Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th September 1804.
Reference Number: 18040912
Reference Number: f18040912-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old-Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 12th of SEPTEMBER, 1804, and following Days,

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY RAMSEY AND BLANCHARD.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED, By Authority of the CORPORATION of the CITY of LONDON, By W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1804

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN PERRING , LORD-MAYOR of the City of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN , Bart. Aldermen of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Recorder of the said City; PETER PERCHARD , Esq. THOMAS SMITH , Esq. Sir MATTHEW BLOXAM , Knt. Alderman of the said City; and NEWMAN KNOWLYS , Esq. Common-Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City, and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Laycock ,

Richard Caley ,

Joshua Vevers ,

Robert Howard ,

William Underwood ,

Archibald Arbuthnot ,

William Philpit ,

John Lee ,

Gervaise Rainse ,

William Slyfield ,

Samuel Beck ,

Thomas Hayward .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Bercher ,

Thomas Colewell ,

John Clark ,

Laurence Row ,

Arthur Hemmitt ,

Thomas Gower ,

Thomas-Watson Turner ,

Thomas Hawkins ,

Frederick Dibble ,

William Weedon ,

James Barnham ,

William Mann .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Henry Conway ,

Richard Friday ,

Richard Willmott ,

Thomas-Jarvis Sambrook ,

James Everett ,

George Ewington ,

Thomas Maddox ,

William Dixon ,

Henry Turner ,

George Webb ,

Zachariah Halmett ,

John Harrington .

Reference Number: t18040912-1

430. JOHN PERRY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Walter West , about the hour of two, on the 17th of July , and burglariously stealing therein a brass warming-pan, value 5 s. the property of the said Walter West .

WALTER WEST sworn. - I live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; I am a smith and ironmonger .

Q. Were you at home on the night of the 17th of July? - A. Yes; we generally go to bed together as near as possible; I was the last of the family that was up; it might be between ten and eleven o'clock when we went to bed.

Q. Did you make your house fast that night before you went to bed? - A. I have every reason to believe that I did make every pin and bar fast; I am in the habit of doing it every night; about two o'clock in the morning I was alarmed by the ringing of my bell by the constable of the night and the watchman; they told me my house was broke open; when I came down stairs, I saw two or three squares of glass in the window was broke, and the shutter was down, the glass of the window was whole when I went to bed, and the shutters were all up.

Q. Did you lose any thing? - A. Yes, a brass warming-pan, which I was shewn the same day; it has my own hand-writing on it.

Q. Did you miss it before you was shewn it? - A. I cannot say I did, but I know it to be mine by the writing that is on the inside of it.

JOSEPH FAULKENER sworn. - I am a watchman: About half past twelve o'clock, we had an alarm like a window being broke open; I went all round my beat, and could not find any thing the matter any where; I saw two men walk the opposite side of the way, but I did not take them, as I could not find any thing amiss then; about two o'clock we heard another alarm down the street, like the noise of a copper or pan; whatever it was, we could not tell; we saw the prisoner walking up to a cart that was tilted up; it belongs to a chimney-sweeper; and before we got up to him, he got from the cart, and was on the pavement, and we took him to the watch-house; we searched him; he had nothing upon him but a knife; I went to the cart after he was taken to the watch-house, and there I found a crow bar, which I believe was the handle of a saucepan.

Q. Did you observe whether the house was broke open? - A. I went over the way, and found a shutter was down, and three squares of glass broke, and a bottle basket standing outside of the window.

RICHARD NELSON sworn. - About a quarter past two o'clock, I was standing outside of the watch-house door, I am constable of the night; I heard a noise of something fallen, like the noise of a pan of some kind; looking steadfast, I saw the prisoner on the outside of the window of Mr. West.

Q. How far might the watch-house be from the house? - A. About the distance of fifty yards.

Q. Was it light? - A. Just break of day; I saw the prisoner fall from a basket that he stood upon, under the window; I immediately pursued after the prisoner, and saw him cross over the road.

Q. Did you see whether he had any thing with him? - A. Not apparently to my sight; the prisoner was making up to a cart that was tilted up; I saw the prisoner stoop; I did not see him lay the property down; when he returned from the cart, I got up to him, and laid hold of him; the watchman was behind me at the same time; I delivered him up to the watchman, who took him to the watch-house; I rung up Mr. West, and told him his house had been broke open; I asked him if he had lost any property; he said, yes, he had, a brass warming-pan; he told me it was marked the price and the width, it was an eleven inch pan; I searched the prisoner, and found nothing upon him but this little knife; his apron was all over blood, and the glass that was broken from the window was the same.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Walter West said on his examination he did not miss any thing; the last witness has said that Mr. West did miss the brass warming-pan; I was returning home from the other side of the water when I was accosted by this gentleman and the watchman, and they said I must go with them; they took me to the watch-house, and searched me; and after that the watchman came in, and said, here is another man we found sleeping in the carts; they put him away separate from me; they likewise stopped another man with a screw-driver upon him; the watchman let him go; the constable said to him, you should not have done so, you should have brought him here; I was on my road home, it was not daylight; I know my innocence; I have not troubled my friends, for fear that I should lose my bread hereafter.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-2

431. MARTHA BEARD , MARY HARRIS ,

ANN JOHNSON , FRANCES-ELIZABETH SINGER , and JANE WILLIAMS , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Borers , in the dwelling-house of John Beard , on the 1st of September, and forcibly taking from his person, and against his will, a pocket-book, value 1 s. a Bank of England note, value 2 l. and three Bank-notes of 1 l. each, the property of the said Joseph Borers .

JOSEPH BORERS sworn. - (The witness being a foreigner, the questions were put to him through the medium of an interpreter.)

Q. What happened to you on the 1st of September? - A. I went to get a bit of a walk; I was walking in a street; I do not know the name of it; I was called by the signal of a young lady; she was standing before her door.

Q. Was either of the prisoners at the bar one of them? - A. Yes, Jane Williams ; I went into the house with her, and the mistress of the house offered me a glass of brandy; I refused it; after I was in the house, the biggest of the prisoners, Martha Beard , said, if I would speak to the young lady, I had better go up stairs; after I had been up stairs, I came down again, and begged to go to the back door to the necessary; when I came back from there, I said to the ladies, if they would give me the change of a one-pound note, I would give them half a pound.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Then ten shillings was the price -

Court. Q. Who did you give this one-pound note to? - A. I did not give the pound note in her hand; I offered it, if they would give me ten shillings back; I would not give her the pound note, without she would give me the ten shillings.

Q. Which of them did you offer the pound to? - A. To Mrs. Beard; I proposed it to her; whether she understood me or not, she gave me a punch in the guts, a push, and a blow on the stomach; then they all fell on me at once, striking and beating me; the tallest woman, Ann Johnson , took me by the coat, and they all took me by the coat, and tore the part, where the pocket-book was, off; with that they all fell upon me; in the pocket-book there was three one-pound Bank-note, and a two-pound Bank-note; after they had beat me well, I sung out so badly, that they were obliged to open the two doors, and then they shoved me out in the dirt, all four of them; the least one, Jane Williams , is innocent.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You can speak English? - A. No.

Q. The little girl you say is innocent? - A Yes.

Q. How came you to charge her in the indictment with this robbery? - A. She never did any thing to me.

Q. How long were you up stairs with that innocent person before you went into the garden? - A. About three quarters of an hour; when I came down, I wanted to give the mistress the money for her, but I did not give it; I wanted her to go out with me for the change, and she did not choose to go with me; I would not trust her, nor she me.

Q. Did you ever offer or shew her the note at all? - A. No, I did not shew her the note; I offered her the note, if she would give me the ten shillings change.

Q. In what language did you speak to her? - A. I spoke the best I could to make them understand English, or what I could.

Q. Whether this quarrel did not take place between you and them about who should trust the other? - A. I told her to come with me where I was to have my dinner, and I would pay her; she did not choose; I went out about three doors further in the muddy condition I was in, and saw a gentleman there that told me I must go to a Justice.

SARAH CULLUM sworn. - I live next door but one; I was in the yard; I heard the man cry out murder, and looking through the paling, I saw Mrs. Beard and all the women beating him; I heard somebody knock at the door, and then the man got out; then I saw the flap of his coat was tore off.

JOHN ANDERSON sworn. - On the 1st of September I was going down Union-street , between the hours of six and seven at night, I heard the cry of murder; knowing it to be an infamous house, I went over; I saw the prosecutor in the yard surrounded by Mrs. Beard and all the girls; the man came out, and went a door or two further: I understood that he had been robbed of his pocketbook; I applied to Mrs. Beard for his pocketbook; she said she would endeavour to find it; I told her, if she did not, I should go to a Magistrate; she went up stairs, and came down in about ten minutes, and said they were looking for it; in about ten minutes after that, the pocket-book was given to me, and the flap of his coat; I opened it in her presence, and shewed her the newspaper that was in it; I said to her, you see here is no notes in the book; she said, there is not; I then returned the pocket-book to the prosecutor, he opened it, and saw there were no notes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were not there at the beginning? - A. I was not.

Q. You were attracted by the noise and scuffle of these parties? - A. To be sure.

Q. What was the cause of this quarrel, you did not know till afterwards? - A. No.

Q. You were not at the first examination; when two of the prisoners were discharged? - A. No.

Q. There were only three taken into custody then? - A. I do not know.

ROBERT LANGDON sworn. - This Joseph Borers came to my house on the 1st of September; I saw him put the Bank notes in a little book;

he went out, and I saw no more of him till he came in about nine o'clock at night; he went up stairs, I carried him a light; his coat was torn, and he put on another coat that was not torn.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you made any application to the prisoners on the part of the prosecutor, that if so much money was paid down, there would be an end of the business? - A. I heard him say, if he had his money, and was paid for his coat, he would drop it.

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - I did not see any thing of the affair; the things were delivered into my care at the Office, I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did not you search the house? - A. We did not search the house; we went into the house, and by order of the Magistrate took these women out.

Q. Did you find any notes on them? - A. No.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the Public-office, Shadwell; I was sent by the Magistrate with the other officer; when we came into the house, they were all dancing; as soon as I came into the house, the prisoner Harris ran out of the house at the window; I brought her back.

Q. Did you search either of them? - A. I did not; we had enough to do to get Mrs. Beard to the Office.

Beard's defence. He came into the house with Williams; I was not present at the first beginning of it; I know no more of it than though I had not been there; a woman brought me a letter, I was talking with her, and when he came down stairs, they said he wanted to go away without paying the lady a compliment.

Johnson's defence. The gentleman went up stairs; when he came down, I was in the yard; he came into the yard, and got scuffling about my clothes; I told him to let me alone, and pushed him from me; he had been up stairs about two hours.

The other prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

All five NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-3

432. WILLIAM HILL , CHARLES CONNELLY , and JOHN LACEY , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Porter , about the hour of seven in the afternoon, on the 3d of August , and feloniously stealing therein one shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. one apron, value 1 s. a child's cloak, value 1 s. a half handkerchief, value 6 d. and a snuff-box, value 6 d. the property of the said Richard Porter .

RICHARD PORTER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Great Ealing parish , I keep a house there: On the 3d of August, between four and five o'clock, I and my wife went out to harvest work; my wife locked the door; my son and daughter went into the country to harvest work for a month; we returned about half past nine o'clock, it was light; when we returned, I found they had broken through a window that had been lathed and plastered up, and the old window in between, they broke through that; the door was locked when I got home; I unlocked the door, and went into the house.

Q. Did you perceive any thing missing? - A. Yes, a shirt and a shift, and my wife's apron, and a little girl's shift and gown, and a half handkerchief; they were all lying on the dresser when I went out; my wife left them there.

Q.Did you do any thing to discover who had broke into your house? - A. A gentleman pursued after them when they got out of the house, and brought the men to the house just as I got home from work.

SARAH PORTER sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; I went out with my husband on the morning of the 3d of August, and we went home together.

Q. What had you left on the dresser? - A. A shirt, a shift, an apron, a little gown, a little girl's shift, and a snuff-box; they had broken a place in the kitchen that was lathed and plastered over a window, and they had turned the cradle upside down.

Q. No child's cloak? - A. No.

SAMUEL GREENHILL sworn. - On the 3d of August, I was coming home from the harvest field, and I saw two men going over Richard Porter's garden gate.

Q. Who were the two men? - A. Connelly and Lacey; I only saw those two go over the garden-gate; after that I saw them come back; the other one was in the lane by the house, his name is Hill; after that I saw the same two go over the gate again; Hill remained in the lane; I saw them come from the house, and get over the garden-gate, and they all three went from the garden together; one of them had a bundle, I cannot say which, I was too far off; by knowing of Porter and his wife, I went into the garden to see what they had been doing of, and I saw a place broke where there was a window at the back of the house. Seeing it had been forced open, I looked, and saw one of the Duke of Kent's men angling in our river; I told him what I had seen, and asked him if he had seen them pass; he said he had; I then asked him if he would go in pursuit of them with me; he was on the other side of the river; I directed him over the river, and he came to me directly; we went in pursuit of them; there were some of Mr. Chapman's men pitching some hay up in a field, and they came with us; the prisoners took through a field where they were reaping wheat, and from

there into the Duke of Kent's pleasure-ground, and there Hill and Connelly were taken.

Q. Did they run through the reaping-field? - A. Yes; I hollaed out stop thief, and they said it was a press-gang that made them run; the other was taken not far from the Duke of Kent's ground.

WILLIAM CHURCHMAN sworn. - I went the other way in search of them; they were taken before a Magistrate, and searched.

WILLIAM HARDING sworn. - I am in the service of the Duke of Kent: I was fishing at the bottom of Porter's garden, about twenty yards from the house; Mr. Greenhill called to me, he shewed me a way over the river, and we went in pursuit of them; I saw two of them taken; I saw them all running as hard as they could from us; Mr. Greenhill called out stop thief.

Q. When you saw Lacey taken, did you see whether he had any thing in his hand? - A. He had not at that time; I ran after them; I picked up a snuff-box, it lay in the track they had been running; I did not see it drop.

JOSEPH RAMSROW sworn. - Were you present when the three prisoners were pursued? - A. We were reaping in a field when they came past; I asked them how Burdett came on; they said Burdett was thirty a head on the day's poll; directly after there came along a man with a pitch-fork, his name is Charles Crow , Mr. Chapman's carter; he asked me if I saw them go along; I told him they were about a hundred and fifty yards before him; he said Richard Porter 's house was broke open; I said, is it true; he swore it was; I went with him, and assisted in the pursuit; the first thing I saw, when we were in sight of them, was a child's shift they had taken, it lay in the road; I picked it up, and put it in my pocket; they were then running; I saw a bundle drop from one of them as they got along the path; I will not say who it dropped from then; Lacey had the bundle when they passed me in the field; I ran by the bundle; one threw himself into the hedge; I did not stop for him, I ran after the other two into the Duke of Kent's garden, where I found them among the bushes; I collared them, and held them till I had assistance, which was not long.

Q. What are the names of them? - A.Connelly and Hill.

WILLIAM CHURCHILL sworn. - I was reaping at the bottom of the field; the prisoners at the bar said to me, young man, you are a cutting it up; I said, I am; they made a bit of a stop, and William Hill said to the other two that stopped, come forward immediately; they went forward; in the course of two or three minutes there came a man with a pitch-fork, I cannot say his name, and he said they had broken Porter's house open.

Q. When Hill desired the others to come forward, did they run? - A. They walked about twenty yards, and then they made a run of it, and got over the stile, one man threw himself into the hedge; I, by the desire of Joseph Ramsrow , ran after them, the other two went into the Duke of Kent's garden, they were taken; I immediately found this man lying on his back in the ditch by the hedge, I called to him to come out of the ditch, I told him if he would not come out I would chop the briars away and fetch him out; I began chopping the briars away with my reap-hook, he then got up, and I laid hold of him, and took him to the Magistrate.

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I was pursuing, the same as the rest, and I picked up a bundle, I saw it drop from one of them, but which I cannot say, I picked it up, and went after them, I took it to Mr. Glasse; I was not in the room when it was given to the constable.

THOMAS JAKEYN sworn. - I am the constable: Dr. Glasse sent for me to take the prisoners into custody. (The property produced, and identified by Sarah Porter .)

Hill's defence. I was in town the morning before, I was out of work, I went along with a young man to seek after work; we went to Brentford, and we were told there was a nigher way to town across the fields; that was a bundle of mine I had, it contained three dirty shirts; as for being in his house to transact any robbery I know nothing about it.

Connelly's defence. I am a bricklayer, and being out of work I was seeking after a job, and coming across the fields we saw these men running; I asked a man what they were running after, he said he believed it was a press-gang; as to the property that has been sworn to, I know nothing about it.

Lacey's defence. I had been at Brentford after the election, I saw some men running as I went across the fields, I heard it was a press-gang; I had been at sea about seven years before, so I run; I had a bundle with me of my own.

Hill, GUILTY , aged 24.

Connelly, GUILTY , aged 20.

Lacey, GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-4

433. ISAAC TIBBS and JOHN TIBBS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Daniels , about the hour of ten at night, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein four silver tea-spoons, value 10 s. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. two guineas in gold, a Bank of England note, value 5 l. another note, value 2 l. and two other Bank-notes, value 2 l. the property of Francis White .

FRANCES WHITE sworn. - Q. Is your name Frances White ? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does your husband live? - A. In Wild-street.

Q. Do you live with a person of the name of Daniels? - A. We did, but since then we have left the house.

Q. Where is Mr. Daniels's house? - A. In Wild-passage .

Q. Is that in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields ? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you live there on the 4th of August last? - A. Yes; the robbery was then committed, and I lived there then.

Q. In what capacity did you live there? - A. My husband is a mechanic .

Q. What is Daniels? - A. Daniels is a broker .

Q. Was your husband employed by him? - A. No.

Q. Were you a lodger in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the house did you occupy? - A. The second pair front room.

Q. Daniels keeps the house, and lives in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of the house being fastened and shut up of a night? - A. Yes; I know by being a lodger in the house, I have let lodgers, several times, into the house of a night.

Q. Do you know of the door being fastened the night of the 3d of August; did you fasten it that night? - A. No.

Q. Did you see it fastened? - A. No.

Q. Then, for any thing you know to the contrary, the door might have been open? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you any thing in your lodging that you missed on the 4th of August? - A. On the 4th of August, Isaac Tibbs 's wife was asking me to go to market with her all day; I went with her in the evening, about half past nine, or near ten o'clock.

Q. Was any body left in the apartments that you occupy? - A. Nobody.

Q. In what state was the door? - A. I locked the door on going out, and took the key in my pocket.

Q. By what time did you return? - A. It was exactly ten minutes past eleven o'clock; when I returned, I found my door broke open, and likewise my chest.

Q. In what manner was the door broke open? - A. The lock was forced.

Q. The goods that were lost had been in the chest? - A. They were securely locked in the chest when I went out.

Q. What were the articles you lost? - A. There were a five pound note, a two pound note, and two one pound notes, all Bank-notes.

Q. Were they in a pocket-book? - A. No; They were in a tea-pot.

Q. When had you seen them there last? - A. Before I left the house; my husband had them in his hands at dinner time.

Q. Did you look at them then? - A. Yes; I know the property to be mine, but I do not know the number of them; there was a five pound note I can swear to.

Q. Do you know the two pound note, and the two one pound notes? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you the key of your chest? - A. Yes, in my pocket.

Q. What other property was there? - A. There were four silver tea-spoons, two guineas in gold, a pair of sheets, and a white dimity petticoat.

Q. Were all these articles missing on your return? - A. Yes; and the things in a deplorable condition, and the property was gone.

Q. Were all these different articles the property of your husband? - A. Yes; I got Mr. Isaac Tibbs to go to the pay-table to fetch my husband home, when I found that I was robbed.

Q. Where did Isaac live? - A. He lived in the back room adjoining me.

Q. Where did John Tibbs live? - A. At No. 12, Duke-street, in the Adelphi; I never saw him with my eyes before I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. Did he fetch your husband? - A. Yes, at half past eleven, he came along with him; and he went with my husband to Bow-street, to seek for one of the officers of Bow-street.

Q. You think you should know the five-pound note again if you saw it? - A. Yes; and likewise the tea-spoons.

Q. How long had Tibbs lodged in the same house with you? - A. That I do not know, I had been but three weeks in the house.

Q. Was there any intimacy between your husband and him? - A. No; he never spoke to him before that night, to my knowledge.

Prisoner Isaac Tibbs . (To Witness.) Q. Are you positive that the sheets were in the house that night; I had information that she sent the sheets to be pledged before? - A. Upon my honour I had not; I defy the people to prove that against me.

FRANCIS WHITE sworn. - Q. You are the husband of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of the spoons being put in the chest? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Tibbs was sent for you? - A. He came to inform me that I was robbed; I left eleven pounds and two shillings, in money and notes, with my wife, to put in the chest.

Q. When did you leave it with your wife? - A. On Saturday the 4th of August, about dinner-time, and went to my usual employ at Mr. Prentice's; I am in the cabinet business.

Q. When you were sent for, and you returned, how did you find your apartment? - A. I found my wife in the greatest agony, and the things were

on the floor; the prisoner, Isaac Tibbs , begged that I would make the best of it I could, as it was a bad jobb, and any thing on his part that he could do, he said, he would, to apprehend them, he urged me to go to Bow-street with him, to see some of the Police-officers at the Brown-bear; I went with him there, but the Brown-bear was shut up; he then urged me to go to the watch-house, to ask the constable of the night what way I had better proceed in it.

Q. Did you go there? - A. Yes; and they told me that any person I had suspicion of to take them up, and Isaac, the prisoner, said to me, I hope you do not think it is me, sir, and told me that he was down at the time at Mr. Prince's, in George's-court, Adelphi; it rested from that night till Monday, when I felt myself to have suspicions on Isaac, and my curiosity led me down to Mr. Prince's, in George's-court, on the Monday.

Q. Did this Mr. Prince keep a public-house? - A. He keeps a public-house.

Q. What time did you go there? - A. I suppose about nine o'clock.

Q. Did you make any discovery there? - A. I asked the publican if any person of the name of Tibbs had been there on Saturday evening; he told me there had, and at the time I was taking a glass of gin, John Tibbs , the prisoner at the bar, came in for change of a five-pound note; either Mr. or Mrs. Prince told him there had been a gentleman inquiring for his brother; and when he had got his change for his five-pound note his brother Isaac came in, and met me in the passage in Mr. Prince's house, Mr. Prince said, here is a gentleman wants you; I said to him, I wished to ask his advice if he could give me any information which way I had better proceed; he asked me if I knew the number of the notes; I told him I did not; he said, he thought I had better get a search-warrant, and search George Daniels 's house, where it was committed; upon this information I wished him good morning, and left him; I asked Mrs. Prince if John Tibbs had not changed a five-pound note; she said he had; I asked her to give me leave to look at it, she gave me the sight of it at a distance; I was perfectly satisfied in my own mind that that was my five-pound note that I lost on the 4th of August; I went immediately from there to the Brown-bear in Bow-street, where I met with Mr. Atkins, the Police-officer; we went immediately in search of the two prisoners at the bar.

Q. Where did you go? - A. We went to the father's house, in Duke-street, in the Adelphi; not finding them there, the women in the house told me they were gone into a place to remove some coals, or something, I am not positive; I remained in the house, while the officer went to the place where they described, there he found the two prisoners.

Q. Did he bring the two prisoners to where you were, at the house? - A. Yes; we went from there to Mr. Prince's with them; the Police officer asked them if they had a five-pound note; they denied having a five-pound note.

Q. It was before you went to Prince's that he asked that question? - A. Yes; we went to Mr. Prince's with them, and asked Mr. Prince which of the brothers it was that changed a five pound note, and Mr. Prince told us it was John Tibbs .

Q. You had seen John change it? - A. I had seen John change it.

Q. What did John say? - A. He did not say any thing particular.

Q. What became of the note? - A. Mrs. Prince had the note; I have seen the note and the spoons at Bow-street.

JOHN PRINCE sworn. - Q. You keep a public-house in George-court? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of either of them changing a five-pound Bank of England note? - A. Yes, John.

Q. When was it? - A. On the 6th of August; I think it was about ten o'clock in the morning, as near as I can guess.

Q. Did you give them the change, or your wife? - A. I had the note in my hand, and my wife told out the change; I recollect what was the change.

Q. Did you keep the note, or your wife? - A. My wife took it; the change was four one-pound notes, a half-guinea, and the rest in halfpence.

Q. Did you tell Francis White , in the presence of the two prisoners, that you had given the change to John Tibbs ? - A. Yes; John Tibbs denied having change, and we both said that he had change not many minutes before.

SARAH PRINCE sworn. - Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember giving change to either of them for a five-pound note? - A. I do; it was to John, on the 6th of August.

Q. After he had the change, you took the note - what did you do with it? - A. I gave it to him to write his name upon it, when I had given him the change.

Q. You did not put any mark of your own upon it? - A. I put my name upon it at Bow-street.

Q. Had you the note in your possession till then? - A. I had; I was unwilling to give the note back; I gave change to the full value to oblige him.

Q. Who carried the note to Bow-street? - A. My husband.

Q.(To Mr. Prince.) You carried the note to Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the same that you received from your wife? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her put her name upon it at Bow-street? - A. Yes; I did not like to give the note to the officer.

Q. Did you leave it at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you leave it with? - A. It was left with the Magistrate and the gentlemen.

Q. Was the prisoner alone when he brought the note to change? - A. Yes, John was alone.

HANNAH COLES sworn. - Q. What do you know about this business? - A. The woman that lived along with Tibbs brought me the four teaspoons; she left them under pretence that she brought them out of pledge, and she desired to leave them with me about half an hour, as she was going a little further.

Q. Which of the Tibbs's did she live with? - A. I do not know either of the Tibbs's; I live in Russell-court.

Q. Then you neither know the man nor the woman? - A. I only know the woman as my being a lodger to her father some time ago.

Q. What was her father's name? - A. Stephens, he is dead; he lived in Angel-court, in the Strand.

Q. Do you know whether she is a married woman? - A. I do not know any thing of that.

Q. Did she come back for them? - A. She came, and Mr. Atkins with her, for them.

Q. What became of them? - A. I delivered them to her in the presence of Mr. Atkins.

Q. Were they the same you received from her? - A. I am sure they were.

Q.(To Mrs. Prince.) You say you have known the prisoners a long time - is either of them married? - A. John is, and the other lived with a young woman.

Q. Do you know the name of the young woman? - A. No; I believe it is the same person that left the spoons.

WILLIAM ATKINS sworn. - I am a Police officer of Bow-street: On Monday, the 6th of August, the prosecutor came, and told me he had been robbed, and stated the different things that had been taken away from him, and particularly the five-pound note, which had been changed at Mr. Prince's; he informed me that it was changed by John Tibbs ; in consequence of his information, I suspected the two prisoners at the bar; I went and enquired at their father's first, if they were there, and there I was told by John's wife that they were at a house in Buckingham-street; I went there, and found both the prisoners. Coming along, I asked John if he had been changing a five-pound note that morning; he told me he had not; I took them to Mr. Prince's house, and asked Mr. Prince if either of these two men had changed a five-pound note with him; he told me that the prisoner John had changed one; I took him to Bow-street with Isaac; I searched him, and found in this purse four one-pound notes, a half-guinea, half-a-crown, and six-pence, and in his waistcoat pocket I found a quantity of halfpence; I asked him how he came by it; he said, it was the change of the five-pound note he had changed with Mr. Prince; I asked him how he came by the five-pound note.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him if he would confess? - A. No; he said he had it of his brother Isaac on Saturday evening.

Q. Was Isaac present at that time? - A. No. he was in another room. In another pocket I found a half-guinea and four seven-shilling pieces; I asked him how he came by that, and he said he received it from his brother Isaac. Not finding any duplicates upon either of the prisoners, I then went to John's lodgings; I searched the apartments, and found nothing; I then went in search of a woman of the name of Stephens, who lived with the prisoner Isaac; I met her in Covent-garden; I desired her to go along with me to Isaac's lodgings; she went with me to the lodgings, and I searched some time; she told me it was of no use my searching; she said, there is nothing here; she said, if I would go with her to Russell-court, to Mrs. Cole's, there I should find the four spoons; I went with her, and she knocked at the door, and asked for the spoons that she had left: Mrs. Cole gave them to Stephens, and Stephens gave them to me.

Q. Did she give them to you immediately? - A. Yes, before I went down stairs; she is not here, I could not find her; these are the spoons that I received from her; I have had them in my custody under lock ever since, and this is the five-pound note I received from Mr. Prince at Bow-street; I have had it in my custody ever since, (produces the spoons and the note); I have John's confession before the Magistrate.

Q. Was it taken in writing? - A. I do not think it was; here is another officer here that he mentioned it to first, and then he went and mentioned it to the Magistrate afterwards.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - Q. You are one of the Police officers? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when either of the prisoners were in custody? - A. I was present at the examination the first time.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners before they were examined? - A. Yes; while Isaac was examined, I took care of John in the yard.

Q. Did you promise or threaten him, in case he did not tell? - A. No; he told me he was with his brother Isaac on the night the robbery was done in the court where these people lived, and he waited in the court while his brother went in the

house where the prosecutor lived, and he brought him back the five-pound note and some spoons, and some other things I do not recollect exactly; he told me they had agreed to break open the place before they went, and they took the property home to his own house.

Q. Do you recollect the examination before the Magistrate - was it taken down in writing? - A. I think it was.

Prisoner, John Tibbs . All he says is false, I never saw the man before in my life; Atkins I have seen before.

Q.(To Mrs. White.) Look at the spoons first - do you know these spoons? - A. Yes.

Q. Whose property are they? - A. They are my husband's property; they are the spoons that were in the chest, that I can prove.

Q. How are they marked? - A. They have three letters cyphered on them, F. H. W.

Q. What is the H for? - A. Francis-Hudson White; I am sure they are my own.

Q. Now the five-pound note, have you any knowledge of that? - A. I know it by the name of Morrison that is on it.

Q. You do not know the name of that person to whom the note did belong? - A. I do not; I observed that name upon it.

Q. Did you receive it from your husband? - A. Yes, upon that very day.

Q.(To Mr. White.) Have you any knowledge of that note? - A. Yes, I recollect it by its being so old a one, and I believe there was the name of Morris, or Morrison, or some name of that kind.

Q. Do you believe that is the note which you lost? - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the spoons? - A. I perfectly recollect the spoons, and where I bought them.

Q. Were these initials that are on the spoons put on by your direction? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Mrs. Prince.) Look at the five-pound note first, at the name of John Tibbs - were you acquainted with the manner of John Tibbs 's handwriting before? - A. No.

Q. Look at your own hand-writing, that you are positive of? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. Have you any doubt of it being the note you received from John Tibbs ? - A. It is the same; I had not another five-pound note at the time, and it was not out of my possession.

Isaac Tibbs 's defence. On the 4th of August, I was employed about nine o'clock at night to carry a piano-forte, and on my return, my brother was with me, it was then about a quarter to ten; we went into Mr. Prince's, the place where I had appointed to meet Eliza Stephens , but nobody came while I was there. On my going out of the door I saw her, and from there I went to Mr. Daniels, No. 3, Wild-passage; on going into the been robbed; I went up stairs, and there I observed a piece of paper lying on the stairs; I put it in my pocket, not taking any notice of it till the next morning; Mrs. White asked me to go for her husband, and I went to Mr. White, and he came there with me; in the morning I found it to be a 5 l. note, which I supposed was his, and he not knowing the number of it, and I being in want, I kept it; and when I went to my brother's, on Monday, he asked me for some money; I owed him 24 s. I told him I had a 5 l. note; I then went to Mr. Prince's; they told me there was a person that wanted me, which I saw was Mr. White; I asked him what he wanted with me; he asked me what he had best to do; I told him it was the best way to go to the office; he went to the office, and I went to work at Mr. Mann's, or Mr. Manwaring's, at the bottom of Nottingham-street, to get some carpets out; Mr. Atkins then came, and demanded us away; he asked me if I had changed a 5 l. note; I told him, no; the gentleman that stood up last was the gentleman that came to me at the office; he came to me, and told me, that I had better tell of it at once; I had got into a fine mess; it would be better for me; I know nothing of the robbery.

John Tibbs 's defence. I applied to my brother for the money that he owed me; he gave me the 5 l. note that he had found; he told me if I would get change he would settle with me for the money I had lent him some weeks before.

Q.(To Mrs. White.) You have said that Tibbs's wife wanted you to go to market? - A. She enticed me all the evening; I went out with her about half-past nine; she left me in Covent-garden when the clock struck eleven, and I went home in ten minutes after that.

Isaac Tibbs , GUILTY , Death , aged 19.

John Tibbs , GUILTY , Death , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-5

434. MAURICE CONNER was indicted for that he, at the delivery of his Majesty's gaol in the county of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 22d of October, in the 42d year of his Majesty's reign, being tried and convicted of felony, was ordered to be transported for seven years, to such parts beyond the seas as his Majesty in privy council should appoint; and that he afterwards, on the 5th of July last, feloniously, and without lawful excuse, was found at large, before the expiration of seven years, for which time he was ordered to be transported .

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - (Produces the certificate of conviction.)

Q. Where did you get that from? - A. From Mr. Shelton's office.

(The certificate read, stating, that Maurice Conner was in due form of law, tried, at Justice

Hall, in the Old-Bailey, for that he, on the 22d of October, in the forty-second year of his present Majesty's reign, about the hour of twelve at night, the dwelling-house of Daniel Croney, did burglariously break and enter, and did burglariously steal and carry away one coat, value 16 s. one waistcoat, value 4 s. and one other waistcoat, value 18 d. the property of Cornelius Sullivan , and the Jury upon that behalf, found him, the said Maurice Conner , guilty of stealing and carrying away the said articles mentioned in the indictment, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house, for which he was ordered to be transported for the term of seven years, to such parts beyond the seas as his Majesty, with the advice of his Privy Council, should direct and appoint.

(Signed) THOMAS SHELTON.)

GEORGE READ sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am commander on board the hulks: This man was delivered to me on February the 14th, 1803, he left the ship on the 6th of July, 1803; he was taken up somewhere about Shadwell, I was sent for to identify him.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man? - A. It is the same man.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, in company with Mr. Brown.

Q. When did you apprehend him? - A. On the 5th of July last, in the parish of Aldgate.

Prisoner's defence. I am the man; I have been at sea ever since I left the ship.

GUILTY , Death , aged 55.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-6

435. EDWARD WILLIAMS , alias DAVIS , was indicted for assaulting Robert Briant , senior , in his dwelling-house, putting him in fear, and taking from his person one book, value 2 d. one Bank of England note, value 15 l. four Bank of England notes, value 40 l. two Bank of England notes, value 10 l. two Bank of England notes, value 4 l. and sixteen other Bank of England notes, value 16 l. the property of Robert Briant , senior.

ROBERT BRIANT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a draper and hosier , in Chiswell-street ? - A. Yes, and a King's-tax collector ; that was the money I had collected for the King's taxes: About a quarter after eleven o'clock, on the 16th of July , I took the opportunity, in my son's absence, to count my Bank-notes on my counter; when I had so done, I put them at the further end of the counter, and put them under the banker's book; this man, the prisoner, I had observed perambulating before the house with a pipe in his mouth, and a canvas apron, having the appearance of a porter; I went round from behind my counter to the door, and when I was there, he was handling a pair of corderoy breeches; he said, to a man that was there, I think these breeches will fit me; I retired, and went to my old place behind the counter; he comes in, and meets me, and says, what will you make such a waistcoat as this for? (like the one he had on) I answered him sixteen shillings; he said, will you make it as good? I answered, yes; the moment he said that, he darted to the counter, and knocked off the banker's book, and catched up all the notes.

Q. Had you counted the notes before you put them down? - A. Yes; there were eighty-five pounds.

Q. Were there any ten-pound notes? - A. Yes, there were four; the fifteen-pound note that he took, he got changed at Mr. Savage's, in Houndsditch, and bought the clothes he now stands up in.

Q. When he darted at the banker's-book, what did he do? - A. He took the notes, and ran out immediately; I was not able to cry out I was so alarmed.

Q. Are you sure that he was the person you saw standing about the shop? - A. Yes, I have no doubt at all; he had the pipe in his mouth, and his large apron on, when he came into the shop.

Q. The notes which you have seen since, and which are here now, do you believe them to be your's? - A. I have no doubt at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The prisoner had some conversation with you about some articles? - A. Yes.

Q. There was nothing unkind said on his part? - A. No.

Q. The notes were lying at one end of the counter, you had had them in your hand the minute before, and then you went to the other end of the counter; you were alarmed at seeing the man run away with the notes? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no attempt of any sort at all of his striking you? - A. No.

Q. How long was he in your shop? - A. Not above a minute and a half; Dr. Hamilton saw him coming out of the shop with his pipe in his mouth.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Could the person who was walking about your shop-window, or perambulating, as you have said, could he observe what you were doing of? - A. Yes, through the cavity of the things that were hanging in the window; there were stockings and caps hanging up, and they could see between them; my shop is a very large shop, they could see all over it.

- LEATHWICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Robin-Hood and Little-John.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar at your house on the 17th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. What did he come to your house for? - A. He came and called for a pint of rum and a quart of milk.

Q. How did he pay for it? - A. He gave me a ten-pound note in my hand, he said he had no

other money to pay; I had some suspicion it was a bad one, I took it to the Bank, and there I wrote my name upon it, and then I tendered it them at the Bank.

Q. This was the morning after the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. Should you know the note again? - A.(Looking at it.) I find my own hand-writing on it.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner at the bar that gave you that note? - A. That is the very man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you always write your name upon the back of the notes you receive? - A. I did upon this.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you any suspicion of this note? - A. I had suspicion that it might be bad, or not got cleverly by.

Q. Is that one ten-pound note, you have now in your hand, the ten-pound note you received from the prisoner, and the one you paid at the Bank? - A. It is the one.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Look at that note, and tell us whether that is one of the notes that the prisoner took from the counter? - A. My son can.

ROBERT BRIANT , jun. sworn. - Q. Look at that note; is that one of the Bank-notes that were taken from the counter? - A. It is one out of the three I received, this one I have a copy of, it is 5155, 17th day of February, 1803.

- ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner, in company with Vickery, on the 18th of July, at his lodgings, the Red-lion, in Holywell-street, Shoreditch, between one and two in the morning, he was in bed, and very much in liquor; the notes were taken by Vickery in my presence, and the amount was given to the prisoner; I believe it was fifty-three pounds; the prisoner was asked how he came by them; he said he had them from an executor of his aunt's, at Manchester; after he was in custody, I left him in Vickery's care to take him to gaol.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You also belong to Worship-street, and was also with Armstrong? - A. Yes: I took from the prisoner's waistcoat-pocket Bank of England notes to the amount of fifty-three pounds, and a little cash from another pocket.

Q. Did you ask him how he came by the notes? - A. Yes; he said they were left him by an aunt at Manchester, and they were paid him by her executor, in Whitcomb-street.

Q.(To Robert Briant , junior.) You have an entry of those notes, will you be so good as to look at them, and refer to your book? - A. This one, 3705, a ten-pound, dated the 30th of January, 1803, I am sure was on the counter; 8005, dated the 5th of May, 1804, that is another ten-pound; there is a memorandum of my own writing that that is one that was on the counter; I am sure by my own book, I received sixty-eight pounds out of the eighty-five.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-7

436. GEORGE REACH was indicted for making an assault upon Robert Corbett , on the 7th of August , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, in his dwelling-house, one book, value 3 d. and one Bank of England note, value 2 l. the property of the said Robert Corbett .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT CORBETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a publican in Lower East-Smithfield , the prisoner is a ballast-heaver , he lodged in my house.

Q. Did any woman live with you? - A. Yes.

Q. What name did she go by? - A. She went by my name; she lived with me four years; on the 7th of August I was taken very ill, my wife (as I called her) persuaded me to go to bed; about twelve o'clock I heard a noise, and when I went down stairs I saw the prisoner in an indecent situation with her; I mean a crime that I did not approve of; he ran down stairs into the cellar, and away she goes off; I took the candle, and went to seek after the man in the cellar, and there I saw him with his breeches undone; I said, George Reach , you rascal; he followed me up stairs; he took me in his arms, and dashed me against the partition; I had nothing on me but my night-shirt and my night-cap; I ran up stairs, and came down again just as I went up, only I had put my breeches on, which had a pocket-book with a 2 l. note in it; then he took me round the middle, and struck me with a quart pot; I had no weapon; he then took my pocket-book out of my right-hand breeches pocket; he held it in his hand and went to the taproom door, saying, you shall never see her any more, shaking the pocket-book at me; the street door was opened, and he went out; he took it away, and I saw it in his hands.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The name of this woman that you have been speaking of is Grace Brooks ; the night this happened you was a little so and so? - A. No; I had not drank any thing that night; her name is Mary Brooks .

Q. Oh then you was ill for want of drink; however, you was ill and went to bed; she not coming up at twelve o'clock, you came down down stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. You took up a knife? - A. No, sir, a fork.

Q. You took up a fork, and swore you would kill him? - A. I did so; he struck me and knocked it out of my hand.

Q. And then you swore you would go up stairs and fetch a sword and kill him? - A. Not at that time; that was at the time I came down without

my breeches on; I went up after that and got my breeches.

Q. Then when you got your breeches you got your sword? - A. He took it very coolly, and said, why do not you divorce her.

Q. When you came down first, what weapon did you get? - A. Nothing but the fork.

Q. What weapon did he hit you with? - A. He hit me with his fist.

Q. He just touched you at the elbow, and then away went with the fork? - A. Then I got the candlestick.

Q. You got the candlestick; I am obliged to get it out of you like drops of blood; did you attempt to hit him with the candlestick? - A. I only struck him one blow with the candlestick.

Q. And then he shoved you against the wainscot? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. After that he took the pocket-book out of your pocket; what day of the week was this? - A.On Tuesday.

Q. Did Mary Brooks go out of the house that night? - A. Yes, and he went out too.

Q. Was either of them in the house the next day? - A. No.

Q. You are sure of that; did you go the next day to a Magistrate? - A. No, on Thursday, and I offered three guineas to apprehend him.

Q. You know there are a certain set of fellows, called Police-officers, that find rogues out immediately; you were quite sorry that Mary Brooks did not come back on Wednesday? - A. I was not sorry.

Q. You were extremely glad she did not come back? - A. I was not sorry nor glad.

Q. I ask you if you have not since that published the banns of marriage with her? - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you whether you are come to give evidence of your beating her? - A. She beat me; I struck her once.

Q. Since he has been in custody, have you not said you should like to see him hanged, and that 40 l. blood-money would be a good thing? - A. No, I never said that; she is as wicked a jade as ever lived.

Q. But since then you have put the banns up? - A. She herself put them up.

Q. Upon your oath did not you authorise the publication last week? - A. No.

Q. Nor consented? - A. Yes, I consented; I said she might.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether you agreed to be married or not; she has lived with you ever since? - A. Yes, she is such a turbulent woman, it is out of my power to turn her out.

- DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a carpenter; between twelve and one o'clock, I was in bed in Mr. Corbett's house; it wakened me; I know nothing more than what I have heard Mr. Corbett say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How soon was the prisoner taken up? - A. I believe near a fortnight afterwards.

Q. He came to Corbett's house afterwards? - A. I never saw him.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are an officer belonging to Shadwell? - A. Yes; Mr. Corbett had got him in the watch-house; I searched him, and found nothing on him; he said he was innocent of the robbery.

Prisoner's defence. I have lodged with the prosecutor from the year 1802 till 1804; he had given me particular charge to take care of his house in his absence; I have saved him much beer; and as I have for that time took care of his house, therefore, on the 27th, when he was out of the way, I did as usual; I shut up the shutters and left the street door open; she desired me to carry a small cask of gin down into the cellar; she followed me with a light; the draft of the wind blowed the candle out; he came down stairs; he had neither coat or breeches on; nothing but his shirt; he said, who is there? she said, there is nobody here but George; he made use of very bad expressions, and said he had caught her and somebody rude with her on the cellar stairs; she went and brought him a light; I was coming out of the cellar; he said, Oh, George, George, I should never have expected such things of you; he then said, you rascal, you have been rude with my wife; he immediately went to his kitchen and got a knife; I said to him, recollect, this is my home; if it is your house, I have paid you for my lodging these two years; he was in his shirt; I laid hold of him and shoved him against the wainscot; I said to him, if I have done you any injury, and committed upon you any violence, there is law for it; he said, you rogue, you robber, you have robbed me of all that is dear to me.

Corbett. Give me leave to speak? -

Mr. Gurney. I should have thought you had spoke enough.

Corbett. When I came down stairs, with my breeches on, he robbed me of my pocket-book.

Mr. Gurney. So you said before.

(The prisoner desired Mrs. Brooks to be called.)

MARY BROOKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you lived some time with Mr. Corbett? - A. Yes.

Q. I see you have a black eye, madam; how came that? - A. Mr. Corbett gave it me the night before I went to take the subpoena out.

Q. Upon the night that this happened, did Mr. Corbett come down stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. What was the greatest quantity of clothes

that he had on, when he came down the second time? - A. He had on only a shirt and a night-cap.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How soon did you run out of the house; did you leave them scuffling when you went out of the house? - A. I gave him a light, and I heard him say, you have robbed me of my wife, of all that is dear to me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-8

437. THOMAS WEBB , alias DEAR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a chesnut gelding, value 10 l. the property of Charles Alderman .

CHARLES ALDERMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a surgeon , residing at Battersea? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you send a horse to Hanworth-park ? - A. Yes; at the latter end of May or the beginning of June.

Q.When did you miss him? - A. The first time I missed him was on the 4th of July.

Q. Was it a gelding? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see that gelding produced afterwards at Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the same gelding that you had sent to Hanworth-park? - A. It was the same gelding I had sent to Hanworth-park.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. It is worth about 20 guineas.

EVAN EVANS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are park-keeper of Hanworth-park? - A. Yes.

Q. To whom does that park belong? - A. To the Duke of St. Alban's.

Q. Do you remember this chesnut gelding of Mr. Alderman's? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you miss this chesnut gelding out of the park? - A. On the 4th of July.

Q. Did you see that horse afterwards at Worship-street? - A. Yes, it is the same horse.

Q. How do you know it to be the same horse? - A. By the marks; we make an entry of the most particular marks when we take them in; it is a dark chesnut horse, with a star in the forehead; a great many saddle-marks about it, and a very black tail.

Q. Did you see that horse at Worship-street, at the time the prosecutor, Mr. Alderman, saw it? - A. I saw it there then, and afterwards at the stable.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Alderman.) Q. Was that horse that you saw in the park-keeper's possession the horse you saw in Worship-street, when the park-keeper was present? - A. It is the same horse.

Q. Tell us how it is marked? - A. It is very much marked with the saddle, and has a star in the forehead.

Q. You are perfectly acquainted with the horse? - A. Perfectly acquainted, I have no doubt it is my horse.

JOSHUA EAST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a livery-stable keeper? - A. I keep stables.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him before this time? - A. Yes, I had bought a horse of him on the Friday before the Tuesday that I bought this horse of him.

Q. Have you heard the witness describe the marks of this horse, and does it tally? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you buy the horse? - A. At Sadler's Repository, in Goswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke; I went to the stables, and asked the prisoner the price of the horse; he asked me 20 l. and, after some talk, I bought him at sixteen guineas.

Q. Did you ask him any questions? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you entertain any suspicions? - A. I asked him if it was his horse, and if he knew any person in town; he said, he knew a person that kept the New Inn, in the Old Bailey, as well as his own brother; I went down there with him.

Q. What did he say? - A. He went with me willingly; I asked the landlord whether he knew him before; he said he never saw him before to his knowledge; I then called the hostler, and he said he never saw him before; I walked back with him, and left him in charge with my partner, Mr. Brett, while I went and got an officer to detain him.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you? - A. Nothing.

- BRETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a partner with Mr. East? - A. Yes.

Q. Who had the care of the horse? - A. The horse was in the care of Mr. Sadler.

Q. And you had the care of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I delivered him over to Armstrong and Ray.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You apprehended the prisoner? - A. Yes; on the 10th of July I apprehended him at Sadler's Repository; he said he had the horse of one Mr. Franklin, of White Walton, in Berkshire, to sell for him; I asked him if Franklin lived in town; he said, no; I asked him if he could tell me where to find Franklin; he said he could not; he said he caught it astray on Hanworth-common; I asked him if Franklin was with him; he said, no; he said he had had it about two days; here are six 1 l. notes and one 2 l. which I have been ordered to keep; Mr. Sadler did make some claim of a certain sum of money, but I have not paid him.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I am an Officer; I searched the prisoner; I found in one of his pockets a key: on Thursday I went down to Hanworth, in company with Mr. Brett, with this key; I tried the turnpike-gates; it will undo every turnpike gate upon that road, and I tried the latch of the prisoner's door; it undoes the latch of the prisoner's door where he lodges.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A. No; Mr. Armstrong found the notes.

Q. No bridle? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. That is a key that I have to let myself in when I am out later than the woman's time to go to bed; she let me have that key.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-9

438. THOMAS SLATER was indicted for feloniously making an assault on John Briant , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a Bank of England note, value 5 l. and six Bank of England notes, value 6 l. the property of the said John Briant .

JOHN BRIANT sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I was in the public line at that time; on the 9th of November I met the prisoner at the bar; I live at No. 6, Frogwell-court, Charterhouse-lane; I went to live privately in a room till I could get a place to suit me; I was going down Long-lane on the 9th of November in the morning; it might be between eight and nine o'clock; I met the prisoner at the bottom of Long-lane; he crossed the way, and asked me how I did; I had not seen him some years before that; I asked him how he did; he said times are very bad in Ireland; I have been over there, and indeed, says he, I have been very much distressed for support; I took him into the White Bear, and gave him a pot of beer, a two-penny loaf, and a quarter of a pound of cheese; I pulled out some notes that I had in my pocket; when I took them out of my pocket, he observed that I had more; during the course of the day, he dodged me about, unknown to me; I little thought of what he meant.

Q. Did you see him several times? - A. Yes; in the course of the day, pretty late, I went to the Bank; my landlord lives at the Bank; his name is Banks; I suppose I staid half an hour talking to Mr. Banks; afterwards I came out, and there I saw the prisoner in my way; I then was going home; there is a piece of ground, where there has been an old brewhouse; since it has been pulled down, it is a ruinous place; now I happened to cross out of Long-lane into that ruinous place, and there I met with the prisoner at the bar again; he said to me, deliver those notes, and I gave him the notes mentioned in the indictment, a 5 l. and six 1 l. notes.

Q. You gave him the very same? - A. Yes; the next morning I went down to Lambeth-street, and laid an information that I had lost so and so; they said they would apprehend the man, and send for me at Frogwell-court, where I lived, and that week they did not find the man; then I went to Shadwell office, and saw Mr. Brown; he told me he knew the man very well, and it was very likely he should find him in a few days; I never saw the prisoner from that time till Mr. Brown came and told me.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am very positive; I have known him five years back; I I cannot be mistaken in him.

Prisoner. Q. Was it night or day when I robbed you? - A. Night.

Q. What time of the night? - A. It might be after ten o'clock or near ten o'clock.

Q. Were you coming from the Bank at that time? - A. Let me be coming from wherever I might, you robbed me of that money, or notes however.

Court. Q. At what time of night was it? - A. It was between nine and ten o'clock; I cannot say to a minute; after I got into my own place, and had lost these notes, I heard the clock strike ten; a little after I came out of the Bank, I stopped about an hour with an acquaintance I happened to meet.

Q. Now I must ask you whether you were sober? - A. I was as perfectly sober as I am now.

Q. You had not been drinking? - A. No.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Q. Are you the person that took up the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you take him? - A. On the 20th of July, in Ratcliff-highway; I and Oliver; I said to Oliver, there is a man that I want for a foot-pad robbery; we immediately went after him till such time as I lost sight of him; he ran down an alley; the other officer perceived that he got into a public-house; he went after him another way, and just as he got into the public-house he nodded his head to me; when I got to the public-house, the prisoner ran away; I crossed to the other side of the way, and there I saw him go into a pawnbroker's shop; I followed him and then he went into another pawnbroker's shop; I immediately followed, and looked through the window, and knew it was the man; I have known him several years; I called to him; he answered to the name of Slater; I said, Slater, you must go with me; then I told him what I wanted him for; I secured him between eight and nine o'clock at night; I told him it was for robbing Mr. Briant, about nine or ten months ago; I took down a sketch of what Mr. Briant said when he came to me; it was for a 5 l. note and six 1 l. notes, by a person of the name of Slater; I told the prosecutor to make himself easy; when he came to inform me, I said, I shall

get him, he works at coal-heaving or ballast-heaving; after I apprehended him, Briant came down and swore he was the man.

Prisoner. Q. You have known me for a hard-working man? - A. You have been taken up for having two wives.

Q. I never was taken before a Magistrate in my life? - A. I know you, and I have heard you were gone to Ireland.

JOHN OLIVER sworn. - I was along with Mr. Brown at the time the prisoner was apprehended.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, my prosecutor I know by sight; I have been always a hard working man, he is a false-swearing dangerous man; he asked me if I belonged to a press-gang; I said I did not; I said to him, what do you ask me such a question for; said he, I have got such a house since the death of my wife (he was a publican), there is a dangerous set of men that use my house, I am afraid I shall lose it; and he said to me, you know Pat Dunn, the press-master, I will send them all to sea, and by that means I shall gain the cause. I have nobody to speak for me, I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

Jury. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Was it dark or light? - A. It was a star-light night.

GUILTY , Death .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-10

439. DANIEL SUTHERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , twenty-seven pounds weight of soap, value 19 s. five brushes, value 5 s. three quarts of oil, value 2 s. 6 d. a stone bottle, value 1 s. a bottle of pickles, value 1 s. a bottle, value 2 d. a pint of pickles, value 10 d. two skins of leather, value 2 s. and a ball of packthread, value 6 d. the goods of William Lambert .

WILLIAM LAMBERT sworn. - I live on Ludgate-hill , I am an oilman ; the prisoner was one of my porter s; he had lived with me ever since the 25th of October last: In consequence of information that I received on Thursday, the 2d of August, at six o'clock in the morning, before my porters came to their work, I marked twenty bars of soap with this wafer-stamp at each end; the soap was in a bin in the cellar locked up; about nine o'clock I ordered them all to breakfast; I then examined the bin, and found two of the marked cakes were gone; I then thought that, being an outside mark, it might be defaced, and I procured some wires about two inches in length; I then put them at each end of the bars of the soap; after they were gone from their work in the evening, I examined the bin again, and two other cakes were gone, which made four; on the next day, when they were gone to dinner, I examined the bin again, and there was one more gone; in the evening, after they were gone, I examined it again, and two more were gone, which made three on the Friday; on Saturday, when they were gone to their breakfast, I found one gone; at dinner time there was another gone, and in the evening there were two more gone, which made in the whole eleven bars of soap; from information, I employed a constable to watch him on the Sunday morning.

Q. How many servants have you in the house? - A. Four porters and a shopman.

JOHN WEATHERFIELD sworn. - I am a constable; I was employed to watch the prisoner: On Sunday morning, I waited with Mr. Lambert's nephew from eight o'clock till nine, at No. 47, East-Smithfield, and within a few minutes of nine o'clock, Mr. Lambert's nephew shewed me the prisoner; he had a bag across his shoulder with this soap wrapped up in an apron in it; there were twenty-four pounds weight of soap in the bag; I jumped out of the coach, and waited for the prisoner coming up to the door, he went in at No. 47, at Robarts's, a potato warehouse; I followed him, I never had him out of my sight; he sat down, I went up to him, and told him he was my prisoner; I took the bag and him into custody, and conveyed him into the coach; I then asked him where he lived, and he gave me one or two false directions; by great persuasions we got from him where he lived, and there we found a great deal of Mr. Lambert's property, oil, and a great many other things.

Q. What did you do with Robarts, did you take him? - A. No; they mostly lock the officer out of their house; I secured the prisoner, and took the property.

Court. You did very right, but the house may be watched.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was in open day-light? - A. It was about nine o'clock in the morning.

Court. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Look at the soap? (the soap produced) - A. Here is the stamp that I put at the ends of the bars, and in this one there is the wire; I have some of the same wire left in my pocket, which exactly corresponds with this.

(Mr. Lambert shewed to the Court the piece of wire he had left, and the wire he had then taken out of the soap.)

Mr. Alley. (To the prosecutor.) Q. I suppose you did not take this man without a good character? - A. No, I had a good character with him.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-11

440. WILLIAM BLADES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , three dollars, value 12 s. the property of John Gray and George Gray .

JOHN GRAY sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a goldsmith ; I live in Billiter-square .

Q. Have you any partners? - A. Yes, a brother, his name is George; the prisoner lived porter with me about four months: On Saturday, the 1st of September, about five o'clock, I was called out of my accompting-house; I was informed the prisoner was seen stealing dollars; I immediately took the man into the accompting-house, I searched him, and found three dollars concealed in his right hand; the prisoner at first denied it, and afterwards confessed it.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to confess? - A. I did not; he confessed that he had stole the dollars; when he confessed before the Lord-Mayor, I applied for mercy for him, but on consideration of my being robbed by servants so frequent, I thought it was a duty I owed myself to prosecute him.

Q. Where were they? - A. They were in a drawer under my counter.

Prisoner. (To the prosecutor.) Q. You said to me, if I would confess, you would not do any thing to me; upon that account I acknowledged taking the dollars out of the drawer; as a prisoner at the bar it is the truth; I could take my oath of it; do you remember that? - A. I cannot recollect.

Court. Q. Can you recollect? - A. No, I cannot; if I could, I certainly should not have gone on with the prosecution.

WILLIAM CUTMORE sworn. - You are servant to Mr. Gray? - A. Yes, I am a shopman; I was on one side of the counter, and he on the other, where the drawer opens; I saw him shutting the drawer where the dollars were; I thought that he had taken some dollars; I did not see him; I had suspected him several times before; then I informed my master; I called him out of the accompting-house.

Q. Were you present when he confessed? - A. I was.

Q. Did your master say any thing to him when he confessed? - A. No.

Q. Did you tell your master you saw the prisoner shutting the drawer? - A. Yes, I asked him what he was about at the time; when I first saw him, he made me no answer.

Q. Can you tell what quantity of dollars there were in the drawer? - A. No; they were not in a till, they were in a drawer for that purpose.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge; he observed to me it was very unfortunate that he should be discovered, as he was going away from Mr. Gray, it was the first time he had done it; I am not come here to commit the man; as much as I have said is the truth; I produce the dollars.

Q.(To Mr. Gray.) Whether the dollars you gave to the constable at the Mansion-house, were the same dollars that you took from the prisoner's hand? - A. They were.

Q. Was he going from you at night? - A. He was, I had discharged him.

Prisoner's defence. I must leave it to the mercy of the Jury in your hands.

Jury. (To the prosecutor.) Q. How long had he lived with you? - A. About four months; I had a very excellent character with this man; I was very much hurt when I detected him.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-12

441. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , nine guineas , the property of Joseph Saunders .

JOSEPH SAUNDERS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a post-boy at the White-horse, Fetter-lane: I was on my return from Hampton on the 26th of July, a quarter before one o'clock in the morning; I was ringing the bell in Fetter-lane , to take the horses and chaise in; the prisoner being on the other side of the way, she came over and catched me round the neck, and took the nine guineas out of my pocket.

Q. Nothing passed between you and her? - A. Nothing; before I missed the money, I saw her draw her hand out of my pocket.

Q. When had you last known that you had the money in your pocket? - A. In Holborn I examined, and I never got down from my horses till I came to the inn; the moment I felt the money gone, I taxed her with it; she denied it; I said if she did not produce it, I would call the watchman; the watchman heard me, and he said, what is the matter, Joe; after that the watchman came over, and asked me what she had robbed me off; I told him nine guineas; and she, after some hesitation, produced six guineas of it to me; I then wanted her to give me the rest of my money, and she would not; she was taken to the watch-house, and it was found upon her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had been to the Red-cow at Hammersmith - you had stopped there? - A. Yes.

Q. I am told that the Red-cow gives very strong milk - you were very drunk? - A. I was not.

Q. Whether she accosted you first, or you her? - A. She me.

Q. You are a very good-natured fellow, I am told; what did you give her - instead of giving her three shillings, you gave her three guineas? - A. I did not.

Q. You keep your silver and gold together? - A. No, I do not.

JOHN PARSONS sworn. - About a quarter before one he came home with the post-chaise; he alighted; I heard him ring the bell; I saw the prisoner cross over the way to him; she said, how do you do, my dear, and he said, how do you do, my dear; I was about six or eight minutes leaning over my watch-box; he said, I shall call the watch; I said, what is that; he said, watchman, I want you; I went over, and found with his left hand he had got hold of her right, that she should not put her hand in her pocket, I suppose; I said, what is the matter; he said, this woman has got my money; I said, you have not been long enough; I thought the had given her a lift; at last he said he had been robbed of nine guineas in gold; he said it was wrapped up in paper; he said to me, watchman, I want this woman to deliver up my money, and let me go about my business; she answered him, that she had not got his money, and pointed to a square box that she had pulled out; she said she had a one-pound note that a gentleman made her a present of, and she had spent two shillings of it; she opened the box; there was in it a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and a six-pence; he said, that is not mine, you have got my nine guineas; at last the hostler came and opened the gates, and then six guineas were delivered by the prisoner to him, and the prosecutor gave it me to give to the constable of the night; then I took her to the watch-house, there she was searched, and it was found on her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The first thing that you heard of, was the solicitation of, How do you do and how do you do, my dear? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were they together? - A. About five minutes.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He was sober; I mostly jump out and ring the bell.

ROBERT ROBERTS sworn. - I was constable of the night; she was brought in and searched; there were found on her three guineas, that made the nine, which was delivered to me; I produce the guineas.

- DENHAM sworn. - I searched her by order of the constable of the night all over; I unlaced her stays, being an old offender; I found it at the bottom of her stocking, near the foot; she had no garters on; I knew her before.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-13

442. JOHN BRICE was indicted for that he, on the 18th of May, 1803, at the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, did marry and take to wife one Ann Lee , spinster, and that he afterwards, on the 8th of July last, at the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great , feloniously did take to wife Rebecca Saul , his former wife being then living .

(The case stated by Mr. Alley.)

RICHARD LIDDLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What are you? - A. I am a waiter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. On the 18th of May, 1803, was he married at Mary-le-bone church? - A. Yes.

Q. Who was he married to? - A. To one Ann Lee .

Q. Do you know whether Ann Lee is alive? - A. She is alive.

Q. How long is it since you have seen her? - A. About a fortnight since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am a waiter at Osborn's Hotel, in the Adelphi.

Q. Were you acquainted with Ann Lee on the 18th of May, 1803? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to be acquainted with Ann Lee ? - A. By a person that lodged in the house with her in Newman-street, Oxford-street.

Q. Was that a public-house or private? - A. A private one.

Q. Are you in the habit of frequently visiting that house? - A. No.

JOHN WILLAT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Are you the parish-clerk of Mary-le-bone? - A. I am singing-clerk: On the 18th of May, 1803, John Brice and Ann Lee were married by license. (Produces the register.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You do not know the person of the man at the bar? - A. I do not.

REBECCA SAUL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your friends live at Norwich? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been living some time with your friends in London? - A. Yes, at No. 18, Duke-street, West Smithfield.

Q. Had you the misfortune to get acquainted with the prisoner at the bar when you lived with your friend? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that, did you go to church with the prisoner? - A. Yes, and was married.

Court. Where were you married? - A. At St. Bartholomew the Great.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had you any property that was left you at Norwich? - A. Yes, one hundred pounds.

Q. What became of it? - A. The man at the bar took it.

Court. Q. When were you married? - A. On the 8th of July last.

Mr. Alley. Q. Pray how long did he remain with you after he got your money? - A. Only two days, and then he went down to Norwich to take the money.

Q. Had you a watch? - A. Yes, a gold watch.

Q. What became of your watch? - A. He took it from me.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-14

443. ISAAC GHRIMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , twenty-two ounces weight of bark, value 10 s. the property of John Pistor , William Pistor , and James Pistor .

JOHN PISTOR sworn. - I live in Walbrook , I am a drug-broker .

Q. Have you any partners? - A. Yes, William and James Pistor ; the prisoner was a porter to us; he had lived with us three or four years; we had missed goods of various kinds, and no person having access to our warehouse, we suspected him: On the 20th of July, I fetched an officer with intent of searching his lodgings; as soon as the officer came, I called the prisoner into the accompting-house, and told him, we having reason to suspect that we had been plundered several times, I desired he would go over with us and the officer to see what he had got in his apartment; the officer observed there was something in his waistcoat, which was his handkerchief; the officer told him that was not the place for his pocket handkerchief; he desired to search his pockets; he pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and put it on a chair in the accompting-house; the officer took up his coat, and he found his pocket full of bark; I am not clear whether it was both or one pocket; on which the officer took him away to the Compter; I asked him how he came to rob us in that manner; he said he only took a little for his own use.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Had you said any thing to induce him to say how he came by it - that it would be better for him if he would tell? - A. I do not recollect any such conversation; I have no doubt where it came from; it came out of one of the chests in our warehouse, which the prisoner had been fastening up; he had been just doing that as the officer came in.

Q. Did you examine that chest to see if any thing had been missed there? - A. I did; there did appear to be a deficiency.

Q. Did you at all weigh the bark to see whether there was the quantity or not? - A. I did not.

Q. He had lived with you three or four years? - A. Yes.

Q. He came into the house with a good character? - A. Yes.

EDWARD CARTWRIGHT sworn. - Mr. Pistor applied to me about five o'clock on the 20th of July, and I went to his house; the prisoner at the bar opened the door, and I went into the accompting-house; Mr. Pistor called him in; I observed his handkerchief in his waistcoat; I said, that is an awkward place to put an handkerchief; upon which he pulled his coat off, and threw it on a chair; I examined the coat, and found the bark in one of the pockets; I produce the coat as well as the bark; I was ordered to keep the coat and the bark too.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Is that the same kind of bark you had in the warehouse? - A. Yes, it is red Peruvian bark; it is very scarce; it is worth about twelve shillings a pound.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-15

444. JOHN M'CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , two handsaws, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Purdy .

THOMAS PURDY sworn. - I am a carpenter , and live in Shadwell parish: I cannot tell exactly the day I lost the saws; I was at work in St. George's in the East , at the new buildings; my tools were there; it was in the month of July last.

Q. How long had you seen them before they were lost? - A. It might be an hour, and then in about ten minutes I was sent for; I found it again.

WILLIAM IRETON sworn. - I am a carpenter; I work near there.

Q. What day was it? - A. On the 17th of July, at dinner-time, Mr. Arnold called to me; I went to the back and he went to the front of the building; I saw the prisoner go up the ladder; after being up there some time, he brought down two saws - a tenon saw, and a hand saw; I was looking through a putlock hole in the wall; he unbuttoned his waistcoat, and put it under, and buttoned it and his great coat very tight; then he went out of the back door; I let him go about four yards, and then I stopped him; he asked me what I wanted of him; I told him I wanted those two saws which he had taken out of the house; at the same time Mr. Arnold stepped up to him, and took the two saws from him.

WILLIAM ARNOLD sworn. - I watched at the front; I called this young man to watch at the back of the building; I took the saws from him, and sent for Mr. Purdy; then I sent for Mr. Brown, the officer.

Prisoner. He never took any thing from me.

Court. Here are others that saw him take them from you; it is very unfortunate, to be sure, to have them found there.

- BROWN sworn. - I am an officer; I was sent for by the last witness to come and take the prisoner into custody; he asked me if I knew him; I told him I knew him very well; he was tried about a Session or two back for the like offence.

(The saws produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. They all swear false against me; he bid me to call at that place to enquire after

him, and when I found nobody in the place, I turned back, but to meddle with any thing I did not.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Chapman-street, Shadwell .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-16

445. BETTY FINCH and THOMAS FINCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , two saddles, value 40 s. two double-bitted bridles, value 20 s. and two single bridles, value 10 s. the property of Hugo Meynell , Esq .

GEORGE LAMB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am servant to Mr. Meynell, his horses are kept in Farm-mews, at the back of Hill-street : On Saturday, the 8th of July, about four o'clock, I left the bridles and saddles all safe; there were other horses in the stable; I did not lock the door when I went away; there are gates to secure the yard, it is inclosed; I went the next morning, and found the saddles and bridles were gone.

Q. At the time you left the gates, they were also open? - A. Yes.

Q. You had not seen Thomas Finch at the stables that evening? - A. No, I saw his brother there; his brother has absconded since; they all lived together in one room.

EDWARD TREADAWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You went and searched the lodgings? - A. Yes, at No. 6, Street-buildings, Mount-street.

Q. Who did you find at the prisoners lodgings? - A. I knocked at the door, and nobody answered; I broke the door open, and found the old woman behind the bed; I was searching the room, and in turning down the bed, I found the two saddles rolled up between the bed and the sacking.

- PERRY sworn. - I am an officer: Thomas Finch was brought to me at Bow-street.

SARAH JORDAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you keep the house that Tread-away searched - whose room was that? - A. The daughter took it of me for the mother and two sons; the mother and her two sons lived there.

Q. On the morning on which the lodgings were searched, was Thomas Finch there? - A. I cannot say I saw him at all; we do not live in the same house, we live next door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you know the fact that the brother of Thomas Finch has not been found since this robbery? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-17

446. WILLIAM PEACEALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a plane, value 10 d. the property of James Bateman ; and a saw, value 3 s. the property of John Hodgson .

THOMAS PURDY sworn. - Q. You are a carpenter, and live at Shadwell? - A. Yes.

Q. What is Bateman? - A. He is a carpenter ; he did business for himself.

Q. Where did he work? - A. I do not know where he was at work.

Q. What do you know about this plane? - A. I took a little part of a shop of Mr. Bateman, in a place called Back-lane, Shadwell , to put a few things in; I was going to unlock my door at half past twelve o'clock, on the 24th of August, and the prisoner came to me, he asked whether I could give him a job as a labourer, he had a labourer's shovel in his hand, daubed with mortar; when he spoke, I saw a smoothing plane, a two-foot rule, and a sash-saw, in his bosom; I detained him, and sent for Mr. Brown the officer.

Q. Was there any communication between your shop and Mr. Bateman's - A. Yes; he was coming out of Mr. Bateman's shop, there are two doors to the shop, one for Mr. Bateman and the other for me.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, I took a smoothing plane, and a saw from him.

- BATEMAN sworn. - Q. Look at that smoothing plane? - A. That is my smoothing plane; I live in Back-lane; the saw belongs to a man that works for me, his name is John Hodgson .

Prisoner's defence. I went to ask for a day's work, if I could get it, I am a carpenter; and as I could not get carpenter's work, I asked for labourer's work; I saw a plane and saw lay out in the road, I took them up and looked at them; they came and took me, and said I wanted to thieve them.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped one hundred yards in Back-lane, Shadwell .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-18

447. CHARLES LLOYD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John-William Uther , Esther his wife, and others, being therein, about the hour of one in the afternoon, on the 26th of July , and stealing therein a silk cloak, value 50 s. the property of the said John-William Uther .

ESTHER UTHER sworn. - Q. Is your name Esther Uther ? - A. Yes; my husband's name is John-William Uther , we then lived at No. 2, Crown-street, Finsbury-square , since then, we have removed, my husband kept the house: On the 26th of July last, I was at home, and my children, my husband was out; betwixt twelve and one o'clock, I was sitting in my parlour, and I thought I heard

a noise of a door creeking; I got up, and went to the stairs to go up, and met the prisoner, Lloyd, coming down stairs, I never saw him before; he put his hand up to his hat, and said good morning to you, madam; I looked up stairs through the banisters, and seeing my bed-room-door open, I immediately ran after the prisoner, and called stop thief; he ran down Christopher's-alley, and pulled off his hat, and cried Burdett for ever, and no Mainwaring; he ran from there to Peter-street, where he secreted himself in the house of one of the witnesses, her name is Sarah Lockhart ; I went into this house, and I went into the yard, with Samuel Haines and Emma Lane, Lloyd, the prisoner, was then coming out at the parlour-door, and Haines and Emma Lane stopped him, and said, you are the man that has robbed Mrs. Uther; he said he was not the man, and that he was a man of consequence, and he was astonished that I should stop him in the street; he said he was a serjeant-major in the Sepulchre's corps; he said he could bring people forward to prove that; he begged that I would let him go; I said no, I will not let you go till you go back with me to my house, and I see what I have lost; accordingly I conducted him back, and when he came to my house I went up stairs to see what I had lost; I saw the second drawer at the top open; I looked in the drawer, and as I had laid my cloak there the day before the first thing, I missed it; I came down stairs, and desired they would detain him. In the mean time, the witness, Mr. Harris, brought my cloak in; Mr. Harris said, what have you lost; I said a black silk cloak lined with purple; he said, I have got it, it was thrown into my yard.

Q. Where does Mr. Harris live? - A. In Wilson-street, Finsbury-square; his premises lay back into Christopher's-alley, where the prisoner ran down.

Q. You did not see the prisoner throw it away while you were following? - A. No; he had turned the corner too quick for me to see; Mr. Harris refused to give me the cloak till I sent for an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. This was between twelve and one o'clock in the day time, when you and your children were at home? - A. Yes.

Q. What state was your outward door in? - A. The outward door was open, and the chamber-door was locked, and on the prisoner was found a key that would open it, and eleven other keys in his breeches, by Harper the officer; when I came down in the morning, I left two children in bed, and when they came down the eldest brought me the key, and said she had locked the door.

