Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th February 1805.
Reference Number: 18050220
Reference Number: f18050220-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 20th of FEBRUARY, 1805, and following Days,

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1805.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; JOHN HEATH , Esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SIMON LE BLANC , Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir THOMAS MANNERS SUTTON , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN, Bart. Sir CHARLES PRICE , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; CHARLES FLOWER , Esq. and RICHARD LEA , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Banks ,

William Branwhite ,

Thomas Atkinson ,

William Walker ,

William Robinson ,

Elisha Wilson ,

Griffith Griffiths ,

John Routh ,

Samuel Jones ,

John Taylor ,

Thomas-Webb Branson ,

William Briant .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Franscillo ,

Ralph Bulmer ,

John Todd ,

William Windle ,

Samuel Brooks ,

John Ford ,

Thomas Pitt ,

William Dobson ,

Robert Walpole ,

John Burntwaite ,

Charles Smith ,

Robert Hart .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Scott ,

James Watson ,

Smallpiece Fox ,

John Carey ,

William Carey ,

William Mandby ,

John Child ,

William Luker ,

William Kaysack ,

William Fitch ,

John Carter ,

Thomas English .

Reference Number: t18050220-1

125. JOHN WILSON, alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , seventeen shirts, value 5 l. forty handkerchiefs, value 2 l. twenty-seven pair of stockings, value 27 s. sixteen pair of breeches, value 8 l. three night-caps, value 1 s. three waistcoats, value 1 l. five coats, value 5 l. two jackets, value 3 l. three books, value 10 s. the property of Hugh Shepley , Esq .

HUGH SHEPLEY , Esq. sworn. - I live at Horslydown : I only know that I lost my clothes from my house, they were taken out of my bed-room; I left my house on the 1st of December, and returned on the 3d.

- LOVETT sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street: I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of December, and searched his lodgings on the 4th; I produce a number of clothes, which I found in the prisoner's lodgings, in Castle-street, Swallow-street, they have been in my custody ever since; when I apprehended him, I searched him, and found six parcels of duplicates, describing a great part of the property mentioned in the indictment. (Produces the duplicates.)

JOHN FOY sworn. - I belong to the Public-office, Marlborough-street, I produce other clothes: On apprehending the prisoner, I searched him; I found on his person a pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs; and on searching his lodgings, I found six handkerchiefs, one shirt, three pair of breeches, a pair of pantaloons, one night-cap, one waistcoat, six pair of stockings, and one pair of gloves.

Q. Whereabouts is Horslydown? - A. In Tooley-street, Surry.

JOHN STINMAN sworn. - I am a publican, I keep the sign of the Conduit, the corner of Conduit-street, Swallow-street: On the 3d of December, the prisoner at the bar came to my house for a lodging, my wife let him the lodging by the week, and he brought in, on the Tuesday following, three large bundles; he went away on the 7th, and before he went away, he brought in a Jew, and sold to him a number of articles of wearing apparel, such as coats, waistcoats, pantaloons, and two military laced jackets; he said, he brought them from on board a ship, he had been servant to an officer, and his master had given them to him, as his master had given up his commission, and was going to marry a lady of great fortune; when he was going away, he said he had no money to pay for his lodging, which was seven shillings, for the week; he left a pair of nankeen breeches, a pair of pantaloons, a waistcoat, and a pair of white trowsers; Mr. Shepley has seen them all, and says they are his property.

DAVID MYERS sworn. - I am a Jew, and a tailor and salesman, I live in Swallow-street: On the 7th of December last, the prisoner at the bar came to my house, and said he had a parcel of clothes to sell; he told me he lodged in Conduit-street, I had only a few doors to go with him; I went with him to his lodgings, where I saw Stinman; I bought two regimental jackets, three coats, two pair of leather breeches, a pair of pantaloons, and two waistcoats; I asked him whose property the jackets were; he said they belonged to the Duke of Rutland, that is all he said, and all I know. (Produces them.)

THOMAS VINCENT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Page, No. 1, Sherrard-street, Golden-square: The prisoner at the bar pledged two shirts, a pair of drawers, and two waistcoats, which I produce.

HENRY YOER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I produce a pair of pantaloons, and a pair of trowsers, pledged by the prisoner.

THOMAS SUTHERLAND sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in Vigo-lane, St. James's: I produce some clothes; the person who took them in has left my service; the articles were pledged on the 2d of December; Mr. Shepley has seen the articles.

WILLIAM OXFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Dry, South-street, Manchester-square: I produce four bundles, one I took in myself, and another parcel I saw taken in by another person in the shop; these two parcels I remember, they have been in my possession ever since. On the 28th of January, I took in two pair of nankeen breeches, and a waistcoat, of the prisoner; and I saw him at our shop on the 23d of January, when he pledged the two other pair of nankeen breeches; I have no doubt of his person. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was down at Brighton, I came up to town from a gentleman on board a ship, and when I came into Little St. James's-street, I I saw a gentleman's servant and two Jews bargaining for these articles; the Jews offered him fourteen pounds, I bid him fifteen pounds, and purchased them all; I think it was on Monday the 2d of December; I had a witness, but he has taken me at a disadvantage.

Prosecutor. I have got a witness here to prove, that he has been frequently at my house.

WILLIAM- MICHAEL POPPILLOW sworn. - I live with Mr. Shepley; I recollect seeing the prisoner at the bar at Mr. Shepley's house, in the kitchen, two or three times; he used to come to see the man servant.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-2

126. WILLIAM MYLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , sixty pounds of pork, value 30 s. the property of John Ellill , Esq .

MATTHEW KENNY sworn. - I am gardener to Mr. Ellill; I live in his house; the pork belonged to him, I had the care of it; it was fresh pork, it was killed the 1st of January; I cut it up, it was laid on the dresser for pickling in the dairy; on the 2d of January it was stole, but we did not miss it till the evening of the 3d; the man that was pickling it missed it; it was not all stolen; I saw the pork, that was stolen on the 11th of January, at the prisoner's house; he had two hands, two belly pieces that joined the loins, and one of the loins had been mangled about; and it fitted the leg that we had at our master's house; we only matched the leg to the loin; the prisoner confessed to the other; we found at his house the joints that we missed.

Q. Was the prisoner at home at the time? - A. No, his wife was; we found the pork in a tub; he had pickled it; it was in his bed-chamber on the first floor.

Q. Did you see the prisoner himself? - A. I saw him throwing up some dung at Totteridge; I told him I found some pork at his house that was my master's property; he replied that if I was to come to his house at Christmas, I should find as much beef; I told him he must go with me to the Magistrate; he readily consented, and went with me; he denied it before the Magistrate.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He is a carter ; he lives at Totteridge, not a great way from Mr. Ellill; he was employed by Mr. Bott.

Q. What quantity of pork might there be in his house? - A. I cannot justly say; I think I missed about sixty pounds; we found six joints in his house.

Q. Had you seen him about your master's house about the 1st, 2d, or 3d of January? - A. No.

AMELIA SMITH sworn. - I was a lodger to the prisoner; my mother occasionally works at Mr. Ellill's; she was there the day after the pork was lost; the servants mentioned it to her; I cannot recollect the day of the month, it was on the first Wednesday in the new year; I saw the prisoner's wife use some pork, and on Sunday morning following I saw her salting the pork; there were twenty pounds, or more; my mother mentioned it to me, and I mentioned it again.

JAMES LAWSON sworn. - I am a constable of the parish of Finchley: On the 11th of February I had a warrant brought to me; I went to the prisoner's house, and found the pork behind a screen; there were six joints; his wife and two children were present, and coming down Whet-stone-lane, I apprehended the prisoner, and was taking him to prison; he wished to go to the Magistrate to inform him how he came by it; I took him to the Magistrate.

Prisoner's defence. It was given to me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-3

127. CHARLES TAYLOR, alias CLARKE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a pair of silver buckles, value 20 s. a silver pepper box, value 20 s. a pair of silver salts, value 20 s. two silver table spoons, value 20 s. a silver cream pot, value 5 s. a silver mustard ladle, value 3 s. a silver table spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. and a window curtain, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of George Williams , privately in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a block-maker ; I live in Narrow-street, Wapping ; I can only speak to the property.

MARY WILLIAMS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. When did you last see this property? - A. On the 12th of January last I saw it in the top drawer of my chest of drawers in my bed-room; the prisoner lived with me till his bill for rent was two pounds; I made out his bill, and sent it up; he told me he would settle very soon. On Thursday morning, the 15th of January, he said he would go to the accompting-house, and bring me the money; I never saw him any more till he was taken up; on the 20th of January. I went to the drawer, and found the property was gone.

Prisoner. (To Mrs. Williams.) Q. I would wish to ask Mrs. Williams respecting my behaviour during the time I was there? - A. He behaved very well while he was at our house.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer of the Thames Police; I produce part of the property - a silver mustard ladle and five duplicates, which he gave me up; he acknowledged to me that he had made away with the property; he likewise told me that he had sold a tea spoon to Mr. Burchall, in the Minories, a very respectable silversmith; I inquired there about the spoon, and about the young man; they told me they had bought a spoon, and they gave it to me, and he told me he had sold a large table-spoon to Barnett Moses; that we could never trace.

GEORGE WINDSOR sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,

I live in Houndsditch; I produce a pair of salts pledged for twelve shillings, and a pepper-castor pledged for eighteen shillings; I cannot speak to the person of the prisoner.

WILLIAM MOORE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live in Cable-street, Whitechapel; I produce a silver cream-pot and a small window curtain; I know the duplicates, but I cannot speak to the person of the prisoner.

HENRY PURCELL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of buckles pawned by the prisoner at the bar on the 17th of January, in the name of John Clark , Union-street, for twelve shillings.

THOMAS NICOLLS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live with Mr. David Windsor , No. 121, Minories; I produce a table-spoon pledged by the prisoner; I took the spoon of him, he pawned it for 8 s. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I am not prepared for my defence; my friends are not here; I do not know what to say, or where to begin first.

Q. (To the prisoner.) Can you account how you came by this property? - A. I had lived with Messrs. Garner and Co. about four months ago; I was promised a place by Sir Robert Braslet in the India-house, and during the time I and my father lodged with Mrs. Williams, my father went to Woolwich for three weeks; he was looking over a transport that was taking in stores; the rent was running on to Mr. Williams, and I expected my father up every day; he did not come; I was very much distressed, and Mrs. Williams wished her money paid; I did not know what to do.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-4

128. RICHARD KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a black gelding, value 30 l. the property of John Drake .

JOHN DRAKE sworn. - I live in the parish of Agnes, in the county of Norfolk : On the afternoon of the 23d of January, I had seen my saddle-horse, a black gelding, safe in the stable with my other cart horses. On the next morning I was informed by my servant that it was missing; I went into the stable immediately, and found the horse was gone, that was about seven o'clock in the morning; I made application to a person in town; I had some bills printed, they were put up, and he informed me that the horse was found; I came up to town on the 4th or 5th of February, and saw the horse again at the Eclipse livery-stables, Oxford-street.

Q. Are you sure that was your horse that you lost? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you at all known the prisoner before? - A. I had seen him in my yard two years before; I believe his friends live in the next parish.

Q. What was he? - A. I heard that he was a shoe-maker .

JOHN BALL sworn. - I am hostler at the Eclipse livery-stables, in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you remember the last witness, John Drake , coming to your stables in February last? - A. Yes; I cannot justly say the day; I shewed Mr. Drake the horse. I took the horse in myself of the prisoner at the bar on the 1st of February; he brought the horse to our stables between the hours of twelve and four in the afternoon; I never saw him before.

Q. In what state was the horse when he came in - did he come in with a saddle? - A. No, no saddle, only a bridle, a roller, and a cloth; he asked me if there was any chance of selling his horse there, or whether we wanted to buy a horse.

Q. Did he say his horse, or this horse? - A. I cannot justly say; we asked him if it was his horse; he said it was; we said he might leave it there a day or two, we would try it; this was on Friday; he came there again on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, to walk him about, and brush him over.

Q. Did he give any account how he came by the horse? - A. Yes, he did say where he bought it, but I do not recollect.

Q. Did he fix any price on it? - A. Twenty-five guineas; the prisoner was apprehended on Monday, when he was riding the horse on the ride.

Q. When the prisoner brought the horse in, had he the appearance of being hard ridden? - A. No; he came to our stables from a livery-stable in Moorfields, I think he said Pope's stables; he did tell me, but I do not justly recollect; I think I understood him that he had stood there from the Monday before; the cloth and roller came from their stables, he said, and he took the cloth and roller from our stable.

Prisoner. The horse stood at Hobson's stables, as I told him.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 4th of February, as he was riding the horse; I had information that a stolen horse was there.

Q. You had not seen Mr. Drake at that time? - A. No, it was about three days before I saw Mr. Drake; it was a friend of Mr. Drake's that took me there; I went with Mr. Drake to the Eclipse livery-stables; when I apprehended the prisoner, I had the bill in my hand; I looked at the horse, and it answered to the description in the bill.

Q. When you went with Mr. Drake to the livery-stables, was that the same horse you shewed him there, that you apprehended him on? - A. The same horse.

Q. When you apprehended the prisoner, what did you say to him? - A. I desired the prisoner to bring the horse into the stable, I asked him whose horse it was; he said, the horse was his own; I asked him where he got the horse; he said, he bought it of one Mr. Baker, in Gloucestershire, a farmer, I am sure that was what he said; I told him it was a stolen horse, and that he was a prisoner of mine, he must go to the Magistrate, and satisfy him about Mr. Baker; I took him into custody, and brought him before Mr. Conant; Mr. Conant asked him how he came by the horse; he told him he bought the horse on the road this side Hammersmith, but he did not know where to find the man; the prisoner is a stranger to me.

Q. (To Mr. Drake.) Did you go first to the Eclipse livery-stables without the officer, or in his company? - A. I went first without the officer; I am confident that is the horse I had lost, I had the horse two years and a half.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking through Hammersmith, and coming back I met this man, he said his name was Baker, and he was a Gloucestershire man, he was on this horse; he says to me, groom, will you buy a horse? I said, if it is worth the money; he asked twenty-five pounds for it; I bid him sixteen pounds for him, afterwards I bought him at eighteen pounds, the horse, bridle, and saddle; I rode him to London, and put him up at Mr. Hobson's stables, I do not know the name of the street, it is in Moorfields; I put him up at livery there; I bought him as he was, he had got two splints and a very bad sand-crack, which I did not see till afterwards; I asked Mr. Hobson to sell him for me; they examined him, and said he was lame, they had no chance to sell it, they having many horses of their own to sell; my landlord knows that I had such a quantity of money, I took twenty-four pounds when I left my last service, and ten pounds I lent to a shoe-maker; I have been in the habit of buying beasts, I have had three hundred pounds stock; I produce a letter - (a witness produced another.)

Court. (To Prisoner.) The letters give you a character, but we cannot read them here.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES BEETHAM sworn. - I live at the Red Lion, Poppin's-court, Fleet-street; I have known the prisoner about six weeks, or two months.

Q. Has he lodged at your house all that time? - A. No, about eight or ten days he was absent; I took no notice of the day he returned, it was about ten days after Christmas when he returned from the country.

Q. How long had he been in your house, after he returned from the country, before he was taken up? - A. About a fortnight; he was in place when I first knew him, about two months ago, with Mr. Peech, as a groom; that is the gentleman you have that letter from; he was looking out for a place when he was at our house, and when he left our house he had fourteen pounds.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-5

129. WILLIAM HANKEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Cooke , about the hour of ten at night, on the 30th of January , and burglariously stealing therein a trunk, value 5 s. ten sheets, value 20 s. a counterpane, value 3 s. the furniture of a half tester bed, value 21 s. a table cloth, value 2 s. six window curtains, value 12 s. and a sofa cover, value 10 s. the property of Mary Cooke .

ELIZABETH JONES sworn. - Q. Do you know Mary Cooke ? - A. She is my sister, she is a widow : On Wednesday, the 30th of January, I was not at home at my sister's house in Lisle-street , I was at a younger sister's, there was not a soul in the house; my sister Cooke was with a friend at Mary-le-bone upon a visit for some time, she had resided there, but was going to leave the house when she could get another; I went out between eleven and twelve in the day, and came home about a quarter after ten o'clock at night; I went to unlock the street-door, I found I could not get any admittance; I asked a person that was passing to try to unlock it; he told me he thought the lock had been picked; I did not get any admittance that night, I went away; I asked the watchman to take care of the house; the next morning the watchman came to me, and said he had took the man that had robbed the house; when I came in the morning, the two watchmen and the constable opened the door very easily.

Q. Then you went into the house - did you find all the things as you had left them the day before? - A. No, the large trunk was gone; I had seen it the day I went out, I know it was locked.

Q. What was in that trunk? - A. There were five pair of sheets, a counterpane, six chintz window curtains, and some other things; I saw them packed in the trunk, they were gone, they were the property of my sister, Mary Cooke .

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. This house is in Lisle-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there many people living in that house? - A. Not a soul but me and a young woman.

Q. You never paid any rent for that house? - - A. No.

Q. You never saw the prisoner before? - A. Never in my life.

Q. How long ago is it that you saw the things put into this trunk? - A. To the best of my recollection, about three weeks before.

JOSEPH TAYLOR sworn. - I am a watchman in Lisle-street.

Q. Do you know Mary Cooke 's house? - A. Yes, it is No. 6. On the 30th of January, about twenty-five minutes past eleven at night, I saw the prisoner at the bar come out of No. 6, Lisle-street, by himself, he had nothing with him, he went to a house that was repairing, there is a fence before the house, he went up to one corner of it; as soon as I saw him in the corner, I crossed the way to him, his back was towards me; I asked him what business he had there; he made no reply; I asked him again; he told me he was looking for a glass-cutter, or glass-grinder; I asked him how he came to come out of that house; he answered still he was looking for a glass-cutter, or glass-grinder; I took him back to the door of No. 6, I asked him how the door came open, and how he came to be in that house; I told him when I called the hour of eleven o'clock, it was fast; at eleven o'clock I put my hand against the door, it was fast; then still he insisted he was looking for a glass-cutter, and when he was got within six or nine inches of the door, he put his finger to the key-hole of the door, and pulled too the door; the door fastened with a spring-lock; I then was going to take him to the watch-house, and when he had got to the middle of the front of the fence, he made a start, and got from me before I could get any assistance; I halloaed out, and he was stopped by a person coming along; I then secured him, and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man? - A. It is the same man, he was never out of my sight; he was searched at the watch-house, and nothing was found upon him; when we came back from the watch-house, we searched the parlour windows outside of the house; we found the two parlour shutters were forced open, and one of the staples broke; the bolt was hanging down, but the sash was fastened by the catch; the next morning I fetched Elizabeth Jones , and went with her to the house; I believe the constable opened the door, it was opened by the key, and as soon as we went in, Mrs. Jones missed the trunk.

Q. Was there any furniture in the house? - A. Yes, there were bedsteads, chairs, and every thing of that kind; I never saw the prisoner before that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How long have you been watchman on that beat? - A. Six or seven months.

Q. You knew the situation of this house, there were there a number of females occasionally, this was one of the houses that was complained of as a nuisance, they were women of the town, it had been indicted as such? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You have said, that, on this night, between eleven and twelve o'clock, you saw the prisoner? - A. About twenty-five minutes past eleven o'clock.

Q. And at eleven you observed the door was fast? - A. Yes.

Q. After that, did you not see some other man? - A. No, nor near that spot; I saw him come out of the door.

Q. Why, man, have you always said that? - A. Yes, there was a woman that asked the way to Leicester-fields; there was no other man but him, you may depend upon.

RICHARD WALKER sworn. - I am a watchman of the same parish, the last witness called me to his assistance, my box is the next beat to his, I saw the prisoner run across Princes-street into a court in St. James's, there he was stopped; I assisted to take him, that is all I know.

WILLIAM CRANN sworn. - About half past eleven o'clock, on the 30th of January, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by these watchmen; I searched him, and found nothing on him; the next morning I took him before the Magistrate, and by his order I went to the house to find out, if possible, by what means he got into the house; we found the parlour shutters wrenched, but the sash fastened down, and we found the kitchen shutters open, and the sash of the kitchen windows open; but I am of opinion it was impossible for him to get in that way, because the kitchen-door was bolted outside of the door, and there was no way, by my examination, which any body could get in but by the door; there was a chest of drawers in the back parlour, and all the drawers forced open but one; I am certain they were forced open, because I found part of the beading on the floor; Mrs. Jones was with me at the time.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work with my father on Wednesday, the 30th of January, and about half after four o'clock in the afternoon there was a man came and told my father, if he would send his son down to his house, he would give him some work; I went out to go there, I met some young men, and I staid out and drank with these young men; this watchman laid hold of another man, and whether he gave him something I do not know; he let him go, and took hold of me.

Q. (To Jones.) No part of what you lost has ever been found? - A. No part whatever.

Q. When you left the house the day before, in what state was the chest of drawers? - A. Every thing safe; it was full of clean linen, sheeting, counterpanes, and blankets.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-6

130. THOMAS HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Jacob Solomon , in the King's highway, putting him in fear and forcibly taking from his person and against his will, a brass barrel, value 4 d. a brass

cover, value 1 d. and two half-crown pieces, the property of Morris Bennett .

JACOB SOLOMON sworn. - Q. What age are you? - A. Fifteen years and eight months.

Q. What is your father? - A. A dealer, his name is Jacob Solomon : On the 4th of February , I was going to Mr. Neate, in Rossiter-street, St. John's-street-road, about seven o'clock, I was stopped in St. John's-street-road by two men, I believe the prisoner at the bar is one of the men, I cannot say I am certain of it.

Q. Was any of your property found afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Was any body present at all at the time? - A. No, nobody at all.

- SMITH sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, the boy pointed him out; I found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-7

131. WILLIAM ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , two yards of Swansdown, value 12 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 20 s. and three nankeen gaiters, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Morley , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Garbinatty .

Second Count. For like offence, only charging it to be the property of Richard Morley .

RICHARD MORLEY sworn. - I am a tailor , my brother took a shop of Joseph Garbinatty , I was left in care of it, I was answerable to my brother for the property in the shop, I saw the property in the shop about five minutes before it was taken out.

Q. What time in the evening? - A. About six o'clock, on the 2d of February.

Q. Whereabouts is Mr. Garbinatty's house? - A. No. 202, High Holborn ; the property was taken from the window inside of the shop, they were hanging up by way of shew, part of them at the bottom of the window, and part of them on the railing; I saw the prisoner attempt to take the goods out of the window; I had been robbed before on Christmas-eve, and on the 1st of February, but by whom I do not know. On the 2d of February, a gentleman came in to tell me to take care of the window; I told him I was watching; the prisoner stood on the threshold of the door, and put his hand into the window, and got hold of the goods, but when the gentleman came in, he went away; I then went out, and crossed the way; I was upon the watch, and in ten minutes he returned, and took the things out of the window; I ran over and laid hold of him, and found the goods upon him.

THOMAS BENNETT sworn. - I am a callenderer, I produce the property, I took them from the prisoner, I kept them till the constable came, and then I delivered them to him; he is obliged to attend at Bow-street to-day, so he gave them to me.

(The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I never had them in my possession.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-8

132. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , two silver forks, value 20 s. a silver desert-spoon, value 7 s. a silver table-spoon, value 10 s. and one silver spoon, value 3 s. the property of John-Fawcett-Henry Rawlins , Esq .

THOMAS HILL sworn. - I am servant to John-Fawcett-Henry Rawlins , Esq. in Margaret-street : On the 30th of January, between nine and ten in the morning, I saw the prisoner in my master's pantry, I had been taking up the breakfast into the little parlour; he asked me for some gentleman's name, whom I knew nothing of, if he lived there; I told him I knew no such a name; I asked him what business he had in my pantry; he asked my pardon; I shut the door, and told him he should not go out of the room till I saw it was all right; I mistrusted that he had got some plate; I went to see if the plate was right, and I was not certain whether it was or not; I took hold of him by the collar, and took him into the parlour to my master; on his going up stairs, he pulled out two silver forks and a desert-spoon; I saw him do it, he threw them down on the stairs; I picked them up; we sent for a constable, and when he came he delivered up a table-spoon to the constable; we took him down into the pantry again, and while the constable was searching him there, he dropped out of his left-hand a silver tea-spoon; the outside door of the area was open, he must have come in that way.

RICHARD BRUCE sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to Mr. Rawlins's house, the prisoner was standing in the passage secured by the other witness; I went directly up to him, he gave me a table-spoon; we took him into the pantry to search him there, he dropped a spoon out of his hand, and I picked it up; then I took him to the watch-house, and from there to the Magistrate at Marlborough-street; the servant gave me the other things, I produce the property.

(The property identified by Thomas Hill.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-9

133. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , four coach-glasses, framed, value 2 l. and three lace

glass-strings, value 12 s. the property of George Ede , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE EDE sworn. - I am a coach-master ; I lost the property out of two coach-houses, Brompton-row , it is part of my yard, which locks up. From information I received from Brampton, I laid in wait all night; the prisoner was gone to Hertford, to the election, he did not return till one o'clock in the morning, and when I went to look for this glass in the morning it was broke; I could not find the frame; I wanted a glass-coach pulled out to go to Marybone, I called the prisoner to help out the coach, the glass frames were gone; I said, this must be done by a thief in my own place; the men said, I would have a search-warrant, master, and search all our premises; I went to the prisoner, and said to him, shew me where this frame is; he said, he did not know where it was; I said, I will pull every stick and every stone up in the place but I will find it; finding some of the glass under the rack-board, I then said the frame is not far; one of my coachmen found it, and gave it to me.

Q. How do you know the prisoner had any thing to do with it? - A. It is the same glass that one of my men was to take to the High-ground for him to sell.

BENJAMIN BRAMPTON sworn. - I am a hackney-coachman, I work for Mr. Ede: On the 11th of February, the prisoner was going out of the yard with a chaise, he drove post-chaises and glass-coaches for Mr. Ede; he put his glass in my coach that I drove, he shewed it to me, he wanted me to take it to town.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th at Mr. Ede's yard, Great Brompton, I produce the glass; after this glass was found, the prisoner called me on one side, and says he, if I tell you the truth, do you think it would be the means of stopping my punishment; I told him it might be.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent.

Brampton. The prisoner informed me that he had taken them, on the night after he was taken.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing to the value of 5 s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, kept to hard labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-10

134. MARY THORPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a silver watch, value 40 s. a silver table-spoon, value 5 s. two silver tea-spoons, value 2 s. two gowns, value 2 l. a half-handkerchief, value 1 s. two guineas, and a half-guinea, the property of Mary-Ann Newport , in the dwelling-house of Joshua Cunningham .

MARY-ANN NEWPORT sworn. - At the time I lost this property I was a lodger to Joshua Cunningham ; I lost this property the day after last Christmas-day was a twelvemonth: The prisoner came to lodge with me on the Tuesday before, in my room, she left me on the Monday evening after, ten minutes before six, I was out, I had left my mother and an infant, and Mary Thorp , in the room; I am positive I had left the property mentioned in the indictment in the room when I went out, and when I came home, it was past eleven o'clock at night, my mother informed me that she was gone, and she had taken her bundle; I had not seen her from that time till the 4th of this present month.

Q. Had she given you any notice that she was to quit your lodging? - A. No; I expected to see her when I came back; the next morning I missed the watch, three spoons, two new cotton gowns, and two guineas and a half in gold, I never found any of my property again; when I saw her, I asked her if I could recover any of my property; I told her she had acted very wrong to me, as I had known her many years; I told her I would not give her into the hands of any Justice whatever, if she would return me my property.

Q. Do you know any thing more? - A. Only from her own confession before the Magistrate.

Court. I cannot hear that after that promise.

SARAH M'DONALD sworn. - I am the mother of the last witness: About half after six o'clock in the evening, I had occasion to go down stairs for a penny candle, I pulled fast the door after me, and when I came up stairs, I found the door open and the prisoner gone; I never saw her since till the 4th of this month, I met her in Drury-lane; I asked her how she did, and took hold of her by the bed-gown; I said, you know Mrs. Thorp you robbed my daughter last Christmas was a twelvemonth; she gave me very abusive language, and struck me several times, and ran away from me; I called after her, and told her I wanted to speak to her seriously about my daughter's things; I intreated her to go with me, and she submitted to go home with me to my daughter's; I knew very well the property was gone when my daughter came back.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I know no more than the prisoner was delivered into my custody; I searched her, I found no property that could be sworn to by the prosecutrix.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-11

135. RICHARD HILSLEY , and BENJAMIN LAWLESS , were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , four bushels of malt, value 2 l. the property of Nathaniel Brickwood ; and the other, for feloniously

receiving the same, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

RICHARD GRANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are servant to Mr. Brickwood? - A. I am.

Q. Mr. Brickwood has a granary at Broken-wharf, in Upper Thames-street ? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 21st of January, was the prisoner Hilsley in Mr. Brickwood's service? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that day, in the afternoon, did you go up into the floor, No. 2.? - A. Yes, about four in the afternoon; and I observed the heap of malt, and a strange man with the prisoner, in the floor No. 2, they were standing by a sack of malt, one on one side, and one on the other, by the malt heap; there were two sacks lying down, and one standing up, the sack that was standing up was turned inside out; all the sacks were close to the malt heap, the two sacks lying down had Mr. Brickwood's mark on them.

Court. Q. You could not read what was marked on the third sack? - A. I could only see there was a mark.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you make any particular observations on this sack of its contents? - A. There were red letter marks on it, and there was a little bit of a hole just by the top of the sack, I put my finger in this third sack, in the hole, and found it was malt; I did not say any thing to Hilsley then, nor the stranger, I left them there, and came away; about ten minutes afterwards Hilsley was coming out of No. 2, and going down stairs; I spoke to him then, and asked him what he was about; to the best of my recollection, he said, that he had been shutting a door in at the top; I then went up to No. 2, and the strange man was standing by the sack of malt, I staid there about five or six minutes, and then I came away, the strange man continued there; I only came down to No. 1, the floor below, where I staid ten or twelve minutes, and then went up to No. 2, again, and the strange man went to the floor No. 1, I saw him come below, and when I went up to No. 2, again, I saw Richard Hilsley , he went up before me to No. 2, and when I went up the third time, Hilsley took one of the sacks in his hands and set it up an end; I came down and left him there, and stopped below perhaps ten minutes or longer, between the wharf-gate and the mill; Hilsley came down, to the best of my recollection, and stood by the strange man, I was never out of sight of the warehouse, nor from under the roof all the time; I said to the stranger, I think you have the appearance of a soldier; Hilsley said, yes; I told Hilsley, and I spoke to a man that we had, that I was going to my quarters; I live in Old Fish-street-hill, I went away almost immediately, and left them both there in the wharf, this was near five o'clock; I had dropped a pocket-book, which I observed as soon as I came home, and returned immediately; I had not been gone from the wharf above ten minutes, at the farthest, and when I came within six or seven yards of my master's gate, in Broken-wharf, I saw Hilsley scrapling a sack on his shoulder, just as though he was taking it out of my master's little gate.

Q. Was he outside of the gate before you saw him? - A. Yes, just got there; it appeared to my eye that he had just come through the wicket, by his scrapling it up; there are two glass lamps just by the gateway; I could see to pick up a pin; he got it on his shoulder and met me, and I met him in the yard, with the sack on his shoulder; the two lamps reflect a very bright light, within five yards of my master's gateway; I saw his face, his stockings and shoes, and likewise the sack of malt that was on his shoulder; I am sure it was Hilsley, I spoke to him but he would not speak to me; I felt the sack with my hand, and felt it to be malt; the sack appeared to have no mark on it; I stopped at the gate, and found somebody was fastening the wicket.

Court. Q. Could you by the light of the lamps form any judgment whether the sack was turned inside out? - A. It appeared to be wrong side out, by the light of the lamps.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was it the usual hour to shut the gates? - A. No, just as the carts come in; sometimes eight or nine o'clock; they are usually put to before they are finally fastened; I followed the prisoner by the light of the lamps; he went up Broken-wharf, and went into No. 57, Upper Thames-street, a green-grocer's shop, kept by Lawless, as a person told me; he went into No. 57, the door was then standing open, he went into the passage and pitched the sack down, I am sure it was Hilsley that went in with the sack, he went into a little room, the glass door of which faced the street door; a man came with a light.

Q. Could you at all see that man's face so as to know him? - A. I could not; Hilsley staid in the house about ten minutes, and I stood at the street door; I saw Hilsley in the room, and when he came out I stepped back, and then I came up to him, and said, Richard, is that you; he replied, yes; I then went immediately to Mr. Brickwood's warehouse, No. 2, and there I saw that the sack that was standing up first, and had been turned inside out, was missing, and only the two other sacks were there; there was no malt at that time at No. 1, only oats.

Q. Did you inform the clerk of any suspicion that you had? - A. Not till the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What time was it on the next day that you told any body about it? - A. Perhaps twelve o'clock to the best of my recollection.

Q. You were upon extremely good terms with Hilsley? - A. I had nothing against him, I had a few light words, but not to bear him any malice; I never had any quarrel with him, only a few sharp words, such as when men are at work they catch up one thing and the other another thing, and one finds fault with the other.

Q. How long have you lived with your master? - A. About a fortnight before last Michaelmas; Hilsley was on the wharf when I came there.

Q. Your master is a lighterman? - A. He is a corn and coal factor.

Q. Have you not a variety of people's sacks in your master's warehouse, and so you borrow one of another in the course of your trade? - A. Never, none but the London company's sacks; they are sacks that come with flour.

Q. These are not the only persons that your master deals with? - A. No.

Q. Therefore there are other sacks that find their way into your master's warehouses? - A. It might be so.

Q. Now, whenever you have taken out the malt from a sack, you turn it inside out if it belongs to another person; have you never seen that done before in your life? - A. I never saw it done there; I have seen flour sacks turned inside out, and then turned back again.

Q. At the time you saw the prisoner pitch it on his shoulder, that was the very time that the person, whoever it was, was going through the wicket? - A. It was just by the wicket, he had just got through the wicket.

Q. Was there any lamp there? - A. There was a light there.

Q. Therefore, if any person was there he must see the person go through the wicket? - A. I cannot say, I did not see the other person.

Q. But if there was any person they might have seen him for what you know; you have said, the moment that person went through the wicket, the gate was shut? - A. Yes.

Q. You have said that you stood at the door of the house, No. 57, and you looked through the passage to the glass door? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there a lamp at the street door? - A. No, there might be a lamp-iron at the door, that I cannot say; there was a light in the room, and the glass door opened immediately as he went into the room.

Q. When he went into the room where there was a light, did the door shut immediately as he went into the room? - A. Not immediately; I believe it was a minute or two after Hilsley went into the room with the sack before he shut the door.

Q. You are quite sure that he left the door open to give an opportunity of looking at him, whoever it was; and that he shut the door after he had let you see every thing he had done? - A. He pitched the sack, and then the door was shut.

Q. I understood you to say, in your original examination, that a man came with a light? - A. Yes, he had a candle.

Q. Can you tell us whether you know the face of that person again? - A. I saw the face of that person, but I cannot tell him again.

Q. Will you tell us how that man was drest? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Did Hilsley return to work again? - A. I never saw him any more that night; I saw him the next day at my master's wharf as usual, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. What is the size of the wicket? - A. I never measured it; it is a wicket I can go through with a little difficulty, by stooping my head I can easily go through it myself, it would not take two persons to go through at the same time.

Q. Have you yourself seen persons carrying loads through the wicket? - A. No, never; the gates are always open in the day, I could take a sack through there with stooping my head.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You say you could carry a sack through, could you pull a sack through? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a usual thing to turn sacks inside out, and then fill them again? - A. Just as they require it.

Q. Had you ever any quarrel with Hilsley to bear him any malice? - A. Never.

Court. Q. You observed this stranger a great deal, was it light or dark? - A. I did observe him, it was about four o'clock in the day, not very light, I could see to do any thing in the granary.

Q. Do you think you should know him again if you were to see him? - A. I think I should; I never have seen him since.

Q. At the time you were watching Hilsley in the passage of No. 57, do you think that person who had a light had his back to you? - A. He stood with his face to me.

Q. Have you any reason to suppose that he saw you? - A. I cannot form any judgment whether he did or not.

Q. You did not speak to Hilsley or any parties at the time the sack was being carried to No. 57? - A. No.

Q. You had not any reason to know what was in the sack but by feeling as he was going from the wicket to No. 57? - A. I felt it a great many times, I did not put my finger in the hole then; I never lost sight of the prisoner, when he came out of No. 57, I did not observe he had any empty sack then.

NATHANIEL BRICKWOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. We understand you carry on the business of corn and coal factor , at Broken-wharf? - A. I do: On the 22d of last month, about

five o'clock, I took with me two constables, Hughes and Comley, to No. 57, a green-grocer's shop, where I found the prisoner, Lawless, on the ground-floor, in a room where he usually slept, as I understood; I found three sacks and a half of malt there; I took a separate sample from each of the three sacks, but not from the half sack; I compared the three samples, and every one of the samples were like the bulk of malt in No. 2; I could not discover the least shade of difference in the world between the bulk and these samples; I have been in the malt trade upwards of thirty-four years, I have had a great many thousand quarters.

Q. Therefore you are not an unexperienced person, and as far as belief can go, what is your belief? - A. Really, as I am in the presence of Heaven, I believe that the three sacks of malt were stolen from me, I have no doubt of it; on the 23d, I had the bulk measured by sworn meters, I found a deficiency of two quarters and six bushels.

Q. How many bushels did you find in the sacks? - A. I believe them to be as near as possible about four bushels, they were full sacks; I saw Lawless when I first went in, but he was taken away by Hughes, the constable; Comley assisted in searching, I did not see the malt when I first saw Lawless, he was not in the room where the malt was found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand that you knew the prisoner Lawless, that he has been in your service? - A. He has, and I have known him living at No. 57 for nearly a twelvemonth; he had worked occasionally for me as a labourer, he had never been a fixed servant.

Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, that he carried on any business at that time? - A. No, I have heard he kept a chandler's shop, and sold greens.

Q. People who deal in the chandlery line sell beans, and malt, and other articles? - A. I never heard of a person that sold greens to sell malt.

Q. You did not take any notice of the room with the glass door? - A. I was in that room, I took no notice of the door.

Q. You have heard that that was the room in which the malt was deposited? - A. I heard so.

Q. Whether you sell by wholesale or retail, or both? - A. Only wholesale.

Q. How lately before had you sold any quantity of malt? - A. On the 14th of January I sold fifteen quarters to Messrs. Dodd and Turner, in Tooley-street, and five quarters to Mr. Golding, in St. Giles's; I estimated that I had ten quarters, and it was from that I was induced to send for sworn meters, to ascertain the quantity; I took stock about the 2d of January.

