his breast; he threw out this piece of print, as hard as he could throw it, into the middle of the street; O, says I, that is the case, is it; I insisted on his coming along with me to pick up the cotton, not knowing what it was, and when I picked it up, I saw it was a piece of cotton; when I came to the watch-house with him, Bates said he was only let out of prison at three o'clock that day.

(The property produced, and identified by Surrage.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-65

284. ANN NEWTON alias BALLARD and MARY ARNOLD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , ten yards of cambric, value 55 s. the goods of James Smith and William Jones , privately in their shop .

It appearing in evidence the property was cambric muslin, and the property of James Smith , William Jones , and John Field , the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-66

285. MARY DRISCALL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Hannah Clark , in the dwelling-house of Peter Clark , on the 31st of March , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, ten shillings and fourpence, the monies of the said Peter Clark .

There being no evidence against the prisoner she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-67

286. MARY LITCHFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a watch, value 20 s. a broach, value 5 s. nine tablespoons, value 6 l. two desert-spoons, value 12 s. five tea spoons, value 15 s. a pair of tea tongs, value 6 s. a bonnet, value 2 s. a gown, value 10 s. and a petticoat, value 4 s. the goods of James Peat , privately in his dwelling-house .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner was at certain times in a state of insanity, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Rooke.

Reference Number: t18050424-68

287. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , eleven pounds weight of lead pipe, value 2 s. the property of the Mayor and Commonalty of the Citizens of London , fixed to a certain building, called the Coal Exchange .

Second Count. For cutting and ripping it, with intention to steal it, fixed to a certain building in their possession.

The prisoner standing mute, not pleading to his indictment, and it appearing in evidence to the Court that he was able to speak, the Court charged the Jury to enquire whether the prisoner stood mute by the visitation of God or wilful obstinacy.

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - Q. You are one of the turnkeys belonging to Newgate - do you know of this man being brought into prison? - A. I do, he was brought last Thursday week.

Q. Has he shewn any signs that he can hear? - A. After he came into the jail, I put the irons on him, and the basil was rather too tight, he said too tight; I took him out in the front lodge, and put him on a larger basil, he said that would do; this morning, when I called him by the name of Taylor, he said coming, and when he came in, the person who takes the description asked his name, he spoke very loud, William Taylor , aged 40.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I have had him in my custody two or three times, he could always speak to me, he spoke very thick, he always understood me; I went to put an iron on him once, he told me it was too heavy.

Jury's Verdict. - He stands mute obstinate and wilful.

The Court then proceeded in the trial on the indictment.

(The case was stated by Mr. Vaillant.)

JAMES DODD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am an assistant to a wholesale grocer, in Lower Thames-street, the corner of Boss-alley: On the 25th of February, in the evening, when I went through the back door, which leads about a yard and a half to where the pipe was cut, I saw the prisoner; he was rising from off his knees quite near to the pipe, he passed me shutting a knife, I believe; I then went round

the corner, and looked at the pipe; I found the pipe bent down to the ground about four or five feet, and that was just the spot where I saw the prisoner rise from off his knee. Seeing the pipe in that situation, I followed him, and catched him directly; I brought him back to where the pipe was; I saw his hands were dirty, and the pipe was cut about a yard and a half; I asked him if he knew any thing about it, I could get no answer, he only muttered; the constable said he spoke to him a great many times.

Q. Do you know these premises? - A. Yes, they belong to the Coal Exchange; the day after I shewed the pipe to Mr. James Montague , of the Coal Exchange.

JAMES MONTAGUE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. Is that the pipe that was shewn you by the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it fixed to the Coal Exchange? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Does it belong to the City of London? - A. It has been purchased by them, and it belongs to the City of London.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-69

288. JAMES AKESS alias AKERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , privily from the person of John Sly , three Bank of England notes, value 3 l. his property .

JOHN SLY sworn. - I live in Manchester-place, Kentish Town : On the 8th of April there was a mountebank at the end of our town, me and my wife, and two or three friends, went up to look at him; about five o'clock the mountebank came about with tickets, we gave him a shilling a-piece for the ticket for prizes, they came about with the packet of prizes; I went to take the ticket that was in the packet, and reaching over to get it, I found myself hussled, one was rather before and the other behind me; I did not get the prize however, and there was a little gentleman on my left side; I had three Bank-notes in my pocket of one pound each, I looked down, and saw the three Bank-notes in the prisoner's hand; I said, you have picked them out of my pocket; directly he turned round, and went away, he was hussling them up in his handkerchief; I ran after him, and catched hold of him, and just as I had laid hold of him Mr. Whitehead came up, and after that the beadle came and laid hold of him by his arm; he asked me what I had lost; I said, three Banknotes; they fell to the ground, and Mr. Keen picked them up; he was taken to a room in a public-house, the next morning he was taken to Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had the curiosity to go and see the mountebank - there was a great crowd there? - A. Yes.

Q. You were hussled about? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know you had lost your notes before the women told you? - A. There was a woman at the public-house who said she saw the prisoner pick them up.

Q. You do not recollect saying yourself to the woman that you did not know how you lost them? - A. I never did say that, I knew I had lost them.

JEREMIAH KEEN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker, I went up Kentish Town, I was outside of the ring, I saw the prisoner running from the ring, I ran and catched hold of him by the collar, to assist the prosecutor; he was hussling his handkerchief in his hand, and he threw down some paper, which I picked up; the prosecutor said he had lost some Bank-notes, the man was taken into custody; I produce the notes, the prosecutor said they were his; he said he had found them when we took him to the public-house.

Q. And the prosecutor said he had lost them? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Look at these notes? - A. I cannot swear to the number of the notes, I only swear that he took them out of my pocket, to the best of my belief, and that is the man.

Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to swear that he took them out of your pocket? - A. I will swear that his hand was against my pocket; I was not in the crowd, I was only behind.

Q. You paid a shilling, you said? - A. Not at that time, that was half an hour before; I never got the packages.

PETER WHITEHEAD sworn. - I am a constable: On the 8th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the field looking at the mountebank; I was outside of the ring, I saw Mr. Sly follow the prisoner at the bar, I went up to him; Mr. Keen, the former witness, was up to him; I asked the prosecutor what he had lost; he said, I have lost three one-pound notes; he had this handkerchief in his hand; when I spoke, he dropped down some paper, which the witness, Keen, picked up; I saw it opened, it was three pound notes.

WILLIAM DONN sworn. - I was in Kentish Town standing with Mr. Sly, and my family were standing with me, where there were some people looking at the mountebank; I saw Mr. Sly following the prisoner at the bar, I saw him hussling an handkerchief, I thought he was trying to get his handkerchief; I ran up to him, he said the prisoner had taken his three one-pound notes.

Prisoner. I will call three witnesses, who saw me pick them up.

SARAH FARR sworn. - I am a married woman,

my husband is a jeweller, I live at No. 1, Cox's-court, Gray's-Inn-lane.

Q. Had you the curiosity to go and see the mountebank? - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner after I had been in the ground some time.

Q. Have you seen him before? - A. Never with my eyes before.

Q. Did you observe any paper there? - A. I saw the paper, which I supposed to be notes, lay on the grass-plat, and I saw the prisoner pick them up; I had dropped a glove on the grass, and I saw there laid some notes.

Q. Why did not you pick them up? - A. I should have strove had not I a child in my arms.

Q. Did you see him apprehended? - A. No.

Q. Nor followed him after he had picked up the notes - what did you say? - A. I did not move from the place where I was.

Q. As you saw him pick them up, I should have thought you would have looked sharp, and cry halves? - A. I did not speak.

Q. You did not see Mr. Sly run after him, nor you did not see him till after he was apprehended - he was in the ring pretty close when he picked up the notes? - A. He was outside of the ring when he picked them up.

Q. You did not see any body lay hold of him at all? - A. No.

RICHARD DAWSON sworn. - I am a shoemaker.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He is a shoemaker; I was in company with the prosecutor's witness, Keen, I was with my wife and family, I saw a bustle all at once; I saw the prisoner stoop and pick up something, which I conceived was paper, I cannot say they were notes.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Sly pursue him? - A. No; I knew the little man by sight, I had seen him at my brother's.

SARAH EWSTESS sworn. - I went to see the mountebank; I saw this little man come up across the fields at first.

Q. Did you know him? - A. I never saw him before in my life; he stood by us about half an hour, there was a young woman that dropped her glove, this little man stooped and picked them up first, or else I should have picked them up; I never saw him before, I only remarked he was a little neat man.

Q. How long after that did Mr. Sly follow him? - A. I cannot say; the little man walked away; we saw it so plain, I said, let us go up to the room, where they have taken him.

Q. You did not see him till after he was taken? - A. I did not, my attention was in seeing the tumblers.

Q. What are you? - A. I keep a broker's shop, in Cox's-court; I sell brokery, earthenware, glass, and old furniture.

Q. No old iron, china, glass and bottles? - A. Yes.

Q. And a little of every thing - Do you deal in old linen? - A. Very little.

MARY EWSTESS sworn. Q. Were you at this Mountebank's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of the paper or notes? - A. I saw it lay on the ground; I saw the prisoner pick it up.

Q. Are you sure of it? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. Where is your mother's house? - A. No. 1, Cox's-court, Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. You are no acquaintance with the prisoner at the bar? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-70

289. MARGARET BERRY and JANE SCOTT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 22 s. the property of Thomas Powdich , privately in his shop .

EDWARD MEREDITH sworn. - I am assistant to Mr. Powdich, linen-draper , No. 294, Holborn : On the 22d of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into the shop, and wished to see some prints; after our young man had shewed them a great many, he came to me and said, it was almost impossible to serve them, as he thought they came with an evil intent; I was at the look out, and happened to be at the outside of the window, and saw the prisoner Scott taking a piece of print under her apron; after I saw her put the print under her apron, I came in and went behind the counter; after the young man had served them, he said, you had better deliver the piece of print from under your apron, which she delivered; I knew she had got it; I did not mean to take the piece of print till she had got out.

Q. Why? - A. Because I wanted to make it a capital offence.

Q. Did you take it from her or did she deliver it up? - A. Neither, it lay on the ground, I picked it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had suspicions of these girls when they came into the shop? - A. I had.

Q. Your Christian charity did not prompt you to tell them you wanted them to commit a felony, that you might have the pleasure of prosecuting? - A. Exactly.

Q. You call yourself assistant, I call you shop-man; what is your master's partner's name? - A. He is sole himself.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. - Q. You are assistant shopman to the assistant of Mr. Powdich? - A. The prisoner came in and asked me for some

print; I shewed them a great number, I saw Jane Scott shuffling something under her apron; I afterwards served her the print; then I accused them of it.

Mr. Alley. Q. After you had taken the money for the goods, you accused them of it? - A. Yes.

Q. What money did they lay out with you? - A. Four shillings and sixpence; she said it was for a child's frock. (The property produced and identified by Meredith.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Berry, GUILTY , aged 29,

Scott, GUILTY , aged 19,

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-71

290. ISAAC HARDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a watch, value 10 l. two gold seals, value 5 l. and a gold chain, value 7 l. the property of Peter Charman .

PETER CHARMAN sworn. - I am a jeweller and silversmith , in St. James's-street ; I missed the watch on the 20th of December, I was not at home at the time of the transaction.

Q. What was the value of the watch? - A. Ten guineas.

Q.What was the worth of the gold chain and the seals? - A. The chain seven guineas, and the seals five pounds; Jonathan Trott informed me that the chain was at Mr. Pattmore's, Ludgate-hill; I went there and they told me they bought it of a person of the name of Harding.

WILLIAM BANN sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am fifteen years; I am apprentice to Mr. Charman; the prisoner at the bar came one day into the shop (I am sure he is the man), and asked for a gold double-bottom hunting-watch; we had not one, but we said we would get one; he went out, and said he would call again the next day; he called again on the next day, and Mr. Pugh shewed him one; he looked at the watch, but did not take it; he asked to look at some other watch; I believe Mr. Pugh took that watch out of his pocket and shewed it him, and the prisoner said he wanted just such a watch to give to his brother; he said he would take that watch which Mr. Pugh shewed him; Mr. Pugh said he had better not take it, as it did not go well; he said he did not mind that; he would bring it back the next day; then he asked to look at the chains and seals that were in the window; we shewed him them, and he agreed to take these two seals and a gold chain; he took a bill out of his pocket and left it as security that he would bring the watch and seals back again the next day.

Q. Is that the bill that you hold in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. For what purpose did you understand that he took this watch and seals? - A. To shew them to his brother; Mr. Pugh let him take them; he never came back again; I never saw him till he was taken.

Q. Did you ever see the watch, chain, and seals, again? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He told you he wanted a watch for the purpose of giving his brother? - A. Yes.

Q. He would take the watch and shew it to his brother, and he would leave that bill in part of payment? - A. No, he would leave it as security.

Q. Do not you remember it was in part of payment; was not you very attentive? - A. I was not very attentive, for Mr. Pugh attended to that; I was doing something else.

Q. Therefore there might something pass that you did not hear. -

Court. Q. All that passed when you were present I understood you to say was, that he did not buy them, he was to bring them the next day, after he had shewed them to his brother, and he left this bill for security till he returned them? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS PUGH sworn. - Q. Are you shopman to Mr. Charman? - A. I was at that time.

Q. Tell us when it was you saw the prisoner? - A. I cannot tell the day, he came in first to look at a gold double-bottom hunting-watch; we did not happen to have one in the house at that time, we promised to get him one to look at, if he would call in a day or two; he called in a day or two afterwards.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. That is the man; I put the day down in the day-book, I cannot recollect the day, it was in November, rather towards the latter end.

Q. He was not a customer of the shop, that you had knowledge of him? - A. I had only seen him once before, when he asked for the gold double-bottom hunting-watch; when he came again, he said, do you recollect I am the person that came in for a gold hunting-watch; I said, I have one now; the price was forty-five guineas; he said, that was too much; he only wanted to make a present of it to his brother; I shewed him a silver hunting-watch out of my pocket, which I wore, to regulate; he said that would do; that was ten pounds ten shillings; he took the watch, chain, and seals, leaving a bill, saying, that will be sufficient, I shall return to morrow, to let you know whether I shall keep them or not; the bill was not to the full amount, I trusted him, seeing that he said he was brother-in-law to Mr. Marsh, at the Lord Chamberlain's Office.

Q. The purchase at this time was not complete? - A. No, the price of the watch, chain, and seals, was twenty-four pounds and odd shillings;

the bill is thirteen pounds eleven shillings and four-pence.

Q. Did he ever come again? - A. No, I never saw him again from that time till I saw him at Hatton-garden. In two or three days after I took the bill to Basing-lane: it is directed payable at Messrs. Carpenter and Co. Basing-lane, Cheapside.

Q. Did you find any gentlemen of the name of Carpenter and Co.? - A. I could not find any such parties.

Q. Have you any doubt upon earth that he is the man? - A. I have no doubt at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He came there the first time to see Mr. Charman? - A. Yes.

Q. It was two or three days afterwards when he came again, therefore you had an opportunity of going to Mr. Marsh, to know if it was true or not? - A. Yes.

Q. Now when he came the second time to purchase, for which he presented you a bill in part of payment, he wanted a watch to give to his brother? - A. No, he did not give it in part of payment.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that he did not give you that in part of payment - He said he would call the next day and pay you the rest? - A. I am sure he said nothing about the part in payment.

Q. That bill you gave him; I see here is a gold seal, four guineas and a half; a small seal; and then there is a silver double bottom hunter, ten guineas. That bill you gave him for all these things? - A. That is not the bill, it is a memorandum, that he might know the price.

Q. It is one of your shop bills? - A. He asked for a memorandum, and we always write upon bills. I never thought any thing of it, but that it was entirely lost, after the bill was not payable and Carpenter was not to be found.

Q. Then you were afraid the whole of the money was lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that he was not to have called the next day, and have paid the 11 l. and odd shillings? - A. He said nothing about paying the rest.

Q. Was not that what you understood, that he was to call the next day and pay you the 11 l. and the other shillings? - A. He was to call the next day to let us know whether his brother liked them.

Q. Mrs. Charman was in the shop, did she take any part of the transaction? - A. She looked at the bill; I do not recollect that she said any thing.

Q. You did not give credit to the bill for what you received? - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that the purchase of the watch depended upon his brother's liking it; was the chain and seal for his own use? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore he did not want his brother's approbation for them? - A. I think he did.

Q. Are you quite sure that this bill was not part of payment? - A. I entered it in the book; it was not a sale; it depended on his will whether it should be a sale or not; I took the bill by way of security.

Court. (To Prosecutor.) Q. This is a bill directed to pay Mr. Harding? - A. The bill was accepted by Carpenter and Co. it is written across the bill, with red ink. It was taken long before it became due.

JOHN- WALTER TOPPER sworn. - I live at No. 10, Basing-lane.

Q. That is the house to which this bill is directed? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any persons of the name of Carpenter and Co.? - A. I do not know any person of that name carrying on business there; I live in the two pair of stairs.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden Office: On the 27th of February last, in the evening, I received information that the prisoner at the bar was at No. 62, in the Old Bailey; I went there and the place was fast; I kneeled on my knees and saw him sitting in the kitchen by the fire-side; I knocked at the door and the door was immediately bolted; I heard the door fastened in the inside; I had got assistants, and on hearing a bustle I ran backwards and left my assistants there; just as I got to the wall at the back door, I heard somebody climbing up the high wall on the other side; I said, is that you; he was trying to get over; I have known him some years; I believe he saw my cutlass, and he dropped from the other side; I said to my assistants, some of you go backwards; I said I would break the house open; that rather alarmed him; he halloaed out, is that you, Trott; I said, yes; he said, if I would behave civil to him, he would give himself up to me; I did not take him on suspicion of this robbery; then the prisoner said to me, I thought you would have searched me; I said, it is of very little use to search you, now you have had this opportunity; I then told him that I took him for swindling; after that, I let Mr. Charman know where the watch-chain was; it had been shewn to me by one of the prisoner's clerks; I produce the watch-chain; it was delivered to me at the Office by one of Mr. Pattmore's men, and here are some blank bills.

Q. Where were his lodgings? - A. I never could find his lodgings; I found a letter in that place directed to him, with other things, tied up in this cloth.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about the watch, chain, and seal? - A. Yes; he said he did not care a button about it, for he had got the bills of parcels.

Q. Did you go to No. 10, Basing-lane? - A. Yes; first I went to No. 1, Plough-court, Lombard-street;

I there found among some papers two keys, which I brought away with me, thinking they were the keys of somewhere; I went to Basing-lane, and these keys opened the door.

Q. Did you find any person of the name of Carpenter in Basing-lane? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know that the prisoner ever lived in Plough-court, where you found those things and the keys? - A. I never saw him there.

DAVID GASS sworn. - I live with Mr. Patmore, Ludgate-hill, (looking at the chain,) I believe this is the same gold chain I purchased of the prisoner on the 28th of December last; I have not the least doubt but that is the chain that I bought of the prisoner; there was a watch pledged by the prisoner, I did not take it in; I have seen the duplicate, it was a silver hunter; a woman came and took that out.

(The chain identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To Pugh) Did you make out the bills of parcels of your own accord, or at his request? - A. At his request.

Prisoner's defence. I unfortunately knew a young man, of the name of Birch, at Birmingham, he came to London; I, having ready money in my pocket when I came to town, he told me that Mr. Carpenter and Taylor were to go and set up agents; I lent them a sum of money, for which they were to pay me interest; knowing Mr. Birch to be a respectable man at Birmingham, I let him have six hundred pounds; I drew upon him for that, and when I came to find the bills were not paid, I was frightened out of my life; I became a distressed man; I have a wife and children, and leave it to the mercy of the Judge and Jury.

Q. Have you any body to prove that you have a brother-in-law in the Lord Chamberlain's Office? - A. Yes, I have a brother here; I belong to a respectable family; I did not let my father know my situation, fearing it might break the old man's heart.

SOLOMON HARDING sworn. - I am a baker, in Red-cross street.

Q. Is Mr. Marsh his brother-in-law? - A. Yes, he married his sister.

Prisoner. I believe Mr. Charman knows that he is my brother-in-law; he has made some inquiry.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-72

291. JOHN M'CARTHY , JOHN HALL , and WILLIAM GRAY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , 173 lbs. weight of Spanish wool, value 40 l. in a lighter, on the navigable River Thames , the property of Henry Salter , Henry Cooper , and John Cooper .

Second Count, For like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Third Count, For like offence, only stating it to be a vessel, instead of a lighter.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN YARWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. You are foreman to Messrs. Salter and Cooper? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the firm of the house? - A. Henry Salter , Henry Cooper , and John Cooper ; one lives at Tottenham, one at Kew, and one in Bridge-street, Blackfriars; they are lightermen at Cox's-quay, Thames-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Hall? - A. Yes, he was a watchman ; on the 10th of April last, I gave him orders to go on board the Essex lighter.

Q. To whom did the Essex lighter belong? - A. To Messrs. Salter and Cooper.

Q. To what place was he to take the Essex lighter? - A. I gave him orders to go down to Blackwall , and load the Essex lighter, she being there, with wool from the ship Young Joan, from St. Andero; Fieldhouse and Taylor were to bring her up.

RICHARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are book-keeper on board the ship Young Joan - did you deliver to William Gray any letter or billet? - A. Yes.

Q. What business is he? - A. A Custom-house officer .

Q. What goods did you deliver from the Young Joan to the Essex lighter? - A. Ninety bags of wool, and a bag of sweepings.

Q. Did you see them put on board? - A. To the best of my knowledge all of them were put in.

Q. Were they whole, or uncut, before they were put on board the Essex lighter? - A. I did not see any cut, but they might have been torn with hooks, being at the latter part of the ship.

Q. What did these bags contain? - A. Spanish wool.

Q. Then you delivered them to Gray; who else was with Gray? - A. I do not know, I delivered them to Gray.

Q. Was there any other person with Gray? - A. I believe Hall, the watchman, was there.

Q. Where was the Young Joan lying at that time? - A. Just below the Orchard-house, at Blackwall.

Q. In whose employ were you? - A. In the employ of the Custom.

Q. You delivered a note to Gray? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you count the number of bags that were on board the lighter? - A. To the best of my knowledge I did.

Q. Did you count them, or did you not? - A I counted them as they went in.

Q. Are you sure there were ninety? - A. I took the account that there were ninety.

Court. Were these much torn? - A. Yes, the latter part.

JOHN GILLMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. What are you? - A. I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police, Wapping.

Q. On the 10th of April last, did you, in company with Perry and Cox, go any where? - A. I did; I went in company with Perry and Cox on board the Essex lighter; she was then driving up past the New Crane, at past ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. That is in the county of Middlesex? - A. It is, and it is below bridge, in the parish of Shadwell.

Q. Did you and the other two officers go on board? - A. Yes, and I observed Gray walking on the same side of the deck that I went on board.

Q. Did you see either of the other prisoners there? - A. I did, I saw Hall.

Q. Whereabouts was Hall? - A. Hall had one of the oars conducting the lighter up.

Q. Did you make any observations on the deck? - A. I did; I saw one of the half-hatches off; it was taken from its place, and the two half-bars off, which confines the hatchway; I then asked Gray what he was; he told me he was a Custom-house officer, and Hall told me he was a watchman.

Q. After observing the hatchway was taken off, did you go down there, or what did you do? - A. I perceived Gray going forward.

Q. At that time did you see any other person there? - A. Yes, a man by the name of Taylor.

Q. You observed Gray going forward? - A. Yes, I followed him, and went down in the fore-scuttle; Gray was upon deck.

Q. When you went down the fore-scuttle, did you observe any thing? - A. I searched there, but did not find any thing, it being dark under the deck; I came up again from the fore-scuttle, and coming aft, where I had been before, a man got into a boat that was hanging a-stern.

Q. Were you near enough to know who that man was? - A. No, it was a short man; I asked Taylor who that man was; he said, that was the lighterman; I then called out, but he made his escape in his boat, and got on shore; after that, we took the three prisoners that were then on deck into custody; we took Gray, Hall, and a man of the name of Taylor; these were the three persons that were on deck when we first came on board; I searched Gray, and did not find any thing on him; I searched Hall, and found a lighter-key.

Q. Did you make any search about the lighter afterwards? - A. Yes; we then took the charge of the lighter ourselves, and put her in safety; we got a light, and went below, and we observed two bags, which are now produced here, sewed up with twine; I then looked round, and saw a third bag that was not sewed up, with the mouth open, close alongside of a bag that had been cut, apparently by some instrument.

Q. Was that bag, upon which it was lying close by, open enough for you to see what was contained in it? - A. Yes.

Q. What did it appear to you to be? - A. Spanish wool, and apparently a great deal was gone out of it; there was a great hole in it; we then made a strict search, for there was very little room, suspecting there was somebody concealed in the hold of the vessel under the hatch, and under the deck, and after some strict search we found M'Carthy, he was stowed away close by the side of the lighter, on one of the bags; we brought him into the hatchway; I asked him how he came there; he said he had got a cast up; I secured him, and gave him into the hands of my brother officers, and I suspected there was some person farther on board.

Q. What reason had you to suspect that? - A. There was a great coat on board.

Q. Did you see the great coat? - A. Not till afterwards.

Q. Did you know M'Carthy before? - A. Yes.

Q. What is M'Carthy? - A. I hardly know what he is.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a Thames Police officer? - A. I am.

Q. You had a great many officers at the time you went on board this lighter? - A. There were four or five of us.

Q. After you had taken the prisoners into custody, did you fasten down the hatchways? - A. No.

Q. I shall expect from you fair answers - we know there was a great deal of pressing on the River at this time? - A. Certainly.

Q. Of course, and so there is at all times? - A. Not hot pressing then, not to break out from all protections.

Q. Now the man that you found on board was a sailor; he was not particularly employed; you took him below; it is no uncommon thing for a man when he is on board a ship, and sees only two men in a boat, to conceal himself, as it was at night? - A. It was as light as it is now.

Q. About ten o'clock as light as it is now? - A. It was very moon-light indeed; we could see the people, and how many on deck, as well as we could now.

Q. Then the man on board could see the boat coming, and he hid himself; that happens to you every day; you did not wonder at finding a man concealed on board? - A. I will prove to you that he is not pressable.

Mr. Curwood. Q. When you went first on board, where was Hall? - A. On board, at the stern.

Q. Pray was that a suspicious situation for a

watchman? - A: What led us to have suspicions was to see the hatch open, and to find a key upon him.

Q. At the situation where you described Hall to be standing, could he see the hatch open? - A. It was as light as it is now; if ever he turned his head down, he must have seen it.

