Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th December 1804.
Reference Number: 18041205
Reference Number: f18041205-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 5th of DECEMBER, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1804.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PETER PERCHARD , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; the Right Hon. Sir NASH GROSE, Knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ROBERT GRAHAM , Knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN PERRING , Esq. Sir BROOK WATSON, Bart. and Sir WILLIAM STAINES , Knt. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir WILLIAM LEIGHTON , Knt. THOMAS ROWCROFT , Esq. and CLAUDIUS- STEPHEN HUNTER , Esq. Aldermen of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS, Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Jones ,

Thomas Kevin ,

Thomas Murve ,

Robert Osmond ,

William Croft ,

Jeremiah Hobson ,

Thomas Lynn ,

Anby Beatson ,

Robert Harrison ,

John Goodiar ,

Ferdinand Baynes ,

Joseph Waller .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Mentel ,

John Winter ,

William Penman ,

John Gaimes ,

Augustine Fallon ,

John Campbell ,

John Parkin ,

Philip Garnoll ,

Francis Beddol ,

James Parry ,

William Green ,

William Morse .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Freeman ,

Nicholas Cabe ,

John Taylor ,

Richard Hatch ,

James Gregg ,

James Johnson ,

Robert Gibbs ,

Thomas Wardell ,

James Rogers ,

Robert Wright ,

William Gibson ,

William Lasher .

Reference Number: t18041205-1

1. EDWARD KELLY and ANDREW CAITHNESS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , fifty pounds weight of lead, value 4 s. the property of John Perry , jun. Philip Perry , John Willis , William Williams , jun. and George Green .

Second Count. For the like offence, the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case stated by Mr. Reynolds.)

JOHN GIBBONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. I believe you are acquainted with the premises at Blackwall ? - A. Yes, I am clerk to Messrs. Perry and Co.

JAMES SINDER sworn - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. I believe you are ship-keeper of the ship Ganges? - A. Yes; I had the care of that ship, and on the 17th of November, the lead was taken out of the yard; the lead was there when the prisoners were there, and when they were gone the lead was gone; it laid under the bow of the ship, I saw it there between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday, three weeks ago to morrow; I did not miss it till two o'clock in the afternoon.

Court. Q. Then all you know is, between the hours of ten and two it was gone? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The lead is supplied by the master plumber, and he furnishes them with his bill for the work; he is the loser in case the lead is lost? - A. It belonged to the ship, it was on Mr. Perry's premises.

HENRY LARWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You are a Thames-police surveyor, and constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes, they were the two men I took with the lead: On the 17th of November, I saw them coming out of Mr. Perry's yard at twelve o'clock in the day; Andrew Caithness had a roll of new lead on his shoulder, and Kelly had a bag of old lead; Caithness is a plumber, and Kelly is a labourer, to Mr. Spence; I catched them with the lead, and I asked them where they were going with it; they said they had been working on board the Ganges, for Mr. Spence, and the lead they were going to carry to their master.

Q. Do you know this Mr. Spence, and where he lives? - A. He lives close to the office, in Wapping, he is a master plumber; I did not have any doubt but the lead was very right, I let them go with the lead; and after they had gone a little distance, I was a little dubious, I turned round, and saw them going towards Wapping with the lead; I sent Rodman to watch them, and I followed after, and when he was a little way from me he called to me; we saw them again at the public-house, the sign of the Rising-sun, where I took them into custody, directly opposite to Mr. Anderson's, an old iron shop; I questioned them what they had done with the lead; they told me they had left it where they knew where to find it, it was of no consequence to me what they had done with the lead; I insisted upon their telling me what they had done with it; I took them into Anderson's shop, and I asked Anderson what became of the lead those two men had left in his shop; Anderson strongly denied that they had left any lead in his shop; and by threatening to take them before the Magistrate, Caithness said to Mr. Anderson, what is the use of denying it, you took the lead from off my shoulder, and carried it backwards; Anderson and Caithness had a long contest in the shop; Anderson strongly denied it, his daughter and wife also denied it; Kelly said nothing; Caithness still insisted that he left it there; I took them all before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understood you that they said it was Mr. Spence's property? - A. Yes, they said that.

ROBERT RODMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Reynolds. Q. You, I believe, are a lighterman and constable - You watched these men? - A. I watched these men to Mr. Anderson's shop, I saw them go into his yard; and when they went into the shop, Caithness had a roll of new lead, and Kelly a bag of old lead; I followed them to Mr. Anderson's shop, and when they came out, they ran over into the public-house, and then they had only an empty bag.

Jury. Q.How do you know it was old lead that was in the bag? - A. There was a hole in the bottom of the bag, I saw it at the corner of it.

Both the prisoners left their defence to their Counsel, and called one witness, who gave them a good character.

Both GUILTY ,

Fined 1 s. and to enter into recognizance to prosecute the receiver.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-2

2. ANN JARVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary-Ann Wall , on the 27th of November , and feloniously stealing two petticoats, value 2 s. two neck-handkerchiefs, value 6 d. one apron, value 6 d. and one pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of Mary-Ann Wall; one petticoat, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. an apron, value 1 s.

and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of Hannah Insole .

MARY- ANN WALL sworn. - I live at No. 4, Hartshorn-court, near Cripplegate ; I am a spinster , I rent the whole house: On the 27th of November, I went out about eleven o'clock in the morning, I had locked my room-door, and took the key in my pocket, but not the street-door; I let the top part of the house, and the bottom room, to lodgers; I returned about half past eleven, and found my room-door opened; the lock had been forced, the staple was not quite off, but it was forced out part of the way; I then was going into the room, and I saw somebody slip out of the room very quick, and go up the second pair of stairs; I followed the person up stairs immediately, and there I found the prisoner on the second pair of stairs; I called Mrs. Davis, and she came to my assistance; she had the things in her lap.

Q. What had she in her lap? - A. Two petticoats, one pair of stockings, and two neck handkerchiefs of mine; I had put them behind my bed in my own room.

Q. Does all your lodgers go in and out at the same street-door? - A. No; Mrs. Davis lives in the lower room, she has a door to herself, and that door does not go up stairs; it is a back door that leads up stairs, and comes into a stone passage that leads into the court; Mrs. Davis came round to me when I called her; I had stopped the prisoner then; she told me to let her pass, as she had nothing but what belonged to her.

Q. What else did you find besides your own property? - A. Part of the property belonging to a young woman - one petticoat, two pair of stockings, one pair of pockets, and a cotton apron, the property of Hannah Insole ; she did not lodge with me; she brought the things to me; I never saw the prisoner in the house before.

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn. - Q. You are a lodger of Mary Wall? - A. I am; I am a widow with four children; the door of my room is in the court; I cannot go to the upper part of the house without going round the stone passage: On the 27th of November, about half past eleven o'clock in the morning, Mary Wall called to me, Mrs. Davis, stop this woman, for she has robbed me; when I came round, and opened the door, I saw the woman come out of the entry with the things in her lap, where I stopped her, and would not let her go past me; the prisoner said, let me go past; I said I will not; she threw down the things, and I picked them up, and gave them to Mary Wall.

THOMAS HOE sworn. - I was sent for to take charge of this woman in Mrs. Wall's house; she was given in charge to me by Mr. Green, and he said, before we take the prisoner up stairs to search her, let us look in the passage, and there we found this chisel in the passage close by the side of her. (Produces it.)

HANNAH INSOLE sworn. - Q. On the 27th of November, had you any of your wearing apparel in the house of Mrs. Wall? - A. Yes; I went out with Mrs. Wall, but she returned before me.

Q. Do you know whether Mrs. Wall locked the door before she went out? - A. I am sure she did. (The property produced, and identified by Mrs. Wall and Hannah Insole .

GUILTY, aged 67,

Of stealing only .

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-3

3. MASON STORFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Butlin , senior, and John Butlin , junior.

(The case stated by Mr. Copley.)

JOHN BUTLIN , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Copley. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Bread-street, Cheapside ; I am in partnership with my brother, Thomas Butlin , the elder; the prisoner at the bar lived with me in the capacity of a porter for eight months; I had suspicion of him before; I called him in, and told him I had a bad opinion of him; I told him I should search him, and I insisted upon searching his box.

Q. In what state were these silk handkerchiefs? - A. They were both joined together in the same state as we sell them; we found the two handkerchiefs wrapped up in a piece of paper in his box; I told him they were our's; he replied they were not; I said I could swear they were taken from the house; then he acknowledged they were mine; I sent for a constable, and took him before the Alderman.

- HILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Copley. Q. What are you? - A. I am a constable; I was sent for, and went to the prisoner's room, up three pair of stairs, and there I found the handkerchiefs in his box; I produce them.

Mr. Copley. (To Mr. Butlin.) Q. These are the goods that were found in his box? - A. I can, without the smallest doubt, say that they were made by us.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have sold some of them? - A. A few; they are a bad pattern.

Q. Do you sell by retail? - A. No.

Court. Q. Do you sell two handkerchiefs? - A. Yes, we do; we seldom sell less than three.

Q. Are you sure that you never sold any to the prisoner? - A. Certainly, I never did myself.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Who sells besides yourself? - A. We have four or five besides myself, or half a dozen.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-4

4. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Glanville , senior, about the hour of seven at night, on the 23d of November , and burglariously stealing therein fourteen yards of flannel, value 2 l. 10 s. thirteen pair of gloves, value 1 l. 6 s. and two silk handkerchiefs, value 9 s. the property of Robert Glanville , senior.

ROBERT GLANVILLE , sen. sworn. - I live at No. 132, in the Minories : On the 23d of November my house was broke open, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I was not at home at the time.

ROBERT GLANVILLE , jun. sworn. - Q. What age are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. You go to church? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. What does an oath oblige you to do? - A. To say nothing but the truth.

Q. Were you at home on the 23d of November? - A. Yes; my father is a haberdasher and milliner: About half past six o'clock, the officer of the street came and asked me whether we had missed any thing out of the shop, it was quite dark; I looked, and found that the window of the shop was cut; I told him what was taken away; the street-keeper produced a handkerchief, which he opened, and shewed me the things.

Q. What had been taken from your shop? - A. About fourteen yards of flannel, two silk handkerchiefs, and thirteen pair of gloves; they all lay in the window against the pane which was cut; I had put them there myself in the morning; the pane was not intirely taken out; the hole was large enough for any man to put his arm in.

Q. Could any person draw fourteen yards of flannel through there? - A. Yes.

Q. How did the glass appear to be cut - by a diamond, or broken? - A. The street-keeper found an instrument on the person that cut it.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar; had you seen him near your shop that day? - A. No.

Q. Was your shop-door shut at the time the street-keeper came to you? - A. It was.

JOHN FORRESTER sworn. - I am a patrol of the Minories: Between six and seven o'clock on the 23d of November, it was dark; I saw the prisoner at the bar looking in at the right hand windows of Mr. Glanville; he went from there to the left hand window, there is a door in the centre; he stood there for the space of a minute, and he retreated up a court, called New-court; I crossed over the way, and I felt the window where he had been standing, and I found the glass taken out; I walked away, and he came to the same situation again.

Q. Did there appear to be any vacancy from the opening? - A. The things that were behind had fallen against it, so that the place was blocked up; I walked away, and he returned again; he took his observations, and went to the same place after the space of a minute; he looked about him, and looked in the other window of the shop; he then went to the place where the glass had been taken out, for the space of a minute, and then retreated into the court again; I stood still, and he retreated backward and forward to the window, and up the court, four or five times; I kept my eye on him; I crossed over the way, and I laid hold of him; I saw his pockets stick out, and I said, my lad, what have you got here; he said, nothing at all; he put his hand to his pocket to throw them down, but I kept his hands up.

Q. Did he attempt to throw them down? - A. He did, but I kept him from that; I took him across the way into Mr. Price's shop, the shoemaker, and there I searched him, and found upon him thirteen pair of men's and women's gloves; I found nothing else on his person. After I secured him, I went back to Mr. Glanville's, and informed them; then I went into Vine-street, that leads out from New-court, and there I found this roll of flannel, and two silk handkerchiefs.

Q. During the time you were watching this man, did you observe any body else go up in the direction of New-court? - A. No, I saw not any person with him; I found these things hid behind a truck, standing up against a wall; I then took the prisoner to the watch-house, and on searching the prisoner I found a knife; I have been a patrol for these five years; I produce the knife; the knife is for that purpose, to work the putty round the mouldings, and the glass flies in all directions.

Q. From what you observed at the time you were watching the prisoner, have you any reason to believe that he saw you? - A. No.

Q. When you searched him, and found this upon him, did he say any thing for himself? - A. He said so far as this, it is all over with me.

(The articles produced, and identified by the prosecutor and his son.)

Prisoner's defence. Every thing that man has said against me is false; I was coming from Wapping, and coming down the Minories I saw those gloves laying on the ground, and I knocked at the door to see if the gloves belonged to the person of the house, where I picked them up; he came to me, and said, what are you doing; I said, I have been doing nothing at all; he said, come along with me, and he took me over the way into a shoe-shop.

Q.(To Forrester.) Was the prisoner knocking at any door when you saw him? - A. No, he was going to the same spot again.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 26 s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-5

5. JOHN HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , thirty pounds weight of lead, the property of Arthur Winders , fixed to his dwelling-house .

ARTHUR WINDERS sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of this fact yourself? - A. I know no further, than on the 7th of November a message was brought to me of the lead being taken away from No. 72, Bishopsgate-street , and I sent my plumber to examine the place.

THOMAS MASON sworn. - I am a plumber: In consequence of information from Mr. Postan, I went to the top of Mr. Winders's house, and there I perceived a piece of lead four feet long, that had been pulled from under the tiling; the mortar laid about it, it appeared just done; I went down to Mr. Winders, and there I saw the prisoner in Mr. Winders's custody; the prisoner said he was innocent; I could not find the lead.

EDWARD POSTAN sworn. - I live in Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate-street: On the 7th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar in the act of pulling down a piece of lead from the skirting of the tiling, he was alone; this was on the top part of the house, between the ridges of Mr. Winders's house.

Q. Where were you when you saw this? - A. On the garret floor; our garret is rather higher than the top of Mr. Winders's roof.

Q. How many yards across from your shop to Mr. Winders's? - A. Between fifteen and twenty, as near as I can guess; I went down, and informed Mr. Mason; we went and looked at the next door, and saw him at work; I said, that is the man; there was a ladder there, and he was removing it into the yard; Mr. Winders asked him if he knew any thing of the lead; he said, no; Mr. Winders ordered me to fetch an officer, which I did, and he gave charge of him.

Q. Did you find the lead afterwards? - A. No.

Q. Did you see what he did with the lead? - A. No more than he threw a piece of lead between two ridges adjoining the premises, all on one roof.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Did he give any account of himself? - A. Yes, he said he was as good a character as any of us were.

OWEN GOFF sworn. - I saw him go from these premises to where he was working on.

Q. Had you seen him at work on other premises? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he was on Mr. Winders's premises? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I was striking a scaffold at the next house, I am quite innocent.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Did you take this man into custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing at the time you took him? - A. He denied having taken it, he said he was as good a character as any man in the parish.

Q. Have you replaced the lead? - A. I have, and it required thirty-five pounds and a half to replace it; I desired the plumber to replace the lead the same as the other was.

Q. Have you ever found the lead? - A. No, we have looked for it every where, and cannot find it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-6

6. JOHN EDMONDS and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , one half-guinea , the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a seaman : On Friday, the 16th of November, about one o'clock in the morning, the prisoners at the bar and me were standing at a door; I wanted something to drink, the house was shut up; there was a scuttle at the door; I wanted a pot of beer, and I handed the half-guinea in at the scuttle, the small place that opens in the door; they returned the half-guinea to me, and this young man, Edmonds, took hold of it.

Q. How came you out so late? - A. I came on shore with my shipmate about eleven o'clock, after mooring the ship, it was dark; he was going to see his mother, and I was going with him; I missed my shipmate, and a gentleman came and told me he knew where my shipmate was.

Q. What time was it that you fell in company with the prisoners? - A. I cannot tell, it was in a house; I was never in the house before, I do not know where the house was, I was not real sober.

Q. Are you sure you were in company with these two men? - A. Yes; the tall man, Williams, came in first.

Q. Did you drink with him? - A.No; I do not know whether my shipmate did, he was in company with my shipmate.

Q. What time did you get in company with Williams? - A. About half past eleven, I cannot rightly tell; the other came to Holborn-hill; I never took notice of him before my shipmate left me in the house; a woman wrangled with him, and the watchman came and took us all out; I cannot tell the name of the place, I am a Prussian; then I was going to treat this man with a pot of beer, and I was turned out of another house.

Q. Then you went towards another? - A. Yes, and this gentleman told me he knew where my shipmate was; I wanted to go to my shipmate, I did not know where he was; then we came to this house that was shut up, and there I put the half-guinea in at the scuttle, it was to pay for a pot of beer; they handed it me out, when the young man, Edmonds, with the blue coat, took hold of the half-guinea; he ran away with it, and I ran after him; the tall man, Williams, stopped me, and prevented me from pursuing the other man; he said it was a sixpence, and I could swear it was half a guinea; in trying to stop me, he tore my waistcoat.

Q. The one that took the half-guinea said nothing? - A. No, he was standing close behind me.

Q. Did you get your half-guinea again? - A. I called the watchman; they were both stopped, and the half-guinea was found by the officer.

Q. When the half-guinea was handed out through the hole in the door, did you try to get it? - A. I said, give me the half-guinea; they said it was a sixpence; I said, let me see it; I was going to lay hold of it, but he was first.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I see you are an honest fellow, as I expected a sailor to be; when you handed it in, somebody not choosing to give change, handed it out to you; you gave it in voluntarily out of good nature to treat your friend? - A. Yes.

Q. When it was returned out from the door, you had no objection to his taking of it - you thought he would give it you again? - A. I would have taken hold of it if I could; I told him to give it me.

Q. Yes, afterwards; you did not object at the time; he certainly should have given it you; you did not say, do not you take it -

Court. Q. He did not ask your leave to take it? - A. No; and when he laid hold of it, he said it was a sixpence.

WILLIAM PINDER sworn. - I am an inspector of the watch and lamps of the parish of St. Andrew: On the 16th of November, I heard the cry of stop thief, and the watchman's rattle sprang; I was close to Bartlet's-buildings, Holborn; I saw two men run, and a sailor likewise; I seized hold of John Edmonds and Thomas Williams by their collars; I asked the sailor what he had lost, and he said he had lost half a guinea; there was a watchman came up, and the patrol of Hatton-garden; we took them down to the watch-house, and when we got there, I heard Thomas Williams rattle something in his mouth, apparently to me some kind of money; I challenged him with having it in his mouth; he put his hand up to his mouth, and I saw him take the half-guinea in his hand; I seized his hand, and wanted him to open it, to let me see what was in his hand, and he swore he would be d - d if any body should see what was in his hand; he put his hand down by the side of him, and shifted it under him; with that I thought it was not out of his mouth, and we endeavoured to pinch his jaws; then I put my hand under him, and found it; I produced it to the officer of the night, and I told him there was the half-guinea that I found; I shewed it to the prosecutor, it was in Williams's custody that I found it.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Which of them was the man that took the half-guinea? - A. The short one, Edmonds.

THOMAS BRANT sworn. - I am an officer of the night at the watch-house of St. Andrew's; I heard the sailor calling out stop thief; I was close by him at the time with the inspector.

Q. Who did he charge with taking it? - A. He said, Edmonds, the short one, was the man that snatched it from the door; when they were at the watch-house, I saw the inspector get the half-guinea in the way he has described it; the sailor was very particular in knowing the man in the dark.

Q. He was quite sure of the man? - A. Yes, and he described him as the same man at the watch-house.

Edmonds's defence. I had been at the play along with George James, and after I had been to the play I called at Mrs. Stepner's house, in Fleet-street; I staid there till about a quarter past twelve; I could not go to my lodgings, I was locked out. Coming by this watering-house, I stopped there, and that young man came to us, with two or three more, very much in liquor; he forced his discourse to me, and asked me to have something to drink; I said I did not want to have any thing to do with him; he put his hand into his pocket, and took out the money, and put it in this hole; the landlord refused changing it, the money was returned, and he accused me of taking the money; I had a drab coat on when we were taken, and he said it was a blue coat. When I was stopped, I said, this man accuses me of having half a guinea; in the mean time, the prisoner Williams said I had nothing to do with it; the watch laid hold of him, and we all went to the watch-house together; the witness, James, will swear that I had been in his company the whole of the time; I never saw the prisoner Williams before in my life.

Williams's defence. This sailor was very much in liquor; he was coming down Fleet-market, and two watchmen were dragging him to this watering-house-door; there was a cry of stop thief; I caught hold of this sailor, and the constable laid hold of me and the sailor.

Q.(To Brant.) Where did you take Williams? - A. Higher up than Bartlet's buildings.

GEORGE JAMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the prisoner Edmonds? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you happen to be with the prisoner Edmonds on the night this robbery was supposed to be committed? - A. Yes; I left the play after eleven o'clock, and never left the company of the prisoner Edmonds; I did not see Williams till we came to the watering house, in Holborn, getting something to drink, and there happened to be a pothole; there were several people at the door; the sailor called for something to drink, and in a few minutes afterwards accused John Edmonds of taking half a guinea away; it was not the prisoner Edmonds that took the half-guinea, I can be upon my oath.

Q. Had Edmonds been in company with the prisoner Williams at all, previous to taking the half-guinea? - A. He was not.

Brant. This witness was the other man we took and turned out of the watch-house; there were five or six in the gang; the sailor had no charge against him.

Court. (To James.) What are you? - A. I am a fishmonger, I live with Mr. Brown, of Leadenhall-market, I am his servant now; I clean fish, I am a weekly servant; I left the play at Covent-garden as soon as it was over, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. Where did the prisoner live at the time this circumstance happened? - A. I cannot rightly tell; he was a glass-cutter.

Q. You never knew who he worked with, nor never where he lived? - A. Not lately; I have known him about these twelve months; about six months ago he lived in Poppin's court, Fleet-street, I never visited him; I met him promiscuously going to the play at the top of Fleet-market, and we went to the play together.

Q. In your way home from Covent-garden, how long were you going from Covent-garden to this house? - A. Not above five minutes.

Q. To this watering house? - A. We were longer than that going there; we delayed the time.

Q. What did you do - this must be an hour after the play had finished, and you had got no further than St. Andrew's, Holborn, that will not take above ten minutes; I should be glad to know how you had been employing yourself? - A. We went into Fleet-street, to a court there, and got something to drink; then we went to No. 4, Bowling-alley, Chancery-lane; I was going home when I was turning up St. Andrew's hill, and we stopped at the watering house; we had not been at the watering house above two minutes, getting something to drink, when the sailor came up.

Q. You had something to drink before? - A. We had.

Q. Did you see the man take the half-guinea out of his pocket? - A. No, I neither saw it handed in or out.

Q. Who did take it? - A. I cannot tell who took it, I did not see any half-guinea; I can swear Edmonds did not take it, he had hold of my arm.

Q. Where was Williams? - A. He was standing near the door.

Q. Did you see him standing there? - A. I cannot say I did; my friend Thompson -

Q. You have a friend Edmonds - does he go by the name of Thompson? - A.No.

Q. How came you to talk of your friend Thompson, where was he? - A. I suppose he was a bed.

Q. Where was your friend Edmonds at the time this half-guinea was lost? - A. My back was right against the pillar of the door, and he stood alongside of me; his arm had hold of mine.

Q. You say this man called out to some man taking his half-guinea? - A. He charged Edmonds; one was on one side of the door, and the other on the other.

Q. Then they were within a yard of each other? - A. They were.

Q. Did he not charge Edmonds while he was standing at the corner? - A. He did not; Edmonds turned the corner, and then he sung out stop thief.

Q. Did you run? - A. I went up Bartlet's-buildings.

Q. Did not Williams run the same way with Edmonds? - A. Williams stopped till after Edmonds run; Edmonds run first, and then the sailor run; I called out to him what do you run for; he said that man has got my half-guinea.

Q. Did not you call out to your friend, what do you run for? - A. I did.

Q. What answer did he make? - A. No answer at all; I was taken at the corner of Bartlet's-buildings, when I was standing there, some gentleman came and catched hold of me, he said, come along with me; I said, I will go quiet enough; he took me to the watch-house, we were all searched.

Q. Did you tell them then this man was at a distance? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you go before the Justice? - A. No.

Q. When were you applied to about this business? - A. I had a subpoena to day.

Q. Did you go to your friend in prison? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not want a subpoena, you knew when the trial would come on; you do not know what this man's way of life is? - A. He was a glass-cutter.

Q. That is only what you have heard him say; you do not know where he works? - A. I do not.

Q. Then he is only a casual acquaintance? - A. It is so.

Edmonds, GUILTY , aged 18, Williams, GUILTY , aged 18,

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-7

7. ANN LOCKHART and ANN TUCKLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , three sheets, value 15 s. four

blankets, value 20 s. a bolster, value 3 s. a tea-kettle, value 1 s. a pair of bellows, value 1 s. a poker, value 6 d. a flock bed, value 10 s. the property of Peter Querey , in his dwelling-house ; and ELIZABETH METCALFE , for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

PETER QUEREY sworn. - I am a Frenchman, and a shoe-maker , I live in Poland-street : I only know from my neighbours.

JOHANNA QUEREY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: I was coming from a house in Charles-street to a house in Poland-street, I only know from information; I went to Mrs. Metcalfe's shop, she delivered them to me.

ANN SHEPHARD sworn. - I am a book-folder: I was standing at the next door to Mrs. Querey's, in Charles-street, Drury-lane; Mrs. Querey was moving to Poland-street; I saw the two prisoners come out of the house with something in their laps, they had two bundles in their aprons, but I could not tell what they had got; I believe it was between two and three o'clock.

Q. Do you know where they went? - A. I do not.

Q. You are sure they are the two women? - A. Yes.

- BUCKLEY sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 9th of November last, Johanna Querey met me in Drury-lane, before eight o'clock at night, she informed me that she was robbed; I could learn from her she had information where the property was; we went to Mrs. Metcalfe's, into her front room, and the bed laid there; and Mrs. Querey said, that was her bed; I interrogated Mrs. Metcalfe, she said, she thought they did not come honestly by it; I asked her if she knew the women, she said she did; I apprehended the two women, and took them to her; she said they were the persons.

Esther Miller was called, and not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-8

8. WILLIAM PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a cock fowl, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Wartnaby .

JOSEPH WARTNABY sworn. - I live at Dalston, in the parish of Hackney : On Sunday the 4th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in my stable, and I heard a noise of the fowls in my yard, I opened the door, and I saw the prisoner at the bar run away.

Q. What is your yard? - A. An open farm yard; he was in the yard close to the stable-door; I ran after him, and as he was going out of the gate he dropped the cock, I saw him drop the cock when he got there; he then ran down Pigwell-lane, about two hundred yards off; I catched hold of him, and brought him back, and sent for a constable.

Q. Does he live in your neighbourhood? - A. We do not know where he lives; he told the Justice he lived in the parish of St. Luke's; I know nothing of the man myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where was your yard dog at the time? - A. He was in the stable with me, and he came out with me.

Q. When you came out of the stable he was going out of the yard? - A. I saw him close to the stable-door.

Q. Did you ever see the cock in that young man's possession? - A. Yes; I saw it drop from him.

Q. This was in the middle of the day, there were a number of people passing and repassing? - A. There were none in my yard; I saw the cock drop from him.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. You had the cock from Mr. Wartnaby? - A. Yes. (The cock produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. There were a number of fowls in the road, and I was hustling them out of my way, in doing that, the cock made a bit of a fly out of my way; I never had the cock at all, they were all in the road as I was going to my uncle's, at at Newington.

GUILTY , aged 24,

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-9

9. THOMAS BIRD and SAMUEL FINCH were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October, a truss of hay, value 2 s. the property of Henry White , and the other for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, knowing it to be stolen .

HENRY WHITE sworn. - I am a farmer ; I live in the parish of Edmonton: On Saturday, the 27th of October, I sent a load of hay to Whitechapel market ; I followed the hay, and when I got to town I employed two men to watch the prisoner Bird, my servant ; I was informed that he had sold hay before; I got an officer and we went and waited for him; the hay was sold by the salesman and I received the whole of the money; it is the truss which is put on the load for the horses to live on, called the horse-bottle, that I charge him with; he sold it.

Q. You are sure this hay was your's? - A. It was; I saw it that morning, it was taken down to the Magistrate; I am sure it was mine; it was taken out of the same stack that the load was, and it was in a truss.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Might not one carman have bought of another, under the idea that it was the perquisites of the carman? - A. I cannot conceive but that Finch must know better than that; he has been a farmer himself.

WILLIAM WOOD sworn. - I received information from Mr. Craven that the prisoner Bird would unload the hay at Mr. Curtis's back place; I was desired to wait there, and if I saw a short elderly man, in a dark brown coat, with a truss of hay, to detain him directly; I saw the bottle-truss thrown down; he took the spare horse from the cart, the horse took one mouthful of hay out of the cart, then he tied the horse up because he should not eat it; when he had unloaded the hay, he put the bottle-truss into the cart; I saw Samuel Finch , the other prisoner; he was on the spot, at a little distance; and the cart went on into Leman-street; the carman stopped at Mr. Curtis's shop and took the money for the hay, and when he got into Plough-street the carman stopped the cart; Finch then was with him; I saw Finch give the prisoner Bird some money, and Bird give him the bottle-truss.

Q. What do you mean by the bottle-truss? - A. The bottle-truss is what the horses have to live on, when they come to town; it is distinct from the load; I saw Finch give Bird some money, and then Bird gave Finch the truss of hay upon his back; he got about three or four yards from the cart; William Brown run from the corner of the street, and took hold of him; I went and took hold of Bird, and told him to stop his cart; I sent for Mr. Griffiths, the officer; Mr. Griffiths and Mr. White came together; we delivered the two prisoners to Mr. Griffiths.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Whether or not this bottle-truss was taken to the Office? - A. I carried it there myself.

Court. Q. You are sure that the bottle-truss that you carried to the Office was the truss that Bird took and delivered to Finch? - A. I am positive of it; Mr. White saw it.

Court. (To Prosecutor.) Q. That is the truss that you swore to be your's? - A. Yes, and that is the truss that we sent for the horses to live on; we do not bind it to the load; it is a square truss to keep the horses on the journey.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I know just the same as the other witness stated, and I have seen Finch buy hay repeatedly of Bird, I suppose near two months, opposite to our accompting-house, and in Plough-street; I saw this bottle-truss sold; I saw Samuel Finch give Thomas Bird some money, it turned out to be eleven-pence halfpenny; Thomas Finch took it on his shoulder, I immediately seized him, and the other witness seized the carman; I asked Finch what he was going to do with that hay; he seemed agitated, and asked me to let him go; I told him he should go when Mr. White came; I sent for Mr. White and Mr. Griffiths, they were waiting at our accompting-house; I delivered the prisoners to Mr. Griffiths, and we went to the Office with them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Curwood. Q. Do you mean to state, that Finch bought this hay knowing it had been stolen? - A. I do not mean to say so; he knew it was stolen there is no doubt.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I do not mean to swear that.

Q. He said that he bought the hay, and gave eleven-pence halfpenny for it, and he did not admit that he bought it knowing it to be stolen? - A. Thomas Bird said in Finch's presence, that he never should have done it if it had not been for Finch learning him to do it; he first asked him.

Court. Q. What answer did Finch make to that? - A. He did not say much; he pretended to be deaf.

Q.(To White.) What is the value of this truss? - A. About 2 s. 4 d 1/2.

- GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an Officer: On Saturday, the 27th of October, I was sent for to take these two prisoners into custody; I went, and when I came there these two young men had stopped them; they were both together, and the truss of hay with them; I asked Bird what he had for the truss of hay; he told me somewhere about a shilling; it was in halfpence; I desired him to give it to me, and I told it at the Office; it was 11 d 1/2; I asked him when he sold him any before; he said on Thursday; I cannot say whether Finch heard him; he appeared to me to be deaf; I asked Finch what he was going to do with it; he said it was for one Cammomile, that kept a horse and cart, and a potato-warehouse, in Plough-street.

Mr. Curwood. Q. I believe he told you he had been sent by Cammomile to purchase it? - A. I do not recollect.

Prisoner Bird's defence. I never sold any before.

The prisoner Finch left his defence to his Counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bird, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Finch, GUILTY , aged 71.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-10

10. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , two blankets, value 6 s. two sheets, value 16 s. two tin saucepans, value 2 s. 6 d. a fire shovel, value 6 d. a tin tea-kettle, value 2 s. 6 d. a hearth-brush, value 3 d. and one chair, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Colin Forbes , in a lodging room let to the prisoner by contract, to be used in and with the lodging .

ANN FORBES sworn. - I live in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch ; I am a married woman; my husband lives with me: About the middle of October the prisoner took a room of me, ready-furnished, up

two pair of stairs; she took it weekly, at 5 s. per week; on Friday morning, the 16th of November, about ten o'clock, I missed her in the house; she had lodged with me about three weeks, and from information I had received from a pot-girl, I concluded I was robbed; I went up stairs and knocked at the door, and no one answered; I went into the room, and then I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I have seen them all since; they are here; I went to a house in Turk-street with an Officer, and there I found my chair; I enquired of the landlady if a Mrs. Johnson had come to live there that night; she said she had, and in about half an hour afterwards she was taken by the Officer.

Q. Was she in the habit of receiving any visits at your house? - A. The sister and mother, and another old woman, came into the house, and went up and down stairs.

Q. No men came there? - A. None that I can recollect; only Benjamin Johnson, her husband; I used to let him in regularly of an evening.

Prisoner. My mother offered to make it up to her for two or three pounds, and she said she would not make it up under 9 l.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) How is that? - A. Oh dear, no; never such a word passed; she begged of me to be merciful; I was very unwilling, as the articles were found, to prosecute, but never no money mentioned.

Prisoner. I did not give the room up, nor was I half an hour out of the place, before she came and said, I had robbed the place.

Q.(To the prisoner.) How long was it till she came to you, after you had robbed that place? - A. About half an hour.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) You found where the prisoner was within half an hour? - A. Yes, I found her out through her own sister; I followed her sister that very day I missed the articles.

Q. Then you found out where the prisoner was? - A. Yes; I went to the Office in Worship-street, and informed the officer; I got a warrant, and the gentleman went up stairs in Turk-street, Bethnal-green, and took her.