Court. Q. Is there any other person who keeps corn within any warehouse to which your gate leads? - A. None, I do not let any part of my warehouses to any corn-dealer whatever; I have no partner.

Q. What is the value of the three bushels? - A. Two pounds.

JAMES COMLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are ward beadle to Queenhithe? - A. Yes: On the 22d of January, I went with the prisoner, Hilsley, to the Compter; I then went to Lawless's house.

Q. How long have you known the house, No. 57? - A. Thirty-eight years, I have known Lawless six years, he has kept the ground floor of that house for three or four years, I have seen him in the room where the malt was found, he sleeps there, and I have seen him with the mash-tub, brewing in the back room; he keeps a chandler's shop; I have seen him making use of all the three rooms; the back room has had a glass door, but the glass is all out, and has been some years.

Court. Q. Have you been frequently in this shop? - A. Yes; he sold oysters, candles, small beer, and split peas; it is not a corn-chandler's shop; I have seen him brew there about once a week; I measured the wicket, the width is one foot three, and the heighth is four foot six.

THOMAS HUGHES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you go with Comley and Mr. Brickwood to No. 57? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him live there? - A. He has been there three or four years; he paid twenty-seven pounds a year for the ground floor.

Q. Have you ever seen him before in that room before you apprehended him? - A. Yes, he keeps a chandler's shop there, and sells butter and cheese, and all kinds of greens.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you considering of - have you ever been here before? - A. Yes, as a witness and a constable.

Q. Were you ever tried here? - A. Yes, I was, but I was acquitted.

Hilsley's defence. I am innocent of this piece of business, I am wrongfully accused; Grant accused me the next day when I had been at work; as I was going out of the yard, he asked me if I did not carry a sack out of the gate, as I was putting on my coat to go to dinner; I said, no; he said, he thought I was the man; he said, he saw a man carry a sack from the gate, and go along with it up the street; I gave him some rough language, he told me the less I said the better; we had been filling a tub full of oats, I worked there all the day till night, when Mr. Hughes came and took me; he swears wrongfully to me, I am not the man.

Lawless's defence. I am innocent; I never bought a grain of corn of this gentleman in my life.

For the Prisoner.

GEORGE DENNISON sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knapp. Q. You are in Mr. Brickwood's service? - A. Yes; I am ostler.

Q. On Monday the 21st of January, did you bar the wicket, and put the chain up? - A. Yes; I cannot justly say what time, it was past four o'clock.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go out that afternoon? - A. I let him out at the wicket, he was alone.

Q. Was there any light, or any candle, at the wicket? - A. No.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner, to see if he had any thing about him? - A. He had his great coat on his back, nothing else.

Q. You did not see him go to the wicket with any thing on his shoulder? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body else go out with any thing on their shoulder that afternoon? - A. No, I did not; that I am quite sure of, I can be upon my oath.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You did not see Grant go through the wicket at all? - A. No.

Q. Nor did you see him standing by the wicket? - A. I did not.

Q. Would it be possible, in the situation in which you were, for him to have gone out with a sack on his shoulder without your seeing it? - A. He had nothing on his back.

Q. Could any man take a sack from your master's yard without your seeing it? - A. I cannot say, because when I am in the stable I cannot see what is done there; I was in the stable when Hilsley came and asked me to let him out.

Q. Whether he had been out before, or had not been out, you do not know? - A. The wicket was chained when I went to let him out.

Q. Any body might open the great gates? - A. Yes, they were not locked.

Q. Supposing I were there, and had a sack upon my shoulder, I might have gone out and you not have known it? - Q. It would make a great rattle if you did it.

Q. Would you venture to swear that nobody opened the wicket, and put the chain up again, without your knowing of it? - A. No.

Q. All that you mean to swear is, that when you let Hilsley out, he had no sack on his shoulder; and the moment you let him out you shut the door, therefore, whether Grant was at the door you cannot tell? - A. No.

Court. Q. Had you any suspicion that caused or induced you to look, to see if any body was outside of the wicket? - A. No; I did not look to see, I had no suspicion.

SAMUEL POULTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you remember, on the 21st of January, Dennison letting the prisoner Hilsley out at the wicket? - A. I saw the prisoner, and the last witness letting him out at the yard; I saw the prisoner go first, and Dennison go afterwards; I did not observe that the prisoner had any thing with him but his great coat, he stood within half a yard of me at the time he went out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were at that time bushel-man, and foreman to Mr. Brickwood; you were turned off? - A. Yes.

Q. You had the care of the malt, had you not? - A. Yes.

Q. You took good care of it? - A. I took as good care of it as I possibly could, I did not see any carried away; I do not recollect that I had been up to No. 2, since the morning; I had lived with Mr. Brickwood about nine months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. If you had seen any body take any sack of malt on his shoulder, what should you have thought it your duty to do? - A. To have told my master; if the prisoner had had a sack on his shoulder, I should have told my master; but I swear positively he had not.

Court. Q. What is the smallest quantity that you sell? - A. I never knew any less than a quarter sold at the time I lived there.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) What is the smallest quantity that you have sold? - A. Five quarters; to oblige a friend, I might have sold two or three quarters; but that I do not believe I have done above two or three times in my life; never so little as a quarter.

AARON WAIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were porter to Mr. Brickwood, at the wharf? - A. Yes.

Q. He has turned you off, as he has the other servants? - A. No; he would have turned me off, he left word with the miller for me not to stay, but I was going off; I saw the prisoner in the dusk of the evening, at No. 1, and I saw him going down stairs, it was between four and five o'clock, he had nothing with him only his great coat; I did not see him any more that evening, I staid not quite half an hour after him; I am sure he had nothing with him when he went down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Who was it that brought the sack down stairs? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you see the strange man there? - A. I did not see any strange man there.

Q. Do you know Shepherd, a soldier? - A. I know many soldiers; I have seen a man that goes by the name of Shepherd.

Q. Was not he there between four and five in the afternoon? - A. He was not, upon my oath, not that I saw.

Q. What were you about at four o'clock? - A. I must have been at No. 1, or on the stairs No. 2.

Q. What was the greatest part of the evening that you were at No. 1, or No. 2, without any intermission? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN JENNINGS sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are agent to the Henley Navigation company? - A. Yes, I live at No. 4, Amelia-place, at present, and I hold an apartment of Mr. Lawless, for which I pay him eight guineas a year, at the back of the passage in the front of the street.

Q. Is there any glass-door to that room? - A. There is a glass-door, but not much glass in it, it is almost broken, the door is generally open at all times of the day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How often are you there? - A. Generally every day, sometimes I am there two hours, and sometimes four or five, and sometimes I do not come at all.

Q. When you are not there Mr. Lawless has the use of that room? - A. It is free open for any person to bring sacks in.

Q. I might go there if I choosed; he brews there once a week? - A. I cannot say that, I have seen him brew.

Q. Every fortnight? - A. I cannot say, he has brewed frequently in that room.

Court. Q. Do you know the other prisoner, Hilsley? - A. I do not know him when I see him, I heard of Lawless being taken up on the next day.

Mr. Gurney. Q. On the evening before he was taken up, did you light any man with a sack into that room? - A. No; I am sure I was not there so late.

Q. Have you any authority to dispose of any of the Henley Navigation company's corn? - A. No, I have sold corn so far as this, if I wanted a sack of corn for myself or my friends, I could have it.

Q. Did you ever sell any sack of malt to Lawless? - A. I never did.

Court. (To Prosecutor.) Q. Supposing a person employed in the warehouse No. 2, could any person come from the warehouse No. 2 with a load, and not be observed in No. 1? - A. Yes, for nothing is more clear; there is a fire burning for three months together in the kiln, and it very often happens that men are roasting potatoes at the fire; when I have gone in the floor No. 1, and could not find them, nothing is so easy for fifty men to come down from No. 2, and not to hear them; there is a temporary erection which would conceal fifty people in No. 1, what we call the pea warehouse, and persons passing from No. 2 could not be observed, but there are many situations in No. 1 in which persons could not pass it without being seen.

Q. (To Waight.) Do you mean to say that there is no part in No. 1 but in which you could observe any person coming from No. 2? - A. No, it is as Mr. Brickwood has said; but all the part where I worked at no man could pass without my seeing him; I was at work for half an hour at that part of the warehouse which overlooked the stair-case that leads to No. 2, I was sorting of sacks, the ragged ones from the whole, and putting the room to rights.

The prisoner, Hilsley, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner, Lawless, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hilsley, GUILTY, aged 54.

Transported for seven years .

Lawless, GUILTY , aged 47,

Transported for fourteen years .

The Jury recommended Hilsley to mercy, on account of his good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050220-12

136. ANDREW BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , seven yards of woollen cloth, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Weddell and John Till .

SAMUEL WEDDELL sworn. - I live at Aldgate : I can only prove that part of the goods were found in the prisoner's custody.

EDWARD SMITH , jun. sworn. - I am an Officer of Lambeth-street: on the 22d of January this man was brought to our Office, about the middle of the day, charged with a felony; he had a large bag, containing various articles, and among them I found this piece of flannel; I asked him where he bought the different things; he said, he bought some at Mr. Weddell's, and told me where Mr. Weddell lived, and amongst the cloth I found this card; I carried it to Mr. Weddell, who owned the card and the cloth.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Look at that cloth; what is it? - A. It is a Salisbury flannel; I know it is mine by the card, otherwise I should not; I had such flannel in my house, but I did not know I had lost it till the Officer came; then I searched and found it was missing; the card has our private mark on it, and it belongs to this piece of flannel.

Q. Where was it when it was in your shop? - A. In the window.

Prisoner. (To Prosecutor.) Q. Do you think you can swear you had this stuff in your shop two days before I came to your shop - A. I would not wish to swear that.

Q. Was the card fixed to the cloth when it came back? - A. It was loose.

Q. Then upon looking over that card, does it satisfy your mind that that piece of Salisbury flannel was the same flannel to which the card was affixed? - A. I could think it was, and the quantity taken corresponds with the quantity left exactly.

Prisoner's defence. A Jew that travels about declared to me, that Mr. Weddell had sold that piece of stuff to him three weeks before I bought

it; he is at Portsmouth, on board of a man of war, with slops.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-13

137. JOHN NORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Pool , privately in his dwelling-house .

JOHN POOL sworn. - I am a labourer in the East India warehouse : I live at No. 70, Lambeth-street, Goodman's fields ; I keep the house; the prisoner is a shoemaker ; he lived near me; I charge him with stealing a silver watch, on the 3d of this month; the watch was hanging under a glass in a back room; I saw him in the house, and heard him call in the street a person of the name of James Clay , that was a lodger in my house; after that, he came to the foot of the stairs, and there he called James Clay , the second or third time; my wife, rather before three o'clock, went to see what o'clock it was, and then I missed it; I thought immediately that the young man who came into the house must have taken it.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I produce the watch: On Sunday, the 3d of February, Mr. Pool sent to me, and I took the young man into custody in the evening, about seven o'clock; after he was locked up, I told him I should go after the people where he had been, and take them up; he said, do not do that, for he had left it there, I might go and ask Mrs. Luxham for the watch that he had left there, I went there, and Mrs. Luxham gave me the watch directly; he had been drinking tea there, with a young woman of Kent-street, in the Borough.

ELEANOR LUXHAM sworn. - Where did you get that watch from? - A. John North came on the 3d of February, about half-past three o'clock, and left that watch.

Q. The same watch that you gave to Smith? - A. Yes. (The watch identified by the Prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was going to call James Clay , my bed-fellow, and found the watch on the outside of the threshold of the door.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-14

138. JOHN BURROWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , 40 lb. weight of leaden pipe, value 10 s. fixed to a certain building called a house, the property of Susannah Green , widow .

Second Count, For a like offence, only fixed to a certain building, not calling it a house.

JOHN-HERBERT GREEN sworn. - I am a brewer, I board and lodge with my mother in Maddox-street Hanover-square , my mother keeps the house, she is a widow: On the 10th of February about the hour of one o'clock, noon day, I was informed by my servant, that they had met a man in the house with a bundle under his arm, and he had gone out with it, it was wrapped up in an apron, I immediately pursued the prisoner, he was stopped in Hanover-street by a friend of mine, and with his assistance I secured him; I saw him go up Poland-street, that leads to Hanover-street, with something under his arm; he threw it down the area, it was part of a leaden pipe.

Q. Are you quite sure this is the man you pursued? - A. Yes, I am perfectly sure.

THOMAS LOWTHER sworn. - I am a dealer in bottles; I was standing at Mr. Stamford's shop, a baker in Hanover-street, facing of Poland-street; I saw the prisoner at the bar come up Poland-street with a parcel under his arm, wrapped up in a canvas cloth; I saw John Green in pursuit of him, as I thought; the prisoner turned his head round when he got to New Poland-street, in Hanover-street; I then crossed over the way and took him; he resisted for about twenty minutes; then we tied his hands, and he was taken to Mount-street watch-house.

Q. What became of the parcel? - A. It was delivered into the watch-house keeper's hands by me; I picked it up in the area, and part in the street; it was wrapped up in an apron, and the apron was hanging on the rails.

ANN MORGAN sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Green; I had been out for a pint of beer, and when I came in I saw this man going out of the passage, with a parcel under his arm.

Q. Are you sure this is the man? - A. Yes, he turned round, and asked me if his acquaintance was there; I told him, no, I had seen him there the over-night, talking to a person, but I do not know who they were; I am sure this is the man.

John-Herbert Green . I produce the lead; it is the same lead, I am confident of; it has been locked up ever since; it is part of a pipe leading from the street to a water-butt; after I had taken the prisoner I missed the lead that leads to the butt; I had seen it there on Friday, the 8th of February, when I filled the butt.

Q. Are you able to say it was taken off these premises? - A. I am.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-15

139. JOHN CONNOR and WILLIAM MILES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , 100 lbs. weight of lead, fixed

to a certain building called a house, the property of John Sulivan .

Second Count, For a like offence, fixed to a certain building.

JOHN SULIVAN sworn. - I am a carpenter : I live in Oxford-buildings : On the 9th of this month I was informed that there were people stripping the lead from the gutter at No. 5, Sun-street; I called a neighbour to my assistance, I went up stairs at No. 4 and we got out at the trap-door into the gutter, and saw the two prisoners standing at one end of the gutter, close to the parapet.

Q. What were they about? - A. The lead was stripped and cut in seven different peices, laying down between them; I laid hold of Miles, I asked him what he was doing there, he said nothing, I asked him again who employed him to do such a piece of business as that to injure me in stripping the lead from that gutter, he made no reply, I told him he must go along with me; I told the other man not to stir, I would run him through if he did, I had a bayonet with me.

Q. When you saw it, it did not remain fixed to the building? - A. They had fixed cords to it to pull it up.

Q. Do you know what they are? - A. One is a bricklayer and the other is a labourer; one of them is a lodger of mine, in the front garret, No. 4, though I had not the pleasure of knowing him then.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These houses belong to you? - A. Yes; I rent them of Mr. Lumley, in Tower-street, and I let out each house to separate persons, No. 6, and No. 4, I receive my rent quarterly, and No. 5, I let to a yearly tenant; I pay my rent for them to Mr. Lumley, quarterly.

BARNARD MILLER sworn. - I belong to the watch-house: These two men were brought into the watch-house to me, I searched them, and found a knife and a chissel, and what is the use of them I leave to your observations; I produce the lead.

SAMUEL PRAG sworn. - I was standing at my own door between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the prosecutor came by me, he said, he had some suspicions that somebody was stripping lead from off his houses; I went with him, and lifted him up the trap-door, and I followed him; we found the two prisoners standing in the gutter, with the lead between them.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Miles called two witnesses, and Connor one, who gave them a good character.

Conner, GUILTY , aged 36,

Miles, GUILTY , aged 29,

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-16

140. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , an umbrella, value 10 s. the property of Richard Jacobs .

THOMAS GOODWIN sworn. - I am shopman to Richard Jacobs , umbrella and stick manufacturer ; I am left in charge of Mr. Jacobs's shop every Friday evening and Saturday, he being a Jew: On Saturday, the 19th of January last, I received information of an umbrella being taken off the hooks that were in the bressomer, at the front of the shop; I pursued the prisoner, and took him in the street, with the property in his hand; I brought him back to the shop, and detained him till I procured a constable; he was taken to Marlborough-street, and from there he was committed to prison.

RICHARD BUNTEN sworn. - A young man, apparently about twenty-four or twenty-five years of age, told me that a man had ran away with an umbrella from Mr. Jacobs's; I went immediately and told my neighbour, Goodwin run after him, and brought him back and the umbrella both; the young man did not stop, but he saw him take it away, and to the best of my knowledge he took it off the wires.

Goodwin. I produce the umbrella, it was hung upon a hook, it is not very easy for persons that are not acquainted with the hooks to take it off.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming through that court, it is a thoroughfare to Conduit-street, for any body to come through; I picked up this umbrella, and as I was walking towards Conduit-street this man ran after me, and said, that is my umbrella; I said, it is not mine, I have just picked it up.

Q. (To Goodwin.) You had not dropped an umbrella? - A. No; I picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-17

141. GEORGE WARTON and RICHARD MAYLIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , forty pounds weight of copper, value 30 s. the property of George Anstie ,

GEORGE ANSTIE sworn. - I am a furniture printer , in the Strand: On the 12th of January I employed Mr. Watty, of Vauxhall, to take some copper from a house of mine in Bond-street , and to relay it with lead, the two prisoners at the bar were the two men that came to do the business; about two or three days afterwards, from information I received by another workman , I went to Bow-street, and two officers went with me to Mr. Buckingham's, in Swallow-street, and there we found the copper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You live in the Strand; this house is in Bond-street; you let it out? - A. No; it is a house that I am repairing.

Q. You do not, yourself, superintend the work? - A. I was there every day.

Q. Did you go with the officers to Buckingham's? - A. I did.

JAMES ROBSHAW sworn. - I am a plasterer, I was going to see what o'clock it was, I was up in the garret on the 16th of January, I looked down, and saw Warton doubling up some copper, and putting it under a piece of mat; I went down and informed Robert Ewster , who slept in the house, that they were doubling up the copper; we then went into the two pair, and looked out of the window, and saw Warton putting it into a basket; they were at work close to the one pair window, on the plat, where they left the basket; I saw no more, I went to my dinner.

ROBERT EWSTER sworn. - Q. You slept in the house? - A. Yes: About twelve o'clock Robshaw came down and let me know what they were doing, in consequence of that, I went up, and saw what he has related. I saw Warton put it into the basket, the other prisoner was standing close by; they made use of the words, when they were doubling the copper up, that the copper was too small; then I went to my dinner, I dined in the room that they go out on the plat; I saw Warton come in at the window with the basket under his arm, and Maylin followed behind; I suspected what they had in the basket, and after they were gone, I opened the window, and there I saw Warton going with it under his arm, he went round Burlington-gardens; I went to a window that looked into Burlington-gardens, I saw Warton carrying it under his arm, and Maylin followed him behind; I then shut the window and went down stairs, and followed the prisoners, I lost sight of them by the time I got down; when I got near them I saw them in Swallow-street, standing near a pewterer's shop; then I saw Warton give Maylin some money; I suspected by where they stood, that that was the shop where they had sold it.

Q. Who keeps that house? - A. Buckingham; I saw Mr. Anstie the next morning and told him what I had seen the afternoon before.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I was desired by Mr. Kinnard to go to Swallow-street, to Buckingham's house; I went there and found some old copper, and in consequence of information, I apprehended the two prisoners at the bar. (Produces the copper.)

THOMAS BUCKINGHAM sworn. - I live at No. 24, Swallow-street, I am a pewterer and brazier, I bought this copper of the two prisoners, and gave them ten-pence a pound for it; I believe I bought of the two prisoners in the whole 40 lb. or better.

Q. On what day? - A. Part on the 12th of January, part on the 14th, part on the 15th, and on the 16th I bought seven or eight pounds of copper of the prisoners

Q. Can you shew us what you bought on the 16th? - A. I really could not tell was it ever so, it was all put together inside of the shop.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Does all the copper belong to you? - A. I judge so, because I have missed as much more as is here.

Q. (To Ewster.) Which is the one taken in the basket? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Is there any part you sold there? - A. Yes, this one piece.

Q. You went there for the purpose of detecting this? - A. Yes; he told us what he bought of the two prisoners afterwards, when we found him out, but not at first.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long was it before you found him out? - A. I informed him on the Thursday, as we found him out on the Wednesday.

Q. Before you sold this last parcel, you informed your master of it? - A. No, after we had sold this last parcel; we sold this on the Queen's birth-night, on Friday the 18th, and on Saturday they were apprehended.

Q. (To Buckingham.) When did you buy it? - A. I cannot directly say.

Q. It is another piece, sold on a different day? - A. I cannot tell whether they came on a different day or together.

Q. Take another piece, when did you buy that? - A. In the course of the four purchases.

Q. When did you buy your purchases? - A. First on the 12th of January, second on Monday the 14th, third on Tuesday the 15th, and the fourth on Wednesday the 16th; they are all here, I believe; the greatest part was brought on Monday, I believe, that was twenty pounds; eight pounds on the 15th, eight pounds and a half on the 16th, six pounds and a quarter, I believe.

Q. Do you know which parcel it is you bought on the 16th? - A. This is a piece I bought on the last day, I am sure of it, by reason it was put in the fire; it was very thick with lead, I was taken in with it.

Q. Was there any other day on which you purchased any with solder? - A. There were; I did not see it till after I purchased the last time, and then I took a small allowance for it, but not enough. (The witness handed a card to Mr. Gurney.)

Q. You give me this card that I might know your address; is this your writing? - A. It is not.

Q. Whose writing is it? - A. A little boy's of mine, that I asked to put it down, it is merely for a memorandum.

Q. Look at it, and tell me whether it is your's, or your little boy's? - A. It is my writing I see.

Q. Both by this piece of paper, and this card, they do not agree with your evidence: they make the solder sold on the 15th? - A. No, the solder on the 16th.

Q. Now which is correct, your paper or your evidence? - A. Both, I hope.

Q. Take your choice, which is correct, both is impossible; was it Tuesday or Wednesday? - A. Wednesday.

Q. Can you point out any one piece, except that one piece you gave me now, that you bought on the Wednesday? - A. This is another piece I bought on Wednesday, I think there were six pounds and a quarter; they were reckoned five shillings, and for which there did not weigh three pounds of copper when the lead was taken off, it came to four shillings; there were several pieces of this kind.

Q. When you were first questioned by the officer, you said you had bought none? - A. I did not.

Q. When Ewster came to your shop, you told him you had not bought copper of these persons? - A. The young man came into the shop to ask me if I bought copper; I told him I must know whether they got it honestly.

Q. I am asking you, in point of fact, did you or did you not, deny having purchased copper? - A. I do not recollect it.

Q. Will you swear that you did not? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) How much copper have you lost in this house? - A. I suppose double the quantity, and more.

Q. What pieces have you matched to your house? - A. Only two or three pieces.

Q. Will you have the goodness to shew us the two or three pieces? - A. These two pieces match exactly; we did not try any more.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence, but called three witnesses each, who gave them a good character.

Warton, GUILTY , aged 19.

Maylin, GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-18

142. MARY M'NOLTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , two hens, value 4 s. the property of Reuben Treasure .

REUBEN TREASURE sworn. - I keep a chandler's-shop and coal shed , King-street, Seven Dials : On the 14th of this month, between eight and nine o'clock, I heard a noise in the coal shed with the fowls; I immediately went down the passage, I found my back door unbolted, and left open to the street; when I entered the coal shed, I saw the prisoner at the bar at the fowl's roost, with her hands lifted up to them; I looked on the floor, I observed a piece of carpet which was not mine; I took it in my hand, and there were two fowls wrapped up in it quite warm; I took her to the watch-house, I produced the fowls at Marlborough-street, they were my property.

Prisoner's defence. My mother sent me of an errand, and as I was going along I rushed against a drunken man; I was afraid of him, and went into that gentleman's house, he went backwards in the yard, and came out again, and said I had killed two of his hens, and brought a piece of carpet to wrap them up in; while he and his wife were talking together, some women came down stairs, and one of the women said it was her carpet, and then they sent me to the watch-house.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-19

143. THOMAS RENARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , five pounds weight of pork, value 3 s. the property of John Horly .

JOHN HORLY sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , No. 13, Cock-hill, Ratcliff ; the prisoner at the bar stopped at my window on the 14th of February, and took from thence two pieces of pork, I saw him do it; I followed him, and took the pieces of pork from him, and took him to Shadwell Office.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man? - A. I was informed at the Office that he had been detected of a similar offence before.

Prisoner's defence. It is real necessity and want.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-20

144. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a silver watch, value 30 s. the property of Mary Barrett .

MARY BARRETT sworn. - I live at No. 6, Adam and Eve-court, Oxford-street , I am a widow, and a laundress ; the prisoner lodged with me from May to the 3d of November, he came in on the 3d of November about eight o'clock, he asked me what he owed me; I told him five shillings and five-pence, but he did not pay me; I then asked him to sit down, he refused, he stood some time; he then asked me what o'clock it was, my watch hung in the beaufet just by his side, I told him to look; he said, when he looked, it is twenty minutes past eight o'clock; he then said he would go and get something for supper; he went out, and never returned; I had nobody with me at the time, nor I never went off the chair.

Q. How soon did you miss the watch? - A. About half an hour afterwards; I was sitting mending stockings by my own fire, and when I went to my beaufet my watch was gone; I went to Marlborough-street to lay an information against him, but never heard any thing of him till the 6th of

February; he was not a soldier then, he worked for Mr. Spencer, a horse dealer.

Q. Did you ever find your watch? - A. Not till he was taken up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. It was about eight o'clock when the prisoner came to you, you did not miss your watch till nine? - A. No.

Q. How many people live in your house? - A. Only four or five.

Court. Q. Was any person in the room? - A. No, nor I had never been off the chair.

WILLIAM DICKER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Salten, pawnbroker, in the Strand; I produce a watch pledged by the prisoner for one pound on the 3d of November, about half past nine at night, or ten o'clock.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. I believe it is, to the best of my recollection.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How was the man dressed that pledged the watch? - A. In a blue coat, he was not dressed like a soldier then.

Q. Then you cannot take upon you to say that was the man, it might have been a man like him for what you know -

Court. Q. So like him, that you have no doubt about him? - A. I rather believe it is the man.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - On the 6th of this month, I took the prisoner into custody; on searching him I found this duplicate with the name of Salten, a pawnbroker, in the Strand. (Produces it.)

Q. (To Dicker.) Look at that duplicate? - A. I have the counter part, they both agree; he had pawned the watch in the name of Howard.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I went along with my brother-officer, I saw him search the fob pocket, and take the ticket out.

(The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-21

145. WILLIAM SIMMS was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved by the instigation of the devil, in and upon Elizabeth Matthews , a woman child, under the age of ten years, and of the age of nine years , feloniously did make an assault, and that he, the aforesaid William Simms , the said Elizabeth Matthews against her will did carnally know and abuse , against the form of the statute and against the King's peace.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-22

146. SAMUEL MITCHELL was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved by the instigation of the devil, feloniously did make an assault in and upon Louisa Todd , on the 22d of January , and against her will feloniously did ravish and carnally know her , against the form of the statute and against the King's peace.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-23

147. ELIZABETH JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , thirty gross of glass beads, value 8 s. the property of Charles Southall .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CHARLES SOUTHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a bead-maker , and live in Banner-street, St. Luke's ? - A. Yes; the prisoner was employed by me, she worked in my house, her business was to put the colour on the beads to imitate pearl: In consequence of information I received, I applied to Mr. Carter on the 25th of January; Mr. Carter produced two bags of beads which I had every reason to suppose were mine, they are in an unfinished state; I told her I had been robbed so much, I thought it my duty to make an example of her; she begged for mercy, and told me she had sold the beads to Mr. Carter, and that she had been in the habit of selling to him for about four months.

- CARTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a bead-maker; the prisoner came to my house and sold these beads to me, which I produce; I shewed them to Mr. Southall, he said he had every reason to believe they were his; I gave her eight shillings for them, they are made of blown glass to imitate pearl.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Southall's house, in Banner-street; she acknowledged taking the goods, she asked Mr. Southall to excuse her, and she would do it no more; she said she had sold a great number of beads for about four or five months, about four pounds worth I think she said.

Court. Q. What did he say to that? - A. He said he would not, he would make an example of her; I searched her room where she lived, I found three parcels more in an unfinished state, which I produce.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) Look at those beads? - A. I believe them to be my property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-24

148. WILLIAM POWELL and MARTHA LANE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Burst , about the hour of five in the morning on the 15th of February , and burglariously stealing therein a bed-gown, value 3 s. the property of Ruth Everett ;

five pounds weight of sugar, value 4 s. a pound weight of meat, value 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of James Burst .

JAMES BURST sworn. - I live at No. 102, York-street, Westminster , I keep a lodging-house there; I know the prisoners perfectly well, they were lodgers at my house, they left the lodging on the 7th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening: On the 15th, in the morning, just as the watchman called the hour of five, I was alarmed by one of my lodgers that somebody was breaking into my kitchen windows; I immediately got a light, and went down stairs into the room above the kitchen; I looked out into the yard with a candle in my hand, and saw the sash of the kitchen was turned back; I called out who is there? no one answered, I heard a great noise below like throwing the things about the room; I saw my front and back door was fastened, I still heard the noise; I went to get my saw in order to prevent them from getting out, then I heard some person go out of the kitchen door into the passage; I returned down to the bottom of the stairs, and when I came there they made their escape, and the front door was opened; I immediately went into the kitchen to see what was missing, I missed my sister-in-law's bed-gown, five pounds of moist sugar packed up, and folded in the handkerchief, and some pieces of cold beef.

Q. In what state was the window when you went to-bed on the over night? - A. It was fastened; a person who is here fastened it, I did not see it.

Q. In what state was it when you saw it at nine o'clock in the morning? - A. The sliding sash was drawn back, and one of the squares broke to get their hand in; the square that was broke was near the hook that fastened the window; we found a few drops of blood on the window, and some sprinkles of blood on the railing.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am an officer, I had a warrant to apprehend the prisoners on the 15th of this month; I took the man when he was on guard, and the woman in Peter-street; when the man was examined, I pulled a glove from off his hand to see if his hand had been cut; I observed the skin was off his right-hand third-finger, it appeared to be very much lacerated, as if it had been rubbed or bruised, it did not seem to be a cut from glass, the skin hung over from one joint to the other, the skin had not been taken from the wound, and it appeared as if it had been done some time; he denied to me ever seeing the woman since he had left the lodgings at Mr. Burst's, he at last acknowledged to the Magistrate where she lived; when I searched the woman, she got up, and put her hand in her pocket first, and pulled out something which she endeavoured to secrete, which was this duplicate of the bed-gown; I found a key on the woman, and went to the room where they lived, and found this hat, (produces it;) it was marked on the top with white, as if it had rubbed against a white cieling or wall, the white mark was rather fresh on the hat then; I took this hat to Mr. Burst, and desired him to go the most natural way he could into the kitchen through the window, and when he got in, he said he could not get in without rubbing his head against it; upon his re-examination, I asked him if this was his hat; he said it was, but the white mark had been put on; the woman prisoner said she had picked up the bed-gown ten minutes before six o'clock in Snow's-rents, which is at the back part of this man's house; first of all she said she had it a good while; I asked her how long, and she found me inquisitive, she at last said that; I found in his room a piece of rag, it appeared as if it had come off some one's finger, it had a little blood on it, and a little blood I found on a little bag in the room.

RUTH EVERETT sworn. - I am James Burst 's wife's sister, we all live together: On the 15th of this month, before I went to-bed, I fastened the kitchen windows myself, I was the last in the kitchen; the kitchen fastens with a hook in the middle of the window and a pin, there is no shutters.

Q. Did you fasten it that night with the hook? - A. I do not know whether I did or no, I fastened it in the middle with a pin; I was alarmed a little past five in the morning, I followed my brother down immediately, I saw the kitchen window drawn back, afterwards I went into the kitchen, and missed the articles he has mentioned; I have seen the bed-gown since at Queen's-square.

- CHARNEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, at Seven Dials; I produce a bed-gown I received of the prisoner Lane on the 15th of this month, between twelve and two o'clock in the day; I am sure of her person.

Powell's defence. I was not out of the guard-house from four in the evening till half past eight in the morning, I was in the guard-house with my arms.

Lane's defence. I was going up to the guard-house about six o'clock in the morning to see if he was going off guard, I picked up this bed-gown; I took it home, I did not know what it was, and being in great distress, I went and pawned it for two shillings.

The prisoner, Powell, called his serjeant, who gave him a good character as a soldier.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-25

149. HARRIETT HAYNES was indicted for feloniously making an assault in and upon Samuel Harris , on the 25th of January , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person

and against his will, a seven-shilling piece, five shillings and sixpence in silver, the monies of the said Samuel Harris .

SAMUEL HARRIS sworn. - On the 25th of January, just as the watch was going past eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner as I was going through Soho-square ; I was coming from Rotherhithe, I had my handkerchief to my eye; she stopped me by putting each of her hands to my waistcoat-pocket, she asked me how I did, I was walking in a hurry, I was fearful of being shut out of my lodgings; I immediately asked her to let me pass.

Q. Had you any conversation with her? - A. I was in too much a hurry; with that she drew her left-hand from my pocket suddenly, I then rather thought she had drawn something out of my pocket; I laid hold of her hand with my right-hand, and put my left-hand in my pocket, and found my money gone; I told her she had took a seven-shilling piece; she exclaimed a seven-shilling piece! a seven-shilling piece! and threw it away.

Q. What money did you miss? - A. A seven-shilling piece, and five shillings and sixpence in silver; I was afraid she would throw the seven-shilling piece away, I heard her rattle it; I charged the watch with her.

Q. Did you see her searched? - A. No.

Q. How long before you met her had you felt the money in your pocket? - A. About an hour before, when I was in Princes-street, Rotherhithe; I had not been accosted before all the way.

WILLIAM CRAIG sworn. - I am constable of the night, I was at the watch-house; the prisoner at the bar was brought to me by a watchman charged by the prosecutor of robbing him. On her being searched, this five shillings and sixpence was found on her, and a halfpenny; she denied having robbed him.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) There is nothing about your money that you know it from any other person's money? - A. On one of the shillings there is W.G. marked, I observed that when I was at Rotherhithe, when I was in company with a young man there, he was telling me that he had three bad shillings; I said, I have silver in my pocket, I will see if I have any bad; I said, here is a shilling marked W. G. with a particular dent in it; I said, they might as well have punched it through while they were doing it; that shilling I will undertake to say I had in my pocket.

Q. You are sure you did not stop in the street, and talk to her? - A. I did not say a word to her more than I have said to you.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking along Soho-square, he stopped me, and asked me if I would take a walk with him round the square; I told him I would, and I did, and that young man gave me three shillings for a compliment; then he said I had robbed him; I told him I would not give it him back, as he had given it me; I had three shillings and sixpence in my pocket before he kept me walking round the square with him.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Is any part of that true? - A. Not a word of it.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing only .

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-26

150. SAMUEL HALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Gordon , about the hour of five at night, on the 15th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two silk cloaks, value 25 s. three petticoats, value 5 s. two tablecloths, value 4 s. four pillow-cases, value 2 s. two aprons, value 1 s. a shawl, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and a cap, value 1 s. the property of Margaret Gordon .

MARGARET GORDON sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop in Portpool-lane : On the 15th of January last I went to Mr. Davis's, the tallow-chandler's; it was almost dark; I went out about half-past four and returned about a quarter before five; when I went out I locked the shop door, and I met the prisoner at the door; the shop door has two panes of glass, and the two other squares for glass has a piece of oil-cloth nailed over one, and the other a board; when I returned with the candles I unlocked the door and went in; I found my drawers were broke open in the back room; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; every thing was there when I went out, and the shawl I had worn not an hour before; I observed the piece of oil-cloth at the door was loose; it hung on one nail; I have seen the shawl since at Hatton-garden.

SARAH LOVELL sworn. - On the 15th of January I went to Mrs. Gordon's shop, and saw the prisoner there, about five in the evening; I saw the prisoner draw his arm out of the window, and he drew after him a white table-cloth or a sheet; he then came out, and I went forward to try the door, but could not get in, and I went to another shop; I saw him go up Sparrow's Rents, and put it in his pocket; when I returned, he came out again, and I asked him if any body was at home; he immediately replied, you d - d b - h, what do you want there; I left him there.

JOHN ALLEN sworn. - I was coming home one night at rather dusk; I was going to Mrs. Gordon's, on an errand; it was near five o'clock; the minute I came to the door the man pulled out a boy from the door; I made haste after him as fast as I could, but could not overtake him; I cannot swear to the boy or the man.

- sworn. - I am an Officer belonging

to Hatton-garden: I acquainted Chapman that I had heard the goods of Mrs. Gordon were in Thomas Hall's house, Saffron-hill; he went there and found this shawl; he said he received it of Samuel Hall, a person that his wife washed for.

THOMAS HALL sworn. - Q. What relation is the prisoner to you? - A. None at all; I produce a shawl; Samuel Hall, the prisoner, gave it to me, for me to give to my wife to wash, on Wednesday night, the 16th of January, at Mr. Ette's, the Distiller's Arms.

Prisoner's defence. I did give him the shawl for his wife to wash; I bought the shawl of a man at the corner of Chick-lane, one night; I gave fifteen pence for it. (The shawl identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY,

Of stealing only .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-27

151. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , three half-pint earthenware mugs, value 6 s. six dishes, value 6 s. thirty-seven plates, value 5 s. two glasses, value 1 s. one dish, value 2 s. five basons, value 6 s. fifteen saucers, value 5 s. fifteen cups, value 5 s. two milk-pots, value 2 s. two sugar-dishes, value 3 s. three basons, value 1 s. 6 d. two cups, value 6 d. two candlesticks, value 2 s. five castors, value 10 s. one tumbler, value 6 d. two goblets, value 5 s. two decanters, value 2 s. a vinegar-cruet, value 6 d. and six jugs, value 6 s. the property of William Spode and William Copeland .

Second Count, For the like offence, only charging it to be the property of Josiah Spode and William Copeland.