Q. Whether he, being on board, could see what was doing under deck? - A. Yes, he could.

Q. How came you to go down, if you could see so well where you were, to look for one of the prisoners? - A. We knew M'Carthy was stowed down there, and there we found him.

Q. Had M'Carthy any occupation on board that ship, or was he a perfect stranger? - A. A perfect stranger, and had no more business there than any other person had.

JOHN COX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Did you go with the last witness and Perry on. board the lighter? - A. Yes; Perry was taken very ill last week, and cannot attend; I went on board about ten o'clock in the evening, and saw Hall, Gray, and Taylor.

Q. Did you observe the hatchway? - A. I observed the half-hatchway open, and the door taken off, and laid over the other hatchway; there are two bars that go across to fasten them down; these bars and two locks were taken off, and the bars laid on one side; Mr. Gillman went down the fore-hatchway, and I remained on deck with the three prisoners; before Gillman went down, he saw a man push by; he ran up, and said there was a man gone away with a boat; he called after the man, but he did not return; he called out to him to come back, or he would fire at him, and he did fire at him; we then called to Perry, and a lighter-man of the name of Legg, to come round the lighter, and after we had got a light I took these three men in charge, Hall, Gray, and Taylor.

Q. Were you present with Gillman when he went down the half-hatch? - A. I observed some bags on the deck that Mr. Gillman found.

Q. Were you able, by looking down, to see the bags? - A. Yes; when the bags were put on deck, Gray was asked how those bags came to be marked; Gray said he had marked them himself, they were sweepings; an observation was made to him that we were very sorry to find him in such a situation; he said he took charge of the lighter, and there was nothing gone out; that it was as he had taken charge of it, and there was the lighter's bill, and he produced the lighter's bill to prove it; I went into the hold afterwards and found three bags cut with a knife, apparently right across in a zig-zag; about twelve or fourteen were there cut; I am speaking of the original bags.

Q. What does that bag contain? - A. Spanish wool; the bags that are now in Court were removed by Gillman.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a lighterman, I was employed by Messrs. Salter and Cooper; I went on board the Essex at Blackwall Reach, on Wednesday morning, the 10th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. You came here in custody? - A. Yes; Fieldhouse, Hall, and Gray, went first on board.

Q. How soon did M'Carthy come on board? - A. About a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Q. Did you know M'Carthy before? - A. About a twelvemonth.

Q. What was he? - A. I know nothing more of him than he was a lumper.

Q. Tell us what happened, as well as you can recollect? - A. When he came on board, he proceeded to take off the half-hatch from the lighter, and then M'Carthy and Fieldhouse went down below; there was a handkerchief chucked out of the boat before M'Carthy came in, tied up as if it was a bundle.

Q. Do you know what that handkerchief contained? - A. I believe it contained bags, but I am not certain; then I chucked the bundle down to Fieldhouse and M'Carthy in the hold of the Essex; I saw no farther, than I saw them put the wool in the bag; I did not see them cut the bag.

Q. Were you present when the wool was found? - A. No; I did not see any thing farther till the Police officers came on board.

Q. Where was the Essex lying at that time? - A. She was coming up the River; at the time they came on board, she was at the New Crane, Shadwell.

Q. Did you see the three bags that the officers found? - A. I saw them after they were brought into the Police-office.

Q. Did you see them after they were undone in the lighter? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body bring them up from the hold? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Where were you at the time the officers came on board? - A. At one of the oars along with Hall.

Q. Where was Gray? - A. Along with Hall; M'Carthy went before the officers came into the hold.

Q. How got you the hatch open? - A. They were unlocked, I did not see them unlocked.

Q. Who unlocked them you do not know? - A. My back was towards them at the time.

Q. Who had the key of the lighter? - A. Each of us lightermen, in the service of Salter and Cooper, had a key to unlock the hatch.

Q. Were you in the employ of Messrs. Salter and Cooper? - A. I was at that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You came from prison? - A. I did.

Q. While you were there, you were out of mischief

- you have said you were at the oar - when the hatch was open, you could see what was going forwards? - A. I turned round, and then I could see they were putting it in bags.

Q. You thought they were packing it up for greater security? - A. I cannot say what they were packing it up for, I did not give it a thought at the time.

Q. Did not you apprehend they were making it more secure? - A. I cannot say I did.

Q. You did not give it a thought, therefore you did not think there was any harm going forward? - A. I understood they were to be put out at St. Catherine's.

Q. You did not think it was any harm? - A. I did not think it was right; I was upon deck at the time it was transacted, I certainly knew what was going forward.

Q. You would not have countenanced a wrong thing; you thought there was no harm in it? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. You can say it if you try; this I can say, by your giving evidence you get your own neck out of the halter? - A. I hope so.

Q. And had not you given evidence, I take it, my dear friend, you might have got your neck into the halter? - A. I do not know.

Q. You must not say, I do not know again; were not you afraid that you might come to the gallows before you intended; were not you afraid that your worthy life might be cut short; were not you afraid society would lose so good a man as you? - A. I was afraid at the time the Police officers took me, I did not know what might follow.

Mr. Alley. Q. Where did you take M'Carthy on board? - A. At Blackwall.

Q. It is no uncommon thing to give a person a lift? - A. I did not take him up, I was not in charge of the craft at the time.

Q. Is it not a common thing to take people up? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. And put them down in the hold -

Gillman. I produce one of the bags.

Q. Are there any more than that? - A. Yes, two more; these are them that Gray said were sweepings; they are all about the same size, I have had them ever since.

- SALTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You are one of the proprietors of the Essex lighter? - A. Yes.

Q. You sent your servants to bring up the property from the Young Joan? - A. Yes.

Q. That is your lighter, and the Spanish wool is consigned to you? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Gillman.) Did you compare that wool in the bags with that which was in the packages that were on board? - A. Yes, it is of the same quality.

Court. (To Salter.) Q. Are there any sweepings in the lighter? - A. There are sometimes.

Q. Do you allow sweepings? - A. They are not allowed; there were sweepings of the ship, after the cargo was taken out, which were put in the lighter-bill, twenty pounds.

Q. Did they come to you in such bags as these? - A. No, larger and different bags from those, bags containing 200 pounds weight.

Hall's defence. I am a poor man, I have got a wife and five small children.

Gray's defence. May it please you, my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. On Tuesday, the 9th of April, I went up with the craft belonging to Mr. Fawcett, containing forty-two bags of wool; I left the ship, about ten minutes past five, in charge of the King's watchman; I then went home to my family, and went to-bed; on the 10th, at three o'clock, I walked down to Blackwall, and took charge of this said Essex lighter; I was not there upon the craft to see this cargo come in, and it was unknown to me what might be concealed in that craft then going up; this said Thomas Taylor , and Thomas Fieldhouse , and me, rowed upon each side at Blackwall, the tide running very strong; we were afraid that a ship would run against the lighter; at that moment he took the key out of his pocket to get a pole to prevent the lighter from being run against; these lightermen have keys, and have a right to go to what part of the craft they like; my duty was to prevent any thing going out of the craft; that was all that I had to do.

M'Carthy's defence. How I got on board this lighter was, I was on board the ship that the lighter got athwart of; I went in, and asked the lighterman if I could get a cast up with them, and I lent a hand to get clear of the ship, and going up Long Reach, I pulled off my great coat, and lent them a hand to get up the Reach; then when I got up the Pool, I continued at the oars till I saw a boat with four men; this gentleman said, two, and there were four, and being a sea-faring man I went down and concealed myself from not being pressed; that is all I have to say.

M'Carthy called one, Hall called one, and Gray called five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

M'Carthy, GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

Hall, GUILTY , Death , aged 52.

Gray, GUILTY , Death , aged 40.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-73

292. WILLIAM BARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , fourteen pounds weight of ham, value 12 s. the property of William Masters , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH MASTERS sworn. - I am the wife

of William Masters ; I live at No. 23, St. John street : On Wednesday, the 27th of February, at near nine o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for half a pound of butter; I served him, and after he had paid for it, he was going out; he returned and said he forgot he wanted half a quartern of cheese, and having more customers in the shop, he said he was not in a hurry; I served the other customers, and then looked for him and he was gone.

Q. Did you miss any thing from your shop? - A. No, I did not hear any thing of it till the next morning, when the constable came we looked and missed the ham.

Q. When had you observed that you had a ham lying there? - A. When my husband went out he asked me to put it away about four or five hours before the prisoner came in; the ham weighed about fourteen pounds.

WILLIAM HEARNE sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 27th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another man come by my box; I knew him; the patrol was with me; I said, we will follow those two men; I saw property in Barrington's lap, I could not tell what; the patrol stopped him, and I asked him what he had got in his lap; he said, some meat; he let the ham fall, and I caught it up; he ran away directly, the patrol followed him, and a soldier stopped him; before he ran away I caught up the ham.

Q. Did you ask him how he got it? - A. He said he had been and bought some meat to take home to be dressed.

THOMAS SELBY sworn. - I am a patrol belonging to Goswell-street: On the 27th of February, about half past nine o'clock; I was talking to the watchman at his box; the prisoner came by: in consequence of what Hearne said to me, I followed him and stopped him, and asked him what he had about him; he said he had some meat; I asked him where he got it from; he said from his father, and he was going to take it home; the watchman came up, and he caught the meat as it fell out of his lap, and he ran away. I followed him, and a young fellow secured him till I got up. He was never out of my sight.

PATRICK MARTYN sworn. - I am a soldier in the East London Militia: On Wednesday the 27th of February, as I was coming out of the Cock public-house, the corner of Golden-lane, Old-street, I heard the cry of, stop thief; I ran up and got hold of the prisoner and secured him.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am a constable of St. Luke's; I produce the ham; I had it from the watchman and patrol; they brought it to the watch-house after they brought the prisoner. -

(The ham identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into the shop to buy half a pound of butter; I paid for it, and then I asked for four eggs, the shop was full of people, more than that there were two ladies and a woman came in, in the mean time I came out, and I saw a bit of a noise a little further; as I came along I found something; I picked it up like an innocent man; a man came up to me and asked me what I had got; I said, it is not mine, I wish the owner had it; when I went and picked up the ham, the watchman saw me pick it up himself.

Hearne. I saw him throw it out of his lap, and I picked it up.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-74

293. JAMES COLEMAN was indicted feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Parkinson , about the hour of four, on the 6th of March , and feloniously stealing therein, a plated tea-pot and stand, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Parkinson .

THOMAS PARKINSON sworn. - I live at No. 20, Montague-street, Bloomsbury : On the 6th of last March I was returning home, between the hours of four and five in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner and another man, within a few yards of the iron railing that leads to the area; they waited till I came within a few yards of them, and I saw the prisoner go down the area steps, and let himself into the door; as I was entering on the steps of the street door myself, when I was knocking at the door he returned, and stared me in the face, by which means I could plainly see he had something like plate; immediately he came up he walked off; I desired the servant to pursue the man; he did, and overtook him; a person brought the tea-pot to me; I knew it to be mine; the tea-pot and stand cost me near five pounds; they are both plated and silver edged; the prisoner was brought back, and I took him to Bow-street: he said he would go either for a soldier or a sailor, which ever I chose.

BARNABAS BRIGHT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thomas Parkinson , I was down below when my master knocked at the door, at the back of the house.

Q. Was the door that opens into the area open or shut, when your master knocked at the door? - A. Shut; I had seen it three or four minutes before; I had seen the tea-pot and stand at one o'clock, because I had cleaned it; I can swear to it being there in the pantry, on a shelf with some china; I heard the area door open and shut, which gave me immediate alarm, and coming along

the passage, I heard Mr. Parkinson knock, and not knowing what it was, I went up to open the door to Mr. Parkinson.

Q. Do you know whether any of the servants opened the area door? - A. There were none of the servants below but the cook, and she was along with me; the pantry door was-not shut. I pursued the prisoner; he was stopped at the bottom of Vine-street, he dropped the property in Duke-street; when Watts stopped him, he said, he hoped I should not take him into custody.

JOHN WATTS sworn. - I am a post boy, at the George, in Drury-lane: on Wednesday, the 6th of March, I was watering my horses in St. Giles's, near the end of Vine-street; I heard the cry of, stop thief; I turned my head up Vine-street, and there I saw the prisoner; I stopped him.

JOHN EDGE sworn. - I am a back and bat maker: On the 6th of March I was in Duke-street, Bloomsbury; I saw the prisoner running and Mr. Parkinson's servant was crying out, stop thief; I saw him throw the tea-pot out of his apron; I followed him till he was secured.

WILLIAM DOVER sworn. - I live in Queen-street Bloomsbury; I was pursuing the prisoner; he dropped the tea-pot and stand in Duke-street, and I picked them up. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I lived in the Duke of Northumberland's family for two years; his coachman was here in the morning. I am very sorry the two witnesses have sworn falsely against me.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-75

294. GEORGE EMBERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a black mare, value 30 l. the property of John Schofield , and a light grey mare, value 20 l. the property of Cuthbert Harlen .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-76

295. THOMAS FINCH and GEORGE FINCH were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Crispin Dark , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 17th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, seventy yards of printed cotton, value 10 l. one hundred yards of edging, value 10 l. twenty yards of lace, value 10 l. twenty yards of mode, value 5 l. two yards of velvet, value 1 l. seven pieces of linen, value 28 l. sixty pair of braces, value 5 l. a great coat, value 10 s. six hundred yards of ribbon, value 15 l. seventy pieces of linen, value 28 l. forty pair of stockings, value 12 l. twenty yards of satin, value 14 l. twelve yards of persian, value 12 s. four hundred penny-pieces, and four hundred halfpence, the property of Crispin Dark .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CRISPIN DARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live at Sunbury, next door to the Castle ; I keep a draper's shop .

Q. On Sunday, the 17th of February, do you recollect your house being broke open? - A. I do.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night? - A. Between ten and eleven; my niece and servant went to bed first.

Q. You secured the whole of the house? - A. The shop door was fastened on the Saturday evening; the shop door and the house door are separate; the shop door and the house door were all secure before I went to bed.

Q. Who got up first in the morning? - A. I and my wife; my wife went first into the shop, and she communicated to me that my shop had been broke open; I went into the shop between seven and eight, it was quite light, and I saw that the half shutter of the door had been broke open with an iron crow; and one of the squares of glass had been broken.

Q. By which means any one could get their hand and put their arms in, and unlock and unbolt the door? - A. Yes, the key was left in the keyhole in the inside.

Q. What did you find missed out of the shop? - A. Mrs. Dark found all the drawers lying on the counter; she gave an alarm; I came to her assistance, and I saw all the drawers lying on the counter, and the tills and the desk had been rifled.

Q. Were the tills locked? - A. No, nor the desk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you been acquainted with the prisoners any time before they were taken into custody? - A. No.

Q. There was a woman of the name of Stone, that you received some information of - how came you to go to the habitations of these prisoners - you knew that a woman of the name of Stone lived in a particular place, and you went there? - A. I did, and some things were found there.

Q. Either you or some of the witnesses swore to it, in the presence of Mr. Pearks, the officer; you nor the officers did not find any thing upon the persons of the prisoners - what was it you found at Mrs. Stone's? - A. Nothing at all was found on the prisoners persons; there were some stockings and a duplicate found at Mrs. Stone's.

SARAH DARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of Crispin Dark ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you manage the business of the shop? - A. Yes, me and my niece entirely; her name is Rebecca Hammond .

Q. When you came down in the morning, and

looked in your shop did you miss these articles? - A. Yes, I missed them, and more.

Court. Q. What time did you come down on the Monday morning? - A. At seven o'clock; I think we had not a clock in the house but what stood.

Q. Do you think any person could move all these things in the space of an hour? - A. I think they could, they were very handy, and were all turned out at once; when I came down I took hold of the nob of the shop-door, and the door opened immediately.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you miss seventy yards of printed cotton? - A. I did.

Q. Twenty yards of lace? - A. A great deal more; I cannot say how many stockings, but there were as many as forty; there was a paper box with modes, silks, satins, and velvets; they took them all away.

JOHN CLEMENTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You keep the Castle, at Sunbury? - A. Yes, next door to Mr. Dark; there is only my yard parts; there is only room enough for a carriage to go in.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you know the prisoners? - A. I know them both well; the little one, Thomas Finch , in particular; he came to my house three weeks before the robbery was committed, with one Moss; Moss said he was a friend, and begged of us to let him have a lodging; he lodged with us one or two nights; then, on Sunday, the 17th, they both came into my house together; the little one nodded to me, knowing me before.

Q. About what time on the 17th of February did they come into your house? - A. I think it was about four o'clock in the afternoon they went into my tap-room, which is at the back part of the house; I do not recollect seeing them above once or twice, or so, on that day; my wife manages the business of the house; I am in the building line; I believe about eight o'clock I saw them both sitting drinking and smoking in my tap-room; I think it was about ten o'clock the last time that I saw them; they were in the tap-room; I am quite sure it is them.

JOHN PEARKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to the Public Office, in Bow-street: On the 18th of February I apprehended the prisoners, in company with other officers; we took George Finch at the Star and Garter, the corner of Whitcomb-street, in the Hay-market; on Monday evening, between the hours of eight and nine at night, I took him to Bow-street; I then went to No. 1, Poulten-court, in Windmill-street, near the Haymarket, and there, in the first floor, front room, I saw Thomas Finch , and in the same room I found two pair of stockings.

Q. Who was with Thomas Finch ? - A. A woman calling herself Mrs. Stone.

Q. Did you hear that her name was Stone? - A. She answered to the name of Stone; she was taken into custody and discharged that evening; I searched the room, and amongst some other duplicates I found the duplicates I now produce, pledged for three pair of hose; I found them in the tea-caddy, in the same room; I took them to the Office, and the stockings also, and the duplicates.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. Nothing.

Q. Did the other prisoner, at the time you apprehended him, say any thing? - A. No, he said nothing; he shewed a bit of a sulk; he did not seem inclined to be taken into custody.

Q. Have you been to the pawnbroker's with these duplicates? - A. Yes, the pawnbroker attends here, who will produce the stockings.

MARY DELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 1, Poulten-court; I kept the house then, I live in the house now, I let the front room to George Finch , the tall one, for him and his wife; the one pair of stairs front left hand room.

Q.(To Pearks.) Was that the room where you took the prisoner and the woman? - A. Yes, I took Thomas there.

Court. (To Mrs. Dell.) Q. You let the room to George? - A. Yes, and Thomas Finch used to come backwards and forwards there.

Q. You understood them to be brothers? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know a person of the name of Mary Stone ? - A. I never heard that her name was Mary Stone before I came into this Court; I always understood her name was Mrs. Finch.

Q. Did that woman turn out to be Mrs. Stone? - A. So I understand.

Q. Did she live with George Finch ? - A. Yes, as his wife.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. To whom did you let the lodgings? - A. To George Finch .

Q. And the woman lived in the lodgings with him, as man and wife, and the other man came backwards and forwards; all that you know is, this woman, of the name of Stone lived there, and this man lived with her; they lived together as husband and wife, and you knew no other? - A. I never knew any other.

WILLIAM KING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am apprentice to Mr. Tate, pawnbroker, Gainsborough-street, Golden square: I produce three pair of stockings, pledged together, in the name of Finch, by a woman, on Monday, the 18th of February, about four in the afternoon; I did not give the duplicate, I saw it given; that is the duplicate, and this is the corresponding one; the three pair were pledged for 7 s.

ESTHER HAMMOND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the niece of Mr. Dark? - A. Yes, when I came down stairs in the morning my aunt told me of the robbery.

Q. Your aunt and you keep the shop I understand; look at these five pair of stockings? - A. These are Mr. Dark's, I saw them on the Saturday night before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you are sure these stockings are part of Mr. Dark's property? - A. Yes.

Q. You have a great variety of cotton stockings? - A. We have.

Q. Do you remember, when you were at the Magistrate's, saying you could not undertake to speak to those stockings till you had got some more to match them? - A. Yes.

Q. Then that was the reason that you formed that opinion upon the subject? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you recollect the Magistrate sending for a needle and thread - Why did you send for a needle and thread? - A. To mark the stockings.

Q. That you might know them; that when you came to the Old Bailey or elsewhere, before the Grand Jury, you might swear to them - You had no occasion for a needle and thread, if you could have known those stockings abstracted from all other stockings in the world; I suppose you would have known them if you had worn them and mended them; then you would not have wanted a needle and thread? - A. I should not.

Q. These stockings you marked at the Magistrate's, in order that you should know them again? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore you only know them again by referring to other stockings that you had in Mr. Dark's shop? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You put a mark on them to know they were the same that were put into the constable's hands? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You say you had matched them with some others? - A. Yes.

Q. Were these stockings that you had to match them with of the same manufactory that had not been stolen? - A. Yes.

Q. Then of course whoever had robbed the house, they had stolen some stockings, and had left others behind them? - A. Yes.

Q. And they matched exactly? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any mark on them? - A. It was torn off.

Q. What was the shop mark? - A. Plain, 4 s. 6 d. on a piece of paper tacked to the heel.

Q. You found that part of the stockings which had not been taken away from you corresponded with those stockings, and which were of the same parcel? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When you saw those stockings at the pawnbroker's, had they been worn? - A. They did not appear to me to have been worn.

Q. Look at these stockings, and see if you know them? - A. They are Mr. Dark's, and they are of the same sort.

Q. Have they any mark by which you know them? - A. The mark is gone, but there is the tacking at the heel that was done at the shop; I generally mark all the stockings so, I tack them together, and there is the mark that I put at the Justice's.

Q. You make a tack at the heel to all the stockings that come into your shop? - A. Yes, always, and it is in these stockings now; I tack them together in pairs.

SAMUEL TAUNTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Bow-street: On Monday, the 18th of February, I apprehended the prisoners, in company with other officers; we apprehended George Finch first, at the Star and Garter; we then went to Poulten-court, No. 1; there we apprehended Thomas; I searched the room, and in his box I found this pistol, which I now produce.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You could not commit a burglary with that pistol - You could not break a house open with it - You know there is a forty pounds reward? - A. Yes, I have heard of it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. If a person commits a burglary, and there is any resistance, he might use it to defend himself? - A. Yes.

George Finch 's defence. All I have to say is I went out of this Mrs. Dell's house, and never returned again; I was at the Star and Garter when these people took me to Bow-street.

Thomas Finch 's defence. I was going along past Poulten-court, and I met with Mary Stone ; she asked me to have a cup of tea with her, and I went up and had a cup of tea with her.

Thomas Finch , GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

George Finch , GUILTY , Death , aged 25.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-77

296. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 14th of March , a certain order for the payment of 265 l. 10 s. purporting to be the order of Messrs. David, Peter, and John Martinean , upon Messrs. Forster, Lubbock, and Clark, with intention to defraud John Miers .

Second Count, For like offence, with like intention. And

Two other Counts, For uttering and publishing as true the like forged and counterfeited order for the payment of money, with like intention.

Mr. Const, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-78

297. HANNAH SHEPHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , twenty ounces weight of black silk, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Charles Campbell , in the dwelling-house of John Wells .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but her own confession, extorted by a promise of forgiveness, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-79

298. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a mahagony table, value 12 s. the property of James Nash .

PETER NASH sworn. - I work with my father at No. 16, Wapping-wall, Shadwell : On Wednesday night, the 17th of April, between five and six in the evening, a neighbour came in, and asked if we had lost a table; I pursued the prisoner, and caught him in Old Gravel-lane, as he was crossing into Bostick-street; I asked him where he had got that table; he told me he had bought it; I told him it was no such thing, it was my father's property; he then put the table down, and struck me, and walked off; there was no person in the shop at the time when the table was taken away, my father had just stepped out.

JOHN WOOLLARD sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Thames Police: On the 17th of April, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner crossing Old Gravel-lane, with a mahogany table on his shoulder; at the same time I saw the lad run up to him, and challenge him with having stolen the table from his father; I saw him drop the table, he struck the lad, and then run down Bostick-street; I pursued the prisoner, and brought him to the Office; that is the table.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Look at that table? - A. That is my table.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in constant service for fifteen or sixteen years. In the American war I had a fall on board a ship from the mast head, and when I get a drop of drink more than ordinary, I do not know what I am about; I have a large family at home; I have been in this regiment going on five years.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38,

Of stealing only.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-80

299. GEORGE SPIKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , thirty yards of blue baize, value 3 l. the property of William Busby , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BUSBY sworn. - I live at No. 42, Duke-street, Mary-le-bone ; I keep a haberdasher's, hosier's, and flannel shop : On Saturday, the 9th of March, the property was taken from my shop; I was not at home, I can only speak to the property.

ANN THOMPSON sworn. - I am a married woman, I live in Gray's-buildings, Duke-street, Manchester-square: On Saturday, the 9th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was passing by Mr. Busby's shop, I perceived two men standing at the iron rails belonging to Mr. Busby's shop, and seeing them there several nights before, it drew my attention to see what they were doing of; I watched, and saw the prisoner standing between the passage door and the shop door; I crossed to the opposite side of the way to watch him, and directly I got over, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with a roll of baize on his arm; it was moon-light, and, to the best of my knowledge, it then appeared like green baize; I immediately gave the alarm, and followed the prisoner closely; I met with Mr. Clements, I desired him to stop him, the other man run off; Mr. Clements stopped him with the baize on his shoulder, and was bringing him back to the shop that he took it from; he threw the baize down, and ran away.

Q. Did Mr. Clements catch him again? - A. Yes; I picked up the baize, and took it into the shop; it was given to the constable.

JAMES CLEMENTS sworn. - I live in Gray-street, Manchester-square, I am a tallow chandler.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Thompson, the last witness, on that Saturday night? - A. The prisoner was passing me in Gray-street, I was looking at him when the woman came up; she asked me to stop that man, he had stole the baize from a shop in Duke-street; I followed him immediately, he then mended his pace; I caught him, and asked him what he was going to do with that piece of baize; he said, a young man, an acquaintance, had asked him to carry it somewhere; I told him he should take it back to where he took it from; he said, he would not, he did not know where; the woman was at hand, she said she would shew him where he took it from; he then went along, and wanted me to carry it; I took hold of him part of the way, and then I loosed him; he walked with me, and when he came near the shop he threw it down, and ran away; I followed him, and took hold of him again, and in the course of the contest he attempted to throw me; I brought him back to Mr. Busby's shop, and left him in the care of the woman that is now present, and other people in the shop; I went for Mr. Watson, the constable; he came, and took charge of him.