ELIZABETH CORDLE sworn. - I lived in the one pair of stairs room, in Mrs. Forbes's house, and the prisoner lived in the two pair of stairs room; the saucepan, broom, and tea-kettle, that were missing, were given to me in my room between this woman and I, by Mrs. Forbes, to make use of, and about a week before these things were missing, I left Mrs. Forbes's room: the prisoner at the bar still remained in the house, and when she went away on Friday morning, Mrs. Forbes came to me about this broom, saucepan, and tea-kettle, and told me Mrs. Johnson had robbed her; she told me to go and seek for her, as I had lent them out of my room; I went to find the prisoner, but could not; I found her mother; I told her mother that Mrs. Johnson had taken the things out of the room that I had lent to her; she said she would go and find the daughter; I told her, if she found the daughter, to take the things to Mrs. Forbes; instead of that, she brought the broom, saucepan, and tea-kettle, to my house, where I then lived; she told me Mrs. Forbes was not at home, she would fetch them from my house at two o'clock in the afternoon; she brought them to me at twelve; it was ten o'clock when I found her mother; I went to Mrs. Forbes, and told her that some of the things were left at my house; Mr. Mason came, and took them from my room; I know not whether the prisoner took them from the room, or no.

Prisoner. She went to my mother, and desired her to bring them to her house, and when they took me, the things were taken away by my aunt, and my husband desired me to go back to the room, as I had not given it up.

Q.(To Cordle.) Did you desire her mother to bring the articles to you? - A. I desired her mother, as Mrs. Forbes had come to me for the things, and I will be upon my oath I said, I shall be punished for the things that I had lent out of my room to her, as she had taken them away out of her room; I told her to endeavour to find her, and carry them to Mrs. Forbes's house, and then I said, may be there will be no more of it.

PETER MASON sworn. - On Friday, the 16th of November, I took the prisoner at the bar in Turk-street, Bethnal-green, and a rush-bottom chair; Mrs. Forbes said, that is my chair; the prisoner then said, if that is your chair, I have left one of mine in the room of it; I took her and the chair to the Office. I went to Mrs. Cordle's house in Holywell-lane; the prisoner's aunt and mother were there, and the tin ware, a blanket, and a brush; they were delivered to Mrs. Forbes, at her desire.

JAMES KING sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live at Messrs. Francis and Parsons's, No. 161, Shoreditch; I produce a blanket pledged for two shillings, on the 12th of November, by the prisoner, I know her well, and a sheet pledged for four shillings by the same woman; I have had them ever since.

JAMES DREW sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I have got a sheet pawned on the 3d of November; I cannot say by whom. (The articles produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

(The prisoner produced a written paper for her defence.)

Q.(To the prisoner.) Can you read that yourself? - A. No.

Q. Who wrote that paper? - A. A young man.

Q.Do you know what it contains? - A. Yes, a woman read it to me.

(Prisoner's defence read as follows.) My Lord

and Gentlemen of the Jury, I was never guilty of such an offence before, and I have reason to repent of my past conduct, and hope my former good character will have some weight in my favour; embarrassed circumstances have been the cause of my acting wrong.

Court. It is exceeding wrong of people, not bred to the profession, undertaking to draw in poor unfortunate prisoners, under presence of assisting them; you see, young woman, you have been miserably deluded by this young man.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-11

11. JOSEPH SCOTT was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously making an assault upon Ann Bray , on the 26th of November , with menaces, and in a forceable violent manner did demand her money, with felonious intention; the money of the said Ann Bray from her person and against her will feloniously to take and carry away .

Second Count. For making an assault, and with menaces feloniously demanding her money, with intent to rob her.

Third Count. For making an assault, feloniously in a forceable violent manner demanding her money, with intent to rob her.

ANN BRAY sworn. - Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar before? - A. Yes; on the 26th of November, as I was coming from Newington-green to town, I saw the prisoner coming towards me, as I was going down the first field; when I got near the bottom of the field, the prisoner passed me near my right hand; he asked me what o'clock it was; I told him I believed it was about eleven; with that he said, your money or your life; I cannot be positive that he said your life, but I understood him so; he demanded my money, which I refused, by telling him that I was not to be frightened out of my money, though at the same time I was in a deal of fear. He told me to make no resistance, that he could call help, and he drew a whistle or something to his teeth; I replied, I could call assistance as well as him; with that he said, did you meet a man; then he said, I will let you go; I made no answer. With that the prisoner passed me, and went towards Newington, and I went towards Newington-green; when I got a little way from him, I turned to pursue the prisoner; with that he turned, and saw me following of him, and he came to meet me; I told him I would have him pursued; he said, what is that you say, what is that you say, twice over; I told him again I would have him pursued, and directly I cried out, William. The prisoner then passed me, and run through a little gate; he turned to his left hand, and went into another field; he went the length of that field, and got over the bank; then I lost sight of him. I turned myself, and saw this William, and a gentleman; they both came to my assistance; I told them what had passed; William pursued the prisoner, and he took him in a place called Cut-throat-lane.

Q. You did not see him take him? - A. No; I saw him bringing the prisoner towards us, I knew him to be the same man.

WILLIAM KING sworn. - Q. You are the person that the last witness alluded to? - A. Yes, I am servant to the Rev. Dr. Gaskin; I was in his yard, when I heard a lady scream, and I immediately went to her assistance; when I came to her, she said she had been stopped by a man, and that he had ran across the fields, pointing towards Kingsland; I immediately pursued the prisoner, and when I had crossed two fields, I looked to the right, and saw the prisoner running down a dirty lane, called Cut-throat-lane; the prisoner looked back over his right shoulder, and saw me pursuing of him; he rather abated his pace, but before I got up to him, he crossed the lane, attempting to get over a bank; I came up to him before he was over the bank, and asked him if he had not seen a lady in the fields leading to Newington-green; his answer was, that he had not; I told him that a lady had been stopped, and that I could take him up on suspicion; he said he should not go back to the lady; he said he was going to Hoxton workhouse to see his father; he walked on a little way, and I went by the side of him, advising him to go back with me to the lady; he rather made a stop, and hesitated for a moment, and asked me if the lady was in the field; I told him she was; he then said he would go back; he walked on a little way, and he said, I have done wrong; I said, what have you done, my friend; he said, I asked the woman what it was o'clock.

Q. Did he say any thing to you about demanding her money? - A. He did mention the word money, but I cannot particularly say what; he then walked on with me till we came to the lady in the field where he had stopped her; he desired me not to say any thing to him, as he had surrendered himself up; I then put him in the cage till night, and then I took him to Worship-street.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Did he produce a pistol, or any weapon of any sort? - A. No, I did not perceive that he had any thing; he demanded my money.

- GREEVES sworn. - Q. What do you know respecting this circumstance? - A. On the 26th of November, after passing the field near Dr. Gaskin's house, I heard the cry of a female voice; I looked round, and heard the cry repeated; I then ran to the assistance of the lady, she was in my sight; she told me she had been stopped by a man; the witness, William King , ran after the prisoner;

I saw King bring the prisoner back; the prisoner, I believe, touched his hat, and said to me, do not touch me, as he had surrendered himself up, but I laid hold of him by the arm.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found an handkerchief with some holes in it, it was silk; people that go out upon the highway make use of this; it may be used for a disguise.

Q. Do you know him? - A. Yes, he is very well known, I have seen him often; he did live about Clerkenwell, he is something in the chair way; he has been here before for stopping ladies in the fields.

Q. Does he follow any trade? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Prisoner's defence. I have this to say: I was going from Newington-green to Newington; I met a woman going there, and I asked her the time of the day; she seemed rather frightened at my asking her that; I said to her, do not be frightened, I do not want to hurt you, nor neither do I ask you for your money; I went on my way a few steps, and she likewise her way; then she turned back, and said she would have me pursued; she called out, William, William, several times, as loud as she could; it rather frustrated me, I did not know what to do; I made my way over into the next field, I turned back, and saw somebody was in pursuit of me; I rather stopped, a person came up to me, and asked me if I had met a woman; I told him, no; he said there had been a woman stopped, and he would advise me to go back with him; I said I am going to see my father, who is in a workhouse at Hoxton; he said, I can take you up on suspicion; I said, is the lady in the field where she was stopped; he replied, yes; I then consented to go back with him, which I did, and the lady, when she saw me with him, said, I was the man that stopped her; I was then immediately put in the cage.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Did you hear the first part of his account - is it true? - A. It is not true, I told you every word, word for word.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-12

12. JAMES HAWKINS , CHARLES HAWKINS , and WILLIAM FIELD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a game cock, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Isaac Rider .

ISAAC RIDER sworn. - I live at No. 12, Park-street , Westminster, I am a smith : On the 4th of September last, my witness informed me that my cock was stolen from his walk; I heard there were some men in custody for stealing game cocks; there was notice given by several of the officers of Bow-street, desiring people that had lost fowls to come forward to own their own; I came forward, and owned one that was in the custody of Dunn, the officer.

JAMES DUNN sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I assisted in apprehending the prisoners on the 6th of November, with Holder.

Q. Did you find this cock in the custody of these men? - A. Yes, they were altogether; Charles Hawkins had the cock in his hand; I assisted Holder in apprehending all the three prisoners; a man of the name of Groom came to me and said, I am glad you have got these three brothers.

Q. Are they three brothers? - A. Yes, by the mother's side.

JOHN HOLDER sworn. - Q. You are an officer? - A. Yes, of Bow-street: I assisted Dunn in apprehending the three prisoners, on the 6th of November, I knew them all; I met these three brothers, and Charles Hawkins had got a cock in his arms; upon this Dunn said, will you go with me, Jack; I called a coach, and put them all three in it; I took the cock from Charles Hawkins , and we took them to the office, I gave the cock to Dunn to keep; Mr. Bond gave us an order to go down to this French school, Mr. Brogilie's, at Kensington, and there I found fourteen live cocks and a dead one; the prisoners at the bar had sold most of them to the young gentlemen there.

Q. Are there any of the young gentlemen of Kensington here? - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN DEVEREAUX sworn. - Q. Were you at the academy at Kensington in November last? - A. I am not sure, I believe I was; I am not there now.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar; do you know them all three? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the habit of buying game cocks of these men? - A. We had some cocks before; they came at the end, when half our cocks were killed; we bought one of the two Hawkins's, and one of Field alone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you bought the cocks, you did not keep them at school, you kept them out? - A. We had a bit of ground at the school, where we kept them separate.

Q. Do you mean to say whether that is the cock that you bought of the prisoner? - A. No.

Q.(To Rider.) What other witness have you got? - A. I have got William Stacey , the man that the cock was at, in his walk, at Five Fields, Chelsea.

WILLIAM STACY sworn. - Q. You had Rider's cock in your walk, had you? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the cock, (the cock produced)? - A. That is the cock that I had, it belongs to Rider: I had that cock on the 4th of November last, I fed

him on that morning between ten and eleven o'clock, he was gone before three.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar; do you know them? - A. I saw them on Sunday morning, in a dirty dress, not becoming such men as them, at chapel-time; I saw them go through a passage at the corner of my house, one of them had a leather apron on like a farrier, or smith, this was between nine and ten o'clock, before I had fed the cock; they returned in about three quarters of an hour, I believe.

Q. You are sure you saw all the three together? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you first miss the cock? - A. About two o'clock; the fowls come in to get their victuals and pick with the children, they go to roost early; we drive them in because we lost some before.

Q. You are sure the cock, produced now, is Mr. Rider's cock? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. They never attempted to touch any thing when you saw them? - A. Not that I saw.

Q.(To Rider.) Are you sure that is your cock? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM GROOM sworn. - On Sunday morning, the 4th of November, I saw the three prisoners together, about half past ten o'clock, at Old Brompton; I followed them down to Little Chelsea-common, at the end next Sloane-square, I turned up to Brompton, and there I lost sight of them; they were going towards Stacey's house.

Q. You did not see them go up to his house? - A. No; on Tuesday following, I saw these three men facing Kensington workhouse, that is the day they were taken up, all three, with Rider's cock; then we took them up, with assistance, to Bow-street, Mr. Boud examined them; he granted an order for the master to send all the game cocks at the school; I saw them in about three quarters of an hour.

James Hawkins 's defence. That cock I bought on the 6th of November, at Tyburn-turnpike, about eight o'clock, of a countryman; he had it with two more.

Charles Hawkins and William Field left their defence to their Counsel.

James Hawkins called two witnesses, Charles Hawkins called one, and William Field called one, who gave them a good character.

James Hawkins , GUILTY , aged 21,

Charles Hawkins , GUILTY , aged 17,

William Field , GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18041205-13

13. JOSEPH GILL , JOHN ADAMS , and JAMES MOORE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , twenty-five yards of woollen cloth, value 9 l. twenty-four yards of corderoy, value 4 l. twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. and one yard of canvass, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Dicker .

Second Count. For like offence, charging it to be the property of Thomas Clark .

(The case stated by Mr. Gurney.)

THOMAS DICKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a woollen-draper , at Wolverhampton? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 6th of November last, did you send any goods by the Newbury waggon? - A. Yes; a piece of blue cloth, an end of corderoy, and a piece of printed cotton, it was tied up in canvass; I directed it myself to Stewart's and Co. No. 9, Ironmonger-lane, November the 6th was on the truss; I delivered it at my own door to the waggoner, he is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you recover your property again? - A. Yes.

JACOB TOWNSEND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the driver of the Newbury-waggon? - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of the 6th of November last, did you receive a truss from Mr. Dicker? - A. Yes, a truss; I put it in the waggon myself.

Q. On the evening of the 7th you were coming across Hounslow-heath? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you there, in consequence of any information that you received, look into the waggon to see that all was safe? - A. Yes; I saw it about eight o'clock in the evening, at Colnbrook.

Q. Did you examine your waggon when you came to Smallbury-green ? - A. Yes; it was all safe then.

Q. When you came to Brentford , did you examine it again? - A. Yes; that was between one and two o'clock in the morning, then I found all the skewers from the off-side of the waggon pulled out.

Q. Could that possibly have happened by accident? - A. It could not; they could not have come out without being pulled out; I looked into the waggon and this truss was missing that I received from Mr. Dicker, I had put it into the middle of the waggon.

Q. Could it have tumbled out by accident? - A. No.

Q. You are quite sure it was there when you came from Colnbrook? - A. Yes.

JOHN STUDBURY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable of Acton? - A. Yes: On the 7th of November I watched the roads, with other persons, from eight o'clock in the evening till between three and four in the morning, a cart came along at a little distance, we were waiting in a shed near the King's-arms, at Acton, and immediately it came close enough, Thomas Malms sprang at the horse's bridle, and happened to catch it; the horse came round to the left-side,

Gill jumped out of the cart, and I was jumping in as he jumped out; I secured Moore and Adams in the cart.

Q. Gill was secured by the persons with you? - A. Yes; as soon as I secured the prisoners I found this truss; I asked them how they came by it; they said they found it on the road; I immediately made Moore and Adams go out of the cart; we took them into the King's-arms, and likewise the truss with them; then, before their faces, I opened the truss, in which I found three parcels with directions upon them.

Q. Was the name upon the cart? - A. Yes: John Adams, Mile-End-road; Adams, the prisoner at the bar, owned the cart.

Q. Did they all resist? - A. No; the two men in the cart did not resist, only Gill; I had a pistol in my hand.

Q. Did any other man accompany them? - A. There was a man on horseback, who rode away as fast as he could make his horse's legs lay to the ground; we took them to Acton round-house, but I was persuaded to take them to a public-house till morning.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How far is Acton from Smallbury-green? - A.At least five miles.

JOHN ADAMS sworn. - Q. Do you remember being on the road on the 9th of November, in company with tudbury? - A. Yes; I heard the can before I saw it; I hollowed out Thomas Malms , get hold of the horse's bridle; I took hold of one of shafts the of the near-side, with that, we pulled it round to the left; I saw three people in the cart.

Q. Did they all remain in the cart? - A.Gill jumped out, they called for assistance; I left the shafts and went to secure him.

Q. How far did Gill get from the cart? - A. Not above three or four yards; he tumbled down in jumping, and hurt himself.

Q. Are you quite sure that he is the man that jumped out of the cart? - A. Yes, I never lost sight of him; he struggled much but not long, because there were three of us about him.

Q. Were you all armed? - A. Yes.

Q.(To prosecutor.) Look at the truss, (the truss produced); see whether that is the truss that you gave to the waggoner? - A. It is, that is my own hand-writing.

Court. Q. You have no partner? - A. No, my brother is dead.

Mr. Gurney. (To Townsend.) Q. Is that the truss you received in your waggon? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your master's name? - A. Thomas Clark, he is my only master.

BENJAMIN PROBITTY sworn. - Q. You are the clerk of this waggon, is Mr. Clark the proprietor of this waggon? - A. Yes; he has no partner at all.

Gill's defence. I was hired by the person that rode on horseback to fetch some smuggled goods, and when I saw him ride away. I jumped out of the cart.

Adams said the same.

Moore did not say any thing in his defence, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Gill, GUILTY , aged 32,

Adams, GUILTY , aged 24,

Moore, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-14

14. JOHN GREAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , in the dwelling-house of William-Hugh Burgess , a promissory note, value 10 l. the property of Robert Williams , the elder, Robert Williams , the younger, John Drury , William Moffatt , and the said William- Hugh Burgess ; the said sum of Money, and the said promissory note, being then due and unsatisfied to them .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are part of the firm of Messrs. William and Co.? - A. Yes; the firm is Robert Williams, my father, myself, the younger John Drury , William Moffatt , and William- Hugh Burgess ; the prisoner was a clerk in our house for fourteen years.

Q. Had you in your house missed a ten-pound Feversham note? - A. We had, on Wednesday the 28th, it was missed from a drawer in a box, after having been posted.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. With respect to its being missed, did you miss it, or one of your clerks? - A. I know nothing of the taking of the note; in consequence of its being missed, on Thursday morning I went from Finchley to the office, (I was informed by a junior partner) to the prisoner; I told him that I had reason to believe that he had taken that note, and that every one in the house knew of a Feversham note being missing; he at first denied it; my partner, Mr. Burgess, was in the room with me, I turned and said to him, will you go and fetch the man who says he gave it to him; while he was gone, he confessed to me that he had taken it; I still told him the man was coming who would prove it to his face.

Q. Did he say he had taken it? - A. He said he found it on the ground, very near the place where this box stands; I then charged him with having the ten one-pound notes that had been given for it; I said, most likely you have got this ten pounds in your pocket now; he said, no, I have not, sir, I have them in my desk; he looked into his desk, and delivered them to me, the ten one-pound notes, which I have now; he begged that we would forgive him, that he had got a wife and three children.

JOHN M'DONALD sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knapp. I am a clerk in Messrs. Williams and Co.'s house.

Q. What do you know of this ten-pound Feversham note? - A. It was missing on the 28th of November, from a box where they are put after passing the cash-book.

Q. Did you pay a Feversham ten-pound note? - A. I did pay one.

Q. Did you ever see a ten-pound Feversham bank-bill in that box? - A. Yes; I took them out of that box to count them, on Wednesday morning, there were twenty-two, and in the evening there were twenty-two.

Q. And on Wednesday, the same day, you found one missing? - A. Yes.

Q. On finding one missing, did you acquaint your master? - A. I did.

Q. Did you, after that, see that note again in your house? - A. I cannot say that was the note.

Q. Did you see a note that was produced by a person of the name of Rust? - A. I saw it at the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At what time on Wednesday morning did you count the notes? - A. About twelve o'clock.

Q. How many did you find? - A. Twenty-two, and the second time we found only 22; there were 23 in the cash-book.

Q. Is your cash-book here? - A. It is not here.

Q. You yourself never counted 23 in that box? - A. No.

Q. Then at every examination you found no more than 22; do you, sir, mean to state from your own knowledge of any Feversham bank note being missing? - A. Not from my own knowledge.

EDWARD RUST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a waiter at the Cock and Woolpack eating-house, Finch-lane, Cornhill? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he came to our house upon this day week; he gave me a note to go to the house of Messrs. Williams', in Birchin-lane.

Q. Did you go there? - A. I did.

Q. Who did you see there? - A. The clerk who gave me the notes in change.

Q.(To Mr. Medley.) Is that the person you paid the notes to? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Rust.) What did you do with the notes that you received from that gentleman? - A. I counted them up, they were all ones, to the amount of 10 l. I took them home, I kept them till Mr. Greaves was in the parlour, and then I gave him the notes; he gave me 6 d. to get a pint of beer and told me to keep the change.

- MEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Williams's, do you know this drawer where the Feversham Bank-notes are kept? - A. I do; I believe it will be necessary to explain this business a little. After the notes are paid, they are put on a file, and then a clerk takes them off that file; they are then taken to a person who writes them off into the cash-book, and this clerk, M'Donald, takes them off and posts them in the ledger; the next is, they are posted and marked off in the cash-book; they are marked off the day after, to see whether the number paid is the number posted.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Williams.) Q. Do you know any thing of this being one of the notes? - A. It has been, I believe, in that box; the whole that is known of that note is, that Medley paid it to Rust.

Medley. It was presented to me for payment on the 29th of November, I believe Rust is the person that presented it; I asked him how he would have it; he said, in small notes; I paid him in small notes; I asked him who he received it from; he said, he received it from Denton.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you seen this drawer to see whether there were any Feversham Bank-notes in it? - A. I do not think that I had, I was not in the Office; this was originally paid.

Q. Had you any knowledge of its ever having been in this drawer? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever see it before Mr. Rust gave it you? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Gurney. (To Rust.) Q. Can you speak to that note, whether that is the note you received from the prisoner? - A. I cannot really say.

Mr. Knapp. (To Medley.) Q. No other note was tended to you but by Rust? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you pay more than one to Rust? - A. I believe not to Rust.

Mr. Knapp. (To Rust.) Q. How came you to say when you received the ten one-pound notes for the Feversham note, you had it from Mr. Denton? - A. I generally say from my master.

Q. Was it from your master or from the prisoner? - A. The prisoner told me to go to that house and get small notes.

Q (To Medley.) What is your department at this Office? - A. I generally pay at the counter.

Q. You have nothing at all to do with the writing off in the cash-book or posting in the ledger-whether, in the course of your duty, it came in the scope of your duty, to write it off in the cash-book or post it off in the ledger? - A. I cannot swear positively yes or no.

Q. Had you on Wednesday or Tuesday counted the Feversham Bank-notes in the drawer? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Can you say whether you saw this Feversham Bank-note before Rust brought it you? - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Knapp. Then there is an end to the case.

Court. (To Medley.) Q. This note, prior to

being tendered at your house, it was due and unsatisfied? - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps it never was in your house as you know - if it comes in your house you pay it? - A. To be sure.

Q. Was it in your house before it came from Rust? - A. I know not.

Q. You have no Feversham Bank-notes before they come to be paid? - A. None.

Q. It could not have come into your house, unless it comes to be paid? - A. Certainly not.

Q. Do you ever re-issue these notes yourself? - A. Never, I suppose they re-issue them.

Q. What becomes of them when they come to you? - A. We send them to the country bankers as vouchers for what we have paid; but if we do pay any, and cannot produce them, we cannot charge them with the note.

Mr. Knapp. I shall prove to your Lordship, that this note never was in the possession of that house till Rust brought it there; and, in the first place, there is no evidence that it is the note belonging to Messrs. Williams and Co.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mr. Williams.) Q. Are you partly sure, that, in the conversation you had with the prisoner, he confessed having this ten-pound Feversham note? - A. I am perfectly-sure, in the confession of the prisoner to me, there was a Feversham ten-pound note mentioned by the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The prisoner had lived with you for as many as fourteen years, whether he had not borne an exceeding good character? - A. Certainly, he was taken in by my partners.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-15

15. CHARLES DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , two legs of mutton, value 6 s. a shoulder of mutton, value 3 s. a saddle of mutton, value 6 s. a chine of pork, value 6 s. and a rib of pork, value 3 s. the property of William Sims .

WILLIAM SIMS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Warwick-lane, Newgate-market : the prisoner was taken with the property on him; I cannot tell what time of the evening it was lost; my place was broke open on Sunday night, and my property was gone.

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I am a watchman in Smithfield; I met the prisoner on Monday morning, between twelve and one o'clock, with a large parcel on his shoulder; I asked him what he had got there; he said meat, and he had bought it of an acquaintance of his the other side of Blackfriars-bridge, in Cuper's-bridge; I asked him how he came so late with it; he said, he had met a friend, and he had taken him to drink with him; then he told me he was stopped by a watchman, and taken into St. Sepulchre's watch-house, and detained there some time by the constable; he told me when they found every thing safe and honest, they let him go; I called the next watchman to me, and asked him to go to the watch-house; the watchman went there, and the prisoner said he would go with him there, and they knowing nothing of the prisoner at the watch-house, nor the parcel neither, detained him; the watchman came back to me, and I took the meat to the watch-house, and delivered it to the constable of the night; he was taken to the Compter.

Prisoner. (To Jones.) Q. You swore you met me with a parcel on my shoulder, and you stopped me with it, was not that parcel on the door when you came out of the box? - A. It was when I come to you; when I first came out of the box it was on your shoulder, and when you saw me come out, you threw it on a cil of a door opposite my box.

Court. (To Prisoner.) Q. You claimed it afterwards, and said you bought it of a friend the other side of the water? - A. I said so after I got to the watch-house.

WILLIAM SIMPSON sworn. - I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's: I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and took these keys from him, (producing them;) there is a latch-key and two other small common keys; I took the prisoner to the Compter; at the time I took him to the Compter, there was a crow found behind the cushion on the seat where the prisoner had been sitting; the stock of the crow corresponded with the wrench that forced the door open. (Produces the crow.)

JOHN PERKINS sworn. - I was officer of the night; the prisoner at the bar was brought in by the watchman, charged with stealing this meat; I took him to the Compter.

Q. Had any body been there from the time the prisoner had been there till the time you came back? - A. No. (Produces the meat.) I asked him how he came by it; he told me he bought it of Mr. Druce, at Cuper's-bridge; I asked him how he came to be so late; he said, he had been drinking; I asked him how he came by such a quantity; he said, he meant to let a friend have a part of it.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Do you know that meat? - A. I do, I know every joint; I lodged this meat in my slaughter-house about half past eleven o'clock on Saturday night; it was taken from my slaughter-house.

Prisoner's defence. I bought it of a person of the name of Druce; I took it of him, thinking it might be of use to my family; I was thinking of salting the legs, which they do in my country which is as useful as any thing else. As to the

crow, I never saw it in my life, nor was there any cushion on the seat in the watch-house; it is not common for watch-houses to have cushions on the seat.

Q.(To Prisoner.) Where is the man you bought the meat of? - A. I sent for the man; he lives at Cuper's-bridge, but he is not here now.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-16

16. DANIEL HALIDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , six tea cups, value 2 s. 6 d. three saucers, value 6 d. a cream jug, value 1 s. and three basons, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Elizabeth North and William North .

WILLIAM NORTH sworn. - I live at No. 104, Bishopsgate-street ; I am a potter and glass-seller .

Q. Have you any partners? - A. Yes, my mother, Elizabeth North : On Tuesday, the 20th of November, we had some friends at our house in the evening, and being a rainy evening, we had occasion to send for a coach by our servant-girl; after some time she returned with one, of which the prisoner was driver; I think the number was 287; the coach was intended for my brother-in-law and sister to go home to Whitechapel.

Q. What time of night was this? - A. A little after ten; I had occasion that evening to go to the Excise Court Office, in Thames-street; I proposed to take a part of the coach with my brother-in-law to the bottom of Houndsditch; in the course of the prisoner's waiting, he sent the servant girl into the parlour, saying, that if the company did not come, he must not wait; we made an observation, that it was improper that the coachman should be in our shop with the door open, and that he should remain with his coach, and the door shut; it was alledged, that the man came in for shelter from the rain; that was the conversation amongst ourselves; after that, the parties went in the coach, and I went with them in it; it happened to turn out, in going along Bishopsgate-street, we heard something rattle in the coach; we then said to one another, there must be some china in the coach; I asked my sister if she had purchased any; she said, no; we heard it again; we then thought it might be the steps of the coach; it was a very good coach; it was not that; we looked under the seats of the coach, and there we found some tea cups; I held them up for some time, and when we got against the lights, I perceived they were my own; we heard some more; I felt again, and found some basons; by that time we had got to the bottom of Houndsditch, and the coachman was drawing up; we then desired him to drive to Whitechapel; when we got there, before any of us got out, we desired a light to be brought; we had a light, and searched further; we found other basons and saucers of another kind; we then immediately called the watchmen and patrols, and got what assistance we could; I challenged the man with taking them; he said, he knew nothing of them, he supposed that our girl put them in the coach; after some altercation, we concluded to take him into custody; we had him in the house for that purpose; he made a great deal of resistance, said it was his coach and horses, he would not be taken from them; we persisted, and took him to Whitechapel watch-house.

ANN ANDERSON sworn. - Q. You are a servant to Mr. North? - A. Yes; I did not know any thing of it till the next day; I fetched the coach.

Q. When the coach came, what became of the coachman? - A. He stood inside of the door all the time; he told me to tell my mistress and master as it rained very hard, he would stand in the inside; I went and asked my mistress leave; mistress said, it was a very odd thing that he could not go inside of his coach.

Q. Where was the china at that time? - A. It stood inside of the door at that time; there is no partition to the shop.

Q. Did you put any china in the coach? - A. No, nor I did not know there was any.

LEVY COHEN sworn. - I am a constable of Whitechapel; I took the prisoner into custody; I produce the property. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was sitting down a job in Bishopsgate-street just before eleven o'clock, the girl came up to me, and said she wanted a coach; I said, I was going home; she said, it is only going a little way; I then put her in the coach, and as soon as I came to the door, she got out; their street-door was open; I went to my horses' heads to feed them; I staid some time, and then I went to the door, and the girl was in the shop; I said, it was very hard I should be waiting here, so many hours I had been out; she went and told them; she came to me, and said they were going directly; the coach-door was open all the time I was feeding my horses, and likewise the door of the house; when they came out, they got inside; I do not know how the china came in the coach, I told them so.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-17

17. THOMAS ISMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a quart of wine, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Scott , Christopher Idle , John Idle , George Idle , Thomas Coates , and William Haynes .

WILLIAM HAYNES sworn. - I am a partner in the house of Mr. Scott, wine-merchant , No. 181, in the Strand.

Q. What are your partners names? - A. John Scott , Christopher Idle , John Idle , George Idle , Thomas Coates , and William Haynes ; it was in one of our vaults the theft was committed; I know nothing of the facts myself.

- M'DONALD sworn. - I was attending the letting out of wines on the 26th of November, at the bonded cellars in Leadenhall-street ; the Excise-surveyor mentioned it to me from what he had found.

Q. They might come and tell their own story - what did you observe yourself? - A. He called me down into the vault; I found a cask leaking from a spile, by a hole being made by a gimlet; the can, which had the wine, was held in the breast-plate of the prisoner; I examined the wine in the can with the wine in the pipe, and it exactly seemed to me to be the same as that in the pipe.

Q. How many casks had you there? - A. Upwards of two hundred.

Q. You do not know any thing about that yourself? - A. I do not.

Court. Q. All that you know when you were down in the cellar, you saw a cask leaking, and wine in the can, which exactly corresponded to the best of your knowledge? - A. Yes.

Q. There were spiles in other casks besides that you have mentioned? - A. Yes, there were in all five.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. There were many vintners' porters and Excise-officers there, as well as the prisoner - how many soldiers were there? - A. I cannot say exactly.

JAMES CUDWORTH sworn. - I am an officer in the Excise: On the 26th of November, they were letting out wines from the bonded cellar of Messrs. Scott and Idle, in Leadenhall-street; it was my part to go down and regage the casks, and to examine the bond; when I came there, I found several casks ready to gage, and pull up; there were several vintners' porters, and soldiers, there at work, bringing the casks forward for the officers to gage at the foot of the stairs; I was there about ten minutes; the master of the vintners ordered all their men up, in order to pull these casks out of the cellar; I observed, about 7 yards further up the cellar, a light with two men, who did not seem to come forward; I got over the casks with the light in my hand to them, and their light went out; whether they blew it out, I cannot say; I turned round, and saw one of the casks leaking very fast from a spile; the prisoner at the bar had his leather apron and buckle on; I asked him what they had been about, and putting my hand between his leather apron and frock, I took out a tin can filled full with wine, (the can produced;) it is a can belonging to the army; I called the officer that was there, and shewed him the can; the cask was then leaking.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you very hard at work that day? - A. I believe there was a deal of wine pulled out that day.

Q. When there is a very hard day's work, they give them a glass of wine in the vaults? - A. I can say before this Court I never heard of such a thing; I saw the prisoner with the can, and took it from him.

Q. You saw him very drunk? - A. I did not make any observations upon it.

Q. You are an Exciseman, and make no observations at all; there were many soldiers there? - A. There were, and I found nothing upon them.

Q. There were several casks with spiles in them - you have heard of such a thing as leaking; who put in the spiles there? - A. I suppose Mr. Scott's clerk.

Q. How much was there in the can? - A. Full a quart.

Court. Q. How near was the prisoner to this cask? - A. Not five feet from it; he was close by the cask when I took him, it was running very fast.

JAMES GABERDESS sworn. - I am a constable; I took the prisoner in my care; this is the same can, I made a mark on it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was the prisoner drunk or sober? - A. He was sober, to the best of my judgment.

Q. You were very sober, I take it for granted? - A. I was as sober as I am now.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-18

18. CHARLOTTE FEEKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , four shillings and sixpence in silver, four penny pieces and three halfpence in copper , the property of William Masters .

WILLIAM MASTERS sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , I live at No. 23, St. John's street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner lived servant with me; I was taken very ill at the time she lived with me; my wife used to leave her in the parlour adjoining the shop, to ring the bell for her if any customers came into the shop when she came up to me. From information my wife gave me when I came down, I marked the money that was in the till; I had marked ten shillings in shillings and sixpences, and put some in each till; the till was not locked; she took first a shilling from one side out of the till, and on the other side she took a shilling and sevenpence halfpenny; I searched her, and found in her box four shillings and sixpence; they were all marked; I found four penny pieces and three halfpence

in her box; I did not find all that I had lost; all the money I found had my mark on it.

Q. Was she ever permitted to take money in the shop for you? - A. She had no business to take money; she was told to ring the bell if any customers came in; after I had fetched the constable, I asked her how she came to take the money; she said it was the first that ever she took from me.

(The money produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I did not take the money; I had money in my box belonging to me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-19

19. ROBERT GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a pair of sheets, value 7 s. and a hand-towel, value 6 d. the property of Edward Plum , in a lodging-room in his dwelling-house, let by contract to him to be used in and with the said lodging .

ANN PLUM sworn. - I live at No. 11, Bird-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 10th of November to take a lodging; I let him one room at four shillings per week for him and his partner.