JOHN PICKSTOCK sworn. - I am in the employ of Messrs. Spode, the prisoner was a servant also: On Saturday, the 17th of January, I suspected he had something in his pocket; I communicated the same to Mr. Spode; the prisoner went out and I followed him and overtook him on Blackfriars-bridge, with a crate on his back, which had been given him; I passed him and hit his pocket; I found something in it; I then requested him to go back; I told him Mr. Spode wanted to speak with him; he asked me what Mr. Spode wanted with him; I told him I did not know; when we came back we met Mr. Spode in the back room; he asked him what he had got in his pocket; he said, nothing; after that he pulled out a mug, and then he pulled out two more mugs (the mugs produced); they are Staffordshire ware; I know them to be Messrs. Spode's manufactory; they are worth 6 s. the three; he said it was the first time, and hoped it would be looked over.

- DORRINGTON sworn. - I am one of the Officers belonging to Bow-street: I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, at Narrow-wall, Lambeth, and found all these articles, the remainder in the indictment.

GUILTY, aged 42,

Of stealing to the value of 6 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-28

152. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. the property of Ann Grocer .

JOHN FOY sworn. - I am an Officer of Marlborough-street; I met the prisoner in Conduit-street, and found this pot in her pocket, and the other folded up in a cloth inside of her apron; the name of Ann Grocer is on the pots.

JOSEPH GROCER sworn. - My mother keeps a public-house , they both belong to my mother, I assist her in the business.

Q. What is the value of them? - A. Three shillings; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. (A written defence, read in Court.) My Lord and Gentlemen, I am seventy years of age, a paralytic fit has deprived me of the power of expressing myself, and I have lost the use of my right side; I was going to carry the pots to the owner; I was never guilty of taking any thing in my life; I hope you will consider my affliction and my age.

Q. (To Grocer.) Where is your mother's house? - A. In Park-street, Grosvenor-square , about half a mile from Conduit-street.

Jury. Q. When you met her, which way was she going? - A. She was going away from Park-street.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-29

153. MATTHEW DOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , two pounds three quarters weight of beef, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of Isaac Baxter .

ISAAC BAXTER sworn. - I am a butcher ; between the hours of nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and asked the price of different pieces of meat, I told him, then he went out into the street to the window, in about a minute or two he came in again and asked the price of mutton chops, I told him 6 d. a pound, he said he would give only 4 d. he took up a piece of flank of beef, I told him that was 6 d. a pound; I went to the other side of the shop to give answer to other customers, my wife called out that he had got the piece of beef he was cheapening of; I went out into the street and took him by the collar and asked him to come back with me, I said you rascal give me the beef from under your coat.

Q. How much beef was it? - A. Two pounds three quarters at 6 d a pound.

Prisoner. I bid him a shilling for the bit of beef, I laid the shilling in his hand and then he walked over to the corner of the shop.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) He says he gave you a shilling? - A. I never saw a bit of his money, he never mentioned it, he only bid me four pence a pound.

Prisoner. I did as soon I came in.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - The prosecutor came to the watch-house and gave the prisoner to me in charge; I understood by the man that there had been a shilling offered, but there was no proof of it.

SARAH FORRESTER sworn. - I was in the shop when the prisoner looked out some mutton chops, he told Mr. Baxter to weigh them at 4 d. a pound, he told him they were 6 d. a pound, he threw them down and went among the people for a few minutes and then retired out of the shop; he came in again and went out, and Mrs. Baxter was behind the counter, she said follow that man Baxter, he has took something away and put it under his coat.

Q. Did you see the prisoner offer any money? - A. I never saw the coin of his money.

Prisoner's defence. I paid him a shilling for it; he followed me out and brought me in again; I gave him the shilling into his hand, when he stretched his hand to me, when I took up the bit of beef in my hand; I told him he would not get any body to buy this bit of beef but a poor man like me; if I had stole the bit of beef, I would not have gone in again when he tapped me on the shoulder; and when I came back with him into the shop, he gave me a slap in the face, and took the beef from me; now, says he, go about your business; no, says I, I shall not go without you give me a shilling; he said he would not give me one at all.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

The Jury recommended him to mercy on account of his good character .

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-30

154. WILLIAM BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a tin bath, value 5 s. the property of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER sworn. - I am a tin-plate worker , I live at No. 29, Norton Falgate ; I had two tin baths at the door on the 9th of February; I had taken in one, and a customer came into the shop and prevented me from taking in the other; about a quarter after ten in the evening I asked the people that were passing and repassing, if they had seen any one with a tin bath; they told me they had seen a man go down Norton Falgate with a bath; I immediately ran down and caught it upon him; it is my own making, I can swear to it.

- KIRBY sworn. - I am an Officer: the property and the man were brought to me at the watch-house; I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner. (To the prosecutor.) Q. I would ask you whether I was in my senses at the time I did that? - A. He appeared to be very much intoxicated.

Prisoner's defence. I am a porter at Leadenhall a I hope Mr. Baker will tell the gentlemen in Court there was a gentleman came forward at the watch-house to speak for me.

Prosecutor. There was a gentleman in the neighbourhood said he had carried loads for him, and he always found him an honest man.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-31

155. JOHN ROGER TURNER was indicted for feloniously forging a certain receipt for the payment of four thousand and seventy pounds ten shillings, being the consideration of seven thousand pounds stock or share in the capital or joint stock in the Reduced Three per Cent. Annuities, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Second Count, For uttering and publishing as true a like forged receipt for the payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third and Fourth Counts, For feloniously forging and uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged receipt for the payment of money, he knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud William Waltham .

Fifth and Sixth Counts, For the like offence, with intention to defraud Joseph Lightfoot .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet; and the case was stated by Mr. Fielding.)

HENRY ENGELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. I believe you are a sugar-baker, in Wellclose-square? - A. Yes.

Q. You are acquainted with Mr. Price, the father-in-law of the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in company with Mr. Price and the prisoner on the 7th of January? - A. Yes.

Q. On Monday, the 7th of January, do you recollect any conversation passing between you and the prisoner or any other person? - A. The prisoner wished to speak to me, he called me out of the room, and told me that his stock-broker had failed, and he wanted an honest man to sell out some stock.

Q. Did he represent to you at all what amount of stock he had? - A. I understood from him sixteen thousand pounds.

Q. Did you then, from this, recommend any person to him? - A. I recommended Mr. John Sherrot , of Ratcliff-highway.

Q. I believe the prisoner was not present when you had some conversation with Mr. Sherrott? - A. He was not.

JOHN SHERROTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. What are you? - A. I am a broker and auctioneer, I live in Ratcliff-highway.

Mr. Alley. Q. Pray, have the Bank promised to pay you in case of conviction? - A. No.

Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Did the prisoner call at your house? - A. On the 8th of January the prisoner called at my house, accompanied with another person, whom I have since learned was Mr. Price, his father-in-law, a shoemaker.

Court. Q. Are you a stock-broker? - A. Yes, and an auctioneer: He called to tell me that he was recommended to me by Mr. Engell, a sugar-refiner, and he wanted me to sell out some stock for him; he came into the accompting-house, and on my asking him his name and place of abode, he said, his name was William Walton , of Malden, in Essex; I asked him how he stood in the Bank books, as gentleman, or otherwise; he said, as gentleman; I then asked him what sum of money he would wish to sell out; he turned round to Mr. Price, his father-in-law, and said, shall I sell out all, or part; Mr. Price made answer, sell so much as will answer your present exigencies. He then gave me an order to sell out seven thousand pounds stock, in the Three per Cent. Reduced Annuities, this was about twelve o'clock on Tuesday the 8th of January; he asked me then, when I should complete it for him; I told him I would get it ready by the next day, about twelve o'clock; he then said, he would meet me the next day at the Reduced Office, to make the regular transfer.

Q. Did he meet you at the office on the same day? - A. I went to the Bank and sold out the stock to Joseph Lightfoot ; the prisoner came the next day, about the time appointed, at twelve o'clock, at the Reduced Office; he asked me whether every thing was prepared ready for him; I took the receipt out of my pocket-book, it was a printed one which I had filled up, I desired him to sign the receipt, and he signed it.

Q. Did he return it to you? - A. He returned it to me after he had signed it.

Q. Did he ask you any further question, whether that was all that he had got to do? - A. Yes; I told him he would have the Bank book to sign presently, but if he would stop in the Reduced Office a short time, I would fetch the person whom I had sold the stock to, and he would pay him for it.

Court. Q. He would give him a check for the money? - A. Yes; I went to see for him, and not seeing him I returned without him; and when I returned, I asked the prisoner if he had any body that could identify him as William Waltham ; his answer was, that he had got no person that knew him; he said, he knew no person there, as his former broker who had done his business had failed, of the name of Thomas Rutt, and he knew no other person; he said that Mr. Engell had recommended him to me, Mr. Engell knew him very well; I told him, that I never identified any person except I was perfectly acquainted with him.

Q. Did he apply to you to identify him? - A. I will not take upon me to say whether he applied to me to identify him, he said Mr. Engell knew him very well; he then said, the business must stand over till to-morrow, and he would call on Mr. Engell, or some other respectable person, to identify him the next day; he made an appointment to meet me between the hours of twelve and one the next day.

Q. Did you attend on the next day? - A. I took the receipt with me, and happened to meet Mr. Engell in the afternoon, and on the next day I attended; the prisoner did not come near me.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. Between four and five that afternoon.

Q. Upon this, did you give any information of what had passed? - A. I acquainted the Solicitor of the Bank of the transaction; first of all, I made my application to the principal clerk there.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - A. The prisoner came to my house about half past four the same day, he was to have attended at the Reduced Office.

Q. What passed between you then? - A. I asked him the reason why he had not come up to the Bank to do the necessary business, he had kept me all day there waiting; I think he said he had been in search of Mr. Thomas Rutt , but did not find him, he was out of town; he wanted to find him, in order to clear up any doubt about knowing of him; Mr. Rutt had purchased stock for him, but he could not find him till the next day, that was the reason why he did not come; I told the prisoner that he had used me very ungenteel, for the stock had rose two per cent. and I was obliged to sell the stock at the price agreed for.

Q. Did you suggest any doubt of him? - A. I was then a little warm, I was very much hurt on the business, on the difference of the price of stock, paying this two pounds out of my pocket; I said to him, is your name William Waltham , or is it not William Waltham ; he said, no; that is all he said; I then said to him, how dare you assume the name of William Waltham ; you have led me into an error, and you have made me pay this money for you; he said, that money will be reimbursed; then in came Mr. Robinson, while I was in conversation, at that period.

Q. Who is Mr. Robinson? - A. He is a corn-chandler,

in Ratcliff-highway; he addressed the prisoner, and said, how do you do Mr. Turner.

Q. Are you sure that he addressed himself to him Mr. Turner? - A. I can swear that he said Mr. Turner; he then said, I think you are mistaken in my person and name; I think he then said to the prisoner, do not you live as clerk to Stonard and Ryland; I do not know what reply he made, he seemed a little confused at that; I then said, as you have said your name is William Waltham , and it is not, I think it my duty to take you into custody, and I charged an officer with him.

Q. Did the prisoner make any observation to what Mr. Robinson said? - A. He was a little confused, and I charged an officer with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had sold this stock to Mr. Lightfoot, on the same day? - A. On the very same day.

Q. When the prisoner came to you at the Bank, and you gave him the receipt which you before filled up, are you sure you saw him sign it? - A. I have sworn, and I mean to swear, that I saw him sign it.

Q. He did not receive any money? - A. No, he did not.

Q. I take it for granted, that he would not have received any money had the transfer been made? - He would not have received any money till the receipt had been given to one of the clerks at the Bank.

Q. In the ordinary course of business, you should have the transfer of money first, and the receipt last? - A. The receipt is generally signed first, then the receipt witnesses to the clerk the number of the book put on the receipt; the clerk would not witness a receipt which he has not seen settled.

Q. The clerk is witness of the receipt which he himself sees signed? - A. No; they do not see the receipt signed, they only see the book signed.

Q. Till the receipt had been properly witnessed, and the transfer signed, the money would not have been paid? - A. Not till the receipt had been properly witnessed.

Q. You could not have got any money till the transfer was signed? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Could any money be got when the receipt was signed? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Is it a practice for you, when you sell stock, to sign the receipt prior to the transfer? - A. Yes; and when the transfer is made and settled, the money is paid: then they give you a check, or the money.

JOHN ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you happen to be at Mr. Sherrott's on the evening of the 10th? - A. I was; before I went in, I was in conversation with Mr. Sherrott's brother at the door, Mr. Sherrott seemed very warm.

Q. Who were in the accompting-house? - A. Mr. Sherrott and Mr. Turner.

Q. Had you known Mr. Turner before? - A. About four years before, he lived with Messrs. Stonard and Ryland.

Q. On that occasion, how did you address yourself? - A. As soon as they had finished the conversation which they were upon, I said, how do you do, Mr. Turner; he turned himself round, and said, I was mistaken, he turned towards me from Mr. Sherrott; I said, I could not be mistaken; I said, that he must know me, and I must know him; I told him my name was Robinson, I said, he must know me in the corn market; I said, you live with Messrs. Stonard and Ryland; he said, he did not know me; Mr. Sherrott got warm, said, that he not only wanted to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, but to ruin him and his family; he was immediately taken into custody; he made answer to Mr. Sherrott, whatever you are loser by it, you shall be paid again; Mr. Sherrott immediately called in the beadle, who was at the door; he said, he was in the hands of justice, and it should take its course.

THOMAS RUTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles. Q. You are a stock-broker? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner, Turner? - A. I know him.

Q. Had you been employed by Stonard and Ryland? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever employed by the prisoner, Turner, to purchase any stock for him? - A. Never in my life; I never had five minutes conversation with him in my life.

Q. Did you ever purchase any stock by the direction of Messrs. Stonard and Ryland for Mr. Waltham? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. Was that at the time he was living with them? - A. Yes, and sometimes one clerk brought the order, and sometimes another, occasionally Turner brought them.

RICHARD RYLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You are a partner in the house of Stonard and Ryland? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner ever live with you? - A. Yes, as clerk.

Q. How long has he lived with you? - A. Several years; whether three, or four, or seven, I am not sure.

Q. During the time he lived with you, did he keep any of your books? - A. He chiefly kept the cash-book, and occasionally others.

Q. Was it part of your business to purchase stock for your correspondents, and receive the dividends? - A. Yes.

Q. Had the prisoner access to your books so as to have knowledge of the business? - A. Perfectly so.

Q. Have you a correspondent of the name of William Waltham , of Malden, in Essex? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you from time to time purchase stock for him? - A. Yes, repeatedly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you speak from your own knowledge? - A. Yes.

(A paper handed to the witness.)

Q. Look at this note? - A. This is principally in Turner's hand-writing; it contains William Waltham , seven thousand four hundred pounds, that is the prisoner's hand-writing, it is altered to ten thousand pounds.

Q. Whose writing is that? - A. I will not take upon me to say whether it is my own writing, or my partner's.

Court. Q. Is that an account of different sums received at the Bank? - A. His attorney applied to me to make out the different sums against dividend-day, and this is one of his lists; it is W. Waltham, 7400 l. altered to 10,000 l. 150 l. Cash Dr. to Sundries, 16th Oct. 1804, Cash Dr. to Sundries for half yearly dividends to 10th instant.

WILLIAM NEWCOMB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are principal clerk in the Reduced Office? - A. I am one of them, there are two.

Q. Will you have the goodness to refer to your ledger to the name of William Waltham , of Malden, in Essex, what sum was standing in his name on the 9th of January? - A. Ten thousand pounds on that day.

Q. Will you have the goodness to look at the receipt - is that the sort of receipt that would be produced to effect a transfer in that stock? - A. Most certainly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to say that it is necessary to effect it? - A. It is part of it.

Q. There are many transfers made out without any receipt? - A. Surely so.

Court. Q. That is a receipt between buyer and seller, and the only receipt that the buyer has under consideration; the transfer is entered agreeable to a ticket that is brought in by Mr. Sherrott for 7000 l. to Joseph Lightfoot , for stock exchanged, then the transaction of Mr. Sherrott, the broker, in order to make this transfer, was entered? - A. Yes, perfectly regular.

Q. Nothing more then is necessary, than the appearance of the proprietor, in order to sign the book? - A. That is all.

Q. So with respect to the purchaser, and with the person selling, they, according to the monies that pass between them, have a receipt? - A. Justly so.

Q. But to the transfer it is necessary to have the signature of the clerk of the Bank, and the number? - A. The clerk of the Bank signs the execution of the transfer at the time the proprietor or his attorney signs; with respect to any witness to a receipt, that may or may not take place with the clerk of the Bank, because the witnessing clerk to the receipt has a ticket with the number that the stock is transferred.

Mr. Alley. Q. You do not consider that as a receipt? - A. That receipt was filled up, and ready to be witnessed by the clerk.

Court. Q. After the transfer is made, and signed by the proper person of course, and the receipt signed, and the money paid that changes the property, then it would be wrote down on the accompts in the book; you have nothing to do with the receipt at the Bank? - A. No.

Q. Except when it is brought to shew you when it is entered? - A. Certainly, it is an article of reference to us. (The receipt read.)

Reduced 3 per Cent. Annuities.

Received this 9th day of January, 1805, of Joseph Lightfoot , the sum of four thousand and seventy-seven pounds ten shillings, being the consideration for seven thousand pounds stock or share in the capital or joint stock in the 3 per Cent. Reduced Annuities, consolidated by Act of Parliament, in the 22d of George II . and 25th of George III . and other subsequent Acts, charged to the sinking funds, transferable at the Bank of England, by me this day transferred to the said Joseph Lightfoot . Witness my hand,

W. Waltham.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That transaction was only in its progress, without it was signed at the time by the clerk, it is of no sort of use; it could not have the effect of a forgery? - A. It could not.

Court. The receipt as far as he had any thing to do is perfect; if it had been witnessed by the clerk it would have shewn that he had received so much money, it is in order to shew that something had been done, in another place that upon producing that they may without difficulty come to the transfer, that is the only use of it to the witnessing clerk, it leads his eye directly to the book, but till it is so signed the purchaser of stock only knows that this is the person that sells him the stock, and the witnessing clerk is only a voucher that the transfer has been entered; still this is a receipt; you are right that he has not obtained any of it, but he has executed one instrument, and that one instrument is the receipt.

Mr. Gurney. Without the witnessing clerk had signed it, it is not a receipt for money, it is requisite that he should have signed it, and therefore a receipt should be given after rather than before.

Court. I should think rather before the transfer, for when the transfer is executed, the party has conveyed away his interest.

Mr. Gurney. Therefore it is like the conveyance of an estate, they should be done at the same time, afterwards to be delivered over to the purchaser,

when the purchaser delivers him over the money, because the broker or the principal will not pay him the money till he sees all the ceremony complete.

Court. It strikes me that the offence with which he is charged is signing a receipt for money; your question is whether this is a receipt for the money, I say a receipt for the consideration of money is a receipt for the transfer; he has signed a receipt for money after all, and in point of fact it matters not whether he did it first or afterwards; he has signed a receipt for the transfer, but when the transfer is complete, there is some mark put on the receipt by the officer of the Bank; then it is a transfer, the other is a receipt; he is not indicted for forging a transfer, he is indicted for forging a receipt; he has put his name upon an instrument purporting to be a receipt, there is something more to be done to it in order to make it a transfer.

Mr. Justice Heath. This indictment is for forging a receipt, it has nothing to do with a transfer; whether this instrument was for a transfer of property is not the question, that is the use he meant to make of it afterwards, which is immaterial to this charge.

GUILTY , Death , aged 34.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-32

156. JOHN HODGES , EDWARD MAHON , and JOHN RUMBALL , were indicted for that they, on the 17th of November , in and upon Edmund Lodge feloniously did make an assault, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a Bank of England note, value 10 l. and a Bank of England note, value 5 l. the property of the said Edmund Lodge .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Alley, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

EDMUND LODGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What situation of life are you in? - A. I hold an office, called the Lancaster Herald : In the month of August I had a house in Southampton-row, Bloomsbury.

Q. Were you returning home any night about ten o'clock? - A. I believe in the month of May, on Whit-Tuesday, about a quarter before ten o'clock in the evening, I was returning home; I had been at Somers Town, where I was engaged; it was not dark; I do not know that it was moonlight at that time.

Q. Tell me whether you saw any of the prisoners there at that time? - A. I saw that one, I believe his name is Hodges; I was going across into Bedford-square ; I was going to the Lord Chancellor's, to know when the House would meet after the recess, and when he came up to me, on my left side, he had the perfect appearance of a gentleman, well dressed, and asked me, if he could get through that way into Bedford-square or Gower-street, I do not know which; I had just come to the beginning of Russell-square, and was turning off to go across.

Q. At the time that he accosted you, did you observe any other person near him? - A. I saw no one; I answered him that I was going across Bedford-square myself; we went on together, and he walked along with me; as soon as I had answered him, he began to speak of the great buildings there, and said, what excellent houses, and so on, and when we came to the corner of a street, called Bedford-street, he made a halt for a moment, and said, what a fine house this is (it is a corner house), and what a magnificent portico to this house; he stopped for a moment, and I stopped for a moment for him, out of civility, and in a moment, he made one step behind, and I felt him, as if he had fell against my side; it was a sort of thing, as though a man's foot had slipped.

Q. At the moment when he hit against you, did you observe any other person? - A. As I was in the act of turning round, to see why he had so struck me in falling against me, two men rushed out, one seized me and the other him.

Q. At this time did they say any thing in the hearing of the prisoner? - A. We were close together; I inquired, as soon as I could recollect myself, what this meant, and what was the reason of it, and one of the men, or both of them, answered, we are here to detect and seize such men as you; we are two of the Bow-street patrols, and stationed near this spot, for this express purpose.

Q. On their saying, they were there for the purpose of taking such men into custody, what effect had it on Hodges, one of the prisoners at the bar? - A. He appeared to be in the most extreme state of agitation; he seemed to lose his legs, and to fall in this manner, and held out his arms for this man to support him; he cried out that he was ruined and undone for ever; these people abused him, and swore to him, and abused me very much, and I expostulated with them, as well as I could; they said, we will not let you go, we know what you are, we observed you both, and we will take you to the Coal-yard; I still kept pressing on them, that they had not detected me nor him, that we were perfectly innocent.

Q. What effect did that produce? - A. Great abuse, with saying, that I had better be quiet, or it would be worse for me; they said they saw what passed, and they conveyed by expressions that they had detected me and this man in some unnatural proceedings.

Q. When that was communicated to you, was there any promise made by any body? - A. They were leading this man and myself across the square, towards a street that goes into Bedford-square, towards Tottenham-court-road and Gower-street;

when we got near Tottenham-court-road, one of these pretended officers said to the other, stop a moment, do you not think something may be done without carrying it any further, these men seem both Gentlemen; what a dreadful thing it would be to themselves and families, if matters were carried to extremities; the other man answered, he knew he was determined to do his duty and nothing should persuade him to have it made up; they went on then towards Tottenham-court-road, when the man who had spoken before to the other renewed his request that it might be made up, the other man then said well, we will walk up this way and see if something can be done.

Q. That was upon his renewing his request; was any thing proposed? - A. We walked up to Tottenham-court-road, and it was proposed that money should be given.

Q. Who proposed that? - A. One of the two men said that if it was done it must be done by means of money, for they were running a great hazard in adopting this manner of settling it; they walked slowly up Tottenham-court-road, and there was some private conversation amongst themselves, whispering; then one of them said, unless you give twenty pounds, we cannot let you go; I answered I would give twenty pounds; we walked on farther up Tottenham-court-road, and Hodges still seemed to be in that state of agitation, overcome by distress, as it appeared to me he had almost lost his senses; they could not get any answer from him.

Q. Did you observe whether there was a watch in his pocket? - A. I did; after they returned to Tottenham-court-road, and come along Great Russell-square, towards my house. When we came into Bloomsbury-square, I desired them to stop; I told them that I would give them my word and honour that I would bring them twenty pounds, for them not to follow me; and on one of the men appearing to treat Hodges roughly, he said, he had but little money in his pocket, he had a few Banknotes; and while the man was talking to him, he seemingly pulled it out, and said, see what a fine watch this man has got, if we cannot get the money we must have that; whether he pulled it out of his pocket I cannot tell, I saw it in one of the men's hands; I left them at the moment, I had not far to go to my house, it might be fifty or sixty yards.

Q. Was it in sight of your house? - A. No, it was in Bloomsbury-square; I left them talking about the watch; I went to my own house to fetch the twenty pounds.

Q. Did the men follow you there? - A. I went into the house, and could not make up any way twenty pounds, so I brought out a Bank-note of thirty pounds, and there was then a third person whom I just had a glimpse of, he ran off; Hodges was not there then, I saw him no more that night; the thirty pound note I gave to one of those two men.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath solemnly, what was the motive that induced you to part with that thirty pounds? - A. It was an extreme dread of the unnatural accusation these people held out to me; I saw no more of them that night.

Q. On the next morning did any body call at your house? - A. On the next day I did not see any body at my house, I was told they had been there; in consequence of what I had been informed, I went to Russell Coffee-house , and there two persons were waiting for me.

Q. When you came there, who were the two persons that you saw? - A. The prisoner Hodges was one, the other person I have never seen since.

Q. Did you learn from Hodges, that he or the other person had called upon you? - A. Certainly.

Q. Did he tell you for what purpose he had called at your house? - A. The man that was with Hodges had completely the manner and appearance of a gentleman altogether: as soon as I was in the coffee-room, he said, Mr. Lodge, there was a most unpleasant affair happened to you in Russel-square last night; he said, this young man, meaning Hodges, is my cousin, he is in the greatest distress imaginable, because he must not go home to his father without returning his father his watch, which he was robbed of by the people who had your money.

Q. Did he say how that could be recovered? - A. He said, he understood by his cousin it was in the hands of these people; he turned to Hodges, and said, Cousin, where are you to go to redeem it from them; Hodges said, they had appointed to meet him at six o'clock at some place, I think, the Bear, in Bow-street.

Q. Do you think there was Bow-street made use of? - A. Yes, I perfectly well remember that; he said, at the Brown-bear, or Black-bear, in Bow-street; the other man then said, I do not know what can be done in this case, I know you have been robbed; and he said to me, he has been robbed by the greatest villains on the earth; as to him, I can answer for him, I have known him from his infancy, and I do not doubt but you are as innocent; but it will be a dreadful thing if matters come to light, it will be our duty, with the greatest industry that is possible, to prevent it; and I must try at some means of getting his watch again; he then said to me, I am an officer in the 15th regiment of light dragoons, my name is Williams, and, said he, you know we military men do not abound with money, I have fourteen or fifteen pounds at home, and he turned round to Hodges, and said to him, what have you got; he took out some small notes; then the other man said, between your money and mine we may get your

watch again; Hodges said I have so much; it was understood that they said they must have as much money of him as they had of me, thirty pounds; then the other man asked me, perhaps, said he, you will give some little assistance; I need not tell you I am ashamed to ask such a thing, but you see the particulars of it; I told him that I would.

Q. In point of fact, did you give them any thing at that time? - A. Yes, seven pounds; I went home to Bloomsbury-square, and brought seven pounds, and gave it to Hodges.

Q. At the time you returned, did you see any other persons that you might judge that they had been with Hodges or no? - A. As I went out of Bloomsbury-square, there was some little suspicion that excited my mind: I turned up King-street instead of going down Bloomsbury, I saw Hodges with two other persons I had not seen before, they parted, and I saw no more.

Q. You went into the country after this? - A. I went on the 16th of August, and returned on the 3d week in September.

Q. Did it happen, after your arrival in town, that you went to your sister's house in Hertford-street? - A. Yes, on the 17th of November; when I was at my sister's I was informed that somebody wanted me, I came away, I think, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was going home; in turning towards Piccadilly, the prisoner Hodges came up to me, and asked me, by name, how I did; I looked at him, and did not at the moment recollect him.

Q. Had you seen him from the Wednesday after the Whitsunday? - A. Never; I did not recollect him at the moment, I said so to him; he said, you remember the very unpleasant business that took place in Russell-square a few months ago; I believe I said, yes, I remember it too well; in a moment after he had said that, the prisoner Mahon came up.

Q. That is the first time you recollect that you ever saw him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner at that time? - A. The third man came up a little after; Mahon came up wringing his hands, and endeavouring to be crying.

Q. What did he say was the cause of that distress? - A. Before he said any thing that I could understand, the third man came up.

Q. That was Rumball? - A. That was the first time I had ever seen him; he stopped at seeing us; I said, Sir, do you belong to this party; he said, yes, I do, putting on a fierce aspect, and my business in the party is, to see that justice is done to these two gentlemen, who are my particular friends; and if you want to know who I am, I am one of the Bow-street patrols, and if you do not act as you should do, my business is to carry you to Mr. Townshend, I suppose you know who I mean. Rumball said that; and if you refuse to settle this matter as you ought, I will carry you before Mr. Townshend; then Mahon, who seemed to be in distress, told me that Hodges was his brother-in-law, and that his father would not do any thing for him, he was a great profligate, and fallen upon him for support, and he was not able to support him; he said, I have a great affection and regard for him, I should like to assist him, but I cannot, I have done many things for him that I ought to be hanged for; we walked on, and Rumball was speaking extremely loud, in a threatening manner, it was a very light night, and about half past eight o'clock; I said, we will walk through the Park, and we will see what is to be done, and I will hear all you have to say; we went through the Park; in the Park the plan was opened, which was, that Hodges should be sent by his cousin to America, and that money was wanting; surely, said Mahon, you cannot grudge a little money for such a purpose; I asked him for what crime, and by what authority the money could be claimed; I was answered, that I had brought Hodges into the practise of unnatural crimes, and therefore I was bound to provide for him, that was the answer from Mahon. On Mahon saying, surely you cannot grudge a little money for such a purpose, Rumball came up, and said, you talk of a little money, not less than two hundred and fifty pounds will do it; I said, that two hundred and fifty pounds was a large sum of money, I could not get two hundred and fifty pounds immediately, it was impossible; we walked into Pall-Mall, Rumball went up to a centinel, and said, are any of our people here tonight; the centinel answered, no, that was in the Park; I having said that two hundred and fifty pounds was a great deal of money to raise, they said, it could not be done for less for the passage and the clothes; I said, in Pall-Mall, you shall have it; I was asked what I could give them then; I said, I had five pounds in my pocket, and if they would go home with me I would give them some more; I said, that five pounds is all I have at this moment.

Q. You did not part with the five pounds that time? - A. No; we got into a coach at Charing-cross, they went down with me to St. Peter's-hill, where I have a lodging, and as we went along, it was agreed that they should come to me on Monday morning, I told them I would give them ten pounds more, at Doctors'-Commons, and the rest they should come for at a future time.

Q. Did they go into your house at Doctors'-Commons? - A. No; I told them they should have the rest of the two hundred and fifty pounds if they came to me on Monday, I would contrive means to get it, or words to that purpose. I went into

the house, they staid at the door; when I came out, I gave the five pound and the ten pound notes together, to Mahon, they were altogether at the time; they then left me; they had appointed to meet me at the College on the Monday at eleven o'clock, this was on Saturday.

Q. Did you communicate to Sir Richard Ford , or any body else, what had passed? - A. On Sunday morning I communicated it to Sir Richard Ford .

Q. The consequence of which was, the officers were to be at your house the next day? - A. Yes.

Q. On the next day, what officers came to your house? - A. Taunton and Baker.

Q. What part of the house did they come to you? - A. They came to an apartment in the Herald's-College; I had borrowed it for the purpose, as a convenient place to manage the matter: it was a small room, with a larger room behind, adjoining it.

Q. Had they bored some holes to see what was done? - A. Yes; and it was done so as to give them a command of what was done. At eleven o'clock, I saw Hodges coming across the Court-yard of the Herald's College, I went out to meet him; he came to me and said, my brother is here, do you wish to see him; I said, I understand your brother is the party most concerned in this business; he went then from me, and returned the second time, with Mahon and Rumball; they then came into this room, and the officers were in the adjoining room.

Q. To observe what was done there? - A. Yes.

Q. Who addressed you first? - A. I think Rumball.

Q. Did he ask for any thing? - A. No, I do not recollect that he asked for any thing; they sat down at the table; I said, I hope this unpleasant affair will be settled, and there will be no more using of ill language; I hope I shall hear no more of this; one and all said, no, certainly you shall hear no more of it; I then said, I can do it in no way but this; you know you had fifteen pounds last Saturday night; (Rumball said, yes;) I will give you a draft for one hundred and eighty-five pounds, which I had ready, in a fictitious name and place; I said, I have sent to a friend in Norfolk-street, and I will go and get fifty pounds of him, which will make it two hundred and fifty pounds, with the fifteen pounds you have had.

Q. Was this conversation loud enough to be heard in the adjoining room? - A. I have no doubt but it was; I gave them this fictious draft which was to be paid the next day; we went out into the street and went into St. Paul's Church-yard, and there we took a coach, and when we got to Temple-bar just as we were coming through, I said I have parted with so much money upon a groundless occasion knowing that the Bow-street men were near, I saw them at the time; I said that man, meaning Hodges, knows I am perfectly innocent, though you have threatened me in this manner, if he chooses to declare it, to which Hodges made no answer, but Rumball said, Oh, if we are to have any more conversation upon it, we have not done with you, you shall have your d - d draft again, and you shall go to Bow-street; I answered, my friend without any trouble to you, we shall be there in a few minutes, and at that moment the officers came and opened the coach doors and came in.

Q. I ask you solemnly whether there was any foundation for that accusation made against you? - A. No, if there had I should not have stood in this place now.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 17th of November, was that the first time you saw either Mahon or Rumball? - A. Yes.

Q. I think you have described Mahon coming up to you wringing his hands and saying his distress was on account of his brother-in-law Hodges? - A. Yes.

Q. Saying that Hodges was ruined and must go out of his country, he asked your assistance; he knew some Bristol or Liverpool captain that would take him to America? - A. Yes.

Q. On that day was any money asked of you upon any other account, but for the purpose of assisting Hodges in leaving the country? - A. No.

Q. What time in the evening was it that you attended these persons in Piccadilly? - A. About a quarter before eight.

Q. And then you yourself proposed to take a walk through the Park? - A. Because Rumball was so noisy.

Q. After you had gone through the Park, you took a hackney-coach at Charing-cross - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go out of the coach in your way from Charing-cross to Doctors' Commons? - A. I should have mentioned that.

Q. Did either of them get out of the coach? - A. I think twice or three time on purpose for buying a stamp, for the remainder of the 250 l.

Q. Did you yourself get out of the coach for that purpose? - A. No, not at all.

Q. When you were at your lodgings on St. Peter's-hill you left them? - A. Yes.

Q. You went into the house yourself, and the door was shut? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there many other persons in the house; who let you in? - A. A female servant let me in.

Q. Was the master of the house at home? - A. I do not know.

Q. How many people live in that house? - A. I believe at the time Mr. Scott and his son were inhabitants of that house, and a female servant, but I dare say they were not at home.

Q. In point of fact you did not see them, nor did you make any enquiry for them? - A. I did not.

Q. How long did you stay in your house? - A. I believe not two minutes; as little time as I could get the note out of the bureau.

Q. Did you give them the precise sum of fifteen pounds? - A. I gave them the precise sum of fifteen pounds; I had a one pound or a two pound note in my pocket, and it was observed that I had more, upon which one of the prisoners, I believe Rumball, said, do not take his one or two pound note, fifteen pound is enough.

Q. You gave them the fifteen pound, and the one or two pound you kept? - A. Just so.

Q. The purpose for which you gave this fifteen pound was to enable Hodges to go to America; was that the purpose? - A. Certainly not; I knew from that moment that which I had never known before, and I strongly suspected that he was in collusion with those persons.

Q. I believe from what we have learned from your Counsel, you had advanced a sum of money to liberate Hodges from his confinement? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before that? - A. I was attacked privately, about four or five days before that, by two persons, in company with a third, who called himself Captain of the Bow-street patrol, and who said they were twenty-two in number.

Q. That was on the 12th of November? - A. The explanation is, that those two persons I first saw in Russell-square, and this third man, an elderly man, who called himself Captain, met me coming from the Heralds' Office; he said he wanted to save this man if he could, if not, I must be farther involved, for this reason, if Hodges be not sent out of the country, he will accuse these men, and he will call you as a witness against them; if he be not put out of the way, and if you do not furnish money for that purpose, we must necessarily accuse you, to prevent your coming evidence against them. - I do not know that it is necessary to go into all this.

Q. What was the reason that was proposed to you? - A. To discharge Hodges; at the same time, these men said it must be done by Jew bail, which I desired to have an explanation of; I did not know what it meant.

Q. What explanation was given to you? - A. They told me there were persons who lived by giving bail, and that they left their houses after bail was given, and were not to be found.

Q. What sum of money were you to give to procure those persons? - A. One hundred pounds, and more.

Q. Then you did give an hundred pound, and more? - A. Yes.

Q. You believed the story that Hodges was really in custody at that time, and therefore you gave them one hundred pounds? - A. I did not know but he was regularly taken into custody, and the man who called himself Captain of the Bow-street patrol took a staff out of his pocket.

Q. Did you, between the 12th and the 17th go out to inquire whether the story was true? - A. I did not, and till the moment that Rumball told me in the street, by Piccadilly, and threatened me, if I did not do so and so, he would carry me to Mr. Townshend, I thought I was in the custody of these three Bow-street officers; from that moment I knew I was not, because no Bow-street patrol would talk so; I was then in more fears than one.

Q. Your mind was then delivered from the fear of being in the custody of officers? - A. Yes.

Q. I mean no imputation to you; there is not the least imputation on your character in all this? - A. I cannot help my feelings.

Q. When you gave the ten pounds and the five pounds where were you? - A. At the door of the house where I have an apartment in Doctors' Commons.

Q. Your servant was close at hand, if you chose to call her; how near was the watchman? - A. I do not know; I had not been in the house forty-eight hours at that time.

Q. Certainly there was a watchman near; you made yourself an appointment to meet them on Monday morning; did you communicate it to Sir Richard Ford first? - A. I was not perfectly determined at what time I should go to Sir Richard Ford , but I was determined to communicate it to a friend of mine, who is intimate with Sir Richard Ford .

Q. You appointed them to call on you again for the remainder of the money, for the purpose of your having persons to take them up? - A. When I gave them the fifteen pounds I acted under every appearance of extreme fear, and the utmost dread and horror.

Q. Had you not an idea of bringing them there on Monday, for the purpose of having them taken up? - A. I had been tossed about in my mind, and hesitating whether it was possible, that if I could prevail upon them to take the fifteen pounds, and leave the matter there, whether I could prevail upon them not to call again; I expected each application would be the last.