- WATSON sworn. - I am a constable, I was sent for to take charge of this man on Saturday the

9th of March; I took him to the watch-house, he said nothing to me, but he made use of very improper expressions; he blamed Mr. Clements, and said he was a liar, and he wished he had a knife he would thrust it into his bl - y guts; he was not the person who took it, that he got hold of him because he could not get hold of the right one.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) What is the value of that baize? - A. Three pounds; it has my own shop mark on it, there are thirty yards, I am sure it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up Duke-street, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw this woman following a man with a roll of cloth, but it was not me; I am as innocent as a child unborn, I know nothing about it, the lad that had the cloth made his escape, and this man laid hold of me; Mr. Busby took upon himself to swear at the Office that the cloth was green, you may depend upon it that is a real fact, he said the cloth was green.

Prosecutor. In regard of that, I was asked by Mr. Graham several times whether that baize was my property; in the hurry of speaking, I might probably say once that green baize; still that baize is my property whether I called it black, blue, or white.

Q. Is that the baize that was before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, and it is the only blue one we have.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-81

300. JOHN GARWOOD was indicted for that he, being a servant to George Philips , did, on the 9th of March , receive and take into his own possession, for and on account of his said master, the sum of 3 s. and did afterwards fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count. For like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the servant of Mr. Haywood, in Oxford-road? - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday, the 9th of March, did Mr. Philips give you any money? - A. Yes, half-a-crown and sixpence, for which he desired I would go into his old shop, and buy three tumblers, in Oxford-road ; I went to the shop, and bought them, the prisoner served me, they came to a shilling a-piece; I gave the prisoner the half-crown and the sixpence which Mr. Philips gave me, I had no more money in my pocket.

JONATHAN PHILIPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the son of George Philips ? - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner for some time past been in your father's service? - A. Yes, better than a twelvemonth.

Q. Your father has lately taken a new shop in Oxford-road? - A. Yes, about five years ago, he has now two shops in Oxford-street.

Q. You, and the prisoner, and another servant, continue at the old shop? - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday, the 9th of March, did you, by order of your father, send out the other servants, leaving only the prisoner in the shop? - A. Yes, that was between seven and eight; I went out with a small parcel to the other shop, and there I saw my father. In consequence of what my father told me, I went back to the old shop.

Q. You have a till-book, is it the business of the person taking money in the shop to enter it there? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the till-book here? - A. No, I examined the till-book, I found no entry of it there; I asked him if any person had been in the shop; he told me he had taken two shillings for goblets, and that was all.

Court. Q. For what purpose did you examine the till-book? - A. For what my father had informed me. Accordingly, a short time after, I took the till-book, and asked him if there was any more to set down, in order to settle the money, as I always do of a Saturday night; I then asked him if there was any thing more to set down in that book; he said, no, he had given me all; he then went out of the accompting-house to put his great coat on to go home; at that interval my father came in, I went out for a Police officer.

Q. When you returned with the Police officer, did you hear your father say any thing to the prisoner? - A. My father asked him for the three shillings that he had taken for the three tumblers; he put his hand into his pocket, and said he was going to put that down; he then took out half-a-crown and sixpence, and gave it for the tumblers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you not know that this man's memory was impaired? - A. He was generally very forgetful.

Court. Q. You really believe he had a bad memory? - A. Yes.

GEORGE PHILIPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner had been your servant for more than twelve months? - A. Yes, he was clerk.

Q. Did you send Thomas Williams on the evening of the 9th of March to your old shop to buy three tumblers? - A. I did, I gave him half-a-crown and sixpence; I followed him to the shop, I saw him receive three tumblers into his hand, and come out of the shop; I went back to my new shop, and saw my son, and gave him orders what to do; I sent my son to the old shop, I followed him, I looked into the till-book, and sent for the peace officer; on perceiving him going out of the door, I said, Garwood, have you any thing to put down in this book? his answer was, since master Jonathan

was out, I have only taken two shillings, and that I have given him; I asked him what the man had bought who had gone out with the flower-pot; he said, we had not what he wanted; I said, Garwood, I have a matter to lay to your charge, I think you have been secreting money, I sent a lad to purchase three tumblers, which money you have secreted; he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and took out some silver, and selected the half-crown and the sixpence; he said, I was just going to set it down, Sir; the officer has the half-crown and the sixpence, he was taken into custody.

- WARREN sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the half-crown and the sixpence.

Mr. Alley. Q.(To Prosecutor.) We have proved that his memory is impaired, you puzzled him about other things, you never told him of the tumblers till the officer came? - A. Certainly.

Q. And then when the officer came you told him; he said, I received this, I forgot to put it down. -

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-82

301. ANN SEYMOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , seven pair of stockings, value 12 s. a cravat, value 2 s. and two two-pound Bank-notes , the property of James Gibbons .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you live at Marybone-park ? - A. Yes; the prisoner is my servant , she has lived with me about two months.

Q. After she had been with you any time, did you miss any of your property? - A. Yes, I missed seven pair of stockings and a cravat; I cannot say I missed the Bank-notes, I discovered them afterwards; the prisoner stated to me she had received some money from her mother, who was very indigent, in the country, she had said that she got a letter wrote to her mother; I requested to know who this person was; at last, after a falsity, she said a Mrs. Baker wrote it for her; in consequence of that, I went across the yard the next morning where her box was; I desired her to accompany me, I saw her box was broken open; she said it was broken open by Mr. Bradley, for she had lost the key; I desired her to get ready to go to Mrs. Baker's, she made her escape with two large bundles.

Q. Did these bundles contain any articles in this indictment? - A. They did, both mine and my nephew's; we pursued her, and after a lapse of a quarter of an hour, we found her in a cellar in Charlton-street, with two bundles, at Mrs. Newton's, the person who washes at my cottage; we brought her and the bundles back to my cottage; we found there in the bundles my stockings and the cravat, we found more articles which I have not mentioned.

Q. Did you afterwards find any notes, and where? - A. In consequence of information, I went to the house of Mrs. Baker; I asked her how she came to write this letter; Mrs. Baker said she had never wrote that letter, nor never had any transactions with her in her life; I took the girl with me, and my nephew; Mrs. Baker said she never saw her before last Monday week; I then turned round to the girl, and asked her if it was true, she made me no answer; I begged Mrs. Baker's pardon for expressing myself so angry; and when this girl was brought back, after she had made her escape, Mrs. Baker came, and said in the girl's presence, I find you have taken Nanny, I have brought you her pocket-book containing two two-pound notes, which I received from your servant Nanny; I questioned the girl, and she said she took them out of my pocket, with others, before I was dressed, while my coat was hanging in the parlour; half an hour elapsed before I told Mrs. Baker I should go to the Office, then Mrs. Baker said she would tell me the whole truth, if I would not bring her into trouble; she said, that Nanny had brought her two other two-pound notes about a fortnight before; the prisoner acknowledged to taking the notes out of my pocket-book, and stockings from the cottage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gleed. Q. Is your house in the City of London? - A. No; Westminster.

Q. Mrs. Baker requested that she should not be brought into trouble, and I believe she is the principal in the business - this is the first service that she came to in London? - A. Yes.

Q. She came to you particularly recommended? - A. Yes, her mother is a poor woman living in Berkshire.

Q. At the time that the girl made her escape from your house, you were not present? - A. No.

Q. In point of fact, you did not see her take the bundles? - A. I did not; I particularly requested the clerk of the indictments not to put the notes in the indictment.

Q. What age is she? - A. Sixteen.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What is the value of the stockings? - A. Fourteen shillings, and the cravat a shilling; they have my marks on them, I know they are mine; I am given to understand that she has shewn much contrition.

Q. Are you sure the notes are your's, that you had not paid them away? - A. I had not; there is my writing on the back of it, West, 22 of the 2nd month, and I am given to understand that the prisoner's mother's life depends upon the issue of this prosecution.

GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

302. ANN SEYMOUR was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a pocket-book,

with instruments, value 18 s. the property of James Gibbons .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES GIBBONS sworn. - After the prisoner was brought back with the bundles, Mrs. Baker came in, and said that she found Nanny was brought back; she said, I have brought you a pocket-book with two two-pound notes in it; she gave it to me, and said the prisoner gave it to her; I then asked her if that was the whole of the property that she had had of her, and she said it was; after the elapse of half an hour, Baker said, if I would not bring her into trouble, she would tell the truth; the prisoner acknowledged that she had given it to her, and that she had taken the pocket-book out of my coat-pocket from my house in town, in Great Russell-street .

Q. Is that pocket-book your property? - A. Yes, it has my mark upon it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and the Jury, thinking she might have acted under the influence of the receiver.

Privately whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-83

303. MARY BERRY , REBECCA REESON , and MARY SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , ten muslin handkerchiefs, value 15 s. the property of William Perkins and John-Arthur Whitehead .

WILLIAM PERKINS sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Brandon-street, Leicester-square ; my partner's name is John-Arthur Whitehead : On the 25th of April, between the hours of nine and ten, I received information that I had lost ten handkerchiefs that were hanging at the door, inside of the shop, tied up with a string; I went out, and saw the three prisoners in company together, at a gin-shop, in Castle-street, Cranbourn-alley; the little one had got her apron up, and I perceived that she had something in it; as soon as she saw me, she threw it out of her apron, and I laid hold of it; it was ten muslin handkerchiefs in one piece; they were my goods.

Q. Are you sure you had not sold these handkerchiefs? - A. I am very sure of that, and I am certain they are what I took from them; when I took the handkerchiefs, I said, you have been stealing these handkerchiefs; she said she had never seen them before in her life.

Berry's defence. I am nothing but a poor girl that follows the market; I went to get something for my supper; I met a woman, and she asked me the way to St. Martin's-lane; she said, hold these handkerchiefs, while I get something to drink.

Reeson's defence. I was standing along-side of her, and the man came and took her.

Smith's defence. I was coming past this liquor shop, and he caught hold of this young woman.

Berry, GUILTY of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

Reeson, NOT GUILTY .

Smith, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-84

304. REBECCA REESON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a bonnet, value 5 s. the property of Mary Ball , spinster .

- HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable: On the night the three prisoners were brought to the watch-house with the handkerchiefs, I saw this bonnet on Rebecca Reeson ; I asked her how she came by it, and she told me that her sister made it; I asked her what she had got under her apron; I looked, and found an old bonnet, which gave me reason to suspect that it was stolen in Cranbourn-alley; I locked her up in the watch-house, and went to inquire in Cranbourn-alley for the owner of the bonnet, and I found the owner.

MARY BALL sworn. - I live at No. 18, Cranbourn-alley ; the constable, Hawthorn, brought the bonnet to me; I had seen it in the day, it was only made the day before, I am quite sure it is mine; I do not know how it went out of the shop.

Q. What is it worth? - A. Three shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner's defence. I never went into the shop; a young girl lent me the bonnet, and I was waiting at the place till she came back.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-85

305. ANN HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , two pillows, value 5 s. one sheet, value 7 s. and two flat irons, value 2 s. the property of Edward Hutchins , in a lodging-room let by contract by him to her, to be used in and with the lodging .

EDWARD HUTCHINS sworn. - I live at No. 7, Great Prescot-street, St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. Was the prisoner a lodger of your's? - A. She came to us on the Friday, as she was taken on the Wednesday, the 20th of March.

Q. Was the lodging furnished? - A. Yes; on the Tuesday following I saw her take a bundle out, and I suspected her; the next morning I took a constable with me, and knocked at her door; she opened the door, and the constable searched the bed, and found a sheet and two pillows were gone, and the flat irons we found were gone out of the room.

Q. Are you sure they were in the room when she took the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you charge her with having taken them?

- A. Yes, and she denied it; I afterwards found the things; she sold the two pillows, and pawned the sheet and the flat irons.

- BARBER sworn. - I keep a shop, No. 5, William-street, St. Mary-le-bone; the prisoner came to me, I believe, on the 18th of March, to buy a gown; she said she had a couple of pillows to part with.

Q. Did you buy them? - A. Yes; I gave her half-a-crown for them.

ROBERT CHAPMAN sworn. - I went with the prosecutor up to the prisoner's room, and searched it; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and searched her, and found the duplicates, which led to a discovery of the flat irons, and the sheet, at the pawnbroker's; I produce the duplicates, and the pawnbroker's servant is here to produce the property. (The property produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I pledged the sheet and the irons; he asked me if I would go and fetch them out; I said I could not, but when my week was up, I would take them both out; I told them where I sold the pillows, and there they found them.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-86

306. MARTHA RICH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , two quart pewter pots filled with beer, value 3 s. the property of Jacob Robinson .

The prosecutor's name being Joseph, and not Jacob, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-87

307. SUSANNAH RANDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , No. 196, Whitecross-street ; I lost a pair of shoes on the 28th of February.

JUDITH SOLOMON sworn. - I live at No. 2, Playhouse-yard; the prisoner at the bar came and told me she had the ticket of a pair of shoes; she said they would fit me, I might have the ticket for fourpence, and they were pledged for two shillings; I sent my sister for them on Saturday night; they told my sister she had stole them.

SAMUEL BRIANT sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lucock, pawnbroker, No. 130, Whitecross-street: On the 1st of March the prisoner came and pledged a pair of shoes; I took them in of her, and lent her two shillings on them; Mr. Lucock delivered them to Mr. Smith in my presence. (The shoes identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not know the shoes were stolen; I saw a woman in Whitecross-street; I pledged the shoes for her in the name of Mary Webb ; she told me she lived at No. 20, Featherstone-street.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

The Jury recommended her to mercy on account of her good character.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-88

308. GEORGE GOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a truss and three-quarters of hay, value 4 s. the property of Francis Moline .

The prosecutor not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-89

309. ANDREW THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , six goblets, value 9 s. 6 d. one pair of salts, value 18 s. one glass mug; value 7 s. six cups and saucers, value 7 s. a set of castors and frames, value 14 s. one bowl, value 18 s. a sugar bason, value 1 s. 6 d. and six cups, value 5 s. the property of Anthony Jefferson .

It appearing in evidence the prisoner had procured these articles to purchase them, the Court were of opinion it was a debt, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-90

310. ANDREW THOMPSON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , one hundred sacks, value 17 l. the property of Francis and Edward Buckingham .

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner had obtained the goods by the name of Hockley, under pretence of purchasing them, he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-91

311. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a mahogany writing-desk, value 42 s. and a gilt frame, value 2 s. the property of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES sworn. - I live in Newport-street , I keep a sale-shop : On the evening of the 19th of March I found the writing-desk and a print that lay on a table at my door in the possession of the prisoner; he might be a yard and a half from my house when I saw him.

Q. Did you see him take it? - A. No.

Q. When had you seen the writing-desk? - A. About ten minutes before.

Q. Did you see him with the desk? - A. My wife laid hold of him first; I told him he had got a desk belonging to me, and he began to laugh.

Q. Are you sure that the writing-desk and frame are your property? - A. Yes, here is my private mark: when I took him to Bow-street, the Magistrate did not sit then, and we took him to the Brown Bear ; he took a knife out, and said he would cut my witnesses bl - y life out; this is the knife, I have kept it ever since.

WILLIAM COBB sworn. - I am a journeyman butcher at Newport-market; I saw the prisoner at the bar about a quarter past six o'clock on the 19th of March walking backwards and forwards by Mr. Jones's shop; the desk stood on a table, and the picture hung over it on the door-post; he took the picture down, and laid it on the desk; he looked on his right hand and then on his left; then he took up the property, and before he got two feet from the door, I caught him fast by the throat; Mr. Jones came up to my assistance, and we took him to Bow-street; the Magistrate not sitting, the prisoner was taken to the Brown Bear ; he was sitting down, and I was standing by him; he said to me, why do not you get farther; I said, I will sit down by you; he struck at me, and I then caught hold of his throat again; he pulled out a knife, and said he would take my bl - y life from me; he said, you bl - y thief. I will do for you; I then got up, and said, if he hit me again, I would knock his head against the settle; he called me a bl - y b - r; I was desired to repeat the words by the Magistrate, though they are very vulgar.

Prisoner. Q. It is the most infamous villainy for this man to say this - Did not you ask me if I would carry a parcel for you, coming by Newport-court? - A. I never saw you in my life before I saw you take up the property.

Q. Did not you say you would leave me a shilling, if I would carry these for you? - A. No, I never did.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Newport-market, coming down St. Martin's-lane; as I came down there, I met this man, and I asked him if he knew any place I could sleep in that night; he told me, no, he would leave me a shilling to get a lodging if I would carry a parcel; he told me to come and take up these things, and carry them; immediately I took hold of them, he called out, stop thief; this man came out, and caught hold of me.

Q. Have you any witness? - A. I know no person in London.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-92

312. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , twelve yards of printed calico, value 18 s. the property of Benjamin Webb .

DAVID THOMAS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Webb, he is a linen-draper , No. 320, High Holborn : On the 27th of March, between the hours of one and two in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar with Mr. Heslop, he was pushing her into the shop; I immediately took her, and saw the printed calico wrapped up in her apron; it was my master's, and it was hanging up on a bar outside of the door-post. (The calico produced and identified by the witness.)

- HESLOP sworn. - I saw the prisoner take from Mr. Webb's shop-door this printed calico, and put it in her apron; I laid hold of her, and brought her back to the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along Holborn, and there was a young woman standing at the shop-window; there was a piece of cotton lying down, and I picked it up; that gentleman came after me, and told me to come back; I told him, by all means, and directly I gave it up into this gentleman's hands.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-93

313. MARTHA HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , two sheets, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Hermitage , Henry Rose , Christian Swift , Walter Swain , and George Armstrong .

Second Count, The property of Samuel Devin .

Third Count, The property of persons unknown.

SAMUEL DEVIN sworn. - I am superintendant of the workhouse of St. George's in the East ; the prisoner at the bar was nurse in the children's ward; she took the sheets from the ward, and carried them to Mr. Bradley to pawn.

Q. Did you see her take them? - A. I did not; Mr. Bradley brought them to me.

ANTHONY BRADLEY sworn. - The prisoner came to our shop some day in March; upon examining of them, and from the appearance of the person, I found them to be the sheets belonging to the parish; I took them to Mr. Devin, and he owned them.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say for myself; I leave it to the mercy of the gentlemen.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-94

314. JOHN THOMPSON , WILLIAM HILL , and JAMES HALSEY , were indicted, the two former for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , two bushels of coals, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Lynam , and the latter for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, they were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-95

315. EDWARD TOTHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , two hundred weight of bar iron, value 2 l. twenty smith's working tools, value 12 s. a box of screws, nails, and hinges, mixed together, value 14 s. the property of William Bailey .

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I was standing at the Hat and Tun door, in Hatton-wall; On the 18th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner and a boy past me, the prisoner had got an old basket on his back, it was as much as he could carry; I suspected that it was stolen property; I followed him and at the bottom of Vine-street, Saffron-hill, he stopped at an old iron shop.

Q. Had this boy any thing with him? - A. No.

Q. Who kept the old iron shop? - A. One March; he mounted the steps of the door and threw it down and run away; I rather suspected that he saw me standing at the top of the hill; I imagine that the boy told him I was following him; I immediately laid hold of the boy and took the property.

Q. What did the bag contain? - A. A great quantity of iron old and new; I took the boy to the office; and the boy was committed to the House of Correction; and by the boy I found out that he worked for Mr. Bailey; and where he lived; I went and took him up immediately.

Q. When you took the prisoner up are you sure he is the man that run away? - A. I have no doubt, I asked him how he came to run away; he said, he run home on purpose to shut his house up.

Q. Where was his house? - A. No. 2, in Weston-park, Lincolns Inn-fields; not having an opportunity to take him before the Magistrate, I took him to the House of Correction, I also informed Mr. Bailey the next morning what I had done; I took Mr. Bailey with me and searched the house, and Mr. Bailey owned the iron and tools; I brought it away; I had two hampers full; Mr. Bailey saw the iron at the Office, that the prisoner threw down at the old iron-shop door.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing to the boy before he run away? - A. I did, but I do not know what it was, he run pretty fast, he had like to have knocked down two or three people as he was running away.

Q. When you went to his house, was there any forge there? - A. There was, and a great many tools which Mr. Bailey owned, and there was a stove there, in an unfinished state.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Never to my knowledge. I produce the property.

WILLIAM FIZZARD sworn. - I am a smith, I work for Mr. Bailey; I know the tools to be Mr. Bailey's property. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I keep a little smith's shop, and have done for seven years past; sometimes I have a man to work for me; I buy old iron; I buy half an hundred weight or an hundred; if it is too heavy for me, I sell it again; I left work at seven o'clock and went with this iron, with my little boy; I said to my wife, my love, I will leave Ted there to take the money, I will not stay, she being ill, and I had not fastened the house up; I went down to Mutton-hill, to the iron shop, and left the boy there; I returned home to my house again directly, my wife being ill at home; I could not think where the boy staid; by and by, after nine o'clock, a person came to our door and knocked; I said, who is there; I opened the door, and this officer came in; he said, are you the person that belongs to this house; I said, I am; did you leave this boy with the iron; where did you get it; I said, I have got more; he said you must go to the Justice, and let us know how you got it; I shewed him all down the cellar; said he, you must go to the Justice; I went to Hatton-garden, and he took me into a public-house; then, by and by, he said, the Justice was gone home; he took me to Clerkenwell for that night, till the next day; at twelve o'clock he came up to me again, and took me to the office, and when I found what he had brought there, I saw enough to frighten five hundred people; I said, what did you bring this property here for, this property I have had by me this seven years; they took every thing from me but my anvil and my forge; if masters knew a man worked for himself they would not employ him; I make stove-grates for one particular gentleman.

Prosecutor. He has not had the chain and pulley above a week.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-96

316. JOHN TINKLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , three knife-boxes, value 30 s. twenty feet of mahogany veneer, value 12 s. and materials for a book-case, value 3 l. the property of John Clarke .

JOHN CLARKE sworn. - I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker : on Monday, the 1st of April, I sent for the prisoner (he was my foreman ); he came to me, and I said, Tinkler, I understand you have taken from me three knife-boxes, which my son saw at your room, what have you done with them; he said, it is very true, I have, and I have sold them to Mr. Solomon, up at the end of the street, for fourteen shillings; my son went to Solomon's, and brought the knife-boxes down.

Q. Did you know them again? - A. Yes; I said, Tinkler, have you took any thing belonging to a secretary and a book-case; he made no reply;

we found the stuff belonging to the secretary at Mr. Prosser's.

ELISHA SOLOMON sworn. - I live in Castle-street, Long-acre; I am a cabinet-maker and upholsterer: On the 30th of March I bought three knife-boxes of the prisoner, for which I gave him fourteen shillings; I gave them to Mr. Clarke's son.

THOMAS PROSSER sworn. - I am a cabinet maker, in Rockingham-court, Castle-street, Long-acre.

Q. Had you ever any dealings with the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. Was there any mahogany veneers taken from your house? - A. Yes, by Mr. Clarke.

Q. How came you by those veneers? - A. I bought them of the prisoner about two months back; I gave him half a guinea for them; he told me he bought them of Francis and Beckworth, and he had no time to work them up himself, and that he had had it by him for two or three years; and I bought the secretary and bookcase of him; I gave him 2 l. 10 s. for it; the prosecutor took it away.

EDWARD TREADAWAY sworn. - I am an officer: On the 2d of April I went with a search-warrant to Prosser's house. I produce the property.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Q. How do you swear to that veneer? - A. Just the same as though I was to take a banker's cheque and tear it; I know it by the veins, and I can swear to the knife-boxes.

Prisoner's defence. Before I worked for Mr. Clarke I had worked for myself upwards of five years; Mr. Clarke bought several things of me and a great many knife-boxes; the last that I sold to Mr. Clarke he said to me, had not you better come and work for me; he advised me to come and work at his shop for him; I did; I had a deal of stuff by me at that time; he told me, if I had no place convenient to put it in, I might bring it to his shop, which I did; some time after I found it convenient to take it home to my lodging and I did take it home, and this secretary and bookcase; it was intended by me at the first for Mr. Wilkinson, a broker, in Moorfields; I bought a little stuff now and then to get it completed; there was not an inch of that stuff belonged to Mr. Clarke; John Clarke , the prosecutor's son, was continually asking me to do a job for him at home; it was against my inclination to do that which I have done for him to oblige him; the first thing I made for him was a lady's dressing-box; after that a deal table with four drawers, for his hair-dresser; and I made a mahogany table for him, and he never gave me any thing for them; I believe he was short of money, and wanted money more than I did, and he told me one time, instead of giving me money, when there were any odd ends lying about the shop, I was welcome to take them, and say nothing to any body; there were some of these knife-boxes I did take by his telling me so to do; the last thing that he told me to take was the stuff to make up for him a three foot and three inch chest of drawers, for he had got a good customer for it; I told him I had no convenience to do it, it would take up a long time to make up at odd times; he said I might make it up on Sundays; he told me to take them; I told him I was fearful if my master found it out, it would get me and him into trouble; he told me I need not fear about his father, he should not know it, he would get the stuff for me; he is here, and it is the truth.

JOHN CLARKE , jun. sworn. - I acknowledge that the prisoner, three years back, made me a dining-table; I intended it for a friend of mine; he did not finish it for a long elapse of time; in short, then he pawned it; it rested there for a twelve month or upwards; then he told me he had pawned it for a pound; he made for me a dressing-box, I gave him the wood to take home to make it for me; the prisoner took the wood with my knowledge; I had my father's approbation to take a little, not to go to a large extent, and he made me a deal table for a hair-dresser of mine.

Q. Did he, with your knowledge or approbation, take the wood for these knife-trays? - A. Not at all.

Q. Did he take the materials for the secretary and the veneers with your approbation? - A. Never.

Q. Have you seen these materials for the secretary? - A. I have, and part of the wood I can say is my father's; my father bought them at Francis and Beckworth's; I am quite sure they are my father's property.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-97

317. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , four coach-seats, value 20 s. the property of William Graves .

WILLIAM GRAVES sworn. - I am a coach-master ; I live in Green Dragon yard, Holborn : On the 14th of March I had been out with the coach myself; I put up the coach in the yard at twelve o'clock, and saw the seats were safe in the coach; they were stuff cushions; I went again to the coach at six o'clock on the 15th and they were gone; the door was open and the steps were let down; I saw them again in the middle of the day at Hatton-garden, and the prisoner was then in custody.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: On the 15th of March, about twenty minutes after six in the morning, I was

coming up Union-street, Hatton-garden; the prisoner at the bar was offering to sell these four cushions to a master baker, as he was coming out of a public-house; he called them chair-seats; the master baker knew me, and seeing me come up, he said to the prisoner, this man will buy them, he is something in the brokery line; I asked him where he brought them from; he said he bought them at Enfield, and gave half a guinea for them; I told him I would buy them and him too; I took and locked him up and the four coach-seats. I produce them. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming out of the country, where I wrought hard for my money and whatever I have had; I have threshed and ploughed for eight shillings a week; I have a wife and two babies at home; I could not get a bit of bread to maintain them; I was coming up to London, and as I was coming along I happened with a man in a cart; he said, my lad, where are you going to; I said, to London; he said, I have got some cushions to sell, if you are willing to get a few shillings by them; I gave him half a guinea for them; I had but sevenpence halfpenny left; I am as hard working a lad as ever you knew, you may depend upon it; I had just come up out of the country the morning as I happened with this misfortune.