Q. Did he enter upon it then? - A. He came according to his promise between nine and ten o'clock in the evening; I lit him up stairs, and the next morning he got up before us, between six and seven o'clock; he called at the foot of the stairs to know what he was to do with the key of his room; I told him to put it under the back-room door, where we slept, me and my husband; he made a rattling with the key; my husband got up, and made search for the key, but could not find it; I got up and searched, but it was not there; I was obliged to get another key, and open the door, and when I entered the room, the bed-clothes were stripped down to the foot of the bed; a sheet was taken of the bed, and a clean towel out of the room; I expected that he would be back at breakfast time, but he never returned; when he took the lodging, he told me that he was a carpenter, and that he had been a barrack builder; I asked him for a reference for his character; he said he was quite a stranger in London, that he came from Wantage, in Berkshire, and was to get up early the next morning to meet Mr. Taylor, the waggoner, that his chest was coming by; I never saw him from that time till last Sunday morning.

Q. I suppose you have not the smallest doubt but that the sheet was in the room, and the towel? - A. They were in the room; I was the person that lighted him to bed; I made the bed myself, and left the towel in the room; last Sunday morning my husband went accidentally into the Spotted Dog public-house, in Oxford-street, the corner of Bird-street, Manchester-square, and there he saw the prisoner at the bar, and my husband gave charge of him to the watchman.

JOHN BIRD sworn. - I am a watchman: I was going by the Spotted Dog, the corner of Bird-street, to the watch-house, just at seven o'clock in the morning; Plum sent a man out to call the watch as I was coming by the door; I went into the house, and saw the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house; I searched him, and he said he had left a bundle at the Spotted Dog; I went back directly; I found the bundle, and the great coat he has now on; I kept the bundle, and the great coat was given to him by the desire of the constable; there is none of the prosecutrix's property in the bundle; there are two old window curtains, and two sheets; I and my brother, by searching his pockets, found a paper where he robbed an old lady.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) I understood you to say that you put him to bed between nine and ten o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. Who were in your house besides you? - A. There were some other lodgers.

Q. You are quite clear, that when you went to the door, you found the door locked, and you could not open it but by the means of another key? - A. No, and I never found the key from that time to this.

Jury. Q. Was there any other key in the house that would open that door? - A. Yes, there was, but I had it in my possession.

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent of the crime; there were other lodgers in the house; the reason I went away was, I have not had the use of my hand for this twelvemonth, and I thought I could not pay the lodging.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-20

20. WILLIAM KILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , two pecks of flour , the property of Benjamin Milton .

BENJAMIN MILTON sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. He was a servant to me: On the 24th or 25th of October last, William Smedley came to me, and told me the prisoner had flour to sell; Smedley brought me the flour on the following Saturday, it was in Dr. Greenlow's bag; it came out of my house; I can swear to the bag, but I cannot swear to flour. (The bag of flour produced.)

Q. Was that the bag that Dr. Greenlow sent to you for the flour? - A. Yes, that is Dr. Greenlow's bag.

Q. You sent some flour in Dr. Greenlow's bag; tell me whether it was about the quantity that is in the bag? - A. There was half a bushel; I have

weighed it since; there may want a pound or two now; there is not so much as I sent away.

Q. What day did you, send it away? - A. On the 20th of October, I sent it by the prisoner.

Q. Do you know whether Dr. Greenlow ever had it? - A. That I cannot tell; it is charged to Dr. Greenlow; I acquainted Dr. Greenlow of the circumstance, it is the same sort of flour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You are a baker; the prisoner at the bar was a weekly servant of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. He was to deliver the flour that goes out of your house to the different customers? - A. Yes.

Q. It happened that Dr. Greenlow, amongst several other customers, sent a bag to have some flour - he was to deliver that flour at Dr. Greenlow's? - A. Yes.

Q. And no other flour went out on that day? - A. No other flour.

Q. Is Dr. Greenlow here? - A. No.

RICHARD SMEDLEY sworn. - William Kill came to my house to deliver his bread; he asked my wife where I was, as soon as he delivered his bread; he called to me in the yard, and said to me, master, do not you sell flour; I said, I do; he said, I have half a bushel (this was the latter end of October, I cannot tell the day of the month) at a certain house, and if you choose to have it, you shall; I immediately said, what do you ask for it; he said, you shall have it for ninepence per quartern, you will get half a crown by it, it will be a good profit; I said, very well; he said, will you fetch it to-day; I said, no, I cannot; he said, will you fetch it to-morrow; I said, very likely I might; as soon as he was gone, I went to his master's, and informed him of the circumstance.

Q. Where were you to fetch it from? - A. From the house of Mrs. Arnold; he said it was left there, and that is the bag I brought from the house of Mrs. Arnold; I said to Mrs. Arnold, I want that flour that William Kill left here for me; Mrs. Arnold went up stairs, and fetched the flour down to me; I immediately took it to Mr. Milton.

ELIZABETH ARNOLD sworn. - I live at Isleworth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I washed for him.

Q. Look at that bag of flour, and see if you know that bag? - A. I never took notice of the bag.

Q. Was a bag left at your house? - A. Yes, by the prisoner.

Q. To whom did you deliver that bag? - A. The prisoner desired me to give it to one Smedley, which I did.

Q. Do you know whose bag this was? - A. I do not know.

Q. What day was it left at your house by the prisoner? - A. I cannot tell; he always paid me very honestly; I washed for him.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Look at that bag, and tell me how you know it is Dr. Greenlow's bag? - A. There is a G on it; it is the bag I sent the flour in to Dr. Greenlow; I sent it on Monday, the 22d, and Smedley called on me the Saturday following, when I saw it again.

Q. You do not know that Dr. Greenlow ever got it? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-21

21. JOHN INGLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Page .

WILLIAM PAGE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , in Liquorpond-street : On the 23d of November, about half past three o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop to pledge a silver watch, which I agreed to lend him 20 s. on; while I was writing a duplicate he went to the back part of the shop; the handkerchief was pinned up with other goods; I called him and gave him the duplicate and a 1 l. note; he then went back to the place he came from, and pretended to stoop down to sand the duplicate; I then discovered him as if putting a silk handkerchief under his coat; my niece said immediately, that fellow has stole a handkerchief.

Q. Did she say that loud? - A. Yes; he then threw it down behind him; I then went round, and insisted upon having the duplicate and the one-pound note; I told him I supposed he had stolen the watch, as well as the handkerchief, and therefore I sent for an Officer; he attempted to run away, and did get out of the shop, but my young man and I pulled him back again; I delivered the handkerchief to the Officer.

Q. Are you sure this handkerchief was pinned? - A. Yes, I had pinned it myself, and saw it there just before he came into the shop.

Jonathan Trott , an Officer, produced the handkerchief and the watch.

Page. I am sure this is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the handkerchief till I saw it at the Justice's.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-22

22. BENJAMIN BISHOP was indicted for that he, about twelve o'clock at night, on the 28th of October , being in the dwelling-house of James Turner , feloniously did steal three guineas and one half guinea, and three Bank notes, of the value of

60 l. the property of Peter Lambeth ; and after having committed the said felony burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, to get out of the same .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

PETER LAMBETH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a foreigner? - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner is a foreigner? - A. Yes.

Q. On board the same ship? - A. No, I was on board the Virginie.

Q. When did you know the prisoner? - A. When I came to London, better than two months ago, I went down to Somerset-house, and the next day I went to live at No. 6, in Wych-street .

Q. At whose house? - A. James Turner 's.

Q. Do you know what parish it is in? - A.St. Mary le Strand.

Q. Was your wife living with you? - A. Yes, and the prisoner staid with me as a servant.

Q. On the day laid in the indictment what happened? - A. Upon the 28th of October I went to take a walk to Chelsea and he staid at home, when I came home my wife went to bed, and he and I went out to take a walk; I took a 2 l. note out of the chest before I went out.

Q. Was that in the presence of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was the key of the chest? - A. In my waistcoat pocket; the waistcoat was lying upon the bed; I put the 2 l. note in my pocket, and we went out and had a pot of beer; I exchanged the 2 l. note, and put a 1 l. note and the other change into my pocket-book; we drank the beer, and then the prisoner said it was too late to go home, and I let him sleep in the room, and I went to bed.

Q. Was the door of the room locked? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Where did your wife and you sleep? - A. In the same room, in the bed; he slept on the floor.

Q. With your permission? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the chest you have been speaking of in the same room? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know if the door of the house was locked? - A. I do not, I got up between seven and eight in the morning.

Q. Where was the prisoner at that time? - A. He was gone; I got up, saw the waistcoat in the chair and the pocket-book out.

Q. Where had you left the waistcoat over night? - A. Upon the tester of the bed, at the top; I then went to the chest, and missed three 20 l. notes out of my pocket-book, and some silver and some gold; I found the key of the chest in the waistcoat pocket; I missed three guineas and a half in gold; I lost altogether between 60 l. and 70 l.

Q. Missing this, what did you do? - A. I went to my friend, Mr. Gardiner, to let him know of it, and he was not at home.

Q. What is Gardiner? - A. A sea-faring man.

Q. Did he know the prisoner? - A. Yes, he saw him along with me; I went to him to know whether I could get any person to look after him.

Q. Do you know his nephew, Lewis? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you communicated to Gardiner and to Lewis that you had been robbed? - A. Yes, and from that we went to Hatton-garden, and gave information there; upon that I came home again.

Q. Where you with Lewis afterwards when the prisoner was found? - A. We caught him the next day, Lewis was with me, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; we saw him in the street opposite the New Church; upon seeing him we sung out, stop thief, and away he ran.

Q. Before he ran did he see you? - A. Yes, I went up to the prisoner and laid hold of him.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. As we were bringing him along, he wanted to take me into a house; he offered to give me 40 l. which he said he had about him, if I would let him go.

Q. That you did not agree to? - A. No, I took him to Hatton-garden, and then Trott took him into custody.

WILLIAM LEWIS sworn. - Q. You are the nephew of Mr. Gardiner? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your uncle? - A. A mariner.

Q. Are you a mariner too? - A. No, I am no profession.

Q. Were you present at the apprehension of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing, or the prosecutor say any thing, that he has not described? - A. No.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - Q. You are one of the Officers belonging to Hatton-garden? - A. Yes, on the 30th of October the prisoner was delivered to me; I searched him, and found this watch upon him; (produces the watch;) I asked him how he came by it, and he said he had purchased it; he had given seven guineas for it; I asked him what he had done with the remainder of the notes; he hesitated for some time, and at last said, if I would let him go along with me, he would shew me where they were.

Q. Before you said any thing to him, did you make him any promise of favour? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you threaten him? - A. I did not, and desired the others not to do it; I then got a coach, and by the prisoner's desire we were to drive to a court in Fleet-street, which he would point out; he took me to the Hole in the Wall court, to the house of one Shepherd, and he told me, before Mrs. Shepherd came up stairs, that she had got some of his notes; Mrs. Shepherd then came into the passage, and cried out, Oh, Ben, what have you been doing; I am afraid you have been doing something amiss; I then told her not to alarm herself, but to give me the notes she had got belonging to the lad.

Q. Did she know you? - A. No, I had hold of the boy's arm; Mrs. Shepherd then opened a drawer, and gave me this paper, containing a parcel of Bank notes, amounting to 38 l. one is a five, and the rest twos and ones; I then asked the prisoner if he had changed all the three 20 l. notes: he said he believed he had, but he could not tell where; he said he had been so tipsey all the night, that he could not tell where; I asked Mrs. Shepherd then, if she had got any thing else belonging to him, and she said, nothing but some old clothes that he had left off; I then took him back to the Office again, after he had pointed out where he had bought the watch.

Q. Did he say where he had bought the watch? - A. Yes, at Mr. Grant's, in Fleet-street; I went with the prisoner to the shop, to know whether he had bought the watch there, and he said he did; I then took him to the Office; he there told me he recollected where he had changed all three of the notes; one he said he changed where he purchased the watch, another at a hosier's shop, and another at a shoemaker's; all three of those places in Fleet-street; I went and made inquiry, and found a lad had changed a 20 l. note at each of those places; I then returned back to the prisoner again, and asked him if he were sure there were no more things of his at Shepherd's, and in consequence of his direction I went and found a number of things that he said he had bought; (produces them;) after he had been examined once, I asked him how he had got out of the house, where he had stolen the notes from; he said he had been a very silly fellow for so doing, that about twelve o'clock at night he took the key and unlocked the box, and took out three 20 l. notes and three guineas and a half in gold.

Q. Did he say where he took it from? - A. No, I told him there were more missing, and he said he was sure that was all he had took out; he told me the room door was not locked; I asked him how he got out at the front door; he said he unfastened it, and let himself out, and pulled the door to after him.

Q. Did you go the house of the prosecutor at all? - A. No.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) What fastening was there to the outer door? - A. I cannot say.

MRS. SHEPHERD sworn. - Q. Did you deliver any thing to Trott? - A. Yes, I received them from Benjamin Bishop ; he told me it was prize-money, and requested me to take care of it; I never opened them.

Prisoner's defence. On the Sunday that he went out to Chelsea he left me in his house, and when he came home, his wife and he were so intoxicated that they had fell into a ditch, and I undressed them and put them to bed, with the assistance of the people of the house.

The prisoner called two of his uncles, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, in consideration of his youth, and on account of the open manner of his confession.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-23

23. CHARLES-EDWARD PEELE and THOMAS-JETSOM FISHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, twenty pounds weight of cheese, value 10 s. the property of Philip Crannis .

PHILIP CRANNIS sworn. - I live at Islington , I keep a chandler's shop : On Sunday, the 25th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon, I had been out, I met my son, on my return home, going for a constable.

JOHN CRANNIS sworn. - I am son to the last witness: On Sunday morning, the 25th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the two prisoners at the bar looking in my father's shop-window; I was in the street talking to a young woman, about twenty feet from my father's house; I did not see either of them go into my father's shop when I was conversing with the young woman; I did not attend to them, my back was to them; I turned my head, and I saw Peele drop a cheese, but I had no suspicion that he had stole it from my father's shop.

Q. What did he do when he dropped the cheese? - A. He picked it up again, and when I had done talking with the young woman, I went to my father's door; a milkman was asking my mother if she had not lost a cheese; I then immediately ran after the two prisoners at the bar, I saw them with the cheese; they crossed the road, and walked fast away.

Q. Upon your running after them, did they run? - A. Yes, and I ran as fast as I could; I catched Fisher at the back of Canonbury-house, in the field, he had just entered it out of the road; they both ran together to Canonbury-place, and then they took different ways; I took hold of him by the collar, and told him he was the man I was running after; he asked me for what; I told him for stealing a cheese from my mother; he said he was not the man; I then asked him what he ran away for; he said, surely he might run if he liked; I had hold of his collar, and by assistance I brought him to my father's house; I delivered him into the care of the person that assisted me, till I fetched an officer.

Q. You do not know how the other was taken? - A. I do not.

Q. You are certain you never saw these young men go into the shop? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. When you turned yourself to look, how was the door, open or shut? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. How long time passed from the time you

first saw them, when they had no cheese, and the time you saw them drop a cheese? A. It might be about six or seven minutes.

Q. Were you no farther than twenty feet distance? - A. No.

Q. And all this time talking to this young woman, with your back rather turned from the shop? - A. Rather turned.

Q. How was the shop door secured? - A Only by a common thumb-latch.

THOMAS CURTIS sworn. - I am a gentleman's coachman: On Sunday, the 25th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was coming from town towards Crannis's house; I asked at Crannis's house what was the matter, seeing people stand there; in consequence of what was told me, I saw Peele running across the fields as fast as he could run to Canonbury-house; he got behind part of a wall, called Canonbury-park; then he slackened his pace, he had been running very hard; I had a great way to go round to find him. I saw him get over the gate, and there I lost sight of him; I went round, and there I saw Peele a great way in the field, walking behind an old gentleman very gently, with his hands in his pockets; I knew him by following him. I walked up to him, and took him by the collar; he asked me what I did that for; I told him he was the person that I ran for, I could not say whether he was the person that stole the cheese; he told me he was very innocent; I took him to Crannis's house.

Q. Did he make much resistance? A. He desired me to let him go by the collar, and take him by the arm; when I brought him in, they desired to speak to one another; the other was brought back before this; I told them they should not do any such thing without somebody with them, so I went with them; they said they would pay for the cheese; they told me, if I would go with them, they would shew me where they had hid the cheese; Fisher told Peele where it was. I went with Peele to the place, and found no cheese, the cheese was never found; he desired me to bring him back, and take the other.

Prisoner Peele. (To John Crannis .) Q. Did you see me have the cheese in my hand? - A. I will not take upon me to swear that he had it.

Court. Q. I understood you to say that you saw Peele drop a cheese? - A. I saw one of them, I am not positive which it was.

Q. You have said that the one that dropped the cheese picked it up, and ran away with it - that you will positively swear? - A. I will.

Jury. Q. Do you mean to say that the same cheese was lost out of your father's shop? - A. I cannot say that.

(The prisoner Peele produced a written paper for their defence.)

Q.(To the prisoners.) Before you have this paper read, are you satisfied about the paper? - A. Yes, it is the truth. (The paper read.)

"My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, the humble address of Charles Peele . - Possessing no ability to speak on my behalf, nor my brother prisoner, I have attempted to put my case in writing. Before this unhappy circumstance befel me, I never committed a crime I was ashamed of, or any thing that could injure my character. I have now in Court my master and other witnesses, that are waiting to prove the same. I am apprentice to Mr. Hendenburgh, a gingerbread-baker, Saffron-hill, and having no time to visit my relations but on Sunday; on the 25th of November, I was going to visit my aunt and other relations, I met my brother-prisoner, Fisher; the morning being cold, we had something to drink, and not being accustomed to drink any thing strong, which we then did, we both drank more than did us good; this, of course, rendered us incapable of conducting ourselves with propriety and decency; and coming along Islington, we saw a cheese lay at a door on the ground; we rolled it along, first one and then the other, not intending to convey it away, nor to keep it; what became of the cheese, it is not in my power to say, but in half an hour afterwards a man laid hold of me, and said we had stole a cheese out of his shop; this, of course, we denied; but on saying he would take us to the watch-house, my brother-prisoner, Fisher, said, he would leave his watch, if we had stole the cheese; the prosecutor would have stopped us sooner, or pursued us at the time, and their not doing so, I trust will have influence on your Lordship's mind, if we had carried the cheese away, John Crannis , being a young man, would have had time to have taken us; we could not have run so fast with the cheese, which, of course, must have weighed from twelve to twenty pounds; I know not what became of the cheese, which is nothing but the truth, we having no intention to take it away. I trust this will meet your Lordship's humanity and compassion, which will ever be amplified by my future conduct for that mercy bestowed upon us.

Q.(To John Crannis .) As you were so near the door during the time you saw the prisoners there, can you take upon yourself to say whether there was any cheese laying at the door? - A. I can take upon myself to say there was not.

Q. I understood you to say, that you saw the prisoners run the very moment you run? - A. No, I went up to my mother's door first.

Q. How long then was it before you pursued them? - A. About six or seven minutes.

Q. I understood you to say, that, when you first pursued them, you saw one of them had the cheese? - A. He had the cheese under his coat, and I could see a part of it under his arm before I went

to my mother's, but I had no suspicion that they had stole it.

Q. When you had gone to your mother's, after you run after them, did you see them with the cheese? - A: They were got out of the road, and were gone into the field; they were still in my sight; I run in the road after them; the field is open.

Q. At the end of the six or seven minutes, when you set off to run after them, did you see the cheese then under either of their arms? - A. I did; I saw them carrying the same cheese.

Q. You are quite clear that you saw the cheese under their arm before you pursued them at the first time, and you saw it at the time you ran after them? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember either of these young men offering their watch to pay for the cheese? - A. I was gone for the officer.

Q.(To Prisoners.) Which of you was it that offered a watch to pay for the cheese? - A.(Fisher.) It was me.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Do you remember Fisher offering a watch to you for the cheese? - A. When I got home, they were both in the shop, and the shop was almost full of people, and the outside of the door was crowded; I asked these prisoners what they had been at; they said, they were very sorry for what they had done; and I said, I fancy so too, I find you have stole my cheese; they said, they had done it merely out of a joke; they said, they intended to bring it back again at night; then Fisher pulled out his watch, and offered his watch for me to take no more notice of it; I told him, I would not take it from him; I said, I should have the constable here in a few minutes, and I shall send you to the watch-house; they then said, if they could go and find the cheese, would I forgive them; they both said that; with that, I let this gentleman's coachman take them one at a time to go and search for this cheese; Fisher went first; he came back again, and said to the other, I cannot find it; then the other asked if he might go and seek for it; he went, and he could not find it; then the constable came, and I gave charge of them.

The prisoner, Fisher, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner, Peele, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Peele, GUILTY , aged 19.

Fisher, GUILTY , aged 17.

The Jury recommended them to mercy, on account of their good character.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-24

24. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November, twenty-one pieces of Indian calico, called Niconees, value 12 l. 12 s. the property of Thomas Brown , Robert Rogers , and Benjamin Brown .

Second Count. For a like offence, only charging it the property of John Twiss .

Third Count. The property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

WILLIAM WOOLLEY sworn. - I am bookkeeper to the Liverpool waggon, at the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury; we loaded twenty-six packages, marked S. A. No. 12, with other goods, in this waggon, on the 5th of November; the waggon went off about ten o'clock the same evening; about twelve the next day, the guard returned, and said the waggon had been robbed; I took a horse, and went to St. Alban's to see what had been taken.

Q. What was missing? - A. One of the bales marked S. A. No. 12; I returned to London, and waited upon these persons that sent the bale, and got patterns of the goods that were in the packages; I then went to Hatton-garden Office, and gave the patterns, and sent patterns to other Offices.

Q. Who is the owner of the waggon? - A. John Twiss .

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - Q. You are the driver of this waggon? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you drive it from the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury? - A. Yes, on the 6th of November, at ten o'clock.

Q. Tell us was the waggon safe, and when? - A. It was safe when it went into Barnet; I went round it then; I went a little further, and saw two ropes cut, and three tarpaulins cut, and some goods missing, I cannot tell what; I turned back to London to inform the book-keeper; the book-keeper came down to St. Alban's to see what was missing; he missed what he has stated.

Q. Did you observe any body loitering about the waggon? - A. No.

Q. What was missing? - A. A large bale about two hundred and a half weight; I had seen the bale in the waggon before I set off, and I observed it was missing.

Q. Did you see a cart with any men? - A. I did not observe any thing of that sort at all.

Q. Did you see any man on horseback near the waggon? - A. No, every thing was safe at Barnet; it was very dark when I was going through Barnet; it was dark when it was done.

JAMES GILLMAN sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Brown and Rogers: On the 2d or 3d of November, a packing order was sent to the East-India warehouse to pack certain East-India goods, of which the bale S. A. was one; it contained sixty-five pieces of India calico, called Niconees; when

I heard of the robbery, I attended Hatton-garden, and on comparing the goods that were found on the prisoner, they corresponded exactly with the piece produced by the King's officer.

RICHARD CURRAN sworn. - I am a servant in the East-India Company's warehouse; I have the care of every thing that is lodged in that department; I received that packing order from Messrs. Brown and Rogers on the 2d of November, among which I looked out sixty-five pieces of Niconees to be packed and marked S. A. No. 12, which was delivered into the officer's care to tell; the officer is to see them put into the bale; I should know the mark of the packages, but not of the bale.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a King's officer, at the Post Prohibited East-India warehouse.

Q. Did you count, on the 2d of November, the things that have been mentioned by the last witness? - A. Yes, sixty-five pieces of Niconees; I saw them looked out; I told the goods, they were marked S. A. No. 12.

JAMES COLEMAN sworn. - I am a King's officer at the East-India Prohibited warehouse; I took the bale to the Custom-house to get it sealed; I got it sealed at the Custom-house, and then went to the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury, and delivered it on the 3d of November; it was directed to the Custom house, Liverpool.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Hatton-garden: On Monday, the 12th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I stood in Cross-street, Sutton-street, near to Charterhouse-wall, I saw the prisoner at the bar with this package on his head and shoulders together; there was a carman coming along, he said, good man, you are loaded, it seems falling, shall I assist you? he put his hands, and heaved it up, while the prisoner got his head under it; they walked on by me; I looked at the bundle, and went and stopped him; I asked him what he had got; he said, what is that to you; I said, I am an officer, and I insist to see what you have got; I suspected them to be part of the things in the hand-bill we had given in at our Office; I asked him where he was going with it; he said, he believed he was going to Chick-lane, but the gentleman gone on was the person that the property belonged to, he had but just taken it up, that he met him in Aldersgate-street, he told him he would give him two shillings to carry a bundle for him; I asked him where he worked; he said at Mr. Bartholomew's, he was in the masonry line, at Islington, he was coming from work; I put him in a coach, and took him to the Office; after I had taken him to prison, I told him he might as well tell me where he fetched it from; then he told me that that man that was along with him brought him out of Whitecross-street, and engaged him to carry this bundle for two shillings, and that him and another man lifted him up with it at a shop-door within about three yards from where I saw him; there is no shop within a hundred yards of the place; he said, if he had his liberty, he could find the parties that gave it him.

Q. Did you ever see the man before? - A. I believe I have, but not lately; he had two shillings in his pocket, which he pretended to say was given him to carry the bundle; he is a stonemason by trade, he was out of here but four or five days before the robbery was committed.

Q. What age is he? - A. Sixty-six; I produce the property.

Q.(To Gillman.) Look at these things? - A. I cannot swear to them, there are no marks on them.

Q.(To Woolley.) Do you know whether these are the goods that you put on board this waggon? - A. I do not.

Williams. They are prohibited goods; I am a King's officer.

Q. Do you know whether these are the goods that you put on board this waggon? - A. I cannot venture to swear, but I believe I have a piece out of the same lot.

Prisoner's defence. I am the man that worked for Mr. Wilmot, a plasterer, at Battle-bridge; as I was going home, at five in the evening, in Clerkenwell parish, between St. John's-street and Goswell-street, a man spoke to me at a corner house, and said, will you carry a load for me; he said into Field-lane; says I, Sir, I will go and fetch a knot; a knot, says he, you do not want a knot, it is only some things in a bag; with that, he fetched it out of a house; I had not walked above forty yards from the house, he gave me two shillings; he says, old man, you carry it very uneasy, shall I lift it up? Mr. Chapman coming by, asked me what I had got; says I, what is that to you, Sir, thinking it was some gentleman that enquired; a woman made answer, and said, he is an officer, and will see; with that, I begged pardon; then he tied my hands before me; pray, says he, how came you by these things here? says I, you know where you met me, as you turn towards the right towards Goswell-street way, there is a corner house, that is the house I came from; says he, did he give you any thing; yes, I said, two shillings; with that, he searched my pockets, and found no more; then he said, where do you live? I gave him to understand where I lived as well as I could, I was not afraid; I said, my daughter shall go and shew you; that is every word I said from first to last, and it is nothing but the truth.

Q.(To Chapman.) Is it a fact that he told you this story? - A. Yes; the prisoner's daughter was not there at that time, she was afterwards.

Prisoner. I was at work for Mr. Newman,

and the turnkeys know it, at the time this robbery was committed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-25

25. JOHN JOBBINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Waters , a Bank of England note, value 10 l. four other Bank of England notes, value 8 l. and a Bank of England note, value 1 l. the property of the said Benjamin Waters .

BENJAMIN WATERS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Islington : On the 17th of November the prisoner came to my house as a Sheriff's Officer, with I believe they call it a distress for 16 l. it was for a debt, a dispute in an account between me and another gentleman.

Q. Then it was an execution? - A. I believe it was.

Q. It was a writ to levy 16 l. on your goods? - A. It was, I looked at the warrant and copied it.

Q. You were satisfied about the fidelity of it? - A. I was: I took my pocket-book out of my pocket and offered him the money; I took out 19 l. there were one 10 l. note, four 2 l. notes, and a 1 l. note; I counted out to him the 16 l. which he refused to take, saying it was not his duty so to do; he persisted, and I told him, if he persisted, I should send for a constable.

Q. He persisted in staying in the house and levying the goods? - A. I suppose that was his intention; I laid the money on the table, where I was standing with him; I went up stairs to call a servant to be witness to my tendering it.

Q. Can you recollect positively that you left the money on the table? - A. I can, I went up stairs for a witness of the tender, and when I returned the money was gone.

Q. Did you bring the witness with you? - A. I did, my servant maid; I expressed my surprize to him, and he said he saw me put the money into my pocket; I searched my pockets, and I even went up stairs; being loth to accuse a man under this circumstance, I suggested to Mrs. Waters that I would go to a place where I had dined; I then searched there, and made every possible inquiry; this was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. An insurance-broker.

Q. On your return from the place where you had dined, what then? - A. My suspicions were immediately increased by a report that Mrs. Waters made to me, and I immediately sent for an officer; I gave him in custody to this officer; he was searched before me, at my house, by the officer, with the assistance of another man whom I sent for, his name is John Manton .

Q. Did you find any thing upon him? - A. Four 2 l. Bank of England notes and a 1 l. Bank of England note.

Q. You had taken the numbers of your notes yourself? - A. No, I happened to receive them that day at a banking-house.

Q. Did you afterwards discover what the numbers were? - A. Not the numbers, the bankers' clerks do not keep the numbers of small notes, but they write the names of such persons as they receive them from.

Q. Is the clerk here? - A. No.

Q. Was there any thing on these five notes, which were then produced by which you can positively swear they are your's? - A. Not sufficiently to swear to them.

Q. Are you perfectly clear of the 19 l. which you produced? - A. Yes, there were four 2 l. notes and one 1 l. note found on the prisoner in a pocketbook in his coat pocket.

Q. Did he discover any reluctance in being searched? - A. So much so that I was obliged to send for another person to assist.

Q. Do you mean by that, that he refused to be searched? - A. He did.

Q. When you found these five notes what did he observe upon them? - A. He said they were his own, that he had been saving them three years and a half; I told him I was sufficiently satisfied by his conduct he had taken them; I desired him to go down stairs with the officer; as he was going down stairs with the officer, he begged to say a few words to me; I told him that whatever he had to say to me, I should be very willing to hear in the presence of the officer; upon which he observed, that the notes were mine, but that I had made him a present of them.

Q. You are sure of his saying those words? - A. I am, it was in the presence of the officer.

Q. I think I need not ask you whether you had made him a present of them? - A. Certainly not.

Q. With respect to the five notes they were secured? - A. They are in my pocket now; the officer took them to the Office, and gave them to me at the Office afterwards; they have been in my possession ever since.

Q. Produce them, and give me the dates of them when they were issued from the Bank? - A.(Produces them;) One 2 l. note, dated 30th November, 1801; another 2 l. 15th October, 1804; another 2 l. 29th September, 1804; another 2 l. 19th September, 1804; and another 1 l. note dated 24th September, 1804.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. You have told us that upon looking at these notes there is nothing upon the face of them by which you know them to be your's? - A. Certainly I cannot swear to them.

Q. You conceived yourself very ill used; you were rather angry? - A. I was very angry.

Q. You offered them to him, and he refused to take them, saying he was not authorized? - A. Yes.

Q. After you laid them on the table you went up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. If you had been certain that you laid them on the table, how came you to go up stairs to look for them? - A. Certainly it was necessary to take every precaution before I accused the man; I was perfectly satisfied in my own mind, I only did it by way of precaution.

Q. Do you mean to say you were certain that you left these notes on the table, after going to other places to look after them? - A. I was.

Q. You will not swear to these notes? - A. No.

Q. The other you never found? - A. No.

Q. Is it within your knowledge that the prisoner's senses, by means of an apoplectic fit, are at times affected? - A. The whole of his conduct looked more like that of a madman than any thing else.

Court. Q. His conduct surprized you? - A. Yes.

Q. With regard to the conversation you had with him, his answers were sensible? - A. In some sense they were not, for after the notes were given back he even abused me.

Q. It did not strike you as a man quite out of his mind? - A. Not entirely so; I can mention one thing that struck me so; on my expressing myself angrily to him, he got up and went to strike me; this was in the kitchen, and when my friend and the constable were there.

Q. Had you ever known him before in your life? - A. Never before.

Q. Except that circumstance of rudeness, his conversation was rational; he told you what he came for, and that he was not authorized to take the money? - A. Yes, he did so.

WILLIAM SELLERS sworn. - Q. Do you remember being sent for by Mr. Waters? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Do you recollect that day, the 17th of November, when he gave the prisoner in custody to you? - A. The prisoner was in Mr. Waters's house when I went in, and Mr. Waters informed me what I was sent for; I took the prisoner into my custody.

Q. Did you search him? - A. First of all he said it was a scheme to get him from the premises, so that the goods might be removed; he told me that he was an officer as well as me; then I told him to lay aside every suspicion of that kind, he was in the possession of the goods, and he was under my care, and I would not leave him till there was another put in possession; I then went to search him; he resisted with a great deal of resolution that we should not search him, and Mr. Waters sent for the other witness; then we insisted upon searching him, and he took his shoes and stockings off, and began to take his small clothes off; then the prisoner said search my pockets; I told him that would not do; I saw he had his pocket-book in his hand.

Q. Did you search his pockets? - A. We had no need; when he wanted me to search his pockets he had taken his pocket-book out and had it in his hand.

Q. Did he cover it completely? - A. No, I could see it.

Q. You saw it when he told you to search his pockets? - A. Yes, I took the pocket-book from him and opened it, and took out five Bank notes; four twos and one one; he said they were his own property, and he had been three years and a half in saving them; I asked him if he knew the number of the notes, as he had had them so long by him; he said he did not; I told him I thought it was very odd, as he had had them so long as three years and a half, that he did not know the numbers of them; he desired me to seal them up; in a little time after he said they were the gentleman's, but the gentleman made him a present of them.

Q. When did he say that they were the gentleman's, and he made him a present of them? - A. In about a quarter of an hour after he had said they were his own.

Q. Where was he when he said that? - A. He was going down stairs; after they were sealed up, they were in my care till we went down to the Office on Saturday morning, where they were produced and broke open; I delivered them to the Magistrate, and then they were returned to Mr. Waters, and I put my name on the back of them.

Q. Did you see the Magistrate give them to Mr. Waters? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Waters) I suppose they have your name on them too? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. He first said they were his own? - A. He did.

Q. In about a quarter of an hour after that he said they were his master's - A. He said they were, but the gentleman had made him a present of them?

Q. He was a little outrageous in his conduct then? - A. No, he was not; I was with him all night in Mr. Waters's kitchen; he did not seem to be a person out of his mind at all that night, not in the least; he offered to strike Mr. Waters at one time, and I really believe he would have struck him, had I not shewn him my staff.