Q. Did not you tell them to call on you on Monday morning, on purpose to have some persons there ready to take them up? - A. No, I gave them the money to get rid of them, knowing I should have the whole of the day to consider what was to be done.

Mr. Watson. Q. On Saturday, the 17th, what length of time was consumed in this conversation? - A. About an hour.

Mr. Alley. Q. From the time you had been at your sister's house to the time you arrived at your own lodgings, where you parted with fifteen pounds,

you had no communication with any friend of your own? - A. None.

Q. When you came to the house the only person you saw was a female servant? - A. Yes.

Q. The master of the house and his son you did not see, therefore there was nobody in the house to whom you might with delicacy communicate the situation you were in? - A. I believe not.

Q. You were asked whether at the time you parted with this fifteen pounds you parted with it for them to call again, and to have persons ready to take them; I understood you that you parted with it under the impression of fear on your mind? - A. Yes, it was to get rid of them that night.

Q. You were asked what was the reason that induced you, after you met these two men, to part with the money; whether it was to get Hodges out of the country, or for the purpose of protecting your character from an accusation of this sort against you? - A. No doubt that was my grand motive, to preserve my character from a dread of this sort.

Q. And that continued to act upon you till you saw Sir Richard Ford ? - A. Yes.

Q. Rumball saying to you that he would take you to Mr. Townshend was the first time you discovered that you were not in the hands of Bow-street officers? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been with them before Rumball said this? - A. I suppose something more than three quarters of an hour.

Q. At the time you gave the ten pound note and the five pound note, knowing yourself to be in the hand of impostors, and persons who represented themselves as Bow-street officers, under what impression of mind did you part with the money? - A. To be free from those things, and to have the next day to advise with my friends what was best to be done.

Q. I want to know what you were afraid would happen to you that night if you had not given them the money? - A. I had no alternative, either to give them the money or to take them into custody instantly, which I could not conveniently have done at the time.

Q. Was it under the apprehension that you would be carried before Townshend? - A. It was under the general apprehension which had lasted throughout, from a charge of that nature; upon that ground I engaged to give them fifteen pounds, and having the next day to consider what was best to be done.

SAMUEL TAUNTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Bow-street patrols? - A. I am.

Q. Are either of the prisoners at the bar Bow-street patrols? - A. They are not.

Q. Did you go by the direction of Sir Richard Ford to Doctors' Commons? - A. Yes, on Monday, the 19th of November last, at ten o'clock in the morning; I did not see Mr. Lodge at that time.

Q. What time was it that you saw Mr. Lodge? - A. About twenty minutes before eleven o'clock, Joseph Baker and Brown were with me.

Q. Where were you placed by Mr. Lodge? - A. In a little room adjoining another, parted by two small folding doors.

Q. Had you seen the other room before you were placed in this room where you were? - A. Yes, these folding doors opened in there.

Q. Was that the room where Mr. Lodge and the prisoners went in afterwards? - A. It was.

Q. When you placed yourselves, you and Baker, by the direction of Mr. Lodge, did you make any experiment by which you could see what passed in the room? - A. I bored holes in each of the pannels; I looked through one and Baker through the other.

Q. How soon after you had bored the holes did Mr. Lodge and the prisoners go into that room? - A. They came in in about a quarter of an hour after we were there.

Q. Then state what you heard pass, and what you saw there? - A. Mr. Lodge and the three prisoners came in; I saw them; those are the persons at the bar; they seated themselves down in a chair, and a conversation ensued; Mr. Lodge signified that he wanted to settle this disagreeable business, and he said to one of them, do you belong to Marlborough-street; Rumball (by his voice) answered, no, I belong to Bow-street, there are near five hundred of us under the direction of Sir Rich. Ford; Mr. Lodge then said, I have given you fifteen pounds, the answer was, yes, by Rumball; Mr. Lodge then proposed to give a draft, and to go to a friend of his in Norfolk-street, to borrow some money to make up two hundred and fifty pounds; they then agreed to walk to St. Paul's, and take a coach to go to Norfolk-street; they then left the room; Baker and me walked out after them; we followed them to where they took a coach, at a distance; they took a coach in St. Paul's church-yard, and we pursued them to the corner of Norfolk-street; then we immediately opened the doors and leaped into the coach, and took them all to Bow-street; I searched Rumball; on Rumball was found a watch and a gold chain; I saw Hodges searched, he had a watch; and Mahon had a chain and a seal, but no watch; I searched Mahon's lodgings on the following day, and found a hat, a veil, and some duplicates.

JOSEPH BAKER sworn. - I know just the same as the last witness.

Sir RICHARD FORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. These persons were brought before you to be examined? - A. They were.

Q. We have learned from the last witness that

these three persons are not a part of the five hundred patrols? - A. They are not.

Q. Were the examinations of the prisoners taken before you? - A. They were.

Q. Look at them, and see whether you signed them? - A. I have got the examination of Edward Mahon , which I signed myself; the examination of John Rumball , which I signed myself; and the examination of John Hodges, which I also signed; another examination of John Hodges , which I also signed, and a third examination of John Hodges , which I also signed; and another examination of John Rumball , which I also signed.

Q. I will begin with the last you have got in your hand; were these freely and voluntarily given? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any promise of not prosecuting Rumball before that examination was taken by you? - A. No.

Q. Was there any promise or threat, or any hopes held out to him, that he should become a witness? - A. No, no hopes; the first time that Rumball was brought before me, he declined being examined; I rather think he had been drinking; he was brought before me some days afterwards; he then begged pardon; I asked him if he would be examined; he said he would, and he would speak the whole truth; he disclosed some circumstances that were material of other persons, who are not in custody; then seeing him desirous of having some sort of favour shewn him, I thought he meant that he might be admitted an evidence, as he expressed that he might be a witness, but as he had acted as an officer I did not suffer him; I certainly do think that he was given to understand that whatever he said should not be made use of against him.

Mr. Knapp. Then I will not pursue it.

The examination of John Hodges read: dated the 19th of November, 1804. I lodge at Mr. Footings No. 296 Oxford-street, I have lodged there a fortnight, with my sister from Somersetshire; I am a Gentleman's servant ; I lived with Dr. Edwards in Sun-street, I left him being anxious to go into the country to see my relations; I know Edward Mahon very well, he came and called on me in Portman-street; he at that time lived in the neighbourhood; he came and called on me at Dr. Edwards's, who is now removed into the Adelphi; I left him sometime in May last and went to Yeovill in Somersetshire to see my friends, and staid there till five weeks ago; I never saw Rumball before I saw him with Mahon, I recollect being in Russell-square when Mr. Lodge came up to me, and we walked together, and as we came out towards Southampton-row, two men rushed upon us, they used us very ill, and said that Mr. Lodge and me were going to do something unnatural; the men were strangers to me, I had never seen them before that I know of; they made me promise that night to meet them the next day in Russell-square, and I went accordingly, and met the same two men; they told me I should go to Mr. Lodge and speak to him, I went to Mr. Lodge's house, the servant told me his master was not at home, but he would be at home in about half an hour; one of the two men told the servant he would call again; then I went with the same men to the Russell-coffee-house, and after that came back to Mr. Lodge's, the servant then said his master was come in but was up stairs and was dressing; the man who went with me said, tell your master I shall be glad to speak to him at the coffee-house over the way; soon after Mr. Lodge came into the coffee-house and said we cannot have any conversation here; Mr. Lodge and the men walked out of the coffee-house and went to Russell-square; I walked behind them and did not hear the conversation, they walked and talked together for an hour, and then Mr. Lodge gave the men some money; I saw no more of the two men then; I left them in Russell-square, I saw no more of Mr. Lodge till last Friday, when Mr. Mahon came to my lodgings and asked me to come out into the street where I saw Rumball; they asked me to go to the Heralds-office to enquire for Mr. Lodge, I went there and inquired; Mr. Lodge was not there; I told them what I had learned, they told me to go to his lodgings, No. 6 Hertford-street, May-fair; Mahon inquired where Mr. Lodge lived, one man said he was at home on Saturday, and another said no; we waited in the street, and in about half an hour he came out, and they told me to speak to him, and I did as they told me; Rumball came up and spoke to Mr. Lodge, Mr. Lodge said do not speak so loud, we went into the Green-park, and then to Pall-mall; I kept behind, Mr. Lodge told me to keep behind, he wanted to speak to these men; we went to Charing-cross and there they took a coach, Mr. Lodge, Mahon, and Rumball went in first, I went the last into the coach, we went to St. Paul's Church-yard; Mr. Lodge desired Mahon to get a stamp; then we went to Mr. Lodge's house; he desired me to stand behind; Mr. Lodge went in and soon came out again, and I believe gave them some money, and from what I understood from Mahon and Rumball, they told me that they were to go to Mr. Lodge the next morning, and when we went to Mr. Lodge they proposed taking a coach, to go to Norfolk-street, where Mr. Lodge was to get some more money, and when the coach stopped at Norfolk-street, the officers took us into custody.

The examination of Edward Mahon , alias Long Tom. Being asked whether he knew a person of

the name of Hammond, says he does not; and whether he is not accustomed to go out of a night extorting money, and charging gentlemen with committing unnatural offences, says no; he has has always got his bread honestly; says he was not near the great gun in St. James's Park when the gold watch was obtained from Lord - ; further says, that he was at Brighton last summer, in hopes of getting employment at the Castle-inn; says, he did not pawn the watch for three pounds, he saw the watch taken from Hodges; says, he thinks he never saw Lord - near London, nor never said to any one that he saw money obtained from him; says, that he did not go with Mears, alias Williams; says, he did not give the watch to Hodges, and further says, he does not recollect walking along with Hodges and Rumball, and being indecent to Rumball; has no recollection of any such thing, either about a month ago, or any other time; or of being with Hodges or Rumball in the Park; Hodges never told him that the watch was obtained from Lord - , or that he ever wanted to get money from him, nor has he any charge to make against any man for making an attempt of any such thing, nor has he ever said it.

Hodges did not say any thing in his defence.

Mahon's defence. I am perfectly innocent of what I am charged with; for the last six weeks I was in a bad state of health, I was not able to take a situation.

Rumball did not say any thing in his defence.

Hodges called one witness who gave him a good character.

Mahon called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

Rumball called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Hodges, GUILTY , Death , aged 22.

Mahon, GUILTY , Death , aged 17.

Rumball, GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-33

157. THOMAS BARWICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , an ounce weight of silver, value 5 s. the property of John Lias .

JOHN LIAS sworn. - I am a silversmith , the prisoner worked with me as a journeyman : On the 15th of this month, when the rest of the men were gone to breakfast, the prisoner at the bar returned rather sooner than the others; I went into the shop, and he was in the act of putting something in his pocket from the work-bench; the prisoner went out of the shop into another, where he occasionally worked, in consequence of which I sent for an officer, and he searched the prisoner, and found some filings in his waistcoat pocket, about an ounce, or more; I asked him how he came by it; he said he did not know how it came there; afterwards he acknowledged he had taken it in my presence; he said it was the first time, he hoped I would forgive him.

Q. What might be the value of what you found in his pocket? - A. Five shillings.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - I was sent for by Mr. Lias; I went up three pair of stairs, where he was at work; then he came down with me; I asked him if he had been robbing his master; he said, no, he rob his master, by no means; I searched his left-hand pocket, and found these silver filings, (produces them;) he said he was very sorry for it; he wanted his master to forgive him; I told him his master could not.

Prisoner's defence. When I came from breakfast it was near ten o'clock; I had never sat down to file at the board; these four spoons I had left loose, they were what I had been working upon; I put them in my pocket, as I usually do, and met my master at the door; I took them into the other room; my master called me down; I did not hear the first time; on my not hearing, the man came up, and said I was wanted; when I came down, he said, I have a suspicion that you have got something in your pocket of your master's; they searched my pocket, and found those filings; I declare to God I never knew I had them; it must be the carelessness of his boys, who take up the filings in the spoons to carry into the accompting-house; they are often playing with the spoons, and carry the filings in them, and whether they had been taking up the filings I cannot say; I never touched a thing before I touched these spoons; I did not find them as I left them, they were one in another when I put them into my pocket; the filings must be in some of them. This is the truth, if I was never to stir; I have worked forty years in the business, and was never under confinement, nor never impeached in my life; I worked for Mr. Lias five years ago.

Prosecutor. He was the last man I should have had suspicion of.

Q. How long has he worked with you this last time? - A. About six months.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-34

158. ELIZABETH CRIMPSHAW, alias JACKSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a pair of sheets, value 8 s. a pair of pillow-cases, value 1 s. a bolster-case, value 1 s. 6 d. a bed-curtain, value 1 s. a window-curtain, value 6 d. twenty pounds weight of feathers, value 20 s. two fire-irons, value 1 s. a flat-iron, value 6 d. a tea-kettle, value 1 s. a pan, value

6 d. and a frying-pan; value 1 s. the property of Joseph Calverley , let by him to her by contract to be used in and with the lodging-room .

HANNAH CALVERLEY sworn. - I live in Orange-court, Swallow-street : The prisoner at the bar came to live with me about half a year ago; she left my lodging in December; I had her taken up on the 30th of January; the room had been shut up a month.

Q. Who let the lodging to the prisoner? - A. I did; she was to pay me three shillings a week, it was furnished; she took the lodging in the name of Jackson; I went up to Marlborough-street, and had advice first; they said I must take a witness, and open the door, and on breaking open the door, the first thing I discovered was, that there were only about three pounds of feathers left in my bed and bolster, and a very good bed it was when I let her the room; the remaining part of the feathers were gone; I missed a pair of sheets, two pillowcases, a blanket, and one blanket cut in two; she had not left me half, only a bit; she had taken all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Whose property were these articles? - A. My husband's, his name is Joseph Calverley .

Q. Were any, or all, of these articles in the room when she took the lodgings? - A. They were all of them in the room.

Q. Has any of the articles been found? - A. Very few.

WILLIAM GEE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I took it in pledge of the prisoner on the 24th of December.

ROBERT GARDNER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant in Carnaby-street; I produce a pillow-case and one sheet; they were pawned by the prisoner at the bar, I am confident of it; the pillow was pledged on the 29th of August in my master's shop, in my presence, and on the 20th of September following I took the sheet in of the prisoner myself.

EDWARD EWER sworn. - I produce a blanket pawned on the 5th of January by the prisoner.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I am an officer: I have four duplicates which the prosecutrix delivered to me; she and I went round to the pawnbrokers, and found this property, which I produce. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. Mrs. Calverley, did not you know that these things were in pawn before you broke open the door; I hope you will not take a false oath; she knew at the time the things were pledged? - A. I did not; if I had known it, I would not have suffered you to have taken them out of the house; I am a poor woman, I have a lame husband to support.

Prisoner's defence. At the time this happened I had two children to support; I had a friend of the name of Jackson, who paid the rent for a considerable time; he went away, and left me with the children; I worked for Mr. Rose, in Bishopsgate-street, and the work was very slack, I could not get any work to support my children; she gave me leave to pledge the things, provided, when I received the money from my brother in the country, I took them out; she said, get them out as soon as you can; the very night that I pledged the blanket she said so. Mr. Rose is out of town, or he would have come and spoke for me; my husband died at the time he worked for Mr. Rose; Mrs. Calverley said, if I would pay her four pounds, she would not prosecute me, otherwise she would punish me, - if it was possible to have me transported she would, without I gave her four pounds; my friends told her they would pay the money for me as far as the things were worth; it was not in my power to raise four pounds; she made answer they would not take less than four pounds, as they had brought it so far; I have got three small children.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-35

159. JOHN MAHANY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a hat, value 14 s. the property of James Swallow .

THOMAS PROCTER sworn. - I live with Mr. James Swallow , hatter , No. 62, St. James's-street : On Monday, the 25th of February, my master left me in care of the shop; about six o'clock the prisoner stood lurking about the door, and looking at me, but I did not think he had any intention of taking any thing; in a few minutes afterwards the prisoner came in, and asked me for a penny lace for his boot; I told him we did not sell any; seeing him a poor boy, I thought I would give him a bit of old hat-binding, and save him his penny, which I did; he thanked me, and went out, and I went on with my work again; a few minutes afterwards I thought I heard somebody come within the step of the door, and I thought I saw the prisoner's hat through the window of the door, as if he was looking to see if I sat there; that gave me some suspicion that he wanted to take something; I dropped down on my hands and knees on the finishing-block behind the door; then the prisoner came creeping in slyly, and caught hold of this hat from the counter, and was carrying it off.

Q. How far was he carrying it off? - A. About two yards from the place where the hat was, he was still in the shop; I got up, and caught hold of him by the collar, and asked him what he was at; he dropped the hat, and began crying; I called out to Miss Swallow, my master's sister, who was in the next parlour; she locked both doors, and went up stairs to call a gentleman; at the time she

was gone, he asked me to speak as well as I could for him; I held the boy till the gentleman came down; then he secured him till I went and fetched a constable; I am certain that is the boy, and this is my master's hat.

Prisoner's defence. I went in for a penny lace; he told me he did not sell any; with that he called me back; he said, as I looked like a poor boy , he would give me a bit of hat-binding, and he gave me a little better than half a yard; I went in again with the penny in my hand, and said, if you please will you give a little bit more of that binding for a penny; he jumped up to get it, and knocked the hat down; I picked it up; then he came and caught hold of me.

Q. (To Procter.) Are you sure you saw the boy take the hat from where it was? - A. I am sure I saw him take it.

GUILTY , aged 13.

To go to the Marine Society to be sent to sea .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-36

160. JOHN FERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a greatcoat, value 21 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of James Boys .

JAMES BOYS sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter , I live at No. 7, Lombard-court, Seven Dials : I lost the property out of the bed-room on Monday, the 21st of January, I had seen it the same morning; I left my coat on the bed; the prisoner was my bed-fellow, I left him in bed; he absconded from the lodgings the next day; I met the prisoner at Marsh-gate, Lambeth, I charged him with it, and he denied it.

JAMES TURNER sworn. - I am a musician, I belong to the Duke of York's band: On the 22d of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went into a public-house in Rosemary-lane to get a pint of beer; while I was drinking the pint of beer, the prisoner came up to me with a pot of beer, and said, will you drink; he took the pocket-handkerchief out of my hand, and threw it in the fire; I told him I did not like that usage, I expected to be paid for it; I stopped a few minutes; then he gave me the choice of two, and said I might have either of them; this is what I received of him.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief, there is a piece put in it; I am certain it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. Have not more people access to that room? Have you not left the key? You know the woman of the house had the key, that I might not be prevented from going into my bed.

GUILTY, aged 54,

Of stealing to the value of 6 d.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-37

161. ANN MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , four pounds weight of soap, value 2 s. the property of John-Floyd Hopkins .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn. - I am brother-in-law to Mr. John-Floyd Hopkins , he keeps an oil-shop in Fitzroy-street : On the 12th of January, Ann Morgan and another was in the shop; she asked for a quartern of yellow soap, and tendered me a shilling; I scrupled the shilling; she said I might cut it, or do what I liked with it; I went to take a pair of scissars to cut the shilling; I saw her go to the soap, and take a cake of it; I looked very hard at her, and the other person said to her, the gentleman thinks you are stealing something, why do not you come forward; when she came forward, I jumped over the counter, and called the watchman, and gave charge of her; the wedge of soap was laying on the counter; after she had taken it I saw it under her arm; she tried to put her cloak over it.

- sworn. - I am watch-house keeper: On the 12th of January the prisoner was brought to me, and this soap; while she was in the watch-house, she dropped a separate piece from under her cloak, Mr. Edwards had these in his custody.

Q. (To Edwards.) What is the worth of this soap? - A. There are four pounds of it, it is worth three shillings and fourpence.

Prisoner. (To Edwards.) Q. Did I not buy half a quartern of soap; it was another woman that took it and you let her go? - A. You did not buy the soap, I did not like the shilling.

FRANCIS HALL sworn. - At eleven o'clock, when my partner was going his round, I was sitting in the box; Mr. Edwards called, and I went over and took the prisoner in charge; when she was at the watch-house there was a piece of soap dropped from under her clothes.

Q. (To Edwards.) Was that soap on the counter? - A. Yes, there were 140 lb. on the counter, going out on Monday; I noticed this piece of soap, there was no more like it.

Prisoner's defence. I bought half a quartern of soap, and I paid for it; I never stole the man's soap.

GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-38

162. HANNAH MIDMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a gown, value 5 s. a child's frock, value 1 s. three aprons, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a bed-gown, value 1 s. and a pocket-handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Elias Simons .

There being no evidence to prove that the prisoner stole the property, she was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-39

163. WILLIAM PATERSON and ELIZABETH CURETON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , four iron rails, value 16 s. the property of George Thompson ; and the latter for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

GEORGE THOMPSON sworn. - I live at No. 80, St. John's square, St. John's street .

Q. Were there any iron rails fixed to your house? - A. Yes, there were, on the 30th of January last; I was not at home at the time they were taken; they were there when I went out, which was about five o'clock in the evening, and when I returned, I had not been at home above ten minutes before Mrs. Thompson went to the door with a candle, and she missed the rails, and when I came to the door I found they were gone. While we were looking at the railing, there was a person came past, who is a witness, and from her information I went to the house kept by the prisoner, Cureton, an old iron-shop ; I went into Cureton's house, and asked her whether she had not received some property recently that she might have suspected were stolen; I told her she was a neighbour, and must know us; it was within two hundred yards; she said there was no property of any kind that she could suspect; I expostulated with her, telling her I was a neighbour, and it would be better for her to tell me of it, than give me the trouble of examining the house; I never mentioned what the property was. I then took a candle, and insisted upon searching, as she denied having received any property; I looked round the shop, and the back place; I asked her if there was any other place; she then said to her son, go down stairs, and shew the gentleman; the son went with me down stairs, and when I was down stairs I conceived that I heard the rattling of iron bars. Upon that I immediately ran up stairs, and found Cureton coming from the side of the counter in the shop; it gave me suspicion that she was doing something there that was not right; I took the candle, and began to examine by the counter, and I pulled out several bags and baskets, and behind the whole there laid the irons all of a row; I then saw my railing; I then began to be warm, and I told her I certainly would punish her, if it was in my power; I got them away as fast as possible, and gave her in charge of the constable.

Q. Did you know your rails again? - A. Yes; I found four, they are particular railing, and they are particularly painted.

ANN TARE sworn. - I was passing by the house of the woman prisoner between eight and nine o'clock on the 30th of January, and saw a man go into an old iron-shop with old iron rails; I informed the gentleman.

CHARLES CHINERY sworn. - Mr. Thompson brought the iron to me in the watch-house; I have had it in my care ever since.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer: In consequence of information that I received I went and secured Paterson, and brought him to the watch-house.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) What do you know of the man? - A. The constable had taken him to the watch-house; when I came to the watch-house about twelve o'clock, I did not know who he was, nor that he was taken up on my charge; after he was searched by the constable, he turned himself to Cureton, and said, what money did you give for them, - did not you say you gave seven shillings and sixpence; I will not be positive whether it was to the prisoner Cureton, or her son; I went out, and when I came in again the prisoner Paterson met me at the door, and said to me, Mr. Thompson, do not give charge of me, my dear fellow, I will do any thing in the world for you, I am a stone-mason, - I will put the railing down again, and I will put the stones to rights, if you will forgive me, I am sorry for what I have done; I said, no, I would prosecute him as far as the law would go; I asked him how he could think of taking them away; he replied that he did not know what he was doing of.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You never told us a word about this at first, till you were asked by my Lord. - When you first saw this man you did not tell him it would be better to tell the truth? - A. No, nothing like it.

Q. You have heard that he is a stone-mason ? - A. I understood so.

Q. He said he would put the railing and the stones to rights? - A. Yes, he did, over and over.

Q. Do you know these rails by some mark? - A. I can swear to them.

Q. Are they different rails from all others? - A. There is not one in fifty like them.

Q. Will you swear that you never saw any like them? - A. There are none like them in the neighbourhood; I know the neighbourhood very well, I have been there twenty years.

Q. With respect to Mrs. Cureton, she told you that which you have not told us, namely, that whoever brought these rails, brought them while she was in bed and sick, and she knew nothing at all about it? - A. She said she was in the other room.

Q. You had not told us any thing about that - you bring new lights on the subject every minute. She said she was in the other room, and a man had thrown them in - she said so, did not she? - A. The son said that the mother received it at the time she was in the other room, and did not know what it was.

Q. Did not she say, that when they were

thrown in, she was in the other room, and very ill in bed? - A. She might, but it is a very little room, it is altogether like one; she might see as she lay in bed what passed in the other room.

Q. You did not see her in bed - you saw the bed-room? - A. I did.

Q. Supposing her to be lying in bed there, could she see what passed in the other room? - A. She might see if she would; if you covered her over she could not.

Q. What is there particular in your railing that you know it by? - A. It is a particular railing, it screws into the wood-work, and fastens in the iron; I can swear to it.

Q. (To Chinery.) Were you present - did you hear any thing pass between the prisoner and the prosecutor? - A. I heard Paterson beg very hard to Mr. Thompson not to make a charge of it, and he would refit the stones and railing; Mr. Thompson said he would prosecute as far as the law would allow; I took this bar, and it fitted the hole in the wood and the stone.

Paterson's defence. I would have sooner given fifty pounds than it should have happened; I am as innocent of the crime as a child unborn.

Cureton left her defence to her Counsel, and called five witnesses who gave her a good character.

Paterson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Paterson, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

Cureton, GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-40

164. JAMES HOLMES and WILLIAM BRANBEED were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , two bags, value 1 s. and forty-five pounds weight of feathers, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Kent , Abbott Kent , Joseph Luck , and Samuel-Luck Kent .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM KENT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are upholsterers and carpet manufacturers in London-wall ? - A. Yes; the two prisoners were both in our employ as feathermen ; Holmes was foreman; Branbeed had been in our employ thirteen months, and Holmes came in our employ on the 14th of January last; Holmes engaged in our service for a guinea a week; Holmes said to me, are there no perquisites; I immediately replied, I never allowed perquisites to any feather-man, but if he behaved himself well he should not want encouragement in our employment.

Q. Did they both continue in your employment down to the 28th of January? - A. They did.

Q. On that evening did Mr. John Smith bring in any bag of feathers into your warehouse? - A. He came and gave some information, but did not bring the feathers; I saw him on the 29th, when he sent the bag of feathers by his porter; I believe one of the bags is the property of me and my partners; the feathers in these two bags were of various sorts, but principally Hudson's Bay feathers.

Q. Upon this did you cause the prisoners to be apprehended? - A. Yes; I went with my solicitor on Wednesday to the Mansion-house, and on Thursday morning we had them apprehended at our warehouse; they were taken before the Lord-Mayor, and the bags likewise; after they were examined before the Lord-Mayor, Holmes said, I could not discover the loss; they found these there, and they were not taken down in stock, they were drivings.

Q. Are these drivings in this paper? - A. Yes, they are worth a penny a pound, they are the mere refuse of the feathers; there is a larger refuse, called strippings, worth about the same value.

Q. Were the feathers which you had before the Lord-Mayor, which Mr. Smith had brought you, at all like strippings or drivings? - A. Not at all; I should not hesitate giving two shillings a pound for them of any merchant, mixed as they are; Hudson's bay feathers are worth three shillings and threepence a pound, if they are not mixed.

Q. After this examination before the Lord-Mayor, did you proceed to examine your stock to see if there was any deficiency? - A. Yes; we took stock on the 15th of January, and after the examination before the Lord-Mayor we took stock again, and the deficiency was between seventy and eighty pounds, but we deducted something from that, because a quantity had been cured - about twenty pounds, which is included in the first statement; then it makes the deficiency about fifty or sixty pounds. Mr. Smith brought us from forty to forty-five pounds, and a third at least, if not half, is Hudson's bay feathers, and we found a deficiency of twenty-seven pounds of Hudson's bay feathers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Drivings and strippings we understand to be the refuse of the feathers, and are never for sale - they are perquisites for the men? - A. I believe it is the case with some persons to allow it to the men, but we do not.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you keep a feather warehouse in Goswell-street? - A. Yes: On the evening of the 28th of January the prisoners at the bar brought two bags of feathers, and said they were drivings; when I looked at them I asked them if they were their perquisites; they said they were; I said, if it is a perquisite, it is a very good one; I said, what do you ask for them; they said, tenpence a pound; I knew Branbeed perfectly well, he worked at Messrs. Kent's, but the other I never saw in my life; I said, they are pretty good, I will give you

nine-pence, the bargain was struck directly; we weighed them, the gross weight, with the bags, was fifty-six pounds, and then I said, what must we take off for the tare of the bags; Holmes said, I believe they must weigh ten pounds; I said, that is forty-six pounds, and forty-six pounds I paid for: I gave one pound fourteen shillings and sixpence to Holmes; he gave me change for a two pound note; I said, I am in a great hurry, I cannot empty them now; Holmes said, never mind bags, we have more bags than we know what to do with.

Q. What did you suppose to be the value of them, when you bought them? - A. I looked upon it to be the perfect value of them at the time, from one bag, I never examined the other, I was in a great hurry to go out; I said, if they all answer to that I will give nine-pence a pound; I knew well that they were no drivings.

Q. How soon did you give information to Messrs. Kent and Luck? - A. I was going to the other end of the town, but I thought it was necessary to go there first.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. These they said were drivings? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew Branbeed before? - A. Yes; Holmes I had never seen; I have bought old drivings of Branbeed before, off old beds when he has come from gentlemen's houses.

Q. It is a perquisite that is allowed? - A. I allow it to my men, some do not.

Q. Then they come to dispose of it, as they told you? - A. I knew it was no drivings.

Q. And, knowing this, you gave nothing near the value of them? - A. Quite the value, if they had been all like them I took out; when I came to examine them, I found Hudson's-Bay feathers in it.

Q. You never opened the bag till after they were gone away, therefore, you took them, hoping they would turn out a better bargain? - A. I thought they were both alike, they said they were. (The bags of feathers produced.)

Q. (To Prosecutor, looking at them.) Are they at all like drivings, or strippings? - A. They are not drivings nor strippings, the two samples are nearly of the same value; they are worth about two shillings a pound.

Holmes left his defence to his Counsel.

Branbeed's defence. When Mr. Holmes came to work at Mr. Kent's, he told me he agreed with him for a guinea a week, and he was to have the perquisites of the drivings from the feathers; I told him there was no such thing allowed since I had been there; he told me he agreed with him for it; I said, I was sure he was mistaken; about a fortnight after he had some, he asked me where I sold mine, that he allowed me; I told him at Mr. John Smith 's, French-alley, Goswell-street, and I went with him.

Holmes called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Holmes, GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for seven years .

Branbeed, GUILTY, aged 29.

The Jury and Prosecutor recommended Branbeed to mercy, thinking he was drawn into the snare by Holmes .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-41

165. RICHARD GEARY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , twelve pair of stockings, value 1 l. 19 s. the property of Thomas Flint .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS SWANN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Flint? A. Yes; No. 47, Gracechurch-street , he is a haberdasher and hosier : The prisoner was a porter, and cleaned the horse and chaise ; on the 18th of January, I went to the stable and called Richard, whom I understood was in the stable; I went nearer to the door of the stable, and called him again, he did not answer me, and when I came close to the door, he pulled it to, to prevent me from coming in; I then called to another man that was at a little distance to bring me a light, it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and as the light came, I saw the prisoner going up the ladder that leads from the stable into the loft; I went into the stable, and as he was going up this ladder I perceived something drop from him, white, down from his left side, I picked it up; it turned out to be one pair of white stockings there, and three pair at a little distance from it, close by the side of the ladder; when he came down again, I asked him how the stockings came there; he denied knowing any thing of them; I took the stockings home, and left them in the warehouse up stairs, and then I went and searched the loft, and there I found eight pair of stockings, and a white handkerchief close by them; I examined them, they were all of the same description: men's super ribbed white cotton stockings, they exactly appear to be all one dozen precisely as we have them from the manufactory; he was given in charge of the officer, and taken away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This stable, in which these articles were found, all the servants had access to? - A. Yes; they all went there.

Q. The gardener had access to this stable as well as the other servants; I do not mean to implicate the gardener at all? - A. He had.

Q. No light in the stable? - A. There was light sufficient for me to see the stockings fall as he went up the ladder.

WILLIAM WOODLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You found Mr. Swann in the

stable at the time you got up the ladder? - A. I was at the sill of the door; I saw it fall from his left side, and I saw the loft searched afterwards, and eight pair of stockings found.

JOHN STRATTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are gardener to Mr. Flint? - A. Yes; I came to town from Mr. Flint's country house on the 18th of January, and at eleven o'clock I put up my horse at that stable.

Q. Did you go into the hay-loft? - A. I did not go into the loft that day, there was hay in the rack.

Q. Did you see any stockings lie in the stable when you were there? - A. No such thing there then; when I came out, I locked the stable door and took the key and hung it up in the warehouse, and there I left it.

JOSEPH SAMUEL sworn. - I am an officer; the prisoner was given me in charge, and the stockings likewise. (The stockings produced, and identified by Thomas Swann .)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the stockings; Mr. Flint is the first master that I served in this country; I came from Ireland.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-42

166. WILLIAM SECKRIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a sack, value 1 s. and three bushels of oats, value 10 s. the property of Edwin Savill , William Savill , and Joseph Savill .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

WILLIAM SAVILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Will you be so good as to give us the names of your partners? - A. Edwin Savill , my father; William, myself; and Joseph, my brother; we are brass and copper merchant s, in the Minories ; the prisoner at the bar has been our carman ten years, in Grace's yard, Minories; we have two sacks of oats, besides beans and chaff, come in weekly for the supply of the horses; each sack containing three-bushels; on the afternoon of the 26th of January I went into the stable, and saw the whole of the week's supply in the stable.

Q. There were two sacks of oats there? - A. Yes, I examined them on Monday, and found one opened, I suppose for the use of the horses, the other remained untied; the foreman marked the sack on the Tuesday following, by my desire, in my presence; the other sack was decreased, but it should have been consumed by the horses on Friday evening; I directed the foreman to watch after the whole of the men were gone, and on Saturday I ordered the prisoner into custody.

ALDER MAMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you watch? - A. Yes, in the warehouse, opposite the stable door; I began my watch about twenty minutes past eight o'clock; the prisoner was then in the stable; I saw Charles Mitchell coming up the yard and go into the stable; Seckrie came out, after a little while, and looked all about the yard, for the space of two minutes, and then went in again; he came out again for a few minutes and went in again, and in two minutes afterwards Charles Mitchell came out with a sack on his shoulder; Seckrie shut to the door; I followed close to Mitchell, to John-street, in the Minories, where he pitched it off his left shoulder into a cart; then I collared him directly; I asked him what he had got there; he struggled and got from me; I brought the sack back to my master's.

Q. Was it the same sack you had marked on Tuesday? - A. Yes, in my master's presence.

Q. Was it full of oats? - A. As full as it came in before.

Q. (To Prosecutor.) What is the value of these oats? - A. More than ten shillings the three bushels.

Q. Have you looked at the sack; is it the sack that your servant marked? - A. It is the same sack that my servant marked in my presence.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-43

167. CHARLES POLLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Villaroy Russell .

VILLAROY RUSSELL sworn. - On the evening of the 18th of last month I was walking up Fetter-lane ; the prisoner was standing up the gateway, leading to Symond's Inn; he accosted me by asking me if I wanted the White Horse inn, in Fetter-lane; he added, at the same time, if I did, it was as far as I could see on the same side of the way; I went on, and the prisoner followed me close, which induced me to have suspicion of him, and after having walked about thirty yards, I felt him drawing my handkerchief out of my pocket; in a moment afterwards the handkerchief struck me on my legs, it being a very large one; I turned round, and got hold of the prisoner, and he threw the handkerchief out of his hand to another man that was with him, and he went off with the handkerchief; I secured the prisoner till I sent for a constable.

Q. Had you said any thing to him about the White Horse? - A. No, he accosted me; I looked up the gateway, from that circumstance, I suppose.

Prisoner's defence. On the 18th of January, I was about thirty yards up Fetter-lane, making water at some inn that is just at the beginning of

Fetter-lane, when the prosecutor came up to me; some man halloaed out, do you want the White Horse; sir, said I, the White Horse is as far as you can see on the same side of the way; the gentleman walked on, and I walked on about my business; he turned round, and said, you have picked my pocket; I said I had not done any such thing; some gentleman came out with a light, and I was taken to the watch-house.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-44

168. THOMAS WOODMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Rawlins , the said John Rawlins , and others of his family, being therein, about the hour of four, on the 15th of February , and stealing therein two coats, value 2 l. 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 7 s. a gown, value 6 s. one sheet, value 9 s. a frock, value 5 s. a cloth, value 2 s. four handkerchiefs, value 5 s. two shifts, value 5 s. and a wrapper, value 9 d. the property of John Rawlins .

(The case stated by Mr. Alley.)

MARY RAWLINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What is your husband's name? - A. John Rawlins ; he lives in Maidenhead-court, Aldersgate-street ; he keeps a clothes shop .

Q. In that shop were there any lines across the window? - A. Yes, several, with clothes hanging on them.

Q. Was there a brown coat hanging on one of these lines? - A. Yes, on the 15th of this month, I was sitting in the parlour; I was alarmed; I thought I heard a rumbling in the shop; my husband was sitting along with me; I got up, and went into the passage; I saw a person go out with a bundle.

Q. That was not the prisoner? - A. No, I saw the prisoner in the shop, with the coat in his hand; when he saw me, he dropped it down on the chair, and came out of the room, and I caught hold of him in the passage; I called for my husband; then he was taken into custody, and taken before a Magistrate, and brought here; the other man had gone away with a variety of articles.

JOHN RAWLINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the husband of the last witness? - A. Yes; I came to her assistance, and saw her have hold of the prisoner; I produce the coat; it is my coat.

Q. (To Mrs. Rawlins.) Is that the coat you saw the man drop? - A. It is.

Q. Had he ever offered to purchase the coat after he was detected? - A. He said nothing at all about it.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing only, to the value of 10 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-45

169. THOMAS KEMP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a bushel of oats, value 5 s. the property of John Bellis .

(The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN BELLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a farmer at Edmonton ; the prisoner was a carman in my service; on the 17th of Nov. I received information that the prisoner had stole a bushel of corn, I sent for an officer to apprehend him.

Q. Did you apprehend him then? - A. No, not for two months after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long had he lived with you? - A. A year and a half.

JAMES ANSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Bellis? - A. Yes; on the 17th of November, the prisoner told me to go home; I was in the stable; I went out and watched him.