Q. What age is your little girl? - A. Between nine and ten.

Q. The chamber-door, when you last saw it, was unlocked? - A. It was.

Q. The person, whoever it was in your passage, he said, good morning, and passed on very quick; you looked up your stair-case to see whether your door was fast or shut? - A. I did, and he passed on very fast.

Q. How long was it after that you saw the person again? - A. Not more than a minute.

Q. You lost sight of him for a minute; where was it you first saw him again? - A. I saw him turn the corner of the alley where he dropped the cloak.

Q. How far distant is your street-door from that alley? - A. My street-door is two doors from Wilson-street, and in Wilson-street I saw him turn down the alley.

Q. When you first saw the prisoner down the alley, you observed him with his hat in his hand, talking about the election? - A. Yes; he ran very fast.

Q. The person, whoever he was in your house, it was only a momentary sight you had of him? - A. No.

Q. Now, madam, I am sure you give your evidence in a very decent and becoming manner, you would not undertake to swear to whom you had seen so momentarily? Will you undertake to swear that he is the man that was in your house? - A. What struck my curiosity was, his saying good morning to me, and then he made a little bit of a halt.

Court. Q. That made you take more notice? - A. Yes; when I met him on the stairs, he had on a blue coat, a striped waistcoat, and a pair of kerseymere breeches.

Q. The alley that laid back from Wilson-street is Christopher's-alley, how low down from Wilson-street is that alley? - A. About five or six doors.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I live in Wilson-street, a part of my premises run back into Christopher's-alley: On the 26th of July, Mrs. Harris brought the cloak to me; the child that took the cloak up is here.

ANN HARRIS sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. I am going of eleven.

Q. Can you read? - A. I can read in the Bible.

Q. Have you learned your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether it is a wicked thing to tell lies? - A. It is a wicked thing.

Q. What becomes of wicked people when they die? - A. They go to the naughty man.

Q. Do you remember finding any thing on your father's premises? - A. Yes; there was a cloak chucked in our yard, and I picked it up.

Q. About what time of the day? - A. About one o'clock.

Q. Was it wrapped up in any thing? - A. No, it lay in our gate-way that goes to the alley.

Q. How far from the gate? - A. It might be about a yard; I picked it up, and put it on one of the logs, the dog barked, and my mother came out, and she looked at it.

Q. What did your mother do with it? - A. She put it down again.

Q. Do you know when it was taken from the log? - A. I do not.

Q. Did you examine the cloak particularly - what sort of a cloak was it? - A. It was a black silk cloak lined with purple.

Q. Do you think you should know it again if you saw it? - A. Yes, I should.

Q.(To Mr. Harris.) You received the cloak from Mrs. Harris, your wife? - A. I did.

Q. She was not subpoenaed here? - A. No; the Magistrate did not think it necessary.

Q. You received it about one o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with it? - A. After I took it I went out, and heard there was a cry of stop thief, in the alley; they told me that Mrs. Uther had been robbed; I went to Mrs. Uther, and took the cloak with me, and have had it in my possession ever since; I produce the cloak and a key, Mrs. Harris brought it in to me, the cloak and the key.

Q. Look at the cloak? - A. This is the cloak that was in the gateway.

Q.(To Ann Harris .) Is that the cloak? - A. Yes; that is the cloak that was in our gateway.

Q. Whether at the time you observed there was any lace on it? - A. I did not take notice.

EMMA LANE sworn. - I was sitting at my mother's door in Wilson-street, between twelve and one o'clock on Thursday the 26th of July: I saw the prisoner run by, Mrs. Uther followed, crying stop thief; he ran down Christopher's-alley, through Long-alley, to Sarah Lockart 's house, in Peter-street, Mrs. Uther and Thomas Haines , I believe, were in the house after him, before I got up; I stood at the door till they came out of the house, and at the time I was standing at the door the prisoner came out; the mob asked the prisoner if he had seen the thief; he said, no; and as the prisoner was coming out of the house he trod upon my toes; I said, you are the man, and collared him; he said, not me, God knows, not me; I held him, and called out to Mrs. Uther; Thomas Haines came up, I said, is not this the man; he said, yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You collared the man on suspicion, and called to Mrs. Uther, saying, he was the man? - A. When she came out, she said she would swear to the man.

Q. Upon your saying he was the man, then she said she would swear to the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Not till then? - A. Not till then.

THOMAS HAINES sworn. - I work in Christopher's-alley: I was going to dinner, I heard the alarm of stop thief; the prisoner was running down the alley, singing out Burdett for ever, no Man-warning; I thought it was a quarrel between the parties, so I let him run by me; still I heard the alarm of stop thief, and people running; then I ran after him, and followed him up to the house where he ran into; I did not rightly know, whether he went into the house or the yard; Mrs. Uther and some more people came up; I went into the passage and the yard, and looked into the privy, and seeing there was no way to get out there, I said, he must be in the house; I returned, and knocked at the parlour door, and asked if there had been such a person; they said, yes, there had been a person there, and offered a parcel, and they would not take it in; and coming out of the door this young woman laid hold of him, and said to me, is not this the young man; I said, this is the man that I followed.

SARAH LOCKHART sworn. - I live in Peter-street: on the 26th of July, I was at home; it might want two or three minutes of one; the prisoner at the bar came to my house; the street door was open; he knocked at my parlour door and opened it; my husband was sitting at work at the window, he is a wig-maker; he asked my husband if he could make a tate for his sister; my husband told him he could; he then asked to have a chair to sit down, for he was very weak; he had just come out of a fever; my husband asked him who recommended him; he said the women had some curious stories to themselves, and his sister had heard some woman talk that he made such things; it was to be made the colour of his hair; he observed that he had run from Finsbury-square, that he was articled to an upholsterer, and that he had a very bad master; he said it must be done by Saturday; he would fetch it; his sister was going to Plymouth; he then took his watch out, to see what it was a clock; he took something out of his pocket, and wrapped it up in a plaid handkerchief; I got up to open the door; he said, my good lady, do not open the door; he turned the brass slide of the lock, and fastened the door; he unbuttoned his breeches, and put the parcel in, and said, now I will go out; I opened the door and he went out; he asked my husband leave to let him leave the parcel there, that he had put into his breeches, but I would have nothing left there; I then said, my God, there is something the matter, look at the people; he said, do not be afraid, and then he went out.

Q. How long was he in your place? - A. Not above five minutes.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - On the 26th of July a man came to the office door, and said a man was wanted in Crown-street; I went there directly to the prosecutor's house; when I came into the room there were several people there with the prisoner at the bar; Mrs. Uther gave me charge of the prisoner for opening her room door, and stealing

a silk cloak; I took the prisoner to the office, and there I searched him; in his waistcoat pocket was a small key, and in his breeches I found this handkerchief, and eleven keys tied up in it; they are common keys, of different sizes; I produced these keys before the Magistrate, and after the prisoner was examined I tried the door with one of the keys, and it opened it the same as any other key would do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. I do not know whether you ever examined a serjeant of the guards? - A. No.

Q. They are just the same sort of common storehouse keys which the serjeants of the guards have? - A. I do not know. (The cloak produced and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. Major-General the Earl of Bambrey has been to see me; he told me, if he was in town, he would come and give me a character; he gave me a character to one of Mr. Kirby's servants.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Of single felony.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-19

448. ROBERT-BROWN PRENTICE , alias JOHN BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a brown gelding, value 10 l. the property of Forby Trendle .

ROBERT CHANDLER sworn. - Q. Do you know any thing of Mr. Forby Trendle's horse? - A. Yes; he is a farmer in the West Riding, in the county of Norfolk.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a farmer; I had the horse in my possession for about three months; he lent him me; on the 16th of April I saw him in the stable; I missed him the next morning about five o'clock.

Q. Was the door locked the over night? - A. Yes; there are two doors to the stable, and in the morning I found the back door opened; I made enquiry in the neighbourhood, but could not find the horse; on the 23d of July I heard that it was in a livery-stable in Worship-street.

Q. Do you know any thing yourself of the prisoner? - A. I never saw him before.

Q. What sort of a horse was it? - A. It was a brown horse with a white blaze on the face, and some grey hairs dispersed all over the horse.

GEORGE ATKINS sworn. - I bought the horse of the prisoner at the bar: on the 21st of April I delivered it up to Mr. Ray, and I believe he delivered it up to Mr. Chandler; I have seen the horse again at the livery-stables in Worship-street; it is a brown horse, with a white blaze down the face and a bushy tail; I bought the horse for a friend; he is a Captain; the prisoner rode him in the yard; the Captain was with me, and he said, buy that horse for me; the prisoner asked 16 l. for it; I bid the prisoner 15 guineas for it; he said, he would not take less than 16 l. for the horse, he did not get any thing by it.

Q. Did the prisoner come to you on account of that horse? - A. He came by, he said; and it was a good horse, and would go in harness very well, but rather aukward; I have seen him in Smithfield for this year and a half, selling of horses.

Q.(To Chandler.) Where is your residence? - A. At Thurston, in the county of Suffolk , about 76 miles from London.

Q.(To Atkins.) Was 16 l. paid to the prisoner for the horse? - A. My acquaintance said, do not part from the horse; I called to him in the Minories, and said, come home, and I will pay you for the horse; and there is a man in our yard, to whom the prisoner gave a shilling for taking the bridle and saddle home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The horse was found in your possession, and therefore you were liable to be charged with stealing it, unless you had brought the man forward you had bought it of? - A. I have a witness that I bought it, but he is not here.

Q. Does it happen that you know where the prisoner resided? - A. He always informed me that he kept a hop-ground at Sittingbourn, and that he kept waggons.

Q. You took a receipt for the payment? - A. No; I have bought an hundred horses and never took a receipt.

Q. Who was this captain? - A. Capt. Brasson; he is a master of a powder-vessel.

Q. Mr. Peck; he is not forth-coming? - A. No; he is in the Compter; he recommended me to this man in Smithfield.

Q. So that neither of the persons who were present at the purchase are forth-coming? - A. I have a witness that saw me buy the horse; he is not here.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a carman, and deal in horses.

Q. Was this a cart horse? - A. No; between a cart-horse and a nag.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with this captain? - A. Twenty years; I knew him from a child; he lives within a quarter of a mile of my house; he is not in town now.

Q. Do not you know there is a reward? - A. I do.

JOHN RAY sworn. - On Monday, the 19th of July, in the evening, the prisoner was brought in custody, by Atkins, to the public-house next the Office in Worship-street; he gave me charge of him, on suspicion of horse-stealing; I searched him, and found on him a phosphorus bottle, and

a pocket-book with a number of duplicates; the Magistrate was not then sitting; we took him to Clerkenwell prison; the next day we took him to the Office; he was committed on the 20th; we went to Mr. Atkins's stables, Whitehorse-yard, Rosemary-lane, where this horse was belonging to Mr. Chandler; it is the same horse Mr. Chandler owns.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The man did not seem to be over rich by the duplicates in his pocket? - A. He did not.

Q. The prisoner has always denied that he knew any thing of the horse? - A. He has.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-20

449. ROBERT-BROWN PRENTICE , alias JOHN BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a chesnut mare, value 15 l. and a black mare, value 15 l. the property of Richard Edgar .

RICHARD EDGAR sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Ratham, near Bury, in the county of Suffolk .

Q. What is your business? - A. A farmer .

Q. Did you miss any mare, of any kind, on Friday night, the 18th of May? - A. Yes; a chesnut mare and a black mare; they were missing on Saturday morning, the 19th of May.

Q. When had you seen them last? - A. On Friday evening, about nine o'clock.

Q. Where were they? - A. They were in a clover-field of my own.

Q. What time did you go to the clover-field? - A. About five o'clock on Saturday morning I went to my clover-field, and saw the gate open and half unhooked.

Q. Had you any other cattle in the same field? - A. Yes; there were three others that remained in the field; I took one of the horses and went down to Bury, and had some hand-bills printed, and distributed them as fast as I could; on the 23d of July, Mr. Mason and I went down to Dagenham; we heard that Mr. Denginfield had purchased this chesnut mare; Mr. Denginfield bought the mare for Mr. Tyser, of Barton; he told us, if we went down to Mr. Tyser's, we should find the mare; Mr. Mason and I accordingly went down, and there we found the mare; she was branded on the fore hoofs with RE; we took the mare up to the Office in Worship-street; that is all I know about that mare; I am sure it is my mare. The black mare Mr. Atkins came and told me he sold to Mr. Roper, in town; Mr. Ray, the Officer, went with me to Mr. Roper.

Q. Where does Roper live? - A. I cannot tell exactly the place; when we went down to Mr. Roper, the mare was gone down the country on a journey.

Q. When did you see the mare last? - A. On the 15th of August; she was branded in the same manner as the other was on the hoofs; Mr. Roper told me he would send the mare when she came off the journey, which he did: I was certain it was my property, being branded on the hoofs; Mr. Ray sent her down to me by one Frost.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These mares were traced back into the witness Atkins's hands? - A. They were.

GEORGE ATKINS sworn. - I bought two mares and a horse of the prisoner on the 20th of May.

Q. What did you give for them? - A. Forty pounds.

Q. Where did you buy them? - A. At my own house.

Q. You knew the prisoner before? - A. I knew him in Smithfield selling horses for a year and a half; I am positive he sold horses there, and at Mr. Langhorn's. Here is a letter that came from Sittingbourn, which was the reason of my taking him.

Q. Are you sure it was the 20th of May when you bought them? - A. Yes; I sold two of them to Mr. Poulter and one to Mr. Roper; the black mare to Mr. Roper, and the chesnut mare to Mr. Poulter; he informed me that he lived at Sittingbourn and kept a hop-ground; that he had waggons, and that he would buy two or three horses frequently, merely to get the load up, and after he got his load up he sold them, though he got nothing by them.

Q. How long had you kept them before you sold them to Mr. Roper and Mr. Poulter? - A. About a fortnight.

Q. What did you sell them for? - A. I sold the three for forty-two pounds: I gave him forty pounds for the three; I sold the black mare to Mr. Roper for seventeen pounds, and the other mare, with the horse, I sold for twenty-five pounds to Mr. Poulter.

Q. How were the mares' hoofs marked? - A. They were branded on the hoofs; I cannot rightly say what with; it was an E and something else.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You can read and write? - A. I can read, but not write.

Q. Did you take any receipt on this occasion? - A. No.

Q. You bought them in a lumping way? - A. Yes.

Q. You contrived to get rid of these horses as soon as you could? - A. I have got horses that I bought to-day, that I will sell to you within an hour.

Q. You keep them, I suppose, till you can make a fair profit? - A. Yes.

Q. You bought these horses for forty pounds, kept them a fortnight, and then sold them for forty-two

pounds? - A. They earned their keep; I sold a horse the other day at sixteen pounds loss.

Q. How many horses have you charged the prisoner with stealing, that were found in your possession? - A. There are three of them.

Q. Eleven stolen horses were traced to you? - A. Certainly I did buy them, I did not know they were stolen when I bought them; I took the prisoner, and after I took him, he made his escape.

- POULTER sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Black Horse-yard, Whitechapel.

Q. Did you buy a mare of the last witness? - A. Yes, I bought a chesnut mare and a horse together of Mr. Atkins; the mare belonged to one man, and another man claimed the horse afterwards; I have known Atkins some time.

Q. When did you buy the mare? - A. About the latter end of May, I cannot say particularly the day; I gave twenty-five pounds for the two; they were very dear when I bought them; the mare had had a kick, she was very lame.

Q. Was the mare marked on the hoof? - A. Yes, and this gentleman found her as I bought her, and I had sold her to Mr. Denginfield; I knew she was marked.

Q. You say you have known the witness Atkins a long while? - A. Yes, I have known him twenty years; I know nothing of the black mare.

Q.(To Atkins.) On the 19th of May, where were you? - A. I was nigh home.

Q. Were you in London? - A. Yes, I was in London.

Q. Have you any people to assist you in your business? - A. Yes, my son, a man, and a boy.

Q.Did either of them see you when you bought these horses? - A. Yes, my man; he is gone from me.

Q. Is there any body here who knows you were in London on the 18th or the 19th of May? - A. I have not been further than Rumford for these six or seven months.

Q. That is somewhere about the time these horses were missing? - A. For these six or seven months I have been no further than Rumford.

Q. Is there any body here that saw you buy the horses? - A. No, I have sent for the man; I am not in the habit of going out of town.

- DENGINFIELD sworn. - I bought the chesnut mare of Mr. Poulter, about the beginning of July.

Q.(To Poulter.) Did you sell the mare to Mr. Denginfield? - A. I did, about the beginning of July.

Q.(To Denginfield.) Where do you live? - A. At Dagenham.

Q. Where did you buy the mare? - A. I bought the mare of Mr. Poulter, in town; the mare was at grass when I bought her; I believe it was about the 3d of July; she was branded on the fore hoofs with R. E. the mare was lame when I bought her of Mr. Poulter; I turned her to grass; I gave information to Mr. Edgar where she was, and he took her to town.

Mr. Alley. (To Atkins.) Q. You told us that you had not been out of town for these five or six months any further than Rumford? - A. No.

Q. Your memory is not impaired, is it; you know Chatham? - A. Yes, it is near Rochester.

Q. Were you not at Chatham three or four months ago? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. You said a while ago you had not been out of town for these six or seven months past, not for three months before you saw the horses, any further than Rumford; upon your oath have you not been at Chatham about three or four months ago? - A. I have.

Court. Q. When were you at Chatham; was it before you bought the mares? - A. Upon my word I cannot rightly tell you.

PETER MASON sworn. - Q. You went down to Dagenham with Mr. Edgar? - A. Yes, and I was at the Office when the prisoner was brought in with another man, on the 9th of July; Mr. Atkins charged him with stealing some horses that he had sold him; Mr. Atkins said he had given him a direction that his name was John Brown; the prisoner persisted that he did live at Sittingbourn; I asked him whereabouts, he said, at Chapel-farm; I said, if he kept a farm there, perhaps he could tell who he bought the horses of; he said he could not tell the people, he had bought them of some travellers at a village called Bye-France, in Kent; we searched, and found some letters that told us where his lodgings were at St. Giles's, and that his friends lived at Norwich; I went with Mr. Edgar to Dagenham, where we found the mare, and brought her up to town.

Q. What colour do you call it? - A. I do not know exactly the colour; the gentleman called it a chesnut colour; she was branded in the fore hoofs with R. E.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Recollect you are upon your oath, and answer me solemnly the truth; you have said that you asked the prisoner where he lived; that he told you at a place called Sittingbourn, in Kent; that he could not tell the people he bought the horses of; that they were travellers, and that he bought them at a village, called Bye France, in Kent; is that the truth? - A. Yes, I wrote it down.

Q. Who were present at the time of this conversation you had with the prisoner? - A. Mr. Ray, Mr. Atkins, and another person who is here.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a constable.

Q. You say Mr. Atkins was there; you have heard Mr. Atkins examined; he did not say any

thing about the prisoner confessing to the stealing of horses; were you examined by the Magistrate? - A. Yes, by Mr. Moser.

Q. Did you ever say to the Magistrate that the prisoner told you he purchased the horses of some persons in the manner you have described? - A. Yes.

(The examination of Mason handed to the Court.)

Court. This is a very superficial examination indeed.

(The examination handed to the witness.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that the hand-writing of the Magistrate? - A. It is. (The examination read.)

"The said Peter Mason faith, that he was with Mr. Edgar at Dagenham, at the house of Denginfield; from there they went to Mr. Tyser, and saw the chesnut mare now produced."

Q. That was on the 23d of July, and this examination we are talking about was on the 10th; this horse was not at that time found? - A. There were several horses not found for a week afterwards; he was in custody on the 9th, and this horse was not found till the 23d.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Q. What account do you give? - A. I can say no further than Mr. Mason has said.

Q. When Mr. Mason was examined on the night of the 10th, were you present? - A. I cannot say I was; we were engaged in going to different parts of the town.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner at the bar give any account how he got these mares on the night he was brought to the Office? - A. On Monday, the 9th of July, in the evening, he was brought to our Office; Mr. Mason, in my presence, asked the prisoner how he got possession of these horses, and where he lived; those were the horses that Mr. Atkins charged him with stealing; Mr. Atkins gave us to understand that he had bought several horses of him; the prisoner told Mr. Mason that he lived at Sittingbourn, in Kent, and that he bought them of a traveller in a village called Bye-France, near Sittingbourn, in Kent; those are the words, I think, that were made use of; I found out afterwards that he did not live at Sittingbourn; I found out where he lived in town, at a tobacconist's shop, in St. Giles's, near to Oxford-road, where he had lodged some time, in a two pair of stairs back room; I told him I had been to his lodgings, and that he did not live at Sittingbourn: that we found out his lodgings at St. Giles's, and he made no reply to it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I think you told my Lord this conversation was on the 9th? - A. I think it was on the 9th, on Monday.

Q. And Mason heard it; on the 10th he was examined, therefore after this conversation had taken place, Mason attended before the Magistrate, and was examined? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You were not there? - A. I cannot say I was; there was so much confusion, I was not present all the time; there were a great number of examinations.

Q. How often were you examined? - A. A vast number of times, I was six weeks going round the country.

Q.Things are done very regular at your Office, the depositions of the several witnesses are taken down in writing? - A. In general they are.

Q. Do not your clerks attend for the purpose of taking down the depositions in writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Then what was said at that time was taken down in writing? - A. I dare say it was.

Q. Were you examined on the 28th, the final examination? - A. I think I was ill at home.

Court. Q. Did you see any person lay hold of the prisoner? - A. When he first came up to our Office, the flap of his coat was off, which I found at the public-house the next day; it was tore off right up to the button; I went to the public-house and got it, and the prisoner had it sewed on the next day.

Q.(To Mr. Atkins.) Did any body accompany you when you went to the Office? - A. Yes, an officer, whom I have sent home in a coach, to get the person that saw me buy the horses.

Q. Was the question put to the prisoner where he bought the horses on the 9th, the night he was taken to the Office? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any body lay hold of the prisoner? - A. I detained him.

Q. Did you see any body lay hold of his coat? - A. I laid hold of his coat in the City-road.

Q. How did he make his escape from you? - A. We were in the City-road; we went over to a public-house; we were asking where he bought the horses; he said, of some travellers, in a village called Bye-France, in Kent; he said, I will not stay inside; I stood between him and the door; I said, now tell the man every thing true; he said, I will not tell you any thing at all; he ran, and I ran after him, and catched hold of his coat; the flap of his coat came off; we stopped him, and put him into a coach, and took him to Worship-street.

Prisoner's defence. I have made no confessions; if I had even had the horses, I should have been much to blame to make that confession; I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY , Death , aged 32.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-21

450. JOSEPH LLOYD was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain promissory note, called a Dover Bank-note, for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud John Minet , Hugh Fector , and James-Peter Fector .

Second Count. For publishing and uttering as

true, a certain promissory note, in like manner, and with the same intention.

Third and Fourth Counts. In like manner, only not stating the promissory note to be called a Dover Bank-note.

Fifth and Sixth Counts. For like offence, with intention to defraud Henry Marks .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp; and the case stated by Mr. Const.)

HENRY MARKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a silversmith and salesman , living in St. Giles's ? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on Sunday, the 8th of April last? - A. I did.

Q. What time of the day? - A. Between nine and ten o'clock in the forenoon; he and another person came to my shop to purchase a waistcoat; I shewed him some waistcoats, and he fixed on one which had been made for myself.

Q.What sort of a waistcoat was that? - A. A buff-coloured marcella, something like a diamond cut.

Q. What price did you ask him for it? - A. I asked him thirteen shillings and sixpence for it.

Q. Did he approve of the waistcoat? - A. Yes, he approved of the waistcoat, and the price likewise.

Q. How did he pay for it? - A. He asked me if I could give him change for a note; I told him I could, and he presented me a Dover Banknote.

Q. Take that note in your hand, and tell me whether that is the note he presented to you? - A. It is.

Q. What passed on his producing that note? - A. I asked him how he came by this note; he told me he received it at Deal barracks; I asked him if he worked at the barracks; he told me, yes; I asked him if he knew Messrs. Minet and Fector, or whether he ever was at Dover; he told me that he had been at Dover; I told him I knew Mr. Fector very well myself, and I asked him whether that was his hand-writing, or whether it was the hand-writing of young Mr. Fector; I told him I knew old Mr. Fector very well; he told me it was young Mr. Fector's hand-writing, for old Mr. Fector was dead.

Q. Did you at the time happen to know whether Mr. Fector, senior, was alive? - A. I did not; I asked him why he did not present this note for payment there; he told me he came very late into town last night, it was too late to present it.

Q.After making all these enquiries, did you then take it of him? - A. I then, by his mentioning that old Mr. Fector was dead, took it; I did not know but it was a good one.

Q. Your suspicions were then immediately lulled, and you took it? - A. I did.

Q. I think you have said thirteen shillings and sixpence was the price of the waistcoat? - A Yes; and when I came to look for change, I saw I had not change sufficient; I then told him to call the next day, and I would give him the change; he had a person along with him that said it would be the best way to take the note, and go somewhere else.

Q. That was the person that came in with the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. What answer did the prisoner give? - A. The answer that he made was, that he had change enough in his pocket for that day, and he would leave the note, and call the next day for the change; I then desired him to tell me what his name was; he said his name was William Jones , No. 14, Pitfield-street, Tottenham Court-road; I inquired what time he would come for his change, and he said, about nine o'clock to-morrow morning; I told him I should not be at home at that time, nor all the day till six o'clock in the evening; he agreed to come at that time. On Monday morning, I went to Mr. Minet to tender this note for payment; the clerks looked at it, they were in the accompting-house; they asked me how I came by it, and said that it was a forged one.

Q. Did he come at that time for the change? - A. No.

Q. You told them exactly the account you have given to day, how you came by it? - A. Exactly.

Q. Are you sure that is the same note? - A.(looking at the note) Yes, there is my hand-writing on it.

Q. What is the name you put at the back of it? - A. William Jones .

Q. How came he not to put his name to it? - - A. Because I always put it down from their mouth.

Q. What became of the note after you had been to Mr. Minet's? - A. It was left there; when I came home, I found some gentlemen in my house making some inquiries, and those two gentlemen and I went up all the streets in Tottenham Court-road, in order to find Pitfield-street, and William Jones.

Q. Could you find any such street as Pitfield-street there? - A. No, no such street.

Q. Of course you did not find such a person as William Jones ? - A. No.

Q. After you had made this fruitless inquiry, what then? - A. Then there came the Solicitor of the Bank to me, to know if I should know the person again, and when I found he did not come for his change, I took his features so much in my mind, that I should know him for fifty years to come.

Q. How soon did you go to Bow-street? - A. I went to Bow-street several times, and never saw him till about a month or five weeks ago.

Q. How many times did you go, that you could

not fix upon the person? - A. About three or four times.

Q. About a month or five weeks ago the prisoner was there? - A. Yes; the Office is up one pair of stairs.

Q. Were there a good many persons in the room? - A. When I came into the room, there were two prisoners in the room with fetters on, and two men without; immediately there came in another prisoner, and another person; I was left in the room about five minutes, and I looked at the prisoner, and knew him immediately; I looked at him very hard, and was ashamed to look at him any more, because he looked at me so very hard.

Q. Had you ever any doubt about the prisoner being the person? - A. Never any doubt.

Q. Have you ever seen the waistcoat that he bought of you since? - A. I saw it this morning; I have got a piece of the pattern, it exactly corresponds; I have no doubt but that it is the waistcoat, though I could not swear to it.

Q. Who was the person that made the waistcoat? - A. He is in Court, his name is Turner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you sworn on the Old Testament? - A. I was.

Q. You live in St. Giles? - A. Yes, I have lived there twenty-four years.

Q. As you have lived there so long, you know it is very nigh Tottenham Court-road? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose you should know all the streets round about there? - A. No, I do not in my own neighbourhood.

Q. Do not you go abroad? - A. No, never.

Q. Do you never walk out? - A. Yes, I walk out about my business, the same as you may.

Q. Who were present in your shop when the prisoner and the man in company came in? - A. Nobody but myself.

Q. How many persons have you serving in your shop? - A. Only Mrs. Marks, besides myself.

Q. Is Mrs. Marks here? - A. No.

Q. How is your parlour situated? - A. It adjoins the shop.

Q. There is a glass door adjoins the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - A. Between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. Do your children go to school? - A. They do.

Q. Where were they on the morning you have been speaking of? - A. They were in the yard playing.

Q. Do they play on Sunday morning? - A. Yes; they say their prayers before they play.

Q. What time do you breakfast? - A. Sometimes nine, and sometimes ten.

Q. Did it happen at this time your children were at play? - A. They were not in the shop.

Q. Where was your wife? - A. She was not down stairs.

Q. Is your wife very bad? - A. No.

Q. Do you indulge her to lie in bed till that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Who gets the breakfast for your children? - A. The servant.

Q. I suppose she must have been in and out of the shop and the parlour; is there a kitchen? - A. Yes; it lies from the shop, behind the parlour.

Q. And you would have me to understand, that your wife was not down stairs, and that your children were not there, nor your servant? - A. No; the servant was in the kitchen.

Q. What sort of a man was the other man? - A. I took no notice of him, my conversation with him was when he spoke, and desired the prisoner to take the note back again, as I had not change enough; that is all the conversation I had from him.

Q. Do you know the house of Minet and Fector? - A. I have been there several times.

Q. How long is it since you have been at Dover? - A. About twenty years; I have a sister that lived there then.

Q. Have you any correspondent at all at Dover now? - A. None at all.

Q. You never had any notes before? - A. No; never in London.

Q. Then you have not seen any for twenty years? - A. No.

Q. In consequence thereof, no sort of suspicion could have arisen upon that note? - A. So far, in consequence, it is signed at the bottom J. M. Fect, and not Fector.

Q. You had no opportunity to judge, in your mind, that it was not one of the notes that they generally issue? - A. I could not; I had no suspicion at all at the time, else I should not have taken it.

Q. Have you a good many neighbours about you? - A. I have many neighbours.

Q. And you, having lived there so long, might have got change? - A. It being Sunday I did not send for it.

Q. Did it not occur to you, that it would be better to get change, rather than lose the custom? - A. He immediately answered he had change enough in his pocket, and he would rather take the waistcoat.

Q. It did not strike you at all then, when he said he had change enough, that he did not pay you with it? - A. Not enough to pay for the waistcoat; he said he had enough to serve him that day.

Q. You say you wrote the name upon it yourself? - A. I did; I always put it down, that I should know it again.

Q. You went to the firm, and discovered that you had got into an aukward situation? - A. I did; I knew him again, at the office, when I looked at the people's faces; I was not examined the same day.

Q. Was the office open? - A. The door was, and I went in myself.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You looked about, after you were in the room, to see if you were right in the person, and then you fixed upon the prisoner? - A. Yes.

HENRY MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. I understand you are one of the clerks of Minet and Fector? - A. I am.

Q. They have a house at London, and at Dover? - A. They have.

Q. At which house do you reside? - A. At Dover.

Q. What is the firm of the house? - A. At Dover there is John Minet , Hugh Fector , and James Peter Fector , he is dead, he died in January.

Q. Will you take that note in your hand? How long have you been in the house? - A. Nineteen years, nearly.

Q. I see that note purports to be payable in London or Dover? - A. Yes.

Q. All the notes that are issued at your house are issued at Dover, and payable at both? - A. Yes.

Q. First look at the note? - A. I have seen all the partners write but Mr. Hugh Fector ; that is not the hand-writing of Mr. John Minet .

Q. That is the gentleman who signs all the notes? - A. Yes it is; and all the notes that are issued are from his hand, at Dover.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say this is not the hand-writing of Mr. Fector? - A. No.

Q. Do you sign any notes? - A. No; I draw bills.

Q. Nobody signs but this Mr. Fector? - A. Mr. James Peter Fector did when he was alive.

Q. Can you undertake to say that is not his hand-writing? - A. Yes; and nobody else was authorised to sign but these two gentlemen.

Q. Are you sure there is no other person interested in this house but these gentlemen you have mentioned? - A. No.

Q. These bills are drawn payable in London; have not they a share of the profits of those notes drawn in the country? - A. I cannot say; I never saw the articles of partnership.

Q. Are they not concerned? - A. It is generally understood so. (The note read.)

WILLIAM DONALD sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable of Birmingham? - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any direction, did you search any house? - A. I searched the house of Joseph Lloyd , in Livery-street, Birmingham, on the 12th of July last.

Q. What did you find there? - A. I found a pawnbroker's ticket, purporting to be a ticket for a waistcoat and a pair of breeches.

Q. In consequence of your looking at the duplicate, you found it was pawned at Mr. Bolt's? - A. Yes; I went to Bolt's with this duplicate, and there received the waistcoat and breeches, on paying the money; I have had them ever since. (Produces them.)

Mr. Knapp. (To Marks.) Q. Is that the waistcoat the prisoner bought of you? - A. I cannot swear to the waistcoat; I went to the tailor that made it, and got a bit of the pattern; I believe it to be the waistcoat, I had no other of the same pattern.

Mr. Alley. (To Donald.) Q. You did not get the pawnbroker's ticket from the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You got it from somewhere else? - A. Yes.

ISAAC BARNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you a tailor? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that waistcoat and tell me whether you made it for Mr. Marks? - A. I did make him such a one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Then you do not mean to swear that you made that? - A. It is the very waistcoat that I made for Mr. Marks.

Q. How many men do you employ? - A. I employ women.

Q. I have heard that women could swear to their own work; do you know that washing removes the situation of the stitches, it alters, likewise, the shape of the waistcoat? - A. It does sometimes.

Q. The women make these things? - A. Yes.

Q. You have not got the women here? - A. No.

Q. The lining is a plain white calico, there is nothing particular in that? - A. It is double at the back.

Q. There is no mark on it? - A. No.

Q. It has been repeatedly washed? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that this is the waistcoat you made for Mr. Marks? - A. I cut it out.

Q. It was a very fashionable pattern last April? - A. I only made one of that pattern.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You cut the waistcoats out? - A. Yes.

Q. And the women stitch them? - A. Yes.

Q. You cut them out yourself, and therefore you know them? - A. Yes.

GILBERT BOLT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You are a pawnbroker, living at Birmingham? - A. Yes; in Church-street.

Q. From whom did you get that waistcoat? - A. From Ann Lloyd , the wife of the prisoner.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say you are a pawnbroker at Birmingham; have you any acquaintance with the prisoner? - A. No acquaintance at all.

GUILTY , Death , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18040912-22

451. WILLIAM GERLL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , in the dwelling-house of William Cooper , a muslin gown, value

10 s. a muslin cloak, value 5 s. and a pair of muslin sleeves, value 1 s. the goods of William Cooper; two muslin gowns, value 10 s. three petticoats, value 15 s. three habit shirts, value 3 s. two shirts, value 5 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a child's cap, value 6 d. the goods of Geo. Thomas .

MARY COOPER sworn. - I live at the King's Head inn, Piccadilly : on the 3d of September, about 11 o'clock in the evening, as we were sitting at the door, we saw the prisoner go out with the things under his arm; he had been a lodger in the house in July (we let the lodgings for the night); he slept there occasionally, perhaps a fortnight or more; I lost a muslin cloak, belonging to me, and a pair of sleeves; the other property belonged to my daughter, who is married; the property was taken from an up-stairs room; my daughter had left the room, and come down stairs; he was pursued, and brought back, and taken to St. George's watch-house.

ELIZABETH THOMAS sworn. - Q. Did you see the prisoner at your house that night? - A. No, I am the daughter of Mrs. Cooper, and am come to swear to the property.

SARAH CHANDLER sworn. - As I was sitting at our gate, in Piccadilly, I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm coming out of the gateway into the street; I ran after him, and cried out, stop thief, and saw him drop the bundle, and I picked it up; I was within a yard of him at the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It is a public yard, belonging to the tavern, or coffee-house, or whatever it is? - A. Yes.

Q. There are a great many people employed in this stable-yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore there were a great number about there at that time? - A. There was not any body came out of the gate at this time but the prisoner.

Q. You were at some distance from the man? - A. No, he brushed my elbow; I rather suspected the man when he came out with the bundle, because we had washed a great many clothes lately.

Q. What distance from the public-house was it that he was taken? - A. I do not know.

Q. Had he a round hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot swear to his person? - A. I cannot.

Court. Q. Is he the man that dropped the bundle? - A. Yes.

JOHN BAKER sworn. - I was returning from Mr. Astley's theatre, and coming on between Dover-street and Gloucester coffee-house I saw a man running with a bundle under his arm, and just against Mr. Dobey's shop he dropped the bundle; my friend and I pursued him; he proceeded down St. James's street, and turned round into Jermyn-street; where he made a slip, and just as we came up to him, the prisoner got up, and ran down Brewer-street; there I caught hold of him by the collar and tripped him up, he fell into the kennel; then a man came up and he was secured; I am sure he is the man that dropped the bundle, because he was not out of my sight till I had hold of him; it was about half after eleven o'clock at night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not stop to pick the bundle up, therefore you cannot say whether that is the bundle or not? - A. Certainly not; I can say, that was the man that dropped the bundle, and was running.