Q. Are any of the persons here that you ploughed and threshed for? - A. No, they are not here.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-98

318. CHARLES SUMPTER and WILLIAM CLARKE were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a set of glass cruets in a mahogany frame, value 8 s. a water-pot, value 1 s. a pair of salts, value 3 s. three glass vinegar-cruets, value 4 s. two glass mustard-pots, value 2 s. 3 d. two glass cruets, value 2 s. 3 d. a japan bottle-stand, value 1 s. 6 d. a pot and top, value 2 s. 6 d. a pan, value 2 s. 6 d. thirty-eight earthen dishes, value 8 s. an earthen jug, value 4 d. three milk-basons, value 8 d. thirty-eight dishes, value 10 s. and two pint mugs, value 4 d. the property of John Few , and the latter for receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

ROBERT CRIB sworn. - I live at No. 228, Holborn; I am a carver and gilder: On the 26th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was at my door, and saw the prisoner Clark at the corner of Hand-court, directly opposite my door: In consequence of information, I suspected he was waiting for the prisoner Sumpter; I then went out, and walked as far as the George and Blue Boar, which is opposite to Mr. Few's; I had not been there more than two minutes before I saw the prisoner Sumpter come out of Mr. Few's, with a basket full of earthen ware; I followed him till he came to the corner of Hand-court, and saw him give it to the prisoner Clark; they set it down on the ground, and one said to the other, nobody will meddle with it; I then went up close to it and they both went into a gin-shop together, the corner-house; they afterwards came out and went up Hand-court together; they then separated, Sumpter went towards Red-Lion street, and Clarke went on towards Gray's Inn, with this basket on his arm; I followed him to Clerkenwell, and not finding a constable at the Sessions-house, I went back and saw no more of him nor the basket till I saw the basket at the Office, which I believe to be the same; I acquainted Mr. Few when I came back, and in consequence of that information he taxed Sumpter with it in my presence, and he then confessed to have given this to Clarke.

JOHN FEW sworn. - In consequence of Mr. Cribb's information, and my believing Sumpter to be a very honest man indeed, I could hardly credit what he informed me of; I charged him with it; I went down with Sumpter to Hatton-garden Office, and the Magistrate sent Hancock, the officer, with me to the prisoner Clarke's lodgings, in company with Sumpter; I there saw an immense quantity of earthen ware, and I was pretty certain they were my property; these are them (produces the property); amongst them there were two baking-dishes with the shape of an hour-glass at the bottom: On the 28th we charged the prisoner Sumpter with it, and we searched the prisoner Clarke's lodging on the same day; I only selected a few of the articles in the indictment; I believe them all to be mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Can you swear, independent of any circumstance whatever, that this dish in my hand is your's; you know other people in the trade have dishes so marked? - A. They may have.

Court. Q.(To Prosecutor.) What trade did Clarke carry on? - A. He is a hawker of earthen ware .

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: On the 28th of February I went along with Mr. Few in the evening to the prisoner Clarke's lodgings, Rotten-row, Old-street; I went into the house and Mr. Few owned the property; I told Mr. Few to identify as many as belonged to him, and I would take them; I went up stairs and found Clarke sitting by the fire-side; I told him he must go with me; I asked the prisoner Sumpter if that was the man who bought them of him; he said he was.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Sumpter called four witnesses, and Clarke three, who gave them a good character.

Sumpter, GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Clarke, GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-99

319. THOMAS POTTINGER , alias POLLINGER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , forty pounds weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of Jeremiah Steadman .

JEREMIAH STEADMAN sworn. - I am a plumber , at No. 79, High Holborn : On the 15th of March I rose rather earlier than usual, I (from information) having suspicion of Pottinger, to watch him; he came into the shop at the usual time, and went up to that part of the shop where the lead was in a large ladle, which weighed from forty to fifty pounds; he spread a bag on the floor, and turned the cake of lead into the sack; then he put it into an old basket, and put it on his shoulder and carried it off; I came out of my position and followed him, and took him back to the shop; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said he was going to take it to the other shop; I have another shop; I sent for a peace-officer, and he took him away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long has the prisoner lived with you? - A. About six months.

Q. When you apprehended the prisoner had he not a key in his hand? - A. I rather think he had, he said he was going to get some wood to light the fire.

Q. He was going to your casting-shop, in the stable-yard; had you told him, on any previous occasion, you would be glad if he would remove the lead to the work-shop? - A. I do not recollect that I had told him; I had told my apprentice. - (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Steadman told me not to let the lead lie about; he told me to take it down to the work-shop in the morning; I was going to take it down, and bring some wood to light the accompting-house fire.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and the Jury, believing he had not long been in the habit of doing so.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-100

320. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for that he, on the 11th of March , being servant to William Sandford , sen. William Sandford , jun. James Sandford , and Matthew Bull , did receive and take into his possession the sum of nine shillings and sixpence for and on account of his said masters, and he, having so received the same, did afterwards feloniously embezzle and secrete the same .

There being no evidence against the prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-101

321. WILLIAM HUNT was again indicted for that he, on the 2d of February , being servant to Messrs. Sanford and Bull , did receive, for and on their account, the sum of nine shillings and sixpence, which he afterwards did embezzle and secrete .

Mr. Knapp, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-102

322. JAMES PARKER was indicted for that he, on the 6th of February , being servant to Messrs. Sanford and Bull , did receive on their account ten shillings, which he afterwards did embezzle and secrete .

There being no evidence against the prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

The prisoner stood charged upon two other indictments of like offence .

Mr. Gurney, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence he was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-103

323. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two pounds weight of hyson tea, value 16 s. the property of Messrs. Twynings .

(The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.)

RICHARD RICHARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. I am in the service of Messrs. Twynings.

Q. What is the firm of the house? - A. Richard, John, and George Twyning : On the 5th of March, about half past one, the prisoner at the bar came into the shop, and asked for a quarter of a pound of eight shilling tea, for which he gave me half-a-crown; I told him he would get it changed at the accompting-house; I observed what he had been doing, he went to the accompting-house, I then desired John Parker to secure him; I saw his handkerchief thrown over a parcel containing two pounds of ten shilling green tea, which was directed to Mr. Rawen; he had taken it up, and put it under his arm, and directly the porter and I laid hold of him, he let it drop; he asked me why I stopped him; I said, for the two pounds of tea he had under his arm.

GEORGE HEWINGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. I took hold of the prisoner, and he dropped the tea between me and him; he had the tea under his arm inside of his coat, I produce the tea.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to swear whether he had it under his coat or under his arm? - A. He had the tea in a handkerchief.

Q. My question is, will you undertake to swear it was under his coat, and not outside of his coat under his arm? - A. It was under the inside of his coat, I could not see it till afterwards.

Q. Is that Mr. Twvning's tea? - A. It is.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I went into Mr. Twyning's shop to purchase some tea, my wife not being able to go herself; I met with a friend by the way, I drank rather too freely, and became intoxicated; I gave the young man half-a-crown to change, he went away from me, and then accused me of taking the tea; it was never in my possession, there was some fell down, but not from me, I never had it under my arm.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-104

324. ELIZABETH PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a beaver hat, value 3 s. a green pelisse, value 10 s. a calico gown, value 5 s. a calico petticoat, value 2 s. and a muslin shawl, value 1 s. the property of John Prentice .

JOHN PRENTICE sworn. - I am a surveyor , I live in Queen-street, Edgware-road ; the prisoner at the bar was my servant .

Q. Are you a married man? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did she live with you? - A. Eighteen days only: On the 2d of February, in the absence of my wife and family, she absconded; she took with her sundry articles of wearing apparel.

Q. Were you all out? - A. Yes, we were all out to the play, there was a single lady lived in the house, she let us in when we came home. On the 20th of the same month she was taken at Kingston-upon-Thames, with part of the property on her.

Q. Had you any character with her? - A. Not exactly; I took her from her friends, I knew her father and mother extremely well; he is a respectable tradesman in Sussex.

- SMITH sworn. - I belong to Bow-street: On the 20th of February, I apprehended the prisoner at Kingston-upon-Thames; I produce the property which she had on.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-105

325. CATHARINE GRAEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , eight muslin handkerchiefs, value 8 s. and two pair of stays, value 2 s. the property of Frances Fowler .

FRANCES FOWLER sworn. - The prisoner at the bar came to me on the 12th of March, and asked for a Mrs. Brown, a midwife; she told me she thought she lodged there, I told her we had no lodgers; I am a baker , I live at No. 15, Charles-street, Hatton-garden ; I directed her to another midwife, she thanked me, and told me she believed that was the place, and the person that she wanted; she then went to the door, and I saw her drop the things; I went and picked them up.

Q. Where were the things before you saw her drop them? - A. In the one pair of stairs front room; I cannot say how she got up there.

Q. Where was it that you had conversation with her? - A. At the door, when she asked me about Mrs. Brown.

Q. Do you know that she went up stairs at all? - A. No, but these things were in the one pair of stairs front room; I only saw her at the door, and I saw her drop the things; I did not see where she came from.

GEORGE WOOD sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; she was in Mrs. Fowler's parlour when I went there, and at that time she was on her knees, and begged and prayed Mrs. Fowler to forgive her; she said, she found the handkerchiefs on the stairs.

Prisoner's defence. On Tuesday morning my aunt was taken very ill, and sent for my mother, and at a quarter before three o'clock in the afternoon she told me to go to No. 3, Charles-street, and fetch the midwife, Mrs. Brown; I went into this gentlewoman's house, a person there said you have dropped something; I said, no, it is not mine; the gentlewoman came out, and said I had taken the things; I had only just gone up to the door.

(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-106

326. ELIZABETH-ANN MOSS alias HOLMES was indicted for the wilful murder of George Holmes , on the 1st of March .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-107

327. SARAH CHESHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , four shillings , the monies of Thomas Wallbank .

THOMAS WALLBANK sworn. - I am a labouring man in a merchant's warehouse, the prisoner

took four shillings from my mantle-piece, I live in Red Lion-street, Spital-fields : On the 17th of March, about one o'clock, she came to my house, I have known her some years, and said she was in great distress, and had but three-pence halfpenny in the world; I told her it was not in my power to relieve her, I had a very large family, she was welcome to take a dinner such as I had for my family; she thanked me, and said she would stay and have some dinner, and she staid there till five o'clock; I went to the door with my children between four and five o'clock, she sat by the fire-place where the four shillings laid on the mantle-piece; I came in after that, and missed the money from the mantle-piece, and accused her of taking it; she denied it, and said she had not got any such money about her; I am sure there was nobody but my own family and her in the room when I went to the door with my children, I stood by the door post, I am sure nobody could come in without my seeing them.

THOMAS HART sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, I made her pull out the money from her pocket, and there were four shillings in silver, and two or three halfpence; I asked her how she came by them; she said, her sister had given them to her to buy a shift, she lived in Paul-street; I went to her sister, and she said she had not seen her that day, but the day before she had given her four-pence; I produce the four shillings.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, the prosecutor and my husband are two own cousins; I have not seen my husband, nor had a halfpenny from him this two years, or better; I had agreed with a person to work for her, she was to give me seven shillings a week; in the course of that week I had received three shillings and four-pence to buy some necessaries, on Saturday I received three shillings and eight-pence of her. On Saturday night I went to my sister's she gave me four-pence, then I had three shillings in silver and four-pence in copper; the mangler asked me to turn the mangle, and then she would give me sixpence, which I did, and when I had done she asked me to give her six pennyworth of halfpence, and she would give me a shilling, then I had four shillings and sixpence. On Sunday morning I went to buy an article that I wanted very bad; going there I called at the prosecutor's and asked him if he had seen any thing of my husband; when I went in there, the prosecutor's wife and another woman were sitting there by the fire-side; I was there above half an hour before the prosecutor came in; I asked the prosecutor's wife if her husband had seen any thing of my husband; she said, her husband was a very close man, and very likely if he had he would not tell, it was of no use to ask him; I told her I wanted to buy a shift, I had only four shillings and sixpence; she advised me not to buy it that week, but trust till another week; when he came in, I asked him if he had seen my husband; he said, no, he begged me to stop to have some dinner. After dinner he went out, and I asked his wife if she would like a pint of beer, she gave me a shilling to get a pint of beer, I brought her the beer, and just about a quarter past five the prosecutor came in again, and as he came in, I heard his wife say I had four shillings in my pocket, and was going to buy a piece of cloth with it; then he came in, and looked on the mantle-piece, and said that how I must have taken it from the mantle-piece; he then said to me that he knew I had four shillings in my pocket, and if I would not give it up to him he would send for an officer, and have me taken up; I told him I would not give it, he sent for an officer, and the officer searched my pocket, and took the four shillings from me.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-108

328. JOHN BLACKLIN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of February , feloniously did utter certain playing cards, liable to a stamp duty, with counterfeited marks thereon, counterfeiting and resembling the impression of certain marks directed to be used by virtue of a certain Act of Parliament made in the 29th year of our Sovereign Lord the King, and several former Acts of Parliament, purposely denoting the duties granted to his Majesty by the said Acts of Parliament for every pack of playing cards, made fit for use and sale, in Great Britain, he knowing the said marks to be counterfeited, with intent to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King .

And several other Counts, only varying the manner of charging the offence.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Solicitor General)

THOMAS BODDINGTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. What are you by business, Mr. Boddington? - A. A linen draper.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mrs. Spalding's, Coventry-street.

Q. When did you become first acquainted with the prisoner at the bar? - A. Sometime in the latter end of December last.

Q. Had you any dealings with him for any commodity? - A. In cards.

Q. What quantity of cards did you purchase of him? - A. Thirty-six dozen.

Q. What was the price that you paid him for them? - A. Fourteen shillings per dozen; I was to pay him fourteen shillings a dozen.

Q. Did you pay him for any that you received? - A. I paid him on account two or three times, two or three drafts; I gave him two bills and a check on account.

Q. You had not paid him for all you had received? - A. Nearly, I believe, but not quite.

Q. Where were the cards delivered which you purchased of the prisoner? - A. In Coventry-street, at Mrs. Spalding's, part of them, and part I fetched myself.

Q. Were those that you fetched yourself delivered to you by the prisoner himself? - A. They were.

Q. Where? - A. At his house.

Q. Where is that situated? - A. In Queen-street, Cheapside , in the City of London.

Q. How many different times, and what quantity did you receive at the prisoner's house? - A. Six dozen I received at one time of the prisoner at his own house.

Q. When was that? - A. I think it was since the 20th of February last, I cannot be certain to the time.

Q. Did any transaction take place on the 29th which induced you to mention that as a date? - A. Upon the 20th of February he sent me six dozen.

Q. That is to say, you desired him to send in six dozen, and as such you found six dozen at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not there when they came? - A. No.

Q. In the first place, with respect to that parcel that you supposed came on the 20th from the prisoner, what number did you find? - A. Six dozen.

Q. Were they perfect cards, or did they want any thing? - A. They each wanted an ace of spades.

Q. At what part of the house did you find them? - A. In the passage.

Q. In the private passage of the house? - A. Yes, there I found the six dozen, wanting the ace of spades.

Q. Were they on a shelf, or on a bench? - A. A bench, they stood under that bench.

Q. Is the private passage separated from the shop by a partition? - A. Yes.

Q. The shop was not open probably, being Fast-day? - A. No.

Q. And you found them there? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before had you ordered them of the prisoner? - A. A little time, about a week, I cannot be certain.

Q. As these packs wanted the aces, did he at any time, and when did he produce the aces? - A. I got the aces from Mr. Blacklin.

Q. How long afterwards? - A. I think it was about a week afterwards; I had them at two separate times.

Q. Did you apply for them, or did he bring them to you? - A. I fetched them from his own house.

Q. In your other dealings with the prisoner for cards, were the aces delivered in the packs, or were they delivered to you in separate parcels? - A. Always delivered in separate parcels.

Q. Did you upon any occasion give orders for cards, and not have them so soon as you expected or wished? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with the prisoner upon that subject, as it sometimes so happened that you did not get the cards so soon as you expected? - A. Yes, he said there was a great demand upon him for them.

Q. Did he assign any other reason at any other time when you applied after the 20th of February for aces to make good your packs - did he give you any reason for his not sending the whole packs? - A. He said he had not them by him.

Q. Did you get any the first time you applied for aces for the packs you had received on the 20th? - A. I think I had some on the same day.

Q. To those that were delivered to you on the 20th? - A. I had a few.

Q. After you had found packs without the aces, in the course of that day you applied to the prisoner? - A. I was gone out at the time they were delivered to me.

Q. And you think you got a few on that day they were delivered to you? - A. I think I had a few.

Q. Did the prisoner assign to you any reason for not furnishing you with all the aces of these packs? - A. He said he had not them by him.

Q. You said you were gone to his house at the time they were sent, the packs without the aces, you were gone to his house while the messenger was going with them - before the cards had arrived to Coventry-street, you had gone to Cheapside to enquire about them? - A. I was gone there.

Court. Q. Was that on the 20th? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. When you came to the prisoner's house, what did he say? - A. He said he had sent six dozen.

Q. You saw him at his house in Queen-street, Cheapside, then? - A. Yes; I told him I had come to order them.

Q. And the prisoner said he had sent six dozen - what passed between you and him? - A. I do not recollect, he delivered me some aces then.

Q. Can you tell what quantity? - A. I cannot; he told me he had not the rest by him.

Q. How soon afterwards did he make up the aces for that quantity? - A. Very soon afterwards; he gave me the whole aces to make up for the whole thirty-six dozen at his own house.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with the prisoner with respect to the price of these cards and those sold at the shops? - A. I asked him the reason that they were so cheap.

Q. What answer did he give? - A. They were made of a coarse paper, and the clippings or clickings of the best.

Q. Do you remember, at any time, either before or after this, receiving any cards of a person of the name of Foy? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it before or after the 20th of February? - A. Before that.

Q. Who was Foy? - A. A boy who carried out goods for Blacklin, the prisoner.

Q. What quantity of cards did Foy deliver to you? - A. I do not recollect what quantity that was; I think three or four, or six dozen.

Q. Were they made up with the aces, the packs, or in what manner did Foy deliver the aces? - A. I remember he delivered the aces in a separate parcel, separate by themselves.

Q. How did he bring the packs? - A. They were made up in dozens, each dozen was enclosed in one paper parcel.

Q. The cards were in one paper without the aces? - A. Yes, I think I recollect him bringing the aces once, and never else.

Q. You told me before, that in no instance you ever received the aces in the packs, but always by themselves? - A. Never in the packs.

Q. The cards themselves were in one large parcel, and the aces by themselves - the dozens were made up in this manner? (shewing them to witness) - A. Yes.

Q. The apartments of Mrs. Spalding were searched by the officers? - A. My apartments were searched.

Court. Q. That is in Coventry-street? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Were you present at the search? - A. Yes.

Q. Were any cards found there by the officers? - A. Yes.

Q. From whom did you receive these cards that were found by the officers? - A. From Blacklin.

Q. Were any aces found by the officers, as well as packs without the aces? - A. Yes.

Q. Were these aces of spades, found by the officer at your apartment, received by you from the prisoner in the manner as you have described? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did you open any of the parcels? - A. I always counted them.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you count your aces of spades to see that they corresponded with your packs to make them compleat? - A. Yes.

Q. How were the aces found by the officers; had you distributed them in, or were they in separate parcels? - A. They were in two or three separate parcels, as I had received them.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Buggin? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time sell any cards to Buggin? - A. At several different times.

Q. From whom did you receive the cards that you sold to Buggin? - A. From Mr. Blacklin.

Q. Did you receive the aces of spades that you sold to Mr. Buggin in the same manner you have described? - A. Yes, I always received them so.

Q. And you sold to some other persons besides? - A. Yes, to a person of the name of Spyers.

Q. When you sold to Buggin, did you deliver them with the aces of spades? - A. I always delivered them as I received them, with the ace of spades separate.

Q. Who introduced you to the prisoner? - A. Mr. Spyers.

Q. Have you ever had any other business with the prisoner, except purchasing of cards? - A. Yes, I have bought a few silk handkerchiefs of him.

Q. Do you recollect the name of the maker, which was printed upon the ace of spades that you received from Blacklin? - A. Hart.

Q. Do you know the price of the cards which are sold at the shop, when they are regularly made? - A. I do not.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner concerning the name of the supposed maker, Hart? - A. I do not recollect that I had; I asked him why these aces were not stamped like what I had seen before.

Q. Those you bought were of the same impression, were they not? - A. Yes.

Q. What difference do you observe in those you bought of the prisoner from others that you bought at other places? - A. There was an additional duty stamped upon what I had seen before.

Q. You had observed an additional duty upon others? - A. Yes.

Q. The aces that you had from him were different from the aces you had seen before; they had the additional duty at the bottom? - A. Yes; I think it was wanting at the bottom of his; he said, they were made before the duty was put on.

Q. Did you at any time state the account as it was between you and the prisoner in payment? - A. I did; as I had wrote it myself I delivered it to the prisoner.

Court. Q. You mean respecting the cards you had purchased of him? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Is that the one you delivered to him? - A.(Looks at it.) This is the one I delivered to him.

Court. Q. Respecting cards and other dealings? - A. Yes.

Q. You delivered it to him? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. I observe it is in red ink, 36 dozen W. P. 14 shillings - what is the meaning of W. P.? - A. Waste paper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. This is your hand-writing? - A. It is.

Court. I take it every duty on cards the first sixpence, and then another sixpence, and so on; they were all additional duties till the present Act

of Parliament put them all into one, which is now half-a-crown.

JOHN RIVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Did you search the apartment of the last witness, Boddington? - A. I did.

Q. At Mrs. Spalding's, in Coventry-street? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you find there? - A. I found a great quantity of cards in paper, and aces.

Q. They appear to be sealed up - have they been in the same state ever since you found them? - A. Yes, they have.

Q. Open them - they are all marked? - A. Yes, they are.

Q. State to my Lord and the Jury what they are? - A. Here is one parcel contains fifty-nine aces of spades, another parcel contains seventy-two aces of spades, another parcel contains seventy-two more, another parcel contains sixty-six, and another parcel contains fifty-four.

Q. Did you find any packs of cards besides these aces? - A. A great many; they are here.

Q. Do you know how many dozens there were? - A. No.

Q. They were made up in dozens? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards searched the house of the prisoner, Blacklin, in Queen-street, Cheapside? - A. I did; on the 6th of March, I searched Boddington's apartment, and I searched the prisoner's house on the same day.

Q. These cards you now produce were found at Boddington's house? - A. They were; this parcel contains just a dozen packs, found at Boddington's house.

Q. Give me one pack; this pack appears to contain fifty-one cards, and no ace of spades; this is one of the packs that you found at Boddington's; you found, you say, a great many; you do not know how many there are, but they are apparently put up in dozens, which you now produce? - A. Yes.

Q. On the same day you went to the house of the prisoner Blacklin? - A. I did.

Q. Was the prisoner at home? - A. He was.

Q. Did you know from him that that house in Queen-street was his residence? - A. We understood so from himself.

Q. Was he present when you searched the house? - A. Yes.

Q. State to my Lord and the Jury what you found in his house? - A. In the one pair of stairs room, on the left-hand side, apparently used for the kitchen, the prisoner was, and in that room were three boxes which contained cards; in another box there was a few loose packs of cards.

Q. What do you mean by containing cards, as distinct from loose cards? - A. The boxes that contained cards were quite full, and in the other box was a few loose packs of cards; there were three boxes regularly packed and nailed down.

Q. I do not know whether you know the quantity of dozens contained in each of the boxes? - A. I do not.

Q. Have you these cards here? - A. Yes; this is one of the boxes, and these are the others; they are sealed up.

Q. Take off the cover of one of them to see how they have been packed? - A. This has been opened.

Q. That box is made to contain that quantity apparently for the purpose? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you examined any of them to see whether they are perfect packs, or no? - A. Yes, I have examined some of them which are loose in the box; I found them to be packs of cards without any aces of spades.

Q. Did you look through the whole, or only some of them? - A. Through a great many of them; I do not know whether I did the whole, or no.

Q. And the observations that you made, it applied to all of them - did you find any aces of spades at Blacklin's? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you take into your possession any book of the prisoner? - A. Spirkes, my brother officer, did.

Q. Was that found in the presence of the prisoner? - A. I cannot say that, it was found in his house.

Q. Did you open it? - A. No.

Q. Have you got the books? - A. I produce them.

Q. The ledger first, that was found in the prisoner's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got a pocket-book there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the pocket-book found likewise? - A. I did not.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am an officer of the City.

Q. Did you assist Rivett in making a search in Blacklin's house? - A. I did, on the 6th of March.

Q. Did you find the pocket-book which you have now in your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you find it? - A. In Mr. Blacklin's pocket, in the cloaths that he had on.

Q. See if there are any cards in that pocketbook? - A. Yes.

Q. What is it? - A. The ace of spades.

Q. There is that card in it, and it is the same that you found in the prisoner's pocket-book in his pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the other things found which have been produced? - A. Yes, all of them, and these books among the rest.

THOMAS CONNELLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. How old are you? - A. I am going of fourteen.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know him? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About eight weeks before I was in custody.

Q. You had lived with him? - A. Yes.

Q. In what capacity? - A. As an errand-boy.

Q. Whereabouts? - A. No. 36, Queen-street, Cheapside.

Q. How many servants were there in the house? - A. Two, Foy and me.

Q. Do you know Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes.

Q. What is he? - A. He lives at Mrs. Spalding's in Coventry-street.

Q. Had you seen Mr. Boddington at your master's house, in company with him? - A. Yes, frequently; I have seen him at my master's house very often, but not very frequently in my master's company.

Q. Had you ever received any direction from your master to carry any thing to Mr. Boddington's? - A. Yes.

Q. What things were these that you were to carry, or did carry? - A. They were square parcels, which I believed to contain cards.

Q. How often do you think you have done that before last Fast day - On last Fast-day did you carry any parcel from your master to Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes; I am not certain whether it was Fast-day, or whether it was Sunday.