Court. Q. What time of the day? - A. In the evening; I looked through the stable door, and watched him; he took a measure of corn in the sieve, and put it in the bag; it was a white bag; I saw him put oats in it; I went to my master's house to tell them to come; I saw him take the oats out of the bin; then I told the other boy; I went up to the stable with an excuse, and put some hay under Smiler; I felt the bag, and it felt like oats; I went and watched him after this, in the small-beer cellar; Kemp bid me good night; he went out in about half an hour, and came round the fields to the little shed, and uncovered it.

Q. Had you seen him put any thing in the shed before? - A. No, he fetched the bag out of the shed.

Q. Did it appear to be the same bag you had seen before? - A. Yes, and then he went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner lived a year and half with your master; you were very fond of him? - A. Yes.

Q. What was it for; because he whipped you at the plough tail; how long was it after you got the whipping at the plough tail that you saw him steal the corn; was there any body but himself in the stable? - A. I do not know.

Q. The door was shut? - A. Yes.

Q. You put your foot on the bag; you felt it was oats; you do not wear dancing pumps in the country; you wear thick shoes? - A. Yes.

Q. So then you felt the oats through the thick shoes? - A. Yes.

JOHN TURPIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I watched along with Ansell and the other

boys, in the small beer cellar; the prisoner wished us good night, and in half an hour he came along the back fields, through the cow-yard, into this little shed, and fetched this white bag out; he went away by the back fields; I came out of the beer-cellar and followed him; I felt the bag, and it felt like oats.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He came to work the next morning, the same as usual? - A. Yes.

Q. Your master was there then himself? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not taken that day, though he was at work? - A. No.

Q. You are very sure it was oats? - A. Yes, I felt the sack going along.

Q. So that feeling it going along, you could tell whether it was oats or rye; all the boys were very fond of the prisoner; he used to make you work very hard? - A. He did not make me work.

Q. Did any of the men see this? - A. No, only us boys.

JAMES HOBBS sworn. - I watched in the beer-cellar; he fetched this bag out of the little shed, and went across the back fields with it.

WILLIAM ANKEN sworn. - I saw him take the white bag out of the little shed; he went across the cow-yard, and strait down the back fields.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable.

Q. Did you go on the 19th of November, with a warrant to take the prisoner into custody? - A. Yes, and when I came into the yard somebody gave him an item, and he absconded, and was gone for two months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where did you take him? - A. In the parish of Edmonton.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-46

170. SARAH BETHELL and JAMES AKERMAN were indicted, the former for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Wilkins , and the latter for receiving the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH WILKINS sworn. - I am a married woman, my husband's name is Samuel, he keeps the Red Lion, in Grosvenor-street ; the prisoner used to come almost every day for half-pints of porter; on the 13th of this month Sarah Bethell was taken by another person, with a pewter pot on her person; I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM FORBES sworn. - On the 13th of this month in the evening, about half-past nine at night, she came into my house, the Goldsmiths' Arms, Bedfordbury, Covent Garden; a few days before that, she came into my house, about the same hour, and called for a pint of porter, and sat down in my house about half an hour or more; on her going away she said she could not drink all the beer; she would take what was remaining in the pot to No. 4, Turner's court, where she lived, and she would return the pot the next morning, about eight o'clock; the next morning she came in, and wanted half a pint of purl; I had no fire lighted, the young woman was then lighting it; she then said, as you have no fire, I will take it home and make it warm at my own apartment, and I will return the pots by and by; I gave her the half pint of purl, and took no more notice; I went over at the regular time to fetch my pots in, to this No. 4, and went to every apartment in the house, and no such person lived there then; on the 13th, a few days from that she came in the evening, and called for the pint of porter which I have mentioned; I knew the prisoner immediately; I drew the pint of porter and gave it her, and said, madam, you did not return those two pint pots which you had; yes, sir, says she, did not you get them; I said, how should I get them; she said she put them outside of the door, and very likely some other publican's servant had taken them away; I asked her to oblige me, and let me walk with her, to her apartment; she said, very well, I will go with you; after which I went into the parlour with a shilling's worth of brandy and water, and she absconded with the pot, though she was drinking her beer in the house; I went after her, and overtook her by the mouth of Turner's court; I then said to her, I will go with you and see if I can find my pots in the house; when she got into the court she did not know which way to turn, she stood a little time, and went into No. 1, I told her that was not the number she directed me to; here I live, says she, will you stop at the door till I go up stairs; I was a stranger in the neighbourhood; I kept close to the prisoner, and when she had got up a few stairs, I found a pint pot of mine on her; after finding the pot, she said, she would shew me where she sold the pots; as such I called upon my friend Mr. Perfect and he went with me and her, and by her direction I went to Akerman's house, an old iron-shop in Vine-street, Chandois-street, we went into Akerman's house, and enquired if he had any pots of Mr. Perfect's (he is a neighbour opposite to me) or Mr. White's, he was the publican I succeeded; he said he had no pots.

Q. Did you find any of Wilkins's? - A. Yes; two pint pots; after our persevering, he handed over two from behind the counter, the prisoner was present at the time; he said he had just received them from the prisoner, and gave her six-pence a pound for them; Mr. Wilkins's name was upon them both; Sarah Bethell and Akerman both begged for mercy, and hoped we would not punish them it being the first that either of them had done,

we sent for a constable to secure the parties, and I took one of the pots to Wilkins.

Q. You left the prisoner in the charge of Godsell? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Wilkins come with you to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes; when Mr. Wilkins came to Akerman's with me, he saw the man and the woman together, he told Akerman he could swear to that being his property, they said nothing; afterwards he took a candle and looked in the woman's face, he said he knew the woman and her friends, and as such would not prosecute; they remained in the hands of the constable, and were taken to the Magistrate; Mr. Wilkins was sent for by the Magistrate and bound over.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Wilkins said he would not prosecute, he knew her and her friends? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you went to Akerman's you told her that your object was to take her as a witness; I ask you whether your object was not to prosecute the receiver and not the thief? - A. No, my object was to prosecute both.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When you asked him if he had any pots, he immediately produced them? - A. He denied having them at first, after that he acknowledged to one; we after that searched more and found another.

Q. Are they new? - A. They are the same as new.

Q. Supposing they were to be sold, they would be sold as second-hand pots? - A. They would be sold for the same as new, if a person was to succeed another.

Q. They are not worth above a shilling? - A. I have not been in the habit of selling one, therefore I do not know.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - Mr. Forbes fetched me on the 13th of January, about nine o'clock at night; I went to Akerman's house, No. 2, Vine-street, Chandois-street, and in the parlour I saw two pint pots with the name of Wilkins on them; one old pint, half mutilated, and some solder melted down, and one as good as new; I asked the woman where she had got them; she made me no answer to that; she owned she had sold them for fivepence a piece; Akerman said he gave her sixpence a piece for them, and he begged for mercy, and hoped we would overlook it; while we were putting the things together, he absconded for about an hour, and his brother was in the parlour; I told the brother I understood the house belonged to him, and if he did not come back, he should stand in his shoes; his brother's wife then informed me, if I would not take her husband, she would go and see if she could find him, and he came back again. (Produces the pots.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Akerman before? - A. I had information of his house being a fence shop - a shop for buying swags.

Court. Q. What is that? - A. Buying stolen property.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not the prisoner Akerman say that he had received them from Bethell, the other prisoner? - A. He did.

Q. And that he had bought them, and gave sixpence a piece for them, which he believed to be the value? - A. I cannot say that he said what was the value; he said that he gave sixpence a piece, and she said fivepence; his brother offered ten pounds to let him go. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Bethell called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

Bethel, GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Akerman, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-47

171. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a counterpane, value 10 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Charles Hall .

CATHARINE HALL sworn. - I live in Compton-mews , I take in washing: On the 21st of January, about twelve o'clock at noon, I went out to get in my linen, and left this counterpane to be sent to the mangle; when I came back, the woman that washes for me told me she had sent the counterpane by the boy.

Q. Whose counterpane was it? - A. It belonged to Mr. Palmer, in Oxford-road; I had it from his house to wash it, and I had washed it, and I desired the woman to send it to the mangler's.

MARY SIMS sworn. - Mrs. Hall left the counterpane with me, and desired me to send it to the mangler's; as soon as the child came home from school, which was just after twelve o'clock, I sent him with it; I had wrapped it up in a coarse apron; he came back crying, with the apron in his hand, and said a man had taken the counterpane.

JAMES DEER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I produce a counterpane wrapped up in a coarse apron: On the 21st of January, about half past one o'clock, the prosecutrix called at my shop, and from information I received from her I was upon my guard; in about half an hour after I received this information, the prisoner at the bar brought the counterpane to pledge.

Q. You are sure of his person? - A. That is the man (pointing to him), and from the information we had previously received, we had every reason to suppose it was the counterpane that had been stolen; we took him to Marlborough-street,

and he was committed; the prisoner said in our shop the counterpane was his own property.

Q. What is the value of that counterpane? - A. Fifteen shillings. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I am not the person that took the counterpane from the child, I was in a public-house, the corner of Duke-street; there was a young man there who had been a gentleman's servant, but was then out of place; he had yellow buttons to his coat; the little boy said at Marlborough-street I was not the same person who took it from him, so I was taken in very innocent.

GUILTY , aged 45,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-48

172. MARY FORBE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a gown, value 10 s. a cloak, value 5 s. four silver tea-spoons, value 4 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Peter Farren .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-49

173. SARAH SHEARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a coat, value 12 s. and a hat, value 6 s. the property of James Rose .

ELIZABETH PETERS sworn. - I live with James Rose , in Clement's-lane .

Q. Is the prisoner at the bar any acquaintance of your's? - A. Yes, she nursed me in my lying-in of my first child.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to Mr. Rose on the night of the 9th of February? - A. Yes, at eleven o'clock; between one and two o'clock I was called down to a neighbour that was ill, and I left the prisoner in the room.

Q. Before you went down to you neighbour, had you done any thing? - A. I put a hat in a box before the prisoner that Mr. Rose had brought home, and a blue coat; I locked the box, and kept the key in my pocket.

Q. You did this before you went down to your neighbour? - A. I did; the prisoner was in my room.

Q. Was any body else in your room? - A. No, nobody else; I was absent about five minutes.

Q. Was the prisoner at your lodgings when you returned? - A. No, she was gone, and the box was under the window with the top of it broke, and the coat and hat were gone; I have seen the property since at John Hincksman 's, in Broad-street.

JOHN HINCKSMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 37, Broad-street, Bloomsbury: I produce a hat and coat pledged on the 9th of February, about two o'clock, by the prisoner at the bar; I lent her five shillings on the coat, and three shillings on the hat.

Q. After that, had you any information of the robbery? - A. I had, in half an hour after I had taken them in, and about an hour after that the prisoner and a man came in, and asked to see these articles, with an intent, as I understood, for the man to purchase them of her. In consequence of the notice I received I detained her, and sent for an officer, and took her to Bow-street.

JAMES BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer: On Saturday, the 9th of this month, about three o'clock, Mr. Hincksman fetched me to his shop; I went with him, and took her into custody to Bow-street. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. On Saturday, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I went down with something for my husband's dinner; I called upon this person; and we had something to drink together; she said she had a trifle of money to make up that she did not want her husband to know of; she told me to pawn this coat and hat for her, and as I did not go back again to her, she went to Mr. Hincksman, and stopped these things.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-50

174. WILLIAM DODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , three quartern loaves of bread, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Heepworth .

JOSEPH HEEPWORTH sworn. - I am a baker , I live in Charles-street, Shoreditch : On the 8th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I heard the footstep of a person coming into the shop, I was in the bakehouse under the shop; I came up stairs, and heard some boys run; I followed them, and heard one of them say to the other, run, now is your time, come along; two of them ran back again towards the shop, and just as I came to the shop-door, on the pathway, the prisoner came out with a quartern loaf in his hand; I laid hold of him, and he dropped the loaf; I fetched an officer, and delivered the prisoner to him; we missed three loaves; I did not catch the other boy .

GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-51

175. JANE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a shift, value 2 s. and two shawls, value 3 s. the property of Aaron Solomon .

FRANCES SOLOMON sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes; my husband's name

is Aaron Solomon , I keep a clothes shop: On the 31st of last month Jane Wilson came to my shop to sell some rags; - I am a very ailing person, I was trying to wash a few things; - she said, you do not look capable of washing; she told me she went out to wash, and she would be glad to do it for me; I told her I could not afford to give much, and that if she had nothing to do she might come and do it for me; she washed for me from two o'clock till half past five; she had dinner and tea, and I gave her threepence; she then said to me, I have nothing to do to-morrow, and if you have a mind I will come and iron them for you; she came the next morning between nine and ten o'clock, and continued till half past two; then our sabbath begins. She then said, you do not touch fire on Saturday, if you have a mind I will come and mind your fire; I said she might come; on Friday she stayed with me till very near eleven o'clock, and came on Saturday morning between eight and nine, and continued till half past five o'clock, and then she had her tea, and was going, she said, to a gentlewoman's house.

Q. Was she paid any thing? - A. No; she said she would come back again at half past ten o'clock, if I would set up so long, and I sat up; I said to my little girl, after she was gone, Betsey, I wish you would get the shift, and I will mend it; she went into the shop, and could not find it; I told her it was very cold, and to get me my shawl, and she could not find the shawl; she said to me, have the other shawl, and when she went to get the other shawl it was gone; I said, it is very odd that what you looked for is gone. I got up in a passion, and looked on the line, and the first thing that I missed was a white bed-gown, and other articles; I know no person was in the place but this woman.

AARON SOLOMON sworn. - I am the husband of the last witness: On Sunday, the 3d of December, about ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in a paved alley in Pall-mall; she was then feeling about herself; my little girl was with me, and she spoke to her; I spoke to my little girl in the Hebrew language, telling her to mind one hand, while I seized the other; the first watchman that I came to I gave her in charge, and told him to mind one hand, and I would mind the other; we took her to St. James's watch-house. In that hand I had hold of there was a bit of red cloth, containing two duplicates of a shift and a shawl belonging to me; this we found at the watch-house, and a shawl about her neck.

JAMES SLADE sworn. - I was constable of the night, I produce two duplicates, the lantern bearer gave them to me; I searched her further, and found this shawl on her neck.

JOHN PEGRIM sworn. - I produce a shift pledged with me on the 2d of this month; I believe it was the prisoner.

JAMES COURTNEY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Tothill-street, Westminster; I produce a shawl pledged on the 2d of February; I cannot say it was the prisoner, it was a woman.

ELIZABETH ROBINS sworn. - I live with Mrs. Solomon: My mistress hung the shift over the back of the chair when she had done it, and when she told me to get it I could not find it, nor the shawl, and there was another shawl that my mistress lent me when I went to the dispensary with her, and that was gone; I saw the duplicates taken from her at the watch-house by the lantern-bearer, and he gave them to the constable; I was not present when the shawl was taken from her neck. (The property identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. (To the prosecutrix.) Q. You were to pay me half a crown from Thursday to Saturday? - A. No, it does not stand to reason I was to pay you that for two or three hours.

The prisoner put in a written defence, as follows; -

"My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, well knowing that it would not be in my power to speak in this awful place, but relying upon that humanity which is always shewn to a poor prisoner, I humbly lay my case before you, and I humbly hope to shew you that I am as innocent as a child unborn. I went some weeks ago into Mr. Solomon's shop to sell a few bad shillings, for which I got a penny; his wife was washing; she asked me if I knew any person that would wash a few things for her; I told her I went out to wash; I washed her clothes for her, and when I had done Mrs. Solomon begged that I would stay to stir the fire and snuff the candles; I was there on Friday, and staid till eleven o'clock at night; I then went on Saturday morning at eight o'clock, and staid all day. In the evening I told her I wanted to go to St. James's, and I told her I would thank her to pay me, which was half a crown; she promised to pay me half a crown, but told me to call the next day, as the never paid any money on her sabbath; I told her I wanted the money; she told me then to take a shift, which she gave me out of the shop, and to pawn it to pay myself, but I told her it would not pawn for half a crown; she then gave me a shawl, and the other shawl she lent me; I was stopped near a place where I was going to by her husband, and he said I had stole them; I leave it to your Lordship.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Did you tell her to take the shawl and the shift? - A. No, I am certain I did not; I have a little girl that runs of my errands, and she knows I did not.

Q. (To Robins.) Did you hear any conversation about paying her for the work she had done? - A. My mistress said she would satisfy her when it was

done, she could not before; she then said it was only a few halfpence; she gave her threepence and a dinner that day.

Q. Were you present when she went away - did you hear your mistress say she might take any thing to pay herself? - A. No, I am confident to the contrary.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-52

176. EDWARD BUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , one cloth spencer, value 4 s. two regimental sword-belts, value 4 s. and a pair of boot-tops, value 2 s. the property of William Lovell .

HENRY BEASLEY sworn. - On the 18th of last month, about two o'clock in the day, I went into the Rum Puncheon, in Old-street ; I had two sword-belts and a pair of boot-tops wrapped up in a black spencer.

Q. Whose property were they? - A. The property of Captain Lovell, the captain gave them me to take home; when I entered the public-house there was a comrade of mine there drinking with the prisoner; he asked me if I would join in the company, which I did, and we drank to the amount of a shilling and a halfpenny in gin and beer; I laid my head on the table, and I believe I went to sleep; in the course of that time my bundle was gone.

Q. Was your comrade there then? - A. No, he was gone, and the prisoner too; I inquired about the bundle, but I could not hear any thing about it at the alehouse. I went to the landlord, and from what he said to me I searched for the prisoner, and found him the next evening; he denied seeing any thing of the bundle; by persuasions I brought him up to the same public-house; he denied every thing; the constable took him into custody that evening, and the next morning at eleven o'clock he confessed.

Q. Did you ever get your things again? - A. The boot-tops and the spencer I got by the prisoner's directions; I found the spencer at Isaac's shop, near St. Giles's; the prisoner told me he flung the sword-belts away, and the boot-tops I found at a porter's that lives at a bottle warehouse.

- ISAACS sworn. - Q. Look at the prisoner - did you ever see him before? - A. No, never.

Q. Did you purchase that spencer of any body? - A. I bought it of a man for a shilling.

Q. What man? - A. I could not take any notice of the man, I had a country-dealer in my house.

Q. How many times did this man come to your shop? - A. Twice; he asked me three shillings, and I bid him a shilling; I locked my door, and went up stairs, as I had a country-dealer there.

Q. Although this man came twice, you took no notice of him? - A. I was in a hurry, I had a country-dealer, I was obliged to have my goods packed up for him immediately; I had no person in the house but myself, my wife was out.

Q. What became of the spencer? - A. The officer has got it.

JAMES GEARY sworn. - I am an officer: I produce a spencer found at Isaacs' by the prisoner's directions, and the boot-tops I found, by the direction of the prisoner, at Mr. Westgate's. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 39.

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-53

177. ANN COSTELLO and MARY COSTELLO were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Nicholas Walker .

There being no evidence to effect the prisoners, they were

Both ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-54

178. JAMES CASTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , two hats, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of James Low .

- MITCHAM sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Ratcliff-highway: On the 22d of January the prisoner brought two hats to pledge, but knowing him to be an old offender I stopped him, and sent for a constable, and I found the owner of the hats.

JAMES LOW sworn. - I live at No. 89, Ratcliff-highway , I am a hatter : I had lost two hats on the 22d of January, prior to Mr. Mitcham sending to me.

Q. Is there any private mark on them? - A. One has got my name on it, the other has not; I believe them both to be mine; they are both the same sort of boys hats that I lost that evening.

Q. Was the prisoner in charge when you went to him? - A. Yes; the prisoner signified then that a woman gave them to him, and she was to give him something for pawning them.

Q. What is the value of the two hats? - A. Two shillings and sixpence.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from my work with my tools on my shoulder; I met a woman that asked me to pawn these things, and she said she would give me a shilling, so I went into this pawnbroker's shop to pawn them, and he said he would not take any hats in to pawn.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-55

179. ANN CARTWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , six iron candlesticks, value 6 s. the property of James-Coulston Ayliffe .

JAMES-COULSTON AYLIFFE sworn. - On the 8th of February, in the evening, I went into the White-hart public-house, Leman-street, Goodman's-fields , to drink, and put them on the taproom table, while I went into the yard; when I came back again into the tap-room, a gentleman asked me where my parcel was; they were done up in paper, I had them to alter.

Q. Where did you find them afterwards? - A. In Red-lion-street, about twenty minutes after I had lost them.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in the public-house? - A. Yes, when I first came in; she came in with a pie-man, whom she called her husband, she was in the house about an hour, and I staid in there an hour and a half; when I came out of the public-house, I saw her in Red-lion-street, she was at a stand, and two watchmen with her; I saw the candlesticks in her apron, and I marked them by desire of the watchmen.

- sworn. - I am a constable: I was at the watch-house at the time when the prisoner was brought in.

Q. When she came into the watch-house did you search her? - A. Yes; I found these six iron candlesticks in paper, and these seven shirts in her lap.

Q. Did she give any account of them? - A. The woman was very drunk, I believe she did not know what she was doing. (The candlesticks produced, and identified by the prosecutor).

Q. Do you know any thing of the woman? - A. No; I have heard she follows selling clothes in Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner's defence. I knew nothing of the candlesticks no more than of my dying-day; I really did not know that I had them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-56

180. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Robson .

ELIZABETH-JANE WATSON sworn. I live at No. 4, Chigwell-street, Ratcliff-highway : The prisoner at the bar lodged with me about twelve weeks.

Q. Do you keep a lodging-house? - A. We had a spare bed to let for a gentleman, and he hired it of us.

Q. Did you know what business he followed? - A. I knew him before he lodged with us, he was in a respectable line of life, in the occupation of a linen-draper ; he was out of employ when he lodged at my house.

Q. When he lodged with you, did he sell you any stockings at any time? - A. He brought home with him last November, a lot of cotton stockings; I selected two pair for my own wear.

Q. How many might there be? - A. There might be seven, eight, nine, or ten pair, I cannot tell; he told me he had bought them at a sale; I gave him seven shillings for the two pair, (produces one pair); the other pair has been washed and worn.

THOMAS ROBSON sworn. - I am a linen-draper, No. 202, High-street, Shadwell.

Q. Look at those stockings. - Do you know them? - A. I am sure I never sold them; I know they are mine, by my private mark; I missed these stockings and a few others at the time.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, I have known him some time; he came to my house frequently as a visitor, he called in as he was passing by; I have known him about a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know what employ he was in at that time? - A. He was in a situation in Ratcliff-highway during some part of the time, but the latter part he has been out of a situation.

Q. When did you first discover these stockings at the house of Mrs. Watson, where the prisoner lodged? - A. On the Saturday night prior to the Monday morning he was apprehended: Mrs. Watson called upon me for me to tell her where to find the prisoner, and in the course of conversation I received the information.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How the stockings got from your shop you do not know? - A. No.

Q. I understood you to say, you have known this person a twelvemonth? - A. Yes.

Q. Of course you had a good opinion of him, else you would not have suffered him to have visited you? - A. About a month before he was taken up, I had a good opinion of him.

Q. You have many cotton stockings in your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. You had sold a great many before this time? - A. Not cotton stockings.

Q. That had your private mark upon them? - A. I have not; I cannot swear for my wife, sometimes she serves; I dare say she will swear that she has not.

Q. And sometimes somebody else? - A. No.

Q. It is no uncommon thing for you to sell them to your customers that deal with you, you deliver them over with your private mark? - A. These are different stockings, these have got a clock; I had but half a dozen pair of stockings of that make in the whole.

Q. I see you have got the clock upon me now, but that will not do; will you swear that neither you nor your wife had not sold a pair of clock stockings prior to October? - A. I will not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-57

181. JOHN EDWARDS was again indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , ten shawls, value 20 s. the property of John Kyle .

JOHN KYLE sworn. - At the time I took up the prisoner I lived at No. 121, Ratcliff-highway , I am a linen-draper : On Monday the 14th of January last, the prisoner came into my shop between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. For what purpose did he come into your shop? - A. I had known him for some time, and he used frequently to call in and stop half an hour or an hour; when he had been in about five minutes, I had occasion to go out, but I returned in again in about five minutes, and then the prisoner was standing outside of the shop-door; when I went in my brother informed me something; I went to the prisoner, who was standing at the door, I took his hat off his head, and found ten shawls in the crown of his hat; I then sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody.

Q. Did he say any thing at the time? - A. He pleaded very much to me to let him go; he told me it was entirely distress that drove him to it. (Produces the property.)

Q. Do you know them to be your's? - A. They are new shawls with my private mark on them; they were in my shop ten minutes before I left my shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have known him some time? - A. I have, about two years.

Q. You have know him in very good situations? - A. I have.

Q. When had you last seen these shawls? - A. I do believe I had seen these shawls ten minutes before I went out.

Q. You do not take your private mark off when you sell them? - A. I do not.

ROBERT KYLE sworn. - I am the brother of the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect your brother stepping out of the shop, and leaving the prisoner in his shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What were you employed about? - A. I had occasion to go behind some furniture for something, and I saw the prisoner take some shawls from a shelf in the shop, and he put them into the crown of his hat, and he went to the step of the door; as soon as my brother came in I told him; then my brother went up to him, and he was taken into custody.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in the habit of buying shawls of different people, and likewise stockings; some gentlemen are here that will prove that I have bought both shawls and stockings of them.

Q. Where are they? - A. There is a gentleman who has promised to be here to-day, but he has neglected coming.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-58

182. CATHERINE HAMILTON, alias HAMBLETON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a rug, value 14 s. a table-cloth, value 4 s. two napkins, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a shift, value 4 s. and a flat-iron, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Simmons .

Second Count. For like offence, charging it to be the property of Joel Barlow .

ANN SIMMONS sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. She was a lodger of mine, I live at No. 5, Strutton-ground ; she has lived with me ever since Christmas till the 14th of February, in a ready-furnished room, at three shillings and sixpence a week.

Q. Was any furniture of the room missing? - A. Yes; all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I take in washing from one family, the table-cloth belonged to Mr. Joel Barlow , and the napkins, they were delivered to me to wash, with other things; I missed them at different times, I have only found some of them again.

SAMUEL PEARSON sworn. - I live at Mr. Burrows's, a pawnbroker: I produce a petticoat, two napkins, and two handkerchiefs; the petticoat and napkins were pledged for half-a-crown, and the handkerchiefs for one shilling and three-pence; I believe it to be by the prisoner, I cannot swear to her person.

JAMES GILLMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen-square: In consequence of information I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, at Mrs. Simmons's, No. 5, Strutton-ground; the prisoner gave me this duplicate, and told me it was all she had; on searching farther I found another duplicate, in a little jar upon the mantle-piece; they are the duplicates belonging to the property now produced. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. (To Prosecutrix.) Q. You told me that that table-cloth you never had in your custody from the family; and that you could take your oath of it? - A. It is false.

Prisoner's defence. She told me that she never had the table-cloth to wash, nor in her custody; and the shift she had given in a mistake to a person, and she had put another in its place; I never was guilty of such a thing in my life; I never touched a thing she had, a wicked wretch.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. 9 d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-59

183. JOSEPH MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , a shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. and a jacket, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Graham .

WILLIAM GRAHAM sworn. - On the 12th of February I was going from the Horse and Ten Bells, in Shoreditch, where I lodged, to the Spread-Eagle, in Gracechurch-street, to go by the coach to Portsmouth, and employed the prisoner as porter to carry my things in a bag; I had supported him, and paid for his lodging about three days before; there were a blue coat, four shirts, two pair of trowsers, a pair of shoes, a jacket, and a pair of drawers.

Q. What happened to you as you were going along together? - A. He seemed to keep behind me; I called to him to come up to me, as I had walked a little way before him; he said, aye, aye, I am coming, and when I looked round again, I did not see him; I called him by name, he did not answer.

Q. Was the bag tied up? - A. Yes; the next day after I heard he was hanging out at Rosemary-lane, and the next morning I found him at the Three Kings, in White's yard, Rosemary-lane; he had then a shirt and jacket of mine on his back.

Q. What house did you take him into? - A. The Old Fountain, in Rosemary-lane; there I gave charge of him to the officer.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - A. He said nothing in the least.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner? - A. No farther than I gave the description of the shirt and jacket, and when it was examined it had the particular marks on it.

Q. Whether you had not engaged him for a seaman? - A. I tendered him, but they would not accept him; they said he was a good for nothing old man.

Q. Are you a seaman? - A. I am; but I do not belong to any ship at present.

LION AARON sworn. - I keep a sale-shop; Mr. Graham came to my shop and told me he had three men that he wanted some slops for; the prisoner was one of them that he had taken up the slops for; he gave him the bag to carry home; he said he was going to the inn, to go to Portsmouth.

JOHN HOLMES sworn. - I am headborough: I produce a jacket and a shirt, which I took from the prisoner on the 12th of February, at the Three Kings, in Rosemary-lane; I asked him if he had got the clothes Mr. Graham had given him in charge, for he said he had taken them to the Old Fountain; after that he said he had taken them out of that house; I asked the prosecutor if he had any private mark on his clothes, as he said they were his that he had on his back; he said, yes, and gave me the mark; the shirt was marked on the shoulder and the jacket on the belly; I turned up the jacket and found the marks. (The shirt and jacket identified by the prosecutor.)

Jury. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Did you ever get the remaining part of your things? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. He told me he would provide me with things for the voyage, and I was with him three days; I was to get every thing ready, and he was to provide it; I had five shillings of him, which I must have paid when I got on board a ship; he called upon me in a coach, about six o'clock in the evening, for me to come to the other house where he lived, for me to go to the South Seas; he had been drinking very freely with two men, and I was to go with them with the bag, and the jacket and trowsers, to the Spread Eagle, in Gracechurch-street, and when we came into the tap-room there was a gentleman there; I was the cleanest man along with him; the gentleman looked round and said, are you going with that man, d - n you; the two men that were with him then turned out of the doors; he took his bed on his shoulder, seeing them go, and I, being in a neighbourhood where I knew no one, I could not find him again, if I had a mind; I took the bag on my shoulder; we being both drunk, I could not find him out; I made no property of the things; I did not want to have the luggage; the next morning I was looking for him; I was not obliged to be answerable for him; I belonged to a man of war; I had my discharge; he was almost as drunk as I was.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Where had you come from before you went to Gracechurch-street? - A. From Rosemary-lane up to my house, and from there to Gracechurch-street; he brought the things from my house with me.

GUILTY, aged 56,

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-60

184. MARY STEDWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. two blankets, value 5 s. a rug, value 5 s. a feather bolster, value 5 s. and a candlestick, value 6 d. the property of Anthony Stroud .

JANE STROUD sworn. - Q. Does your husband keep a lodging-house ? - A. Yes, in Rose-street, Soho ; the prisoner lodged in our front garret; it was furnished at 4 s. a week; she staid but a few days; she absconded on the 6th of February, we let her the room on the 2d of February; after she was gone, I entered the room, and saw she had left me nothing but the naked bed; she had taken a pair of sheets, a pair of blankets, a bolster, a rug, and a brass candlestick.

Q. Were all these things in the room when you let the lodging to her? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM FEARN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I produce a blanket pledged for one shilling, in the name of Mary Stedwell , I cannot identify the person.

MICHAEL LEE sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her, and I found several duplicates; she gave us all the account in writing where she pawned these things.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-61

185. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , fourteen yards of printed calico, value 21 s. the property of Thomas Powdich .

MARIA OXLEY sworn. - I live with my father, in Middle-row, Holborn .

Q. Do you know Mr. Powdich? - A. Yes, he keeps a linen-draper's shop opposite our house: on the 19th of January I was at the one pair of stairs window, and saw the prisoner at the bar take a piece of print from the door.

Q. Did you take notice of her so as to know her again? - A. Yes.

Q. Describe the manner in which you first observed her? - A. The next shop to Mr. Powdich's is a print shop; she went and looked into Mr. Powdich's shop-window, to see whether the young men were engaged, and seeing they were engaged, she took one of the pieces of print that were on the horse at the door, and put it under her cloak, and went round the corner of Middle-row with it.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About twelve o'clock; I went immediately down stairs into the shop, and told my brother; he immediately went after her; she was brought back almost immediately; my brother brought her back in about three minutes to Mr. Powdich's shop; I went over, and saw my brother open her cloak, and then she gave him the print.

Q. Did you hear what was said? - A. She said, provided they did not punish her, she was willing to make any recompense.

Q. You never saw her before? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure it is the same woman you saw taking the print? - A. Yes, there was no other person near Mr. Powdich's door; there were people looking at the print-shop next door, but not near Mr. Powdich's door that she looked in.

THOMAS BINGHAM sworn. - In consequence of the information I received from my sister, I went round the corner of Middle-row and pursued the prisoner to Gray's-inn-lane.

Q. How did you know her? - A. By the description my sister had given me, she said she had a red cloak on; there was no person else there but her, she crossed directly over to Gray's-inn-lane; I told her she had got something that did not belong to her; I took her round the waist, and brought her into Mr. Powdich's shop, and there I opened her cloak, and she gave it into my hand; she said she would make any recompense.

Prisoner. I told him, if it was his property, he was very welcome to it; I picked it up in the street.

Q. (To Bingham.) Did she say she picked it up in the street? - A. No.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I live with Mr. Powdich; I saw the last witness bring the prisoner into the shop; he told me that lady had got something that belonged to us; he immediately opened her cloak, and she gave him the print, and he immediately gave it to me.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I produce the piece of print. - (The property identified by William Jones .)

Q. (To Jones.) Do you know where that piece of print was placed? - A. Just inside of the threshold of the door, on a stool: there was a pile of them put there in the morning; I had seen that print there.

Prisoner's defence. I was looking into the picture-shop, where a great number of people were looking, as well as me; I picked this piece of print up, four yards from the picture-shop, on the ground; I never took it off from the stool; I kicked against it before I saw it; I took it up, supposing some person might have dropped it; the prosecutor promised my witness that my trial was not till to-morrow, else I had a witness to speak for me, that I had lived with five years.

THOMAS POWDICH sworn. - I do not reside there myself, I only know that it is my property.

Q. Did you promise her witness that her trial should not be till to-morrow? - A. No application has been made to me by any person whatever.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-62

186. MARGARET EYRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a wheelbarrow, value 25 s. the property of Richard Howell .

WILLIAM BARNET sworn. - I live servant with Mr. Howell: on the 16th of February, about two o'clock in the morning, it was moon-light, I was looking through the window, and saw the prisoner go from the corner of the cart-house down the ground with the wheelbarrow.

Q. How was she dressed? - A. In men's clothes; coat, waistcoat, and breeches; I went to the carter, and asked him if he had seen any body; he said, no; then he and I ran round the ground, and I saw the prisoner wheeling it among the gooseberry-bushes, at the farther end of the

ground, towards the gate that leads to Fulham; she sat down on the barrow; I followed her, and brought her to my master, and informed him of it.

Prisoner. His master has done it out of spite; I never came in with an intention of taking his master's barrow; his master knew me when I was in as good circumstances as himself; I do not say I did not sit down on the barrow.

RICHARD HOWELL sworn. - She was brought to me, drest in men's apparel; I know nothing of the circumstance.

Q. Do you know any thing of the woman? - A. I knew her in good circumstances about ten years ago; since that I can say nothing more than that she was a servant before she married a respectable man of fortune; her husband and she parted about ten years ago; they put her into business.

Q. Was the barrow taken from off your premises? - A. It was not taken from off my premises.

Prisoner's defence. I had no intention to take the barrow off the premises; it was of no use to me; I was out in the evening with some friends, before I came to Fulham; I stopped later than I should, I was tired, and went to sit down in the barrow in Mr. Howell's ground; I went to pitch it farther, as the people were coming in to get ready to go to market, and finding it cold there, I pushed it farther into the ground, and where there was no place to take it out; if I had meant to take the barrow, should not I have brought it out the same way as I went in, there being no other way; my husband's friends and the gardeners can make laws among themselves; if they like a person, they will give him any thing, but my husband's friends wish to send me out of the land, and the reason why I appeared in men's apparel (as has been stated by my husband's friends) is, that I being able to execute the work of a gardener , and being dressed as a man, I had the same wages as a man had; I had no intention of stealing it; the prosecutor knew me in better circumstances; it is all spite and malice.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Sutton.

Reference Number: t18050220-63

187. THOMAS SIMMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , fourteen yards of calico, value 2 l. and twenty-five yards of linen, value 3 l. the property of John and Daniel Kay , in their dwelling-house .

(The indictment was read by Mr. Clifton, and the case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

- DOYLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton.

Q. You are shopman to Mr. Allenby, a linen draper in Fleet-street? - A. I am; on the 4th of February the prisoner at the bar accompanied with another person with a light countenance, and about the same size, he might be taller; they inquired if we sold silk handkerchiefs; to which I told them, no; they then said, do you sell Irish cloth; to which I answered in the affirmative, they then said they would call in the evening.

Q. Did they purchase any thing then? - A. No; about six o'clock in the evening one of the men who had been with me in the morning (not the prisoner) called, and looked out a piece of Irish cloth, and fourteen yards of calico, and desired them to be sent to the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street; and desired me not to be more than a quarter of an hour, for they were going away immediately in a post-chaise; I went with the goods myself, with the direction he gave, which was, Mr. Morgan, Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street; when I got to the Castle and Falcon, I met the prisoner at the bar in the passage; he said to me, you have got the parcel for my brother, Mr. Morgan, to which I answered, yes; he then said you must go back and fetch the other piece of Irish that he looked at, (holding out his hands to take the parcel); in consequence of that I hesitated about the delivery of the parcel; upon that he said, O you may deliver it at the bar, which I did, at the same time desiring the girl to take care of it till I returned; I then went out but I was not satisfied with the first message I had given, I returned and gave her a second caution, and I said, you are not to deliver it to any person that was with me, or any one else except myself, it is my property; I told her to keep it till I returned; in consequence of that I went home for the other piece of cloth, and on my return I found they were gone.

Court. Q. You left the prisoner at the Castle and Falcon, and when you returned the cloth was gone; and you did not see the prisoner? - A. No, and the parcel was gone; there were twenty-six yards of Irish cloth, at 4 s. 6 d. a yard, that makes 5 l. 17 s. and fourteen yards of printed calico, at 4 s. 6 d. a yard; it altogether came to 9 l.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You left that under the care of the bar-woman? - A. Yes.

Q. And under her direction? - A. Yes.

DANIEL KAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You, sir, are one of the proprietors of the Castle and Falcon ; will you be so good as to give us the name of your partner? - A. John Kay; I have no other partner; my father resides in the house, he is not a partner.

Q. On the evening of the 4th of February, did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. On the evening of the 4th of February, the prisoner at the bar and another man came up the passage, I saw them come in as I stood in the bar, they came in arm in arm between seven and eight o'clock up the passage to me, I being then in the bar.