FRANCIS MARSH sworn. - I am one of the constables of St. George's, Hanover-square; about half-past eleven o'clock the prisoner was brought to me; I took an inventory of the things after I had taken the charge; I searched him, and in his right hand pocket I took out these things, which I shewed to Mrs. Cooper and Mrs. Thomas; they said they were their things; I produce the property, they have been in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Mrs. Cooper.) Look at these things? - A. These sleeves belong to me, and the muslin gown, and this cloak.

Q.(To Mrs. Thomas.) Will you look at these things? - A. This child's cap, a habit-shirt, and a pair of muslin sleeves; they all belong to me, the whole of them.

Q.(To Mrs. Cooper.) Where were these things in the house? - A. My gown was in the drawer at half-past ten in the evening; the rest were in a basket that belongs to my daughter; I will swear to the gown.

Q.(To Mrs. Thomas.) What is the value of these things? - A. The two gowns, five shillings each; three petticoats, five shillings each; two habit-shirts, one shilling each; and two muslin handkerchiefs, sixpence each.

Q.(To Mrs. Cooper.) What is the value of your gown? - A. Ten shillings, and five shillings the cloak.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Confined 12 months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham.

Reference Number: t18040912-23

452. SARAH ENGLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , in the dwelling-house of William Orger , 4 lb. weight of sewing-silk, value 4 l. and a linen wrapper, value 1 s. the property of the said William Orger .

WILLIAM ORGER sworn. - I am a haberdasher ; I live at No. 2, Silver-street, Golden-square : I perceived the prisoner in my shop; I was not exactly at the door leading to the shop; I stepped towards the shop, and then I observed the

prisoner going out of the shop without speaking; I supposed she had stolen something, and stepping towards the door I observed a small parcel of silk lying on the floor, which gave me reason to suspect she had stolen the silk; I went after her, and took her about two doors off with the silk in a basket under her arm; I took her back into the shop, and sent for an Officer, and took her and the basket with the silk to the Office in Marlborough-street; I tied the silk up at the time; the Magistrate ordered me to take it back, as it had never been out of my sight; the silk was lying on the counter, in the same state it is now; (produces the silk;) I observed it about two or three minutes before; the prime cost of the silk is 4 l.

Q. Have you any doubt of the silk being your's? - A. None.

Prisoner's defence. If I was in your premises, I do not know it; I work very hard for my living; I was never guilty of any thing of the kind in my life; I was very much in liquor; I do not know the gentleman or the shop; I do not know where the place is.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Whipped in the gaol and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-24

453. ELIZABETH DAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , in the dwelling-house of John Tyler , one guinea, six crowns, three half-crowns, six shillings, and sixpence, the monies of Ann Stevens .

It appearing to the Court that the prosecutrix had promised forgiveness to the prisoner, on condition that she would confess, the prisoner was therefore

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-25

454. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , five wooden posts, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of David Whitaker .

MICHAEL DARCEY sworn. - I saw the prisoner on the 19th of August, about half past five o'clock in the morning, at Hackney ; he had two pieces of wood on his shoulder; I let him pass me, and watched him home to his house; I returned and went to the watch-house, and informed the night-constable.

Q.What sort of wood was it? - A. Old posts; he told me to go and watch him again; I went again, and saw the prisoner go into David Whitaker 's premises, and take the wood out and put it on his shoulder and walk away with it; I met him and stopped him; he had not gone above an hundred yards before I took him; when I stopped him he threw the wood down; I took the wood to the watch-house, and him with the other hand, and delivered him up to the night-constable.

THOMAS GLOVER sworn. - I am a headborough: I was at the watch-house on the 19th of August; I went with Darcey to apprehend the prisoner; Darcey took another station; I immediately followed the prisoner when he came from his own house to Mr. Whitaker's premises; I saw him go into Mr. Whitaker's premises; I saw him come out with the posts; we took him to the watch-house; I know the field where the building is; I have understood it to be Mr. Whitaker's for many years; I went in company with Griffiths to the prisoner's lodgings after that, and there we found three other pieces of oak; they seemed to be old posts for railing; we took them to the watch-house; they have been in our care ever since.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am constable of Hackney: I know nothing more than what the patrol told me, that he saw a man going with some posts; on the 19th of August we secured him and the two posts; I went with Glover and examined his lodgings, and there we found three other posts; they were taken to the watch-house; they have been in my care ever since.

Q. Were they all five deposited in the watch-house? - A. They were; Mr. Whitaker was in the country at the time; Mr. Brown, his carpenter, came and saw them.

JAMES BROWN sworn. - I am a carpenter, employed by Mr. Whitaker; I went to the watch-house and saw these posts; I believe them to be Mr. Whitaker's, I cannot swear to them; he had a great quantity of that sort; I am building on the spot.

Q. Were any of these posts placed in a field near this building? - A. They were within about twenty yards; there were a great many; I went to the heap where they laid, and I could see there had been some removed that morning.

Q. How soon after did you look at the heap? - A. I suppose about an hour after he was taken into custody.

Q. Do you know whether all that whole heap were the property of Mr. Whitaker? - A. They were all Mr. Whitaker's and mine, together.

Q. What might be the value of these five posts? - A. I suppose they are worth sixpence a-piece, if they are worth any thing at all.

Prisoner. I have not any thing to say in my defence.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Whipped in gaol and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-26

455. JAMES MORLEY, alias THOMAS SPRATT, alias THOMAS JOHNSON, alias LEISLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , one diamond locket, set in

gold, value 26 l. 5 s. the property of William Gaimes , privately in his shop .

(The case stated by Mr. Watson.)

WILLIAM GAIMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. What are you? - A. I am a jeweller , and live at No. 54, St. Paul's church-yard .

Q. On the 15th of August do you know whether you were at home? - A. I was not there myself.

Q. On the 15th of August had you such an article in your shop as a diamond locket? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You have many? - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q. Had you any particular one that you know of? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards miss that? - A. I very seldom attend the shop myself.

Q. Was there a diamond locket missing from the shop? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Have you any partners? - A. No.

AMELIA COLES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live with Mr. Gaimes; he keeps a jeweller's shop in St. Paul's church-yard.

Q. On the 15th of August do you remember any body coming into the shop? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. At what time of the day? - A. As near as I can guess, about one or two o'clock, the prisoner came in.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am quite sure.

Mr. Watson. Q. What did he ask for? - A. He asked to look at some pearl broches; I took out a tray, and shewed him a great number of articles; when I had shewn him some, he asked to look at more; there was another young lady in the shop, and she took out the tray in which this diamond locket was; he looked out articles to the amount of twenty-three pounds; when he had looked them out, he gave me a direction to send them to Mrs. Rumley, No. 25, in the Change, pointing out to the Old-Change; when I had selected these things together, I missed this diamond locket; he asked me first of all, whether I could talk French, and I said, no; he said then, he would be in the way to interpret; he said they were for a lady that was going to the East-Indies; he gave me this direction, and went out.

Court. Q. Had you observed this diamond locket before? - A. Yes, the moment the tray was taken out of the window.

Q. When did you miss it? - A. The moment he left the shop.

Q. How long had he been in the shop? - A. About half an hour.

Q. During the half hour he had been in the shop, had any body else been in? - A. No, there was not any person whatever.

Q. Nobody came during the time he was there? - A. No, not a soul.

Q. You are certain that nobody came in from the time he came in, to the time he went out? - A. There was not.

Q. You missed it the moment he went out? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not attempt to pursue him? - A. No, I supposed he would make off as soon or before I got out.

Q. Did you see which way he went? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You took no steps to apprehend him that night? - A. I took this direction, and found it was false; I am perfectly satisfied he is the man, though I never saw him before.

Q. When he was gone, what did you do? - A. I put the things together; I went to the place where the direction was, and found it was false.

Q. Did you find any body at this No. 25? - A. No.

Q. Who lived there? - A. I do not know; there was no such person as Mrs. Rumley; I saw a woman and a child there.

Q. Did he give his directions in writing? - A. He did not.

Mr. Watson. Q. You have stated to my Lord that nobody came into the shop for the half hour he continued in the shop? - A. There was not.

Q. What was the name of that young lady that served in the shop with you? - A. Mary-Ann Gibbs.

Q. In the first place was Mary- Ann Gibbs in the shop with you, at the moment the prisoner first came in? - A. Not at the first moment.

Q. Had you happened to shew him any articles before she came into the shop? - A. Out of the first tray.

Q. In what tray was the diamond locket, mentioned in the indictment, deposited? - A. In the second tray.

Q. Are you sure that, before Miss Gibbs came into the shop, that you had not opened the second tray at all? - A. I did not, because she gave it to me.

Q. Then, if I understand you right, Miss Gibbs drew out the second tray; at the time she drew out the second tray, are you able to state whether the diamond locket was there? - A. I am sure it was.

Q. You say that you parcelled up a variety of articles to the amount of twenty-three pounds, to take to Mrs. Rumley? - A. I did.

Q. Was there any such thing amongst the things which he had selected, as a diamond locket? - A. No, there was not; those were pearl broches he had selected to purchase.

Q. When and where did you see the prisoner at the bar? - A. Not till Tuesday, the 11th of September, when we saw him at Marlborough-street.

Court. Q. This happened on the 15th of August? - A. Yes.

Q. From the 15th of August, to the 11th of

September, you had not seen the prisoner at the bar? - A. No.

Q. You stated that the prisoner at the bar was in the shop half an hour; when you saw him at Marlborough-street, had you any doubt whatever in your mind about the prisoner? - A. None in the least; the moment I saw him, I said it was him; I pointed to him, and said it was the person.

MARY- ANN GIBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. Q. Where do you live? - A. I live with Mr. Gaimes, I serve in his shop; he keeps a jeweller's shop in St. Paul's Church-yard; I was there on the 15th of August last; I remember the prisoner coming into the shop when Miss Coles was there.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. I know him.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner at the bar was in the shop when you came in, when Miss Coles was there? - A. Quite sure.

Q. At the time you came into the shop, what was passing? - A. He was looking at some bracelets, out of the first tray.

Q. What passed after you came into the shop? - A. I took the second tray out.

Q. Are you able to swear whether or not there was a diamond locket in that second tray? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You are certain? - A. Yes, quite certain.

Mr. Watson. Q. Do you happen to know what the bought price of that was? - A. It cost twenty-eight guineas; the prisoner looked out some goods, and ordered a quantity more to be sent, to the amount of twenty-three pounds; he had the bill made out; he had not money enough in his pocket, and ordered them to be sent to the Old-change, No. 25, where, he said, there was Rumley on the door.

Court. Q. Have you the bill of parcels here that was made out? - A. No.

Prosecutor. It was destroyed, I have no doubt; we have a number of false directions of this kind, we take no account of them.

Mr. Watson. (To Miss Gibbs.) Q. Are you quite sure that there was no such article purchased as a diamond locket any way? - A. No, he never even mentioned it, he left the shop.

Q. He left the shop, and what then? - A. He left the shop, and then we missed the diamond locket immediately; we did not miss it before he left the shop in any way whatever; after he was gone, we looked out the goods; he was to have some more handsome things brought, he said, besides what he purchased.

Q. I believe you accompanied the last witness, Miss Cole; did she pack up the goods pursuant to order? - A. Yes, she went away with them.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner? - A. Last Tuesday, at Marlborough-street; I am confident it is the same person.

Q. Have you the slightest doubt in the world? - A. None in the least.

Court. Q. You had never seen him from the 15th of August till the 11th of September? - A. No.

Q. And yet you are sure he is the same person? - A. Quite sure.

Q. You had never seen him before? - A. No.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - On Tuesday last, the prisoner was brought to the Office in Marlborough-street; a neighbouring boy says, here is a shoe that belongs to the prisoner; I went down to the lock-up place, and shewed the prisoner the shoe; he said it was his, he paid fourteen shillings for the pair a fortnight back, on a Sunday; he said he bought them of the Prince of Wales's shoe-maker; he asked for the shoe, but seeing the shoe was cut in such a nasty way, I would not give it him, it being cut in such an artful way; he attempted to make his escape after he was apprehended, and in doing that he lost his shoe.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-27

456. THOMAS STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , twelve pair of patten rings, value 3 s. 6 d. five dozen of patten ties, value 1 l. 6 s. two pocket-books, value 3 s. 6 d. one thread-case, value 6 d. one purse, value 6 d. two enamel boxes, value 1 s. 6 d. three knives, value 2 s. two knife cases, value 4 d. one screw case, value 1 s. one smelling-bottle, value 10 d. one silver tooth-pick, value 9 d. one pocket yard measure, value 1 s. and one silver thimble, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of John Knight .

JOHN KNIGHT sworn. - I am a manufacturer of walking sticks and dealer in toys ; I live at No. 17, Smithfield-bars ; the prisoner was my apprentice .

Q. How long had he got to serve? - A. About a year and a half: On the 22d of July, when I arose, the prisoner was calling our niece to open the door to let him out; I came down myself; the prisoner asked me to let him out; I said he must go and fetch me a peck of flour; while he was gone for the flour, perceiving his bundle to be very large, I examined the outside of it, and found, through the hole of the wrapper, some patten ties; I immediately went to the Half Moon public-house, to ask the landlord to step in, but the landlord was not up. On my return, I found a neighbour standing before the house; I desired him not to go away, if I required him I should call him in; I went into my own house, and in a very short time the prisoner returned and rung at the bell; I opened the door, and took the flour; I said I would

not detain him any longer, I would take the flour up; the prisoner said he must go up stairs, he had left his bundle in the kitchen; when he went up stairs, I beckoned the evidence to come in, and told him to stop till the prisoner came down; the evidence came in, and went into the shop, and I shut the door directly; I said to the prisoner the bundle was very large, he must dirty an uncommon quantity of linen in the course of a week, and before he took it any further, I must see what it contained; when I opened the bundle, there were five dozen of patten ties; I asked him where he got them from; he said, on the Thursday evening prior (I was out on Thursday), he had them from the ware-room; I had left the key in the door.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to say that? - A. No; the next parcel that was packed up, I had to cut the strings, and upon opening it, there were twelve pair of patten rings; I asked him where he got them from, and he said, from below, in the work-shop, where he worked in; I asked him what he was going to do with them, and he said he was going to try if he could sell them; I then said to him, as the bundle was so very productive, I would search his pockets; I searched his pockets, and found in his pockets the different articles mentioned in the indictment; I then sent for an officer, and after the officer came, he found another article, or two; he said he was going to give them away to several people.

Q. How long had he been with you? - A. About five years.

Q. How did he behave? - A. I liked the lad very well.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. Till this happened, you had a good opinion of him? - A. Not till this time, I had suspected him some time.

Q. Have you any partners? - A. None.

Q. How did you induce him to say this you have been telling us; did you tell him it would be better for him to confess? - A. No.

Q. Did not you send to his father? - A. I sent a friend to him, in order to find out who his accomplices were; I made no promise to him at any time.

WILLIAM OVERTON sworn. - I am a coach wheelwright: Mr. Knight called me in, there was nobody but Mr. Knight and me present; when the prisoner came down stairs, he had a bundle under his arm; when Mr. Knight asked him what he had got there in the bundle, he said they were things he was going to take to the washerwoman to wash; Mr. Knight said he should like to see the contents of the bundle; Mr. Knight took the bundle from the prisoner, and untied it, and there he found some patten rings and some patten ties; and the other things mentioned in the indictment was found in his pocket.

Q. What account did the prisoner give of the patten rings and ties? - A. I cannot say particularly; he said he had the rings from one place, and the ties from another.

Q. Was there any thing said by Mr. Knight, to induce the prisoner to say he had taken them from any part of the premises? - A. Not at all.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a victualler: On Sunday morning, the 22d of July, Mrs. Williams came up, and said Mr. Knight wanted to speak to me very particularly; I went to him, and when I got into the shop, I saw a bundle; Mr. Knight then said to me, you will be kind enough to see what is in this bundle; he took up the bundle, and untied it; he asked him where he took them from; he said he took the ties from some store room, at the time he had left the key in the door, and the patten rings he had taken out of the work-shop below; the other things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of his pockets; that is all I know.

GEORGE-HASLEWOOD WARREN sworn. - I am a constable: On the 22d of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, Mr. Knight sent for me to take charge of the prisoner; when I got there, he had been searched; I searched him over again, and found a silver thimble in his breeches pocket, which Mr. Knight said was his property; I took the prisoner to the Compter, and took care of the property; I produce the property.

Q.(To Mr. Knight.) Look at these patten rings, are they your's? - A. Yes, and the patten ties.

Jury. Q. Have you any private mark on any of them? - A. Yes.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-28

457. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , five pounds weight of Spanish liquorice, value 5 s. the property of John and George-Allen Aylwin .

JOHN AYLWIN sworn. - I am a cooper ; I live in Lower Thames-street ; the prisoner was employed by me as a cooper : On the 31st of July, he was employed in cooping a cask of Spanish juice in the warehouse; about one o'clock I saw him in the warehouse; I stood close against the door when the prisoner came out of the warehouse; I asked him to step back with me to the warehouse, I wanted to speak to him; when he got into the yard, I took hold of his coat pocket, and asked him what he had got there; he said, only a stick or two of juice for his children; I asked him if ever he had taken any before; he, with the greatest protestation, declared that he had never taken any

thing of any kind whatever before; I asked him if he had no more about him than what he had got in that pocket, and he declared that he had not; I sent for a constable, and desired him to examine his pockets first, and in his pockets he found six sticks of juice; I then ordered the constable to search him very close over, which he did, and he found eleven sticks more secreted in his shirt and breeches.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not worked for you these four years and a half constantly, and had you not seven years character of me from 'Squire Shiplin? - A. I went to Mr. Shiplin; he spoke of his having been with him some time; he said he did not know any thing against him.

Q. Have you a partner? - A. Yes, George- Allen Aylwin .

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a constable; Mr. Aylwin sent for me: I went and searched him, and found six sticks in his pocket, and eleven secreted in his breeches and shirt; I produce it.

Jury. Q. In what manner are they marked? - A. S in the middle of the stick.

Court. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Have you lost any more than these? - A. I do not know that I found any more missing.

Prisoner's defence. I was bred and born in London, I am a freeman and citizen; I have never had my name brought in question.

Prosecutor. He has a wife and four small children; I always found his wife to be a very nice comfortable woman, and her children very clean; the eldest of the children is near eight years old.

GUILTY , aged 62.

The Jury and the prosecutor recommended him to mercy, on account of his family.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-29

458. WILLIAM WATERFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two pounds six ounces weight of soap , the property of Richard-Prince Swallow .

RICHARD-PRINCE SWALLOW sworn. - I am a soap manufacturer , No. 20, West-street, Smithfield : As I was not present when he took the soap away, I have but little to say on the subject.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge? - A. No; I have suspected him before, and I have forgiven him once before.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I am Mr. Swallow's clerk; I was out on the 25th of July; one of my fellow-servants informed me that he had suspicion; I immediately said, on Waterfield; he said, yes: I said, I am sure he has something about him, besides what he ought to have; as soon as I had got to the accompting-house, I found Waterfield was gone, and I told a man to run after him; I was apprehensive that the man could not find him, so I run out myself, and called him back; as he was coming into the warehouse, he pulled out a piece of soap from his breast; I immediately said, Waterfield, it is of no use; he put it down in the accompting-house, and said, that is all I have taken; I informed him I was not satisfied with that; he put his hand into his breeches, and pulled out another piece of soap; I produce the soap.

Q. It is your property? - A. It is the soap that he was working on that day; it was warm when he cut it, and it was warm when he brought them into the accompting-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You forgave the poor man, and let him go home? - A. He begged of us not to tell Mr. Swallow.

Q. He was let go? - A. He was, certainly.

Q. How long has he lived in the house? - A. Twenty-five years.

Prosecutor. I have suspected him these five years that I have had the business.

Court. Q. What wages had he? - A.Nineteen shillings a week.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-30

459. JAMES WESLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Alger .

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. William Alger , No. 74, Sun-street, Bishopsgate ; this lad was brought to me by a witness.

JOSEPH DEWES sworn. - I am a carpenter: as I was coming up Sun-street last night, a little before eight o'clock, I saw something lying carelessly at a linen-draper's shop; it laid partly on the floor of the shop, and partly on the stone step; I turned back to inform them of it, and saw the prisoner go up to the door, and take the handkerchiefs, and put them under his coat; it appeared to me as if they had been hung up, and had fallen down.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an Officer: these are the handkerchiefs; there are four; when I had got him into custody, I searched him and found a new pair of stockings next to his shirt, which he could not give any account of; on being asked how he came by the handkerchiefs, he said they were hanging half on the hook and half down; he took hold of them, and the pin came out.

Q.(To James Smith .) Look at these handkerchiefs; have they your private mark? - A. No; they have no private mark; I know they are my master's; they were hanging up at half-past seven o'clock; I saw them there.

Court. Do you let things hang up after dark in this kind of way, tempting every idle boy that goes by; you hang up things there to tempt people to come into the shop, but after dark you do not consider you tempt every idle, loose, and disorderly person, to take them.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Whipped in jail and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-31

460. MARY RAMSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , two sheets, value 6 s. two pillow-cases, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Levi Philips , in a lodging-room let by contract by him to the prisoner, to be used in and with the lodging-room .

MARY PHILIPS sworn. - Q. Are you a married woman? - A. Yes, my husband's name is Levi Philips ; we keep a lodging-house in Dean-street, Westminster ; she was only two nights in my house.

Q. Did you ever get your things again? - A. No, she pawned them.

The pawnbrokers not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-32

461. DANIEL MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a mahogany writing desk, value 2 l. a gold medal, value 2 l. a gold ring, value 2 l. two studs, value 1 l. two lockets, value 3 l. two glass ink-stands, value 10 s. two silver bladed knives, value 5 s. a shaving case, value 1 l. two razors, value 5 s. a looking-glass, value 1 s. a purse, value 1 s. thirteen guineas, six half guineas, and two seven shilling pieces , the goods and monies of William Hotham .

WILLIAM HOTHAM sworn. - Q. What was the prisoner? - A. He was a hackney coachman : On Wednesday, the 15th of August, I arrived in town with the York mail; I took a hackney coach at Lombard-street, when I got out of the mail; I took my luggage out, and put it into his coach, and was drove by the prisoner.

Q. Did you take his number? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect his person? - A. I am sure he is the man that drove me; I put into the coach a mahogany box, with the articles in question, they were all in the box; there was a gold medal, a gold ring, two studs, two lockets, two glass inkstands with silver tops, a silver case, two silver bladed knives, two razors, a looking-glass, and a purse, containing thirteen guineas, six half guineas, and two seven-shilling pieces; I fancy there was a guinea more; the coach set a gentleman down at Covent-garden, and from thence drove to my lodgings in Duke-street, St. James's ; when I alighted, I desired the woman-servant of the house to see the things got out of the coach, and after having paid the coachman his fare, I retired.

Q. Had you seen the mahogany box when you stopped at Covent-garden; the box was not delivered by mistake there? - A. No, only a trunk belonging to a gentleman was taken out.

Q. The box continued in the coach till you arrived in Duke-street? - A. I am sure of it.

Q. You had not quitted the coach? - A. No; I got out when the other gentleman got out, I was not out above a minute, I saw the box when I got in again.

Q. When you alighted you went up stairs? - A. Yes; about an hour afterwards I had occasion to go into the country, I had got up to the top of Duke-street, in the chaise, when I found I had not got my box; I sent back immediately, and was told that no such thing was taken out of the coach; I directed my landlord to advertise the box, and he did so.

Q. Did you ever recover your box? - A. Yes; I went to the office on the Saturday after, and saw the box, and swore to the property.

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a sawyer, I live at No. 2, Back-hill: I saw the prisoner bring this box down into my room, on Wednesday, between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. He is a coachman, he drove for a person in Red Lion-yard, Warner-street; he lodged along with me at that time; he brought the box down stairs to me, and tried different things to open it, but he could not open it, he got a chissel and forced the lock open; when the box was opened, there were some guineas and half-guineas, to the amount of sixteen, I believe, and two seven-shilling-pieces; it was all told into the box again.

Q. That is the same box? - A. Yes; the box was tied up, I lent him the napkin to tie it up, and he put it in a little room of mine; he went and did his horses up, and then came back again and took it away; I never saw it again till I saw it at Westminster.

JAMES GILMORE sworn. - I am a Police-officer, of Queen-square: On Saturday, the 18th of August, I went to a place beyond Westminster, where the prisoner then lodged, and searched the apartment, and found this box concealed in another box; I then received further information where he worked, in Red Lion-yard, Great Warner-street; I immediately went and apprehended him; on searching him I found this purse, containing twelve guineas, five half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces.

HANNAH FREAKS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a servant, I live at No. 41, Duke-street, St. James's: I was the servant that came to the door to let captain Hotham in, about half past five

on Wednesday morning; the coachman gave me an umbrella, two great coats, a small parcel of books, and a portmanteau trunk, belonging to the captain; I asked him if that was all; he replied, it was.

Q. You did not look in the coach? - A. No; the captain asked him what his fare was; he said, four shillings and sixpence; the captain gave him four shillings and sixpence; he said, sir, I hope you will give me something, for your luggage is heavy; the captain returned, and went up stairs.

Q. Did you ever see that box? - A.No.

Q. You did not receive it from the coach that morning? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the person of the coachman? - A. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN HOBBS sworn. - I went with Gilmore to search the prisoner's lodgings; I can say no more than he has said.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along Fenchurch-street, facing Lombard-street, I took two gentlemen up, with their luggage, I did not see what luggage it was; one gentleman went to the Hummums, in Covent-garden, and the other to Duke-street, St. James's; I did not get into the coach to get these things out, I reached and took them out, and delivered them at the house; the lady asked me if the things were all out; I told her they were; the gentleman gave me four shillings and sixpence, I wanted something extra for carrying the luggage; I stood for about ten minutes and counted my money, what I had earned, and walked off gently; coming to Charing-cross, a woman and a man wanted a coach, they got in, and they ordered me to drive to the George and Blue-boar, in Holborn; after that, I watered my horses, and then I saw that box under the seat of the coach, I could not tell whether it belonged to that gentleman, or to the man and woman I took up after; I took it home, and they asked me if it had been left in the coach; I said, yes, I do not wish to have it opened; oh, said he, my landlord, they cannot hurt you for opening it; my landlady got two or three small keys, they would not fit; after that, she sent her daughter and borrowed a bunch of keys, and none of them would fit; here is, said she, a man in our court that makes these boxes, when he came, he said he did not make these kind of boxes, but, he said, I can get him a key in the course of the afternoon; my landlord came home to dinner, and they wished to see what was in it, they said I had a right; he gave me a chissel, I would not open it, he took the chissel and he opened it, and over-hauled what was in the box; I could not read or write, they know more than me about it; I took the money out for fear it should be lost, I did not wish to make away with it, nor any thing of the kind; I was never here before in my life.

Q. Is your master here? - A. No; his name is Hodges, I drove No. 114; I do not suppose he would lose a day's work to come.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Is that your box? - A. Yes; my name is on it on a brass plate, I am sure of it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-33

462. WILLIAM SYMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , seven shirts, value 24 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 12 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. a trunk, value 5 s. a pair of silver buckles, value 12 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a cambric handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of George Hollings .

GEORGE HOLLINGS sworn. - I live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square : On the 5th of September, from information I received from the other servant, I suspected that William Symonds had stole some of my property; Symonds was a servant of mine, he took care of my horse, and did other things in the house besides; in consequence of this information, I told Symonds to turn out his pockets, and from a book that came out of his pocket, I saw four duplicates of things that were at the pawnbroker's, there were two of them that were in his own name; I sent for a constable, and took him to Bow-street; the Magistrate desired that I would go to these pawnbrokers, and examine the things that were there, and see if they were my property; I did, and I found they were my property; one of the pawnbroker's names was Turner, and the other's name was Sutherland; he was to have left my house the day this happened; at the time he turned his pocket out I saw a key, I went to a public-house where he had taken lodgings, Mr. Duratt's, the Castle, in Shepherd's-court, at the back of my premises, and in the room that he had taken, there was a leather trunk of mine, and the key that I found on him opened it; and when the constable opened the trunk, he found some more of my property in it: two shirts, three pair of silk-stockings, two pair of cotton-stockings, and two or three neck-handkerchiefs; these were found at the room he took for his lodgings; at Mr. Turner's, the pawnbroker, there were five shirts, a waistcoat, and a pocket-handkerchief; at Sutherland's, a pair of silver buckles, a handkerchief, and a broach set with diamonds, the broach belonged to Mrs. Hollings.

Q. What became of the contents of the trunk? - A. The constable has got the contents of the trunk, the trunk is at my house.

Q. When had you seen this property last? - A. The trunk I had not seen for a long time, it was put up in a lumber garret; the linen and the waistcoat were kept in a drawer.

Q. You had not particularly counted over your things before? - A. No.

Q. You have no reason to know that they all went at once? - A. No other than the duplicates mention, when they were pawned; one was within eighteen days before I took up the prisoner.

- DURATT sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At the Castle, in Shepherd's-court.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No more than his being sent for beer; he took a lodging of me on the 4th of September, he brought a leather trunk on the 5th; I took down a key when he came, from where they generally hang for the lodgers' convenience; I opened the door, and he took the trunk in, he locked the door, and hung up the key; Mr. Hollings, and the officer, came in the same day the prisoner brought the trunk, betwixt eleven and twelve o'clock; Mr. Hollings and the officer came betwixt seven and eight o'clock, to the best of my recollection; I went along with Mr. Hollings and the officer to where he had left the trunk.

Q. Was it the same trunk which the prisoner had brought with him? - A. Yes; I was present when Mr. Hollings opened it, he had the key; the officer took the things and the trunk away. (The property produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court, I have no one here to speak for me; when I lived with Mr. Hollings, there was one Sarah M'Crow lived there a short time as cook, she told me she had been a married woman, and had some shirts and some other articles to sell: she brought forwards four shirts; I went to Mr. Hollings, and borrowed a one pound note; in a short time I bought a pair of silver buckles of her, and a topaz broach, at the same time she gave me the duplicates, as they were in pledge; I was distressed for money, and as I had borrowed a pound note of Mr. Hollings I did not like to ask for more; I took two shirts and a waistcoat, and pledged them in Brewer-street, in my own name; in a short time afterwards, I took the broach and buckles, into Swallow-street, and pledged them; the leather trunk was given to me by a gentleman that lived with Mr. Hollings, as he said he would give it me I took it; when I went into the country I took it with me, and when I came back I brought it back with me.

Q.(To Mr. Hollings.) Are you sure that is your trunk? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you purchase it yourself? - A. No; it was given to me.

Q. He says that the things were given, or sold to him, by Sarah M'Crow? - A. Mrs. Hollings gave Sarah M'Crow a good character; when she went away she shewed her box, and there was none of my property in it; she lives at Bow, I did not proceed against her; many of the things are pawned since she left me, some so lately as the 18th of August.

GUILTY , aged 21,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-34

463. JOSEPH NETTLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , one diamond-ring, value 50 l. one black shagreen box, value 2 s. a bead necklace and cross, value 5 s. and 30 beads, value 2 s. the property of Harriet Esten . (The indictment was stated by Mr. Alley, and the case opened by Mr. Const.)

HARRIET ESTEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the widow , I believe, of Mr. James Esten? - A. I am.

Q. Have you a house now in Half-moon-street, Piccadilly ? - A. Yes; in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square.

Q. You have a mother who has a country house at Nottingham? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in the habit of visiting her? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it happen that you came from her to go to the Opera? - A. Yes; I called at my house before I went there.

Q. Did you wear this diamond ring then? - A. Yes; it was mounted so as to be worn either as a broach or a ring.

Q. What was it worth? - A. Fifty pounds.

Q. When you returned from the Opera-house, did you propose going to your mother's? - A. Yes; I called at my house to deposit the ring, I gave it to Ellen Russell to take care of it for me; on the Saturday fortnight I had occasion to inquire for the ring of Ellen Russell .

Q. Did you get the ring from her? - A. No.

Q. Did you search the house at the time? - A. She did.

Q. Did you accompany her in the search? - A. No.

Q. Had you another female servant in the house? - A. Yes; her name was Esther, I do not recollect the other name, she was in the capacity of cook; I dismissed her from my service, but desired her not to go till I had made some inquiry about the ring.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at the bar in your house? - A. Yes; I saw him in the presence of Mr. Graham; I recollect he had been in the house, and offered himself as a servant, before.

Q. You left your ring at your house in Piccadilly? - A. Yes; the regular place and deposit of them were in the house at Piccadilly, but in the care of Ellen Russell .

Q. Were you present when Mr. Graham had some conversation with the prisoner at the bar, and the other servants, in the house? - A. I was.

Q. Did the prisoner ever say whether he had been in the house? - A. He told Mr. Graham that he

had slept in the house for a week, while I was out of town.

Q. This you said was a fortnight after the 9th? - A. About a fortnight subsequent.

Q. Have you ever seen the ring since? - A. Yes, at Mr. Hawley's; I saw the diamond out of the setting.

Q. Did you see any setting then? - A. Not then.

Q. Did you at any subsequent time see any setting? - A. I afterwards saw the diamond in the setting, at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You came from the Opera on the 9th? - A. Yes.

Q. You left it then in the care of Ellen Russell ? - A. Yes.

Q. And never saw it for about a month afterwards? - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. My friend, in his eagerness, stopped you from saying, what I understood you to say, it was impossible for you to tell, whether it was your's or not, out of the setting? - A. It was impossible to know the diamond out of the setting exactly, only by seeing the diamond itself.

Q. How many females did you leave in the house? - A. Ellen Russell and Esther the cook.

Q. That is the wife of the prisoner? - A. She is now; she was not then; I discharged her for having people in my house during my absence, without my leave.

Q. You charged her with having stolen this; in what place was this diamond ring kept? - A. Generally in the wardrobe.

Q. To which the women servants in the house had access? - A. Yes, the key had been lost.

Q. Had you any man servant in the house? - A. Yes, his name is Edward Hughes .

Q. Was he ever taken up and lodged in Newgate? - A. Never.

Q. When the prisoner was charged with it in Mr. Graham's presence, he was quite astonished at it; he protested his innocence? - A. He did.

Q. Do you happen to know that he actually desired that the loss of this should be advertised in the public papers? - A. I never heard that.

AARON GRAHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. The prosecutrix applied to you concerning her loss? - A. Yes; it was on a Sunday; I believe I received a note from Mrs. Esten; I went there and examined some of the servants, particularly Ellen Russell, that had the care of this diamond; the next day I called upon her again; then I understood the prisoner had been there, and had slept in the house; I desired to see him, and saw him; I made nothing out of the servants; I examined him; he particularly seemed astonished, because I suspected that their was a possibility of his having taken it; he denied it; I mentioned my having called at Mr. Hawley's; still he never said any thing of having sold one; I examined him, and it was taken down in writing; I mentioned Mr. Hawley's name to him; he never mentioned one thing, but, on the contrary, protested his innocence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. After you charged him with it, I believe you made use of some sort of a threat, that you had a good mind to send him to prison? - A. Yes.

Q.Notwithstanding you did not do so; he was at large; he was not under any sort of recognizance? - A. He was not.

Q. Was it not a fortnight before he was under any confinement? - A. I cannot say.

Q. He came to your office voluntarily, by appointment? - A. Yes, he did; and I let him go; and then, after the things were found, I sent the Officer for him.

ELLEN RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. In the month of June last you lived as servant with Mrs. Esten? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect, upon the 9th of June last, Mrs. Esten having given into your care, when she returned from the Opera, a diamond-ring? - A. Yes; I put it into a box, and put the box into a drawer in the wardrobe.

Q. In about a fortnight after that, your mistress made enquiry about it, and you could not find it? - A. I could not find it.

Q. You had the care of your mistress's wardrobe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect whether there were any beads in a box? - A. Yes, in a black shagreen case; there were some mock pearls, a necklace, and a cross; I have seen the box since at Bow-street.

Q. The other female servant, the prisoner's wife, was then in the house; you were on good terms together? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner at the bar before Mrs. Esten had lost the ring? - A. Both before and after.

Q. Then she gave you the ring on the 9th, and on the 23d the loss was discovered; had you seen him in the time? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of visus did he pay; where they of duration? - A. Sometimes he stopped a good while, and sometimes not long.

Q. Was it day or night that he was there? - A. He did sleep there four or five nights; I asked him to sleep there.

Q. The question is, whether he slept there between the 9th of June, when the ring was given to you, and the 23d, when she had discovered she had lost it? - A. He had been frequently in the house in the course of that time, but he never slept in the house during that time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He had slept in the house by way of safe-guard to the house, when your mistress was out of town? - A. Yes.

Q.He did not sleep with the cook? - A. No.

Q. He never slept in the house till after the 23d? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Your fellow servants and you were on very good terms? - A. Yes.