Q. What parcel was it? - A. A square parcel.

Q. What directions had you received from your master at the time with that parcel, that you delivered either on Fast-day, or on Sunday? - A. To ask for Mr. Boddington at Mrs. Spalding's, and to leave it there.

Q. Your master's directions were to carry it to Boddington, at Mrs. Spalding's, and if he was not at home to leave it there? - A. Yes.

Q. What parcel was that? - A. A square parcel, we call it a half-gross parcel.

Q. When you came to Mrs. Spalding's, who did you see there? - A. The maid-servant.

Q. Have you learned what the name of the maid-servant was? - A. No.

Q. You saw there a female servant? - A. Yes; I asked for one Mr. Boddington, if he was at home.

Q. And you understood he was not at home? - A. Yes.

Q. In what part of the house was it that you saw this servant? - A. At the private door, in Coventry-street.

Q. At a private door, and when you got in that door there was a passage, not the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. In the private passage of that door you saw the maid-servant? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver the parcel to her? - A. Yes.

Q. By the direction of your master? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what she did with the parcel? - A. No, I am not certain what she did with it.

Q. Then you came away? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the time when your master was apprehended? - A. Yes, I remember the night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. How old are you? - A. I am turned of fourteen.

Q. You are sure you are turned of fourteen - did you not say before the Magistrate you were only eleven? - A. No.

Q. You were directed to leave this parcel to any body you might find there? - A. I was to leave it if Mr. Boddington was not at home.

Q. You were to leave it, and you did leave it? - A. Yes.

RUTH JAGGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. When did you live with Mrs. Spalding - did you live there in February last? - A. Yes, when the lad brought the parcel, I lived there; I lived there since the beginning of this year.

Q. Do you remember any boy coming with a parcel to your house? - A. Yes, there was a parcel come, brought by a boy.

Q. Did you take it in at the shop, or the private door? - A. At the private door.

Q. Who was it brought for? - A. It was brought for Mr. Boddington.

Q. Did Mr. Boddington live at your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you recollect what day it was? - A. No.

Q. Was it a day when the shop was open? - A. No.

Q. What did you do with the parcel? - A. I laid it under the bench in the passage.

Q.(To Connelly.) Do you recollect the countenance of that person; do you think it is the woman you gave it to? - A. I think it is.

MATTHEW FOY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How ald are you? - A. Ten years.

Q. Have you learned your catechism? - A. Yes, at school.

Q. Do you understand the nature of an oath? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it is a right thing to tell a lie? - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. Do you know where you will go to if you tell lies after you are dead? - A. Yes, to hell.

Q. You were an errand boy in the service of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Boddington the witness that has been examined? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been employed by your master to take parcels to Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember taking a square parcel? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you take it to? - A. To Mr. Boddington.

Q. Do you know what it contained? - A. Yes.

Q.What did it contain? - A. Cards.

Q. Did you give the parcel containing cards to Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes, sometimes to Mr. Boddington, and sometimes I left it.

Q. Did you give the square parcel that you have been speaking of to Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any thing else, besides the packs of cards, from your master to Mr. Boddington? - A. Yes, another parcel, about the size of a pack of cards.

Q. Do you know what the other parcel contained? - A. Yes, the aces of spades.

Q. Do you know how many packs of cards the first parcel contained? - A. Yes, half a dozen; half a gross.

Q. Do you know how many aces of spades there were? - A. No.

Q. Were there several? - A. Yes, I cannot tell how many.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Did you see the inside of the packages? - A. No.

Q. When you talk about cards being in parcels, it is only what you supposed? - A. I know they were cards.

Q. How do you know they were cards if you did not see them? - A. I saw them put up, I sorted the cards myself.

Q. You did it openly, you made no secret of it? - A. No, it was done in the parlour.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was any body with you at the time you were sorting of them? - A. Mr. and Mrs. Blacklin, that was all.

SAMUEL BUGGIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Solicitor General. Q. Do you know Mr. Boddington, the first witness called? - A. I do.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About four years.

Q. Have you ever purchased any cards of him? - A. I have.

Q. What price had you usually given him for these cards? - A. Eighteen shillings a dozen.

Q. Were they delivered to you in perfect packs, or were the aces of spades delivered separate? - A. The aces of spades were delivered separate.

Q. Was there a correspondent ace of spades to each park delivered? - A. Exactly.

Q. There were as many aces of spades as packs? - A. Yes.

Q. But the aces of spades were delivered by themselves? - A. Yes.

Q. In what number were they delivered at a time, the packs? - A. Sometimes two dozen and sometimes one.

Q. Have you ever disposed of some of these cards, to persons of the name of Maydwell and Knipe? - A. To Isaac Maydwell I have.

Q. Were the cards which you sold to Maydwell those which you purchased of Boddington? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time see the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Blacklin? - A. Yes, I saw him once.

Q. Was it while you were in the course of dealing for those cards at Boddington's? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you at that time ordered any cards of Boddington, that you were in expectation of receiving them? - A. I had.

Q. Did the prisoner come to you, or you go to him? - A. He came to me.

Q. What did he say to you? - A. He asked for me, I told him my name was Buggin.

Q. I believe you live with Mr. Oliver, a linen-draper, in Skinner-street, Holborn? - A. Yes; he said he came to inform me that I could not have the articles of Mr. Boddington for the present.

Q. You told him that the articles that you had ordered were cards? - A. Yes.

Q. He told you immediately that you could not have the articles that you had ordered - what were the articles? - A. Cards.

Q. What did you say to him? - A. I asked him when I could; he said he could not exactly tell when, the demand was so great.

Q. What farther did he say? - A. He said he could sell me an article at a much lower price, which he thought would do as well.

Q. I believe your apartments were searched were they not? - A. They were.

Q. Were you present when they were searched? - A. I was not.

Q. There were no cards at your apartment at that time? - A. Not one.

EDWARD WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you a card-maker by business? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever work for a person of the name of Lee? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did Lee carry on his business? - A. No. 43, Fetter-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Blacklin? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he a customer of Lee's? - A. Yes.

Q. What he used to purchase of Lee were cards? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of cards, and in what packages? - A. Playing cards, sometimes six dozen and sometimes a gross; from a gross to two gross, from two gross to a dozen.

Q. What wrappers were these cards put up in? - A. White.

Q. Were they similar to this? (A plain sheet of paper.) - A. Yes.

Q. Were any of them put up in stamped wrappers? - A. No.

Q. Not in the way the trade is legally carried on? - A. No.

Q. Were any of the aces put in these quantities?

- A. There were none of them that had aces to them.

Q. The aces of spades were wanting - A. Yes.

Q. The entire pack, all but the aces of spades? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner furnished with the aces of spades to make up the packs of cards fifty-two? - A. Yes.

Q. What aces of spades were furnished him? - A. The aces of spades my master sold him - he furnished it himself.

Q. Were the aces of spades procured from the Stamp-Office? - A. No.

Q. Were they delivered complete in packs, or delivered separate from the other fifty-one? - A. They were delivered by me and my partner, so many aces as he wanted in the pack, separate.

Q. So, if there was a gross of packs he had a gross of aces of spades, according to the quantity? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been engaged in making cards - Were the aces of spades legally obtained from the Stamp-Office? - A. Yes.

Q. Is this the manner in which you receive the duty aces, as they are called - Is that the manner in which you receive the duty aces from the Stamp-Office? (Shewing the legal stamps.) - A. Yes.

Q. How many on each sheet? - A. Twenty on each sheet.

Q. Look at this, and tell me whether that is the sort of sheet for the cards that were delivered to Blacklin? - A. Yes, that is one that I had from the shop.

Q. It appears marked Edward Wright .

Court. Q. What is that?

Mr. Garrow. It is one of the sheets of duty aces stamps which he used to work up at Lee's. These that were worked up at Lee's contained only ten on each sheet, and the other, the legal sheet of duty aces stamps, contained twenty.

Q. These aces were delivered to the prisoner in number to correspond with the packs of cards? - A. Yes.

Q. You worked from the sheets resembling these which are now produced? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. These two sheets came from Lee's, there is the name of Edward Wright upon these two sheets? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that these two sheets were taken from Lee's shop? - A. They were.

Q. And the aces delivered to the prisoner were made from the sheets corresponding with these? - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Lee, I believe, has absconded? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner apply occasionally for cards that he had ordered? - A. Yes.

Q.Did it sometimes happen that you could not execute his orders so early as he wished? - A. Yes, at times.

Q. Was that occasioned by the want of cards generally or the want of duty aces? - A. Sometimes the demand was so large that we had not got the cards generally, and sometimes, when we had got the rest of the cards, the aces were wanting.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with the prisoner on that subject? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. What passed then between him and you? - A. I have told him that the aces were out, we had got none in the house.

Q. Was there ever an occasion happened when you stood still till the plate was engraved? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether at that time the prisoner's orders were unexecuted for want of the aces? - A. He told me so; that he wanted aces of spades, and he could not execute the orders because he had not the aces to put to them; and the orders he had delivered they would not give him the money for them till he had furnished the aces of spades; I told him not to blame my master for it, as the man who had the doing of it had disappointed him.

Q. Give us your very expression as you used in your conversation with him at that time, or any other time about a plate? - A. I do not recollect that I told him any thing about a plate; no more than what I have observed to the man that had the doing of it.

Q. The aces that are furnished when the duties are regularly paid are obtained at the Stamp-Office, are they not? - A. Yes.

Q. So that no man, except the person employed by the Stamp-Office, have any thing to do with them till they are delivered to the card-maker? - A. No.

Q. Are these regularly and immediately furnished upon application at the Office? - A. Yes.

Q. The duty aces which are delivered from the Stamp-Office, do not they always contain the card-maker's name? - A. Always.

Q. Therefore any that had been issued from the Stamp-Office, your master would have had his name upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. I observe that these you have produced, as manufactured at Lee's, have the name of Hart upon them - Was there any maker at the time you were employed by Lee, of the name of Hart, that you were acquainted with? - A. No, none at all.

Q. Are you pretty well acquainted with the makers in town? - A. Yes, I know them.

Q. And I suppose you have worked for many of them - Did you know Hart when he was in the trade? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how long ago it is since he left off? - A. I believe about seven years.

Q. So that if he had been in the trade, it is probable

you should have known it? - A. I certainly should.

Q. When the prisoner visited Lee's house occasionally, did he come where you passed? - A. We pasted backwards, he very seldom came there, he was sometimes there.

Q. He came sometimes there, while you were actually pasting these plates, which are half the size of the legal plates? - A. I do not recollect seeing him there while we were in the act of doing it.

Q. What price did he pay Lee for the cards he had bought of him? - A. I do not rightly know.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with Blacklin about it? - A. I have heard Blacklin say that my master charged him too much.

Q. Do you happen to know from Blacklin himself what his selling price was, when he was stating to you that your master charged him too much for them - Do you know what he sold them at himself? - A. No.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Are you a card-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you work for Lee? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Blacklin? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he a customer of Lee's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he deal to a large amount? - A. Yes, he used to be one of Mr. Lee's principal customers.

Q. How many gross a month did Lee make? - A. I suppose about thirteen or fourteen gross per month.

Q. I do not know whether you happen to know what the duty would be, if they were bought at the Stamp-Office? - A. Half a crown a pack.

Q. And he would make about thirteen gross per month. -

Mr. Gibbs. Three thousand two hundred and forty-two pounds a year, and more than that.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Did Mr. Lee use some legal stamps? - A. He did.

Q. Did he use some that were not legal stamps? - A. Yes.

Q. What proportion did one bear to another? - A. He very seldom used more than one hundred and forty packs per month.

Q. And the prisoner was his principal customer? - A. Latterly he was.

Q. Were they upon the footing of intimacy? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon some occasion you supped together with him? - A. I did, in Christmas week.

Q. You and Lee supped at Blacklin's house with him? - A. Yes.

Q. Were those sheets in the name of Hart, the sheets that you used to work up for the greatest part of your trade? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. This is from the same impression? - A. Yes.

Q. Were all sold to the prisoner at the bar, Mr. Blacklin, made with these aces? - A. Yes.

Q. What we call, at the present, forged aces? - A. Yes.

Q. From your own knowledge of aces do you know whether these are legal or forged? - A. They are not legal, they are forged.

Q. And all that Lee sold to Blacklin were of that manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q. Are not the cards, with the card denoting the stamp-duty of the card-maker, generally issued in this form, with the paper stamp on the wrapper? - A. Yes.

Q. He is bound to do it under a penalty, and indeed a man buying them, without that, subjects himself to a penalty - Were any of these cards that were sold by Lee to Blacklin issued in this form? - A. I never saw any.

Q. Look at these - Is that the form in which they were always delivered? - A. Yes, in a white wrapper.

Q. Were the aces of spades delivered in that wrapper, or in separate parcels? - A. Always in separate parcels by themselves.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner complain at any time, either in, or not in, Lee's presence, that his orders were not executed speedy enough? - A. Never before me.

Q. Had you ever any conversation before you on that subject? - A. Never.

NATHANIEL MERCHANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are the Inspector of the Stamp-Office? - A. Yes.

Q. How old are you, sir? - A. Seventy-two.

Q. Just look at that thirty-six dozen and the corresponding aces (Lee's aces) that were found at Boddington's? - A. There are seventy-two, and each corresponds to the thirty-six dozen.

Q. For what number of years have you been an Inspector? - A. About four years.

Q. From inspecting these aces, are you able to say whether they are from any instrument issued at the Stamp-Office? - A. They certainly did not come from the Stamp-Office.

Court. Q. What aces are they? - A.(Mr. Fielding.) Part of the parcel marked B. containing seventy-two aces, being part of what was found at Boddington's.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Look them all over, Mr. Merchant; are you enabled to say what they are? - A. They are all of them forged, Mr. Hart has not gone beyond the number 80; I mean, there has been, I believe, no aces issued from the Stamp-Office, in the name of Hart, beyond the number of 80; these are 112, 113, 114, 115, and 116.

Mr. Solicitor General. Q. Genuine ones, in the name of Hart, never exceeded the number 80.

Q. What are the other seven aces found at Boddington's? - A. They are all a forgery, and they

are from the same plate, and the same numbers, from 112 to 116.

Q. The paper 8, containing 59 aces of spades, what are they? - A. These are the same, and appear from the same impression, and contain the same number; the paper marked B contains six aces, they are forged; and the plate E is a forgery, containing fifty-four aces: they appear to be from the same plate.

Q. The one that was in the pocket-book of the prisoner, the ace of spades which the officer took out of the pocket-book, which was in his pocket and on his person, look at that, and tell me whether that is a forgery; it is in the name of Hart? - A. It is the same, and marked 112, a higher number than Hart ever had.

Mr. Garrow. Q. We now shew him the two papers marked Edward Wright , which Wright said he brought from Mr. Lee's manufactory - Do these appear to you to be a forgery, and to resemble those you have already looked at in these cards? - A. Yes.

Q. Are they imitations, and do they bear resemblance to those which were issued by the Stamp-Office? - A. Certainly they are an imitation of those which were issued by the Stamp-Office while Hart was in the trade, but the numbers do not agree.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Were you engraver at the Stamp-Office at that time? - A. No, I have examined the books, I find none higher than 80, and I have heard from my predecessor.

Q. You do not know that of your own knowledge; your only reason for believing these are forgeries is there are higher numbers, which somebody has told you are higher than Hart ever had? - A. Certainly these numbers do not correspond with the numbers belonging to Hart at the Stamp-Office.

Q. You do not know, you not being engraver at the Stamp-Office at that time; there may be other plates besides those which you have seen. -

Mr. Garrow. Q. I now shew him a genuine plate, a sheet containing twenty impressions, with the name of Hart on them; look at that and look at the ten; and look whether those of the ten, found at Lee's with the name of Hart - Do they appear to be made with a view to imitate them? - A. They are done to imitate.

Q. From your inspection of the legal one of twenty, and the other of ten impressions on Lee's paper, do they appear to be done with imitation of the genuine plates issued by the Stamp-Office? - A. Yes.

CHARLES- EDWARD BERRESFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are Secretary to the Stamp-Office, you have been so sometime? - A. From the year 1801.

Q. Before that time you were Deputy Secretary? - A. Yes, and I was First Clerk for a great many years.

Q. And you are conversant with the business I take it for granted? - A. Yes; the aces are issued from the plates in sheets.

Q. How many in a sheet? - A. There are twenty in a sheet.

Q. Do you remember the time when Hart was card-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this sheet, and tell me whether this sheet is from the plate engraved for Hart? - A. It is the same as was used by Hart.

Q. Have you searched the office books, to see how high Hart's numbers went? - A. I have, I do not find that they went higher than 80.

Q. If they had gone higher than 80, must not you have found it in your search? - A. From the search I do not find any above 80, and I have searched with all the diligence I can.

Q. Is the person who was engraver at the time Hart was a maker living or dead? - A. Dead.

Q. Mr. Merchant succeeded him? - A. Mr. Merchant was his assistant for some time, and afterwards succeeded him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. You say probably there may be numbers above 80? - A. I cannot say whether there are or not.

Court. Q. You have said you searched? - A. Yes, I cannot find any above 80; I cannot say any thing respecting the cards.

Q. Have you searched the Stamp-Office with your best diligence, to find whether there are any above 80? - A. I find none beyond 80, there is no record beyond 80.

Q. Have you searched any of the warrants? - A. I have only searched the books.

Mr. Solicitor General. Q. They are regularly entered in the book? - A. They are.

Q. You find no entry beyond 80? - A. I have not.

Q. If there had been must not you have found them in your searching? - A. I think so; I have gone from 1765 up to 1800; I have searched all that period, and there are none higher than 80.

Q. You do not believe there are any higher than 80? - A. No.

Q. Have you any reason to believe or suspect there are any beyond 80? - A. No.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. You said you had not got the warrants of the Commissioners of the Office, to see if there were any plates ordered beyond 80; you have not been furnished with these warrants? - A. No.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Would not those warrants have enabled you to make a better search; what do you mean by not having the warrants? - A. I have only examined the entry of the order-book.

Q. The entry in the order-book is a transcript of the warrants? - A. Yes.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. What book have you examined? - A. Only the order-book.

Q. Will you take upon you to swear that there are no higher numbers? - A. To the best of my belief there are no higher numbers than 80.

Mr. Solicitor General. Q. The person to whom the warrants were delivered was the engraver you know? - A. Yes.

Q. Whenever there is a warrant of that sort made, there is an entry made of the order, and a specimen of the stamp afterwards taken; you have seen no entry beyond 80? - A. No.

Court. Q. The person to whom this warrant is given is the engraver, and the order of that engraving is entered in the book, and you have searched that book? - A. Yes.

Q. And when the engraving is made there is an impression taken from it and kept? - A. Yes.

Q. And you find no order of the engraving, nor any impression? - A. There is no order of engraving, nor any impression in that book.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. Where did you find that account? - A. In the prisoner's accompt book.

Q. This is Boddington's account, called waste paper; this you found at the prisoner's house? - A. I did. After his books were brought to Bow-street I examined them in the presence of the Magistrate, and in the presence of the defendant.

Court. Q. Whose book is this? - A.(Mr. Garrow.) The prisoner's, which Rivett has spoken of.

Mr. Chetham. I found this accompt in the green book, in the ledger.

Mr. Garrow. This is the accompt which Boddington said he wrote, stating the transaction between him and the prisoner, and found in the ledger.

(Read in Court.) Dtr. Mr. Blacklin with T. Boddington. - On the debtor side is cash, 5 l. - 26 draft, 24 l. 16 s. - 8 pans - 17 draft, Mr. Seck, 21 l. On creditor side, Jan. 16, ban, one cants. of Co. - February 3d, 10 compts, 4 yellows, 28 l. 13 s. one pans, 2 l. 2 s. - 36 dozen, W. P. in red ink - 14 with a stroke, 25 l. 4 s. - and two books, 5 s. The whole of that 36 dozen is in red ink, except the sum, the 14 with a stroke is with red ink, and all this carried out with a stroke in common ink.

Mr. Garrow. I will just shew one of the forged cards; you will see the forged card has not the additional duty at the bottom; at the bottom of the forged card there is nothing but the word Hart; on the legal one there is the word additional duty.

Prisoner's defence. At the time that I received these cards, I did not know that there were any aces of spades that were forged, I understood that they were foreign cards brought from abroad; I shortly after was informed that a large quantity of waste paper had been sold to the Neckinger Mill Company about two years ago, and which I have always since understood; the Neckinger Mill Company purchased at Somerset-house these aces amongst the quantities of waste paper which they purchased at Somerset-house.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q.(To Mr. Shelton.) Will you have the goodness to read the 1st and 7th Counts. - (Read in Court.)

The Jurors upon their oath present, that John Blacklin , on the 26th of February, in the 45th year of his present Majesty's reign, with force and arms, feloniously did utter certain playing cards, liable to a stamp duty, with counterfeit marks thereon, counterfeiting and resembling the impression of certain marks directed to be used by virtue of a certain Act of Parliament, made in the 29th year of our Sovereign Lord the King, and several former Acts of Parliament, purposely denoting the duties granted to his Majesty on cards, made fit for sale, and used in Great Britain; that he, the said John Blacklin , on the 26th of February as aforesaid, feloniously did utter playing cards with such counterfeited marks thereon, he knowing the said counterfeited marks to be forged.

The said Jurors present, that the said John Blacklin , on the 26th of February, in the 45th year aforesaid, did feloniously vend and sell divers playing cards, liable to a stamp duty, with counterfeited marks on the spotted side of the said cards, counterfeiting an impression of certain marks directed to be used by a certain Act of Parliament, made at Westminster, in the 29th year of his Majesty's reign, entitled an Act for granting to his Majesty several additional stamp duties on cards and dice, and several former Acts of Parliament, relating to cards made fit for sale in Great Britain.

Mr. Serjeant Best. I take this to be the most convenient time to state my objections, and to make an arrest of judgment, if the case should require it, as it does not appear to me that this offence is particularly described by either of these Counts.

The evidence that we have heard does not prove any offence within this Act of Parliament upon which this indictment is framed, the 29th of George the Third; the words are, that if any person shall counterfeit, or forge, or procure to be forged or counterfeited, or vend and sell any stamp or mark to be used relating to cards, dice, or newspapers, or shall counterfeit or resemble the same, with such counterfeit marks thereon, knowing the same to be counterfeited, shall be guilty of felony.

Your Lordship will see that they are, by another Act of Parliament, directed to apply this stamp

not upon any of the cards, but upon the wrapper; the statute I allude to is the 9th of Ann, chap. 28, sect. 41, there the Commissioners are directed to put this stamp on the wrapper of these cards. I submit to your Lordship, it may be said that subsequent Acts of Parliament have added additional duties, still if the original statute of Ann is not repealed, whatever number of duties may be added, the stamp must be in the same place, and in the same manner, as it is pointed out by the said Act of Parliament; and any stamp put in any other manner, is a stamp which the Commissioners are not authorized to put on. I submit to your Lordship, as it appears to me, this man did not vend any of these stamps upon wrappers, nor any stamp upon cards, and if the Commissioners are authorized, by any subsequent Act of Parliament, to put the stamp upon a particular card, then this indictment has not made out the case, because this indictment is not for the offence of putting the stamp upon a particular card. I desired these two Counts to be read, and your Lordship will find that it is both uttering and vending stamps, not upon a particular card, but stamps upon playing cards.

Mr. Gleed. If I understand the meaning of the word cards right, it must be a perfect pack of cards; the uttering of any one card would not be a felony within the meaning of this Act of Parliament, but by making use of the word playing cards. We must likewise see what the Legislature thought proper to impose upon selling such cards. The duty has been imposed upon a pack of playing cards, it is so stated upon the face of this indictment to be playing cards, and the evidence has been, in this case, of uttering cards without the aces of spades. The cards, without the aces of spades, cannot be considered as playing cards, nor can the ace of spades sold by itself at any time be said to be playing cards. In all cases of forgery, it is necessary that the forged instrument should be in all parts the similitude of the true; in this case there arises an objection, namely, it does not appear to be a pack of cards within the meaning of the words in this Act of Parliament, nor is it that which upon the face of the indictment it charges the prisoner with. It charges the prisoner with uttering, vending, and selling playing cards, when, in point of fact, the only evidence that has been introduced on the part of the prosecution have only supported the sale of a parcel of fifty-one cards, and not a pack of cards.

Mr. Solicitor General. It has been stated to your Lordship, that we cannot possibly support this indictment that charges the prisoner with having sold cards with counterfeit stamps, which must mean a counterfeit stamp on the wrapper; for the learned Serjeant says there is no Act justifies any stamp upon these cards. The 9th of Ann, which directs stamps to be put on the wrapper, which is true, but my answer is a positive denial on the fact, from subsequent Acts of Parliament on the case, which he had either forgotten or omitted. The 10th of Ann, chap. 19, sect. 162, it is enacted, that on one card in each pack shall be marked on the spotted side thereof. Your Lordship will go to the 5th of George the Third, chap. 46, sect. 9, which I do not find to be repealed, it there directs the Commissioners to provide a new stamp for the wrapper. No, for the ace of spades, and to make distinction between those meant for home consumption and those for exportation, and then it directs that which has always been observed by the Stamp Office, and which they have been studiously attentive to, that one of the sixpenny duties shall be denoted on the wrapper, and another also is directed to be put on the wrapper, and one of these sixpenny duties is also directed to be denoted on the ace of spades. I am not sure that any former Act mentions the ace of spades, but the 10th of Ann having directed it to be on the spotted side of one of the cards, and practice has continued it on the ace of spades. The next argument that fell from a learned friend of mine was, that the Act which prohibits the selling of playing cards with counterfeit stamps, must mean to prohibit vending packs of cards with counterfeit stamps, and that there is no evidence in this case of the vending a pack of cards, only a parcel of fifty-one, and that therefore this case is not within the Act. Certainly, without deviating from the indulgence which is permitted to the Counsel of a prisoner, I might have interrupted him when he was addressing your Lordship, though in fact he was addressing the Jury, when he was stating that there was not sufficient evidence to go to a Jury. Your Lordship will see there is not only evidence, but decisive evidence, and the fact is most certain, that the packs are sold in this way: - If I was to sell a dozen, containing each fifty-one in one parcel, and I sell another parcel containing twelve aces of spades, which two parcels together make twelve packs, if it was necessary to prove his selling these cards, and delivering them in this way, there is no doubt from the evidence. In the first place, do they bargain for cards containing each fifty-one? No; they bargain for a gross, or packs of cards; what or how much a dozen, for what is a dozen parcels of cards without the aces of spades? No, they include the aces of spades, there is no additional price for the aces of spades that these people were to pay, I will prove it by Boddington, who bought thirty-six dozen, and the evidence has said they would not pay for the cards, they would not pay the man till he had sent out the aces of spades. It is beyond all possibility of a doubt that the prisoner not only sold, but actually delivered packs of cards, and that it is proved beyond

all possibility of a doubt or hesitation, that there were all these packs of cards not only sold, but a specific price to be given for each pack.