Q. Mr. Waters was in a great passion? - A. I cannot pretend to say; he had a right to be in a passion.

Q. He was rather warm? - A. It was enough to make him.

JOHN MANTON sworn. - Q. Do you remember Mr. Waters sending to you on the 17th of November? - A. Yes, I went into the parlour where the prisoner and my master were.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was searched? - A. I was, I saw the notes taken out of his pocket-book.

Q. Did he make any difficulty to be searched? - A. He said he did not like to be stripped before a parcel of people; I said, my friend, you must be searched; he began to undress himself, and after he had all his things searched, and his pockets, and nothing found on him, then they came to his pocket-book; I saw five notes taken out; he kept it in his hand till every pocket and every thing had been searched; he then said he did not wish Mr. Waters to see the notes, so the officer and he went to the other side of the room.

Q. He would not give you the pocket-book then? - A. No; the officer looked the notes over, and after he called the notes over, my master said there wanted a ten-pound note. After the notes were sealed up, before they came out of the parlour, the prisoner said he should be glad to speak to Mr. Waters, if he would hear him; he then said, they were your property, but you made them a present to me; this was at the parlour door, as he was going down into the kitchen; in the course of the night he seemed very well; I sat with him all the night with the officer.

Q. Did the man converse rationally? - A. I cannot say he did at one time; he said one part of the night, I would sooner have gone to Botany-bay than have come into this house.

Q. Did any thing pass in conversing with the man, that led you to suppose that he was not possessed of his right mind? - A. I cannot recollect any thing.

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Waters's house; he desired to look at my warrant, I gave it him, and he copied it off on a bit of paper; he then put the notes in my hand, and took them away; he gave me the warrant back again, and then went down stairs; he came up stairs after me, and asked me if he had given me any notes; I looked in my pocket-book, I told him, no; I did not look in my warrant; he called a constable, and he found the notes in my warrant, in my pocket-book; in going down stairs I found they were there, I did not know they were there.

JAMES WILLIAMS , sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. Did you attend the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have.

Q. What has been the state of his health lately? - A. I have not attended him very lately.

Q. Do you know any thing of his having had an apoplectic fit? - A. Yes, he has had two, I think; the first was about three years ago.

Q. Have they been in any degree of violence? - A. Yes, they certainly affected his mind, for at the time his mental faculties were very much deranged, and also at a subsequent time.

Court. Q. When was the last time you perceived that effect? - A. I cannot recollect exactly the time, but he seemed to be in a state of idiotism; I have met him in the street, and asked him how he was; he seemed to be in a state of stupor, and I then thought his intellects were not as they were formerly.

Q. When was the last time that you saw him, so as to mark any thing particular? - A. About six months ago I met him in the street, and I perceived these effects even then.

Mr. Clifton. Q. Do you know any thing of his character? - A. I cannot say any thing particular, I never heard any thing that was bad of him.

JAMES WILLIAMS , jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Clifton. Q. Did you at any time attend the prisoner? - A. I attended the prisoner by my father's directions; I know nothing more than what my father has stated.

Q. When was the last time that you conversed with any degree of particularity? - A. I believe within this month.

Q. Did you perceive that his faculties were at all affected at that time? - A. They were, as they usually have been lately.

Court. Q. How were they usually - his faculties were not so impaired as not to know what he was about? - A. There was something of a stupor about him.

Q. Did he converse rationally? - A. Not always.

Mr. Clifton. Q. Do you know of his having had these two fits? - A. I do.

Q. What impression did you perceive it had made on him? - A. A wonderful difference.

GUILTY , Death , aged 30.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and the prosecutor, on account of his having had two severe attacks of apoplectic fits, supposing they might have made an impression on his mind.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-26

26. JOHN WHITE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Butler , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 7th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a coat, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. and a neck-handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Curtis ; and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Butler .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

BENJAMIN BUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At Little Sutton, in Chiswick parish .

Q. Does your wife live with you? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any lodgers? - A. Yes: William Curtis , Robert Curtis , John Davis , and William Hutchins .

Q. Was your house broke open, and when? - A. In the night between the 7th and 8th of November.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night? - A. About nine o'clock, I myself, and every lodger, were in bed; I left my wife up.

Q. Before you went to bed, did you fasten up the premises? - A. Yes; I fastened the windows and the doors as they usually are; the wash-house joins to the house, it is a part of the house.

Q. Was the window of the wash-house secure? - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge, just as it used to be of other nights; I got up about six o'clock in the morning; in the night-time I thought I heard something in the wash-house.

Q. About what time was it you heard this? - A. It might be between two and three o'clock in the morning; I had got some rabbits in the wash-house, I thought it might be them; I called who is there.

Q. You got no answer, I suppose? - A. No; then I thought I heard the back-door go open.

Q. The wash-house is under the same roof as your own room? - A. Yes.

Q. What then? - A. I thought it might be one of the lodgers come down and gone to the necessary.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning? - A. About six, or rather before, it was dark; we went to work at Mr. Dance's, the gardener, I returned at breakfast-time, at nine o'clock; I got intelligence, and that led me to my wash-house; I discovered that the frame was taken out, and that I had lost some things, I lost my wife's cloak, a pair of sheets, and some raw pork.

Q. That was all that you missed of your property - Did Curtis return with you? - A. Yes.

Q. He lost some property too, did he? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your son here? - A. Yes, he lost some property; we then went together after this man, but he was taken in a public-house by the Duke of Devonshire's brewer; I went towards Brentford, the first house I went to was Mr. Faulkener's, the Waggon and Horses; then I went to the Seven-stars, at Brentford; where, afterwards, we found the things at the Fox and Hounds; I made inquiry whether any man had been there with a bundle; I found there a pair of shoes belonging to my son.

Q. Had these shoes been in the house the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any thing else there? - A. No; I found nothing more in Brentford, Curtis did.

Q. When did you come up to the man, and where? - A. At night, at the Seven-stars, at Brentford; it might be seven o'clock in the evening when we found him at the Seven-stars; and we found him with some of the clothes upon him, he was dressed in William Curtis 's coat and waistcoat, and more things were found in the bundle, belonging to Curtis and my son.

Q. Had he the bundle with him? - A. Yes; the bundle was down on the bench by him; I asked him whose bundle it was, he said his.

Q. What was there belonging to your son? - A. A neck-handkerchief.

Q. Any thing else? - A. No, not in the bundle.

Q. What was there belonging to William Curtis ? - A. A pair of stockings, a pair of shoes, a neck-handkerchief, and two pocket-handkerchiefs; having found the coat and waistcoat on him, and these things in the bundle, which he said were his, I sent for the constable.

Q. Before that, did the prisoner say any thing? - A. No; I could not get any thing out of him that night; I delivered him over to the constable.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing the next morning? - A. No.

Q. Were the sheets ever found? - A. No.

ELIZABETH BUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes; I went to bed between nine and ten, after my husband.

Q. Were all the lodgers gone to bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the house secured when you went to bed? - A. The house was secured that night; I got up at half past six o'clock, my husband was gone to work, and William Curtis ; Robert Curtis said he had lost his shoes, I immediately jumped out of bed and went to look, I said somebody had hid them; I went into the wash-house, and found the chair my husband had bought lately outside of the door; I asked Curtis how this chair came out at the door; then I saw the frame was taken out of the wash-house window; I then went to see what was missing; I missed nothing more of my husband's than the sheets and my cloak; my son's shoes, coat, and handkerchief, and the key, and two-pence halfpenny out of his pocket; and a drawer was opened just close to the men's bed-side.

Q. What was there taken out of the drawer? - A. Twenty shillings of my son's cash; the meat was taken out of the cupboard, and all William Curtis 's best wearing apparel.

WILLIAM SIMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am a constable: I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner, on the 8th of November, between six and seven o'clock; I apprehended him at the Seven-stars.

Q. Did he say any thing? - A. No.

Q. Were did you get that bundle from? - A. From the prisoner, and the coat and waistcoat I got from the prisoner; he had a basket and a bundle; I found the coat and waistcoat on his back. (Produces the coat and waistcoat.)

Q.(To Curtis.) Are these your's? - A.(Looks at them.) Yes; they are my Sunday cloaths.

Court. Q. Were these taken from your room? - A. Yes, out of the drawer.

Sims. I produce the breeches I got from Mr. Carpenter, a salesman, at Brentford.

Q.(To Curtis.) Look at them? - A. They are mine; they were secure in the drawers the night this robbery was committed.

Sims. These are a pair of cotton stockings, they were in his bundle.

Curtis. They are mine, they were secure in the drawers.

- CARPENTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a salesman at Brentford? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I know him now again.

Q. Had you ever seen the man before he came to you? - A. No; he came about eight o'clock in the morning, on the 9th of November.

Q. Is Chiswick far from Brentford? - A. About a mile and a half; he came to the door, and asked me if I would buy a coat; I looked at it.

Q.(The coat shewn the witness.) Is that the same sort of coat? - A. I can swear to the coat by the slit here; I looked at the coat; we did not agree; he had a waistcoat, and I looked at the waistcoat, and I knew it was bought at my shop.

Court. Q. Was it bought by that young man, Curtis? - A. Yes, I said to him, this waistcoat was bought at my shop, but you are not the man that bought it; he said no, he was not; he said, the man that belonged to it was at work, they worked together at Mr. Dance's, a gardener, at Chiswick; I said to him, send the man down that owns the waistcoat, and I will buy the waistcoat of him; he said, would I buy the coat on his back; I bought the breeches; these are the same breeches; I gave him half-a-crown for the old coat and waistcoat, and four shillings for the breeches.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say at all; the things were given to me to sell; I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY , Death , aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-27

27. HANNAH PALMER and ANN HARRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , twenty-eight yards of lace, value 7 l. the property of Christopher Fisher , privately in his shop .

CHRISTOPHER FISHER sworn. - I live at No. 19, Great Newport-street, in the parish of St. Martin .

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar - do you know them? - A. Perfectly so.

Q. Do you remember seeing them at your shop in the 20th of October last? - A. I do, about half past four o'clock in the afternoon; they both came together.

Q. Was there any body in the shop besides yourself? - A. My wife was in the back part of the shop, and her father-in-law, sitting by the fire; there is a screen between the back shop and the front shop; it totally hinders any person sitting there from seeing who comes into the front shop.

Q. Then the back shop is so separated by a screen, as just to leave a passage from one shop to the other? - A. Exactly so.

Q. So that if you were in the back shop, you could not see without going round that? - A. No.

Q. As either of them sat, could either of them see what passed in the fore shop? - A. I believe he might, if he sat facing the door, but he sat with his face towards the fire, and his back towards me; my wife was so placed that she could not see in the least when the two prisoners at the bar came in.

Q. What did they ask for? - A. They asked to look at some black lace.

Q. Had you ever seen them before? - A. I had seen the tall one before pass by, I believe; I know more of them now; I have an officer here who can tell more than I; the short one I did not know at all, I never saw her before in my life; I asked them what sort of lace they wanted, whether British or real; she answered, real; Palmer, the tall one, said she wanted real, she wanted some very good; I immediately shewed them some of different patterns and prices, from five shillings up to eighteen shillings a yard; they seemed very difficult both in pattern and price; there was one lace in particular that took the fancy of the prisoner Harris; she said to Palmer, my dear, this is good lace, it is real lace, taking the cloak that she had on in her hand; she said, my cloak is trimmed with real British lace, and directly threw it over the counter, covering the lace, to shew me the lace that was on it; this was Harris; Palmer made answer, I know it is. After that, Ann Harris walked to the door; I supposed that she intended to shew me some other that was outside, as we have a shew-board, and that shew-board stands sloping, you cannot see in the inside; but she did not go to the shew-board, but stood in the front of the door upon the threshold, and seemed to be adjusting something in the front of her, in this kind of manner, (witness described how); she supposed that I could not see her, having a pile of woollen cloaks piled up against the door, but so as not to cover the whole of it, but leaving one square of glass of the door uncovered, from which I can see every one that passes in the street; that is how I saw her in that motion; I observed her before she returned into the shop again; she was not quite out, but was upon the threshold. At the time she returned, the prisoner Palmer was looking at a lace of 18 s. per yard, it was Harris that went to the door;

Palmer said the price was too high, that she should not like to give more than 14 s. but did not bid me 14 s. I answered I could not take that, and they both walked out of the shop.

Q. How long might they be in your shop altogether? - A. I suppose about fifteen or twenty minutes.

Q. So they bought nothing at all? - A. Not any thing.

Q. How soon after they were gone, did you miss any thing? - A. I began, as soon as they were gone, to adjust my lace, taking them one by one, and in the space of three minutes I missed the card of lace I now charge them with; this is the pattern of it, (shewing a small bit of lace.)

Q. Are you quite clear that you saw the card of lace upon the table while they were there? - A. The card of lace was there, and was particularly looked at by Harris, saying it was a good one; I am perfectly clear it was there, I had it in my hand to shew them.

Q. And you are perfectly clear it was upon the counter, and that Ann Harris particularly admired it? - A. Exactly so.

Q. How much did you lose? - A. Twenty-eight yards.

Q. What might be the price of it? - A. Seven pounds.

Q. The value of the whole? - A. Yes; the whole was gone.

Q. How do you know the pattern? - A. This is the pattern I know it by; it is a kind of a sample.

Q. You are positively certain that that pattern, twenty-eight yards of lace, was laying on the counter, and that you missed it? - A. I am certain of that; I saw which way they turned after they went out of my shop, I took my hat, and went in pursuit of them; the street being very short, that in less than a minute they can turn either corner, I took the turning towards Cranbourn-alley, and through Leicester-square, but did not meet them; I saw no more of them till Wednesday, the 24th, about half past three, when they passed the door, both of them together; I then went in pursuit of them; I followed them up Long-acre at a distance, and they went into Mr. M'Knight's, a linen-draper; I beckoned to him, I stood in the doorway; I beckoned him to come to speak to me, as he knew me well; he turned into the back parlour, and he said if I would come to him, he would speak to me; I went in to speak to Mr. M'Knight, and in the mean time the prisoners stepped out, they saw me.

Q. I wish you to be particular about that? - A. When I was standing at the parlour door with him, they directly went out of the shop without purchasing a single thing of Mr. M'Knight.

Q. Did they inquire for any thing? - A. There was a person in at the time at Mr. M'Knight's looking at some kind of linen, but they all went out together.

Q. Had the prisoners joined in company to look at any linen before you went into the shop? - A. I do think they had in the same business; I followed them immediately.

Q. When they went out, what did you do? - A. I stepped out of the shop, and took the prisoner Harris by the arm, and said, walk along with me. O, my dear, said she, I will walk along with you any where; I took Harris, and we went into Mr. M'Knight's shop again; I believe Mr. M'Knight's man brought Palmer in; she was brought in; they were taken into the back parlour, and I immediately sent to Bow-street for an officer.

Q. You have described this action of her taking up the lower part of the cloak, and putting it over the counter - did the cloak cover any part of the lace? - A. Nearly the whole of it.

Q. Had the action of putting her cloak in that sort of a way, the appearance of a natural action to shew it you, or strange and forced? - A. It is rather unusual to shew it you in that manner; sometimes they will shew in this manner (describing how), but I never knew one throw it over.

Q. It did not excite suspicion in you? - A. None in the least.

Q. You never found that lace? - A. No, nor never heard any thing of it.

RICHARD LIMERICK sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; we searched the prisoners, and that is all we can say; we found nothing upon them; nothing that they said made any impression on my memory in the least; they denied the charge, and when they were fully committed, there was a girl stepped forward, and said, that Palmer was an innocent woman, and that she did this robbery.

Palmer's defence. The gentleman has known me for many years, and he knows that I do not live many doors from him, and when he was at Bow-street, he swore to twenty-seven yards.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Is that true, that you knew her many years back? - A. No; I knew her and her father by sight, but I never spoke to the man in my life.

Palmer. I bought a cloak of this gentleman the 24th of last May; I have never been in his shop since.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Did you sell her a cloak? - A. I really do not know, I cannot say that I have.

Palmer. I have got my cloak at home.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Do you know that she lived in your neighbourhood? - A. I have seen her pass, but I did not know who she was.

Palmer. I am an innocent woman, and the officer knows that a young woman came into the Office, and said she did the robbery.

Harris's defence. I am an innocent woman; at the Office a gentleman came up, and he said he

could not swear to our persons, we were not the women.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Did you before state that you did not know the persons of the prisoners at the bar? - A. No.

Harris. His friend did.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Had you any doubt before the Magistrate of the persons of the prisoners at the bar? - A. None in the least; I could identify the person of the prisoner Palmer, in case of an alibi; the two officers are here that searched them, and they found nothing upon them.

Harris. At the time the gentleman said the robbery was committed, I had not seen Mrs. Palmer for three weeks, or a fortnight, and I brought her a gown that I made for her on that day.

Palmer, GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

Harris, GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

The Jury recommended them to mercy on account of their youth.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-28

28. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a copper, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Holmes .

SAMUEL HOLMES sworn. - I am a smith : On the 17th of November, as I was coming along the passage of my house, No. 5, Castle-court , I observed the prisoner take up the copper at the door; he went down the court with it, I followed him, and asked him what he was going to do with that copper; he told me he was going to carry it home; I immediately collared him, and brought him back again to my house; he was very resolute, and kicked me much.

Q. Is it your copper? - A. It is, it was never out of my sight.

ROBERT LOCK sworn. - I was sent for; I took the prisoner to Covent-garden watch-house, and from thence to Queen-square.

Prisoner's defence. I worked last in Whitechapel at the white lead mills, which made me very ill; I was obliged to go to my parish; I had been out but three days from my parish, I was coming along this street, and a man asked me if I wanted a job; I was out of employment; I said, yes; he told me he had a copper up Castle-court, and he would go and get me a knot; he shewed it me; it is against a dead wall, said he, I suppose about four or five yards opposite the door; Mr. Holmes was standing at the door at the same time; I took it up in my arm, thinking the man was coming up with the knot, and carried it down; directly Mr. Holmes came up, and took hold of me; the man ran away.

Q.(To Holmes.) Did you see a man run away? - A. There was a man talking to him, and he did run away; I went after him, but could not overtake him.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? - A. No.

GUILTY

Of stealing under the value of 39 s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-29

29. SAMUEL WILMOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a saddle, value 21 s. and a bridle , value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Gabriel-Tucker Stewart , Esq.

Second Count. For like offence, only charging it to be the property of John Bestford .

BENJAMIN GOOD sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Bestford; Mr. Stewart's horse stands at livery in my master's stables; I saw them both there, the saddle and the bridle, on the preceding night; nobody was in the stable after me that night, I locked the stable-door; I missed them the next morning; I went to the stable on the next morning about half past six o'clock, I put the key in the door as usual, and the key would not go round to unlock the door; with that, I tried the latch of the door, and found it was undone; I looked round to see if any thing was missing; I did not observe the saddle missing; soon after, the watchman came, and asked me if I had missed any thing out of the stable; I immediately looked up to where I had left the saddle and the bridle, and then I found they were not there.

WILLIAM HINOTT sworn. - I am a watchman in St. George's, Hanover square : As I was calling the hour of five in the morning by Lord Haywood's premises, I came within ten yards of Mr. Bestford's stable-door; I saw two men standing, one was dressed like a groom, and the other like a helper; as I drew nigher to them, I saw first the prisoner at the bar lay down a saddle.

Q. Are you sure to his person? - A. I am positive of him, and as soon as he laid down the saddle, he stared me hard in the face; I passed by the person that was along with him, he was dressed like a groom; I slipped by the groom apparently, he strove to hide the bridle; I went about three yards, I turned round, and said, are you going to ride so soon as this in the morning; I had no suspicion of the robbery; they immediately jumped off from the kirb into the dirt, both of them; the other man that was with the prisoner seemed to have a number of keys with him, they jingled very much; I then ran after them, and cried, stop thief, and sprang the rattle at the bottom of Holles-street; at the last spring of the rattle I heard one John Hinkman say he had caught one. In about a minute after I saw him, and I told him that was the man that run from me; I told him I would shew him the place where I had the charge against him; I

brought him to Mr. Bestford's stable, and there the saddle was laying on the ground with the belly upwards; I secured the prisoner till the stable-keeper's servant was up; I asked him what he had been doing out so early, or so late; he told me he had been fishing at Brentford; the Magistrate asked him the same question; he told him he had been at Paddington with a friend, and he had left his friend in the street.

JOHN HINCKMAN sworn. - On Saturday, the 3d of November, about five o'clock in the morning, as I was coming into Cavendish-square to go to my daily labour, I heard the watchman's rattle, and stepping forward to assist the watchman, I met the prisoner at the bar running as hard as he could run; I caught hold of him by the collar, and I called out to the watchman, and told him I had got him, and when the watchman saw him, he said he was the man that had the saddle.

Prisoner's defence. I was going through Cavendish-square to Norfolk-street, to my work, and from thence he took me; the watchman coming down Oxford-road, held up the light, and said I was the man; he asked me where I had been; I was afraid it would come to my master's ears, and I told him I was going a fishing; there being but four masters in our trade, if a man has a bad character, they will not employ him; I am a saffron-caker; I was not willing it should be known in the trade; the last witness has sworn false, you may depend upon it. (The saddle produced and identified by the witness, Good.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-30

30. ANN GAROBBO and MARY ROCKWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , nineteen yards of lace, value 2 l. a gold ring, value 5 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two other handkerchiefs, value 2 s. one window curtain, value 1 s. one muslin apron, value 1 s. and five guineas , the property of Benjamin Jacobs .

BENJAMIN JACOBS sworn. - I live at No. 21, Holley-street, Clare-market ; the prisoner, Ann Garobbo , was my servant ; she lived with me a fortnight and three days; she left me on the 22d of October.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other prisoner? - A. She came to me, pretending to bring a letter to Garobbo from her husband, who was on board one of his Majesty's ships; I apprehended Mary Rockwell first, and then I apprehended Ann Garobbo ; they were both taken one evening, the 27th of October; I found a bill on Garobbo of my own, which I know was placed in a drawer with a lock of hair in it; the bill I had at Sadler's Wells, and I found the duplicates which corresponded with the pawnbrokers.

ANN JACOBS sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect when the prisoner, Garobbo, left you? - A. On the 22d of October; she asked my leave on Sunday night to let her go to Somerset-house to receive her monthly money that her husband allowed her; she told me if I would let her go at ten o'clock, she would be back in an hour; I told her she might go; she went out at ten, and did not return till three o'clock, she was then in liquor; I was very angry with her returning so late and being in liquor; she said, she had a letter from her husband, and that she was to have another, and the other prisoner brought it; I did not see the other prisoner at first; she called me up stairs afterwards, and said she had received a second letter; she then asked me, as she was late with her work, to let the other prisoner stay and help her, if I would give her a bit of victuals, she would pay her for the work; I said a bit of victuals was no object to me, if she was honest; she said, she was as honest as untold gold; they went up stairs to go to work, as I thought.

Q. Was Garobbo capable of doing work? - A. She said she was; she went and laid down, I am positive, for I begged her to lie down; the other prisoner came down, and was cleaning some candlesticks in the kitchen, and I saw them both making the beds in the two pair of stairs; I went up stairs, and fetched the candlesticks out of the same room; part of the time Rockwell was down stairs, and part of the time she was up stairs; Ann Garobbo came down stairs, and asked me if I wanted any thing; I told her I wanted some tea and sugar; I gave her the money for it, and I never saw her afterwards.

Q. After they went away, did you miss any thing? - A. I went into the back parlour, and there I saw her own things gone out of her box; they had both been there about an hour before they went away; in the course of two days following, I saw my cupboard door undone, and there I missed my card of lace, part of it is in Court now.

Q. What is that lace worth? - A. There were nineteen yards and a half on the card, I valued it at forty shillings; I went to my drawers, and there I had a caddy that had five guineas in it, which I put by for my rent; it was locked when I left it, and I found the five guineas gone; in the one-pair back room, where they had been making the bed, I missed that and a fore-finger ring with hair in it.

Q. What is that worth? - A. Three or four shillings; I missed a handkerchief-pin, a short window-curtain, and an apron; some of the lace I have seen, and the handkerchief I have seen, at Marlborough-street.

JAMES PORTER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Wright, a pawnbroker; I got a silk handkerchief and lace; when they were pledged, the two prisoners were together; I received the handkerchief and lace on the 24th of October of the prisoner Garobbo, for five shillings.

JOHN BASNET sworn. - I am shopman to my father: Mary Rockwell came on the 22d of October; she pawned a cotton handkerchief and a remnant of lace; I lent her 5 s. on them, with a dimity petticoat and a shawl; the petticoat and shawl belonged to the prisoner.

SAMUEL PEARSON sworn. - I am servant to Sarah Barrow : On the 25th of October, I had an handkerchief pledged by a person, but I do not recollect who it was.

- sworn. - I am an officer of Marlborough-street: On the 27th of October, I went with Mr. Jacobs to the Great Almonry, No. 2, Westminster; there I apprehended Garobbo; I searched the room, and in the drawer I found three duplicates that corresponded with the three different pawnbrokers' duplicates where I found the lace. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Garobbo's defence. Their house is a house of ill fame; they drink a deal of liquor in this house; I had a deal of liquor in this house before I went for my husband's money, and when I came back my master gave me more liquor, and he said go and lay down in the back parlour.

Prosecutrix. I deny it, he was not in the house at the time you came back; he went to work before she went to make the beds.

Rockwell's defence. Garabbo came to me to ask me if I would go with her to do her work; when I went in, they asked me down stairs; I know nothing at all about it.

Garobbo, GUILTY, aged 21.

Rockwell, GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing under the value of 39 s.

Confined two years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-31

31. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for that he, on the 29th of November , feloniously did forge and counterfeit, and caused to be forged and counterfeited, and willingly aided and assisted in making a certain order for payment of 20 l. 10 s. with intention to defraud James Vere , Peter Vere , James-Lewis Lucadou , and William Smart .

Second Count. For feloniously uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged and counterfeited order for payment of money, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with the same intention.

And Two other Counts. For uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged and counterfeited order for payment of money, with intention to defraud William Robson and Titus Keymer .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp; and the case stated by Mr. Const.)

WILLIAM HAYMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. I am fourteen next Twelfth day.

Q. Look round, and tell me whether you know the person of the prisoner? - A. That is he that is at the bar.

Q. Did you see him the latter end of last month? - A. It was last Thursday week I saw him facing No. 77, Lombard-street, about four o'clock in the afternoon; he asked me whether I would go into No. 77, and receive that; there was a bit of paper given into my hand by the prisoner; I went in.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. What became of the prisoner when you went in? - A. He stood in the street.

Q. You went in there and saw a clerk? - A. Yes, I gave the paper to the clerk, he is here in Court.

Q. Mr. Hawkins was the person that you saw? - A. Yes, and I gave the piece of paper to him.

Q. What did he do with that paper? - A. He asked me where I got it from; the gentleman looked in the book then.

Q. Did you go back to the prisoner then? - A. Yes, by myself, in the street to the prisoner; I left the paper there; the prisoner was gone a little further; I stood there, and he came to me; I told him that the gentleman said he must step in himself.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you before you said any thing to him? - A. He walked away very quick; then two gentlemen came out and took him, and brought him back.

Q. Had the prisoner gone out of your sight before they took him? - A. Yes.

Q. When he returned back again, are you sure that he was the person that gave you the paper? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure that the paper you received from the prisoner, you gave to Mr. Hawkins? - A. Yes, I had no other.

Q. Look round, Mr. Hawkins is nearer to you, tell me whether that is the person you gave the paper to? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. When the paper was given to you, were you not desired to go and see if it was a good check? - A. No, I am sure it was not; he asked me if I would go in and receive that.

- HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Vere and Co. No. 77, Lombard-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving from the last witness a draft on the 29th of November? - A. I do.

Q. When you saw the draft, did it appear to be a good one? - A. It appeared to be a forged one.

Q. You went and took the prisoner? - A. I did, and I went afterwards to the Mansion-house; I have it about me now, it was payable to Mr. Getham, or bearer, 20 l. 10 s.

Q. Do you know the person whose name is there? - A. Yes, they have kept cash at our house, and they have at this time an account kept open.

Q. When you received it you saw it was a forgery, and did not pay it? - A. I did; I did not pay it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At present they keep an account with you, did they last Thursday? - A. Yes, and for years.

Q. Has this draft been in your possession ever since? - A. Not the whole of the time.

Q. How long was the draft that you received from the boy out of your possession? - A. A very short time; it was in the possession of Mr. Lucadou from about four o'clock on Thursday till twelve o'clock on Saturday, at the Mansion-house.

Q. Did you give it to Mr. Lucadou? - A. I did not; it was laid on our counter, and who took it up I do not know.

Q. It was out of your sight till you saw it before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Exactly so.

Q. Did you put any mark upon it before you parted with it? - A. No, but from the attention I paid to it, I have no doubt of it; I think I can swear to it without any difficulty.

EDWARD HAYTCHBERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are one of the clerks in the banking-house of Messrs. Vere and Co. No. 77, Lombard-street? - A. Yes.

Q. On Thursday, the 29th of November, in consequence of a draft being brought in, you went out? - A. I went out by myself, just out of the door, and saw the prisoner speak to the boy.

Q. Is that the boy that is standing up here? - A. Yes, I saw him speak to him, and then he ran away; I ran after him, and I came up to him in Pope's Head alley, that leads from Lombard-street to Cornhill; I told him that he had been sending a check by the boy to our house; he said he had not; I told him he had, and that he must go back with me, and as I was taking him back Mr. Fleming came up; he is one of our clerks; we then both took him into our house.

JAMES- LEWIS LUCADOU sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a partner in the house of Messrs. Vere: what is the firm of your house? - A. James Vere , Peter Vere , James- Lewis Lucadou , and William Smart .

Q. Do you remember the boy that has been examined bringing the draft? - A. Yes, I was there, between the hours of four and five; I saw him, and I think I saw the prisoner before he was brought in; I saw when he was brought in; I said, how came you by that; he made me no answer; I pressed him two or three times to tell me where he had got it; his answer was, he lived with Mr. Morgan, in Lawrence-lane, who kept cash at our house; I desired one of the clerks to go for a constable, and just at the moment he was going out of the room with this constable, he said, I wrote it, I meant it as a joke, or intended it as a joke.

Q. What did you do with this draft? - A. I immediately took this draft and put it under lock and key.

Q. You went to the Mansion-house? - A. I did.

Q. Did you carry the draft to the Mansion-house? - A. I did not, I rather think it was Hawkins.

Q. You locked it up and kept it till the next morning? - A. Yes, and when I came down into the office, I saw the draft again; I have not a doubt but it is the same draft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have not a doubt but it is a draft of the same purport? - A. I have no doubt at all it is the same, and now looking upon it I have no doubt.

Q. It has been out of your possession? - A. It certainly has.

Q. It is a draft, in your judgment, of the same hand-writing; you will not swear positively that it is the same draft? - A. I saw the draft and looked attentively upon it at the time; I have not a doubt but it is the same, to the best of my recollection and judgment.

Q. You have seen a draft similar to this, and, upon recollection, it induces you to think it is the same? - A. I have not a doubt but it is the very draft.

Q. That is the impression on your mind; Messrs. Booth and Robson had no account open at your house? - A. They have at this time what we call accounts open, upon which there is a balance due to them.

Mr. Const. Q. Have you any doubt of that draft that you took to the Mansion-house, but it is the same you had under lock and key? - A. None in the least.

Jury. We believed that he said he could not swear it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Upon oath do you believe that to be the draft you had locked up in your desk? - A. I do believe it to be the identical draft; I have not the least doubt; I can take my oath of it.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt that you had it in your possession, and delivered it to be produced before the Magistrate? - A. I have no doubt.

TITUS KEYMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 26, Friday-street, Cheapside; I am a warehouseman; my partners are Edward Booth and William Robson.

Q. Did you in November last, draw any draft

upon Messrs. Vere and Co.? - A. I did not.

Court. Q. You have no other partners? - A. No.

Q. You did not draw any draft upon any part of last month? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Hawkins.) Q. Do you know Mr. Keymer? - A. Yes, I do.

Mr. Gurney. Did you ever see Mr. Keymer write? - A. A great many times.

Q. Do you say that is Mr. Keymer's handwriting? - A. I believe not.

Q. It is not like it? - A. I think it is in imitation of it, but I have no doubt that it is not his hand-writing.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you speak it from what he has said to you? - A. No, I suspected it when the boy gave it me; I have seen him write many times, there is a faint resemblance, but it could not deceive me. (The draft read in Court.)

"77, Lombard-street, London, 28th November, 1804, Messrs. Vere, Lucadou, and Smart. Pay to M. Gethan, or bearer, 20 l. 10 s. Signed Booth, Robson, and Self. T. Keymer."

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I found the check, and I gave it to the boy to enquire if it was a regular check.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-32

32. WILLIS TURNSTILE and JOSEPH CANE were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a gold watch, value 13 l. the property of George Blog and Basil Blog , in the dwelling-house of George Blog ; and the latter, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, they were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-33

33. WILLIS TURNSTILE was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a silver watch value 2 l. 10 s. the property of George Blog and Basil Blog , in the dwelling-house of George Blog .

GEORGE BLOG sworn. - I am a jeweller and goldsmith , I live in Jewin-street ; I missed the silver watch the same day as I did the gold watch; I know no further than my man telling me he saw the prisoner have a watch.

JOHN GILL sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. George Blog : On the 13th of November, my master having occasion to ship some goods to Barbadoes, my master ordered the prisoner at the bar to get our truck ready; I went with him, and going down Cheapside; I run the truck against him; he said, I had burst his watch open; not knowing he had a watch, I asked him what he meant; he shewed me the watch, I knew the watch, and he put it in his pocket again; I had just took hold of it when he held it by the string.

Q. Whose watch was it? - A. I did not examine it then.

Q. Were you able to say it was your master's watch when you got home, and saw it again? - A. Yes, I then knew it to be my master's, it is No. 106. he had not then been out of my sight; I told one of our men, and the man seeing the string, asked him to shew him the watch; I then took the watch, I asked him how he came by the watch; he said his mother bought it for him.

JOHN THOMPSON sworn. - I live at No. 35, Chiswell-street, I am servant to Mr. Dobson; I have a silver watch, pledged on the 13th of November, for sixteen shillings, of Joseph Cane. (The watch produced, and identified by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I took the two watches.

Q. How came you to take them? - A. Because I wanted money; and my brother who is at sea promised to send me some money, and when I received that money I promised to pay it; I gave them to my father-in-law, and he asked me how I came by them; I told him my fellow-apprentice gave them me; and then he went and pledged them directly.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

To be sent to sea .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-34

34. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a pair of sheets, value 5 s. the property of Richard Prosser ; a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and an handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Nevill .