Q. She knew the wardrobe perfectly? - A. No.

Q. She knew where it was? - A. Yes; she slept in the next room to me; the wardrobe was in the floor immediately under.

Q. She is the woman that was charged with the robbery by Mrs. Esten, and committed for trial? - A. Yes.

Q. Between the 9th and 23d of June, did you ever see the prisoner in that room or near it at all? - A. I never saw him in it at all.

Q. Did you ever see him in any part of the house near to that room where it was? - A. No; he did not sleep in the house between the 9th and the 23d.

Q. You say the man slept in the house as a safeguard to the house? - A. He did.

Q. Was the other man in the house at that time? - A. No.

JOHN HAWLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Are you a silversmith? - A. Yes; I live in Coventry-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever bring any jewels to you to sell? - A. On the 15th of June he came to my shop, and said he had found a diamond, and asked if we purchased them.

Q. At that time was he a stranger to you? - A. Entirely; I asked him the particulars concerning it; he said he found it on Ludgate-hill, near the Bell Savage Inn, on Holy Thursday; he had been to see the children come from St. Paul's; this was on the 15th, when he came to my shop; I told him it was a thing of some consequence, and some value, and recommended him to have it advertised; he told me he had looked over the different papers since the time of finding the diamond, for the purpose of seeing if it had been advertised, but he said he had no objection to leaving it with me, if I thought proper, or if I chose to make enquiries, or advertise it myself, he had no objection; he went away, I advertised it, and I saw him again on the Tuesday or Wednesday following.

Q. Did he bring you any thing but the diamond? - A. The diamond was set, but it was not a complete piece of work; it was not a ring, or a broach, nor any thing else; it was only a diamond in this enamelled border.

Q. Was the enamel perfect when he brought it to you? - A. I believe it was, I am not quite certain; he asked me what success I had had, on the Tuesday or Wednesday, when he called again; I told him not any yet; his father called afterwards whom I have seen since.

Q. How do you know it to be his father? - A. He said to me, I understand my son has left a diamond with you; the prisoner called on Monday on me, and said the Saturday following he should come and take it away or dispose of it; on the Saturday following he came, and his father with him; it was the same person that called before; I told them as before, I had heard nothing of it; I had made several enquiries; I had been to those in the trade; I had been to Green and Ward's, and to a variety of other jewellers; they told me they had come to take the diamond away; I gave it to them; they asked me what it was worth; I told them I supposed it was worth about twenty guineas; they asked me if I would give twenty guineas for it; I told them I would; they said they would sell it me, and they would take it no farther; I gave them twenty guineas; I gave them 20 l. in notes, a gold ring, which was 14 s. and the charge for the advertisement.

Q. Did you know what was the value of it? - A. I conceived that to be the trade price of it; it weighed 12 grains 3 penny weights and an 8th of a grain.

Q. Did he tell you he had found any thing else at that time? - A. He did not. Mrs. Esten called some time afterwards and she saw the diamond; I had taken it out of the setting; I shewed her the diamond, and she said it resembled her's very much; it was out of the setting then; as soon as I found it I waited upon her, which was in about half an hour after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long did this diamond remain in your possession from the time the prisoner brought it, and the time Mrs. Esten called upon you? - A.Somewhat about a month.

Q. You recommended him to advertise it; he had no objection to your advertising it, and you did advertise it; and he left it with you eight or nine days, till you purchased it of him? - A. I purchased it of him about eight days after he left it.

Q.He left his direction with you; it was a true address? - A. Yes.

Q. You advertised it, and had the means of resorting to him, if you had found an owner; and the prisoner paid for the advertisement, not you? - A. Yes, he did.

Q. He said his father was a tailor and lived in Portpool-lane, No. 44? - A. The young man in the shop took down his address.

WILLIAM ANTHONY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a Police-Officer? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time go to No. 44, Portpool-lane? - A. Yes; the prisoner's father is a

lodger there; he gave me a box with some beads in it.

Q. Who gave it to you? - A. The prisoner's father; I produce the beads.

Court. Q.(To Mrs. Esten.) Look at those things? - A. The diamond, as far as I can judge, in the mutilated state it now is, I have no doubt is mine; the beads, I am certain they are mine.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you mean to swear that it is positively your's? - A. I mean to swear positively that I believe it is mine.

Q.(To Ellen Russell .) You look at the articles? - A. I cannot speak to the diamond ring; the others I can speak positively to.

(The examination of the prisoner before Mr. Graham read.)

" Joseph Nettleton says, that he has known Esther, his wife, for two years; he has visited her at Mrs. Esten's during the whole of the time she has lived there, which he believes to be about three or four months; that he slept in Mrs. Esten's house three or four nights, at the request of Ellen Russell , during the time the footman was in custody; that he was married on Sunday week at St. Pancras church; he says that the diamond ring he sold to Mr. Hawley he found on Holy Thursday, near the Bell Savage Inn, Ludgate-hill; that he kept the ring five weeks before he offered it to Mr. Hawley, and looked in the different newspapers, to see if it was advertised; and when he found it he was going to see the charity-children come from St. Paul's, he having been brought up in St. Andrew's school, and that the diamond and the beads were altogether wrapped up in a piece of paper in the box.

Prisoner's defence. The box and the beads, and the diamond, I found altogether, on Ludgate-hill, opposite the Bell Savage Inn; I know nothing at all about it, as true as I am here, of its being Mrs. Esten's property.

The prisoner called four witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-35

464. WILLIAM COLEMAN was indicted for that he, on the 15th of January , feloniously and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut Thomas Dubbledey in and upon the two fore-fingers of his left hand, with intent in so doing to disable him .

Second Count. For like offence, with intention to do him some grievous bodily harm.

THOMAS DUBBLEDEY sworn. - I live at No. 5, King-street, Drury-lane: On the 15th of January, I had been with Mr. Hooker to the Pantheon-chapel, to a funeral; I was returning from there, and was in Theobald's-road with my friend, Barnard Harris .

Q. Did any thing happen before you got to Theobald's-road? - A. The prisoner struck Barnard Harris before the constable attempted to take him; Barnard Harris gave charge of the prisoner for striking him.

BARNARD HARRIS sworn. - I live at No. 8, Little Wild-street: I had been to the Pantheon-chapel; I was walking home by the side of my own daughter, who is one of the charity children belonging to the Free-school; they had been singing an Anthem over the grave of the servant girl of the mistress of the school, that was deceased; we had crossed Gray's Inn-lane, and was coming into Little James-street; I saw the prisoner at the bar at the head of the mourners; I saw him square with his arms up against the mourners, and when he came to the children, he behaved in a very indecent manner, especially to the girls, making use of infamous language, and shoving them off the pavement; upon which I addressed him in the following words:

"My friend, do not insult the children, let them pass on;" he then made ready to strike me.

Q. Had you made any offer to strike him? - A. No; I kept off the first blow with an old umbrella I had in my hand; as soon as I dropped my hand by my side, I received a blow from him on the right side of the face, which knocked me from the pavement into the middle of the coach road, but I did not fall to the ground; when I recovered myself, I went to the opposite side of the street, and turning round, I saw Mr. Webb and Mr. Thorn with the prisoner; they seemed as if they were preventing him from following me; I went over, and said it was a pity that I could not pass the street without being insulted by him, or any other person; Mr. Webb and Mr. Thorn said there was a constable just by, and it was a pity but such a man was taken up; upon which, Mr. Hooker asked if there was any man to give charge of him, and I gave charge of him; Mr. Hooker took his staff out of his pocket, and took hold of him; then we proceeded to take him on to St. Andrew's watch-house; Mr. Hooker finding him very strong, and more than he could manage, called on Mr. Dubbledey to assist, and he took hold of him; the prisoner used every effort he could to get away; we had to drag and carry him all the way; in the course of going along, some person sung out, which I judged to be Mr. Hooker, he has got a knife, take care of him.

Q. Was that before or after Dubbledey had hold of him? - A. After.

Q. Did Dubbledey do any more than lay hold of him? - A. I did not see that he did; in a little while after Mr. Hooker had called out, he threw the knife from him, and Mr. Webb picked it up; when we got to the top of Bedford-row, I saw

Dubbledey's hand running down with blood, and from there we took him to the watch-house in Eagle-street.

Q. What time of the night was it? - A. It was about half past four, it was good light; I could see him perfectly well, or any one else.

Q.(To Dubbledey.) You mentioned being in Theobald's-road; what happened when you were there? - A. I saw the prisoner strike Barnard Harris with his fist, and knocked him off the pavement; I saw him a long time before cutting capers with Mr. Hooker, and likewise with all the children.

Q. What did he do with the children? - A. He used very impudent language, he put himself in different postures.

Q. Did he meddle with their persons at all? - A. Only pushing them about.

Q. Before he struck Harris, had Harris done any thing at all to him? - A. No further than saying, my friend, let the children alone; Mr. Hooker was the undertaker of the funeral; he left his company, and came to the children; seeing one was one way, and the others another, Barnard Harris asked whether there was any constable nigh; Mr. Webb and Mr. Thorn said it was a pity such a rascal should go on so; Hooker said he was a constable; he laid hold of the prisoner, and called me to assist; I laid hold of him, and we dragged him along; he was very resolute, and strove to get away from us, and at Theobald's-road he drew a knife.

Q. You did not see him draw the knife? - A. No; the constable sung out he had got a knife, going across John-street; I looked round, and saw my hand running with blood; I looked at Mr. Hooker's coat, and saw it cut about a foot; Mr. Webb looked out for the knife, and found it; we dragged him to the watch-house, and there I washed my hand with some water; it was cut deep through the skin.

Q. Could it have been done by a scratch? - A. No, it was done by a sharp instrument.

Q. How many wounds had you on your two fore-fingers? - A. One on each, on the outside of my fingers.

Q. What length might the wound be? - A. About three quarters of an inch long, each of them.

Q. What depth? - A. Near the bone, as near as could be; they were both cut at one time.

Q. Did you apply for any assistance to have your wound cured? - A. I dressed it myself.

Prisoner. On the examination before the Magistrate, he said he never felt nor saw me cut him; it is not possible that a man having a cut near the bone, should not feel it.

Dubbledey. In the heat of blood I was in, I did not feel it.

Prisoner. I cannot say whether I did it or not, I was not sensible at the time.

Q.(To Dubbledey.) Was he sober or drunk? - He was sober enough to fling away the knife, after the person sung out, he has got a knife.

NATHANIEL HOOKER sworn. - I am an undertaker; I had conducted this funeral.

Q. Were you at that time a constable? - A. I was sworn in at Hatton-garden a special constable. On returning with the mourners, I saw the prisoner put himself in different postures; when I came up to him, I just put my hand to his arm, and said to him, my friend, do let the people pass by; he squared to any person that passed by, just as though he would strike them; I desired him the second time to stand up, and gave him a little bit of a shove; I passed on, and thought the mourners were following me; I looked back, and saw they were all scattered; I went back to see what was the matter, and heard the people crying out for a constable; when I came back, I said, who gives charge of him; I unbuttoned my coat, and pulled out my staff, and held it up against his face.

Q. Did you strike him? - A. No, he made great resistance; I called out for Thomas Dubbledey to aid and assist me in the King's name, which he did.

Q. In his assisting you, did he make use of any violence? - A. No, we had hold of him by his arms; we had then got, I think, into John-street; I felt something pulling my coat, but I did not perceive whether it was the mob, or any thing else; I cast my eyes to Dubbledey, and saw his hand running with blood; I immediately said, gentlemen, he has got a knife; I saw the knife distinctly in his hand; he took his arm in this manner (describing how), and threw the knife away; he could not lift his arms far, as we had hold of him, I stopped him; I said, gentlemen, he has thrown the knife away, I with you would find it; I heard the knife drop, Mr. Webb picked it up; I took him on to the watch-house, and there I searched him; this coat, which I have on now, was cut right across; it was examined by the Magistrate; as the coat was loose, it did not penetrate to the waistcoat; if it had been tight, I suppose my bowels would have been cut out.

JOHN THORN sworn. - I saw the funeral partly come up Little James-street, and saw the prisoner interrupt the children; I likewise saw him strike Barnard Harris , without any provocation on his side; I heard a constable called for; I said, with others, it was a pity that a constable could not be found to take him into custody; Mr. Hooker came back, and said, who will give charge of him; he received the charge, and called Dubbledey to his assistance; taking him towards the watch-house, some person said he had a knife in his hand; immediately after, some person said he had thrown the knife away, and Mr. Webb and I went to look

for the knife; Mr. Webb found it, and when we found it, I saw Doubleday's hand was bloody.

Q. Were you at the watch-house when Dubbledey's hand was cut? - A. I was, I did not notice it then.

Q.(To Hooker.) When you were at the watch-house, what sort of a wound did it appear to you? - A. A little more than skin deep.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn. - I was in company with Mr. Thorn, between four and five o'clock, it was drawing towards dark; I observed the prisoner insult the children, and drive them off the foot way; Barnard Harris interfered, by desiring him to let the children alone; the prisoner then struck him, and the second time I interfered, and said, strike him no more; I thought his conduct deserved some care; I said, was there any constable near, it was a pity but he had charge of him; the undertaker of the funeral said he was a constable, and would take charge if any body would give it; the charge was given by Barnard Harris , and the constable requested the assistance of Thomas Dubbledey ; they had not conveyed the prisoner a great distance, before I heard the people say he had got a knife, but no sooner had I got there, than he had thrown the knife away; as I was going up to the prisoner something struck my eye, I was nigh the spot, I stooped, and picked up the knife.

Q. Did you see the wound that Dubbledey received? - A. Yes; the depth of the wound I will not pretend to say, they were sufficient marks of cuts; he was wounded in more than two places.

Prisoner's defence. I have been to sea in the Zealand; I had an accident of falling between decks, and fractured my scull; I have been home more than two months; I got drinking at the Blue Lion, in Gray's Inn-lane; I was discharged on account of the fracture; when I used to drink, it got into my head, it used to make me intirely out of my senses; whether I did cut or not, I cannot say; I cannot see what intent I could have in doing it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-36

465. JOHN BOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , four yards and a half of book muslin, value 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. two diaper table-cloths, value 14 s. one diaper tablecloth, value 6 s. three yards and a half of cambric, value 1 l. 19 s. twenty-five yards of Irish cloth, value 2 l. 10 s. and seven yards of worked muslin, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of Joseph Craig and Benjamin Webb .

BENJAMIN WEBB sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Holborn above the Bars .

Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Craig, is the house your's? - A. No, the house is Mr. Craig's; we are linen-drapers ; I am come to swear to the property.

- CORDEROY sworn. - I am an apprentice to Messrs. Craig and Webb: On the 20th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, I discovered several articles concealed in the shop-window under a piece of printed cotton; about an hour afterwards I looked there, and they were gone.

Q. After you had seen the goods lay there, did you see any body come into the shop? - A. I was not in the shop the whole of that interval; about twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner deliver a small deal box to the next witness.

Q. Where was the prisoner then? - A. He was in the shop; the prisoner ordered him to take the box to the Saracen's Head-inn; Mr. Craig was out at that time; when he returned, I informed him of what I had seen; he brought the box down stairs; the prisoner lived in the house, he was shopman .

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have several servants in the house? - A. We had at that time three or four.

Q. Pray sir, has not Mr. Craig left the house, and gone to reside at Brighton, without an intention of returning to town? - A. He is not at Brighton now, nor was not then.

Q. What was put into the box, you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. Of course if you had known, you would not have let it gone out? - A. No.

- JONES sworn. - I am an occasional porter to Messrs. Craig and Webb: On the 20th of July, the prisoner came over to my house; my wife took in the message, I was out; I went over to Messrs. Craig and Webb's when I came home, and he shewed me the box; he asked me what I would have to carry it to the Saracen's Head, Aldgate; he bid me a shilling; I said I would not take it, I would have one shilling and sixpence; I took it, and there I left it.

Q. Did you go back to him for the money? - A. As I came along, he was standing at the door, and he gave me the one shilling and sixpence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The Saracen's Head-inn, Aldgate, where you delivered it, is in the City? - A. It is.

BENJAMIN ROW sworn. - I was at work at Mr. Brown's, in Shoreditch; the prisoner gave me a box to carry.

Q.(To Jones.) Were there two boxes? - A. There were.

GEORGE HAWKINS sworn. - I am coach bookkeeper at the Saracen's Head; I took in the box, No. 1, to go by Frewer's waggon; it was directed to Mrs. Bolton, Aylsworth, in Suffolk; it was ordered to go by the waggon, but our waggon book-keeper being out of the way, I took it in.

Q. Who brought the box? - A. I cannot recollect who I took it of.

- sworn. - I am book-keeper to Mr. Frewer's Waggon; a box was brought to me, marked No. 2, directed to Mrs. Bolton, Aylsworth, in Suffolk; Row brought the box.

WILLIAM SUMNER sworn. - On the 20th of July I was sent for to the Saracen's Head Inn, Aldgate; I am a revenue-officer; when I came there, there were Messrs. Webb and Craig; they told me, in the boxes that were there, there were some things that they thought should not be there; they asked me if I would open the boxes; I opened them, and afterwards they discovered some of their property; the boxes were corded and sealed; that is all that I know about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you opened the boxes, the prisoner was not there? - A. No.

GEORGE BROWN sworn. - I know that there was a man came to my house with a box, and that my man carried it to the Saracen's Head Inn, Aldgate.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 20, Shoreditch.

Q. Did you see him carry it? - A. Yes.

Q. When was it? - A. I cannot recollect the day of the month.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - On Friday, the 20th of July, Mr. Craig sent for me to his house, to take the prisoner into custody; I searched him, and found about him a small bill of some things he had got to enter into the books of Messrs. Craig and Webb; I took him before the Magistrate; he was examined the next morning; I went to order the book-keeper to bring the boxes.

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn. - I produce the boxes, No. 1 and 2.

Q.(To Corderoy.) Is that the box that you saw him give to the porter? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Jones.) Is that the box that you carried? - A. Yes.

Q. What was written on the box? - A.(Mr. Webb.) The box was in canvas then; it was marked No. 1; the direction was on the outside; it was directed to Mrs. Bolton, Aylesworth.

Q.(To Webb.) Are these things your's? - A. They were the joint property of Mr. Craig and myself.

Q. What is the value of these things? - A. The table-cloth, 7 s. the two diaper cloths are worth 14 s. I suppose in this box, marked No. 1, 30 s.

Q. You can swear to them? - A. To the best part of them I can.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-37

466. JOHN JUNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , one pail , the property of John Raban .

THOMAS CLARK sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a labourer; I work for Mr. Raban; I left this pail on the barges on the 18th of July, about a quarter before eleven o'clock in the forenoon, full of water.

Q. Do you know any thing of that man; what is he? - A. I do not know what he is; I only know him by sight.

LYDIA SEDWELL sworn. - He brought the pail up to me, about six weeks ago; he asked me to buy it; he said he was very much distressed, and my husband gave him fourteen pence for it; I told him I did not want to buy it.

Q. What became of the pail? - A. John Sewel came and asked for it; I gave it him the same day.

Q. The same pail that you bought of the prisoner you gave to Sewel? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner that you bought it of? - A. Yes.

JOHN SEWEL sworn. Q. What are you? - A. A labourer to Mr. Raban; I was coming home, and a gentleman told me that he saw him with the pail; he shewed me the house that he went into; I enquired whether the pail was left there; she told me she had bought one; she delivered the pail to me.

Q. What did you do with the pail that you received from Lydia Sedwell ? - A. I gave it to Thomas Edwards .

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - I am horse-keeper to Mr. Raban; I bought the pail, and kept it in my care till such times as Clark took it away, and left it on the craft.

Q. The pail was delivered afterwards to you by Sewel? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it the same pail? - A. It is the same pail.

Q. Whose pail is it? - A. Mr. Raban's.

WILLIAM KIMBER sworn. - On the 18th of July I was sent for by Mr. Raban's clerk; I saw the prisoner at the bar and the pail; I asked him if this was the pail he had stolen; he said, yes; I marked it immediately; I have had it in my possession ever since.

JOHN LEWIS sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a sea-faring boy; I saw him come off the barges with the pail, and take it off; he came over the barge that I was in, and carried it up Mr. Griffiths's wharf.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes; I have seen him a great many times; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I was on shore picking up coals and rope and what I could; I saw this pail; I went and sold it to this woman for 14 pence; I said to them I had stole no pail.

Court. Here is a witness that saw you take it from the barge.

Prisoner. No, he did not; I was washing my legs.

Q.(To Edwards.) Is there any mark upon that pail? - A. There is a break in the wood in one of the staves just by the middle hoop.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-38

467. SUSANNAH M'CARTY was indicted for unlawfully receiving, on the 24th of August , eleven glass bottles, value 2 s. four quarts of gin, value 9 s. one pint and a half of brandy, value 3 s. three quarts of noyeaux, value 12 s. and one pint and a half of Madeira wine, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of George-William Downing ; she, the said Susannah M'Carty, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

GEORGE-WILLIAM DOWNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you are a wine and spirit broker , residing at No. 70, Tower-street ? - A. Yes.

Q. You had a lad that lived with you, of the name of Lunn? - A. He lived with me about a year and a half; he was just breeched when I first took him.

Q. Had you missed any of your property? - A. I had missed some noyeaux, that were in cases, and one bottle of Madeira.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any information that you received from the boy, find any brandy on the premises of the prisoner? - A. Yes; on the 29th of August we went to her house near Widegate-street, Petticoat-lane; she furnished us with her address; when we came there, we opened her drawer, and there we found a bottle nearly full of brandy; I gave it to Read, the officer, after tasting and shaking it.

Q.Did you go to your stock, and did you observe that you had missed any quantity? - A. About two-tenths of an inch, which is a little more than a bottle; I tasted it from the bottle which was found at her house; it was import strength; the strength it would be allowed to come into the port of London.

Q. You say it was import strength; is that the state in which it would be sold by publicans? - A. No; I believe you may go into ninety-nine gin-shops out of an hundred, and not get it of that strength, because it is the profit they are allowed; it would be reduced 3 s. in a gallon.

Q. Did you taste the gin; what state was that in? - A. Similar; I went by the bead on the vial.

Q. Did you find any thing more in the stone bottle which was found? - A. The bottle was covered up in a sieve of fruit, as I conceived it to be, under her barrow; I found it to be brandy and water; brandy grog.

Q. Did you know that to be your property? - A. No.

Q. Do you know the bottle of brandy that was found in her house? - A. Yes; I can swear to that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You import a deal of brandy? - A. Yes.

Q. You say the strength of spirits is seen by shaking the vial, to see what sort of a bead it makes; do not you know that the thermometer is to ascertain the heat, and the hydrometer the strength? do you know the woman? - A. No.

Q. Not at all? - A. No; I have seen her in passing; that is all.

Q. You speak to the brandy because of your shaking it; it had the strength of that which you had at home? - A. Yes.

Q. I think you say you may go to ninety-nine gin-shops out of an hundred, and not get such brandy? - A. That I am sure is true.

Court. Q. As to the bead, that may be put upon it to make it look stronger than what it is? - A. I believe it is possible to be done, but the bead put upon it by a chemical process will shew different, we do not do it; the process may be done by others to lower it.

Q. Therefore, if a customer comes, he sees there is a fine bead on it? - A. We never do it.

Q. You do not do it, but the retailers do.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What account did she give of the bottle of brandy? - A. She said she bought it at the Hole in the Wall, Aldgate; it was found in her drawer.

Mr. Alley. That might be owing to the lady's delicacy; she did not like her husband to know she had a bottle of brandy at all.

- LUNN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. I am 12 years and 6 months.

Q. How long have you lived with your master? - A. About a year and a half.

Q. You know the prisoner; where did she use to be? - A. Close to my master's house with a barrow.

Q. What daily? - A. Yes; I have known her about two months.

Q. How came you acquainted with her? - A. One day, I went to buy a halfpenny-worth of apples; she asked me to bring her some liquor; I denied her; she said I must do it; I took her five bottles of Hollands, four bottles of noyeaux, one bottle of Madeira, and one bottle of brandy.

Q. Where did you take this from? - A. From my master's house; I took them to Harp-lane, and delivered them to her there.

Q. You took them at different times? - A. I took the five bottles of Hollands at once, and the four of noyeaux at once; and the bottle of Madeira

and bottle of brandy at another time; she said she would give me 18 d. a bottle for the spirits, and and a shilling a bottle for the wine; she gave me a shilling a bottle for the noyeaux; I took nothing else to her.

Q. Are you quite sure you have told us the truth? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I am told you were a naked boy when you came to your master, and was breeched at your master's; how was it? - A. I was breeched some time.

Q. I suppose you have learned your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell me the eighth or ninth commandment? - A. No, sir.

Q. The eighth is, thou shalt not steal; the ninth is, thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour; did you ever hear them before? - A. I learned them, but I quite forgot them.

Q. Where does your mother live? - A. At Bermondsey.

Q. Sometimes you ride across the river with a scull to your mother's house? - A. No; I generally walk over.

Q. Your sister used to be where your master lived? - A. No.

Q. Had you not a sister? - A. Yes; my things used to come sometimes on a Sunday.

Q. When was this you stole these things from your master? - A. About three months ago.

Q. You are a good judge of liquor? - A. No.

Q. How can you tell whether it was gin, rum, or brandy? - A. I can tell whether it was brandy or gin.

Q. Have you tasted gin? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot tell whether it was gin, brandy, or rum; you took the first thing that came to your hand, like any other rogue? - A. Yes.

Q. And though you stole, you cannot either read or write? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever drink brandy, rum, or gin? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it was red or white? - A. There were some red and some white.

Q. How can you undertake to swear whether you gave rum or brandy? have you ever seen brandy mixed with sugar? - A. No.

Q. I hope you will never tell another lie? - A. No.

Q. Then do not tell me another lie? - A. No.

Q. Then whether it was brandy or rum you cannot tell? - A. It was a bottle of brandy that I gave to her.

Court. Q. Was it in a bottle when you took it? - A. No, I took it out of a puncheon.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were not wicked enough to taste it? - A. No.

Q. You might mistake a rum puncheon for a brandy puncheon; might you not? - A. No.

Q. Who told you it was brandy? - A. Some of the men.

Q. Did any body see you take it? - A. No.

Q. You always took it privately? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know what a bellencher is? - A. Yes.

Q. It is what they draw samples with; have you ever helped to draw with the bellencher? - A. I have sometimes with my master, upon the quays.

Q. You know the smell of brandy? - A. Yes.

Q. When you put the bellencher in, did you suck the bellencher, or taste the brandy at all? - A. No.

Court. Q. You were taken up for this? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you in custody now? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever tell your master this before you were taken up? - A. No.

Q. What was she selling at the door? - A. Sometimes she sold apples and sometimes pears.

Q. At the first time she asked you to give her some liquor, did not you tell your master or some of the men, that a wicked woman asked you to bring her some liquor? - A. No.

Q. Where did you give them to her? - A. The five bottles of Hollands I took to the pastry-cook's, and left them there, and when she came I gave them to her.

Q. Did you deliver them to her in the presence of the pastry-cook? - A. No, I left them, and said I would call bye and bye.

Q. Did you deliver the noyeaux at the pastry-cook's? - A. No; I took eleven in the middle of the day to her.

Jury. Q. What did you do with the money? - A. I spent it at the pastry-cook's, some of it, and some she paid me in apples.

- BUTLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live at the Hole in the Wall? - A. Yes, in Aldgate; I am nephew to the master of the house; I do not know the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you ever sell to the prisoner at the bar any rum, brandy, or noyeaux, or any thing else? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose the ladies are very secret when they come for liquor; they do not go into the bar? - A. I know nothing at all about it, I never saw the woman before.

- CROZIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. I am shopman there; it is a liquor-shop and wine-vaults; I have seen the prisoner there some times.

Q. Did you sell her any Madeira, any noyeaux, or any strong brandy? - A. No; I always serve in the shop when I am in the way.

Q. Who keeps this wine-vaults? - A. John Copeland ; he is ill, and confined in his bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you keep a register of every pint of gin you serve? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you never sold her strong brandy? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of brandy do you sell? - A. Reduced brandy.

JAMES KAZEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know the last boy that was examined? - A. Yes, Lunn.

Q. Did you ever see any thing of any gin that was taken by him? - A. No, I did not; I saw a basket packed up in my master's passage.

Q. What did that basket contain, or what did the bottles contain? - A. I cannot tell that.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you know the boy, and know him to be a great rogue? - A. No, I do not say so; what a person hears they can hear, and yet they cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-39

468. JOSEPH RUMBLE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of July , on Thomas Morgan , did make an assault, and that he, then and there, did feloniously force and drive the near wheel of a dray, drawn with horses, over the head of Thomas Morgan , and thereby gave him a mortal bruise and fracture on the head, of which he instantly died; and so the Jurors say, that he the said Joseph Rumble , the said Thomas Morgan did kill and slay .

ANN JUST sworn. - I live with my father and mother.

Q. What is your father? - A. A gentleman, he lives at No. 4, Chiswell-street.

Q. What day was it? - A. On the 11th of July last: I was in Long-lane , going along with a child in my arms.

Q. Whose child was it? - A. Mr. Morgan's.

Q. What age was the child? - A. A year and a half, his name was Thomas Judson Morgan ; I was met by a dray as I was going along.

Q. You saw the dray coming towards you? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the night was it? - A. Four o'clock in the afternoon, the dray came on the pavement.

Q. Who drove the dray? - A. I do not know.

Q. How many horses had the dray? - A. I do not know; the wheels of the dray was on the foot pavement.

Q. How was it going, fast or slow? - A. I do not know; a man came by and knocked the child out of my arms, he ran against me.

Q. Did the man come behind you, or before you? - A. He met me, and the hind wheel of the dray went over the child's head; it was taken to a surgeon, the surgeon examined the child, and said it was dead.

Q. Were there any other carriage in the street? - A. I do not know.

Q. How far was the wheel on the pavement? - A. Very near the wall, there was but just room for me to stand on the pavement.

Q. As you met the dray, why did not you go back? - A. I did not see it till it came quite close to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. In what part of Long-lane did this happen? - A. Between Charter-house-square and Smithfield.

Q. Do not you recollect, that another dray was passing at the time? - A. I do not know that it was at the time.

Q. The pavement is very narrow there, particularly so? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see where the man was that was driving the dray? - A. No.

THOMAS TOWERSON sworn. - I am a soldier: I was coming down Long-lane, and I observed this dray coming down, it was coming from Smithfield; I saw this little girl with a child in her arms; a man coming along hit the child out of her arms; a cart was unloading on the opposite side of the way, the drayman held his whip towards the shaft-horse to keep from the other cart that was unloading on the other side of the way, the horse took fright, and run on the pavement, and the wheel ran over the child.

Q. Did he whip the horse? - A. No; the girl cried out, the drayman stopped immediately, I took the child up, and took it to St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

Q. Who drove the dray? - A. Joseph Rumble .

Q. How were the horses going? - A. They were walking.

Q. How near was she to the dray? - A. About as near as me, I was just against her.

Q. You were behind her, were not you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were examined before the Coroner - You gave a different story before the Coroner? - A. I gave it to the best of my knowledge; I was in such a fright I did not know what I was about; I was informed there was a cart on the opposite side of the way when I got to the hospital.

Q. You said, before the Coroner, you never saw there was a cart? - A. No, I was told so.

Q. You were sworn to tell me what you saw, not what you heard; you now say a man came running against her, and knocked the child out of her arms; you swore before the Coroner that the dray ran against her, and knocked the child down. Who have you been with yesterday? - A. I do not know; I was here yesterday.

Q. Who have you been with talking this matter over? - A. Nobody at all.

Q. You do not do the prisoner any good; which is the truth, the man running against the girl and knocking the child out of her arms, or, the wheel of the dray striking the child out of the girl's arms,

and the wheel running over it? - A. A man coming along hit the child out of the girl's arms.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. This was in the narrow part of Long-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw the dray coming, was not the man driving very carefully? - A. Yes; they were walking.

Q. Holding up the whip, the horse came on the pavement in a minute? - A. Yes; I saw the horse come on the pavement.

- sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a shoemaker by trade: I was working in my stall, I saw a dray come up the lane very gently indeed; I saw the wheel go over the child's head, the drayman stopped, I did not see the child struck down, I saw the child down; a cart was unloading on the opposite side of the way, it was a little cart, with one horse.

Q. A town cart? - A. No, not so big as a town cart.

Q. Your street is wide enough for two drays to pass? - A. Yes; sometimes a dray and a waggon pass.

Q. On which side of Long-lane were you working? - A. On the right-hand side from here; the accident was on the left.

JOHN ROSSITER sworn. - I live at No. 65, Long-lane, I am a shoemaker: I was up in my first-floor, about four o'clock, I heard a dray come brisk up the lane, I heard a young woman crying out; I instantly turned my head to look out of the window, and I saw the wheel go over the child's head; I then ran down stairs, when this good man that spoke last catched it up, and he and I took it to the hospital.

Q. Did you observe whether there was any cart there? - A. There was a small cart unloading some goods for a lodger coming into my house.

Q. How near was the accident to your house? - A. It was not exactly fronting of my house.

Q. You did not see how the dray went? - A. No; it was loaded with small empty barrels.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Kirkham, No. 29, Long-lane: I was at work very near the door, stuffing chairs, I heard the dray come along; just as it passed by the step of our door, I heard sombody cry out; I went out, and saw the child lying on the pavement; I went back again into the shop.

Q. Was the child killed then? - A. Yes; I did not see the dray go over it.

Q. Did you see the dray pass? - A. Yes; it came very near the step of our door.

Q. How far is your door from where the accident happened? - A. About four yards.

Q. Are you sure, when it came near the steps of your door, it was upon the pavement? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BAXTER sworn. - I am house surgeon of St. Bartholomew's-Hospital: When I saw the child it was dead.

Q. What was the occasion of its death? - A. The dray going over its head.

Q. You have not the least doubt of it? - A. None in the least.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along with the dray, and there was a cart unloading on the opposite side; I held my whip to the hind horse to keep clear of the cart, and the horse came in rather before I could stop him; I did not see the girl, nor the child.

Jury. Q. You were on the wrong side of your horses? - A. No, I was on my right side.

Q. In what situation were you to your horses? - A. I was standing against the middle horse.

THOMAS FRAILE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Bolland. Q. Were you with Rumble at the time this accident happened? - A. Yes.

Q. In what manner was he driving this dray? - A. He was at the side of the middle horse, and I was at the fore horse; the dray was coming along very gently; he hauled in the horse to prevent him running against the cart; the wheel might take the curb, it laid very low, and it was in a very narrow place.

Court. Q. You were returning home with the dray and empty barrels? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

The Jury, on account of his good character, recommended his punishment to be as slight as possible; and the father of the child recommended him to mercy.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-40

469. THOMAS BENNETT was indicted for that he, on the 6th of July , one piece of false and counterfeited money called a shilling, made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Charlotte Burrel , he then and there at the time knowing it to be false and counterfeited; and that he the said prisoner had about him at the time, one other false and counterfeited piece of money, made to the likeness of and for a good shilling, he at the time knowing that last piece of money to be false and counterfeited .

Second Count. That he, on the 13th of July , one other false and counterfeited piece of money, made to the likeness and for a good shilling, did utter to the said Charlotte Burrel , he then and there knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

CHARLOTTE BURREL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You keep the Mitre, in Mitre-court, St. James's, Duke's-place , in the ward of Aldgate? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I have seen him twice before.

Q. When did he come to you first? - A. On the 6th of July, near eleven o'clock in the morning; he called for half a pint of porter, and gave me a shilling, which at that time I supposed to be a good one; afterwards it turned out to be a bad one; I gave him a sixpence and fourpence three-farthings change, and he went away; I laid the shilling upon the mantle-piece under an image; I found it to be a very bad one, by rubbing it, the moment he was gone. On the Friday following, to the best of my recollection, it was the 13th of July, he then called for half a pint of porter; there was a person in the bar with me then, and I said that was the person that offered me the bad shilling; then he offered me a bad shilling, but I gave him no change for that, supposing it was a bad one; I took the shilling, and compared it with the other on the mantle-piece.

Q. Did it appear to be a bad one? - A. Certainly; I turned to the prisoner, and told him that he made a trade of it, that he might be content with giving me one in a week, without giving me the second; he said he did not know it was a bad one, and that he had never been in my house before; I told him I would send for a constable, and have him searched, for I thought he had more about him; he made no answer, and I sent for a constable, who is now in Court; I gave the two shillings to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You keep the Mitre; pray do you know a person of the name of Dyer? - A. I do.

Q. I do not like to pry into secrets; have not you the good fortune to be married - no private marriage? - A. No.

Q. You tell me upon your oath you are not married? - A. I am not.

CHARLES BLOXHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a constable; you were sent for to Mrs. Burrel's? - A. I was; I saw the prisoner there, and searched him; I found on him twenty-nine bad shillings in his waistcoat pocket; I have had them ever since.

Q. Produce the two first of all; have you kept them separate? - A. These are the two, (producing them); and these are the others; I have kept them separate, exactly as you see them.