Q. What sort of a face had the other man? - A.

A light complexion, and rather a taller man than the prisoner.

Q. Did either of them speak to you? - A. The man of a light complexion spoke to me, and said, Mr. Kay, there will be a parcel come for my brother (pointing to the prisoner) which you will be good enough to take care of; I answered him, it should be taken care of for him; but not being certain of the name in the first instance, I followed them, by saying, did you say Morgan? one of them answered, which I think was the prisoner; he said, yes; they were going into the coffee-room to take some brandy and water.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar hear what the other person said to you? - A. Yes, he must, they were close together; the prisoner at the bar shook his head in this way (describing it), as a person does when he arrives from a long journey, to adjust his hair.

Q. I believe you have paid for the parcel? - A. I have promised to pay for it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long has your father been out of partnership? - A. My father has never been in partnership at all.

GEORGE CASTLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You are chamberlain at the Castle and Falcon? - A. Yes; I saw a man take a parcel out of the bar, but whether it was the prisoner or not I cannot say; it was on the same day as Mr. Kay has described; there was a person came to the bar, and asked for a parcel, whether he took the parcel up, or whether it was given to him, I do not know; it was a brown paper parcel.

Q. Did you see two persons in the coffee-room? - A. I was not in the coffee-room at that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Who the person was that you do not know, nor whether it was given to him, nor whether he took it? - A. I do not.

SARAH WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are assistant and bar-maid to the Castle and Falcon? - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of the 4th of February, do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar there? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the person with whom Mr. Doyle left the parcel? - A. Yes; I put it on the dresser in the bar.

Q. You say you saw the prisoner at the bar there - Did you see any other person with him? - A. No.

Q. What did the prisoner do? - A. He came and spoke to the chamberlain for the parcel.

Mr. Knapp Q. Did you hear him speak to the chamberlain? - A. I saw him come to the chamberlain, and he appeared as if he was speaking to him, and the chamberlain came and asked me for the parcel.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did the chamberlain come and ask you for the parcel directed Morgan? - A. Yes; I told him I did not know that I had it, but I would look for it.

Q. Did you give it to the chamberlain? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did any body come into the bar afterwards? - A. Yes, the other man, the light complexioned man, came into the bar; the chamberlain lifted up a box; the gentleman said, no, that was not it, his was a brown paper parcel; he asked me for it; I told him I did not know, upon which he turned round and said, this is it (he then seeing the brown paper parcel); I said to the chamberlain, that parcel is not paid for; I told him there was no direction on it; Oh! said he, this is the parcel.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was the prisoner present? - A. I did not see the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. The act of one is the act of the other; they were both in company together.

Court. They first of all were together at the linen-draper's, and the other man, in the evening, directs the parcel to be left for one Morgan, at the Castle and Falcon; they were seen together at the Castle and Falcon, by Mr. Kay; Mr. Doyle went to the Castle and Falcon, with the parcel; the prisoner speaks to him; it is for the Jury to say, whether all this satisfies their minds.

Mr. Gurney. Q. He took up the large brown paper parcel? - A. Yes; I said, sir, there is no direction on it; he said, it is my parcel, and I must have it; and he took it away and went down the passage.

Q. Did he go towards the coffee-room? - A. That is all I know.

JOSEPH HUDSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You are a waiter at the Castle and Falcon? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 4th of February, seeing the prisoner? - A. Yes, and another man with him, rather taller than himself, and a lighter countenance and complexion; the prisoner at the bar paid for the liquor that they had; they were in the coffee-room together, drinking brandy and water; the other man, with a light complexion, said, make haste, or the chaise will be gone; he had a large brown paper parcel under his arm; they both went out of the room together, the other man having the parcel under his arm.

Q. Was there any chaise waiting for them? - A. There was not at our house.

Mr. Knapp. (To the chamberlain.) Q. You are sure the parcel was not delivered to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Here is no possession at all proved to the prisoner.

Court. There was full possession, because, in this

case, the act of one is the act of the other; it is all one transaction.

GUILTY, aged 34,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-64

188. RICHARD HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , five table-cloths, value 26 s. two pillow-cases, value 4 s. eight aprons, value 16 s. and three towels, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Evans .

Second Count. For the like offence, the property of Stephen Rostan .

ELIZABETH EVANS sworn. - I keep a mangle : on the 4th of February the prisoner at the bar came to my house and asked for a lodging; he came in twice in the course of the day about it; he agreed to take it, and after that, at dusk, I went out; I had left in my room some linen I had to mangle for Mr. Rostan, and when I came back again, the linen was gone; I had left only my little child of nine years of age in the room.

LUCY EVANS sworn. - Q. Have you ever learned to say your prayers or your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what you are bound to do when you are sworn as a witness? - A. To speak the truth.

Q. And what will happen to you if you do not speak the truth? - A. I shall go to hell.

Q. Do you remember the day the prisoner at the bar came to take the lodgings of your mother? - A. Yes, I saw him.

Q. Do you remember whether he was there more than once in the day? - A. He was.

Q. Do you remember whether your mother went out in the evening or not? - A. She did go out, and she left me at home with my brother and my little sister; they are younger than me.

Q. After your mother was gone out, did any body come into the house before she came back again? - A. Yes, Richard Higgins ; that is him, (pointing to the prisoner,) he said he wanted my mother; I said she was gone out, to take a basket of clothes; he said he wanted to speak to her about the lodgings; then he walked up and down the shop; he took my little sister up and gave her a halfpenny; then he pushed me to the door, and went out with a bundle that was on the counter; when he was got out he went towards Chelsea; when my mother came home I told her.

SARAH PRIDGET sworn. - I was at Mrs. Evans's house when the prisoner came to take the lodgings.

Q. You were not there in the evening? - A. No, I saw him three weeks after that at Pimlico; I said nothing to him; but went to the Bag of Nails, where he had slept a night or two till Mrs. Evans got the lodging ready: and I told the publican, my husband went and took him at a public-house; he was obliged to take him by the collar, he was unwilling to come.

Prisoner's defence. I asked this lady for a lodging, she said she would get it ready on the Monday following; I had been to get work of Mr. Bramin, and if I could have got work of him, I should have gone to her lodging, but Mr. Clark, whom I was to work for, told me I might sleep with his boy; I never saw the place after the time I went away; I went back to her, and told her I would have come to her lodging but I had this offer; I am as innocent as a child unborn; when the child was examined at the Office, she had not a word to say but what the mother put in her mouth.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-65

189. LOUIS GIFFARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , eight ounces weight of sugar, value 6 d. the property of Herman Schroeder , the elder , Herman Schroeder , the younger , and Julius-Adolphus Schroeder .

The prosecutor not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-66

190. CHARLES ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , seventy-eight yards of printed calico, value 4 l. the property of Edward Twell .

EDWARD TWELL sworn. - I am a linen-draper , at No. 43, Bishopsgate Without : On the 15th of February the prisoner took from my door a bundle of printed cotton, it was placed on a stool at the door.

WILLIAM DREWETT sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Twell: On the 15th of February, about half past three, or near four o'clock, in the afternoon, a woman called in, and informed me, that the prisoner at the bar had taken the cotton from the door; I immediately pursued after him, and took him with the cotton under his arm.

Q. How far had he got from your shop? - A. From 150 to 250 yards from the door; I requested him to go back with me, and told him I wanted the goods that he had; he immediately delivered them to me; there was an officer there; I brought back the goods, and the officer brought him back to the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was hanging up outside of the house? - A. No, they were on a stool.

Q. Outside of the house? - A. Yes; persons are not obliged to take them.

Mr. Alley. Nor are you obliged to put them out in the street.

THOMAS WISE sworn. - I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, between three and four o'clock, on the 15th of this month, and the prisoner at the bar passed by me, with this property under his arm; I kept my eye upon him, and in a very short time Mr. Drewett came up and caught hold of the prisoner; I went to his assistance, and he gave charge of the prisoner, and I took him to the Compter; I produce the goods; I have had them in my possession ever since.

Jury. Q. Did you ask the prisoner where he got those goods? - A. Yes, he said a person gave them to him to carry.

Court. (To Drewett.) Q. Are they your master's goods? - A. They are the goods that I put out at the door in the morning.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-67

191. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a goose, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - I am a poulterer : I live in Bishopsgate-street, and have a shop in Leadenhall market .

JOSEPH WYERS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Thomas Morris : On Friday, the 25th of January, I was standing in my master's shop, about a quarter past five in the evening; the prisoner at the bar came up to the shop; I had lit up one candle and went to get another, and the prisoner not seeing any body in the shop he took up a goose and put it under his jacket; with that I went after him, and when he saw me coming after him, he took to his heels and ran; I called out, stop thief; then he pulled out the goose from under his jacket and threw it from him; I am positive of the man, he was never out of my sight.

Q. How far was he from the shop to where he was stopped by any body? - A. About twenty yards.

Q. You did not see him throw it away? - A. A young man picked it up, and gave it to the officer.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-68

192. SARAH BRIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a goose, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - This is the same goose that the last prisoner took; on Saturday, the 26th of January, when we returned from the Mansion-house (where we had been with the last prisoner), about six o'clock, the goose being an article that would not keep, the officer brought it back; I did not lay the goose out directly, I put it out on the board; I was shewing a couple of fowls to a lady; I heard some paper rattle behind me where the goose was laid on; I turned round and saw the prisoner at the bar with her cloak on, which she partly threw over the goose, and with her left hand she drew the goose over the board; I saw the best part of the goose move from the board, she did not go away from the shop; I asked her what she had got there, she said, she had got nothing; I put my hand to her side and there I felt the goose; I took it from her, and gave her in charge.

Q. Did you know any thing of this woman before? - A. I have seen her before.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through the market, to provide for me and my family, and there was a cry about this goose; I saw several people stand to see what was the matter; I was standing there because I could not get through; this young man came to me, and said that I was the person that took the goose.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-69

193. MARY MEAD was indicted for that she, having been convicted at two different times, for unlawfully and feloniously uttering counterfeited money, afterwards, on the 5th of February , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, and as and for a good shilling unlawfully and feloniously did utter to Thomas Clayton , she then and there well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

Second Count, for the like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Mr. Powell, you produce a copy of the record from the Office for London and Middlesex? - A. I do.

Q. Did you examine it with the original record? - A. I did.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Mary Mead ? - A. Perfectly well; the prisoner is the same person that was convicted in May Session, 1801, at Clerkenwell, on her second offence, for uttering counterfeited money; this is the copy of the record; I was present at the time of the trial, and when the sentence was passed she had two years imprisonment, and to find sureties for two years more.

Q. Were you present at the first time she was convicted? - A. I was; that was in September, 1789.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you take in your hand a piece of parchment, and find exactly the words, from the beginning to the end, that is that copy? - A. Yes. (The copy of the record read in Court.)

THOMAS CLAYTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a servant employed by Mrs. Kippin, No. 82, in the Minories ; does she keep a tallow-chandler's shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Mary Mead? - A. Only from her coming to buy half a pound of candles, on the 5th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening; when she came in, she said she wanted half a pound of eights candles; I handed her the candles, and she gave me a seven-shilling piece; I carried the seven-shilling piece to my mistress, and I said to her, that woman is a strange customer.

Q. Did you look at the seven-shilling piece? - A. I did not take particular notice of it; my mistress gave me four shillings, and five sixpences.

Q. Was there any thing remarkable about the shillings or sixpences? - A. One of the shillings was bent one way only, the others were flat, and the sixpences likewise; I gave the silver and a halfpenny to the prisoner, and half a pound of candles, which made up the seven-shilling piece; when she had got the candles, she said she never gave more than ninepence a pound for the candles; I said I could not sell them for less than elevenpence a pound; she took up one shilling and laid it down again; I took up the money, the four shillings and the five sixpences back again; upon her saying that, I supposed it to be the same; I did not look at it; I took it to my mistress; my mistress found the bad shilling; then I took the bad shilling back to her; I said she had changed one of my mistress's shillings; she began to stutter, and could not give me a plain answer; she was like as though she had an impediment in her speech.

Q. What did you do with that shilling you brought from your mistress? - A. I laid it on the counter, and was sent out for an officer.

Q. Do you know enough of that shilling, which you brought from your mistress the first time, bent as you described, and the shilling that your mistress complained of, how was that bent? - A. The shilling that I first gave her was bent one way only, whereas this was bent two ways; the officer has that shilling.

Q. You fetched the constable did you? - A. Yes, his name is Kinnersley; he took her into the private room to search her; the constable called me, he thought he heard something fall from her; I looked, and I found a shilling by the right-hand corner of the fire.

Q. What sort of a shilling was it? - A. The same shilling that was passed on me, and was changed for my good one.

Jury. Q. Was the good shilling found on this woman afterwards? - A. No, it was found in her mouth.

Q. Have you got the four shillings here? - A. I have got none of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know whether the four shillings are good or not? - A. My mistress looked at them particularly; I did not; I took them from her as good ones.

Q. Whether good or bad you do not know? - A. They were all good to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you take notice of them at all particularly? - A. No, I did not.

Mrs. KIPPIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. You keep a tallow-chandler's shop in the Minories? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar on the 5th of February? - A. Yes, my servant brought me a seven-shilling piece to change, and I gave him four shillings and five sixpences.

Q. Were there any marks about any of your shillings? - A. Yes; one was a bent shilling, bent all one way.

Q. Were the four shillings all good ones? - A. Yes, I am quite sure they were; and so were the sixpences; I saw Clayton take the change to her; the partition between the back room and shop is glass; he came back almost immediately to me, with four shillings and five sixpences.

Q. Were they the same four shillings you had given before to Mary Mead ? - A. All excepting one, and that was bent both ways, whereas mine was bent only one way; I went to her with the money, I told her I had not given her a bad shilling; she told me it was the same; I told her positively it was not, for that all my shillings were good; with that, I told my young man to go for an officer, that I suspected her to be a person that was uttering bad money. While he was gone, she told me she did not think it was a bad shilling; I told her it was, and that it was not the shilling that I gave her; she asked me to let her look at it, and I gave it to her, and she put it into her mouth, I observed two shillings in her mouth; and after she had put this shilling into her mouth she laid me down my own shilling again, and said, I do not think it is a bad one; I told her, no, that was not, for that was the shilling that I had given to her; then the officer came, and he saw it.

Q. Did you afterwards see the shilling that was produced by the officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the shilling, that you saw afterwards by the officer, the shilling that was brought back to you from the prisoner? - A. It was; it was bent both ways.

Q. Did you take particular notice of her during the whole time till the officer came? - A. Yes; having a suspicion of her I watched her all the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you brought the four shillings here? - A. No.

Q. Have you brought the one shilling that is good here? - A. Yes.

Q. You have not brought the three, part of the four shillings? - A. They were all flat shillings, and good.

Jury. Q. Do you keep any till in your shop? - A. Yes; but there was no silver in it at that time.

Q. We wish to know whether the servant, (the last witness), had an opportunity of changing the the silver before he had given it to her? - A. He had not that opportunity.

- KINNERSLY sworn. - Q. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable: I was sent for on the 5th of February, I went, and saw the prisoner in the shop, I was informed that she was a woman that passed bad money; I took her into a back room, I told her I must search her, I searched both her pockets; she stood with her left side towards the fire, and she put her left hand up to her mouth and chucked something into the fire, upon which, I heard the found of money; I immediately called for assistance, and Clayton came in, as there was no other person in the room but myself, I was positive there was money of some sort, either in the ashes or in the fire; Clayton looked in the ashes under the fire-place and could not peceive any thing; I said look in the fire, he found this shilling in it, and he took it out with the fire-tongs, and delivered it to me, I have had it in my custody ever since; I searched her every where but found no bad money: she had half-a-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and three-pence, and some soap, the money was good, and marked with a Y; she was very insolent and saucy at first, afterwards she behaved very well.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you searched a great many for uttering bad money? - A. Yes, three before.

Q. Did you ever find half-a-guinea, and a good many seven-shilling-pieces on their persons? - A. No, never.

Q. Nor will you ever in your life again. -

Mr. Knapp. (To Clayton.) Q. Is that the shilling that you took out of the fire? - A. It is; and it is the shilling that I took to my mistress the second time with the change.

Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Q. Look at that shilling; Is that the shilling that was brought to you by the last witness? - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. (To Clayton.) Q. You know it by its colour, do not you? - A. I know it by taking it out of the fire.

Q. The question is whether this is the shilling that you took to your mistress from the prisoner, and you know it by its colour? - A. I know it by its being bent.

Q. Do you know it by the colour? - A. It was not of this colour at first.

Mr. Gurney. If this had been burnt for seven years it could not have been a worse colour.

- FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are one of the Moniers of the Mint; look at that, and tell me whether that is a counterfeit? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Mr. Gurney. No doubt of it, it is all copper every bit.

Mr. Knapp. (To Kinnersly.) Q. Have you not got another shilling? - A. Yes; I should have produced it, but it was not called for; I received this from Clayton. (Produces it.)

Q. (To Clayton.) Is that the shilling that you received from your mistress, being one of the four shillings? - A. That is the self-same shilling.

Q. (To Prosecutrix.) Look at that shilling, and tell me whether that is one of the four shillings that you gave to Clayton? - A. It is.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Franklin.) Q. Is that a good shilling? - A. That is doubtful.

Mr. Gurney. One is a bad shilling, and the other is doubtful.

Prisoner's defence. (Read in Court.) My Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury. Unfortunately situated as I am, in such a perilous situation, I have not the least fear or doubt of hearing the voice of the Jury say not guilty, instead of the contrary; you are, gentlemen of the Jury, to decide in my case, and that which I am charged with in my indictment you will see cannot be supported; namely, that I came into the prosecutrix's shop, to utter a bad shilling, knowing it to be so, when the contrary is the case, as hereafter I shall prove, by a fair representation of simple facts. On the evening stated in the indictment I went into the prosecutrix's shop to purchase some candles, for which I tendered a seven-shilling piece; the boy took it into the parlour; when the change was produced by the boy, I found that I was charged more for the candles than I could purchase them for elsewhere, the difference being only one penny, and the boy would not take any less than he asked for them by the pound. It is here to be observed, that I never refused any part of the change, nor, to the best of my recollection, had I any reason to do so; the prosecutrix came out of the parlour, and she said that I returned to her a shilling that she did not send out from the parlour to me, and she added that I was in the habit of so doing; I said, I would be very happy to have the charge investigated; upon which the prosecutrix sent for the constable; he declared it was all good; she ordered the constable to take and search me, and I, conscious of my innocence of the charge, readily submitted, the result of which was, that I had no bad money about me, nor any less money than the seven-shilling piece for the purchase of the candles,

but there was a half-guinea and a seven-shilling piece found on me, which I had when I went into the prosecutor's shop, and which was returned to me as being good and lawful coin. Now, gentlemen, what case they could find to ground my indictment upon, I declare to God I know not. They should have had the whole of the change brought into Court, and you would have heard the result of its examination, to see whether any part of such change was bad; this is a material part of my defence. On my examination at the Mansion-House, I understood they intended to support the charge against me, though I am ignorant upon what ground. The constable said, that, during the time he was searching me, he heard something that jingled, or made a noise like money, in the fireplace, and he called the prosecutrix's boy to search for it; and between the constable and the boy they found or produced a piece of burnt metal of some sort, which they said was the same that I uttered to the prosecutrix, which was impossible, and which the following facts will contradict: for the change which I received from the prosecutrix she had returned to her, though she said it was not the same she sent out; but the transaction proved it otherwise, as she had the change examined by the constable, the consequence of which was, he said it was all good; and she had the full change previous to the finding of this piece of metal, that she, the prosecutrix, nor any one else could identify, and for which I am at present indicted for my life; my prosecutrix was satisfied that I had returned to her all the change, and it was good. Upon these facts, I rest assured you will find me not guilty, which an English Jury, I trust, will; and I, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-70

194. JAMES MOODY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of George Sloane .

GEORGE SLOANE sworn. - Last Thursday, about a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was passing over London-bridge , I was near the centre arch of the bridge, when the prisoner at the bar put his hand into my pocket, and took out a silk handkerchief, and put it into his breast, and ran away with it, and a mob after him; I can prove that he threw it into a shop.

Prisoner. You did not see me throw it into a shop.

Court. Q. You are sure the prisoner was the person that picked your pocket? - A. I am very sure.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me pick your pocket? - A. I saw you pick my pocket, and I saw you put it into your breast.

Q. Did you see my hand in your pocket? - A. I could not see behind me; I felt your hand in my pocket.

Prisoner. That is a falsehood, sir.

RICHARD UNDERHILL sworn. - Q. What do you know of this transaction? - A. I was coming up Tooley-street, about a quarter past three o'clock, and heard the cry of stop thief; the first man I met was the prisoner at the bar, at the corner of the White Horse, in Tothill-street; I pursued him, and when I got about twenty or thirty yards in the court, I saw him put his hand into his bosom and throw away a handkerchief into a green-grocer's shop; the woman of the shop picked it up immediately, and gave it to me over the hatchway; he was stopped, and the gentleman came up and claimed the handkerchief, and he asked me to get an officer; I went to Union-hall and brought an officer, and that gentleman gave charge of him.

Q. You are sure that it was the prisoner that chucked the handkerchief into that shop? - A. Yes.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for, between the hours of three and four, to take the prisoner into custody. (Produces the handkerchief, which is identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. Please your honour, I was coming over the bridge, on Thursday evening, about a quarter after three; I was going to meet a waggon with some flour, and saw the handkerchief lying on one of the seats on the bridge; I did not know who it belonged to any more than any gentleman who sits here; so soon as this gentleman saw me put it into my bosom, he sung out, stop thief; I am as innocent as either of the gentlemen of the Jury that sits round there; I am not guilty of any thing of the kind, I never did see who it belonged to, nor I never saw the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-71

195. JOSEPH MORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , ten pair of stockings, value 24 s. the property of Elizabeth Hamer .

It appearing from the evidence of the prosecutrix, that the felony was committed on Monday, the 4th of February, and in the indictment it is the 4th of January; and she having a partner, her sister Mary Hamer ; and the things being laid in the indictment, the property of Elizabeth Hamer , they being the property of Elizabeth Hamer and Mary Hamer ; the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18050220-72

196. JOSEPH CLARK , JAMES SWIFT ,

and FRANCES POWELL , were indicted, the two former for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , three bushels of coals, value 3 s. and a sack, value 1 s. the property of James Copous , and the latter for receiving the same, she knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

GEORGE BRAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a sworn meter at Mr. Copous's wharf? - A. I was on the 29th of January.

Q. Were you measuring coals for Mr. Copous? - A. I was on the craft measuring out twenty one sacks of coals for Mr. Copous's waggon, and Clark was employed in loading the waggon when I was on the craft; I supposed I had sent him up nineteen sacks, I came up to Clark the carman and said, how many have you got Joe; he said eighteen; then I said, I must send you three more to make up twenty one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You seem to be quite in a supposition that there were only nineteen; did you see them all measured out; will you undertake to say there were any lost out of that room? - A. No; It was impossible for me to tell whether any were gone.

Q. Therefore in point of fact you can swear nothing at all.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Whatever sacks of coals were in that craft, were the property of Mr. Copous? - A. Yes.

ROBERT MILES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Copous? - A. Yes; on the 29th of January I was part of the time the waggon was loading in the craft; I believe a cart went away with the waggon, Clark drove the waggon and Swift drove the cart; they both went away together.

Q. Were the coals both in the waggon and the cart, the property of Mr. Copous? - A. They were.

Q. Where was Clark to deliver the coals to in that waggon? - A. To Mr. Jones, in Castle-street, Shoreditch; the coals in the cart, and in the waggon were both to be delivered at one place.

Q. Had either of the prisoners orders to deliver coals at Mr. Powell's, the White Hart public-house, Queen-street ? - A. No.

Q. That is the house of the woman prisoner? - A. Yes; it is in Queen-street, Ratcliff-cross; Mr. Copous's wharf is near to it, only about 200 yards from it.

Court. Q. Was Powell any customer to your house? - A. No, the carmen used to stop and drink at that house.

Q. Does your master sell as little as a sack at a time? - A. No, he sells three sacks.

ROBERT JAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a master smith; I have been these thirty years; I live at No. 77, High-street, Shadwell: On the 29th of January, about one o'clock in the day, I had been to see what my men were doing, and opposite to the White Hart, Queen-street, I saw a coal waggon first and a cart behind it; I saw the prisoner Clark take a sack of coals from the left side of the tail of the waggon and run across the way into the White Hart public-house; I went round to the front of the waggon to see who they belonged to, and saw Mr. Copous's name on it; I then saw Swift, he was beginning to tie up the rope a little tighter at the tail of the waggon; I then told Swift I had seen what was done and I would not pass it; he said he knew nothing of what had been done; I then went into the public-house and the first I saw was the prisoner Clark; he had just got rid of the sack, and was going to drink; I did not see the sack again, it was all instantly done; I said to him, my friend, I have seen what you have done, and I will not suffer it; he said, in answer, what have I done; I said, I saw you take a sack of coals out of the tail of that waggon and bring them into this house, to which he made no reply; the woman prisoner, Powell, as I supposed then, was the landlady of the house; she was near enough to hear what I had said to Clark; she stood at the left hand of the bar; I immediately turned round to her and said, madam, I have seen that man bring a sack of coals from the tail of that waggon now standing opposite the door, into this house, and I will not suffer it; I will go immediately and acquaint Mr. Copous? she said she knew nothing about any coals; upon that I immediately quitted the house, it was all momentarily done, I was not half a minute after Clark in the public-house, and the woman prisoner I found in the tap-room, standing still, she must have seen the coals; I then went to Mr. Copous's house and informed the clerk; his clerk went up with me immediately; we did not go into the house; the waggon and the cart had removed, but not out of sight.

Q. Did you see Mr. Powell, the landlord of the house? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You took no pains to see whether he was at home or not? - A. None.

Q. There is a passage through this house to an alley that leads to the wharf? - A. There is.

Q. You say that Mrs. Powell must have seen the situation she was in, if she was there? - A. Certainly.

Q. But whether she was there when the coals were put down it is not possible for you to say? - A. Certainly.

Q. She was attending to different persons who were calling for liquor? - A. She was standing still.

Q. There were several persons in the tap-room,

it was her business to attend them? - A. I did not know she was the landlord's wife.

Q. Why you do not understand the question; were there not a number of people in the taproom, and was it not her business to attend them? - A. I think I have got intellects; certainly.

Q. Was she standing at the time the waggoner deposited the coals; that you do not know? - A. I do not.

Court. Q. Did you return to the house and search for any coals, as soon as any information was given? - A. I did nothing about it till Mr. Copous came up, about six o'clock in the evening.

JAMES COPOUS sworn - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. In consequence of information that had been given you, by Mr. James, you went to the office? - A. Yes, about six o'clock in the evening, and the prisoners were then taken into custody.

Q. You did not superintend the search of the house? - A. No.

Q. Had Mr. Powell, the master of the public-house, agreed with you for any coals? - A. No.

Q. Had any of your servants liberty from you to sell a sack of coals? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In point of fact no property was ever found? - A. No.

Q. I believe it was not your intention to prosecute the woman? - A. I went up to Mr. Reid, the Magistrate, and he persuaded me to take them all up.

Court. You did very right to do as the Justice recommended.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Swift and Powell called three witnesses each who gave them a good character.

Clark, GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Swift, NOT GUILTY .

Powell, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050220-73

197. THOMAS FRANCIS was indicted for that he, on the 6th of October , being servant to Alexander Copeland , did receive the sum of 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. for and on account of his said master, and that he, afterwards, did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same from his said master .

The case stated by Mr. Knapp.

ALEXANDER COPELAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have no partners? - A. No.

Q. You are a builder , and have a wharf at Mill-bank, Westminster ? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was superintendant of that wharf ? - A. Yes, he had the charge of the wharf.

WILLIAM HUNT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am clerk to Mr. Copeland.

Q. The prisoner at the bar was superintendant at the wharf? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar use to deliver to you his accounts once a fortnight? - A. Yes, of monies received by him, on account, to Mr. Copeland.

Q. Have you got his account-book? - A. Yes.

Q. Does it appear, on the 6th of October, that he received any money from Mr. Locke, of the sum of 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. is there any receipt of any money received from Mr. Locke? - A. No.

Q. Is that the hand-writing of the prisoner? (shews him a paper) - A. It is.

Q. You settled with him once a fortnight? - A. I do not; the cashier, Mr. Stephenson, receives the money, and I settle the accounts of the book.

Court. Q. In the prisoner's book is there any account of any money received on the 6th of October? - A. There is none received on the 6th of October, but there is money paid by him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Is there any account of money received on the 5th of October? - A. No.

Q. Is there any credit given to him for any money received on the 6th? - A. No.

Q. Did you always ask him, when you settled, whether there was any money to be brought to account? - A. Yes, several times, and he always said, no.

Court. Q. October 8th, whose hand writing is this, received six pounds? - A. That memorandum is my writing; this was an account of his own wages, and sundry expences paid by him.

Q. Were you constantly in the habit of asking him whether he had received any money, regularly every fortnight? - A. I cannot say that I did every time, but at sundry times I have done so.

Q. When did you first entertain any suspicion that he had received any money of Mr. Locke? - A. On his last settlement that we had on account of his wharfage; I asked him myself whether he had received any money for wharfage, in consequence of my sending the bill in, the man brought the receipt; he denied receiving the 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. of Mr. Locke; I had told him I should send round, and I did, and Mr. Locke came with his receipt; this was on the 19th of January, he mentioned one sum of Mr. Stapleton, and that is the only one he mentioned, and that was for wharfage.

BENJAMIN EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you pay any sum of money to the prisoner for Mr. Locke? - A. I paid to Mr. Francis, on the 6th of October last, the sum of 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. for Mr. Locke, for money due to Mr. Copeland for wharfage.

Q. Were did you get that bill from? - A. From Mr. Locke, and the receipt from Mr. Francis, the prisoner.

Q. Did you see him write it? - A. I did; it is the prisoner's hand-writing (read in Court); October 6, 1804, received of Mr. Evans, 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. for Mr. Copeland. Thomas Francis .

Q. Where was this that you paid him the money? - A. At Mr. Read's, the Elephant and Castle, in Queen-street; it was between four and seven in the afternoon.

Q. Was he sober then? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any appearance of having been drinking? - A. No, not at all.

JAMES LOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you wharfage coals at Mr. Copeland's wharf? - A. Yes; I cannot say when it was, it was according to the bill; I cannot read or write myself; Evans owed me this money for carting the coals, and he paid that money for me.

Q. Do you know Francis, the prisoner? - A. Yes; I asked Francis, the prisoner, for the bill, I believe it might be a month or five weeks before Evans paid the bill; I asked the prisoner whether he objected taking the money of Evans; he said, not at all; I wished to know if he would let Evans stand pay-master; he said, yes, and he did pay it.

- STEPHENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are cashier to Mr. Copeland, and of course, you being cashier, you had the managing the accounts of Mr. Copeland? - A. I had.

Q. Have you the books here? - A. Yes; you may see my initials in the book, it is in the handwriting of Francis, this is his accounts, and there is my settlement.

Q. Does there appear on the 6th of October any sum of money accounted by him to your master, for a sum of money paid by Locke, or at least by Evans, is that the book in which it ought to have appeared? - A. If it had been paid it should have been there; it should have given credit for it here; it is not here.

Q. Where is the last sum of money received before this? - A. The 14th of September was the last settlement before the 6th of October, and the next settlement is the 19th of November.

Q. Does there appear, either on the 14th of September, or on the 19th of November, any credit given for the sum of 5 l. 13 s. 8 d. given by Mr. Locke? - A. He has not given credit for the sum received, nothing but charges, and no credit.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and gentlemen of the Jury. I acknowledged receiving the money, and that it was totally an omission on my own part in not bringing it to account.

Court. (To Stephenson.) Q. When was he taken up? - A. In February.

Q. Where you present when he was taken - did he say any thing when he was taken? - A. He did not, as I understood, I was not present.

- GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050220-74

198. ABEL M'DONALD and HENRY SIDDONS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a knife, value 6 d. a seven-shilling-piece, and fourteen shillings , the property of Robert Abbott .

There being no evidence to affect either of the prisoners, they were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-75

199. WILLIAM MELLISH was indicted for that he, on the 12th of January , being servant to Samuel Newman , did receive and take into his possession the sum of 17 s. 2 d. for and on account of his said master, and that he, afterwards, did fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count. For the like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

SAMUEL NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 20th of January, I believe the prisoner was your apprentice ? - A. Yes; I am a butcher , he has been my apprentice three years and a half.

Q. What age is he? - A. (Prisoner.) Seventeen years the 22d of last January.

Q. On the 12th of January did you send him to his Majesty's house at Kew? - A. Yes, he always went there.

Q. Did he go there on the 12th with a shoulder of mutton? - A. I do not know, I am not clerk.

Q. It was his custom to go daily to his Majesty's house at Kew , to Mr. Hutchinson, for orders? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on that day happen to be in your shop when he came back from Mr. Hutchinson to your shop for some meat for him? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember what he said? - A. I do not indeed.

Q. Did you deliver to him, or was any meat delivered to him, to take to Mr. Hutchinson? - A. I cannot say, the business I do; I cannot say I am sure.

Court. Q. You do not know whether you sell a pound of meat in a week or not? - A. I only know I sell a great deal.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have a daughter that makes out your bills? - A. My daughter is the only person that makes out all my bills.

Q. Did you receive from him, after he had been to Mr. Hutchinson's, (supposing he had been there) the sum of 17 s. 2 d.? - A. No, by no means.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You do not know that any meat at all was delivered to Mr. Hutchinson from the prisoner? - A. Oh, dear me, to be sure I do not; I should be very wrong if I said so I am sure; I declare I do not.

- HUTCHINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you live in his Majesty's house at Kew? - A. I do; Mr. Newman is my butcher.

Q. On the 12th of January, did the prisoner at the bar bring you any meat from Mr. Newman's? - A. I cannot say particularly to the day.

Q. You have a bill in your hand which will tell you the date? - A. Yes; on the 12th of January.

Q. You see the last article in that bill is dated the 12th of January? - A. That makes me remember that a shoulder of mutton was brought to me when he first brought the bill with the meat, it amounted to 11 s. 10 d. I ordered him to take the bill back and bring a receipt to the bill, the bill having no receipt, and to bring a shoulder of mutton, and include that in the bill; he came, I think, the next day, with the shoulder of mutton, and the bill as it now stands; when he brought the shoulder of mutton, that was the day I paid him, and he brought the receipt that is now with it; I paid him 17 s. 10 d.

Court. Q. Was it 17 s. 10 d. or 17 s. 2 d.? - A. 17 s. 10 d.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. You have no recollection of this transaction except as you derive it from that bill - was this the last bill you ever paid? - A. This is the last bill I ever paid him; I recollect having some conversation with him; he brought the bill without a receipt the first time he brought it, and when I paid him, I paid him 17 s. 10 d. I told him I would not pay him without the receipt, and when he brought the receipt, I recollect paying it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What age are you? - A. I am in my eighty-seventh year.

PHILLIS NEWMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You assist in your father's business? - A. I do, I make out his bills.

Q. Just look at that bill - is any part on that bill your hand-writing? - A. The three first articles, the 11 s. 10 d. is my hand-writing.

Q. Is the last article 5 s. 4 d. for the shoulder of mutton your hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Q. Are the words at the bottom of the receipt, paid, P. Newman, your hand-writing? - A. It is not.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming back to you for a shoulder of mutton? - A. I cannot say I do.

Q. Did he bring you back 17 s. 2 d. or any other sum of money, from Mr. Hutchinson? - A. None at all.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say that he brought you no part, not even the 11 s. 10 d.? - A. Not any.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you, either on that day, or on any other day, ask him any questions respecting the money from Mr. Hutchinson? - A. I asked him if Mr. Hutchinson had paid him any money, he said, no.

Q. Was that after he had taken in that bill of 11 s. 10 d.? - A. I cannot say that I did ask him about that bill.

Q. How soon after the delivery of that bill was he taken up? - A. About a fortnight after; I do not remember having any conversation with him about it.

Court. Q. You do not remember the shoulder of mutton being delivered to him? - A. I cannot say that I do.

Q. You sent him out for orders, and when he came home you took minutes in your book of those orders? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got that book here? - A. No.

Q. Then, in fact, you do not know of any of these things being delivered? - A. I believe them to be delivered.

Q. This fact is clear, that the goods and the shoulder of mutton were delivered; whether delivered from your shop or another shop, that is another thing - Did you ever see the prisoner write? - A. I cannot swear to that writing, I have seen him write.

Mr. Gurney. (To Prosecutor.) How soon did you discover this last bill of Mr. Hutchinson having been paid to the prisoner? - A. I should think in about two weeks.

Q. Did you question him about the subject? - A. Some trifle my son did, he never denied it.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better if he would tell you? - A. I did.

Mr. Knapp. There is not sufficient evidence to go to a Jury upon the delivery of the articles themselves; there is no proof at all of any of the articles coming from their shop, only that they were delivered to Mr. Hutchinson by this person.

Court. There is certainly a point which I do not take upon myself to decide in the Court; and though I should be clearly of your opinion, and in favour of the prisoner, yet it is a point of so much consequence to the public, perhaps the discussion of it may do a great deal of harm; I will take the opinion of the Jury upon that fact - the delivery of the goods.

Mr. Gurney. That is a fact, the delivery of the goods.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 11 s. 10 d.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-76

200. GEORGE ATWELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Revill , about the hour of eight in the night of the first of February , with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing therein, 3 pair of steel snuffers, value 4 s. and 3 japan snuffer-trays, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Revill .

LUKE HEBERT sworn. - I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Revill , ironmonger , No. 36. Shoreditch ; On

the first of this month, between the hours of eight and nine in the evening, I heard a noise at the shop window; I was behind the counter serving some customers.

Q. What noise? - A. I cannot describe the noise any other way than it was a little noise; I went to see what it was, and I observed a hand coming through a hole of the window; the window had been broken for a week before that, but the piece had been fastened with putty; I saw the same hand draw through the hole a snuffer tray: I immediately ran out and secured the prisoner.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. Between five and eight yards from the door; I am not certain.

Q. Did you find any thing on him? - A. While I had hold of him he kept struggling, and during that struggle he let fall two pair of snuffers and three snuffer trays, but before I came to him I heard one pair of snuffers fall, which he threw away; I thought they were snuffers by the jingle on the stones; I picked up the snuffers and the trays with one hand, and held him with the other, and brought him into the shop, and sent for an Officer, and he was taken into custody.