RICHARD PROSSER sworn. - The prisoner at the bar came to my house on Monday night, the 3d of December, and asked to lodge there just that night; I told him he might have a bed, he had a pint of beer and went to bed; the next morning, a little before nine o'clock, I was standing in the bar, the prisoner came down stairs, he seemed to be in a great hurry, running out of the house; when he was at the door I called to him, twice, and he took no notice; I told the servant girl to go up stairs, and I looked after him, I thought I saw him have something with him; when the girl was up stairs, I called the waterman at the door to go after him, (I pointed to the prisoner) to tell him I wanted him; the girl came down, and said there were the sheets missing, the waterman brought him back; I found a pair of sheets put in the back part of his breeches; he had an handkerchief and a pair of stockings belonging to a young man that lodged with me, his name is Nevil.

THOMAS SHEAVES sworn. - Q. Have you got the sheets? - A. Yes; I got them from the back part of his breeches, and I got the stockings from his bosom. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor and Samuel Nevil.)

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-35

35. RICHARD WILLIAMSON and GEORGE SAVAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , three pints of peppermint, value 3 s. and a glass bottle, value 6 d. the property of Richard Brashaw .

RICHARD BRASHAW sworn. - I am a victualler , I live at the Coach and Horses in Leather-lane : On the 4th of this month, Williamson and Savage came in.

Q. Did you know the lads? - A. Yes, Williamson I did; Williamson had robbed me in February, and was tried for it; at this time they had a woman in company with them; there was a large bottle at the end of the counter, and Savage put his hand behind and reached this bottle of peppermint down; I saw him put his hand behind him, but I did not see him take the bottle; after he had turned himself round, he bolted out with the bottle, and ran so fast we could not find him; my wife took hold of Williamson, and by assistance we took him to the watch-house; the bottle was never found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you known Savage before? - A. No.

Q. I suppose you had a great many people there; your shop is a shop of good custom? - A. Yes.

MARY BRASHAW sworn. - Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes; I served the two prisoners with two glasses of gin; immediately after I served them, Savage put his hand behind him, and took the bottle from the shelf, and ran away; we pursued him, but could not find him; I secured the other prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There was a good many people in your shop? - A. There were only these three at that time.

RICHARD FLOWER sworn. - I saw George Savage come in along with this man, and a sprat-woman; they had a glass of gin, and Savage paid for it; Savage put his hand behind him, and the bottle was gone; Mrs. Brashaw called out, bring the bottle back; we all ran out directly after him.

JOHN TROTT sworn. - I was going over Mutton-hill last Tuesday evening about eleven o'clock, and saw some sprat-women sitting there with a light; I saw the prisoner there, and the prisoner saw me; I knew him well, and I did not wish the prisoner Savage to see me, if I could have helped it; I touched my hat with my stick to take off any suspicion of my watching him; he said to me, good night; I went on a little further in the dark, and I hid myself up against a dark wall; he was very much intoxicated; I heard him say, d - n them, they have got one, but I have given them the double; thinking he might have got away from my brother officers, I let him alone till I made inquiry, I went to a house that I thought they used, I found it was not so, I went to the watchmen and asked them; I heard from some person coming by that Mr. Brashaw's house had been robbed of some peppermint; I went to the prosecutor's house and inquired about it, and there I learned the description of Savage immediately; I then told them to make themselves easy, I thought I could bring the prisoner back; I then went down to where I saw the women selling sprats, and there I took him, and from there to the prosecutor's, and they said, he was the person; he denied ever having been in the house.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence, nor call any witnesses to character.

Williamson, GUILTY , aged 37,

Savage, GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-36

36. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the 22d day of November , upon George Harris , feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike him on the side of the face, and on his left leg, with intent to kill and murder .

Second Count. Charging it to be with intent to disable him.

Third Count. For stabbing and cutting the said George Harris , with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

Fourth Count. With intent to obstruct the lawful detainer of him, the said Henry, for a felony.

Fifth Count. With intent to obstruct and prevent the lawful taking of him, the said Henry.

And Sixth Count. With intent to obstruct the apprehending him for a certain offence, for which he was liable to be apprehended.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

The certificate of the conviction of the prisoner before the Magistrate was read, for having in his possession two bushels of coals belonging to a certain ship on the navigable River Thames.

GEORGE HARRIS sworn. - Q. You are a Constable belonging to the parish of Shadwell? - A. I am.

Q. You are also a Police-Officer ? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. Since this happened; I knew nothing at all of him before.

Q. Was Hewit with you when you apprehended him? - A. Yes, the 22d of November, about ten o'clock at night, I and Hewit were out on our duty.

Q. Had you received directions from the Magistrates to take up persons that might be found with property suspected to be stolen from ships or vessels in the river? - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of your duty did you and Hewit see the prisoner? - A. Yes, near the entrance of Leading-street, Shadwell.

Q. That is close to the river Thames? - A. About 120 yards from the river we saw the prisoner in a boat; he had a bag of coals on his back; I asked him how he came by them.

Q. Did you tell him they were coals? - A. No, we did not know at that time; he said, in the first place, the captain gave them to him; afterwards he said they belonged to different men that had been working on board the ship.

Q. Did he mention any ship? - A. Not in particular.

Q. Did he mention any ship he had been on board of? - A. Not at all; he said the men had given them to him, upon which we took him into custody; then we told him we were Officers of the Shadwell Police-Office.

Q. On what suspicion? - A. On suspicion of the coals being stolen from some ship or vessel in the river Thames.

Q.Where was the prisoner coming from at the time? - A. From the bottom of Shadwell market.

Q. Is that near to the river? - A. About 120 yards from it.

Q. When you told him you were Officers of the Police, what then? - A.He came with us as far as the middle of the market.

Q. Did you tell him why you apprehended him? - A. Yes, on suspicion of the coals being stolen.

Q. Did you tell him from where you suspected they were stolen? - A. Yes, from the river Thames; after we told him we were Police-Officers he came as far as the middle of Shadwell market with us.

Q. Did he come along with you quietly? - A. Yes, as far as the middle of the market; when we first took him into custody he put the coals off his back; we helped them on his back again, and he carried them to the middle of Shadwell market; he then threw the coals from off his back, and said he would carry them no farther; I took the prisoner by the arm to take him to the lock-up house.

Q. Before you took him by the arm to take him to the lock-up house, what was Hewit doing? - A.- A. I desired him to stay behind to take care of the property; the prisoner and I proceeded on to near the top of the market-hill.

Q. Does that market hill lead to the river? - A. No, to the Highway; when we got pretty near the top of the hill the prisoner turned round, caught me by the collar, and said he would go no farther with me; he struggled a good deal, and I threw him; he held me fast by the collar, and dragged me down with him; while I was in that situation, upon him upon the grounds, I felt myself to be wounded in the face, and I bled a great deal.

Q. Did you feel when you found the blood in your face what kind of instrument it was? - A. No, I found I was cut in the face; a person came by at that time, of the name of Morgan, and assisted me.

Q. How assisted you? - A. Helped me to get up, and the prisoner got up and I laid hold of him again; when we got quite to the top of the hill he laid hold of me by the collar again, and struggled with me, and I threw him again; while I was falling he cut me on the leg, and stabbed at my body in several places.

Q. At the time you received this wound in the leg, did you perceive it was with a sharp instrument? - A. Yes, it cut through my stocking very plainly.

Court. Q. Is your present illness the cause of that? - A. Yes, I have been confined ever since; my clothes were cut in various parts of the body; I caught hold of the prisoner, and got him up.

Q. Morgan was with you at this time? - A. Yes, and I proceeded to the lock-up house with him, and delivered him to the jailor and other officers present; I went to the surgeon, Mr. Pater, to get my wounds dressed.

Q. The next day you appeared before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner appeared there? - A. Yes.

Q. And was convicted there? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave this account, and he was detained for this offence? - A. Yes.

Q. He was convicted of not giving a satisfactory account of these coals? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM TELLKAMPFF sworn. - I am clerk to the Magistrates at the Police-Office, Shadwell.

Q. Is that Mr. Read's, the Magistrate's, handwriting? - A. It is; I saw him sign it.

(The conviction read.)

Q.(To Harris.) Upon that occasion, before the Magistrate, did he give any account from whom he received the coals, or where he got them? - A. No, he did not.

Q. He was then committed upon the charge you have now given evidence of? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he make any defence to that charge? - A. None at all.

Q. He understood perfectly well what was going forward? - A. Perfectly well; the Magistrate asked him what he had to say, but he had nothing to say.

Q. From that time to this have you been attended by Mr. Pater, the surgeon? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been able to go about your business? - A. No, perfectly disabled. (The prosecutor's great coat, with a cut in the side and another higher up on the shoulder, his waistcoat, his stockings, and his other coat, were also produced, and appeared to have been cut.)

Court. Q. Of course in this business you were obstructed in carrying him to the Office where you were going to carry him? - A. Yes, I was.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see any knife or weapon with me; I went as quietly with him as any man could? - A. I did not see any knife at the time; not till after I was cut.

Q. Did you not strike me on the top of Shadwell market? - A. I never struck you at all.

Q. Did not another gentleman come up and lay hold of me? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you knock him down? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was not I searched, and no weapon found upon me? - A. He was searched, and nothing of the kind found upon him.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - Q. Did you go out with Harris on the 22d of November? - A. I did; I am a constable of the parish and one of the Police-officers.

Q. You saw the prisoner? - A. Yes, very near the top of Leading-street, Shadwell market; I stopped him, and asked him how he came in possession of those coals on his back; he said a captain belonging to the ship where he had been at work had given them to him; we then told him we thought the captain would not give him so many as that; he then said they belonged to different men, and they had given them all to him, and he had given them some beer for them; we told him we did not think it a satisfactory account, and he must go with us; he said he would go with us.

Q. Had you told him you were officers? - A. We told him before, as we were bringing him along, that he must go with us; we came together to the middle of Shadwell market; the prisoner, Harris, and me; he then threw the coals off his back, and said he would take them no farther; Harris then took hold of him, and desired me to stay by the coals, which I did, and Harris and the prisoner went on together without me; I was to stay there till he came back; I thought he staid a long while, and got a strange man to help me up with them; I took them to the lock-up house.

Q. Did you find the witness Harris there? - A. I did not; we locked the coals up, and produced them before the Magistrate the next day.

Q. When did you see Harris afterwards? - A. I went over to the doctor's, and saw him there.

ROBERT MORGAN sworn. - I am a coal-merchant.

Q. Did you see the witness Harris in Shadwell on the 22d of November? - A. I saw Harris having a scuffle with some man, about ten at night; I saw them fall together, Harris was uppermost; on their getting up again, Harris requested I would assist him; on that I laid hold of the man by the collar; after that he did not make much resistance; I walked a little way with him and then let him go.

Q. Did you not observe any thing the matter with Harris? - A. As he was going to the lock-up room I perceived his cheek bleed.

Q. Do you recollect which cheek it was? - A. The left cheek; I mentioned it to him; I asked him how he came by it; he said he imagined he cut it in the fall by some glass, or something that might be about there; then he observed he had lost his hat, and I said I would go back for it; I found the hat and took it to him in the tap-room where the lock-up room was kept, and gave it to him.

Q. Did you observe that his leg was cut? - A. No, not then; he was advised to go to the doctor's, and I went soon after; they say the wounds are both in the leg and the cheek; they appeared to be cut by a sharp instrument, as I observed at the time.

Q. Did they appear as if they could have been done by glass? - A. No, I said I would go over the way, and shew them where the scuffle was, to see if there was any instrument; I went to the place where the first scuffle was, with some officers.

Q. Was there any thing found in your presence? - A. No, I returned to the surgeon's, and saw him dressed.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not a great many oyster-shells in the place? - A. I did not observe any.

NATHANIEL OLIVER sworn. - I am an Officer belonging to Shadwell Police-office: Harris brought the prisoner to me at the Lock-up-house, and I searched him.

Q. You went to know the situation in which Harris was? - A. Very much cut, the side of his cheek was bleeding very much; I went and searched the prisoner, stripped him naked, but found nothing upon him; after I had done that, I locked him up; then I went with three officers, with flambeaux's, to see if I could find any instrument that he was cut with.

Q. Did you find any thing? - A. Yes; about fourteen yards from where the scuffle was, I found a knife, (produces it); it was dirty on one side when I took it up.

Q. Was it bloody? - A. It did not appear to be bloody, it was thrown into the dirt.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you went to the place to look for the knife? - A. About five minutes after I searched the prisoner; I have had the knife ever since; it was shewn to the prisoner the day he had his hearing, he denied having any knife.

Q. You attended, and was present at his conviction on the Bum-boat Act? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Was the knife found open? - A. No, it was shut.

THOMPSON PATER sworn. - I am a surgeon, in Shadwell.

Q. Did the prosecutor, Harris, apply to you? - A. He did, on Thursday the 22d of November, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; he was bleeding in his left cheek.

Q. He has shewn us the scar? - A. That was in consequence of it.

Q. It appeared to be done by a sharp instrument? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you suppose it might have been done by such a knife as this? - A. It might.

Q. Could it have been done by glass? - A. It would have been more irregular.

Q. Could it have been done by an oyster-shell? - A. I should suppose not; it appeared evidently to be done by something sharp.

Q. Did you see his leg? - A. Yes; it was not so formidable in the appearance as that on the cheek; his cheek is now well, his leg is not well yet; his leg might have healed as soon as his cheek, but the first two or three days he walked about, and that might inflame it.

Q. From the appearance of the leg that night, did it appear to have been inflicted with a sharp instrument? - A. It was a simple division of the skin, without injuring any of the parts beneath.

Q. Could the wound in the leg be inflicted by glass, or an oyster-shell? - A. No; it appeared to be by an instrument.

Q.(To Oliver.) You said you went to the spot, and found a knife? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any oyster-shells, or glass there? - A. There were none.

Prisoner's defence. I never had a knife, nor any weapon in the world, I did not know he was cut, I did not know any thing about it; when he searched me, I told him I had no knife.

GUILTY , Death , aged 29,

Of all the Counts but the first.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-37

37. ELIZABETH SPENCER , alias BLACKWOOD , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , four table-cloths, value 20 s. the property of George Diggles .

GEORGE DIGGLES sworn. - I live in Halfmoon-street, Piccadilly .

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether she was in your service on the 15th of November last? - A. She was.

Q. Did you miss any thing out of your house when she was in your service? - A. A number of articles, particularly the four table-cloths; the four table-cloths are the only articles that I have found.

Q. What are they worth? - A. Twenty-five or twenty-six shillings.

Q. When did you first miss them? - A. Some time in October; I did not suspect the prisoner to have robbed me at that time; she had been in my service about a month or six weeks, then I suspected her, and taxed her with it; and in consequence of a search-warrant, I found them by a woman that was an accomplice with her, who is in Court now, to give evidence; it was on the 16th of November that I found the articles.

Q. You came at the knowledge of these things by the accomplice of her? - A. Yes, she is an acquaintance of her's; I had a search-warrant and searched for the tickets; she then said, she would tell us all the other woman did.

Q. You searched the house of this witness, and found the duplicates there? - A. No; we found several duplicates, but none of my goods were found; she told me she would explain every thing.

LUCY MELL sworn. - Look at the prisoner at bar; do you know her? - A. Yes.

Q. Is she any relation of your's? - A. No.

Q. Did you know her in the month of October last; and November? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In lodgings; I am a married woman, my husband is clerk to an attorney.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to you about the latter end of October with any thing? - A. It was some time in October, I cannot recollect exactly.

Q. What did she bring you? - A. Three tablecloths.

Q. Did she tell you where she got them from? - A. No.

Q. What did she bid you do with them? - A. She asked me to pledge them for her, and I pledged them with the two gentlemen that are in Court; I pledged five in the whole, Mrs. Spencer gave me three, and two I took from the house of Mr. Diggles.

Q. How came you to have access at Mr. Diggles's house? - A. I went to see her two or three times while she was servant there.

Q. You went to see the prisoner; did the prisoner give them to you, or did you take them yourself? - A. She gave them me for the purpose of pledging them.

Q. You told me she only gave you three, but, by your account, you had five? - A. I had five in the whole, they were at different times: she was in the habit of going backwards and forwards to Mr. Diggles, they were acquaintances; and when she was in better circumstances they used to visit each other.

Q. She was not then a servant? - A. She was not; she gave me one when she was his acquaintance, and then she gave me two when I believe Mrs. Spencer was in his service, and two I took from the house myself.

Q. That is, receiving it from her? - A. Yes, and the others she brought to me.

Prisoner. She had them for her own use.

Q.(To Mell.) What did you do with the money? - A. It was to replace the things that she had made away with in her lodging, prior to her going to service to Mr. Diggles.

Prisoner. Here is my landlady will answer, that, when I gave up my lodging, every thing was replaced before I left it.

Jury. Q.(To Mell.) In what line of life was the prisoner in before she went to service? - A. She had been kept by the Hon. Lessian Blackwood.

Q. Did she live with this gentleman in that capacity? - A. Oh, no.

GEORGE JONES sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 28th of September, the last witness pawned two table-cloths, I produce them; I never saw the prisoner at the bar; I have had them in my custody ever since she pledged them, in the name of Collins.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - On the 27th of October, Mrs. Mell pawned two table-cloths; I produce them, they have been in my custody ever since.

Jury. Q. Has that woman been in the habit of pawning goods at your house? - A. Yes, I have known her these two years, she pledged the table-cloths in the name of Jennings. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Mrs. Mell has told us, that this woman was an acquaintance of your's before she came into your service? - A. The way she was acquainted with me, I knew the Hon. Captain Blackwood five years ago, and the prisoner was living with him in the situation you have just heard; I used to see her and Captain Blackwood almost every day; Captain Blackwood is gone to the Isle of Jersey; some time after this I saw her in distress, and I wished to know how her circumstances were; she called upon me at my house; she said, she was in great distress, and she said she wished to get into service if she could.

Q. When she called upon you, did she ever stay much in your company? - A. I treated her with a deal of kindness, and in summer time she came and assisted in the kitchen in pickling and preserving.

Q. What are you? - A. I am in the profession, I am an attorney and solicitor.

Q. When did you take her into your service? - A. About the middle of September.

Q. With regard to Mrs. Mell, do you know much of her? - A. I never saw her but twice before; I was at her house in order to search for the things, I never saw her but once at my house; after I had been robbed, I suspected every person that came into my house, and this Mrs. Mell came; I desired her to walk out, I had to go out to attend to my business; when I returned, I understood she had been there a second time on the same day.

Q. You knew she was not in the habit of visiting any person in your house? - A. No other than the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you know that of your own knowledge? - A. I do not.

Jury. Q. Are you a married man? - A. I am; I have been married some years.

Prisoner's defence. Me and my prosecutor were always in the habit of visiting each other before I went into his house, and when I went I was not as an hired servant, I was as an intimate friend to assist till they were suited.

EMILY THOMPSON sworn. - The prisoner at the bar lodged at my house before she went to Mr. Diggles's, she went from my house to Mr. Diggles's, she rented a ready-furnished room in my house, and when she left it all the furniture was there, there was not any thing missing.

Q. Was there ever a time before she left it that it did appear she had made away with any thing? - A. No, nothing of the kind; I never knew any thing missing; I think she lodged with me from the 18th of June till she went to Mr. Diggles's service.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) When you searched after your goods at Mrs. Mell's, all the duplicates were found in the custody of Mrs. Mell? - A. A number of duplicates were found, but none which led to the property that I lost.

Q. You never got any duplicates of these particular articles? - A. None.

Q. And the only information that you got was from Mrs. Mell - what induced you to indict the prisoner at the bar instead of Mrs. Mell - the whole should have gone against Mrs. Mell? - A. When I went to Mrs. Mell, she told me she would tell me the truth if I would promise not to hurt her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-38

38. JOHN HALEY , ANN HALEY , and SAMUEL COOK , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a piece of linen cloth, value 1 s. seven promissory notes, value 147 l. five promissory notes, value 125 l. twenty promissory notes, value 150 l. three other promissory notes, value 48 l. and a warrant for payment of money, value 30 l. 10 s. the property of Samuel Palmer , John Smith , and William Wilkins , the said notes and the said sum of money, at the time of the felony, being then due and unsatisfied to them .

Second Count. For like offence, only laying

them to be the property of John Willan , John Jooley , and Benjamin Fieldhouse .

Third Count. Like the former, only laying them to be the property of John Vidler .

SAMUEL PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you live at Pountane on the Water, in Gloucestershire? - A. Yes, I am a mercer and draper .

Q. What is the name of your partners? - A. William Wilkins and John Smith .

Q. On Sunday, the 11th of November, did you send up any parcel to London, containing two packages, inclosing a number of different country Banknotes, and to what amount? - A. I did; the amount of the notes together, with one check to Ladbroke, was 500 l. 10 s. of various Banks; they were put up in two internal packages in one; one directed to Palmer, Smith, and Co. Cateaton-street, and the other to Beddome, Fish, and Co. Fenchurch-street; I sent them by my servant, Richard Tomlin , to the Gloucester mail coach; I have the number of the notes with me now.

RICHARD TOMLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you a servant of Messrs. Palmer, Smith, and Wilkins? - A. I am; I took the parcel to the Unicorn, at Moreton; I delivered it to Mr. Hewitt.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you live at Moreton in the Marsh, at Gloucester, at the Unicorn - did you on Sunday receive a parcel from Messrs. Palmer, Smith, and Wilkins, of the last witness? - A. I did.

Q. Did you book it? - A. I did, and I put it under the seat of the Gloucester mail coach on that same Sunday.

JAMES JEFFRIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Are you book-keeper to Messrs. Willan and Co.? - A. Yes, at the Bull and Mouth Inn.

Q. On Monday, the 12th of November, did any parcel come by the Gloucester mail coach directed to Messrs. Palmer, Smith, and Wilkins? - A. No, the parcel was missing.

Q. Have you the way-bill? - A. Yes, there is an entry there of it, and I not finding it, wrote

"not come."

Q. It was not missing in the way-bill when the people came to enquire for it? - A. It was missed in about two hours after the coach arrived, and I not having marked it off, said

"not come;" the mail coach was gone when the enquiry was made.

Q.(To Hewitt.) Is that entry in the way-bill made by you? - A. No, the entry was made by the man that looks over the way-bill; I put the parcel in the coach, and made it safe.

JOHN VIDLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the mail coach maker? - A. Yes; the prisoner Haley has been in my service for many years, he takes the coach after it arrives at the inn, and brings it to the manufactory, and takes another back; my manufactory is at Milbank, Westminster; I let out mail coaches to Messrs. Willan and Co.

Q. Was he the street driver of the Gloucester mail coach on Monday, the 12th of November? - A. I did not see him drive it; it was under his direction, and he told me himself that he did drive it; he was apprehended before I knew of it; I saw him after his examination at Bow-street.

Q. Did you make use of any promise or threats? - A. I told him if he did know any thing about it, it would be better for him to confess the truth.

Mr. Gurney. After that, I have no right to ask you any question.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You say he was street driver, and he had the sole controul of the coach from the inn to Milbank, and nobody else - Mr. Cook had nothing to do with the driving of the coach? - A. Nothing at all.

- BLIGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a warehouseman living at No. 3, Maiden-lane, Wood-street, in the City of London? - Yes.

Q. On Wednesday, the 14th of November, did you see the prisoner Cook? - A. Yes, he came to my house; he said, Sir, I have got a very good customer for you; I said, I was very much obliged to him for introducing a good customer to me; he said, he should expect a little commission for the introduction, which is not unusual in London; I believe he then went out, and in the space of ten minutes he came in again with Mrs. Haley; she said, Sir, I want to look at some goods; I shewed her some printed cotton; she looked out goods to the amount of 60 l. 19 s. 5 d. including the wrapper of the parcel; she said, Sir, I hope you have no objection to take country Bank-notes; I said, no, certainly, if they were payable in London; she then looked out country Bank-notes to the amount of 85 l. upon the house of Robarts and Curtis; Mr. Barber's porter, of Cheapside, whose name is Mee, came in at the time; I said, I will thank you if you would step to the banking-house, and receive this money; he went, and brought the 85 l. in small notes; she said, she had a great many more country Bank-notes, would I be so good as to send somebody to get change for them; I sent Mr. George Robertson ; she gave him 320 l. which was altogether 405 l. I kept the 85 l. in my pocket till Mr. Robertson came back, and Mr. Robertson brought back the money for the rest from the banker's; then I gave Mrs. Haley, the prisoner, all the money, deducting the 65 l. and the fractions for the goods she had purchased.

Q. Do you remember whether Mr. Cook was, or was not, by at the time Mr. Robertson took the notes to get change at the banker's? - A. He was.

Q. Was Mr. Cook by at the time you paid to her the whole 405 l. deducting the 60 l. for the goods? - A. I believe not.

Q. Were the notes that you gave to Mee and Robertson the same notes that she gave you? - A. They were.

Q. Did they then leave your warehouse together? - A. They were together when they left my warehouse; she desired me to get the goods packed up in a parcel, and she would return for them at two o'clock in the day; she came by herself in the evening, and took the goods away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When Cook first came by himself, he said he could recommend you to a good customer? - A. Yes.

Q. The money was paid by Mrs. Haley? - A. It was.

Q. Did it appear to you that Cook had any thing to do with the purchase of the goods, or the production of the notes? - A. Not at all.

Mr. Alley. Q. You never saw Mr. Haley in London? - A. Never.

WILLIAM MEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a porter to Messrs. Barber and Co. in Cheapside? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the house of Mr. Bligh, in Maiden-lane? - A. I was.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners at the bar then? - A. I believe the woman was in when I went there.

Q. Did you see either of the other prisoners there? - A. No.

Q. Were you requested to take 85 l. in country notes, and get them changed? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Where were you to go and change them? - A. To Robarts and Curtis's; I took them there, and got 85 l. in notes, and gave them to Mr. Bligh.

GEORGE ROBERTSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an hosier in the parish of St. Ann, Soho.

Q. On Wednesday, the 14th of November, did you happen to be at Mr. Bligh's, and do you remember going from there with any notes? - A. Yes, but I cannot recollect the day of the month, it was about the middle of November; I recollect the person standing now at the right hand, Cook; I have a very imperfect knowledge of the woman.

Q. Was there a woman there? - A. There was.

Q. Did you receive there at that time any country Bank-notes to take to the banker's? - A. Yes, to a large amount; I received at one banking-house 180 l. and I went to others.

Q. From whom did you receive these country Bank-notes? - A. From Mr. Bligh; I went to Esdailes and Co. Robarts and Co. and Willis and Co. I delivered the country Bank-notes I had from Mr. Bligh to the banking-houses, and the notes I had in change for them I returned to Mr. Bligh.

WILLIAM LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are clerk to Robarts and Co.? - A. Yes.

Q. On Wednesday, the 14th of November, did you pay any particular Bank-notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you brought the book here? - A. No; I have an exact copy of it here.

Mr. Gurney. You should have brought the book here.

JOHN BRAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you brought your book here? - A. I have got the identical note; I am clerk to Marsom and Co. it is a note for 10 l. No. 4013, 24th of November, 1801; I paid the person that brought that note a 10 l. Bank of England note.

Q.(To Palmer.) Q. Is that one of the notes you sent up in the parcel? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk at Esdailes' house? - A. I am; I have brought the notes; I have an Exeter note, No. 2988, 13th of June, 1801, 20 l. a Tedbury note, No. 2780 l. 10 l. 12th of June, 1804; another, No. 153, 27th September, 1802, 10 l. and No. 2692, 14th September, 1801, 10 l.

Q.(To Palmer.) Are these notes in your list? - A. They all are.

Court. You need not go through all these notes.

Q. What Bank of England notes did you give Mr. Smith? - A. A 100 l. a 50 l. and a 30 l. Bank of England notes; I did not pay the last myself, it was paid by an assistant, who is a Quaker; a 100 l. No. 9737, a 50 l. No. 165, and a 30 l. No. 9530, Bank of England notes.

- RANGER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where do you live? - A. In Vine-street, Westminster.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner Haley and his wife? - A. I am; Mrs. Haley came to me on Wednesday morning to go and mind her bar, she keeps a public-house; she said she had a little business to do in the City that day; she then told me she would lend me 20 l. and the next day she lent it me in a country note, and I gave the same note I had from Mrs. Hayley to Mrs. Creymer.

JANE CREYMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What note was it? - A. A Chichester note; I carried it to Sir James Esdaile's, and got it changed of Francis Smith ; I took the number of it, there was a mark, it had been cut asunder, and it was joined with some gum.

Q. Is that the note you received from Mrs. Ranger? - A.(The note shewn her.) Yes.

Court. (To Smith.) Q. Do you recollect whether you paid that note to Mrs. Creymer? - A. I remember her perfectly well.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On Saturday, the 17th of November

did you apprehend Haley and his wife? - A. I did, and on Monday I searched their house in the Horse-ferry-road, Westminster; I found on her person 6 l. 14 s. 6 d. in cash, and one-pound Bank of England notes; in her drawer up stairs I found 10 l. 10 s. 6 d. in cash and notes; I found a waistcoat-piece, and six pocket handkerchiefs, quite new; Haley and his wife were both present. I went to the lodgings of the prisoner Cook, in Church-street, St. John's the Evangelist, Westminster, Mrs. Haley pointed out the apartment to me; Cook was not at home; I searched there, and in a box I found 35 l. 13 s. 6 d. in notes and cash, and a great quantity of Irish linen and sheeting.

Mr. Alley. Q. What you found in Mrs. Haley's house was no more than you could find in any public-house? - A. No.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes, of the parish of St. John the Evangelist; I went to No. 5, Church-street; Cook was not at home when I went first; the second time I took him into custody; he asked me what it was for; I told him it was on suspicion of having 150 l. from Mrs. Haley; I then searched him, and found five shillings; I then took him to Bow-street; he wanted to know who gave the information; I told him that Mrs Haley said he had so much of her money; he said he had not, and if he had, he was too good a judge to keep such things about him.

Q. Did you know what Mr. Cook was? - A. He has been an attorney in the country; I was accompanied by young Mr. Vidler; when I got to Bow-street. I saw the Office was shut up; I then went to take him to the watch-house, and when I was got within a hundred yards of the watch-house, he said, what in the world is all this about, I will tell you it is not about me now, but I have got 150 l. and if I would go with him, he would shew it me, but it was too late to go now, the people were in bed, it would make them very much alarmed, he would go in the morning. On the next morning we went to No. 10, Goswell-street; he went up two pair of stairs; he went first, and I followed him; he said, walk in; he then opened a box with his keys, and took out a paper, and said, here Mr. Goodenough, here are the notes that I told you of, look at them, and see if they are right; there were in the paper two Bank-notes, No. 9559, a 100 l. and No. 1065. a 50 l.

Mr. Alley. Q. Was Mrs. Haley there at the time? - A. She was not.

Goodenough. When I was looking at the number of the notes, I saw Mr. Cook pointing to a box to the woman that was there, as much as to say, take that box; I insisted upon searching that box, he was very unwilling; I searched it, and there was a waistcoat-piece, a brown coat that never was on any one's back, a pair of velveteen breeches, and a pair of new shoes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understood you, that you said Cook had them from Mrs. Haley? - A. Yes.

Q. He shewed you the door of the house where these notes were? - A. Yes, and he said if there was any inquiry about the notes, he meant to deliver them to the right owner.

Q. Was Mrs. Haley present when he said say to you? - A. No.

- TOMKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are one of the partners at Willis and Co's.? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Robertson coming to your house? - A. Yes, I know his person very well.

Q. What Bank-notes did you receive from Mr. Robertson? - A. To the amount of 110 l.

Q. Give me the number of the country Banknotes? - A. No. 9255, a 10 l. Reading Bank-note, No. 9300, 10 l. No. 577, 10 l. No. 9259, 10 l. No. 9771, 10 l. No. 966, 10 l. No. 234, 15 l. No. 2088, 15 l. No. 2879, 15 l. and No. 757, 5 l. making in the whole 110 l.; a 100 l. Bank of England note I paid him, dated 1st November, 1804, No. 9559, and the 10 l. No. 8664.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a partner to Mr. Palmer? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. You are a warehouseman in Cateaton-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Your's was the house to which this parcel was directed? - A. It was.

Q. Did it arrive? - A. It did not, we expected it.

ROBERT- MEYER HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Beddome and Fisher? - A. Yes, I am clerk to Boswell- Brandon Beddome and Hewit Fisher.

Q. Did this parcel of Bank-notes expected, arrive at your house? - A. It did not.

John Haley and Ann Haley left their defence to their Counsel.

Cook's defence. I am perfectly innocent of the crime charged against me; I know nothing of the notes, except from Mrs. Haley, and as to the notes found in my lodging, they were given to me on Saturday morning; the day before she gave me five pounds in notes, and seven shillings, to go to the Excise-office to pay for the license. As I went along, I went to where my trunk was, at No. 10, Goswell-street, I always leave my trunk there; I never have any thing at my lodging barely, but my night-cap; I had locked up the notes in my trunk, because I was going to Wapping; I went to Wapping, and dined, and drank tea there; I returned the next day to the place where my trunk lodged, and I dined and drank tea there; on the

morning following it was a rainy day, it rained from the time I went out till I returned. When I was apprehended, young Mr. Vidler came to my lodging, and told me that Mrs. Haley had left in my house 150 l. to change in small notes; my answer was, whatever was in my possession was safe, and I wished the right owner to have it. Soon after that, Goodenough rifled my pockets, and as to money I had but five shillings and sixpence in silver and halfpence; he then took me to Bow-street, and who should he see but old Mr. Vidler, as he told me, and the office was shut up, and the Magistrate was gone; he then said he must take me to the watch-house, as I must be taken care of for that night, and as to the conversation that I had with him concerning the notes, I said, if you will go with me to-morrow morning where my trunk is, I will go with you, I shall be happy when they are all out of my custody; I desired him, as we were going along, not to drive up to the house, but to stop an hundred yards from the spot; we stopped at the end of Long-lane, and we went to the lodging where my trunk has been for two or three years; as soon as we got into the room, I unlocked the trunk, and produced the notes; the clothes that were in that room have been in my possession for two or three years, and the reason I did not wear them was, I had not proper apparel to wear with them; I opened the trunk as soon as I got into the room, and said, there they are, and I am very happy they are out of my possession; this was at the woman's lodgings that has washed my linen for these two or three years; she is as good a woman as ever breathed in the world; there was nothing but a trunk that contained a few books, and some private memorandums; he insisted, after finding nothing in my first trunk, on searching the other; I opened the other trunk, and he searched every paper, he shook every book, and he found nothing more in it, as God knows, but the 150 l. delivered to me by Mrs. Haley; that is the truth. I have no acquaintance in London to speak for me, I have kept no company in London these four years; very fortunately for me, a gentleman has come forward to give me a character; he has always acted by me, and every person, as a man of honour.