JAMES POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Will you have the goodness to look at the two shillings first? - A. These are both counterfeits, and the twenty-nine are all counterfeits.

Q. Do they appear to be of the same manufactory? - A. Yes.

Q.(To Bloxham.) Were they loose in his pocket? - A. No, they were in a bit of brown paper.

Court. (To Powell.) Q. Have they ever been in circulation? - A.No.

GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time, to find sureties for one year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-41

470. SARAH-ANN RAYFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , one half-crown, one shilling, and twelve penny-pieces , the property of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I am a brass-founder ; I live at No. 6, Pear-tree-court, Clerkenwell .

Q. What is this girl? - A. She is a neighbour; she lives about three doors from me; her father is dead; her mother keeps a mangle.

Q. What age is she? - A. I cannot tell; I missed money before at different times; she has been taken ever since the 21st of July, and been in prison. On the 10th, I had the shop robbed of a bowl full of money, and I put some money there on the 14th, to see whether they would come again; twelve shillings and sixpence there. On the 15th, the money was there, which was Sunday, and in the afternoon the money was gone; I was determined to find out some method to detect them, the shop laying intirely back from my house; I went to Hatton-garden, and engaged with the officer to detect them; I put some money there on the 16th, and told the officer to set up to watch. On Friday he came, and told me he could not come that night, he was upon particular business; I set up myself, and this girl came between three and four o'clock in the morning.

Q. How did she get in, at the window? - A. The pane was broke; there was a board put up there, she pulled it down, and came in; Mr. Hancock was called, and he came into the shop, and saw her; we let her come out of the shop with the property on her, because we thought there might be somebody else there; Mr. Hancock saw her come out, and he took her about three or four yards from the window; when he took her, he brought her into the house; she had nothing but a sort of a smock-gown on, and a pair of slippers; he ordered me to go to her mother's, and fetch her clothes, which I did; I saw nobody with her.

Q. Did you find the money on her? - A. The money was in her hand in a bag; I called her mother up.

Court. (To the prisoner.) Q. What age are you? - A. Not ten years.

Q.(To Smith.) What kind of a woman is the mother? - A. She is a hard working woman, and has got a large family.

JAMES HANCOCK sworn. - I was sent for by Mr. Smith: By his desire I set up in the back place

four nights; I had particular business, and could not set up that night; I thought it was some man when I came; I never was more surprised; the mother is a very hard working woman, a widow with a great family; I saw her come out with the bag of halfpence in her hand, and when I saw no more people, I took her back again, and bolted the door.

Q. Did you find out whether she was set on by any body? - A. I cannot tell; I produce the money; it was all marked by Mr. Smith, I desired him.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Whipped in jail and discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-42

471. CATHARINE DREW and CATHARINE CARNEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , fifty-four yards of printed calico, value 5 l. 8 s. the property of Thomas Powdich , privately in his shop .

THOMAS POWDICH sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. In Holborn , I am a linen-draper ; I was not present myself.

GEORGE CHAPMAN sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Powdich: On the 23d, in the morning, the prisoners came in, and made choice of a gown; after they had cut it off, they had not sufficient money to pay for it; they left one shilling on it, and said they would call for it on Saturday; they came in on the same day, in the after part, and they wished, they said, to have another cut off from the same print, which I cut off.

Q. Did they pay for it? - A. No, they had it put by in the same way, and was to call for it on Saturday; they likewise came in again on Friday, the next day, with a third person, and made choice of another gown for the third person; during the time I was serving the third person, I observed one of the prisoners stoop down, under pretence of tying up her stockings; I perceived her making a great bustle in tying up her stockings, which excited my notice; when she arose up, she took both her hands, pretending to draw up her petticoat.

Q. Which was that? - A. Catharine Drew ; I perceived the sides of her waist to have increased very much, nearly double to what it was before, which induced me to go round the counter immediately; her eyes were fixed on me; her sides decreased, and I picked up that piece from beneath her petticoats, near the counter; I accused her of having taken it, and she denied it; I took her by the arm, and desired her to go out immediately; the other young man that was behind the counter desired me to observe the other (Carney). I saw the boy pull a piece of print from under her arm; I took them both to the door, I saw a constable in the street, and gave charge of them immediately; the third person had a gown cut off, pretending a marriage was to take place, and they wished to appear like sisters.

WILLIAM JAMES sworn. - I saw them come in; I took the piece of print from under Carney's arms. (The property produced and identified.)

Drew's defence. I went into this shop; I asked them to shew me a bit of muslin for caps; he asked three shillings and sixpence, which I thought too much; he asked me if I wanted any cotton, I told him I did not; he came along the shop, and made a prisoner of me; I turned round to get my muslin, and he pushed me out of the shop.

Carney's defence. I went into the shop to pay two shillings off my gown; there were several women in the shop that were buying of prints; he stood upon the counter chucking the cottons down, and this piece fell down; I laid hold of the cotton to put it upon the counter; with that he came round, and kicked me out of the shop.

Drew, GUILTY .

Carney, GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-43

472. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a basket, value 2 s. and two fowls, value 6 s. the property of Richard Castle .

RICHARD CASTLE sworn. - I am a broker at Mile-end .

Q. You are not only a broker , but a poulterer ? - A. Yes; I bought them of one Mr. White, and put them at my door for sale in that basket, on the 1st of August; I was at work backwards, and was called by my youngest daughter; she told me a man had robbed her mother of some fowls; I then run after him towards Bow, I was informed he was taken in Stepney fields; he was taken to our house; the man who took him is here with the fowls and basket; when I got home, they had let him go; I desired him to be fetched back again, and he was brought back again directly; I have lost a great many things from the door.

Q. Are you sure it is the same man that was brought back first, and the man who had the fowls? - A. I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was your daughter that told you of the transaction? - A. Yes.

Q.Therefore you know nothing at all about it yourself? - A. No.

- HOLDER sworn. - I am a labouring man: I was going down Mile-end-road to dinner, and saw the prisoner at the bar take the fowls from the door; I told the prosecutor's wife of it; I ran after him, and overtook him, and brought him

and the fowls back to the door; the man that lived over the way ordered me to let him go about his business; I am sure that is the man I saw take the fowls.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are my fowls, I can swear to them.

Mr. Alley. Q. You have a great many fowls for sale? - A. No.

Q. You have a great many fowls that you keep? - A. Yes.

Q. When they were brought back, did you not give them a little airing with the other fowls in your yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Then how can you swear to them? - A. This is the basket, and these are the fowls that were lost from my house.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-44

473. ELIZABETH HERBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a table-cloth, value 5 s. four shirts, value 12 s. an apron, value 3 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and a child's cap, value 3 d. the property of Richard Sellman .

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - I am a shoemaker, I live at No. 11, King's Head-court, Long-alley : On Tuesday, the 31st of July, about half past six o'clock in the morning, I had just sat down to work; in the absence of my wife, I saw a woman come into the room; she said she wanted a Mrs. Williams, I suspected she was after no good, and told her to go down again; I saw her go into the house of Mrs. Sellman.

Q. Was it the same woman that came into your room that you saw go into Mrs. Sellman's? - A. Yes; I watched her from the door, I live nearly opposite; she was in about ten minutes, she came out with a parcel of loose things in her arms.

Q. Did you see whether there was anybody there? - A. The shutters were shut; I saw her come out with the things under her arm, I was working with my shirt-sleeves tucked up; I pulled them down and ran after her, I soon overtook her, and before I got quite close to her she dropped the things; I picked up the things, and called out stop thief; a young lad laid hold of her, and I brought her back to Mr. Sellman's, he was ill in bed; I got him up, and sent for an officer and gave charge of her, the officer has got the things.

- NELSON sworn. - I am an officer, I produce the things.

SUSANNAH SELLMAN sworn. - I know nothing of the robbery, I know the things are mine.

Prisoner's defence. May it please you my Lord, I went to enquire for Mrs. Williams, I was going to look after some needle-work; I called at Mrs. Sellman's; I went up two pair of stairs to inquire for Mrs. Williams, she came out of Yorkshire; I asked the gentleman for her, he told me she did not live there; I immediately came out of the house, when that young man came to me; he said, you must go back with me; I went back, and was carried into the same house, and the first sight that ever I saw of the things was, that gentleman called Mrs. Sellman, and Mrs. Sellman came and kicked the things down stairs; as I stand before Almighty God, I never saw the things before; the young woman told me she lodged at No. 11; my friends have been here three days, they are not able to lose any more time.

Jury. (To Edwards.) Q. Whether you are perfectly sure that is the same woman that dropped the bundle? - A. I positively swear she is the same woman, she had a black eye at the same time.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-45

474. ROBERT ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , seventeen penny-weights of silver, value 4 s. the property of James Bridgeman .

JAMES BRIDGEMAN sworn. - I am a watch-case maker , I live in Church-row, at the back of St. Luke's .

Q. Did you lose any silver? - A. I lost three pieces of silver, I have lost property at several times: On the 18th of July, one piece was taken from the prisoner, seventeen penny-weights, all in one piece; I lost it out of my shop between the hours of six and seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. When had you seen it there last? - A. It was left there on the Monday at dinner-time, till the Wednesday; it was cut off this bit of slip by the prisoner; I ordered my apprentice to conceal himself in the loft of the shop. (Produces the slip of silver from which it was cut off.)

Q. You had suspicions a long time before? - A. Yes, and particularly of the prisoner; my apprentice saw the whole of the circumstance.

JOHN RUMSEY sworn. - On Wednesday morning, the 18th of July, about half past six o'clock, my master desired me to get into the loft; I got into the loft, and watched right over the prisoner's seat; there was a crack made, so that I could see the transaction of the prisoner, my master and the other apprentice was out of the shop; he arose from his seat, and I saw him take up the slip of silver which my master produced; he put a pair of shears in the vice, and cut a piece off; the slip of silver was lying on a board; he laid the slip, when he had cut it off, on the place where he took it from, and put the piece into his pocket; he sat

down and worked for a time, and then he arose and went to the scales and weighed it; he put it into his pocket, and sat down to work again; when he was sitting at work, he took it out of his pocket, and tried to bend it; then he put it into his pocket, and worked for a time; he got up again, and went to the other side of the shop, and I saw no more of the piece of silver which he had cut off; my master was down stairs, he desired the maid to call him down stairs; the prisoner went out; I then got out of the loft, and told my master the transaction of the prisoner.

WILLIAM PALMER sworn. - On the 18th of July, Mr. Bridgeman came to me, requesting me to go to his house; he placed me in the parlour, saying that his journeyman would go out of his house to breakfast; I waited in his parlour till he had got out of the house, and then took him to a public-house, and searched him, and from his hat this piece of silver tumbled out, which I now produce.

Q.(To Bridgeman.) Is that your piece of silver? - A. Yes; it was cut off this slip, it fits it.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say more, than I have been a hard working man through my life-time; I have got a wife, and six helpless children, and an aged mother, who looks to me for support; I hope, Mr. Bridgeman, you will recommend me to mercy, on account of my family.

Prosecutor. When you did that, you did not think of my family, but I recommend you to mercy.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) How long had he worked for you? - A. Better than a twelvemonth.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

The Jury recommended him to mercy, on account of his family.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-46

475. HARRIET BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , four muslin gowns, value 4 l. two petticoats, value 20 s. one cap, value 1 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Smith .

The Court being of opinion that this case was not a felony in point of law, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Ordered to be detained till next Session.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-47

476. HELENA DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a gold pin, value 3 s. the property of Richard Dolphin .

RICHARD DOLPHIN sworn. - I live at No. 5, High-street, St. Marylebone : I am a pork butcher , the prisoner was a servant to me; during the time she was my servant , this pin was missing; we had great reasons to suppose she had taken it away; Mrs. Dolphin said she was almost certain that she had got it; the prisoner then said, that if she said she had got it, she would trounce her; upon this we discharged her; after she had left us about six or seven weeks, on the 26th of August, she went to a baker, and had two quartern loaves in my name; he detected her, and sent her to the watch-house. On the 27th, I went to her at the watch-house, and asked her if she had taken away the pin that she was turned away for, and to tell me where it was, I should be glad, that I might obtain it; she then fell on her knees.

Q. When you went to her to speak about this, did you tell her it would be better for her if she confessed; did you hold out any hopes to her? - A. I certainly did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-48

477. MARY HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , two sheets, value 10 s. one bolster, value 10 s. and one counterpane, value 10 s. the property of Aminadab Rodbourn .

MARY RODBOURN sworn. - The prisoner at the bar took of me a ready-furnished room, on the 26th of August, at five shillings a week, it was up one pair of stairs; I delivered her the key, and described the sheets that I gave into her possession, and I said I should want to change them.

Q. When did you miss these things? - A. I missed them on Friday, at half past twelve o'clock, when the prisoner was out of the house; I have got a key myself that belongs to the same room, for being robbed before, it made us careful, and when she came in, I asked her for the sheets, to change them for her; I said, will you give me the sheets, and I will give you others; she said, most assuredly I will; she then went away, and run; I cried out stop thief, and followed her; a man in the street took her; I followed her to Marlborough-street; she said, Mrs. Rodbourn let me go, I will bring them to you on Monday, or directly; my husband not being present, I did not know what to do; I took her before the Magistrate, and she denied ever having them on the bed; I then told her, if she would own to them, that I would not put myself to any expence.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I was going up Sackville-street on the 31st of August, and saw the prosecutrix running after the prisoner, she was crying out stop thief; I asked her what was the matter, and she said the prisoner had robbed her room; I ran after her, and stopped her; I desired

her to come back; she said, let me go, I will return her her property; I said, I know nothing of you, you must go back with me; I brought her back, and the woman desired me to take her to Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, I can assure you I am wrongfully accused by my prosecutrix, of whom I took the lodgings; at the time I took the room, she said she was sorry she could not make the place so comfortable as she wished; she had taken the key of the door with her, and then charged me with stripping the apartment of that which was never in the room; I declare myself innocent; leaving my case in your hands, I trust in God I shall be acquitted.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-49

478. ANN NAILOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , one gown, value 20 s. the property of Martha Griffiths .

MARTHA GRIFFITHS sworn. - Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mr. Robson's, a paper-hanger, in Piccadilly .

Q. Did you lose a gown at any time? - A. Yes; on the 24th of July I gave the prisoner my gown to take to Mrs. Bustfield, to wash with Mr. Robson's linen; on the 27th Mrs. Bustfield sent it back to me with my master's linen, but an apology was made to me by the prisoner about my gown, that, if I did not want it, Mrs. Bustfield would send it me on Monday.

Q. Did she bring it on Monday? - A. No; on Friday, the 27th, she brought all excepting my gown.

- BUSTFIELD sworn. - I am a washerwoman; I received a gown of the prisoner on the 24th, belonging to Martha Griffiths , Mr. Robson's servant ; I sent it home with Mr. Robson's linen on the 27th, by the prisoner; I did not know but the owner had got it.

Q. Are you sure that gown went home with the rest of the things on Friday? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever send such a message by her as you would send it home on Monday? - A. No; because I gave it her with the other things.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I had an information against the prisoner for carrying away a great quantity of linen; I went to Birmingham and took her at her father's house; I did not know whose property this gown was; the prisoner owned the gown to be part of the property; she gave it up with a great quantity of linen, which belonged to Mr. Reynolds; I took her up at Birmingham on the 3d of August last; she acknowledged to part of a basket of linen which she had made away with; she had the gown on when I apprehended her, and at the watch-house I made her take it off.

Prisoner's defence. (The prisoner handed a paper to the Court, which was read as follows:)

"My Lord and gentlemen, I am exceeding sorry for having acted wrong; my character was always good till this transaction; I unfortunately over-staid my time with a woman of the name of Mary Griffiths; I was persuaded to pledge the articles; after having done so, I was abandoned by my companion, whom I have never seen since, nor heard of; I have nothing to say more, only throwing myself upon the lenity of this honourable Court, hoping this, my first offence, will excite you to be merciful to me; so shall my future conduct be ever grateful, and that, by keeping in mind your lenity, I may tread in the paths of virtue, and leading a life of honesty, endeavour to repay the humanity shewn to the unfortunate prisoner,

ANN NAILOR ."

Q.(To Martha Griffiths.) Can you swear to that gown? - A. Yes; there is only one button on it; it should have had two; there was but one on it when I lost it; I know it is mine.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-50

479. AMBROSE WOOTAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , one dollar, value 5 s. two half-crowns, value 5 s. nine pieces of silver coin called shillings, and three sixpences; and a Bank of England 1 l. note , the property of William Orange .

Second Count, in like manner, only laying it to be the property of James Carter and John Gibson .

WILLIAM ORANGE sworn. - On Sunday evening, July the 29th, I lost some money and a 1 l. note; it was endorsed on the back with my own hand-writing; I am collector of the toll ; on the 27th I made up my money, and put it into the cupboard; on the evening of the 29th I went out to get something I wanted; I was not gone above two minutes; when I returned, the money was gone; I mentioned it to the officer in the morning, and he said he had information of a party that had been seen lurking about the house; in consequence of that, I went with him to the prisoner's lodgings; he was in bed; he was called down, and he denied it; he said it was a false information, and that he had not been seen near the place; the officer asked him, if he had any objection to be searched; he then put his hand into his pocket and threw down the silver, which was a dollar and two half-crown pieces, and several shillings and sixpences, part of the property that was in the cupboard in paper.

Q. Can you swear to the property? - A. One shilling I noticed very particularly; the officer then

went to his bed-room, and returned in a short time with the note.

Q. Where did you go with him? - A. Into the yard adjoining the house.

JOHN GLOVER sworn - I am an officer in the parish of St. George, Hackney; the prosecutor told me, on the 30th, that his house had been robbed on the preceding evening; I went home and told my daughter; she told me she saw the prisoner at the bar on the preceding evening, lurking about the house; in consequence of that, we went to the prisoner's lodgings, and told him we had suspicion of him, and if he was innocent, he could have no objection to being searched; he took the silver out of his pocket and threw it down; the prosecutor looked over it, and said he could swear to one shilling, which was in the money he had lost; I went up into his bed-room, and after some little searching I found this note I now produce, under the carpet by his bed side. I then took him into custody. (The money and notes produced.)

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Can you swear to that note? - A. I can swear to the endorsing at the back of the note, it is the only one I received that day; and this shilling, there is a little nick on the side of it; there was all the money found on him but one shilling.

HANNAH GLOVER sworn. - On the 30th of July, my father came home and told me that Orange had been robbed; I told my father the prisoner had been lurking about the door about ten o'clock on the 29th of July.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing the note.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Hotham .

Reference Number: t18040912-51

480. JOHN SHAW was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, upon Catherine Sterling , on the 25th of June , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a silver watch, value 2 l. the property of the said Catherine Sterling .

Second Count, for the like offence, only laying the watch to be the property of Thomas Rutherford .

CATHERINE STERLING sworn. - On Sunday, the 25th of June last, I met this Rutherford in Oxford-road, near St. Giles's; it was past one o'clock in the night; this man came home to my room with me in St. Giles's ; when he came into my room he gave me his watch to take care of, and he gave me a shilling to go out and get some liquor; I was gone for the liquor about ten minutes; the prisoner is a watchman; in getting the liquor I passed by his watch-box; I knew him before; he asked me what I had done with that gentleman that passed by with me; I told him that he was in my room, and that he had given me a shilling to get some liquor, and asked me to take care of his watch; the prisoner asked me if I would give him any liquor, if he came with me; I told him I would; he came with me to the public-house, and had a glass of liquor; he asked me, upon my return, if I would give him the watch out of my pocket, if I would, he would turn the man down stairs; I told him I would not; he walked with me to my own door, and at my own door another young man came up to enquire for a young woman that slept with me; I told him that she was asleep in bed.

Q. Was the prisoner there then? - A. Yes; they both spoke together; I do not know what they said then; he said I had got a man's watch in my pocket, and if I did not deliver it to him he would take me to the watch-house; I told him he might take me, and then I would not give it him; the prisoner desired me to call the young woman down to him; I went into the passage to call this young woman down, and the young man struck me; at the time I was struck, I had the man's watch in my pocket.

Q. How do you know you had it in your pocket then; you had it in your pocket when you went out? - A. Yes.

Q. But you did not particularly observe that you had it in your pocket at that time? - A. No, I did not.

Q. You say the young man struck at you; you did not perceive that any person took the watch at that time? - A. No, I was very much in liquor at that time.

Q. Who took you to the Justice? - A. The constable; that was on the Tuesday or Wednesday following; the man that owned the watch sent for the constable.

Q. What became of you after you received this blow? - A. I went up stairs to my own room, after I recovered myself; the young man I received the watch from was asleep, and when he awaked he missed his watch; he asked for his watch, and I told him, as well as I could, how I had lost it; he said he would take me to a Justice; I said I was very willing to go; on Tuesday, I think it was, he took me to the Justice; I have seen the watch since at Marlborough-street, but I did not know the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You live in St. Giles's; you never had the good luck to be married in this country? - A. I have been married in Ireland.

Q. She is called spinster; there is an end to this part; Rutherford was an old acquaintance of your's? - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. You were quite tipsey, and he was just as drunk as you? - A. Yes.

Q. They were your lodgings that Rutherford accompanied you to? - A. Yes.

Q. There was Mary Kelly with you; she slept with you? - A. Yes.

Q. You accommodate one another with a lodging now and then? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you any thing of a scholar; can you read? - A. No.

Q. You know what a duplicate is? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever shew Mary Kelly a duplicate of a watch? - A. No.

Q. You have sometimes told her some of your secrets? - A. Yes; I did tell her something about the watch.

Q. You did not tell her about the duplicate? - A. No.

Q. You were quite a stranger to Rutherford? - A. Yes; I never saw him before that night.

Q. How came it that he should have so strong a notion of you as to give you his watch to take care of? - A. He did.

Q. And you never saw him before, and this in the honest part of St. Giles's; what business is he? - A. He is here; he is a tailor.

Q. Had you any acquaintance with the prisoner? - A. Yes, I knew he was a watchman.

Q. What was the other man; was not his name Foley? - A. Yes, it was Foley that was enquiring for Kelly.

Q. Did you not charge Foley with having robbed you? - A. I swore that he knocked me down.

Q. You were at the Grand Jury when the bill was thrown out? - A. I was sworn to tell the truth.

Q. He was at Bow-street, was he not; you have told us that you were yourself discharged; was not the prisoner discharged also? - A. He was.

Q. You saw him on the next night? - A. No; on the Tuesday night I saw him.

Q. You cried out lustily when you were knocked down? - A. Yes.

Q.This was in the entry that you were knocked down? - A. Yes.

Q Are there any rooms on the ground floor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Hurly? - A. Yes.

Q.She was at home at the time that Rutherford was in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore if you cried out, she must have heard you? - A. Yes.

Q. Her room door was adjoining the entry? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her husband open the room door? - A. Not to my knowledge; I cannot recollect.

Q. How came you to speak to the prisoner that night? - A. I had to pass by; he spoke to me first.

Q. You did not tell him you would be glad if he could get any money on it? - A. I did not; I had money enough in my pocket.

Q. Whose shilling was that you spent when you treated the watchman? - A. Mr. Rutherford's.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Rutherford that you treated the watchman? - A. No; not till the next morning.

Q. How many examinations had you at Bow-street? - A. Only one.

Q. You did not choose to go to Bow-street, Mr. Rutherford brought a man and took you to Marlborough-street; the prisoner came forward and voluntarily offered himself? - A. He did.

Court. Q. How do you know he came voluntarily and offered himself? - A. I heard so.

Mr. Alley. Q. You never spoke to Mary Kelly about the watch? - A. No.

Q. You never asked the prisoner to get some money on the watch? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner was never in the room while Mr. Rutherford was there? - A. There were only Mary Kelly, Rutherford, and myself.

Q. Did the watchman go into the public-house when you gave him this liquor? - A. He did.

Q. Who served you this liquor? - A. There were a man and woman there; to the best of my belief it was the man.

THOMAS RUTHERFORD sworn. - Q. You were in company with the last witness on the morning of the 26th of June? - A. I was; I went home with her to her lodgings.

Q. Had you a watch with you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were very much in liquor? - A. I was not so much in liquor, but I knew very well what I was doing of.

Q. Did you give charge of your watch to any body? - A. I gave it to the girl and desired her to take care of it.

Q. Did you send the girl for any liquor? - A. I said if she wanted any thing here was a shilling, that was all; I wanted to go to sleep; she said, let us have something to drink.

Q. Was it your intention to go to sleep when you parted with your watch? - A. Yes, I had been out in the country, and had spent the evening with some friends, who had kept me late.

Q. Were you awake when she returned? - A. No, I awoke in the morning, and desired her to give me the watch; I was in a hurry to go to work; she told me she had not got it; she told me two men took it: they knocked her down in the passage, and took it from her.

Q. Have you seen the watch since? - A. Yes, I saw it again on the 25th of July, I believe, in the possession of Mr. Dobree; I found it out by a hand-bill I got printed.

Q. Do you know the number of the watch? - A. Yes, 111; and there were the two initials(TR)

of my name on the swivel; the wife of the prisoner offered me money to make it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had not been acquainted with that girl before that night? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You say you were sober enough to know what you were about? - A. I know that I delivered the watch to her.

Q. The girl was very drunk, she told me so herself, and you gave her, who was then drunk, and was going out, a watch to take care of? - A. I cannot say I was sober, but I knew what I was about; and she did not seem to me to be quite drunk.

Q. The girl was quite a stranger to you; and there was another girl in the room? - A. Yes; she told me she was an acquaintance of her's.

Q. You never saw a man in the room when you lost your watch; the girl was out? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give her a shilling to bring home liquor, for her and you to drink together? - A. I did not want any.

Q. Was not she to bring it home? - A. I expected it so.

Q. She staid some time; you knew nothing of her till the morning when you awoke? - A. No.

Q. She said you charged her with stealing it? - A. I took her to the office, that I might have a good understanding.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with her that she should have two guineas? - A. I offered a guinea to any one that would bring the watch.

Q. This is a highway-robber; do you know any thing of a forty pounds reward? - A. I have heard of such a thing, but I do not know the truth of it; I know no more than by hear-say.

Court. Q. You told me the girl asked for liquor, and that you gave her the shilling to get what she liked with it; you told me that you did not want the liquor yourself, you wanted only to sleep; and now you say you expected the liquor? - A. I expected the liquor, but I did not want any of it.

THOMAS YOUNG sworn. - I am an utter stranger to this; I am the maker of the watch.

Q. Who did you make it for? - A. Thomas Rutherford .

FRANCIS GIBBS sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Payne, pawnbroker, in Bow-street, Bloomsbury; I took in a watch on the 3d of July last, I lent ten shillings and seven-pence on it, the maker's name is Young.

Q. From whom did you receive it? - A. I cannot tell, it was a man; it was pledge in the name of Shaw. On the 13th following, the prisoner, Shaw, brought me the ticket, and asked me five shillings more on the watch, to the best of my knowledge it was him; after he had asked for five shillings more on the watch, he hesitated for a time, and took a pound note out, and took the watch out.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am a servant to Mr. Dobree, No. 135, Holborn: On Friday, the 13th day of July, the prisoner brought a watch, and asked a guinea on it; I looked at the watch, and found it was worth a good deal more, I know the prisoner by pledging the watch; I asked him if it was his own watch; he said, it is, I only want a guinea on it; I lent him the guinea; I looked at him, I could not challenge him with it; when he was gone, I saw T R on the swivel, the name that he gave was Daniel Sutherland , and that he lived in some court in St. Giles's. There was a printed hand-bill delivered to me on the 26th of July, and finding the T R mentioned in the hand-bill, I remembered taking in a watch with T R on the swivel; and, in my own opinion, I conceived I should be able to tell the person that pledged it when I was asked; I went to Marlborough-street, and was taken to a place where several people were locked up, I desired the officer not to point out any person to me, and I pointed to the prisoner at the bar; I firmly believe him to be the man that pledged the watch.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - I am an officer, I apprehended Shaw and Foley: The prisoner strongly denied knowing any thing of that watch.

Q.(To Rutherford.) Look at that watch? - A. This is my watch; my initials are on the swivel, T R; the number is 111.

Q.(To Young.) Look at that watch? - A. This is the watch I made for Rutherford, the initials were put on it by his particular order.

MARY KELLY sworn. - Q. Do you know the prosecutrix? - A. Yes, and I saw Rutherford at her lodgings after the trial at Bow-street.

Q. Did she tell you of any duplicate of a watch, and where? - A. She happened to be looking in her pocket, and I saw a duplicate of a watch; I asked her how she came by it; she said, hush!

Q. That was to hold your tongue? - A. Yes; that was shortly after the trial at Bow-street, there was John Shaw written upon it.

MARGARET-CARTHY HURLY sworn. - Q. Do you know the prosecutrix, Mrs. Sterling? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the night on which the robbery was supposed to be committed? - A. I do, I was asleep at the time.

JAMES HURLY sworn. - I am a bricklayer's labourer.

Q. You live in the same house with the prosecutrix, where the robbery was supposed to be committed. - Do you remember the night this happened seeing the prosecutrix? - A. No; I remember what I saw, and what I heard; I went to bed with my wife when the clock struck ten, and awoke when the clock struck twelve, I heard the noise of two people in the passage; I said, what are you; he said, a friend that means you no harm; this was between twelve and one o'clock; they went up stairs, I stopped about a quarter of an hour, and

held the latch of the door in my hand, I thought it was some stranger; and then I heard a woman coming, and I peeped; she tumbled down, and made a noise as if she was hurt; I think it was Catherine Sterling, I knew her voice.

Q. You never heard any crying, or any alarm? - A. No; if it had been made I must have heard it; I remained awake about two hours afterwards.

Q. Do you usually lay awake so many hours in the night? - A. No; I was disturbed by the people in the passage.

Q. Is it any thing unusual for people to walk up stairs at a late hour of the night? - A. They go up stairs now all hours of the night, particularly on a Saturday and Sunday nights.

JOHN DALTON sworn. - I am one of the East London Militia. Shaw was a watchman; I had liberty from my officer to do any thing for my support; I am a constable and a watchman, I was placed in Shaw's beat when he was in custody; when I was upon Shaw's beat, this woman, the prosecutrix, passed me, she forced her discourse to me; she asked me if I knew Shaw, she said she was the girl that took him up; that she was out so and so, and she met a gentleman, and brought him home; she told me the same story as she told you; she came the next night after this, again, and she told me she was accidentally passing, that she had seen Rutherford, he asked her if she would have something to drink, she had drank above a glass of brandy, and that he said, do not think I have any animosity with you, - if you put the watch in my way, and that you could prove that he knocked you down, I will give you two guineas for the trouble, - if she could prove the man that knocked her down, he did not want to trouble her at all.

Q.(To Rutherford.) You have heard the account given by John Dalton ? - A. I know nothing about it; as for saying I asked her to drink, to the best of my knowledge, I did not, I might; and as to the money, I did not offer; I was, with the officer, going to see if I could get the watch.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-52

481. JOHN CONNER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Reardon , on the 9th of July , about the hour of three in the afternoon, no person being therein, and stealing therein one pair of breeches, value 1 s. one pair of trowsers, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 2 d. a shift, value 2 s. one half-guinea, six penny-pieces, and twenty-four halfpence, the property of John Reardon ; one coat, value 5 s. and three pounds three shillings, in money , the property of Frederick Barry .

JOHN REARDON sworn. - I live on Saffron-hill ; I rent two rooms, and a little bit of a place, that makes three; I have a wife and two children; I missed my property on the 9th of July; I was at work, and my wife and children were out, when this was done; I went out after dinner, and returned at four o'clock, before my wife came home; I found the door broke open, with a hole in it, which had been made to push the lock back, and my box-lock was broken.

Q. Was that hole in the door when you left the house? - A. No, it was made after, and when I went into the room, I found all the things missing; there was half a guinea that was mine, and the three guineas belonged to a lodger of mine, Frederick Barry , and a great coat and pantaloons; I lost my breeches, and my wife's shift, they were in my box; my wife had the key of the box.

WILLIAM- JULIAN EDWARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 12th of July, a person, calling himself John Conner , pledged a coat and a shift for seven shillings; that is all I know.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, he was one of my lodgers.

JONATHAN TROTT sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Hatton-garden; a woman came to the Office on the 12th of July last, saying she wanted an officer to take a man into custody, in Spread Eagle-court, Gray's Inn-lane; when I got there, the prosecutor was standing at the door; he said the man was in the cellar that had robbed him; I called him several times to come out; I went down after him, after waiting about twenty minutes, and found him standing in the chimney-place pulling off those small clothes which the prosecutor said were his; I took him up; there was a waistcoat and trowsers lay in the cellar, which the prosecutor said he knew; they were very filthy, we could not produce them; I then took him to the Office; going along, he confessed to me that he had sent another man to pledge some clothes, but he did not know where; he said he broke the door open very easy with his hands, and likewise the box; I then asked him what he could have done with all the money, as he had no money about him; his answer was, fool like, I got among a parcel of my companions, and spent it all, or lost it.

Prisoner's defence. He has told a parcel of had lies; I bought the clothes of a man in the street.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Are your own breeches there? - A. Yes, I can swear to them now; I have sworn to them before, and the coat, waistcoat, and pantaloons; I had such in my box, they belong to Barry; they were in my box where the money was; Barry left them with me, he is in the country.

Q. When you looked in your box, did you observe

they were gone? - A. I observed they were all gone.

GUILTY

Of stealing the breeches only.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-53

482. MARY ROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , twelve yards of printed calico, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Todhunter .

MARY TODHUNTER sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Todhunter ; my husband is a linen-draper , at No. 18, Union-street, Bishopsgate-street : On the 4th of September, before ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in; she wanted some thread, for which she offered bad money; she went away, and in the course of an hour after that she returned again, and came a little way into the shop, and went out again; I immediately came from behind the counter to see if she had taken any thing out of the shop.

Q. Did she say any thing the second time she came into the shop? - A. No.

Q. Did she see you? - A. I cannot say; I immediately went to the door to look after her; she was walking slowly towards Steward-street; I observed her having a piece of my print under her gown; I ran after her, and took the print from under her gown, and brought her back to the shop; I begged some of the neighbours to fetch an officer, and the officer came and took her into custody; I know it to be my print, I had sold a great deal of it; there were twelve yards.

Q. What might it be worth a yard? - A. Two shillings.

ANN JAMES sworn. - On Tuesday, the 4th of September, about half past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing at my own window, which is opposite Mrs. Todhunter's; I saw the prisoner come up to the shop-window, and look at a piece of print; with that she went away, and came back again, and in the space of five minutes she drew this piece of print from off the railing that hung outside of the window; she put it under her gown, and went into the shop; she came out again, and was making off towards Steward-street; Mrs. Todhunter came out of the shop, and followed her; she took the print from under her gown, and brought her back to the shop.

CHARLOTTE ELLIS sworn. - I was taking a walk up Union-street, and observed the prisoner at the bar at Mrs. Todhunter's window; she stood there a few minutes, and then went away; she returned back again; I saw her take the piece of print, and put it under her gown; she went into the shop, and came out again, and went towards Steward-street; Mrs. Todhunter ran after her, and took her herself.

FRANCIS JARVIS sworn. - I am an officer; I received the bundle from Mrs. Todhunter, I have had it in my possession ever since; I produce the property.

Q.(To Mrs. Todhunter.) Look at that print? - A. I know it by the pattern, I am positive it is my print; I had sold twice eight yards off the piece; it was taken out of the shop that morning to put upon the rail.

Jury. Q. Do you value it at prime-cost at two shillings? - A. No, it cost two shillings and twopence a yard.

Prisoner's defence. I had been as far as Spitalfields to get work, I am a shoe-binder , and just as I came by the window, I picked it up; I went into the shop, and called twice, but nobody answered me; I came out, and that gentlewoman came after me, and said, that is my piece, there is twelve yards of it; she said, it is twenty-four shillings, you may have it for that; I said I did not want it; I am sure I had no intention of stealing it, or else I would not have gone into the shop with it; she says she saw me coming into the shop, the gentlewoman was not in the shop.

Q.(To Mrs. Todhunter.) She came into the shop, but she never spoke; did she see you? - A. I do not think she did when she came in; she immediately went out with part of the print sticking out, it was wrapped over with the tail of her gown, it was a small part that I saw; I did not observe the print gone before I went after her, and I saw nobody else.

Q. When she came in, did she look about as if she wanted to speak to any body? - A. No.

Q. You have heard what she said about the conversation when you went out? - A. I ran directly after her to the corner of Steward-street; I caught her by the arm, and took the piece of print from her first; she said, I was coming to your shop, ma'am; she said nothing more, only when I sent for an officer, she begged me not to punish her.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-54

483. CHARLOTTE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , eleven pounds weight of ham, value 7 s. the property of Edward Sower .

SARAH SOWER sworn. - Q. What is your husband's name? - A. Edward Sower ; my husband keeps an eating-house , No. 8, James-street, Covent-garden : On the 29th of August, I lost this ham, it was in the shop; the door was open; I perceived the back of the prisoner as she passed by the window, with this ham under her arm.