Court. I consider it as an offence undoubtedly upon which the Revenue has been defrauded in the strictest sense of the words of the Act of Parliament, that is on record, because there are fifty-one in one parcel, and one in another, which made up the pack of cards.

Jury. Q.(To the Secretary of the Stamp Office.) Whether you know of any cards being sold to the Neckinger Mill Company? - A. There were some sold, but I do not know to whom.

Court. Q.(To Mr. Solicitor of the Stamp Office.) Do you know of any being sold to the Neckinger Mill Company? - A. A society of gentlemen proposed to convert old paper into new, they applied to Government for authority to purchase the waste paper at the Stamp Office, and Government conceiving it was for the benefit of the public, the Commissioners were directed to sell their waste paper for the purpose of being converted into new paper, consequently the Commissioners did dispose of a great quantity of waste paper, amongst which there were cancelled aces of spades, which were brought from the card-makers, with the corners cut off; the Company, at the same time, giving this most positive assurance, that the paper would be immediately plunged into the caldron, and at once destroyed; this Company and manufactory failed, they did not perform their engagement by destroying this waste paper, they afterwards advertised their stock to be sold, and amongst the other things the aces of spades were sold cancelled, and with the corners cut off.

Court. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, that all the aces of spades that they sold the corners were cut off? - A. Mr. Lee applied with a feigned name, they were not sold in sheets, I cannot speak to that.

Prisoner. Mr. Robey, the auctioneer, sold these goods for the Neckinger Mill Company; I gave my attorney yesterday evening some aces of spades which Mr. Lee had purchased of the Neckinger Mill Company, he purchased vast quantities, and my attorney has some of the aces without the corners being cut off; I have been informed that they sold a vast quantity which originally came from Somerset-house.

Court. Gentlemen, you are to understand that they waited for the aces of spades while they were engraving the plate, therefore this could not be from that.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-109

329. JOHN CASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a watch, value 5 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. a key, value 1 d. and a chain, value 1 s. the property of Michael Kelly .

MICHAEL KELLY sworn. - I am a serjeant of the Royal Marines , the prisoner took the watch out of my pocket on the 25th of March on the Walworth-road ; I had been in the City, and going home I found the liquor had taken effect of my head, I sat down on the road, the prisoner spoke to me, and I told him where I lived; he said, he would see me home; he pulled the watch out of my pocket, and went away from me towards Camberwell; I followed him, but I could not get on so fast as he did, I was intoxicated; I gave the alarm of stop thief, but he effected an escape; I received information of the watch being pawned.

Q. Are you sure that is the man that took your watch? - A. Yes.

STEPHEN LAMB sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lane, a pawnbroker, in Holborn; the prisoner came to us on the 26th of March with this watch which I produce, and borrowed 1 l. 7 s. early in the morning; he came on the day following, and said he wanted to make up two pounds.

Q. Is that the man? - A. Yes.

(The watch identified by the prosecutor.)

- sworn. - I saw him take the watch out of the gentleman's pocket, and run towards Camberwell.

Prisoner's defence. I am a lamp-lighter; I was coming along the road, I saw this watch lay on the ground; the next morning I went and pledged it at that gentleman's house, I looked in the paper, and not finding it advertised, I thought it my own.

Q. Can you call any one to prove that they saw you find it? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-110

330. ANDREW BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. the property of James Kitchen .

JAMES KITCHEN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I live at No. 60, Broad-street, St. Giles's ; I lost a pair of men's shoes from the outside of the shop window on the 3d of April, about half past eight in the morning, they were found on the prisoner by William Daniel .

WILLIAM DANIEL sworn. - I am a salesman at St. Giles's; as I was standing at my door, a neighbour called to me, and said there goes a man that has taken a pair of small clothes; he had taken a pair of small clothes, and they had let him go; I seeing a pair of shoes in his hand, I said to him, how came you by these shoes? he said, he bought

them; I said, I rather think you have taken them; the shoes were taken to Mr. Kitchen, and he owned them.

(The shoes produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-111

331. ELEANOR CONDY , MARY MARNEY , and SARAH SULLIVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , six yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Noble Monnecy Bird and William Brown .

NOBLE MONNECY BIRD sworn. - I am a linen-draper , I live in Ratcliff-highway : On the 23d of February, between four and five in the afternoon, on being informed the prisoners had taken a piece of cotton, I desired my men to let them go out of the shop with it; I desired one of the shopmen to follow them to see that they did not drop it.

JOHN TRUSTY sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Bird: On the 23d of February I saw the three prisoners come in, they asked to look at some prints; I saw Mary Marney conceal a piece of print under her cloak, I told Mr. Bird of it, and denied serving them any more articles, but let them go out; my employer told me to fetch them back, I brought them all three back, and gave them to Mr. Bird.

NICHOLAS DAVIS sworn. - I am an officer; I took the three prisoners up stairs, they dropped the print inside of the parlour door, which of them I do not know.

Q. What did they say? - A. They only laughed.

(The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Condy, GUILTY , aged 15.

Marney, GUILTY , aged 14.

Sullivan, GUILTY , aged 11.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-112

332. CHARLES LESSING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , three shillings and four sixpences , the property of John Faulkener .

JOHN FAULKENER sworn. - I am a publican , I keep the Coach and Horses, in the Strand , the prisoner was my servant; from information, on the 11th of March, I stamped seventeen shillings and six sixpences; after every body was gone to bed, I emptied my money out of the till, and put the marked silver in, and ten shillings worth of copper marked likewise; I got up in the morning about half past seven, the money was all safe in the till then; about a quarter after nine, there were three shillings and four sixpences gone out of the till; I sent for an officer, he was searched, and there was found on him two shillings and one sixpence, with the mark that I had put on.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer, I searched the prisoner, I produce the money I found in his left-hand breeches pocket.

(The money identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-113

333. ELIZABETH LAKE was indicted for that she, on the 8th of December , in the forty-first year of His Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Mary-le-bone , by the name of Elizabeth Smith , Spinster, did take to husband one Thomas Haylett ; her former husband being then living .

There being no evidence to prove the former marriage, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-114

334. BENJAMIN BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , forty-six pounds weight of lead, value 11 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Rice , fixed to a certain building, called a house .

Second Count, For like offence, stating it to be a building, not calling it a house.

JOHN COLLIS sworn. - I am a plumber: On the 25th of March, I put that lead on Mr. Rice's house up St. John-street road ; it was fixed on to the hip of the roof with nails, and it was taken off the same evening.

HENRY SOPER sworn. - I am an East-India labourer, and a soldier in the first battalion, and a private watchman to Mr. Roystan, of Clerkenwell parish; on the 25th of March, a little after ten o'clock, I heard the watchmen spring the rattles; I run up and saw two watchmen taking a man to the watch-house, and returning back again to my master's house I saw a large bundle of lead lie under some railing in the main road; I took it up and carried it to the watch-house.

- POTTINGER sworn. - I am a watch-case maker: I was standing at the corner of Corporation-row, with an acquaintance of mine, on the 25th of March, about five minutes past ten at night, and I heard the cry of stop thief; I immediately run over the way, and saw that man run at seven or eight yards distance before me, and two watchmen were in pursuit of him; I seized him by the neck, and said to him, holt, holt, old man, and then I shoved him down.

Q.Had he any thing about him? - A. Not any thing that I saw at the time; the watchmen came up and I delivered him into the watchmen's hands.

WILLIAM GOODEY sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Woolcock, he is the builder of this house, and lives in St. John's-street-road; my mistress desired some of us lads to come out, and see if there was any body on the building; I saw a man at the top part of the building; he seemed to be stamping the lead together, and when he came on the ladder he seemed to have a bundle under his right arm; I heard the watchman crying the hour of half after nine o'clock; we went to the corner of Percival-street to call the watchman, and coming back again I saw that man make a dart, and he went right backwards; he sprung into a passage when I and the watchman were coming up; in making up to him, he run across the road on to the footpath, and run under the railing; I ran after him, and just at the corner of Northampton-place I stumbled against a bank; I then saw this young man lay hold of him.

Q. When he run across the road had he any thing with him? - A. No, I never saw any thing with him.

Q. Did you see any lead about him at any time? - A. I saw a bundle under his arm, I could not tell what it was.

Q. Was that bundle afterwards found? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The first that you saw of any person was on the ladder, high up? - A. He was upon the scaffold.

Q. You say it was a quarter before ten, we all know it was quite dark at that time; if you had seen any man on the scaffold you know you could not tell what colour his coat was? - A. No.

Q. Nor whether they had round hats on or not? - A. No.

Q. You could not see what their faces were? - A. No.

Q. You went to Percival-street, so that the people who were on the ladder might get away if they had a mind? - A. Yes.

CHARLES WADDINGTON sworn. - I am a carpenter: my mistress sent me out to see if there was any body on the building, and when I came to the front door I saw a man on the building; he was making a noise, by which I supposed he was ripping off the lead; I watched him, and saw him come down the ladder, very slowly, with a bulge under his coat; I watched him about a quarter down the ladder; I left him then, and run to the watchman along with the witness Goodey.

Q. What man was that you saw come down, was it the prisoner? - A. I cannot tell, because I lost sight of him when I went to the watchman; the minute I told the watchman, I run forward, and before I got to Mr. Percival's house, I saw a man, and I cried out, that is the man, and immediately he crept under the rails and dropped something from under his arm; he ran immediately into the road, I followed him, and just as I got up to him at Northampton-place Pottinger knocked him down.

Q. Was that the same man that stooped down and dropped something that you saw taken? - A. Yes, and the lead was found exactly where I see him drop it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you see the man that came down the ladder stoop under the rails? - A. I do not know that it was the man that came down the ladder, I lost sight of him about two minutes. (The lead produced and identified by Collis.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to a person that I knew, to do some work for me; I have five days work in a week; I am a gardener, I wanted this man to work for me while I finished some other work; I saw a mob running, holloaing out, stop thief; I was running to see what was the master, and they took me.

Q. Tell the Jury how you came up to that rail? - A. Upon my word it is quite false, it is indeed.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-115

335. JANE DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a flannel petticoat, value 3 s. the property of Peter Barrett .

MARGARET BARRETT sworn. - My husband's name is Peter Barrett , he is a journeyman hairdresser : On the 19th of March I hung a flannel petticoat out in the yard to dry; when I went into the yard I missed it; my landlady stopped the person in the passage.

- ALLEN sworn. - Margarett Barrett lodges in my house; she lost a waistcoat out of the yard in the forenoon of the same day; I was more attentive to the yard on that account; I saw the prisoner in the yard and asked her what she wanted; I went to meet her in the passage; she then had a flannel petticoat on her arm; I said, you had not a flannel petticoat when I saw you in the yard; I called Mrs. Barrett down, and asked her if she had lost any thing out of the yard; she took the flannel petticoat from her, and said, it was her's; I said, there is the woman who took it, and you must prosecute her. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I ask her pardon, I am very sorry for what I did, I never did such a thing before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-116

336. RICHARD DAVIS was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 22d of March , two hind coach wheels, value 4 l. 14 s. the property of James Bushnell and Thomas Williams .

JAMES BUSHNELL sworn. - I am a coach-maker , my partner's name is Thomas Williams , I live at No. 254, Oxford-street ; I was informed that my premises were broke open.

JOHN KING sworn. - I am a smith: On Friday, the 22d of March, I saw the prisoner and another man with the two hind wheels; they were of a lead colour; they were coming along from the premises to Tyburn turnpike.

Q. What were they doing of? - A. They were driving them through Tyburn turnpike.

Q. Did you see them take them from the premises? - A. I saw them within twenty yards of the premises; I saw them turn up Park-lane with them.

JOHN ELLSTONE sworn. - I am a coach-master, I live at the Red-Lion yard, Great Warner-street, Coldbath-fields: On Friday, the 22d of March, Charles Oliver came to me and offered me a pair of hind wheels to sell; I bought them of him, and paid three guineas and a half for them.

Q. Were they new wheels? - A. I do not know, they were all over dirt, they were very good wheels.

Q. How long had they been drove? - A. I cannot tell any thing about that.

Q. You a coach-master, and cannot tell how long coach wheels have been drove? - A. As soon as I knew these wheels were stolen I sent them back to Mr. Bushnell.

Q. When did you pay the money? - A. The moment I bought them, on the Friday, about the middle of the day; I bought them by the recommendation of my own wheeler.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - I produce the box that was taken out of the wheels, the boxes would not fit his carriage, they were obliged to be taken out. (The wheels produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge, I know nothing at all about the wheels.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-117

337. RICHARD DAVIS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , two fore wheels, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of James Bushnell and Thomas Williams .

JAMES BUSHNELL sworn. - On Monday morning, the 25th of March, I found the door of my premises broke open, in the Bayswater-road : They are premises that we have to put the carriages and the wheels in till we get them painted. I only know that I got the wheels back again.

EDWARD WILLIAMS sworn. - I live by the side of Mr. Bushnell's premises, where the wheels were taken from; I saw the prisoner and another man, on Monday morning, the 25th of March, coming from the premises of Mr. Bushnell with the fore wheels.

Q. Did you know the person of Davis? - A. Yes, and the other was Charles Oliver , each of them had a fore wheel; this was a little after six o'clock; they were about twenty yards from Mr. Bushnell's premises; when I first saw them, when they saw me, they were very much shocked; I work for the same master; they were ashamed to see me; one stooped down to tie on his shoe, and the other endeavoured to hide himself, taking the flap of his long coat up, holding it so. I did not know that they were doing any thing that was indecent till afterwards; the premises were searched and found to be broke open; Mr. Bushnell came to me, and I told him what I had seen.

Q. Are you sure that the two persons you saw roll the wheels along were the prisoner and Oliver? - A. Yes, they went up Park-lane, both in one direction; when I came to look at the premises, the boards were broken down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You knew Davis very well? - A. Yes, he is a wheelwright: I saw the felloes for him.

Q. All the opportunity you had of seeing the wheels was, you were in the road, and they were on the foot-path? - A. Yes, I was at the gate paying the toll for my ass; I saw they were coloured a light colour, I did not search into them.

Q. Can you undertake to say, that at the time you first saw them, they were coming from Mr. Bushnell's premises? - A. I did not see them come out; I saw them as soon as they were out in the road.

Court. (To the prosecutor.) Q. What is the value of these two fore wheels? - A. They cost us three guineas before they were painted.

JOHN ELLSTONE sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner Davis? - A. I have seen him before, I know him by sight.

Q. Had he ever any dealings with you about any fore wheels of a coach? - A. I never made any agreement with him in my life; I bought them of Oliver on Monday, and I sent them back about Friday or Saturday.

Q. What Monday was it? - A. I know it was on a Monday.

Q. Do not you know quarter-day - what time of the day was it? - A. About eleven o'clock.

Q. When had you seen Oliver before? - A. On the Friday, when I bought the hind wheels of him; I had not seen him before on Monday.

Q. Had you seen Davis before on that day? - A. I saw Davis when I paid Oliver the three guineas for the wheels, on Monday, in the tap-room; we both went together to the public-house that I use in the street.

Q. How came you to pay him in the public-house rather than in your own house? - A. Oliver took me to the public-house, and there I paid him.

Q. You sat down and drank with him? - A. I do not think that I drank, I think there was a pot of beer called for, I sat down of course with him to pay him the money, I had not sat down above two minutes before I paid him the money.

Q. Who sat in the same box with you and Oliver? - A. Haycroft, a master wheelwright; the prisoner sat in the other box, on the opposite side.

Q. Did you speak to him? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did Oliver speak to him? - A. There was some of the silver that he rather disputed, and he called that man to see whether it was good; Davis said the silver was very good, and Oliver put it into his pocket; then he went and sat down in his former place; he sat by himself all the time I was there; I was not in the place above seven minutes altogether; I never saw Oliver before I bought the hind wheels of him.

Q. Then Davis, besides being called to see whether the silver was good or not, had no conversation with Oliver? - A. No, it did not shew to me that he had any connection with Oliver at that time.

Q. Are you sure that you returned to Mr. Bushnell the very same two fore wheels that Oliver sold to you? - A. I did not take them home myself; Mr. Bushnell declared them to be the wheels that he lost; Oliver came down to me, and said, take care of those wheels, I have stolen them, and then he set off as fast as he could; the wheeler was then boxing them on.

Q. What did you give for the hind wheels? - A. Three guineas and a half; they declared to me they sold them for a person in distress.

Q. How came you to give no more than three guineas and half for the hind wheels, and give three guineas for the fore wheels? - A. It appeared to me that there was a great deal more iron on the fore wheels than there were on the hind wheels.

Jury. Q. There cannot be more iron on the fore wheels than there are on the hind? - A. I was recommended by my own wheeler that they were sold entirely for distress.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Oliver was the person you agreed with, and the man who avowed to you he was the thief? - A. It was so.

Q. You never agreed with the prisoner, nor never saw him at the time you bought the wheels? - A. He was at the public-house.

Q. Had you any conversation with Davis about the wheels? - A. No.

Court. Q. Who was the third person in the box with you? - A. Haycroft.

Q. Did Oliver apply to Haycroft for his judgment on the silver? - A. No.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner at the public-house in Marlborough-street; he told me he was come to inquire after some man that was apprehended about some wheels; I told him I believed, through Oliver's interest, the matter would be squashed; I looked at Davis very hard, and, through the information that I had, I thought he was the man that I wanted; I said, is your name Davis; he said, yes, it is; you are a wheeler, are you; he said, yes, I am; then I said to him, you are the person that I want; O, said he, it is all very well, I am come to clear myself up with it; I took him before the Magistrate; I went to the place where the wheels were sold; I produce one box of each wheel, which I took out of Mr. Ellstone's coach-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So the prisoner at the bar, who is now charged with stealing these articles, found his way to this public-house, where he might be apprehended? - A. He was there.

Q. He acknowledged that his name was Davis, and that he was a wheelwright, after you had the conversation with him that Oliver would squash the business? - A. I did say so.

Q. You had been looking for him three days, and at the end of the three days you found him at the public-house where the people are put before they are examined? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You had been looking for him two or three days? - A. I went one day to Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell, looking for him.

Q. Did you know where he worked? - A. I believe he left his place of work after this, I was informed so, I should have been very glad to have waited on him if I had known where to find him.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) When was it that the two fore wheels were brought back to you? - A. I think on the Friday following.

Q. Are you sure that these wheels which were brought back to you are the same wheels that were stolen from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go with a constable, and with a search warrant, to Ellstone's? - A. Yes, and I took away the boxes belonging to the wheels; I can speak positively to the boxes; I went after the prisoner to Mr. Hudson's, his master, where he worked (the prisoner worked for the man who made my wheels); I went after Oliver too; I never succeeded in finding him; I am sure they are my boxes by sitting the arm; they are made on the arm to fit, when they are hot; they will not fit another gentleman's carriage; it might happen that they might fit a hackney-coach; I will swear they are my boxes.

Prisoner's defence. Please you my Lord, I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-118

338. ANN BAKER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 27th of March , a pocketbook, with instruments, value 10 s. of Ann Seymour , who had been tried this sessions and convicted, she knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.You were the prosecutor of Ann Seymour , who was tried yesterday and convicted? - A. Yes.

Q. You have, through the indulgence of the Court, been permitted to take her home to your house? - A. I have.

Q. Tell us whether you missed this pocket-book with this case of instruments? - A. In consequence of the information of Ann Seymour , I went to the prisoner, in company with Ann Seymour ; I told the prisoner I came to demand a letter that my servant girl had from her mother, inclosing some money, the girl having told me her mother had sent her a letter with some money; she answered, with a good deal of apparent surprize, that she had received no letter; I told her it was certainly a mistake; she said no it was not; I asked her if she had seen my servant that morning before; she said she had not; I asked her if she had not given her a seven-shilling piece that she had received from her mother; she said, no, she had never any thing to do with the girl in her life; she never saw her before last Monday week; I then turned round to the girl and said to her, is this the truth, and she sighed; I then begged Mrs. Baker's pardon for having expressed myself so very angrily, and went away.

Q. Where does the prisoner live? - A. Immediately against my garden-gate; when the girl had taken her bundles, I and my nephew pursued her, and we took her in Charlston-street; we brought her back to my house in Marybone-park. When I went in, I found Mrs. Baker there; she said, O sir, you have taken Nanny, I have brought you in a pocket-book with two two-pound Bank-notes, which she gave to me; I said, how could you be so vile a woman as to tell me in the morning that you never had any transaction with her in your life; she then said she had seen her, and that Ann Seymour asked her to counterfeit a letter, as though it came from her mother, and to say in the letter that the seven-shilling piece was all that the mother could send her at present; I asked her if she agreed to write the letter; she said she could not write, but she agreed that a young girl, who I believe is here, should write it. I then asked her if she had any thing more of the girl's, and she said she had not; in about half an hour, or more, I expressed I should go to Bow-street; she then said, if I would not bring her into trouble, she would tell all the truth; I said, you shall go to Bow-street, this transaction shall be fathomed; she told us where she had paid the Bank-notes away; there were two other two-pound notes she had of the girl.

Q. Did you find any Bank-notes in consequence of her information? - A. I did, I found two two-pound notes in the pocket-book; she said the girl had given them to her, and she said to the girl, I hope you have not been robbing of your master.

Q. What is the value of the pocket-book and the instruments? - A. About seven shillings.

Q. You have got the pocket-book? - A. Yes, this is the pocket-book the prisoner brought to me, I have my private mark on it.

Court. Q. What was the age of this girl, your servant? - A. Sixteen years of age.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury - I will tell you the truth, and nothing but the truth, from the beginning to the ending of my acquaintance with the girl: the first acquaintance of this girl with me was, she came to me, and asked me to new sleeve her a gown; I told her I could not do it, but I had a young woman within doors that did needle-work; she went and brought the gown, and came in and said, will you be so good as to do an errand for me; I said, it is a job I do not like; she said, I cannot get it myself, if you will, I will take it as a great favour; I asked her what it was to do, and she said it was to buy her some necessary things, a flannel, two flowered aprons, and some cloth to make a shift, and a pair of white stockings; she came past again, and then she pulled out the notes from her breasts, and gave them to me; I put them up in the cupboard, and did not look at them; she came again in the afternoon, and said, Mrs. Baker, if you see a gown, buy it for me; she said the young woman there would go with me. I immediately, after she was gone, went and looked at these notes, and I saw that they were two two-pound notes, and I said to the young woman that was with me, that was witness to it, this girl has left two two-pound notes, that money will buy a great many things. Accordingly I saw her go by the next morning, and the young woman with me called her in, and I said, what did you give me, why here are two two-pound notes; she said, I have not had a bit of rest all night, my poor mother sent them to me out of the country, and I thought I gave you but one, and I was going to get a letter wrote to send down to my mother concerning it; she said, go and lay it out. I went and brought her the things she told me, and the money I paid for them came to 2 l. 9 s. 4 d.; she came on the next morning, and I gave her half-a-guinea and a pound note; she left them at my house for the young woman to make, who is a neighbour of mine, and who was every time there that she was, and heard every thing that passed; she said, if you do not make them till the latter end of next week, till I leave my place, it will do. On the next Tuesday she came to my

house, and asked me to go to town, and buy a little tea, and she gave me the pound note. On the next Wednesday morning she came running in at the door, and she said, Mrs. Baker, can you write a few lines for me to my mother, it is concerning a seven-shilling piece; I said, I cannot; the young woman said, I would do it if I could, but my hands are very bad; she ran out of the door, and threw this pocket-book at the corner of my bed's head, and out she went. As soon as I cut my children a bit of bread and butter, Mr. Gibbons came in, and asked me if I had a letter from her mother, and whether I had wrote to her mother; I made a reply, I never had any letter from her mother; he said, have you burnt it; I said, no, I never had any letter from her mother, and moreover I never knew the girl till last Monday week; Mr. Gibbons certainly did come in very rash, and he said he would take me to Bow-street; he went out, and begged my pardon. As soon as Mr. Gibbons was gone, the girl pushed open the door; I said, you good for nothing girl, where are you going; she said, I do not know where I am going; she said, keep what you have got, Mrs. Baker, and say nothing; I ran immediately, as fast as I could, round to Mr. Gibbons's, and whether Mrs. Gibbons or the nephew came to the door, I cannot recollect; I asked whether Mr. Gibbons was at home; she said, no, but the nephew was. I had this pocket-book in my hand, and I said, here, Mrs. Gibbons, is a pocket-book which the girl threw on my bed, and there is the two two-pound notes that were in it; she would not take it till the nephew came; I asked her if the girl was in the room; she said, yes; I said, if you please to let me see her; on going into the room, I asked to sit down; then I said, you good for nothing hussy, did you not throw this pocket-book on my bed, and did not you bring me two one-pound notes to buy you some things, which are now at my house, and I will go and fetch them if you please; Mr. Gibbons made answer, no, we will call for them. I dropped the one-pound note, that she gave me to buy her some tea, on the table, and there was a sleeve I had thrown on the table too, which I saw after Mr. Gibbons was gone; when he came in, I gave him the pound-note and the sleeve; he asked me if that was all; I told him of every thing that belonged to this girl; they took this girl to Bow-street. Mr. Gibbons brought a gentleman that took me, and I got bail that bailed me out; Mr. Gibbons asked if this person would be bound for my removal out of the cottage in the course of a fortnight; they said they would not do any such thing to hurt me. Gentlemen, I believe I have told you the truth.

ANN BARNS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What age are you? - A. I am seventeen.

Q. Your father lives close to the cottage of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And you occasionally, for the sake of company, go and set in the cottage of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in the cottage when Ann Seymour brought any pocket-book? - A. Yes; she threw it on the bed, she did not stay in the house a minute; it was a week before that she shewed it to us, and said it was her father's present before he died; she wished Mrs. Baker to write her a letter, as though it came from her mother.

Q. Were you present when Ann Seymour brought any Bank-notes for any purpose? - A. Yes, a week, or a fortnight before, she brought two two-pound Bank-notes for Mrs. Baker to buy her a few articles of wearing apparel.

Q. Did she say from whom she received these Bank-notes? - A. Not at that time; I called her in the next morning, and Mrs. Baker asked her how she came by them, and she said her mother had sent them up out of the country.