Haley called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Cook called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

John Haley , GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Samuel Cook , GUILTY , aged 67.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Ann Haley , NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-39

39. ELIZABETH WHARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , three shillings , the property of James Barker .

JAMES BARKER sworn. - I live at No. 108, Drury-lane , I am a fishmonger ; the prisoner at the bar lived with me, and passed as house-keeper , for ten months; during part of the time she lived with me, she slept in the same room where I did, and had a bed to herself, on account of my being ill; I missed money in that ten months to the amount of an hundred pounds; I was sure the prisoner must take it: On the 30th of October I marked the money, I put it in my small clothes pocket, in a purse; I went to bed about nine or ten o'clock, I am sure it was in my pocket then, and about seven o'clock the next morning I got up, and found the money gone; there were five shillings gone, two that were not marked, and three that were marked.

Q. Did she sleep in your room that night? - A. She did.

Q. Perceiving that you had lost five shillings in the morning, did you tax her with it? - A. No; the officer was ready within three doors of my house to take her, provided she robbed me that night; I went to him immediately I got up; he came and searched her, and found the marked money there, which he produced at Bow-street, and there I saw them; I am sure they are the shillings I had marked the day before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long has there been two beds in the room? - A. I suppose about two months, I was very ill.

Q. She was not fit for a bed-fellow - did she not sleep with you? - A. I have had no bed-fellow except my wife, who is dead and gone.

Q. You prosecute for the sake of public justice - I dare say you would be the last person to make offers to the prisoner's friends? - A. They have made me offers, but I have not made them any.

Q. That is the reason you have come here, because they have given you none - do you know the Bull Inn, in Holborn, did not you go there? - A. I do not deny but I have been there; here is a person in Court that offered me fifty pounds, that I now positively swear to, but I told him I would not do so, that I had discharged a man in consequence of her robbing me, and therefore she should take the consequence.

Q. Therefore if any body should say that you went to the Bull Inn to solicit her friends to compound this, it is not true? - A. I never did.

Q. What did you go for? - A. I went to the person that keeps the Bull Inn, by the desire of the prisoner, to let her brother know what situation she was in at this time, she would thank him to come to town.

Court. Q. Whenever you met them, you met them at the Bull Inn? - A. I never saw Mr. Cannon, her brother, but twice in my life; the first

time I went to the Bull Inn was by desire of the prisoner

Q. Where did you see the prisoner for her to express that desire? - A. I was in the yard, and the sister came to me and said she expected her brother was coming up, and immediately he came up to tell him to come down that evening; I told her I would do her that favour; I would call at the Bull Inn; I was going past.

Mr. Gurney. Q. That very sister could have done that herself? - A. Her sister was here in the yard and asked me.

Q. And would not go to the Bull Inn; why did not you tell her to go herself? - A. When I came out she was gone.

Court. Q. What message did you deliver to the brother? - A. I told the brother that I saw the sister of the prisoner, and she wished to speak to him, if he would oblige her; that was all that passed between us then.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am one of the patrols of Bow-street; I went to Mr. Baker's house, by his desire; I went in and searched the prisoner; I told her I was to search her, she had robbed her master; she said she had got no property of his.

Q. What did you find when you searched her? - A. Two shillings and sixpence; the two shillings are marked; in about an hour afterwards she was searched by a woman; I searched her as far a man ought.

Q. Were you present when the woman searched her? - A. No; the woman took something from her breast, and put it in her pocket afterwards; I took three shillings from the prisoner's pocket, and two shillings I took up from the floor, while the prisoner was putting her clothes on; she said the money was her own; I took her to Bow-street, and she was committed; I produce the three shillings that the woman said were found at her breast.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Look at these three shillings? - A.(Looking at them.) They were in my possession when I went to bed that night; I did not put the mark on them; I had noticed the mark that was on them; I had picked out marked shillings and took a copy of the marks.

Mr. Gurney. You should have said that before.

Court. Q. Let me look at the paper; you say you wrote the marks down before you went to bed? - A. I did; the last three shillings are the last marked on the paper.

Mr. Gurney. Q. This was Monday night that you put the marked shillings in your purse? - A. Yes.

Q. It was Tuesday morning when you recovered them? - A. Yes.

Q. There was a good deal more silver in your purse? - A. Yes, about 2 l.

Q. This paper you wrote on Monday night? - A. Yes.

Q. That is as true as all the rest you have sworn to day? - A. That is the copy that I took off on Monday night.

Q. Is that an exact copy of what you wrote on Monday night? - A. It is the exact copy.

Q. Then on Monday night how could you anticipate these three shillings? - A. On Monday night I had put down twenty shillings; that is a copy of the shillings that I missed.

Court. Q. That is the copy of the marks that are on the three shillings that were missing.

Mr. Gurney. That could not be the copy wrote on Monday night, for here are two plain shillings, one is marked with an M or W, which way you turn it.

Q. Have you got the paper which you wrote on Monday night? - A. I have not.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

JOHN FURNEHOUGH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you keep the Bull Inn, Holborn? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Barker first coming to your house on the 30th of October last? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he speak to you when he came? - A. He asked me if I knew Mr. Cannon, of Long Crandom, in Oxfordshire; I told him I did; he then asked me if he was not a large farmer, and a man of considerable property; I told him I knew him to be a man of considerable property, and a great farmer; he said he had a sister of Mr. Cannon's living with him; she had been taking some money out of the till; did I think that if I wrote to him he would come to town and settle the matter without prosecuting her; I told him I would write down to him, and I did not doubt but Mr. Cannon would come, but I could not answer whether he would make it up.

Q. How often has Mr. Prosecutor been at your house? - A. He has been there not less than ten times; on Wednesday, the 14th of November, and Friday, the 16th, he came to meet the coach, and asked if Mr. Cannon was not come; I told him, Mr. Cannon had not been in town; he appeared very much disappointed; I asked him if he had done any thing when he had been in town; he said no, they would not give him money enough.

Court. Q. Did he say how much he wanted? - A. He said he had asked 200 l. in all; he said that his recognizance must be forfeited, and the officer must have 40 l. I told him I thought it was a good deal of money for my own part; Mr. Cannon might do as he pleased.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did he demand 200 l. or say he had lost 200 l? - A. He said he had lost a great deal of money at various times, and he did not know but she might have had it; he came on Friday, the 16th; we had two pints of wine together; I took the liberty of asking him closely about it; he came

of his own accord; I never sent for him, nor did any body else; Mr. Cannon was not in town; he came to enquire for Mr. Cannon; then he told me he had lost a great deal of money; his affairs were in a deranged state; he had been ill, and had been robbed, and if he could get a couple of hundreds it would stop a gap or two; this was his expression - he had some heavy bills to make up; I then quarrelled with him.

Q. How soon after the 16th did he come again? - A. I cannot speak positively, perhaps in the course of a week he has been repeatedly; on Sunday, the 18th, I gathered from his own conversation that there had been an intimacy between him and the prisoner; I said, I understand you have been free with your maid, and if a man makes free with his maid, he must expect they will make free with him; he then said, if I have, that is no reason I should be robbed.

Court. Q. Therefore, from that expression of his, you made the conclusion, that there had been an intimacy - there might or there might not? - A. I told him he had been the means of bringing the woman to seduction; from that time I would not speak to him; I desired him to walk out of the house; he after that came to my house, last Saturday night; he came in a quarter of an hour after Mr. Cannon did, and offered to make it up for 100 l. Mr. Cannon said he would not give him a shilling; there are other witnesses will corroborate that Mr. Cannon told me, that the prosecutor had followed him from the New Inn, in the Old Bailey, to our house.

Q. How long have you been intimate with Mr. Cannon? - A. Two years.

Q. Did Mr. Barker admit of any intimacy between the woman and him? - A. When I said, if a man makes free with his maid, he must expect she will make free with him; he said, well, if I have, that is no reason that I should be robbed; that is all that was expressed; I saw her after wards.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever hear her say any thing in the presence of Barker, if it was in his presence you may tell us? - A. No.

JOHN FOWLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You keep a public-house at Thame, in Oxfordshire? - A. Yes, I am acquainted with Mr. Cannon; I have been up to town with Mr. Cannon two or three times upon this occasion; we came merely to settle it, and at each time I saw Mr. Barker; I received a letter from Mr. Furnehough, and I think twice out of the three times I saw Mr. Barker at Mr. Furnehough's; the first time I think was on Friday, the 23d of November; Mr. Barker brought a publican that lives in Drury-lane to the Bull Inn, Holborn; I and Mr. Cannon, Mr. Barker, and that gentleman, were all four in a room; Mr. Barker proposed that I should be arbitrator for Mr. Cannon and his friend for him.

Q. Was the accomodation proposed by Barker or by Cannon? - A. Barker said to Mr. Cannon, let us leave the room, and let these men settle it.

Court. Q. Who first talked about settling it? - A. Barker.

Q. Did Mr. Barker ever mention any specific sum of money? - A. No.

Q. Did they leave the room? - A. No, Mr. Cannon offered 80 l. I said, it is of no use for you to leave the room; I will not agree to any such money, and Barker said he would not take any such money; we all four left the room, and went into another; I went out a little while; they said, when I came back, that Barker offered to make it up for 200 l.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did Barker ever say any thing to you respecting his circumstances? - A. Yes, when we went to his house, he told me that he had been ill, and that he had been robbed; he was afraid that he must call his creditors together, and he could not say whether he could pay 5 s. 10 s. or 15 s. in the pound.

Q. Has he ever said any thing to you at any other time? - A. He always seemed to be very anxious to get it settled.

Court. Q. Did not the first proposal come from the woman's brother; give me a true answer? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did not you and her brother go on purpose to make some offer to stop the prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the first sum that the brother offered? - A. Eighty pounds, and Barker said he would not take any such money.

CHARLES DODWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you? - A. I am a farmer; I live in Long Crandom, in Buckinghamshire.

Q. That is where Mr. Cannon lives? - A. Yes, it is on the borders of Oxfordshire.

Q. Did you come up with Mr. Cannon, in consequence of Mr. Furnehough's letter? - A. Yes, I went with Mr. Cannon and Mr. Fowler to Mr. Barker's house; we came to settle this business of his sister's; when we first went in, Barker knew Cannon; he said; Mr. Cannon, come in, and sit down gentlemen; we did so; then he began relating this circumstance that happened; he said his housekeeper had robbed him of five shillings that were marked, and they were found on her, and she was committed to prison; then he said he really believed he had been robbed of 200 l. and he was so reduced in circumstances, that he thought he must call his creditors together to take all he had; then he began to talk of his servant's character, and an excellent one he gave her as ever I heard; that he had trusted her with the keys of his bureau, that they both slept in one room, and that if he prosecuted

her he should never be happy; he pointed out there might be ways to settle it, but he must not be seen in it.

Q. Was that before Mr. Cannon had made any offer? - A. He made no offer of any thing, I was in the room at the time, I do not know that Mr. Cannon spoke, he sat crying; I asked him what way or how this could be settled; he said there was a way, but it must be kept a secret; then he asked me where we put up, I told him at the Bull Inn, in Holborn; he wished us to stop a few minutes, and he would go and speak to his attorney, he did not live far from there, he would be back in ten minutes; he went out, and came back much about the time he said he should be gone; he said his attorney did not chuse to come to the Bull Inn, in Holborn, for there were many catch-pole fellows there that catched at people's words, and his attorney was at a public-house near that place, and if we would go, he would go and shew us where he was; we went to that public-house, I do not know the sign, it was not far from his house, Barker went with us; when we got into the room, the attorney, if he was an attorney, said, Barker, you must leave the room; he left the room, and came in again; and after he came in again, nothing passed there, excepting having a glass of brandy and water, and we came away; this was on the 22d or 23d of November; when we came out of the public-house, Barker said, I will go part of the way with you, I will shew you the Bull Inn; he went all the way, we did not want him; when we got to the Bull Inn we ordered a supper, and one of us, I believe, asked him to supper; he said he would go home, and then return; he came to supper, I did not see any body with him till after supper; after supper, they all went out of the room, and where they were gone to I could not tell; after a time, I went to see where they were, I found they were in another room; I was going into the room, and Barker said, I must beg you to stop out.

Q. Who were there? - A. Barker, Fowler, and Cannon, and another person, a stranger to me; Cannon said, I will leave it to you and Barker to settle it; Barker and I went out into the yard, he made proposals that if I would give two hundred pounds he would never appear against her; and when the Sessions came on, he would come down there and stop till the Sessions were over; I told him I would not agree to such sort of terms at all, and I did not offer him a farthing.

Q. How often have you seen him since? - A. He has been with Mr. Cannon every day since; I have seen him every day, and I have heard him talk to Mr. Cannon about settling it.

Q. How often have you seen him come to the Bull? - A. About twice; he came on Saturday night. Mr. Cannon was there, I was with him a little while; I was sometimes in the room with them, and sometimes out; then I heard Mr. Barker say, I will not hurt your sister, but then I did not hear the sum; Mr. Cannon said, I will not give you one farthing, she shall come and take her chance at the trial.

Q. Pray Mr. Dodwell, have not you known Mrs. Wharton? - A. I have not known much of her of late years, she was bred and born in our place.

Q. At the time you knew her, what sort of a character had she? - A. An extraordinary character.

Court. Q. You came to town for the very purpose of settling it with Mr. Cannon? - A. No; he asked me to come with him.

Q. Did he not tell you he was come to settle the prosecution? - A. We said nothing about settling till Mr. Barker did.

Q. You knew what you went to Mr. Barker's for? - A. We went to ask Mr. Barker merely what had happened.

Q. You had no idea you were going to settle it? - A. Not the least in the world.

Q. Fowler had been with you, had not he? - A. He went with us.

Q. Did you hear his evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to persist that you had not any idea about settling it? - A. I did not apprehend any idea of settling it.

Q. You had come up with Fowler and with Cannon? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Barker.) Did you call on Furnehough, and give him directions to write to Cannon, to come up and settle this prosecution? - A. I went by the desire of the prisoner at the bar, she desired me to go to Mr. Furnehough, that he would let her brother know what situation she was in, and get him to come up.

Q. Did the first proposal come from you, or from the prisoner's relations? - A. I never made any offer at all, they made it first; they never had a letter from me on the business.

Q. You swear positively, that you never made any proposal to them? - A. Never; Mr. Furnehough and this gentleman, as a witness, has sworn that I followed them home; Mr. Cannon and Mr. Fowler was here till near nine o'clock, till after the three prisoners were tried for the five hundred pounds; Mr. Cannon was here, and gave the old gentleman a character; I went to the Bunch of Grapes, I asked a lame man that was in the taproom to put my beer to warm; I was here till nine o'clock, and my servant will prove that I was at home by half after nine.

Q.(To Furnehough.) What time did the prosecutor come to your house? - A. I left the Court at the time Mr. Cook was being tried; I went home before the rest of the parties.

Q. What time did you see them at your house? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. What time did the prosecutor come to your house? - A. I cannot exactly say, it was after I returned home from here.

Court. It must be near nine.

Prosecutor. I was here till nine; here is my own servant will prove that I was at home at half past nine.

Furnehough. You were at my house after that.

Fowler. I saw him on Saturday night at the Bull.

Prosecutor. I was not there.

Furnehough. I saw you in the yard.

Fowler. I saw him in the room.

Mr. Gurney. (To Fowler.) What time did you get to the Bull? - A. I should think it was nine o'clock.

Q. Did the prosecutor go with you? - A. No.

Q. How long after you had been at the Bull, was it before you saw the prosecutor? - A. Not ten minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-40

40. ELIZABETH WHARTON was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , two shillings , the property of James Barker .

JAMES BARKER sworn. - The two shillings were both marked, I lost them on Sunday night, or Monday morning, I saw them about seven or eight o'clock; I took the money out of my pocket, and set down the marks upon them; I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock, I had put them in a purse in my breeches-pocket; when I got up, I searched my purse, I found three shillings were gone, there were only two shillings found upon her, and a sixpence, when she was searched, this was on the 29th.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you ever ask two hundred pounds to make this up? - A. I never did make any demand.

Q. Did you or did you not, desire Mr. Furnehough to write to Mr. Cannon to come up and settle this business? - A. I delivered the message to him as the prisoner at the bar desired me; to tell him the situation of the prisoner, and to desire him to come up.

Q. Did you or did you not, enquire of Mr. Furnehough whether her brother was a man of great property? - A. I enquired of him whether he was or was not.

Q. And whether you said to him, that your circumstances were embarrassed, and that two hundred pounds, or any considerable sum, would be of great use to you? - A. I said, I had lost money to the amount of two hundred pounds, and which way I should recover myself I did not know, and I hoped I should make friends; I never demanded two hundred pounds of any one, nor a single halfpenny.

Q. Did you or did you not, go to the New Inn, or the Bull, on Saturday night? - A. I did not.

Jury. Q. You deny being at the Bull and at the New Inn on Saturday? - A. I was at the Bunch of Grapes, and drank a pint of beer, and I heard the clock strike nine; I was not near the New-Inn, nor the Bull.

Q. As your housekeeper had the keys of your bureau, she might have been in the habit of going there, or to your breeches, to get money to buy something in for the house? - A. She never had the keys of my bureau but when I was ill, she had them once.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am an officer: I went by the desire of the prosecutor and searched the prisoner, I found on her two shillings and sixpence, I produce the money and the purse.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You found this money in her pocket? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Prosecutor.) Q. Look at this money? - A. They are my property, I put them in my purse; and on the same paper I put them down. I produced the original at Bow-street.

Mr. Gurney. That is not here, that I should like to have seen; I don't like your copies.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

Mr. Gurney. (To Furnehough.) Q. Did the prosecutor desire you to write a letter to the prisoner's brother? - A. He did; he asked me first whether I thought Mr. Cannon would come forward and settle the business; and he asked me whether he was a man of property.

Q. Then I ask you, whether it was at his desire that you wrote to Mr. Cannon to come up? - A. It was; I told him that Mr. Barker had been with me; I represented the case, that Mr. Barker said he would settle it without bringing it into Court.

Q. Had Mr. Barker said so to you? - A. Yes; I told Mr. Barker I wondered he had not called on me before she was committed.

Q. How many times, altogether, has he been at your house? - A. Ten times.

Q. Have you at any time heard him say how much he asked? - A. Two hundred pounds.

Q. Was he at your house last Saturday night? - A. Yes; and, upon my oath, I saw him on Saturday at the New Inn, in the coffee-room, I was with him at least an hour there.

Q. Do you know the New Inn from the Bunch of Grapes? - A. Yes; the coffee-room is down the yard.

Q.(To Fowler.) Did you see Mr. Barker at the New Inn on Saturday? - A. I do not know that I did; I saw him at the Bull in the evening.

Q.(To Dodwell.) Did you see Mr. Barker at the New Inn on Saturday? - A. I did.

Q. Were you in company with Mr. Furnehough and Mr. Cannon? - A. Yes; and I saw Barker at the Bull in the evening.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-41

41. THOMAS alias WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Rhodes , about the hour of twelve at night on the 5th of November , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a petticoat, value 4 s. three children's petticoats, value 3 s. three pair of pockets, value 1 s. 6 d. four children's night-caps, value 1 s. ten children's shirts, value 10 s. two half handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. a child's flannel shirt, value 6 d. two children's frocks, value 6 s. two square handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three children's tippets, value 3 s. six children's trowsers, value 16 s. four children's handkerchiefs, value 5 s. and twenty-two pin-cloths, value 16 s. the property of Thomas Rhodes ; five habit shirts, value 2 s. 6 d. six muslin half handkerchiefs, value 9 s. and six night caps, value 3 s. the property of Elizabeth Beliar ; a night cap, value 4 d. the property of Elizabeth Hughes ; and a pair of pockets, value 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Woltman .

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Rhodes, he is a cow-keeper in the Hampstead-road, St. Pancras ; I live at the next door to Mr. Rhodes; the prisoner at the bar came to our house to plant some celery and other plants in the garden; he worked part of two days, Mr. Rhodes paid him himself: On the 6th of November, one of the men picked up a quantity of wet linen, and brought it to me in the accompting-house, he picked it up in the adjoining field; I examined it, and found Mr. Rhodes's mark on it; it led me to suspect the laundry had been broke open; I rung the bell, and the servants came down, and I went through into the laundry, and found the door had been broke open, and the baskets were all standing empty; we called Mr. Taylor, the officer, and he examined the premises.

Q. How had it been broke open? - A. By a chisel, or a crow.

Q. Where is the laundry - does it adjoin the house? - A.(The witness produced a paper drawing, delineating the situation of the premises.) There is a way to go into the laundry from the wash-house, and the kitchen joins the wash-house; it all belongs to the house, and is joined by a wall, and the garden is walled in of two sides, and the other two by a paling; it was the door of the laundry that comes into the garden that was broke open.

ELIZABETH BELIAR sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Rhodes.

Q. Who was last up that night? - A. Rebecca Hughes and Ann Riley .

Q. Are they here? - A. No, I saw the lock broke in the morning; I only come to claim the things that belong to my master.

ANN M'DONALD sworn. - I keep a shop, No. 50 East-street, Mary-le-Bone; the prisoner at the bar brought me the things to sell on the 9th of November; I deal in clothes, and in the brokery line.

Q. Do you deal in old iron? - A. Yes; he said they were given to him for his wife and children, and he could not afford to keep them, he was in want of money.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes, since June, as a gardener.

Q. He has dealt at your shop - you have bought things of him before? - A. No, I have been at his garden, and bought vegetables; I have seen them cut out of his garden at Lisson-grove, near Mr. Rhodes's; he brought these things to me, I bought the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Are they all here? - A. I fancy so; Mr. Taylor and Mr. Crocker has them; part I sold to a Jew; I put them in the window as soon as I bought them, and sold them directly, and the Jew sold them to a man who is now in Court.

Q. What did you give him for all you bought of him? - A. Twenty-four shillings for one parcel, and eighteen shillings for the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You had the misfortune to be taken up on this occasion? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you married? - A. I am a widow.

Q. You forgot that before the Justice? - A. I did say I was a married woman, I have been married.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer, I produce all the property; I found some of the property in this woman's house.

Q.(To M'Donald) These things that were found in your house were the things that you bought of the prisoner? - A. Yes, excepting one handkerchief, which is my own.

Crocker. After we had searched the woman, she said who she had bought them of; we took her to Bow-street, and then went in pursuit of the prisoner, and searched his house; there we found some things in his own house, and here are some things this woman sold to a Jew.

EDWARD HAYCOCK sworn. - I bought these things of Solomon; I received an advertisement of a robbery, I produced these things; I went to Mr. Rhodes, and told him the next day; I told the Jew the property was claimed by Mr. Rhodes, and he must find me the person whom he had bought them of; he took me immediately to this house, and I gave information to Mr. Rhodes.

(The property produced, and identified by Elizabeth Beliar.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 44,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-42

42. JAMES JONES and WILLIAM HANKEY were indicted, the first, for that he, on the 27th of October , upon Jeremiah Regan , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did then and there strike, cut, and wound him, in and upon his right ear, left hand, and right shoulder, with intent in so doing feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully, with malice aforethought, to kill and murder; and the latter, for that he feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully, did counsel, aid, and abet, the said James Jones , in manner aforesaid, and at the time the said felony was committed, knew and was privy to the same .

Second Court. For like offence, with intent to disable him.

Third Court. For like offence, with intention to do him some bodily harm.

JEREMIAH REGAN sworn. - I am a plasterer ; I live in Crown-street, St. Giles's: On the 27th of October, at half past eleven o'clock, I was coming from pay-table, the Gowers Arms, the corner of Store-street; I was coming down High-street, St. Giles's , Hankey and Jones were standing on the pavement; I passed Hankey, and was going to pass Jones; Jones gave me a shove, I asked him what he did that for.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes, I have seen him very often; when I asked him what he did that for, he immediately squared up to me; I pushed him down on his hands and knees.

Q. Did you square to him? - A. No, I pushed him; he jumped up, and he called out, Bill Hankey , give me a knife; he cut my right ear right down.

Q. Is there a scar? - A. Yes, (shewing it;) he cut me across the left hand on my fore-finger, and across my right shoulder; I kept running back, and they followed me up till I made my escape away from them.

Q. Had you drank with them before? - A. No.

Q. Have you been in their company before? - A. No.

Q. Nor in the same public-house? - A. Yes, I have been in the same house.

Q. How many times? - A. Not above twice in my life.

Q. Had you ever been at any variance with them? - A. Never.

Q. When he pushed you, was it merely pushing you off the pavement? - A. No, he pushed me against the shop window.

Q. You turned round, and put yourself in a posture to strike? - A. No, Sir, I did not; he began to square up, and I gave him a push with my hands; then he got up, and called for a knife.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Whether you had known the prisoners or no before you met them this evening - were you not in the habit of going to a hop that there was at the Horseshoe, in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's - did not you and your wife, as you call her, go there? - A. No.

Q. Have you not been there at the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see Jones there? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see Hankey there? - A. Yes, on the Saturday night following.

Q. Had you not been quarrelling about your girl? - A. No.

Q. Did you accost him, or he you? - A. He did not say any thing to me, he pushed me; it was dark.

Q. Then he might have pushed you by accident, might not he - before he struck you, you knocked him down? - A. Yes, and after that he called for the knife.

Q. Why did you go away and give no charge, the watch was set? - A. I was glad to make my escape.

Q. Why did not you run away while he was getting the knife? - A. We were not above two yards distance from each other.

Q. Were you drunk? - A. No.

Q. Was he drunk? - A. I do not know.

Q. Have not you drank together since? - A. I was in a public-house where he was, but I did not drink with him; I was in the next box to him, I asked him what he cut me for.

Q. Did not you shake hands together, and make it up? - A. No.

Q. Hankey did nothing at all with you? - A. No.

THOMAS LANE sworn. - I am a brewer's servant; I was in a public-house, the sign of the Horseshoe, St. Giles's, there was a noise in the street, I went out, and I saw Hankey with this crow, (produces it;) he said he would knock any body's bl - y brains out, if they touched him; I went up to him, and took the crow from him; soon after, Sayer and another took him into custody.

JOHN SAYER sworn. - I took Jones in Baker-street.

Jones's defence. May it please you, my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, as I was coming from my work, and coming through Bainbridge-street, I stopped at the Horseshoe, to get some refreshment, on the Saturday night mentioned; I went in, and there were two young women there that asked me to drink, and this young man came in, and gave me a nod, and sat on the same bench as I did; I drank the liquor, and came out, and one of the young women took hold of my arm, and turning out from there into High-street, three men came and hussled me, and this Jeremiah Regan came up and struck me; there were some blows ensued on both sides, and that young man was taken to the watch-house, and the young man that took him to the watch-house beat me severely with a stick, I kept my bed for several days; after that I met

Jeremiah Regan , he told me that I had ill used him, and he wanted a recompence; I told him, I thought I was ill used, I did not think there was any occasion for it; I asked him to go and have something to drink; we went into a public-house at Westminster, and I drank with him for two hours; he came with me to my room, and drank tea with me; I said, Jerry, is there any animosity between you and me now; he said no; he went away, and I wished him good night.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Is any part of this true? - A. It is not true.

Hankey left his defence to his Counsel.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18041205-43

43. WILLIAM LEWINGTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Oriel , about the hour of two at night, on the 13th of July , and burglariously stealing therein a French clock, value 10 l. the property of Thomas Oriel ; seven gold seals, value 3 l. a gold watch, value 5 l. a silver watch-chain, value 10 s and two boxes, value 5 s. the goods of William Kelly .

It appearing from the evidence of James Hancock , an officer of Hatton-garden, that, on the 23d of November, he went to the house of the prisoner with a search-warrant, to search for property stolen from the Rev Mr. Abraham Reeves ; on searching, he discovered in a cupboard that went under the stairs a box, containing a French eight-day clock, and two small boxes, which were identified by the prosecutor and Mrs. Kelly; but the prisoner calling three witnesses who proved an alibi, that he was fourteen miles from London at an auction, at a place called Tatten Marsh, beyond Costen, on Friday the 13th, and Saturday the 14th of July, the Court were of opinion he was not the man that stole it, but the receiver only.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-44

44. JAMES-ROBERT GILLING , alias JAMES GILLAN , was indicted for that he, on the 4th of July, in the 31st year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, did take to wife one Ann Smith , and to her was married; and that he afterwards, on the 3d of November, in the 41st year aforesaid , at the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , did take to wife one Olive Adams , his former wife being then living .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

JANE THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ann Smith? - A. I do; the prisoner and her were married in the year 1791, at St. Ann's, Westminster.

Q. What time of the year? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Have you seen Ann Smith lately? - A. Yes, I saw her a minute or two ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Had you known him before you saw him married? - A. A very short time.

Q. Are you sure that he is the person? - A. Yes.

OLIVE ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you married to the prisoner? - A. Yes, at St. Martin's in the Fields, three years ago last Friday week.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-45

45. SARAH CARMICHAEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a silver table-spoon, value 10 s. and a silver teaspoon, value 2 s. the property of Richard-Jeremiah Hart .

RICHARD- JEREMIAH HART , sen. sworn. - I am a victualler , I keep the White Hart, in Abchurch-lane ; the prisoner lived with me as cook : On Friday, the 14th of September, the spoons laid in the indictment were lost; I desired a general search throughout the house; the prisoner at the bar being more assiduous in searching for these spoons than any other servant in the house, still my suspicions arose that she took them; she asked to go out in the afternoon to fetch her cloak, which she did; I desired my son to follow her, and in an hour after he returned with her; she said she hoped I would not punish her; I told her I certainly should for what she said in the morning; in the morning she had wished a number of bad things upon those who took them away; I sent for Sapwell, and gave charge of her.

RICHARD- JEREMIAH HART , jun. sworn. - On Friday, the 14th of September, I followed her; she went to a pawnbroker's shop in Field-lane, I saw her go in; I went upon the step to see what she was doing; I saw her pull some spoons from her pocket, and lay them on the counter; I saw her take the spoons up again, and put them in her pocket; seeing she was coming out of the shop, I withdrew, and I followed her to Middle-row, Holborn; the prisoner looked into the window some time, and then went into the shop; I saw her take the spoons from her pocket, and lay them on the counter as before; I saw she was about to take them up again; I then went into the shop, and asked her whose spoons they were she had got there, she replied, your's, meaning my father's; I then desired the person in the shop to send for an officer; he seemed very unwilling to do it; he went out; he said he could not get one; she, upon

that, said, if I would let her go with me, she would not attempt to run away; she walked home with me, and when I got there, I told my father I had got the person that took the spoons; he desired me to go for the constable.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable; I produce the spoons.

Mr. Hart. I am perfectly sure they are mine.

Prisoner's defence. I only beg for mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 34.

The Jury and the prosecutor recommended her to mercy, on account of her having been three months in the Compter, and being far advanced in pregnancy, believing that distress drove her to it.

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-46

46. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for that he, on the 26th of November , fraudulently, unlawfully, and designedly, produced to William Batten , a servant of John Gardner , a certain false order and writing on paper, as and for a true order and writing on paper for a lump of fresh butter, value 2 s. 6 d. two pounds weight of salt butter, value 2 s. 4 d. and six pounds weight of cheese, value 5 s. with an intent to defraud John Gardner .

JOHN GARDNER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Leadenhall-market .

Q. Do you know Mr. Woodhouse? - A. Yes, he is a stock-broker, he keeps an account at our house.

Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction yourself? - A. No; my servant told me that there was a man came and served him so many times; I told him, if he did so again, to stop him.

WILLIAM BATTEN sworn. - Q. You are a servant to Mr. Gardner? - A. Yes; the prisoner came to our house on the 26th of November, about two o'clock; he brought a plate, and left a note in the plate; he said he was going down the market, he would call as he came back again; a young man took the note to Mrs. Woodhouse to ask her if it was her hand-writing; she said it was not. He came again in about ten minutes afterwards, and I asked him what he wanted; he said, the things that were in the note; when the young man came back from Mrs. Woodhouse, we stopped him, and asked him where he came from; he said, Token-house-yard, from Mrs. Woodhouse; the young man told him that note did not come from Mrs. Woodhouse, he had just been, and she denied the writing it; we then sent for an officer; it is not the first time.

Q. Is that the note? - A. Yes. (The note read in Court.)

" Richard Gardner , please to send by the bearer a lump of fresh butter, and two pounds of salt, and six pounds of cheese, the best, for M. R. Woodhouse."

ANN WOODHOUSE sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 23, Token-house-yard.

Q. Did you send any body on Monday, the 26th of November, to this house? - A. No.

Q. Look at the note? - A.(Looks at it.) It is not my hand-writing.

Q. Is it written by any body belonging to your house? - A. It is not.

Q. Did you send for any goods that day? - A. I did not; he married an old servant of our's, about six weeks ago, and I then supposed him to be an honest man.

Q. You never sent him for any thing from your house? - A. No.

Prisoner. Her mother sent me once.

Q. Did she send on the 26th of November last? - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-47

47. MARY KEMPLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , two shirts, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Nathan Jeffrey .

NATHAN JEFFREY sworn. - I live at No. 10, Tottenham-place, Tottenham-court road ; I am a tailor : On the 18th of October I went out to work at six o'clock in the morning; I was fetched by my daughter about three o'clock in the afternoon; she made me acquainted with the loss of the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. How lately had you seen them before? - A. On the night of the 17th.

Q. What part of the house were they in? - A. In the attic story.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes, she is a first cousin of mine; I took her on the 30th, at Wandsworth; I found two shirts, two pair of stockings, and a pair of Nankin trowsers, at Mrs. Bariel's, a rag-shop in Grafton-street; they were things that my wife had to wash.

CAROLINE BARIEL sworn. - I live in Grafton-street; the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 18th of October, between eleven and twelve; she brought me this pair of pantaloons, two shirts, and two pair of stockings; she told me she had a bad husband, who had left her, and she had two or three children in the workhouse.

Q. What did you give her for them? - A. Seven shillings.

THOMAS ARMFIELD sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; I produce the property; on the 30th of October I went to Mrs. Bariel, through information of the prisoner.

MARY JEFFREY sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. What ought you to do when you take an oath? - A. Make an appeal to Almighty God.

Q. What do you promise God to do when you take an oath? - A. To tell the truth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, she came to my father's house on the 18th of October; she said that she came from my father's aunt, in Blackfriars, and she wanted to speak to my father directly; she sat down and had breakfast with us; she came in between the hours of nine and eleven, and staid till between ten and eleven; my mother went out, and the prisoner sent me out to Tottenham-court road; the prisoner was gone when I came back, and the bundle was gone; the door was open.

Q. There were some things made up in a bundle with a bill in it before she came? - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the house was the bundle in? - A. In the attic.