Q. Could she take it without coming into the shop? - A. No; the ham was in the back part of the shop.

Q. How long had you seen the ham before she took it? - A. Not a minute before; when I missed it, I ran out immediately.

Q. Did you see the prisoner as soon as you got out? - A. No, I did not see her till I came into Bow-street, that is a great distance from our house; there are several turnings, I went the straight road after her; she was running in Bow-street as fast as she could; I laid hold of her, she had the ham on her arm, wrapped up in a kind of a sack-bag; I took it from her, I never saw her before; the officer took her to the Office.

Q. How do you know that to be your ham? - A. There's nobody cuts it but myself.

Q. When the prisoner passed by, as you suppose, I suppose you did not get a particular view of her, so as to know her person? - A. She was in her shift-sleeves when I took her, and when she passed the window with the ham under her arm, she was in her shift-sleeves; I have not the least doubt but she is the person.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along to my work, I met with a man, and he asked me if I would hold a piece of ham while he returned; I said, yes; he told me to wait in the street, and I waited in the street; a gentlewoman came up to me, and said that piece of ham was her's; ma'am, says I, if it is your's, there it is, but a gentleman left it with me while he returned; I have no witnesses; I gave it her directly, I have two fatherless children that belong to me.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in the jail and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18040912-55

484. HAMMOND CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , five shillings , the property of William Tucker .

WILLIAM TUCKER sworn. - I am a tin-plate worker , the prisoner was an apprentice of mine.

Q. What do you accuse him of? - A. Of taking five shillings out of the till, on the 29th of August, and on the 30th; I marked thirteen shillings and sixpence, and a five-shilling piece; out of which I missed, on the 29th, two shillings, and on the 30th I missed three shillings, which made the five; I had reason to suspect the lad; I went up stairs to his box, I found it locked; I saw a constable, and spoke to him; he opened the box, and in his box there were five of the shillings; I had marked a letter T on them all.

Q. How long had this boy been with you? - A. About seven months; I had always found him an honest lad, I am sorry this occurred.

Q. What is his parents? - A. His mother is a widow woman that keeps a public-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say he was apprenticed to you about seven months ago? - A. Yes.

Q. And a small premium of ten pounds was given to you? - A. Yes.

Q. And his mother is a good sort of a woman? - A. I believe she is.

Q. You had no reason to doubt at all of his honesty till then? - A. Not till then.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN sworn. - I am a constable: I was in Oxford-road the day he mentioned last; the prosecutor was in the tin-shop; he asked me to go and open the box, I opened the box, and found five shillings all marked; the boy was not there when I went in, he came in while I was there; we taxed him with it, and he denied it; the master said he had better confess, it would be better for him; I produce the money.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Look at the money? - A. They are the same shillings, and the same mark on them.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Privately whipped and discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-56

485. GEORGE FREAK and JOHN RICHARDSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a saddle, value 6 s. a bridle, value 5 s. two cloths, value 1 s. and a set of harness for a single horse-chaise, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Yockney .

SAMUEL YOCKNEY sworn. - I was awaked at four o'clock in the morning on the 10th of July, and was informed of the transaction.

- VEVER sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Martin in the Fields : On the 10th of July, about twenty minutes past four o'clock, I was sitting in my box, and thought I heard somebody stepping in the hop-garden were these stables are; I turned my eye on one side, and saw a man coming peeping to see whether the watchman was in his box; I went out of the box, and saw Richardson and Freak; Freak had got the saddle on his shoulder, and Richardson had got a wrapper with the harness in it; I went up to them, and said, where are you going with this; Freak said, where we like, what is that to you; I said, I will know who you are, and then I sprung my rattle, and they threw down the bundles, and away they ran; I ran after them a great way, and then they were stopped.

Q. Did you know them before? - A. No.

Q. Did you lose sight of them? - A. Yes, but I know they are the same men; I should know

Freak amongst five thousand men; I was close to them, they were stopped in about ten minutes.

Q. Are you sure that these two men that were stopped, were the two men that came out of the hop-garden? - A. I am.

GEORGE COOPER sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Yockney; it is Mr. Yockney's property, and I can swear to it.

JOHN STEEL sworn. - I am a watchman: I saw Richardson run, I sprang the rattle, and my brother watchman stopped him, and held him fast.

RICHARD LEWIS sworn. - I am one of the constables of St. Martin's; I searched both the prisoners when they were brought to the watch-house; on Freak I found a bottle of phosphorous, and a bunch of matches; on Richardson I found nothing; I produce the property, they have been in my possession ever since.

Q.(To Vever.) Is that the saddle you saw on Freak? - A. I can swear to the saddle; I ran after him first, and then came back, and saw the saddle, and carried it to the watch-house.

Q.(To Cooper.) Look at these things? - A. They are all Mr. Yockney's.

Freak's defence. I work for Mr. Mason, in Drury-lane; I was going to work, and as I was coming up George-alley, I was taken by a watchman (not here) to St. Martin's watch-house.

Richardson's defence. I work for Mr. Middlemoor; as I was going to work, I stood at a court in St. Martin's-lane having a pennyworth of saloop; they took me away to the watch-house; I did not know Freak before, which he said before the Magistrate.

Freak, GUILTY , aged 31.

Richardson, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-57

486. CATHARINE FLINN and HANNAH CUMMINGS , alias FLINN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , five yards of printed calico, value 10 s. the property of Alexander-Colville Johnstone .

WILLIAM SPRATWELL sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Johnstone, linen-draper , at Nortonfalgate : On the 27th of August, between the hours of two and three o'clock, I saw the two prisoners and another girl in the shop; they were inquiring for an apron.

Q. What age are they? - A. They will not tell any thing, I believe; I repeatedly told them there was not any thing that would suit them; they hesitated for some moments, and then went away; I saw no more of them till Mr. Thomas's man came down with them and the print, and then I swore to the property; I perfectly well recollected that print had lain on the counter not above an hour before; the youngest one, Cummings, has given three names; we heard that the mother of them lived at the King's-bench; they said they lived at the bottom of Longbottom's-rents, the other side of the water; I believe they are about nine or ten years old; they were detected stealing all through the neighbourhood; a baker's wife said they had stole a loaf of bread from her shop.

THOMAS THOMAS sworn. - I am a linen-draper, at No. 25, Shoreditch; they came into my shop, and asked for a piece of print; I shewed them three or four pieces, and in turning round, I observed one of them conceal a piece of print under her frock.

Q. Which of them? - A. The eldest, Catharine Flinn ; I laid hold of her, and she let go the print; I then took her out to the passage, and found under her frock a piece of print concealed; I sent my young man down with it to different shops, and at last he found it was Mr. Johnstone's; they had been into my shop a week before, and we had lost a piece of print then.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer; I endeavoured to find out who the children belonged to; one of them said they lived in Longbottom's Rents, the other side of the water; I went there, they did not live there; I believe their right names is M'Oney. (The piece of print produced and identified.)

Flinn, GUILTY , aged 10.

Cummins, GUILTY , aged 8.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-58

487. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , 10 lb. weight of lead, value 20 d. the property of Joshua Buley .

JOSHUA BULEY sworn. - I am a salesman at the Victualling-Office; I cannot speak to any more than having lost the property mentioned in the indictment; I live in Leonard-street, Shoreditch.

- FURNET sworn. - I am a patrol on the Commercial-road; on the 30th of July, a quarter before four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come by on the opposite side of the road; I came out of my box, and asked him what he had got under his right arm; I insisted upon seeing; he said, what was it to me, it was a likely matter he should let me see what he had got; he made a bit of a run, and I ran after him; I told him, if he did not bring to, I should fire into him; with that he dropped the parcel, and run as hard as he could push; I did not run above seven or eight fathoms after him; I knew him; I took up this property, and took it to Stepney lock-up house, and when I let it be known there were most of the people knew him, for he formerly laid about the premises there; I knew him very well by seeing

him come out of the strawhouse, and by taking him up once before; I told Mr. Escent's carman; he said he knew him very well; he said he would go along with me to take him, and as we were returning from the water side, we saw the same man; I went and took him.

Q. Are you sure that he is the same man that had the parcel? - A. I am very clear in that.

Q. What did that parcel contain? - A. Several pieces of leaden pipe.

Q. Are you sure that he dropped these things? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw that property, nor did I ever see the man before he took me in the day time.

Court. He says he saw you before and the bundle too, and you ran away.

Q.(To Mr. Buley) Look at these things? - A. I cannot swear to the property myself, here is a man that can.

THOMAS TOD sworn. - I am a gunstock-maker, in Albion-street, Commercial-road ; I knew these pipes to be mine; that is, they were on my premises.

Q. Who is your landlord? - A. Joshua Buley ; they were fixed on since I was tenant to him, they come through the house into the back yard, I have got the other piece that I was forced to cut off.

Q. Do they match? - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-59

488. JOHN PYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , 50 lbs. weight of nails, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Wilson .

Second Count, For the like offence, the property of persons unknown.

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I live at Brook's wharf ; I am a wharfinger ; some time ago, the prisoner was taken into my employ as a labourer , to land the nails and other goods; on Wednesday, the 25th of July, my two sons were at the Artillery-Ground, it being field-day; I attended at Hatton-Garden, the prisoner said there that he was employed by my watchman to deliver them at an iron-shop in Cow-cross.

Q. Were you present when the confession was taken? - A. I was, and saw him make his mark, and the Justice sign it. (The confession read.)

" John Pyman , the prisoner at the bar, saith, that the nails found in his possession were given to him by the watchman, at Mr. Wilson's wharf, at eight o'clock, at his own house, No. 2, Castle-yard; and that he told him to carry them to Briley's, an old iron shop, in Cow-cross; and in about a week's time before this they had Landed a quantity of nails; that Webb had stole about a dozen bags of nails; that he sold some of those nails to Jack Duck , the bargeman, and some to Briley; and that he says Duck took some on board of his barge, and that he also sold some of the nails to Briley; that it was night time before he took the nails, and that Webb has been in this practice for near a twelve-month back, and that the nails found upon him were given him, by the watchman, Webb, to carry to Briley.

THOMAS WHITE, Constable."

THOMAS WHITE sworn. - On Wednesday, the 25th of July, I stopped him with this basket of nails on his shoulder; he passed me in Cow-cross; I asked him what he had got there; he said he did not know; I asked him where he was going to; he said he did not know where he was going; he had a paper in his mouth; there was Briley written upon it; I then took the basket off his shoulder, and found it to contain nails; I asked him where he had brought them from; he said, from the Marlow waggon, they were given him by the waggoner; not satisfied with this account, I took him into custody; after that, he confessed that Webb, the watchman, had given them to him; we took him past the iron-shop, and he called out, Briley, this man has got your nails.

Prisoner. (To the prosecutor.) Q. Will you swear to these nails? Mr. White has spoke very right what I said.

- sworn. - I am a Police-Officer belonging to Hatton-Garden; I was in company with White; at half past eight we saw the prisoner at the bar; he said he brought them from the Marlow waggon, and he said he was going to take them to Thames-street; he had a note in his mouth with the name of Briley on it; on bringing him out of the Office, he said he was very sorry he did not tell the truth; he was very sorry he had taken them; he was sorry he was to suffer for Webb; that they had sold nails to one Jack Duck or Ducket, a bargeman, and to Briley.

Q. Did he say that he was sorry that he, or that Webb, had stolen them? - A. That he had taken them off the wharf.

Prisoner. It is a false word that he has just spoke.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Do you know whose nails they are? - A. They are my property.

Q. Are they like the nails that you deal in? - A. Every nail that I deal in passes through my hands, from Birmingham; I was told that there were a quantity of nails in the watchman's box; when he was gone, we had it broke open; he had taken the key with him, we found a quantity of loose nails there.

Prisoner's defence. I went one morning to Mr. Wilson's wharf; James Webb came and asked me

to go and clean his pigs; he had two sows and some pigs; I was to get some wash for them, and I was to go to Briley's for him; he told me to take that bag of nails; I refused to take them without a direction; he gave me the direction, and he told me he would come close by me; I have carried parcels of nails for him a great many times.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Judgment respited till next Sessions.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-60

489. DENNIS KEEFE and CATHERINE KEEFE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , two guineas, four half-guineas, seven seven-shilling pieces. two crown pieces, and four shillings , the property of Cornelius Coghlan .

CORNELIUS COUGHLAN sworn. - I am a labouring man ; I lodged with the prisoners some time.

Q. Are they man and wife? - A. I understood so; they lived in Hackney road ; on Sunday morning, after coming from work on the Saturday night, I had got my weekly money in gold and brass; I had received 23 s. I had two seven-shilling pieces in the morning; I took and put it in that pocket where I had gold; I had two guineas, four half-guineas, two crown pieces, and six seven-shilling pieces, exclusive of the two I put in on Sunday morning; that was all the money; no silver, excepting the two crown pieces; I wanted to put the money together; the prisoners at the bar, the wife and the husband, were both up, and I put the money out of one purse into the other to make it safe; and the wife, who is a prisoner at the bar, advised me to put the money in a safe place, and not to have it about me, but there was no box or chest in the place that had a lock to it, but the room door; I made to a cupboard, and took out the purse that I had put the two seven-shilling pieces in; I do not know they saw me, if they had had a mind they might; and making over to my wallet, and taking my purse, I put the purse into a pair of gloves, and folded both gloves together; and there was a shirt, saving your presence, I put it into the middle of that shirt, and made a ball of it with two pocket handkerchiefs; I asked the woman where I should put it; with that I put it over the cupboard in the room where we lay.

Q. Is it a lodging-house? - A. Yes.

Q. How many people lodge in that house? - A. Four families in it.

Q. Is it a large house? - A. No, only four small rooms; there are two down rooms and two up rooms.

Q. When did they take it? - A. I cannot say nor swear that.

JAMES KEYS sworn. - As I was going upon duty at ten o'clock, this man was waiting for an officer at the watch-house; he said he had been robbed of seven guineas; I went and took the man and his wife to the watch-house; I found on the man a one-pound note, one guinea, and two seven-shilling pieces; when I took them before the Magistrate, he ordered me to give them the pound note for them to subsist upon; I have the guinea and the two seven-shilling pieces; when we found the bundle, I found there was something pledged that evening; they had pledged a coat and waistcoat; it is a very unlikely thing that they had got his money.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) You have seen this guinea and these seven-shilling pieces; can you swear to them? - A. I cannot swear to gold.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-61

490. SARAH JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a silk cloak, value 30 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. and nine yards of linen cloth, value 15 s. the property of George Kremelmeyer .

SARAH KREMELMEYER sworn. - Q. What is your husband? - A. He is a German; a greengrocer , in Plough-street, Whitechapel ; on the 6th of July my husband got up in the morning between four and five o'clock; he was going to Fairlop fair; we keep a horse and cart; the street door was bolted, and the lower door room he locked; he told me so; we did not miss any thing till I came down stairs; then I missed my cloak; I looked round, and could not see any thing of it; I then missed the linen and the stockings; they were a pair of black silk stockings footed with white, and nine yards of new linen; about half a yard of it was sewed; I had began to make a sheet; I found my cloak at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. The prisoner and her mother both lodged in my house.

Q. What is the prisoner? - A. A silk-winder .

JOHN BANNISTER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. At that time I was assistant to Mr. Purse, a pawnbroker; on the 6th of July, the prisoner came with an Officer to pledge this cloak, to pay the expences of the Compter; she was in the Compter the over-night; it was a silk cloak, upon which I advanced her one pound; that is all that I know of it, except when I went up to Lambeth-street, where the prisoner was; I am sure she is the person that pawned the cloak. (The cloak produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been out all night; I came home between four and five o'clock in the morning; as I was going up our street I met an Irish woman coming out of the house with a bundle; she gave me the cloak; as I came through Aldgate the Officers took me to the Compter, and I was taken before my Lord Mayor; the Officer

told me I must go and pledge the cloak to pay the expences, which was half a guinea; I did not take any of the things, and what was in the bundle I do not know; the Officers stopped me, and asked me where I lived; I had been into Darkhouse-lane, with a person that was going to Gravesend; I never was in the place that night; my mother is a very hard-working woman; the two Officers were in our street, where I met the woman.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Did you ever find your stockings again? - A. No, nor my linen.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-62

491. ANN HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , four bottles of wine, value 10 s. and two shillings , the property of William Reeves .

JANE REEVES sworn. - I live in King-street, Holborn .

Q. You are the wife of Mr. Reeves, the composer ? - A. Yes; the prisoner was my servant , on the 2d of July, I sent her out, to change a seven-shillings piece; she brought me back three shillings, four sixpences, and some halfpence; I laid them on the dresser where I was ironing, in the kitchen; when I had done ironing, I took up the money to go up stairs, and found there were two shillings wanting.

Q. You had not parted with any? - A. No.

Q. I suppose you had not observed the pieces of money so as to know them again? - A. No; I rang for her, and told her there were two missing; she said I must be mistaken, it could not be lost; I told her very likely, but I had not got it; she said that could not be; she observed that there was nobody in the kitchen but herself and me.

Q. Was that true? - A. Yes; no one came in, and I never stirred out of the kitchen.

Q. Then nobody, in point of fact, did come into the kitchen, after she delivered to you the change? - A. No, she persisted in it that I must be mistaken, and I persisted that I was not; I looked again, and there were no more than one shilling and four sixpences, and when she put them down there were three shillings and four sixpences; I had not laid them from my hand at all, when I took them up and went into my chamber.

Q. Have you ever seen the money again? - A. No.

Q. Did you yourself go down into the kitchen and make search? - A. No.

Q. Did you direct her to go down and make search? - A. I do not remember that I did.

Q. Might it not be possible that in the action of ironing you might have misplaced those two shillings from the ironing-board to the floor? - A. No, I put the money on the dresser.

Q. I suppose she was doing the work of the kitchen? - A. I observed her removing some basons, there was no occasion for it; I saw her at the dresser, but I did not see her take the money.

Q. So I presume you never desired her to go down and look for it? - A. I was convinced that she knew where it was.

Q. That is what you thought; is that all you know respecting the money? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you turn her away that day? - A. No, she staid several weeks after that.

Q. Were there missing four bottles of wine the same day as the silver was missed? - A. No.

Q. Then it will be necessary for me to ask which you have the strongest proof of, the money or the wine? - A. Sir, I am certain of the two shillings.

WILLIAM REEVES sworn. - Q. There are in the indictment two distinct charges, because they were taken at different times; you must select which is the strongest case against her? - A. I think the wine.

Court. (To Jury.) Then, gentlemen, you must discharge all this about the money.

Q.(To Mr. Reeves.) Do you know whether you have missed any wine? - A. Yes, I have missed wine for several months.

Q. Can you say, during the time this woman lived with you, you missed to the amount of four bottles? - A. Yes, a great deal more.

Q. Do you know any thing particular yourself about the wine? - A. I cannot say I do.

Q. Did you ever charge her at any time of taking your wine? - A. I told her somebody must go to my cellar.

Q. How was this wine secured? - A. In a cellar, under lock and key.

Q. Who kept the key? - A. The key was in a closet; no person could go to it without they went to the closet, where the key was hung up.

Q. You kept the cellar constantly locked? - A. Yes.

Q. And you kept the key that closet was locked with? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any occasion to send this girl to that closet? - A. Sometimes she used to go and take out the tea and sugar.

Q. Did you ever miss the key yourself? - A. I cannot say that ever I did.

Q. Did you ever send her for wine? - A. Never, I made a practice of getting it myself, or Mrs. Reeves.

Q. Did you search her box at the time you discharged her? did you find any bottles? - A. No, I searched her box, and found no bottles.

Q. Did you cause her to be taken up in your service? - A. Yes; when I searched her box I found a great many clothes that she bought with my money.

Q. That only strengthened your suspicions, and

induced you to have her taken up; when did you have her taken up? - A. About a fortnight or three weeks ago.

Q. Had you a good character with her? - A. Yes.

Q. How long has she lived with you? - A. Two years and five months.

Q. What age is she? - A. About twenty; my suspicions have been alive a great while.

Q. You still kept her? - A. I could not prove any thing against her.

Q. Did you find any thing in her box, that would open your cellar? - A. No.

MARY TODDEL sworn. - I saw her take two bottles one morning, and two in the evening at another time; Mr. Reeves lodged in the house with the family that I lived with.

Q. What family did you live with? - A. Mr. Coombe, in King-street, Holborn.

Q. Mr. Reeves's cellar is separate from Mr. Coombe's? - A. Mr. Coombe had no cellar for wine, it was Mr. Reeves's cellar she took the wine from.

Q. How long did you see her do this before she was taken up? - A. About two or three months before she was taken up, I observed her with two bottles; I did not observe what was in them.

Q. Two bottles at one time coming from the wine-cellar; did you see how near she was from the wine-cellar - A. When she had the two bottles she was coming out of the wine-cellar door.

Q. Who keeps the key of that wine-cellar door - A. Mrs. Reeves.

Q. Did you say any thing to her? - A. No.

Q. You did not make any observation to Mrs. Reeves about it? - A. No, not till I was going to leave my place.

Q. How long was it after you told Mrs. Reeves of her coming out of the wine-cellar? was the time you saw it done at the time you left your place? - A. No, about a month or six weeks before.

Q. What made you tell Mrs. Reeves of it then? - A. Mrs. Reeves had lost her comb, and that made me speak, because it was laid upon me; I was going to leave my place.

Q. Who laid it upon you? - A. She came down stairs, and said it must be one of you that has taken my comb, and I was going away the next morning.

Q. Then you told Mrs. Reeves what you had observed? - A. Yes.

Q. Not before that? - A. Not before that.

Q. If it had not been for this dispute about the comb you would not have told? - A. She begged me not to mention it; I thought she had some money that was not her own.

Q. When was it that she begged you not to mention it? - A. When I was going away.

Q. What became of that wine; how was it used? - A. There was wine drank in the house; I partook of some wine while I was in the house; she gave me a glass of wine now and then.

Q. Is it not an extraordinary thing for servants to have wine in the kitchen? - A. She informed me that her mistress gave her some.

Q. You understood that her mistress did not give her these two bottles; did you ever ask her mistress about that; you never would have told, if it had not been for this quarrel? - A. She confessed herself.

Q. That was before the Justice? - A. It was not.

Q.(To Mrs. Reeves.) How is that? - A. When she was taken up, this young woman told me she had seen her take wine twice.

Q. Did not you tell the young woman at the bar it would be better for her to confess? - A. Yes.

Q. And the other young woman would never have told you, only for the dispute about this comb; do you keep any thing but wine in this cellar? - A. Yes, spirits; brandy, wine, and shrub.

Q. You do not know what was in these two bottles? - A. No.

Q. Is that all the evidence you have? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. (To Mary Toddel .) Q. Mary, did not you persuade me to go to my mistress's cellar, to take my mistress's wine, and likewise drink with me? - A. No.

Prisoner. You certainly did.

Prisoner's defence. This person persuaded me to do it, and likewise drank part of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-63

492. MARY RAMSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a sheet, value 2 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. a looking-glass, value 1 s. and one pillow, value 8 d. the property of William Williams , in a lodging-room, let by contract by him to the prisoner, to use in and with the lodging-room .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - I live in Sherrard-street, Golden-square ; I keep two houses; she lodged in one that I did not live in myself; on Friday the took the lodgings as a married woman; I let the lodgings to her; she told me, that her husband worked at Kensington, he was a carpenter, and came home twice a week.

Q.Did you ever see him? - A. Yes, I have seen papers that she left in the room, that she was married to a man of the name of Ramsden, at Liverpool; I found out that the man I had seen was not her husband; the man she lived with, the constable told me, his name is Bull; she had the one pair of stairs room, at 5 s. 6 d. per week; she absconded on the 8th of August, and I found it out on the 20th;

on the 21st I had all the duplicates of these things sent me by a lodger in the next house; I went into the room, and found they were missing; she had gone to Westminster; I went to her, and asked her why she kept the key, to run herself in debt; she let me have the key on the 20th.

WILLIAM LEE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's apprentice, to Mr. Tate, of Cambridge-street, Golden-square; I produce a sheet, I do not know who brought it; I have seen the prisoner at our shop; it was pledged on the 16th of July for 2 s. in the name of Ann Turner .

HUNTER DEVAUGH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant; I live at No. 35, Windmill-street, Golden-square; I produce a looking-glass, a pillow, and a bolster; the prisoner pawned them in the name of Taylor.

Q.(To Williams.) Do you know how this poor woman was enabled to get her living? - A. I have heard that the has borne a good character; she has got some friends at Liverpool; I recommend her; she has got a young child to support. (The property identified by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY , aged 21.

The Jury recommended her to mercy, on account of her having borne a good character, and having a child.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-64

493. ANN CLAG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a sheet, value 3 s. the property of James Purcel .

JAMES PURCEL sworn. - I have three houses that I let out ready furnished, in Puckeridge-street, St. Giles's ; my housekeeper let her a one pair of stairs room ready furnished, at No. 14, Puckeridge-street, at sixpence a night; on the 12th of January, she took the room, and went in it immediately, and left it on the 14th; then she came to my shop, and returned the key; she put it on the counter; my housekeeper said to her, I shall thank you to stop here till I go and examine the room; the housekeeper immediately returned, she had only to go across the street; the shop was crowded with people whom I was serving, I keep a chandler's shop ; she ran away before she came back; my house keeper returned, and found one of the sheets were gone; I did not see the prisoner again till the 11th of August; she was taken up by another man for robbing her lodgings; I saw my housekeeper deliver her the pair of sheets for the use of her lodging.

ELIZABETH PURCEL sworn. - I am housekeeper to the last witness.

Q.Did you let any part of the house, No 14, Puckeridge-street, to the prisoner? - A. A one pair of stairs room, it was a furnished lodging; I gave her two sheets to use, I saw her take them to the room, I went with her; I let her the room for sixpence a night; she staid there either one night, or two, and she brought the key; I told her to wait for me, to see whether the things were right; in going into the room, I saw the bed made, and the sheet was doubled, so as to resemble a pair of sheets; when I turned it down, there was only one, that I am sure of; I was not gone above three minutes to inspect the room, and when I returned she was gone; I have never seen the sheet again, nor the prisoner till she was taken up; I then told her to give me the duplicate, and I would take it out; she denied that she had took it, and I am sure that she stole it.

Q. You did not see her take it? - A. No; it is worth five shillings:

Q. Can you tell how she got her living? - A. No.

JAMES BLACKMAN sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street; Mr. Purcel gave me charge of her; I took her on the 11th of August.

Prisoner's defence. When I delivered the key to her, she said she did not dispute my word; I had been a lodger to her a long time; I have been six weeks on bread and water in prison; I am in a deplorable state, I am almost lost; he makes a practice of taking people up, he has taken up twenty; he was ashamed to throw in the bill at Hicks's-hall, he has brought me here to be transported.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-65

494. MARY HOWEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , twenty-six yards of printed cotton, value 39 s. the property of John Fairweather .

JAMES STEED sworn. - I am in the employment of Mr. Fairweather, No. 34, Oxford-street ; On the 31st of August, I observed the prisoner at the bar walking down Oxford-street with something in her apron, (I was informed by a witness,) I followed her, and took the print from her about ten doors off; I endeavoured to take it out of her apron, but she dropped it; the print had been outside of our door, upon a chair, among several others.

Court. A very good way to make a shew of goods, but a great temptation to people going by, to take them away; you should not leave things on the outside of the shop; people passing by, have an opportunity of plundering; the woman might not have committed this offence, if it had been within the shop.

Q. You are sure the print was Mr. Fairweather's? - A. Yes.

Q.What was the value of it? - A.Thirty-nine shillings.

Q. What did she say upon your laying hold of her? - A. She said nothing; I never saw her before.

MARGARET GILLIE sworn. - I live in John-street, Tottenham Court-road; I am a shoemaker's wife: On the 31st of August, I was coming down Oxford-street, and perceived the prisoner untying a piece of cord that fastened some linen that was outside of the shop, on a chair; in so doing, she slipped the piece of cotton from the rest; I went and informed the prosecutor, and he took away the print from her.

Q. You did very right; upon that the first witness came out, and took her; do you know any thing of the woman? - A. I never saw her before in my life.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know what to say.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-66

495. WILLIAM MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , forty-eight feet of leather-pipe, value 4 l. 16 s. and one brass screw, value 6 s. the property of John Brown, senior , and John Brown, junior .

JOHN BROWN, junior, sworn. - I am in partnership with my father, I live at No. 10, Dean's-court, St. Martin's-le-grand : On the 11th of August last, we lost a leather pipe and a brass screw; I had seen it there about three minutes before it was taken away, I had left it there myself.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. No, I never saw him before in my life, before the constable took him out of his house; we had another man taken up first, that Mr. Bond acquitted.

Q. What time of the day was it when you lost it? - A. Between one and two o'clock.

Q. Have you seen it again? - A. Yes, it was brought me to buy by another man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. I understood you to say, you never saw the prisoner before in your life? - A. No.

MORGAN JONES sworn. - I am a constable of the liberty of St. Martin's-le-grand; Mr. Brown came to me, and I went to the prisoner's house on the Friday following, the 17th of August.

Q. Was it Mr. Brown that went with you to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes, Mr. Brown, the younger, took me to the prisoner's house; the pipe was brought by another man to Mr. Brown's house for sale, and there it was taken; the other man was stopped, and he impeached the prisoner, and by his information I went to the prisoner's house.

Q. When you got to the prisoner's house, what passed? - A. He was there at work; I told him he was wanted to go with me; he said what was the matter; I said, I cannot say, nothing; he went with me to the watch-house; the other man said, the prisoner at the bar gave him the pipe to sell.

Q. What has become of the other man? - A. We cannot find him; he was bound over to appear by Mr. Bond, but he does not appear.

Q.(To Brown.) Then all that you know of the prisoner being concerned in it, is from the information of the man that was stopped with the pipe? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his name? - A. John Claridge ; his master was bound for his appearance.

Court. Let him be called upon his recognizance.

The witness was called, and not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-67

496. JOHN KEMP was indicted for being feloniously and unlawfully at large in the county of Middlesex, without lawful excuse, before the expiration of the term for which he was sentenced to be transported .

WILLIAM HANSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kirby, of Newgate.

Q. Were you in this place in February Sessions last, when John Kemp was tried for a burglary? - A. I was.

Q. Is that the man that was so tried? - A. The very man.

Q. Do you know in whose dwelling-house the burglary was alledged to be committed? - A. I remember perfectly well; the burglary was in the house of George Parker . (The record read.)

"Middlesex. These are to certify, that at the delivery of the King's gaol in Newgate, held at Justice-hall, in the Old-Bailey, on Wednesday the 25th of February, in the 43d year of his Majesty's reign, before John Perring , Esq. Alderman, and Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc, Knt.; Sir Beaumont Hotham , Knt.; Sir Watkin Lewes , Knt.; Sir Richard-Carr Glyn, Bart.; Thomas Skinner , Esq. Alderman of the said City. John Sylvester , Esq. Recorder of the said City; Peter Perchard , Esq. and others, Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, Esq. Common Serjeant of the said City.

" John Kemp , late of the parish of St. James's, Westminster, was indicted for that he, on the 29th of January, in the 43d year of his present Majesty's reign, about the hour of eight at night, in the dwelling-house of George Parker , burglariously did break and enter, and feloniously and burglariously did steal and carry away one silk cloak, value 3 l. six shifts, value 30 s. two gowns, value 20 s. two petticoats, value 15 s. and twelve yards of sarsnet, value 30 s. the goods of George Parker ; he was thereupon found guilty, and received sentence of Death. The said John Kemp was pardoned

on condition of his being transported during the term of his natural life; whereupon the said John Kemp was ordered to be transported accordingly, to the Eastern Coast of New South Wales, for and during the term of his natural life.

"15th Sept. 1804. (Signed) JOHN SHELTON ."

Q.(To Hanson.) Are you sure that is the same person? - A. I put him to the bar myself, and likewise when he came to have his sentence; I took him down to the Bail-dock, and delivered him to another servant.

Q. How long did he remain in Newgate? - A. From that time to the 15th of August last; I saw him from day to day.

Q. What became of him? - A. He was put in a caravan, and ordered to be sent down to Portsmouth; I went with him some part of the way, he made his escape on the 16th; there were two caravans, I went with one, and Mr. Kirby with the other; he did not make his escape from me, it was from the other caravan he made his escape, on the road to Portsmouth, in the Liberty of Hants; I did not miss him till I came out of the caravan, I did not see him till last Friday week; I heard of him on the Monday; I did not see him again till I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the same person? - A. None in the least.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN sworn. - Q. Did you take the prisoner up? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you take him? - A. At No. 3, in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's, he was in bed; I received information on the 16th of August that he was at large.

Q. Were you present when he was tried? - A. I saw the sentence passed upon him; I was present then.

Q. Did he say any thing when you took him? - A. He was fast asleep in bed, laying on his back; I stood right across him, and stood upon him; I received information that he had a brace of pistols, I broke open the door and went in, he was fast asleep with a young woman; in the room I found an iron crow, a phosphorus bottle, a bunch of matches, and a piece of wax-candle.

Q. Was there any body else in the room besides this young woman? - A. No; he got the poker, and struck me over the arm, the blow was aimed at my head, he tried to kill me, he cut my arm; while I was packing up these things, I saw him whisper to the girl, and I suspected him, I saw him get the poker; his hands being small, he got the handcuffs off.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY , Death , aged 18.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-68

497. THOMAS PHALIAL was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Marer , on the King's highway, on the 8th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a hat, value 4 s. the property of the said John Marer .

JOHN MARER sworn. - I am a butcher , I live at No. 1, Osborn-street, Whitechapel: On the 8th of September, I was going from my house to Whitechapel-market, about half after eleven o'clock at night; I crossed the street in Whitechapel , and the prisoner, and another man, met me in the middle of the road, the prisoner steps up to me, and with his fist he knocked me down; I holloaed out, murder! and they both made off; as soon as I recovered from the blow, I got up and looked for my hat, and could not find it; I made towards the people that cried stop thief, and near Parson-street, I met the prisoner in custody with the watchman; I said, that is the man that knocked me down; he took him to the watch-house, and there I gave charge of him.

Q. Was any thing found upon him? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the man before? - A. No.

Q. And the moment he came to you he knocked you down? - A. Yes.

Q. Which side of the way were you? - A. On the side of Aldgate Church; I had a full sight of him by the butcher's lights.

Court. He might have a full sight of your face, not you of his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. How long were you on the ground? - A. About three minutes.

Q. What became of the other man? - A. I do not know indeed.

Q. Is this the same account you gave before the Magistrate? - A. Exactly the same, or thereabouts.

Q. Did not you say something about an accomplice? - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. This was done at half past eleven o'clock at night - will you take upon you to say it was the prisoner that knocked you down? - A. It was at half past ten o'clock; I will take upon me to say it is the man.

Q. You said before, it was half past eleven o'clock. - You have heard of the forty pounds reward? - A. I never heard of it to my knowledge.

Court. Q. Where have you lived all your life? - A. In Whitechapel.

Mr. Watson. Q. And you will take upon you to swear that you never heard of a forty pounds reward? - A. I do not know what you mean.

Q. And that is as true as every word you have spoke? - A. Yes; I only come here to speak the truth, I did not come here for the forty pounds.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - I am a watchman: Near eleven o'clock on the 8th of September, I heard the out-cry of stop thief; I saw a man run in the middle of the coach-road, and just as he came by the corner of Castle-street, Whitechapel, he turned up; I went after him, and stopped him, I seized him by the neck-handkerchief; I said, you

are the man we are crying stop thief after; he said, I am no thief; he made great resistance to get away, I took him to the watch-house; I told him before I would let him go I would lose my life.

Q. You only saw one man? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been a watchman? - A. Since last September; I had no other employment to do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Watson. Q. You know there is a reward? - A. I was never here before in my life; I know there is a reward, but what for I do not know.

Q. You and Marer have been talking about it? - A. I have not changed a single word about it with him.

Court. Q.You never spoke to him about any reward? - A. I never knew what it was for.

Court. And you have been a watchman for a twelvemonth. -

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Have you any other witness? - A. No; I thought my own evidence was sufficient; I can perfectly swear the prisoner is the man.

Court. We all understand that, and this is all you know, there is no robbery brought home to this man.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-69

498. JAMES SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Steele , about the hour of ten at night, on the 7th of August , and burglariously stealing therein, a hat, value 1 s. and an iron key, value 1 d. the property of William Miller .

WILLIAM MILLER sworn. - I am a waiter to Mr. Steele, at the King's Arms, Wellclose-square, St. John's, Wapping : On Monday, the 27th of August, about half past ten o'clock at night, as I was coming from the coffee-room to the bar (there is a window between the bar and coffee-room, the window looked into Neptune-street,) I saw the man's arms come through the window; I saw him lift the window up, and take the hat and the key which laid in the window.