Q. Did you know the boy before this? - A. No.

Q. The snuffers and the snuffer trays that you picked up were the property of the prosecutor? - A. Yes; I know they are his property.

Q. Did you miss them? - A. Yes.

JOHN GREGORY sworn. - I took him into custody, and found this little instrument on him; it is a small book, he had nothing else but that in his pocket.

Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see such an instrument before? - A. Yes, it is used to go into any hole to reach lace, silk handkerchiefs, or other things. ( John Armstrong an officer produced the property.)

Q. They are steel snuffers; - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. He has been tried before; the boy lives with his friends.

Q. Do you know his parents? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. It is a prickler to pick up the fish with.

GUILTY , Death , aged 14.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-77

201. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, in and upon James Grant , on the 30th of January , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will 324 newspapers, value 8 l. the property of Lucretia Green and Willis Richards .

2 d. Count. For like offence, only charging it to be the property of James Grant.

JAMES GRANT sworn. - I live with Mrs. Lucretia Green.

Q. Who is her partner? - A. Willis Richards ; I am their errand boy .

Q. What business are they? - A. Newsmen; dealers in newspapers .

Q. Were you at any time carrying any parcel of newspapers, and were you met by any body to stop you? - A. Yes on the 30th of January.

Q. Where were you carrying newspapers to; were they a large parcel? - A. To the Gloucester coffee-house; they were to go by the mail coach, there were 324.

Q. You were carrying them for your master and mistress? - A. Yes.

Q. What happened to you? - A. He came and knocked me down in Rupert-street .

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. About a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Somebody came and knocked you down; did you see who it was? - A. No, I do not know who it was.

Q. Did he come behind you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he knock you down with his hand, or a stick, or what? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you receive a blow? - A. Yes, on my back, and I fell down.

Q. What became of this parcel of newspapers? - A. This man took them from me.

Q. What man? - A. This man, the prisoner.

Q. Was there another with him? - A. Yes, and somebody snatched them from me.

Q. Did you see any body snatch them from you? - A. Yes, this man, the prisoner.

Q. Did you see the prisoner snatch them from you, as you were down? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him before? - A. No, but he took them from me.

Q. Who it was that knocked you down you do not know? - A. No.

Q. But, as soon as you were down, the prisoner took the parcel from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any body with the prisoner then? - A. No.

Q. How near was he to you? - A. Close to me.

Q. What did he do as soon as he snatched the parcel from you? - A. He made away up Rupert-street.

Q. What did you do? - A. I cried out, stop thief.

Q. Did you see him stopped? - A. No.

Q. How soon after did you see him? - A. In about five minutes afterwards.

Q. Whereabouts was he then? - A. In Rupert-street.

Q. Who had him in custody then? - A. A man.

Q. Are you sure that that man you saw afterwards was the man that snatched the newspapers from you? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. When was this? - A. On the 30th of January.

Q. At what time? - A. About a quarter past seven in the evening.

Q. It was very dark then? - A. Yes, a very dark night.

Q. Something struck you on the back? - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts was the prisoner at that time? - A. He was at the end of Rupert-street.

Q. Whereabouts were you when you received the blow? - A. I was crossing; I was at the right hand of Oxendon-street.

Q. Oxendon-street is opposite to Rupert-street? - A. I do not know.

Q. You say you had a push, and, in consequence of that push, you sell? - A. Yes.

Q. And in getting up the papers were snatched from you? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it you were alarmed? - A. Yes.

Q. The man who took the papers ran away? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner at the bar you never saw before that night? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. And the night was very dark? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it between the time of knocking you down and taking the paper from you? - A. Immediately.

Q. No interval between? - A. No.

- SLADE sworn. - Q. Did you see the prisoner? - A. Yes, I was at my own house, which was about a hundred yards from where the prisoner was apprehended, by a person of the name of Chaunt; I heard the cry of, stop thief, and a boy came up and told me there was a boy robbed; I run up Rupert-street about 150 yards from my house.

Q. You found the prisoner and somebody else contending? - A. Yes, they were struggling, and I laid hold of the prisoner, on the opposite side to where the man had got hold of him; I held him till a person of the name of Wilson came up to my assistance, and then we apprehended him; I held him till the prosecutor brought the newspapers to me, and then I took him to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. Where did you see the prisoner first? - A. I came up to the prisoner just by the Blue posts, and when I was there the boy came up with the newspapers; the boy was there at the time, though I did not see him; I enquired for him, and he was brought up to me.

BENJAMIN CHAUNT sworn. - On the 30th of January I was in Rupert-street, as soon as I got into Rupert-street I heard the alarm of stop thief, I was coming out of St. Martin's lane into West-street.

Q. You did not hear the cry of stop thief till you were in Rupert-street? - A. No.

Q. When you heard the cry of stop thief, did you see any body? - A. There was one gentleman before me; I made towards the noise of the boy, and as I made towards him I saw a man crossing the street, he had something under his arm, I could not see then what it was, I mended my way towards him and kept him in my sight; he was running the same side as I was; as soon as I got up to him I laid hold of him; he had something under his arm, and when he found that I would not let him go, he threw the parcel on the flags.

Q. You saw that, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you keep him fast? - A. I kept him fast for a little time, till at last he threw himself out of my arms.

Q. Did you take particular notice of him when you had him fast, so as to know him again? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was it? - A. The prisoner at the bar, I am sure of it.

Q. How far did he get from you? - A. About a yard, as near as I can guess; I laid hold of him again; On my laying hold of him again he fell a beating me.

Q. Did any body come up while he was beating you? A gentleman that was behind me.

Q. Do you know who that gentleman was? - A. No.

Q. (To Mr. Slade.) Did you come up to the assistance of Chaunt? - A. Yes, and then we secured him.

Q. (To Chaunt.) Did you see what became of the parcel that he threw upon the flags? - A. No, I did not see it picked up at all.

Q. You did not see what it was? - A. No.

Q. Did you see Grant the boy? - A. Not till afterwards.

Q. How soon did you see Grant? - A. It might be ten minutes after I was in Rupert-street.

Q. Did he come up to you or you go to him? - A. He came up to the constable.

Q. Had he any thing with him? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. You never saw the parcel at all after that? - A. Not till we went to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. This was a dark night we have heard? - A. It was not very dark.

Q. You say when you came towards Rupert-street your attention was attracted by the noise of stop thief; How soon after did you see the prisoner? - A. About two minutes.

Q. How far up Rupert-street were you from Coventry-street - were you half way up from Coventry-street? - A. No, not so much as that.

Q. Did you meet him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he coming up Coventry-street? - A. Yes.

Q. As soon as you got into Rupert-street, you have just said, that first you seized the prisoner, he struggled with you, he got away, and you then seized him a second time? - A. Yes.

Q. And that in about ten minutes time the boy came up? - A. I believe it was.

Q. How long was it after you heard the cry of stop thief that the prisoner came up? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You say you struggled with the man a great deal; you were much alarmed? - A. I was not much alarmed.

Q. Do you happen to know whether in case this man is convicted there is a reward? - A. I do not.

Q. Did you ever hear of it? - A. I do not know any thing about it; I was never in any thing of the kind before.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a bridle-bit maker, I live at No. 6, St. Ann's-street.

Q. Are you a Londoner? - A. I came from the County of Warwick, from a place called Oxley.

Q. How long have you been in town? - A. Three years come the 14th of next June.

Q. What was the occasion of your coming to town? - A. I had not seen my mother for fourteen or fifteen years.

Q. Had you any brothers living in Birmingham? - A. I had one; we were all bred and born in the county of Warwick, at Oxley.

Q. Is your father dead? - A. He has been dead about nine years, I never knew him.

Q. Have you any brothers now living? - A. Yes, one at sea and one in America; there have been three

of them killed this war in the service of their country; I have heard as such, I cannot tell any more.

Q. I ask you if you know any thing about a reward; do you mean to swear, that with respect to this transaction, you have not had any conversation about a reward? - A. I have not had any conversation about a reward.

Q. Can you tell me how much would be given by the parish, provided this prisoner was convicted? - A. None, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Recollect yourself; have you not stated that there was a reward of twelve pounds paid by the parish? - A. I have had several of the prisoners friends come to me, and offer me a sum of money, I do not know how much it was; they have been every day; I told them I could do no more than speak the truth of what I had seen.

Q. Have you not said there would be a reward of twelve pounds from the parish, and forty pounds besides, and upon the oath you have taken, have not you, upon that ground, offered to take sixteen pounds of any body? - A. No; there was a gentleman with me and he wanted to give me a sum of money; I told him I could do nothing in it.

Q. My question is whether you have not offered to take the sum of sixteen pounds? - A. No, they wanted me to take a sum of money, how much was not mentioned, to the best of my knowledge; I told him I could not do any thing at all with it, I did not wish to appear against him, it was disobliging my master.

Q. Have you offered to take money and goods, or any thing else besides money; twelve pounds and a pair of boots? - A. No.

Q. You will swear that positively? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you know the names of any of these people that came after you and offered you this money? - A. One is Smith or Clarke, I cannot say exactly.

- WILSON sworn. - Smith, an inhabitant of Rupert-street came to me to take the prisoner into custody, and when I came I found Slade with him; he desired me to assist him, which I did; he laid hold of one side, and I the other.

Q. Did you find the last witness Chaunt there? - A. Yes.

Q. Who had hold of the prisoner at that time? - A. Slade; there was an altercation at that time; Chaunt was close to him, and a gentleman brought the boy over with the bundle that he was robbed of and took care of the boy that he should not lose it again; I took him to Marlborough-street.

Q. Do you know who the gentleman was? - A. No.

Q. (To Grant.) You said that the bundle was snatched from you? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to get it again? - A. A gentleman brought them to me.

Q. Where was the prisoner at the time the gentleman brought them to you? - A. Up Rupert-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner and the other people there? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that bundle the gentleman brought to you the same bundle you had been carrying before? - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Q. Have you got it here? - A. No, here is the wrapper. (The wrapper produced.)

Court. Q. They were to go in the mail-coach? - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the wrapper that was given to you by a gentleman in the street? - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. Q. What do you know it by? - A. I know it by its being dirty, that is all.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down the end of Coventry-street and I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man cross with it; that is all I can say.

Wilson. He said, after he had been confined, that if the two Saffron-hill lads had been with him he would have cut his way through all the mob; I heard him say that.

WILLIAM CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. I live at No. 2, Chapel-street, Grub-street; I am a master shoe-maker, the prisoner is a journeyman shoe-maker , he has worked for me about these two years; he is a very hard working man; I never knew any thing against him.

Q. Do you know any thing of the witness Chaunt? - A. His wife came to me last night, and said that her husband was very uneasy about it.

Q. Have you had any conversation with Chaunt himself, at his own house? - A. I was there, and when I went there he told me himself, that he was the same day down enquiring for me, on the former part of the day; he said, we have been to day with the bill, and we have not found it; he said, if you come to morrow morning, before eight o'clock, and give me ten pounds and a pair of boots, as you are in the shoemaking line, I wish to make a flaw in the bill.

Q. When was that? - A. When we went with the officer to find the bill; he said, we know how to make a flaw in it, if not, his life lies in my hands; I said, I cannot positively say I shall be with you in the morning.

Q. Did he tell you he would send his wife? - A. Yes, and his wife did call last night; his wife was with me on Monday night, and last night his wife called about seven o'clock in the evening at my house; I was with him last night was a week, and then he said he should expect sixteen pounds, after that, he said he would take twelve pounds; he said the parish that he was taken in gives twelve pounds, and there was a forty pound reward; there were two people with me heard him say, that if he should be convicted he should be entitled to forty pounds; he said the boy saw nothing about it, nor knows nothing about it, it all lies to me.

Q Are you sure that passed from him to you about the forty pounds and the twelve pounds? - A. Upon my oath; he cannot deny it.

Court. Q. When did you first know any thing of Chaunt? - A. When the prisoner sent to me, and told me he was in trouble; that was the first time that I knew any thing about it.

Q. Upon that where did you go? - A. He said there is a man that laid hold of me, by the name of Chaunt; he lives in little St. Andrew's lane, he is a bridle bit maker by business.

Q. Did you go to Chaunt? - A. I did; I asked him what this man was in trouble about; he said, I took

hold of him, he was running along the street; I do not wish to hurt the man, I can get out of the way.

Q. Did you offer to give him any thing? - A. No, it was his own words.

Q. How often did you go to his house? - A. Three times in all, I believe.

Q. Do you mean to swear it was no more than three times? - A. It might be four times that I was there.

Q. It might be more? - A. No.

Q. What did you go to Chaunt's house four times for? - A. After he told me the business, he told me he would not appear against the man if I would give him sixteen pounds; I never made any bargain with him.

Q. What did you go after him for? - A. Only to hear what he had to say about the prisoner.

Q. I want to know what you went after him first for? - A. To hear what the man had done, I was entirely a stranger to the business; then in invited me to come up there.

Q. Was it for the sake of his company or society that you went after him the first time? - A. We have got a chair-club near there.

Q. Then you went up to spend the evening, and not on business about the prisoner? - A. I only made enquiry of what the man had done.

Q. You thought this man an extremely bad man to offer to make it up for money; did you take any other person at any other time? - A. Two persons at one time.

Q. And who at another time? - A. A man of the name of Holmes; I did not hear them interfere in the business.

GUILTY , Death , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18050220-78

202. MARY, the wife of HENRY JENKINSON , was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 22d day of December , a bank note, for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

2d. Count. For feloniously uttering, disposing of, and putting away, a like forged and counterfeited banknote, she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with the same intention.

Two other Counts, For forging and uttering as true, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, a promissory note for the payment of 2 l. describing it the same as the two former counts, with the like intention.

Four other Counts, For the like offence, with intention to defraud William Page .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Bosanquet; and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

ANN PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet.

Q. You are the wife of Mr. William Page , of Liquorpond-street ? - A. I am.

Q. What is your husband? - A. A pawn-broker and salesman .

Q. Are there two shops or one? - A. Two shops united in each other.

Q. Are they both in the same street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at any time last year coming to your shop? - A. Yes, on the night of the 22d of December.

Q. Do you recollect her person? - A. Very well.

Q. For what purpose did she come there? - A. To purchase a broach, and she also purchased a pair of wire ear-rings as well as a broach.

Q. How did she pay for them? - A. She paid for them with a two pound bank-note.

Q. Did you take any notice of the note with which she paid you? - A. I took notice of the note with which she paid me; it was quite a new one.

Q. Were there any marks by which you should know it again? - A. There was small writing on the back, but I did not particularly observe it; I did not look much where the writing was; there was K. B. between the Britannia and the two; it was signed Phillips.

Q. Is that the note? (handing it to her) - A. That is the note which I took of her.

Q. What did you do with that note when you had taken it of the prisoner? - A. I put it into the till which we usually keep money in immediately; I saw it again on Sunday morning.

Q. When did she come? - A. On the Saturday night the 22d of December, as is my usual custom, I took the money out of the till on Saturday night, and on Sunday morning Mr. Page discovered this to be a bad note.

Q. When did you part with that note? - A. I do not exactly remember which day of the week it was, I think it was on the Tuesday following.

Q. To whom did you part with it? - A. To a gentleman of the name of Lewis.

Q. Did it go out of your hands before you parted with it to Mr. Lewis? - A. No, I gave it to Mr. Lewis myself.

Q. Are you certain of the person of the prisoner? - A. I am certain of the person of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you never parted with this note till you gave it to Mr. Lewis? - A. No, it never was out of my possession.

Q. You discovered on Sunday morning it was a bad note? - A. No, Mr. Page discovered it.

Q. How came you to pass it to Mr. Lewis, you understanding it to be a bad one? - A. I keep a pocket book with notes for payment, I had put this with the rest and passed it without any intention.

Q. You passed it to Mr. Lewis? - A. I did.

Q. Do you mean to swear that on Sunday morning, your husband knew that it was a bad note? - A. Yes.

Q. And you knew it as well as your husband? - A. Yes.

Q. So that when you knew that as well as your husband you passed it to a tradesman? - A. I do not know whether he is a tradesman or not, I believe he is a gentleman.

Q. How long was it after you gave it to Mr. Lewis, before you saw it again? - A. On the 30th.

Q. You took it on the Saturday, and on the Sunday you knew it to be a bad one, on the Tuesday you parted with it, and on the subsequent Sunday you saw it again? - A. Yes.

Q. You manage the business of one shop, and your husband the other? - A. Yes.

Q. Your's is not a pawnbroker's shop? - A. No; it is a sale shop.

Q. This transaction took place between you and the prisoner on Saturday night? - A. Yes.

Q. That is generally the busiest night for pawnbrokers? - A. Yes.

Q Therefore, of necessity, you take more money then than on other days? - A. I do not.

Q. There is more money taken on Saturday in your house than on other days? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known the prisoner at the bar before Saturday? - A. I never saw her before in my life.

Q. What did she purchase? - A. She purchased a broach for twelve shillings, and a pair of wire ear rings for three shillings; she dealt with me for the broach, and with my niece for the ear-rings.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop? - A. There was a person that came into the shop to buy some gold rings.

Q. Was not she looking at the same articles as the prisoner? - A. No, she was not.

Q. Do you mean to say whether she was in company with her or not? - A. I do not know, they went out at the same time.

Q. Some few minutes past before you took the note, you had no suspicion that it was a bad one, or else you would not have taken it? - A. No.

Q. You did not write upon the note at the time you took it? - A. I did not; I made an observation that there was K. B. upon it and signed by the name of Philips.

Q. You had a great many other bank-notes? - A. No.

Q. You say this bank-note was never out of your possession, till you gave it to Mr. Lewis; do you mean to say that you are accurate in that? - A. I do.

Q. How came your husband to say it was a bad note? - A. I took the money out of the till on the Saturday night, and on Sunday it is our usual custom to look it over, I sat by when he looked over the cash, it was all put together.

Q. Do you make your husband your cashier? - A. No, I keep the money myself.

Q. Do you collect your money every Saturday, or every night, or do you do it once a week? - A. We do not keep any account of the sale-shop, the pawnbroker's shop is kept separate.

Q. I ask you whether you account with your husband oftener than once a week? - A. I never account with him at all, I keep it myself in general, and if he wants any I give it him.

Q. Does he look over your money more than once a week? - A. More particularly on the Sunday, because he has more time.

Q. Had the prisoner been in your shop upon any accident happening to one of the wires of the ear-rings? - A. Yes, she brought it back; at the time they were sold they were supposed to be correct, and they were to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did not the prisoner, shortly after, in the same night, return and tell you one was a broken wire, and desire you to change it? - Yes.

Q How long after? - A. Within a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did not she advance you some ready money to induce you to change the wire? - A. She gave me sixpennyworth of halfpence.

Jury. Q. Had not you taken any other 2 l. note? - A. Upon my word I cannot tell.

Q. Did you put it with others? - A. Not till I looked at it.

Q. And then you put it with the others? - A. There might be others, I cannot say.

Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Was there any other 2 l. note whatever marked K.B. or signed Philips, in that part of the drawer in which you put that note? - A. No.

Q. You had no other note marked K.B. and signed Philips? - A. No.

Q. How came you to give it to Mr. Lewis? - A. I gave it inadvertently; he purchased some things of me, and gave me a 5 l. note, for which I had to give him 3 l. 6 s. he said I should like to have your name upon it; Mr. Page came into the shop, and he said, be so good as to put your name upon it; then I desired his address, and W.P. was put upon the note.

Q. Look at the note? - A. This is the note; there is the W.P. that was marked by Mr. Page before it was given to Mr. Lewis.

Q. Be so good as to look at the front of the note, at the K.B; is that the note you took of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I think I could swear it.

Court. Q. When did you discover that you had given this to Mr. Lewis? - A. Mr. Page discovered it the same evening, and was very angry; he was to have seen Mr. Bliss, the Inspector of the Bank, the next morning, and was going to give him this note; Mr. Page took every pains that was in his power to get the note again.

JANE RAMSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. You are the niece of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner at the bar coming into your aunt's shop? - A. Yes.

THOMAS BLISS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are an Inspector of the Bank, and, in consequence of information you received, you went to the house of the prisoner, on Saturday the 29th of December in the afternoon? - A. In consequence of some information I went to the prisoner's house; when the officers apprehended her they searched her house; there was a miniature painting lying in the front parlour where the prisoner was; I asked the prisoner whose picture that was, she said it was her husband's; I asked her if Cornelius Holt was her husband; she said she was married to him, it was her husband.

Q. How came you to put that question to her with that name, Cornelius Holt ? - A. I thought it was a miniature-picture of Cornelius Holt .

Q. Had you any knowledge of such a person? - A. I had a knowledge of Holt, it struck me that it was like him, and thought that it was the picture of him.

Q. When you were with the woman, and the officers had taken her into custody, what passed between her and you? - A. She said that Holt was her husband, and that she was married to him, and soon after the officers had done searching her she seemed violently agitated, and said, Oh! that villain, Holt, will bring me at last to the gallows! then she was taken in a coach to Bow-street: we stopped at Mr. Page's, in

Liquorpond-street; I went in the coach with her, and stopped there with the prisoner and the officer; she went into the shop and saw Mrs. Page, and Jane Ramsey , her niece; they both saw her, and said that was the woman that had been there.

Q. What passed between you and the prisoner, or between the prisoner and any body else? - A. In conversation with Mrs. Page, Mrs. Page asked her about the ear-rings and the broach; she said, if I did buy a broach, it is disposed of; you will not see it again; you may take and hang me by the neck, or what you will, I will never say what I have done with it; she acknowledged being there, and buying the ear-rings and something else.

Q. Were there any questions put to her, how she paid for them? - A. Mrs. Page, in the presence of the prisoner, said that she had paid her a 2 l. note, and Jane Ramsey was called upon to see if she knew the prisoner, and she recollected that she was present.

Q. What said the prisoner upon Mrs. Page saying that she had paid her a 2 l. note? - A. She said first that she had paid her a 2 l. note, and afterwards said that she did not, but that she paid her in money.

Q. Did any thing more particularly pass in the shop at that time? - A. Not particularly, that I recollect; she was then taken to Bow-street.

Q. Before you came to the Office did any thing pass between you and her that was material? - A. When she was in the coach, she cried and seemed very much agitated; she said once that she would never say any thing against Holt; when she was at Bow-street I went up to one of the officers, for him to go somewhere, and she said, when you take me to the bar at the Old Bailey, you will cut just as good a figure with me there as you did with Mr. Holt; it was me that helped to get Mr. Holt clear; I spoke to Mr. Pecker and some of the other witnesses, and instructed them what to say. I went away then for one of the officers that had not come down. When I went up again she said, you are Mr. Bliss, are you, of the Bank? if I am a Bank prisoner I will be kept well, and have a woman to wait upon me.

Q. When was it before this day in December that you had seen Mr. Page? - A. He applied to me about the 26th of October, and from that to the 30th, I had been with him several times.

Q. You gave him some advice, I do not ask you what that advice was? - A. I gave him some advice, and he gave me a 2 l. note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time in the evening was it when you went to the prisoner's house? - A. It was in the evening, just at candlelight.

Q. What state of mind was the woman in at the time she was apprehended? - A. She seemed very uneasy, and very much agitated; she cried, and made the most violent noise, she and her little girl; I said to Crocker, I believe she does it to alarm somebody that is at the door; I desired him to take her into the back room.

Q. Did she appear to be quite collected, or did she seem to have had some drink after dinner? - A. She was very much agitated; she said so many things that were real facts and truths, that she was certainly collected, or else she could not have said so many things as she did say.

Q. Had her agitation the appearance of having drank too much after dinner, or was it occasioned by the officers searching her? - A. I cannot say that her agitation had the appearance of having drank after dinner; I should rather think it was from her apprehension, and from the officer searching her.

Q. Do you remember in the morning saying to her, now you are sober, give me an account - Did you make any observation to her of her being sober the next morning? - A. I thought at first the woman appeared as though she had drank something; she seemed agitated and cried.

Q. Was she kept from liquor, or was it desired by you and the officer that liquor should be kept from her? - A. I desired that she might have a good bed; I desired her to have every thing that was proper.

Q. Had not she brandy by your order? - A. I said that every thing she wanted she was to have.

Q. Did not you desire that she should have spirits; aye or no? - A. Upon my life I do not recollect that I did.

Q. Had she any? - A. The woman seemed ill, and if she asked for any I should have had no particular objection to her having that or any thing else.

Q. Had she not some spirits at Bow-street, before you had any conversation with her? - A. I do not know; I desired her to have a comfortable bed prepared, and every thing that was proper for a woman.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did it strike you that her agitation was the effect of having had too much liquor, or in consequence of her being searched? - A. I do assure you that I thought it was in consequence of her being searched, and her apprehension.

Court. Q. Was she searched? - A. Yes, the officer searched her.

Q. Was any thing found upon her? - A. I believe not. (The note handed to Mr. Bliss.)

Mr. Bliss. The whole of it is a forgery, it is a most horrid composition, it is not an engraving, it is done with a hair pencil all through.

Court. Q. Holt was tried was he? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Giles Q. You are a pawnbroker, in Liquorpond-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember at any time in October last the prisoner coming to you and pledging any thing? - I believe it was on the 6th of October.

Q. Did she pledge any articles with you? - A. She pledged a gown, a petticoat, a broach, and a pair of ear-rings.

Q. In what name did she pledge them? - A. In the name of Mary Jenkins .

Q. What did you lend her upon them? - A. Sixteen shillings.

Q. This was on the 6th of October; did she afterwards come for the purpose of redeeming these articles? - A. She came to redeem them on the 27th of October.

Q. What did she give you, or offer for payment, to redeem these articles? - A. A 2 l. note; she had another ticket of a silk cloak, pledged at our shop in the name of Jane Jones ; she redeemed that also for 2 s. 6 d.

Q. Was this late or early in the evening of the 27th? - A. It was, I rather think, a little after eleven o'clock, just at the time we were going to shut up the door.

Q. What did you do with that note - Is this the note? - A. This is the note I received for the pledge, on the 27th of October, here is the mark that I made on it, on Sunday morning, I know it to be the same, I had no other two pound note in the till at all.

Q. That note which you received from her you put in the till? - A. Yes, I had it on Saturday night, and on Sunday morning, looking over my accounts, which is usual in pawn-brokers' shops, I discovered this note to be a bad one, and then I put the memorandum on it, and that was the only two pound note there was in the till.

Jury. Q. Did you take no other in the course of the day? - A. I do not think that I did.

Mr. Giles. Q. In the course of the day you took notes, and put them away? - A. Yes.

Q. This was the last transaction that evening? - A. I do not believe that there was any other person came into the shop after her.

Q. When you discovered it to be a bad one did you make any application to the Bank? - A. Yes, in the course of a day or two I applied to Mr. Bliss.

Q. Did the prisoner afterwards, at any future time, come to your shop? - A. I do not know of my own knowledge.

Q. Look at that note, see if it has your initials at the back of it, and state to my Lord and the Jury how you came to put your initials upon it? - A. I was busy in the pawnbroker's shop; a few days after it was taken I came into the sale-shop for some change, and Mrs. Page had been dealing with a gentleman for some articles, and he wished change for a five-pound note.

Q. That gentleman was Mr. Lewis? - A. Yes, he asked me to put my initials on the note, and accordingly I did so; I afterwards asked him his name and address to put on the five-pound note, which he gave to Mrs. Page.

Q. Is that the five-pound note which Mr. Lewis gave you? - A. It is.

Q. When did you first see that two-pound note again? - A. On the 23d of December.

Q. Who shewed it you? - A. I asked Mrs. Page for the cash, and on looking over the notes I discovered this to be a bad one; there had been one taken in the pawnbroker's shop the same evening, and I supposed that to be a bad one at the time.

Q. When you discovered the note which you hold in your hand, did you give any directions to Mrs. Page? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time of the day was it when your wife brought that note to you? - A. She did not bring it to me, I went out of one shop into the other.

Q. You were not particularly occupied at the other shop? - A. Yes, I was; I came into the shop to get some silver at the time.

Q. How came you to put down Mr. Lewis's address? - A. To know what I was about; I had time enough to write it, but I was in a hurry, and when I had done it, I immediately went into the other shop.

Q. If you had known the note was bad you would have stopped it; at the time you gave Mr. Lewis the note you were not aware of the identity of the note? - A. I was not.

Q. There were a great number of notes together? - A. I do not know how many there might be.

Q. You made your observation upon it on the Sunday, and after the Sunday you did not know it again when it was put into the pocket book? - A. I returned it back to Mrs. Page, and she put it into the pocket-book on the Sunday.

Q. You only know it is the same note you gave to Mr. Lewis by the indorsement, but at the time you gave it you did not know it was the bad note, and your wife was with you at the time you gave it, and had the same opportunity of knowing it? - A. She was.

Q. This woman pawned something on the 6th of October, did she give you a correct address? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that you were able to find out where she resided? - A. Yes.

Q. The duplicate remained with you after the things were redeemed, so that still you knew where to find her? - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday night the things were redeemed? - A. Yes.

Q. How many shopmen do you employ? - A. One shopman.

Q. Had you supped at that time? - A. No.

Q. You have told my Lord and the gentlemen of the Jury, that on the next morning you did not find any other two pound note, but how many other two pound notes you had on the same day you cannot tell? - A. I cannot.

Q. You cannot tell how many you had changed in the course of that day? - A. No.

Q. Nor at night? - A. No.

Q. At the time of taking the note you had no suspicion? - A. No.

Q. She gave you the two shillings and sixpence in cash? - A. Yes, I had given her a one pound-note and the rest in change.

Mr. Giles. Q. I was asking you whether this was not the last transaction that night? - A. I believe it to be the last transaction that evening.

Q. With respect to the note that you marked with your initials, is that the note that you received in October? - A. It is the note that my wife received when I had the cash of her, and that was given to Mr. Lewis, that I marked with my initials.

Q. That is another that you wrote the prisoner's name to? - A. Yes.

Q. My friend asked you about a pocket-book; that was not your pocket-book? - A. It is the pocket-book that is kept in the sale-shop; it is generally in the care of Mrs. Page; she always takes care of it in the evening.

Q. Did you, before you signed that note, make any observation on it? - A. No, I was in a hurry, and went into the other shop after I had signed it.

Q. With or without looking at it? - A. I did not take any notice of it, I did not look at it, I put my initials on it, and being in a hurry, I went into the other shop immediately.

Q. Did you then observe it to be a bad note? - A. No, I was not aware of it, I did not think any thing about it, I only wrote my initials in a hurry, Mrs. Page had given him the change.

ROBERT LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bosanquet. Q. What are you? - A. I am an excise officer, in the silk office.

Q. Do you remember at any time changing a five-pound note at Mr. Page's shop? - A. I do.

Q. What did you receive in change? - A. I received three pounds six shillings, I paid him one pound fourteen shillings.

Q. Did you receive any two pound note? - A. Yes, Mr. Page put his initials on it.

Q. When did you return that? - A. On Sunday morning, the 30th of December.

Q. Who applied to you? - A. Mr. Page applied to me, and a person with him; I had passed it; I went with Mr. Page to the person, and Mr. Page gave the person another two pound note for it; I knew the note when I saw it again.

Q. Can you say positively whether the note you received from Mr. Page was the note that you returned to him? - A. I can.

Mr. Fielding. Q. (To Mr. Bliss.) Is that a counterfeit? - A. The whole of it is counterfeit, and the outlines are of the same texture with the other note, it is the same kind of paper, it is not printed; this note was in my possession the 30th of October, that was near two months before the other note was taken.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. What age are you? - A. I am sixteen; I live with Mr. Page, I am his apprentice.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar? - A. It is the same woman that came into the shop on the 27th of October; I am sure it is the woman.

Q. Do you recollect what time of the night it was? - A. Very near shutting up time.

Q. What is your usual time for shutting up on a Saturday night? - A. Eleven o'clock; it was near to that time.

Q. Does your recollection serve you to say whether there was any person in the shop after her? - A. I do not think there was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you say you do not think there was, there might be for any thing you know; your business is not in the shop, your business is to go up and down to the warehouse? - A. I came down with that parcel, and unpinned it.

Q. When you bring down a parcel you go up again? - A. I was not up after that person came, I did not go back again that night.

Mr. Fielding. Q. How was she dressed at that time of night? - A. She had a red cloak on and a black bonnet.

Jury. Q. Are you certain of having a knowledge of that woman from the dress that she had on then? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. (To Ramsey.) Look at the prisoner at the bar, is that the person you saw in the shop? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Q. And you have no doubt that she is the person who came to change the ear-rings also? - A. She came to change the ear rings. (The note read.)

1804. Bank.

Two No. 4421.

4 Oct. 1804.

I promise to pay to Mr. Abraham Newland , or bearer, on demand, the sum of two pounds. London, the 4th day of Oct. 1804, for the Governor and Company of the Bank on England.

E. Phillips.

Entd. C. Wilkinson.

Mr. Alley. I see it is there Bank on England instead of Bank of England. It is not a Bank-note.

Court. There is a count in the indictment for a promissory note; it comes within that.

Giles. Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar being in custody? - A. I do; I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Bliss going out of the room at any time? - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner making any observation at that time? - A. The prisoner said, that is Mr. Bliss, is it, then I am mum, he shall get nothing out of me, they shall hang me first, that I recollect passed at the Brown Bear.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. She had some brandy and water to drink at the Brown Bear? - A. No.

Q. You had been asking her to give some information against her husband? - A. No, I was in company all the time she was in our house, and I went with Mr. Bliss and the prisoner to the office: I heard all that was said.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty, I never took any thing out in my life from Mr. Page; I took two gowns from one of his shopmen, on Saturday night, and I gave him a one pound note and he gave me a shilling, and as to the broach I never bought one of Mrs. Page, I bought two pair of ear rings; Mr. Bliss ordered me brandy, and behaved very ill to me indeed; he used me extremely ill, and told me I should be hanged, for Mr. Holt had given me the notes; I told him I never had them of him in my life.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, Death , aged 34,

Of uttering only.

The Jury believing this woman acted under the influence of another person, begged leave to recommend her to mercy .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-79

203. WILLIAM BOARD and ELIZABETH BOARD were indicted for that they, not having the fear of God before their eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 20th of January , feloniously and traiterously did forge, counterfeit, and coin, a piece of base, false, and counterfeited coin, called a sixpence, made to the likeness of and for a good sixpence, in the similitude and likeness of good and legal current coin of this realm, made of metal, falsely and deceitfully did colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

Second Count, For that they one other round piece of base, false, and counterfeited, coin, called a sixpence, did forge, counterfeit, and coin, and caused to be forged, counterfeited, and coined, made of metal, falsely and deceitfully did colour with materials to produce the colour of silver, against their allegiance to the King, and against the form of the statute.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

JAMES HILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I believe you live near Gloucester-street, Mary-le-bone? - A. Yes, I am a dyer.

Q Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, they lived in St. John's Wood-row, Mary-le-bone-fields .

Q. They took a cottage of you? - A. Yes, about a fortnight after last Lady-day.

Q. What sort of a cottage is it? - A. One room.

Q. Is it elevated from the ground? - A. Yes, it consists of one room and a cellar underneath it; there are four windows, only one was stopped up by the prisoner and one door to it.

Q. Towards Christmas last did you observe any thing about this cottage? - A. The Saturday before Christmas day I was walking in my garden, near the window that looks into my premises, and I saw him cutting white metal in the form of sixpences. On the 19th of January I was listening at the window and heard the prisoner at work; he was almost ready to go out, which he usually did every evening; he used to be at home at work all day and went out in the evening; I heard the prisoner count forty-one, what he did not say; I heard him say he thought some were not very passable; a young woman in the room answered she would pass them; I used to see this person, whom I call a young woman, coming there every evening, and in the evening the prisoners and this young woman used to take a walk, and sometimes they were out all night, that I learned from the children.

Q. Have you yourself seen that young woman with the prisoner walking out of an evening? - A. I have seen them go out of an evening, and the woman at the bar with him.

Q. That woman at the bar is the wife of the prisoner? - A. I believe she is, she passes as such.

Q. Did you observe any thing more before you gave the information? - A. The instant I heard him count forty-one I thought it was near the time he usually went out in an evening; I went down to Marlborough-street and gave the information, I then went with three officers to the house; they are here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a dyer? - A. Yes.

Q. The man prisoner took this little house of you: what distance is your house from that? - A. It may be three or four hundred yards.

Q. Are there many houses there? - A. Yes, there are a continuation of buildings in the row that comes from Gloucester-street, leading to Portman-square.

Q. Had these people paid you any rent? - A. I received one pound from them.

Q. When was that? - A. I cannot particularly call that to my mind.

Q. He had been a good deal in arrears for rent to you? - A. There was half a year's rent due.

Q. Had you given him notice to quit? - A. No.

Court. Q. Had you any quarrel with him about it? - A. Never.

Q. There was some rent due to you? - A. There was half a year's due.

Mr. Alley. Q. The first you observed of this was before Christmas; was there any body in company with you? - A. No.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. In the evening, about seven o'clock.

Q. It was dark at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. You were looking through the window where there was a light? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there not blinds against this window? - A. There was a child's coat, with holes in it, which hung up at the window.

Q. I suppose there were window-shutters for security? - A. No, none at all.

Q. How many rooms are there in the house? - A. One room; the room under it is uninhabitable.

Q. How many feet from the ground may the room be that they inhabited? - A. Six feet.

Q. You did not convey a ladder there to look in at the window? - A. There is always a ladder of my own against the window.

Q. Then you climbed up the ladder to look into this window? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner must have known of the ladder, it being always there? - A. I removed it if I wanted it, else it remained there; it was not on his premises.

Q. It was against his house? - A. It was in my premises, in a garden that I keep myself; the ladder was in my garden that comes close to the back of the house; it was standing close to the side of the house.

Q. You looked through the window, notwithstanding the coat was against the window? - A. I did.

Q. When did you first communicate what you had first seen to any body? - A. I never communicated that to any body.

Q. How long after Christmas was it that you communicated what you had seen to the officer? - A. On Saturday the 19th of January.

Q. Then you suffered a fortnight or three weeks to elapse before you communicated it at the office? - A. I did.

Q. You had no quarrel with the man before you went to the office? - A. I never had.

Mr. Fielding. Q. The ladder is at the bottom of your garden? - A. Yes; there is a little place of my own, and the ladder leans against it.

Q. The bottom of the ladder is fixed on your premises? - A. Yes; and leans against a place of my own, by the side of the prisoner's house.

JOHN FOY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You are a Police-officer of Marlborough-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to the house of the prisoner at the bar? - A. I did.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 19th of January, about half past seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. How many officers went with you? - A. Petherick, Lovett, Warren, and Hillier, the landlord of the house.