Q. Do you know of Mrs. Baker having bought her any articles of wearing apparel? - A. Yes; I was to have made them up.

Q. You were present at Mrs. Baker's receiving the notes and the pocket-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at the time believe what Ann Seymour said - from her behaviour, and from the account that she gave of these notes and pocketbook, did you believe it to be true? - A. I did believe it was true.

Q. How long have you known Mrs. Baker? - A. Near two years; she has washed for my father, my brother, and me, and during that time she has maintained a good character for honesty.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-119

339. THOMAS CRASK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a metal watch, value 20 s. the property of Brownlow Bourdillon .

BROWNLOW BOURDILLON sworn. - I live at Hampstead : On Wednesday, the 20th of March, a party of friends came down in a post-chaise to dine with me, the prisoner was the person who drove the post-chaise . From information of one of my servants that the watch was taken out of the kitchen, the prisoner was searched, and the watch was found on him when he came back to take the company away.

THOMAS GILES sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Bourdillon: On the 20th of March my master's watch was in the kitchen, it was for the use of the cook.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner there? -

A. Yes, he was in there to have some refreshment by my master's orders.

Q. Did he bring the company to your master's house? - A. Yes; I observed the watch in the kitchen just before six o'clock, when I carried dinner in; I looked at it, it wanted about five minutes to six, it was hanging up in the kitchen just by the door; I saw the prisoner in the kitchen about seven o'clock.

Q. When did the prisoner leave the kitchen? - A. About eight o'clock; I missed the watch about twenty minutes after he was gone, I saw him searched in the kitchen when he returned to take the company home, and the watch was found upon him. (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I thought it was the servant's watch, and with that I took it, I thought he left it in a very careless place; I put it in my pocket, and went to the stable to get my horses ready, thinking to return it to the servant again; I had no thoughts of keeping the watch, nor to part with it; if I had had any idea of not returning the watch, I should have made away with it, or concealed it somewhere, or dropped it, or thrown it in the street.

GUILTY , aged 33.

The prosecutor recommended him, on account of his good character, having made enquiries respecting him.

Privately whipped and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-120

340. JOHN MURPHY and GEORGE HARRISON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , thirty pieces of wood, value 20 s. and a large board, value 1 s. the property of Charles Pinsent ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

CHARLES PINSENT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Dean-street, Soho, I am a carpenter ; I lost thirty pieces of wood, and a large board, part of the materials of a house that I had purchased.

Q. Was Murphy one of your servants? - A. Yes, he was carter , he had been with me about a year and a half; I employed him to remove this wood from the 6th of April to the 13th; I only know from information; on the 13th of April I saw some of the materials at the house of the prisoner Harrison, he keeps a coal-shed , and sells wood .

Q. Were these materials such as fairly might be broken up for fire-wood, or were they better than ought to be broken up for fire-wood? - A. Some of them were better than ought to be broken up for fire-wood; I found there about eighteen cube feet in various pieces and various dimensions; I had purchased all the timber at the Marquis of Stafford's house, and this found at Harrison's was part of it; I found this piece out of the lot that I had remaining, and it matches with those found at the prisoner's house, they fit exactly, they were all marked in lots before the sale, and previous to the Marquis buying the house of Lord - .

Q. Had you observed the wood marked before you found it at Harrison's house? - A. I had not; I have an evidence here that did.

Q. It bore a lot-mark of the house? - A. It did, it was part of lot 5 l; I likewise found in the prisoner Harrison's house a number of penny bundles of wood cut up, with some paper on them, which is exactly the pattern of the paper which came from the house, there were several pieces of wood covered with this pattern paper; I knew them directly I saw them, he said his wife bought them without his knowledge.

JOHN SALES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a carpenter, I work for Mr. Pinsent, I had the loading of the cart with part of the materials at different times, John Murphy drove the cart.

Q. Were all these materials that are now in Court found at Harrison's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see where the prisoner Murphy went with these materials? - A No, I did not accompany the cart; I recollect putting this board in the cart.

Court. Q. Is that board proper to be cut into firewood? - A. It is too good to be used for that purpose.

Q. Look at the other materials, are they like the materials that your master had purchased? - A. Yes, they are, and they are too good for fire-wood.

Q. How much wood was there found at Harrison's? - A. About half a cart load.

- POTTS sworn. - I live at Lord Stafford's, I know this to be Mr. Pinsent's property, I know this particular board, and they all have the appearance of the materials that he purchased of Lord Stafford; I was always in the house before it was pulled down, they were all marked in lots.

JOHN THORNTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a shoe-maker, I live at No. 7, Well-street, Oxford-road.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. I know them both; Mr. Harrison is my landlord, he lives at No. 68, Well-street; I know Murphy by sight, seeing him drive a cart; I have a stall at No. 69, next door to Mr. Harrison; the prisoner came frequently on the Tuesday before Good Friday with a cart load of wood, he stopped at the prisoner Harrison's door, he loosened the wood, and took part of it out, and put it down at Mr. Harrison's door.

Q. Did you see who took it in? - A. Mr. Harrison picked the best of it, and threw it down his own cellar, the large pieces.

Q. What did he do with the other? - A. He cut it up into these pieces; the cart did not stay I suppose above six or seven minutes at the door.

Q. Are you sure that Murphy was the man that drove the cart? - A. He was; I did not pay any attention to the name on the cart, there were five loads that he came with.

Q. Was that on the same day? - A. No, there were two days.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Thornton, you say

that you saw Murphy come with the cart, and put the wood down at Harrison's door? - A. Yes.

Q. This is the first time that you are speaking of? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you venture to swear positively that you saw the prisoner, or was it his wife that you saw at the time the cart was there? - A. I did not see Harrison at that time; the prisoner Harrison came home with a barrow of grains, and then he took up the wood.

Q. How long had the prisoner Murphy been gone when he came home? - A. Directly after almost.

Q. Did he see Murphy before he took the wood in? - A. I cannot say but he was very near him; when Murphy was gone from the door, he was not above the length of this Court from him.

Q. Did Harrison call him back, or speak to him? - A. Not till the next time he saw him afterwards, and saw the wood.

Q. I take it for granted you and Mr. Harrison were upon good terms - take your time, it requires consideration, there is a deal of difficulty in it? - A. I do not owe the man any harm, he had been picking at me these three years back.

Q. By which I understand you were upon no good terms at all with him after he had been picking at you for three years - there is a little matter of rent due now? - A. Not now.

Q. There was rent due? - A. No, never; the very day my rent was due was on Good Friday; I paid him on the Thursday evening, I offered him the rent before Good Friday, though there was none due, and I had my key in my hand.

Q. Did you, or was he obliged to sue out a Marshalsea writ for his rent? - A. No, not to my knowledge; he said, he would serve me with an ejectment if I would not give up my premises; there was a question about the repairs of the house, I repaired it out of my pocket, and he would not pay me again.

Q. Did you receive any notice from him? - A. I received two written notices from him to quit the premises, I received the first notice about a twelvemonth ago; when I came in, he was to repair my premises.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Wheatley - he is a sheriff's officer belonging to the Marshalsea? - A. I do not know, indeed.

Q. You have said you had received no Marshalsea writ - upon your oath, had not you a Marshalsea writ served you by Wheatley, or a copy of a writ? - A. I was served with a Marshalsea writ by Wheatley the day after my rent was due. On the 12th of April my rent was due, on the 11th I offered my rent, and took witness with me, I offered my rent to his wife; on Good Friday I did not go, I thought it would be all the same, and on the Saturday after the Good Friday I was served with the writ.

Court. Q. You tendered your rent on the Thursday, and then on the Saturday he served you with a writ? - A. Yes, and I paid him, and brought the stamp with me, and he never gave me the receipt.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have told us for this reason you were not upon good terms with your landlord - have you ever expressed that you would ruin Harrison? - A. I never said to any body I would ruin Harrison till after he served me with a writ, and then I said that to Mr. Wheatley.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever say it to any body else? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you make use of the expression to a person of the name of Knight? - A. I will not swear one way or the other.

Q. Did not you go to Mr. Knight the very day that Wheatley served you with a copy of a writ, and say you would ruin him as you had the means and the power? - A. I cannot say whether I did, or did not.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a Police officer of Marlborough-street, I searched Harrison's house with a warrant on the 13th of April; I found this board, and the quartering, and the timber that is in the yard; I found it in the cellar, Mr. Pinsent picked out this bundle of wood from many others that were there, it has paper stuck on it; Mr. Pinsent took a piece of it, and it corresponded with the remaining pieces of paper on the wood; I took both the prisoners into custody.

Q. Did Harrison say any thing when you took him? - A. He denied that he had bought it, and said he was not at home when it was left there; Mrs. Harrison told us, in both the prisoners' hearing, that she had bought it, she told what she gave for it, which was two shillings.

Q. She named the price, and he suffered it to pass as the real transaction? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you take Murphy? - A. Mr. Pinsent sent for him to bring an empty cart, after the search had been made; I desired the person that fetched him to tell him to drive the cart up Well-street, as we wanted a cart; I thought it would answer a double purpose for him to drive the cart; I stopped him at Harrison's door, Mr. Pinsent was either at the door, or inside of Harrison's house; I took Murphy into Harrison's house, and told him what I apprehended him for; Mrs. Harrison said to Murphy, you know I bought it of you, and I gave you two shillings for it; he said, yes, it was two shillings that I got for it.

JOSEPH DUGGINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep a tallow chandler's shop, I live at No. 69, Well-street.

Q.(To Hamilton.) Do you know this person? - A. Yes, that is the next door neighbour to the prisoner Harrison.

Duggins. In the morning part of Tuesday or Wednesday, my young man being up all night, I took my mould-frames out to the door to cool, I came out of my cellar to fetch them in.

Q.(To Thornton.) What time on Tuesday before Good Friday did you see Murphy with the cart at Harrison's? - A. In the morning part

Duggins. I believe about ten or eleven o'clock, as I had the mould-frames under my arm, I saw a cart at Mr. Harrison's door; I saw the man take out some wood from under the cords, three or four pieces, which was thrown down at Mr. Harrison's door; I had my mould-frames under my arm, I will not take upon me to say whether I saw Mr. or Mrs. Harrison at the door.

Murphy left his defence to his Counsel.

Harrison's defence. I hope the Jury will take notice that my tenant has meant my ruin; he has asserted it to many people who are here to prove it.

Murphy called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Harrison called sixteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Murphy, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

Harrison, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-121

341. MARGARET OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , four pieces of brass cast work, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Walford .

THOMAS WALFORD sworn. - I am a brass-founder and caster .

Q. Was the prisoner in your service? - A. No. she had lived at a public-house in the same street: On Saturday after Ash-Wednesday I caught the prisoner in the coal-cellar, between seven and eight in the evening, concealed, with the property in her hand; I had seen the property in the ware-room about half-past four in the afternoon; she had been discharged from her service; she had no business there at that time.

Q. What age is she? - A. Fourteen. (The property produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 14.

The Prosecutor and Jury recommended her to mercy, believing it to be her first offence.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-122

342. ESTHER EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , twenty-eight yards of check kersey, value 3 l. the property of John and Edward Sylvester .

EDWARD SYLVESTER sworn. - I am assistant to my father, who keeps a blanket-warehouse , in Goswell-street : the cloth in question did not exactly belong to me or my father, they were left in the charge of me and my father by Mr. Coxeter, who lives in our neighbourhood, to sell, if an opportunity offered; it was intended for horse-cloths; I did not miss the piece of cloth till Mr. Spicer brought me a pattern of it.

Q. You did not know of its being taken? - A. No, I did not; the officer asked me if I had such cloth in the warehouse; I knew I should have such a thing; he took me to Worship-street, and there I saw the piece of cloth.

WILLIAM HILL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Macpherson, straw hat warehouse, Maiden-lane: On the 11th of April, as I was in Golden-lane, I saw the defendant with that same bundle of kersey, and her cloak wrapped round it; she went a little way up a court to a girl, and then walked towards Cow-heel-alley, and left the said bundle of kersey in the other court; Mr. Spicer, the officer, and I, went after her, but could not find her; I left Mr. Spicer, and was going home, and happened to meet her in Wood-street; she came up to me, and asked me if I had any demands on her, before I spoke to her; I said, if you are impertinent, I will tell you; with that I went and called an officer; she made her escape, and went into Basinghall-street, we proceeded after her; the officer one way and I the other; I got her in Basinghall-street, and delivered her up to the city officer.

Q. Are you sure this is the woman you saw in Golden lane? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I do not know the man.

JOHN KING sworn. - I am a pavior's labourer and watchman; on the 11th of April, between the hours of one and two, I was coming from my dinner; at the corner of Hartshorn-court, Golden-lane, this woman had a bundle wrapped up in a red cloak; she had sat it on the footway in Golden-lane, and was trying to take it up in her arms; she was very much in liquor, and had a deal to do to get it up in her arms; she carried it as far as Two-Brewers court, in Golden-lane; she took her cloak from off it, and said d - n the weight, it is too heavy for me to carry, and there she left it; I thought it was proper to call an officer to take care of the property, and I gave it to Spicer.

- BISHOP sworn. - I live in Two-Brewers court; I saw the prisoner drop a large bundle, exactly at the bottom of Two Brewers-court; she put on her cloak and went away and left it; I took it into my house till Spicer came.

JAMES SPICER sworn. - I am an officer; I know no more than coming up at the time and securing the property. I produce it. (The property identified by Edward Sylvester.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was going through a passage I saw a roll of something lie on the ground; a man came along; I asked him who it belonged to; I asked him to take it up to some house, and find an owner for it; he said he would have nothing to do with it, I then tried to lift it up myself, I found it was too heavy, I tied my cloak round it to take care of it, till I found an owner; I got it up; it fell down, I could not carry it; I dare say I tried to carry it ten or a dozen times, till I got to a corner of an alley, and there I left it, in the presence of six or eight men; I desired them to take care of it; I would not have any thing more to do with it.

Q.(To Hill.) Did she observe you following of her - how came she to know you again? A. I was standing in the mob along with the rest, I saw her again in Wood-street; she then asked if I had any demands on her.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-123

343. MATTHEW HUSBAND , alias JAMES HUSBAND , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , fifty pounds weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Scott and William Jordan .

WILLIAM JORDAN sworn. - I am a carpenter and builder .

Q. Have you any partner? - A. Yes, Thomas Scott ; On the 15th of April I had occasion to go to look at three houses, they were covered in, in Tottenham-court-road ; I found a part of the gutters were stolen; on the evening of the 16th of April I was still at the look out, and about ten o'clock I went to the back part of these premises; I heard a rattling amongst the slates were the gutters laid; I was then convinced that some person was there going to take off the lead; I looked up, and after looking for about a minute and a half, I fairly saw

a man at work in the gutter; I went into a room of one of the houses, where John Nutting lodges; I told him there was a thief upon the house; I told him to come out, and take a weapon by way of defending himself; he laid hold of the poker; I called out, what are you about there; the watchman was at the front of the house; he called, what is the matter; I said, there is some person upon the house cutting the lead; the watchman sprang his rattle, and a number of people came to the front of the house; the man then desisted from working at the back part of the house; John Nutting saw him go into the garret; he did not attempt to come down; we lost sight of him; he got in at the roof at the back part of the house; I went and got a light, and went through the house that I live in, and went to this garret, and shewed the light into the window, and John Nutting saw him go down the partition, to the bottom of the house; it is very easy for persons, acquainted with houses of this description, to go down by having braces; we have occasion to do so ourselves sometimes; they can hold by the uprights, and keep their feet upon these braces; I saw him clearly go down; he had got the same jacket on then as he has now; he went down the partition to the bottom of the house, and came out of the kitchen-window; we had the house all shut up but the kitchen-window; we did not suppose any one could get in there; John Nutting followed him there, and took him at the back part of the house; we searched the gutter, and found there were two pieces of lead cut from the gutter, rolled up, and a great many slates broken; he was taken to the watch-house. I produce the lead.

JOHN NUTTING sworn. - I saw a person go from the end of the roof in at the back garret-window, and when William Jordan went up to the top of the house I saw a man come down the partition; I caught hold of the prisoner just as he came out of the back kitchen-window; the prisoner is the man I secured. (The lead identified by the plumber, James Golding.

Prisoner's defence. I had occasion to go there and do whatever it was; the same time I was there, there was an alarm given; they took me on suspicion, as being the person; I am very innocent of the crime.

Q. How came you to go up to the roof, and come down the partition; that is the awkward part of it? - A. I was not there at all.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-124

344. SUSANNAH HARMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a Japan tea-tray, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of William Alvey .

WILLIAM ALVEY sworn. - I am a miniature-painter and jeweller ; I live in Middle-Row, Holborn : On the morning of the 10th of April I received information that a woman had taken a tea-tray from my door; I followed her, and took it from her about fifty yards from the house.

GEORGE RICE sworn. - I saw her take it; she had the tea-board in her hand; I brought her back to the house, and put her into custody. (The tea-board produced, and identified by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I had been unfortunately drinking all the evening, and that morning I did not know what I did.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-125

345. ELIZABETH OTWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of James Parrot .

JAMES PARROT sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter : On the 10th of April I went to see two or three friends, after I left work; about twelve or one o'clock in the morning, as I was coming home, this lady came up to me in Cork-street, Burlington-gardens.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was not; this lady came up to me, and said, my dear, how are you; I said, very well, thank you, madam; I went with her to Westminster ; she wanted some gin; I gave her a shilling, and she gave me the change; when I got into her room I went to bed; she put a chair against the door, and she came to bed; I awoke about three o'clock, and I was all alone by myself; I had put my watch and my money in my pocket; I searched, and the first thing that I missed was my watch.

Q. Did you ever find your watch? - A. No.

Q. When was the last time that you had seen your watch? - A. In the room along with her; she said to me in the room, where is your watch; I made answer, I have not got one; she said, I saw you with one in Cork-street, and I can hear one under my head; she had taken all but one halfpenny out of my pocket; it is a family watch, or else I should not care about it.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer: The prosecutor came to me to apprehend the prisoner; he went into the room, there were two women in bed, and he said, that is the woman who robbed me of my watch; she got up in bed, and said, how could I rob you, I have not got a shift on, if I had robbed you I should have bought a shift; she acknowledged that she was with him in Cork-street, but knew nothing whatever of the young man's watch.

Q.(To prosecutor.) How many girls did you pick up that night? - A. Only that one, she did not undress herself that night; I could not see what she had got on.

Prisoner's defence. The first time I saw that young man was at the top of Cork-street, he asked me where I was going; I told him I was going home; he said he was locked out, and he asked if he might come to bed with me; he went with me, and treated me at the watering-house, Piccadilly; there were three or four other girls he caught hold of, and he went up a court with them, and when we came home he had only one shilling; he said, if he saw me again he would make it up to me.

Prosecutor. I never saw one girl after I met her in Cork-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-126

346. JOSEPH TOWERS and JANE TOWERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a game cock, value 5 s. and five hens, value 5 s. the property of Evan Evans .

EVAN EVANS sworn. - I am a farmer , I live at Hanwell : On Saturday night, the 6th of April, my yard was robbed of eighteen fowls out of the fowl-house.

Q. Is your yard an enclosed yard? - A. It is where I keep my horses, and every thing else an open shed; I lost a cock, seventeen hens, a pair of white ducks, and a spotted Muscovy drake; I published some hand-bills, and offered twenty guineas reward; I heard of my property, and found some of my fowls at a lady's house, who had purchased them.

- FOOT sworn. - I am a poor day-labouring man, I live at Belfont: The woman prisoner came, on the 7th of April, to sell some fowls; I told her the gentlewoman was not up; she came again, about half an hour after seven, with four fowls; she asked half a crown a piece for them of Mrs. Barnes; the lady sent them down to me, she bought three hens and a cock, I gave her 10 s. for the four; I produce the cock, the woman was then alone. (The cock identified by the prosecutor.)

Foot. About an hour afterwards the man came along the high road, we took him the same day these things were sold to Mrs. Barnes; both the man and woman came by Mrs. Barnes's gate about a quarter of an hour afterwards with more fowls.

- sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Barnes: I saw the woman when she came on the Sunday morning; she brought half a dozen fowls in a basket; the fowls were taken up to my mistress in her bed-room; she purchased four of them, and gave her ten shillings for them.

JAMES COOPER sworn. - I keep a public-house at Pelfont: The man came in, on the 7th of April, and called for a pint of beer.

Q. Any body with him? - A. No.

Q. What time of the day? - A. About half-past seven; he called for a pint of beer, and after he had drank that he called for another, and before he had drank the second pint the woman came in; she said to him, I am obliged to wait, for the gentlewoman is not up; she had not a basket with her then.

Joseph Tower 's defence. I am innocent of the crime, I was not nigh the place, I had not seen my wife for a week, till I went into that gentleman's house and had a pint of beer, I had been into Berkshire to work at the nursery-gardens.

Jane Towers 's defence. I was hunting on the common, and found them in the basket in the furze-bushes, and I took them to the gentlewoman's house to get the money if I could; I have got six small children; my husband had not seen me for a week; I was glad to sell them to get a bit of bread; I saw my husband go into the public-house; I went to him; he never knew any thing about it; he never saw the fowls nor the money.

Joseph Towers , GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for seven years .

Jane Towers , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-127

347. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , three bushels of coals, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Smith .

Second Count. For the like offence, only charging it to be the property of John Turnbridge .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the son of Ann Smith ; does she carry on the business of a coal-merchant ? - A. Yes; on the 27th of February we had ordered some coals from Mr. Turnbridge's wharf, to be delivered to Morris and Stow's, Primrose-street.

Q. And these coals were the property of your mother? - A. Yes.

GEORGE TURNBRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a wharfinger, at Wapping? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 27th of February was the prisoner in your service? - A. He was one of our waggoner s, and on that day I sent him with Mrs. Smith's coals, to Morris and Stow's, Primrose-street; I cannot say how many sacks he had in the waggon; the quantity ordered was thirty-three sacks.

Q. Whatever he took were to go to Primrose-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give him any orders to stop at Mrs. Banks's? - A. No.

Q.(To Mr. Smith.) Is Mr. Banks any customer of your's? - A. No.

SARAH BANKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at No. 31, Church-lane, Whitechapel : On the 27th of February the prisoner asked me if I wanted any coals; I told him, yes, he might bring a bushel or two; instead of that he brought me in a sack; I am a washerwoman; I saw the waggon at the door.

Q. Did you make any agreement what you were to pay him? - A. I paid him twenty-one pence a bushel; that is what I always pay; I told him I would pay him, but I had only a one-pound note; he was to call again.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH CANE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a coal-merchant? - A. Yes, at Ratcliffe-cross: On the morning of the 27th, I was walking through Church-lane between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, and I passed a waggon that appeared to have one sack taken out, and the cords were loose; I turned round to look at the horses, and I saw a sack thrown up; there was the prisoner and another man at the horse's head; when I got up to them, I said, have you been selling a sack of coals, lads; he said, no, it was a customer his master served; I thought it probably might; I mentioned it at the Coal-exchange to Mr. Turnbridge; I have seen the prisoner about the streets a great many years; I never saw an improper thing by him before.

Prisoner's defence. I had a little drop of liquor in my head, I never did such a thing before; I was never in trouble in my life before, I work very hard for my living.

Prosecutor. He has worked for us nine or ten months; the man has behaved very well; I never heard any thing against him till this time.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-128

348. ANN WELLS and ELIZABETH MOORE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD sworn. - I work at a coal-shed ; I was going up Drury-lane along with a young man, and I picked up this young woman, Ann Wells , on the 5th of March, between twelve and one o'clock; she asked me to give her something to drink, and we had a glass of liquor a-piece; when I went into her room, I had

only a five-shilling piece; I was going to give it to her to get some beer, and the young man that was with me said, do not give it to her, she will be off with it. In the mean time he was gone for the beer, she stooped down, and took the watch out of my pocket, and ran down stairs; Elizabeth Moore blowed the candle out; I went after her, but I never saw the watch any more; I searched Ann Wells , and the watch was not found about her.

Wells's defence. I was going home at half past twelve o'clock, and that young man and another stopped me; they insisted on going with me; I am an unfortunate girl; they went up stairs with me, and sat down by the fire; this young man began to pull me about, and shewed very indecent actions in the room; then he swore that I had robbed him of his watch; I never stirred from the place.

Moore's defence. I never saw a thing of the kind, I assure you.

Wells, GUILTY , aged 18.

Moore, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-129

349. ROBERT ALDRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , fourteen pounds weight of lead pipe, value 4 s. the property of William White .

MARTHA DAY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. White; I was going to draw some beer between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and I observed the prisoner with his arm up to the leaden pipe, pulling it down, and the other part of the leaden pipe laid down by the side of me; I asked him who he wanted, and he said he wanted a ship-mate of his; I told him he did not want and body; I took him by the collar, and he got away; I then laid hold of him by the waistband of his breeches, and held him tight till somebody came to my assistance.

- HAMILTON sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; I produce the leaden pipe.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-130

350. SARAH TOWNSHEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , seven yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of William Scottney .

WILLIAM SCOTTNEY sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 15, Oxford-street : On the 22d of April, I had seven yards of printed cotton taken from an iron rail outside of the door, between the hours of five and six o'clock in the evening.

HENRY FRASER sworn. - On the 22d of April a woman at the outside of the door beckoned me to come out; she said the woman had run away with a piece of print; I ran after her immediately, and when I got up to her, I saw it in her apron; I accused her of taking it; she said she did not take it, it was given to her by a person who had bought it; I took her back to the shop. (The print produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

ANN DAVIS sworn. - I saw it taken; the prisoner is the person.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-131

351. SARAH WILLIAMS , alias SIXSMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a tea-cloth, value 1 s. a half cambric handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d and two silver thimbles, value 2 s. the property of Robert White .

ROBERT WHITE sworn. - I am a laundress , I live in George-street, Battle-bridge : On the 7th of March we employed this woman as a washer-woman ; I have for several months past missed things every week; I walked across the laundry, and she seemed to be watching me; I had rather a suspicion; there was a handkerchief lying by my wife's ironing-board; I looked at the board again, and it was gone; I let her go out, and called her in again; I fetched an officer, and it proved to be a tea-cloth; between the lights I thought it was a handkerchief; we found a number of duplicates on her of some of my property; she took a number of other people's property.

JOHN AVERY sworn. - I belong to Bow-street; I produce a half cambric handkerchief, of which I found the duplicate on her, pawned at Mr. Fleming's, Fleet-market, along with a great many other things which have been given up to the people; the things were given up by the order of Sir Richard Ford .

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-132

352. CATHARINE RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , twenty-eight yards of printed calico, value 40 s. the property of Robert Cottel .