Q. Are you sure that he lifted the window up? - A. The window was lifted up.

Q. Did you see him? - A. I did not; I saw a man's arms put through the window; he took the hat and key; I immediately made away to the door that leads into Neptune-street; I turned to the right that leads into Wellclose-square; I saw him run from the window towards Wellclose-square; I halloaed out stop thief, and he was stopped; when I came up to him, I found the hat and key upon him; I brought him back to where he took the hat from, and my master insisted upon sending for a constable for him; I gave him in the charge of Dunbar.

Q. Now this window, how long had you seen it before? - A. Before it was lifted up, it might be about a quarter of an hour, because I laid some halfpence in the window.

Q. Are you sure the window was down? - A. I am certain that the window was down; it communicates to the street; we never open it, on account of having a safe close by it, and it has communication to the stairs.

Q. Do you leave it in such a manner that any body may open it, as it leads to a safe, and put money there, that any idle boy may put his hand in and take it? - A. There is a little kind of a ledge at the bottom of the window, they cannot see the halfpence.

Q. What do you keep in that safe; I should think this window should be open, in order to keep it cool in hot weather; on the 27th of August it was warm weather? - A. Yes.

Q. If you wanted to keep the provisions safe, you ought to keep it as cool as possible; are you certain sure the window was not open? - A. I am sure the cook had not opened it, we have no other servant there but the master's neice; I am sure the window was down, we cannot go past from the kitchen to the cellar without passing it.

Q. Do you know this man? - A. I never saw him before; he has an ancient father that he takes care of, I hope you will be as favourable as you can; I took him before a Magistrate in hopes he would send him on board a man of war; it was very tempting to be sure, there was a blind to the window, this blind was gone to be mended, and outside you can see every transaction.

Q. Did you hear the window open? - A. I did not.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am a constable: I took the prisoner into custody; I produce the hat and key. (The hat and key identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming across Wellclose-square between the hours of ten and eleven o'clock at night, when I heard the cry of stop thief; I was stopped by a man, who is not the man that gave the evidence against me; I am charged with the hat, which I know nothing at all about.

Q. The hat was found upon you? - A. This is not the man that stopped me, that gave evidence against me now; this man came up afterwards with the hat, and challenged me with it; I know no more of the hat than Adam.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) Who was it that stopped him? - A. A man that belongs to the West-India dock; he went to Shadwell Office; instead of that he was taken to Lambeth-street-office.

Prisoner. I had not the hat at the time when the man came up to me, nor do I know the man that stopped me, no more than a child that is not born of his mother; I know nothing of the robbery.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing only.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-70

499. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , ten yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of William Porter , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH BROOKS sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Porter, a linen draper , Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square : On Wednesday, the 12th of September, the prisoner at the bar, along with another person, brought a small pattern of print to match; I told them we had not got it, we had others equally as handsome; I shewed them a great number, and being very busy, I told the boy, who was just returned, to shew them some others, while I attended on other customers; after the boy had shewed them others for some time, he came up to me, and asked me to come, as he thought he should not be able to serve them; I came and shewed them two or three more; they had fixed on a yard-wide print; they said that would have done, if it had been ell-wide; at that time the prisoner at the bar went out of the shop, and the boy got over the counter, and went immediately after her; the boy came in with the prisoner in about five or ten minutes, and produced the piece of print.

JOSEPH PEARCY sworn. - Q. On Wednesday, the 12th of September, I had been out with a parcel, and when I came in, the last witness desired me to wait upon the prisoner; after I had shewed them several different patterns, they were going out of the shop unserved; I called the young man to wait upon them, and when he had shewed several different patterns, the prisoner at the bar ran out of the shop; on seeing her hand under her apron, it gave me suspicion that she had stole something; I immediately ran out of the shop after her, and overtook her in St. Martin's-court; I took the piece of printed cotton from under her apron, and told her to come along with me; she resisted at first, but the neighbours interfered, and she came home with me; I went and fetched a constable; I did not suspect her till I saw her running out of the shop.

- HART sworn. - I live with Mr. Porter.

Q. Do you know whether it was the prisoner, or the other person, that produced the pattern? - A. The other; I let her go; the prisoner went out first; there were a great many other customers in the shop at the time.

JOHN HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable of St. Ann's; I was sent for by the prosecutor; I took the prisoner into custody, and conveyed him before the Magistrate; I have had the property in my possession ever since; I produce the property.

(The property produced and identified.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence, but called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-71

500. ELIZABETH DARBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , two shillings, and three halfpence , the property of Richard Ghislin .

RICHARD GHISLIN sworn. - Q. What country are you? - A. A Londoner; I am a bookbinder by trade, I live in North-street, Westminster: On this day four weeks I had been to the trade society which I belong to, and, coming home, I met with this woman; she wanted to go with me; I refused to go with her; she put her hand into my pocket; I told her she had robbed me; she said she had not; I called the watch, and the watchman immediately came up; she dropped the money on the stones.

Q. You had not been with her? - A. Not at all.

Q. What time of night was it? - A. Near three o'clock in the morning; it was late before I got away from the trade club at St. Martin's-le-grand.

Court. You ought to have been at home, and in bed, instead of being at the trade club till that time.

- DONNERY sworn. - I am a watchman: On the 21st of August I was going my round, calling three o'clock in the morning, and met the prosecutor and the prisoner; the prosecutor wanted the prisoner to come along with him; he said to her, come along with me; she said, no, that he had a girl in Tothill-street the night before, and that she would not go with him; I desired them directly to keep off, or I would leave off crying the hour on my beat; I was near my box, and as soon as I got into my box, he cried out, watch; I came out to him, he said he was robbed; I heard the money drop; I took up two shillings in money, and some halfpence; I gave it to the constable of the night at the watch-house, and he returned it to him in my presence.

Q. Was he sober? - A. The prosecutor was drunk.

Q.(To the prosecutor.) You were a little drunk? - A. Yes, a little.

Q. You do not recollect the circumstance, that you wanted her to go with you? - A. I do not.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming home; I met this man, and he asked me if he should go home with me; I told him, no; he asked me if I would have a glass; I told him he had a girl with him; he said she had run away from him; he took two shillings out of his pocket, he offered it to me; I told him he mistook the person; he tore my cloaths, and used me very ill; he dropped the money by some means or other; he was afraid I was going to pick it up, and so he called the watchman.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-72

501. ESTHER EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a felt hat, value 9 s. the property of Daniel Pedder .

Mrs. PEDDER sworn. - My husband is a hatter , No. 1, Beech-street : On the 22d of August, the prisoner came about the window several times; by knowing of her, I paid attention to her; she had a great long cloak on; I seemed to pay great attention to my work, but I was paying more attention to her; I had just turned my back; she reached to the sticks that the hats hung on, and whipped off a hat, just by the side of the door, and put it under her cloak, on the right hand side of her; I ran after her, and brought her into the shop; I

took the hat from her, and put it down in the shop, and immediately sent for a constable; she abused me very much, she was very much in liquor; she took a hat once before; she said she had two children, I let her go then; we were obliged to have a coach to take her to the Office.

ROBERT COLTSTON sworn. - I am a constable; I took her into custody; she was rather in liquor.

EDWARD TRING sworn. - I was sent for, as well as Coltston; I searched her; she had fourteen shillings and sixpence, and some bad silver in her pocket.

(The bad silver produced and identified.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into this woman's shop to buy a hat for my son; going into the shop, I saw one at the door marked ten shillings and sixpence; the lady came out to me, and asked me if I would buy that hat; I told her, yes, if she would sell it reasonable; I had the hat in my hand; I told her I would not give that for it, I would give nine shillings for it; she then said I should buy that hat, and pay for it, or else I should go to jail; I said, since you are so fierce about it, I will not buy it at all; that is the truth; and then she sent for a constable.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-73

502. ELIZABETH HORE and CATHARINE MULLINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a gown, value 12 s. and a flannel petticoat, value 3 s. the property of Hannah Casey .

HANNAH CASEY sworn. - I am a single woman , I follow the milk business , I live in Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane : On the 14th of July, I lost a gown and petticoat out of my room, I was not at home; I went out at four o'clock in the morning, and returned at past nine; I found my gown and petticoat were gone, I found the pawnbrokers had them on the same day; I did not miss them till the afternoon; I saw the gown and petticoat at Bow-street.

MARGARET KELLY sworn. - I live at No. 4, Vinegar-yard; Casey sleeps with me; I saw a woman run out of the door on the 14th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon; it was Ann Hore , I saw her go out of the street door, I was standing in a room down stairs; I followed her, and cried out stop thief, and the people followed her and stopped her; she had the gown and petticoat in her lap; when the people followed her, she threw the gown and petticoat away; I saw her back only, I did not see her face, I cannot swear to her.

Q. Was that the woman that you saw with the gown and petticoat in her lap? - A. To the best of my knowledge it is; I have nothing to say to the other prisoner, only to Hore.

- ARMFIELD sworn. - On the 14th of July, I saw Elizabeth Hore run up Langworth-street; on the top of Langworth-street there was a great mob; they ill used her.

Q. Did you see her throw it away? - A. No; I took them to Bow-street. (The property produced and identified.)

Hore's defence. As I was coming down Long-acre, I saw a bundle lay at the corner of Langworth-street; I was going to pick it up, and an elderly gentlewoman that stood there picked it up; she says to me, you impudent b - h, what reason have you to stoop and pick it up.

Q. How came it on the ground? - A. I do not know, and instantly this woman put up her hand and struck me, and gave me a black eye, and this woman wanted to pull me back to her house; she said I had stole them; I said, I do not know where you live; I will not go with you without an Officer; that gentleman said, you shall go with me, my dear; that gentleman took me to Bow-street, and that woman swore falsely against me; I was never in that woman's house in my life; I saw that woman pick up the bundle.

Mullins did not say any thing in her defence.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-74

503. JAMES MORLEY, alias JAMES JOHNSON , alias THOMAS SPRAT , alias LEISLEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a silver thimble, value 2 s. a silver pencil-case, value 10 s. 6 d. and a pair of scissars, value 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Elvey .

ELIZABETH ELVEY sworn. - I am a jeweller and pocket book maker ; I keep a shop at No. 9, New Bond-street ; on the 10th of January last, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and looked out a great number of articles, to the amount of 8 l. 6 s. he took away a pencil-case, half a guinea, a silver thimble, and a pair of scissars; he desired the rest of the articles to be sent to the Honourable Mr. Leisley, at General Leisley 's, Stable-yard, St. James's; they were to be sent at five o'clock, and the bill with them, and the whole of the articles to be included; this is the address he gave; it is his own hand writing; I saw him write it myself; when my shopman went there, there was no such person lived in the Stable-yard.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. I am certain he is the man, and that is his hand writing.

(Produces a paper.)

Prisoner. I have my witnesses in Court that will prove to the contrary.

MICHAEL INGLEFIELD sworn. - I was there when the young man looked out the different articles, to the amount of 8 l. 6 s. his apparel was very mean, to what he has on now; he had on black gaiters, such as soldiers wear, and at the bottom there were two or three holes unbuttoned, which I thought was a careless way for a gentleman; I should not have taken such notice of him, only from his apparel; he ordered them to be brought to General Leisley 's house, Stable-yard, St. James's; as they dined at five o'clock, I was to bring them then; I went and enquired for General Leisley , at the Stable-yard, having to deliver it there; I found that General Leisley did not live there; I was informed by a sergeant of the guards that General Leisley lived in Duke-street, I went there, the servant informed me he was not within, but he would be in in a few minutes; he came in, and the servant went up stairs after him with these things; the girl said he had no servant of that name, nor any man servant in town; I went home and related how it was; here is a witness that will give you to understand how he behaved when he was apprehended, which was very lately.

GEORGE CUMMINGS sworn. - I happened to be in Mrs. Tuckey's shop, in Bond-street; this man came in under pretence of purchasing; I know nothing of this transaction; he then said his name was Mawly: it

was me that took him to Marlborough-street, and when he came within four doors of the office he pulled off his shoe and left it; that is the shoe that was brought into Court the other day when he had his trial.

Prisoner. It was late on Saturday evening when I arrived in town; on Sunday I went to my shoemaker, and bought of him that shoe; one of my feet is much larger than the other, and I am obliged to cut one of my shoes that way; it is no detriment to the shoe; I have a person that will swear I was with Captain Lake, on board his Majesty's ship the Repulse, from the 27th of October till the 3d of June.

WILLIAM RIDER sworn. - Q. What are you? - A. I belong to Greenwich hospital; I am Sir Richard Pearson , the Lieutenant Governor's, servant; the prisoner, James Johnson , was on board the Repulse, with me.

Q. What is the prisoner's name? - A. James Johnson ; I saw him on board; he was an impressed man; he was not suffered to go on shore from the 2d of September to the 15th of March last, and there I acted as lieutenant's steward; when I quitted this ship, this man succeeded me in the same station.

Q. Where is the Repulse? - A. Off Rochelle.

Q. Who is she commanded by? - A. By the Hon. Capt. Leadbetter.

Q. When did the prisoner go on board the Repulse? - A. The latter end of November, or the beginning of December.

Q. Where was he from that time to the 15th of March? - A. At the Nore; and from there we went to Yarmouth, and from there we went to the North Seas; we came off the Texel on the 5th of December, and never left the Texel for seven weeks; and the man was never out of the ship from the day he came into the ship till the 16th of March; I informed Mr. Pearson of this circumstance; he desired me to come down immediately; I know he was in the ship on the 16th; I was discharged then, as disabled; on the 18th, the purser called on me, and paid me the extra-money that was due to me; I asked him about Johnson, as Johnson took the place; I can swear he was on board the ship the time I said; he was on board the Zealand, and from thence he was turned over to the Repulse, at the Nore; I was at the Nore at the time.

Q. Who is admiral of that fleet? - A. Admiral Thornborough.

Q. You say this man was on board a ship, from September, October, or November, till you left it in the middle of March, 1804; and in that time the man was never out of the ship? - A. He acted as a midshipman's steward, and by my being discharged, they recommended him to be lieutenant's steward, which was the 11th of March. (The witness produced a paper, shewing his discharge from the Repulse; and a paper, the hand-writing of Capt. Lake.)

EDWARD MANSFIELD sworn. - I am a tailor; I live at No. 4, Carburton-street, Fitzroy-square; I can swear that I have read letters from Mr. Johnson, to a person of the name of Brown, at Weymouth; they were not sent to me; they were sent in January this present year.

Q. You are a tailor; you went and read some letters? - A. Yes, it was on his sister's account that I knew him; she lived in Titchfield-street.

Q. Could not she read? - A. I went to enquire for him, on which I saw the letter sent in that month.

Q. This is a bad story, you come to prove there were some letters sent to somebody in January, these letters are not here; the Jury want to know how you should read her letters? - A. I went to enquire for this same Johnson, and he was on board of ship at the time.

Court. That you cannot tell.

Prisoner. There are no other witnesses but my father and brothers.

Court. You might have had a certificate of your being in the ship from Somerset-house.

Prisoner's defence. I have been put in the papers a whole fortnight; I did not send to my father; I did not want him to know any thing about it; I was not in England at the time Mrs. Elvey says her shop was robbed; I am not the person, nor I never was in her shop.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Look at the prisoner; are you certain the prisoner is the man that robbed your shop? - A. I have no doubt; I believe him to be the man; any person might be mistaken.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-75

504. JAMES FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a hat, value 5 s. the property of Richard Clements .

RICHARD CLEMENTS sworn. - I live at No. 30, Middle-row, Holborn ; I know nothing more than taking the prisoner with the hat; on the 22d of August I lost two hats from my door, my shop is small and dark; I received information from my neighbour that a man had been seen lurking about there; I was in the hosier's shop when the prisoner passed, and he said, there is the very man now.

Q. Did you pursue him? - A. No, he stopped at the hosier's window; I went out, and going across I saw another hat gone; I pursued him, and took him with the hat; this was the third hat I had lost within the space of two hours.

Q. Did you take the hat from him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it your property? - A. Yes; I brought him into the shop.

Q. What is the value of the hat? - A. Five shillings.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What is your partner's name? - A. I have none.

Q. The hat was upon a rail, extended from your shop into Middle-row? - A. No farther than the depth of a hat crown.

Q. But at the outside of the window, that if any body was walking along, or if there was a croud, they might easily be knocked down? - A. They could not, for this reason; they are tied.

Q. Was the prisoner drunk or sober? - A. At the time, I thought he was intoxicated; I will not swear one way or the other.

BENJAMIN BANKS sworn. - I live directly opposite; I am sorry to say I saw the prisoner take it, and walk away with it; he had a kind of a drill jacket on, and he concealed it, as well as he could, under it, and walked leisurely away with it.

Q. Had you seen him there before? - A. I had seen him there about two hours; I did not observe him the whole time; I had business that called me out, and when

I came back, in the space of two or three minutes, he took the hat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. Do not you know that a party of soldiers had a dinner, and had been drinking, at the corner public-house? - A. At the Cock and Hoop the soldiers were dining.

Q. Did he appear to be drunk or sober? - A. He appeared to be sober.

(The hat produced, and identified by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence, but called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Whipped in jail and discharged .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-76

505. RICHARD SIMKO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a glove, value 1 d. three shillings and sixpence, twenty-four penny-pieces, and twelve halfpence , the property of John Williams .

JANE WILLIAMS sworn. - My husband is a labourer in the dye-house; one evening I was in the City-road , with a little table before me, to sell some oysters and fruit; I am a Welch woman; and there was a little drawer at one side of the table; there was a glove in the drawer, with 3 s. 6 d. in silver, and 2 s. 6 d. in penny-pieces and new halfpence; there came two little boys and walked about me for half an hour; I told them to go away, and I would give them some oysters for going away; while they did open the oysters, I went and served another person; they then took my glove out of the drawer and my money.

Q. How did they know you had your money there? - A. They did walk about a long while, and did see me put my money there; when they did go a little way from me I did look after these two boys, and they did look after me, and I happened to see my glove in the prisoner's hand; and I did go after them and they did go into the burying-ground in the City-road; I did not see them after that night; the day after that we did go and look after the glove, me and my husband, and Vyneford Roberts; and we did find Richard Simko, in Rose-alley, by Golden-lane; and this Richard Simko did own to the money, before the Constable and Vyneford Roberts.

VYNEFORD ROBERTS sworn. - Mrs. Williams begged me to go to this boy; she did not know where this boy lived; I knew where the prisoner's mother lived; I said to the mother, it is very wrong for you to encourage the boy, and she fell a swearing; O, mother, says he, do not deny it; I had the money, and you bought some victuals; you know I had the money; he said he shared the money with the other boy; I looked upon the mother to be worse, than the boy; she encouraged him to thieve before now; I look upon the woman to be more in fault than the boy.

Court. Q You are right; how old is this boy? - A. He is near fourteen, by what his mother told me; I have known him four years; his mother is in very low life indeed, there cannot be any thing lower.

Q.(To the prosecutrix.) Do you know the boy? - A. Yes, about a twelvemonth ago

Q. What is his mother? - A. She is a poor woman, and sells oysters and things.

EDWARD TRIGG sworn. - I was sent for to take him into custody, in Rose-alley; Mr. Roberts and Mrs. Williams had got hold of him; I asked the boy if he had got any of the money; he said, no, he had shared it between the other boy and him, and his share of the money he had given to his mother, to buy victuals.

Q. Do you know any thing of the boy? - A. Yes, he has been here four Sessions running; his mother is here.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-77

506. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of August , eighteen yards of black silk lace, value 3 l. the property of William Wall .

AMELIA WALL sworn. - I live at No. 6, Panton-street, Haymarket ; on the first of August, as I was sitting at my dinner, with my two young women whom I employ, I thought I heard the shop door open, which we always shut when we go to dinner; I looked back, and saw the prisoner; at the window there were some lines to shew our lace.

Q. What business are you in? - A. In the haberdashery , and every thing in the fancy way; I thought I heard the door move, and looked about and saw the prisoner dragging some lace from the window; I said, there is a thief, there is a thief; there was not another person in the street when I went out but the prisoner; I ran after him, crying, stop thief; he got up Coventry-street, and was calling, stop thief, too; two gentlemen laid hold of him, and waited till I came up; I was ready to faint; they said, has he robbed you; I said, yes, this is the man; he had an apron on; with that, Mr. Manson, the baker came up; he had the lace under an apron that he wore, and Mr. Manson took the lace from him, from under his apron; Mr. Manson kept the lace.

- MANSON sworn. - I am a baker; I live in Panton-street; on the 1st day of August, about half past two o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming through a little room in my shop; just at that moment I was opposite Mrs. Wall, I saw the prisoner running and Mrs. Wall running after him; I pursued him, Mrs. Wall was crying out stop thief, and before I got up to the prisoner he was stopped in Coventry-street; as soon as I got into Coventry-street, I met the prisoner at the bar in the custody of two men, I found the lace under his apron; I produce the lace.

JOHN WALTER sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker; as I was going up Coventry-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner coming, he cried stop thief; I looked round and saw no other person; with that I stopped him; I saw the lace hang down before it was taken out of his apron. (The lace identified by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner. He struck me three or four times at the pit of my stomach.

Walter. I never struck him at all.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-78

507. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a copper tea-kettle, value 5 s. the property of Charles Clift .

LUCY CLIFT sworn. - My husband keeps a public-house at St. George's in the East ; on the 10th of August, at five o'clock in the afternoon; a witness in Court called me from the bar; he said he had seen the prisoner conceal and take away a large copper tea-kettle; I did not see her do it; I know it is mine.

WILLIAM M'GILL sworn. - I am a gardener by business; on the 10th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going into the George Half-way house, Stepney fields, I saw the other witness talking to Mrs. Clift, and Mrs. Clift knowing me, asked me to follow the prisoner; I followed the prisoner, and found she had the kettle concealed under her petticoats when I came up to her.

JAMES RHOADS sworn. - I was sitting in Mr. Clift's public-house, the George, on the 10th of August; I saw the prisoner at the bar take the kettle from the fireplace, and put it under her petticoats; I informed Mrs. Clift of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was sitting in the house some time; the servant (I did not know the servant) asked me to go and fetch a tea-kettle of water.

Court. Then you need not have put it under your petticoats.

Prisoner. It was not under my petticoats; they only say that out of spite. (The kettle produced, and identified by the prosecutrix.)

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-79

508. THOMAS HICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , one dollar, value 5 s. three shillings, and one sixpence , the monies of John Boddington .

JOHN BODDINGTON sworn. - I am a coach-smith ; I live in Albemarle-street; I was going to a master that I had worked for; and I went into the sign of the Plough, at the bottom of Princes-street, Westminster , to have a pint of beer, about nine o'clock on Sunday morning, and there were three or four soldiers came and sat by me; they were smoking, and the smoke got into my eyes; I went to sleep, and that soldier put his hand into my pocket, and he took a knife and cut my trowsers, and took my money.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was not very sober.

Q Are you sober now? - A. Yes, at the time my pocket was cut, I was a little tipsy; I had drank two or three pints of beer, I drank one pint off at a draught, and that overcome me, I cannot stand a great deal of drink as some men can

WILLIAM STPEL sworn. - I saw the prisoner's hand in the man's pocket; I am a lodger; I was waiting in this house, as I do on a Sunday morning; I went up stairs, and when I came down, I saw his hand in his pocket again, but I saw no money taken.

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk? - A. He was rather stupid; he seemed as if he had been drinking that morning, or the over-night.

Q.(To Boddington) Are you sure you had the money in your pocket? - A. Yes, I know it was the same man, because I saw him going to pick another man's pocket.

Q. What money had you in your pocket? - A. One dollar, three shillings, and sixpence.

Q. Was it all gone? - A. Every half-penny, I had not one halfpenny left to help myself.

Q.When you were sober, did you take the man up? - A. I never saw him after that, till I could learn out his name.

Q. To Steele.) When you saw this man put his hand into his pocket. what did you do? - A. I told him to leave off; there was nobody in the tap-room at the time.

Q. Was there any money found? - A. Not that I heard of; he was taken on Monday night to Queen-square; I was there; he made me go as a witness.

Prisoner's defence. I was drinking at the time that the man lost his money; I know nothing about his money; I am quite innocent of the affair; the house that he was drinking in is a house that takes people in from three o'clock in the morning till 12 at night.

Q. How came you to be out? - A. I was upon guard.

Q. Is your serjeant here? - A. No, here is a serjeant that will speak for me.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-80

509. BENJAMIN WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , sixty wooden hoops, value 22 s. the property of Samuel Chandler .

The Court being clearly of opinion it was a fraud, and not a felony, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-81

510. BENJAMIN WEST was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , 120 wooden hoops, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Chandler .

The Court being clearly of opinion it was a fraud, and not a felony, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-82

511. HARRIET HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , one half-guinea, and one shilling , the monies of Elias Bishop .

ELIAS BISHOP sworn. - I am a plasterer .

Q. What do you accuse this woman of? - A. Of taking half a guinea from me, and one shilling; she met me in Poland-street on the 25th of August, about half past ten in the evening; she came up to me, and put one hand on my shoulder, and the other hand in my waistcoat pocket, and took my money out.

Q. Nothing else passed? - A. Nothing but that,

Q. Did you ever get your money? - A. Yes; we took her away to St. James's watch-house, she was secured, and the money was taken from her.

JOHN COCKEY sworn. - I was with Bishop in Poland-street, and he called to me, and said he was robbed of half a guinea and a shilling; he had got hold of the girl by the hand; I got hold of the other, and we took her down to the watch-house, so that she had not an opportunity of getting her hand into her pocket; we found it in one of her pockets - the half-guinea, the shilling, and some halfpence, and in the other pocket we found half a crown and some halfpence.

Q.(To Bishop.) Look at that money, do you know it? - A. Yes, there is a little circle on one of the shillings, and on the half-guinea there is a little dent about the middle of it.

Prisoner's defence. Please you, my Lord, it is about three weeks ago, it was between five and six o'clock in the evening, I met with a gentleman; he took me to a house in Soho-square, and he made me a present of half a guinea; I met with that young man in the evening about ten o'clock, on Saturday, I was going to buy me something for my Sunday's dinner; the young man followed me, and I happened to have the money in my hand; he said I had robbed him; I am as innocent as a child unborn; that young man asked me to take him home; I told him I was far from home, I could not take him home.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18040912-83

512. SAMUEL NEWBORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , eighteen pounds weight of brass, value 20 s. the property of Charles-Hampden Turner .

(The case stated by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BENNETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you employed in Mr. Turner's bleaching-ground? - A. Yes; Mr. Turner keeps a bleaching-ground , and he is a sail-cloth manufacturer ; the prisoner was a carpenter employed in our manufactory: On the 20th of August, between the hours of one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner come into the bleaching-ground, and he went into a place called the mill; after he had been there about three or four minutes, I saw him open the carpenter's shop-door, and go in; Mr. Robarts came, and I nodded to him, and he went and saw Newborn in the carpenter's shop; he asked him what he wanted there; the prisoner said he wanted a piece of tallow; Mr. Robarts said, where are you at work; he said, at the dressing-shop; Mr. Robarts said. that is the only place to get the tallow, they have always tallow there; the prisoner said, I have often asked them for it, but they will not give it me in the factory; Mr. Robarts then said, I will give you a bit; he took a bit, and came out with him; he shut the door after him, and Mr. Robarts left him, and went to his dinner; the prisoner saw one of Mr. Robarts's children, and said, there James, take a penny-piece, and get something for your brother and you; I was working along with another man shaking of yarn; then I saw Newborn go into the carpenter's shop again, he might be there about the space of a minute; I saw him come out with something between his waistcoat and shirt, it made a bulk as though it was a plane; I came out of the whitening-ground; when he came out, he said to me, do you want a piece of tallow; after that I saw Mr. Robarts come out, and I communicated to him what I had seen; I followed Mr. Robarts, and found Newborn not in the factory, but standing by the gate; Mr. Robarts and I went up into the dressing-shop, and we found the brass under Newborn's coat; I threw the coat off, and said, I have found out the nest; I knew it to be Newborn's coat; it was a brass mortar that belonged to one of the mills.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You seem to have been the principal engine in apprehending the prisoner; how long has he been in the factory? - A. He has been a twelvemonth upon the ground.

Q. You and he have not been friends for these six months past, I am told; are there a great many weavers about the house? - A. There are about twenty, I believe.

Q. Who carried the brass there, you cannot tell; you know nothing more about it than that the prisoner was charged with it? - A. I saw him come out of the carpenter's shop with something like a bulk under his waistcoat; I took it to be a carpenter's plane.

Court. Q. Had you and the prisoner, before you made any discovery, any quarrel with each other? - A. Not one; I was upon as good terms with him as I was with the others.

Mr. Knapp. Q. In truth, your master had a great deal of his property plundered, and he suspected all of you, but you had not any quarrel with him, nor any body else? - A. No.

JOHN INGLE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a clerk to the prosecutor: Understanding that the brass was found under his coat, I gave orders that he should be watched, in order to find out where he sold the property; I went after him, and took him up at the dressing-shop; I charged him with stealing of it.

Court. Q. Tell us what you said to him, and what answer he gave you? - A. I charged him with stealing the brass, he denied it a short time, and then he said he had took it.

Q. Before he acknowledged he had taken it, did you say it would be better for him to tell the truth? - A. Yes.

Q. Then we must not hear what the prisoner said; in consequence of what the prisoner said, did you find any thing? - A. I had it taken out from under his coat before his face; I was present when it was taken from under his coat.

Q. Do you know the coat to be his? - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Was it at the same place where Bennet described, and the same coat? - A. Exactly the same place, and the same coat.

Q. Do you know that brass? - A. I don't know it, but Robarts is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When the prisoner went out, had he his coat on? - A. No, a jacket.

Q. Then, of your own knowledge, you know nothing about it; your men generally throw their coats off when they work? - A. Generally they do.

Court. Q. But they have their waistcoat on? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. What is the firm of the house? - A. Charles-Hampden Turner.

Q. Has he any partner? - A. No, not to my knowledge.

JAMES ROBARTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You pursued the prisoner? - A. Yes, I missed the brass out of a box in the shop, where I put it myself, in the carpenter's shop; I went to the carpenter's shop, and there I missed the brass.

Q. How long before had you seen the brass? - A. That very day at nine in the morning; he took it at three o'clock.

Q. What was the brass? - A. It was a large bearer of eighteen pounds; it cost twenty-seven shillings, besides the workmanship.

Q. Were you present when it was found under his coat? - A. Yes, and I knew the coat to be his, and there was the brass; it is Mr. Turner's property.

Q. When and where did you come up with the prisoner? - A. We went up, and came down again; he was not where he should be - at work; when we came

up to him, we laid the brass before him, and he denied it; we took the brass, and it has been delivered to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many feet long is this brass? - A. Not a foot long.

Q. May a man put it into his waistcoat pocket -

Mr. Knapp. We do not charge him with putting it into his pocket, but in his waistcoat.

Mr. Alley. Q. Where was this taken from? - A. This was taken out of my shop.

Q. How many men work there? - A. I have got one man and the prisoner.

Q You were neighbourly enough one to the other; other men had access there? - A. There is no man had any business there besides them and me.

Q. You must be very morose one with another; you are glad to see your neighbours sure? - A. No, not on that ground; Mr. Turner would not let you come in, if you were to come there.

Q. Who took the brass there, you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. I suppose he was gone to get some gin? - A. I cannot say.

Q. The man was gone to get something, and when he was taken into custody there was nothing found upon him? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. But it was found under his coat, and where he worked? - A. Yes.

- HOLBROOK sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell; I produce the brass.

Q.(To Robarts) Look at that brass? - A. It is the property of Mr. Turner; I can bring another box that this fixes in.

Mr. Alley. Q. That is very heavy, it must be impossible to put that in a man's waistcoat? - A.Recollect, his hand was fixed here

Mr. Knapp. I think his arm could support it.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Third Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-84

513. JOHN BROWN, alias CATCH ME IF YOU CAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a one-pound Bank-note , the property of John Wheatley .

JOHN WREATLEY sworn. - I am a tobacconist , I live in Ratcliffe-highway : On Friday, the 14th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. Richardson and Brown came into my shop; Richardson asked me if I could give him change for a two-pound note; I told him I could give him two ones, if that would do; I took them to be ship-mates; he said that would do; I put the two one-pound notes down on the counter, while Richardson was getting the two-pound note out of his protection-box; the prisoner reached over the counter, and took hold of one of the one-pound notes, and asked me if I could change the other; he immediately clasped it in his hand, and ran out of the shop; I immediately pursued him, and he was taken before he was out of my sight; when he was taken, he fell down in the kennel, and rubbed his hand in the kennel all about amongst the mud; the note was lost in the mud; I never saw any thing of them before.

GEORGE RICHARDSON (An African) sworn. - I follow the sea; I had been to the Court-office to draw some money, this man was standing at the door when I came out; he told me he was hungry; I pitied this poor man, I gave him a pot of beer and some bread and cheese, after that I called for another pint, and after that I went away; I was tired, I called a coach, and when I had told the coachman where I was going, he said he was going that way; I took him in the coach, I paid three shillings for him and me to ride; and then, after we came out of the coach, I came to Mr. Wheatley's, we went into the shop, I had a two pound note, I wanted Mr. Wheatley to change it; Mr. Wheatley put two one pound notes on the counter; while I was getting my two pound note out of my protection-box, this man snatched up one of the one pound notes in this manner: (describing bow), and ran out of the shop, and I ran out after him; I lost my protection by that man; he is a very bad fellow, he cannot be a good fellow; I never saw him before.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am a constable and beadle of St. George's in the East: I heard the cry of stop thief; I might be about thirty yards, when I heard it, from Mr. Wheatley's shop.

Q. Was he running then? - A. Yes; he made rather a slip, and I stopped him; he swore very much, he cut my eye while I was securing him, and struggled to get away from me; he d - d the country, and said that the French would come here, and that he should have a glorious slaughter; he said he had been fighting for his King and Country, and at Somerset-house they had been robbing him of his money.

Q. Did you see him do any thing in the kennel? - A. He put his hand in the kennel, and rubbed his righthand in the kennel; it is a strong dirty kennel.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. No; I understood, by the jailer, that he had been in custody before.

Prisoner's defence. I was not in his shop at all, I was coming along the street; they cried out stop thief; I am innocent of the charge, they knocked me down, I asked them what was the matter, they said I had robbed him; they would not hearken to me, they said I was the thief; I said I was not, I was going to Deptford; I am a seafaring man, and have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-85

514. ANN GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a silk cloak, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Prior , widow .

The prosecutor and witnesses not apppearing in Court, after being called, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18040912-86

515. GEORGE WOODFORD was indicted for that he, on the 23d of June , unlawfully, knowingly, designedly, and by false pretences, did obtain, of and from Mary the wife of Joseph Godwin , two pieces of carpet, containing fifty-two yards, value 15 l. the property of Francis Lea and Thomas Lea , with intent to cheat and defraud them thereof .

MARY GODWIN sworn. - Q. You are the wife of Joseph Godwin ? - A. Yes.

Q. Who were you servants to? - A. To Messrs. Francis and Thomas Lea , Artillery-street.

Q. Where do they carry on business? - A. At Bagnio-court, Newgate street .

Q. That is where you and your husband live? - A. Yes, my husband is agent to their manufactory: On the 23d of June, some time in the forenoon, the prisoner came with two or three yards of carpet under his arm, and asked me whether that was our pattern; I told him no, it was not; he said he came from Mr. Hall, in Moorfields, he produced the order out of his pocket; I have got the order in my hand.

Q. Was Mr. Hall a customer? - A. Yes.

(The order read.) -

"Please to let the bearer have two pieces of body to match, or as near as possible, for Hall and Co. Moorfields." - I gave him the order; I knew Mr. Godwin was in the neighbourhood, and I sent him to him; he went out, but never went to him; he came back, and told me he was not there; I went up into the upper warehouse and picked out the two pieces of carpet.

Q. How much did they contain? - A. One was twenty-eight yards and a half, and the other was twenty-four; he asked me to be particular to find two pieces of this colour, for the ladies were waiting to choose them.

Q. And you, upon the delivery of this order, delivered to him the two pieces of carpet? - A. I did.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mrs. Godwin, do you know, of your own knowledge, who are the partners in this house? - A. Only two that I know of; I know the old gentleman.

Q. Does Mr. Godwin know better than you - whether Mr. Godwin is their agent? - A Yes, he is.

Q. You only acted because he was out? - A. No.

JOSEPH GODWIN sworn. - Q. You are agent to these gentlemen? - A. I am.

Q. Would you be answerable for these goods? - A. No; I conceive I am not answerable for goods lost in that way; if it had been taken from me I should not be answerable for the loss of them at all.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is Francis and Thomas Lea in partnership? - A. They have been; I never knew of any dissolution.

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - Q. You live in Moorfields? - A. Yes.

Q. What is your partner's name? - A. John Escent.

Q. Are you a customer of Messrs. Lea? - A. I am.

Q. Did you send for the carpet by George Woodford ? - A. No, I do not know him; I never saw him at that time.

Q. Whether that is your hand-writing? - A. No.

Q. What is your business? - A. Upholders and brokers.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - I am the officer that took him into custody.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel; and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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