Q. Whose things were these? - A. Mr. Price's.

Q.(To Jeffrey.) Do you know whether they were in the house to be washed that day? - A. I am sure of it; there is Mr. Price's mark on them.

LISCOMBE PRICE sworn. - Q. Did you employ Mrs. Jeffrey to wash these things for you? - A. My wife did; she washed for the family; I cannot speak to these things.

Q.(To Mary Jeffrey .) Had your mother any thing to wash for Mr. Price? - A. I fetched them the day before.

Prisoner's defence, read in Court, as follows: I humbly beg pardon for writing these few lines. - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I hope you will excuse me; I was afraid I should not be able to speak in Court, being very ill, and knowing I am taken innocently by my own first cousin; I was very much distressed, my husband being abroad for three years, and having two helpless children, he pretended to take pity on me; I happened to call on him, and he and his wife were out; there was no one at home but his daughter; she told me that the bundle was left for me, and I did not know the contrary till my cousin came and took me up; he took me from my children, and told me he was going to take me to his wife, but instead of taking me there, to my great surprize, I was taken to the watch-house, and from there to prison; I begged hard for him to have mercy, as it was a mistake, and he owing me some money; I begged him to consider my helpless infants, who had no protector but myself and Almighty God; I hope, Gentlemen, you will shew mercy, as I am innocent of wronging him, and if I had, I did not think so near a relation would serve me so, when he knew the trouble and distress I have been drove to; I humbly beg pardon, and I beg for mercy, as I am innocent of over wronging my cousin, and he still knows it, if he will speak the truth.

Q.(To Mary Jeffrey.) Did you tell her that bundle, or any bundle was for her? - A. I did not tell her any thing about the bundle.

Q. Can you be certain that there was not any bundle put up for her? - A. I am sure of that.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) What is the worth of that bundle - A. About 16 s.

Q. Has the prisoner a family? - A. Her husband has left her; she has two children in Wandsworth workhouse.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

The Jury recommended her to mercy, believing she did it through distress at the time.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-48

48. PETER LADEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a seven-shilling piece, a dollar, value 5 s. a half-crown, four shillings in silver, and two sixpences , the monies of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD sworn. - I am a mariner ; I was rather benighted; I asked the watchman to get me a lodging; he took me to his house and I went to bed; I laid my clothes on the floor by the side of the bed.

Q. Where was the prisoner? - A. Asleep in the same room.

Q. Are you sure you had all your money safe when you went to bed; were you sober? - A. I was sober enough to see what I had in my pocket, and the watchman saw it too; I had a seven-shilling piece, a dollar, a half-crown, four shillings, and two sixpences; when I went to bed it was in my waistcoat pocket; I awoke about a quarter past six in the morning; I felt in my pocket and it was gone.

Q. Any other man slept in the bed with you? - A. Yes, one; and two other men slept in the other bed; my pocket-book was searched all over; there was a pound note in my pocket-book; it was gone; I could not swear to the number of it.

Q. Any mark on your money so as you should know it again? - A. No; the prisoner came in there on Saturday about half an hour after I was there; the mistress of the house charged him with taking it; he denied it; he denied it at Shadwell Office, and it was found on him when he was searched.

THOMAS BURTON sworn. - I am a seaman; I was bed-fellow to this man that lost the money; my landlord waked me, and asked me if I would let this man lay down by the side of me; the prisoner came along side of my bed, feeling about; I said, who is that; he said, Peter; I asked him two or three times, before he gave me any answer.

Q. When did you hear that the prosecutor had lost any money? - A. At twelve o'clock in the day, on Saturday; then I told my landlady what I had heard in the night he was there; he said he had no money at all about him; he was taken up and carried to the Office.

Q. Was there any other person besides you, the prosecutor, and the prisoner, that slept in the room that night? - A. Yes, one; he is not here; he is a seaman.

Q. Was the lodging-room locked that night? - A. It was not.

THOMAS FLACK sworn. - I am a watchman; the prosecutor came to me between one and two in the morning.

Q. Did you see when he went to bed whether he was sober? - A. He was rather fresh; when I met with him first the parish watchman was with me, and he offered us something to drink; he turned his money from one hand to another; we counted it, 19 s. 6 d. I led him home to my own door; I am very positive he did not lose his money by the way; I lighted him up stairs, and saw him into bed; when I called him up in the morning, between six and seven o'clock, he told me he had lost his money.

Q. Was the prisoner gone? - A. Yes; the prisoner came in the afternoon of the 10th; I was in bed; I got up when I heard he was there; he said he had none of the man's money; I went with him to the Office; he still persisted in having none of the man's money; I saw him searched; there were 26 s. and odd money found upon him.

Q. Were there a seven-shilling piece, a dollar, and half-crown, found upon the prisoner? - A Yes.

Q. I suppose there were no marks on those pieces? - A. No.

EDWARD CUMBER sworn. - I am an Officer of Shadwell: On Saturday, the 10th of November, I took the prisoner into custody to the Office; I asked him at the Office if he had any money about him; he said, no, only a few halfpence; I searched him, and in his waistcoat pocket, under a Dantzick waistcoat, I found three halfpence and a penny piece in copper; in his breeches pocket I found, wrapped up in a piece of paper, one seven-shilling piece, a dollar, and two shillings; I searched farther, and found in a small red pocket-book a discharge and a pension-ticket, 3 s. in silver, and two sixpences, in a parcel; I asked him how he came by them; he said he was a lumper, and he got them all from Mr. Scott.

Q. Mr. Scott lives by you? - A. Yes, I know him very well.

Prisoner's defence. The man that I lodge with is a watchman; after I had a drink of beer, I went home and went to bed, and after I was in bed he brought up this captain's mate of a West Indiaman, and put him into bed along with the sailor; there was neither lock nor key on the door; the captain's mate, the sailor, and likewise a waggoner, slept together; when I awoke, I wanted to make water; I felt about my bed, and there was no chamber-pot there; so I went to the sailor's bed, and felt all about for it; who's that? said the sailor; I said, it is Peter; he said, what do you want? I said, I want to make water; after that, I returned to my bed again; in a little while after that the sailor came out of his bed, Peter, said he, the captain's mate has p - d all over me, I will thank you to let me lay alongside of you till morning, and in the morning, when I awoke, the sailor was gone away from me; the time came for me to go to work on board the ship; I got up, and told my landlady she was much to blame to take a strange man in liquor into her house; I went on board my own ship, and on Saturday I was taken up for the robbery; the mistress of the house said, you had better own to the robbery; I said, I cannot own to it, I did not do it; they took me to the Justice and overhauled me; they took my discharge from a man of war and my pension-ticket; my friends are all on board his Majesty's ships of war up the Mediterranean.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-49

49. MARY DAVIS and SARAH HALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , a cap, value 3 s. 6 d. and thirty-six yards of ribbon, value 1 l. 2 s. the property of Mary-Ann Russell , privately in her shop .

MARY- ANN RUSSELL sworn. - I live in High Holborn, at No. 239, I am a lodger, I keep a milliner's-shop : I was not in the shop when the prisoners first came in, my sister was; when Mary Davis came back she offered to pay for the cap; I charged three shillings and sixpence for the cap, she put down three shillings for the cap on the counter, and it remained there for a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did she offer to pay for it before the constable was sent for, or mentioned? - A. No, afterwards; and missing the ribbons I would not take the money; the ribbons were never found, the cap was found in Sarah Hall's possession.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was the cap an old shop-keeper? - A. It had been made about a week.

Q. Had any body looked at the cap? - A. Yes.

Q. The cap was not complete for sale? - A. It was not trimmed.

Court. Q. It was fit for sale? - A. Yes; we sell untrimmed caps as well as trimmed ones.

ISABELLA RUSSELL sworn. - Q. What age are you? - A. Fourteen.

Q. Do you assist in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the two prisoners at the bar, and tell

me whether you saw them on Tuesday evening, the 6th of November? - A. Yes; they came in together, between five and six o'clock; when they came in, they asked me if a dress-milliner lived there of the name of Jones; I told them no; Mary Davis asked if we sold coloured ribbons; I said yes; I asked her what colour, and shewed her some ribbons; and while I was shewing her some ribbons, Sarah Hall tried on a velvet hat, and knocked down the cap.

Q. Was it the cap that was afterwards found? - A. Yes; Sarah Hall then had a bit of ribbon for a shoe-string, and paid for it; and Mary Davis had a bit of white ribbon for a viel, they both together came to eight-pence, Hall paid for the two; then they went out of the shop.

Q. At this time, had you any other customer in the shop? - A. No; nor any other person serving in the shop but myself, my sister was not in the shop; I was putting the things to rights in the window after they went out, and I missed a cap.

Q. Did either Davis or Hall, while they were there, bargain for a cap? - A. No.

Q. When you missed the cap, did you tell your sister of it? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did they stay in the shop? - A. About five minutes; we missed the ribbon while Mary Davis was in the shop, when she came back.

Q. In consequence of your telling your sister that the cap was gone, what did you do? - A. I went after them immediately; they had not got a great way in Holborn when I overtook them, they were together; I asked them if they had not catched a cap up in their muffs some how; they said no; they told me I might feel in their muffs if I liked, I must be mistaken; I had better go and look on the floor; I felt in Mary Davis 's muff; it was not there; Hall took the things out of her muff herself, and shook it, and it was not there; at that time, my sister Charlotte came up; the prisoners said they would come back to the shop; my sister desired them to come back, and they came back; when they were a few doors from our house, Sarah Hall ran away; we brought Davis back, and she said she knew nothing more of Sarah Hall than that she had a gown made where her pelisse was made which she had on; she said she did not know where she lived; then the ribbon was missed, while Mary Davis was in the shop; we missed a piece of purple and a piece of pink; Mary Davis had the purple in her hand when she first came in with Hall, and asked what it was a yard; I told her 6 d.

Q. Was the purple or pink ribbon ever found? - A. No.

Q. Do you know how much in quantity there was of it? - A. No, my sister does.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The other prisoner (Hall) was the person near the window where the cap was? - A. Yes.

Q. Mary Davis was with you when the cap fell down? - A. Yes.

Q. Now with respect to the ribbon, did you see it plain enough in her hand? - A. Yes.

Q. Mary Davis made no objection to come back? - A. No.

Q. And when you made a charge of a cap, that cap the offered to pay for? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. I understood you to say that Sarah Hall never touched the ribbon at all? - A. No.

Court. (To Mary- Ann Russell .) Q. You were alarmed by your sister, and in consequence of that came into your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. When you came into your shop, did you miss any thing? - A. Not exactly at the minute.

Q. How long after Davis was brought back that you missed the ribbon? - A. About ten minutes; then I told Davis I certainly should not take pay for the cap, and begged her to give up the other prisoner; she denied any knowledge of her whatever; she had met her once at a dress milliner's; the cap was found in Sarah Hall's possession.

Q. How long after Davis was taken up, was Hall found? - A. That very day week: the cap I have seen since at the office.

Q. How much ribbon did you miss? - A. Eighteen yards of each, they were pieces on a roller.

Q. What was the price of your ribbon? - A. Twenty-two shillings the two pieces.

Q. Did you ever know any person living there of the name of Jones? - A. No; I have lived there three years.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: On Monday, after the prisoner Davis was taken into custody, I went to the examination, and hearing there was another woman with her, I asked the little girls some questions; she described the other woman to me, and in consequence of her information, I went after Hall, and I took her on the Tuesday following; I told her what I took her for, and she said that she did not know any thing about it.

Q. Did you search her? - A. Not at that time; she was identified by the little girl at the office; I then went afterwards, and searched Hall's lodgings with Richard Limerick ; I found this cap in a drawer in the same room where I took her; the door was locked, and we broke it open. (The cap produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. Q. You took two caps at my lodgings? - A. I did.

Davis left her defence to her Counsel.

Hall's defence. This cap I made, and the two caps are my own that he found in my lodging.

Davis called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Hall called one witness, who gave her a good character

Davis, GUILTY, aged 27,

Hall, GUILTY, aged 31,

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. 6 d.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-50

50. ROBERT BORRILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. and two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Isaac Venes .

ISAAC VENES sworn. - I am a publican ; I only know the pots are mine, I sent my nephew after him.

EDWARD VENES sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Sixteen: On the 17th of November last, about nine o'clock in the morning, a person came into our house, and told us there was a pot-stealer in the street; I went out to him, and saw him run up Titchfield-street, into Mary-le-bone street, and there I caught him.

Q. Do you know where he took them from? - A. They were taken from a door in Norfolk-street.

Q. The pots you found on him were your uncle's? - A. Yes; when I took them from him, he did not say any thing; I said, they are my master's pots, you must come back with me; I brought him back.

JAMES JORDAN sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take this man into custody; he had these pots in his apron; he said nothing at all.

(The pots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. It is all very true; I never was in a Court before in my life, I am sixty-one next July.

Jordan. I believe the man did it through want.

GUILTY .

The prosecutor recommended him to mercy, believing he did it through want.

Privately whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-51

51. DANIEL BRACKET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a pair of boots, value 5 s. and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the property of William Anderson .

WILLIAM ANDERSON sworn. - I live at No. 61, Wych-street : On the 26th of October, I left the prisoner at the bar in care of my place between four and five o'clock, to go to tea; I returned about six, and he was gone; I missed a pair of boots, and a pair of shoes, I had to heel-piece.

Q. When did you see him again? - A. Not till he was apprehended; he had the boots on his legs when he was apprehended.

Q. The shoes, I believe, has never been found? - A. No.

Q. What was the value of these boots? - A. Five shillings, they were old boots, and three shillings the value of the shoes.

Q. Did you charge him of having deserted his trust? - A. I said, Dan, how could you serve me so.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - I am one of the patrols of Bow-street; I took the prisoner on Thursday, the 1st of November; the prosecutor was with me when I took him, he had the boots on his legs.

Q. Did he say where he lodged at that time, so as you might look after the shoes? - A. No; he said he was in want of a pair of shoes or boots, that made him take them.

Prisoner's defence. I am an unfortunate young man; I do not get my living by thieving, nor plundering; that my prosecutor knows, and the gentleman that took me knows it; I am a foreigner, a great many miles from home, I come from Italy.

Q.(To Smith.) Do you know him? - A. I have known him seven or eight years; the last year he was in Tothill-fields for an assault; I never heard any thing worse of him.

Q. Do you know that he has been working for his living? - A. He used to work for the horse-dealers. (The boots produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-52

52. JOHN HOLDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Ann Appleton , widow , on the 3d of December , a metal watch, value 40 s. a gold ring, value 10 s. a cloth coat, value 40 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. three pair of breeches, value 24 s. three sheets, value 20 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 2 s. three pair of stockings, value 5 s. a leather trunk, value 3 s. one dollar, value 5 s. two half-guineas, twelve seven-shilling pieces, two Bank of England notes, value 40 l. two other Bank of England notes, value 20 l. a Bank of England note, value 2 l. and twenty-seven one-pound Bank of England notes , the property of George Edwards .

GEORGE EDWARDS sworn - I live in Mrs. Ann Appleton 's house, in Guildford-street ; she is a widow.

Q. Did you lose any thing from that house on the 3d of December? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home at the time? - A. Yes, I was asleep; it was about five o'clock when the box was missing; I got up about half past six, and looked round, after taking the key of my box from under my pillow; the box was gone, and every thing in it.

Q. Was every thing safe on the 2d of December? - A. Yes, every thing was safe at half past eleven on the over-night, when I went to-bed.

Q. What part of the house did you lodge in? - A. The one pair of stairs back room.

Q. Do you enter the house of Mrs. Appleton by

a separate door? - A. I always enter at the front door.

Q. Does she enter in at the same door? - A. Yes; there is a back door and a front door.

Q. Is your door separate from her's? - A. No.

Q. Do you sleep with the chamber door locked, or mostly open? - A. It might be open that night, I cannot say.

Q. There was no appearance of the lock having been forced? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same house? - A. He lodged in the same room where I lodged, there were three beds in the room.

Q. Was he in bed when you went to-bed? - A. He was in bed when I went to-bed.

Q. Did any body sleep in the three beds? - A. Yes, Thomas Cane slept in the same bed with me; there were three young men slept in the other beds besides the prisoner.

Q. Then, in all, six people slept in the room - were all the persons in bed when you went to-bed? - A. No.

Q. When you got up at half past six, was the prisoner in bed? - A. He was not.

Q. Were any others gone? - A. No, they were all in bed.

Q. How many persons were in bed when you went to-bed? - A. I cannot exactly say, I believe none but him.

Q. Did you make any inquiry after this man, in consequence of the trunk being missing, and he gone? - A. Immediately after I missed my trunk I went to Mrs. Appleton; I asked her if she had moved my trunk; she said, no; she came up stairs, and we looked under all the beds, and she said, where is the painter.

Q. That is the trade of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I am a butcher; Mrs. Appleton said, for God's sake Edwards, go and stop the coach; I immediately asked what countryman he was, and they said he was a Bath countryman; I went to the White Horse cellar, and gave a description of the man.

Q. How soon after did you see him? - A. I saw him about twelve o'clock on the same day, on Monday, the 3d of December.

Q. Where did you see him? - A. At Slough; pursued him on the road.

Q. Was he in the Bath coach? - A. He took the Bath coach at the White Horse; he was detained at Slough just as he got out of the coach.

Q. Did you find your box at Slough? - A. No; saw the box that morning at seven o'clock, it was directed to be left, till called for, at Bath; I found at the Old White Horse cellar.

Q. When you saw the prisoner at Slough, what passed between you and him? - A. I said to Mr. Crocker, that is the man.

Q. What passed between the prisoner and you? - A. I asked him how he could do so; he said, he had been persuaded to do it; he then was secured by Crocker.

Q. Where is your box? - A. It is here; it has been in the possession of the porter of the Old White Horse Cellar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This poor man you say is a painter? - A. It seems so.

Q. You had a good opinion of him, and, till this unfortunate transaction, he was the last man in the world you would have suspected? - A. He was the last man in the world that I should have suspected would have done so.

WILLIAM SABINE sworn. - I am porter at the White Horse Cellar.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do not.

Q. Had you any thing left in your charge on the 3d of December? - A. Yes, about half past five in the morning.

Q. What was left in your charge? - A. That box.

Q. Is there a direction on it? - A. Yes, George Russell , Bath, to be left till called for.

Q. By whom? - A. By the man that left it; I cannot say whether he is the man, I believe he is.

Q. You do not know whether he is the man or no? - A. I cannot say, I believe he is, I am not positive.

Q. Have you had it in your possession ever since? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body call for it? - A. Yes, Mr. Edwards, the prosecutor, called for it, about seven o'clock in the morning; he gave a description of the man, and asked if any body had left it; I brought the box forward immediately.

Q. By what conveyance went the man? - A. He was to go by the afternoon Bath coach, he went towards the New White Horse Cellar, but I did not go out of doors to look after him; I work at the Old White Horse.

Q. Did you inform the prosecutor which way he went? - A. Yes; I gave the person that brought the box a receipt to call for it at Bath.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - Q. In consequence of information from this person, did you go down in the Bath coach in pursuit of the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. You lit of the prisoner? - A. I did.

Q. Where did you find him? - A. At the Red Lion, at Slough.

Q. Did you charge him with the offence? - A. Yes, because the prosecutor pointed him out to me; I charged him with having stolen the box, he said, he was very sorry, he was over-persuaded by some person in the house.

Q. Did he name that person? - A. He did not; I searched him, and found on him that receipt. (Produces it.)

Q. Shew it to the porter? - A.(Sabine.) That is the same receipt; it is my own hand-writing.

Q. Read it? - (Read in Court.)

"London, Dec. 3, 1804.

"Received one trunk, directed George Russell , Bath, which I promise to deliver to the bearer, at Bath." - This receipt must be produced as a voucher for the delivery of the goods. I found two twenty-pound notes, two ten-pound notes, one two-pound, and twenty-seven ones; two half guineas, twelve seven-shilling pieces, and a dollar; this silk handkerchief was round his neck, a shirt and waistcoat, and two other handkerchiefs.

Q. Where were these? - A. In a bundle which he had, and this silver watch, which he had bought at Brentford, as he told me himself.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) After you had recovered the box, did you examine it? - A. The box was examined at Bow-street.

Q. What was taken from the box? - A. Not any thing except the money, and these clothes, which are produced by Crocker.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether they are your's? - A. This neck handkerchief is mine; these are all mine, I will take my oath they are mine.

Q. Had you any marks on the Bank-notes? - A. No.

Q. Do they correspond in sum with what you lost out of the box? - A. I think there were ninety-five pounds in notes in the box; I cannot say exactly, there were about one hundred and five pounds in Bank-notes and cash.

Q. How much in Bank-notes? - A. I do not exactly know.

Q. Do you know whether you had any of twenty pounds amongst the Bank-notes? - A. Yes, two.

Q. Do they correspond with the numbers? - A. They exactly appear the number.

Q. No. 3025 and 2035? - A. That is the number of them; I had the numbers from Mr. Drummond's clerk.

Q. All the rest were secure in the box tied down, except the notes and the things in the bundle? - A. Yes.

Q. That watch is not your's? - A. It is not.

Q. Have you examined the things in your box? - A. One new cloth coat, value 2 l. and one waistcoat.

Q. There is a metal watch, was it safe in the box? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the value of that? - A. About a pound, and a gold ring, value ten shillings; three shirts I value at a pound, and three pair of breeches I value at twenty-four shillings; two silk handkerchiefs, they were in the box, value five shillings; two cotton handkerchiefs, two shillings; three pair of stockings, one of them silk, value five shillings; the leather trunk I value at three shillings; a dollar, two half guineas in the box, and twelve seven-shilling pieces; all the money was tied up in a handkerchief to go to market the next morning.

Q. And you seeing them in your box knew them to be your's? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-53

53. WILLIAM MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , twelve pounds weight of pewter, value 6 s. three quires of cartridge paper, value 2 s. 6 d. and a quire of demy paper, value 6 d. the property of Fulchram Moorgues ; and a knife, value 6 d. the property of Philip Bassooth .

FULCHRAM MOORGUES sworn. - Did you lose any pewter and paper on the 3d of December? - A. Yes; I was in the country at the time.

JOHN MULLINER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Moorgues, No. 9, Vine-buildings, Leather-lane, Holborn , the prisoner was a labourer : On Monday, the 3d of December, I had reason to suspect somebody had taken away some metal; in the evening I counted sixty-one pieces, they were rims of dishes, and I watched this man as narrow as I could, I suspected him; he went off at a quarter after seven instead of eight o'clock, he wished me a good night; I went back immediately and counted over the metal, and found fifty-eight; I immediately pursued him, and took John Pool with me; I overtook him in the way from Brook-street to Castle-court, he was crossing the way; I desired him to come back, and I said he had got my master's property about him; he said very little, only begging me to let him go; and I walked a little way up the street before he saw my friend Pool, and as we were coming along, he said he would deliver it up to us if we would let him go.

Q. Did he say, or you, what he had at that time? - A. No, I did not tell him what I had missed at that time; we brought him back to the accompting-house, and there he pulled out two pieces of what I had missed, and he delivered them before we sent for a constable.

Q. Where had he these pieces about him? - A. In his breeches-pocket, or in his breeches; and in a short time after he came in, he got the other pieces down on the floor.

Q. What might they all weigh together, the three pieces? - A. About three pounds.

Q. What is the worth of it? - A. About half-a-crown; it is worth ten-pence a pound.

JOHN POOL sworn. - Q. Are you a workman of Mr. Moorgues? - A. Yes; I went with the last witness and brought him back to the warehouse, he desired to be let go, and he said he would give up what he had got.

Q. Did he say what he had got at that time? - A. He took a piece of pewter, a rim of a dish, out in the street, he had it in his hand, and when we took him into the accompting-house he put it on the desk; the foreman asked him if he had any more; he said, no; he felt his jacket, and he felt something in his jacket-pocket, he desired me to take it out; I did, it was a rim of another dish; the constable was sent for, and he was going to be taken away, a person asked him for his hat, and handed it to me; I felt it very heavy, and turned it up, and out fell six round pieces of pewter, which was about six pounds weight; the third rim we afterwards found in the accompting-house near where he stood, on the floor.

Q. Did you find any cartridge, or demy paper? - A. That we afterwards found in the accompting-house.

JAMES RUNDLE sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to take charge of this man, on the 3d of December, about eight o'clock in the evening; on the day following I searched his lodgings, I produce the property I found there.

Q.(To Mulliner.) Are these pieces of pewter such as are manufactured in your master's manufactory? - A. Yes; I believe them to be my master's property.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court; I have a large family, four small children.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-54

54. WILLIAM WAIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , ten muslin handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Curtis .

ELIZABETH CURTIS sworn. - Q. On the 12th of November, did you lose any muslin neck-handkerchiefs? - A. I lost ten, they were taken from a hedge; the girl had washed them and I put them out to dry; I lived with Mrs. Maddox at Shepherd's-bush, they were hung out on Monday.

Q. When did you see or hear of them again? - A. I believe it was a fortnight afterwards; I saw them at Bow-street, I was sent for.

Q. When you saw them at Bow-street, did you know them to be your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Who does the house belong to? - A. Mr. Middlemas, Mrs. Maddox lodges there; I know the prisoner, he was employed in Mr. Middlemas's garden, it is a large garden.

Q. He was a workman at the time your mistress and you lodged there? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH TOBEY sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. I keep the Little King's-arms public-house, at Brentford.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he came in and asked for a bed, and slept at our house two or three nights; he left a bundle with wet linen in it, and there was a shirt not finished washing.

Q. You had the curiosity to open the bundle when he was absent? - A. Yes.

Q. There were these ten neck-handkerchiefs, and a shirt? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of this, you gave information against him? - A. I told the constable of it, the constable took him on the 15th.

Q. Was he taken at your house? - A. No; he was just gone when I told the constable.

Q. Had he taken the bundle away from your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know where he worked? - A. He worked two or three miles away from my house.

WILLIAM SIMS sworn. - Q. You are a constable of Brentford? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information that Mrs. Tobey gave you, did you go after the prisoner? - A. I did; I found him at the Six Bells, on Thursday the 15th of November, in the afternoon; he had a large bundle with him, there were fifteen handkerchiefs altogether, ten of them were muslin handkerchiefs.

Q. Were they wet at the time? - A. No; I told him that I suspected that he had got that with him that was not his own; he told me no, they were his sister's, and she lived at Hampton-wick; I took him to the office, the Justice's clerk and Mr. Julian examined him; the next morning, as the coach was coming to the door to take him to Bow-street, he burst out a crying, and asked me to let him go to Mr. Julian; I took him there, at his request, he burst out again crying, and he said, he had taken them off his master's hedge, and he hoped Mr. Julian would interfere and get him on board a man of war; when we came to Bow-street, the young woman swore to them.

Q.(To Prosecutrix.) Look at that bundle, and tell us whether you find the ten neck-handkerchiefs? - A. Yes; they are all mine.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18041205-55

55. SARAH EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a petticoat, value 14 s. three shifts, value 16 s. three pin-a-fores, value 7 s. and three napkins, value 3 s. the property of James Roberts , in his dwelling-house .

Mrs. ROBERTS sworn. - I am the wife of James Roberts , a surgeon , in Cecil-street : On the 15th of November, I engaged the prisoner as a servant , she came to me about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening; I went into the cellar and shewed her where the coals were, she lit a fire, there were

some articles of linen drying; I gave the prisoner half-a-guinea to buy some bread, she went down stairs and staid about ten minutes, I then heard her go out; my little daughter of nine years old came up stairs, and in consequence of what she told me I went down stairs, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them); she returned in about two hours afterwards with the bread and the change, she need not have been gone more than three minutes; my husband taxed her with having taken the linen, and she denied seeing any thing in the kitchen worth taking; I have never been able to find the property; the prisoner said, my husband being a surgeon, that she heard the cutting up of dead people in the back kitchen, and was so alarmed that she could not stay; I was up stairs at the time with five small children; there was no person below stairs at the time she went out; my husband came home about twenty minutes after she was gone, and I let him in.

JAMES ROBERTS sworn. - Q. You are a surgeon? - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar came as a servant to my house about a quarter past seven in the evening; I went out a little after, and visited a child that was sick; I returned in about three quarters of an hour, my wife told me the girl was gone, and had robbed the house; about ten o'clock she returned from the baker's with a loaf; I asked her the reason she stopped so long, and I told her I supposed she had forgot her pattens; no, says she, I have returned with the loaf, and the change of the half guinea; I asked her if she had brought the linen she had taken out of the kitchen; she said, she had not, nor did not take it, nor did she see any; I asked her the reason of her being gone so long, and also where she had taken her own box, as she had taken her own box with her; she told me she smelt something disagreeable on the top of the stairs, and she always conceived that she heard me in the back kitchen cutting up dead people, that was the reason of her going away; I told her it she did not tell me where the linen was, I should certainly send her to the watch-house; she said, she did not take it, I might do as I pleased; I then called the watchman, and took her to the watch-house immediately; the constable of the night took her into a little apartment, and searched her; he found none of my property on her, but found ten duplicates at another place; she gave the watchman the key of her box, and told him where she lived, and she had left her box at her lodgings, No. 30, Monmouth-street; there the watchman searched her box, and found none of my property.

Q. What was the value of the things? - A. Something about two pounds.

Q.(To Mrs. Roberts.) What do you value the linen at? - A. Above two pounds.

Prisoner's defence. At half past seven in the evening I went to this place, I took with me a small box; there was a smell in the place, I thought it was the smell of human flesh, and they were chopping something up; I took up my band-box, and was going to leave the place; Mrs. Roberts rung the bell, she told me to go and get a quartern loaf and some cheese; I went home to my lodgings with my band-box, and I went back to my mistress with the loaf and the change; I could not get the cheese, it was too late; Mr. Roberts abused me when I came back, he said I had taken his linen; I told him I had not, I had never untied my bandbox at all.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-56

56. ANN ALSEY and THOMAS GUNN were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , seventeen dollars, value 3 l. 10 s. the property of Erpune , a native of China, in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Gunn ; and the other, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

(Erpune, the Prosecutor, being a native of China, Mr. John Anthony was sworn as an interpreter.)

Mr. Gurney. (To Anthony.) Q. You are yourself a native of China? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been educated in the Christian religion, and are a Christian? - A. I have been christened in the church of England.

Q. The prosecutor is a Chinese? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How long have you been in England? - A. Since the American war, backwards and forwards.

Q. At what age did you leave China? - A. At eleven years old.

Q. What do you know, of your own knowledge, of an oath in China - did you ever see an oath administered in a Court of Justice there? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been at China since you were a man? - A. Yes.

Q. You are well acquainted then with the mode of taking an oath in the Courts of Justice there? - A. Yes.

Q. To whom do they make an appeal? - A. To the God they worship in that country; they break a saucer, and then they are told, your body will be cracked as that saucer is cracked, if you do not tell the truth.

Q. What is meant by his body being cracked - does it mean by the God they worship? - A. Yes, that is the meaning of the oath.

Q. You are quite sure that is the way of taking an oath in China? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Now administer the oath to him in the usual way in his own country.

(The oath was then administered to the prosecutor,

and a saucer delivered to him, which he dashed to pieces.)

JOHN ANTHONY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you have the care of the Chinese who are brought to this country in the ships of the India Company? - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you keep them? - A. In Hastings-court, Angel-gardens, Shadwell.

Q. On the 1st of November was Erpune, one of the Chinese, in your care? - A. Yes.

Q. How late in the afternoon of that day, before this happened, had you seen him? - A. I saw him about six o'clock that evening; he came back again between nine and ten, the prisoners live at the end of the gardens, about fourteen or fifteen doors off.

Q. I believe you were present with Rodgers, the Police officer, when Gunn was taken up? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you yourself know that Erpune had any dollars that day? - A. I did not see them, I know he had been paid.

Q.(To Erpune.) Did you go to the house of that man, Gunn? - A. Yes, at six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was that on the 1st of November? - A. Yes.

Q. What passed when you went there? - A. I went to the prisoner's house, and wanted a girl; Mrs. Gunn sent a boy to bring that girl to the house; I gave the dollars into Mr. Gunn's hand for the girl.

Q. How many dollars had you about you? - A. I had nineteen dollars, in a cloth.

Q. Did you take those dollars out of your pocket while Gunn and the girl were by? - A. I took the nineteen dollars out of my pocket, and put them upon the table, that every one saw them.

Q. After you had done this, did you, and Gunn, and the girl, go any where? - A. The girl went first with me, and the man followed after to the public-house to get the dollar changed.

Q. Was that the same dollar you had given to Gunn, or another dollar? - A. I gave Mr. Gunn one dollar for the girl, and changed another for liquor; they took the dollar for 4 s. 2 d. and took for the beer, and then I took the change.

Q. After you had had the beer, did you come back to Gunn's house? - A. After we had drank the liquor, I went back to Gunn's, and went to-bed.

Q. Who did you go to bed with? - A. That girl.

Q. Did you undress? - A. I undressed, and only kept my waistcoat on.

Q. Where were your dollars? - A. In my waistcoat.

Q. Are you quite sure, when you went to-bed, the dollars were in your waistcoat-pocket? - A. Quite sure.

Q. Were you quite sober? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fall asleep? - A. Yes.

Q. When you awoke again, did you find your dollars in your pocket? - A. When I awoke, my dollars were gone, and the girl was gone.

Q. Did you get up? - A. I got up, and ran down stairs, and saw Mr. Gunn, and told him my dollars were gone.

Q.(To Anthony.) Can he speak a little broken English? - A. Very little: he cannot understand any thing you say.

Q. Can he say dollar? - A. Yes, he can say dollar.

Q.(To Erpune.) What did Gunn say? - A. He took a candle, and went up stairs to see if he could find the dollars.

Q. Did they find them? - A. No.

Q. After that, did you go out with Gunn? - A. Gunn said, do not make a noise, I will go out, and endeavour to find the girl; Mr. Gunn and I went to the public-house, but could not find the girl.

Q. After that, did you meet with Mr. Gole? - A. After this, I called to Mr. Gole, and said, this man has taken my dollars.

Q. Where did you see Mr. Gole? - A. Under the gate-way.

Q. Was Gunn by at that time? - A. Yes.

ABRAHAM GOLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live with Mr. Anthony; I am his brother-in-law, he married my sister.

Q. You understand a little Chinese? - A. Very little, but so as to understand a little; I was passing under the gate-way, when Erpune, the Chinese, had the prisoner by the collar.

Q. What time was this? - A. A little after nine.

Q. What did Erpune say to you? - A. He called out in broken English, "this man catchee my dollar." Gunn was going to make a reply; I said he had better go into my house, and not make a disturbance in the street, and I would endeavour to interpret between them.