THOMAS DOBSON sworn. - I saw the prisoner on the 27th of February, as I was walking along Holborn , take this piece of cotton from the rod that went across the window on the outside.

- CLARK sworn - I was servant to Mr. Cottel at that time; the gentleman came in, and gave the alarm; I pursued her, and took her about five hundred yards off in Lincoln's-inn-fields; I found this piece of print concealed under her cloak, I produce it; I can swear it is the property of Mr. Cottel.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going along the street, I saw this piece of cotton lie on the ground; he came and took hold of me, and said I stole it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-133

353. ELIZABETH SUMMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of April , a cloak, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Hill .

RICHARD LAW sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hill, a pawnbroker , No. 64, Turnmill-street .

Q. Did you see the prisoner take the cloak? - A. No, I did not see her take it; I pursued after her, and took her up Brick-alley, and brought her back to the shop; she had the cloak tucked up her gown; I know the cloak was on the counter; a witness came and informed me of it, and I took the cloak from her.

JOHN PUCKERIDGE sworn. - Q. Do you know this woman? - A. Yes; on Monday, the 22d of April, I saw her in the shop; I stood by Richard Law when he was hanging the things up; the rest of the things were taken off the counter, and this cloak was on the counter; the woman watched very much, and I watched; I turned my head as though I saw nothing about it, and when I turned my head back again, the cloak was gone off the counter; she got her half handkerchief out, and then she went out of the shop; then I made the alarm; I saw her brought back, and I saw the cloak taken from under the body of her gown.

(The cloak produced and identified by Law.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming out of the shop, and it laid under my feet, and I picked it up.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050424-134

354. ISAAC MAYDWELL was indicted for that he, on the 11th of February , feloniously did utter certain playing cards, liable to a stamp-duty, with counterfeit marks thereon, counterfeiting and resembling the impression of certain marks directed to be used by a certain Act of Parliament passed in the 29th year of his present Majesty, and several former Acts of Parliament denoting the duties granted to his Majesty for every pack of playing cards made fit for sale, he knowing them to be counterfeited .

And various other Counts for like offence.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp, and the case was stated by Mr. Garrow.)

FRANCIS THEW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live at No. 4, Duke's-court, Drury lane.

Q. When were you first acquainted with the prisoner? - A. On the 8th of January last, I went to him at No. 6, Lovell's-court, Paternoster-row; I told him that I was informed by a person that he dealt in cards; he said he did, but he had but one pack; he let me have them; they were put up in white paper, I gave him two shillings for them; there were fifty-two in the pack, and the ace of spades I think was with them; I saw him afterwards on the 11th at the same place, and I told him I wanted a dozen packs; he took me to a house in Butcherhall-lane, where he knocked at the door; a girl answered the door, and she asked him if his name was Isaac; he said, yes; he asked for a parcel that was left for him, and she gave him the parcel without any more questions.

Court. Q. Did you know what it contained? - A. Yes, a dozen packs of cards; he then delivered them to me, and I paid him twenty-three shillings for them; I told him I was going out of town at that time, and requested his directions, which he gave me, and it is now on the directions of one of the parcels.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Look into that parcel, and see whether it is now as it was when it was delivered to you, and whether the aces of spades are not in a separate parcel to that? - A. Yes, it is; they correspond in number to them, but they are in separate parcels; I think I saw him again on the 17th in Lovell's-court; I applied to him then for two packs; I then went with him again to Butcherhall-lane; he asked for Mr. Knipe; they said he was not there; then he said he must go to the office; he took me with him to the Bull and Mouth inn; he desired me to wait in the street; he went into the inn, and brought the two packs to me, all but the aces of spades; he said he must go and get the aces of spades; then I went with him to the house of Mr. Read, in Hosier-lane, a cloth-presser; after he had been in a little time, he called to me, while I was waiting in the street; I went in and paid him there two shillings a pack for them, and there I received the aces. On the 29th I saw him again in Lovell's-court; he took me again to Butcherhall-lane, and there I saw Mr. Knipe; he asked for two packs of cards, and Mr. Knipe handed him out two parcels of cards, which he gave me. I saw him again on the 6th of February in Lovell's-court; I applied for two dozen then; these are them.

Q. Are the aces of spades made up in a separate parcel, and correspond in number to the two dozen packs - open them? - A. Yes, they are; I paid him forty-five shillings for them; I saw they were in separate parcels after I got home; I had before observed the name of Hart being on the aces; I mentioned it to him; the reason of my observation to him was, because he had told me they were French cards; he told me that was an illusion, they were French cards.

Q. What may be the price of a pack of cards now, or at the time you bought these? - A. Four shillings a pack.

Court. Q. You mean the fair price with the duty? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. In consequence of information, you went on purpose to purchase these cards? - A. Yes; I saw him again on the 16th of February, I went for two dozen; I went to the Bull and Mouth inn with him; I saw Knipe there; Maydwell said then he would get three dozen, and leave them with Mr. Knipe for me, as he was going out of town.

Q. He made an appointment with you on the 3d of March? - A. He was to meet me at the house of Mr. Pocock, No. 43, Eagle-street; I had told him that was my lodgings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had not been acquainted with him prior to the month of January - it was only then that you were taken into this awkward service? - A. No.

Q. You depend upon the bounty of the Stamp-office? - A. No bounty at all; I expect to be paid for my time and trouble.

EDWARD WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. Are you a playing-card maker? - A. Yes, I worked for Lee, No. 42, Fetter-lane.

Q. How many gross of cards did Mr. Lee make a month? - A. From fifteen to sixteen gross a month.

Q. Were all these cards made with aces got from the Stamp-office? - A. No, he might make perhaps a gross a month with aces from the Stamp-office; he used aces of spades that he got elsewhere, that were forged.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a card-maker; I worked for Thomas Lee , in Fetter-lane.

Q. What stamps did you use? - A. Stamps that Mr.

Lee procured in general; now and then stamps from the Stamp-office.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the difference between a forged stamp and a good one? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were so wicked as to do it? - A. I was only a servant.

Q. Do not you know that a servant is not forced to commit a felony if his master does - were not you taken into custody? - A. I surrendered.

THOMAS ROW sworn. - On the 6th of March I went to Pocock's, No. 43, Eagle-street, and I took the prisoner into custody with these seven parcels of cards; they appear to be fifty-one; in one parcel the aces are separate; I saw him knock at the door, and I seized him directly.

CHARLES- EDWARD BERRESFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. Q. You are Secretary to the Stamp-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know from the documents of the Stamp-office when Hart ceased to be a card-maker? - A. I do not know; I have searched the books, and I find his highest number was 80, (looking at the ace: of spades found at Thew's, sold by Maydwell,) they are all forged; they have an imitation of the real ones from the Stamp-office, and these numbers are from 112 to 116.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I am the officer that delivers the legal aces of spades to the different card-makers; the name of the card-maker is inserted on each duty ace; I never deliver the name of one card-maker to another.

Q. Are they constantly delivered in this form, twenty in a sheet? - A. Yes, never in any other way; I knew Hart very well, he ceased card-making on the 13th of November, 1797; he failed, and I was in possession of all his duty aces that were at his manufactory, and I brought them to the Office.

Mr. Alley. Q. You know that a great number had been sold to the Neckinger Mill Company? - A. I do not know that, I have heard so.

Mr. Garrow. Q. Whatever might have been transacted between the Neckinger Mill Company and the Stamp-office, could the Neckinger Mill Company have received forged aces from the Stamp-office? - A. I apprehend not.

Court. Q. Every card-maker has the aces stamped on his paper; his name is likewise inserted on every ace? - A. Yes.

Q. And Lee cannot have Hart's stamps, and Hart cannot have Lee's? - A. Certainly not.

Prisoner's defence. I have always considered them as French cards; I have always bought and sold them as such.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-135

355. JAMES KNIPE was indicted for that he, on the 16th of February , feloniously did utter certain playing cards liable to a stamp-duty, with counterfeit marks thereon, counterfeiting and resembling the impression of certain marks and stamps directed to be used by a certain Act of Parliament made in the 29th year of our Lord the King, and several other former Acts relative to certain duties granted to his Majesty for certain cards made fit for use and sale in Great-Britain, he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace .

And several other Counts of like offence.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Knapp. and the case stated by Mr. Garrow.)

FRANCIS PUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You either did live or do live now with a card-maker? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any direction that you received from Mr. Estcourt, or any officer of the Stamp-office, did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the 16th of February any where? - A. Yes, I think at No. 7, Butcherhall-lane.

Q. What passed between you that day? - A. I wanted two packs of cards of him.

Q. Had you any and what conversation with him, before you asked him for these packs of cards? - A. No conversation with him; I had seen him with Maydwell sometimes, and knew him on that account.

Q. What cards did you ask him for then? - A. Part of the cards which Maydwell had left for me; he gave me two dozen, which I wanted at that time.

Q. What made you apply to him and not to Maydwell, when Maydwell was to have given them to you? - A. Maydwell was gone out of town.

Q. Had there been at any time any conversation with the prisoner; had he given you to understand that you should make application to him -

Mr. Gurney. Q Had you any conversation with the prisoner about this? - A. The last time that I saw Maydwell, before he went out of town.

Q. How long was that before the sixteenth of February? - A. I think that was on the last parcel that I got from Maydwell.

Mr. Fielding. Q. That was on the sixteenth of February? - A. It was. Maydwell told Knipe to let me have the three dozen at different times; when he wanted he said he would if he could; he parted from us and I saw no more of him at that time.

Q. Did you see him again on the 21st of February? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was it that you saw him? - A. At the Bull and Mouth I saw Knipe.

Q. What passed with you and him on the 21st? - A. I went for the purpose of purchasing two dozen packs, one of these dozens was part of them which Maydwell had left for me; he said he had not so many.

Court. Q. Who said so? - A. Knipe, he said he had only ten packs which he would get me, and he went up stairs and fetched them.

Q Where was he then? - A. At the Bull and Mouth; he went from the Bull and Mouth to Butcherhall-lane to get them.

Mr. Fielding Q.Where did he deliver them to you? - A. At Butcherhall-lane, I went with him from the Bull and Mouth.

Q. What did you pay for them? - A. Twenty shillings.

Q. Was that the money that he asked for them? - A. I agreed that I would make up for that when I had two dozen more; I was to make it up in the next purchase.

Q. What were you to pay him by the dozen? - A. Twenty-two shillings and sixpence.

Court. Q. For what? - A. A dozen packs; I got them, and parted then with him.

Mr. Fielding Q. On the first of March had you any other transaction with him? - A. I went for the purpose of getting two dozen and two packs.

Q. Where did you go? - A. I went to Butcherhall-lane, to his house.

Q. Did he live there? - A. He had a lodging there.

Q.Did you see him that day? - A. Yes, I told him I wanted two dozen, and two packs to make up the other dozen.

Q. Did you receive them of him? - A. Yes, I gave him two pounds seven shillings and sixpence, at the rate of two and twenty and sixpence per dozen.

Q. Upon these different parcels, in what manner were the aces of spades made up? - A. The aces of spades were made up as far as corresponded with the proper number of cards, but made up by themselves.

Q. When was it that you had the conversation with him respecting the cheapness of the cards; was that between the 16th of February and the 1st of March? - A. Yes, it was; we were conversing upon that and other things; upon which he asked me about the cards, whether I knew that they were forged, or whether I thought that they were forged, I cannot say which, it is a very hard thing to swear upon; I answered, no; I think he said, well, but they are; I was very much flurried at the time he mentioned that they were forged; I think that was the word.

Q. You then looked at the ace of spades, you saw the manner it was stamped upon the cards, you observed the name of the card-maker; what stated you to him about the name of Hart? - A. I never mentioned that to him.

Q. When you received your directions from the gentlemen of the Stamp-Office, directing you to purchase cards, did you know any thing of the forgery? - A. I did not know any thing of the forgery, but I suspected it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I think you told us that you were at Mr. Wheeler's, a card-maker, are you in his employ? - A. Yes, as clerk, from the beginning of January.

Q. You have had a great deal of knowledge in cards from the beginning of January - Does he deal in a large way? - A. Not very large, equal with others.

Q. You undertook this on purpose of serving Mr. Wheeler, and now you hope, or you are expecting, to serve yourself, how old are you? - A. Nineteen.

Q. A promising youth, the prisoner must have been an old acquaintance of your's? - A. No.

Q. Not acquainted with him, when Maydwell introduced you to him he was a man that put his life into your hands; there was something so inviting in your face, and you would have us believe, though you went to him twice, and purchased cards of him, that is the story you come here with, and you not being acquainted with him, you had been buying of him, and buying of Maydwell, and you did not know they were forged? - A. I did not know they were forged.

Q. You had bought of him the aces of spades separate from the other cards; you likewise knew what the duty was upon a pack of cards; that it was half a crown a pack; you being conversant with card-making, you knew that the sheets came from the Stamp-office not in this way; that the duty was half a crown a pack, and this came from the Stamp-office in this manner, and was so used by card makers, and put up together, and you did not know that they were forged? - A. I did not know that they were forged.

Q. Did you believe then that the stamp upon the aces of spades that you bought, came from the Stamp-office? - A. I did not believe it; I suspected it to be wrong, I did not positively know that they were forged, I suspected they were wrong.

Q. You suspected there was some fraud, and therefore you could not believe them to come from the Stamp-office? - A. No.

Q. Then I want to know if you did not believe them to be forged, and not to come from the Stamp-office, what third place there was? - A. I could not tell, I suspected them to be forged.

Q. Did you or did you not believe them to be forged? - A. I could not tell, I suspected them to be forged.

Q. Did not you believe them to be forged? - A. I believed (if believing is the same as thinking) them to be forged.

Q. Then if any question was asked you, who was conversant with cards, by this young man, who is rather younger than yourself, did you give him any information on the subject - If he ever asked you how people could afford to sell them so cheap, did you ever give him any information on the subject? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever ask him how they could make these cards in France, and afford to sell them so cheap? - A. I have not the least recollection.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. I never did.

Court. Q. You do not recollect that you ever did? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have been telling my friends at my left hand that he took you to Butcherhall-lane - Upon your oath, was not that Maydwell's lodging, and not the prisoner's - Will you swear it was his lodging? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was his lodging; the prisoner told me that he kept cards there, and that he had a room for the purpose of keeping them.

Q. Pray was that the same house that you went to with Maydwell? - A. There were two houses, one No. 15, and Mr. Knipe and the people of that house removed to No. 7.

Q. The place that you have described, was that the place where Maydwell lodged? - A. No, Maydwell lodged at No. 6, Lovell's court, Paternoster-row; Maydwell went and got them from Knipe.

Q. Do you mean to repeat the same thing, that you do not expect any sort of reward for all this? - A. I never expected it from the first; I expect to be paid for my time.

Q. That you heard from my friends speech, I wish I had put you out of Court at the time; then you would have us to believe, that you went for the purpose of bringing Lee to justice; that was what you bought the cards for, not expecting any sort of reward for yourself? - A. Upon my oath, I did not,

Mr. Fielding Q. The first object which you set out with, was to bring Lee to justice? - A. It was.

EDWARD CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Dampier. Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner on the sixth of March, at the Bull and Mouth, Bull and Mouth street.

Q. Did you search him? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you find any cards in his pocket? - A. None in his pocket; in his box, in his apartment, I found one pack.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What part was it? - A. In a room, in the Bull and Mouth inn; I gave those cards to Mr. Chetham, he was also with me, and I searched in Butcherhall-lane, No. 7; I found some cards there; I produce them; they are in the same state as I found them.

Court. Q. What quantity of cards are there? - A. Nine packs.

Q. Who told you it was his lodgings? - A. When I took the prisoner he took me to his lodgings with Mr. Chetham.

Mr. Dampier. Q. Were there any duty aces with these cards? - A. None in these nine.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Did you go with the last witness to the prisoner's lodging? - A. Yes, I did, and to his lodging-room at the Bull and Mouth inn.

Q. The prisoner was the book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth inn? - A. He was one of the book-keepers in the coach-office.

Q. Did the last witness give you any thing when you were there? - A. I was present when the box was opened; I asked him whether that was his box; he said it was; I then desired the officer to search it; Cartwright searched it, and found one pack of cards, and he delivered them to me; these are the cards, I have had them ever since in my possession; I marked the ace of spades with my initials.

Q.(To Mr. Beresford.) This impression was made at your office, from a plate prepared by the authority of the Commissioners, for Hart, the card-maker, and look at the other aces produced by Thew, what is the number upon that? - A. No. 116.

Q. Have you searched the documents of your office? - A. Yes, and I find no one higher than 80.

Q.(To Mr. Merchant) Will you look at the first parcel which Thew produced? - A The numbers are all higher than 80; they are from 112 to 116.

Q. Do they appear to be a general imitation, and to have a general resemblance of the genuine one; you are the engraver at the Stamp-office? - A. Yes, they are in imitation.

Q Look at that Mr. Chetham found? - A. They are all forgeries.

Q. What numbers do you find upon these? - A. They are all higher than 80; they are from 112 to 116.

- PRITCHARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are the overseer, you deliver out these things to the card-makers? - A. I am.

Q. Did you know a card-maker of the name of Hart? - A. Very well.

Q. For a considerable while have you delivered out any in his name? - A. None since the year 1797.

Q. I do not know whether you know of your own knowledge how high his number went? - A. No.

Q. Is that from the Stamp-office? - A. I have no hesitation to say it is forged.

Q. The plates are delivered to the makers whose name they bear? - A. Always.

Q. So that the plates of Lee would not be delivered to Hart, nor the plates of Hart to Lee? - A. No, they have been delivered by me for a great number of years, and I never delivered one to the name of another card-maker.

Prisoner's defence. Thew was introduced to me as a mere stranger by Maydwell; I should have been very imprudent to have told a person I had never seen before that the cards I sold were forged; I never acknowledged to any person that they were forged, because I never knew it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-136

356. WILLIAM ROW and GEORGE ROW were indicted for that they, on the 22d of January , in the county of Cornwall , upon Ezekiel Gavid , a subject of our Lord the King, and in the service of the Excise, being then on shore, and in the due execution of his duty, was then and there seizing and carrying away twenty gallons of foreign spirituous liquors, for the use of our Lord the King, which was then and there liable to be seized by the said Ezekiel Gavid , that they, upon him, did violently make an assault, and unlawfully did oppose, hinder, and obstruct, him, in the due execution of his duty .

Second and Third Counts, For the like offence, with the like intention.

(The indictment was read by Mr. Jackson, and the case stated by Mr. Solicitor General.)

EZEKIEL GAVID sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding.

Q. You are an officer of the Excise , and was the 22d of January last? - A. Yes, I met with these men, about four o'clock on that day, at Bodmin-Cause, near Luxillion, in Cornwall, on the high road; I saw two men riding, as near as I can recollect, and one a walking; there were three horses, with kegs slung across their backs, in the usual way they carry smuggled goods; when I came near them I observed William Row, the tallest man; I alighted from my horse, and went up with intention to seize them; I went up to take hold of the horse, and was knocked down; I cannot recollect any more.

Q. Before you went up to take hold of the horse, of these men that were mounted, had they got off their horses? - A. Yes; I cannot recollect any more of it, I lost my senses with the blows.

Q. Do you recollect the very behaviour of the men at the time you got off your horse - did they make towards you or not? - A. I think they did, with their bludgeons uplifted; they were several feet long; a double-handed stick, as they call it.

Q. Tell us where you were when you recovered yourself? - A. At my father's house; it was eight or ten days before I recovered my senses; I saw them afterwards in Bodmin goal; I have no doubt at all of the persons of the prisoners being the men who assaulted me on the road.

Q. You continued very ill a long time? - A. I am not perfectly recovered now; my sight fails me, I feel a lightness and giddiness in my head at this time.

ARTHUR GAVID sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you were with your brother and his

wife, returning from her father's house? - A. Yes, I was on horseback, and my brother and his wife were on another horse; we came up to the prisoners near Bodmin Cause, about three o'clock in the afternoon; there were two men on horseback, and one walking; they had two kegs on their horses, and each of the three a horse apiece; my brother holloaed out to me, here comes a seizure.

Q. Was it loud enough for the prisoners to hear? - A. Yes, he halloaed out here comes kegs, or ankers, will you assist, we will take or seize them; I told him I would if there was occasion; they each of them had a large green oak stick, I think they were about four feet long; when my brother spoke to me, I got down; he told his wife to get down, and he went forward towards the men; he said to the men, strike, I will take them in the King's name; they said be off, be off, d - n your bl - y eyes, be off; they prevented me from hearing any more by their noise, they spoke louder than my brother, I could not hear him; one of the men pushed on before, he said to the other two come on; they had their bludgeons uplifted against my brother, the first man that struck missed him; I took hold of his stick, and held it fast; I held him till I heard the shrieks of my brother's wife, then I looked about, and my brother was upon his face, and the other two men were beating him with their bludgeons while he was laying on the ground; I let go the man that I had hold of, and ran between the two men and my brother, and said do not murder him, do not murder him; I said let me assist him, I am his brother, I am no Excise officer; I received a blow that I thought was intended for him, and the man that struck me first struck me again; then the man that I was holding of, he came up, and gave me a violent blow; those two men that are at the bar now struck me twice, and the men that struck my brother struck me down to the ground; my brother's wife was continually shrieking, then they ran off with their horses.

Q. How long a time might this occupy altogether? - A. Not above two or three minutes; I have no doubt but the two prisoners at the bar are the two out of the three that conducted themselves so, I am sure of their persons, William Row was one of the persons that beat my brother, and George Row was the man that I held, he struck me afterwards; my brother was taken to a cot-house, he was quite insensible, he had some life, but very ill; he was after that taken to my father's house, and was attended by a medical person a long time, he was confined a month before he rode out.

Mr. Gurney addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendants, and Mr. Solicitor General replied.

William Row, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

George Row, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18050424-137

357. MICHAEL WOOTTAN was indicted for that he, having been convicted in January, 1802, for having uttered a piece of false, base, and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of the gold coin of this realm, called a half-guinea, to John Hawkins , and received sentence to be imprisoned six months.

That he, on the 22d of February last, one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the similitude and likeness of a good shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully did utter to Griffith Jones , he at the time of uttering this last piece of false and counterfeited money then and there knowing it to be false .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Burnham, the Solicitor of the Mint - do you produce a copy of the record of the prisoner being tried in Essex? - A. Yes, I have examined it with the original, it is exactly as the original is.

EDWARD WALLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was the constable that apprehended him, I was present when he was tried and convicted for uttering a counterfeited half-guinea. (The record read in Court.)

GRIFFITH JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a victualler , I keep the Duke of Marlborough's Head, in Bishopsgate-street : On the 22d of February last, between four and five in the afternoon, the defendant came in for a glass of gin; I served him, he tendered me a bad shilling; I asked him if he had any more of the same sort; he seemed surprised, he said he would give me another for it; I told him I would not let him change it. I sent for a constable, he fell down on his knees, and begged I would let him go; the constable came, and he examined him, he had nine shillings and sixpence of good silver, and just such another bad shilling as he tendered me.

PATRICK MULLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable, I was sent for on this occasion; I received one bad shilling from the prosecutor, and the other I detected on him; I produce them.

Q.(To Mr. Powell.) Tell us whether they are counterfeit or not? - A. They are counterfeited.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and to find sureties for two years at the expiration of that time .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-138

358. ELEANOR LEE was indicted for that she, on the 16th of April , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of, and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Elizabeth Brett , she at the time of committing the offence well knowing it to be counterfeited .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZABETH BRETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a servant to Mr. Bayfield, he keeps the Coach-makers' Arms, in Camomile-street ; she came to my master's, and asked for a quartern of gin; I served her, she tendered me half-a-crown; I gave her two shillings and two-pence halfpenny change; I put the half-crown in the till, she gave me one of the shillings back again, and said it was a bad one; I put it in the till, and gave her another out of the till; she said, that was a bad one; I then took it, and told the child to call her father; she said, never mind, I will take all halfpence; my master then came into the bar, I told him the woman had refused the silver often; he looked into the till, and said he saw two bad shillings in the till; my master stopped her, and sent for two constables; they took her up stairs to search her, and at the place where she was standing before she went up stairs, I picked up

a bad shilling, I sent the child up stairs with it; when the child came down stairs, she was jumping about, she picked up a paper with six shillings in it.

LOUISA BAYFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Ten; I picked up a paper with six shillings in it, I gave it to my father and mother.

THOMAS BAYFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. In consequence of what the girl told me, that she had refused the change two or three times, I asked her where she had put the shillings she refused; I suspected the imposition, I gave her two good shillings, one with the letter S on it, and the other U; the prisoner thanked me, and said she was sure of good money when I came; I took the two shillings bad, and went round the bar, and stopped all four of them, there were other women at the bar with her at the time; I saw the officer search the prisoner, and on her he found the two shillings marked with the letters S and U, and another bad shilling; the officer has all the bad money.

JOHN FRANCIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was standing at Mr. Bayfield's door at the time, I thought it was prudent to take the woman up stairs; going up stairs I found two shillings; one in a paper and one out.

Court. Q. You do not know who it dropped from? - A. No.

- WHEELER sworn. - I am a constable, I searched the prisoner, and found two good shillings on her and a bad one.

Q.(To Mr. Powell.) Look at these two shillings found in the till, that the prisoner returned, and the one found by the constable? - A. They are counterfeited.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-139

359. THOMAS-JOSEPH CHARLES was indicted for a fraud .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BUSTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am in partnership with my brother, Thomas Buston ; the prisoner is a fellowship-porter , he made the application to Bull, my clerk; we pay the corn-porters.

OBADIAH BULL sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Buston; on Thursday, the 14th of March , he came to me and received the money for the bill I have got in my hand, to the amount of 3 s. 4 d. and three other bills he received of me at different times; he was the person that tendered these bills to me, and I paid him; on the 12th of March he brought me a ticket of Mr. Sweetman, four shillings and nine-pence three farthings; and the ticket of the 9th, is four shillings and five-pence halfpenny to Foulcher; on Fowl-stairs, on the 7th, he charged four shillings and five pence to Minton.

- MINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a corn-meter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do: On the 7th of March the prisoner did not work for me, it is a false ticket.

- FOULCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a meter.

Q. Did the prisoner Charles work for you on the 9th of March last? - A. No, it is a false ticket, he was not with me on that day.

THOMAS WOODLAND sworn. - I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner, I asked him how he came to do this; he said, he had been along with a parcel of girls; I believe he said he had done this to the amount of five pounds.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050424-140

360. PATRICK GIBBONS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Mr. Knapp, Counsel for the plaintiff, declining to offer any evidence against the defendant, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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