Q. I suppose it must be dark at that time? - A. Very dark and wet.

Q. No advantage of lamps at the back of the garden? - A. No, it was quite dark, and no lamps in the neighbourhood.

Q. Tell me, when you came to the house, how you placed yourselves? - A. When we came near the house,

I left the other officers and went with Hillier, who was to shew me the way.

Q. When you came to the house, did you see or hear any thing? - A. I went to the back of the house, there was a ladder placed against it; I went up the ladder to the window, which had a cloth or coat hanging before it, there was no shutter, only this thing in the inside, this was the only blind to hinder me from seeing into the room; I heard a noise of rubbing or filing, which I conceived to be so at that time, and I saw a shade of an arm passing backwards and forwards, I waited there till I was satisfied; I had a warrant to apprehend the man at the bar, I told my brother officers what I had seen; we went altogether to the house, I desired Petherick to go to the back of the house to watch there, while we attempted to force the door of the house; the first time we put our shoulders against the door and pushed it the woman screamed out, and the man jumped up, and cried out, who is there? the woman cried out, fetch the pistol; the man came immediately to the door, we kept still trying to force the door, we had forced it almost open, so that we could put our arms in; the man prisoner at the bar then said, he would blow our brains out if we attempted to come in at the door, he was standing with the pistol in his hand at the door; when we found we could not force the door, we took our cutlasses and cut the frame of the window away at the side of the door; he came to the window, and said, he would shoot any of us that came in; Lovett said, he might shoot if he liked, he could only kill one; I heard Petherick crying out at the back of the house, that if any body offered to come out of the window at the back of the house he would shoot them; I ran round to Petherick, and saw the window was open, I thought I could get easier admission there; I got on Petherick's shoulder, and got in at the window, and before I had got in at the window, the prisoner had fired his pistol through the front window where we had cut away the frame from the sash.

Q. I understand he did it by the desire of somebody? - A. He fired it off without any intention of injuring any of us.

Q. Did you succeed in getting into the house? - A. I got into the room immediately, where he was standing; as soon as he fired off the pistol, he stooped down and unbolted the door; I got in and seized him, and the other officers came in; I hand-cuffed him immediately, and searched him.

Q. On searching his person, what did you find? - A. Five sixpences folded up in a piece of paper.

Q. Were they in a state, at that time, fit for common circulation? - A. We found one piece that was fit for circulation, and one blank, they were both loose in his pocket; these are the five that were in his pocket, folded up in that piece of paper, (produces them); they were then just as they are now.

Q. Were they in the same pocket? - A. Yes, altogether; only five were folded up, and these two were loose.

Q. You found nothing else on his person? - A. In what state were his hands? - A. I did not observe any particular mark on them, his face and hands were dirty.

Q. Did you search the woman? - A. Lovett searched the woman.

Q. Tell me what more you observed yourself? - A. The woman prisoner desired one of the children to pick up his hat that was laying on the ground; I observed a great number of blanks lying on the floor, I took the prisoner's hat and shook it, and in his hat I found these two other blanks, I did not pick up the blanks; I said to my brother officers, take care of the prisoners; and then, after all was right, and the prisoners secured, I searched the room, and found a small box of tools; and as soon as I began to search it, I found this bit of scouring-paper, and that blank lying on it, upon the tools, and in the box I found these tools: there are two punches, an awl, a piece of cork, and two pair of scissars.

Q. Were these tools nearly altogether, or spread about the room? - A. They were all in a little open box.

Q. Did you find any thing more? - A. A pair of pliers, a file, and some more scouring-paper that had been a little used; the file had metal in its teeth as it has now; I found a little bag, and two pens, a small hammer, a dirty cloth, and some old gloves; and in the little box I found something, but I do not know what it is.

Q. Did any thing more pass before your eyes? - A. I saw Lovett search the woman, but nothing particular passed then.

Q. Was it you, or any of the other officers, that observed the woman throwing any thing out of the window? - A. That was Petherick.

Q. Was it you that went in company with Petherick to the house of the prisoner the next day? - A. Yes; we went to make a further search.

Q. What did you find then? - A. I found under the stairs, under some tiles concealed, a bottle of aqua-fortis; the tiles were placed shelving against the wall, and between the tiles and the wall there was a vacancy, and there the bottle was put, and a little pot with blacking and a brush in it.

Q. Have you tried it, so as to know that it is aqua-fortis? - A. It is burning stuff.

Q. You were enabled to discover this bottle by the means of one of the prisoner's children? - A. I was; and I brought it to the office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have already told us, that at the time you went there it was dark? - A. Quite dark.

Q. You were not surprized at a person presenting a pistol at the time you went? - A. No, I knew he would.

Q. You did not give notice that you were Police-officers? - A. If we had told them that, they might have concealed what we found; we thought of bursting the door upon them; Lovett and Petherick told me what we were to expect.

Q. You did not, at that time, find any aqua-fortis? - A. No.

Q. When you came before the Magistrate, you were told it would not do very well without that? - A. I was so informed, and I went again.

Q. You found the aquafortis outside of the house, under the stairs that led to the room, which is open to the yard or garden at least? - A. It is a little place that I could just get into.

Q. That is open to the garden? - A. It is.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you get into the house? - A. I did.

Q. What did you do when you were in the house? A. I secured the prisoners, and gave them to Foy to take care of while I searched the room.

Q. Did you search the woman? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me what you found on searching the woman? - A. I observed her sitting close by the fire, and something placed in her right hand, I seized her by the hand immediately, and on unclinching it I found some things which I have here, blank sixpences, more than fifty of them; I found nine or ten blanks on the ground, I found one that seemed to be a good sixpence in her pocket, that I found on her person.

Q. Did you find any thing else on the premises? - A. I did some white powder.

Q. What is that? - A. Cream of tartar, a file, and some scouring-paper, which I found upon the ground, it laid under the table.

Q. What appearance had the teeth of the file at that time? - A. It had metal in its teeth, and it has now; and at the back part of the premises, upon the roof of a pig-sty near to the window, I found some clippings, and some more blanks.

Q. You did not go with Foy the next day? - A. No, that was Petherick.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Marlborough-street? - A. I am.

Q. Did you get into the house? - A. I did; I found three bad sixpences just by the man prisoner, as he sat in the chair, upon the floor, they seemed to be in three different states: one is more ready for circulation than the other, there is one that is fit, or very near fit, for circulation, I am not competent judge enough to say which.

Mr. Alley. Q. It is not such a one as you would take? - A. I might.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Did you go with Foy the next day? - A. I did.

Q. Where was it that you found the aqua-fortis? - A. Under the stairs, placed under some pan-tiles, there I discovered that bottle of aqua-fortis, and a little bottle of blacking; I put it to my tongue and tasted it, it was of a saltish nature.

JOHN WARREN sworn. - I went with the other officers, I know no more than they do.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you examine the hands of the prisoner? - A. I did not, I only saw they were dirty.

Q. Do you mean to say that none of you examined to see whether there were marks of aqua-forts on his hands? - A. I do; it was very dark, and we were busy; I did not observe any thing particular on his hands.

CALEB-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You, I believe, have skill enough to give us an account of these different instruments? - A. Yes.

Q. First of all, look at the scissars? - A. The blanks appear to have been cut out of a plate by these scissars.

Q. The scissars are a fit instrument for that purpose? - A. They are; in this paper appear to be some clippings, which they call sissel; and here are several blanks which appear to have been just cut out, and these scissars would effect that purpose; the pliers would be necessary to hold the blanks during the process of filing, and preparing it for colour.

Jury. Q. Does not that mark the money? - A. That would be taken off afterwards; here are two files which would be used in filing the surface and the edge; the teeth of one of the files are very large, and the other very fine, and is generally called a float; the sand-paper would be used to take out the scratches of the file; it appears to have been used; the cork would be used to take out the scratches of the sand-paper, and give it a complete polish; the sand-paper follows the file, and the cork follows the sand-paper. The blank in that state, after having gone through the process, would be fit for colouring.

Q. Are there any blanks there that have been coloured? - A. Here are several that have gone through that process, fit to be coloured.

Q. Are there any coloured? - A. Here is one in the paper which is complete and fit for circulation.

Q. Now look at the five that Foy found? - A. These five are also fit for circulation.

Q. You will be so good as to inform the Jury the use of the aqua-fortis? - A. After the blank is in this state it is put into pickle; the aqua-fortis being too strong of itself, it is lowered with a little water; the action of the aqua-fortis is to produce the silver upon the surface, all metal having a portion of silver in it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is that aquafortis? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Explain the use of the cream of tartar? - A. After they are taken out of the pickle it is usual to boil them with an equal quantity of salt and cream of tartar, which brings the colour more to the surface and cements it; after having been boiled, they generally scour them with cream of tartar and throw them into cold water, and dry them with a linen cloth; the blacking is the only thing which takes off the brightness.

Q. All the articles there found are the instruments necessary? - A. Yes.

Q. And would coin one of these sixpences? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Should they not be put into bran and dried over a fire? - A. Where there is a large quantity it dries them quicker than a linen cloth.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Look at those five again? - A. These five appear to be perfectly finished.

- FRANKLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Look at those pieces? - A. They were never coined at the Mint; they are all counterfeited.

Mr. Alley. Q. You would not take them for sixpences? - A. No.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

William Board , GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Elizabeth Board , GUILTY, Death , aged 30.

The Jury recommended the woman prisoner to mercy, on account of her having acted under the influence of her husband .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18050220-80

204. THOMAS DORSETER , GEORGE EAST , and CHRISTOPHER ELLIS , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , six

pounds weight of flour, value 1 s. 8 d. and six pieces of cloth, value 6 d. the property of William Jamieson ; the second for receiving, on the same day, four pounds weight of flour, value 1 s. 4 d. part of the said six pounds, and six pieces of cloth, value 6 d. and the third for receiving two pounds weight of flour, value 8 d. being the other part of the said flour, they well knowing it to be stolen, the property of the said William Jamieson .

WILLIAM JAMIESON sworn. - I am a baker ; Dorseter was my journeyman ; the prisoner East and Ellis worked together in a stall in Edgware-road, about forty yards from my house; I believe they are tailor s, and are partners.

Prisoner East. I am a leather breeches maker .

Q. What do you accuse these men of? - A. On the 22d of January I had strong suspicion that the prisoner Dorseter robbed me; I watched him once and saw him go into the two prisoners' stall, and I saw him come out twice: on the 23d I went out in the morning, on purpose to watch him, and went into the Crown public-house (which is opposite to the prisoners' stall), and called for a pint of beer; in about five minutes I saw the prisoner Dorseter come out of my shop and go into their stall; I immediately followed him and opened the door of the stall, and asked the prisoner Dorseter what he was doing there; (he was then in the act of loosening down his breeches, but on my appearance he shoved them up again;) he said he had come after a coat that was being mended; the prisoner Ellis was sitting on a board; he said he had got it, and Dorseter, after that, said it was at my house; I immediately put my hand here (the witness shewing) to Dorseter, and said, you have got something of mine; yes, master, he said, I have, I hope you will forgive me. I had made a signal to my wife and she sent the maid; I sent her for a constable to Marylebone; the constable searched Dorseter and found a handkerchief full of flour in his breeches, and a bag; this was the state it was found in; there were 6 pounds 6 ounces, but I did not weigh it myself; we took them to Marlborough-street, and they were all committed; we had a search-warrant, and we went to the prisoners' stall, and there we found some flour-bags empty, and some handkerchiefs in which had been flour, and there were two half-quartern loaves.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. How long had Dorseter lived with you? - A. Three or four months.

Q. You received a character with him? - A. No, he was a man that I brought home; I told him I was distressed for a man; I told him he might continue with me till I could get a country lad, or till I was suited with a man.

Q. You watched him to the tailor's shop? - A. Yes.

Q. He said there it was the first time, and he hoped you would forgive him; what did you say to him to induce him so to say? - A. I did not say any thing; I said, you have got some property of mine here; he said, Yes, I hope you will forgive me. It was a handkerchief of flour.

Q. You do not mean to swear to that flour, flour is a very particular thing to swear to? - A. I think he got it from my house, I saw him come out of my house with it; and I never lost sight of him.

Q. So he might, and yet get the flour from the other end of the town. Has he not got a wife and three or four children? - A. I believe he has.

CHARLES HILL sworn. - I was going by, and saw the prisoner Dorseter searched, and the flour taken from his small-clothes; that is all I know.

- HAMILTON sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street, I searched the stall, and there I found this bag of flour, this piece of floury cloth, and papers and handkerchiefs, and this small quantity of flour, at Ellis's lodgings.

Q. (To prosecutor.) What is the worth of that found at Ellis's? - A. Eightpence; I could not swear positively to flour, I am certain some of these things are mine.

Court. I suspect some of those things to be your's.

The prisoner Dorseter left his defence to his Counsel.

The other prisoners, East and Ellis, did not say any thing in their defence, nor did either of them call any witnesses to character.

Dorseter, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

East, NOT GUILTY .

Ellis, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-81

206. ANN SANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. a silk cloak, value 2 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of silver buckles, value 8 s. and five sheets, value 18 s. the property of Jonathan Chipman .

ROSE CHIPMAN sworn. - I live in Brille-row, Somers-town ; my husband's name is Jonathan Chipman ; he is a milkman . In July last Ann Sanders commenced working and lodging with me; I then thought her a prudent woman: On the 18th of October last I was brought to bed, and then she lived below with me; on the 20th she took three sheets to a Mrs. Savage, and gave them to her to pawn; I lost a great part of my property the latter end of October.

Q. Where were your sheets laid? - A. In a box close to my bed-side; after, that she had occasion to go up stairs for some things necessary for me; she broke open a box, and took out half a guinea in gold, a pair of silver buckles, and a sheet; she gave the buckles to Mrs. Savage to sell them for her at Mr. Dunball's; she stole a silver spoon, a pound of sugar, a blue and white handkerchief, a black silk cloak, and a coat that was under the foot of our bed; we found that her husband wore that, and since that he has run away; there is a great deal of the property lost. I have seen the spoon and the cloak since.

MARTHA SAVAGE sworn. - I pawned a silver spoon for the prisoner for 1 s. 6 d. and a cloak, a shirt and handkerchief; the buckles I sold to a pawn-broker for her, and a pair of sheets also I pawned for her, I gave her the money for all these articles, and the duplicates.

Prisoner. Q. (To Savage.) I asked you to pawn the buckles? - A. You desired me, if I could get more by selling them, to sell them, which I did for you.

RICHARD DUNBALL sworn. - I live with Mr. - , Skinner-street, Somers-town; I produce a cloak and a spoon, pawned by Martha Savage ; the prosecutor enquired about these things at our shop, and after that the prisoner came and begged me to let her have the spoon

out; I detained her; she confessed to me that she stole the spoon.

RICHARD HAMILTON sworn. - I took her into custody, she admitted to me that she had been imprudent in taking the spoon, handkerchief, and cloak.

Prisoner's defence. I had got nothing but the spoon, I never had got the three sheets; the sheets on my bed I pledged, and I brought them back again; the things were all on the bed when I left the room.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-82

207. JAMES PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a wooden cask, value 1 s. and sixty pounds weight of butter, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of Alexander Gainsford and Richard Payne .

THOMAS CROKER sworn. - I am carman to Messrs. Gainsford and Payne, cheesemongers , on Holborn-bridge; I was out last Friday with a load of goods, going to Bowl-yard, St. Giles's , and not being able to take my cart up the yard, I backed if up as far as I could, having some goods to carry up there about twenty yards; I was not gone from my cart above two minutes, and when I came back I missed a cask of butter from my cart, and while I was enquiring concerning it my witness came and told me that she saw a man take a cask from my cart, and carry it into the Black-dog passage, I pursued after the man into Dyot-street, and put my hand on his shoulder, and said, my friend, I think you are the man that robbed me; he answered, by no means; I said to him, I shall thank you to go with me to Bowl-yard, and as soon as I brought the prisoner back, the witness came forward and said, that is the man that robbed your cart, I saw him carry it into the Black-dog passage.

ELEANOR POOLE sworn. - I live at No. 1, Bowl-yard, Broad St. Giles's; I was looking out of my window when I saw the prisoner take the butter out of the cart; I saw Croker, the carter, carrying the butter into Mrs. Partridge's, No. 5, a chandler's shop, up the court; in the mean time, the prisoner came up to the end of the court, and looked round twice to see if there was any body near the cart, the cart stood at my window, I saw the prisoner turn the cask upside down and put it on his shoulder, and take it into the Black-dog passage; I told the carman and he brought him back again, and asked me if that was the man that took the butter out of the cart; I said, I am sure he is the man. The prisoner denied it at the Office.

- M'DONALD sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street, I took the prisoner into custody and ordered Michael Lane to go to the Black-dog passage stairs, which he did, and there he found the butter.

MICHAEL LANE sworn. - I am an officer: I found the butter, it laid on the settle of the stairs, in the very passage where the woman saw the prisoner go into; I produce the cask. (The cask identified by Thomas Croker .)

Prisoner's defence. I never touched it, nor was I nigh it; I was never so nigh the cask as I am now; I am not the man, as God is my judge; I had been very ill, and was going to get a little money that was owing to me, and I stood talking to a man, and that man came to me and said, I had robbed his cart; I am as innocent as the child unborn; I saw a man with a cask go by me, but what it was I do not know.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-83

208. THOMAS COOK was indicted for that he, on the 18th of January , being clerk to John Folke , did receive and take into his possession for and on account of his said master, the sum of 3 l. 17 s. 6 d. and that he, afterwards, did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal, the same, from his said master .

Mr. Gurney counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-84

209. MARY SNELL was indicted for that she, on the 15th of November , being servant to Thomas Warner and Edward Warner , did receive and take into her possession the sum of one pound and six-pence, for her said master, and that she, afterwards, did fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and feloniously steal, the same from her said masters .

Second Count. For the like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-85

210. HENRY BEST was indicted for that he, on the 22d of January , being servant to Joshua-Richard Wilkinson , did receive the sums of 3 s. 3 d. - 6 s. 6 d. - 6 s. 6 d. - 6 s. 3 d. - 6 s. 3 d. and 5 s. on account of his said master; and that he afterwards did fraudulently embezzle, secrete, and feloniously steal the same from his said master .

Second Count. On the 23d of January , the sums of 5 s. and 6 s. 3 d. which he had received from Paul Elliott and Solomon Poiza , and that he, afterwards, on the same day, feloniously did steal, from his said master, a cask, value 5 s. and a crown piece, two half-crowns, 5 s. and 10 s. 6 d. the goods and monies of Joshua- Richard Wilkinson .

JOSHUA-RICHARD WILKINSON sworn. - I am cooper and hoop-bender , I live at No. 17, Walbrook, and have a cooperage at Dowgate-hill , of which the prisoner was my foreman .

Court. Q. In your indictment there are a number of charges, are they all on one day? - A. They are on different days.

Q. Then the person who drew up this indictment ought not to put them all in one charge, because the prisoner does not know how to defend himself, therefore, we suffer no more than one transaction in one indictment; if you can separate one, which you please, you have the choice of all the different articles; the one you can best bring home to the prisoner? - A. I will take the 11 s. 3 d. - the 6 s. 3 d. and 5 s. were both on the 23d of January.

- JONES sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Deschamps:

in consequence of an application from Mr. Wilkinson I sent Paul Elliot and one of our porters for a cask and two bundles of hoops.

PAUL ELLIOTT sworn. - I am foreman to Messrs. Deschamps; I was desired by Mr. Jones to go down to the cooperage, to purchase a cask of 5 cwt. tierce, and I was to say it was for myself; I bought it of the prisoner at the bar, and gave him a seven-shilling piece for it, and received from him 2 s. in change.

SOLOMON POIZA sworn. - I work at Mr. Deschamps: I went by the order of that man to buy some hoops of the prisoner; I bought two bundles of hoops of him on the 23d of January, for 6 s. 3 d. I took them to Mr. Deschamps' warehouse; I did not know any thing of the secret before I went to my Lord Mayor.

JOHN-HENRY TOMLINSON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Wilkinson: It was the duty of the prisoner to pay the money he received to me, and from the book it does not appear that he has paid me any.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This book is the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the evening of the 23d? - A. I cannot recollect that.

Q. Did you see him on Thursday morning? - A. I did.

Q. Did you receive any money for the day before? - A. I did not; he was taken up on the Thursday.

Court. Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did he account to you for it? - A. He did not.

Prisoner's defence. I am charged with an intent to defraud; I did not mean to defraud; I meant to make the money good on Saturday night when I received my wages.

Jury. Q. (To the prosecutor.) We wish to know whether there was a rule for him to pay what he received on a Saturday night? - A. No, what he received one day he was to account for on the next day to the clerk.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-86

211. SAMUEL NUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , three pounds weight of indigo, value 3 s. the property of William-Wentworth Deschamps , Bennett Stephenson Morgan , and Peter M'Taggert .

WILLIAM-WENTWORTH DESCHAMPS sworn. - I am a merchant , the prisoner at the bar was a porter to me for two years: On the 25th of January I was informed that he had robbed me, and when he was searched the property was found upon him.

HUGH JONES sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Deschamps: I was informed for some time past that the prisoner had taken away indigo: On the 25th of January I accordingly went to the warehouse, and desired him to fetch up a bale of goods from the warehouse, which he did.

Q. At what time of the day? - A. About half-past three o'clock; I saw something in his pocket, and immediately brought him before Mr. Deschamps; I told him I suspected he had indigo in his pocket; he denied it; I desired him to pull it out, but he would not; I put my hand into his pocket and pulled out one stone; his apartments were afterwards searched; I do not know exactly the quantity found there; the officer has it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He said he had no more than that which you took out of his pocket? - A. He said he had none; his coat was on him at the time I perceived the lump in his pocket.

DANIEL LEADBEATER sworn. - I am an officer; I produce the indigo: this piece Mr. Jones told me, in the presence of the prisoner, was taken out of his pocket; he gave charge of him, and I took him to the Compter; then I went to his lodgings, No. 23, Windmill-street, and under his bed, in a basket, I found this other indigo, and this gum. (Produces it.)

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did you see this indigo taken from the prisoner? - A. Yes, and I perceived he had something in his pocket before it was taken out. When he was taken before the Magistrate he confessed the whole, and that he had been betrayed by some other man. He confessed that he had robbed me eight months since.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you make any promise to him? - A. I did not.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-87

212. JAMES HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , a tub, value 1 s. and sixty pounds weight of butter, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of Edward Lambkin .

EDWARD LAMBKIN sworn. - I am a carrier from West Mill, in Hertfordshire, to London: As I was unloading my cart, in Gracechurch-street , my brother saw the prisoner at the bar take a firkin of butter out of my cart.

JOHN LAMBKIN sworn. - On Saturday morning, ten minutes past six o'clock, I was unloading my cart, in Gracechurch-street; (we have two carts between us); I heard a noise (a lump) from my brother's cart; I ran up to my brother's shafts and turned round and saw the prisoner take a tub of butter from my brother's cart; I ran after the prisoner and took him with the tub of butter on his

shoulder, before he came to the end of Gracechurch-street. The butter we have returned.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . sworn. - I am an officer; I know nothing farther than having the prisoner and the tub of butter delivered into my charge. I produce the cask. (The cask identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. Q. (To the Witness.) I wish to ask him whether he saw me take it off the shafts? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I had been to Leadenhall for my friend; I lived at Mr. Wright's, a sheep's head shop, in Whitecross-street; and returning home, at the corner of the court, a man asked me to carry that cask; I carried it to the corner of Cornhill, and that man accused me of taking the cask.

Court. He says he followed you and caught you, before you came to the end of Gracechurch-street.

Jury. (To the witness.) Q. Did you lose sight of him before you took him? - A. No; when he jumped from the shafts, he kept in the road; I am sure it is the same man that took it from the shafts; there was no person passing by at the time.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-88

213. SARAH M'LAUGHLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a pelisse, value 1 l. a gown, value 5 s. and two petticoats, value 10 s. the property of William Cawthorn .

WILLIAM CAWTHORN sworn. - I am a brandy-merchant , in Idol-lane, Tower-street : I only know from information, excepting the pelisse I took myself from her in the Compter.

SARAH-ESTHER DUDLEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cawthorn: On Friday, the 1st of this month, I was going up stairs, between three and four o'clock, and met the prisoner at the bar coming down; I asked her what she wanted; she said she wanted one Mr. M'Carthy, or somebody of that name; I told her no such person lived there, and there was a bell at the door, if she wanted any body she should ring there; having something in her apron I had rather a suspicion of her, and asked her what she had in her apron; she said it did not belong to me; with that I pulled her apron on one side, and saw these skirts which I knew to be my mistress's; I asked her how she came by them; she kept saying, how stupid, how stupid, let me go; I called for assistance, and asked her if she had got any thing else about her, belonging to me; she said she wished God might strike her down dead, if she had any thing else that belonged to me.

AMBROSE ELLISON sworn. - I came to the assistance of the last witness, and as I came nearer she wished to pass me; I told her she should not go till I had got an officer. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I leave my case in the hands of the gentlemen of the Jury; it is the first crime. I know no more about it than the child that was born last night. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-89

214. MARY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , four pair of pattens, value 6 s. the property of John Clark .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in Court, their recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-90

215. GEORGE MORGAN was indicted for that he, on the 13th of December , by means of false pretences, did obtain one piece of gold coin, called a seven-shilling piece, a dollar, value 5 s. two half-crowns, and three shillings, the monies of Elizabeth Moody , with intent to cheat and defraud her of the same .

Stood again indicted for that he, on 13th day of December, unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, did falsely pretend that he had got an information against her for a Little-Go, and that he, the said George Morgan, had a warrant against her, the said Elizabeth Moody , and that he would take her to prison, and that he belonged to the Mansion-house, by means of which false pretence he did obtain from her, the said money, the property of the said Elizabeth Moody .

The evidence of the plaintiff not coming within the legal charge of the indictment, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18050220-91

216. JOHN BEWICK stood indicted for that he, on the 9th of January , fifty pounds weight of metal, value 50 s. the property of George Pengree and George Grenfell , then by a certain evil-disposed person before feloniously stolen, unlawfully did receive and have, he knowing the said goods to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

ROBERT GARLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you the clerk of Messrs. George Pengree and George Grenfell ? - A. Yes; they are copper-merchant s, in Upper Thames-street: On the 9th of January last I received information from William Aldridge , and I went with him to the prisoner's house, where I saw the prisoner binding up wood; he keeps a coal-shed and an old-iron

shop; I told him I was informed by Aldridge, the soldier present, that he had received a piece of metal, that was stolen from our warehouse; he denied it; I said I was certain that he had it; he did not deny it a second time, but after hesitating about ten minutes, he removed the bench upon which he was making up the wood, and took up a trap door in the floor, and we all descended with him into the cellar, where there was a great deal of coals. On the coals there lay a bundle of new brooms; the prisoner took one of the brooms, and with the handle began to dig in the coals; after digging some time the handle of the broom broke against the metal.

Q. Did you get any metal out? - A. I did at last, by the means of a shovel; it was buried about three feet deep.

Q. When it was dug out did you know it? - A. I knew it to be the metal that was stolen from our warehouse, and I knew that we had that piece of metal in our warehouse that very day.

Q. Upon this being dug out, and upon your knowing it again, what did the prisoner say? - A. He hoped that we would not take charge of him. We took both him and the metal.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This composition, which you call metal, is a mixture of copper and lead? - A. It is principally; it is called nail-metal, and is a composition well known by the trade; it is a pintal and brace for a rudder; we had two pintals for rudders in the warehouse at that time, both alike; we had them about a week.

Q. You think the wicket was open; were the gates open or shut? - A. I rather think they were open; we have customers coming through them frequently at night.

Q. Immediately you went to the house of the prisoner you charged him having received it of a person that stole it, and he did not believe you, and denied having received it of a person that had stolen it, but when you persisted in it he immediately descended down this trap door, as you call it, and got it for you. I suppose there was a promise that he should not be prosecuted if this was produced? - A. I certainly did make use of these words - that it would be the better for him if he gave it up.

Q. And then, after you said it would be the better for him if he gave it up, and he having produced it, then your master entered this prosecution.

Court. Q. You say this was a coal-shed and an old-iron shop; was there any appearance of an old-iron shop? - A. Yes, there was some old iron in the window.

Q. Was there any entrance into the cellar outside of the house? - A. Not that we could perceive.

Q. What is the value of this piece of metal? - A. I think it is fifty-four pounds; it is worth a shilling a pound.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a private in the West London Militia? - A. Yes; on the evening of the 9th of January, I was in Upper Thames-street, with Richard Sibley my comrade; I was coming by the premises of Messrs. Pengree and Grenfell, I saw two soldiers run out of their yard, and one of them had this copper thing on his shoulder, he made a stumble, and the copper thing made a rattle, they brushed round the carts, or else I would have taken them; I followed them to a place where they sold it, up a paved court, the first turning from Bread-street, I took Mr. Garland to the place afterwards; they staid in the house about eight or ten minutes, and came out without the metal; then I went and informed the people who belonged to the metal, and left my comrade at the door to watch that the metal was not brought out of the house; when I came back I found my comrade, Sibley, still watching.

Q. What passed when you went into the house? - A. The gentleman belonging to the metal promised the man that he would forgive him if he would bring the metal to light, and that it should be the better for him.

Q. Did you hear what Mr. Garland said, when he first went in? - A. Yes; he challenged the man with having the metal, and he strictly denied it; when he promised him it would be better for him, then he lifted up the trap-door in the lower apartment, and we all went down with him; I saw the metal dug out of the coals.

Court. Q. Was there any appearance of old iron in the shop? - A. Yes; when I was in the shop it had the appearance of an old iron shop; and there were potatoes and greens, an old iron, in the window.

RICHARD SIBLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are in the West London Militia? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you and your comrade in Upper Thames-street on Monday the 9th of January? - A. Yes; and saw two men come out of Messrs. Pengree and Grenfell's yard, one had a red jacket on, and the other a blue one; I could not perceive whether they had got any thing with them because it was dark, we pursued them.

Q. Did you hear anything make a noise? - A. No; they went up an alley to an iron-shop, where they sold coals; I was left there to watch the place.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see any money paid? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you hear the promise that was made if the brass was found, that he would forgive him? - A. I did.

JOHN STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney.

I produce the piece of metal that was dug out of the coals.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you hear the offer that was made to him, that it would be the better for him if he produced it, and then he did produce it? - A. Yes, and I heard him deny it, and say that he had not got it. (The property identified by the witness Garland.)

The defendant called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 20 l.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050220-92

217. GEORGE O'HARA and ROBERT AICKEN were indicted for that they, on the 6th of November , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to one Samuel Marks , they, at the time of uttering, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited, and that they had about them, and in their custody, one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of and for a good shilling, they well knowing this last piece of money to be false and counterfeited .

Second Count. That they, on the same day, one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, did unlawfully and deceitfully utter to one Philip Moses , they, at the time of uttering it, well knowing it to be false and counterfeited.

There being no evidence to affect the defendant O'Hara, the defendants were both found

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18050220-93

218. EDWARD BARROW was indicted for that he, on the 20th of December , one ream of paper, value 7 s. 6 d. and thirty quires of other paper, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Harrison , William Cook , and William Milbourne , then lately before stolen by a certain evil-disposed person, unlawfully did receive and have in his possession, he well knowing the said goods to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the defendant, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18050220-94

219. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for that he, on the 14th of November , forty-eight pounds of whalebone, value 3 l. then lately before stolen by a certain evil-disposed person, unlawfully, for the sake of lucre and gain, did receive and have, he well knowing the same goods to have been stolen .

(The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JONATHAN DELVAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the Common-Councilmen of the City of London? - A. I am; I live in Fell-street, I am a whalebone merchant.

Q. How lately before you found the whalebone had you discharged one of your journeymen? - A. About a fortnight before I discharged a man of the name of John Floyd , he was a labourer; I had two other men at that time; John Floyd recommended me to Mr. Jeaneret, the corner of the Old Jewry, for a character, and afterwards to another.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did the defendant recommend any person to you? - A. I was referred to him for a character for Floyd, but I could not find him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Upon your discharging Floyd, what became of your other men? - A. James Clements and Thomas Beale left me on the Saturday night.

Q. Had you missed any whalebone from your premises? - A. I had missed a quantity of manufactured goods, called Best British; it is whalebone; I am now speaking of the property that was afterwards found.

Mr. Gurney. Q. It is called Narrow Thomson and Middle Thomson here? - A. It is.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you missed them during the time those persons so described by you were in your service? - A. Yes.

Q. While Floyd was in your service? - A. Yes; on the Thursday after Lord-Mayor's day, which I think was the 15th of November, Mr. James Martyn called upon me, and in consequence of what he told me I went the next morning to look at some whalebone at his warehouse in the Old Change; that is James Martyn , the witness; I recognized the whalebone to be my own manufactory immediately I saw it; it is my own work, I knew it directly I saw it. On seeing this whalebone I went to Thomas Martin, the defendant, and told him I wished him to go with me to the Mansion-house on particular business; I did not tell him for what; at that time I supposed him a respectable man, and did not wish to hurt his feelings; he told me he would go with me in about a quarter of an hour, that I think were his words, he was then at the King and Queen in Distaff-lane. He then went over into his warehouse, and told me he would be with me presently; he then came back again, and told me he would come to the Mansion-house in about a quarter of an hour. Finding him shuffling in that way I desired him to come directly; I went to the Mansion-house, and staid there about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, and not finding him there I came back again; I then went to the public-house, and not finding him there I went back again to the Mansion-house, and met with Mr. Read, the officer,

and I brought Mr. Read with me to take him into custody, and he took him into custody.

Q. Did he say any thing in your presence at the time he was taken into custody? - A. In the presence of James Martyn he did; he owned having sold that bone to James Martyn.

Q. Are you sure that the whalebone that was produced at Mr. James Martyn 's was your's? - A. I am perfectly clear of it, I have no hesitation whatever.

Q. Is that whalebone you saw at Mr. James Martyn 's in the same state you would have sold it at your warehouse? - A. Certainly not; it never went out of my warehouse sold in that state, nor from no other warehouse; it was merely in a preparatory state.

Court. Q. It was in a state that was never sold to any one? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You had three men in your service, which three men you suspected were not honest men; one of them referred you to the defendant to give him a character - did he give him a character? - A. He did not, because I had not an opportunity of meeting with him; I went to where I was referred to; his warehouse I did not then know.

JAMES MARTYN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I am a whalebone-cutter, living in the Old Change.

Q. Do you know the defendant, Thomas Martin ? - A. I do, I have known him about eighteen months.

Q. Do you know what business he follows? - A. I do not.

Q. Have you met him frequently during that time? - A. Frequently, almost daily.

Q. Do you remember meeting him on any occasion, and when, at the King and Queen public-house? - A. I do perfectly well, on the 13th of November, in Distaff-lane.

Q. That was the house you used? - A. Yes, and the house the defendant used. I went in the afternoon to take a pint of porter as usual; he said, I have got some whalebone to sell, and he immediately took a stick from underneath the bench from where he was sitting, and asked me to look at it; it was twisted up; I immediately took and untwisted the stick; he said, what is it worth; I said, is it all like this, as he said he had a parcel to sell, about half a hundred weight; he said he was no great judge of it himself; I told him if it was all like that, it might be worth a guinea, but I could not exactly tell till I had seen the bulk; he said it was too late that evening to see the bulk, but I might see it the next day at his warehouse opposite. Accordingly I thought no more of it that evening; nor the next day, but I met him the next day, and he said, now you may see the whalebone; I went with him over to the warehouse, and when I first saw it I was convinced of the circumstance; I said, is here fifty-six pounds; he put it in the scale, and it exactly weighed forty-eight pounds; I said, here is not so much as you said there was, it is not worth that, I will give you a pound-note for it; he said, I will take that, and I gave him a pound note for it; he said, if you will go over the way to the public-house with me, I will treat you with a shilling's worth of punch, and we went over the way; he said, I hope you will get plenty of money by it, for I have got plenty, I have got a seven-shilling piece by it; I told him I could not tell what I might get by it.

Q. What was the value of that you bought? - A. I suppose, fairly between the manufacturer and the dealer, about three pounds. I immediately went to the first person in the trade to inquire about it, and afterwards found out Mr. Delvar, and went to him the next day.

Q. How came you to offer so little value for it? - A. I supposed it to be some part of my own stock till I took the outside strings off, as I have had various porters with me at times; when I found it was not my own stock, I thought it my duty to let the trade know. I then communicated to Mr. Delvar what had passed; I told him he had better come and see the whalebone, and there he said it was his whalebone, when he came the next morning.

Q. Do you remember hearing the defendant say any thing at all about this, in respect of purchasing it? - A. I do not recollect that he said how he came by it; at the Mansion-house he said he bought it for me, he told the Lord-Mayor so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you remember, at the first time of his shewing it to you, whether he said he had bought some, or whether he could buy it? - A. He said he had it at the warehouse opposite.

Q. This was at the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember whether there was any other person present? - A. There were neighbours; there were one or two; in fact, there was a gentleman who does business for me - my attorney was there.

Q. The worst man in the world to shew such a thing before him, is it possible - there might be some of your neighbours there when you paid him? - A. I do not recollect that there were.

JOHN READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the City constables, you apprehended the defendant? - A. Yes, at the King and Queen, in Distaff-lane, on the 16th of November.

Q. Do you know what business he carries on? - A. He is a general dealer in every thing; there was almost every thing there; in his warehouse there was gum, drugs of different descriptions, and stuff that dyers use, I do not know the name

of the stuff, and there were a great many other things; Mr. Delvar went with me when I searched the warehouse. I produce the whalebone, it was given to me by Mr. James Martyn , the last witness; I have had it ever since.

Q. Do you recollect what he said at the Mansion-house? - A. He said he bought it at a sale, and it was an article that he was unacquainted with.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you mean to say that he said he had bought it at a sale - this was in Mr. Delvar's presence, he must have heard it? - A. I do not know whether he heard it.

Q. Do you mean to say that before the Lord-Mayor he said he had bought it at a sale? - A. I would not have said it without he did; he did say he bought it at a sale, and that it was an article that he did not understand.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Delvar.) Q. Is that your property? - A. I believe that to be my property, I have no doubt, I will identify it; in the first place, it is my own manufactory, and worked by my own hands; in the next place, when I saw this bone at Mr. James Martyn's warehouse, I knew it to be mine by the length; every half dozen and every half pound I have divided, so that there is an equal quantity of sticks to every half dozen; I have not the least hesitation whatever in saying, they are my property.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 50 l.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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