Q. Did they come into your house? - A. They did; I asked Gunn if he knew any thing of the China man; he said yes; I asked him if he had been to his house with a girl; he also replied, yes; I further asked him if he knew any thing of the dollars; he said, the girl must have taken them; I then told Gunn, you had better return this poor man his money; he replied that he was a poor man, and how could he afford to do it; he then asked me what the amount of them would be; Erpune said he had lost nineteen; I had a pen in my hand about to cast them up, when Gunn said, mind they are not 5 s. dollars, they only pass for 4 s. 2 d. I then sent a servant for an officer; Rodgers came, and took him into custody.

EBENEZER ALLNUTT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are shopman to

Mr. Ashbridge, a pawnbroker, in Ratcliff-highway? - A. I am.

Q. On the evening of the 1st of November did you see the prisoner Alsey at your master's house? - A. Yes; she came about seven o'clock, sold a dollar, and took out some articles of wearing apparel that were in pledge.

Q. With what coin did she redeem them? - A. Two dollars.

Q. With a Bank impression, or common Spanish dollars? - A. Common Spanish dollars.

Q. Did Gunn come to your house that evening? - A. Yes, about three quarters of an hour before her; he brought two dollars of the same description to sell them; he sold them to my master for either 4 s. 2 d. or 4 s. 3 d. I cannot say which.

EDWARD RODGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I am an officer of Shadwell: On the evening of the 1st of November, I was sent for to take the prisoner Gunn into custody, about half past nine in the evening; I then left him in charge with Mr. Gole, in Mr. Anthony's parlour, and went instantly to search his house; I first searched his person, and then his house, but found nothing; I then returned to Gunn, and asked him where the dollars were that the China man had lost; he told me he did not know, but he believed the girl had them, but that he would make up the loss, and begged of me not to take him into custody; I told him I could make no bargains with him of that kind, that I was under the necessity of taking him into custody; he several times said he was innocent, in his way to the Office, but he would still make up the loss, if I would let him go.

Q. How soon after did you find the prisoner Alsey? - A. Several days, eight or ten; I traced her to Spital-fields, and from there to Lambeth; I found her at a public-house, under a false character, on Tower-hill; I told her I took her for robbing a China man of dollars; she denied it; I took her into custody, I searched her, and found nothing upon her; as I was taking her to the Office, she said it was hard she should suffer for Mrs. Gunn; about ten minutes before I took her to the Magistrate, which was the next morning, I had her in custody all night at a lock-up house near the Office, she sent for me, and told me she wished to tell the truth; I neither used promise nor threat, but desired her to be sure to stick to the truth; I told her to be cautious, for what she told me I should repeat to the Magistrate; she then said she had taken sixteen of the dollars, and had taken no more; she said she had divided the sixteen dollars with Mrs. Gunn; I then brought her before the Magistrate, and she said the same before the Magistrate; it was not taken in writing.

(The prisoner, Alsey, put in a written defence, which was read as follows:)

"My Lord and Gentlemen, I humbly address you in the hope you will humanely consider my statement as the truth. The person who is tried with me kept a common lodging-house for the reception of men and women; I went with the prosecutor, and he gave me a dollar and a sixpence; Mrs. Gunn stopped me in the way, and told me he had plenty of money, and advised me to go up and rob him; I, unfortunately for myself, followed her advice, and shared the dollars with her; they not being stamped, and not considered the current coin, I could not part with them for more than 4 s. 2 d. a piece; I went to service for the purpose of retrieving my character, from which place I was taken up; I humbly throw myself on your mercy, and hope by your clemency to alter my mispent life.

Gunn's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Alsey, GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Gunn, GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-57

57. ANN CROUCH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bolton , about the hour of eight in the night of the 5th of November , and burglariously stealing eight silver watch-cases, value 2 l. 8 s. the property of the said James.

Second Count, For breaking and entering the same dwelling-house, and stealing six silver watch-cases, value 36 s. the property of William Blake , and two silver watch-cases, value 12 s. the property of James Bridgman .

JAMES BOLTON sworn. - I live at No. 66, Noble-street, in the parish of St. Luke : On the 5th of November I went out between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning.

Q. What are you? - A. A watch-glass joint finisher; I returned between eight and nine at night, and missed eight silver watch-cases from off my board; I made an alarm, but could hear nothing of the property; I had left my wife at home; that is all I know of it.

ANN BOLTON sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: On the 5th of November I went out between two and three o'clock; I left eight watch-cases on the board; when I returned, at nine o'clock in the evening, my husband came home with me, and when I went up stairs I found my door fastened; it was a very bad lock; I fastened it with a string and a piece of wood, and when I came home I found the wood in the staple, just the same as I left it; I opened my room door, which is up two pair of stairs, and then I missed eight watch-cases from my husband's work-board.

Q. Did you find the lock broke? - A. No, it

was a very bad lock; I went down stairs, and asked Ann Crouch if she had heard any body go up stairs, she lives in the same house, underneath me; she replied that, being the 5th of November, she had been out to an acquaintance's house, and had but just returned, and she could not tell; I heard no more till the next morning; my husband and I were going to Mr. Blake's, to whom six of the cases belonged, to inform him we had been robbed of the property, and met Mr. Blake and Mr. Cole coming to our house; Mr. Blake then asked my husband if he had brought the six cases home; Mr. Blake and Mr. Cole came home with my husband, and sent him for an officer.

JOHN- BENJAMIN COLE , sen. sworn. - I am a silversmith in Barbican; I keep a goldsmith's shop.

Q. How far did you live from Bolton? - A. I suppose about half a mile.

Q. Look at the prisoner; did you ever see her before? - A. Yes; on the 6th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, she came to my shop, and offered eight cases to sell; I asked her if they were her own property; she told me, no, they belonged to a watchmaker that was in distress, and wanted the money; seeing them in an unfinished state, I rather suspected they were not honestly come by; they were bent almost double; I looked at the mark, and I knew the maker of them; they were marked WB, William Blake ; I stopped two of them; I had known the woman many years; she took the other six away; I went to Mr. Blake's, but, prior to that, I sent my son to watch where the woman went to.

Q. Did you know where she lived? - A. Not exactly; Mr. Blake agreed to go with me to this workman, James Bolton, and we met him on the road; he told us what had happened; that is all I know of my own knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. These cases were quite in an unfinished state? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you happen to weigh them? - A. I have weighed them.

Q. I would venture to ask you what is the value? - A. I should think, as near as I can calculate, 4 s. 9 d. a piece with the covers, but they have not got the covers.

Q. Then they would be considerably under forty shillings? - A. They would be under forty shillings.

Q. What state was this poor creature in when she came to your house? - A. She was intoxicated, and smelled very strong of liquor.

Q. Did she appear to know what she was about? - A. She did not hardly.

JOHN- BENJAMIN COLE , jun. sworn. - Q. You are the son of the last witness? - A. Yes; I followed the prisoner when she left my father's shop; she went into a pawnbroker's at the corner of Barbican, but upon seeing me she came out again; I told her they would not take them in the state they were, that they would stop them at every place she went; I followed her to the top of Brick-lane, just by the New-road turnpike; I went up to her again, and asked her for the six watch cases; she gave them to me, and I gave them to my father.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. She knew you were following her all this time? - A. Yes.

JOHN PALMER sworn. - I was sent for, and went to apprehend the prisoner; I knocked at her door, and told her she was my prisoner; she said, what of that; she then delivered up the property; I told her we must search her and the room; in searching her, I found seventy-two duplicates upon her; while I was looking over the duplicates, I heard William Saunders say, here is the property we were looking for; I turned round, and saw Tring, the officer, take eight covers belonging to these bottoms from out of the mattress, under the prisoner's bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q.Did she appear to be intoxicated? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mr. Cole.) Can you identify these under cases from the covers? - A. It is impossible.

- SANDERS sworn. - I was with the last witness when the covers were found in Mrs. Crouch's bed.

- TRING sworn. - I took these covers out of the mattress; that is all I know of it.

Q.(To Bolton.) Look at those covers and cases, and tell me if they belong to each other? - A. These covers all belong to the cases, but they are so bent up, that it is impossible to match them.

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 55,

Of stealing goods to the value of 39 s.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-58

58. THOMAS CHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , a plated sugar bason, value 10 s. four silver desert spoons, value 40 s. a silver table spoon, value 15 s. and two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the property of John-Henry Stevenson , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SUMMERS sworn. - In November last I lived with John- Henry Stevenson , Esq . No. 46, Barnard-street, Russel-square .

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. I never saw him before that occasion; on the 23d of November, about nine o'clock, I went into the front parlour, and was laying the breakfast; I heard the alarm of stop thief called by my fellow-servant, Jane Meredith ; I heard the area-steps rattle very much indeed, it is a kind of a ladder; I looked

over the blinds in the parlour window, and saw the prisoner go out from the gate.

Q. Are you sure of the man? - A. Yes, I saw him go out from the area gate, and I pursued him to Russel-square; after I got into the street, I never lost sight of him; I am sure he is the man, he was running when I came out.

Q. How near might you be to him when you got into the street? - A. I suppose it might be two hundred yards: I gained ground upon him, and came up with him; I called out stop thief, and a person of the name of Baynes stopped him; I came up, and seized him.

Q. How far were you from Baynes when he seized him first? - A. I suppose about fifty yards; Baynes and I brought the prisoner back to the house; we sent for John White , the constable; when we got him into the passage of my master's house, he persisted in dropping the plate there, and he accordingly dropped it; I saw him drop it; Wood, the constable, picked it up; that is all I know about it; Baynes is confined for debt in the King's Bench prison.

JANE MEREDITH sworn. - I was servant to Mr. Stevenson in November last.

Q. Do you remember being at work below stairs in your master's house, and being alarmed? - A. Yes, I saw this young man come towards the butler's pantry; I had never seen him before.

Q. You don't know how he got in? - A. No.

Q. Was the area door open? - A. Yes.

Q. He was going towards the area? - A. Yes, I heard the things rattle in his apron; I cried out stop thief; he then ran up the area steps; I ran up the steps after him, but no further; I then saw William Summers come out at the street-door, and go after him; Mr. Baynes and he brought him back, and I saw him drop the plate in the passage from out of his apron; Mr. Wood, the constable, picked it up.

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I searched him, and he acknowledged having dropped those things, (produces them); I have had them in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Summers.) Is it your business to take care of the plate? - A. It is.

Q. Look at these articles, can you take upon yourself to say they are your master's? - A. I can swear that every one of these things were under my care.

Q. Can you speak to the value of them? - A. No, I don't know the value of such things; the sugar bason is not worth above five shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I never was guilty of any thing of the kind before in my life; I am a plasterer by trade.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing goods to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-59

59. LUCY SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , twenty-three yards of cotton, value 30 s. the property of Judah Wilkinson .

JUDAH WILKINSON sworn. - I live in Dartmouth-street, Westminster , I am a linen-draper : On Tuesday, the 4th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner had been looking at the things hanging up at my door for some minutes; after having walked about twenty yards from the door, I missed a piece of print, and being sure she had nothing with her, when she was looking at the door, I called out stop thief, when she immediately dropped the print; I then brought her back to my own shop with the print; I then sent for a constable at Queen-square.

Q. Did you know any thing of the woman? - A. Only by coming to my shop as a customer.

THOMAS HATCH sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for by Mr. Wilkinson to take the prisoner into custody; I have had the print in my possession ever since; this is it. (Producing it.)

Wilkinson. This is my print, it has my private mark upon it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-60

60. WILLIAM BOWMAN and JOHN JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , seventy pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. belonging to Luke Wetton , fixed to a dwelling-house .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building.

ROBERT BARTON sworn. - I am a carpenter.

Q. Do you know the house of Mr. Wetton? - A. Yes, at this end of Brentford .

Q. Did you see any lead put on the house of Wetton? - A. Yes, I put it on myself the beginning of April last.

Q. Did you afterwards see any lead produced to you by any other person? - A. Yes, the 14th of November, at Mr. Wetton's; I fitted it to the house, and it tallied exactly.

Q. Are you certain that is the lead you put on that house? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SIMS sworn. - On the 9th of November I saw the prisoners at the bar at the end of the town, it was dark; Jones had a basket under his arm.

Q. Did you know the prisoners before? - A. Yes; I suspected they were about no good, and I followed them up Green Dragon-lane; they turned out of the road to the dunghill; Jones took the lead out of the dung, and put it into a bag; Bowman held the bag; I called out, and jumped over the road-way, and secured the prisoners; the lead lay at the foot of Bowman, he rose up from it as

he came up to him; Jones resisted a good deal, Bowman did not; I asked what they had got there; they said they did not know; I have had the lead in my possession ever since; I took it to the house of Wetton, I saw it fitted, and it fitted exactly.

(The lead was produced by the witness, and deposed to by Barton.)

Jones's defence. I know nothing of it.

Bowman's defence. I never had it in my hand.

Bowman, GUILTY , aged 47.

Jones, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18041205-61

61. MATTHEW HUSBAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , fifty-two pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Brown , fixed to a certain dwelling of his .

Second Count. Charging it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

THOMAS BROWN sworn. - I live in Quebec-street, Mary-le-bone: On the 14th of November missed a quantity of lead off the skeleton of a hall house in Newman-street, Edgware-road ; on the 15th I saw the constable that sits up at the watch-house in Mary-le-bone lane; I mentioned the circumstance to him; he told me there was a person brought into the watch-house with a quantity of lead on his shoulder the night before; I went down to the watch-house immediately, and saw the lead; I could not possibly say the lead was examine, it was cut and mangled about so; the witnesses went immediately to fit the lead to the building.

Q. Was it in such a state that you could fit it to the place? - A. Yes, part of it.

- NOKES sworn. - On the 14th of November I detected the prisoner in Queen Ann-street West, between seven and eight o'clock at night, and brought him to the watch-house; I asked him where he got the lead; he told me he got it at No. 24, Edgware-road.

Q. Was that Mr. Brown's house? - A. No; I asked him where he was going with it; he said, to Mr. Woods, in Pawlin-street; I brought him to the watch-house, and the next day we took it to the place; one part seemed to sit.

Q. You will not venture to swear it was part of the lead that was on that house? - A. No.

HENRY BETTS sworn. - I was at the watch-house; I saw the lead fitted; this little bit fitted in to a piece of the roof at the end of the house; the whole of the lead had been taken from the top of the house.

Prisoner's defence. On this evening, going down Swallow-street, I met a person who I knew was a plumber, I don't know his name; I said I wanted a job; he said he was going to repair, and fetch some old lead from the premises; he desired me to wait at Berkeley-street, and he would go to a gentleman that he would recommend me to; he came with a piece of lead; he said there was another piece; he went in, and in ten minutes brought the other piece; I was going with him with the lead; I stopped to ease myself at Manchester-square, and he went on; the watchman stopped me, and asked me where I was going with it; I said, to Mr. Woods; he took me to the watch-house, and I staid there all night, and in the morning I was taken down to Marlborough-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-62

62. JOHN CULVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , three brass collars, value 1 s. and six deal boards, value 6 d. the property of John Isbister and Caleb Isbister .

JOHN ISBISTER sworn. - I am in partnership with my brother, Caleb Isbister , straw hat manufacturers , No. 12, Foster's buildings, Whitecross-street ; the prisoner was a journeyman with us about eighteen months; we missed a machine we used in our business; we were led to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 1, Paul's-alley, Redcross-street.

Q. You went there without a warrant at first? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner there? - A. No, he was in custody.

Q. How do you know they were his lodgings? - A. Because we were in the habit of sending for him there, and he told us they were his lodgings afterwards; we got a warrant; I went with Joshua Bray , a City officer, and he delivered some small keys to the officer the first time.

Q. When you went the second time, did the prisoner accompany you? - A. He refused to let us search without a warrant; when he found we had a warrant, we searched the room up one pair of stairs; we searched the lower part of the house first, and found nothing.

Q. Was the prisoner with you the second time? - A. No; he was with us the first time; we went three times altogether.

Q. The first time you went without a warrant, and without the prisoner, and the second time without a warrant? - A. Yes, and the prisoner with us; he refused we should make the search, because he said we had no right to do it without a warrant; then we returned for the warrant.

Q. When was that? - A. On Monday, the 29th of October; Joshua Bray , Edward Tring , and my brother, and me, went together; we went then without the prisoner; we searched the lower part of the house, and found nothing; then we went up stairs, and searched in the room on the one pair of stairs, which was pointed out as the prisoner's apartment.

Q. Did you get the key? - A. Yes; we found on the top of the Dutch clock, in the apartment, the three collars, a small chisel or punch, and a quantity of boards, about ten.

Q. Was there any of the boards that you knew by any particular mark? - A. Yes, two; one had a name, the other had been cut asunder, and cut off a part of the name.

Q. Did you see any boy in the house? - A. Yes; there were several children in the house.

Q. Did you see any difficulty about the key? - A. Yes; the second time, when the prisoner was with us, we were led to the room by a key; the officer had the key, the prisoner was close by; the officer went to put the key in the key-hole, and the prisoner immediately seized hold of it, and after some struggle wrested it out of the officer's hand, and chucked it down stairs; it went down to the very bottom of the stairs; he called out to a boy to run away with it; the boy got the key, and did run; Bray run after him, and brought the key back again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You said something about a machine for splitting straw; I believe you had some difference with the prisoner - you thought he wanted to take a copy of it? - A. Yes.

Q. These boards were part of boxes which had contained straw, and sent from the country? - A. Yes.

Q. Are not these boxes used for fire wood? - A. Parts of them are.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Godsell, a carpenter? - A. Yes.

Q. Has he ever had any boxes from your house? - A. Only one; I gave it to him to alter, and he brought it back again.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Godsell had only one to alter, and that he returned? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever give the prisoner any of them? - A. No.

JOSHUA BRAY sworn. - On Saturday, the 27th of October, I went with the prosecutor, and on the 29th I went to the watch-house, where the prisoner was locked up.

Q. Did you go afterwards to his lodgings? - A. Yes, in Redcross-street, with a key for him to open the door, and to look at it; when we came there, his landlady insisted we should not search.

Q. Did you go the second time? - A. Yes; the prisoner was sent for, and directly he came, he said we should not search, because there was no warrant; I insisted upon seeing his apartments; he shewed us up stairs; when I went to put the key in the key-hole, after a long struggle, he got the key out of my hand, and threw it down stairs, and called to a boy to run away with it; I caught him before he got out at the door, and then we took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. In that room, when you came the third time, what did you find? - A. Three brass collars, a punch, and some boards; I have the collars; the other constable has the boards.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - I am a constable; I went with Bray.

Q. You brought some things from the lodgings, and have got them? - A. Yes. (Produces them.)

Q.(To Isbister.) Are these collars your property? - A. Yes.

Q. Are the boards your property? - A. Yes; there appears to have been an endeavour to deface the writing, but it appears sufficient for me to know it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have sworn to these collars - are there not thousands of these collars at every brass foundery? - A. No; they are made to my order, and mine only.

- LARKIN sworn. - Q. Look at these boards, and tell us if that is your writing? - A. It is.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

JOHN GODSELL sworn. - I am a carpenter.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - A. Yes; I have worked for him these three years making boxes.

Q. You had old boxes to make up into other articles? - A. I had one box to mend a box lid; I took it home, and glewed it up, and they wanted an addition to it.

Q. Did any part of that box remain in your hands, or did you give it to the prisoner? - A. No, I believe I took it in my basket to the prisoner's lodgings.

Court. Q. What did you take to the prisoner's lodgings? - A. I made him a table.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-63

63. MARY BURNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a counterpane, value 2 s. two blankets, value 6 s. a set of fire-irons, value 6 s. a tea-kettle, value 2 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a looking-glass, value 1 s. and several other articles, the property of James Price , in a lodging-room, let to her by contract .

It appearing in evidence that the lodging was let to the husband of the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-64

64. MARY BURNETT was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a cotton gown, value 7 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a cloak, value 3 s. a candlestick, value 2 s. and several other articles the goods of James Price .

MARGARET PRICE sworn. - I know the prisoner On Saturday morning, the 20th of October, she came into my room as I was at work; my gown and skin were laying on the chair, my black cloak hung one hook on the door, and the brass candlestick was one shelf along with several more; when my work was

done, I got up to put the gown and skirt on, and they were gone; I am in the watch business, and being Saturday I was in a hurry, and did not observe her.

Q. How long after she was in the room did you miss them? - A. Not above a quarter of an hour.

Q. How long did she stay in the room? - A.Not long; she seemed in a tremble, and frightened, I do not know for why; I went down stairs to see if I could see her in the yard, I could not see her come up again; I had not been up long before two ladies came to ask for my lodger; I said, my lodger is not at home, for she has robbed me; one of the gentlewomen was the woman that gave her a character when she took the room of me; then she said, she has robbed this gentlewoman of the furniture of a four-post bed; I went down into the court, and sent for a constable; she never returned till the officer took her.

WILLIAM SPICER sworn. - I am a constable, I know the prisoner, I went in search of her, I found her on Tuesday, the 23d, in the afternoon, going up Goswell-street; I saw her sitting on some stones by the road-side; I apprehended her with this gown on, (producing it;) I searched her, I found a few more duplicates besides what she had left behind in the lodging at Mrs. Price's, I found them myself in the lodging

CHARLES BERRY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you know her person? - A. No.

Q.Somebody pawned a petticoat with you? - A. Yes, it was the 20th of October; she pawned a candlestick the same day.

Spicer. I found the silk cloak at a poor person's at Hoxton, where the prisoner said she had given it away.

(The things were produced, and identified by Mrs. Price.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-65

65. ANN LOCKHART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a blanket, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Benjamin Wallis , in his dwelling-house, let by contract to the prisoner as a lodging .

SARAH WALLIS sworn. - I am the wife of Benjamin Wallis ; I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane ; I let the first floor seven or eight months ago to the prisoner; she was taken up for another affair, I sent my husband up to see if my things were among them.

Q. Had you missed any thing at that time? - A. Yes, when she was taken before the Justices, she gave up the tickets.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I can produce the four tickets, the pawnbrokers will produce the property; I got the tickets from the husband, Mr. Wallis.

BENJAMIN WALLIS sworn. - I am owner of the house where apartments were let to the prisoner; I heard the prisoner was taken up to the watch-house; I went into the room where she lodged, and missed the blanket, two sheets, and a flat iron; when we came before the Magistrates at Marlborough-street, I asked her to give me up the duplicates of my property, accordingly the duplicates were laid down before the Magistrate, and delivered to the officer.

Q.(To Kennedy.) Q. Did you get these duplicates at the office? - A. I did; I did not see the prisoner deliver them up.

Q.(To Wallis.) Did you see the tickets delivered up? - A. Yes.

THOMAS PRITCHETT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I had a blanket, sheet, and flat iron; they were pledged at my shop; I know the prisoner, but cannot remember her bringing them.

Q. Look at the duplicate, is that your's? - A. Yes.

Q. Were those things pledged under that duplicate? - A. Yes.

(The property identified by Mrs. Wallis.)

Prisoner's defence. Some time after I took the lodging, my husband was taken very sick.

Q.(To Mrs. Wallis.) Did you let the lodgings to the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was her husband with her? - A. No.

Prisoner. My husband was taken bad through a hurt he had two years ago; I pledged these things out of my room, and meant to return them; my husband brought the tickets to the Justices, and I gave them up; he went on the Saturday to pay five shillings for the rent, and said if they would give the tickets up, he would get the things out.

Q.(To Mr. Wallis.) Had you any conversation with the prisoner's husband? - A. No, I never saw the man but once in my life.

Q. Did any person, pretending to be her husband, take the lodging of you? - A. No.

Q. Did he, as her husband, pay you five shillings at any time? - A. The Saturday after she was taken up, he came and paid for the room; I asked what was to be done about my things; he said, he had taken them out so often, he would take them out no more.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-66

66. JAMES PIERCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , a silver watch, value 10 s. the property of John Jenkins .

JOHN JENKINS sworn. - I live in Nightingale-lane, Limehouse .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; on the 11th of November he came to my house, I asked him to come in and stay, as it was a rainy day; in about half an hour I had occasion to go up stairs, and upon going up I saw the prisoner draw near the fire; when I came down stairs, he was gone; in about a quarter of an hour I found the watch missing that hung over the mantle-piece.

Q. Are you perfectly sure it was there when you went up stairs? - A. Not perfectly, but I believe it was there; my wife missed it, I left her in the room below stairs; when I went up into the room the prisoner was in; I was out all the morning, I noticed the watch hanging up when I came home, that was about an hour and a half before the prisoner came; I looked to see what o'clock it was, nobody had been there but me and my wife; when I missed the watch, I went to the

nearest public-house to see if I could see him; I went to two public-houses, but could not see him; I returned, and in about ten minutes, looking out, I saw the prisoner going by the house, he was reeling as if he was intoxicated.

Q. Did he appear intoxicated when he came about the lodging? - A. I noticed he was in liquor when he sat down in the chair; I followed him, and in about a few minutes he got into a house, I went in after him.

Q. A public-house? - A. No, a private house; I stopped at the bottom of the stairs, and called out Jim; he said, who wants me? and came down; I asked him if he would step over to my house, I wanted to speak to him; he came over to the room where the watch hung, and I asked him if he had seen any thing that hung upon that nail; he said, no; I asked him two or three times, he still refused; I stooped down, and heard the watch tick in his pocket, it was in the lining of his breeches a good way down; after I told him he was the man that had my watch, he asked me to go out backwards, he wanted to speak to me backwards; I told him no, the door should not be opened; he made a stoop, however, by the door, and slid the watch on the table.

Q. Describe the action as well as you can? - A. He unbuttoned his coat, and slid it out under the skirt of his coat on the table.

Q. He did this in a way perfectly open for you to see? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw him unbutton his breeches? - A. Yes, he took the watch from the inside of his breeches; I took up the watch, a labouring man came in, I left him in his custody with my wife, and went myself for a constable, and gave him in charge. (Produces the watch.)

Q. Are you in any business? - A. I work in the Wet Docks, I am foreman of the warehouse.

THOMAS PERKINS sworn. - I am a watch-housekeeper; Jenkins came to me on the 11th of November, to take charge of the prisoner; I asked the prisoner how he came to do such an action as to rob the man of his watch, and he said he should not have done it if he had not been so much in liquor, he did not know what he was doing; I took him to the watch-house.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-67

67. MATTHEW WEBSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , one handsaw, value 3 s. an axe, value 1 s. and a hammer, value 4 d. the property of James Burnett .

SAMUEL ALDER sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he pledge a hand-saw with you? - A. He did not pledge the things, he offered them to pledge the 27th; suspecting them to be stolen, I detained them, and gave him into custody of an officer; I gave the things to the officer.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, and received the hand-saw from Alder, I have had it ever since; I got the handsaw from Alder's; I never saw him before.

JAMES BURNETT sworn. - I am a carpenter; the prisoner Webster is a sawyer where I work.

Q. Look at that saw - do you know that saw? - A. Yes, it is Stevena, maker, and my name is on it; know it to be mine; it was put in a house where we work for safety; on Tuesday evening, about five o'clock. I missed it on Wednesday morning.

Q. What time did the prisoner come to pledge this with you? - A. About a quarter before seven.

Prisoner's defence. I was out of work, and walking about all day; I could not get any work that day; I had no victuals, I did not know what to do.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-68

68. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a pair of breeches value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a neat handkerchief, value 4 d. the property of William Irvin

WILLIAM IRVIN sworn. - On the 19th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, as I went up to bed, I missed my things out of the window-seat in the bed-room.

Q. Did she live in the same house? - A. No; I mentioned it to my fellow servant, and she knew nothing of them; I mentioned it to one of the lodgers, and she said the woman was brought back that had got my things, I saw them immediately after.

MARY MADDER sworn. - I was out on an errand and coming in at a private door, saw the prisoner coming out.

Q. Do you live in the same house with Irvin? - A. Yes; I knew she was no lodger in the house, and the room having been robbed before I followed her and brought her back; she had the young man's property upon her. (The things produced.)

Irvin. These are my property; there is no mark upon them, but I know them to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. I had a walk out of the country, forty miles, with three children; I was so tired I sat down to rest at a street door; there was a hat, and I took it up, but as to the inside of the door, as I have three fatherless children, I never was within the door.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18041205-69

69. THOMAS JACKSON and SARAH RUMBOLD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , a canvas bag, value 1 d. a seven-shilling piece, and a Bank note, value 2 l. the property of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT sworn. - I am a sailor : I was in company with the two prisoners on the 22d of last month, at the George, in George-yard, Whitechapel , between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; we had half a pint of gin to drink; then after that, we had another; then she took me round the neck, pretending to kiss me, and put her hand into my right-hand pocket and took out a brown purse.

Q. Did you perceive her put her hand into your pocket? - A. No; I had just before taken the purse out of my breeches pocket, to get change, to pay for half a pint of gin, to Mrs. Sherwood, the landlady; she would not give me change; she said I had smaller money

in my pocket, and I gave her a seven-shilling piece to take for it; she gave me a dollar, a shilling, and four-pence in halfpence; I then put my purse into my right hand waistcoat pocket; Sarah Rumbold was sitting by the side of me.

Q. How soon after this was it she put her hands about your neck? - A. I suppose in the course of about five minutes; Jackson went out almost directly, and she allowed in about five minutes; I did not miss my purse till Mrs. Sherwood wanted me to leave my money with her; that was directly after Sarah Rumbold went out; I felt for my purse, and found it missing; it contained a 2 l. note and a seven-shilling piece; when Mrs. Sherwood laid down the dollar, Rumbold took it up before my face.

Q. Did you not quarrel about it? - A. That I said nothing about.

Prisoner Jackson. Q. Do you charge me with the money you lost? - A. No, only your receiving it of Sarah Rumbold .

Jackson. Q. He wanted to fight and quarrel with me all the time we were in the house? - A. No such thing; I said if the girl liked to go with him he might go with her; if not she might go with me.

ELIZABETH SHERWOOD sworn. - My husband keeps the George.

Q. Do you remember the night of Jackson and Rumbold coming together into your house? - A. Yes, the d of last month; they had either three or four half-pints, I cannot say which; Wright was somewhat the horse for liquor, but very little; he asked me to take payment for the gin out of a 2 l. note; I refused changing it, telling him he had smaller change; he then gave me a seven-shilling piece; I gave him a dollar and shilling, and fourpence; Rumbold took the dollar before his face and mine.

Q. He did not object to that? - A. No he did not.

Q. Where did he put the 2 l. note after you refused to change it? - A. In a small purse in his right hand waistcoat pocket, Jackson went and spoke to him at the bar, was rather the worse for liquor, but not drunk; he not pay any part of the gin, he said he was going me to get a fire for Sarah Rumbold , for she was going to stay with George, then Sarah Rumbold went out in less than ten minutes I asked George Wright to see me his 2 l. note that he might not lose it, when ting his hand in his pocket he found it was gone; instantly went out to the Office myself; it was between eight and nine; I got a couple of Officers, and her searching several public-houses we found them at the Black Swan, going to bed; it was at the first house down Rose-lane, and they were taken into custody.

SUSANNAH MILES sworn. - I was in Sherwood's tap-room on the 22d of November last; I saw Jackson, Sarah Rumbold, and Wright, there; they were ing at the same table and I opposite to them; I saw Sarah Rumbold put her hand about his neck, with a ence to kiss him, and took a little bag out of his left hand pocket, and give it to Thomas Jackson; Jackson went out almost directly after; Sarah Rumbold t out in about five minutes.

Q. What did you do? - A. I sat where I was till Sherwood challenged me with it, and then I told her.

Q. How near did you set to Wright? - A. A great off, I suppose the length of this table.

Q. When you saw a theft of this sort committed, how came you not to take notice of it? - A. Because I did not wish to trouble my head with it, if I could help it.

Q. What are you? - A. An unfortunate woman.

Q. Do you know either Sarah Rumbold or Jackson? - A. Yes, I have known them a good bit; I never knew any harm of them before.

Q.(To Mrs. Sherwood.) Do you know the last witness? - A. Yes; by using my house, the same as the others.

Q. She did not sit at the same table with these people? - A. No; she sat on a bench towards the fire, about two yards from Wright.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street, Whitechaple.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Sherwood sending for you? - A. Yes; on the 22d of November she came down to the Flying-horse, Lambeth-street; I called Nowlan, my brother officer, and we went in search of the prisoners in different places, and next door to the Black Swan, in Rose-lane, Spitalfields, we found them; we went up one pair of stairs, we knocked at the door some time before they would open it, it was bolted on the inside, I believe; when I opened it, Sarah Rumbold was sitting on one side of the bed undressed, and Jackson at the foot of the bed with his clothes on, he rather flew in a passion, and wanted to know what business we had there; I told him we came to look for a two pound note, and a seven-shilling-piece; I looked about the bed and found Sarah Rumbold 's pockets, lying on the bed; in her pocket I found the eleven shillings and sixpence in silver, ten shillings, and three sixpences, and eight shillings in penny-pieces and halfpence, I turned them out on the table, and counted them; Nowlan searched Jackson, but found nothing upon him; I then asked him how he came by that money, I mistrusted they had changed a two pound note; Jackson said, no, it is money that I gave her; Sarah Rumbold immediately said, it was not his money, it was her's; we then searched the room, Jackson knocked the candle out once or twice, he was very obstinate, he said the house should not be searched, they had nothing there but their own; we then got a light, and searched the house again, but found nothing more, we then took him into custody; on the road going to the watch-house, I asked Jackson how he could be such a fool to get into a hobble to rob this poor sailor; he said, he was very sorry, and if he had not been drunk he would have had nothing to do with it; we then took him to the watch-house, and in the morning, when we took them out, he begged to go to his master, and he would get the money, and make it good to the sailor.

Q. On the over-night, did he appear to you to be drunk? - A. Yes; Jackson was very much so, Rumbold was not; I asked Rumbold in the morning where she had changed the note; she said she could not tell; I then asked her what she had done with the remainder of the money; she said she could not tell, that was all she had; and she could not tell whether it was a one-pound note or a two-pound note.

Prisoner Jackson. Q. Can you say, positively, I had any of that man's money? - A, No.

Rumbold's defence. That gentleman sent that young woman to me, and she came to me before I was out of bed and said George Wright wanted to see me, at the

George; I went up, and she was sitting by him by the fire; he called for a quartern of gin, and parted it between that girl and me; he asked me if I would go abroad with him in the Royal George, lying at Gravesend; we were all drinking together, he was so much in liquor he did not know whether he gave the money or lost it; the officer came to my room and took out one pound six shillings, and two duplicates.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Had you seen this girl in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. The other girl with her? - A. Yes.

Q. You had some gin then? - A. Yes.

Jackson's defence. I drank some of the liquor with them, but I never handled a farthing of his money.

Jackson, GUILTY , aged 36.

Rumbold, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18041205-70

70. WILLIAM BOWEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

There being no evidence against the defendant, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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